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Sample records for localized corrosion iii

  1. Solution chemistry of Mo(III) and Mo(IV): Thermodynamic foundation for modeling localized corrosion.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P; Wilson, L; Wesolowski, David J

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the behavior of molybdenum dissolution products in systems that approximate localized corrosion environments, solubility of Mo(III) in equilibrium with solid MoO{sub 2} has been determined at 80 C as a function of solution acidity, chloride concentration and partial pressure of hydrogen. The measurements indicate a strong increase in solubility with acidity and chloride concentration and a weak effect of hydrogen partial pressure. The obtained results have been combined with literature data for systems containing Mo(III), Mo(IV), and Mo(VI) in solutions to develop a comprehensive thermodynamic model of aqueous molybdenum chemistry. The model is based on a previously developed framework for simulating the properties of electrolyte systems ranging from infinite dilution to solid saturation or fused salt limit. To reproduce the measurements, the model assumes the presence of a chloride complex of Mo(III) (i.e., MoCl{sup 2+}) and hydrolyzed species (MoOH{sup 2+}, Mo(OH){sup 2+}, and Mo(OH){sub 3}{sup 0}) in addition to the Mo{sup 3+} ion. The model generally reproduces the experimental data within experimental scattering and provides a tool for predicting the phase behavior and speciation in complex, concentrated aqueous solutions. Thus, it provides a foundation for simulating the behavior of molybdenum species in localized corrosion environments.

  2. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  3. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  4. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    2000-01-28

    Alloy 22 is an extremely Corrosion Resistant Material, with a very stable passive film. Based upon exposures in the LTCTF, the GC rates of Alloy 22 are typically below the level of detection, with four outliers having reported rates up to 0.75 #mu#m per year. In any event, over the 10,000 year life of the repository, GC of the Alloy 22 (assumed to be 2 cm thick) should not be life limiting. Because measured corrosion potentials are far below threshold potentials, localized breakdown of the passive film is unlikely under plausible conditions, even in SSW at 120 deg C. The pH in ambient-temperature crevices formed from Alloy 22 have been determined experimentally, with only modest lowering of the crevice pH observed under plausible conditions. Extreme lowering of the crevice pH was only observed under situations where the applied potential at the crevice mouth was sufficient to result in catastrophic breakdown of the passive film above the threshold potential in non-buffered conditions not characteristic of the Yucca Mountain environment. In cases where naturally ocurring buffers are present in the crevice solution, little or no lowering of the pH was observed, even with significant applied potential. With exposures of twelve months, no evidence of crevice corrosion has been observed in SDW, SCW and SAW at temperatures up to 90 deg C. An abstracted model has been presented, with parameters determined experimentally, that should enable performance assessment to account for the general and localized corrosion of this material. A feature of this model is the use of the materials specification to limit the range of corrosion and threshold potentials, thereby making sure that substandard materials prone to localized attack are avoided. Model validation will be covered in part by a companion SMR on abstraction of this model.

  5. Localized Corrosion of Alloy 22 -Fabrication Effects-

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2005-11-05

    This report deals with the impact of fabrication processes on the localized corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022). The four fabrication processes that were analyzed are: (1) Surface stress mitigation of final closure weld, (2) Manufacturing of the mockup container, (3) Black annealing of the container and (4) Use of different heats of Alloy 22 for container fabrication. Immersion and Electrochemical tests performed in the laboratory are generally aggressive and do not represent actual repository environments in Yucca Mountain. For example, to determine the intergranular attack in the heat affected zone of a weldment, tests are conducted in boiling acidic and oxidizing solutions according to ASTM standards. These solutions are used to compare the behavior of differently treated metallic coupons. Similarly for electrochemical tests many times pure sodium chloride or calcium chloride solutions are used. Pure chloride solutions are not representative of the repository environment. (1) Surface Stress Mitigation: When metallic plates are welded, for example using the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) method, residual tensile stresses may develop in the vicinity of the weld seam. Processes such as Low Plasticity Burnishing (LPB) and Laser Shock Peening (LSP) could be applied locally to eliminate the residual stresses produced by welding. In this study, Alloy 22 plates were welded and then the above-mentioned surface treatments were applied to eliminate the residual tensile stresses. The aim of the current study was to comparatively test the corrosion behavior of as-welded (ASW) plates with the corrosion behavior of plates with stress mitigated surfaces. Immersion and electrochemical tests were performed. Results from both immersion and electrochemical corrosion tests show that the corrosion resistance of the mitigated plates was not affected by the surface treatments applied. (2) Behavior of Specimens from a Mockup container: Alloy 22 has been extensively tested for

  6. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua; K. Mon

    2003-06-24

    The recommended waste package (WP) design is described in BSC (2001a). The design includes a double-wall WP underneath a protective drip shield (DS) (BSC 2003a). The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation (DOX), general corrosion (GC) and localized corrosion (LC) of the DS plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. The DS design also includes structural supports fabricated from Ti Grade 24. Degradation of Ti Grade 24 is not considered in this report. The DS provides protection for the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. This Model Report (MR) serves as a feed to the Integrated Waste Package Degradation Model (IWPD) analyses, and was developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (BSC 2002a). The models contained in this report serve as a basis to determine whether or not the performance requirements for the DS can be met.

  7. The local effects of metal corrosion in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H John

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion has long been recognized to occur in total hip arthroplasty, but the local effects of this process have only recently become better understood. This article provides an overview of corrosion at modular junctions, and discusses the various etiologic factors for corrosion and the biologic response to metal debris released from this junction. Algorithms are provided for diagnosis and treatment, in accordance with the best available data.

  8. Localized weld metal corrosion in stainless steel water tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Strum, M.J.

    1995-05-25

    The rapidly developed leaks within the TFC and TFD tanks (LLNL groundwater treatment facilities) were caused by localized corrosion within the resolidified weld metal. The corrosion was initiated by the severe oxidation of the backsides of the welds which left the exposed surfaces in a condition highly susceptible to aqueous corrosion. The propagation of surface corrosion through the thickness of the welds occurred by localized corrosive attack. This localized attack was promoted by the presence of shielded aqueous environments provided by crevices at the root of the partial penetration welds. In addition to rapid corrosion of oxidized surfaces, calcium carbonate precipitation provided an additional source of physical shielding from the bulk tank environment. Qualification testing of alternate weld procedures showed that corrosion damage can be prevented in 304L stainless steel GTA welds by welding from both sides while preventing oxidation of the tank interior through the use of an inert backing gas such as argon. Corrosion resistance was also satisfactory in GMA welds in which oxidized surfaces were postweld cleaned by wire brushing and chemically passivated in nitric acid. Further improvements in corrosion resistance are expected from a Mo-containing grade of stainless steel such as type 316L, although test results were similar for type 304L sheet welded with type 308L filler metal and type 316L sheet welded with type 316L filler metal.

  9. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  10. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  11. General and localized corrosion of the drip shield

    SciTech Connect

    Estill, J C; Farmer, J C; McCright; R D

    1999-08-20

    Ti Gr 7 is an extremely corrosion resistant material, with a very stable passive film. Based upon exposures in the LTCTF, it has been determined that the general corrosion and oxidation rates of Ti Gr 7 are essentially below the level of detection. In any event, over the 10,000 year life of the repository, general corrosion and oxidation should not be life limiting. The large separation between measured corrosion and threshold potentials indicate that localized breakdown of the passive film is unlikely under plausible conditions, even in SSW at 120 C. In the future, the pH and current in crevices formed from Ti Gr 7 should be determined experimentally. With exposures of two years, no significant evidence of crevice corrosion has been observed with Ti Gr 16 in SDW, SCW, and SAW at temperatures up to 9O C, though many of the samples have a beautiful green patina. An abstracted model has been presented, with parameters determined experimentally, that should enable performance assessment to account for the general and localized corrosion of this material. A feature of this model is the use of the materials specification to limit the range of corrosion and threshold potentials, thereby making sure that substandard materials prone to localized attack are avoided.

  12. Localized corrosion of candidate container materials in ferric chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, D L; Lum, B Y; Roy, A K

    1998-10-01

    Localized corrosion behavior of candidate inner and outer container materials of currently-designed nuclear waste package was evaluated in aqueous solutions of various concentrations of ferric chloride (FeCl{sub 3}) at 30 C, 60 C and 90 C using the electrochemical cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) technique. Materials tested include A 5 16 carbon steel and high-performance alloys 825, G-3, G-30, C-4, 625. C-22, and Ti Gr-12. A 516 steel suffered from severe general and localized attack including pitting and crevice corrosion. High-nickel alloys 825 and G-3 also became susceptible to severe pitting and crevice corrosion. The extent of localized attack was less pronounced in alloys G-30 and C-4. Alloy 625 experienced severe surface degradation including general corrosion, crevice corrosion and intergranular attack. In contrast, only a slight crevice corrosion tendency was observed with nickel-base alloy C-22 in solutions containing higher concentrations of FeCl{sub 3} at 60 C and 90 C. Ti Gr-12 was immune to localized attack in all tested environments. The test solutions showed significant amount of precipitated particles during and after testing especially at higher temperatures.

  13. Localized Corrosion Behavior of Type 304SS with a Silica Layer Under Atmospheric Corrosion Environments

    SciTech Connect

    E. Tada; G.S. Frankel

    2006-03-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed a potential repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. [I] The temperature could be high on the waste packages, and it is possible that dripping water or humidity could interact with rock dust particulate to form a thin electrolyte layer with concentrated ionic species. Under these conditions, it is possible that highly corrosion-resistant alloys (CRAs) used as packages to dispose the nuclear waste could suffer localized corrosion. Therefore, to better understand long-term corrosion performance of CRAs in the repository, it is important to investigate localized corrosion under a simulated repository environment. We measured open circuit potential (OCP) and galvanic current (i{sub g}) for silica-coated Type 304SS during drying of salt solutions under controlled RH environments to clarify the effect of silica layer as a dust layer simulant on localized corrosion under atmospheric environments. Type 304SS was used as a relatively susceptible model CRA instead of the much more corrosion resistant alloys, such as Alloy 22, that are being considered as, waste package materials.

  14. Localized corrosion in materials for geothermal power. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Troiano, A.R.; Hehemann, R.F.

    1982-04-01

    The influence of 16 different geothermally related environments on a number of potentially useful steels was examined for both general and localized corrosion and at ambient and 150/sup 0/C. Variation in chloride concentration of 1 to 20% generally demonstrated only minor aggressiveness in acidified solutions. In general, the presence of H/sub 2/S raised the corrosion rate. However, very low concentrations (10 ppM) indicated higher rates than in saturated brines. This is rationalized on the basis of the inability to develop a semi-protective film at the low H/sub 2/S concentration. The corrosion rate for the Cr-Mo steel was unexpectedly high at ambient, but improved substantially at 150/sup 0/C. The Ni-Cu-Nb steel consistently demonstrated excellent resistance in all environments, except the 10 ppM H/sub 2/S at ambient. At 150/sup 0/C there were no exceptions to its superior performance. Maximum pit depth studies, analyzed statistically, indicated that the Ni-Cu-Nb alloy was the most resistant to localized attack. A clean (low inclusions) Mn-C and a clean vacuum melted steel ranked well. A comparison of two almost identical Mn-C steels one clean and one dirty clearly indicated the deleterious influence of inclusions on the tendency for localized corrosion. The profiling of a protected section of a creviced or pitted sample helped to delineate the nebulous line of demarcation between general and localized corrosion in these low alloy steels.

  15. Localized corrosion resistance of corrosion-resistant Ni based alloys in hot concentrated seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Sugahara, Katsuo; Takizawa, Yoshio

    1998-12-31

    Localized corrosion resistance of stainless steel (Type 316L), a titanium-based alloy (Ti-0.15Pd) and corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloys (a new alloy MAT-21 (Alloy T) and Alloy C-276) was evaluated in four simulated seawater solutions containing 1.8 to 22.0 wt% of chloride ions concentrated by evaporation. Stress corrosion cracking was observed on the 316L stainless steel but not on Alloy T and Alloy C-276 in the solutions. Pitting attack occurred on the surface of the 316L stainless steel base metal in all the solutions. Alloy C-276 suffered pitting attack on the surface including the welded section only in the solutions containing 18.9 and 22.0 wt% of chloride ions, respectively. No pitting attack occurred over any part of the surface including the welded section of Alloy T in any of the solutions. No crevice corrosion was observed in an immersion test of Alloy T and the Ti-0.15 5Pd alloy using test pieces with crevices although crevice corrosion was seen the creviced test pieces of Alloy C-276 and the 316L stainless steel. It was found that both Alloy T and the Ti-0.15Pd alloy, which exhibit high repassivation potentials for crevice corrosion (E{sub r,CREV})corresponding to crevice corrosion potentials, have excellent crevice corrosion resistance, while these alloys which exhibit corrosion potentials greater than E{sub r,CREV}in a solution with a high chloride ion concentration and a high dissolved oxygen concentration in open air may be corroding in the crevices.

  16. DETERMINATION OF CORROSION INHIBITOR CRITERIA FOR TYPE III/IIIA TANKS DURING SALT DISSOLUTION OPERATIONS SUMMARY DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Wiersma, B.; Garcia-Diaz, B.

    2009-10-01

    testing, pitting occurred on all coupons independent of heat treatment, inhibitor concentration, temperature, surface preparation, or welding. (4) In slow strain rate testing, cracking occurred on samples tested in solutions containing up to the maximum inhibitor concentration. The primary conclusion derived from this experimental program is that A537 carbon steel exposed to high nitrate (> 5.5M) solutions at inhibitor levels below the current specifications (0.6M OH{sup -} and 1.1M OH{sup -} + NO{sub 2}{sup -}) are susceptible to localized corrosion in the form of pitting and stress corrosion cracking. Long-term storage (e.g., greater than 100 days) of dissolved salt solutions not meeting the current inhibitor specifications for high nitrate salt chemistries in Type III waste tanks shall be avoided. Short term storage (e.g., less than 100 days) at low temperatures (e.g., less than 50 C) in these tanks is permissible for waste removal purposes. The stress relief process reduces the risk of SCC in the Type III waste tanks. On the other hand, the current inhibitor specifications should be strictly followed for the Type I, II and IV waste chemistry to prevent initiation of localized corrosion mechanisms. These tanks were not stress relieved and are more susceptible to SCC.

  17. Arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) reactions with zerovalent iron corrosion products.

    PubMed

    Manning, Bruce A; Hunt, Mathew L; Amrhein, Christopher; Yarmoff, Jory A

    2002-12-15

    Zerovalent iron (Fe0) has tremendous potential as a remediation material for removal of arsenic from groundwater and drinking water. This study investigates the speciation of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) after reaction with two Fe0 materials, their iron oxide corrosion products, and several model iron oxides. A variety of analytical techniques were used to study the reaction products including HPLC-hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The products of corrosion of Fe0 include lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH), magnetite (Fe3O4), and/or maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3), all of which indicate Fe(II) oxidation as an intermediate step in the Fe0 corrosion process. The in-situ Fe0 corrosion reaction caused a high As(III) and As(V) uptake with both Fe0 materials studied. Under aerobic conditions, the Fe0 corrosion reaction did not cause As(V) reduction to As(III) but did cause As(III) oxidation to As(V). Oxidation of As(III) was also caused by maghemite and hematite minerals indicating that the formation of certain iron oxides during Fe0 corrosion favors the As(V) species. Water reduction and the release of OH- to solution on the surface of corroding Fe0 may also promote As(III) oxidation. Analysis of As(III) and As(V) adsorption complexes in the Fe0 corrosion products and synthetic iron oxides by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) gave predominant As-Fe interatomic distances of 3.30-3.36 A. This was attributed to inner-sphere, bidentate As(III) and As(V) complexes. The results of this study suggest that Fe0 can be used as a versatile and economical sorbent for in-situ treatment of groundwater containing As(III) and As(V).

  18. PROBABILITY BASED CORROSION CONTROL FOR LIQUID WASTE TANKS - PART III

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.; Edwards, T.

    2010-12-09

    The liquid waste chemistry control program is designed to reduce the pitting corrosion occurrence on tank walls. The chemistry control program has been implemented, in part, by applying engineering judgment safety factors to experimental data. However, the simple application of a general safety factor can result in use of excessive corrosion inhibiting agents. The required use of excess corrosion inhibitors can be costly for tank maintenance, waste processing, and in future tank closure. It is proposed that a probability-based approach can be used to quantify the risk associated with the chemistry control program. This approach can lead to the application of tank-specific chemistry control programs reducing overall costs associated with overly conservative use of inhibitor. Furthermore, when using nitrite as an inhibitor, the current chemistry control program is based on a linear model of increased aggressive species requiring increased protective species. This linear model was primarily supported by experimental data obtained from dilute solutions with nitrate concentrations less than 0.6 M, but is used to produce the current chemistry control program up to 1.0 M nitrate. Therefore, in the nitrate space between 0.6 and 1.0 M, the current control limit is based on assumptions that the linear model developed from data in the <0.6 M region is applicable in the 0.6-1.0 M region. Due to this assumption, further investigation of the nitrate region of 0.6 M to 1.0 M has potential for significant inhibitor reduction, while maintaining the same level of corrosion risk associated with the current chemistry control program. Ongoing studies have been conducted in FY07, FY08, FY09 and FY10 to evaluate the corrosion controls at the SRS tank farm and to assess the minimum nitrite concentrations to inhibit pitting in ASTM A537 carbon steel below 1.0 molar nitrate. The experimentation from FY08 suggested a non-linear model known as the mixture/amount model could be used to predict

  19. How Dangerous Can Localized Corrosion Be? An Experiment that Studies Its Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celdran, R.; Gonzalo, P.

    1988-01-01

    Considers three common cases of localized corrosion of metals: pitting, crevice, and stress corrosion. Provides experimental methods for studying all three methods. Includes a discussion of expected results. (ML)

  20. Corrosion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  1. A new localized corrosion monitoring technique for the evaluation of oilfield inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, S.L.; Griffin, A.M.; Garcia, J.G. Jr.

    1996-08-01

    Flow induced localized corrosion (FILC) is one of the major problems in the oilfield. Presently very few effective techniques are available for monitoring localized corrosion in oilfields. A new electrochemical technique was developed to provide a simple and effective way to monitor localized corrosion. The technique requires a potentiostat and a ZRA (zero resistance ammeter) as the measurement instrument. A special setup was designed to create a small anode and a large cathode. The technique was tested in a recirculating flow loop simulating FILC conditions. This technique was used to demonstrate the effectiveness of a corrosion inhibitor in mitigating localized corrosion. It can be further applied, both in the laboratory and in the field, to other areas where FILC is severe. 35 refs., 12 figs.

  2. IMPACT OF WATER CHEMISTRY ON LOCALIZED CORROSION OF COPPER PITTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will help identify what waters are problematic in causing the corrosion of copper pipes and improve understanding of how water distribution leads to corrosion. This project will also focus on the prevention of pinhole leaks and how to reverse them once they occur. ...

  3. Localized corrosion of stainless steels and nickel alloys in flue gas desulfurization environments

    SciTech Connect

    Phull, B.S.; Lee, T.S.

    1986-08-01

    The results of a planned interval test of 90 days duration in a model flue gas desulfurization system are discussed. Tests were conducted in a high chloride, limestone slurry-based environment containing fluoride and flyash. Corrosion in absorber and outlet duct zones is outlined in terms of relative tendencies of localized corrosion propagation for six alloys.

  4. Interfacial valence electron localization and the corrosion resistance of Al-SiC nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Sareh; Hua, Guomin; Akhlaghi, Farshad; Yan, Xianguo; Li, Dongyang

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural inhomogeneity generally deteriorates the corrosion resistance of materials due to the galvanic effect and interfacial issues. However, the situation may change for nanostructured materials. This article reports our studies on the corrosion behavior of SiC nanoparticle-reinforced Al6061 matrix composite. It was observed that the corrosion resistance of Al6061 increased when SiC nanoparticles were added. Overall electron work function (EWF) of the Al-SiC nanocomposite increased, along with an increase in the corrosion potential. The electron localization function of the Al-SiC nanocomposite was calculated and the results revealed that valence electrons were localized in the region of SiC-Al interface, resulting in an increase in the overall work function and thus building a higher barrier to hinder electrons in the nano-composite to participate in corrosion reactions. PMID:26667968

  5. Influence of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria on the corrosion of low carbon steel: Local electrochemical investigations.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Rebeca; Schütz, Marta K; Libert, Marie; Tribollet, Bernard; Vivier, Vincent

    2014-06-01

    Low carbon steel has been considered a suitable material for component of the multi-barrier system employed on the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). A non negligible amount of dihydrogen (H2) is expected to be produced over the years within the geological repository due to the anoxic corrosion of metallic materials and also to the water radiolysis. The influence of the activity of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria (HOB) and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) on carbon steel corrosion is considered in this study because of the high availability of energetic nutriments (H2, iron oxides and hydroxides) produced in anoxic disposal conditions. Local electrochemical techniques were used for investigating the activity of IRB as a promoter of local corrosion in the presence of H2 as electron donor. A local consumption of H2 by the bacteria has been evidenced and impedance measurements indicate the formation of a thick layer of corrosion products.

  6. Studies of localized corrosion in welded aluminum alloys by the scanning reference electrode technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Nunes, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    Localized corrosion in welded samples of 2219-T87 Al alloy (2319 filler), 2090 Al-Li alloy (4043 and 2319 fillers), and 2195 Al-Li alloy (4043 and 2319 fillers) has been investigated using the relatively new scanning reference electrode technique. The weld beads are cathodic in all cases, leading to reduced anode/cathode ratios. A reduction in anode/cathode ratio leads to an increase in the corrosion rates of the welded metals, in agreement with results obtained in previous electrochemical and stress corrosion studies involving the overall corrosion rates of welded samples. The cathodic weld beads are bordered on both sides by strong anodic regions, with high propensity for corrosion.

  7. Localized effects of macrofouling species on electrochemical corrosion of high grade alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgkiess, T.; Nevilie, A.

    1998-12-31

    Interactions between macrofouling and corrosion on some stainless steels, UNS N06625 and UNS R30006 have been studied in long-term tests conducted in natural seawater off the west coast of Scotland. After a 18-month exposure period, the specimens were heavily fouled primarily with barnacles and mussels and all the materials exhibited crevice corrosion although this was less extensive on the Ni-base alloy. Localized corrosion was observed under the base of live barnacles on UNS S31603 stainless steel. DC electrochemical anodic polarization tests undertaken after the 18-month exposure period, yielded unusually high currents in the range of potential between the free corrosion value and the breakdown potential. This observation was associated with the appearance, after the anodic polarization, of black sulfide corrosion products at the specimen/resin crevices, around barnacles and around mussel byssus threads.

  8. Electrochemical noise sensors for detection of localized and general corrosion of natural gas transmission pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Russell, James H.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret

    2002-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory funded a Natural Gas Infrastructure Reliability program directed at increasing and enhancing research and development activities in topics such as remote leak detection, pipe inspection, and repair technologies and materials. The Albany Research Center (ARC), U.S. Department of Energy was funded to study the use of electrochemical noise sensors for detection of localized and general corrosion of natural gas transmission pipelines. As part of this, ARC entered into a collaborative effort with the corrosion sensor industry to demonstrate the capabilities of commercially available remote corrosion sensors for use with the Nation's Gas Transmission Pipeline Infrastructure needs. The goal of the research was to develop an emerging corrosion sensor technology into a monitor for the type and degree of corrosion occurring at key locations in gas transmission pipelines.

  9. Localized Corrosion Behavior of Al-Si-Mg Alloys Used for Fabrication of Aluminum Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pech-Canul, M. A.; Giridharagopal, R.; Pech-Canul, M. I.; Coral-Escobar, E. E.

    2013-12-01

    The relationship between microstructure and localized corrosion behavior in neutral aerated chloride solutions was investigated with SEM/EDAX, conventional electrochemical techniques, and with scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM) for two custom-made alloys with Si/Mg molar ratios of 0.12 and 0.49. In this order, Al3Fe, Al3Mg2, and Mg2Si intermetallics were identified in the first alloy and Al(FeMn)Si and Mg2Si particles in the second one. Anodic polarization curves and corrosion morphology showed that the alloy with higher Si/Mg molar ratio exhibited a better corrosion performance and evidence was shown that it had a more corrosion-resistant passive film. The corrosion process for both alloys in aerated 0.1 M NaCl solutions was localized around the Fe-rich intermetallics. They acted as local cathodes and produced dissolution of the aluminum matrix surrounding such particles. Mg2Si and Al3Mg2 exhibited anodic behavior. SKPFM was successfully used to map the Volta potential distribution of main intermetallics. The localized corrosion behavior was correlated with a large Volta potential difference between the Fe-rich intermetallics and the matrix. After immersion in the chloride solution, such Volta potential difference decreased.

  10. Effect of environmental variables on localized corrosion of high-performance container materials

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, A.K.; Fleming, D.L.; Lum, B.Y.

    1997-01-01

    Electrochemical cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) experiments were performed on several candidate high-performance waste package container materials to evaluate their susceptibility to localized corrosion in aqueous environments relevant to the potential underground high-level nuclear waste repository. This paper presents the results of this study showing the effects of chloride ion (Cl) concentrations, pH, temperature, and electrochemical potential scan rate on the pitting corrosion behavior of these materials.

  11. CHROMATE INHIBITION OF THE LOCALIZED CORROSION OF ALUMINUM: MEASUREMENTS OF ELECTROCHEMICAL TRANSIENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    SASAKI,K.; ISAACS,H.S.

    2001-09-02

    We investigated the inhibition by chromate ions of the localized corrosion of aluminum by electrochemical transient measurements. In agreement with other work, the measurements demonstrated that chromate is a cathodic inhibitor for aluminum in open circuit. The reduction of hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium is assumed to take place on catalyzed sites of the surface. The resulting products inhibit oxygen reduction reactions at these sites, thereby retarding pitting corrosion.

  12. A FRAMEWORK FOR THE ANALYSIS OF LOCALIZED CORROSION AT THE PROPOSED YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    J.H. Payer; S.A. Carroll; G.E. Gdowski; R.B. Rebak

    2006-03-09

    The proposed Yucca Mountain Repository presents a familiar materials performance application that is regularly encountered in energy, transportation and other industries. The widely accepted approach to dealing with materials performance is to identify the performance requirements, to determine the operating conditions to which materials will be exposed and to select materials of construction that perform well in those conditions. A special feature of the proposed Repository is the extremely long time frame of interest, i.e. 10,000's of years and longer. Thus, the time evolution of the environment in contact with waste package surfaces and the time evolution of corrosion damage that may result are of primary interest in the determination of expected performance. An approach is presented to the analysis of localized corrosion during a time period when it is possible for waters from drips and seepage to contact the waste package surfaces, and the analysis is demonstrated for the water chemistry of mixed salt solutions and a set of time-temperature-relative humidity profiles for a hot, mid and cool temperature waste package. Based on the analysis, there are large time periods when localized corrosion can not be supported, and no corrosion damage will occur. Further analysis can then focus on time periods when it is possible for localized corrosion to occur and the determination of the evolution of any corrosion damage.

  13. A Framework for the Analysis of Localized Corrosion at the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Payer, J H; Carroll, S A; Gdowski, G E; Rebak, R B; Michels, T C; Miller, M C; Henson, V E

    2006-01-10

    The proposed Repository presents a familiar materials performance application that is regularly encountered in energy, transportation and other industries. The widely accepted approach to dealing with materials performance is to identify the performance requirements, to determine the operating conditions to which materials will be exposed and to select materials of construction that perform well in those conditions. A special feature of the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository is the extremely long time frame of interest, i.e. 10,000's of years and longer. Thus, the time evolution of the environment in contact with waste package surfaces and the time evolution of corrosion damage that may result are of primary interest in the determination of expected performance. An approach is presented to the analysis of localized corrosion during a time period when it is possible for waters from drips and seepage to contact the waste package surfaces, and the analysis is demonstrated for the water chemistry of mixed salt solutions and a set of time-temperature-relative humidity profiles for a hot, mid and cool temperature waste package. Based on the analysis, there are large time periods when localized corrosion can not be supported, and no corrosion damage will occur. Further analysis can then focus on time periods when it is possible for localized corrosion to occur and the determination of the evolution of any corrosion damage.

  14. DETERMINATION OF CORROSION INHIBITOR CRITERIA FOR TYPE III IIIA TANKS DURING SALT DISSOLUTION OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B

    2008-01-04

    Preparation of high level waste for vitrification involves in part the dissolution of salt cake from the carbon steel storage tanks. The salt crystals composing this cake are high in nitrate concentration with the interstitial liquid being high in hydroxide and nitrite concentration. During the salt dissolution process, a stage is reached in which the inhibitors, hydroxide and nitrite, are insufficient to prevent nitrate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and fall outside the requirements of the corrosion control program. Additional inhibitors, which are necessary to meet the requirements, may be counterproductive to the efficiency of the process and waste minimization. Corrosion testing was initiated to better characterize the necessary inhibitor concentration for high nitrate waste during salt dissolution processing. A four-phase test program is being conducted: (1) electrochemical characterization, (2) accelerated or polarized U-bend testing, (3) long-term (non-polarized) U-bend testing and (4) vapor space U-bend tests. Electrochemical testing, which included cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP), linear polarization resistance (LPR) and open-circuit potential (OCP) measurements, was performed to identify stress corrosion cracking susceptibility, to characterize pitting resistance and to determine the general corrosion rate. Polarized U-bend tests were utilized to assess the effect of minimum inhibitor concentrations and heat treatment on SCC and to determine test parameters for future long-term U-bend testing. Results from CPP, LPR and OCP tests demonstrated that carbon steel formed a protective oxide film and the potential became electropositive during exposure to the waste at all inhibitor concentrations. The tenacity of this film improved as the inhibitor concentration level was increased and the temperature was decreased. This passive film increased the resistance to localized corrosion significantly. Therefore if any of these inhibitor levels are selected

  15. Study and Modeling of the Localized Nature of Top of the Line Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Marc

    The occurrence of localized corrosion in Top of the Line Corrosion (TLC) was investigated both in sweet (CO2-dominated) and sour (H 2S-dominated) environments. The focus of the work was to understand the influence of the environmental parameters on localized corrosion at the top of the line in order to develop a narrative of the mechanism. The first part of this project presents the unique setup developed for the experimental work. Several large scale flow loops were used to perform the tests in order to recreate the field environments as closely as possible. The test section was designed using a carbon steel insert exposed to three different levels of cooling at the same time. This concept was quite successful in simulating realistic localized features. A series of long term exposure (one- to three-month) experiments was conducted to investigate the controlling parameters. The occurrence of localized corrosion could be very clearly correlated to the condensation rate, the gas temperature and the organic acid content. Important observations on the morphology of localized TLC features could be made, providing useful insight on the mechanisms involved. The second part of the study attempted to link the presence or absence of a large droplet on the steel surface to the extent of corrosion occurring underneath it. However, this was not successful as no clear relationship could be established with certainty. Instead, the water condensation rate was thought to control the corrosion and the overall aggressiveness of the environment (CO2, acetic acid). Finally, a modeling approach was proposed for the prediction of the localized attack in a top of the line corrosion scenario. The method was based on the observations made during the experimental part of the work and presented a mechanism for the prediction of the onset and propagation of localized corrosion. The FeCO3 saturation level played a key role in defining the overall corrosiveness of the condensed water, while the

  16. Implementation of Localized Corrosion in the Performance Assessment Model for Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Vivek Jain, S. David Sevougian, Patrick D. Mattie, Kevin G. Mon, and Robert J. Mackinnon

    2006-04-30

    A total system performance assessment (TSPA) model has been developed to analyze the ability of the natural and engineered barriers of the Yucca Mountain repository to isolate nuclear waste over the 10,000-year period following repository closure. The principal features of the engineered barrier system (EBS) are emplacement tunnels (or ''drifts'') containing a two-layer waste package (WP) for waste containment and a titanium drip shield to protect the waste package from seeping water and falling rock, The 20-mm-thick outer shell of the WP is composed of Alloy 22, a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The barrier function of the EBS is to isolate the waste from migrating water. The water and its associated chemical conditions eventually lead to degradation of the waste packages and mobilization of the radionuclides within the packages. There are five possible waste package degradation modes of the Alloy 22: general corrosion, microbially influenced corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, early failure due to manufacturing defects, and localized corrosion. This paper specifically examines the incorporation of the Alloy-22 localized corrosion model into the Yucca Mountain TSPA model, particularly the abstraction and modeling methodology, as well as issues dealing with scaling, spatial variability, uncertainty, and coupling to other sub-models that are part of the total system model.

  17. Characterization of Localized Corrosion in an Al-Cu-Li Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chen; Zhang, Xinxin; Zhou, Xiaorong; Sun, Zhihua; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Tang, Zhihui; Lu, Feng; Thompson, George E.

    2016-05-01

    Corrosion behaviors of recently developed 2A97-T6 aluminum-copper-lithium alloy in sodium chloride solution are investigated using scanning electron and transmission electron microscopies in conjunction with electron backscatter diffraction. It has been found that corrosion product rings were established on the alloy surface as early as 5 min during immersion in sodium chloride solution. Meanwhile, hydrogen continuously evolved from within the rings. Pitting corrosion is evident with crystallographic dependant corrosion channel facets mainly parallel to {100} planes. Non-uniform distribution of misorientation in the 2A97 aluminum alloy results in a portion of grains of relatively high stored energy. Such grains were preferentially attacked, serving as local anodes, during the development of crystallographic pitting.

  18. General and Localized Corrosion of Borated Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    T.E. Lister; Ronald E. Mizia; A.W. Erickson; T.L. Trowbridge; B. S. Matteson

    2008-03-01

    The Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system is being proposed to transport and store spent nuclear fuel at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The preliminary design of this system identifies borated stainless steel as the neutron absorber material that will be used to fabricate fuel basket inserts for nuclear criticality control. This paper discusses corrosion test results for verifying the performance of this material manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A887, Grade A, under the expected repository conditions.

  19. Adverse local tissue response lesion of the knee associated with Morse taper corrosion.

    PubMed

    McMaster, William C; Patel, Jay

    2013-02-01

    Modularity in arthroplasty components has increased options for solving complex issues in primary and revision procedures. However, this technology introduces the risk of accelerated metal ion release as a result of fretting or passive crevice corrosion within the Morse taper junction. Cobalt toxicity locally and systemically has been described with hip metal bearing surfaces and may be accentuated with ion release from Morse tapers. This is a case report of a knee adverse local tissue response lesion associated with corrosion within the Morse taper of a revision knee arthroplasty in the absence of systemic metal allergy.

  20. Structural health monitoring of localized internal corrosion in high temperature piping for oil industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eason, Thomas J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Lozev, Mark G.

    2015-03-01

    Crude oil is becoming more corrosive with higher sulfur concentration, chloride concentration, and acidity. The increasing presence of naphthenic acids in oils with various environmental conditions at temperatures between 150°C and 400°C can lead to different internal degradation morphologies in refineries that are uniform, non-uniform, or localized pitting. Improved corrosion measurement technology is needed to better quantify the integrity risk associated with refining crude oils of higher acid concentration. This paper first reports a consolidated review of corrosion inspection technology to establish the foundation for structural health monitoring of localized internal corrosion in high temperature piping. An approach under investigation is to employ flexible ultrasonic thin-film piezoelectric transducer arrays fabricated by the sol-gel manufacturing process for monitoring localized internal corrosion at temperatures up to 400°C. A statistical analysis of sol-gel transducer measurement accuracy using various time of flight thickness calculation algorithms on a flat calibration block is demonstrated.

  1. Electrochemical study of resistance to localized corrosion of stainless steels for biomaterial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, J.; Karlen, C.; Ulfvin, C.

    2000-03-01

    Sandvik Bioline High-N and 316 LVM are two austenitic stainless steels especially developed for biomaterial applications. Their resistance to localized corrosion was investigated by electrochemical methods including cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and potentiostatic polarization measurements in a phosphate-buffered saline solution and in a simulated crevice solution, i.e., designed for crevice corrosion testing. Sandvik SAF 2507 (a high-performance super duplex stainless steel) was included in the tests as a reference material High-N, higher alloyed than 316 LVM, demonstrated excellent resistance to pitting initiation and a strong tendency to repassivation. High-N proved to have an equivalent or even higher resistance to localized corrosion than SAF 2507. The latter is known for its impressive corrosion properties, particularly in chloride containing environments. While 316 LVM may run the risk of crevice corrosion in implant applications, the risk seems negligible for High-N. In view of the fact that also the mechanical properties are superior to those of 316 LVM, High-N is a very attractive implant material.

  2. The Estimation of Localized Corrosion Behavior of Ni-Based Dental Alloys Using Electrochemical Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareci, Daniel; Chelariu, Romeu; Iacoban, Sorin; Munteanu, Corneliu; Bolat, Georgiana; Sutiman, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the electrochemical behavior of the five non-precious Ni-based dental casting alloys in acidified artificial saliva. For comparison, nickel was also investigated. In order to study the localized corrosion resistance, the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CCP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were performed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations were made after the CCP tests. The Ni-Cr alloys with chromium (14-18%) contents were susceptible to localized corrosion. The Ni-Cr-Mo alloy with contents of chromium (≈13%) and molybdenum (9%) presents a dangerous breakdown, but have a zero corrosion potential so that the difference between them is around 650 mV. The Ni-Cr-Mo alloys with higher chromium (22-25%) and molybdenum (9-11%) contents had a much larger passive range in the polarization curve and were immune to pitting corrosion. Pitting resistance equivalent (PRE) of about ≈54 could provide the Ni-based alloy with a good pitting corrosion resistance.

  3. The Effect of Phosphate on the Morphological and Spectroscopic Properties of Copper Pipes Experiencing Localized Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extensive localized or pitting corrosion of copper pipes used in household drinking-water plumbing can eventually lead to pinhole water leaks that may result in water damage, mold growth, and costly repairs. A growing number of problems have been associated with high pH and low ...

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF LOCALIZED CORROSION OF COPPER PIPES USED IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Localized corrosion of copper, or "copper pitting" in water distribution tubing is a large problem at many utilities. Pitting can lead to pinhole leaks less than a year. Tubing affected by copper pitting will often fail in ultiple locations, resulting in a frustrating situation ...

  5. Localized corrosion behavior of nickel alloys in model SO/sub 2/ scrubber environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hibner, E.L.; Ross, R.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Nickel base alloys and austenitic stainless steels have been evaluated in a working model limestone flue gas desulfurization system previously described in the literature. Corrosion in the absorber and outlet duct zones was characterized in terms of environmental effects on localized corrosion propagation of each alloy. Increasingly environmental chloride and/or fluoride content produced a more severe environment, even in the presence of flyash. Crevice pits which initiated in 30 days, failed to propagate with additional exposure to 90 days; however, the degree of initiation increased.

  6. Study of localized corrosion in aluminum alloys by the scanning reference electrode technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1995-01-01

    Localized corrosion in 2219-T87 aluminum (Al) alloy, 2195 aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy, and welded 2195 Al-Li alloy (4043 filler) have been investigated using the relatively new scanning reference electrode technique (SRET). Anodic sites are more frequent and of greater strength in the 2195 Al-Li alloy than in the 2219-T87 Al alloy, indicating a greater tendency toward pitting for the latter. However, the overall corrosion rates are about the same for these two alloys, as determined using the polarization resistance technique. In the welded 2195 Al-Li alloy, the weld bean is entirely cathodic, with rather strongly anodic heat affected zones (HAZ) bordering both sides, indicating a high probability of corrosion in the HAZ parallel to the weld bead.

  7. Mitigating Localized Corrosion Using Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA) Coatings on Welded 25% Cr Superduplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Lu, Q.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2015-04-01

    Thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA) coating has been increasingly used for the protection of carbon steel offshore structures, topside equipment, and flowlines/pipelines exposed to both marine atmospheres and seawater immersion conditions. In this paper, the effectiveness of TSA coatings in preventing localized corrosion, such as pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr superduplex stainless steel (SDSS) in subsea applications, has been investigated. Welded 25% Cr SDSS (coated and uncoated) with and without defects, and surfaces coated with epoxy paint were also examined. Pitting and crevice corrosion tests, on welded 25% Cr SDSS specimens with and without TSA/epoxy coatings, were conducted in recirculated, aerated, and synthetic seawater at 90 °C for 90 days. The tests were carried out at both the free corrosion potentials and an applied cathodic potential of -1100 mV saturated calomel electrode. The acidity (pH) of the test solution was monitored daily and adjusted to between pH 7.5 and 8.1, using dilute HCl solution or dilute NaOH, depending on the pH of the solution measured during the test. The test results demonstrated that TSA prevented pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr SDSS in artificial seawater at 90 °C, even when 10-mm-diameter coating defect exposing the underlying steel was present.

  8. Measurements and mechanisms of localized aqueous corrosion in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchheit, Rudolph G., Jr.; Stoner, Glenn E.

    1990-01-01

    Like most heat treatable aluminum alloys, localized corrosion and stress corrosion of Al-Li-Cu alloys is strongly dependent on the nature and distribution of second phase particles. To develop a mechanistic understanding of the role of localized corrosion in the stress corrosion process, bulk samples of T(sub 1) (Al2CuLi) and a range of Al-Cu-Fe impurity phases were prepared for electrochemical experiments. Potentiodynamic polarization and galvanic couple experiments were performed in standard 0.6 M NaCl and in simulated crevice solutions to assess corrosion behavior of these particles with respect to the alpha-Al matrix. A comparison of time to failure versus applied potential using a constant load, smooth bar SCC test technique in Cl(-), Cl(-)/CrO4(2-), and Cl(-)/CO3(2-) environments shows that rapid failures are to be expected when applied potentials are more positive than the breakaway potential (E sub br) of T(sub 1) (crack tip) but less than E(sub br) of alpha-Al (crack walls). It is shown that this criterion is not satisfied in aerated Cl(-) solutions. Accordingly, SCC resistance is good. This criterion is satisfied, however, in an alkaline isolated fissure exposed to a CO2 containing atmosphere. Rapid failure induced by these fissures was recently termed preexposure embrittlement. Anodic polarization shows that the corrosion behavior of T(sub 1) is relatively unaffected in alkaline CO3(2-) environments but the alpha-Al phase is rapidly passivated. X ray diffraction of crevice walls from artificial crevices suggests that passivation of alpha-Al occurs as hydrotalcite-type compound (LiAl2(OH)6)2(+) - CO3(2-) - nH2O.

  9. Laboratory Evaluation of an Electrochemical Noise System for Detection of Localized and General Corrosion of Natural Gas Transmission Pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, S.J.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Russell, J.H.; Holcomb, G.R.; Cramer, S.D.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Eden, D.

    2003-03-16

    Gas transmission pipelines are susceptible to both internal (gas side) and external (soil side) corrosion attack. Internal corrosion is caused by the presence of salt laden moisture, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and perhaps O{sub 2} in the natural gas. Internal corrosion usually manifests itself as general corrosion. However, the presence of chlorides in entrained water also can lead to pitting corrosion damage. The electrochemical noise technique can differentiate general from localized corrosion and provide estimates of corrosion rates without external perturbation of the corroding system. It is increasingly being applied to field and industrial installations for in situ corrosion monitoring. It has been used here to determine its suitability for monitoring internal and external corrosion damage on gas transmission pipelines. Corrosion measurements were made in three types of environments: (1) aqueous solutions typical of those found within gas pipelines in equilibrium with th e corrosive components of natural gas; (2) biologically-active soils typical of wetlands; and (3) a simulated, unpressurized, internal gas/liquid gas pipeline environment. Multiple sensor designs were evaluated in the simulated pipe environment. Gravimetric measurements were conducted in parallel with the electrochemical noise measurements to validate the results.

  10. Defining the RNA polymerase III transcriptome: Genome-wide localization of the RNA polymerase III transcription machinery in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Canella, Donatella; Praz, Viviane; Reina, Jaime H.; Cousin, Pascal; Hernandez, Nouria

    2010-01-01

    Our view of the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription machinery in mammalian cells arises mostly from studies of the RN5S (5S) gene, the Ad2 VAI gene, and the RNU6 (U6) gene, as paradigms for genes with type 1, 2, and 3 promoters. Recruitment of Pol III onto these genes requires prior binding of well-characterized transcription factors. Technical limitations in dealing with repeated genomic units, typically found at mammalian Pol III genes, have so far hampered genome-wide studies of the Pol III transcription machinery and transcriptome. We have localized, genome-wide, Pol III and some of its transcription factors. Our results reveal broad usage of the known Pol III transcription machinery and define a minimal Pol III transcriptome in dividing IMR90hTert fibroblasts. This transcriptome consists of some 500 actively transcribed genes including a few dozen candidate novel genes, of which we confirmed nine as Pol III transcription units by additional methods. It does not contain any of the microRNA genes previously described as transcribed by Pol III, but reveals two other microRNA genes, MIR886 (hsa-mir-886) and MIR1975 (RNY5, hY5, hsa-mir-1975), which are genuine Pol III transcription units. PMID:20413673

  11. Localized corrosion probability in stainless steels after cathodic protection in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Salvago, G.; Bollini, G.

    1999-04-01

    Growth of calcareous deposits on stainless steels (SS) exposed to seawater under cathodic protection (CP) conditions was examined. CP was performed by galvanic coupling with iron, zinc, or magnesium anodes. The influence of the galvanic coupling period on the temporal evolution of localized corrosion susceptibility was examined for various SS with CP removed. The study was carried out using a statistical approach with 33 SS samples from the same group. Temporal evolutions of corrosion potential distributions and breakdown potential distributions were determined. Visual and microscopic observations were compared with the localized corrosion risk evaluated from the superimposition of corrosion potential distributions with breakdown potential distributions. Galvanic coupling of SS with iron anodes in seawater did not lead to growth of calcareous deposits, and protection failed soon after galvanic coupling was removed. Galvanic coupling with zinc anodes in seawater led to growth of a light layer of aragonite, and the protection persisted for >3 weeks after the coupling was removed. Galvanic coupling with magnesium anodes in seawater led to growth of thick calcareous deposits of a different composition. Protection persisted for >1 year after the galvanic couple was removed.

  12. Localized Corrosion of Alloy 22 -Fabrication Effects-FY05 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2005-10-06

    This report deals with the impact of fabrication processes on the localized corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022). The four fabrication processes that were analyzed are: (1) Surface stress mitigation of final closure weld, (2) Manufacturing of the mockup container, (3) Black annealing of the container and (4) Use of different heats of Alloy 22 for container fabrication. Immersion and Electrochemical tests performed in the laboratory are generally aggressive and do not represent actual repository environments in Yucca Mountain. For example, to determine the intergranular attack in the heat affected zone of a weldment, tests are conducted in boiling acidic and oxidizing solutions according to ASTM standards. These solutions are used to compare the behavior of differently treated metallic coupons. Similarly for electrochemical tests many times pure sodium chloride or calcium chloride solutions are used. Pure chloride solutions are not representative of the repository environment. (1) Surface Stress Mitigation--When metallic plates are welded, for example using the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) method, residual tensile stresses may develop in the vicinity of the weld seam. Processes such as Low Plasticity Burnishing (LPB) and Laser Shock Peening (LSP) could be applied locally to eliminate the residual stresses produced by welding. In this study, Alloy 22 plates were welded and then the above-mentioned surface treatments were applied to eliminate the residual tensile stresses. The aim of the current study was to comparatively test the corrosion behavior of as-welded (ASW) plates with the corrosion behavior of plates with stress mitigated surfaces. Immersion and electrochemical tests were performed. Results from both immersion and electrochemical corrosion tests show that the corrosion resistance of the mitigated plates was not affected by the surface treatments applied. (2) Behavior of Specimens from a Mockup container--Alloy 22 has been extensively tested for

  13. The use of microelectrodes in the study of localized corrosion of aluminum 6111-like alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Aboubakr M.

    This thesis is classified into four chapters. While chapter 1 is only an introductory chapter that summarizes the two mechanisms that are trying to explain localized corrosion of metals and alloys, Chapter 4 is the conclusions and future work chapter that presents the new achievements that have been added to the field of corrosion science by this work besides the proposed work to be done in the future. In chapter 2, Crevice corrosion of an experimental Al 6111-like alloy with 0.68% Cu has been studied using potentiodynamic and potentiostatic techniques in different concentrations of sodium chloride and in 0.1M nitric acid solutions. Potentiodynamic experiments show that the alloy has an active/passive transition in a saturated sodium chloride solution at elevated temperatures (90 and 70°C). Also, a steep electrode potential gradient, E(x), within the crevice has been measured using a microprobe connected to a SCE and controlled by a 3-D manipulator, and the observed locations of corrosion on the crevice wall are similar to the locations seen previously for systems in which it was clear that the shift of E(x) into the active peak region of the polarization curve on the crevice wall stabilized the crevice corrosion process. In chapter 3, focuses on the corrosion of a peak aged aluminum 6111-like alloy of 1.47% copper using the artificial pit configuration (pencil electrode) with relatively larger specimens in the form of plates rather than wires. The sample which was flush with the surface of the epoxy resin mount was anodically polarized in neutral NaCl solutions of different concentrations and pH 6.9. The alloy dissolved uniformly at a certain rate to form a local cell with epoxy resin walls and the alloy surface as its bottom. The potential drop profile within the cavity was recorded on a daily basis. It showed that the total potential drop is in the order of 50 mV. The pH in the local cell was measured using a commercial mono pH microelectrode coupled with a

  14. Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers in the US: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    1988-11-04

    Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including: undesirable phase transformations due to lack of phase stability; atmospheric oxidation; general aqueous corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC). This paper is an analysis of data from the literature relevant to the pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of these alloys. Though all three austenitic candidates have demonstrated pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, Alloy 825 has the greatest resistance to these forms of localized attack. Both types 304L and 316L stainless steels are susceptible to SCC in acidic chloride media. In contrast, SCC has not been documented for Alloy 825 under comparable conditions. Gamma irradiation has been found to enhance SCC of Types 304 and 304L stainless steels, but it has no detectable effect on the resistance of Alloy 825 to SCC. Furthermore, while microbiologically induced corrosion effects have been observed for 300-series stainless steels, nickel-based alloys such as Alloy 825 seem to be immune to such problems. Of the copper-based alloys, CDA 715 has the best overall resistance to localized attack. Its resistance to pitting is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. Observed rates of dealloying in CDA 715 are less than those observed in CDA 613 by orders of magnitude. The resistance of CDA 715 to SCC in tarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 102 and superior to that of CDA 613. Its resistance to SCC in nontarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. 22 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Considerations of the Role of the Cathodic Region in Localized Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Kelly; A. Agarwal; F. Cui; X. Shan; U. Landau; J.H. Payer

    2006-03-17

    The ability of wetted cathodes of limited area to support localized corrosion sites on passive materials exposed to atmospheric conditions was studied computationally. The analysis pertains to conditions where metal surfaces are covered by thin layers of moisture in contrast to conditions of full immersion. The moisture may be a continuous layer or in patches with and without particulate on the surface. These conditions are of interest for the surfaces of the waste packages at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository where waste packages are supported in air. The cathode capacity was characterized by the total net cathodic current, I{sub net}, which the surface surrounding a localized corrosion site (i.e., a pit or crevice) could supply. The cathode capacity increases with increasing cathode area, but it saturates at finite cathode sizes due to the resistance of the thin electrolyte layer. The magnitude of the capacity depends on the water layer thickness, the solution conductivity, and the electrochemical reaction kinetics. The presence of particulates is treated by considering both volume and surface coverage effects. The limited electrolyte volume under thin film conditions can lead to rapid pH changes which decrease the cathode capacity due to the slower electrochemical kinetics at elevated pH. These effects can make localized corrosion less likely to be sustained.

  16. Investigations of Localized Corrosion of Stainless Steel after Exposure to Supercritical CO2

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ziomek-Moroz; W. O’Connor; S. Bullard

    2012-03-11

    Severe localized corrosion of a 316 stainless steel autoclave occurred during investigating Type H Portland cement stability in 0.16 M CaCl{sub 2} + 0.02 M MgCl{sub 2} + 0.82 M NaCl brine in contact with supercritical CO{sub 2} containing 4% O{sub 2}. The system operated at 85 C and pressure of 29 MPa. However, no corrosion was observed in the same type of autoclave being exposed to the same environment, containing Type H Portland cement cylindrical samples, also operating at pressure of 29 MPa but at 50 C. The operation time for the 85 C autoclave was 53 days (1272 hours) while that for the 50 C autoclave was 66 days (1584 hours). Debris were collected from the base of both autoclaves and analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Corrosion products were only found in the debris from the 85 C autoclave. The cement samples were analyzed before and after the exposure by X-ray florescence (XRF) methods. Optical microscopy was used to estimate an extent of the 316 stainless steel corrosion degradation.

  17. The Effect of Inhibitors on the Susceptibility of Al 6013/SiC Interface to Localized Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Zaki; Aleem, B. J. Abdul

    2009-03-01

    Al 6013-20 SiC (p) in tempers T4, O, and F is sensitive to localized corrosion in 3.5 wt.% NaCl because of the preponderance of the secondary phase particles of Cu, Fe, and Cr at the Al/SiC interface. Treatment with cerium chloride effectively inhibited the localized corrosion of the alloy by suppressing the cathodic reactions at Al 6013/SiC interface as shown by electrochemical investigations. Morphological studies showed the formation of a protective cerium oxide/hydroxide films, which suppresses the corrosion of the alloy.

  18. 40 CFR 300.215 - Title III local emergency response plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Planning and Preparedness § 300.215 Title III local emergency response plans... are codified at 40 CFR part 355. (a) Each LEPC is to prepare an emergency response plan in accordance... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Title III local emergency...

  19. 40 CFR 300.215 - Title III local emergency response plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Planning and Preparedness § 300.215 Title III local emergency response plans... are codified at 40 CFR part 355. (a) Each LEPC is to prepare an emergency response plan in accordance... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Title III local emergency...

  20. 40 CFR 300.215 - Title III local emergency response plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Planning and Preparedness § 300.215 Title III local emergency response plans... are codified at 40 CFR part 355. (a) Each LEPC is to prepare an emergency response plan in accordance... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Title III local emergency...

  1. 40 CFR 300.215 - Title III local emergency response plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Planning and Preparedness § 300.215 Title III local emergency response plans... are codified at 40 CFR part 355. (a) Each LEPC is to prepare an emergency response plan in accordance... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Title III local emergency...

  2. 40 CFR 300.215 - Title III local emergency response plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Planning and Preparedness § 300.215 Title III local emergency response plans... are codified at 40 CFR part 355. (a) Each LEPC is to prepare an emergency response plan in accordance... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Title III local emergency...

  3. COMPUTATION MODELING OF LOCALIZED CORROSION STABILITY ON WETTED SS316L AT 25 AND 95 DEGREE C

    SciTech Connect

    F. Cuti; F.J. Presuel-Moreno; R.G. Kelly

    2005-10-13

    For corrosion resistant materials exposed to low-temperature atmospheric environments, the corrosion mode of highest risk is expected to be localized corrosion (pitting, crevice, stress-corrosion cracking) due to accumulation of aggressive species within thin solution layers and/or formation of occluded local geometries. The stability of such a localized corrosion site requires that the corroding site (anode) must dissolve at a sufficient high rate to maintain the critical chemistry, and a robust cathodic area (cathode) must exist that can provide sufficient cathodic current. The characteristics of both the anode and the cathode depend on a large number of physiochemical variables (e.g., temperature, ionic concentration, water layer thickness, etc) and electrochemical parameters (i.e., cathodic and anodic polarization behavior). The effects of all these parameters add significantly to the dimensionality of the problem and a systematic study of these parameters is thus more tractable computationally than experimentally. The objective of this study was to computationally characterize the stability of such a local corrosion site and explore the effects of physiochemical and electrochemical parameters on that stability. The overall goal is to contribute to the establishment of a scientific basis for the prediction of the stabilization of localized attack on wetted, corrosion resistant material surface. A localized corrosion site, illustrated in Figure 1, consists of two parts: (a) the external wetted surface (cathode) and (b) the crevice (anode). This study computationally separated the two and modeled them individually, linking them through the imposition of a common fixed potential at the junction point (i.e., the mouth of the crevice). An objected-oriented computational code, CREVICER, developed at UVa, was extended to study separately both the wet surface (cathode) and the crevice (anode). SS316L was chosen as the material of interest.

  4. Localized Corrosion of a Neutron Absorbing Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    R.E. Mizia; T. E. Lister; P. J. Pinhero; T. L. Trowbridge

    2005-04-01

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program, located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), has developed a new nickel-chromium-molybdenum-gadolinium structural alloy for storage and long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The new alloy will be used for SNF storage container inserts for nuclear criticality control. Gadolinium has been chosen as the neutron absorption alloying element due to its high thermal neutron absorption cross section. This alloy must be resistant to localized corrosion when exposed to postulated Yucca Mountain in-package chemistries. The corrosion resistance properties of three experimental heats of this alloy are presented. The alloys performance are be compared to Alloy 22 and borated stainless steel. The results show that initially the new Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy is less resistant to corrosion as compared to another Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy (Alloy 22); but when the secondary phase that contains gadolinium (gadolinide) is dissolved, the alloy surface becomes passive. The focus of this work is to qualify these gadolinium containing materials for ASME code qualification and acceptance in the Yucca Mountain Repository.

  5. Localized corrosion of GaAs surfaces and formation of porous GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Schmuki, P.; Vitus, C.M.; Isaacs, H.S.; Fraser, J.; Graham, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    The present work deals with pitting corrosion of p- and n-type GaAs (100). Pit growth can be electrochemically initiated on both conduction types in chloride-containing solutions and leads after extended periods of time to the formation of a porous GaAs structure. In the case of p-type material, localized corrosion is only observed if a passivating film is present on the surface, otherwise -- e.g. in acidic solutions -- the material suffers from a uniform attack (electropolishing) which is independent of the anion present. In contrast, pitting corrosion of n-type material can be triggered independent of the presence of an oxide film. This is explained in terms of the different current limiting factor for the differently doped materials (oxide film in the case of the p- and a space charge layer in the case of the n-GaAs). The porous structure was characterized by SEM, EDX and AES, and consists mainly of GaAs. From scratch experiments it is clear that the pit initiation process is strongly influenced by surface defects. For n-type material, AFM investigations show that light induced roughening of the order of several hundred nm occurs under non-passivating conditions. This nm- scale roughening however does not affect the pitting process.

  6. In-situ x-ray measurements of pit solutions during localized corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, J.H.; Davenport, A.J.; Isaacs, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    In this work, in-situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements of the ion concentrations within an artificial pit are presented to study the ionic species present and mass transport phenomena during localized corrosion taking place on metal surfaces. The x-ray absorption by an element in a sample is markedly greater at an energy just above than just below one of its absorption edges and the energy of this edge is characteristic of the absorbing element. A pair of measurement above and below the edge serves to determine both the presence and the amount of the element sought. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Localized Deformation as a Primary Cause of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Was

    2009-03-31

    The objective of this project is to determine whether deformation mode is a primary factor in the mechanism of irradiation assisted intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys in light watert reactor core components. Deformation mode will be controlled by both the stacking fault energy of the alloy and the degree of irradiation. In order to establish that localized deformation is a major factor in IASCC, the stacking fault energies of the alloys selected for study must be measured. Second, it is completely unknown how dose and SFE trade-off in terms of promoting localized deformation. Finally, it must be established that it is the localized deformation, and not some other factor that drives IASCC.

  8. The effects of temperature and aeration on the corrosion of A508III low alloy steel in boric acid solutions at 25-95 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Qian; Lu, Zhanpeng; Chen, Junjie; Yao, Meiyi; Chen, Zhen; Ejaz, Ahsan

    2016-11-01

    The effects of temperature, solution composition and dissolved oxygen on the corrosion rate and electrochemical behavior of an A508III low alloy steel in boric acid solution with lithium hydroxide at 25-95 °C are investigated. In aerated solutions, increasing the boric acid concentration increases the corrosion rate and the anodic current density. The corrosion rate in deaerated solutions increases with increasing temperature. A corrosion rate peak value is found at approximately 75 °C in aerated solutions. Increasing temperature increases the oxygen diffusion coefficient, decreases the dissolved oxygen concentration, accelerates the hydrogen evolution reaction, and accelerates both the active dissolution and the film forming reactions. Increasing dissolved oxygen concentration does not significantly affect the corrosion rate at 50 and 60 °C, increases the corrosion rate at 70 and 80 °C, and decreases the corrosion rate at 87.5 and 95 °C in a high concentration boric acid solution with lithium hydroxide.

  9. COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF CATHODIC LIMITATIONS ON LOCALIZED CORROSION OF WETTED SS 316L, AT ROOM TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    F. Cui; F.J. Presuel-Moreno; R.G. Kelly

    2005-10-13

    The ability of a SS316L surface wetted with a thin electrolyte layer to serve as an effective cathode for an active localized corrosion site was studied computationally. The dependence of the total net cathodic current, I{sub net}, supplied at the repassivation potential E{sub rp} (of the anodic crevice) on relevant physical parameters including water layer thickness (WL), chloride concentration ([Cl{sup -}]) and length of cathode (Lc) were investigated using a three-level, full factorial design. The effects of kinetic parameters including the exchange current density (i{sub o,c}) and Tafel slope ({beta}{sub c}) of oxygen reduction, the anodic passive current density (i{sub p}) (on the cathodic surface), and E{sub rp} were studied as well using three-level full factorial designs of [Cl{sup -}] and Lc with a fixed WL of 25 {micro}m. The study found that all the three parameters WL, [Cl{sup -}] and Lc as well as the interactions of Lc x WL and Lc x [Cl{sup -}] had significant impact on I{sub net}. A five-factor regression equation was obtained which fits the computation results reasonably well, but demonstrated that interactions are more complicated than can be explained with a simple linear model. Significant effects on I{sub net} were found upon varying either i{sub o,c}, {beta}{sub c}, or E{sub rp}, whereas i{sub p} in the studied range was found to have little impact. It was observed that I{sub net} asymptotically approached maximum values (I{sub max}) when Lc increased to critical minimum values. I{sub max} can be used to determine the stability of coupled localized corrosion and the critical Lc provides important information for experimental design and corrosion protection.

  10. Using the WISC-III with Navajo Children: A Need for Local Norms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLellan, Mary J.; Nellis, Leah

    2003-01-01

    The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III) was administered to 175 Navajo children at 2 reservation elementary schools. Local normative information was developed to reduce test bias associated with the English-laden content in the test. A procedure was developed for converting WISC-III scores, enabling comparison of…

  11. Localized dealloying corrosion mediated by self-assembled monolayers used as an inhibitor system.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, B R; Bashir, A; Ankah, G N; Valtiner, M; Renner, F U

    2015-01-01

    The structure and chemistry of thiol or selenol self-assembled organic monolayers have been frequently addressed due to the unique opportunities in functionalization of materials. Such organic films can also act as effective inhibition layers to mitigate oxidation or corrosion. Cu-Au alloy substrates covered by self-assembled monolayers show a different dealloying mechanism compared to bare surfaces. The organic surface layer inhibits dealloying of noble metal alloys by a suppression of surface diffusion at lower potentials but at higher applied potentials dealloying proceeds in localized regions due to passivity breakdown. We present an in situ atomic force microscopy study of a patterned thiol layer applied on Cu-Au alloy surfaces and further explore approaches to change the local composition of the surface layers by exchange of molecules. The pattern for the in situ experiment has been applied by micro-contact printing. This allows the study of corrosion protection with its dependence on different molecule densities at different sites. Low-density thiol areas surrounding the high-density patterns are completely protected and initiation of dealloying proceeds only along the areas with the lowest inhibitor concentration. Dealloying patterns are highly influenced and controlled by molecular thiol to selenol exchange and are also affected by introducing structural defects such as scratches or polishing defects. PMID:25920488

  12. High resolution imaging of latent fingerprints by localized corrosion on brass surfaces.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Alex J; Hillman, A Robert; Bond, John W

    2010-01-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is capable of imaging fingerprint ridges on polished brass substrates at an unprecedented level of detail. While exposure to elevated humidity at ambient or slightly raised temperatures does not change the image appreciably, subsequent brief heating in a flame results in complete loss of the sweat deposit and the appearance of pits and trenches. Localized elemental analysis (using EDAX, coupled with SEM imaging) shows the presence of the constituents of salt in the initial deposits. Together with water and atmospheric oxygen--and with thermal enhancement--these are capable of driving a surface corrosion process. This process is sufficiently localized that it has the potential to generate a durable negative topographical image of the fingerprint. AFM examination of surface regions between ridges revealed small deposits (probably microscopic "spatter" of sweat components or transferred particulates) that may ultimately limit the level of ridge detail analysis.

  13. Localized Corrosion Susceptibility Of Alloy 22 In Na-K-Cl_NO3 Brines At 110 To 150?C

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, T; Felker, S J; Hailey, P D; Staggs, K J; Gdowski, G E

    2006-03-31

    Electrochemical cyclic potentiodynamic polarization experiments were conducted to assess crevice corrosion of Alloy 22 in de-aerated aqueous solutions of chloride and nitrate salts of potassium and sodium in the temperature range 110-150 C. The tests were run in neutral and slightly acidic aqueous solutions. The Alloy 22 specimens were multiple creviced weld prisms. No evidence of crevice corrosion was observed in the range 125-150 C. In the 120 to 160 C temperature range, the anionic concentration of stable aqueous solutions is dominated by nitrate relative to chloride. At nominally 120 C, the minimum nitrate to chloride ratio is about 4.5, and it increases to about 22 at nominally 155 C. The absence of localized corrosion susceptibility in these solutions is attributed to the known inhibiting effect of the nitrate anion. Aqueous solution chemistry studies indicate that nitrate to chloride ratios of less than 0.5 are possible for temperatures up to nominally 116 C. At 110 C, aqueous solutions can have dissolved chloride well in excess of nitrate. Localized corrosion was observed at nitrate to chloride ratios up to 1.0, the highest ratio tested. The extent of localized corrosion was confined to the crevice region of the samples, and was limited for nitrate to chloride ratios greater than or equal to 0.3.

  14. Local Area Network Implementation: Moving toward Phase III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoehl, Susan B.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a LAN (local area network)-based automation project which has neared completion of the first phase of implementation at the Health Sciences Library of Allegheny General Hospital (Pittsburgh, PA). Changes in the library and its objectives with increased technological experience are examined. Diagrams of the current LAN configuration and…

  15. THE SENSITIVITY OF CARBON STEELS' SUSCEPTIBILITY TO LOCALIZED CORROSION TO THE PH OF NITRATE BASED NUCLEAR WASTES

    SciTech Connect

    BOOMER KD

    2010-01-14

    The Hanford tank reservation contains approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war weapons production, which is stored in 177 underground storage tanks. The tanks will be in use until waste processing operations are completed. The wastes tend to be high pH (over 10) and nitrate based. Under these alkaline conditions carbon steels tend to be passive and undergo relatively slow uniform corrosion. However, the presence of nitrate and other aggressive species, can lead to pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This work is a continuation of previous work that investigated the propensity of steels to suffer pitting and stress corrosion cracking in various waste simulants. The focus of this work is an investigation of the sensitivity of the steels' pitting and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility tosimulant pH. Previous work demonstrated that wastes that are high in aggressive nitrate and low in inhibitory nitrite are susceptible to localized corrosion. However, the previous work involved wastes with pH 12 or higher. The current work involves wastes with lower pH of 10 or 11. It is expected that at these lower pHs that a higher nitrite-to-nitrate ratio will be necessary to ensure tank integrity. This experimental work involved both electrochemical testing, and slow strain rate testing at either the free corrosion potential or under anodic polarization. The results of the current work will be discussed, and compared to work previously presented.

  16. A model for prediction of possibility of localized corrosion attack of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkarainen, T.J.

    1996-10-01

    Empirical or semi-empirical relations were developed to express the dependence of the possibility (probability) of localized corrosion attack of various stainless steels on environmental factors. Only chloride induced attack within the range 0--100 C (32--212 F) is considered. The environmental variables considered include temperature, pH, chloride content, sulfate content, presence of oxidizing agents, crevices and deposits, flow rate and possibility of concentration of solution by evaporation. Common mathematical operations are used to formulate the trends into equations. Examples of the predictions of the model are given for type AISI 316 stainless steel in two environments: Baltic Sea water at 25 C and a solution containing 300 mg/l of chloride ions at 70 C.

  17. Surface Localization of Buried III-V Semiconductor Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Alonso-González, P; González, L; Fuster, D; Martín-Sánchez, J; González, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we study the top surface localization of InAs quantum dots once capped by a GaAs layer grown by molecular beam epitaxy. At the used growth conditions, the underneath nanostructures are revealed at the top surface as mounding features that match their density with independence of the cap layer thickness explored (from 25 to 100 nm). The correspondence between these mounds and the buried nanostructures is confirmed by posterior selective strain-driven formation of new nanostructures on top of them, when the distance between the buried and the superficial nanostructures is short enough (d = 25 nm).

  18. THE EFFECT OF PHOSPHATE ON THE MORPHOLOGICAL AND SPECTROSCOPIC PROPERTIES OF COPPER DRINKING WATER PIPES EXPERIENCING LOCALIZED CORROSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extensive localized or pitting corrosion of copper pipes used in household drinking-water plumbing can eventually lead to pinhole water leaks that may result in water damage, mold growth, and costly repairs. A large water system in Florida has been addressing a widespread pinhole...

  19. Corrosion in the aluminum containment tank at the Nuclear Center of Mexico TRIGA Mark III reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mota, Juan Ramon

    1986-07-01

    The reactor developed a leak inside the exposure room discovered when it was opened for a routine inspection. This leak started to diminish immediately after it was found and disappeared completely in 2.5 months. The hydrostatic tests of the exposure room cooling water pipes and of the primary cooling system suction pipe proved that piping do not have leaks. A portion of the total volume of water was drained from the pool to conduct an inspection on the aluminum liner. Penetrant dye tests were initiated over welded Joints and walls. Welded Joints were all found to be in good condition but a total of 35 indications were reported on walls and concentrated on two main areas. A vacuum system was used to test for leakage. Seven indications were found to be perforations that crossed through the wall, fifteen indications did not cross through the wall but required repair and the rest were superficial irregularities. For the inspection of surfaces that remained covered by water, two methods were used. One was a television camera that was adapted to be used under water and hooked to a monitor and a videorecorder for close up inspection of the walls. The other consisted of submarine still color photography performed by divers. The evaluation of these inspections concluded that out of the 10 areas previously identified, only one presented the kind of problem that required repair. The last inspection performed was that using ultrasound techniques. Irregularities found did not require complete replacement of the aluminum liner. The repair procedures included the welding of aluminum plates over damaged areas and the injection of an effective insulating material (resin) to stop the corrosion mechanism.

  20. Fluid dynamics in airway bifurcations: III. Localized flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Martonen, T B; Guan, X; Schreck, R M

    2001-04-01

    Localized flow conditions (e.g., backflows) in transition regions between parent and daughter airways of bifurcations were investigated using a computational fluid dynamics software code (FIDAP) with a Cray T90 supercomputer. The configurations of the bifurcations were based on Schreck s (1972) laboratory models. The flow intensities and spatial regions of reversed motion were simulated for different conditions. The effects of inlet velocity profiles, Reynolds numbers, and dimensions and orientations of airways were addressed. The computational results showed that backflow was increased for parabolic inlet conditions, larger Reynolds numbers, and larger daughter-to-parent diameter ratios. This article is the third in a systematic series addressed in this issue; the first addressed primary velocity patterns and the second discussed secondary currents.

  1. Rhizoid Differentiation in Spirogyra: III. Intracellular Localization of Phytochrome.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Y

    1979-07-01

    Localization of phytochrome which mediates rhizoid differentiation in Spirogyra was investigated. The red-absorbing form of phytochrome (Pr) seems to be distributed all over the cell periphery which remained in the centripetal end part after the centrifugation, as rhizoids formed equally well with red spotlight irradiation of three different parts of an end cell, i.e. distal end, middle, and proximal end, and with irradiation of centrifugal and centripetal end parts of a centrifuged end cell. The Pr distribution was confirmed with an experiment using far red irradiation over the entire cell, centrifugation, and red spotlight irradiation. The Pr-phytochrome molecules appeared to be mobile because no dichroic orientation was shown with polarized red spotlight irradiation. On the contrary, it is suggested that far red-absorbing form of phytochrome molecules are evacuated from the centripetal end part by the centrifugation in an experiment involving red irradiation over the entire cell-centrifugation-far red spot irradiation. Rhizoid formation was repressed markedly by far red irradiation of the centrifugal end part but not of the centripetal end part.

  2. Localized atomic orbitals for atoms in molecules. III. Polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aufderheide, Keith H.; Chung-Phillips, Alice

    1982-02-01

    Using a previously described method, localized atomic orbitals (LAOs) for atoms in molecules are constructed for the atoms C, N, O, and F in the polyatomic molecules CH4, NH3, OH2, CH3CH3, CH3NH2, CH3OH, CH3F, CH2CH2, C6H6, CO2, and CHCH. As in our prior studies, LAOs partition into sets of core, lone pair, and bonding orbitals. Ordinarily, both core and lone pair LAOs are doubly occupied and bonding is described principally as the interaction of bonding LAOs on adjacent, bonded atoms. Angles between valence LAOs on a given atom continue to vary in a manner reminiscent of trends common to simple valence shell electron pair repulsion theory. Of special interest are the systems CO2, C6H6, and CH3F: The peculiarities germane to these molecules are discussed fully in the text. Finally, certain properties (orbital populations, intra-atomic orbital angles, etc.) of groups (-CH3, -NH2, -OH, etc.) common to several systems studied show a remarkable transferability.

  3. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin III Effect of the Previous Treatment of Sheet Material on the Susceptibility to This Type of Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1928-01-01

    As a result of testing, it was determined that control of the rate of quenching and the avoidance of accelerated aging by heating are the only means of modifying duralumin itself so as to minimize the intercrystalline form of corrosive attack. It is so simple a means that it should be adopted even though it may not completely prevent, but only reduce, this form of corrosive attack. By so doing, the need for protection of the surface is less urgent.

  4. Current and potential distributions in corrosion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Smyrl, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    Current and potential distribution calculations in corrosion are reviewed. The mathematical methods used, and the specific results for galvanic corrosion, cathodic protection, and localized corrosion are described.

  5. Azimuthal sound localization in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris): III. Comparison of sound localization measures.

    PubMed

    Feinkohl, Arne; Borzeszkowski, Katharina M; Klump, Georg M

    2016-02-01

    Sound localization studies have typically employed two types of tasks: absolute tasks that measured the localization of the angular location of a single sound and relative tasks that measured the localization of the angular location of a sound relative to the angular location of another sound from a different source (e.g., in the Minimum Audible Angle task). The present study investigates the localization of single sounds in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) with a left/right discrimination paradigm. Localization thresholds of 8-12° determined in starlings using this paradigm were much lower than the minimum audible angle thresholds determined in a previous study with the same individuals. The traditional concept of sound localization classifies the present experiment as an absolute localization task. However, we propose that the experiment presenting single sounds measured localization of the angular location of the sound relative to a non-acoustic spatial frame of reference. We discuss how the properties of the setup can determine if presentation of single sounds in a left/right discrimination paradigm comprises an absolute localization task rather than a localization task relative to a non-acoustic reference. Furthermore, the analysis methods employed may lead to quite different threshold estimates for the same data, especially in case of a response bias in left/right discrimination. We propose using an analysis method precluding effects of response bias on the threshold estimate. PMID:25870127

  6. Localized corrosion of high performance metal alloys in an acid/salt environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, L. G.; Ontiveros, C.

    1991-01-01

    Various vacuum jacketed cryogenic supply lines at the Space Shuttle launch site at Kennedy Space Center use convoluted flexible expansion joints. The atmosphere at the launch site has a very high salt content, and during a launch, fuel combustion products include hydrochloric acid. This extremely corrosive environment has caused pitting corrosion failure in the thin walled 304L stainless steel flex hoses. A search was done to find a more corrosion resistant replacement material. The study focussed on 19 metal alloys. Tests which were performed include electrochemical corrosion testing, accelerated corrosion testing in a salt fog chamber, and long term exposure at a beach corrosion testing site. Based on the results of these tests, several nickel based alloys were found to have very high resistance to this corrosive environment. Also, there was excellent agreement between the electrochemical tests and the actual beach exposure tests. This suggests that electrochemical testing may be useful for narrowing the field of potential candidate alloys before subjecting samples to long term beach exposure.

  7. LOCALIZED CORROSION OF AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEELEXPOSED TO MIXTURES OF PLUTONIUM OXIDE AND CHLORIDE SALTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P; Kerry Dunn, K; Jonathan Duffey, J; Ron Livingston, R; Zane Nelson, Z

    2008-11-21

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted to investigate the corrosivity of moist plutonium oxide/chloride (PuO{sub 2}/Cl-) salt mixtures on 304L and 316L stainless steel coupons. The tests exposed flat coupons for pitting evaluation and 'teardrop' stressed coupons for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) evaluation at room temperature to various mixtures of PuO{sub 2} and chloride-bearing salts for periods up to 500 days. The two flat coupons were placed so that the solid oxide/salt mixture contacted about one half of the coupon surface. One teardrop coupon was placed in contact with solid mixture; the second teardrop was in contact with the headspace gas only. The mixtures were loaded with nominally 0.5 wt % water under a helium atmosphere. Observations of corrosion ranged from superficial staining to pitting and SCC. The extent of corrosion depended on the total salt concentration and on the composition of the salt. The most significant corrosion was found in coupons that were exposed to 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 2 wt % chloride salt mixtures that contained calcium chloride. SCC was observed in two 304L stainless steel teardrop coupons exposed in solid contact to a mixture of 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 0.9 wt % NaCl, 0.9 wt % KCl, and 0.2 wt % CaCl{sub 2}. The cracking was associated with the heat-affected zone of an autogenous weld that ran across the center of the coupon. Cracking was not observed in coupons exposed to the headspace gas, nor in coupons exposed to other mixtures with either 0.92 wt% CaCl{sub 2} or no CaCl{sub 2}. The corrosion results point to the significance of the interaction between water loading and the concentration of the hydrating salt CaCl{sub 2} in the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels to corrosion.

  8. Localized corrosion effects and modifications of acidic and alkaline slurries on copper chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Tzu-Hsuan; Yen, Shi-Chern

    2003-04-01

    This study demonstrates the CMP performance can be enhanced by modifying the corrosion effects of acidic and alkaline slurries on copper. A corrosion test-cell with a polishing platform is connected with the potentiostat to investigate the corrosion behaviors of copper CMP in various alumina slurries. Experiments show that the slurry needs to be maintained in acidic pH<4.56 or alkaline pH>9.05 surroundings and thus better dispersion of alumina particles and less residual contaminant on copper surface can be obtained. The surface defects after copper CMP using acidic and alkaline slurries are described by pitting corrosion mechanisms, and these mechanisms can be regarded as a basis to modify their corrosion effects. Experimental results indicate that it is necessary to modify the dissolution of HNO 3 and oxidization of NH 4OH for copper CMP slurries. Consequently, the slurries of 5 wt.% HNO 3 by adding 0.1 wt.% BTA or 5 wt.% KNO 3 by adding 1 wt.% NH 4OH achieve good CMP performance for copper with higher CMP efficiency factor (CMPEF), 1460 and 486, and lower surface roughness ( Rq), 4.019 and 3.971 nm, respectively. It is found that AFM micrographs can support the effectiveness of corrosion modifications for copper CMP in various slurry chemistries.

  9. Electrochemical corrosion testing: An effective tool for corrosion inhibitor evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, L.S.; Van de Ven, P.; Mowlem, J.K.

    1996-10-01

    Corrosivity of an Antifreeze/Coolant can lead to localized attacks which are a major cause for metal failure. To prevent this phenomenon, specific corrosion inhibitors are used to protect the different metals in service. This paper will discuss the electrochemical principles behind corrosion, Realized corrosion and corrosion inhibition. It will also discuss electrochemical techniques which allow for the evaluation of these inhibitors.

  10. Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies. III. Co-evolution of Black Hole Growth and Star Formation Activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rieke, George H.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Wang, Yiping; Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2013-03-01

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of <78 Mpc). We estimate typical BH masses of 3 × 107 M ⊙ using [Ne III] 15.56 μm and optical [O III] λ5007 gas velocity dispersions and literature stellar velocity dispersions. We find that in a large fraction of local LIRGs, the current SFR is taking place not only in the inner nuclear ~1.5 kpc region, as estimated from the nuclear 11.3 μm PAH luminosities, but also in the host galaxy. We next use the ratios between the SFRs and BH accretion rates (BHAR) to study whether the SF activity and BH growth are contemporaneous in local LIRGs. On average, local LIRGs have SFR to BHAR ratios higher than those of optically selected Seyferts of similar active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosities. However, the majority of the IR-bright galaxies in the revised-Shapley-Ames Seyfert sample behave like local LIRGs. Moreover, the AGN incidence tends to be higher in local LIRGs with the lowest SFRs. All of this suggests that in local LIRGs there is a distinct IR-bright star-forming phase taking place prior to the bulk of the current BH growth (i.e., AGN phase). The latter is reflected first as a composite and then as a Seyfert, and later as a non-LIRG optically identified Seyfert nucleus with moderate SF in its host galaxy. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407.

  11. LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES. III. CO-EVOLUTION OF BLACK HOLE GROWTH AND STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY?

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Hernan-Caballero, Antonio; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rieke, George H.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Wang Yiping; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2013-03-10

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of <78 Mpc). We estimate typical BH masses of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} using [Ne III] 15.56 {mu}m and optical [O III] {lambda}5007 gas velocity dispersions and literature stellar velocity dispersions. We find that in a large fraction of local LIRGs, the current SFR is taking place not only in the inner nuclear {approx}1.5 kpc region, as estimated from the nuclear 11.3 {mu}m PAH luminosities, but also in the host galaxy. We next use the ratios between the SFRs and BH accretion rates (BHAR) to study whether the SF activity and BH growth are contemporaneous in local LIRGs. On average, local LIRGs have SFR to BHAR ratios higher than those of optically selected Seyferts of similar active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosities. However, the majority of the IR-bright galaxies in the revised-Shapley-Ames Seyfert sample behave like local LIRGs. Moreover, the AGN incidence tends to be higher in local LIRGs with the lowest SFRs. All of this suggests that in local LIRGs there is a distinct IR-bright star-forming phase taking place prior to the bulk of the current BH growth (i.e., AGN phase). The latter is reflected first as a composite and then as a Seyfert, and later as a non-LIRG optically identified Seyfert nucleus with moderate SF in its host galaxy.

  12. Application of wire beam electrode technique to investigate initiation and propagation of rebar corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Wei; Dong, Ze Hua Kong, De Jie; Guo, Xing Peng

    2013-06-15

    Multi-electrode technique named as wire beam electrode (WBE) was used to study pitting corrosion of rebar under concrete cover. When WBE embedded mortar sample was immersed in NaCl solution, uneven distributions of galvanic current and open circuit potential (OCP) on the WBE were observed due to the initiation of pitting corrosion. The following oxygen depletion in mortar facilitated the negative shift of the OCP and the smoothing of the current and potential distributions. Wetting–drying cycle experiments showed that corrosion products instead of oxygen in wet mortar specimen sustained the propagation of pitting corrosion due to Fe (III) taking part in cathodic depolarization during oxygen-deficient wet period, which was confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy. In addition, new pitting corrosion occurred mainly near the corrosion products, leading to preferentially horizontal propagation of rust layer on the WBE. A localized corrosion factor was further presented to quantify the localised corrosion based on galvanic current maps.

  13. Electrochemical Noise Sensors for Detection of Localized and General Corrosion of Natural Gas Transmission Pipelines. Final Report for the Period July 2001-October 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Jr., Bernard S.; Russell, James H.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret

    2002-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory funded a Natural Gas Infrastructure Reliability program directed at increasing and enhancing research and development activities in topics such as remote leak detection, pipe inspection, and repair technologies and materials. The Albany Research Center (ARC), U.S. Department of Energy was funded to study the use of electrochemical noise sensors for detection of localized and general corrosion of natural gas transmission pipelines. As part of this, ARC entered into a collaborative effort with the corrosion sensor industry to demonstrate the capabilities of commercially available remote corrosion sensors for use with the Nation's Gas Transmission Pipeline Infrastructure needs. The goal of the research was to develop an emerging corrosion sensor technology into a monitor for the type and degree of corrosion occurring at key locations in gas transmission pipelines.

  14. General and Localized corrosion of Austenitic and Borated Stainless Steels in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    SciTech Connect

    D. Fix; J. Estill; L. Wong; R. Rebak

    2004-05-28

    Boron containing stainless steels are used in the nuclear industry for applications such as spent fuel storage, control rods and shielding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion resistance of three borated stainless steels with standard austenitic alloy materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Tests were conducted in three simulated concentrated ground waters at 90 C. Results show that the borated stainless were less resistant to corrosion than the witness austenitic materials. An acidic concentrated ground water was more aggressive than an alkaline concentrated ground water.

  15. General and Localized Corrosion of Austenitic And Borated Stainless Steels in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Estill, J C; Rebak, R B; Fix, D V; Wong, L L

    2004-03-11

    Boron containing stainless steels are used in the nuclear industry for applications such as spent fuel storage, control rods and shielding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion resistance of three borated stainless steels with standard austenitic alloy materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Tests were conducted in three simulated concentrated ground waters at 90 C. Results show that the borated stainless were less resistant to corrosion than the witness austenitic materials. An acidic concentrated ground water was more aggressive than an alkaline concentrated ground water.

  16. Nanoparticle coating on the silane-modified surface of magnesium for local drug delivery and controlled corrosion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Seok; Park, Min; Kim, Myung Hun; Park, Chun Gwon; Huh, Beom Kang; Seok, Hyun Kwang; Choy, Young Bin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we proposed a potential method for the preparation of a magnesium-based medical device for local drug delivery and controlled corrosion. A magnesium surface was modified with 3-aminopropyltrimethoxy silane, and the resulting surface was then coated with drug-loaded nanoparticles made of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) via electrophoretic deposition. The drug-loaded nanoparticles (i.e., Tr_NP) exhibited a size of 250 ± 67 nm and a negative zeta potential of -20.9 ± 2.75 mV. The drug was released from the nanoparticles in a sustained manner for 21 days, and this did not change after their coating on the silane-modified magnesium. The silane-modified surface suppressed magnesium corrosion. When immersed in phosphate buffered saline at pH 7.4, the average rate of hydrogen gas generation was 0.41-0.45 ml/cm(2)/day, compared to 0.58-0.6 ml/cm(2)/day from a bare magnesium surface. This corrosion profile was not significantly changed after nanoparticle coating under the conditions employed in this work. The in vitro cell test revealed that the drug released from the coating was effective during the whole release period of 21 days, and both the silane-modified surface and carrier nanoparticles herein were not cytotoxic.

  17. DETERMINATION OF CORROSION INHIBITOR CRITERIA FOR TYPE III/IIIA TANKS DURING SALT DISSOLUTION OPERATIONS INTERIM REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Counts, K; Bruce Wiersma, B; John Mickalonis, J

    2007-12-31

    Preparation of high level waste for vitrification involves in part the dissolution of salt cake from the carbon steel storage tanks. During dissolution, a point is reached in which the corrosion inhibitors, hydroxide and nitrite, are diluted below established guidelines, and nitrate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is possible. Because the addition of inhibitors may be counterproductive to process efficiency and waste minimization, corrosion testing was initiated to revisit and possibly revise the guidelines for inhibitor limits. The bases for the work summarized in this status report are results from previously-completed phases of study. In the first two phases of study, several reduced-inhibitor levels were tested in HLW simulants with nitrate concentrations ranging from 4.5 M to 8.5 M. The first two phases of work determined, among other things, the reduced-inhibitor levels and solution chemistries in which heat-treated and non-heat-treated A537 carbon steel is susceptible to SCC, crevice corrosion, and pitting. The work covered in this current task both builds on and verifies the conclusions of the previous work. The current work involves testing of low levels of inhibitors in HLW simulants with 5.5 M to 8.5 M nitrate concentrations. Stressed U-bend specimens, both polarized and non-polarized, were tested. Non-polarized U-bend testing is ongoing, with the U-bends currently in test for 100 days. The purpose of the testing is to determine SCC susceptibility in the vapor space (VS) and liquid air interface (LAI) regions of the HLW tanks under conditions expected during salt dissolution, and also to verify previous accelerated testing. The simulated wastes being tested have nitrate concentrations of 5.5 M and 8.5 M and inhibitor levels of 0.01 M/0.01 M hydroxide/nitrite and 0.1 M/ 0.1 M hydroxide/nitrite. The open circuit potential measurements being monitored and the corrosion morphology of the U-bends are in agreement with results and observations of previous

  18. A high-sensitivity scanning magnetometer based on the giant magneto-impedance effect for measuring local magnetic fields of corrosion currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudoshnikov, S. A.; Bardin, I. V.; Bautin, V. A.; Nozdrin, A. G.; Popova, A. V.; Prokhorova, Yu. V.; Skomarovskii, V. S.; Lyubimov, B. Ya.; Seferyan, A. G.; Usov, N. A.

    2016-05-01

    The design, main characteristics, and specific features of a new high-sensitivity magnetometer based on the giant magneto-impedance (GMI) effect in amorphous ferromagnetic microwires are considered. It is shown that, in addition to measuring homogeneous fields, the device is capable of detecting weak local magnetic fields of conduction currents and ion currents involved in corrosion processes. Results of in situ magnetic measurements of corrosion processes in the model system of copper-zinc in a sulfuric acid solution qualitatively agree with the data of direct corrosion tests employing the standard gravimetric method.

  19. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 310 - Form: Application for Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Release Under CERCLA Sec. 123 III..., EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS REIMBURSEMENT TO LOCAL GOVERNMENTS FOR EMERGENCY... Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Release Under CERCLA Sec....

  20. The role of local strains from prior cold work on stress corrosion cracking of α-brass in Mattsson's solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ulaganathan, Jaganathan Newman, Roger C.

    2014-06-01

    The dynamic strain rate ahead of a crack tip formed during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under a static load is assumed to arise from the crack propagation. The strain surrounding the crack tip would be redistributed as the crack grows, thereby having the effect of dynamic strain. Recently, several studies have shown cold work to cause accelerated crack growth rates during SCC, and the slip-dissolution mechanism has been widely applied to account for this via a supposedly increased crack-tip strain rate in cold worked material. While these interpretations consider cold work as a homogeneous effect, dislocations are generated inhomogeneously within the microstructure during cold work. The presence of grain boundaries results in dislocation pile-ups that cause local strain concentrations. The local strains generated from cold working α-brass by tensile elongation were characterized using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The role of these local strains in SCC was studied by measuring the strain distributions from the same regions of the sample before cold work, after cold work, and after SCC. Though, the cracks did not always initiate or propagate along boundaries with pre-existing local strains from the applied cold work, the local strains surrounding the cracked boundaries had contributions from both the crack propagation and the prior cold work. - Highlights: • Plastic strain localization has a complex relationship with SCC susceptibility. • Surface relief created by cold work creates its own granular strain localization. • Cold work promotes crack growth but several other factors are involved.

  1. Method for studying stabilization of localized corrosion on carbon steel by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Campaignolle, X.; Crolet, J.L.

    1997-06-01

    Initiation of a corrosion pit in plain carbon steel (CS) was simulated by preconditioning a small area and a larger concentric area as an anode and cathode, respectively. Preconditioning was achieved by applying a galvanic current between the electrodes. During this initial step, the effect of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) on resulting polarization of this artificial galvanic cell was investigated. The previously conditioned electrodes then were left short-circuited, and the naturally flowing galvanic current was measured using a zero-resistance ammeter. In the presence of SRB biofilms, an active and naturally stable galvanic cell was achieved. In sterile conditions, the coupling current either was unstable or very low. This technique was aimed at studying risk factors linking bacterial contamination to the onset of rapid pitting corrosion.

  2. Passivity and Localized Corrosion of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy in High pH Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsagabi, Sultan; Ninlachart, Jakraphan; Raja, Krishnan S.; Charit, Indrajit

    2016-06-01

    Electrochemical corrosion tests were carried out on AZ31 magnesium alloy specimens in pH: 4.5, 9.5, and 13.0 solutions with 0-2000 ppm of chloride additions at room temperature. No passivity breakdown was observed during cyclic polarization in pH:13 solutions containing up to 1500 ppm of chloride. Addition of sodium sulfate and sodium dihydrogen phosphate as supporting electrolytes offset the chloride effect on the corrosion of AZ31 in pH 4.5 and 9.5 solutions. The Mott-Schottky analysis showed the presence of a duplex surface layer consisting of an n-type MgO1- x inner layer ( x = 0.024-0.05), and a p-type outer layer which thickened with time at the expense of the inner layer.

  3. Application of a passive electrochemical noise technique to localized corrosion of candidate radioactive waste container materials

    SciTech Connect

    Korzan, M.A.

    1994-05-01

    One of the key engineered barriers in the design of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is the waste canister that encapsulates the spent fuel elements. Current candidate metals for the canisters to be emplaced at Yucca Mountain include cast iron, carbon steel, Incoloy 825 and titanium code-12. This project was designed to evaluate passive electrochemical noise techniques for measuring pitting and corrosion characteristics of candidate materials under prototypical repository conditions. Experimental techniques were also developed and optimized for measurements in a radiation environment. These techniques provide a new method for understanding material response to environmental effects (i.e., gamma radiation, temperature, solution chemistry) through the measurement of electrochemical noise generated during the corrosion of the metal surface. In addition, because of the passive nature of the measurement the technique could offer a means of in-situ monitoring of barrier performance.

  4. Electrochemical model of local corrosion at the tip of a loaded crack

    SciTech Connect

    Andreikiv, O.E.; Tym`yak, N.I.

    1994-07-01

    A model of electrochemical processes near a crack tip in a stressed metal subjected to corrosion with hydrogen depolarization is suggested. It is shown that, in order to describe the kinetics of hydrogenation of the prefracture area, it is necessary to take into account the type of passivation layer on the newly formed metal surface near the crack tip and the mechanism of its formation.

  5. Planar multi-electrode array sensor for localized electrochemical corrosion detection

    DOEpatents

    Tormoen, Garth William; Brossia, Christopher Sean

    2014-01-07

    A planarized type of coupled multi-electrode corrosion sensing device. Electrode pads are fabricated on a thin backing, such as a thin film. Each pad has an associated electrical lead for connection to auxiliary electronic circuitry, which may include a resistor associated with each electrical pad. The design permits the device to be easily placed in small crevices or under coatings such as paint.

  6. Development and the Educational Effect of a System of the Corrosion of Iron and the Anti-corrosion Ability of Conductive Polymer Polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun; Nakamura, Noriyuki; Yamazaki, Suzuko; Ichimori, Hayato; Osaki, Nobukazu; Okano, Hiroshi

    Few general chemistry textbooks of high schools, colleges and universities introduce the corrosion of iron into the oxidation-reduction (redox) section, although the corrosion is very popular phenomena for students. Besides, no description appears about conductive polymers as anti-corrosion materials. The corrosion is a redox reaction proceeding through the local cell mechanism : the iron oxidation half-cell reaction at the local anode and the reduction of oxygen at the local cathode. To prepare a teaching tool for understanding of the mechanism, the visualization of the corrosion was attempted using phenolphthalein and potassium hexacyanoferrate (III) as color couplers for the anodic and cathodic products : Fe2+ and OH-. The local anode and cathode were obviously shown as gradual blue and red coloration when commercial nails were soaked in 4% NaCl aqueous solution containing phenolphthalein and potassium hexacyanoferrate (III) . On the other hand, no coloration occurred for the nail covered with a conductive polymer polyaniline. To know the anti-corrosion mechanism, the open-circuit potential of the nail was measured. The fact that the potential was kept at the potential range where iron was passivated implied that polyaniline acted as an in-situ oxidant. The visualization was experimentally performed at an actual chemistry class and the utility value was estimated. As a result, the visualization is expected to be a useful teaching tool for the corrosion and the understanding of the role of polyaniline as the anti-corrosion material.

  7. ASA III osteoporotic fracture in 62 patients treated with vertebroplasty under local anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Emre, Tuluhan Yunus; Gökcen, H Bahadır; Atbaşı, Zafer; Kavadar, Gülis; Enercan, Meriç; Ozturk, Cagatay

    2016-01-01

    Vertebroplasty is a minimally invasive procedure that may be performed under either local or general anesthesia. In this study, we aimed at assessing the outcomes of the vertebroplasty performed under local anesthesia in patients at high risk of general anesthesia. Vertebroplasty was performed under local anesthesia in the treatment of a total of 62 patients (68 vertebrae in total) with osteoporotic vertebral fractures between 2011 and 2013. None of the patients had a history of trauma. Patients who were classified as ASA III during the preoperative examinations were included in the study. VAS scores were evaluated before the surgery, on the first postoperative day, and in week 1 and in month 1 after the surgery. The average age was 77.5 years (age range 53-102). An average of 2 cc of cement was injected to 22 patients (35.5 %), and an average of 3 cc of cement was injected to 40 patients (64.5 %). The mean VAS scores were 7.52 (6-9) before the procedure, 3.55 (2-5) on the first day, 2.03 (0-4) in week 1 and 0.87 (0-2) in month 1 postoperatively. Asymptomatic cement embolism was detected in one patient. No other complications were observed in the study group. Vertebroplasty performed under local anesthesia is an effective and safe procedure in terms of pain control and early ambulation and is bereft of the complications associated with general anesthesia.

  8. Measurements and mechanisms of localized aqueous corrosion in aluminum-lithium-copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, Douglas; Stoner, Glenn E.

    1991-01-01

    Summary information is included for electrochemical aspects of stress corrosion cracking in alloy 2090 and an introduction to the work to be initiated on the new X2095 (Weldalite) alloy system. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was studied in both S-T and L-T orientations in alloy 2090. A constant load TTF test was performed in several environments with a potentiostatically applied potential. In the same environments the electrochemical behavior of phases found along subgrain boundaries was assessed. It was found that rapid failure due to SCC occurred when the following criteria was met: E(sub BR,T1) is less than E(sub applied) is less than E(sub Br, matrix phase). Although the L-T orientation is usually considered more resistant to SCC, failures in this orientation occurred when the stated criteria was met. This may be due to the relatively isotropic geometry of the subgrains which measure approximately 12 to 25 microns in diameters. Initial studies of alloy X2095 includes electrochemical characterization of three compositional variations each at three temperatures. The role of T(sub 1) dissolution in SCC behavior is addressed using techniques similar to those used in the research of 2090 described. SCC susceptibility is also studied using alternate immersion facilities at Reynolds Metals Corporation. Pitting is investigated in terms of stability, role of precipitate phases and constituent particles, and as initiation sites for SCC. In all research endeavors, attempts are made to link electrochemistry to microstructure. Previous work on 2090 provides a convenient basis for comparison since both alloys contain T(sub 1) precipitates but with different distributions. In 2090 T(sub 1) forms preferentially on subgrain boundaries whereas in X2095 the microstructure appears to be more homogeneous with finer T(sub 1) particles. Another point for comparison is the delta prime strengthening phase found in 2090 but absent in X2095.

  9. Characterization of microstructure, local deformation and microchemistry in Alloy 690 heat-affected zone and stress corrosion cracking in high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhanpeng; Chen, Junjie; Shoji, Tetsuo; Takeda, Yoichi; Yamazaki, Seiya

    2015-10-01

    With increasing the distance from the weld fusion line in an Alloy 690 heat-affected zone, micro-hardness decreases, kernel average misorientation decreases and the fraction of Σ3 boundaries increases. Chromium depletion at grain boundaries in the Alloy 690 heat-affected zone is less significant than that in an Alloy 600 heat-affected zone. Alloy 690 heat-affected zone exhibits much higher IGSCC resistance than Alloy 600 heat-affected zone in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water. Heavily cold worked Alloy 690 exhibits localized intergranular stress corrosion cracking. The effects of metallurgical and mechanical properties on stress corrosion cracking in Alloy 690 are discussed.

  10. LOCALIZATION OF A TYPE III RADIO BURST OBSERVED BY THE STEREO SPACECRAFT

    SciTech Connect

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J. E-mail: Robert.MacDowall@nasa.go

    2010-09-10

    Ray tracing calculations show that (1) emissions from a localized source escape as direct and reflected waves along different paths, (2) the reflected waves experience higher attenuation and group delay because they travel longer path lengths in regions of reduced refractive index, and (3) widely separated spacecraft 'A' and 'B' can detect the direct as well as reflected emissions escaping along different directions. It is proposed that the source of a radio burst observed by twin spacecraft 'A' and 'B' can be localized if at a given frequency the emission at one of them is identified as the direct emission and is identified at the other as the reflected emission by comparing the observed time delays {Delta}T, as well as intensity ratios I{sub B} /I{sub A} with the corresponding values of the direct and reflected emissions obtained for a given coronal model. A type III event observed by the STEREO spacecraft 'A' and 'B' shows that its characteristics are consistent with direct and reflected emissions by being less intense and delayed at 'A' in comparison to that at 'B'. By applying the proposed technique to this event, the location of its source is found to lie between the turning point of the ray and the harmonic layer corresponding to f {sub pe} = f/2, where f and f {sub pe} are the frequency of the emission and the electron plasma frequency, respectively. The comparisons of the widths of the fundamental and harmonic emission cones with the angular separation of spacecraft 'A' and 'B' indicate that the mode of the observed emission is probably the harmonic.

  11. Frequency Fine Structures of Type III Bursts Due to Localized Medium-Scale Density Structures Along Paths of Type III Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    2012-07-01

    Predictions from large-scale kinetic simulations are presented for the effects on coronal type III bursts of localized, medium-scale, enhanced density structures superposed on the coronal background along the paths of type III beams. The simulations show that these density structures can produce pronounced frequency fine structures in type III spectra. Flux intensifications and reductions of f p and 2 f p emission relative to those for the unperturbed background corona occur at frequencies corresponding to the density structures, where f p is the local electron plasma frequency. Frequency fine structures that are intense, slowly drifting, and narrowband, and thus resemble the characteristics of stria bursts, are predicted for the 2 f p emission. The 2 f p results are consistent with the qualitative proposal of Takakura and Yousef ( Solar Phys. 40, 421, 1975) for the interpretation of stria/type IIIb bursts. However, the predicted f p emission is much weaker than the 2 f p emission and generally below observable levels, and the predicted frequency fine structures do not always show stria characteristics. The predictions are thus inconsistent with the qualitative suggestion of Takakura and Yousef and the interpretations of many observers that stria bursts occur more often in f p than in 2 f p emission. The significant discrepancies for f p emission between our numerical calculations and the qualitative proposition of Takakura and Yousef (1975) are mainly caused by: i) differences in the detailed emission processes, ii) neglect of scattering of f p emission off small-scale density fluctuations by Takakura and Yousef (1975), and iii) other simplifications made in both works. Possible improvements to the simulations are discussed, including improvements to the emission processes and the coronal and beam conditions ( e.g., beam speed), in order to produce realistic stria/type IIIb bursts in f p emission.

  12. Investigation of the inhibiting action of O-, S- and N-dithiocarbamato(1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane)cobalt(III) complexes on the corrosion of iron in HClO 4 acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babić-Samardžija, K.; Khaled, K. F.; Hackerman, N.

    2005-02-01

    The inhibiting properties of four macrocyclic cobalt(III) complexes of the general formula [Co III(Rdtc)cyclam](ClO 4) 2, where cyclam and Rdtc- refer to 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane and morpholine-, thiomorpholine-, piperazine-, N-methylpiperazine-dithiocarbamates, respectively, has been studied on the corrosion of iron in aerated 0.1 M HClO 4 solutions by potentiodynamic polarization (dc) technique and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (ac). Inhibitor efficiency for the corrosion of iron is found to be better for cobalt complexes then for related amino-ligands. The impedance increases with inhibitor concentration. Polarization curves indicate that the inhibitors are predominantly mixed-type. Better protection by the complex inhibitors was obtained with longer immersion time. The best fit for inhibitors adsorption is obtained using the Langmuir isotherm model. Molecular modeling calculations were used to correlate structural properties of the complex species and their inhibition efficiency.

  13. Efficient masking of corrosion and fission products such as Ni(II) and Pd(II) in the presence of the minor actinide Am(III) using hydrophilic anionic or cationic bis-triazines.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Frank W; Harwood, Laurence M; Hudson, Michael J; Müllich, Udo; Geist, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    Water soluble anionic and cationic bis-triazine ligands are able to suppress (mask) the extraction of corrosion and fission products such as Ni(II) and Pd(II) that are found in PUREX raffinates. Thus it is possible to separate these elements from the minor actinide Am(III). Although some masking agents have previously been developed that retard the extraction of Pd(II), this is the first time a masking agent has been developed for Ni(II).

  14. The Arabidopsis Deubiquitinating Enzyme AMSH3 Interacts with ESCRT-III Subunits and Regulates Their Localization[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Katsiarimpa, Anthi; Anzenberger, Franziska; Schlager, Nicole; Neubert, Susanne; Hauser, Marie-Theres; Schwechheimer, Claus; Isono, Erika

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitination and deubiquitination regulate various cellular processes. We have recently shown that the deubiquitinating enzyme Associated Molecule with the SH3 domain of STAM3 (AMSH3) is involved in vacuole biogenesis and intracellular trafficking in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, little is known about the identity of its interaction partners and deubiquitination substrates. Here, we provide evidence that AMSH3 interacts with ESCRT-III subunits VPS2.1 and VPS24.1. The interaction of ESCRT-III subunits with AMSH3 is mediated by the MIM1 domain and depends on the MIT domain of AMSH3. We further show that AMSH3, VPS2.1, and VPS24.1 localize to class E compartments when ESCRT-III disassembly is inhibited by coexpression of inactive Suppressor of K+ transport Defect 1 (SKD1), an AAA-ATPase involved in the disassembly of ESCRT-III. We also provide evidence that AMSH3 and SKD1 compete for binding to VPS2.1. Furthermore, we show that the loss of AMSH3 enzymatic activity leads to the formation of cellular compartments that contain AMSH3, VPS2.1, and VPS24.1. Taken together, our study presents evidence that AMSH3 interacts with classical core ESCRT-III components and thereby provides a molecular framework for the function of AMSH3 in plants. PMID:21810997

  15. SECM Study of Effect of Chromium Content on the Localized Corrosion Behavior of Low-Alloy Steels in Chloride Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indira, K.; Nishimura, T.

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the effect of chromium (Cr) content (0, 1, 3 and 5% Cr) in epoxy-coated alloy steel against corrosion using in situ electrochemical techniques such as EIS and SECM in a 3% NaCl solution. The EIS results revealed that the epoxy-coated Cr steel exhibited higher impedance values than carbon steel, which is attributed to the greater resistance of Cr steel toward corrosion. Based on the cyclic voltammogram results, the tip potentials were set at -0.7, 0.04 and 0.60 V for determining the concentration of dissolved oxygen at cathodic region, and oxidation of Cr2+ and Fe2+ at anodic region, respectively. The SECM measurements showed that, the tip current in the anodic region has decreased with increase in Cr content of the sample, which indicates that the oxidation of Fe2+ and Cr2+ decreases (corrosion is reduced) with the increase in Cr content of the steel. Besides, 5% Cr steel can maintain the highest corrosion resistance, and 1 and 3% Cr steels have higher corrosion resistance than the 0% Cr steel. This higher corrosion resistance of Cr steel samples could be due to the formation of Cr-rich hydro-oxide layers [Cr(OH)3 as a corrosion product] on the surface of the samples. Thus, the epoxy-coated Cr alloy steel has greater corrosion resistance in a chloride-containing environment than the carbon steel. Hence, epoxy-coated Cr alloy steel can be successfully used as a construction material in structures.

  16. SECM Study of Effect of Chromium Content on the Localized Corrosion Behavior of Low-Alloy Steels in Chloride Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indira, K.; Nishimura, T.

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the effect of chromium (Cr) content (0, 1, 3 and 5% Cr) in epoxy-coated alloy steel against corrosion using in situ electrochemical techniques such as EIS and SECM in a 3% NaCl solution. The EIS results revealed that the epoxy-coated Cr steel exhibited higher impedance values than carbon steel, which is attributed to the greater resistance of Cr steel toward corrosion. Based on the cyclic voltammogram results, the tip potentials were set at -0.7, 0.04 and 0.60 V for determining the concentration of dissolved oxygen at cathodic region, and oxidation of Cr2+ and Fe2+ at anodic region, respectively. The SECM measurements showed that, the tip current in the anodic region has decreased with increase in Cr content of the sample, which indicates that the oxidation of Fe2+ and Cr2+ decreases (corrosion is reduced) with the increase in Cr content of the steel. Besides, 5% Cr steel can maintain the highest corrosion resistance, and 1 and 3% Cr steels have higher corrosion resistance than the 0% Cr steel. This higher corrosion resistance of Cr steel samples could be due to the formation of Cr-rich hydro-oxide layers [Cr(OH)3 as a corrosion product] on the surface of the samples. Thus, the epoxy-coated Cr alloy steel has greater corrosion resistance in a chloride-containing environment than the carbon steel. Hence, epoxy-coated Cr alloy steel can be successfully used as a construction material in structures.

  17. The Subarcsecond Mid-infrared View of Local Active Galactic Nuclei. III. Polar Dust Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, D.; Hönig, S. F.; Gandhi, P.

    2016-05-01

    Recent mid-infrared (MIR) interferometric observations have shown that in a few active galactic nuclei (AGNs) the bulk of the infrared emission originates from the polar region above the putative torus, where only a little dust should be present. Here, we investigate whether such strong polar dust emission is common in AGNs. Out of 149 Seyferts in the MIR atlas of local AGNs, 21 show extended MIR emission on single-dish images. In 18 objects, the extended MIR emission aligns with the position angle (PA) of the system axis, established by [O iii], radio, polarization, and maser-based PA measurements. The relative amount of resolved MIR emission is at least 40% and scales with the [O iv] fluxes, implying a strong connection between the extended continuum and [O iv] emitters. These results together with the radio-quiet nature of the Seyferts support the scenario that the bulk of MIR emission is emitted by dust in the polar region and not by the torus, which would demand a new paradigm for the infrared emission structure in AGNs. The current low detection rate of polar dust in the AGNs of the MIR atlas is explained by the lack of sufficient high-quality MIR data and the requirements on the orientation, strength of narrow-line region, and distance of the AGNs. The James Webb Space Telescope will enable much deeper nuclear MIR studies with comparable angular resolution, allowing us to resolve the polar emission and surroundings in most of the nearby AGNs. Based on European Southern Observatory (ESO) observing programmes 60.A-9242, 074.A-9016, 075.B-0182, 075.B-0621, 075.B-0631, 075.B-0727, 075.B-0791, 075.B-0844, 076.B-0194, 076.B-0468, 076.B-0599, 076.B-0621, 076.B-0656, 076.B-0696, 076.B-0743, 077.B-0060, 077.B-0135, 077.B-0137, 077.B-0728, 078.B-0020, 078.B-0173, 078.B-0255, 078.B-0303, 080.B-0240, 080.B-0860, 081.B-0182, 082.B-0299, 083.B-0239, 083.B-0452, 083.B-0536, 083.B-0592, 084.B-0366, 084.B-0606, 084.B-0974, 085.B-0251, 085.B-0639, 086.B-0242, 086.B-0257, 086

  18. Effect of Organic Acid Additions on the General and Localized Corrosion Susceptibility of Alloy 22 in Chloride Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Carranza, R M; Giordano, C M; Rodr?guez, M A; Ilevbare, G O; Rebak, R B

    2007-08-28

    Electrochemical studies such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022) in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C. All the tested material was wrought Mill Annealed (MA). Tests were also performed in NaCl solutions containing weak organic acids such as oxalic, acetic, citric and picric. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was significantly higher in solutions containing oxalic acid than in solutions of pure NaCl at the same pH. Citric and picric acids showed a slightly higher corrosion rate, and acetic acid maintained the corrosion rate of pure chloride solutions at the same pH. Organic acids revealed to be weak inhibitors for crevice corrosion. Higher concentration ratios, compared to nitrate ions, were needed to completely inhibit crevice corrosion in chloride solutions. Results are discussed considering acid dissociation constants, buffer capacity and complex formation constants of the different weak acids.

  19. Alloy 22 Localized Corrosion Susceptibility In Aqueous Solutions Of Chloride And Nitrate Salts Of Sodium And Potassium At 110 - 150?C

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, S; Hailey, P D; Lian, T; Staggs, K J; Gdowski, G E

    2006-01-17

    Alloy 22 (a nickel-chromium-molybdenum-tungsten alloy) is being investigated for use as the outer barrier of waste containers for a high-level nuclear waste repository in the thick unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Experiments were conducted to assess crevice corrosion of Alloy 22 in de-aerated aqueous solutions of chloride and nitrate salts of potassium and sodium in the temperature range 110-150 C (some limited testing was also conducted at 90 C). Electrochemical tests were run in neutral salt solutions without acid addition and others were run in salt solutions with an initial hydrogen ion concentration of 10{sup -4} molal. The Alloy 22 specimens were weld prism specimens and de-aeration was performed with nitrogen gas. No evidence of crevice corrosion was observed in the range 125-150 C. In the 120 to 160 C temperature range, the anionic concentration of stable aqueous solutions is dominated by nitrate relative to chloride. At nominally 120 C, the minimum nitrate to chloride ratio is about 4.5, and it increases to about 22 at nominally 155 C. The absence of localized corrosion susceptibility in these solutions is attributed to the known inhibiting effect of the nitrate anion. At 110 C, aqueous solutions can have dissolved chloride in excess of nitrate. Localized corrosion was observed at nitrate to chloride ratios up to 1.0, the highest ratio tested. The extent of localized corrosion was confined to the crevice region of the samples, and was limited for nitrate to chloride ratios greater than or equal to 0.3. Aqueous solution chemistry studies indicate that nitrate to chloride ratios of less than 0.5 are possible for temperatures up to nominally 116 C. However, the exact upper temperature limit is unknown and no electrochemical testing was done at these temperatures. Limited comparison between 8 m Cl aqueous solutions of Na + K on the one hand and Ca on the other indicated similar electrochemical E{sub crit} values and similar morphology of attack

  20. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  1. Localized corrosion susceptibility of Al-Li-Cu-Mg-Zn alloy AF/C458 due to interrupted quenching from solutionizing temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertz, J. E.; Gouma, P. I.; Buchheit, R. G.

    2001-10-01

    Isothermal time-temperature-localized corrosion-behavior curves were determined for the Al-1.8Li-2.70Cu-0.6Mg-0.3Zn alloy AF/C458, to understand the effect of slow or delayed quenching on localized corrosion susceptibility. Alloy samples were subject to a series of systematic interrupted quenching experiments conducted at temperatures ranging from 480 °C to 230 °C for times ranging from 5 to 1000 seconds. Individual samples were then exposed to an oxidizing aqueous chloride solution consisting of 57 g/L NaCl plus 10 mL/L H2O2 to induce localized attack. The localized corrosion mode was characterized by optical microscopy. Additionally, the microstructure of selected samples was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to relate the corrosion mode and morphology to microstructural features. Results showed that only pitting attack was exhibited by samples subjected to isothermal treatment at temperatures greater than 430 °C. At temperatures ranging from 280 °C to 430 °C, isothermal treatment tended to induce susceptibility to intergranular attack (IGA) and intersubgranular attack (ISGA) for all treatment times investigated. For isothermal treatments at temperatures lower than 280 °C, only pitting was observed for treatment times less than about 30 seconds, while IGA and ISGA were observed for longer treatment times. Comparisons showed that the time-temperature domains for IGA and ISGA were virtually coincident. Based on this finding and the results from TEM characterization, IGA and ISGA appear to be related to the precipitation of a Zn-modified T 1 (Al2(Cu,Zn)Li) precipitate, which can occur both on low-angle and high-angle grain boundaries in this alloy. When the alloy is resistant to IGA and ISGA, the grain boundaries are decorated by θ' (Al2Cu), and T B (Al7Cu4Li) phase particles, or subgrain boundaries are populated by a comparatively low density of T 1 precipitates. It is, therefore, speculated that θ' and T B are more corrosion

  2. Diagnosis and Management of Adverse Local Tissue Reactions Secondary to Corrosion at the Head-Neck Junction in Patients With Metal on Polyethylene Bearings.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Darren R; Berger, Richard A; Paprosky, Wayne G; Sporer, Scott M; Jacobs, Joshua J; Della Valle, Craig J

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed 27 patients who underwent revision for an adverse local tissue reaction (ALTR) secondary to corrosion at the head-neck junction with MoP bearings. Serum cobalt and chromium levels were elevated in all cases, with a mean cobalt of 11.2 ppb and chromium of 2.2 ppb. Patients underwent modular bearing exchange, including a ceramic head with a titanium sleeve in 23 of 27 cases with only one recurrence of ALTR in one of the four patients not treated with a ceramic head. The diagnosis of ALTR secondary to corrosion is associated with cobalt levels of >1 ppb with cobalt levels elevated above chromium. Retention of a well-fixed stem and modular exchange to a ceramic head leads to resolution of symptoms and decreases in metal levels.

  3. Automation of a Local Table of Contents Service Using dBase III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellamy, Lois M.; Guyton, Joanne

    1987-01-01

    Automation of a table of contents service at the Methodist Hospital School of Nursing Library using dBase III facilitates matching patrons with journals. The program is also used for journal check-in and mailing labels. Future applications may include production of a journal holdings list, statistics, and reporting. (21 references) (MES)

  4. Practical aspects of corrosion fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.

    1994-08-01

    Aspects important in corrosion have been introduced. They are: (a) ``Pourbaix Diagrams`` which consider thermodynamic stability of metals as a function of electrical potential and water pH; (b) the anodic interfacial reaction rates which depend on potential and accumulation of reaction products; (c) the prediction of polarization curves based on the kinetics and thermodynamics; and (d) localized corrosion models, as this form of corrosion is a major cause of corrosion failures.

  5. Development of a decision support system for the introduction of alternative methods into local irritancy/corrosivity testing strategies. Creation of fundamental rules for a decision support system.

    PubMed

    Gerner, I; Zinke, S; Graetschel, G; Schlede, E

    2000-01-01

    The notification procedure of the European Union (EU) for new chemicals requires the application of protocols on physicochemical and toxicological tests for the evaluation of physicochemical properties and probable toxic effects of each notified substance. A computerised database was developed from data sets and toxicological test protocols relating to substance properties responsible for skin and eye irritation/corrosion. To develop specific structure-activity relationship (SAR) models and to find rules for a decision support system (DSS) to predict local irritation/corrosion, physical property data, chemical structure data and toxicological data for approximately 1300 chemicals, each having a purity of 95% or more, were evaluated. The evaluation demonstrated that the lipid solubility and aqueous solubility of a chemical are relevant to, or - in some cases - responsible for, the observed local effects of a substance on the skins and eyes of rabbits. The octanol/water partition coefficient and the measured value of the surface tension of a saturated aqueous solution of the substance give additional information that permits the definition of detailed SAR algorithms that use measured solubility values. Data on melting points and vapour pressure can be used to assess the intensity and duration of local contact with a chemical. Considerations relating to the reactivity of a pure chemical can be based on molecular weight and the nature of the heteroatoms present. With respect to local lesions produced following contact with the skin and eyes of rabbits, the data evaluation revealed that no general "local irritation/corrosion potential" of a chemical can be defined. A variety of mechanisms are responsible for the formation of local lesions on the skin or in the eyes: serious lesions are produced by mechanisms different from those that cause moderate irritation in these organs. In order to develop a DSS that uses the information extracted from the database, chemical main

  6. Observation of local radio emission associated with type III radio bursts and Langmuir waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Stone, R. G.; Fainberg, J.

    1992-01-01

    The first clear detection of fundamental and harmonic radiation from the type III radio source region is presented. This radiation is characterized by its lack of frequency drift, its short rise and decay times, its relative weakness compared to the remotely observed radiation and its temporal coincidence with observed Langmuir waves. The observations were made with the radio and plasma frequency (URAP) receivers on the Ulysses spacecraft between about 1 and 2 AU from the Sun.

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Localized Iridium(III) Complexes as Efficient Photodynamic Therapy Agents via Protein Modifications.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jung Seung; Kang, Myeong-Gyun; Kang, Juhye; Park, Sun-Young; Lee, Shin Jung C; Kim, Hyun-Tak; Seo, Jeong Kon; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Lim, Mi Hee; Rhee, Hyun-Woo; Kwon, Tae-Hyuk

    2016-08-31

    Protein inactivation by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as singlet oxygen ((1)O2) and superoxide radical (O2(•-)) is considered to trigger cell death pathways associated with protein dysfunction; however, the detailed mechanisms and direct involvement in photodynamic therapy (PDT) have not been revealed. Herein, we report Ir(III) complexes designed for ROS generation through a rational strategy to investigate protein modifications by ROS. The Ir(III) complexes are effective as PDT agents at low concentrations with low-energy irradiation (≤ 1 J cm(-2)) because of the relatively high (1)O2 quantum yield (> 0.78), even with two-photon activation. Furthermore, two types of protein modifications (protein oxidation and photo-cross-linking) involved in PDT were characterized by mass spectrometry. These modifications were generated primarily in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, producing a significant effect for cancer cell death. Consequently, we present a plausible biologically applicable PDT modality that utilizes rationally designed photoactivatable Ir(III) complexes. PMID:27494510

  8. Radiolytic corrosion of uranium dioxide induced by He2+ localized irradiation of water: Role of the produced H2O2 distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traboulsi, Ali; Vandenborre, Johan; Blain, Guillaume; Humbert, Bernard; Haddad, Ferid; Fattahi, Massoud

    2015-12-01

    The short-range (few μm in water) of the α-emitting from the spent fuel involves that the radiolytic corrosion of this kind of sample occurs at the solid/solution interface. In order to establish the role of localization of H2O2 species produced by the He2+ particle beam in water from the surface, we perform UO2 radiolytic corrosion experiment with different distance between H2O2 production area and UO2 surface. Then, in this work, the radiolytic corrosion of UO2 particles by oxidative species produced by 4He2+ radiolysis of water was investigated in open to air atmosphere. The dose rate, the localization of H2O2 produced by water radiolysis and the grain boundaries present on the surface of the particles were investigated. UO2 corrosion was investigated by in situ (during irradiation) characterization of the solid surface, analysis of H2O2 produced by water radiolysis and quantification of the uranium species released into the solution during irradiation. Characterization of the UO2 particles, surface and volume, was realized by Raman spectroscopy. UV-vis spectrophotometry was used to monitor H2O2 produced by water radiolysis and in parallel the soluble uranium species released into the solution were quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. During the He2+ irradiation of ultra-pure water in contact with the UO2 particles, metastudtite phase was formed on the solid surface indicating an oxidation process of the particles by the oxidative species produced by water radiolysis. This oxidation occurred essentially on the grain boundaries and was accompanied by migration of soluble uranium species (U(VI)) into the irradiated solution. Closer to the surface the localization of H2O2 formation, higher the UO2 oxidation process occurs, whereas the dose rate had no effect on it. Simultaneously, closer to the surface the localization of H2O2 formation lower the H2O2 concentration measured in solution. Moreover, the metastudtite was the only secondary

  9. Adverse local tissue reactions in metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty due to trunnion corrosion: the risk of misdiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, M R; Endo, M; Zachara, S; Nielsen, T O; Greidanus, N V; Masri, B A; Garbuz, D S; Duncan, C P

    2015-08-01

    Adverse reaction to wear and corrosion debris is a cause for concern in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Modular junctions are a potential source of such wear products and are associated with secondary pseudotumour formation. We present a consecutive series of 17 patients treated at our unit for this complication following metal-on-highly cross-linked polyethylene (MoP) THA. We emphasise the risk of misdiagnosis as infection, and present the aggregate laboratory results and pathological findings in this series. The clinical presentation was pain, swelling or instability. Solid, cystic and mixed soft-tissue lesions were noted on imaging and confirmed intra-operatively. Corrosion at the head-neck junction was noted in all cases. No bacteria were isolated on multiple pre- and intra-operative samples yet the mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate was 49 (9 to 100) and C-reactive protein 32 (0.6 to 106) and stromal polymorphonuclear cell counts were noted in nine cases. Adverse soft-tissue reactions can occur in MoP THA owing to corrosion products released from the head-neck junction. The diagnosis should be carefully considered when investigating pain after THA. This may avoid the misdiagnosis of periprosthetic infection with an unidentified organism and mitigate the unnecessary management of these cases with complete single- or two-stage exchange.

  10. Gd(III)-Labeled Peptide Nanofibers for Reporting on Biomaterial Localization in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive supramolecular nanostructures are of great importance in regenerative medicine and the development of novel targeted therapies. In order to use supramolecular chemistry to design such nanostructures, it is extremely important to track their fate in vivo through the use of molecular imaging strategies. Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) are known to generate a wide array of supramolecular nanostructures, and there is extensive literature on their use in areas such as tissue regeneration and therapies for disease. We report here on a series of PA molecules based on the well-established β-sheet amino acid sequence V3A3 conjugated to macrocyclic Gd(III) labels for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These conjugates were shown to form cylindrical supramolecular assemblies using cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. Using nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion analysis, we observed that thermal annealing of the nanostructures led to a decrease in water exchange lifetime (τm) of hundreds of nanoseconds only for molecules that self-assemble into nanofibers of high aspect ratio. We interpret this decrease to indicate more solvent exposure to the paramagnetic moiety on annealing, resulting in faster water exchange within angstroms of the macrocycle. We hypothesize that faster water exchange in the nanofiber-forming PAs arises from the dehydration and increase in packing density on annealing. Two of the self-assembling conjugates were selected for imaging PAs after intramuscular injections of the PA C16V3A3E3-NH2 in the tibialis anterior muscle of a murine model. Needle tracts were clearly discernible with MRI at 4 days postinjection. This work establishes Gd(III) macrocycle-conjugated peptide amphiphiles as effective tracking agents for peptide amphiphile materials in vivo over the timescale of days. PMID:24937195

  11. Visualizing the Translocation and Localization of Bacterial Type III Effector Proteins by Using a Genetically Encoded Reporter System

    PubMed Central

    Gawthorne, Jayde A.; Audry, Laurent; McQuitty, Claire; Dean, Paul; Christie, John M.; Enninga, Jost

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial type III secretion system (T3SS) effector proteins are critical determinants of infection for many animal and plant pathogens. However, monitoring of the translocation and delivery of these important virulence determinants has proved to be technically challenging. Here, we used a genetically engineered LOV (light-oxygen-voltage) sensing domain derivative to monitor the expression, translocation, and localization of bacterial T3SS effectors. We found the Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacterial effector fusion Tir-LOV was functional following its translocation and localized to the host cell membrane in discrete foci, demonstrating that LOV-based reporters can be used to visualize the effector translocation with minimal manipulation and interference. Further evidence for the versatility of the reporter was demonstrated by fusing LOV to the C terminus of the Shigella flexneri effector IpaB. IpaB-LOV localized preferentially at bacterial poles before translocation. We observed the rapid translocation of IpaB-LOV in a T3SS-dependent manner into host cells, where it localized at the bacterial entry site within membrane ruffles. PMID:26921426

  12. Hydrodynamic Models of Line-Driven Accretion Disk Winds III: Local Ionization Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereyra, Nicolas Antonio; Kallman, Timothy R.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present time-dependent numerical hydrodynamic models of line-driven accretion disk winds in cataclysmic variable systems and calculate wind mass-loss rates and terminal velocities. The models are 2.5-dimensional, include an energy balance condition with radiative heating and cooling processes, and includes local ionization equilibrium introducing time dependence and spatial dependence on the line radiation force parameters. The radiation field is assumed to originate in an optically thick accretion disk. Wind ion populations are calculated under the assumption that local ionization equilibrium is determined by photoionization and radiative recombination, similar to a photoionized nebula. We find a steady wind flowing from the accretion disk. Radiative heating tends to maintain the temperature in the higher density wind regions near the disk surface, rather than cooling adiabatically. For a disk luminosity L (sub disk) = solar luminosity, white dwarf mass M(sub wd) = 0.6 solar mass, and white dwarf radii R(sub wd) = 0.01 solar radius, we obtain a wind mass-loss rate of M(sub wind) = 4 x 10(exp -12) solar mass yr(exp -1) and a terminal velocity of approximately 3000 km per second. These results confirm the general velocity and density structures found in our earlier constant ionization equilibrium adiabatic CV wind models. Further we establish here 2.5D numerical models that can be extended to QSO/AGN winds where the local ionization equilibrium will play a crucial role in the overall dynamics.

  13. WINGS-SPE. III. Equivalent width measurements, spectral properties, and evolution of local cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Cava, A.; Moretti, A.; Varela, J.; Bettoni, D.; Couch, W. J.; D'Onofrio D'Onofrio, M.; Dressler, A.; Fasano, G.; Kjærgaard, P.; Marziani, P.; Moles, M.; Omizzolo, A.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Cluster galaxies are the ideal sites to look at when studying the influence of the environment on the various aspects of the evolution of galaxies, such as the changes in their stellar content and morphological transformations. In the framework of wings, the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey, we have obtained optical spectra for ~6000 galaxies selected in fields centred on 48 local (0.04 < z < 0.07) X-ray selected clusters to tackle these issues. Aims: By classifying the spectra based on given spectral lines, we investigate the frequency of the various spectral types as a function of both the clusters' properties and the galaxies' characteristics. In this way, using the same classification criteria adopted for studies at higher redshift, we can consistently compare the properties of the local cluster population to those of their more distant counterparts. Methods: We describe a method that we have developed to automatically measure the equivalent width of spectral lines in a robust way, even in spectra with a non optimal signal-to-noise ratio. This way, we can derive a spectral classification reflecting the stellar content, based on the presence and strength of the [Oii] and Hδ lines. Results: After a quality check, we are able to measure 4381 of the ~6000 originally observed spectra in the fields of 48 clusters, of which 2744 are spectroscopically confirmed cluster members. The spectral classification is then analysed as a function of galaxies' luminosity, stellar mass, morphology, local density, and host cluster's global properties and compared to higher redshift samples (MORPHS and EDisCS). The vast majority of galaxies in the local clusters population are passive objects, being also the most luminous and massive. At a magnitude limit of MV < -18, galaxies in a post-starburst phase represent only ~11% of the cluster population, and this fraction is reduced to ~5% at MV < -19.5, which compares to the 18% at the same magnitude limit for high

  14. The effect of chloride ion concentration gradients on the initiation of localized corrosion of steel in reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, M.J.; Brown, R.

    1994-12-31

    It has been established that for steel reinforced concrete roads treated with deicing salts or exposed to a marine environment, chloride ions are introduced at the surface of the concrete structure. Two models were discussed in which chloride ion concentration gradients would form in a steel reinforced concrete structure. Electrochemical testing to investigate the models was conducted on plain carbon steel specimens in a simulated concrete environment of saturated calcium hydroxide solution with varying concentrations of sodium chloride. The varying chloride ion concentrations promoted open circuit potential shifts. These potential shifts may lead to galvanic corrosion effects depending on the chloride ion concentration gradients in the structure.

  15. Subcellular distribution of small interfering RNA: directed delivery through RNA polymerase III expression cassettes and localization by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Paul, Cynthia P

    2005-01-01

    Reduction in the expression of specific genes through small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is dependent on the colocalization of siRNAs with other components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathways within the cell. The expression of siRNAs within cells from cassettes that are derived from genes transcribed by RNA polymerase III (pol III) and provide for selective subcellular distribution of their products can be used to direct siRNAs to the cellular pathways. Expression from the human U6 promoter, resulting in siRNA accumulation in the nucleus, is effective in reducing gene expression, whereas cytoplasmic and nucleolar localization of the siRNA when expressed from the 5S or 7 SL promoters is not effective. The distribution of siRNA within the cell is determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Although the long uninterrupted duplex of siRNA makes it difficult to detect with DNA oligonucleotide probes, labeled oligonucleotide probes with 2'-O-methyl RNA backbones provide the stability needed for a strong signal. These methods contribute to studies of the interconnected cellular RNAi pathways and are useful in adapting RNAi as a tool to determine gene function and develop RNA-based therapeutics. PMID:15644179

  16. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. III. Classification of Kepler Eclipsing Binary Light Curves with Locally Linear Embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matijevič, Gal; Prša, Andrej; Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; Bloemen, Steven; Barclay, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    We present an automated classification of 2165 Kepler eclipsing binary (EB) light curves that accompanied the second Kepler data release. The light curves are classified using locally linear embedding, a general nonlinear dimensionality reduction tool, into morphology types (detached, semi-detached, overcontact, ellipsoidal). The method, related to a more widely used principal component analysis, produces a lower-dimensional representation of the input data while preserving local geometry and, consequently, the similarity between neighboring data points. We use this property to reduce the dimensionality in a series of steps to a one-dimensional manifold and classify light curves with a single parameter that is a measure of "detachedness" of the system. This fully automated classification correlates well with the manual determination of morphology from the data release, and also efficiently highlights any misclassified objects. Once a lower-dimensional projection space is defined, the classification of additional light curves runs in a negligible time and the method can therefore be used as a fully automated classifier in pipeline structures. The classifier forms a tier of the Kepler EB pipeline that pre-processes light curves for the artificial intelligence based parameter estimator.

  17. KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARY STARS. III. CLASSIFICATION OF KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARY LIGHT CURVES WITH LOCALLY LINEAR EMBEDDING

    SciTech Connect

    Matijevic, Gal; Prsa, Andrej; Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; Bloemen, Steven; Barclay, Thomas E-mail: andrej.prsa@villanova.edu

    2012-05-15

    We present an automated classification of 2165 Kepler eclipsing binary (EB) light curves that accompanied the second Kepler data release. The light curves are classified using locally linear embedding, a general nonlinear dimensionality reduction tool, into morphology types (detached, semi-detached, overcontact, ellipsoidal). The method, related to a more widely used principal component analysis, produces a lower-dimensional representation of the input data while preserving local geometry and, consequently, the similarity between neighboring data points. We use this property to reduce the dimensionality in a series of steps to a one-dimensional manifold and classify light curves with a single parameter that is a measure of 'detachedness' of the system. This fully automated classification correlates well with the manual determination of morphology from the data release, and also efficiently highlights any misclassified objects. Once a lower-dimensional projection space is defined, the classification of additional light curves runs in a negligible time and the method can therefore be used as a fully automated classifier in pipeline structures. The classifier forms a tier of the Kepler EB pipeline that pre-processes light curves for the artificial intelligence based parameter estimator.

  18. General Corrosion and Passive Film Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, S; Roberts, S; Evans, K; Wolery, T; Carroll, S

    2005-11-29

    We have studied Alloy 22 corrosion and passive film stability in nitrogen-purged Na-K-Cl-NO{sub 3} brines having NO{sub 3}:Cl ratios of 7.4 at 160 C and NO{sub 3}:Cl ratios of 0.5 and 7.4 at 220 C in autoclave experiments under a slight pressure. The experiments were done to show the effect of high nitrate brines on the durability of the Alloy 22 outer barrier of the waste canisters. Ratios of NO{sub 3}:Cl used in this study were lower than expected ratios for the repository environment at these temperatures and atmospheric pressures (NO{sub 3}:Cl > 25), however they were thought to be high enough to inhibit localized corrosion. Localized corrosion occurred on the liquid-immersed and vapor-exposed creviced specimens under all conditions studied. Crevice penetration depths were difficult to quantify due to the effects of deformation and surface deposits. Further characterization is needed to evaluate the extent of localized corrosion. The bulk of the surface precipitates were derived from the partial dissolution of ceramic crevice formers used in the study. At this time we do not know if the observed localized corrosion reflects the corrosiveness of Na-K-Cl-NO{sub 3} solutions at elevated temperature over nine months or if it was an artifact of the experimental protocol. Nor do we know if much more concentrated brines with higher NO{sub 3}:Cl ratios formed by dust deliquescence will initiate localized corrosion on Alloy 22 at 160 and 220 C. Our results are consistent with the conclusion that nitrate concentrations greater than 18.5 molal may be required to offset localized corrosion of Alloy 22 at 160 and 220 C. Stability of the passive film and general corrosion were evaluated on the liquid-immersed and vapor-exposed non-creviced specimens. Elemental depth profiles of the vapor-exposed specimens are consistent with the development of a protective Cr-rich oxide near the base metal. The combined passive film and alloy oxide of the immersed specimens was much thicker

  19. PROBING THE LOCAL BUBBLE WITH DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS. III. THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE DATA AND CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Farhang, Amin; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Javadi, Atefeh; Van Loon, Jacco Th.

    2015-02-01

    We present new high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) observations of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) in the Local Bubble and its surroundings. We observed 432 sightlines and obtain the equivalent widths of the λ5780 and λ5797 Å DIBs up to a distance of ∼200 pc. All of the observations were carried out using the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, during three years, to reach a minimum S/N of ∼2000. All of the λ5780 and λ5797 absorptions are presented in this paper and we tabulate the observed values of the interstellar parameters, λ5780, λ5797, Na ID{sub 1}, and Na ID{sub 2}, including the uncertainties.

  20. Probing the Local Bubble with Diffuse Interstellar Bands. III. The Northern Hemisphere Data and Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhang, Amin; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Javadi, Atefeh; van Loon, Jacco Th.

    2015-02-01

    We present new high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) observations of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) in the Local Bubble and its surroundings. We observed 432 sightlines and obtain the equivalent widths of the λ5780 and λ5797 Å DIBs up to a distance of ~200 pc. All of the observations were carried out using the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, during three years, to reach a minimum S/N of ~2000. All of the λ5780 and λ5797 absorptions are presented in this paper and we tabulate the observed values of the interstellar parameters, λ5780, λ5797, Na ID1, and Na ID2, including the uncertainties.

  1. Clustering of Local Group Distances: Publication Bias or Correlated Measurements? III. The Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grijs, Richard; Bono, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Aiming at providing a firm mean distance estimate to the SMC, and thus to place it within the internally consistent Local Group distance framework we recently established, we compiled the current largest database of published distance estimates to the galaxy. Based on careful statistical analysis, we derive mean distance estimates to the SMC using eclipsing binary systems, variable stars, stellar population tracers, and star cluster properties. Their weighted mean leads to a final recommendation for the mean SMC distance of (m-M)0SMC=18.96+/- 0.02 mag, where the uncertainty represents the formal error. Systematic effects related to lingering uncertainties in extinction corrections, our physical understanding of the stellar tracers used, and the SMC's complex geometry—including its significant line of sight depth, its irregular appearance which renders definition of the galaxy's center uncertain, as well as its high inclination and possibly warped disk—may contribute additional uncertainties possibly exceeding 0.15-0.20 mag.

  2. Local mode of motions in amorphous solid. III. Contribution of hydrogen bonds in D-sorbitol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoki, Motosuke; Ujita, Koji

    1993-11-01

    Dielectric properties of the local mode of motions (the β relaxation process) in two D-sorbitol glasses are presented as a function of temperature and pressure. The glasses were vitrified from the liquid by isobaric cooling at a rate of -0.2 K/min under 0.1 and 78.5 MPa. The following results are different from those observed in molecular and polymer glasses: the relaxation magnitude of the higher-density glass vitrified under 78.5 MPa is larger than that of the lower-density glass vitrified under the atmospheric pressure; the distribution of the relaxation time of the higher-density glass is narrower than that of the lower-density glass; and the relaxation magnitude of each glass appears to increase slightly with pressure. The results are interpreted by the difference in the distribution of intermolecular hydrogen bonds frozen-in at the vitrification points. It is also suggested that the hydrogen bonds in the glasses may be slightly decomposed and/or weakened by external pressure.

  3. Local Group dSph radio survey with ATCA (III): constraints on particle dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Regis, Marco; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Profumo, Stefano; De Blok, W.J.G.; Massardi, Marcella; Richter, Laura E-mail: sergio.colafrancesco@wits.ac.za E-mail: blok@astron.nl E-mail: laura@ska.ac.za

    2014-10-01

    We performed a deep search for radio synchrotron emissions induced by weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) annihilation or decay in six dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies of the Local Group. Observations were conducted with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) at 16 cm wavelength, with an rms sensitivity better than 0.05 mJy/beam in each field. In this work, we first discuss the uncertainties associated with the modeling of the expected signal, such as the shape of the dark matter (DM) profile and the dSph magnetic properties. We then investigate the possibility that point-sources detected in the proximity of the dSph optical center might be due to the emission from a DM cuspy profile. No evidence for an extended emission over a size of few arcmin (which is the DM halo size) has been detected. We present the associated bounds on the WIMP parameter space for different annihilation/decay final states and for different astrophysical assumptions. If the confinement of electrons and positrons in the dSph is such that the majority of their power is radiated within the dSph region, we obtain constraints on the WIMP annihilation rate which are well below the thermal value for masses up to few TeV. On the other hand, for conservative assumptions on the dSph magnetic properties, the bounds can be dramatically relaxed. We show however that, within the next 10 years and regardless of the astrophysical assumptions, it will be possible to progressively close in on the full parameter space of WIMPs by searching for radio signals in dSphs with SKA and its precursors.

  4. Phase I/II Trial Evaluating Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Salvaging Treatment of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lin; Hu, Jiyi; Guan, Xiyin; Gao, Jing; Lu, Rong; Lu, Jiade J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Radiation therapy is the mainstay strategy for the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). Intensity-modulated X-ray therapy (IMXT) alone is the current standard for stage I and II NPC. For stage III and IV A/B diseases, concurrent chemotherapy should be provided in addition to IMXT. However, optimal treatment for locally recurrent NPC after previous definitive dose of radiotherapy is lacking. Various techniques including brachytherapy, IMXT, stereotactic radiosurgery or radiotherapy (SRS or SBRT) have been used in the management of locally recurrent NPC. Due to the inherent limitation of these techniques, i.e., limited range of irradiation or over-irradiation to surrounding normal tissues, moderate efficacy has been observed at the cost of severe toxicities. Carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) offers potential physical and biological advantages over photon and proton radiotherapy. Due to the inverted dose profile of particle beams and their greater energy deposition within the Bragg peak, precise dose delivery to the target volume(s) without exposing the surrounding organs at risk to extra doses is possible. In addition, CIRT provides an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE) as compared to photon and proton radiotherapy. Such advantages may translate to improved outcomes after irradiation in terms of disease control in radio-resistant and previously treated, recurrent malignancies. It is therefore reasonable to postulate that recurrent NPC after high-dose radiotherapy could be more resistant to re-irradiation using photons. Reports on the treatment of radio-resistant malignancies in the head and neck region such as melanoma, sarcoma, and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) have demonstrated superior local control rates from CIRT as compared to photon irradiation. Thus patients with recurrent NPC are likely to benefit from the enhanced biological effectiveness of carbon ions. As effective retreatment strategy is lacking for locally recurrent NPC

  5. DEPOSITION TANK CORROSION TESTING FOR ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING POST OXALIC ACID DESTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.

    2011-08-29

    An Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed to aid in the high level waste tank closure at the Savannah River Site. The ECC process uses an advanced oxidation process (AOP) to destroy the oxalic acid that is used to remove residual sludge from a waste tank prior to closure. The AOP process treats the dissolved sludge with ozone to decompose the oxalic acid through reactions with hydroxyl radicals. The effluent from this oxalic acid decomposition is to be sent to a Type III waste tank and may be corrosive to these tanks. As part of the hazardous simulant testing that was conducted at the ECC vendor location, corrosion testing was conducted to determine the general corrosion rate for the deposition tank and to assess the susceptibility to localized corrosion, especially pitting. Both of these factors impact the calculation of hydrogen gas generation and the structural integrity of the tanks, which are considered safety class functions. The testing consisted of immersion and electrochemical testing of A537 carbon steel, the material of construction of Type III tanks, and 304L stainless steel, the material of construction for transfer piping. Tests were conducted in solutions removed from the destruction loop of the prototype ECC set up. Hazardous simulants, which were manufactured at SRNL, were used as representative sludges for F-area and H-area waste tanks. Oxalic acid concentrations of 1 and 2.5% were used to dissolve the sludge as a feed to the ECC process. Test solutions included the uninhibited effluent, as well as the effluent treated for corrosion control. The corrosion control options included mixing with an inhibited supernate and the addition of hydroxide. Evaporation of the uninhibited effluent was also tested since it may have a positive impact on reducing corrosion. All corrosion testing was conducted at 50 C. The uninhibited effluent was found to increase the corrosion rate by an order of magnitude from less than 1 mil per year (mpy

  6. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80{degrees}C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either {open_quotes}satisfactory{close_quotes} (2-20 mpy) or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment.

  7. Effect of corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking on pipe integrity and remaining life

    SciTech Connect

    Jaske, C.E.; Beavers, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    Process piping is often exposed to corrosive fluids. During service, such exposure may cause localized corrosion or stress-corrosion cracking that affects structural integrity. This paper presents a model that quantifies the effect of localized corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking on pipe failure stress. The model is an extension of those that have been developed for oil and gas pipelines. It accounts for both axial and hoop stress. Cracks are modeled using inelastic fracture mechanics. Both flow-stress and fracture-toughness dependent failure modes are addressed. Corrosion and crack-growth rates are used to predict remaining service life.

  8. Atmospheric corrosion and epoxy-coated reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, H.G.

    1998-12-31

    Atmospheric corrosion can have a tremendous effect on the ability of epoxy-coated reinforcement to maintain its effectiveness. Corrosive conditions can result in the coating becoming brittle and more susceptible to damage from handling. Atmospheric conditions can also enhance localized corrosion at holidays on the bars. Efforts to minimize these effects will be discussed.

  9. Phase I/II study of trastuzumab, paclitaxel, cisplatin and radiation for locally advanced, HER2 overexpressing, esophageal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Safran, Howard . E-mail: hsafran@lifespan.org; Di Petrillo, Thomas; Akerman, Paul; Ng, Thomas; Evans, Devon; Steinhoff, Margaret; Benton, David; Purviance, John; Goldstein, Lisa; Tantravahi, Umadevi; Kennedy, Teresa R.N.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the overall survival for patients with locally advanced, HER2 overexpressing, esophageal adenocarcinoma receiving trastuzumab, paclitaxel, cisplatin, and radiation on a Phase I-II study. Methods and Materials: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus without distant organ metastases and 2+/3+ HER2 overexpression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) were eligible. All patients received cisplatin 25 mg/m{sup 2} and paclitaxel 50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly for 6 weeks with radiation therapy (RT) 50.4 Gy. Patients received trastuzumab at dose levels of 1, 1.5, or 2 mg/kg weekly for 5 weeks after an initial bolus of 2, 3, or 4 mg/kg. Results: Nineteen patients were entered: 7 (37%) had celiac adenopathy, and 7 (37%) had retroperitoneal, portal adenopathy, or scalene adenopathy. Fourteen of 19 patients (74%) had either 3+ HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry, or an increase in HER2 gene copy number by HER2 gene amplification or high polysomy by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The median survival of all patients was 24 months and the 2-year survival was 50%. Conclusions: Assessment of the effect of trastuzumab in the treatment of patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma overexpressing HER2 is limited by the small number of patients in this study. Overall survival, however, was similar to prior studies without an increase in toxicity. Evaluation of HER2 status should be performed in future trials for patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus that investigate therapies targeting the HER family.

  10. Non-local exchange correlation functionals impact on the structural, electronic and optical properties of III-V arsenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najwa Anua, N.; Ahmed, R.; Shaari, A.; Saeed, M. A.; Haq, Bakhtiar Ul; Goumri-Said, Souraya

    2013-10-01

    Exchange correlation (XC) energy functionals play a vital role in the efficiency of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, more soundly in the calculation of fundamental electronic energy bandgap. In the present DFT study of III-arsenides, we investigate the implications of XC-energy functional and corresponding potential on the structural, electronic and optical properties of XAs (X = B, Al, Ga, In). Firstly we report and discuss the optimized structural lattice parameters and the band gap calculations performed within different non-local XC functionals as implemented in the DFT-packages: WIEN2k, CASTEP and SIESTA. These packages are representative of the available code in ab initio studies. We employed the LDA, GGA-PBE, GGA-WC and mBJ-LDA using WIEN2k. In CASTEP, we employed the hybrid functional, sX-LDA. Furthermore LDA, GGA-PBE and meta-GGA were employed using SIESTA code. Our results point to GGA-WC as a more appropriate approximation for the calculations of structural parameters. However our electronic bandstructure calculations at the level of mBJ-LDA potential show considerable improvements over the other XC functionals, even the sX-LDA hybrid functional. We report also the optical properties within mBJ potential, which show a nice agreement with the experimental measurements in addition to other theoretical results.

  11. Corrosion protection

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

  12. AC methods for detection and monitoring of crevice corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Ashwani Kumar

    Crevice corrosion represents one of the most deleterious forms of localized corrosion which can lead to unpredicted catastrophic failures of structural and engineering components. Crevice corrosion is typically encountered in metals and alloys which exhibit a passive behavior (e.g. stainless steels, aluminum and aluminum alloys, nickel base alloys, and titanium and titanium base alloys) in electrolytic solutions. Due to the extensive application of these metals and alloys in chemical, petrochemical, marine environments, and power industries, crevice corrosion has been a subject of intense investigation in the past two decades. Most of the studies have focused on understanding the mechanism of crevice corrosion and the control measures for specific engineering structures. However, there are few, if any, commercially available methods for the detection of initiation or monitoring of crevice corrosion propagation. This is due to the fact that crevice corrosion often takes place in shielded areas of metal/alloy surfaces which are optically inaccessible and the visual examination of the metal in crevice is extremely difficult. Most of the research efforts in this area have been directed towards comparative evaluation of crevice corrosion resistance of different alloys in a variety of electrolytes. In order to detect initiation and monitor the propagation rate of crevice corrosion in highly passivated alloys, an innovative, non-destructive, in situ research methodology based on the use of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) has been developed. This research technique is based on the fact that (i) crevice corroding sites possess lower interfacial impedance compared to the passivated surfaces (ii) the crevice has a very high solution resistance, resulting in an extremely high iR drop from the crevice to the bulk solution (iii) placement of the probing electrodes (e.g. Counter Electrode and Reference Electrode) directly inside the crevice environment drastically

  13. Corrosion Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  14. Fireside Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon

    2011-07-14

    Oxy-fuel fireside research goals are: (1) determine the effect of oxyfuel combustion on fireside corrosion - flue gas recycle choice, staged combustion ramifications; and (2) develop methods to use chromia solubility in ash as an ash corrosivity measurement - synthetic ashes at first, then boiler and burner rig ashes.

  15. Corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wisotsky, M.J.; Metro, S.J.

    1989-10-31

    A corrosion inhibitor for use in synthetic ester lubricating oils is disclosed. It comprises an effective amount of: at least one aromatic amide; and at least one hydroxy substituted aromatic compound. The corrosion inhibitor thus formed is particularly useful in synthetic ester turbo lubricating oils.

  16. Corrosion control in alkanolamine gas treating: Absorber corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Helle, H.P.E.

    1995-12-01

    Even in 1980, when corrosion in alkanolamine units was rampant, over 50% of all acid gas purification systems was based on alkanolamine absorbents. Over the years the control of corrosion has gradually become firmer. This paper examines the reasons for corrosion and provides insight in one particular aspect of corrosion in alkanolamine units, absorber corrosion. Three factors are identified, solvent degradation, local stagnancy and exceeding the units capacity. Solvent degradation increases the corrosivity of the solvent proper by the formation of complexing compounds such as diamines. Local stagnancy allows the solvent loading level to approach equilibrium which creates a corrosive environment. Exceeding the unit`s capacity will achieve essentially the same but on a larger scale. The corrosion enhancement by interaction of a total of 12 factors is made visual and clarified. The paper examines step by step the means to prevent a number of the factors arising. Guidelines are given for design of the absorber and absorber internals, the molarity of the solvent, inhibition and the benefits and handicaps of filming inhibitors.

  17. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  18. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1994-04-26

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figures.

  19. Corrosion of nickel-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Scarberry, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The volume consists of three tutorial lectures and 18 contributed papers. The three tutorial lectures provide state-of-the-art background on the physical metallurgy of nickel-base alloys as it relates to corrosion. Also featured are the mechanisms and applications of these alloys and an insight into the corrosion testing techniques. The three tutorial lecture papers will help acquaint newcomers to this family of alloys with a thorough overview. The contributed papers are categorized into four major topics: general corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, fatigue and localized corrosion. Each topic is key-noted by one invited lecture followed by several contributed papers. The papers in the general corrosion section are wide ranging and cover the aspects of material selection, development of galvanic series in corrosive environments, corrosion resistance characteristics, hydrogen permeation and hydrogen embrittlement of nickel and some nickel-base alloys.

  20. A new electrochemical noise technique for monitoring the localized corrosion of 304 stainless steel in chloride-containing solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Benish, M.L.; Sikora, J.; Shaw, B.; Sikora, E.; Yaffe, M.; Krebs, A.; Martinchek, G.

    1998-12-31

    A new electrochemical noise technique was developed to investigate metastable pitting by applying a bias potential between two nominally identical working electrodes. The current flowing between the biased working electrodes was measured with a zero resistance ammeter. Potential was measured between one working electrode and a reference electrode. These tests were conducted using 304 stainless steel working electrodes in a 0.5 M NaCl + borate buffer solution. A bias potential of 150 to 200 mV was used to localize the anodic and cathodic reactions to their respective electrodes. The noise signal was significantly affected by conditioning the electrodes at open circuit. When the electrodes were conditioned for several days, the breakdown potential increased, and the frequency and magnitude of the current transients increased. However, when the conditioning time was increased to a month, all metastable pitting transients disappeared, indicating an enhanced passive film.

  1. Localized corrosion of 316L stainless steel with SiO2-CaO films obtained by means of sol-gel treatment.

    PubMed

    Vallet-Regí, M; Izquierdo-Barba, I; Gil, F J

    2003-11-01

    Sol-gel films on austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316L) polished wafer were prepared from sono-sols obtained from tetraethylorthosilane and hydrated calcium nitrate. However, pitting was observed in different places on the stainless steel surfaces. The corrosion resistance was evaluated by the polarization resistance in simulated body fluid environment at 37 degrees C. The critical current density, the passive current density, the corrosion potential, and the critical pitting potential were studied. The austenitic stainless steel 316L treated presents important electrochemical corrosion and consequently its application as endosseous implants is not possible. PMID:14566812

  2. Fighting Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structures such as bridges, parking decks, and balconies are designed to have a service life of over 50 years. All too often, however, many structures fall short of this goal, requiring expensive repairs and protection work earlier than anticipated. The corrosion of reinforced steel within the concrete infrastructure is a major cause for this premature deterioration. Such corrosion is a particularly dangerous problem for the facilities at NASA s Kennedy Space Center. Located near the Atlantic Ocean in Florida, Kennedy is based in one of the most corrosive-prone areas in the world. In order to protect its launch support structures, highways, pipelines, and other steel-reinforced concrete structures, Kennedy engineers developed the Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System. The system utilizes an inorganic coating material that slows or stops the corrosion of reinforced steel members inside concrete structures. Early tests determined that the coating meets the criteria of the National Association of Corrosion Engineers for complete protection of steel rebar embedded in concrete. Testing is being continued at the Kennedy's Materials Science Beach Corrosion Test Site.

  3. Localization, by linkage analysis, of the cystinuria type III gene to chromosome 19q13.1

    SciTech Connect

    Bisceglia, L.; Totaro, A.; Melchionda, S.

    1997-03-01

    Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive aminoaciduria in which three urinary phenotypes (I, II, and III) have been described. An amino acid transporter gene, SLC3A1 (formerly rBAT), was found to be responsible for this disorder. Mutational and linkage analysis demonstrated the presence of genetic heterogeneity in which the SLC3A1 gene is responsible for type I cystinuria but not for type II or type III. In this study, we report the identification of the cystinuria type III locus on the long arm of chromosome 19 (19q13.1), obtained after a genomewide search. Pairwise linkage analysis in a series of type III or type II families previously excluded from linkage to the cystinuria type I locus (SLC3A1 gene) revealed a significant maximum LOD score (Z{sub max}) of 13.11 at a maximum recombination fraction ({theta}{sub max}) of .00, with marker D19S225. Multipoint linkage analysis performed with the use of additional markers from the region placed the cystinuria type III locus between D19S414 and D19S220. Preliminary data on type II families also seem to place the disease locus for this rare type of cystinuria at 19q13.1 (significant Z{sub max} = 3.11 at {theta}{sub max} of .00, with marker D19S225). 33 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. DPC materials and corrosion environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest; Clarity, J.

    2014-10-01

    After an exposition of the materials used in DPCs and the factors controlling material corrosion in disposal environments, a survey is given of the corrosion rates, mechanisms, and products for commonly used stainless steels. Research needs are then identified for predicting stability of DPC materials in disposal environments. Stainless steel corrosion rates may be low enough to sustain DPC basket structural integrity for performance periods of as long as 10,000 years, especially in reducing conditions. Uncertainties include basket component design, disposal environment conditions, and the in-package chemical environment including any localized effects from radiolysis. Prospective disposal overpack materials exist for most disposal environments, including both corrosion allowance and corrosion resistant materials. Whereas the behavior of corrosion allowance materials is understood for a wide range of corrosion environments, demonstrating corrosion resistance could be more technically challenging and require environment-specific testing. A preliminary screening of the existing inventory of DPCs and other types of canisters is described, according to the type of closure, whether they can be readily transported, and what types of materials are used in basket construction.

  5. CO sub 2 induced inhibition of the localized corrosion of aluminum, Al-0. 5% Cu, and Al-2% Cu in dilute HF solution

    SciTech Connect

    Scully, J.R. . Dept. of Materials Science); Peebles, D.E. )

    1991-01-01

    This study presents work on corrosion of aluminum, Al-.5% Cu, and Al-2% Cu. Electrochemical tests were performed in dilute HF solutions both with and without CO{sub 2} sparging. It is suggested that CO{sub 2} or its reaction products interact with the passive film so that exposure of Cu in the oxide-solution interface is minimized. CO{sub 2} is investigated as a corrosion inhibitor. 4 refs. (JDL)

  6. PH and Electrochemical Responsive Materials for Corrosion Smart Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Calle, Luz M.

    2008-01-01

    Corrosion is a costly issue for military operations and civil industries. While most corrosion initiates from localized corrosion form, such as pitting, failure directly caused by localized corrosion is the most dangerous kind, because it is difficult to anticipate and prevent, occurs very suddenly and can be catastrophic. One way of preventing these failures is with a coating that can detect and heal localized corrosion. pH and other electrochemical changes are often associated with localized corrosion, so it is expected that materials that are pH or otherwise electrochemical responsive can be used to detect and control corrosion. This paper will review various pH and electrochemical responsive materials and their potential applications in corrosion smart coatings. Current research results in this field will also be reported.

  7. Predictors of Local Recurrence After Rituximab-Based Chemotherapy Alone in Stage III and IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Guiding Decisions for Consolidative Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jegadeesh, Naresh; Rajpara, Raj; Esiashvili, Natia; Shi, Zheng; Liu, Yuan; Okwan-Duodu, Derrick; Flowers, Christopher R.; Khan, Mohammad K.

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: The role of consolidative radiation therapy (RT) for stage III and IV diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in the era of rituximab is not well defined. There is evidence that some patients with bulky disease may benefit, but patient selection criteria are not well established. We sought to identify a subset of patients who experienced a high local failure rate after receiving rituximab-based chemotherapy alone and hence may benefit from the addition of consolidative RT. Methods and Materials: Two hundred eleven patients with stage III and IV DLBCL treated between August 1999 and January 2012 were reviewed. Of these, 89 had a complete response to systemic therapy including rituximab and received no initial RT. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression were performed, with local recurrence (LR) as the primary outcome. Results: The median follow-up time was 43.9 months. Fifty percent of patients experienced LR at 5 years. In multivariate analysis, tumor ≥5 cm and stage III disease were associated with increased risk of LR. The 5-year LR-free survival was 47.4% for patients with ≥5-cm lesions versus 74.7% for patients with <5-cm lesions (P=.01). In patients with <5-cm tumors, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was ≥15 in all patients with LR. The 5-year LR-free survival was 100% in SUV<15 versus 68.8% in SUV≥15 (P=.10). Conclusions: Advanced-stage DLBCL patients with stage III disease or with disease ≥5 cm appear to be at an increased risk for LR. Patients with <5-cm disease and SUVmax ≥15 may be at higher risk for LR. These patients may benefit from consolidative RT after chemoimmunotherapy.

  8. Differential localization of type I and type III procollagen messenger ribonucleic acids in inflamed periodontal and periapical connective tissues by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Larjava, H; Sandberg, M; Happonen, R P; Vuorio, E

    1990-01-01

    Inflammatory lesions of periodontal and periapical connective tissue were studied by in situ hybridization to detect cells responsible for type I and type III collagen production. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from patients with oral lesions of various stages of inflammation were hybridized with cDNA probes specific for human pro alpha 1(I) and pro alpha 1(III) collagen mRNAs, and with bacteriophage lambda DNA as a control probe. This technique permitted us to localize fibroblasts active in type I collagen synthesis in the vicinity of inflammatory infiltrates in all the samples studied. Cells containing high levels of type III collagen mRNA were seen in early abscess formation and they were particularly abundant in pyogenic granuloma and irritation fibroma. Type I collagen mRNA was prominent in gingival fibrosis. In the infrabony lesions with active inflammatory infiltrations the production of collagen was confined mostly to the periphery of the lesions. These findings give indirect evidence that cytokines liberated during the early stages of the inflammatory process stimulate expression of the type III collagen gene by fibroblasts. In chronic lesions a gradual switch from type III to type I collagen gene expression occurs. The change in collagen types appears to underlie the observed isolation of the inflammation by a collagenous capsule. In all the samples studied fibroblasts exhibited marked variation in their levels of procollagen mRNAs, supporting previous views about their heterogeneity in connective tissues. The approach presented here offers new possibilities to study cellular interactions and metabolic activities in inflammatory lesions. PMID:2296161

  9. Histology of the Oral Mucosa in Patients With BRONJ at III Stage: A Microscopic Study Proves the Unsuitability of Local Mucosal Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Sara Di; Trapassi, Alberto; Corradino, Bartolo; Cordova, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonate Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (BRONJ) is a newly recognized condition reported in patients treated with aminobisphosphonates (BF). BRONJ is defined as the presence of exposed necrotic alveolar bone that does not resolve over a period of 8 weeks in a patient taking bisphosphonates who has not had radiotherapy to the jaw. Treatment protocols have been outlined, but trials and outcomes of treatment and long-term follow-up data are not yet available. In 2004 an expert panel outlined recommendations for the management of bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaws. Through the histological study of the oral mucosa over the bone necrosis and around the osteonecrosis area in 8 patients affected by BRONJ at III stage, the authors highlight the inappropriateness of the local mucosal flaps to cover the losses of substance of the jaw, BF-related. Methods Mucosa tissue was taken from 8 patients, affected by BRONJ, III stage. The samples taken from the mucosa around and over the osteonecrosis area were fixed with formalin and an ematossilina-eosin dichromatic coloring was carried out. Results The samples of mucosa showed pathognomonic signs of cell suffering that prove that in these patients using local mucosa flaps is inappropriate. Conclusions The authors suggest that only a well vascularized flap as free flap must be used to cover the osteonecrosis area in patients with BRONJ stage III. Because of the structural instability of the mucosa in patients suffering of osteonecrosis Bf related the local flaps are prone to ulceration and to relapse. PMID:23390472

  10. Corrosion and corrosion fatigue of airframe aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G. S.; Gao, M.; Harlow, D. G.; Wei, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    Localized corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and growth are recognized as degradation mechanisms that effect the durability and integrity of commercial transport aircraft. Mechanically based understanding is needed to aid the development of effective methodologies for assessing durability and integrity of airframe components. As a part of the methodology development, experiments on pitting corrosion, and on corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and early growth from these pits were conducted. Pitting was found to be associated with constituent particles in the alloys and pit growth often involved coalescence of individual particle-nucleated pits, both laterally and in depth. Fatigue cracks typically nucleated from one of the larger pits that formed by a cluster of particles. The size of pit at which fatigue crack nucleates is a function of stress level and fatigue loading frequency. The experimental results are summarized, and their implications on service performance and life prediction are discussed.

  11. CORROSION INHIBITION

    DOEpatents

    Cartledge, G.H.

    1958-06-01

    The protection of ferrous metsls from the corrosive action of aqueous solutions is accomplished by the incorporation of small amounts of certain additive agents into the aqueous solutions. The method comprises providing a small concentration of technetium, in the form of pertechnetate ion, dissolved in the solution.

  12. Boric Acid Corrosion of Concrete Rebar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabalan, R. T.; Yang, L.; Chiang, K.–T.

    2013-07-01

    Borated water leakage through spent fuel pools (SFPs) at pressurized water reactors is a concern because it could cause corrosion of reinforcement steel in the concrete structure and compromise the integrity of the structure. Because corrosion rate of carbon steel in concrete in the presence of boric acid is lacking in published literature and available data are equivocal on the effect of boric acid on rebar corrosion, corrosion rate measurements were conducted in this study using several test methods. Rebar corrosion rates were measured in (i) borated water flowing in a simulated concrete crack, (ii) borated water flowing over a concrete surface, (iii) borated water that has reacted with concrete, and (iv) 2,400 ppm boric acid solutions with pH adjusted to a range of 6.0 to 7.7. The corrosion rates were measured using coupled multielectrode array sensor (CMAS) and linear polarization resistance (LPR) probes, both made using carbon steel. The results indicate that rebar corrosion rates are low (~1 μm/yr or less)when the solution pH is ~7.1 or higher. Below pH ~7.1, the corrosion rate increases with decreasing pH and can reach ~100 μm/yr in solutions with pH less than ~6.7. The threshold pH for carbon steel corrosion in borated solution is between 6.8 and 7.3.

  13. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 310 - Form: Application for Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the applicant or other unit of local government. RC Utilities RC1: Utilities—for power, water... durable equipment declared a total loss as a result of contamination during the responseEQ2: Rents—for...

  14. Carbon-ion radiotherapy for locally advanced or unfavorably located choroidal melanoma: A Phase I/II dose-escalation study

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Hiroshi . E-mail: h_tsuji@nirs.go.jp; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Yanagi, Takeshi; Hirasawa, Naoki; Kamada, Tadashi; Mizoe, Jun-Etsu; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Ohnishi, Yoshitaka

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the applicability of carbon ion beams for the treatment of choroidal melanoma with regard to normal tissue morbidity and local tumor control. Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and February 2006, 59 patients with locally advanced or unfavorably located choroidal melanoma were enrolled in a Phase I/II clinical trial of carbon-ion radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiologic Sciences. The primary endpoint of this study was normal tissue morbidity, and secondary endpoints were local tumor control and patient survival. Of the 59 subjects enrolled, 57 were followed >6 months and analyzed. Results: Twenty-three patients (40%) developed neovascular glaucoma, and three underwent enucleation for eye pain due to elevated intraocular pressure. Incidence of neovascular glaucoma was dependent on tumor size and site. Five patients had died at analysis, three of distant metastasis and two of concurrent disease. All but one patient, who developed marginal recurrence, were controlled locally. Six patients developed distant metastasis, five in the liver and one in the lung. Three-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rates were 88.2%, 84.8%, and 97.4%, respectively. No apparent dose-response relationship was observed in either tumor control or normal tissue morbidity at the dose range applied. Conclusion: Carbon-ion radiotherapy can be applied to choroidal melanoma with an acceptable morbidity and sufficient antitumor effect, even with tumors of unfavorable size or site.

  15. Corrosion 99: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO{sub 2} Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H{sub 2}S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

  16. Corrosion 99: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO[sub 2] Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H[sub 2]S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

  17. Cellular localization of type I III and IV procollagen gene transcripts in normal and fibrotic human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Milani, S.; Herbst, H.; Schuppan, D.; Surrenti, C.; Riecken, E. O.; Stein, H.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have determined the cell types producing alpha 1 (I), alpha 2 (I), alpha 1 (III), and alpha 1 (IV) procollagen gene transcripts in adult human liver by in situ hybridization with [35S]-labeled RNA probes. The liver specimens comprised a total of 20 biopsies with normal histology and biopsies with fibrosis or cirrhosis at different clinical stages and of heterogeneous origins. In normal liver, procollagen type I, III, and IV transcripts were detected in stromal and vascular mesenchymal cells of portal tracts and central veins, as well as in some perisinusoidal cells of the lobule. In fibrotic liver, increased levels of these procollagen mRNAs were observed in the same locations, and particularly enhanced in stromal cells of fibrotic septa and portal tracts, as well as in perisinusoidal cells. Expression of alpha 1 (IV) procollagen RNA was additionally found in some vascular endothelial and bile duct epithelial cells. Although previously suggested as the major source of liver collagens, hepatocytes showed no significant procollagen transcript levels in any of our samples. Thus, procollagen synthesis does not appear to be a function of hepatocytes, but rather of mesenchymal, endothelial, and bile duct epithelial cells in adult human liver. These findings may have implications for the development of specifically targeted antifibrotic therapies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:2372043

  18. Corrosion and corrosion prevention in gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mom, A. J. A.; Kolkman, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    The conditions governing the corrosion behavior in gas turbines are surveyed. Factors such as temperature, relative humidity, the presence of sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and fuel quality are discussed. Electromechanical corrosion at relatively low temperature in compressors; oxidation; and hot corrosion (sulfidation) at high temperature in turbines are considered. Corrosion prevention by washing and rinsing, fueld additives, and corrosion resistant materials and coatings are reviewed.

  19. Titanium corrosion in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Been, Jantje

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion of Grade 2 titanium in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments has been studied by weight loss corrosion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and potentiodynamic polarography. Calcium ions and wood pulp were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. In alkaline peroxide, the titanium corrosion rate increased with increasing pH, temperature, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The corrosion controlling mechanism is thought to be the reaction of the oxide with the perhydroxyl ion. No evidence of thermodynamically stable calcium titanate was found in the surface film of test coupons exposed to calcium-inhibited alkaline peroxide solutions. Calcium inhibition is probably the result of low local alkali and peroxide concentrations at the metal surface produced by reaction of adsorbed calcium with hydrogen peroxide. It has been shown that the inhibiting effect of calcium is temporary, possibly through an effect of calcium on the chemical and/or physical stability of the surface oxide. Pulp is an effective and stable corrosion inhibitor. Raising the pulp concentration decreased the corrosion rate. The inhibiting effect of pulp may be related to the adsorption and interaction of the pulp fibers with H 2O2, thereby decreasing the peroxide concentration and rendering the solution less corrosive. The presence of both pulp and calcium led to higher corrosion rates than obtained by either one inhibitor alone. Replacement of hydrofluoric acid with alkaline peroxide for pickling of titanium was investigated. Titanium corrosion rates in alkaline peroxide exceeded those obtained in the conventional hydrofluoric acid bath. General corrosion was observed with extensive roughening of the surface giving a dull gray appearance. Preferred dissolution of certain crystallographic planes was investigated through the corrosion of a titanium single crystal. Whereas the overall effect on the corrosion rate was small

  20. The Effect of Extrafascial Hysterectomy After Completion of External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Locally Advanced Stages (IIB-III) of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sarraf, Zahra; Hamedi, Bahareh; Hooshmand, Soodabeh; Mosalaie, Ahmad; Robati, Minoo; Momtahan, Mozhdeh; Farhadi, Pouya

    2013-01-01

    Background: Worldwide, cervical cancer is one of the most challenging gynecologic cancers in treatment. Objectives: This study was designed with the aim of comparing patients treated with External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT) and Interactivity Brachytherapy (ICBT) with EBRT and extrafascial hysterectomy in locally advanced stages of cervical cancer (IIB-III). Patients and Methods: The present study was designed as a case-control which was performed on the patients with cervical cancer in locally advanced stages (IIB-III) admitted to Namazi and Faghihi hospitals (university hospitals in Shiraz) between 2008-2011. 51 patients were included in two distinct groups: 25 patients were treated with EBRT and Interactivity Brachytherapy (group A). 26 patients were treated with EBRT and extrafascial hysterectomy group B. Results: In group A, the number of patients with FIGO stage IIb and III were 16 and 9, respectively, and 17 and 9 in group B. The median duration of follow-up was 24 months. There were no significant differences between two groups in metastasis and recurrence rate (P > 0.05). 5-years overall survival rate was 54.8% [95% CI: 39-70.9] in group A and in group B was 50.9% [95% CI: 41.5-60] and The LOG-rank test which controls the effect of treatment modalities on overall survival rate, did not show any significant difference between two groups (P = 0.407). Conclusion: The results of our study showed that the trend of treatment using EBRT along with intracavity brachytherapy may have the same outcome as the method of using EBRT and extrafascial hysterectomy. Overall, it seems that external beam radiation followed by extrafascial hysterectomy could be a proper substitute for brachytherapy. PMID:24693381

  1. Controlled-Release Microcapsules for Smart Coatings for Corrosion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Corrosion is a serious problem that has enormous costs and serious safety implications. Localized corrosion, such as pitting, is very dangerous and can cause catastrophic failures. The NASA Corrosion Technology Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center is developing a smart coating based on pH-sensitive microcapsules for corrosion applications. These versatile microcapsules are designed to be incorporated into a smart coating and deliver their core content when corrosion starts. Corrosion indication was the first function incorporated into the microcapsules. Current efforts are focused on incorporating the corrosion inhibition function through the encapsulation of corrosion inhibitors into water core and oil core microcapsules. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of encapsulated corrosion inhibitors are shown.

  2. EFFECT OF CREVICE FORMER ON CORROSION DAMAGE PROPAGATION

    SciTech Connect

    J.H. Payer; U. Landau; X. Shan; A.S. Agarwal

    2006-03-01

    The objectives of this report are: (1) To determine the effect of the crevice former on the localized corrosion damage propagation; (2) FOCUS on post initiation stage, crevice propagation and arrest processes; (3) Determine the evolution of damage--severity, shape, location/distribution, damage profile; and (4) Model of crevice corrosion propagation, i.e. the evolution of the crevice corrosion damage profile.

  3. A modeling and experimental study for long-term prediction of localized corrosion in carbon steel overpacks for high-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hoch, A.; Porter, F.; Sharland, S.; Honda, A.; Ishikawa, H.; Taniguchi, N.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a joint modeling and experimental study for investigation of pit growth in carbon steel High-Level Radioactive Waste overpacks under consideration in Japan. A mathematical model of the growth of corrosion pits in metals has been developed. This model is implemented in the computer program CAMLE, and includes representation of the chemical, electrochemical and migration processes that control pit-growth rates. Experiments to provide key input data for the model are described, in addition to experiments to measure short-term pit growth. Predictions form the model are compared with these data. Overall, the comparisons are encouraging and the model shows good potential as a tool for assessment of the long-term corrosion behavior of overpacks under repository conditions. Future developments of the model to improve agreement are discussed.

  4. A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-08-21

    The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed.

  5. 2nd ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer: locally advanced stage III non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, W E E; De Ruysscher, D; Weder, W; Le Péchoux, C; De Leyn, P; Hoffmann, H; Westeel, V; Stahel, R; Felip, E; Peters, S

    2015-08-01

    To complement the existing treatment guidelines for all tumour types, ESMO organises consensus conferences to focus on specific issues in each type of tumour. The 2nd ESMO Consensus Conference on Lung Cancer was held on 11-12 May 2013 in Lugano. A total of 35 experts met to address several questions on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in each of four areas: pathology and molecular biomarkers, first-line/second and further lines of treatment in advanced disease, early-stage disease and locally advanced disease. For each question, recommendations were made including reference to the grade of recommendation and level of evidence. This consensus paper focuses on locally advanced disease.

  6. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Improved Corrosion Management Could Provide Significant Cost and Energy Savings for the Chemical Industry. In the chemical industry, corrosion is often responsible for significant shutdown and maintenance costs.

  7. Improved Survival in Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy as Primary Local Treatment Modality

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Raben, David; Chen Changhu

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the overall and cause-specific survival in patients with Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy (RT) as the primary local treatment modality. Methods and Materials: The survival of patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with primary RT was queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database. The effect of the year of treatment on overall and cause-specific survival was analyzed as a categorical and continuous variable. The patterns of care for these patients were also evaluated. Results: Between 1988 and 2004, 6,759 patients were identified. Survival was significantly improved in patients treated more recently. When analyzed as a continuous variable, each year was associated with a 3% and 4.1% reduction in the relative risk of overall and cause-specific mortality, respectively (p < 0.0001). Patients treated after 1998 had a 7.6% and 6.1% absolute improvement in overall and cause-specific survival, respectively, compared with patients treated before 1998 (overall survival, hazard ratio, 0.81; cause-specific survival, hazard ratio, 0.77; p < 0.0001). This benefit in survival was limited to tumors of the oral cavity, oropharynx, and hypopharynx. The use of RT increased among patients treated more recently. This shift in patterns of care was most pronounced for tumors of the larynx and hypopharynx. Conclusions: The overall and cause-specific survival of patients with Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with primary RT has improved with time. The improvement is consistent with that observed in a large meta-analysis of randomized patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

  8. Electrochemical situation in corrosion-mechanical cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, L.N.; Kalinkov, A.Yu.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the electrochemical situation in corrosion cracks is determined by the electromotive force of local galvanic cells at the crack tip and the polarization resistance of anodic processes.

  9. Non-local photo-polymerization kinetics including multiple termination mechanisms and dark reactions: Part III. Primary radical generation and inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Gleeson, Michael R.; Liu Shui; Guo Jinxin; Sheridan, John T.

    2010-09-15

    Photopolymers are playing an ever more important role in diverse areas of research such as holographic data storage, hybrid photonic circuits, and solitary waves. In each of these applications, the production of primary radicals is the driving force of the polymerization processes. Therefore an understanding of the production, removal, and scavenging processes of free radicals in a photopolymer system is crucial in determining a material's response to a given exposure. One such scavenging process is inhibition. In this paper the non-local photo-polymerization driven diffusion model is extended to more accurately model the effects of (i) time varying primary radical production, (ii) the rate of removal of photosensitizer, and (iii) inhibition. The model is presented to specifically analyze the effects of inhibition, which occur most predominantly at the start of grating growth, and comparisons between theory and experiment are performed which quantify these effects.

  10. The HST Snapshot Survey of Nearby Dwarf Galaxy Candidates. III. Resolved Dwarf Galaxies In and Beyond the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebel, E. K.; Seitzer, P.; Dolphin, A. E.; Geisler, D.; Guhathakurta, P.; Hodge, P. W.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Karachentseva, V. E.; Sarajedini, A.; Sharina, M. E.

    1999-12-01

    We present results for several nearby, resolved dwarf galaxies imaged with WFPC2 in the framework of our HST snapshot survey of nearby dwarf galaxy candidates (Seitzer et al., paper I in this series). All data presented here were analyzed with the automated photometry package HSTPHOT (Dolphin et al., paper IV in this series). Our closest target is the recently discovered Cassiopeia dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy (Karachentsev & Karachentseva 1999, A&A, 341, 355), a new Local Group member and companion of M31 (Grebel & Guhathakurta 1999, ApJ, 511, 101). Our WFPC2 snapshot data reveal a pronounced red horizontal branch in Cas dSph. IC 5152 is a dwarf irregular (dIrr) just beyond the Local Group. Our data show a significant intermediate-age population with a strongly tilted asymptotic giant branch (AGB), a substantial young population, and a wide giant branch. Other nearby galaxies to be discussed include NGC 1560, ESO 471-G006, ESO 470-G018, and KK 035. Most of these galaxies are being resolved into stars for the first time. We describe their properties in detail and derive distances for all dwarfs with a well-defined tip of the red giant branch. Membership of these galaxies in nearby groups is discussed. Support for this work was provided by NASA through grant GO-08192.97A from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. EKG acknowledges support by NASA through grant HF-01108.01-98A from the Space Telescope Science Institute. EKG and IDK are supported by the Henri Chrétien International Research Grant administered by the American Astronomical Society. PG is an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow.

  11. The Corrosion and Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of Nickel Based Alloy Weld Overlay and Coextruded Claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockdale, Andrew

    The use of low NOx boilers in coal fired power plants has resulted in sulfidizing corrosive conditions within the boilers and a reduction in the service lifetime of the waterwall tubes. As a solution to this problem, Ni-based weld overlays are used to provide the necessary corrosion resistance however; they are susceptible to corrosion fatigue. There are several metallurgical factors which give rise to corrosion fatigue that are associated with the localized melting and solidification of the weld overlay process. Coextruded coatings offer the potential for improved corrosion fatigue resistance since coextrusion is a solid state coating process. The corrosion and corrosion fatigue behavior of alloy 622 weld overlays and coextruded claddings was investigated using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator retrofitted with a retort. The experiments were conducted at a constant temperature of 600°C using a simulated combustion gas of N2-10%CO-5%CO2-0.12%H 2S. An alternating stress profile was used with a minimum tensile stress of 0 MPa and a maximum tensile stress of 300 MPa (ten minute fatigue cycles). The results have demonstrated that the Gleeble can be used to successfully simulate the known corrosion fatigue cracking mechanism of Ni-based weld overlays in service. Multilayer corrosion scales developed on each of the claddings that consisted of inner and outer corrosion layers. The scales formed by the outward diffusion of cations and the inward diffusion of sulfur and oxygen anions. The corrosion fatigue behavior was influenced by the surface finish and the crack interactions. The initiation of a large number of corrosion fatigue cracks was not necessarily detrimental to the corrosion fatigue resistance. Finally, the as-received coextruded cladding exhibited the best corrosion fatigue resistance.

  12. Evaluation of Encapsulated Inhibitor for Autonomous Corrosion Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsey, M. N.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Calle, L. M.; Pearman, B. P.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns the development of smart coating technologies based on microencapsulation for the autonomous control of corrosion. Microencapsulation allows the incorporation of corrosion inhibitors into coating which provides protection through corrosion-controlled release of these inhibitors.One critical aspect of a corrosion protective smart coating is the selection of corrosion inhibitor for encapsulation and comparison of the inhibitor function before and after encapsulation. For this purpose, a systematic approach is being used to evaluate free and encapsulated corrosion inhibitors by salt immersion. Visual, optical microscope, and Scanning Electron Microscope (with low-angle backscatter electron detector) are used to evaluate these inhibitors. It has been found that the combination of different characterization tools provide an effective method for evaluation of early stage localized corrosion and the effectiveness of corrosion inhibitors.

  13. A Local Baseline of the Black Hole Mass Scaling Relations for Active Galaxies. III.The MBH– Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennert, Vardha N.; Treu, Tommaso; Auger, Matthew W.; Cosens, Maren; Park, Daeseong; Rosen, Rebecca; Harris, Chelsea E.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2015-08-01

    We create a baseline of the black hole (BH) mass ({M}{BH})—stellar-velocity dispersion (σ) relation for active galaxies, using a sample of 66 local (0.02\\lt z\\lt 0.09) Seyfert-1 galaxies, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Analysis of SDSS images yields AGN luminosities free of host-galaxy contamination, and morphological classification. 51/66 galaxies have spiral morphology. Out of these, 28 bulges have Sérsic index n\\lt 2 and are considered candidate pseudo-bulges, with eight being definite pseudo-bulges based on multiple classification criteria met. Only 4/66 galaxies show signs of interaction/merging. High signal-to-noise ratio Keck spectra provide the width of the broad Hβ emission line free of Fe ii emission and stellar absorption. AGN luminosity and Hβ line widths are used to estimate {M}{BH}. The Keck-based spatially resolved kinematics is used to determine stellar-velocity dispersion within the spheroid effective radius ({σ }{spat,{reff}}). We find that σ can vary on average by up to 40% across definitions commonly used in the literature, emphasizing the importance of using self-consistent definitions in comparisons and evolutionary studies. The {M}{BH}–σ relation for our Seyfert-1 galaxy sample has the same intercept and scatter as that of reverberation-mapped AGNs as well as that of quiescent galaxies, consistent with the hypothesis that our single epoch {M}{BH} estimator and sample selection function do not introduce significant biases. Barred galaxies, merging galaxies, and those hosting pseudo-bulges do not represent outliers in the {M}{BH}–σ relation. This is in contrast with previous work, although no firm conclusion can be drawn on this matter due to the small sample size and limited resolution of the SDSS images.

  14. The Star Formation Histories of Local Group Dwarf Galaxies. III. Characterizing Quenching in Low-mass Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2015-05-01

    We explore the quenching of low-mass galaxies (104 ≲ {{M}\\star } ≲ 108 {{M}⊙ }) as a function of lookback time using the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies. The SFHs were derived by analyzing color-magnitude diagrams of resolved stellar populations in archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. We find: (1) lower-mass galaxies quench earlier than higher-mass galaxies; (2) inside of Rvirial there is no correlation between a satellite’s current proximity to a massive host and its quenching epoch; and (3) there are hints of systematic differences in the quenching times of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites, although the sample size and uncertainties in the SFHs of M31 dwarfs prohibit definitive conclusions. Combined with results from the literature, we qualitatively consider the redshift evolution (z = 0-1) of the quenched galaxy fraction over ˜7 dex in stellar mass (104 ≲ {{M}\\star } ≲ 1011.5 {{M}⊙ }). The quenched fraction of all galaxies generally increases toward the present, with both the lowest and highest-mass systems exhibiting the largest quenched fractions at all redshifts. In contrast, galaxies between {{M}\\star } ˜ 108-1010 {{M}⊙ } have the lowest quenched fractions. We suggest that such intermediate-mass galaxies are the least efficient at quenching. Finally, we compare our quenching times with predictions for infall times for low-mass galaxies associated with the MW. We find that some of the lowest-mass satellites (e.g., CVn II, Leo IV) may have been quenched before infall, while higher-mass satellites (e.g., Leo I, Fornax) typically quench ˜1-4 Gyr after infall. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA constract NAS 5-26555.

  15. A Review Corrosion of TI Grade 7 and Other TI Alloys in Nuclear Waste Repository Environments

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua; K. Mon; P. Pasupathi; G. Gordon

    2004-05-11

    Titanium alloy degradation modes are reviewed in relation to their performance in repository environments. General corrosion, localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen induced cracking, microbially influenced corrosion, and radiation-assisted corrosion of Ti alloys are considered. With respect to the Ti Grade 7 drip shields selected for emplacement in the repository at Yucca Mountain, general corrosion, hydrogen induced cracking, and radiation-assisted corrosion will not lead to failure within the 10,000 year regulatory period; stress corrosion cracking (in the absence of disruptive events) is of no consequence to barrier performance; and localized corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion are not expected to occur. To facilitate the discussion, Ti Grades 2, 5, 7, 9, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, and 24 are included in this review.

  16. EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ASSESSMENT OF FY2008 CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SIMULANT TESTING PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    BOOMER KD

    2009-01-08

    The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) has been overseeing the implementation of selected parts of Recommendation III of the final report, Expert Panel workshop for Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank Waste Chemistry Optimization, RPP-RPT-22126. Recommendation III provided four specific requirements necessary for Panel approval of a proposal to revise the chemistry control limits for the Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). One of the more significant requirements was successful performance of an accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experimental program. This testing program has evaluated the optimization of the chemistry controls to prevent corrosion in the interstitial liquid and supernatant regions of the DSTs.

  17. Cisplatin, hyperthermia, and radiation (trimodal therapy) in patients with locally advanced head and neck tumors: A phase I-II study

    SciTech Connect

    Amichetti, M.; Graiff, C.; Fellin, G.; Pani, G.; Bolner, A.; Maluta, S. ); Valdagni, R. Istituto per la Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica, Trento )

    1993-08-01

    Hyperthermia is now being widely used to treat clinical malignancies, especially combined with radiotherapy and more rarely with chemotherapy. The combination of heat, radiation, and chemotherapy (trimodality) can lead to potent interaction. The present Phase I-II study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility and acute toxicity of a combination of cisplantin, hyperthermia, and irradiation in the treatment of superficial cervical nodal metastases from head and neck cancer. Eighteen patients with measurable neck metastases from previously untreated squamous cell head and neck tumors were entered into the trial. Therapy consisted of a conventional irradiation (total dose 70 Gy, 2 Gy five times a week) combined with a weekly administration of 20 mg/m[sup 2] iv of cisplatin and a total of two sessions of local external microwave hyperthermia (desired temperature of 42.5[degrees]C for 30 min). Feasibility of the treatment was demonstrated. Acute local toxicity was mild; no thermal blisters or ulcerations were reported and only two patients experienced local pain during hyperthermia. Cutaneous toxicity appeared greater than in previous studies with irradiation plus hyperthermia and irradiation plus cisplatin. Systematic toxicity was moderate with major toxic effects observed in three patients (World Health Organization (WHO) grade 3 anaemia). Even though it was not an aim of the study to evaluate the nodal response, they observed a complete response rate of 72.2% (95% confidence interval 51-93.4%), 16.6% of partial response and 11.1% of no change. The study confirms the feasibility of the combination of cisplantin, heat, and radiation with an acceptable toxicity profile. The trimodal therapy deserves further evaluation as a way to enhance the efficacy of irradiation in the treatment of nodal metastases from head and neck tumors. 43 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Uroporphyrinogen-III synthase: Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, expression of a mouse full-length cDNA, and its localization on mouse chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Desnick, R.J.; Kozak, C.A.

    1995-04-10

    Uroporphyrinogen-III synthase, the fourth enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, is responsible for the conversion of hydroxymethylbilane to the cyclic tetrapyrrole, uroporphyrinogen III. The deficient activity of URO-S is the enzymatic defect in congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP), an autosomal recessive disorder. For the generation of a mouse model of CEP, the human URO-S cDNA was used to screen 2 X 10{sup 6} recombinants from a mouse adult liver cDNA library. Ten positive clones were isolated, and dideoxy sequencing of the entire 1.6-kb insert of clone pmUROS-1 revealed 5{prime} and 3{prime} untranslated sequences of 144 and 623 bp, respectively, and an open reading frame of 798 bp encoding a 265-amino-acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 28,501 Da. The mouse and human coding sequences had 80.5 and 77.8% nucleotide and amino acid identity, respectively. The authenticity of the mouse cDNA was established by expression of the active monomeric enzyme in Escherichia coli. In addition, the analysis of two multilocus genetic crosses localized the mouse gene on chromosome 7, consistent with the mapping of the human gene to a position of conserved synteny on chromosome 10. The isolation, expression, and chromosomal mapping of this full-length cDNA should facilitate studies of the structure and organization of the mouse genomic sequence and the development of a mouse model of CEP for characterization of the disease pathogenesis and evaluation of gene therapy. 38 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Characterization of nuclear localization signals in the type III effectors HsvG and HsvB of the gall-forming bacterium Pantoea agglomerans.

    PubMed

    Weinthal, Dan M; Barash, Isaac; Tzfira, Tzvi; Gaba, Victor; Teper, Doron; Sessa, Guido; Manulis-Sasson, Shulamit

    2011-05-01

    HsvG and HsvB, two paralogous type III effectors of the gall-forming bacteria Pantoea agglomerans pv. gypsophilae and P. agglomerans pv. betae, determine host specificity on gypsophila and beet, respectively. They were previously shown to be DNA-binding proteins imported into host and non-host nuclei and might act as transcriptional activators. Sequence analysis of these effectors did not detect canonical nuclear localization signals (NLSs), but two basic amino acid clusters designated putative NLS1 and NLS2 were detected in their N-terminal and C-terminal regions, respectively. pNIA assay for nuclear import in yeast and bombardment of melon leaves with each of the NLSs fused to a 2xYFP reporter indicated that putative NLS1 and NLS2 were functional in transport of HsvG into the nucleus. A yeast two-hybrid assay showed that HsvB, HsvG, putative NLS1, putative NLS2, HsvG converted into HsvB, or HsvB converted into HsvG by exchanging the repeat domain, all interacted with AtKAP-α and importin-α3 of Arabidopsis thaliana. Deletion analysis of the NLS domains in HsvG suggested that putative NLS1 or NLS2 were required for pathogenicity on gypsophila cuttings and presumably for import of HsvG into the nucleus. This study demonstrates the presence of two functional NLSs in the type III effectors HsvG and HsvB.

  20. Laser-controllable coatings for corrosion protection.

    PubMed

    Skorb, Ekaterina V; Skirtach, Andre G; Sviridov, Dmitry V; Shchukin, Dmitry G; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2009-07-28

    We introduce a novel and versatile approach to the corrosion protection by use of "smart" laser-controllable coating. The main advantage of the proposed technique is that one could terminate the corrosion process by very intensive healing after an appearance of corrosion centers using local laser irradiation. It is also shown that by applying a polyelectrolyte shell with noble metal particles over the mesoporous titania and silica via layer-by-layer assembly it is possible to fabricate micro- and nanoscaled reservoirs, which, being incorporated into the zirconia-organosilica matrix, are responsible for the ability of laser-driven release of the loaded materials (e.g., corrosion inhibitor). Furthermore, the resultant films are highly adhesive and could be easily deposited onto different metallic substrates. Laser-mediated remote release of incorporated corrosion inhibitor (benzotriazole) from engineered mesoporous containers with silver nanoparticles in the container shell is observed in real time on single and multicontainer levels.

  1. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO{sub 2} corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  2. Metal levels in corrosion of spinal implants

    PubMed Central

    Beguiristain, Jose; Duart, Julio

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion affects spinal instrumentations and may cause local and systemic complications. Diagnosis of corrosion is difficult, and nowadays it is performed almost exclusively by the examination of retrieved instrumentations. We conducted this study to determine whether it is possible to detect corrosion by measuring metal levels on patients with posterior instrumented spinal fusion. Eleven asymptomatic patients, with radiological signs of corrosion of their stainless steel spinal instrumentations, were studied by performing determinations of nickel and chromium in serum and urine. Those levels were compared with the levels of 22 patients with the same kind of instrumentation but without evidence of corrosion and to a control group of 22 volunteers without any metallic implants. Statistical analysis of our results revealed that the patients with spinal implants without radiological signs of corrosion have increased levels of chromium in serum and urine (P < 0.001) compared to volunteers without implants. Corrosion significantly raised metal levels, including nickel and chromium in serum and urine when compared to patients with no radiological signs of corrosion and to volunteers without metallic implants (P < 0.001). Metal levels measured in serum have high sensibility and specificity (area under the ROC curve of 0.981). By combining the levels of nickel and chromium in serum we were able to identify all the cases of corrosion in our series of patients. The results of our study confirm that metal levels in serum and urine are useful in the diagnosis of corrosion of spinal implants and may be helpful in defining the role of corrosion in recently described clinical entities such as late operative site pain or late infection of spinal implants. PMID:17256156

  3. Microbial Corrosion in Linepipe Steel Under the Influence of a Sulfate-Reducing Consortium Isolated from an Oil Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlAbbas, Faisal M.; Williamson, Charles; Bhola, Shaily M.; Spear, John R.; Olson, David L.; Mishra, Brajendra; Kakpovbia, Anthony E.

    2013-11-01

    This work investigates microbiologically influenced corrosion of API 5L X52 linepipe steel by a sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) consortium. The SRB consortium used in this study was cultivated from a sour oil well in Louisiana, USA. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the mixed bacterial consortium contained three phylotypes: members of Proteobacteria ( Desulfomicrobium sp.), Firmicutes ( Clostridium sp.), and Bacteroidetes ( Anaerophaga sp.). The biofilm and the pits that developed with time were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). In addition, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) and open circuit potential (OCP) were used to analyze the corrosion behavior. Through circuit modeling, EIS results were used to interpret the physicoelectric interactions between the electrode, biofilm and solution interfaces. The results confirmed that extensive localized corrosion activity of SRB is due to a formed biofilm in conjunction with a porous iron sulfide layer on the metal surface. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed semiconductive corrosion products predominantly composed of a mixture of siderite (FeCO3), iron sulfide (Fe x S y ), and iron (III) oxide-hydroxide (FeOOH) constituents in the corrosion products for the system exposed to the SRB consortium.

  4. Biochemical Contributions to Corrosion of Carbon Steel and Alloy 22 in a Continual Flow System

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J.; Martin, S.; Masterson, B.; Lian, T.

    1998-12-03

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) may decrease the functional lifetime of nuclear waste packaging materials in the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. Biochemical contributions to corrosion of package materials are being determined in reactors containing crushed repository-site rock with the endogenous microbial community, and candidate waste package materials. These systems are being continually supplied with simulated ground water. Periodically, bulk chemistries are analyzed on the system outflow, and surfacial chemistries are assessed on withdrawn material coupons. Both Fe and Mn dissolved from C1020 coupons under conditions that included the presence of YM microorganisms. Insoluble corrosion products remained in a reduced state at the coupon surface, indicating at least a localized anoxic condition; soluble reduced Mn and Fe were also detected in solution, while precipitated and spalled products were oxidized. Alloy 22 surfaces showed a layer of chrome oxide, almost certainly in the Cr(III) oxidation state, on microcosm-exposed coupons, while no soluble chrome was detected in solution. The results of these studies will be compared to identical testing on systems containing sterilized rock to generate, and ultimately predict, microbial contributions to waste package corrosion chemistries.

  5. USE OF COUPLED MULTI-ELECTRODE ARRAYS TO ADVANCE THE UNDERSTANDING OF SELECTED CORROSION PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect

    N.D. Budiansky; F. Bocher; H. Cong; M.F. Hurley; J.R. Scully

    2006-02-23

    The use of multi-coupled electrode arrays in various corrosion applications is discussed with the main goal of advancing the understanding of various corrosion phenomena. Both close packed and far spaced electrode configurations are discussed. Far spaced electrode arrays are optimized for high throughput experiments capable of elucidating the effects of various variables on corrosion properties. For instance the effects of a statistical distribution of flaws on corrosion properties can be examined. Close packed arrays enable unprecedented spatial and temporal information on the behavior of local anodes and cathodes. Interactions between corrosion sites can trigger or inhibit corrosion phenomena and affect corrosion damage evolution.

  6. Corrosion resistance of porous NiTi biomedical alloy in simulated body fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stergioudi, F.; Vogiatzis, C. A.; Pavlidou, E.; Skolianos, S.; Michailidis, N.

    2016-09-01

    The corrosion performance of two porous NiTi in physiological and Hank’s solutions was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization, cyclic polarization and impedance spectroscopy. Electric models simulating the corrosion mechanism at early stages of immersion were proposed, accounting for both microstructural observations and electrochemical results. Results indicate that both porous samples were susceptible to localized corrosion. The porosity increase (from 7% to 18%) resulted in larger and wider pore openings, thus favoring the corrosion resistance of 18% porous NiTi. Strengthening of corrosion resistance was observed in Hank’s solution. The pore morphology and micro-galvanic corrosion phenomena were determining factors affecting the corrosion resistance.

  7. Supplementary safety system corrosion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.H.; Wiersma, B.J.

    1991-05-21

    This memorandum presents experimental data from electrochemical and immersion tests to support the continued use of two sections of nonconforming steel in the Supplementary Safety System. The Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee met on May 16, 1991 to evaluate materials that had been installed in the SSS. The materials lacked complete Corrosion Evaluation (CE) and/or Certified Mill Test Reports and had been installed during recent modifications (Project S-4332). Items that lacked proper documentation included AISI Type 304 stainless steel (304) instrument tubing (0.375'' OD) associated with the pressure transmitters and a two-foot section of 304 pipe located on the far side of the system downstream of the pneumatic valves. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization scans were performed on sensitized and solution-annealed 304 samples in as-mixed and acidified Gd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, or ink'', solutions at room temperature to determine the susceptibility of 304 to localized corrosion in this environment. No localized attack was observed on the solution annealed or sensitized 304 in the Gd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solution. These tests revealed no significant differences in the behavior of the sensitized and solution-annealed 304 in gadolinium nitrate solution. Therefore, localized corrosion of the nonconforming components is not anticipated, and the performance of the nonconforming components should not differ from that of corrosion evaluated and certified materials. Previous studies have shown that AISI Type 304L stainless steel (304L) did not pit during a three-month exposure in gadolinium nitrate solutions of pH 2 or 5. These combined results support the continued use of the nonconforming steels until replacement can be made at the next scheduled long shut-down.

  8. Supplementary safety system corrosion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.H.; Wiersma, B.J.

    1991-05-21

    This memorandum presents experimental data from electrochemical and immersion tests to support the continued use of two sections of nonconforming steel in the Supplementary Safety System. The Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee met on May 16, 1991 to evaluate materials that had been installed in the SSS. The materials lacked complete Corrosion Evaluation (CE) and/or Certified Mill Test Reports and had been installed during recent modifications (Project S-4332). Items that lacked proper documentation included AISI Type 304 stainless steel (304) instrument tubing (0.375`` OD) associated with the pressure transmitters and a two-foot section of 304 pipe located on the far side of the system downstream of the pneumatic valves. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization scans were performed on sensitized and solution-annealed 304 samples in as-mixed and acidified Gd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, or ``ink``, solutions at room temperature to determine the susceptibility of 304 to localized corrosion in this environment. No localized attack was observed on the solution annealed or sensitized 304 in the Gd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solution. These tests revealed no significant differences in the behavior of the sensitized and solution-annealed 304 in gadolinium nitrate solution. Therefore, localized corrosion of the nonconforming components is not anticipated, and the performance of the nonconforming components should not differ from that of corrosion evaluated and certified materials. Previous studies have shown that AISI Type 304L stainless steel (304L) did not pit during a three-month exposure in gadolinium nitrate solutions of pH 2 or 5. These combined results support the continued use of the nonconforming steels until replacement can be made at the next scheduled long shut-down.

  9. Engineering Task Plan for Fourth Generation Hanford Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-06-20

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) describes the activities associated with the installation of cabinets containing corrosion monitoring equipment on tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. The new cabinets (one per tank) will be installed adjacent to existing corrosion probes already installed in riser WST-RISER-016 on both tanks. The corrosion monitoring equipment to be installed utilizes the technique of electrochemical noise (EN) for monitoring waste tank corrosion. Typically, EN consists of low frequency (4 Hz) and small amplitude signals that are spontaneously generated by electrochemical reactions occurring at corroding or other surfaces. EN analysis is well suited for monitoring and identifying the onset of localized corrosion, and for measuring uniform corrosion rates. A typical EN based corrosion-monitoring system measures instantaneous fluctuations in corrosion current and potential between three nominally identical electrodes of the material of interest immersed in the environment of interest. Time-dependent fluctuations in corrosion current are described by electrochemical current noise, and time-dependent fluctuations of corrosion potential are described by electrochemical noise. The corrosion monitoring systems are designed to detect the onset of localized corrosion phenomena if tank conditions should change to allow these phenomena to occur. In addition to the EN technique, the systems also facilitate the use of the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) technique to collect uniform corrosion rate information. LPR measures the linearity at the origin of the polarization curve for overvoltages up to a few millivolts away from the rest potential or natural corrosion potential. The slope of the current vs. voltage plot gives information on uniform corrosion rates.

  10. Prediction of Corrosion of Advanced Materials and Fabricated Components

    SciTech Connect

    A. Anderko; G. Engelhardt; M.M. Lencka; M.A. Jakab; G. Tormoen; N. Sridhar

    2007-09-29

    The goal of this project is to provide materials engineers, chemical engineers and plant operators with a software tool that will enable them to predict localized corrosion of process equipment including fabricated components as well as base alloys. For design and revamp purposes, the software predicts the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and assists the user in selecting the optimum alloy for a given environment. For the operation of existing plants, the software enables the users to predict the remaining life of equipment and help in scheduling maintenance activities. This project combined fundamental understanding of mechanisms of corrosion with focused experimental results to predict the corrosion of advanced, base or fabricated, alloys in real-world environments encountered in the chemical industry. At the heart of this approach is the development of models that predict the fundamental parameters that control the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environmental conditions and alloy composition. The fundamental parameters that dictate the occurrence of localized corrosion are the corrosion and repassivation potentials. The program team, OLI Systems and Southwest Research Institute, has developed theoretical models for these parameters. These theoretical models have been applied to predict the occurrence of localized corrosion of base materials and heat-treated components in a variety of environments containing aggressive and non-aggressive species. As a result of this project, a comprehensive model has been established and extensively verified for predicting the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and temperature by calculating the corrosion and repassivation potentials.To support and calibrate the model, an experimental database has been developed to elucidate (1) the effects of various inhibiting species as well as aggressive species on localized corrosion of nickel

  11. Phase I/II Study of Erlotinib Combined With Cisplatin and Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Herchenhorn, Daniel; Dias, Fernando L.; Viegas, Celia M.P.; Federico, Miriam H.; Araujo, Carlos Manoel M.; Small, Isabelle; Bezerra, Marcos; Fontao, Karina M.D.; Knust, Renata E.; Ferreira, Carlos G.; Martins, Renato G.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Erlotinib, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is active against head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and possibly has a synergistic interaction with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We investigated the safety and efficacy of erlotinib added to cisplatin and radiotherapy in locally advanced HNSCC. Methods and Materials: In this Phase I/II trial 100 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin was administered on Days 8, 29, and 50, and radiotherapy at 70 Gy was started on Day 8. During Phase I, the erlotinib dose was escalated (50 mg, 100 mg, and 150 mg) in consecutive cohorts of 3 patients, starting on Day 1 and continuing during radiotherapy. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any Grade 4 event requiring radiotherapy interruptions. Phase II was initiated 8 weeks after the last Phase I enrollment. Results: The study accrued 9 patients in Phase I and 28 in Phase II; all were evaluable for efficacy and safety. No dose-limiting toxicity occurred in Phase I, and the recommended Phase II dose was 150 mg. The most frequent nonhematologic toxicities were nausea/vomiting, dysphagia, stomatitis, xerostomia and in-field dermatitis, acneiform rash, and diarrhea. Of the 31 patients receiving a 150-mg daily dose of erlotinib, 23 (74%; 95% confidence interval, 56.8%-86.3%) had a complete response, 3 were disease free after salvage surgery, 4 had inoperable residual disease, and 1 died of sepsis during treatment. With a median 37 months' follow-up, the 3-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 61% and 72%, respectively. Conclusions: This combination appears safe, has encouraging activity, and deserves further studies in locally advanced HNSCC.

  12. Continuous 7-Days-A-Week External Beam Irradiation in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Final Results of the Phase I/II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Serkies, Krystyna; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Jassem, Jacek

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of definitive continuous 7-days-a-week pelvic irradiation without breaks between external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between November 1998 and December 1999, 30 patients with International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology Stage IIB or IIIB cervical cancer were included in a prospective Phase I/II study of continuous 7-days-a-week pelvic irradiation, to the total Manchester point B dose of 40.0-57.6 Gy. The first 13 patients (Group A) were given a daily tumor dose of 1.6 Gy, and the remaining 17 patients (Group B) were given 1.8 Gy. One or two immediate brachytherapy applications (point A dose 10-20 Gy, each) were performed in 28 cases. Results: Two patients did not complete the irradiation because of apparent early progression of disease during the irradiation. Eleven of the 28 evaluable patients (39%; 45% and 35% in Groups A and B, respectively) completed their treatment within the prescribed overall treatment time. Acute toxicity (including severe European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 and 4 effects in 40%) was experienced by 83% of patients and resulted in unplanned treatment interruptions in 40% of all patients (31% and 47% of patients in Groups A and B, respectively). Severe intestinal side effects occurred in 31% and 41% of Patients in Groups A and B, respectively (p = 0.71). The 5-year overall survival probability was 33%. Cancer recurrence occurred in 63% of patients: 20% inside and 57% outside the pelvis. Cumulative incidence of late severe bowel and urinary bladder toxicity at 24 months was 15%. Conclusion: Continuous irradiation in locally advanced cervical cancer is associated with a high incidence of severe acute toxicity, resulting in unplanned treatment interruptions. Late severe effects and survival after continuous radiotherapy do not substantially differ from

  13. Internal Corrosion and Deposition Control

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter reviews the current knowledge of the science of corrosion control and control of scaling in drinking water systems. Topics covered include: types of corrosion; physical, microbial and chemical factors influencing corrosion; corrosion of specific materials; direct ...

  14. Hot corrosion of the B2 nickel aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.

    1993-01-01

    The hot corrosion behavior of the B2 nickel aluminides was studied to determine the inherent hot corrosion resistance of the beta nickel aluminides and to develop a mechanism for the hot corrosion of the beta nickel aluminides. The effects of the prior processing of the material, small additions of zirconium, stoichiometry of the materials, and preoxidation of the samples were also examined. Additions of 2, 5, and 15 w/o chromium were used to determine the effect of chromium on the hot corrosion of the beta nickel aluminides and the minimum amount of chromium necessary for good hot corrosion resistance. The results indicate that the beta nickel aluminides have inferior inherent hot corrosion resistance despite their excellent oxidation resistance. Prior processing and zirconium additions had no discernible effect on the hot corrosion resistance of the alloys. Preoxidation extended the incubation period of the alloys only a few hours and was not considered to be an effective means of stopping hot corrosion. Stoichiometry was a major factor in determining the hot corrosion resistance of the alloys with the higher aluminum alloys having a definitely superior hot corrosion resistance. The addition of chromium to the alloys stopped the hot corrosion attack in the alloys tested. From a variety of experimental results, a complex hot corrosion mechanism was proposed. During the early stages of the hot corrosion of these alloys the corrosion is dominated by a local sulphidation/oxidation form of attack. During the intermediate stages of the hot corrosion, the aluminum depletion at the surface leads to a change in the oxidation mechanism from a protective external alumina layer to a mixed nickel-aluminum spinel and nickel oxide that can occur both externally and internally. The material undergoes extensive cracking during the later portions of the hot corrosion.

  15. Lymphadenectomy in locally advanced cervical cancer study (LiLACS): Phase III clinical trial comparing surgical with radiologic staging in patients with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Frumovitz, Michael; Querleu, Denis; Gil-Moreno, Antonio; Morice, Philippe; Jhingran, Anuja; Munsell, Mark F; Macapinlac, Homer A; Leblanc, Eric; Martinez, Alejandra; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2014-01-01

    Radiation treatment planning for women with locally advanced cervical cancer (stages IB2-IVA) is often based on positron emission tomography (PET). PET, however, has poor sensitivity in detecting metastases in aortocaval nodes. We have initiated a study with the objective of determining whether pre-therapeutic laparoscopic surgical staging followed by tailored chemoradiation improves survival as compared with PET/computed tomography (CT) radiologic staging alone followed by chemoradiation. This international, multicenter phase III trial will enroll 600 women with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer and PET/CT findings showing fluorodeoxyglucose-avid pelvic nodes and fluorodeoxyglucose-negative para-aortic nodes. Eligible patients will be randomized to undergo either pelvic radiotherapy with chemotherapy (standard-of-care arm) or surgical staging via a minimally invasive extraperitoneal approach followed by tailored radiotherapy with chemotherapy (experimental arm). The primary end point is overall survival. Secondary end points are disease-free survival, short- and long-term morbidity with pre-therapeutic surgical staging, and determination of anatomic locations of metastatic para-aortic nodes in relationship to the inferior mesenteric artery. We believe this study will show that tailored chemoradiation after pre-therapeutic surgical staging improves survival as compared with chemoradiation based on PET/CT in women with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer.

  16. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the Treatment of Locally Recurred Head-and-Neck Cancer: Final Analysis of a Phase I/II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Saarilahti, Kauko; Atula, Timo; Collan, Juhani; Salli, Eero; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Vaelimaeki, Petteri; Maekitie, Antti; Seppaenen, Marko; Minn, Heikki; Revitzer, Hannu; Kouri, Mauri; Kotiluoto, Petri; Seren, Tom; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli; Joensuu, Heikki

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy and safety of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of inoperable head-and-neck cancers that recur locally after conventional photon radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: In this prospective, single-center Phase I/II study, 30 patients with inoperable, locally recurred head-and-neck cancer (29 carcinomas and 1 sarcoma) were treated with BNCT. Prior treatments consisted of surgery and conventionally fractionated photon irradiation to a cumulative dose of 50 to 98 Gy administered with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Tumor responses were assessed by use of the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) and adverse effects by use of the National Cancer Institute common terminology criteria version 3.0. Intravenously administered L-boronophenylalanine-fructose (400 mg/kg) was administered as the boron carrier. Each patient was scheduled to be treated twice with BNCT. Results: Twenty-six patients received BNCT twice; four were treated once. Of the 29 evaluable patients, 22 (76%) responded to BNCT, 6 (21%) had tumor growth stabilization for 5.1 and 20.3 months, and 1 (3%) progressed. The median progression-free survival time was 7.5 months (95% confidence interval, 5.4-9.6 months). Two-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 20% and 30%, respectively, and 27% of the patients survived for 2 years without locoregional recurrence. The most common acute Grade 3 adverse effects were mucositis (54% of patients), oral pain (54%), and fatigue (32%). Three patients were diagnosed with osteoradionecrosis (each Grade 3) and one patient with soft-tissue necrosis (Grade 4). Late Grade 3 xerostomia was present in 3 of the 15 evaluable patients (20%). Conclusions: Most patients who have inoperable, locally advanced head-and-neck carcinoma that has recurred at a previously irradiated site respond to boronophenylalanine-mediated BNCT, but cancer recurrence after BNCT remains frequent. Toxicity was

  17. Corrosion inhibiting organic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sasson, E.

    1984-10-16

    A corrosion inhibiting coating comprises a mixture of waxes, petroleum jelly, a hardener and a solvent. In particular, a corrosion inhibiting coating comprises candelilla wax, carnauba wax, microcrystalline waxes, white petrolatum, an oleoresin, lanolin and a solvent.

  18. Duralumin and Its Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, WM

    1927-01-01

    The types of corrosion and factors of corrosion of duralumin are investigated. Salt water is the most common of the corroding media with which designers have to contend in using duralumin in aircraft and ships.

  19. Initiation and growth of mesa corrosion attack during CO{sub 2} corrosion of carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Nyborg, R.

    1998-12-31

    The initiation and development of mesa corrosion attack during CO{sub 2} corrosion of carbon steel has been studied in flow loop experiments performed at 80 C and pH 5.8. Video recordings of growing mesa attacks have been performed in a test section with a glass window in the corrosion loop. These observations have shown that the mesa attack can grow both laterally and in depth below a lid of original corrosion film before the film is torn away stepwise by the flow. Possible mechanisms for initiation of mesa corrosion attack are discussed based on the observations from the video recordings. Mesa attacks can result from several small local attacks growing together into one large mesa attack.

  20. A Survey of Local Group Galaxies Currently Forming Stars. III. A Search for Luminous Blue Variables and Other Hα Emission-Line Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip; McNeill, Reagin T.; Olsen, K. A. G.; Hodge, Paul W.; Blaha, Cynthia; Jacoby, George H.; Smith, R. C.; Strong, Shay B.

    2007-12-01

    We describe a search for Hα emission-line stars in M31, M33, and seven dwarfs in or near the Local Group (IC 10, NGC 6822, WLM, Sextans B, Sextans A, Pegasus, and the Phoenix dwarf) using interference filter imaging with the KPNO and CTIO 4 m telescopes and Mosaic cameras. The survey is aimed primarily at identifying new luminous blue variables (LBVs) from their spectroscopic similarity to known LBVs, avoiding the bias toward photometric variability, which may require centuries to manifest itself if LBVs go through long quiescent periods. Follow-up spectroscopy with WIYN confirms that our survey detected a wealth of stars whose spectra are similar to the known LBVs. We "classify" the spectra of known LBVs and compare these to the spectra of the new LBV candidates. We demonstrate spectacular spectral variability for several of the new LBV candidates, such as AM2, previously classified as a Wolf-Rayet star (WR), which now shows Fe I, Fe II, and Balmer emission lines but neither the N III λλ4634, 4642 nor the He II λ4686 emission it did in 1982. Profound spectral changes are also noted for other suspected and known LBVs. Several of the LBV candidates also show >0.5 mag changes in V over the past 10-20 years. The number of known or suspected LBVs is now 24 in M31, 37 in M33, 1 in NGC 6822, and 3 in IC 10. We estimate that the total number of LBVs in M31 and M33 may be several hundred, in contrast to the eight known historically through large-scale photometric variability. This has significant implications for the timescale of the LBV phase. We also identify a few new WRs and peculiar emission-line objects. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  1. Nickel-base alloys combat corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.C.; Herda, W.

    1995-06-01

    The modern chemical process industry must increase production efficiency to remain competitive. Manufacturers typically meet this challenge by utilizing higher temperatures and pressures, and more-corrosive catalysts. At the same time, the industry has to solve the technical and commercial problems resulting from rigid environmental regulations. To overcome these obstacles, new alloys having higher levels of corrosion resistance have been developed. These materials are based on increased understanding of the physical metallurgy of nickel-base alloys, especially the role of alloying elements. Results of many studies have led to innovations in nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys containing both high and low amounts of nickel. Higher molybdenum and chromium contents, together with nitrogen additions, have opened up an entirely new class of alloys having unique properties. In addition, a new chromium-base, fully wrought super stainless steel shows excellent promise in solving many corrosion problems. These newer alloys have the ability to combat uniform corrosion, localized corrosion, and stress-corrosion cracking in the harsh halogenic environment of the chemical process industry. This article briefly lists some of the major highlights and corrosion data on recent nickel-chromium-molybdenum and nickel-molybdenum alloys, and the development of a chromium-base, wrought super-austenitic alloy known as Nicrofer 3033 (Alloy 33). Some comparisons with existing alloys are presented, along with a few commercial applications.

  2. Long Term Corrosion Potential and Corrosion Rate of Creviced Alloy 22 in Chloride Plus Nitrate Brines

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K J; Stuart, M L; Etien, R A; Hust, G A; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2005-11-05

    Alloy 22 is a nickel base alloy highly resistant to all forms of corrosion. In conditions where tight crevices exist in hot chloride containing solutions and at anodic potentials, Alloy 22 may suffer crevice corrosion, a form of localized attack. The occurrence (or not) of crevice corrosion in a given environment (e.g. salt concentration and temperature), is governed by the values of the critical potential (E{sub crit}) for crevice corrosion and the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) that the alloy may establish in the studied environment. If E{sub corr} is equal or higher than E{sub crit}, crevice corrosion may be expected. In addition, it is generally accepted that as Alloy 22 becomes passive in a certain environment, its E{sub corr} increases and its corrosion rate (CR) decreases. This paper discusses the evolution of E{sub corr} and corrosion rate (CR) of creviced Alloy 22 specimens in six different mixtures of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium nitrate (KNO{sub 3}) at 100 C. The effect of immersion time on the value of E{sub crit} was also determined. Two types of specimens were used, polished as-welded (ASW) and as-welded plus solution heat-treated (ASW+SHT). The latter contained the black annealing oxide film on the surface. Results show that, as the immersion time increases, E{sub corr} increased and the CR decreased. Even for highly concentrated brine solutions at 100 C the CR was < 30 nm/year after more than 250 days immersion. Some of the exposed specimens (mainly the SHT specimens) suffered crevice corrosion at the open circuit potential in the naturally aerated brines. Immersion times of over 250 days did not reduce the resistance of Alloy 22 to localized corrosion.

  3. RpoS and quorum sensing control expression and polar localization of Vibrio cholerae chemotaxis cluster III proteins in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ringgaard, Simon; Hubbard, Troy; Mandlik, Anjali; Davis, Brigid M; Waldor, Matthew K

    2015-08-01

    The diarrheal pathogen Vibrio cholerae contains three gene clusters that encode chemotaxis-related proteins, but only cluster II appears to be required for chemotaxis. Here, we present the first characterization of V. cholerae's 'cluster III' chemotaxis system. We found that cluster III proteins assemble into foci at bacterial poles, like those formed by cluster II proteins, but the two systems assemble independently and do not colocalize. Cluster III proteins are expressed in vitro during stationary phase and in conjunction with growth arrest linked to carbon starvation. This expression, as well as expression in vivo in suckling rabbits, is dependent upon RpoS. V. cholerae's CAI-1 quorum sensing (QS) system is also required for cluster III expression in stationary phase and modulates its expression in vivo, but is not required for cluster III expression in response to carbon starvation. Surprisingly, even though the CAI-1 and AI-2 QS systems are thought to feed into the same signaling pathway, the AI-2 system inhibited cluster III gene expression, revealing that the outputs of the two QS systems are not always the same. The distinctions between genetic determinants of cluster III expression in vitro and in vivo highlight the distinctive nature of the in vivo environment.

  4. Solution chemistry of Mo(III) and Mo(IV): Thermodynamic foundation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peiming; Wilson, L; Wesolowski, David J; Rosenqvist, Jorgen K; Anderko, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the behavior of molybdenum dissolution products in systems that approximate localized corrosion environments, solubility of Mo(III) in equilibrium with solid MoO2 has been determined at 80 C as a function of solution acidity, chloride concentration and partial pressure of hydrogen. The measurements indicate a strong increase in solubility with acidity and chloride concentration and a weak effect of hydrogen partial pressure. The obtained results have been combined with literature data for systems containing Mo(III), Mo(IV), and Mo(VI) in solutions to develop a comprehensive thermodynamic model of aqueous molybdenum chemistry. The model is based on a previously developed framework for simulating the properties of electrolyte systems ranging from infinite dilution to solid saturation or fused salt limit. To reproduce the measurements, the model assumes the presence of a chloride complex of Mo(III) (i.e., MoCl2+) and hydrolyzed species (MoOH2+, Mo(OH)2 +, and Mo(OH)3 0) in addition to the Mo3+ ion. The model generally reproduces the experimental data within experimental scattering and provides a tool for predicting the phase behavior and speciation in complex, concentrated aqueous solutions. Thus, it provides a foundation for simulating the behavior of molybdenum species in localized corrosion environments.

  5. Corrosion Product Film-Induced Stress Facilitates Stress Corrosion Cracking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhiliang; Ren, Xuechong; Guan, Yongjun; Su, Yanjing

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analyses were conducted to clarify the role of corrosion product films (CPFs) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Flat and U-shaped edge-notched specimens were investigated in terms of the CPF-induced stress in the metallic substrate and the stress in the CPF. For a U-shaped edge-notched specimen, the stress field in front of the notch tip is affected by the Young’s modulus of the CPF and the CPF thickness and notch geometry. The CPF-induced tensile stress in the metallic substrate is superimposed on the applied load to increase the crack tip strain and facilitate localized plasticity deformation. In addition, the stress in the CPF surface contributes to the rupture of the CPFs. The results provide physical insights into the role of CPFs in SCC. PMID:26066367

  6. Engineering Task Plan for the 241-AN-105 Multi-Function Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    EDGEMON, G.L.

    1999-08-25

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) describes the activities associated with the installation of the corrosion probe assembly into riser WST-RISER-016 (formerly 15B) of tank 241-AN-105. The corrosion monitoring system utilizes the technique of electrochemical noise (EN) for monitoring waste tank corrosion. Typically, EN consists of low frequency (4 Hz) and small amplitude signals that are spontaneously generated by electrochemical reactions occurring at corroding or other surfaces. EN analysis is well suited for monitoring and identifying the onset of localized corrosion, and for measuring uniform corrosion rates. A typical EN based corrosion-monitoring system measures instantaneous fluctuations in corrosion current and potential between three nominally identical electrodes of the material of interest immersed in the environment of interest. Time-dependent fluctuations in corrosion current are described by electrochemical current noise, and time-dependent fluctuations of corrosion potential are described by electrochemical noise. The corrosion monitoring system is designed to detect the onset of localized corrosion phenomena if tank conditions should change to allow these phenomena to occur. In addition to the EN technique, the system also facilitates the use of the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) technique to collect uniform corrosion rate information. LPR measures the linearity at the origin of the polarization curve for overvoltages up to a few millivolts away from the rest potential or natural corrosion potential. The slope of the current vs. voltage plot gives information on uniform corrosion rates.

  7. Corrosive effect of the type of soil in the systems of grounding more used (copper and stainless steel) for local soil samples from the city of Tunja (Colombia), by means of electrochemical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, L.; Salas, Y.; Blanco, J.

    2016-02-01

    In this work electrochemical techniques were used to determine the corrosion behaviour of copper and stainless steel electrodes, used in grounding varying soil type with which they react. A slight but significant change in the corrosion rate, linear polarization resistance and equivalent parameters in the technique of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy circuit was observed. Electrolytes in soils are slightly different depending on laboratory study, but the influence was noted in the retention capacity of water, mainly due to clays, affecting ion mobility and therefore measures such as the corrosion rate. Behaviour was noted in lower potential for copper corrosion, though the corrosion rate regardless of the type of soil, was much higher for electrodes based on copper, by several orders of magnitude.

  8. Computer aided corrosion surveillance using electrochemical noise techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, S.A.; Quirk, G.P.; Hadfield, M.

    1999-11-01

    Real-time mechanistic analysis of electrochemical noise data is essential for rapid identification of localized corrosion by plant operators. Recent developments towards this goal include: Intelligent Noise Data Reduction techniques to eliminate uninformative data; neural nets which learn how to categorize corrosion mechanisms from data patterns; multivariate analysis which allows the identification of combinations of plant process parameters that cause damage. These techniques can be combined to facilitate pro-active management of the corrosion problem, including consideration of corrosion mechanisms within the plant optimization process.

  9. ELECTROCHEMICAL NOISE BASED CORROSION MONITORING HANFORD SITE PROGRAM STATUS

    SciTech Connect

    EDGEMON, G.L.

    2005-03-21

    The Hanford Site near Richland, Washington has 177 underground waste tanks that store approximately 253 million liters of radioactive waste from 50 years of plutonium production. Prior to 1995 no online corrosion monitoring systems were in place at Hanford to facilitate the early detection of the onset of localized corrosion should it occur in a waste tank. Because of this, a program was started in 1995 to develop an electrochemical noise (EN) corrosion monitoring system to improve Hanford's corrosion monitoring strategy. Three systems are now installed and operating at Hanford. System design, performance history, data and the results of a recent analysis of tank vapor space data are presented.

  10. Localized deformation as a key precursor to initiation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels employed in nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsen, Wade; Diego, Gonzalo; Devrient, Bastian

    2010-11-01

    Cold-work has been associated with the occurrence of intergranular cracking of stainless steels employed in light water reactors. This study examined the deformation behavior of AISI 304, AISI 347 and a higher stacking fault energy model alloy subjected to bulk cold-work and (for 347) surface deformation. Deformation microstructures of the materials were examined and correlated with their particular mechanical response under different conditions of temperature, strain rate and degree of prior cold-work. Select slow-strain rate tensile tests in autoclaves enabled the role of local strain heterogeneity in crack initiation in pressurized water reactor environments to be considered. The high stacking fault energy material exhibited uniform strain hardening, even at sub-zero temperatures, while the commercial stainless steels showed significant heterogeneity in their strain response. Surface treatments introduced local cold-work, which had a clear effect on the surface roughness and hardness, and on near-surface residual stress profiles. Autoclave tests led to transgranular surface cracking for a circumferentially ground surface, and intergranular crack initiation for a polished surface.

  11. SRB seawater corrosion project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozack, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 2219 aluminum when exposed to seawater was characterized. Controlled corrosion experiments at three different temperatures (30, 60 and 100 C) and two different environments (seawater and 3.5 percent salt solution) were designed to elucidate the initial stages in the corrosion process. It was found that 2219 aluminum is an active catalytic surface for growth of Al2O3, NaCl, and MgO. Formation of Al2O3 is favored at lower temperatures, while MgO is favored at higher temperatures. Visible corrosion products are formed within 30 minutes after seawater exposure. Corrosion characteristics in 3.5 percent salt solution are different than corrosion in seawater. Techniques utilized were: (1) scanning electron microscopy, (2) energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and (3) Auger electron spectroscopy.

  12. Stress corrosion resistant fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    A family of high performance aerospace fasteners made from corrosion resistant alloys for use in applications where corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking are of major concern are discussed. The materials discussed are mainly A-286, Inconel 718, MP35N and MP159. Most of the fasteners utilize cold worked and aged materials to achieve the desired properties. The fasteners are unique in that they provide a combination of high strength and immunity to stress corrosion cracking not previously attainable. A discussion of fastener stress corrosion failures is presented including a review of the history and a description of the mechanism. Case histories are presented to illustrate the problems which can arise when material selection is made without proper regard for the environmental conditions. Mechanical properties and chemical compositions are included for the fasteners discussed. Several aspects of the application of high performance corrosion resistant fasteners are discussed including galvanic compatibility and torque-tension relationships.

  13. Corrosion initiation and propagation behavior of corrosion resistant concrete reinforcing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Michael F.

    cracking. Experimental results were used in conjunction with an existing model to predict the time until concrete cracking occurs for new rebar materials. The results suggest that corrosion resistant materials offer a significant extension to the corrosion propagation stage over carbon steel, even in very aggressive conditions because small, localized anodes develop when initiated.

  14. Electrochemical corrosion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knockemus, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The objective was to gain familiarity with the Model 350 Corrosion Measurement Console, to determine if metal protection by grease coatings can be measured by the polarization-resistance method, and to compare corrosion rates of 4130 steel coated with various greases. Results show that grease protection of steel may be determined electrochemically. Studies were also conducted to determine the effectiveness of certain corrosion inhibitors on aluminum and steel.

  15. Effective corrosion monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, C.F.; Tofield, B.C.

    1988-04-01

    The results of two surveys (conducted in 1981 and 1984) of users of corrosion monitoring equipment are described. The benefits to be obtained from a well-designed corrosion monitoring system, especially if a corrosion control program is used, are outlined together with the difficulties and barriers that can obstruct successful application. Developing methods such as AC impedance, electrochemical noise, and thin layer activation are discussed in view of the comments received from the surveys.

  16. Corrosion Detection Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, B.

    2003-12-01

    Nondestructive Examination Systems' (NDE) specialists at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site have unique, remotely controllable, corrosion detection capabilities. The corrosion detection devices most frequently used are automated ultrasonic mapping systems, digital radiography imaging devices, infrared imaging, and eddy current mapping systems. These devices have been successfully used in a variety of applications, some of which involve high levels of background radiation. Not only is corrosion located and mapped but other types of anomalies such as cracks have been detected and characterized. Examples of actual corrosion that has been detected will be discussed along with the NDE systems that were used.

  17. Initial steps of corrosion in the steel/Ca(OH)[sub 2] + Cl[sup [minus

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, J.A.; Otero, E.; Feliu, S. ); Lopez, W. )

    1993-01-01

    The studies about localized corrosion usually involve determining the critical breakdown potential (E[sub b]). However, this procedure does not provide an accurate indication of the risk of pit corrosion occurring naturally, because in free corrosion conditions the necessary polarization to reach the breakdown potential is not applied externally, but it depends exclusively on the generation of some type of galvanic cell. The goal of this work was to determine under free corrosion conditions the factors that foster localized corrosion in the steel/Ca(OH)[sub 2] + Cl[sup [minus

  18. Flow-induced corrosion behavior of absorbable magnesium-based stents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Shanov, Vesselin; Xu, Zhigang; Collins, Boyce; White, Leon; Jang, Yongseok; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study corrosion behavior of magnesium (Mg) alloys (MgZnCa plates and AZ31 stents) under varied fluid flow conditions representative of the vascular environment. Experiments revealed that fluid hydrodynamics, fluid flow velocity and shear stress play essential roles in the corrosion behavior of absorbable magnesium-based stent devices. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerates the overall corrosion (including localized, uniform, pitting and erosion corrosions) due to the increased mass transfer and mechanical force. FISS increased the average uniform corrosion rate, the localized corrosion coverage ratios and depths and the removal rate of corrosion products inside the corrosion pits. For MgZnCa plates, an increase of FISS results in an increased pitting factor but saturates at an FISS of ∼0.15Pa. For AZ31 stents, the volume loss ratio (31%) at 0.056Pa was nearly twice that (17%) at 0Pa before and after corrosion. Flow direction has a significant impact on corrosion behavior as more severe pitting and erosion corrosion was observed on the back ends of the MgZnCa plates, and the corrosion product layer facing the flow direction peeled off from the AZ31 stent struts. This study demonstrates that flow-induced corrosion needs be understood so that Mg-based stents in vascular environments can be effectively designed.

  19. SAGE III

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-15

    SAGE III Data and Information The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas ... on the spacecraft. SAGE III produced L1 and L2 scientific data from 5/07/2002 until 12/31/2005. The flight of the second instrument is as ... Guide Documents:  Project Guide Data Products User's Guide  (PDF) Relevant Documents:  ...

  20. Corrosion chemistry closing comments: opportunities in corrosion science facilitated by operando experimental characterization combined with multi-scale computational modelling.

    PubMed

    Scully, John R

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in characterization tools, computational capabilities, and theories have created opportunities for advancement in understanding of solid-fluid interfaces at the nanoscale in corroding metallic systems. The Faraday Discussion on Corrosion Chemistry in 2015 highlighted some of the current needs, gaps and opportunities in corrosion science. Themes were organized into several hierarchical categories that provide an organizational framework for corrosion. Opportunities to develop fundamental physical and chemical data which will enable further progress in thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of corrosion were discussed. These will enable new and better understanding of unit processes that govern corrosion at the nanoscale. Additional topics discussed included scales, films and oxides, fluid-surface and molecular-surface interactions, selected topics in corrosion science and engineering as well as corrosion control. Corrosion science and engineering topics included complex alloy dissolution, local corrosion, and modelling of specific corrosion processes that are made up of collections of temporally and spatially varying unit processes such as oxidation, ion transport, and competitive adsorption. Corrosion control and mitigation topics covered some new insights on coatings and inhibitors. Further advances in operando or in situ experimental characterization strategies at the nanoscale combined with computational modelling will enhance progress in the field, especially if coupling across length and time scales can be achieved incorporating the various phenomena encountered in corrosion. Readers are encouraged to not only to use this ad hoc organizational scheme to guide their immersion into the current opportunities in corrosion chemistry, but also to find value in the information presented in their own ways.

  1. Constituent Particle Clustering and Pitting Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, D. Gary

    2012-08-01

    Corrosion is a primary degradation mechanism that affects the durability and integrity of structures made of aluminum alloys, and it is a concern for commercial transport and military aircraft. In aluminum alloys, corrosion results from local galvanic coupling between constituent particles and the metal matrix. Due to variability in particle sizes, spatial location, and chemical composition, to name a few critical variables, corrosion is a complex stochastic process. Severe pitting is caused by particle clusters that are located near the material surface, which, in turn, serve as nucleation sites for subsequent corrosion fatigue crack growth. These evolution processes are highly dependent on the spatial statistics of particles. The localized corrosion growth rate is primarily dependent on the galvanic process perpetuated by particle-to-particle interactions and electrochemical potentials. Frequently, severe pits are millimeters in length, and these pits have a dominant impact on the structural prognosis. To accommodate large sizes, a model for three-dimensional (3-D) constituent particle microstructure is proposed. To describe the constituent particle microstructure in three dimensions, the model employs a fusion of classic stereological techniques, spatial point pattern analyses, and qualitative observations. The methodology can be carried out using standard optical microscopy and image analysis techniques.

  2. COPPER PITTING CORROSION: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Localized or pitting corrosion of copper pipes used in household drinking-water plumbing is a problem for many water utilities and their customers. Extreme attack can lead to pinhole water leaks that may result in water damage, mold growth, and costly repairs. Water quality has b...

  3. Potentiodynamic Corrosion Testing.

    PubMed

    Munir, Selin; Pelletier, Matthew H; Walsh, William R

    2016-01-01

    Different metallic materials have different polarization characteristics as dictated by the open circuit potential, breakdown potential, and passivation potential of the material. The detection of these electrochemical parameters identifies the corrosion factors of a material. A reliable and well-functioning corrosion system is required to achieve this. Corrosion of the samples was achieved via a potentiodynamic polarization technique employing a three-electrode configuration, consisting of reference, counter, and working electrodes. Prior to commencement a baseline potential is obtained. Following the stabilization of the corrosion potential (Ecorr), the applied potential is ramped at a slow rate in the positive direction relative to the reference electrode. The working electrode was a stainless steel screw. The reference electrode was a standard Ag/AgCl. The counter electrode used was a platinum mesh. Having a reliable and well-functioning in vitro corrosion system to test biomaterials provides an in-expensive technique that allows for the systematic characterization of the material by determining the breakdown potential, to further understand the material's response to corrosion. The goal of the protocol is to set up and run an in vitro potentiodynamic corrosion system to analyze pitting corrosion for small metallic medical devices. PMID:27683978

  4. Aluminum Corrosion and Turbidity

    SciTech Connect

    Longtin, F.B.

    2003-03-10

    Aluminum corrosion and turbidity formation in reactors correlate with fuel sheath temperature. To further substantiate this correlation, discharged fuel elements from R-3, P-2 and K-2 cycles were examined for extent of corrosion and evidence of breaking off of the oxide film. This report discusses this study.

  5. Potentiodynamic Corrosion Testing.

    PubMed

    Munir, Selin; Pelletier, Matthew H; Walsh, William R

    2016-09-04

    Different metallic materials have different polarization characteristics as dictated by the open circuit potential, breakdown potential, and passivation potential of the material. The detection of these electrochemical parameters identifies the corrosion factors of a material. A reliable and well-functioning corrosion system is required to achieve this. Corrosion of the samples was achieved via a potentiodynamic polarization technique employing a three-electrode configuration, consisting of reference, counter, and working electrodes. Prior to commencement a baseline potential is obtained. Following the stabilization of the corrosion potential (Ecorr), the applied potential is ramped at a slow rate in the positive direction relative to the reference electrode. The working electrode was a stainless steel screw. The reference electrode was a standard Ag/AgCl. The counter electrode used was a platinum mesh. Having a reliable and well-functioning in vitro corrosion system to test biomaterials provides an in-expensive technique that allows for the systematic characterization of the material by determining the breakdown potential, to further understand the material's response to corrosion. The goal of the protocol is to set up and run an in vitro potentiodynamic corrosion system to analyze pitting corrosion for small metallic medical devices.

  6. Fireside Corrosion USC Steering

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak

    2011-09-07

    Oxy-Fuel Fireside Research goals are: (1) Determine the effect of oxy-fuel combustion on fireside corrosion - (a) Flue gas recycle choice, Staged combustion ramifications, (c) JCOAL Collaboration; and (2) Develop methods to use chromia solubility in ash as an 'ash corrosivity' measurement - (a) Synthetic ashes at first, then boiler and burner rig ashes, (b) Applicable to SH/RH conditions.

  7. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  8. Metallic plate corrosion and uptake of corrosion products by nafion in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Bozzini, Benedetto; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Kaulich, Burkhard; Kiskinova, Maya; Prasciolu, Mauro; Sgura, Ivonne

    2010-07-19

    Nafion contamination by ferrous-alloy corrosion products, resulting in dramatic drops of the Ohmic potential, is a suspected major failure mode of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells that make use of metallic bipolar plates. This study demonstrates the potential of scanning transmission X-ray microscopy combined with X-ray absorption and fluorescence microspectroscopy for exploring corrosion processes of Ni and Fe electrodes in contact with a hydrated Nafion film in a thin-layer cell. The imaged morphology changes of the Ni and Fe electrodes and surrounding Nafion film that result from relevant electrochemical processes are correlated to the spatial distribution, local concentration, and chemical state of Fe and Ni species. The X-ray fluorescence maps and absorption spectra, sampled at different locations, show diffusion of corrosion products within the Nafion film only in the case of the Fe electrodes, whereas the Ni electrodes appear corrosion resistant. PMID:20564283

  9. Crude unit corrosion and corrosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Bagdasarian, A.; Feather, J.; Hull, B.; Stephenson, R.; Strong, R.

    1996-08-01

    In the petroleum refining process, the Crude Unit is the initial stage of distillation of the crude oil into useable fractions, either as end products or feed to downstream units. The major pieces of equipment found on units will vary depending on factors such as the assay of the design crude, the age of the refinery, and other downstream units. The unit discussed in this paper has all of the major pieces of equipment found on crude units including double desalting, a preflash section, an atmospheric section, a vacuum section, and a stabilization section. This paper reviews fundamental corrosion issues concerning the Crude Unit process. It is, in concise form, a description of the process and major equipment found in the Crude Unit; types of corrosion and where they occur; corrosion monitoring and inspection advice; and a list of related references for further reading. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Corrosion in methylphosphonic difluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Zabielski, C.V.; Levy, M. )

    1994-12-01

    Electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization studies were conducted for a variety of ferrous and nonferrous metals in methylphosphonic difluoride. Studies were also made of the effects of organic inhibitors on the corrosion rates of 1,020 steel, type 316L, and type 304 stainless steel, and magnesium in methylphosphonic difluoride. Chemical weapons in the US include binary munitions in which two components are kept in separate compartments until activation. These munitions must be stockpiled for long periods of time (up to 30 years) and then must operate reliably when the need arises. The principal cause of failure will be corrosion of the storage container by the highly corrosive methylphosphonic difluoride (DF). The objectives of this study were to: investigate the kinetics and mechanisms of corrosion of Al 6061-T6 and candidate metal alloys in DF; establish effective corrosion inhibitors; and ultimately incorporate or immobilize inhibitors into coatings that provide protection above the liquid line.

  11. Optimization of a Three-Component Green Corrosion Inhibitor Mixture for Using in Cooling Water by Experimental Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghari, E.; Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Ahangari, M.; Bagheri, R.

    2016-04-01

    Factors such as inhibitor concentration, solution hydrodynamics, and temperature influence the performance of corrosion inhibitor mixtures. The simultaneous studying of the impact of different factors is a time- and cost-consuming process. The use of experimental design methods can be useful in minimizing the number of experiments and finding local optimized conditions for factors under the investigation. In the present work, the inhibition performance of a three-component inhibitor mixture against corrosion of St37 steel rotating disk electrode, RDE, was studied. The mixture was composed of citric acid, lanthanum(III) nitrate, and tetrabutylammonium perchlorate. In order to decrease the number of experiments, the L16 Taguchi orthogonal array was used. The "control factors" were the concentration of each component and the rotation rate of RDE and the "response factor" was the inhibition efficiency. The scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy techniques verified the formation of islands of adsorbed citrate complexes with lanthanum ions and insoluble lanthanum(III) hydroxide. From the Taguchi analysis results the mixture of 0.50 mM lanthanum(III) nitrate, 0.50 mM citric acid, and 2.0 mM tetrabutylammonium perchlorate under the electrode rotation rate of 1000 rpm was found as optimum conditions.

  12. Comparison of TGSCC and crevice corrosion in a brass/nitrite system

    SciTech Connect

    Edgemon, G.L.; Bell, G.E.C.; Mickalonis, J.I.

    1999-11-01

    The use of electrochemical noise based corrosion monitoring equipment to detect localized corrosion in laboratory and process systems has increased markedly over the last five years. One of the most interesting systems to study is the stress corrosion cracking of UNS C22000 brass exposed to 1-M sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2}) at ambient temperature. This test has been proposed as a possible standard for evaluating electrochemical noise equipment. Stressed brass specimens exposed to this environment consistently display the same movement from general corrosion to passivation to transgranular stress corrosion cracking. In an effort to better understand the complex patterns of data this system is capable of producing, crevice corrosion tests using similar specimens and environments were performed. Data from the stress corrosion cracking tests are presented and compared with data from the crevice corrosion tests.

  13. Research needs for corrosion control and prevention in energy conservation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brooman, E.W.; Hurwitch, J.W.

    1985-06-01

    A group of 28 electrochemists, materials scientists and corrosion engineers was brought together to determine if the government could have a role as a focal point for corrosion R and D, discuss opportunities in fundamental research and solving corrosion problems, and develop a research agenda. Participants from government, industry and academia assembled into four technical discussion groups: localized corrosion, general corrosion, high temperature corrosion, and corrosion control and prevention. Research needs were identified, discussed, then assigned a figure of merit. Some 44 corrosion control and prevention topics were identified as having a high priority for consideration for funding. Another 35 topics were identified as having a medium priority for funding. When classified according to corrosion phenomenon, the areas which should receive the most attention are molten salt attack, crevice corrosion, stress-corrosion cracking, erosion-corrosion, pitting attack, intergranular attack and corrosion fatigue. When classified according to the sector or system involved, those which should receive the most attention are chemical processes, transportation, buildings and structures, electric power generation, and batteries and fuel cells.

  14. The Corrosion and Preservation of Iron Antiques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Discusses general corrosion reactions (iron to rust), including corrosion of iron, sulfur dioxide, chlorides, immersed corrosion, and underground corrosion. Also discusses corrosion inhibition, including corrosion inhibitors (anodic, cathodic, mixed, organic); safe/dangerous inhibitors; and corrosion/inhibition in concrete/marble, showcases/boxes,…

  15. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

    1981-10-21

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  16. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Pullen, William C.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Bell, Richard T.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  17. Liquid-metal corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; DeVan, J.H.; Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1985-09-01

    A review of corrosion and environmental effects on the mechanical properties of candidate structural alloys for use with liquid metals in fusion reactors is presented. The corrosion/mass transfer behavior of austenitic and ferritic steels and vanadium-base alloys is evaluated to determine the preliminary operating temperature limits for circulating and static liquid-lithium and Pb-17Li systems. The influence of liquid-metal environment on the mechanical properties of structural materials is discussed. Corrosion effects of nitrate and fluoride salts are presented. Requirements for additional data are identified.

  18. Novel systems for corrosion detection in piping

    SciTech Connect

    Raad, J.A. de; Fingerhut, M.P.

    1995-12-31

    Predictive maintenance requires accurate quantitative information. Nondestructive testing (NDT) tools have been able provide the necessary information, economically. Examination of the full surface of components is often required, which is contrary to the more typical spot location measurements. In addition, predictive maintenance inspection often requires the examination of hot and or insulated components. These challenges have been satisfied by recent developments in NDT and are applicable to a broad range of facility types such as tank terminals and pulp and paper plants. For non-insulated and above ground piping systems magnetic flux leakage (MFL) tools have recently been introduced into the marketplace. These tools allow very quick and reliable detection of local and extensive general corrosion, in carbon steel pipes or vessel walls, with nominal wall thicknesses of up to 15 mm. A relatively new method for detection of corrosion under insulated components is the RTD-Incotest, pulse eddy current (PEC) system. This system can also provide the components remaining wall thickness at general corrosion locations. Demand for corrosion detection under insulation on piping has also been satisfied by new dynamic Real-Time-Radiography systems. These systems are relatively fast, but the concept itself and its weight require close human access to the pipe, hence, some method of accessing above ground piping is required. Nevertheless, the systems satisfy a market demand. Time-of-flight-Diffraction (TOFD) for detection and sizing of weld root corrosion as well as coherent color enhanced thickness mapping will also be introduced.

  19. Detection of stress corrosion cracking and general corrosion of mild steel in simulated defense nuclear waste solutions using electrochemical noise analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgemon, G. L.; Danielson, M. J.; Bell, G. E. C.

    1997-06-01

    Underground waste tanks fabricated from mild steel store more than 253 million liters of high level radioactive waste from 50 years of weapons production at the Hanford Site. The probable modes of corrosion failures are reported as nitrate stress corrosion cracking and pitting. In an effort to develop a waste tank corrosion monitoring system, laboratory tests were conducted to characterize electrochemical noise data for both uniform and localized corrosion of mild steel and other materials in simulated waste environments. The simulated waste solutions were primarily composed of ammonium nitrate or sodium nitrate and were held at approximately 97°C. The electrochemical noise of freely corroding specimens was monitored, recorded and analyzed for periods ranging between 10 and 500 h. At the end of each test period, the specimens were examined to correlate electrochemical noise data with corrosion damage. Data characteristic of uniform corrosion and stress corrosion cracking are presented.

  20. Evaluation of the stress corrosion behavior of selected stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dorning, R.E. II

    1983-11-05

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the stress corrosion behavior of selected stainless steels in several fluorinating environments. The possibility of stress corrosion cracking or pitting which could substantially reduce the serviceability of the stainless steels was the primary concern. Laboratory testing indicated that stress corrosion cracking or other forms of localized attack of the austenitic stainless steels tested (304, 304-L, 316, and 316-L) would not occur in the dry gas environments investigated. AISI 316 and 316-L stainless steels exhibited no significant corrosion in any of the test environments. Stressed 304 and 304-L stainless steels exhibited increased general corrosion and pitting when moisture was added to the fluorinating environment. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  1. An In Vitro Comparison of PMMA and Calcium Sulfate as Carriers for the Local Delivery of Gallium(III) Nitrate to Staphylococcal Infected Surgical Sites.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Rebecca A; Tennent, David J; Chang, David; Wenke, Joseph C; Sanchez, Carlos J

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic-loaded bone cements, including poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and calcium sulfate (CaSO4), are often used for treatment of orthopaedic infections involving Staphylococcus spp., although the effectiveness of this treatment modality may be limited due to the emergence of antimicrobial resistance and/or the development of biofilms within surgical sites. Gallium(III) is an iron analog capable of inhibiting essential iron-dependent pathways, exerting broad antimicrobial activity against multiple microorganisms, including Staphylococcus spp. Herein, we evaluated PMMA and CaSO4 as carriers for delivery of gallium(III) nitrate (Ga(NO3)3) to infected surgical sites by assessing the release kinetics subsequent to incorporation and antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and S. epidermidis. PMMA and to a lesser extent CaSO4 were observed to be compatible as carriers for Ga(NO3)3, eluting concentrations with antimicrobial activity against planktonic bacteria, inhibiting bacterial growth, and preventing bacterial colonization of beads, and effective against established bacterial biofilms of S. aureus and S. epidermidis. Collectively, our in vitro results indicate that PMMA is a more suitable carrier compared to CaSO4 for delivery of Ga(NO3)3; moreover they provide evidence for the potential use of Ga(NO3)3 with PMMA as a strategy for the prevention and/or treatment for orthopaedic infections. PMID:26885514

  2. An In Vitro Comparison of PMMA and Calcium Sulfate as Carriers for the Local Delivery of Gallium(III) Nitrate to Staphylococcal Infected Surgical Sites

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Rebecca A.; Tennent, David J.; Chang, David; Wenke, Joseph C.; Sanchez, Carlos J.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic-loaded bone cements, including poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and calcium sulfate (CaSO4), are often used for treatment of orthopaedic infections involving Staphylococcus spp., although the effectiveness of this treatment modality may be limited due to the emergence of antimicrobial resistance and/or the development of biofilms within surgical sites. Gallium(III) is an iron analog capable of inhibiting essential iron-dependent pathways, exerting broad antimicrobial activity against multiple microorganisms, including Staphylococcus spp. Herein, we evaluated PMMA and CaSO4 as carriers for delivery of gallium(III) nitrate (Ga(NO3)3) to infected surgical sites by assessing the release kinetics subsequent to incorporation and antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and S. epidermidis. PMMA and to a lesser extent CaSO4 were observed to be compatible as carriers for Ga(NO3)3, eluting concentrations with antimicrobial activity against planktonic bacteria, inhibiting bacterial growth, and preventing bacterial colonization of beads, and effective against established bacterial biofilms of S. aureus and S. epidermidis. Collectively, our in vitro results indicate that PMMA is a more suitable carrier compared to CaSO4 for delivery of Ga(NO3)3; moreover they provide evidence for the potential use of Ga(NO3)3 with PMMA as a strategy for the prevention and/or treatment for orthopaedic infections. PMID:26885514

  3. A Geobacter sulfurreducens Strain Expressing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type IV Pili Localizes OmcS on Pili but Is Deficient in Fe(III) Oxide Reduction and Current Production

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Vargas, Madeline

    2014-01-01

    The conductive pili of Geobacter species play an important role in electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides, in long-range electron transport through current-producing biofilms, and in direct interspecies electron transfer. Although multiple lines of evidence have indicated that the pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens have a metal-like conductivity, independent of the presence of c-type cytochromes, this claim is still controversial. In order to further investigate this phenomenon, a strain of G. sulfurreducens, designated strain PA, was constructed in which the gene for the native PilA, the structural pilin protein, was replaced with the PilA gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Strain PA expressed and properly assembled P. aeruginosa PilA subunits into pili and exhibited a profile of outer surface c-type cytochromes similar to that of a control strain expressing the G. sulfurreducens PilA. Surprisingly, the strain PA pili were decorated with the c-type cytochrome OmcS in a manner similar to the control strain. However, the strain PA pili were 14-fold less conductive than the pili of the control strain, and strain PA was severely impaired in Fe(III) oxide reduction and current production. These results demonstrate that the presence of OmcS on pili is not sufficient to confer conductivity to pili and suggest that there are unique structural features of the G. sulfurreducens PilA that are necessary for conductivity. PMID:24296506

  4. Stifling of Crevice Corrosion in Alloy 22 During Constant Potential Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Mon, K G; Pasupathi, P; Yilmaz, A; Rebak, R B

    2005-02-05

    Artificially creviced Alloy 22 (N06022) is susceptible to crevice corrosion in presence of high chloride aqueous solution when high temperatures and high anodic potentials are applied. The presence of oxyanions in the electrolyte, especially nitrate, inhibits the nucleation and growth of crevice corrosion. Crevice corrosion may initiate when a constant potential above the crevice repassivation potential is applied. The occurrence of crevice corrosion can be divided into three characteristic domains: (1) nucleation, (2) growth and (3) stifling and arrest. That is, crevice corrosion reaches a critical stage after which growth stops and the specimens start to regain the passive behavior displayed prior to localized attack.

  5. BWR steel containment corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.P.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-04-01

    The report describes regulatory actions taken after corrosion was discovered in the drywell at the Oyster Creek Plant and in the torus at the Nine Mile Point 1 Plant. The report describes the causes of corrosion, requirements for monitoring corrosion, and measures to mitigate the corrosive environment for the two plants. The report describes the issuances of generic letters and information notices either to collect information to determine whether the problem is generic or to alert the licensees of similar plants about the existence of such a problem. Implementation of measures to enhance the containment performance under severe accident conditions is discussed. A study by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the performance of a degraded containment under severe accident conditions is summarized. The details of the BNL study are in the appendix to the report.

  6. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  7. Optimized planning of in-service inspections of local flow-accelerated corrosion of pipeline elements used in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based units at the Novovoronezh NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Povarov, V. P.; Shipkov, A. A.; Gromov, A. F.; Budanov, V. A.; Golubeva, T. N.

    2015-03-01

    Matters concerned with making efficient use of the information-analytical system on the flow-accelerated corrosion problem in setting up in-service examination of the metal of pipeline elements operating in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based power units at the Novovoronezh NPP are considered. The principles used to select samples of pipeline elements in planning ultrasonic thickness measurements for timely revealing metal thinning due to flow-accelerated corrosion along with reducing the total amount of measurements in the condensate-feedwater path are discussed.

  8. Corrosivity Of Pyrolysis Oils

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, James R; Bestor, Michael A; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Storey, John Morse

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis oils from several sources have been analyzed and used in corrosion studies which have consisted of exposing corrosion coupons and stress corrosion cracking U-bend samples. The chemical analyses have identified the carboxylic acid compounds as well as the other organic components which are primarily aromatic hydrocarbons. The corrosion studies have shown that raw pyrolysis oil is very corrosive to carbon steel and other alloys with relatively low chromium content. Stress corrosion cracking samples of carbon steel and several low alloy steels developed through-wall cracks after a few hundred hours of exposure at 50 C. Thermochemical processing of biomass can produce solid, liquid and/or gaseous products depending on the temperature and exposure time used for processing. The liquid product, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, as produced contains a significant amount of oxygen, primarily as components of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. As a result of these constituents, these oils are generally quite acidic with a Total Acid Number (TAN) that can be around 100. Because of this acidity, bio-oil is reported to be corrosive to many common structural materials. Despite this corrosive nature, these oils have the potential to replace some imported petroleum. If the more acidic components can be removed from this bio-oil, it is expected that the oil could be blended with crude oil and then processed in existing petroleum refineries. The refinery products could be transported using customary routes - pipelines, barges, tanker trucks and rail cars - without a need for modification of existing hardware or construction of new infrastructure components - a feature not shared by ethanol.

  9. Method for inhibiting corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Stapp, P. R.

    1985-12-03

    A composition comprising the reaction adduct or neutralized product resulting from the reaction of a maleic anhydride and an oil containing a polynuclear aromatic compound is provided which, when applied to a metal surface, forms a corrosion-inhibiting film thereon. The composition is particularly useful in the treatment of down-hole metal surfaces in oil and gas wells to inhibit the corrosion of the metal.

  10. Eddy current detection of pitting corrosion around fastener holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heida, J. H.; Thart, W. G. J.

    1995-01-01

    An evaluation of the eddy current technique for the detection and depth assessment of corrosion around fastener holes in F-16 lower wing skins is described. The corrosion type in this structure is pitting corrosion at the countersink edge of the fastener holes. Due to a corrosion clean-up limit of only 1.5 - 2.5 percent, a maximum thickness reduction in the range of 0.08 - 0.32 mm is allowed (depending on local skin thickness). This specifies the needed sensitivity for in-service corrosion inspection. In the evaluation use was made of specimens cut out of the F-16 lower wing skin structure. In total twelve specimens were exposed to an accelerated corrosion test (EXCO-test). Eddy current inspection of the specimens with installed fasteners was performed with a standard eddy scope and four different eddy current probes. After the eddy current inspection cross-sections of the twelve-specimens were made to determine the extent of pitting corrosion at the countersink edges. After evaluation of the inspection results the following conclusions can be drawn: for in-service detection of countersink edge corrosion standard visual inspection is the preferred technique regarding the simplicity, sensitivity and reliability of inspection; and for the purpose of depth assessment the eddy current technique is capable of detecting countersink edge corrosion with a depth from about 0.1 mm. Due to the corrosion clean-up limit of only 1.5 - 2.5 percent (0.08 - 0.32 mm), however, the eddy current technique is considered not applicable for in-service depth assessment of countersink edge corrosion in F-16 lower wing skins.

  11. A SIMPLE APPROACH TO ASSESSING COPPER PITTING CORROSION TENDENCIES AND DEVELOPING CONTROL STRATEGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Localized corrosion of copper premise plumbing in drinking water distribution systems can lead to pinhole leaks, which are a growing problem for many homeowners. Despite the fact that water quality is an important factor associated with localized copper corrosion, definitive appr...

  12. A SIMPLE APPROACH TO ASSESSING COPPER PITTING CORROSION TENDENCIES AND DEVELOPING CONTROL STRATEGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Localized corrosion of copper plumbing in drinking water distribution systems can lead to pinhole leaks, which are a growing problem for many homeowners. Although water quality is one factor that can be responsible for localized copper corrosion, there is not a good approach to ...

  13. Corrosion protection of low-carbon steel using exopolysaccharide coatings from Leuconostoc mesenteroides.

    PubMed

    Finkenstadt, Victoria L; Côté, Gregory L; Willett, J L

    2011-06-01

    Corrosion of metals is a serious and challenging problem faced worldwide by industry. Purified Leuconostoc mesenteroides exopolysaccharide (EPS) coatings, cast from aqueous solution, inhibited the corrosion of low-carbon steel as determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). There were two different corrosion behaviors exhibited when EPS films from different strains were cast onto the steel. One EPS coating reacted immediately with the steel substrate to form an iron (III) oxide layer ("rust") during the drying process while another did not. The samples that did not flash corrode had higher corrosion inhibition and formed an iron (II) passivation layer during EIS testing that persisted after the cells were disassembled. Corrosion inhibition was strain-specific as polysaccharides with similar structure did not have the same corrosion potential. PMID:21290167

  14. Corrosion protection of low-carbon steel using exopolysaccharide coatings from Leuconostoc mesenteroides.

    PubMed

    Finkenstadt, Victoria L; Côté, Gregory L; Willett, J L

    2011-06-01

    Corrosion of metals is a serious and challenging problem faced worldwide by industry. Purified Leuconostoc mesenteroides exopolysaccharide (EPS) coatings, cast from aqueous solution, inhibited the corrosion of low-carbon steel as determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). There were two different corrosion behaviors exhibited when EPS films from different strains were cast onto the steel. One EPS coating reacted immediately with the steel substrate to form an iron (III) oxide layer ("rust") during the drying process while another did not. The samples that did not flash corrode had higher corrosion inhibition and formed an iron (II) passivation layer during EIS testing that persisted after the cells were disassembled. Corrosion inhibition was strain-specific as polysaccharides with similar structure did not have the same corrosion potential.

  15. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  16. Experimental Study on Rebar Corrosion Using the Galvanic Sensor Combined with the Electronic Resistance Technique

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunze; Li, Kaiqiang; Liu, Liang; Yang, Lujia; Wang, Xiaona; Huang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new kind of carbon steel (CS) and stainless steel (SS) galvanic sensor system was developed for the study of rebar corrosion in different pore solution conditions. Through the special design of the CS and SS electronic coupons, the electronic resistance (ER) method and zero resistance ammeter (ZRA) technique were used simultaneously for the measurement of both the galvanic current and the corrosion depth. The corrosion processes in different solution conditions were also studied by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and the measurements of polarization curves. The test result shows that the galvanic current noise can provide detailed information of the corrosion processes. When localized corrosion occurs, the corrosion rate measured by the ER method is lower than the real corrosion rate. However, the value measured by the LPR method is higher than the real corrosion rate. The galvanic current and the corrosion current measured by the LPR method shows linear correlation in chloride-containing saturated Ca(OH)2 solution. The relationship between the corrosion current differences measured by the CS electronic coupons and the galvanic current between the CS and SS electronic coupons can also be used to evaluate the localized corrosion in reinforced concrete. PMID:27618054

  17. Experimental Study on Rebar Corrosion Using the Galvanic Sensor Combined with the Electronic Resistance Technique.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunze; Li, Kaiqiang; Liu, Liang; Yang, Lujia; Wang, Xiaona; Huang, Yi

    2016-09-08

    In this paper, a new kind of carbon steel (CS) and stainless steel (SS) galvanic sensor system was developed for the study of rebar corrosion in different pore solution conditions. Through the special design of the CS and SS electronic coupons, the electronic resistance (ER) method and zero resistance ammeter (ZRA) technique were used simultaneously for the measurement of both the galvanic current and the corrosion depth. The corrosion processes in different solution conditions were also studied by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and the measurements of polarization curves. The test result shows that the galvanic current noise can provide detailed information of the corrosion processes. When localized corrosion occurs, the corrosion rate measured by the ER method is lower than the real corrosion rate. However, the value measured by the LPR method is higher than the real corrosion rate. The galvanic current and the corrosion current measured by the LPR method shows linear correlation in chloride-containing saturated Ca(OH)₂ solution. The relationship between the corrosion current differences measured by the CS electronic coupons and the galvanic current between the CS and SS electronic coupons can also be used to evaluate the localized corrosion in reinforced concrete.

  18. Experimental Study on Rebar Corrosion Using the Galvanic Sensor Combined with the Electronic Resistance Technique.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunze; Li, Kaiqiang; Liu, Liang; Yang, Lujia; Wang, Xiaona; Huang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new kind of carbon steel (CS) and stainless steel (SS) galvanic sensor system was developed for the study of rebar corrosion in different pore solution conditions. Through the special design of the CS and SS electronic coupons, the electronic resistance (ER) method and zero resistance ammeter (ZRA) technique were used simultaneously for the measurement of both the galvanic current and the corrosion depth. The corrosion processes in different solution conditions were also studied by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and the measurements of polarization curves. The test result shows that the galvanic current noise can provide detailed information of the corrosion processes. When localized corrosion occurs, the corrosion rate measured by the ER method is lower than the real corrosion rate. However, the value measured by the LPR method is higher than the real corrosion rate. The galvanic current and the corrosion current measured by the LPR method shows linear correlation in chloride-containing saturated Ca(OH)₂ solution. The relationship between the corrosion current differences measured by the CS electronic coupons and the galvanic current between the CS and SS electronic coupons can also be used to evaluate the localized corrosion in reinforced concrete. PMID:27618054

  19. Taking Advantage of a Corrosion Problem to Solve a Pollution Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palomar-Ramirez, Carlos F.; Bazan-Martinez, Jose A.; Palomar-Pardave, Manuel E.; Romero-Romo, Mario A.; Ramirez-Silva, Maria Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Some simple chemistry is used to demonstrate how Fe(II) ions, formed during iron corrosion in acid aqueous solution, can reduce toxic Cr(VI) species, forming soluble Cr(III) and Fe(III) ions. These ions, in turn, can be precipitated by neutralizing the solution. The procedure provides a treatment for industrial wastewaters commonly found in…

  20. Corrosion behavior of engineering alloys in synthetic wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval-Jabalera, R.; Arias-Del Campo, E.; Chacón-Nava, J. G.; Martínez-Villafañe, A.; Malo-Tamayo, J. M.; Mora-Mendoza, J. L.

    2006-02-01

    The corrosion behavior of 1018, 410, and 800 steels exposed to synthetic wastewater have been studied using linear polarization resistance, cyclic potentiodynamic curves (CPCs), electrochemical noise (EN), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests. The conditions were: a biochemical oxygen demand of 776 ppm; a chemical oxygen demand of 1293 ppm; a pH of 8; and a cell temperature of 25 °C. From the CPC and EN results, no localized corrosion was found for the stainless steels. However, small indications of a possible localized corrosion process were detected for the 1018 steel. The EIS results revealed that different corrosion mechanisms occurred in the carbon steel compared with the stainless steels. The results show that the corrosion mechanism strongly depends on the type of steel. Overall, the 1018 steel exhibited the highest corrosion rate, followed by the 410 alloy. The highest corrosion resistance was achieved by the 800 alloy. In addition, scanning electron microscopy analyses were carried out to explain the experimental findings.

  1. Characterization of Corrosion Product Layers from CO2 Corrosion of 13Cr Stainless Steel in Simulated Oilfield Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Z. F.; Wang, X. Z.; Liu, L.; Wu, J. Q.; Zhang, Y. Q.

    2011-10-01

    The influence of temperature and flow rate on the characterization and mechanisms of corrosion product layers from CO2 corrosion of 13Cr stainless steel was carried out in simulated oilfield solution. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization method as well as weight loss tests in autoclave were utilized to investigate pitting corrosion behavior at various temperatures. Weight loss tests were performed at 100 and 160 °C under dynamic and static flow conditions. At the same time, the significant pitting parameters such as E corr, E pit, E pp, ∆ E, and I pass in cyclic polarization curves at various temperatures were analyzed and compared for revealing the pitting behavior of 13Cr stainless steel. The surface measurement techniques such as SEM, XRD, and XPS were used to detect the corrosion product layers. The results showed that both temperature and flow rate had significant effects on characterization of corrosion product layers or passive films formed on 13Cr stainless steel in CO2 corrosion system. At high temperature, lots of pits were formed at the localized corrosion areas of metal surfaces. Corrosion rates under the condition of 5 m/s were higher than those under the static condition regardless of the test temperatures.

  2. Characterization of corrosion scale formed on stainless steel delivery pipe for reclaimed water treatment.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Liu, Shuming; Smith, Kate; Yu, Kanghua; Hu, Hongying; Jiang, Wei; Li, Yuhong

    2016-01-01

    To reveal corrosion behavior of stainless steel delivery pipe used in reclaimed water treatment, this research focused on the morphological, mineralogical and chemical characteristics of stainless steel corrosion scale and corroded passive film. Corrosion scale and coupon samples were taken from a type 304 pipe delivering reclaimed water to a clear well in service for more than 12 years. Stainless steel corrosion scales and four representative pipe coupons were investigated using mineralogy and material science research methods. The results showed corrosion scale was predominantly composed of goethite, lepidocrocite, hematite, magnetite, ferrous oxide, siderite, chrome green and chromite, the same as that of corroded pipe coupons. Hence, corrosion scale can be identified as podiform chromite deposit. The loss of chromium in passive film is a critical phenomenon when stainless steel passive film is damaged by localized corrosion. This may provide key insights toward improving a better comprehension of the formation of stainless steel corrosion scale and the process of localized corrosion. The localized corrosion behavior of stainless steel is directly connected with reclaimed water quality parameters such as residual chlorine, DO, Cl(-) and SO4(2-). In particular, when a certain amount of residual chlorine in reclaimed water is present as an oxidant, ferric iron is the main chemical state of iron minerals.

  3. ARSENIC INTERACTION WITH IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST: IMPLICATIONS FOR ARSENIC REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zerovalent iron is being used in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remediate groundwater arsenic contamination. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under anaerobic conditions. The interaction between arsenic and this green...

  4. TRU drum corrosion task team report

    SciTech Connect

    Kooda, K.E.; Lavery, C.A.; Zeek, D.P.

    1996-05-01

    During routine inspections in March 1996, transuranic (TRU) waste drums stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) were found with pinholes and leaking fluid. These drums were overpacked, and further inspection discovered over 200 drums with similar corrosion. A task team was assigned to investigate the problem with four specific objectives: to identify any other drums in RWMC TRU storage with pinhole corrosion; to evaluate the adequacy of the RWMC inspection process; to determine the precise mechanism(s) generating the pinhole drum corrosion; and to assess the implications of this event for WIPP certifiability of waste drums. The task team investigations analyzed the source of the pinholes to be Hcl-induced localized pitting corrosion. Hcl formation is directly related to the polychlorinated hydrocarbon volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the waste. Most of the drums showing pinhole corrosion are from Content Code-003 (CC-003) because they contain the highest amounts of polychlorinated VOCs as determined by headspace gas analysis. CC-001 drums represent the only other content code with a significant number of pinhole corrosion drums because their headspace gas VOC content, although significantly less than CC-003, is far greater than that of the other content codes. The exact mechanisms of Hcl formation could not be determined, but radiolytic and reductive dechlorination and direct reduction of halocarbons were analyzed as the likely operable reactions. The team considered the entire range of feasible options, ranked and prioritized the alternatives, and recommended the optimal solution that maximizes protection of worker and public safety while minimizing impacts on RWMC and TRU program operations.

  5. EFFECTS OF CHEMISTRY AND OTHER VARIABLES ON CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN MH

    2008-11-13

    Laboratory testing was performed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the corrosivity of the tank wastes stored in Double-Shell Tanks using simulants primarily from Tanks 241-AP-105, 241-SY-103 and 241-AW-105. Additional tests were conducted using simulants of the waste stored in 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-AN-107, and 241-AY-101. This test program placed particular emphasis on defining the range of tank waste chemistries that do not induce the onset of localized forms of corrosion, particularly pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This document summarizes the key findings of the research program.

  6. Liver fibrosis in elderly cadavers: localization of collagen types I, III, and IV, α-smooth muscle actin, and elastic fibers.

    PubMed

    Mak, Ki M; Chu, Edward; Lau, K H Vincent; Kwong, Allison J

    2012-07-01

    We have shown a high prevalence of liver fibrosis in elderly cadavers with diverse causes of death by Sirius red stain; however, the various collagen types in these samples have yet to be evaluated. To further characterize the histopathology of the fibrotic lesions in the livers of these elderly cadavers, this study used immunohistochemistry and histochemistry to identify the principal collagens produced in liver fibrosis, fibrogenic cells and elastic fibers. Collagen I and III immunoreactions were found to colocalize in collagen fibers of fibrotic central veins, perisinusoidal fibrotic foci, portal tract stroma, and fibrous septa. α-Smooth muscle actin-expressing perisinusoidal hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), as well as perivenular, portal, and septal myofibroblasts, were closely associated with collagen fibers, reflecting their fibrogenic functions. HSCs and myofibroblasts were also noted to express collagen IV, which may contribute to production of basal lamina-like structures. In fibrotic livers, the sinusoidal lining showed variable immunostaining for collagen IV. Collagen IV immunostaining revealed vascular proliferation and atypical ductular reaction at the portal-septal parenchymal borders, as well as capillary-like vessels in the lobular parenchyma. While elastic fibers were absent in the space of Disse, they were found to codistribute with collagens in portal tracts, fibrous septa and central veins. Our combined assessment of collagen types, HSCs, myofibroblasts, and elastic fibers is significant in understanding the histopathology of fibrosis in the aging liver.

  7. Corrosion testing using isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Hohorst, Frederick A.

    1995-12-05

    A method for determining the corrosion behavior of a material with respect to a medium in contact with the material by: implanting a substantially chemically inert gas in a matrix so that corrosion experienced by the material causes the inert gas to enter the medium; placing the medium in contact with the material; and measuring the amount of inert gas which enters the medium. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a body of the material, which body has a surface to be contacted by the medium; and a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the body to a depth below the surface. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a substrate of material which is easily corroded by the medium, the substrate having a surface; a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the substrate; and a sheet of the material whose resistance to corrosion is to be tested, the sheet being disposed against the surface of the substrate and having a defined thickness.

  8. Corrosion testing using isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Hohorst, F.A.

    1995-12-05

    A method is described for determining the corrosion behavior of a material with respect to a medium in contact with the material by: implanting a substantially chemically inert gas in a matrix so that corrosion experienced by the material causes the inert gas to enter the medium; placing the medium in contact with the material; and measuring the amount of inert gas which enters the medium. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested is described composed of: a body of the material, which body has a surface to be contacted by the medium; and a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the body to a depth below the surface. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested is described composed of: a substrate of material which is easily corroded by the medium, the substrate having a surface; a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the substrate; and a sheet of the material whose resistance to corrosion is to be tested, the sheet being disposed against the surface of the substrate and having a defined thickness. 3 figs.

  9. PERFORMACE OF MULTI-PROBE CORROSION MONITORING SYSTEMS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    CAROTHERS KD; BOOMER KD; ANDA VS; DAHL MM; EDGEMON GL

    2010-01-14

    Between 2007 and 2009, several different multi-probe corrosion monitoring systems were designed and installed in high-level nuclear waste tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in WaShington State. The probe systems are being monitored to ensure waste tanks operate in regions that minimize localized corrosion (i.e., pitting) and stress corrosion cracking. The corrosion monitoring systems have been installed in wastes with different chemistry types. An ongoing effort during the same time period has generated non-radioactive simulants that are tested in the laboratory to establish baseline corrosion monitoring system performance and characterize data to allow interpretation of readings from the multiple corrosion monitoring systems. Data collection from these monitoring systems has reached the point where the results allow comparison with the laboratory testing. This paper presents analytical results from the corrosion monitoring system development program.

  10. Development of an Accelerated Test Method for the Determination of Susceptibility to Atmospheric Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical rationale is presented for use of a repetitive cyclic current reversal voltammetric technique for characterization of localized corrosion processes, including atmospheric corrosion. Applicability of this proposed experimental protocol is applied to characterization of susceptibility to crevice and pitting corrosion, atmospheric corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Criteria upon which relative susceptibility is based were determined and tested using two iron based alloys commonly in use at NASA-Kennedy; A36 (a low carbon steel) and 4130 (a low alloy steel). Practicality of the procedure was demonstrated by measuring changes in anodic polarization behavior during high frequency current reversal cycles of 25 cycles per second with 1 mA/sq cm current density amplitude in solutions containing Cl anions. The results demonstrated that, due to excessive polarization which affects conductivity of barrier corrosion product layers, A36 was less resistant to atmospheric corrosion than its 4130 counterpart; behavior which was also demonstrated during exposure tests.

  11. The corrosion protection of 2219-T87 aluminum by anodizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1991-01-01

    Various types of anodizing coatings were studied for 2219-T87 aluminum. These include both type II and type III anodized coats which were water sealed and a newly developed and proprietary Magnaplate HCR (TM) coat. Results indicate that type II anodizing is not much superior to type II anodizing as far as corrosion protection for 2219-T87 aluminum is concerned. Magnaplate HCR (TM) coatings should provide superior corrosion protection over an extended period of time using a coating thickness of 51 microns (2.0 mils).

  12. Examination of the corrosion behavior of aluminum current collectors in lithium/polymer batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Devine, T.M.; Evans, J.W. |; Monteiro, O.R.; Brown, I.G.

    1999-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of aluminum, a candidate material for the current collectors of the positive electrodes of lithium-polymer batteries, in contact with a lithium polymer electrolyte was examined in both batteries and three-electrode electrochemical cells. The results indicate aluminum is resistant to uniform corrosion in the polymer electrolyte: poly(ethylene oxide)-LiN(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2} but can be susceptible to pitting corrosion. Localized pitting corrosion occurs on the aluminum current collector during overcharging of the battery. Pitting corrosion only occurred in the electrochemical cells when the aluminum electrode was anodically polarized to potentials that were considerably greater than those that resulted in pitting corrosion in batteries. The greater susceptibility of the aluminum current collectors of batteries to pitting corrosion is attributed to inhomogeneous current flow through the current collector. This results in local breakdown of the passive film on aluminum at sites of locally high current density. The inhomogeneous current density that flows through the aluminum/cathode interface is caused by the presence of discrete paths through the cathode with low electrical resistance. In an effort to improve the localized corrosion behavior of aluminum electrodes, it was found that surfaces impregnated by ion implantation with {approximately}20 atom % tungsten exhibited enhanced resistance to pitting corrosion in poly(ethylene oxide)-LiN(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}.

  13. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  14. Solving A Corrosion Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion problem, it turned out, stemmed from the process called electrolysis. When two different metals are in contact, an electrical potential is set up between them; when the metals are surrounded by an electrolyte, or a conducting medium, the resulting reaction causes corrosion, often very rapid corrosion. In this case the different metals were the copper grounding system and the ferry's aluminum hull; the dockside salt water in which the hull was resting served as the electrolyte. After identifying the source of the trouble, the Ames engineer provided a solution: a new wire-and-rod grounding system made of aluminum like the ferry's hull so there would no longer be dissimilar metals in contact. Ames research on the matter disclosed that the problem was not unique to the Golden Gate ferries. It is being experienced by many pleasure boat operators who are probably as puzzled about it as was the Golden Gate Transit Authority.

  15. Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Russ Braunling

    2004-10-31

    The Corrosion Monitoring System (CMS) program developed and demonstrated a continuously on-line system that provides real-time corrosion information. The program focused on detecting pitting corrosion in its early stages. A new invention called the Intelligent Ultrasonic Probe (IUP) was patented on the program. The IUP uses ultrasonic guided waves to detect small defects and a Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) algorithm to provide an image of the pits. Testing of the CMS demonstrated the capability to detect pits with dimensionality in the sub-millimeter range. The CMS was tested in both the laboratory and in a pulp and paper industrial plant. The system is capable of monitoring the plant from a remote location using the internet.

  16. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Fronk, Matthew Howard; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Hulett, Jay S.; Brady, Brian K. NY); Cunningham, Kevin M.

    2011-06-07

    A PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements comprising a corrosion-susceptible substrate metal coated with an electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant polymer containing a plurality of electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant filler particles. The substrate may have an oxidizable metal first layer (e.g., stainless steel) underlying the polymer coating.

  17. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Fronk, Matthew Howard; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Hulett, Jay S.; Brady, Brian K.; Cunningham, Kevin M.

    2002-01-01

    A PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements comprising a corrosion-susceptible substrate metal coated with an electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant polymer containing a plurality of electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant filler particles. The substrate may have an oxidizable metal first layer (e.g., stainless steel) underlying the polymer coating.

  18. Barnacle-induced corrosion of high-alloyed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Koryakova, M.D.; Filonenko, N.Yu.; Kaplin, Yu.M.

    1995-03-01

    Local corrosion of two sorts of high-alloyed steels under the action of acorn barnacles (Balanuses) has been studied. It has been shown that in natural seawater at anaerobic conditions beneath living and dead barnacles, metabolic activity of bacteria may be considered as a primary cause for local surface depassivation.

  19. Microbiologically influenced corrosion: looking to the future.

    PubMed

    Videla, Héctor A; Herrera, Liz K

    2005-09-01

    This review discusses the state-of-the-art of research into biocorrosion and the biofouling of metals and alloys of industrial usage. The key concepts needed to understand the main effects of microorganisms on metal decay, and current trends in monitoring and control strategies to mitigate the deleterious effects of biocorrosion and biofouling are also described. Several relevant cases of biocorrosion studied by our research group are provided as examples: (i) biocorrosion of aluminum and its alloys by fungal contaminants of jet fuels; (ii) sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB)-induced corrosion of steel; (iii) biocorrosion and biofouling interactions in the marine environment; (iv) monitoring strategies for assessing biocorrosion in industrial water systems; (v) microbial inhibition of corrosion; (vi) use and limitations of electrochemical techniques for evaluating biocorrosion effects. Future prospects in the field are described with respect to the potential of innovative techniques in microscopy (environmental scanning electron microscopy, confocal scanning laser microscopy, atomic force microscopy), new spectroscopic techniques for the study of corrosion products and biofilms (energy dispersion X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron microprobe analysis) and electrochemistry (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, electrochemical noise analysis).

  20. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Is Associated With Longer Local Control After Definitive Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Stage III Nonsquamous Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yagishita, Shigehiro; Horinouchi, Hidehito; Katsui Taniyama, Tomoko; Nakamichi, Shinji; Kitazono, Satoru; Mizugaki, Hidenori; Kanda, Shintaro; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Sumi, Minako; Shiraishi, Kouya; Kohno, Takashi; Furuta, Koh; Tsuta, Koji; Tamura, Tomohide

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the frequency and clinical significance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in patients with potentially curable stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are eligible for definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: Between January 2001 and December 2010, we analyzed the EGFR mutational status in consecutive NSCLC patients who were treated by CRT. The response rate, relapse-free survival, 2-year relapse-free rate, initial relapse sites, and overall survival of the patients were investigated. Results: A total of 528 patients received CRT at our hospital during the study period. Of these, 274 were diagnosed as having nonsquamous NSCLC. Sufficient specimens for mutational analyses could be obtained from 198 of these patients. The proportion of patients with EGFR activating mutations was 17%. In addition to the well-known characteristics of patients carrying EGFR mutations (female, adenocarcinoma, and never/light smoker), the proportion of cases with smaller primary lesions (T1/2) was found to be higher in patients with EGFR mutations than in those with wild-type EGFR. Patients with EGFR mutations showed similar response rate, relapse-free survival, and 2-year relapse-free rates as compared to patients with wild-type EGFR. Local relapses as the site of initial relapse occurred significantly less frequently in patients with EGFR mutation (4% vs 21%; P=.045). Patients with EGFR mutations showed longer local control (adjusted hazard ratio 0.49; P=.043). After disease progression, a majority of the patients with EGFR mutations received EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (62%), and these patients showed longer postprogression survival than those with wild-type EGFR. Conclusions: Our study is the first to show radiosensitive biology of EGFR-mutated tumors in definitive CRT with curative intent. This finding could serve as a credible baseline estimate of EGFR-mutated population in stage III nonsquamous NSCLC.

  1. In-situ monitoring of undercoating corrosion damage by Direct Optical Interrogation (DOI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Garrity, Meng

    topcoat dramatically reduces undercoating corrosion and masks many deficiencies of a conversion coating or primer. DOI was used to compare undercoating corrosion that developed due to exposure in ASTM B117, ASTM G85-A5 and outdoor environments. Similar corrosion morphologies developed in ASTM B117 and static immersion exposures. A single and stable corrosions site nucleated and propagated with a filamentary morphology. In general, salt spray exposure was more aggressive than static immersion. ASTM G85-A5 exposure produced different corrosion morphologies. Corrosion sites were round rather than filamentary. Massive nucleation of small corrosion sites across the whole surface also occurred. ASTM G85 environment was mild compared with the ASTM B117 and static immersion exposures. In outdoor exposure testing carried out for 5 months, no signs of corrosion was observed. To assess the extent to which oxygen reduction occurring on the coated surface supported corrosion site growth, a universal pH indicator was added to agar gels or PVB coatings applied on top of metallizations. Color changes indicating pH changes associated with local alkalization or acidification due to local cell action were assessed visually. Overall, the evidence is consistent with the idea that both hydrogen reduction and oxygen reduction support local corrosion site growth. In practical embodiments of corrosion protection, every effort should be made to restrict oxygen reduction to slow corrosion growth rates.

  2. Corrosion behavior of aluminum-lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Garrard, W.N. )

    1994-03-01

    Corrosion behavior of three aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys was investigated in aerated 0.5 M sodium sulfate (Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]), deaerated 3.5% sodium chloride (NaCl), and aerated 3.5% NaCl. Corrosion behavior of the Aluminum Association (AA) alloys 2090-T8E41 (UNS A92090, sheet), AA 8090-T851 (UNS A98090, sheet), and AA 8090-T82551 (UNS A98090, bar) was compared to behavior of the conventional AA 7075-T6 (UNS A97075, sheet). Uniform corrosion was the predominant form of attack in aerated Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] and deaerated NaCl, although some localized attack resulted from corrosion of intermetallics on specimen surfaces. Pitting was the main form of attack in aerated NaCl. In all three media, the sheet materials corroded at a similar rate, but the bar form of AA 8090 corroded at a lower rate. Pretreatment of the alloys by immersion in a cerium (Ce) solution inhibited pitting in aerated NaCl but only for a short period.

  3. Nanocontainer-based corrosion sensing coating.

    PubMed

    Maia, F; Tedim, J; Bastos, A C; Ferreira, M G S; Zheludkevich, M L

    2013-10-18

    The present paper reports on the development of new sensing active coating on the basis of nanocontainers containing pH-indicating agent. The coating is able to detect active corrosion processes on different metallic substrates. The corrosion detection functionality based on the local colour change in active cathodic zones results from the interaction of hydroxide ions with phenolphthalein encapsulated in mesoporous nanocontainers which function as sensing nanoreactors. The mesoporous silica nanocontainers are synthesized and loaded with pH indicator phenolphthalein in a one-stage process. The resulting system is mesoporous, which together with bulkiness of the indicator molecules limits their leaching. At the same time, penetration of water molecules and ions inside the container is still possible, allowing encapsulated phenolphthalein to be sensitive to the pH in the surrounding environment and outperforming systems when an indicator is directly dispersed in the coating layer.The performed tests demonstrate the pH sensitivity of the developed nanocontainers being dispersed in aqueous solutions. The corrosion sensing functionality of the protective coatings with nanocontainers are proven for aluminium- and magnesium-based metallic substrates. As a result, the developed nanocontainers show high potential to be used in a new generation of active protective coatings with corrosion-sensing coatings.

  4. Corrosion of barrier materials in seawater environments

    SciTech Connect

    Heiser, J.H.; Soo, P.

    1995-07-01

    A brief review has been carried out on the performance of barrier materials for low-level radioactive wastes in seawater environments. The environments include those for shallower coastal waters as well as the deep ocean (down to 3800 m). The review is mainly focused on metallic materials since they are the most common for seawater service and they have the largest data base. Information from the literature is usually pertinent to shallower coastal locations, but there is a valuable source of corrosion data obtained from several studies of metallic specimens exposed to ocean-bed conditions. In addition, the corrosion of carbon steel barriers has been evaluated for actual waste containers that were retrieved from previously-used disposal sites in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Of the metallic materials studied, carbon steel showed the least corrosion resistance. Failure by non-uniform attack in a typical waste container could occur in as little as 25 y in some ocean environments ` Penetration by local attack, such as pitting and crevice corrosion resistance was also observed for more expensive materials such as low-alloy steels, stainless steels, titanium alloys, zirconium alloys, copper alloys, nickel alloys, aluminum alloys, and lead alloys.

  5. Corrosion behavior of CRA`s in high density packer fluids at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Scoppio, L.; Barteri, M.; Cheldi, T.; Ke, M.; Massi, S.

    1999-11-01

    Results from an experimental investigation carried out in high density brine packer fluids are presented. Different variables were examined, namely temperature, time of exposure, chemical inhibition and brine composition and density. Tests to compare the performance of different classes of stainless steels were carried out by autoclave exposure under different deaerated brines solutions: NaCl/NaBr, CaCl{sub 2}/CaBr{sub 2} and CaBr{sub 3}/ZnBr{sub 2}, CaCl{sub 2}, CaCl{sub 2}/CaBr{sub 2}/ZnBr{sub 2}. General corrosion, localized corrosion (pitting and crevice), galvanic corrosion and resistance to environmental cracking were evaluated both in absence of corrosion inhibitor and with the addition of two different commercial inhibitors. Duplex steels were very resistant to the localized corrosion, although pitting and crevice were present in some combination of brine and temperature. The martensitic steel was very sensitive to the general and the localized corrosion. Brine CaCl{sub 2}/CaBr{sub 2} {rho} = 1.75 g/cm{sup 3}, showed at 200 C, a pitting on 13%Cr lower than expected. This is probably due to the general corrosion which show a mechanism competitive with localized corrosion. As a result, pitting corrosion is a matter of big concern when applications in heavy brine are considered. In fact only the most alloyed materials at temperature below 200 C can be considered as immune. As a consequence, the effect of commercially available corrosion inhibitors is sometime lower than expected and there is a need of further improvements of corrosion inhibitors for the application to the CRA`S (Corrosion Resistant Alloys) in brine environments at 200 C.

  6. A Scanning Auger Microprobe analysis of corrosion products associated with sulfate reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowski, R.A.; Chen, G.; Clayton, C.R.; Kearns, J.R.; Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.

    1995-03-01

    A Scanning Auger Microprobe analysis was performed on the corrosion products of an austenitic AISI type 304 SS after a potentiostatic polarization of one volt for ten minutes in a modified Postgate`s C media containing sulfate reducing bacteria. The corrosion products were characterized and mapped in local regions where pitting was observed. A critical evaluation of the applicability of this technique for the examination of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) is presented.

  7. Corrosion and tribocorrosion of hafnium in simulated body fluids.

    PubMed

    Rituerto Sin, J; Neville, A; Emami, N

    2014-08-01

    Hafnium is a passive metal with good biocompatibility and osteogenesis, however, little is known about its resistance to wear and corrosion in biological environments. The corrosion and tribocorrosion behavior of hafnium and commercially pure (CP) titanium in simulated body fluids were investigated using electrochemical techniques. Cyclic polarization scans and open circuit potential measurements were performed in 0.9% NaCl solution and 25% bovine calf serum solution to assess the effect of organic species on the corrosion behavior of the metal. A pin-on-plate configuration tribometer and a three electrode electrochemical cell were integrated to investigate the tribocorrosion performance of the studied materials. The results showed that hafnium has good corrosion resistance. The corrosion density currents measured in its passive state were lower than those measured in the case of CP titanium; however, it showed a higher tendency to suffer from localized corrosion, which was more acute when imperfections were present on the surface. The electrochemical breakdown of the oxide layer was retarded in the presence of proteins. Tribocorrosion tests showed that hafnium has the ability to quickly repassivate after the oxide layer was damaged; however, it showed higher volumetric loss than CP titanium in equivalent wear-corrosion conditions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 102B: 1157-1164, 2014.

  8. Copper corrosion in coastal Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S. Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is studying the atmospheric corrosion performance of copper and other metals along the Oregon coast. Only the copper results will be presented in this paper. Atmospheric corrosion measurements of copper samples were made at seven bridges, eight coastal communities, and three inland reference sites to quantify and understand the effect of high chloride environments on the corrosion performance of copper. The materials were atmospherically exposed for 1, 2, and 3 years to examine the effects of sheltering, orientation, distance from the ocean, and coastal microclimates on the rate of corrosion and the composition of the corrosion film.

  9. Corrosion protection by anaerobiosis.

    PubMed

    Volkland, H P; Harms, H; Wanner; Zehnder, A J

    2001-01-01

    Biofilm-forming bacteria can protect mild (unalloyed) steel from corrosion. Mild steel coupons incubated with Rhodoccocus sp. strain C125 and Pseudomonas putida mt2 in an aerobic phosphate-buffered medium containing benzoate as carbon and energy source, underwent a surface reaction leading to the formation of a corrosion-inhibiting vivianite layer [Fe3(PO4)2]. Electrochemical potential (E) measurements allowed us to follow the buildup of the vivianite cover. The presence of sufficient metabolically active bacteria at the steel surface resulted in an E decrease to -510 mV, the potential of free iron, and a continuous release of ferrous iron. Part of the dissolved iron precipitated as vivianite in a compact layer of two to three microns in thickness. This layer prevented corrosion of mild steel for over two weeks, even in a highly corrosive medium. A concentration of 20 mM phosphate in the medium was found to be a prerequisite for the formation of the vivianite layer.

  10. Visualizing Nanoscale Distribution of Corrosion Cells by Open-Loop Electric Potential Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Honbo, Kyoko; Ogata, Shoichiro; Kitagawa, Takuya; Okamoto, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Naritaka; Sugimoto, Itto; Shima, Shohei; Fukunaga, Akira; Takatoh, Chikako; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-02-23

    Corrosion is a traditional problem but still one of the most serious problems in industry. To reduce the huge economic loss caused by corrosion, tremendous effort has been made to understand, predict and prevent it. Corrosion phenomena are generally explained by the formation of corrosion cells at a metal-electrolyte interface. However, experimental verification of their nanoscale distribution has been a major challenge owing to the lack of a method able to visualize the local potential distribution in an electrolytic solution. In this study, we have investigated the nanoscale corrosion behavior of Cu fine wires and a duplex stainless steel by in situ imaging of local corrosion cells by open-loop electric potential microscopy (OL-EPM). For both materials, potential images obtained by OL-EPM show nanoscale contrasts, where areas of higher and lower potential correspond to anodic areas (i.e., corrosion sites) and cathodic areas, respectively. This imaging capability allows us to investigate the real-time transition of local corrosion sites even when surface structures show little change. This is particularly useful for investigating reactions under surface oxide layers or highly corrosion-resistant materials as demonstrated here. The proposed technique should be applicable to the study of other redox reactions on a battery electrode or a catalytic material. The results presented here open up such future applications of OL-EPM in nanoscale electrochemistry. PMID:26811989

  11. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metals: The Effects of Composition, Structure and Environment on Corrosion Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Choi, J S; Haslam, J; Lian, T; Day, S; Yang, N; Blue, C; Peters, W; Bayles, R; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Lavernia, E; Ajdelsztajn, A; Grave, O; Aprigliano, L; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J; Branagan, D J; Beardsley, B

    2006-04-11

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative thermal phase stability, microstructure, mechanical properties, damage tolerance, and corrosion resistance. Some alloy additions are known to promote glass formation and to lower the critical cooling rate [F. Guo, S. J. Poon, Applied Physics Letters, 83 (13) 2575-2577, 2003]. Other elements are known to enhance the corrosion resistance of conventional stainless steels and nickel-based alloys [A. I. Asphahani, Materials Performance, Vol. 19, No. 12, pp. 33-43, 1980] and have been found to provide similar benefits to iron-based amorphous metals. Many of these materials can be cast as relatively thick ingots, or applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. A wide variety of thermal spray processes have been developed by industry, and can be used to apply these new materials as coatings. Any of these can be used for the deposition of the formulations discussed here, with varying degrees of residual porosity and crystalline structure. Thick protective coatings have now been made that are fully dense and completely amorphous in the as-sprayed condition. An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Project will be given, with particular emphasis on the corrosion resistance of several different types of iron-based amorphous metals in various environments of interest. The salt fog test has been used to compare the performance of various wrought alloys, melt-spun ribbons, arc-melted drop-cast ingots, and thermal-spray coatings for their susceptibility to corrosion in marine environments. Electrochemical tests have also been performed in seawater. Spontaneous breakdown of the passive film and localized corrosion require that the open-circuit corrosion potential exceed the critical potential. The resistance to localized corrosion is seawater has been

  12. Oxidation and Corrosion of Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Lee, Kang N.

    2000-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites are candidates for numerous applications in high temperature environments with aggressive gases and possible corrosive deposits. There is a growing realization that high temperature oxidation and corrosion issues must be considered. There are many facets to these studies, which have been extensively covered in some recent reviews. The focus of this paper is on current research, over the past two years. In the authors' view, the most important oxidation and corrosion studies have focused on four major areas during this time frame. These are; (I) Oxidation of precursor-based ceramics; (II) Studies of the interphase material in ceramic matrix composites; (III) Water vapor interactions with ceramics, particularly in combustion environments; and (IV) Development of refractory oxide coatings for silicon-based ceramics. In this paper, we shall explore the most current work in each of these areas.

  13. Corrosion monitoring along infrastructures using distributed fiber optic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhandawi, Khalil B.; Vahdati, Nader; Shiryayev, Oleg; Lawand, Lydia

    2016-04-01

    Pipeline Inspection Gauges (PIGs) are used for internal corrosion inspection of oil pipelines every 3-5 years. However, between inspection intervals, rapid corrosion may occur, potentially resulting in major accidents. The motivation behind this research project was to develop a safe distributed corrosion sensor placed inside oil pipelines continuously monitoring corrosion. The intrinsically safe nature of light provided motivation for researching fiber optic sensors as a solution. The sensing fiber's cladding features polymer plastic that is chemically sensitive to hydrocarbons within crude oil mixtures. A layer of metal, used in the oil pipeline's construction, is deposited on the polymer cladding, which upon corrosion, exposes the cladding to surrounding hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbon's interaction with the cladding locally increases the cladding's refractive index in the radial direction. Light intensity of a traveling pulse is reduced due to local reduction in the modal capacity which is interrogated by Optical Time Domain Reflectometery. Backscattered light is captured in real-time while using time delay to resolve location, allowing real-time spatial monitoring of environmental internal corrosion within pipelines spanning large distances. Step index theoretical solutions were used to calculate the power loss due changes in the intensity profile. The power loss is translated into an attenuation coefficient characterizing the expected OTDR trace which was verified against similar experimental results from the literature. A laboratory scale experiment is being developed to assess the validity of the model and the practicality of the solution.

  14. Effect of biologically relevant ions on the corrosion products formed on alloy AZ31B: an improved understanding of magnesium corrosion.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yongseok; Collins, Boyce; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2013-11-01

    Simulated physiological solutions mimicking human plasma have been utilized to study the in vitro corrosion of biodegradable metals. However, corrosion and corrosion product formation are different for different solutions with varied responses and, hence, the prediction of in vivo degradation behavior is not feasible based on these studies alone. This paper reports the role of physiologically relevant salts and their concentrations on the corrosion behavior of a magnesium alloy (AZ31B) and subsequent corrosion production formation. Immersion tests were performed for three different concentrations of Ca(2+), HPO4(2-), HCO3(-) to identify the effect of each ion on the corrosion of AZ31B assessed at 1, 3 and 10 days. Time-lapse morphological characterization of the samples was performed using X-ray computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the surface corrosion products was determined by electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results show that: (1) calcium is not present in the corrosion product layer when only Cl(-) and OH(-) anions are available; (2) the presence of phosphate induces formation of a densely packed amorphous magnesium phosphate corrosion product layer when HPO4(2-) and Cl(-) are present in solution; (3) octacalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite (HAp) are deposited on the surface of the magnesium alloy when HPO4(2-) and Ca(2+) are present together in NaCl solution (this coating limits localized corrosion and increases general corrosion resistance); (4) addition of HCO3(-) accelerates the overall corrosion rate, which increases with increasing bicarbonate concentration; (5) the corrosion rate decreases due to the formation of insoluble HAp on the surface when HCO3(-), Ca(2+), and HPO4(2-) are present together.

  15. Crevice and pitting corrosion behavior of stainless steels in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Zaragoza-Ayala, A.E.; Orozco-Cruz, R.

    1999-11-01

    Pitting and crevice corrosion tests in natural seawater were performed on a series of stainless steels (i.e., S31603, N08904, S32304, S31803, S32520, N08925 and S31266) in order to determine their resistance to these types of localized corrosion. Open circuit potential (OCP) measurements for these alloys show for short exposure times an ennoblement in the OCP. After a certain time, occasional fall and rise in the OCP values was observed, which can be related to nucleation and repassivation of pits and/or crevices on the metal surface. Analysis of the electrochemical behavior and microscopic observations shows that only S31603 and S32304 alloys were susceptible to crevice and pitting corrosion, whereas the remaining alloys exhibited good resistance. Pitting potentials determined by the potentiodynamic technique also show S3 1603 and S32304 are susceptible to pitting corrosion under the experimental conditions used in this work.

  16. Effects of local field and inherent strain in reflectance anisotropy spectra of A{sup III}B{sup V} semiconductors with naturally oxidized surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Berkovits, V. L.; Kosobukin, V. A.; Gordeeva, A. B.

    2015-12-28

    Reflectance anisotropy (RA) spectra of naturally oxidized (001) surfaces of GaAs and InAs crystals are measured for photon energies from 1.5 up to 5.5 eV. The differential high-accuracy RA spectra reveal features substantially different from those caused by either a reconstruction of clean surface or a built-in near-surface electric field. Models of atomic structure with anisotropic transition layers of excess arsenic atoms specific for GaAs(001)/oxide and InAs(001)/oxide interfaces are proposed. In conformity with these models, a general theory of reflectance anisotropy is developed for semiconductor/oxide interfaces within the Green's function technique. The theory takes into account the combined effect of local field due to interface dipoles and of intrinsic near-surface strain of the crystal. Measured RA spectra are analyzed in the model of valence-bond dipoles occupying a rectangular lattice in a multilayer medium. Comparing the measured and calculated spectra, we conclude that RA spectra of oxidized GaAs(001) and InAs(001) surfaces are simultaneously influenced by interface and near-surface anisotropies. The former is responsible for the broad-band spectral features which are associated with polarizability of the valence bonds attached to As atoms at the crystal/oxide interface. The near-surface anisotropy is due to inherent uniaxial straining the near-surface region of crystal. The effect of strain on RA spectra is experimentally and theoretically substantiated for GaAs crystal wafers undergone a uniaxial applied stress. Basically, this work results in the following. It establishes the physical nature of different levels of RA spectra observed in a majority of papers, but never analyzed. It demonstrates how the studied features of RA spectra could be applied for optical characterization of strained interfaces and atomic layers.

  17. Sixteen Years of Ulysses Interstellar Dust Measurements in the Solar System. III. Simulations and Data Unveil New Insights into Local Interstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Veerle J.; Strub, Peter; Krüger, Harald; von Steiger, Rudolf; Frisch, Priscilla

    2015-10-01

    Interstellar dust (ISD) in the solar system was detected in situ for the first time in 1993 by the Ulysses dust detector. The study of ISD is important for understanding its role in star and solar system formation. The goal of this paper is to understand the variability in the ISD observations from the Ulysses mission by using a Monte Carlo simulation of ISD trajectories, with the final aim to constrain the ISD particle properties from simulations and the data. The paper is part of a series of three: Strub et al. describe the variations of the ISD flow from the Ulysses data set, and Krüger et al. focus on its ISD mass distribution. We describe and interpret the simulations of the ISD flow at Ulysses orbit for a wide range of particle properties and discuss four open issues in ISD research: the existence of very big ISD particles, the lack of smaller ISD particles, the shift in dust flow direction in 2005, and particle properties. We conclude that the shift in the dust flow direction in 2005 can best be explained by Lorentz force in the inner heliosphere, but that an extra filtering mechanism is needed to fit the fluxes. A time-dependent filtering in the outer regions of the heliosphere is proposed for this. Also, the high charge-to-mass ratio values found for the heavier particles after 2003 indicate that these particles are lower in density than previously assumed. This method gives new insights into the ISD properties and paves the way toward getting a complete view on the ISD from the local interstellar cloud. We conclude that in combination with the data and simulations, also impact ionization experiments are necessary using low-density dust, in order to constrain the density of the particles.

  18. A Phase III study of oral steroid administration versus local steroid injection therapy for the prevention of esophageal stricture after endoscopic submucosal dissection (JCOG1217, Steroid EESD P3).

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Tomonori; Tanaka, Masaki; Eba, Junko; Mizusawa, Junki; Fukuda, Haruhiko; Hanaoka, Noboru; Takeuchi, Manabu; Aoyama, Ikuo; Kojima, Takashi; Takizawa, Kohei; Ono, Hiroyuki; Muto, Manabu

    2015-11-01

    A randomized Phase III trial commenced in Japan in September 2014. Endoscopic local steroid injection has been commonly used and considered acceptable as the current standard treatment for the prevention of esophageal stricture after endoscopic submucosal dissection for superficial esophageal cancer. The purpose of this study is to confirm the superiority of prophylactic oral steroid administration following endoscopic submucosal dissection in terms of stricture-free survival over endoscopic local steroid injection for patients with superficial esophageal cancer. A total of 360 patients will be accrued from 35 Japanese institutions within 2.5 years. The primary endpoint is stricture-free survival, and the secondary endpoints are the number of endoscopic balloon dilations for 12 weeks after endoscopic submucosal dissection, adverse events, serious adverse events and the proportion of patients with dysphagia score ≤1 at 12 weeks after endoscopic submucosal dissection. This trial has been registered in the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000015064 (http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index.htm). PMID:26246480

  19. Electrochemical noise measurements of sustained microbially influenced pitting corrosion in a laboratory flow loop system.

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y. J.

    1999-01-13

    Because of the chaotic nature of the corrosion process and the complexity of the electrochemical noise signals that are generated, there is no generally accepted method of measuring and interpreting these signals that allows the consistent detection and identification of sustained localized pitting (SLP) as compared to general corrosion. We have reexamined electrochemical noise analysis (ENA) of localized corrosion using different hardware, signal collection, and signal processing designs than those used in conventional ENA techniques. The new data acquisition system was designed to identify and monitor the progress of SLP by analyzing the power spectral density (PSD) of the trend of the corrosion current noise level (CNL) and potential noise level (PNL). Each CNL and PNL data point was calculated from the root-mean- square value of the ac components of current and potential fluctuation signals, which were measured simultaneously during a short time period. The PSD analysis results consistently demonstrated that the trends of PNL and CNL contain information that can be used to differentiate between SLP and general corrosion mechanisms. The degree of linear slope in the low-frequency portion of the PSD analysis was correlated with the SLP process. Laboratory metal coupons as well as commercial corrosion probes were tested to ensure the reproducibility and consistency of the results. The on-line monitoring capability of this new ENA method was evaluated in a bench-scale flow-loop system, which simulated microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) activity. The conditions in the test flow-loop system were controlled by the addition of microbes and different substrates to favor accelerated corrosion. The ENA results demonstrated that this in-situ corrosion monitoring system could effectively identify SLP corrosion associated with MIC, compared to a more uniform general corrosion mechanism. A reduction in SLP activity could be clearly detected by the ENA monitoring system

  20. Simulation of Fatigue Crack Initiation at Corrosion Pits With EDM Notches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen W.; Newman, John A.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    Uniaxial fatigue tests were conducted to compare the fatigue life of laboratory produced corrosion pits, similar to those observed in the shuttle main landing gear wheel bolt-hole, and an electro-discharged-machined (EDM) flaw. EDM Jaws are used to simulate corrosion pits during shuttle wheel (dynamometer) testing. The aluminum alloy, (AA 7050) laboratory fatigue tests were conducted to simulate the local stress level contained in the wheel bolt-hole. Under this high local stress condition, the EDM notch produced a fatigue life similar to test specimens containing corrosion pits of similar size. Based on the laboratory fatigue test results, the EDM Jaw (semi-circular disc shaped) produces a local stress state similar to corrosion pits and can be used to simulate a corrosion pit during the shuttle wheel dynamometer tests.

  1. TREATMENT TANK CORROSION STUDIES FOR THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.

    2011-08-24

    Radioactive waste is stored in high level waste tanks on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is aggressively seeking to close the non-compliant Type I and II waste tanks. The removal of sludge (i.e., metal oxide) heels from the tank is the final stage in the waste removal process. The Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed and investigated by SRR to aid in Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) as an option for sludge heel removal. Corrosion rate data for carbon steel exposed to the ECC treatment tank environment was obtained to evaluate the degree of corrosion that occurs. These tests were also designed to determine the effect of various environmental variables such as temperature, agitation and sludge slurry type on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel. Coupon tests were performed to estimate the corrosion rate during the ECC process, as well as determine any susceptibility to localized corrosion. Electrochemical studies were performed to develop a better understanding of the corrosion mechanism. The tests were performed in 1 wt.% and 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with HM and PUREX sludge simulants. The following results and conclusions were made based on this testing: (1) In 1 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, carbon steel corroded at a rate of less than 25 mpy within the temperature and agitation levels of the test. No susceptibility to localized corrosion was observed. (2) In 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, the carbon steel corrosion rates ranged between 15 and 88 mpy. The most severe corrosion was observed at 75 C in the HM/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. Pitting and general corrosion increased with the agitation level at this condition. No pitting and lower general corrosion rates were observed with the PUREX/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. The electrochemical and coupon tests both indicated that carbon steel is more susceptible to localized corrosion in the HM/oxalic acid environment than

  2. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Cunnane, J.C.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II.

  3. Corrosion in a temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; White, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    High temperature corrosion limits the operation of equipment used in the Power Generation Industry. Some of the more destructive corrosive attack occurs on the surfaces of heat exchangers, boilers, and turbines where the alloys are subjected to large temperature gradients that cause a high heat flux through the accumulated ash, the corrosion product, and the alloy. Most current and past corrosion research has, however, been conducted under isothermal conditions. Research on the thermal-gradient-affected corrosion of various metals and alloys is currently being studied at the Albany Research Center’s SECERF (Severe Environment Corrosion and Erosion Research Facility) laboratory. The purpose of this research is to verify theoretical models of heat flux effects on corrosion and to quantify the differences between isothermal and thermal gradient corrosion effects. The effect of a temperature gradient and the resulting heat flux on corrosion of alloys with protective oxide scales is being examined by studying point defect diffusion and corrosion rates. Fick’s first law of diffusion was expanded, using irreversible thermodynamics, to include a heat flux term – a Soret effect. Oxide growth rates are being measured for the high temperature corrosion of cobalt at a metal surface temperature of 900ºC. Corrosion rates are also being determined for the high temperature corrosion of carbon steel boiler tubes in a simulated waste combustion environment consisting of O2, CO2, N2, and water vapor. Tests are being conducted both isothermally and in the presence of a temperature gradient to verify the effects of a heat flux and to compare to isothermal oxidation.

  4. Vapor Corrosion Response of Low Carbon Steel Exposed to Simulated High Level Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B

    2006-01-26

    A program to resolve the issues associated with potential vapor space corrosion and liquid/air interface corrosion in the Type III high level waste tanks is in place. The objective of the program is to develop understanding of vapor space (VSC) and liquid/air interface (LAIC) corrosion to ensure a defensible technical basis to provide accurate corrosion evaluations with regard to vapor space and liquid/air interface corrosion. The results of the FY05 experiments are presented here. The experiments are an extension of the previous research on the corrosion of tank steel exposed to simple solutions to corrosion of the steel when exposed to complex high level waste simulants. The testing suggested that decanting and the consequent residual species on the tank wall is the predominant source of surface chemistry on the tank wall. The laboratory testing has shown that at the boundary conditions of the chemistry control program for solutions greater than 1M NaNO{sub 3}{sup -}. Minor and isolated pitting is possible within crevices in the vapor space of the tanks that contain stagnant dilute solution for an extended period of time, specifically when residues are left on the tank wall during decanting. Liquid/air interfacial corrosion is possible in dilute stagnant solutions, particularly with high concentrations of chloride. The experimental results indicate that Tank 50 would be most susceptible to the potential for liquid/air interfacial corrosion or vapor space corrosion, with Tank 49 and 41 following, since these tanks are nearest to the chemistry control boundary conditions. The testing continues to show that the combination of well-inhibited solutions and mill-scale sufficiently protect against pitting in the Type III tanks.

  5. Combined geochemical and electrochemical methodology to quantify corrosion of carbon steel by bacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Marta K; Moreira, Rebeca; Bildstein, Olivier; Lartigue, Jean-Eric; Schlegel, Michel L; Tribollet, Bernard; Vivier, Vincent; Libert, Marie

    2014-06-01

    The availability of respiratory substrates, such as H2 and Fe(II,III) solid corrosion products within nuclear waste repository, will sustain the activities of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria (HOB) and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB). This may have a direct effect on the rate of carbon steel corrosion. This study investigates the effects of Shewanella oneidensis (an HOB and IRB model organism) on the corrosion rate by looking at carbon steel dissolution in the presence of H2 as the sole electron donor. Bacterial effect is evaluated by means of geochemical and electrochemical techniques. Both showed that the corrosion rate is enhanced by a factor of 2-3 in the presence of bacteria. The geochemical experiments indicated that the composition and crystallinity of the solid corrosion products (magnetite and vivianite) are modified by bacteria. Moreover, the electrochemical experiments evidenced that the bacterial activity can be stimulated when H2 is generated in a small confinement volume. In this case, a higher corrosion rate and mineralization (vivianite) on the carbon steel surface were observed. The results suggest that the mechanism likely to influence the corrosion rate is the bioreduction of Fe(III) from magnetite coupled to the H2 oxidation.

  6. Numerical simulation of monitoring corrosion in reinforced concrete based on ultrasonic guided waves.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhupeng; Lei, Ying; Xue, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulation based on finite element method is conducted to predict the location of pitting corrosion in reinforced concrete. Simulation results show that it is feasible to predict corrosion monitoring based on ultrasonic guided wave in reinforced concrete, and wavelet analysis can be used for the extremely weak signal of guided waves due to energy leaking into concrete. The characteristic of time-frequency localization of wavelet transform is adopted in the corrosion monitoring of reinforced concrete. Guided waves can be successfully used to identify corrosion defects in reinforced concrete with the analysis of suitable wavelet-based function and its scale. PMID:25013865

  7. Cathodic protection against crevice corrosion of high-alloy steel in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Baptista, W.; Pimenta, G.

    1995-10-01

    Localized corrosion of high-alloy steel in seawater, mainly under crevices, limits the alloys` use in such environments. An in-situ test program was conducted to study this corrosive process and possible protective measures. Attention focused on the resistance of several types of high-alloy steels under corrosive conditions and on the response of type 316 stainless steel to cathodic protection (CP) by carbon steel and zinc anodes. It was found that CP could effectively mitigate crevice corrosion in these subsea conditions.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Monitoring Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete Based on Ultrasonic Guided Waves

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhupeng; Lei, Ying; Xue, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulation based on finite element method is conducted to predict the location of pitting corrosion in reinforced concrete. Simulation results show that it is feasible to predict corrosion monitoring based on ultrasonic guided wave in reinforced concrete, and wavelet analysis can be used for the extremely weak signal of guided waves due to energy leaking into concrete. The characteristic of time-frequency localization of wavelet transform is adopted in the corrosion monitoring of reinforced concrete. Guided waves can be successfully used to identify corrosion defects in reinforced concrete with the analysis of suitable wavelet-based function and its scale. PMID:25013865

  9. Millimeter Wave Nondestructive Evaluation of Corrosion Under Paint in Steel Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.

    2006-03-06

    Millimeter wave nondestructive evaluation techniques have shown great potential for detection of corrosion under paint in steel structures. They may also provide for detection of other anomalies associated with the corrosion process such as precursor pitting. This paper presents the results of an extensive investigation spanning a frequency range of 30-100 GHz and using magnitude- and phase-sensitive reflectometers. Using 2D automated scanning mechanisms, raster images of two corrosion patches are produced showing the spatial resolution capabilities of these systems as well as their potential for evaluating localized corrosion severity.

  10. WASTE PACKAGE CORROSION STUDIES USING SMALL MOCKUP EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    B.E. Anderson; K.B. Helean; C.R. Bryan; P.V. Brady; R.C. Ewing

    2005-10-19

    The corrosion of spent nuclear fuel and subsequent mobilization of radionuclides is of great concern in a geologic repository, particularly if conditions are oxidizing. Corroding A516 steel may offset these transport processes within the proposed waste packages at the Yucca Mountain Repository (YMR) by retaining radionuclides, creating locally reducing conditions, and reducing porosity. Ferrous iron, Fe{sup 2+}, has been shown to reduce UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} to UO{sub 2(s)} [1], and some ferrous iron-bearing ion-exchange materials adsorb radionuclides and heavy metals [2]. Of particular interest is magnetite, a potential corrosion product that has been shown to remove TcO{sub 4}{sup -} from solution [3]. Furthermore, if Fe{sup 2+} minerals, rather than fully oxidized minerals such as goethite, are produced during corrosion, then locally reducing conditions may be present. High electron availability leads to the reduction and subsequent immobilization of problematic dissolved species such as TcO{sub 4}{sup -}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}, and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and can also inhibit corrosion of spent nuclear fuel. Finally, because the molar volume of iron material increases during corrosion due to oxygen and water incorporation, pore space may be significantly reduced over long time periods. The more water is occluded, the bulkier the corrosion products, and the less porosity is available for water and radionuclide transport. The focus of this paper is on the nature of Yucca Mountain waste package steel corrosion products and their effects on local redox state, radionuclide transport, and porosity.

  11. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  12. CORROSION PROTECTION OF ALUMINUM

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R.S.; Nelson, W.B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred. (D.C.W.)

  13. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

    1997-08-19

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  14. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, Debra A.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Thompson, Karen G.; Bryan, Coleman J.

    1997-01-01

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  15. Papering Over Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center's battle against corrosion led to a new coating that was licensed to GeoTech and is commercially sold as Catize. The coating uses ligno sulfonic acid doped polyaniline (Ligno-Pani), also known as synthetic metal. Ligno-Pani can be used to extend the operating lives of steel bridges as one example of its applications. future applications include computers, televisions, cellular phones, conductive inks, and stealth technology.

  16. Stress Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Advanced testing of structural materials was developed by Lewis Research Center and Langley Research Center working with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Under contract, Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa) conducted a study for evaluating stress corrosion cracking, and recommended the "breaking load" method which determines fracture strengths as well as measuring environmental degradation. Alcoa and Langley plan to submit the procedure to ASTM as a new testing method.

  17. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  18. Ultimate strength performance of tankers associated with industry corrosion addition practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Han Byul; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Chen Guang; Paik, Jeom Kee

    2014-09-01

    In the ship and offshore structure design, age-related problems such as corrosion damage, local denting, and fatigue damage are important factors to be considered in building a reliable structure as they have a significant influence on the residual structural capacity. In shipping, corrosion addition methods are widely adopted in structural design to prevent structural capacity degradation. The present study focuses on the historical trend of corrosion addition rules for ship structural design and investigates their effects on the ultimate strength performance such as hull girder and stiffened panel of double hull oil tankers. Three types of rules based on corrosion addition models, namely historic corrosion rules (pre-CSR), Common Structural Rules (CSR), and harmonised Common Structural Rules (CSRH) are considered and compared with two other corrosion models namely UGS model, suggested by the Union of Greek Shipowners (UGS), and Time-Dependent Corrosion Wastage Model (TDCWM). To identify the general trend in the effects of corrosion damage on the ultimate longitudinal strength performance, the corrosion addition rules are applied to four representative sizes of double hull oil tankers namely Panamax, Aframax, Suezmax, and VLCC. The results are helpful in understanding the trend of corrosion additions for tanker structures

  19. Environmental and Geometrical Conditions to Sustain Crevice Corrosion in Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Carranza, R M; Rodr?guez, M A; Rebak, R B

    2006-11-10

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is highly resistant to localized corrosion. Under aggressive environmental conditions Alloy 22 may be susceptible to crevice corrosion in hot chloride (Cl{sup -}) solutions. The objective of the present work was to explore the environmental and geometrical conditions for crevice corrosion to occur. Electrochemical tests were performed using PCA and prismatic mill annealed Alloy 22 specimens in chloride solutions. Crevice corrosion current density was found to be a function of applied potential. i{sub CREV} values ranged from 40 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} to 20 mA/cm{sup 2}. Such low values of current density explained the absence of pitting corrosion in Alloy 22 at any potential. Decreasing of the effective diffusion distance in a propagating crevice is thought to cause crevice corrosion stifling or repassivation after long anodic polarization. Crevice corrosion breakdown potential is expected to decrease with potential scan rate, approaching repassivation potential for low scan rates. The lowest corrosion potential of Alloy 22 in hydrochloric acid solutions at which active corrosion exists was proposed as the lowest possible repassivation potential for crevice corrosion.

  20. Effect of microstructure on the corrosion of CVD-SiC exposed to supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Allen, T. R.; Barringer, E.

    2009-10-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is an important engineering material being studied for potential use in multiple nuclear energy systems including high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and water-cooled reactors. The corrosion behavior of SiC exposed to supercritical water (SCW) is critical for examining its applications in nuclear reactors. Although the hydrothermal corrosion of SiC has been the subject of many investigations, the study on the microstructural effects on the corrosion is limited. This paper presents the effect of residual strain, grain size, grain boundary types, and surface orientations on the corrosion of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) β-SiC exposed to SCW at 500 °C and 25 MPa. Weight loss occurred on all the samples due to localized corrosion. Residual strains associated with small grains showed the most significant effect on the corrosion compared to the other factors.

  1. Corrosion in supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Propp, W.A.; Carleson, T.E.; Wai, Chen M.; Taylor, P.R.; Daehling, K.W.; Huang, Shaoping; Abdel-Latif, M.

    1996-05-01

    Integrated studies were carried out in the areas of corrosion, thermodynamic modeling, and electrochemistry under pressure and temperature conditions appropriate for potential applications of supercritical fluid (SCF) extractive metallurgy. Carbon dioxide and water were the primary fluids studied. Modifiers were used in some tests; these consisted of 1 wt% water and 10 wt% methanol for carbon dioxide and of sulfuric acid, sodium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium nitrate at concentrations ranging from 0.00517 to 0.010 M for the aqueous fluids. The materials studied were Types 304 and 316 (UNS S30400 and S31600) stainless steel, iron, and AISI-SAE 1080 (UNS G10800) carbon steel. The thermodynamic modeling consisted of development of a personal computer-based program for generating Pourbaix diagrams at supercritical conditions in aqueous systems. As part of the model, a general method for extrapolating entropies and related thermodynamic properties from ambient to SCF conditions was developed. The experimental work was used as a tool to evaluate the predictions of the model for these systems. The model predicted a general loss of passivation in iron-based alloys at SCF conditions that was consistent with experimentally measured corrosion rates and open circuit potentials. For carbon-dioxide-based SCFs, measured corrosion rates were low, indicating that carbon steel would be suitable for use with unmodified carbon dioxide, while Type 304 stainless steel would be suitable for use with water or methanol as modifiers.

  2. Corrosion detection by induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roddenberry, Joshua L.

    Bridges in Florida are exposed to high amounts of humidity due to the state's geography. This excess moisture results in a high incidence of corrosion on the bridge's steel support cables. Also, the inclusion of ineffective waterproofing has resulted in additional corrosion. As this corrosion increases, the steel cables, responsible for maintaining bridge integrity, deteriorate and eventually break. If enough of these cables break, the bridge will experience a catastrophic failure resulting in collapse. Repairing and replacing these cables is very expensive and only increases with further damage. As each of the cables is steel, they have strong conductive properties. By inducing a current along each group of cables and measuring its dissipation over distance, a picture of structural integrity can be determined. The purpose of this thesis is to prove the effectiveness of using electromagnetic techniques to determine cable integrity. By comparing known conductive values (determined in a lab setting) to actual bridge values, the tester will be able to determine the location and severity of any damage, if present.

  3. Corrosive wear principles

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    The dual effects of corrosion and wear operate together in such industries as paper and pulp, coal handling, mining, and sugar beet extraction. There is a synergistic effect that causes far greater wastage to carbon steels, alloy steels, and even much more abrasion resistant cast irons. Several laboratory and in situ studies have been conducted to better understand the contributions of corrosion and wear to the wastage process. The environmental conditions are usually set by the process. However, there are a few instances where inhibitors as sodium nitrite, sodium chromate, and sodium metasilicate have been successfully used to reduce metal wastage of carbon steels. Hardness has been found to be an unreliable guide to performance under wet sliding conditions. Heat treated alloy steels and cast irons are inferior to stainless steels. Even distilled water is too severe a corrodent for steels. While the austenitic stainlesses perform the best, cold rolling to increase hardness does not further improve their performance. The surface roughness of stainless steels gets smoother during corrosive wear testing while it gets rougher for the alloy steels. This observation substantiated the reputation of improved slideability for stainless alloys over alloy steels.

  4. Corrosion inhibitors from expired drugs.

    PubMed

    Vaszilcsin, Nicolae; Ordodi, Valentin; Borza, Alexandra

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a method of expired or unused drugs valorization as corrosion inhibitors for metals in various media. Cyclic voltammograms were drawn on platinum in order to assess the stability of pharmaceutically active substances from drugs at the metal-corrosive environment interface. Tafel slope method was used to determine corrosion rates of steel in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Expired Carbamazepine and Paracetamol tablets were used to obtain corrosion inhibitors. For the former, the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 0.1 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid solution was about 90%, whereas for the latter, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the same material in the 0.25 mol L(-1) acetic acid-0.25 mol L(-1) sodium acetate buffer solution was about 85%.

  5. ROLE OF IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST IN ARSENIC REMEDIATION USING ZEROVALENT IRON IN COLUMN TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined corrosion products of zerovalent iron (Peerless iron) that was used in three column tests for removing arsenic under dynamic flow conditions with and without added phosphate and silicate. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate and magnetite were major iron corrosion products...

  6. Tuning the Internet for corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Cottis, R.A.; Bogaerts, W.; Diamantidis, Z.

    1999-11-01

    The Internet provides a powerful, content-neutral mechanism for the presentation and delivery of information, but it has limitations for corrosion applications. These include the difficulty of defining corrosion specific information and the inability to accommodate commercial information. The Thematic Network described here is an open group project that aims to establish mechanisms for the indexing and exchange of corrosion information over the Internet.

  7. Embeddable sensor for corrosion measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Robert G.; Yuan, J.; Jones, Stephen H.; Wang, W.; Hudson, K.; Sime, A.; Schneider, O.; Clemena, Gerardo G.

    1999-02-01

    The design of a microinstrument for corrosion monitoring in reinforced concrete is presented and the performance of the prototype device discussed. Sensors for the measurement of corrosion rate, corrosion potential, chloride concentration, and concrete conductivity have been developed and tested inside of model concrete slabs. The tests include electrochemical chloride driving as a method for test acceleration and wet/dry cycling. The corrosion rate and conductivity sensors perform very well, as do all aspects of the electronics. Work continues on the chloride sensor and reference electrode.

  8. Electrochemical Apparatus Simulates Corrosion In Crevices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khoshbin, S. Rachel; Jeanjaquet, S. L.; Lumsden, Jesse B.

    1996-01-01

    Method of testing metal specimens for susceptibility to galvanic corrosion in crevices involves use of relatively simple electrochemical apparatus. By following method, one quantifies rates of corrosion of dissimilar-metal couples exposed to various etchants or other corrosive solutions.

  9. Quantitative corrosion monitoring and detection using ultrasonic Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Grant A.; Braunling, Russ

    2005-05-01

    Corrosion is a major problem for airframe operators. For the aircraft industry in general, the direct costs of corrosion are estimated at $2.2 billion. As part of their strategy to control corrosion, airframe operators constantly seek to improve their ability to anticipate, manage and identify corrosion activity. Motivated by the need for an on-line real-time corrosion-monitoring tool for industry and aircraft a prototype system and analysis approach is presented. The tool employs ultrasonic Lamb waves along with a dispersion compensated synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) to detect emerging pitting damage. In order to develop an automated detection approach the noise sources of the SAFT processed defect maps were examined and modeled. The random noise was found to be neither stationary nor normally distributed. Locally varying Weibull distribution parameters are used to characterize the image noise. An algorithm is developed to quantify the uncertainty in the corrosion detection and to allow assignment of a constant false alarm probability to any region of the monitored area.

  10. Systematic approach for simultaneously correcting the band-gap andp-dseparation errors of common cation III-V or II-VI binaries in density functional theory calculations within a local density approximation

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2015-07-31

    We propose a systematic approach that can empirically correct three major errors typically found in a density functional theory (DFT) calculation within the local density approximation (LDA) simultaneously for a set of common cation binary semiconductors, such as III-V compounds, (Ga or In)X with X = N,P,As,Sb, and II-VI compounds, (Zn or Cd)X, with X = O,S,Se,Te. By correcting (1) the binary band gaps at high-symmetry points , L, X, (2) the separation of p-and d-orbital-derived valence bands, and (3) conduction band effective masses to experimental values and doing so simultaneously for common cation binaries, the resulting DFT-LDA-based quasi-first-principles methodmore » can be used to predict the electronic structure of complex materials involving multiple binaries with comparable accuracy but much less computational cost than a GW level theory. This approach provides an efficient way to evaluate the electronic structures and other material properties of complex systems, much needed for material discovery and design.« less

  11. Corrosion of candidate materials in Lake Rotokawa geothermal exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Estill, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    1995-05-01

    Corrosion rates were determined for CDA 613, CDA 715, A-36 carbon steel, 1020 carbon steel, and Alloy 825 flat coupons which were exposed to geothermal spring water at Paraiki site number 9 near Lake Rotokawa, New Zealand. Qualitative observations of the corrosion performance of Type 304L stainless steel and CDA 102 exposed to the same environment were noted. CDA 715, Alloy 825, 1020 carbon steel, and other alloys are being considered for the materials of construction for high-level radioactive waste containers for the United States civilian radioactive waste disposal program. Alloys CDA 613 and CDA 102 were tested to provide copper-based materials for corrosion performance comparison purposes. A36 was tested to provide a carbon steel baseline material for comparison purposes, and alloy 304L stainless steel was tested to provide an austenitic stainless steel baseline material for comparison purposes. In an effort to gather corrosion data from an environment that is rooted in natural sources of water and rock, samples of some of the proposed container materials were exposed to a geothermal spring environment. At the proposed site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, currently under consideration for high-level nuclear waste disposal, transient groundwater may come in contact with waste containers over the course of a 10,000-year disposal period. The geothermal springs environment, while extremely more aggressive than the anticipated general environment at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, could have similarities to the environment that arises at selected local sites on a container as a result of crevice corrosion, pitting corrosion, microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC), or the concentration of the ionic species due to repetitive evaporation or boiling of the groundwater near the containers. The corrosion rates were based on weight loss data obtained after six weeks exposure in a 90{degrees}C, low-pH spring with relatively high concentrations of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and Cl{sup -}.

  12. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-11-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys.

  13. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K

    2015-11-30

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys.

  14. Monitoring power plant fireside corrosion using corrosion probes

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to monitor the corrosion degradation of key components in fossil fuel power plants is of utmost importance for Futuregen and ultra-supercritical power plants. Fireside corrosion occurs in the high temperature sections of energy production facilities due to a number of factors: ash deposition, coal composition, thermal gradients, and low NOx conditions, among others. Problems occur when equipment designed for either oxidizing or reducing conditions is exposed to alternating oxidizing and reducing conditions. This can happen especially near the burners. The use of low NOx burners is becoming more commonplace and can produce reducing environments that accelerate corrosion. One method of addressing corrosion of these surfaces is the use of corrosion probes to monitor when process changes cause corrosive conditions. In such a case, corrosion rate could become a process control variable that directs the operation of a coal combustion or coal gasification system. Alternatively, corrosion probes could be used to provide an indication of total metal damage and thus a tool to schedule planned maintenance outages.

  15. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys. PMID:26615896

  16. Corrosion and stress corrosion problems associated with the Space Shuttle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, J. G.

    1971-01-01

    The problems encountered and the methods used to prevent corrosion and stress corrosion cracking on current space vehicles and aircraft are discussed. Preventing these problems on the Space Shuttle, in particular, by properly using materials that are highly resistant to this phenomenon, is examined in detail.

  17. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K

    2015-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys. PMID:26615896

  18. Corrosion behavior of a welded stainless-steel orthopedic implant.

    PubMed

    Reclaru, L; Lerf, R; Eschler, P Y; Meyer, J M

    2001-02-01

    The corrosion behavior of combinations of materials used in an orthopedic implant: the spherical part (forged or forged and annealed) constituting the head, the weld (tungsten inert gas (TIG) or electron beam (EB) techniques), and the cylindrical part (annealed) constituting the shaft of a femoral prosthesis - has been investigated. Open-circuit potentials, potentiodynamic curves, Tafel slope, mixed potential theory and susceptibility to intergranular attack are electrochemical and chemical procedures selected for this work. Electrochemical measurements using a microelectrode have been made in the following zones: spherical part, cylindrical part, weld, and weld/sphere, and weld/shaft interfaces. To detect intergranular attack, the Strauss test has been used. At the interfaces, corrosion currents, measured (Icorr) and predicted (Icouple) are low, in the order of the pico- to nanoampere. The electrochemical behavior of the electron beam (EB) weld is better than that of the tungsten inert gas (TIG). Welds at interfaces can behave either anodically or cathodically. It is better if welds, which are sensitive parts of the femoral prosthesis, behave cathodically. In this way, the risk of starting localized corrosion (pitting, crevice or intergranular corrosion) from a galvanic couple, remains low. From this point of view, the sample with the EB weld offers the best behavior. All the other samples containing a TIG type of weld exhibit a less favorable behavior. The mechanical treatments (forged, and forged and annealed) of the steel sphere did not show any difference in the corrosion behavior. No intergranular corrosion has been observed at the weld/steel interface for unsensitized samples. With sensitized samples, however, a TIG sample has exhibited some localized intergranular corrosion at a distance of 500 microm along the weld/stainless steel (sphere) interface. PMID:11197502

  19. Identification of key factors in Accelerated Low Water Corrosion through experimental simulation of tidal conditions: influence of stimulated indigenous microbiota.

    PubMed

    Marty, Florence; Gueuné, Hervé; Malard, Emilie; Sánchez-Amaya, José M; Sjögren, Lena; Abbas, Ben; Quillet, Laurent; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Muyzer, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors favoring Accelerated Low Water Corrosion (ALWC) on harbor steel structures remain unclear warranting their study under controlled experimental tidal conditions. Initial stimulation of marine microbial consortia by a pulse of organic matter resulted in localized corrosion and the highest corrosion rates (up to 12-times higher than non-stimulated conditions) in the low water zone, persisting after nine months exposure to natural seawater. Correlations between corrosion severity and the abundance and composition of metabolically active sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) indicated the importance and persistence of specific bacterial populations in accelerated corrosion. One phylotype related to the electrogenic SRB Desulfopila corrodens appeared as the major causative agent of the accelerated corrosion. The similarity of bacterial populations related to sulfur and iron cycles, mineral and tuberculation with those identified in ALWC support the relevance of experimental simulation of tidal conditions in the management of steel corrosion exposed to harbor environments.

  20. CORROSION TESTING IN SIMULATED TANK SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.

    2010-12-09

    Three simulated waste solutions representing wastes from tanks SY-102 (high nitrate, modified to exceed guidance limits), AN-107, and AY-102 were supplied by PNNL. Out of the three solutions tested, both optical and electrochemical results show that carbon steel samples corroded much faster in SY-102 (high nitrate) than in the other two solutions with lower ratios of nitrate to nitrite. The effect of the surface preparation was not as strong as the effect of solution chemistry. In areas with pristine mill-scale surface, no corrosion occurred even in the SY-102 (high nitrate) solution, however, corrosion occurred in the areas where the mill-scale was damaged or flaked off due to machining. Localized corrosion in the form of pitting in the vapor space of tank walls is an ongoing challenge to overcome in maintaining the structural integrity of the liquid waste tanks at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. It has been shown that the liquid waste condensate chemistry influences the amount of corrosion that occurs along the walls of the storage tanks. To minimize pitting corrosion, an effort is underway to gain an understanding of the pitting response in various simulated waste solutions. Electrochemical testing has been used as an accelerated tool in the investigation of pitting corrosion. While significant effort has been undertaken to evaluate the pitting susceptibility of carbon steel in various simulated waste solutions, additional effort is needed to evaluate the effect of liquid waste supernates from six Hanford Site tanks (AY-101, AY-102, AN-102, AN-107, SY-102 (high Cl{sup -}), and SY-102 (high nitrate)) on carbon steel. Solutions were formulated at PNNL to replicate tank conditions, and in the case of SY-102, exceed Cl{sup -} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} conditions, respectively, to provide a contrast between in and out of specification limits. The majority of previous testing has been performed on pristine polished samples. To evaluate the actual tank carbon steel

  1. Corrosion Evaluation of INTEC Waste Storage Tank WM-182

    SciTech Connect

    W. J. Dirk; P. A. Anderson

    1999-11-01

    Irradiated nuclear fuel has been stored and reprocessed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory since 1953 using facilities located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). This reprocessing produced radioactive liquid waste which was stored in the Tank Farm. The INTEC Tank Farm consists of eleven vaulted 300,000-gallon underground tanks including Tank WM-182. Tank WM-182 was put into service in 1955, has been filled four times, and has contained aluminum and zirconium fuel reprocessing wastes as well as sodium bearing waste. A program to monitor corrosion in the waste tanks was initiated in 1953 when the first of the eleven Tank Farm tanks was placed in service. Austenitic stainless steel coupons representative of the materials of construction of the tanks are used to monitor internal tank corrosion. This report documents the final inspection of the WM-182 corrosion coupons. Physical examination of the welded corrosion test coupons exposed to the tank bottom conditions of Tank WM-182 revealed very light uniform corrosion. Examination of the external surfaces of the extruded pipe samples showed very light uniform corrosion with slight indications of preferential attack parallel to extrusion marks and start of end grain attack of the cut edges. These indications were only evident when examined under stereo microscope at magnifications of 20X and above. There were no definite indications of localized corrosion, such as cracking, pitting, preferential weld attack, or weld heat affected zone attack on either the welded or extruded coupons. Visual examination of the coupon support cables, where they were not encased in plastic, failed to reveal any indication of liquid-liquid interface attack of any crevice corrosion. Based on the WM-182 coupon evaluations, which have occurred throughout the life of the tank, the metal loss from the tank wall due to uniform corrosion is not expected to exceed 5.5 x 10-1 mil (0.00 055 inch

  2. pH Sensitive Microcapsules for Delivery of Corrosion Inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Calle, Luz M.

    2006-01-01

    A considerable number of corrosion problems can be solved by coatings. However, even the best protective coatings can fail by allowing the slow diffusion of oxygen and moisture to the metal surface. Corrosion accelerates when a coating delaminates. Often, the problems start when microscopic nicks or pits on the surface develop during manufacturing or through wear and tear. This problem can be solved by the incorporation of a self-healing function into the coating. Several new concepts are currently under development to incorporate this function into a coating. Conductive polymers, nanoparticles, and microcapsules are used to release corrosion-inhibiting ions at a defect site. The objective of this investigation is to develop a smart coating for the early detection and inhibition of corrosion. The dual function of this new smart coating system is performed by pH-triggered release microcapsules. The microcapsules can be used to deliver healing agents to terminate the corrosion process at its early stage or as corrosion indicators by releasing dyes at the localized corrosion sites. The dyes can be color dyes or fluorescent dyes, with or without pH sensitivity. Microcapsules were formed through the interfacial polymerization process. The average size of the microcapsules can be adjusted from 1 to 100 micron by adjusting the emulsion formula and the microcapsule forming conditions. A typical microcapsule size is around 10 microns with a narrow size distribution. The pH sensitivity of the microcapsule can also be controlled by adjusting the emulsion formula and the polymerization reaction time. Both corrosion indicator (pH indicator) and corrosion inhibitor containing microcapsules were formed and incorporated into paint systems. Test panels of selected steels and aluminum alloys were painted using these paints. Testing of compatibility between the microcapsule system and different paint systems are in progress. Initial experiments with the microcapsule containing paint

  3. THE IMPACT OF PHOSPHATE ON COPPER PITTING CORROSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pinhole leaks caused by extensive localized or pitting corrosion of copper pipes is a problem for many homeowners. Pinhole water leaks may result in water damage, mold growth, and costly repairs. A large water system in Florida has been addressing a widespread pinhole leak proble...

  4. COPPER PITTING CORROSION AND PINHOLE LEAKS: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Localized corrosion, or "pitting", of copper drinking water pipe continues is a problem for many water utilities and their customers. Extreme attack leads to pinhole leaks that can potentially lead to water damage, mold growth, and costly repairs for the homeowners, as well as th...

  5. Assessing corrosion damage in reinforced concrete beams using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Dong-Jin; Weiss, W. Jason; Prine, David W.; Shah, Surendra P.

    1999-02-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) behavior of reinforced concrete beams tested under flexural loading was investigated to characterize and identify the source of damage. This research was aimed at identifying the characteristic AE response associated with micro-crack development, localized crack propagation, corrosion, and debonding of the reinforcing steel.

  6. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  7. INHIBITION OF CORROSION

    DOEpatents

    Atherton, J.E. Jr.; Gurinsky, D.H.

    1958-06-24

    A method is described for preventing corrosion of metallic container materials by a high-temperature liquid bismuth flowing therein. The method comprises fabricating the containment means from a steel which contains between 2 and 12% chromium, between 0.5 and 1.5% of either molybdenum and silicon, and a minimum of nickel and manganese, and maintaining zirconium dissolved in the liquid bismuth at a concentration between 50 parts per million and its saturation value at the lowest temperature in the system.

  8. Corrosion beneath disbonded pipeline coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G.

    1997-04-01

    The relationship between coatings, cathodic protection (CP), and external corrosion of underground pipelines is described. Historically, this problem has been addressed by focusing on the corrosion and CP processes associated with holidays, e.g., coating disbondment and CP current flow within the disbonded region. These issues and those associated with disbonded areas distant from holidays are also discussed.

  9. Atlas 5013 tank corrosion test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, W. M.; Girton, L. D.; Treadway, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    The type and cause of corrosion in spot welded joints were determined by X-ray and chemical analysis. Fatigue and static tests showed the degree of degradation of mechanical properties. The corrosion inhibiting effectiveness of WD-40 compound and required renewal period by exposing typical joint specimens were examined.

  10. INTERNAL CORROSION AND DEPOSITION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corrosion is one of the most important problems in the drinking water industry. It can affect public health, public acceptance of a water supply, and the cost of providing safe water. Deterioration of materials resulting from corrosion can necessitate huge yearly expenditures o...

  11. Agricultural Polymers as Corrosion Inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural polymers were composed of extra-cellular polysaccharides secreted by Leuconostoc mesenteroides have been shown to inhibit corrosion on corrosion-sensitive metals. The substantially pure exopolysaccharide has a general structure consisting of alpha(1-6)-linked D-glucose backbone and appr...

  12. 'Long-Cell Action' Corrosion: A Basic Mechanism Hidden Behind Components Degradation Issues in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Genn Saji

    2006-07-01

    In spite of industries' effort over the last 40 years, corrosion-related issues continue to be one of the largest unresolved problems for nuclear power plants worldwide. There are several types of strange corrosion phenomena from the point of view of our current understanding of corrosion science established in other fields. Some of these are IGSCC, PWSCC, AOA, and FAC (Erosion-Corrosion). Through studying and coping with diverse corrosion phenomena, the author believes that they share a common basis with respect to the assumed corrosion mechanism (e.g., 'local cell action' hypothesis). In general, local cell action is rarely severe since it produces a fairly uniform corrosion. The 'long cell action' that transports electrons through structures far beyond the region of local cell corrosion activities has been identified as a basic mechanism in soil corrosion. If this mechanism is assumed in nuclear power plants, the structure becomes anodic in the area where the potential is less positive and cathodic where this potential is more positive. Metallic ions generated at anodic corrosion sites are transported to remote cathodic sites through the circulation of water and deposits as corrosion products. The SCC, FAC (E-C) and PWSCC occur in the anodic sites as the structure itself acts as a short-circuiting conductor between the two sites, the action is similar to a galvanic cell but in a very large scale. This situation is the same as a battery that has been short-circuited at the terminals. No apparent external potential difference exists between the two electrodes, but an electrochemical reaction is still taking place inside the battery cell with a large internal short current. In this example what is important is the potential difference between the local coolant and the surface of the structural material. Long cell action corrosion is likely enhancing the local cell action's anodic corrosion activities, such as SCC, FAC/E-C, and PWSCC. It tends to be more hazardous

  13. The electrochemical corrosion behavior of low-carbon steel in simulated Yucca Mountain repository environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Tiangan

    The corrosion of nuclear waste container materials in possible concentrated underground environments is one of the major concerns in Yucca Mountain repository project. Low carbon steel (LCS) is considered an optional material to serve as a corrosion allowance layer. AISI 1016 low carbon steel was investigated in concentrated J-13 ground waters. The electrochemical behavior of LCS was studied by monitoring corrosion potential behavior, measuring polarization resistance and conducting anodic potentiodynamic polarization and cyclic polarization tests. LCS showed excellent resistance against general corrosion in J-13 waters under de-aerated conditions, with the measured corrosion rates at 25sp° and 90sp°C were less than 0.28 mpy. The temperature, precipitation and overall concentration effects on corrosion rate were minimal under de-aerating conditions. Under aerated conditions, the dissolved oxygen significantly increased corrosion rate of LCS in the J-13 water with low concentration and temperature. Corrosion rate reached 5.5 mpy in aerated 10X J-13 water at 25sp°C. Corrosion rate of LCS decreased in aerated J-13 waters with increasing temperature or concentration. With limitation of solubility, concentration overall species in J-13 water up to 1000X did not increase corrosion rate or tendency of localized corrosion. Resistance to pitting corrosion varies with presence of aggressive Clsp- ions, oxidizer, inhibitors and precipitates. With heavy precipitates in overall concentrated J-13 waters at 90sp°C, measured pitting and protection potentials were increased significantly. Presence of dissolved oxygen or higher Clsp- fraction decreased Esbpit, and significantly decreased Esbprot as well. However, 1000X Clsp- J-13 water formed passive film on LCS at 25sp°C. Addition of Fesp{3+} significantly increased pitting and crevice corrosion tendency, because adding FeClsb3 removed inhibitor and passivator anions from aerated J-13 waters during the solution preparation

  14. Electrochemical studies of corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of single salts, as well as multicomponent mixtures, on corrosion inhibition was studied for type 1010 steel; for 5052, 1100, and 2219-T87 aluminum alloys; and for copper. Molybdate-containing inhibitors exhibit an immediate, positive effect for steel corrosion, but an incubation period may be required for aluminum before the effect of a given inhibitor can be determined. The absence of oxygen was found to provide a positive effect (smaller corrosion rate) for steel and copper, but a negative effect for aluminum. This is attributed to the two possible mechanisms by which aluminum can oxidize. Corrosion inhibition is generally similar for oxygen-rich and oxygen-free environments. The results show that the electrochemical method is an effective means of screening inhibitors for the corrosion of single metals, with caution to be exercised in the case of aluminum.

  15. Corrosion of Titanium Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Alman, D.E.

    2002-09-22

    The corrosion behavior of unalloyed Ti and titanium matrix composites containing up to 20 vol% of TiC or TiB{sub 2} was determined in deaerated 2 wt% HCl at 50, 70, and 90 degrees C. Corrosion rates were calculated from corrosion currents determined by extrapolation of the tafel slopes. All curves exhibited active-passive behavior but no transpassive region. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiC composites were similar to those for unalloyed Ti except at 90 degrees C where the composites were slightly higher. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiB{sub 2} composites were generally higher than those for unalloyed Ti and increased with higher concentrations of TiB{sub 2}. XRD and SEM-EDS analyses showed that the TiC reinforcement did not react with the Ti matrix during fabrication while the TiB{sub 2} reacted to form a TiB phase.

  16. Carbon dioxide corrosion in cool production wells of a high pressure steam drive

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, R.W.; Treseder, R.S.; Craycraft, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    Severe localized corrosion of carbon steel tubing and flowlines in production wells from a high pressure steam drive occurred during the first 6 weeks of operation. Corrosion was attributed to carbon dioxide, with localization occurring at points of high temperature. Corrosion rates declined rapidly as the wellhead temperatures in the production wells increased from 38 to above 100 C, and the hydrogen sulfide content of the gas increased from a trace to 1--2%. The inhibiting effect of hydrogen sulfide is consistent with observations in other high carbon dioxide environments.

  17. Pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion of an advanced chromium-based stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, M.

    1999-07-01

    Alloy 33 is a (wt. %) 33 Cr-32Fe-31Ni-1.6Mo-0.6CU-0.4N austenitic stainless steel combining high yield strength of min. 380 N/mm{sup 2} (55 KSI) with high resistance to local corrosion and superior resistance to stress corrosion cracking. Ranking the material according to its PRE (pitting resistance equivalent) value, the new alloy fits in between the advanced 6% Mo superaustenitics and the nickel-base Alloy 625 but due to the balanced chemical composition the alloy shows a lot less sensitivity to segregation in the base material as well as in welded structures. It is recommended to weld the material with matching filler. The critical pitting temperature of such joints in the 10% FeCl{sub 3}{center{underscore}dot} 6H{sub 2}O solution is reduced by only 10 C in comparison to the base material. Corrosion tests in artificial seawater (20 g/l Cl{sup {minus}}) with additions of chloride up to 37 g/l as well as in a NaCl-CaCl{sub 2}, solution with 62 g/l Cl{sup {minus}}--revealed that the critical pitting temperature does not differentiate from the 6% Mo austenitic steel Alloy 926. With respect to crevice corrosion the depassivation pH value has been determined in 1 M NaCl solution according to Crolet and again there was no difference between Alloy 33 and Alloy 926. SCC tests performed on Alloy 33 in the solution annealed condition as well as after heavy cold work up to R{sub PO,2} {approx} 1,100--1,200 N/mm{sup 2} (160--174 KSI) indicate the high resistance to stress corrosion cracking in hot sodium chloride solutions.

  18. The effect of conditioning agents on the corrosive properties of molten urea

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, D E; Nguyen, D T; Norton, M M; Parker, B R; Daniels, L E

    1991-01-01

    From the process case histories of the failure of several heat exchanger tube bundles, it was revealed that molten urea containing lignosulfonate as a granulation conditioning-hardening agent (Urea LS[trademark]) is corrosive to Types 304 and 316 stainless steel. The results of field and laboratory immersion corrosion tests indicated that the corrosivity of molten urea is strongly dependent on the process temperature rather than the conditioner composition. At temperatures below 295F, molten Urea LS[trademark] is not aggressive to these stainless steels. However, at temperatures above 300F, the corrosion of these stainless steels is extremely severe. The corrosion rate of Types 304, 304L, 316, and 316L is as high as hundreds of mils per year. The corrosion mechanism tends to be more general than localized. The results of the laboratory corrosion test also revealed that among alloying elements, copper is detrimental to corrosion resistance of stainless steel exposed to molten Urea LS[trademark], chromium is the most beneficial, and nickel has only a minor effect. Thus, copper-free and chromium stainless steels have superior corrosion resistance to the molten Urea LS[trademark] at a wide range of temperatures up to 345F.

  19. LABORATORY TESTING TO SIMULATE VAPOR SPACE CORROSION IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Gray, J.

    2013-08-30

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 70 years at the Hanford nuclear facility. Vapor space corrosion of the tank walls has emerged as an ongoing challenge to overcome in maintaining the structural integrity of these tanks. The interaction between corrosive and inhibitor species in condensates/supernates on the tank wall above the liquid level, and their interaction with vapor phase constituents as the liquid evaporates from the tank wall influences the formation of corrosion products and the corrosion of the carbon steel. An effort is underway to gain an understanding of the mechanism of vapor space corrosion. Localized corrosion, in the form of pitting, is of particular interest in the vapor space. CPP testing was utilized to determine the susceptibility of the steel in a simulated vapor space environment. The tests also investigated the impact of ammonia gas in the vapor space area on the corrosion of the steel. Vapor space coupon tests were also performed to investigate the evolution of the corrosion products during longer term exposures. These tests were also conducted at vapor space ammonia levels of 50 and 550 ppm NH{sub 3} (0.005, and 0.055 vol.%) in air. Ammonia was shown to mitigate vapor space corrosion.

  20. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  1. Naval electrochemical corrosion reducer

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Howard L.

    1991-10-01

    A corrosion reducer for use with ships having a hull, a propeller mounted a propeller shaft and extending through the hull, bearings supporting the shaft, at least one thrust bearing and one seal. The improvement includes a current collector and a current reduction assembly for reducing the voltage between the hull and shaft in order to reduce corrosion due to electrolytic action. The current reduction assembly includes an electrical contact, the current collector, and the hull. The current reduction assembly further includes a device for sensing and measuring the voltage between the hull and the shaft and a device for applying a reverse voltage between the hull and the shaft so that the resulting voltage differential is from 0 to 0.05 volts. The current reduction assembly further includes a differential amplifier having a voltage differential between the hull and the shaft. The current reduction assembly further includes an amplifier and a power output circuit receiving signals from the differential amplifier and being supplied by at least one current supply. The current selector includes a brush assembly in contact with a slip ring over the shaft so that its potential may be applied to the differential amplifier.

  2. EVALUATION OF THE CORROSIVITY OF DUST DEPOSITED ON WASTE PACKAGES AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    C. Bryan; R. Jack; T, Wolery; D. Shields; M. Sutton; E. Hardin; D. Barr

    2005-08-03

    Potentially corrosive brines can form during post-closure by deliquescence of salt minerals in dust deposited on the surface of waste packages at Yucca Mountain during operations and the pre-closure ventilation period. Although thermodynamic modeling and experimental studies of brine deliquescence indicates that brines are likely to form, they will be nitrate-rich and non-corrosive. Processes that modify the brines following deliquescence are beneficial with respect to inhibition of corrosion. For example, acid degassing (HCl, HNO{sub 3}) could dry out brines, but kinetic limitations are likely to limit the effect to increasing their passivity by raising the pH and increasing the NO{sub 3}/Cl ratio. Predicted dust quantities and maximum brine volumes on the waste package surface are small, and physical isolation of salt minerals in the dust may inhibit formation of eutectic brines and decrease brine volumes. If brines do contact the WP surface, small droplet volumes and layer thicknesses do not support development of diffusive gradients necessary for formation on separate anodic-cathodic zones required for localized corrosion. Finally, should localized corrosion initiate, corrosion product buildup will stifle corrosion, by limiting oxygen access to the metal surface, by capillary retention of brine in corrosion product porosity, or by consumption of brine components (Cl{sup -}).

  3. Review of corrosion causes and corrosion control in a technical facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charng, T.; Lansing, F.

    1982-01-01

    Causes of corrosion of metals and their alloys are reviewed. The corrosion mechanism is explained by electrochemical reaction theory. The causes and methods of controlling of both physiochemical corrosion and biological corrosion are presented. Factors which influence the rate of corrosion are also discussed.

  4. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  5. Prediction of Corrosion of Alloys in Mixed-Solvent Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Anderko, Andrzej; Wang, Peiming; Young, Robert D.; Riemer, Douglas P.; McKenzie, Patrice; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Angelini, Peter

    2003-06-05

    systems; (6) Development of fundamentals of a detailed kinetic model of general corrosion, which includes a detailed treatment of local chemistry changes near the metal/solution interface coupled with transport through a liquid layer and solid phases at the interface; (7) Development of parameters for OLI's kinetic model of general corrosion of common engineering alloys in aqueous systems with a variety of solutes. With this model, the users will be able to predict the effect of various process conditions (such as environment composition, temperature, pressure) on the general corrosion of alloys; (8)Comprehensive review of the fundamentals of the models by an Academic Review Panel, which was performed in conjunction with three annual review meetings; (9)Development and commercial release of the Corrosion Analyzer, a Windows software product that encompasses the thermodynamic model, a facility for generating stability diagrams and the model for predicting the rates of general corrosion of selected alloys in aqueous systems.

  6. Coal-ash Corrosion of Alloys for Combustion Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Purohit, A.; Rink, D.L.

    2003-04-22

    A program on coal-ash corrosion is being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the performance of several structural alloys in the presence of mixtures of synthetic coal ash, alkali sulfates, and alkali chlorides. Candidate alloys are also exposed in a small-scale coal-fired combustor at the National Energy Technology Laboratory in Pittsburgh. Experiments in the present program, which addresses the effects of deposit chemistry, temperature, and alloy chemistry on the corrosion response of alloys, were conducted at temperatures in the range of 575-800 C for time periods up to {approx}1850 h. Fe-base alloys selected for the study included HR3C, 310TaN, HR120, SAVE 25, NF709, modified 800, 347HFG, and HCM12A. In addition, 800H clad with Alloy 671 was included in several of the exposures. Ni-base alloys selected for the study included 600, 601, 617, 690, 625, 602CA, 214, 230, 45TM, HR 160, and 693. Data were obtained on weight change, scale thickness, internal penetration, microstructural characteristics of corrosion products, mechanical integrity of the scales, and cracking of scales. Results showed that the relationship of corrosion rates to temperature followed a bell-shaped curve for Fe-base alloys, with peak rates at {approx}725 C, but the rate itself was dependent on the alloy chemistry. Several Fe-base alloys showed acceptable rates in the sulfate-containing coal-ash environment; but NaCl in the deposit led to catastrophic corrosion at 650 and 800 C. Ni-base alloys generally exhibited less corrosion than the Fe-base alloys under similar exposure conditions; however, they were susceptible to localized corrosion in the form of pits.

  7. Environmental and alloying effects on corrosion of metals and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Dong

    2009-12-01

    In the first part of this project, corrosion studies were carried out on 304L stainless steel samples welded with Cr-free consumables, which were developed to minimize the concentration of chromate species in the weld fume. The corrosion properties of Ni-Cu and Ni-Cu-Pd Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) welds and Shielded Metal Arc (SMA) welds are comparable to those of welds fabricated with SS308L consumable, which is the standard consumable for welding 304L. Although the breakdown potentials of the new welds from both welding processes are lower than that of the SS308L weld, the repassivation potential of these new welds is much higher. Generally, the repassivation potential is a more conservative measure of susceptibility to localized corrosion. Our studies showed that the Ni-Cu and Ni-Cu-Pd welds are more resistant to crevice corrosion than SS308L welds, which is related to the high repassivation potential. Also, addition of Pd improved the corrosion resistance of the new welds, which is consistent with previous studies from button samples and bead-on-plate samples. Other corrosion studies such as creviced and uncreviced long time immersion, atmospheric exposure, and slow strain rate testing suggest that Ni-Cu-Pd welds can be a qualified substitute for SS308 weld. In the second part of this project, efforts are put on the connection between lab and field exposure tests because sometimes the correspondence between lab atmospheric corrosion tests (ASTM B117) and field exposures is poor as a result of differences in the critical conditions controlling chemical and electrochemical reactions on surfaces. Recent studies in atmospheric chemistry revealed the formation of extremely reactive species from interactions between UV light, chloride aerosols above oceans and oxidizing agents such as ozone or peroxide. Atmospheric corrosion of metals can be affected by these species which might be transported long distances in the atmosphere to locations far from oceans. However, these

  8. Selection of Corrosion Resistant Materials for Nuclear Waste Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. Rebak

    2006-08-28

    Several countries are considering geological repositories to dispose of nuclear waste. The environment of most of the currently considered repositories will be reducing in nature, except for the repository in the US, which is going to be oxidizing. For the reducing repositories, alloys such as carbon steel, stainless steels and titanium are being evaluated. For the repository in the US, some of the most corrosion resistant commercially available alloys are being investigated. This paper presents a summary of the behavior of the different materials under consideration for the repositories and the current understanding of the degradation modes of the proposed alloys in ground water environments from the point of view of general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  9. Selection of Corrosion Resistant Materials for Nuclear Waste Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2006-06-01

    Several countries are considering geological repositories to dispose of nuclear waste. The environment of most of the currently considered repositories will be reducing in nature, except for the repository in the US, which is going to be oxidizing. For the reducing repositories alloys such as carbon steel, stainless steels and titanium are being evaluated. For the repository in the US, some of the most corrosion resistant commercially available alloys are being investigated. This paper presents a summary of the behavior of the different materials under consideration for the repositories and the current understanding of the degradation modes of the proposed alloys in ground water environments from the point of view of general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  10. SNF Interim Storage Canister Corrosion and Surface Environment Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Charles R.; Enos, David G.

    2015-09-01

    This progress report describes work being done at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Of particular concern is stress corrosion cracking (SCC), by which a through-wall crack could potentially form in a canister outer wall over time intervals that are shorter than possible dry storage times. In order for SCC to occur, three criteria must be met. A corrosive environment must be present on the canister surface, the metal must susceptible to SCC, and sufficient tensile stress to support SCC must be present through the entire thickness of the canister wall. SNL is currently evaluating the potential for each of these criteria to be met.

  11. Enhanced Corrosion Resistance of Iron-Based Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Day, S D; Lian, T; Aprigliano, L F; Hailey, P D; Farmer, J C

    2007-02-18

    Iron-based amorphous alloys possess enhanced hardness and are highly resistant to corrosion, which make them desirable for wear applications in corrosive environments. It was of interest to examine the behavior of amorphous alloys during anodic polarization in concentrated salt solutions and in the salt-fog testing. Results from the testing of one amorphous material (SAM2X5) both in ribbon form and as an applied coating are reported here. Cyclic polarization tests were performed on SAM2X5 ribbon as well as on other nuclear engineering materials. SAM2X5 showed the highest resistance to localized corrosion in 5 M CaCl{sub 2} solution at 105 C. Salt fog tests of 316L SS and Alloy 22 coupons coated with amorphous SAM2X5 powder showed resistance to rusting. Partial devitrification may be responsible for isolated pinpoint rust spots in some coatings.

  12. TEM Observations of Corrosion Behaviors of Platinized Carbon Blacks under Thermal and Electrochemical Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.Y.; Zhang, J.L.; Yu, P.T.; Zhang, J.X.; Makharia, R.; More, Karren Leslie; Stach, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Carbon blacks such as Vulcan XC-72 are widely used to support platinum (Pt) or Pt alloy catalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Despite their widespread use, carbon blacks are susceptible to corrosion during fuel cell operations. In this work, the corrosion behaviors of platinized Vulcan XC-72 nanoparticles under thermal and electrochemical conditions were monitored by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thermal corrosion experiment was carried out in a gas-cell TEM, which allows for a direct observation of the thermal oxidation behavior of the nanoparticles. The electrochemical corrosion experiment was performed outside of the TEM by loading the nanoparticles on a TEM grid and then electrochemically corroding them step by step followed by taking TEM images from exactly the same nanoparticles after each step. This work revealed four types of structural changes: (i) total removal of structurally weak aggregates, (ii) breakdown of aggregates via neck-breaking, (iii) center-hollowed primary particles caused by an inside-out corrosion starting from the center to outer region, and (iv) gradual decrease in the size of primary particles caused by a uniform removal of material from the surface. These structural changes took place in sequence or simultaneously depending on the competition of carbon corrosion dynamical processes. The results obtained from this work provide insight on carbon corrosion and its effects on fuel cells' long-term performance and durability.

  13. Corrosion-resistant sulfur concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBee, W. C.; Sullivan, T. A.; Jong, B. W.

    1983-04-01

    Sulfur concretes have been developed by the Bureau of Mines as construction materials with physical and mechanical properties that suit them for use in acid and salt corrosive environments where conventional concretes fail. Mixture design methods were established for preparing sulfur concretes using different types of aggregates and recently developed mixed-modified sulfur cements. Bench-scale testing of the sulfur concretes has shown their potential value. Corrosion resistance, strength, and durability of sulfur concrete are superior to those of conventional materials. Field in situ evaluation tests of the sulfur concretes as replacement for conventional concrete materials are in progress in corrosive areas of 24 commercial chemical, fertilizer, and metallurgical plants.

  14. Corrosion-resistant coating development

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Kupp, D.M.; Martin, R.L.

    1997-12-01

    SiC-based heat exchangers have been identified as the prime candidate material for use as heat exchangers in advanced combined cycle power plants. Unfortunately, hot corrosion of the SiC-based materials created by alkali metal salts present in the combustion gases dictates the need for corrosion-resistant coatings. The well-documented corrosion resistance of CS-50 combined with its low (and tailorable) coefficient of thermal expansion and low modulus makes CS-50 an ideal candidate for this application. Coatings produced by gelcasting and traditional particulate processing have been evaluated.

  15. Corrosion manual for internal corrosion of water distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Singley, J.E.; Beaudet, B.A.; Markey, P.H.

    1984-04-01

    Corrosion of distribution piping and of home plumbing and fixtures has been estimated to cost the public water supply industry more than $700 million per year. Two toxic metals that occur in tap water, almost entirely because of corrosion, are lead and cadmium. Three other metals, usually present because of corrosion, cause staining of fixtures, or metallic taste, or both. These are copper (blue stains and metallic taste), iron (red-brown stains and metallic taste), and zinc (metallic taste). Since the Safe Drinking Water Act (P.L. 93-523) makes the supplying utility responsible for the water quality at the customer's tap, it is necessary to prevent these metals from getting into the water on the way to the tap. This manual was written to give the operators of potable water treatment plants and distribution systems an understanding of the causes and control of corrosion.

  16. Alloying of metals for corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    McCafferty, E.; Hubler, G.K.; Natishan, P.M.

    1989-09-29

    The corrosion resistance of bulk metals is improved by implanting a corrosion-resistant species into the surface of the bulk metal in a layer beginning at the surface and extending to a depth of at least about 50 angstroms. An amount of corrosion-resistant species is deposited so that the oxide layer that forms on the corrosion-resistant species implanted bulk metal is composed of at least about three percent of the oxide of the corrosion-resistant species.

  17. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  18. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  19. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1995-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  20. Review on stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue failure of centrifugal compressor impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiao; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng; Li, Jianfeng

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion failure, especially stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue, is the main cause of centrifugal compressor impeller failure. And it is concealed and destructive. This paper summarizes the main theories of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue and its latest developments, and it also points out that existing stress corrosion cracking theories can be reduced to the anodic dissolution (AD), the hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), and the combined AD and HIC mechanisms. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue in the crack propagation stage are similar to stress corrosion cracking. The effects of stress ratio, loading frequency, and corrosive medium on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation rate are analyzed and summarized. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in corrosive environments, which contain sulfide, chlorides, and carbonate, are analyzed. The working environments of the centrifugal compressor impeller show the behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in different corrosive environments. The current research methods for centrifugal compressor impeller corrosion failure are analyzed. Physical analysis, numerical simulation, and the fluid-structure interaction method play an increasingly important role in the research on impeller deformation and stress distribution caused by the joint action of aerodynamic load and centrifugal load.

  1. Part I. Corrosion studies of continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites. Part II. Galvanic corrosion between continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites and 4340 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun

    Part I. The corrosion performance of continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites (CF-AMCs) was investigated in both the laboratory and field environments by comparing them with their respective monolithic matrix alloys, i.e., pure Al, A1-2wt%Cu T6, and Al 6061 T6. The corrosion initiation sites were identified by monitoring the changes in the surface morphology. Corrosion current densities and pH profiles at localized corrosion sites were measured using the scanning-vibrating electrode technique and the scanning ion-selective electrode technique, respectively. The corrosion damage of the materials immersed in various electrolytes, as well as those exposed in a humidity chamber and outdoor environments, was evaluated. Potentiodynamic polarization behavior was also studied. The corrosion initiation for the composites in 3.15 wt% NaCl occurred primarily around the Fe-rich intermetallic particles, which preferentially existed around the fiber/matrix interface on the composites. The corrosion initiation sites were also caused by physical damage (e.g., localized deformation) to the composite surface. At localized corrosion sites, the buildup of acidity was enhanced by the formation of micro-crevices resulting from fibers left in relief as the matrix corroded. The composites that were tested in exposure experiments exhibited higher corrosion rates than their monolithic alloys. The composites and their monolithic alloys were subjected to pitting corrosion when anodically polarized in the 3.15 wt% NaCl, while they passivated when anodically polarized in 0.5 M Na2SO4. The experimental results indicated that the composites exhibited inferior corrosion resistance compared to their monolithic matrix alloys. Part II. Galvanic corrosion studies were conducted on CF-AMCs coupled to 4340 steel since CF-AMCs have low density and excellent mechanical properties and are being considered as potential jacketing materials for reinforcing steel gun barrels. Coupled and

  2. CORROSION RELIABILITY PREDICTION: LONG TERM NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE IN YUCCA MOUNTAIN

    SciTech Connect

    G.S. Frankel; E. Tada; B. Maier

    2005-08-18

    The US. Department of Energy has proposed the disposal of high level nuclear waste from commercial and defense reactors in a mined geologic repository under Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The waste will be stored in metallic canisters. The barrier against corrosion will be an Alloy 22 canister and a Ti Grade 7 drip shield. Both of these materials are extremely corrosion resistant. The environment inside Yucca Mountain is relatively benign, but the long time period over which these materials must resist penetration makes corrosion a concern. This paper presents a background of the corrosion issues and shows some recent results regarding measurements of localized corrosion under thin aqueous layers and layers that simulate wet dust deposits.

  3. Effect of High Temperature Aging on the Corrosion Resistance of Iron Based Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S D; Haslam, J J; Farmer, J C; Rebak, R B

    2007-08-10

    Iron-based amorphous alloys can be more resistant to corrosion than polycrystalline materials of similar compositions. However, when the amorphous alloys are exposed to high temperatures they may recrystallize (or devitrify) thus losing their resistance to corrosion. Four different types of amorphous alloys melt spun ribbon specimens were exposed to several temperatures for short periods of time. The resulting corrosion resistance was evaluated in seawater at 90 C and compared with the as-prepared ribbons. Results show that the amorphous alloys can be exposed to 600 C for 1-hr. without losing the corrosion resistance; however, when the ribbons were exposed at 800 C for 1-hr. their localized corrosion resistance decreased significantly.

  4. Electrochemical Corrosion Characteristics of Arc-Ion-Plated AlTiN Coating for Marine Application.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hyung; Kim, MyoungJun; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2016-02-01

    In this study, aluminum titanium nitride (AlTiN) coating was deposited by arc ion plating onto mirror finish STS 304 plate. The surface and cross-section of the coating was characterized by SEM and EDX analysis. Several electrochemical corrosion experiments were performed including rest potential measurement, potentiodynamic polarization experiment and Tafel analysis. The result of the experiments indicated that the AlTiN coating presented lower corrosion current density than the substrate material (STS 304) under uniform corrosion environment. It was also observed that AlTiN coating may have a risk of being attacked by localized corrosion attack such as pitting when pores or micro/nano particles in the coating are exposed to chloride ion containing corrosion environment, especially marine environment. PMID:27433658

  5. Development of corrosion-resistant improved Al-doped austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Keietsu; Miwa, Yukio; Okubo, Nariaki; Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Tsukada, Takashi

    2011-10-01

    Aluminum-doped type 316L SS (316L/Al) has been developed for the purpose of suppressing the degradation of corrosion resistance induced by irradiation in austenitic stainless steels (SSs). The electrochemical corrosion properties of this material were estimated after Ni-ion irradiation at a temperature range from 330 °C to 550 °C. When irradiated at 550 °C up to 12 dpa, 316L/Al showed high corrosion resistance in the vicinity of grain boundaries (GBs) and in grains, while severe GB etching and local corrosion in grains were observed in irradiated 316L and 316 SS. It is supposed that aluminum enrichment was enhanced by high-temperature irradiation at GBs and in grains, to compensate for lost corrosion resistance induced by chromium depletion.

  6. Why metals volubility may not be a good indicator of corrosion in alkanolamine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rooney, P.C.; DuPart, M.S.

    1999-11-01

    Although it is generally believed that Fe, Cr and Ni content in alkanolamine gas treating solutions reflects the corrosivity of the solution, the authors have found that this is not necessarily the case. Comparison of metals volubility by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with carbon steel and stainless steel weight loss coupons of various alkanolamines heated in an autoclave showed that low metals volubility does not necessarily mean low coupon corrosivity. High metals volubility also did not necessarily mean high coupon corrosivity. One plant having very high metals volubility was found to have very low corrosion upon a thorough plant inspection. Another plant had severe localized corrosion that could not have been predicted based upon the low (200ppm) Fe in the alkanolamine compared to the total surface area of carbon steel in this plant.

  7. Electrochemical Corrosion Characteristics of Arc-Ion-Plated AlTiN Coating for Marine Application.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hyung; Kim, MyoungJun; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2016-02-01

    In this study, aluminum titanium nitride (AlTiN) coating was deposited by arc ion plating onto mirror finish STS 304 plate. The surface and cross-section of the coating was characterized by SEM and EDX analysis. Several electrochemical corrosion experiments were performed including rest potential measurement, potentiodynamic polarization experiment and Tafel analysis. The result of the experiments indicated that the AlTiN coating presented lower corrosion current density than the substrate material (STS 304) under uniform corrosion environment. It was also observed that AlTiN coating may have a risk of being attacked by localized corrosion attack such as pitting when pores or micro/nano particles in the coating are exposed to chloride ion containing corrosion environment, especially marine environment.

  8. Fe sub 3 Al-type iron aluminides: Aqueous corrosion properties in a range of electrolytes and slow-strain-rate ductilities during aqueous corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, R.A.; Kim, J.G. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    The Fe{sub 3}Al-type iron aluminides have undergone continued development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for enhancement of mechanical and corrosion properties. Improved alloys and thermomechanical processing methods have evolved. The overall purpose of the project herein described was to evaluate the aqueous corrosion properties of the most recent alloy compositions in a wide range of possibly-aggressive solutions and under several different types of corrosion-test conditions. The work supplements previous aqueous-corrosion studies on iron aluminides by the present authors. Four stages of this one-year aqueous-corrosion investigation are described. First the corrosion properties of selected iron aluminides were evaluated by means of electrochemical tests and longer-time immersion tests in a range of acidic, basic and chloride solutions. Theses tests were performed under non-crevice conditions, i.e. the specimens were not designed to contain crevice geometries. Second, the iron-aluminide alloy that proved most resistance to chloride-induced localized corrosion under non-crevice conditions was further evaluated under more-severe crevice conditions by electrochemical and immersion testing. Third, in order to study the relative roles of Fe, Al, Cr and Mo in the formation of passive films, the chemical compositions of passive films were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). And fourth, in order to study aqueous-corrosion effects on the ductilities of iron aluminides as related to hydrogen embrittlement and/or stress-corrosion cracking, slow-strain-rate corrosion (SSRC) tests were conducted over a range of electrochemical potentials.

  9. Fe{sub 3}Al-type iron aluminides: Aqueous corrosion properties in a range of electrolytes and slow-strain-rate ductilities during aqueous corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, R.A.; Kim, J.G.

    1992-08-01

    The Fe{sub 3}Al-type iron aluminides have undergone continued development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for enhancement of mechanical and corrosion properties. Improved alloys and thermomechanical processing methods have evolved. The overall purpose of the project herein described was to evaluate the aqueous corrosion properties of the most recent alloy compositions in a wide range of possibly-aggressive solutions and under several different types of corrosion-test conditions. The work supplements previous aqueous-corrosion studies on iron aluminides by the present authors. Four stages of this one-year aqueous-corrosion investigation are described. First the corrosion properties of selected iron aluminides were evaluated by means of electrochemical tests and longer-time immersion tests in a range of acidic, basic and chloride solutions. Theses tests were performed under non-crevice conditions, i.e. the specimens were not designed to contain crevice geometries. Second, the iron-aluminide alloy that proved most resistance to chloride-induced localized corrosion under non-crevice conditions was further evaluated under more-severe crevice conditions by electrochemical and immersion testing. Third, in order to study the relative roles of Fe, Al, Cr and Mo in the formation of passive films, the chemical compositions of passive films were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). And fourth, in order to study aqueous-corrosion effects on the ductilities of iron aluminides as related to hydrogen embrittlement and/or stress-corrosion cracking, slow-strain-rate corrosion (SSRC) tests were conducted over a range of electrochemical potentials.

  10. Corrosion Problems in Absorption Chillers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Absorption chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of absorption and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)

  11. Argentinean map of atmospheric corrosivities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosales, B.M.; Ayllon, E.S.; Leiro, M.C.; Fernandez, A.; Moriena, G.; Varela, F.; Codaro, E.N.; Vilche, J.R.

    1995-10-01

    In the present paper the results obtained by the Argentinean research groups integrated in the MICAT (Iberoamerican Map of Atmospheric Corrosion) Project are given. Outdoor exposure in 6 test situations of different environmental conditions were performed by quadruplicate, on plain carbon steel and pure zinc, copper and aluminium, during yearly periods from 1 to 4 years. Three samples were used for the weight loss determinations while the fourth one was used to characterize the corrosion products formed through electrochemical d.c. and a.c. techniques and SEM-EDAX surface analysis. Good correlations were observed among the corrosion rates, the environmental conditions, both electrochemical techniques and the morphology of the rusts in plant and in polished cross sections. The techniques applied allowed to evidence the different protectiveness of the rusts formed on the metals, according to the solubility, morphology, hygroscopic power and pollutants content of the corrosion products` components.

  12. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  13. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C.; Lee, Chuck K.; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  14. Electrochemical determination of the corrosion behavior of candidate alloys proposed for containment of high level nuclear waste in tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R.S.; Overturf, G.E.; Garrison, R.E.; McCright, R.D.

    1984-06-18

    Long-term geological disposal of nuclear waste requires corrosion-resistant canister materials for encapsulation. Several austenitic stainless steels are under consideration for such purposes for the disposal of high-level waste at the candidate repository site located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. With regard to corrosion considerations, a worst case scenario at this prospective repository location would result from the intrusion of vadose water. This preliminary study focuses on the electrochemical and corrosion behavior of the candidate canister materials under worst-case repository environments. Electrochemical parameters related to localized attack (e.g., pitting potentials) and the electrochemical corrosion rates have been examined. 15 references, 15 figures, 4 tables.

  15. Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Preventative Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Montgomery, Eliza; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry; Back, Teddy; Balles, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings and Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) project is to identify, test, and develop qualification criteria for the use of environmentally friendly corrosion protective coatings and CPCs for flight hardware and ground support equipment. This document is the Final Report for Phase I evaluations, which included physical property, corrosion resistance, and NASA spaceport environment compatibility testing and analysis of fifteen CPC types. The CPCs consisted of ten different oily film CPCs and five different wax or grease CPC types. Physical property testing encompassed measuring various properties of the bulk CPCs, while corrosion resistance testing directly measured the ability of each CPC material to protect various metals against corrosion. The NASA spaceport environment compatibility testing included common tests required by NASA-STD-6001, "Flammability, Odor, Offgassing, and Compatibility Requirements and Test Procedures for Materials in Environments that Support Combustion". At the end of Phase I, CPC materials were down-selected for inclusion in the next test phases. This final report includes all data and analysis of results obtained by following the experimental test plan that was developed as part of the project. Highlights of the results are summarized by test criteria type.

  16. Integrated Corrosion Facility for long-term testing of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste containment

    SciTech Connect

    Estill, J.C.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Gdowski, G.E.; McCright, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    A long-term-testing facility, the Integrated Corrosion Facility (I.C.F.), is being developed to investigate the corrosion behavior of candidate construction materials for high-level-radioactive waste packages for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Corrosion phenomena will be characterized in environments considered possible under various scenarios of water contact with the waste packages. The testing of the materials will be conducted both in the liquid and high humidity vapor phases at 60 and 90{degrees}C. Three classes of materials with different degrees of corrosion resistance will be investigated in order to encompass the various design configurations of waste packages. The facility is expected to be in operation for a minimum of five years, and operation could be extended to longer times if warranted. A sufficient number of specimens will be emplaced in the test environments so that some can be removed and characterized periodically. The corrosion phenomena to be characterized are general, localized, galvanic, and stress corrosion cracking. The long-term data obtained from this study will be used in corrosion mechanism modeling, performance assessment, and waste package design. Three classes of materials are under consideration. The corrosion resistant materials are high-nickel alloys and titanium alloys; the corrosion allowance materials are low-alloy and carbon steels; and the intermediate corrosion resistant materials are copper-nickel alloys.

  17. [Microorganisms in heat supply lines and internal corrosion of steel pipes].

    PubMed

    Rozanova, E P; Dubinina, G A; Lebedeva, E V; Suntsova, L A; Lipovskikh, V M; Tsvetkov, N N

    2003-01-01

    In laboratory experiments with batch cultures of thermophilic microorganisms isolated from urban heat supply systems, the growth of sulfate-reducing, iron-oxidizing, and iron-reducing bacteria was found to accelerate the corrosion rate of the steel-3 plates used in the pipelines. In the absence of bacteria and dissolved oxygen, minimal, corrosion was determined. The aforementioned microorganisms, as well as sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, were found to be widespread in water and corrosion deposits in low-alloy steel pipelines (both delivery and return) of the Moscow heat networks, as well as in the corrosion deposits on the steel-3 plates in a testing unit supplied with the network water. The microorganisms were found in samples with water pH ranging from 8.1 to 9.6 and a temperature lower than 90 degrees C. Magnetite, lepidocrocite, goethite, X-ray amorphous ferric oxide were the corrosion products identified on the steel-3 plates, as well as siderite, aragonite, and S0. The effect of microbiological processes on the rate of electrochemical corrosion was evaluated from the accumulation of corrosion deposits and from variation in total and local corrosion of the steel plates in a testing unit.

  18. RESULTS OF EXPERIMENT TO DETERMINE CORROSION RATES FOR 304L IN HB-LINE DISSOLVER VESSEL VENTILATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J; Kathryn Counts, K

    2008-02-22

    Radioactive material being processed as part of the DE3013 program for HB-Line will result in the presence of chlorides, and in some cases fluorides, in the dissolver. Material Science and Technology developed an experimental plan to evaluate the impact of chloride on corrosion of the dissolver vessel ventilation system. The plan set test variables from the proposed operating parameters, previous test results, and a desired maximum chloride concentration for processing. The test variables included concentrations of nitric acid, fluorides and chlorides, and the presence of a welded and stressed metal coupon. Table 1 contains expected general corrosion rates in the HB-Line vessel vent system from dissolution of 3013 contents of varying nitric acid and chloride content. These general corrosion rates were measured upstream of the condenser in the experiment's offgas system near the entrance to the dissolver. However, they could apply elsewhere in the offgas system, depending on factors not simulated in the testing, including offgas system temperatures and airflow. Localized corrosion was significant in Tests One, Two, and Three. This corrosion is significant because it will probably be the first mode of penetration of the 304L steel in several places in the system. See Table 2. For Tests One and Three, the penetration rate of localized corrosion was much higher than that for general corrosion. It was approximately four times higher in Test One and at least 45 times higher in Test Three, penetrating an entire coupon thickness of 54 mils in 186 hours or less. There was no significant difference in corrosion between welded areas and un-welded areas on coupons. There was also no significant attack on stressed portions of coupons. It is probable that the lack of corrosion was because the stressed areas were facing downwards and offered no place for condensation or deposits to form. Had deposits formed, pitting may have occurred and led to stress corrosion cracking. The

  19. In vitro corrosion of pure magnesium and AZ91 alloy—the influence of thin electrolyte layer thickness

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Rong-Chang; Qi, Wei-Chen; Zhang, Fen; Li, Shuo-Qi

    2016-01-01

    In vivo degradation predication faces a huge challenge via in vitro corrosion test due to the difficulty for mimicking the complicated microenvironment with various influencing factors. A thin electrolyte layer (TEL) cell for in vitro corrosion of pure magnesium and AZ91 alloy was presented to stimulate the in vivo corrosion in the micro-environment built by the interface of the implant and its neighboring tissue. The results demonstrated that the in vivo corrosion of pure Mg and the AZ91 alloy was suppressed under TEL condition. The AZ91 alloy was more sensitive than pure Mg to the inhibition of corrosion under a TEL thickness of less than 200 µm. The TEL thickness limited the distribution of current, and thus localized corrosion was more preferred to occur under TEL condition than in bulk solution. The TEL cell might be an appropriate approach to simulating the in vivo degradation of magnesium and its alloys. PMID:26816655

  20. Crevice Corrosion Susceptibility of Alloy 22 in Fluoride and Chloride Containing Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S D; Rebak, R B

    2004-11-22

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is highly resistant to crevice corrosion in pure chloride (Cl{sup -}) solutions. Little research has been conducted to explore the resistance of this alloy to other halides such as fluoride (F{sup -}) and bromide (Br{sup -}). Even less information is available exploring the behavior of localized corrosion for Alloy 22 in mixtures of the halide ions. Standard electrochemical tests such as polarization resistance and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP), were conducted to explore the resistance to corrosion of Alloy 22 in deaerated aqueous solutions of 1 M NaCl, 1 M NaF and 0.5 M NaCl + 0.5 M NaF solutions at 60 C and 90 C. Results show that the general corrosion rate was the lowest in the mixed halide solution and the highest in the pure chloride solution. Alloy 22 was not susceptible to localized corrosion in the pure fluoride solution. In 1 M NaCl solution, Alloy 22 was susceptible to crevice corrosion at 90 C. In the mixed halide solution Alloy 22 was susceptible to crevice corrosion both at 60 C and 90 C.

  1. Anodized titanium and stainless steel in contact with CFRP: an electrochemical approach considering galvanic corrosion.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Yves; Tognini, Roger; Mayer, Joerg; Virtanen, Sannakaisa

    2007-09-15

    The combination of different materials in an implant gives the opportunity to better fulfill the requirements that are needed to improve the healing process. However, using different materials increases the risk of galvanic coupling corrosion. In this study, coupling effects of gold-anodized titanium, stainless steel for biomedical applications, carbon fiber reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRP), and CFRP containing tantalum fibers are investigated electrochemically and by long-term immersion experiments in simulated body fluid (SBF). Potentiodynamic polarization experiments (i/E curves) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) of the separated materials showed a passive behavior of the metallic samples. Anodized titanium showed no corrosion attacks, whereas stainless steel is highly susceptibility for localized corrosion. On the other side, an active dissolution behavior of both of the CFRPs in the given environment could be determined, leading to delaminating of the carbon fibers from the matrix. Long-term immersion experiments were carried out using a set-up especially developed to simulate coupling conditions of a point contact fixator system (PC-Fix) in a biological environment. Electrochemical data were acquired in situ during the whole immersion time. The results of the immersion experiments correlate with the findings of the electrochemical investigation. Localized corrosion attacks were found on stainless steel, whereas anodized titanium showed no corrosion attacks. No significant differences between the two CFRP types could be found. Galvanic coupling corrosion in combination with crevice conditions and possible corrosion mechanisms are discussed.

  2. Corrosion testing in natural waters: Second volume

    SciTech Connect

    Kain, R.M.; Young, W.T.

    1997-12-31

    This is the second STP of the same title. The first volume, STP 1086, was published in 1990 and contained papers on seawater corrosivity, crevice corrosion resistance of stainless steels, corrosion fatigue testing, and corrosion in potable water. Since then, final results have become available from the worldwide study on corrosion behavior of metals in seawater, and additional studies have been performed that should be brought to the attention of the corrosion engineering community. The second volume contains these studies. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  3. Chem I Supplement: Corrosion: A Waste of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This article, intended for secondary school chemistry students, discusses the corrosion of metals. The discussion includes: (1) thermodynamic aspects of corrosion; (2) electrochemical aspects of corrosion; and (3) inhibition of corrosion processes. (HM)

  4. FY2004 CORROSION SURVEILLANCE RESULTS FOR L-BASIN

    SciTech Connect

    VORMELKER, P

    2005-09-05

    This report documents the results of the L-Basin Corrosion Surveillance Program for the fiscal year 2004. Test coupons were removed from the basin on February 12, 2004, shipped to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and visually examined in a contaminated laboratory hood. Selected coupons were metallurgically characterized to establish the extent of general corrosion and pitting. Pitting was observed on galvanically coupled and on intentionally creviced coupons, thus demonstrating that localized concentration cells were formed during the exposure period. In these cases, the susceptibility to pitting was not attributed to aggressive basin water chemistry but to localized conditions (intentional crevices and galvanic coupling) that allowed the development of oxygen and/or metal ion concentration cells that produced locally aggressive waters. General oxidation was also observed on all of the coupons with localized corrosion observed on some of the coupons. These coupons were not pretreated to produce a protective oxide layer prior to exposure in the basin water. Non-protected coupons are more susceptible to corrosion than fuel cladding which has developed a protective oxide layer from high temperature reactor operations. However, the oxide on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stored in L-Basin is not necessarily in pristine condition. Some of the oxide may have spalled off or been mechanically damaged prior to arrival at SRS. These areas on the fuel cladding would have the same susceptibility to corrosion as the coupons. Current observations from the test coupons demonstrate that, even with rigorously controlled basin water chemistry, localized aggressive conditions can develop in intentional crevice and galvanic samples. These results do illustrate the potential for corrosion induced degradation and thus the importance of a routine surveillance program similar to that conducted on the Uruguay fuel and on the surveillance coupons stored in L-Basin and future in

  5. Effect of Surface Stress Mitigation on the Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, D V; Yilmaz, A; Wong, L L; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2004-11-10

    When metallic plates are welded, for example using the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, residual tensile stresses may develop in the vicinity of the weld seam. Processes such as Low Plasticity Burnishing (LPB) and Laser Shock Peening (LSP) could be applied locally to eliminate the residual stresses produced by welding. In this study, Alloy 22 (N06022) plates were welded and then the above-mentioned surface treatments were applied to eliminate the residual tensile stresses. The aim of the current study was to comparatively test the corrosion behavior of as-welded (ASW) plates with the corrosion behavior of plates with stress mitigated surfaces. Immersion and electrochemical tests were performed. Results from both general and localized corrosion tests show that the corrosion resistance of the mitigated plates was not affected by the surface treatments applied.

  6. Stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) with roughly equal amount of austenite and ferrite phases are being used in industries such as petrochemical, nuclear, pulp and paper mills, de-salination plants, marine environments, and others. However, many DSS grades have been reported to undergo corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in some aggressive environments such as chlorides and sulfide-containing caustic solutions. Although stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in chloride solution has been investigated and well documented in the literature but the SCC mechanisms for DSS in caustic solutions were not known. Microstructural changes during fabrication processes affect the overall SCC susceptibility of these steels in caustic solutions. Other environmental factors, like pH of the solution, temperature, and resulting electrochemical potential also influence the SCC susceptibility of duplex stainless steels. In this study, the role of material and environmental parameters on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions were investigated. Changes in the DSS microstructure by different annealing and aging treatments were characterized in terms of changes in the ratio of austenite and ferrite phases, phase morphology and intermetallic precipitation using optical micrography, SEM, EDS, XRD, nano-indentation and microhardness methods. These samples were then tested for general and localized corrosion susceptibility and SCC to understand the underlying mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation in DSS in the above-mentioned environments. Results showed that the austenite phase in the DSS is more susceptible to crack initiation and propagation in caustic solutions, which is different from that in the low pH chloride environment where the ferrite phase is the more susceptible phase. This study also showed that microstructural changes in duplex stainless steels due to different heat treatments could affect their SCC

  7. Corrosion behavior of titanium and other alloys in laboratory FGD scrubber environments

    SciTech Connect

    Schutz, R.W.; Grauman, J.S.

    1986-04-01

    Immersion and crevice corrosion testing of various high performance alloys in actual and representative flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber liquors was performed to characterize relative alloy corrosion behavior. Correlation with previous field data identified crevice corrosion as the limiting mode of attack in hot, low pH, aerated scrubber liquors. Also, pitting limited performance of stainless steel alloys was tested. Titanium alloys exhibited superior resistance to all forms of localized attack and are shown to be resistant to smeared surface iron pitting, and hydrogen uptake when galvanically coupled to carbon steel under simulated aggressive scrubber conditions.

  8. Corrosion models for predictions of performance of high-level radioactive-waste containers

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.; Gdowski, G.E.

    1991-11-01

    The present plan for disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the US is to seal it in containers before emplacement in a geologic repository. A proposed site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is being evaluated for its suitability as a geologic repository. The containers will probably be made of either an austenitic or a copper-based alloy. Models of alloy degradation are being used to predict the long-term performance of the containers under repository conditions. The models are of uniform oxidation and corrosion, localized corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking, and are applicable to worst-case scenarios of container degradation. This paper reviews several of the models.

  9. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cunnane, J.C.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion.This document is organized into three volumes. Volumes I and II represent a tiered set of information intended for somewhat different audiences. Volume I is intended to provide an overview of waste glass corrosion, and Volume 11 is intended to provide additional experimental details on experimental factors that influence waste glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II. Volume I is intended for managers, decision makers, and modelers, the combined set of Volumes I, II, and III is intended for scientists and engineers working in the field of high-level waste.

  10. Report on accelerated corrosion studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Mowry, Curtis Dale; Glass, Sarah Jill; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2011-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted accelerated atmospheric corrosion testing for the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to help further the understanding of the development of corrosion products on conductor materials in household electrical components exposed to environmental conditions representative of homes constructed with problem drywall. The conditions of the accelerated testing were chosen to produce corrosion product growth that would be consistent with long-term exposure to environments containing humidity and parts per billion (ppb) levels of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) that are thought to have been the source of corrosion in electrical components from affected homes. This report documents the test set-up, monitoring of electrical performance of powered electrical components during the exposure, and the materials characterization conducted on wires, screws, and contact plates from selected electrical components. No degradation in electrical performance (measured via voltage drop) was measured during the course of the 8-week exposure, which was approximately equivalent to 40 years of exposure in a light industrial environment. Analyses show that corrosion products consisting of various phases of copper sulfide, copper sulfate, and copper oxide are found on exposed surfaces of the conductor materials including wires, screws, and contact plates. The morphology and the thickness of the corrosion products showed a range of character. In some of the copper wires that were observed, corrosion product had flaked or spalled off the surface, exposing fresh metal to the reaction with the contaminant gasses; however, there was no significant change in the wire cross-sectional area.

  11. Corrosion inhibition of powder metallurgy Mg by fluoride treatments.

    PubMed

    Pereda, M D; Alonso, C; Burgos-Asperilla, L; del Valle, J A; Ruano, O A; Perez, P; Fernández Lorenzo de Mele, M A

    2010-05-01

    Pure Mg has been proposed as a potential degradable biomaterial to avoid both the disadvantages of non-degradable internal fixation implants and the use of alloying elements that may be toxic. However, it shows excessively high corrosion rate and insufficient yield strength. The effects of reinforcing Mg by a powder metallurgy (PM) route and the application of biocompatible corrosion inhibitors (immersion in 0.1 and 1M KF solution treatments, 0.1M FST and 1M FST, respectively) were analyzed in order to improve Mg mechanical and corrosion resistance, respectively. Open circuit potential measurements, polarization techniques (PT), scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to evaluate its corrosion behavior. SECM showed that the local current of attacked areas decreased during the F(-) treatments. The corrosion inhibitory action of 0.1M FST and 1M FST in phosphate buffered solution was assessed by PT and EIS. Under the experimental conditions assayed, 0.1M FST revealed better performance. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction analyses of Mg(PM) with 0.1M FST showed the presence of KMgF(3) crystals on the surface while a MgF(2) film was detected for 1M FST. After fluoride inhibition treatments, promising results were observed for Mg(PM) as degradable metallic biomaterial due to its higher yield strength and lower initial corrosion rate than untreated Mg, as well as a progressive loss of the protective characteristics of the F(-)-containing film which ensures the gradual degradation process.

  12. Alloy 33, a new material resisting marine corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.C.; Koehler, M.

    1997-12-01

    A new austenitic chromium-based material alloyed with nominally (wt.%) 33 Cr, 32 Fe, 31 Ni, 1.6 Mo, 0.6 Cu and 0.4 N, having a pitting resistance equivalent of 50, has been developed recently. The alloy exhibits excellent local corrosion resistance in chloride-bearing media. When tested in 10% FeCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6 H{sub 2}O solution, a critical pitting temperature of 85 C was determined. Low segregation in the matching weld metal means that the critical pitting temperature of a 5 mm PAW weld seam is only 10 C lower. Potentiostatic corrosion tests in artificial seawater at 0.3 V (SCE) with additions of 0.5 mol NaCl reveal no pitting corrosion at 85 C, and crevice corrosion in artificial seawater at 0.3 V (SCE) has not been observed at temperatures below 55 C. In saturated CaCl{sub 2} solutions at 125 C under constant load conditions the resistance to stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 33 is superior even to that of Alloy 926. The combination of excellent corrosion resistance to a broad variety of media with high yield strength, 30% above that of the nitrogen-alloyed 6% Mo stainless steels, not only offers a cost-effective alternative to higher-cost nickel alloys, but also allows for light weight structures in the Offshore Industry. Alloy 33 (UNS R20033) has been approved by ASME and VdTUEV for pressure vessels in the temperature range of {minus}196 C to 450 C and can be manufactured to all semi-finished products used in the marine and chemical industries.

  13. High-Resolution Analytical Electron Microscopy Characterization of Corrosion and Cracking at Buried Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Thomas, Larry E.

    2001-07-01

    Recent results are presented demonstrating the application of cross-sectional analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) to corrosion and cracking in high-temperature water environments. Microstructural, chemical and crystallographic characterization of buried interfaces at near-atomic resolutions is shown to reveal evidence for unexpected local environments, corrosion reactions and material transformations. Information obtained by a wide variety of high-resolution imaging and analysis methods indicates the processes occurring during crack advance and provides insights into the mechanisms controlling environmental degradation.

  14. Effect of Stress on Corrosion at Crack Tip on Pipeline Steel in a Near-Neutral pH Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yao; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the local corrosion at crack tip on an API 5L X46 pipeline steel specimens was investigated under various applied loads in a near-neutral pH solution. Electrochemical measurements, including potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, combined with micro-electrochemical technique and surface characterization, were conducted to investigate the effect of stress on local anodic solution of the steel at the crack tip. The stress corrosion cracking of the steel was dominated by an anodic dissolution mechanism, while the effect of hydrogen was negligible. The applied load (stress) increased the corrosion rate at the crack tip, contributing to crack propagation. The deposit of corrosion products at the crack tip could protect somewhat from further corrosion. At sufficiently large applied loads such as 740 N in the work, it was possible to generate separated cathode and anode, further accelerating the crack growth.

  15. Hanford transuranic storage corrosion review

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, J.L.; Divine, J.R.

    1980-12-01

    The rate of atmospheric corrosion of the transuranic (TRU) waste drums at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Project, near Richland, Washington, was evaluated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The rate of corrosion is principally contingent upon the effects of humidity, airborne pollutants, and temperature. Results of the study indicate that actual penetration of barrels due to atmospheric corrosion will probably not occur within the 20-year specified recovery period. Several other US burial sites were surveyed, and it appears that there is sufficient uncertainty in the available data to prevent a clearcut statement of the corrosion rate at a specific site. Laboratory and site tests are recommended before any definite conclusions can be made. The corrosion potential at the Hanford TRU waste site could be reduced by a combination of changes in drum materials (for example, using galvanized barrels instead of the currently used mild steel barrels), environmental exposure conditions (for example, covering the barrels in one of numerous possible ways), and storage conditions (for example, separating the layers of barrels with slats of wood instead of sheets of plywood).

  16. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    SciTech Connect

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  17. Fireside corrosion probes--an update

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Matthes, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to monitor the corrosion degradation of key metallic components in fossil fuel power plants will become increasingly important for FutureGen and ultra-supercritical power plants. A number of factors (ash deposition, coal composition changes, thermal gradients, and low NOx conditions, among others) which occur in the high temperature sections of energy production facilities, will contribute to fireside corrosion. Several years of research have shown that high temperature corrosion rate probes need to be better understood before corrosion rate can be used as a process variable by power plant operators. Our recent research has shown that electrochemical corrosion probes typically measure lower corrosion rates than those measured by standard mass loss techniques. While still useful for monitoring changes in corrosion rates, absolute probe corrosion rates will need a calibration factor to be useful. Continuing research is targeted to help resolve these issues.

  18. Corrosion and Preservation of Bronze Artifacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Robert

    1980-01-01

    Reviews chemical information relating to the corrosion of bronze artifacts. Properties of copper alloys are reviewed, with a thorough discussion of the specialized properties of bronze. Techniques to reduce or eliminate corrosion are listed. (CS)

  19. Microencapsulation of Corrosion Indicators for Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.; Calle, Luz M.; Hanna,Joshua S.; Rawlins, James W.

    2011-01-01

    A multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous detection, indication, and control of corrosion is been developed based on microencapsulation technology. This paper summarizes the development, optimization, and testing of microcapsules specifically designed for early detection and indication of corrosion when incorporated into a smart coating. Results from experiments designed to test the ability of the microcapsules to detect and indicate corrosion, when blended into several paint systems, show that these experimental coatings generate a color change, indicative of spot specific corrosion events, that can be observed with the naked eye within hours rather than the hundreds of hours or months typical of the standard accelerated corrosion test protocols.. Key words: smart coating, corrosion detection, microencapsulation, microcapsule, pH-sensitive microcapsule, corrosion indicator, corrosion sensing paint

  20. Materials corrosion and protection from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Donald F.

    Materials erode under environmental stresses such as high temperature, high pressure, and mechanical shock/stress, but erosion is often exacerbated by chemical corrosion. In this dissertation, periodic density functional theory (DFT) is employed to simulate interfacial adhesion, absorption kinetics, bulk diffusion, and other material phenomena (e.g., hydrogen-enhanced decohesion and shock-induced phase changes) with the intention of understanding corrosion and subsequent failure processes and guiding the design of new protective coatings. This work examines corrosion and/or protection of materials ( i.e., Fe, Ni, W) with important applications: structural steel, gun tubes, high-pressure oil recovery vessels, jet engine turbine blades, and fusion reactor walls. We use DFT to model the pressure-induced, bcc-to-hcp phase transformation in Fe, in which a new low energy pathway is predicted exhibiting nonadiabatic behavior coupling magnetic and structural changes. Protection of steel is addressed in two aspects: interfacial adhesion of protective coatings and assessment of corrosion resistance provided by a surface alloy. First, the current chrome-coated steel system is examined where extremely strong adhesion is predicted at the Cr/Fe interface originating in strong spin correlations. A ceramic coating, SiC, is considered as a possible replacement for Cr. Strong adhesion is predicted, especially for C-Fe interfacial bonds. To assess corrosion resistance, we model ingress of two common corrosive elements, H and C, into two Fe alloys, FeAl and Fe3Si. Adsorption and absorption thermodynamics and kinetics, as well as bulk dissolution and diffusion are calculated in order to determine whether these two alloys can inhibit uptake of H and C. Relative to pure Fe, dissolved H and C are less stable in the alloys, as the dissolution enthalpy is predicted to be more endothermic. Overall, the energy barriers and rate constants for adsorbed H/C diffusing into Fe3Si subsurface layers

  1. Prediction of Failure Due to Thermal Aging, Corrosion and Environmental Fracture in Amorphous and Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C

    2003-04-15

    DARPA is exploring a number of advanced materials for military applications, including amorphous metals and titanium-based alloys. Equipment made from these materials can undergo degradation due to thermal aging, uniform corrosion, pitting, crevice corrosion, denting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatigue, hydrogen induced cracking and microbial influenced corrosion. Amorphous alloys have exceptional resistance to corrosion, due in part to the absence of grain boundaries, but can undergo crystallization and other phase instabilities during heating and welding. Titanium alloys are extremely corrosion resistant due to the formation of a tenacious passive film of titanium oxide, but is prone to hydrogen absorption in crevices, and hydrogen induced cracking after hydrogen absorption. Accurate predictions of equipment reliability, necessary for strategic planning, requires integrated models that account for all relevant modes of attack, and that can make probabilistic predictions. Once developed, model parameters must be determined experimentally, and the validity of models must be established through careful laboratory and field tests. Such validation testing requires state-of-the-art surface analytical techniques, as well as electrochemical and fracture mechanics tests. The interaction between those processes that perturb the local environment on a surface and those that alter metallurgical condition must be integrated in predictive models. The material and environment come together to drive various modes of corrosive attack (Figure 1). Models must be supported through comprehensive materials testing capabilities. Such capabilities are available at LLNL and include: the Long Term Corrosion Test Facility (LTCTF) where large numbers of standard samples can be exposed to realistic test media at several temperature levels; a reverse DC machine that can be used to monitor the propagation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in situ; and banks of potentiostats with

  2. Corrosion of copper, nickel, and gold dental casting alloys: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Johansson, B I; Lucas, L C; Lemons, J E

    1989-12-01

    The corrosion behavior of commercially available copper, nickel, and gold alloys for dental castings was investigated. The alloys investigated included: three copper alloys (76-87Cu, 6-11A1, 0-12Zn, 1-5Ni, 0-4Fe, 0.5-1.2Mn), two nickel alloys (68-78Ni, 12-16Cr, 4-14Mo, 0-1.7Be), and one gold alloy (77Au, 14Ag, 8Cu, 1Pd). Anodic and cathodic polarization curves, long-term immersion tests in saline and artificial saliva solutions, and dog crown studies were conducted to evaluate both the in vitro and in vivo corrosion characteristics of the alloys. All evaluations conducted demonstrated that the copper alloys were highly susceptible to corrosion attack. High corrosion currents were observed in the in vitro tests, and SEM of the alloys specimens showed significantly altered surfaces. The anodic polarization curves predicted that the beryllium-containing nickel alloy should be susceptible to localized corrosion and SEM revealed an etched surface with corrosion of certain microstructural features. No significant corrosion was predicted or observed for the non-beryllium nickel alloy and the gold alloy. The in vitro corrosion evaluations predicted the in vivo corrosion behavior for the alloys. Since the three copper alloys and the beryllium-containing nickel alloy demonstrated significant corrosion under the tested conditions, the use of these alloys for restorative procedures is questionable due to the release of significant levels of selected ions to the oral cavity.

  3. Smart Coatings for Launch Site Corrosion Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.

    2014-01-01

    Smart, environmentally friendly paint system for early corrosion detection, mitigation, and healing that will enable supportability in KSC launch facilities and ground systems through their operational life cycles. KSC's Corrosion Technology Laboratory is developing a smart, self-healing coating that can detect and repair corrosion at an early stage. This coating is being developed using microcapsules specifically designed to deliver the contents of their core when corrosion starts.

  4. Naphthenic acid corrosion in the refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, H.L. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    Field tests and laboratory studies of refinery process streams are presented. The effects of temperature, velocity and physical state were studied with respect to alloy selection for corrosion resistant service. The amount of molybdenum in the austenitic stainless steel alloys is the dominant factor in conferring corrosion resistance. The Naphthenic Acid Corrosion Index (NACI) is useful in assessing the severity of corrosion under a variety of circumstances.

  5. Corrosion of metals by hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, E. A.; Moran, C. M.; Distefano, S.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism of corrosion of metals by hydrazine has been studied by means of coupons in sealed ampoules and by electrochemical techniques. The variables considered were temperature, CO2 impurity level, alloy composition and microcrystalline structure. The coupon studies, to date, verify that increasng temperature and the presence of CO2 does increase the corrosion rate as expected. The presence of molybdenum in stainless steels to the 3 percent level is not necessarily deleterious, contrary to published reports. The influence of microcrystalline structure and surface characteristics are more dominant effects. However, with Ti-6Al-4V, two different microcrystalline structures showed no significant differences. Corrosion rates of CRES 304 L in hydrazine have also been measured by several electrochemical techniques such as Tafel plots, polarization resistance and A. C. Impedance. This is the first documented work to show that A. C. Impedance can be used with non-aqueous solvents. Preliminary data correlated satisfactorily with the results of the coupon studies.

  6. Surface modification for corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1993-06-01

    The raw gas environments that arise from coal gasification have chemical compositions that are low in pO{sub 2} and moderate-to-high in pS{sub 2}. Metallic materials for service in such an environment undergo predominantly sulfidation attack at temperatures of 400 to 700{degree}C. Modification of alloy compositions in bulk can alter the scaling processes and lead to improvements in corrosion resistance, but the benefits can only be attained at temperatures much higher than the service temperatures of the components. Modification of surfaces of structural components by several of the coating techniques examined in this study showed substantial benefit in corrosion resistance when tested in simulated coal gasification environments. The paper presents several examples of surface modification and their corrosion performance.

  7. Graphene coatings for protection against microbiologically induced corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Ajay

    Microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) is a special form of electrochemical corrosion where micro-organisms affect the local environmental conditions at the metal-electrolyte interface by forming a stable biofilm. The biofilm introduces localized concentration cells, which accelerate the electrochemical corrosion rates. MIC has been found to affect many industrial systems such as sewage waste water pipes, heat exchangers, ships, underwater pipes etc. It has been traditionally eradicated by physical, biochemical and surface protection methods. The cleaning methods and the biocidal deliveries are required periodically and don't provide a permanent solution to the problem. Further, the use of biocides has been harshly criticized by environmentalists due to safety concerns associated with their usage. Surface based coatings have their own drawback of rapid degradation under harsh microbial environments. This has led to the exploration of thin, robust, inert, conformal passivation coatings for the protection of metallic surfaces from microbiologically induced corrosion. Graphene is a 2D arrangement of carbon atoms in a hexagonal honeycomb lattice. The carbon atoms are bonded to one another by sp2 hybridization and each layer of the carbon ring arrangement spans to a thickness of less than a nm. Due to its unique 2D arrangement of carbon atoms, graphene exhibits interesting in-plane and out of plane properties that have led to it being considered as the material for the future. Its excellent thermal, mechanical, electrical and optical properties are being explored in great depth to understand and realize potential applications in various technological realms. Early studies have shown the ability of bulk and monolayer graphene to protect metallic surfaces from air oxidation and solution based galvanic corrosion processes for short periods. However, the role of graphene in resisting MIC is yet to be determined, particularly over the long time spans characteristic of

  8. Electrochemical Measurement of Atmospheric Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeArmond, Anna H.; Davis, Dennis D.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    Corrosion of Shuttle thruster components in atmospheres containing high concentrations of nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) and water is an important issue in ground operations of bipropellant systems in humid locations. Measurements of the corrosivities of NTO-containing atmospheres and the responses of different materials to these atmospheres have been accomplished using an electrochemical sensor. The sensor is composed of alternating aluminum/titanium strips separated by thin insulating layers. Under high humidity conditions a thin film of water covers the surface of the sensor. Added NTO vapor reacts with the water film to form a conductive medium and establishes a galvanic cell. The current from this cell can be integrated with respect to time and related to the corrosion activity. The surface layer formed from humid air/NTO reacts in the same way as an aqueous solution of nitric acid. Nitric acid is generally considered an important agent in NTO corrosion situations. The aluminum/titanium sensor is unresponsive to dry air, responds slightly to humid air (> 75% RH), and responds strongly to the combination of humid air and NTO. The sensor response is a power function (n = 2) of the NTO concentration. The sensor does not respond to NTO in dry air. The response of other materials in this type of sensor is related to position of the material in a galvanic series in aqueous nitric acid. The concept and operation of this electrochemical corrosion measurement is being applied to other corrosive atmospheric contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, sulfur dioxide, and acidic aerosols.

  9. Corrosion performance of structural alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1999-07-15

    Component reliability and long-term trouble-free performance of structural materials are essential in power-generating and gasification processes that utilize coal as a feedstock. During combustion and conversion of coal, the environments encompass a wide range of oxygen partial pressures, from excess-air conditions in conventional boilers to air-deficient conditions in 10W-NO{sub x} and gasification systems. Apart from the environmental aspects of the effluent from coal combustion and conversion, one concern from the systems standpoint is the aggressiveness of the gaseous/deposit environment toward structural components such as waterwall tubes, steam superheaters, syngas coolers, and hot-gas filters. The corrosion tests in the program described in this paper address the individual and combined effects of oxygen, sulfur, and chlorine on the corrosion response of several ASME-coded and noncoded structural alloys that were exposed to air-deficient and excess-air environments typical of coal-combustion and gasification processes. Data in this paper address the effects of preoxidation on the subsequent corrosion performance of structural materials such as 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel, Type 347 austenitic stainless steel, Alloys 800, 825, 625, 214, Hastelloy X, and iron aluminide when exposed at 650 C to various mixed-gas environments with and without HCI. Results are presented for scaling kinetics, microstructural characteristics of corrosion products, detailed evaluations of near-surface regions of the exposed specimens, gains in our mechanistic understanding of the roles of S and Cl in the corrosion process, and the effect of preoxidation on subsequent corrosion.

  10. Corrosion beneath disbonded coatings: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes the relationship between coatings, cathodic protection (CP), and external corrosion of underground pipelines. Historically, this problem has been addressed by focusing on the corrosion and CP processes associated with holidays, e.g., coating disbandment and CP current flow within the disbanded region. This paper addresses these issues but also considers corrosion associated with disbanded areas that are distant from holidays.

  11. 7 CFR 3201.44 - Corrosion preventatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Corrosion preventatives. 3201.44 Section 3201.44... Designated Items § 3201.44 Corrosion preventatives. (a) Definition. Products designed to prevent the deterioration (corrosion) of metals. (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have...

  12. 7 CFR 3201.44 - Corrosion preventatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Corrosion preventatives. 3201.44 Section 3201.44... Designated Items § 3201.44 Corrosion preventatives. (a) Definition. Products designed to prevent the deterioration (corrosion) of metals. (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have...

  13. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or...

  14. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or...

  15. 7 CFR 3201.44 - Corrosion preventatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Corrosion preventatives. 3201.44 Section 3201.44... Designated Items § 3201.44 Corrosion preventatives. (a) Definition. Products designed to prevent the deterioration (corrosion) of metals. (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have...

  16. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or...

  17. 7 CFR 2902.44 - Corrosion preventatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Corrosion preventatives. 2902.44 Section 2902.44... Items § 2902.44 Corrosion preventatives. (a) Definition. Products designed to prevent the deterioration (corrosion) of metals. (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or...

  19. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion is a destructive process that often causes failure in metallic components and structures. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of other existing microcapsules designs, the corrosion controlled release function that allows the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand only when and where they are needed. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into the microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection efficacy.

  20. CORROSION RESISTANT JACKETED METAL BODY

    DOEpatents

    Brugmann, E.W.

    1958-08-26

    Jacketed metal bodies of the type used as fuel elements for nuclear reactors, which contain an internal elongated body of fissionable material jacketed in a corrosion resistant metal are described. The ends of the internal bodies are provided with screw threads having a tapered outer end. The jacket material overlaps the ends and extends into the tapered section of the screw threaded opening. Screw caps with a mating tapered section are screwed into the ends of the body to compress the jacket material in the tapered sections to provtde an effective seal against corrosive gases and liquids.

  1. Stress corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, M. J.; Smyrl, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    Service experience applications, experimental data generation, and the development of satisfactory quantitative theories relevant to the suppression and control of stress corrosion cracking in titanium are discussed. The impact of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on the use of titanium alloys is considered, with emphasis on utilization in the aerospace field. Recent data on hot salt SCC, crack growth in hydrogen gas, and crack growth in liquid environments containing halide ions are reviewed. The status of the understanding of crack growth processes in these environments is also examined.

  2. Corrosion resistant thermal barrier coating

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, S.R.; Miller, R.A.; Hodge, P.E.

    1981-03-01

    A thermal barrier coating system for protecting metal surfaces at high temperature in normally corrosive environments is described. The thermal barrier coating system includes a metal alloy bond coating, the alloy containing nickel, cobalt, iron, or a combination of these metals. The system further includes a corrosion resistant thermal barrier oxide coating containing at least one alkaline earth silicate. The preferred oxides are calcium silicate, barium silicate, magnesium silicate, or combinations of these silicates. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

  3. Coatings for improved corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1992-05-01

    Several coating approaches are being developed to resist attack in coal-fired environments and thereby minimize corrosion of underlying substrate alloys and extend the time for onset of breakaway corrosion. In general, coating systems can be classified as either diffusion or overlay type, which are distinguished principally by the method of deposition and the structure of the resultant coating-substrate bond. The coating techniques examined are pack cementation, electrospark deposition, physical and chemical vapor deposition, plasma spray, and ion implantation. In addition, ceramic coatings are used in some applications.

  4. The impact of gallic acid on iron gall ink corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouchon-Quillet, V.; Remazeilles, C.; Bernard, J.; Wattiaux, A.; Fournes, L.

    Many old manuscripts suffer from iron-gall ink corrosion, threatening our graphic heritage. Corroded papers become brown and brittle with age. The chemical reactions involved in this corrosion are relatively well known: they include both acidic hydrolysis and oxidation catalysed by free iron(II). Yet, a great variety of iron-gall ink recipes, including a wide range of constituents can be found in the literature and the visual aspect of old inks, can be very different from one inscription to another, even if they have been written on the same sheet of paper. This suggests that even if the free iron(II) plays a dominant role in the paper alteration, the contribution of other ingredients should not be neglected. For this reason, we explored the impact gallic acid may have on the corrosion mechanisms and in particular on the oxidation reactions. These investigations were carried out on laboratory probes prepared with paper sheets immersed in different solutions, all containing the same amount of iron sulphate, and different gallic acid concentrations. These probes were then artificially aged and their degradation state was evaluated by bursting strength measurements, FTIR spectrometry and Mössbauer spectrometry. All these analyses lead us to conclude that gallic acid has an influence on the iron(III)/iron(II) ratio, probably because of its reducing properties.

  5. Determination of critical length scales for corrosion processes using microelectroanalytical techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Wall, Frederick Douglas

    2004-03-01

    A key factor in our ability to produce and predict the stability of metal-based macro- to nano-scale structures and devices is a fundamental understanding of the localized nature of corrosion. Corrosion processes where physical dimensions become critical in the degradation process include localized corrosion initiation in passivated metals, microgalvanic interactions in metal alloys, and localized corrosion in structurally complex materials like nanocrystalline metal films under atmospheric and inundated conditions. This project focuses on two areas of corrosion science where a fundamental understanding of processes occurring at critical dimensions is not currently available. Sandia will study the critical length scales necessary for passive film breakdown in the inundated aluminum (Al) system and the chemical processes and transport in ultra-thin water films relevant to the atmospheric corrosion of nanocrystalline tungsten (W) films. Techniques are required that provide spatial information without significantly perturbing or masking the underlying relationships. Al passive film breakdown is governed by the relationship between area of the film sampled and its defect structure. We will combine low current measurements with microelectrodes to study the size scale required to observe a single initiation event and record electrochemical breakdown events. The resulting quantitative measure of stability will be correlated with metal grain size, secondary phase size and distribution to understand which metal properties control stability at the macro- and nano-scale. Mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion on W are dependent on the physical dimensions and continuity of adsorbed water layers as well as the chemical reactions that take place in this layer. We will combine electrochemical and scanning probe microscopic techniques to monitor the chemistry and resulting material transport in these thin surface layers. A description of the length scales responsible for driving the

  6. Corrosion Behavior of Surface-Treated Implant Ti-6Al-4V by Electrochemical Polarization and Impedance Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Subir; Yadav, Kasturi

    2011-04-01

    Implant materials for orthopedic and heart surgical services demand a better corrosion resistance material than the presently used titanium alloys, where protective oxide layer breaks down on a prolonged stay in aqueous physiological human body, giving rise to localized corrosion of pitting, crevice, and fretting corrosion. A few surface treatments on Ti alloy, in the form of anodization, passivation, and thermal oxidation, followed by soaking in Hank solution have been found to be very effective in bringing down the corrosion rate as well as producing high corrosion resistance surface film as reflected from electrochemical polarization, cyclic polarization, and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) studies. The XRD study revealed the presence of various types of oxides along with anatase and rutile on the surface, giving rise to high corrosion resistance film. While surface treatment of passivation and thermal oxidation could reduce the corrosion rate by 1/5th, anodization in 0.3 M phosphoric acid at 16 V versus stainless steel cathode drastically brought down the corrosion rate by less than ten times. The mechanism of corrosion behavior and formation of different surface films is better understood from the determination of EIS parameters derived from the best-fit equivalent circuit.

  7. Laboratory stress corrosion cracking studies in polythionic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, V.B.; Newsome, J.F.

    1984-08-01

    Stress corrosion cracking caused by polythionic acid and/or chlorides is a problem in coal liquefaction pilot plants. This problem is also common in refineries and has been the subject of extensive research. This study examines (1) the relationship of the ASTM standard ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid test for determining sensitization to resistance to polythionic stress corrosion cracking, (2) the cracking resistance of higher-alloy Fe-Ni-Cr materials in addition to the common austenitic stainless steels, and (3) the effect of chloride concentrations up to 1% in polythionic acid solutions on cracking behavior. We found that the ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid test can be used as an acceptance test for materials resistant to polythionic acid stress corrosion cracking because of its severity. The more highly alloyed materials were more resistant to sensitization than most of the austenitic stainless steels and were virtually unattacked in polythionic acid solutions containing up to 1% chloride. Chloride increased the corrosion rate and caused localized pitting, but it did not affect significantly the number of failures or the failure mode.

  8. Annealed perfluorinated cation exchange polymers for corrosion resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kinlen, P.J.; Silverman, D.C. )

    1993-11-01

    Casting and annealing a perfluorinated cation exchange (Nafion) polymer onto aluminum or 316SS results in a system which inhibits pitting and crevice corrosion that normally occurs in the presence of chloride ions and dissolved oxygen. This inhibition is believed to results from the unique chloride ion rejection properties of the annealed Nafion coating. Under neutral and basic conditions (pH > 5), localized corrosion is suppressed. Potentiodynamic polarization scans of the annealed Nafion coated aluminum and 316SS positive to the potential of the bare electrode does not produce pits. Electrochemical impedance results show that corrosion is unchanged after the coated alloy has been polarized above the pitting potential. In addition, the electrochemical impedance results indicate that the electrical resistance of the coating is low, hardly increasing the uncompensated resistance above that found for the bare metal. Hence, the movement of water and positive ions through the coating is unhindered Long-term stability and long-term corrosion inhibition afforded by the polymer must still be assessed to determine the practical limits of applicability of this coating system.

  9. Adverse local tissue reaction (ALTR) associated with corrosion products in metal-on-metal and dual modular neck total hip replacements is associated with upregulation of interferon gamma-mediated chemokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Kolatat, Kritti; Perino, Giorgio; Wilner, Gabrielle; Kaplowitz, Elianna; Ricciardi, Benjamin F; Boettner, Friedrich; Westrich, Geoffrey H; Jerabek, Seth A; Goldring, Steven R; Purdue, P Edward

    2015-10-01

    Adverse local tissue reactions (ALTR) associated with tribocorrosion following total hip arthroplasty (THA) have become a significant clinical concern in recent years. In particular, implants featuring metal-on-metal bearing surfaces and modular femoral stems have been reported to result in elevated rates of ALTR. These tribocorrosion-related tissue reactions are characterized by marked necrosis and lymphocytic infiltration, which contrasts sharply with the macrophagic and foreign body giant cell inflammation associated with polyethylene wear particle induced peri-implant osteolysis. In this study, we characterize tribocorrosion-associated ALTR at a molecular level. Gene expression profiling of peri-implant tissue around failing implants identifies upregulation of numerous inflammatory mediators in ALTR, including several interferon gamma inducible factors, most notably the chemokines MIG/CXCL9 and IP-10/CXCL10. This expression profile is distinct from that associated with polyethylene wear induced osteolysis, which is characterized by induction of markers of alternative macrophage activation, such as chitotriosidase (CHIT-1). Importantly, MIG/CXCL9 and IP-10/CXCL10 are also elevated at the protein level in the synovial fluid and, albeit more moderately, the serum, of ALTR patients, raising the possibility that these factors may serve as circulating biomarkers for the early detection of ALTR in at-risk patients. PMID:25940887

  10. Atmospheric Corrosion of Ag and Cu with Ozone, UV and NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huang

    . With the addition of NaCl, corrosion rate of Cu increases dramatically because of the breakdown of the naturally formed cuprous oxide by NaCl. To mimic corrosion behavior of metals in real field, a new environment chamber that generated constant deposition of NaCl was invented. With this novel environment chamber, the kinetics of Cu corrosion with constant deposition of NaCl in synthetic air with high and low CO2 and UV was studied. Cu2O and Cu2(OH)3Cl were both dominant corrosion products after exposure. 0.1 M Na2CO3 instead of 0.1M KCl was used as supporting electrolyte for reduction of Cu2O and Cu2(OH)3Cl, because it can clearly differentiate reduction of Cu2O and Cu2(OH)3Cl. With quantification of Cu2O and Cu2(OH)3Cl respectively, it is found UV has strong effect on formation of Cu2O but little on Cu2(OH)3Cl. It is also determined that localized corrosion of Cu dominates at the beginning of Cu corrosion and then uniform corrosion takes over.

  11. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, L. M.; Hintze, P. E.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Jolley, S. T.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effects of corrosion on various structures at the Kennedy Space Center, and the work to discover a corrosion control coating that will be autonomous and will indicate corrosion at an early point in the process. Kennedy Space Center has many environmental conditions that are corrosive: ocean salt spray, heat, humidity, sunlight and acidic exhaust from the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs). Presented is a chart which shows the corrosion rates of carbon steel at various locations. KSC has the highest corrosion rates with 42.0 mils/yr, leading the next highest Galeta Point Beach, in the Panama Canal Zone with 27 mils/yr corrosion. A chart shows the changes in corrosion rate with the distance from the ocean. The three types of corrosion protective coatings are described: barrier (passive), Barrier plus active corrosion inhibiting components, and smart. A smart coating will detect and respond actively to changes in its environment in a functional and predictable manner and is capable of adapting its properties dynamically. The smart coating uses microcapsules, particles or liquid drops coated in polymers, that can detect and control the corrosion caused by the environment. The mechanism for a pH sensitive microcapsule and the hydrophobic core microcapsule are demonstrated and the chemistry is reviewed. When corrosion begins, the microcapsule will release the contents of the core (indicator, inhibitor, and self healing agent) in close proximity to the corrosion. The response to a pH increase is demonstrated by a series of pictures that show the breakdown of the microcapsule and the contents release. An example of bolt corrosion is used, as an example of corrosion in places that are difficult to ascertain. A comparison of various coating systems is shown.

  12. Systematic understanding of corrosion behavior of plasma electrolytic oxidation treated AZ31 magnesium alloy using a mouse model of subcutaneous implant.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yongseok; Tan, Zongqing; Jurey, Chris; Collins, Boyce; Badve, Aditya; Dong, Zhongyun; Park, Chanhee; Kim, Cheol Sang; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to identify the differences between corrosion rates, corrosion types, and corrosion products in different physiological environments for AZ31 magnesium alloy and plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) treated AZ31 magnesium alloy. In vitro and in vivo tests were performed in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) and mice for 12 weeks, respectively. The corrosion rates of both AZ31 magnesium alloy and PEO treated AZ31 magnesium alloy were calculated based on DC polarization curves, volume of hydrogen evolution, and the thickness of corrosion products formed on the surface. Micro X-ray computed tomography (Micro-CT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to analyze morphological and chemical characterizations of corrosion products. The results show that there is more severe localized corrosion after in vitro test in HBSS; however, the thicknesses of corrosion products formed on the surface for AZ31 magnesium alloy and PEO treated AZ31 magnesium alloy in vivo were about 40% thicker than the thickness of corrosion products generated in vitro. The ratio of Ca and P (Ca/P) in the corrosion products also differed. The Ca deficient region and higher content of Al in corrosion product than AZ31 magnesium alloy were identified after in vivo test in contrast with the result of in vitro test.

  13. Imprints of coronal temperature disturbances on type III bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Robinson, Peter

    The electron temperature Te and ion temperature Ti in the corona vary with time and loca-tion, due to transient and persistent activity on the Sun. The effects of spatially localized disturbances in Te and Ti on coronal type III radio bursts are simulated. The disturbances are superimposed on monotonically varying temperature backgrounds and arise from spatially confined solar activity. Qualitatively and quantitatively different imprints are found on the curve of the maximum flux versus frequency of type III bursts, because of the disturbances in Te and Ti . The results indicate that nonthermal coronal type III bursts offer a new tool to probe and distinguish between spatially localized structures of Te and Ti along the paths of type III beams. Furthermore, localized temperature disturbances may be responsible for some fine structures in type III bursts, e.g., striae in type IIIb bursts in the presence of multiple, localized temperature disturbances.

  14. Experimental Design for the Evaluation of Detection Techniques of Hidden Corrosion Beneath the Thermal Protective System of the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammerer, Catherine C.; Jacoby, Joseph A.; Lomness, Janice K.; Hintze, Paul E.; Russell, Richard W.

    2007-01-01

    The United States Space Operational Space Shuttle Fleet Consists of three shuttles with an average age of 19.7 years. Shuttles are exposed to corrosive conditions while undergoing final closeout for missions at the launch pad and extreme conditions during ascent, orbit, and descent that may accelerate the corrosion process. Structural corrosion under TPS could progress undetected (without tile removal) and eventually result in reduction in structural capability sufficient to create negative margins of . safety and ultimate loss of local structural capability.

  15. Influence of respiratory substrate in carbon steel corrosion by a Sulphate Reducing Prokaryote model organism.

    PubMed

    Dall'agnol, Leonardo T; Cordas, Cristina M; Moura, José J G

    2014-06-01

    Sulphate Reducing Prokaryotes (SRP) are an important group of microorganisms involved in biocorrosion processes. Sulphide production is recognized as a fundamental cause of corrosion and nitrate is often used as treatment. The present work analyses the influence of respiratory substrates in the metal, from off-shore installations, SRP influenced corrosion, using Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATTC 27774 as model organism, since this can switch from sulphate to nitrate. Open Circuit Potential over 6days in different conditions was measured, showing an increase around 200 and 90mV for the different media. Tafel plots were constructed allowing Ecorr and jcorr calculations. For SRP in sulphate and nitrate media Ecorr values of -824 and -728mV, and jcorr values of 2.5 and 3.7μAcm(-2), respectively, were attained indicating that in nitrate, the resultant corrosion rate is larger than in sulphate. Also, it is shown that the equilibrium of sulphide in the solution/gas phases is a key factor to the evolution of corrosion Nitrate prevents pitting but promotes general corrosion and increases the corrosion potential and iron dissolution 40 times when compared to sulphate. Our results demonstrate that nitrate injection strategy in oil fields has to be considered carefully as option to reduce souring and localized corrosion.

  16. Corrosion and Fretting of a Modular Hip System: A Retrieval Analysis of 60 Rejuvenate Stems.

    PubMed

    De Martino, Ivan; Assini, Joseph B; Elpers, Marcella E; Wright, Timothy M; Westrich, Geoffrey H

    2015-08-01

    Femoral stems with dual-taper modularity were introduced to allow independent control of length, offset, and version. Corrosion and fretting related to micromotion at the neck-stem junction are thought to stimulate an adverse local tissue reaction (ALTR). Analysis of 60 consecutively retrieved modular-neck stem implants (Rejuvenate, Stryker) revised primarily for ALTR was done to determine the variables influencing corrosion and fretting patterns at the neck-stem interface. Taper damage evaluation was performed with stereomicrocopic analysis with two observers. Evidence of fretting and corrosion was seen at the neck-stem taper in all implants, including three implants revised for periprosthetic fractures within four weeks of the index surgery indicating that this process starts early. Femoral stems paired with the long overall neck lengths had significantly higher corrosion scores. Correlation of the corrosion severity at particular locations with the length of implantation suggests that the neck-stem junction experiences cyclic cantilever bending in vivo. The positive correlation between the length of implantation and fretting/corrosion scores bodes poorly for patients who still have this implant. Scanning electron microscopy on a subset of specimens was also performed to evaluate the black corrosion material. We strongly urge frequent follow-up exams for every patient with this particular modular hip stem.

  17. Alloy 33, a new corrosion resistant austenitic material for the refinery industry and related applications

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, M.; Heubner, U.; Eichenhofer, K.W.; Renner, M.

    1995-09-01

    A new corrosion resistant austenitic material alloyed with nominally (wt. %) 33 Cr, 32 Fe, 31 Ni, 1.6 Mo, 0.6 Cu, 0.4 N exhibits excellent resistance to general and local corrosion in hot mineral acids and chloride bearing solutions. Furthermore, the new alloy stands out for its superior corrosion resistance in many other corrosive environments from acidic to alkaline including resistance to stress corrosion cracking. In mixed HNO{sub 3}/HF acids the corrosion resistance of Alloy 33 is superior to high chromium nickel-base alloys. In NAOH solutions the new alloy is applicable to conditions where the known stainless steels fail. Due to its high nitrogen content the new alloy exhibits a small grain size in its solution annealed condition and, consequently, a high yield strength and excellent toughness CP properties. Alloy 33 is easily welded without filler or using matching filler metal. Typical applications of Alloy 33 include heat exchangers, condenser tubes and other equipment for the Refinery Industry and the Chemical Process Industry as well as light weight structures in the Offshore Industry. Especially the multi-purpose character of Alloy 33 with respect to its corrosion resistance as well to acidic and alkaline media as to chloride bearing cooling waters opens a wide variety of applications.

  18. TRIO-012: a multicenter, multinational, randomized, double-blind phase III study of IMC-1121B plus docetaxel versus placebo plus docetaxel in previously untreated patients with HER2-negative, unresectable, locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mackey, John; Gelmon, Karen; Martin, Miguel; McCarthy, Nicole; Pinter, Tamas; Rupin, Mathieu; Youssoufian, Hagop

    2009-11-01

    In this multinational, placebo-controlled, randomized phase III trial, Translational Research In Oncology (TRIO) will define the efficacy and safety of adding a novel antiangiogenic agent, IMC-1121B (ramucirumab), to standard first-line docetaxel chemotherapy for women with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. We will evaluate whether the addition of IMC-1121B prolongs progression-free survival and whether its use improves overall survival. Accrual is under way.

  19. Microclimate Corrosion Effects in Coastal Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S. Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Cramer, S.D.

    1996-03-24

    The Albany Research Center is conducting atmospheric corrosion research in coastal environments to improve the performance of materials in the Nation's infrastructure. The corrosion of bare metals, and of painted, thermal-sprayed, and galvanized steels are presented for one-year exposures at sites located on bridges and utility poles along the Oregon coast. The effects of microclimates (for example distance from the ocean, high wind zones, and salt-fog prone regions) are examined in conjunction with sample orientation and sheltered/unsheltered comparisons. An atmospheric corrosion model examines the growth and dissolution of corrosion product layers to arrive at a steady-state thickness and corrosion rate.

  20. Fiber optic approach for detecting corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostecki, Roman; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Davis, Claire; McAdam, Grant; Wang, Tianyu; Monro, Tanya M.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion is a multi-billion dollar problem faced by industry. The ability to monitor the hidden metallic structure of an aircraft for corrosion could result in greater availability of existing aircraft fleets. Silica exposed-core microstructured optical fiber sensors are inherently suited towards this application, as they are extremely lightweight, robust, and suitable both for distributed measurements and for embedding in otherwise inaccessible corrosion-prone areas. By functionalizing the fiber with chemosensors sensitive to corrosion by-products, we demonstrate in-situ kinetic measurements of accelerated corrosion in simulated aluminum aircraft joints.

  1. Analyses of containment structures with corrosion damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Corrosion damage to a nuclear power plant containment structure can degrade the pressure capacity of the vessel. For the low-carbon, low- strength steels used in containments, the effect of corrosion on material properties is discussed. Strain-to-failure tests, in uniaxial tension, have been performed on corroded material samples. Results were used to select strain-based failure criteria for corroded steel. Using the ABAQUS finite element analysis code, the capacity of a typical PWR Ice Condenser containment with corrosion damage has been studied. Multiple analyses were performed with the locations of the corrosion the containment, and the amount of corrosion varied in each analysis.

  2. Thermal control system corrosion study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Robert; Folsom, Rolfe A.; Mucha, Phillip E.

    1990-01-01

    During the development of an expert system for autonomous control of the Space Station Thermal Control System (TCS), the thermal performance of the Brassboard TCS began to gradually degrade. This degradation was due to filter clogging by metallic residue. A study was initiated to determine the source of the residue and the basic cause of the corrosion. The investigation focused on the TCS design, materials compatibility, Ames operating and maintenance procedures, and chemical analysis of the residue and of the anhydrous ammonia used as the principal refrigerant. It was concluded that the corrosion mechanisms involved two processes: the reaction of water alone with large, untreated aluminum parts in a high pH environment and the presence of chlorides and chloride salts. These salts will attack the aluminum oxide layer and may enable galvanic corrosion between the aluminum and the more noble stainless steel and other metallic elements present. Recommendations are made for modifications to the system design, the materials used, and the operating and maintenance procedures, which should largely prevent the recurrence of these corrosion mechanisms.

  3. Thermal control system corrosion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Robert; Folsom, Rolfe A.; Mucha, Phillip E.

    1990-02-01

    During the development of an expert system for autonomous control of the Space Station Thermal Control System (TCS), the thermal performance of the Brassboard TCS began to gradually degrade. This degradation was due to filter clogging by metallic residue. A study was initiated to determine the source of the residue and the basic cause of the corrosion. The investigation focused on the TCS design, materials compatibility, Ames operating and maintenance procedures, and chemical analysis of the residue and of the anhydrous ammonia used as the principal refrigerant. It was concluded that the corrosion mechanisms involved two processes: the reaction of water alone with large, untreated aluminum parts in a high pH environment and the presence of chlorides and chloride salts. These salts will attack the aluminum oxide layer and may enable galvanic corrosion between the aluminum and the more noble stainless steel and other metallic elements present. Recommendations are made for modifications to the system design, the materials used, and the operating and maintenance procedures, which should largely prevent the recurrence of these corrosion mechanisms.

  4. Corrosion inhibition for distillation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Baumert, Kenneth L.; Sagues, Alberto A.; Davis, Burtron H.; Schweighardt, Frank K.

    1985-01-01

    Tower material corrosion in an atmospheric or sub-atmospheric distillation tower in a coal liquefaction process is reduced or eliminated by subjecting chloride-containing tray contents to an appropriate ion-exchange resin to remove chloride from such tray contents materials.

  5. Corrosion resistant metallic bipolar plate

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P.; Schneibel, Joachim H.; Pint, Bruce A.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2007-05-01

    A corrosion resistant, electrically conductive component such as a bipolar plate for a PEM fuel cell includes 20 55% Cr, balance base metal such as Ni, Fe, or Co, the component having thereon a substantially external, continuous layer of chromium nitride.

  6. CORROSION RESISTANT JACKETED METAL BODY

    DOEpatents

    Brugmann, E.W.

    1958-08-26

    Reactor faul elements of the elongated cylindrical type which are jacketed in a corrosion resistant material are described. Each feel element is comprised of a plurality of jacketed cylinders of fissionable material in end to end abutting relationship, the jackets being welded together at their adjoining ends to retain the individual segments together and seat the interior of the jackets.

  7. Silicate Glass Corrosion Mechanism revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Thorsten; Lenting, Christoph; Dohmen, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the mechanism(s) of aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste borosilicate glasses is essential to predict their long-term aqueous durability in a geologic repository. Several observations have been made with compositionally different silicate glasses that cannot be explained by any of the established glass corrosion models. These models are based on diffusion-controlled ion exchange and subsequent structural reorganisation of a leached, hydrated residual glass, leaving behind a so-called gel layer. In fact, the common observation of lamellar to more complex pattern formation observed in experiment and nature, the porous structure of the corrosion layer, an atomically sharp boundary between the corrosion zone and the underlying pristine glass, as well as results of novel isotope tracer and in situ, real time experiments rather support an interface-coupled glass dissolution-silica reprecipitation model. In this model, the congruent dissolution of the glass is coupled in space and time to the precipitation and growth of amorphous silica at an inwardly moving reaction front. We suggest that these coupled processes have to be considered to realistically model the long-term performance of silicate glasses in aqueous environments.

  8. The dual role of microbes in corrosion.

    PubMed

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion. PMID:25259571

  9. The dual role of microbes in corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion. PMID:25259571

  10. The dual role of microbes in corrosion.

    PubMed

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion.

  11. Influence of NOM on copper corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Korshin, G.V.; Ferguson, J.F.; Perry, S.A.L.

    1996-07-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) profoundly affected the corrosion of copper in a moderately alkaline synthetic water. It decreased the rate of corrosion, increased the rate of copper leaching, and dispersed crystalline inorganic corrosion products. The interaction of NOM with corrosion products was modeled using separate phase of malachite and cuprous oxide. The authors concluded that NOM promotes the formation of pits in a certain narrow range of concentrations (0.1--0.2 mg/L in laboratory tests) and suppresses this type of corrosion at higher dosages. At low DOC concentrations, the main interaction between NOM and the surfaces of corroding metal and corrosion products is adsorption. The influence of NOM on corrosion of metals in real distribution systems must be studied in relation to long periods of surface aging, flow rate, concentration and type of oxidants, pH, and alkalinity.

  12. ARSENATE AND ARSENITE SORPTION AND ARSENITE OXIDATION BY IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron (II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron that is being used in permeable reactive barriers to remediate groundwater arsenic contamination. To optimize the design of iron barriers, it is important to evaluate the influence of geoch...

  13. 78 FR 21980 - Aging Management of Internal Surfaces, Service Level III and Other Coatings, Atmospheric Storage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requests public comment on the Draft License Renewal Interim Staff Guidance (LR-ISG), LR-ISG-2012-02, ``Aging Management of Internal Surfaces, Service Level III and Other Coatings, Atmospheric Storage Tanks, and Corrosion under Insulation.'' The draft LR-ISG proposes to revise NRC staff-recommended aging management programs (AMP) and aging......

  14. CHEMICAL INTERACTIONS OF ARSENATE, ARSENITE, PHOSPHATE, AND SILICATE WITH IRON (II,III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular zerovalent iron has been proposed to be used as a medium in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remove arsenic from contaminated groundwater. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust (carbonate green rust, or CGR) is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under ...

  15. CHEMICAL INTERACTIONS OF ARSENATE, ARSENITE, PHOSPHATE, AND SILICATE WITH IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular zerovalent iron has been proposed to be used as a medium in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remove arsenic from contaminated groundwater. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust (carbonate green rust, or CGR) is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under ...

  16. Photoelectrochemical corrosion of GaN-based p-n structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomichev, A. D.; Kurin, S. Yu; Ermakovi, I. A.; Puzyk, M. V.; Usikov, A. S.; Helava, H.; Nikiforov, A.; Papchenko, B. P.; Makarov, Yu N.; Chernyakov, A. E.

    2016-08-01

    Direct water photoelectrolysis using III-N materials is a promising way for hydrogen production. GaN/AlGaN based p-n structures were used in a photoelectrochemical process to investigate the material etching (corrosion) in an electrolyte. At the beginning, the corrosion performs through the top p-type layers via channels associated with threading defects and can penetrate deep into the structure. Then, the corrosion process occurs in lateral direction in n- type layers forming voids and cavities in the structure. The lateral etching is due to net positive charges at the AlGaN/GaN interfaces arising because of spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization in the structure and positively charged ionized donors in the space charge region of the p-n junction.

  17. Case study of a fast propagating bacteriogenically induced concrete corrosion in an Austrian sewer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grengg, Cyrill; Mittermayr, Florian; Baldermann, Andre; Böttcher, Michael; Leis, Albrecht; Koraimann, Günther; Dietzel, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Reaction mechanisms leading to microbially induced concrete corrosion (MICC) are highly complex and often not fully understood. The aim of the present case study is to contribute to a deeper understanding of reaction paths, environmental controls, and corrosion rates related to MICC in a modern Austrian sewer system by introducing an advanced multi proxy approach that comprises gaseous, hydro-geochemical, bacteriological, and mineralogical analyses. Various crucial parameters for detecting alteration features were determined in the field and laboratory, including (i) temperature, pH, alkalinity, chemical compositions of the solutions, (ii) chemical and mineralogical composition of solids, (iii) bacterial analysis, and (iv) concentrations of gaseous H2S, CH4 and CO2 within the sewer pipe atmosphere. An overview of the field site and analytical results, focusing on reaction mechanisms causing the corrosion, as well as possible remediation strategies will be presented.

  18. Polyoxometalate ionic liquids as self-repairing acid-resistant corrosion protection.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Sven; Kostrzewa, Monika; Wierschem, Andreas; Streb, Carsten

    2014-12-01

    Corrosion is a global problem for any metallic structure or material. Herein we show how metals can easily be protected against acid corrosion using hydrophobic polyoxometalate-based ionic liquids (POM-ILs). Copper metal disks were coated with room-temperature POM-ILs composed of transition-metal functionalized Keggin anions [SiW11 O39 TM(H2 O)](n-) (TM=Cu(II) , Fe(III) ) and quaternary alkylammonium cations (Cn H2 n+1 )4 N(+) (n=7-8). The corrosion resistance against acetic acid vapors and simulated "acid rain" was significantly improved compared with commercial ionic liquids or solid polyoxometalate coatings. Mechanical damage to the POM-IL coating is self-repaired in less than one minute with full retention of the acid protection properties. The coating can easily be removed and recovered by rinsing with organic solvents.

  19. Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22 in Oxalic Acid and Sodium Chloride Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S D; Whalen, M T; King, K J; Hust, G A; Wong, L L; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2003-06-24

    Nickel based Alloy 22 (NO6022) is extensively used in aggressive industrial applications, especially due to its resistance to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in high chloride environments. The purpose of this work was to characterize the anodic behavior of Alloy 22 in oxalic acid solution and to compare its behavior to sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions. Standard electrochemical tests such as polarization resistance and cyclic polarization were used. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 in oxalic acid solutions increased rapidly as the temperature and the acid concentration increased. Extrapolation studies show that even at a concentration of 10{sup -4}M oxalic acid, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 would be higher in oxalic acid than in 1 M NaCl solution. Alloy 22 was not susceptible to localized corrosion in oxalic acid solutions. Cyclic polarization tests in 1 M NaCl showed that Alloy 22 was susceptible to crevice corrosion at 90 C but was not susceptible at 60 C.

  20. Ion and laser microprobes applied to the measurement of corrosion produced hydrogen on a microscopic scale.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Use of an ion microprobe and a laser microprobe to measure concentrations of corrosion-produced hydrogen on a microscopic scale. Hydrogen concentrations of several thousand ppm were measured by both analytical techniques below corroded and fracture surfaces of hot salt stress corroded titanium alloy specimens. This extremely high concentration compares with only about 100 ppm hydrogen determined by standard vacuum fusion chemical analyses of bulk samples. Both the ion and laser microprobes were used to measure hydrogen concentration profiles in stepped intervals to substantial depths below the original corroded and fracture surfaces. For the ion microprobe, the area of local analysis was 22 microns in diameter and for the laser microprobe, the area of local analysis was about 300 microns in diameter. The segregation of hydrogen below fracture surfaces supports a previously proposed theory that corrosion-produced hydrogen is responsible for hot salt stress corrosion embrittlement and cracking of titanium alloys. These advanced analytical techniques suggest great potential for many areas of stress corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement research, quality control, and field inspection of corrosion problems. For example, it appears possible that a contour map of hydrogen distribution at notch roots and crack tips could be quantitatively determined. Such information would be useful in substantiating current theories of stress corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement.