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Sample records for locally advanced hepatocellular

  1. [Treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma : Novel agents and role of local therapy].

    PubMed

    Parisod, Louis; Duran, Rafael; Denys, Alban; Digklia, Antonia

    2017-05-17

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is increasing in Switzerland and its treatment is a challenge. The purpose of this article is to summarize the different therapeutic approaches in the metastatic stage, as well as the perspectives of targeted treatments and immunotherapy. Until recently, the only recognized therapeutic standard for these patients with metastatic CHC was sorafenib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. If the patient was to progress under sorafenib, no other recognized therapeutic option was available as second line. We present in this article the recent data on regorafenib, also an inhibitor of tyrosine kinases, the first systemic therapy showing an increase in survival for patients progressing under sorafenib. Then we will discuss promising data and progress made in treatments checkpoints inhibitors and therapies combining local and systematic approaches.

  2. Thymostimulin versus placebo for palliative treatment of locally advanced or metastasised hepatocellular carcinoma: a phase III clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Thymostimulin is a thymic peptide fraction with immune-mediated cytotoxicity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in vitro and palliative efficacy in advanced HCC in two independent phase II trials. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of thymostimulin in a phase III trial. Methods The study was designed as a prospective randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter clinical phase III trial. Between 10/2002 and 03/2005, 135 patients with locally advanced or metastasised HCC (Karnofsky ≥60%/Child-Pugh ≤ 12) were randomised to receive thymostimulin 75 mg s.c. 5×/week or placebo stratified according to liver function. Primary endpoint was twelve-month survival, secondary endpoints overall survival (OS), time to progression (TTP), tumor response, safety and quality of life. A subgroup analysis according to liver function, KPS and tumor stage (Okuda, CLIP and BCLC) formed part of the protocol. Results Twelve-month survival was 28% [95%CI 17-41; treatment] and 32% [95%CI 19-44; control] with no significant differences in median OS (5.0 [95% CI 3.7-6.3] vs. 5.2 [95% CI 3.5-6.9] months; p = 0.87, HR = 1.04 [95% CI 0.7-1.6]) or TTP (5.3 [95%CI 2.0-8.6] vs. 2.9 [95%CI 2.6-3.1] months; p = 0.60, HR = 1.13 [95% CI 0.7-1.8]). Adjustment for liver function, Karnofsky status or tumor stage did not affect results. While quality of life was similar in both groups, fewer patients on thymostimulin suffered from accumulating ascites and renal failure. Conclusions In our phase III trial, we found no evidence of any benefit to thymostimulin in the treatment of advanced HCC and there is therefore no justification for its use as single-agent treatment. The effect of thymostimulin on hepato-renal function requires further confirmation. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN64487365. PMID:20735834

  3. Thymostimulin versus placebo for palliative treatment of locally advanced or metastasised hepatocellular carcinoma: a phase III clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Dollinger, Matthias M; Lautenschlaeger, Christine; Lesske, Joachim; Tannapfel, Andrea; Wagner, Anna-Dorothea; Schoppmeyer, Konrad; Nehls, Oliver; Welker, Martin-Walter; Wiest, Reiner; Fleig, Wolfgang E

    2010-08-24

    Thymostimulin is a thymic peptide fraction with immune-mediated cytotoxicity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in vitro and palliative efficacy in advanced HCC in two independent phase II trials. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of thymostimulin in a phase III trial. The study was designed as a prospective randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter clinical phase III trial. Between 10/2002 and 03/2005, 135 patients with locally advanced or metastasised HCC (Karnofsky >or=60%/Child-Pugh advanced HCC and there is therefore no justification for its use as single-agent treatment. The effect of thymostimulin on hepato-renal function requires further confirmation. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN64487365.

  4. Challenges of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Colagrande, Stefano; Inghilesi, Andrea L; Aburas, Sami; Taliani, Gian G; Nardi, Cosimo; Marra, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive malignancy, resulting as the third cause of death by cancer each year. The management of patients with HCC is complex, as both the tumour stage and any underlying liver disease must be considered conjointly. Although surveillance by imaging, clinical and biochemical parameters is routinely performed, a lot of patients suffering from cirrhosis have an advanced stage HCC at the first diagnosis. Advanced stage HCC includes heterogeneous groups of patients with different clinical condition and radiological features and sorafenib is the only approved treatment according to Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer. Since the introduction of sorafenib in clinical practice, several phase III clinical trials have failed to demonstrate any superiority over sorafenib in the frontline setting. Loco-regional therapies have also been tested as first line treatment, but their role in advanced HCC is still matter of debate. No single agent or combination therapies have been shown to impact outcomes after sorafenib failure. Therefore this review will focus on the range of experimental therapeutics for patients with advanced HCC and highlights the successes and failures of these treatments as well as areas for future development. Specifics such as dose limiting toxicity and safety profile in patients with liver dysfunction related to the underlying chronic liver disease should be considered when developing therapies in HCC. Finally, robust validated and reproducible surrogate end-points as well as predictive biomarkers should be defined in future randomized trials. PMID:27678348

  5. Erlotinib for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zong, Yuan; Xu, Gang-Zhu; Xing, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of erlotinib for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods: A systematic literature search was undertaken in June 2015. Phase II/III trials of erlotinib for the treatment of advanced HCC were included. A descriptive analysis was applied. The study was conducted in College of Medicine, Honghui Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, China, between June 2015 and January 2016. Results: Ten trials, comprising 9 phase II and one phase III trial, were included in the systematic review. The tumor response rate was 0% in 4 of the phase II trials, <10% in 3 of the phase II trials and the phase III trial, and >20% in 2 of the phase II trials. The disease control rate was 42.5-79.6% in most studies. Three studies reported a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 6.5-9.0 months, although PFS was <3.5 months in most studies. Most trials reported a median overall survival of 6.25-15.65 months. The most frequent grade 3/4 toxicities were fatigue (11.9%), diarrhea (10%), increased alanine and aspartate transaminases (7.3%), and rash/desquamation (6.9%). Conclusion: Erlotinib provides efficacious and well-tolerated treatment for advanced HCC. However, more detailed investigations of HCC pathogenesis and evaluation of sensitive patient subsets are needed to improve outcomes of patients with advanced HCC. Additional well-designed, randomized, controlled trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of erlotinib as monotherapy or combination with other drugs for advanced HCC. PMID:27761555

  6. Yttrium-90 radioembolization vs sorafenib for intermediate-locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: a cohort study with propensity score analysis.

    PubMed

    Gramenzi, Annagiulia; Golfieri, Rita; Mosconi, Cristina; Cappelli, Alberta; Granito, Alessandro; Cucchetti, Alessandro; Marinelli, Sara; Pettinato, Cinzia; Erroi, Virginia; Fiumana, Silvia; Bolondi, Luigi; Bernardi, Mauro; Trevisani, Franco

    2015-03-01

    Sorafenib and transarterial (90) Y-radioembolization (TARE) are possible treatments for Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) intermediate-advanced stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). No study directly comparing sorafenib and TARE is currently available. This single-centre retrospective study compares the outcomes achieved with sorafenib and TARE in HCC patients potentially amenable to either therapy. Seventy-four sorafenib (71 ± 10 years, male 87%, BCLC B/C 53%/47%) and 63 TARE HCC patients (66 ± 9 years, male 79%, BCLC B/C 41%/59%) were included based on the following criteria: Child-Pugh class A/B, performance status ≤1, HCC unfit for other effective therapies, no metastases and no previous systemic chemotherapy. Median overall survivals of the two groups were comparable, being 14.4 months (95% CI: 4.3-24.5) in sorafenib and 13.2 months (95% CI: 6.1-20.2) in TARE patients, with 1-, 2- and 3-year survival rates of 52.1%, 29.3% and 14.7% vs 51.8%, 27.8% and 21.6% respectively. Two TARE patients underwent liver transplantation after successful down-staging. To minimize the impact of confounding factors on survival analysis, propensity model matched 32 patients of each group for median age, tumour gross pathology and the independent prognostic factors (portal vein thrombosis, performance status, Model for End Liver Disease). Even after matching, the median survival did not differ between sorafenib (13.1 months; 95% CI: 1.2-25.9) and TARE patients (11.2 months; 95% CI: 6.7-15.7), with comparable 1-, 2- and 3-year survival rates. In cirrhotic patients with intermediate-advanced or not-otherwise-treatable HCC, sorafenib and TARE provide similar survivals. Down-staging allowing liver transplantation only occurred after TARE. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Local Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second commonest cancer in Taiwan. The national surveillance program can detect HCC in its early stages, and various curative modalities (including surgical resection, orthotopic liver transplantation, and local ablation) are employed for the treatment of small HCC. Local ablation therapies are currently advocated for early-stage HCC that is unresectable because of co-morbidities, the need to preserve liver function, or refusal of resection. Among the various local ablation therapies, the most commonly used modalities include percutaneous ethanol injection and radiofrequency ablation (RFA); percutaneous acetic acid injection and microwave ablation are used less often. RFA is more commonly employed than other local ablative modalities in Taiwan because the technique is highly effective, minimally invasive, and requires fewer sessions. RFA is therefore advocated in Taiwan as the first-line curative therapy for unresectable HCC or even for resectable HCC. However, current RFA procedures are less effective against tumors that are in high-risk or difficult-to-ablate locations, are poorly visualized on ultrasonography (US), or are large. Recent advancements in RFA in Taiwan can resolve these issues by the creation of artificial ascites or pleural effusion, application of real-time virtual US assistance, use of combination therapy before RFA, or use of switching RF controllers with multiple electrodes. This review article provides updates on the clinical outcomes and advances in local ablative modalities (mostly RFA) for HCC in Taiwan. PMID:24159599

  8. New advances in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Sonia; Herrera, Iván; Irurzun, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cause of deaths in cirrhotic patients and the third cause of cancer related deaths. Most HCC are associated with well known underlying risk factors, in fact, HCC arise in cirrhotic patients in up to 90% of cases, mainly due to chronic viral hepatitis and alcohol abuse. The worldwide prevention strategies are conducted to avoid the infection of new subjects and to minimize the risk of liver disease progression in infected patients. HCC is a condition which lends itself to surveillance as at-risk individuals can readily be identified. The American and European guidelines recommended implementation of surveillance programs with ultrasound every six months in patient at-risk for developing HCC. The diagnosis of HCC can be based on non-invasive criteria (only in cirrhotic patient) or pathology. Accurately staging patients is essential to oncology practice. The ideal tumour staging system in HCC needs to account for both tumour characteristics and liver function. Treatment allocation is based on several factors: Liver function, size and number of tumours, macrovascular invasion or extrahepatic spread. The recommendations in terms of selection for different treatment strategies must be based on evidence-based data. Resection, liver transplant and interventional radiology treatment are mainstays of HCC therapy and achieve the best outcomes in well-selected candidates. Chemoembolization is the most widely used treatment for unresectable HCC or progression after curative treatment. Finally, in patients with advanced HCC with preserved liver function, sorafenib is the only approved systemic drug that has demonstrated a survival benefit and is the standard of care in this group of patients. PMID:27028578

  9. A phase I study on combined therapy with proton-beam radiotherapy and in situ tumor vaccination for locally advanced recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proton-beam radiotherapy (PBT) has been shown to be effective to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as a nonsurgical local treatment option. However, HCC still remains as one of the most difficult cancers to be cured because of frequent recurrences. Thus, methods to inhibit the recurrence need to be explored. To prevent the HCC recurrence, we here report on a prospective phase I study of ‘in situ’ tumor vaccination using CalTUMP, a newly developed immunoadjuvant consisting of BCG extract bound to hydroxyapatite and microparticulated tuberculin, following local PBT for HCC. Methods Patients with locally advanced recurrent HCC, which had been heavily pretreated with various treatments, were enrolled. PBT was performed with the conventional method to the target HCC. Subsequently, CalTUMP was injected into the same irradiated-tumor three times at one-week intervals. Three dose-levels of CalTUMP (1/10, 1/3, and 1/1) were administered to 3 patients each. Vital signs, blood samples, ultrasound, and computed tomographic scans were monitored to evaluate the safety. Results Three intratumoral injections of CalTUMP following PBT (median dose: 72.6 GyE) were accomplished in 9 patients. Transient low-grade fever and minor laboratory changes were observed in 7 patients after CalTUMP injections. No other treatment-related adverse events were observed. Median progression-free survival was 6.0 months (range: 2.1-14.2) and 4 patients were progression-free for more than 1 year. Conclusions Intratumoral injection of CalTUMP following PBT was feasible and safe in patients with heavily pre-treated HCC. Further clinical studies to evaluate the efficacy of this in situ tumor vaccination are warranted. PMID:24131485

  10. Hepatocellular carcinoma: Advances in diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haoran; Song, Tianqiang

    2015-10-01

    Thanks to the growing knowledge on biological behaviors of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), as well as continuous improvement in imaging techniques and experienced interpretation of imaging features of the nodules in cirrhotic liver, the detection and characterization of HCC has improved in the past decade. A number of practice guidelines for imaging diagnosis have been developed to reduce interpretation variability and standardize management of HCC, and they are constantly updated with advances in imaging techniques and evidence based data from clinical series. In this article, we strive to review the imaging techniques and the characteristic features of hepatocellular carcinoma associated with cirrhotic liver, with emphasis on the diagnostic value of advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques and utilization of hepatocyte-specific MRI contrast agents. We also briefly describe the concept of liver imaging reporting and data systems and discuss the consensus and controversy of major practice guidelines.

  11. Antiangiogenic Therapies for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sampat, Keeran R.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a significant cause of death worldwide. HCC is a highly vascular tumor, and proangiogenic cytokines such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and fibroblast growth factor may play crucial roles in this disease. Sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor that blocks VEGF and PDGF signaling, was the first systemic therapy to demonstrate improved survival in patients with advanced HCC. Several other drugs targeting VEGF are in development. Because of the anticipation of eventual resistance to anti-VEGF therapies, drugs that also target alternative proangiogenic pathways are being investigated. Recent clinical and preclinical data along with ongoing studies are reviewed. PMID:23576483

  12. Combination treatment including targeted therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan; Wang, Anqiang; Zhang, Haohai; Yang, Xiaobo; Wan, Xueshuai; Lu, Xin; Sang, Xinting; Zhao, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Management of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), one of the most lethal cancers worldwide, has presented a therapeutic challenge over past decades. Most patients with advanced HCC and a low possibility of surgical resection have limited treatment options and no alternative but to accept local or palliative treatment. In the new era of cancer therapy, increasing numbers of molecular targeted agents (MTAs) have been applied in the treatment of advanced HCC. However, mono-targeted therapy has shown disappointing outcomes in disease control, primarily because of tumor heterogeneity and complex cell signal transduction. Because incapacitation of a single target is insufficient for cancer suppression, combination treatment for targeted therapy has been proposed and experimentally tested in several clinical trials. In this article, we review research studies aimed to enhance the efficacy of targeted therapy for HCC through combination strategies. Combination treatments involving targeted therapy for advanced HCC are compared and discussed. PMID:27626176

  13. Progress in systemic therapy of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xin-Lei; Qin, Shu-Kui

    2016-01-01

    Primary liver cancer, mainly consisting of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is one of common malignancies worldwide, and prevalent among the Chinese population. A diagnosis of early stage HCC has proven to be very difficult because of its insidious feature in onset and development. At the time of diagnosis, most HCC cases are locally advanced and/or distant metastatic, which results in difficulty to be treated and poor prognosis. For advanced HCC, systemic therapy is frequently adopted as an important palliative method. In recent years, clinical studies and observations have often reported about systemic anti-cancer therapy of advanced HCC, including molecular target therapy, systemic chemotherapy and immunotherapy. In this article, we review these treatment modalities to provide a reference for clinicians. PMID:27547002

  14. Technical advances in external radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kang, Min Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy techniques have substantially improved in the last two decades. After the introduction of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, radiotherapy has been increasingly used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Currently, more advanced techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), and charged particle therapy, are used for the treatment of HCC. IMRT can escalate the tumor dose while sparing the normal tissue even though the tumor is large or located near critical organs. SABR can deliver a very high radiation dose to small HCCs in a few fractions, leading to high local control rates of 84%-100%. Various advanced imaging modalities are used for radiotherapy planning and delivery to improve the precision of radiotherapy. These advanced techniques enable the delivery of high dose radiotherapy for early to advanced HCCs without increasing the radiation-induced toxicities. However, as there have been no effective tools for the prediction of the response to radiotherapy or recurrences within or outside the radiation field, future studies should focus on selecting the patients who will benefit from radiotherapy. PMID:27621577

  15. Thymostimulin in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Dollinger, Matthias M; Behrens, Christa M; Lesske, Joachim; Behl, Susanne; Behrmann, Curd; Fleig, Wolfgang E

    2008-01-01

    Background Thymostimulin is a thymic peptide fraction with immune-mediated cytotoxicity against hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro. In a phase II trial, we investigated safety and efficacy including selection criteria for best response in advanced or metastasised hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods 44 patients (84 % male, median age 69 years) not suitable or refractory to conventional therapy received thymostimulin 75 mg subcutaneously five times per week for a median of 8.2 months until progression or complete response. 3/44 patients were secondarily accessible to local ablation or chemoembolisation. Primary endpoint was overall survival, secondary endpoint tumor response or progression-free survival. A multivariate Cox's regression model was used to identify variables affecting survival. Results Median survival was 11.5 months (95% CI 7.9–15.0) with a 1-, 2- and 3-year survival of 50%, 23% and 9%. In the univariate analysis, a low Child-Pugh-score (p = 0.01), a low score in the Okuda- and CLIP-classification (p < 0.001) or a low AFP-level (p < 0.001) were associated with better survival, but not therapy modalities other than thymostimulin (p = 0.1) or signs of an invasive HCC phenotype such as vascular invasion (p = 0.3) and metastases (p = 0.1). The only variables independently related to survival in the Cox's regression model were Okuda stage and presence of liver cirrhosis (p < 0.01) as well as response to thymostimulin (p < 0.05). Of 39/44 patients evaluable for response, two obtained complete responses (one after concomitant radiofrequency ablation), five partial responses (objective response 18%), twenty-four stable disease (tumor control rate 79%) and eight progressed. Median progression-free survival was 6.4 months (95% CI 0.8–12). Grade 1 local reactions following injection were the only side effects. Conclusion Outcome in our study rather depended on liver function and intrahepatic tumor growth (presence of liver cirrhosis and Okuda stage) in addition

  16. Recent Advances in Tumor Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae Wook; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation for early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an accepted non-surgical treatment that provides excellent local tumor control and favorable survival benefit. This review summarizes the recent advances in tumor ablation for HCC. Diagnostic imaging and molecular biology of HCC has recently undergone marked improvements. Second-generation ultrasonography (US) contrast agents, new computed tomography (CT) techniques, and liver-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled the early detection of smaller and inconspicuous HCC lesions. Various imaging-guidance tools that incorporate imaging-fusion between real-time US and CT/MRI, that are now common for percutaneous tumor ablation, have increased operator confidence in the accurate targeting of technically difficult tumors. In addition to radiofrequency ablation (RFA), various therapeutic modalities including microwave ablation, irreversible electroporation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation have attracted attention as alternative energy sources for effective locoregional treatment of HCC. In addition, combined treatment with RFA and chemoembolization or molecular agents may be able to overcome the limitation of advanced or large tumors. Finally, understanding of the biological mechanisms and advances in therapy associated with tumor ablation will be important for successful tumor control. All these advances in tumor ablation for HCC will result in significant improvement in the prognosis of HCC patients. In this review, we primarily focus on recent advances in molecular tumor biology, diagnosis, imaging-guidance tools, and therapeutic modalities, and refer to the current status and future perspectives for tumor ablation for HCC. PMID:26674766

  17. VESPRO: An Individual Patient Data Prospective Meta-Analysis of Selective Internal Radiation Therapy Versus Sorafenib for Advanced, Locally Advanced, or Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma of the SARAH and SIRveNIB Trials

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Emma; Gandhi, Mihir; Chatellier, Gilles; Dinut, Aurelia; Pereira, Helena; Chow, Pierce KH; Vilgrain, Valérie

    2017-01-01

    Background Untreated advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has an overall poor prognosis. Currently there are 2 ongoing prospective randomized controlled trials that are evaluating the efficacy and safety of sorafenib and selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) with yttrium-90 resin microspheres in patients with advanced HCC. The SorAfenib versus Radioembolisation in Advanced Hepatocellular carcinoma (SARAH; 459 patients) trial is being performed in Europe and the SIRt VErsus SorafeNIB (SIRveNIB; 360 patients) trial in the Asia Pacific region. Prospectively combining the results, these trials will not only allow for increased precision to estimate efficacy (in terms of survival), but will also provide increased statistical power for subgroup analyses. Objective To ensure the prospectivity and transparency of the meta-analysis. Methods The sirVEnib and SARAH merge PROject (VESPRO) is an individual, patient-data prospective meta-analysis of the SIRveNIB and SARAH randomized trials. The VESPRO protocol includes prespecified hypotheses, inclusion criteria, and outcome measures. The primary outcome measure is overall survival and secondary outcomes include tumor response rate, progression-free survival, progression in the liver as first event, and disease control in the liver. Pooling of toxicity results will allow for robust safety profiles to be established for both therapies, and provides increased statistical power to investigate treatment effects in key subgroups. Analyses will be performed in the intent-to-treat population stratified by trial. Results Both studies are expected to demonstrate a survival benefit for SIRT together with a better toxicity profile compared with sorafenib. It is also anticipated that liver progression as the first event would be longer in the intervention compared with the control. Conclusions As the results of the 2 trials are not yet known, the methodological strength is enhanced, as biases inherent in conventional meta

  18. VESPRO: An Individual Patient Data Prospective Meta-Analysis of Selective Internal Radiation Therapy Versus Sorafenib for Advanced, Locally Advanced, or Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma of the SARAH and SIRveNIB Trials.

    PubMed

    Gebski, Val; Gibbs, Emma; Gandhi, Mihir; Chatellier, Gilles; Dinut, Aurelia; Pereira, Helena; Chow, Pierce Kh; Vilgrain, Valérie

    2017-02-15

    Untreated advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has an overall poor prognosis. Currently there are 2 ongoing prospective randomized controlled trials that are evaluating the efficacy and safety of sorafenib and selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) with yttrium-90 resin microspheres in patients with advanced HCC. The SorAfenib versus Radioembolisation in Advanced Hepatocellular carcinoma (SARAH; 459 patients) trial is being performed in Europe and the SIRt VErsus SorafeNIB (SIRveNIB; 360 patients) trial in the Asia Pacific region. Prospectively combining the results, these trials will not only allow for increased precision to estimate efficacy (in terms of survival), but will also provide increased statistical power for subgroup analyses. To ensure the prospectivity and transparency of the meta-analysis. The sirVEnib and SARAH merge PROject (VESPRO) is an individual, patient-data prospective meta-analysis of the SIRveNIB and SARAH randomized trials. The VESPRO protocol includes prespecified hypotheses, inclusion criteria, and outcome measures. The primary outcome measure is overall survival and secondary outcomes include tumor response rate, progression-free survival, progression in the liver as first event, and disease control in the liver. Pooling of toxicity results will allow for robust safety profiles to be established for both therapies, and provides increased statistical power to investigate treatment effects in key subgroups. Analyses will be performed in the intent-to-treat population stratified by trial. Both studies are expected to demonstrate a survival benefit for SIRT together with a better toxicity profile compared with sorafenib. It is also anticipated that liver progression as the first event would be longer in the intervention compared with the control. As the results of the 2 trials are not yet known, the methodological strength is enhanced, as biases inherent in conventional meta-analyses are avoided. This has the effect of providing

  19. Single administration of Selective Internal Radiation Therapy versus continuous treatment with sorafeNIB in locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (SIRveNIB): study protocol for a phase iii randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Mihir; Choo, Su Pin; Thng, Choon Hua; Tan, Say Beng; Low, Albert Su Chong; Cheow, Peng Chung; Goh, Anthony Soon Whatt; Tay, Kiang Hiong; Lo, Richard Hoau Gong; Goh, Brian Kim Poh; Wong, Jen San; Ng, David Chee Eng; Soo, Khee Chee; Liew, Wei Ming; Chow, Pierce K H

    2016-11-07

    Approximately 20 % of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients diagnosed in the early stages may benefit from potentially curative ablative therapies such as surgical resection, transplantation or radiofrequency ablation. For patients not eligible for such options, prognosis is poor. Sorafenib and Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) are clinically proven treatment options in patients with unresectable HCC, and this study aims to assess overall survival following either SIRT or Sorafenib therapy for locally advanced HCC patients. This investigator-initiated, multi-centre, open-label, randomized, controlled trial will enrol 360 patients with locally advanced HCC, as defined by Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage B or stage C, without distant metastases, and which is not amenable to immediate curative treatment. Exclusion criteria include previous systemic therapy, metastatic disease, complete occlusion of the main portal vein, or a Child-Pugh score of >7. Eligible patients will be randomised 1:1 and stratified by centre and presence or absence of portal vein thrombosis to receive either a single administration of SIRT using yttrium-90 resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres®, Sirtex Medical Limited, Sydney, Australia) targeted at HCC in the liver by the trans-arterial route or continuous oral Sorafenib (Nexavar®, Bayer Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany) at a dose of 400 mg twice daily until disease progression, no further response, complete regression or unacceptable toxicity. Patients for both the Sorafenib and SIRT arms will be followed-up every 4 weeks for the first 3 months and 12 weekly thereafter. Overall survival is the primary endpoint, assessed for the intention-to-treat population. Secondary endpoints are tumour response rate, time-to-tumour progression, progression free survival, quality of life and down-staging to receive potentially curative therapy. Definitive data comparing these two therapies will help to determine clinical practice in the large group

  20. Phase I/II Randomized Trial of Sorafenib and Bevacizumab as First-Line Therapy in Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Hepatocellular Carcinoma: North Central Cancer Treatment Group Trial N0745 (Alliance).

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Joleen M; Mahoney, Michelle R; Loui, William S; Roberts, Lewis R; Smyrk, Thomas C; Gatalica, Zoran; Borad, Mitesh; Kumar, Shaji; Alberts, Steven R

    2017-04-01

    Angiogenesis has been a major target of novel drug development in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It is hypothesized that the combination of two antiangiogenic agents, sorafenib and bevacizumab, will provide greater blockade of angiogenesis. To determine the optimal dose, safety, and effectiveness of dual anti-angiogenic therapy with sorafenib and bevacizumab in patients with advanced HCC. Patients with locally advanced or metastatic HCC not amenable for surgery or liver transplant were eligible. The phase I starting dose level was bevacizumab 1.25 mg/kg day 1 and 15 plus sorafenib 400 mg twice daily (BID) days 1-28. In the phase II portion, patients were randomized to receive bevacizumab and sorafenib at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or sorafenib 400 mg BID. Seventen patients were enrolled in the phase I component. Dose-limiting toxicities included grade 3 hand/foot skin reaction, fatigue, hypertension, alanine/aspartate aminotransferase increase, dehydration, hypophosphatemia, creatinine increase, hypoglycemia, nausea/vomiting, and grade 4 hyponatremia. Seven patients were enrolled in the phase II component at the MTD: sorafenib 200 mg BID days 1-28 and bevacizumab 2.5 mg/kg every other week; 57% (4/7) had grade 3 AEs at least possibly related to treatment. No responses were observed in the phase II portion. Estimated median time to progression and survival were 8.6 months (95% CI: 0.4-16.3) and 13.3 months (95% CI 4.4 - not estimable), respectively. The MTD of the combination is sorafenib 200 mg twice daily on days 1-28 plus bevacizumab 2.5 mg/kg on days 1 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. In the phase II portion of the trial, concerns regarding excessive toxicity, low efficacy, and slow enrollment led to discontinuation of the trial. (Clinical Trials ID: NCT00867321.).

  1. Recent advances in immunotherapy for hepatocellular cancer.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H

    2007-02-10

    There is a continuing need for innovative, alternative therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Immunotherapy of cancer is attractive because of the exquisite specificity of the immune response. Activation of an HCC-specific response can be accomplished by strategies targeting tumour-associated antigens (for example: alpha fetoprotein (AFP)) or viral antigens in those patients infected with hepatitis B or C. Uncharacterised and mutated antigens can also be targeted with whole tumour cell or tumour lysate-based immunisation strategies. Viral vectors coding for genes which make the patient's tumour immunogenic can allow the immune system to naturally evolve specificity against immunogenic target antigens. Strategies which have been tested in human clinical trials include adoptive transfer of lymphocytes, cytokine injections, autologous tumour-pulsed dendritic cells (DC) as well as AFP-derived peptides in adjuvant and pulsed onto autologous DC. These trials, testing novel immune-based interventions in HCC subjects, have resulted in immunological responses and some have impacted recurrence and survival of HCC subjects.

  2. Sorafenib Tosylate With or Without Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-22

    Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Non-Resectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage III Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7

  3. Liver abscess in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma after sorafenib treatment.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung Kak; Jung, Young Kul; Yoon, Hyun Hwa; Kwon, Oh Sang; Kim, Yun Soo; Choi, Duck Joo; Kim, Ju Hyun

    2014-01-25

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a critical global health issue and the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The majority of patients who present HCC are already at an advanced stage and their tumors are unresectable. Sorafenib is a multi-kinase inhibitor of the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway and was recently introduced as a therapy for advanced HCC. Furthermore, studies have shown that oral sorafenib has beneficial effects on survival. However, many patients experience diverse side effects, and some of these are severe. Liver abscess development has not been previously documented to be associated with sorafenib administration in HCC. Here, we report the case of a HCC patient that developed a liver abscess while being treated with sorafenib.

  4. Dynamic localization of hepatocellular transporters in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Roma, Marcelo G; Crocenzi, Fernando A; Mottino, Aldo D

    2008-01-01

    Vesicle-based trafficking of hepatocellular transporters involves delivery of the newly-synthesized carriers from the rough endoplasmic reticulum to either the plasma membrane domain or to an endosomal, submembrane compartment, followed by exocytic targeting to the plasma membrane. Once delivered to the plasma membrane, the transporters usually undergo recycling between the plasma membrane and the endosomal compartment, which usually serves as a reservoir of pre-existing transporters available on demand. The balance between exocytic targeting and endocytic internalization from/to this recycling compartment is therefore a chief determinant of the overall capability of the liver epithelium to secrete bile and to detoxify endo and xenobiotics. Hence, it is a highly regulated process. Impaired regulation of this balance may lead to abnormal localization of these transporters, which results in bile secretory failure due to endocytic internalization of key transporters involved in bile formation. This occurs in several experimental models of hepatocellular cholestasis, and in most human cholestatic liver diseases. This review describes the molecular bases involved in the biology of the dynamic localization of hepatocellular transporters and its regulation, with a focus on the involvement of signaling pathways in this process. Their alterations in different experimental models of cholestasis and in human cholestatic liver disease are reviewed. In addition, the causes explaining the pathological condition (e.g. disorganization of actin or actin-transporter linkers) and the mediators involved (e.g. activation of cholestatic signaling transduction pathways) are also discussed. Finally, several experimental therapeutic approaches based upon the administration of compounds known to stimulate exocytic insertion of canalicular transporters (e.g. cAMP, tauroursodeoxycholate) are described. PMID:19058304

  5. Lenvatinib: a potential breakthrough in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Oikonomopoulos, Georgios; Aravind, Preetha; Sarker, Debashis

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has reached a plateau after the approval of sorafenib in 2007. Several molecularly targeted therapies have failed to show significant improvement in survival outcomes compared with sorafenib, due to flaws in the design of clinical trials or failure to understand and correct for the competing co-morbidity of liver dysfunction. Lenvatinib is a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent antiangiogenic effects, and has recently been approved for differentiated thyroid cancer. Lenvatinib has shown highly promising response data in Phase I/II clinical trials in HCC, although with some concerns regarding its toxicity profile. The pivotal Phase III REFLECT trial comparing lenvatinib to sorafenib has been completed, and the results of this trial will determine whether lenvatinib represents a breakthrough in the current crisis affecting HCC drug development.

  6. Hepatocellular carcinoma: Advances in diagnosis, management, and long term outcome.

    PubMed

    Bodzin, Adam S; Busuttil, Ronald W

    2015-05-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains a common and lethal malignancy worldwide and arises in the setting of a host of diseases. The incidence continues to increase despite multiple vaccines and therapies for viruses such as the hepatitis B and C viruses. In addition, due to the growing incidence of obesity in Western society, there is anticipation that there will be a growing population with HCC due to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Due to the growing frequency of this disease, screening is recommended using ultrasound with further imaging using magnetic resonance imaging and multi-detector computed tomography used for further characterization of masses. Great advances have been made to help with the early diagnosis of small lesions leading to potential curative resection or transplantation. Resection and transplantation maybe used in a variety of patients that are carefully selected based on underlying liver disease. Using certain guidelines and clinical acumen patients may have good outcomes with either resection or transplantation however many patients are inoperable at time of presentation. Fortunately, the use of new locoregional therapies has made down staging patients a potential option making them potential surgical candidates. Despite a growing population with HCC, new advances in viral therapies, chemotherapeutics, and an expanding population of surgical and transplant candidates might all contribute to improved long-term survival of these patients.

  7. Hepatocellular carcinoma: Advances in diagnosis, management, and long term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bodzin, Adam S; Busuttil, Ronald W

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains a common and lethal malignancy worldwide and arises in the setting of a host of diseases. The incidence continues to increase despite multiple vaccines and therapies for viruses such as the hepatitis B and C viruses. In addition, due to the growing incidence of obesity in Western society, there is anticipation that there will be a growing population with HCC due to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Due to the growing frequency of this disease, screening is recommended using ultrasound with further imaging using magnetic resonance imaging and multi-detector computed tomography used for further characterization of masses. Great advances have been made to help with the early diagnosis of small lesions leading to potential curative resection or transplantation. Resection and transplantation maybe used in a variety of patients that are carefully selected based on underlying liver disease. Using certain guidelines and clinical acumen patients may have good outcomes with either resection or transplantation however many patients are inoperable at time of presentation. Fortunately, the use of new locoregional therapies has made down staging patients a potential option making them potential surgical candidates. Despite a growing population with HCC, new advances in viral therapies, chemotherapeutics, and an expanding population of surgical and transplant candidates might all contribute to improved long-term survival of these patients. PMID:26019732

  8. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Biliary Tract or Liver Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  9. Local ablative treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma: An updated review

    PubMed Central

    Facciorusso, Antonio; Serviddio, Gaetano; Muscatiello, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Ablative treatments currently represent the first-line option for the treatment of early stage unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Furthermore, they are effective as bridging/downstaging therapies before orthotopic liver transplantation. Contraindications based on size, number, and location of nodules are quite variable in literature and strictly dependent on local expertise. Among ablative therapies, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has gained a pivotal role due to its efficacy, with a reported 5-year survival rate of 40%-70%, and safety. Although survival outcomes are similar to percutaneous ethanol injection, the lower local recurrence rate stands for a wider application of RFA in hepato-oncology. Moreover, RFA seems to be even more cost-effective than liver resection for very early HCC (single nodule ≤ 2 cm) and in the presence of two or three nodules ≤ 3 cm. There is increasing evidence that combining RFA to transarterial chemoembolization may increase the therapeutic benefit in larger HCCs without increasing the major complication rate, but more robust prospective data is still needed to validate these pivotal findings. Among other thermal treatments, microwave ablation (MWA) uses high frequency electromagnetic energy to induce tissue death via coagulation necrosis. In comparison to RFA, MWA has several theoretical advantages such as a broader zone of active heating, higher temperatures within the targeted area in a shorter treatment time and the lack of heat-sink effect. The safety concerns raised on the risks of this procedure, due to the broader and less predictable necrosis areas, have been recently overcome. However, whether MWA ability to generate a larger ablation zone will translate into a survival gain remains unknown. Other treatments, such as high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation, laser ablation, and cryoablation, are less investigated but showed promising results in early HCC patients and could be a valuable therapeutic option in

  10. Cyberknife treatment for advanced or terminal stage hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hideo; Taniguch, Hiroyoshi; Nomura, Ryutaro; Sato, Kengo; Suzuki, Ichiro; Nakata, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety and efficacy of the Cyberknife treatment for patients with advanced or terminal stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Patients with HCC with extrahepatic metastasis or vascular or bile duct invasion were enrolled between May 2011 and June 2015. The Cyberknife was used to treat each lesion. Treatment response scores were based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1. The trends of tumor markers, including alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and proteins induced by vitamin K absence II (PIVKA II) were assessed. Prognostic factors for tumor response and tumor markers were evaluated with Fisher’s exact test and a logistic regression model. Survival was evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: Sixty-five patients with 95 lesions were enrolled. Based on the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer classification, all patients were either in the advanced or terminal stage of the disease. The target lesions were as follows: 52 were bone metastasis; 9, lung metastasis; 7, brain metastasis; 9, portal vein invasion; 4, hepatic vein invasion; 4, bile duct invasion; and 10 other lesion types. The response rate and disease control rate were 34% and 53%, respectively. None of the clinical factors correlated significantly with tumor response. Fiducial marker implantation was associated with better control of both AFP (HR = 0.152; 95%CI: 0.026-0.887; P = 0.036) and PIVKA II (HR = 0.035; 95%CI: 0.003-0.342; P = 0.004). The median survival time was 9 mo (95%CI: 5-15 mo). Terminal stage disease (HR = 9.809; 95%CI: 2.589-37.17, P < 0.001) and an AFP of more than 400 ng/mL (HR = 2.548; 95%CI: 1.070-6.068, P = 0.035) were associated with worse survival. A radiation dose higher than 30 Gy (HR = 0.274; 95%CI: 0.093-0.7541, P = 0.012) was associated with better survival. In the 52 cases of bone metastasis, 36 patients (69%) achieved pain relief. One patient had cerebral

  11. Prometheus' spirit: quality survival in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma after gemcitabine and cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Doval, D C; Pande, S B; Sharma, J B; Pavithran, K; Jena, A; Vaid, A K

    2008-10-01

    In advanced virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) associated with cirrhosis, the average survival is four months. We report a 56-year-old man with a large-volume advanced HCC, in whom gemcitabine and cisplatin-based chemotherapy resulted in near-complete regression, and quality survival of 24 months.

  12. Local Anesthetics Inhibit the Growth of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Le Gac, Grégoire; Angenard, Gaëlle; Clément, Bruno; Laviolle, Bruno; Coulouarn, Cédric; Beloeil, Hélène

    2017-08-29

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive cancer with limited therapeutic options. Retrospective studies have shown that the administration of local anesthetics (LAs) during cancer surgery could reduce cancer recurrence. Besides, experimental studies reported that LAs could inhibit the growth of cancer cells. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of LAs on human HCC cells. The effects of 2 LAs (lidocaine and ropivacaine) (10 to 10 M) were studied after an incubation of 48 hours on 2 HCC cell lines, namely HuH7 and HepaRG. Cell viability, cell cycle analysis, and apoptosis and senescence tests were performed together with unsupervised genome-wide expression profiling and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for relevant genes. We showed that LAs decreased viability and proliferation of HuH7 cells (from 92% [P < .001] at 5 × 10 M to 40% [P = .02] at 10 M with ropivacaine and from 87% [P < .001] to 37% [P = .02] with lidocaine) and HepaRG progenitor cells (from 58% at 5 × 10 M [P < .001] to 29% at 10 M [P = .04] with lidocaine and 59% [P < .001] with ropivacaine 5 × 10 M) in concentration-dependent manner. LAs have no effect on well-differentiated HepaRG. Ropivacaine decreased the mRNA level of key cell cycle regulators, namely cyclin A2, cyclin B1, cyclin B2, and cyclin-dependent kinase 1, and the expression of the nuclear marker of cell proliferation MKI67. Lidocaine had no specific effect on cell cycle but increased by 10× the mRNA level of adenomatous polyposis coli (P < .01), which acts as an antagonist of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Both LAs increased apoptosis in Huh7 and HepaRG progenitor cells (P < .01). The data demonstrate that LAs induced profound modifications in gene expression profiles of tumor cells, including modulations in the expression of cell cycle-related genes that result in a cytostatic effect and induction of apoptosis.

  13. Yttrium-90 Radioembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma-Performance, Technical Advances, and Future Concepts.

    PubMed

    Molvar, Christopher; Lewandowski, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a lethal tumor, claiming over half a million lives per year. Treatment of HCC is commonly performed without curative intent, and palliative options dominate, including catheter-based therapies, namely, transarterial chemoembolization and yttrium-90 ((90)Y) radioembolization. This review will showcase the performance of (90)Y radioembolization for the treatment of HCC, focusing on recent seminal data and technical advances. In particular, novel radioembolization treatment concepts are discussed and compared with conventional HCC therapy.

  14. Yttrium-90 Radioembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma–Performance, Technical Advances, and Future Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Molvar, Christopher; Lewandowski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a lethal tumor, claiming over half a million lives per year. Treatment of HCC is commonly performed without curative intent, and palliative options dominate, including catheter-based therapies, namely, transarterial chemoembolization and yttrium-90 (90Y) radioembolization. This review will showcase the performance of 90Y radioembolization for the treatment of HCC, focusing on recent seminal data and technical advances. In particular, novel radioembolization treatment concepts are discussed and compared with conventional HCC therapy. PMID:26622103

  15. Pilot study with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin for advanced or unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schmidinger, M; Wenzel, C; Locker, G J; Muehlbacher, F; Steininger, R; Gnant, M; Crevenna, R; Budinsky, A C

    2001-01-01

    We performed a pilot-study on pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Seventeen patients received 40 mg/m2 PLD intravenously every 4 weeks. A clinical benefit response was achieved in 50% (complete remission 7%, minor remission 7%, stable disease 36%). Toxicities were moderate. In view of these encouraging findings, further studies appear warranted. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11747325

  16. Cost-effectiveness of sorafenib versus SBRT for unresectable advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Leung, Henry W C; Liu, Chung-Feng; Chan, Agnes L F

    2016-05-18

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been shown to improve overall survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. This study aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of SBRT compared to sorafenib which is the only drug for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. A Markov decision-analytic model was performed to compare the cost-effectiveness of SBRT and sorafenib for unresectable advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Patients transitioned between three health states: stable disease, progression disease and death. We calculated the data on cost from the perspective of our National Health Insurance Bureau. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to determine the impact of several variables. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) for sorafenib compared to SBRT was NT$3,788,238 per quality-adjusted life year gained (cost/QALY), which was higher than the willingness to pay threshold of Taiwan according to WHO's guideline. One-way sensitivity analysis revealed that the utility of progression disease for the sorafenib treatment, utility of progression free survival for SBRT, utility of progression free survival for sorafenib, utility of PFS to progression disease for SBRT and transition probability of progression disease to dead for SBRT were the most sensitive parameters in all cost scenarios. The Monte-Carlo simulation demonstrated that the probability of cost-effectiveness at a willingness to pay threshold of NT$ 2,213,145 per QALY was 100 % and 0 % chance for SBRT and sorafenib. This study indicated that SBRT for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma is cost-effective at a willingness to pay threshold as defined by WHO guideline in Taiwan.

  17. Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma: recent advances in China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tian Fei; Hua, Xiang Wei; Cui, Xiao Lan; Xia, Qiang

    2014-02-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation is currently the best treatment option for selected patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). From 1980 to 2011, 8874 patients with HCC in China underwent liver transplantation. The organ donation classification criteria of China (China criteria), which are established by the Government of China, are divided into three parts: China criteria I, donation after brain death; China criteria II, donation after cardiac death and China criteria III, donation after dual brain-cardiac death. Data from the China Liver Transplant Registry(CLTR) System shows that patients within the Milan criteria have higher survival rates than those who are beyond these criteria. Based on CLTR data, altogether 416 patients received living-donor liver transplantation(LDLT) in China. Their 1-year and 3-year survival rates were significantly higher than those of the non-LDLT recipients. The most common early stage(<30 days after liver transplantation) complications include pleural effusion, diabetes, peritoneal effusion or abscess, postoperative infection, hypertension and intraperitoneal hemorrhage; while the most common late stage (≥ 30 days after liver transplantation) complications were diabetes, hypertension, biliary complications,postoperative infection, tacrolimus toxicity and chronic graft rejection. The incidence of vascular complication, which is the main reason for acute graft failure and re-transplantation, was 2.4%. Liver transplantation is an effective treatment for patients with HCC in China.

  18. A Recent Advance in Image-Guided Locoregional Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yaoping; Zhai, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide and the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths. Hepatic resection and liver transplantation are considered to be the preferred treatment for HCC. However, as novel therapeutic options such as image-guided locoregional therapies have emerged and been refined, the manner in which HCC is treated has changed dramatically compared with what it was considered just 2 decades earlier. Summary This study reviews the current results of various image-guided locoregional therapies for treating HCC, especially focusing on thermal ablative and transarterial techniques. Key Message Advances in image-guided locoregional therapies, including local ablative therapy and transarterial therapy, have led to a major breakthrough in the management of HCC. Both survival rates and cure rates of patients with HCC have improved markedly since the introduction of these techniques. Practical Implications Radiofrequency ablation is currently considered as an alternative to surgical resection for patients with early-stage HCC. A newer technique of ablation such as microwave ablation is increasingly being used, especially for large HCC. Transarterial chemoembolization has become a standard care for asymptomatic patients with multinodular tumors in intermediate-stage disease, and transarterial radioembolization has become the method of choice in HCC cases with portal vein thrombosis. Moreover, combination treatment modalities, such as thermal-based ablation combined with transarterial chemoembolization or 125I seed implant brachytherapy, may further broaden their clinical indications for HCC. Moreover, use of localized radiation in combination with thermal ablation has been reported to improve tumor control and long-term survival. PMID:27904861

  19. Molecularly targeted therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma - a drug development crisis?

    PubMed Central

    Thillai, Kiruthikah; Ross, Paul; Sarker, Debashis

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the fastest growing cause of cancer related death globally. Sorafenib, a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor, is the only drug proven to improve outcomes in patients with advanced disease offering modest survival benefit. Although comprehensive genomic mapping has improved understanding of the genetic aberrations in hepatocellular cancer (HCC), this knowledge has not yet impacted clinical care. The last few years have seen the failure of several first and second line phase III clinical trials of novel molecularly targeted therapies, warranting a change in the way new therapies are investigated in HCC. Potential reasons for these failures include clinical and molecular heterogeneity, trial design and a lack of biomarkers. This review discusses the current crisis in HCC drug development and how we should learn from recent trial failures to develop a more effective personalised treatment paradigm for patients with HCC. PMID:26909132

  20. Efficacy and Tolerability of ABT-869 Versus Sorafenib in Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-09-07

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma Non-resectable; Hepatocellular Carcinoma Recurrent; Carcinoma, Hepatocellular; Liver Diseases; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Digestive System Neoplasms; Carcinoma; Liver Neoplasms; Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Adenocarcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial

  1. Sorafenib for the Treatment of Advanced Hepatocellular Cancer - a UK Audit.

    PubMed

    King, J; Palmer, D H; Johnson, P; Ross, P; Hubner, R A; Sumpter, K; Darby, S; Braconi, C; Iwuji, C; Swinson, D; Collins, P; Patel, K; Nobes, J; Muazzam, I; Blesing, C; Kirkwood, A; Nash, S; Meyer, T

    2017-04-01

    Sorafenib is the current standard treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. We carried out a national audit of UK patients treated with sorafenib as standard-of-care and those treated with systemic therapy in first-line trials. Sorafenib-treated and trial-treated patients were identified via the Cancer Drugs Fund and local databases. Data were collected retrospectively from medical records according to a standard case report form. The primary outcome measure was overall survival, estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Data were obtained for 448 sorafenib-treated patients from 15 hospitals. The median age was 68 years (range 17-89) and 75% had performance status ≤ 1. At baseline, 77% were Child-Pugh A and 16.1% Child-Pugh B; 38% were albumin-bilirubin grade 1 (ALBI-1) and 48% ALBI-2; 23% were Barcelona Clinic Liver Classification B (BCLC-B) and 72% BCLC-C. The median time on sorafenib was 3.6 months, with a mean daily dose of 590 mg. The median overall survival for 448 evaluable sorafenib-treated patients was 8.5 months. There were significant differences in overall survival comparing Child-Pugh A versus Child-Pugh B (9.5 versus 4.6 months), ALBI-1 versus ALBI-2 (12.9 versus 5.9 months) and BCLC-B versus BCLC-C (13.0 versus 8.3 months). For trial-treated patients (n=109), the median overall survival was 8.1 months and this was not significantly different from the sorafenib-treated patients. For Child-Pugh A patients with good performance status, survival outcomes were similar to those reported in global randomised controlled trials. Patients with ALBI grade > 1, Child-Pugh B or poor performance status seem to derive limited benefit from sorafenib treatment. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Spatial localization of the JAG1/Notch1/osteopontin cascade modulates extrahepatic metastasis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xue, Tong-Chun; Zou, Jing-Huai; Chen, Rong-Xin; Cui, Jie-Feng; Tang, Zhao-You; Ye, Sheng-Long

    2014-11-01

    The model of Notch-driven carcinogenesis and development of hepatocellular carcinoma remains controversial and is based on observations of developmental stage- and dose-dependent Notch activation. In this study, the relevance of the spatial distribution of Notch cascade members to the promotion of hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis was evaluated. The spatial expression patterns of the members of the Jagged1 (JAG1)/Notch1 cascade in HCC were evaluated in a tissue microarray of 112 tumors and 46 peri-tumors. Regulation of JAG1/Notch1 on osteopontin (OPN) was evaluated by RNA interference. Tumor cells with JAG1 expressed on the membrane (JAG1(Mem)) were more likely to undergo extrahepatic metastasis [p<0.001; hazard ratio (HR), 0.166; 95% CI, 0.068-0.402], and JAG1(Mem) was a strong independent prognostic factor for metastasis (HR, 0.467; 95% CI, 0.271-0.806; p=0.006). JAG1(Mem) also showed a strong positive correlation with Notch1(Mem). In addition, tumors with JAG1(Mem) expression had more poorly encapsulated membranes (p=0.014). Furthermore, Notch1(Mem) expression correlated with HCC metastasis and was the strongest predictive factor for metastasis. However, in peri-tumoral tissues, most JAG1 (45/46) and Notch1 (41/46) was localized to the cytoplasm. The expression of OPN, one of the main targets of JAG1/Notch1 signaling and a crucial metastasis-related gene in HCC, correlated significantly with JAG1(Mem) expression. Knockdown of JAG1 expression or Notch1 expression induced the downregulation of OPN in HCC cells. Taken together, protein localization is a critical factor affecting the activity of the Notch cascade in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, our results suggest that the JAG1/Notch1/OPN cascade represents a potential therapeutic target for hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis.

  3. Hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, G A

    1999-05-01

    Hepatitis C infection is associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, and progress has been made in a number of areas. Transgenic mice lines expressing the hepatitis C core protein develop hepatic steatosis, adenomas, and hepatocellular carcinomas, with no significant hepatitis or fibrosis. This implies that hepatitis C can lead directly to malignant transformation. A new lesion, irregular regeneration, has been described in chronic hepatitis C infection and is associated with a 15-fold increase in the relative risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma. A minority of patients with hepatitis C-related hepatocellular carcinoma have intense lymphocytic infiltration of the cancer, a feature associated with a better prognosis. Several studies have confirmed the association between large cell dysplasia and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, large cell dysplasia may not be a premalignant lesion and instead may be a marker for premalignant alterations elsewhere in the liver. Oral contraceptives previously have been linked to an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. A large multicenter European case-control study has shown minimal increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma with use of steroidal contraception. Tamoxifen had shown promise in the management of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. However, a randomized placebo-controlled study of 477 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma found no benefit from tamoxifen. In a preliminary study, however, octreotide has shown improved survival and quality of life in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Finally, interferon treatment continues to be linked to a reduced risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with hepatitis C. These studies generally are not randomized, and a randomized prospective study is required to address this issue.

  4. Managing patients receiving sorafenib for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: a case study.

    PubMed

    Hull, Diana; Armstrong, Ceri

    2010-05-01

    Despite improvements in cytotoxic chemotherapy agents over the last 50 years, the outlook for patients with many of the most common solid tumours has remained poor. However, in recent years a number of targeted therapies have been licensed in the European Union for use in these cancer types. One such therapy, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (sorafenib) is now used to treat patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metastatic renal cell carcinoma. This article will explore the role of the oncology nurse in managing patients receiving sorafenib for advanced HCC. A brief overview of sorafenib as a current treatment approved for advanced HCC in the palliative setting is presented. This is followed by a case study-based discussion with particular reference to some of the key care coordination challenges facing the oncology nurse. The management of treatment-related adverse events and the importance of using a multidisciplinary team approach is also reviewed.

  5. Investigating the Pretreatment miRNA Expression Patterns of Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients in Association with Response to TACE Treatment

    PubMed Central

    El-Halawany, Medhat S.; Ismail, Heba M.; Zeeneldin, Ahmed A.; Elfiky, Ammar; Tantawy, Marwa; Kobaisi, Mohamed H.; Hamed, Ikram; Abdel Wahab, Abdel Hady A.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a lethal malignancy with poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) using chemotherapy agents—doxorubicin and cisplatin—is an accepted treatment option for locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. In the current study, we analyzed the expression pattern of a selected panel of 94 miRNAs in archival samples that were collected prior to treatment from 15 Egyptian patients diagnosed with advanced hepatocelleular carcinoma. We observed an overall increase in miRNA expression in HCC samples compared with normal subjects. Out of 94 examined miRNAs, 53 were significantly upregulated while 3 miRNAs were downregulated in HCC samples compared to normal liver samples. Comparing the pretreatment miRNA expression profiles in HCC patients and the patients response to TACE treatment resulted in the identification of a set of 12 miRNAs that are significantly upregulated in nonresponders group. This miRNA panel includes miR-10a-1, miR-23a-1, miR-24, miR-26a, miR-27a, miR-30c, miR-30e, miR-106b, miR-133b, miR-199a, miR-199-3p, and miR-200b. Furthermore, we observed that a panel of 10 miRNAs was significantly associated with patients' survival status at 1 year. These results highlight the potential implications of pretreatment miRNAs expression profiling in prediction of the patients' response to TACE treatment in liver cancer. PMID:25811030

  6. A unique bleeding-related complication of sorafenib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor as a standard of care for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, may lead endothelial cells to an unstable state by blocking the signaling pathway of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, which may result in the disruption of the architecture and integrity of the microvasculature, and eventually increase the risk of hemorrhage. Hemobilia is a relatively uncommon condition as a consequence of hepatocellular carcinoma and its risk factors remain uncertain. Case presentation Here we report a unique case of hemobilia occurring in a 55-year-old Korean man with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma on Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer advanced stage after seven days of treatment with sorafenib. He had received prior radiation therapy. Endoscopy revealed bleeding from the major duodenal papilla and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography revealed an amorphous filling defect throughout the common bile duct. Blood clots were removed by balloon sweeping and a nasobiliary drainage tube was placed. No further bleeding has been detected as of eight months after discontinuation of sorafenib. Conclusion Sorafenib may increase the risk of biliary bleeding in hepatocellular carcinoma patients who were primed with irradiation, by blocking the signaling pathway of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. Therefore, sorafenib should be used with caution in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, especially when combined with radiation therapy. PMID:24571585

  7. A unique bleeding-related complication of sorafenib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ha Yan; Moon, Sung Hoon; Song, Il Han

    2014-02-26

    Sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor as a standard of care for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, may lead endothelial cells to an unstable state by blocking the signaling pathway of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, which may result in the disruption of the architecture and integrity of the microvasculature, and eventually increase the risk of hemorrhage. Hemobilia is a relatively uncommon condition as a consequence of hepatocellular carcinoma and its risk factors remain uncertain. Here we report a unique case of hemobilia occurring in a 55-year-old Korean man with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma on Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer advanced stage after seven days of treatment with sorafenib. He had received prior radiation therapy. Endoscopy revealed bleeding from the major duodenal papilla and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography revealed an amorphous filling defect throughout the common bile duct. Blood clots were removed by balloon sweeping and a nasobiliary drainage tube was placed. No further bleeding has been detected as of eight months after discontinuation of sorafenib. Sorafenib may increase the risk of biliary bleeding in hepatocellular carcinoma patients who were primed with irradiation, by blocking the signaling pathway of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. Therefore, sorafenib should be used with caution in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, especially when combined with radiation therapy.

  8. Living Donor Liver Transplantation for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis after Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dai Hoon; Joo, Dong Jin; Kim, Myoung Soo; Choi, Gi Hong; Choi, Jin Sub; Park, Young Nyun; Seong, Jinsil

    2016-01-01

    Locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein thrombosis carries a 1-year survival rate <10%. Localized concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), followed by hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC), was recently introduced in this setting. Here, we report our early experience with living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in such patients after successful down-staging of HCC through CCRT and HAIC. Between December 2011 and September 2012, eight patients with locally advanced HCC at initial diagnosis were given CCRT, followed by HAIC, and underwent LDLT at the Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea. CCRT [45 Gy over 5 weeks with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as HAIC] was followed by HAIC (5-FU/cisplatin combination every 4 weeks for 3–12 months), adjusted for tumor response. Down-staging succeeded in all eight patients, leaving no viable tumor thrombi in major vessels, although three patients first underwent hepatic resections. Due to deteriorating liver function, transplantation was the sole therapeutic option and offered a chance for cure. The 1-year disease-free survival rate was 87.5%. There were three instances of post-transplantation tumor recurrence during follow-up monitoring (median, 17 months; range, 10–22 months), but no deaths occurred. Median survival time from initial diagnosis was 33 months. Four postoperative complications recorded in three patients (anastomotic strictures: portal vein, 2; bile duct, 2) were resolved through radiologic interventions. Using an intensive tumor down-staging protocol of CCRT followed by HAIC, LDLT may be a therapeutic option for selected patients with locally advanced HCC and portal vein tumor thrombosis. PMID:27401662

  9. Advanced local area network concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Terry

    1985-01-01

    Development of a good model of the data traffic requirements for Local Area Networks (LANs) onboard the Space Station is the driving problem in this work. A parameterized workload model is under development. An analysis contract has been started specifically to capture the distributed processing requirements for the Space Station and then to develop a top level model to simulate how various processing scenarios can handle the workload and what data communication patterns result. A summary of the Local Area Network Extendsible Simulator 2 Requirements Specification and excerpts from a grant report on the topological design of fiber optic local area networks with application to Expressnet are given.

  10. Sorafenib Tosylate and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-15

    Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Child-Pugh Class A; Stage III Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IV Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  11. Hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, T.; Kojiro, M.

    1986-01-01

    With the remarkable recent diagnostic and therapeutic advances and the discovery of a possible pathogenetic role of hepatitis B virus, the study and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma are entering a new era. Parallel developments in the pathological study of this malignancy are also to be expected. To coincide with this new era, this book presents the authors' accumulated pathomorphological knowledge of hepatocellular carcinoma. The detailed coverage is based on the examination findings of 439 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma autopsied at the authors' department in the last twenty years.

  12. The effect of locoregional therapies in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma treated with sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Sarpel, Umut; Spivack, John H.; Berger, Yaniv; Heskel, Marina; Aycart, Samantha N.; Sweeney, Robert; Edwards, Martin P.; Labow, Daniel M.; Kim, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Background & aims It is unknown whether the addition of locoregional therapies (LRTx) to sorafenib improves prognosis over sorafenib alone in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of LRTx in this population. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of patients with advanced HCC as defined by extrahepatic metastasis, lymphadenopathy >2 cm, or gross vascular invasion. Sorafenib therapy was required for inclusion. Survival of patients who received LRTx after progression to advanced stage was compared to those who did not receive LRTx. Results Using an intention to treat analysis of 312 eligible patients, a propensity weighted proportional hazards model demonstrated LRTx as a predictor of survival (HR = 0.505, 95% CI: 0.407–0.628; P < 0.001). The greatest benefit was seen in patients with the largest tumor burden (HR = 0.305, 95% CI: 0.236–0.393; P < 0.01). Median survival in the sorafenib arm was 143 days (95% CI: 118–161) vs. 247 days (95% CI: 220–289) in the sorafenib plus LRTx arm (P < 0.001). Conclusions These results demonstrate a survival benefit with the addition of LRTx to sorafenib for patients with advanced HCC. These findings should prompt a prospective clinical trial to further assess the role of LRTx in patients with advanced HCC. PMID:27154804

  13. Surgical resection of localized hepatocellular carcinoma: patient selection and special consideration

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ka Wing; Cheung, Tan To

    2017-01-01

    Localized hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) refers to a solitary or few tumors located within either the left or right hemiliver without evidence of bilobar or extrahepatic spread. This term encompasses a heterogeneous morphology with no regard to stage of prognosis of the disease. Surgical resection remains the mainstay of curative treatment for the localized HCC. Various biochemical and radiological tests constitute an indispensible part of preoperative assessment. Emergence of laparoscopic hepatectomy has brought liver resection into a new era. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of HCC allows more aggressive surgical resection without compromising outcomes. New insights into the management of special situations, such as ruptured HCC, pyogenic transformation of HCC, and HCC with portal vein tumor thrombus, rekindle the hopes of curative resection in these terminal events. Amalgamating salvage liver transplantation into the surgical management of resectable HCC has revolutionized the treatment paradigm of this deadly disease. PMID:28097107

  14. [Chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Bazaeva, I Ia; Gorbunova, V A; Kravets, O A; Khokhlova, S V; Limareva, S V; Panov, V O; Strel'tsova, O N; Tarachkova, E V

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer takes second place in morbidity and third place in mortality from gynecological cancer. Advanced stages among newly diagnosed cases is still large. The "gold standard" of treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer is chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin that results in a lower risk of death. Improvement of radiotherapy methods allowed to bring optimal dose to the primary tumor with the inclusion of regional metastasis areas with less risk of damage to surrounding healthy tissue and organs. The search for alternative combinations of cytostatics, modes of drug administration, adjuvant chemotherapy after chemoradiotherapy showed an increase in survival of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer.

  15. Chemotherapy and target therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: New advances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Gan-Lu; Zeng, Shan; Shen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Primary liver cancer is one of the commonest causes of death. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for 90% of primary liver cancers. For patients with unresectable or metastatic HCC, conventional chemotherapy is of limited or no benefit. Sorafenib is the only systemic treatment to demonstrate a statistically significant but modest overall survival benefit, leading to an era of targeted agents. Many clinical trials of targeted drugs have been carried out with many more in progress. Some drugs like PTK787 showed potential benefits in the treatment of HCC. Despite these promising breakthroughs, patients with HCC still have a dismal prognosis. Recently, both a phase III trial of everolimus and a phase II clinical trial of trebananib failed to demonstrate effective antitumor activity in advanced HCC. Sorafenib still plays a pivotal role in advanced HCC, leading to further explorations to exert its maximum efficacy. Combinations targeted with chemotherapy or transarterial chemoembolization is now being tested and might bring about advances. New targeted agents such as mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors are under investigation, as well as further exploration of the mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:25914779

  16. Practical Effect of Sorafenib Monotherapy on Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Soung Won; Shim, Kwang Yeun; Lee, Sae Hwan; Kim, Sang Gyune; Cha, Sang-Woo; Kim, Young Seok; Cho, Young Deok; Kim, Hong Soo; Kim, Boo Sung; Kim, Kyoung Ha; Kim, Jung Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims We investigated the effects of sorafenib monotherapy on advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) in a clinical setting. Methods In total, 143 consecutive patients with unresectable HCC were treated with sorafenib. Among these patients, 30 patients with advanced HCC and PVTT (Vp3 or 4) were treated with sorafenib monotherapy. Results All patients had a performance status of 1 to 2 (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 1/2, 20/10) and Child-Pugh class A or B (A/B, 17/13). Eleven patients had modified Union for International Cancer Control stage IVA tumors, whereas 19 had stage IVB tumors. All patients had PVTT (Vp3, 6; Vp4, 24). Following sorafenib monotherapy, three patients (10.0%) had a partial response with PVTT revascularization, and nine (30.0%) had stable disease, with a disease control rate of 33.3%. The median overall survival was 3.1 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.70 to 3.50), and the median progression-free survival was 2.0 months (95% CI, 1.96 to 2.05). Fatigue and hand-foot skin reactions were the most troublesome side effects. Conclusions A limited proportion of patients with advanced HCC and PVTT exhibited a remarkable outcome after sorafenib monotherapy, although the treatment results in this type of patient is extremely poor. Further studies to predict good responders to personalized therapy are warranted. PMID:24312711

  17. Immune inflammation indicators and implication for immune modulation strategies in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma patients receiving sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Gardini, Andrea Casadei; Scarpi, Emanuela; Faloppi, Luca; Scartozzi, Mario; Silvestris, Nicola; Santini, Daniele; de Stefano, Giorgio; Marisi, Giorgia; Negri, Francesca V.; Foschi, Francesco Giuseppe; Valgiusti, Martina; Ercolani, Giorgio; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca

    2016-01-01

    We evalueted a systemic immune-inflammation index (SII), neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) with the aim to explored their prognostic value in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with sorafenib. 56 advanced HCC patients receiving sorafenib were available for our analysis. Lymphocyte, neutrophil and platelet were measured before beginning of treatment and after one month. Patient with SII ≥ 360 showed lower median PFS (2.6 vs. 3.9 months, P < 0.026) and OS (5.6 vs. 13.9 months, P = 0.027) with respect to patients with SII < 360. NLR ≥ 3 had a lower median PFS (2.6 vs. 3.3 months, P < 0.049) but not OS (5.6 vs. 13.9 months, P = 0.062) than those with NLR < 3. After adjusting for clinical covariates SII and NLR remained an independent prognostic factor for OS. The SII and NLR represent potential prognostic indicator in patients with advanced HCC treated with sorafenib. PMID:27613839

  18. Survival outcome of salvage hepatectomy in patients with local, recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent radiofrequency ablation as their first treatment.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Masaki; Nakai, Takuya; Hayashi, Michihiro; Hirokawa, Fumitoshi; Nagano, Hiroaki; Wada, Hiroshi; Kaibori, Masaki; Matsui, Kosuke; Tanaka, Shogo; Yamaue, Hiroki; Kubo, Shoji

    2016-09-01

    Local recurrence is a specific problem after radiofrequency ablation of small hepatocellular carcinoma, and additional treatment is an important issue. We aimed to investigate the outcome of salvage hepatectomy in patients who develop local, recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma after treatment with radiofrequency ablation. From 2001-2013, we reviewed 58 patients from 6 university hospitals with local, recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent salvage hepatectomy after their initial radiofrequency ablation treatment. Pathologic characteristics and prognostic factors influencing overall survival were analyzed. Noncurative resection, des-gamma carboxy prothrombin levels >40 mAU/mL, and multiple preceding treatments before salvage hepatectomy were negative prognostic factors for overall survival. The 5-year survivals for the prognostic factors were 0%, 24%, and 30%, respectively, after salvage hepatectomy, and 0%, 54%, and 54% after initial radiofrequency ablation treatment, respectively. As for the pathologic finding of local, recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma after radiofrequency ablation, vascular invasion was observed frequently in patients with increases in des-gamma carboxy prothrombin levels and with multiple preceding treatments before salvage hepatectomy with a frequency of 59% and 53%, respectively (P < .01 and .05). Noncurative resection, increases in serum des-gamma carboxy prothrombin, and multiple preceding treatments were prognostic factors for subsequent salvage hepatectomy; nevertheless, survival outcomes were still acceptable when a curative salvage hepatectomy was performed. Increases in serum des-gamma carboxy prothrombin and multiple preceding treatments were positive predictors for pathologic vascular invasion. These factors should be taken into consideration when selecting treatment modalities for locally recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma following radiofrequency ablation. Repetition of unsuccessful, loco-regional treatment would appear

  19. Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robert C G

    2016-12-01

    The diagnosis for locally advanced pancreatic cancer is based on high-quality cross-sectional imaging, which shows tumor invasion into the celiac/superior mesenteric arteries and/or superior mesenteric/portal venous system that is not reconstructable. The optimal management of these patients is evolving quickly with the advent of newer chemotherapeutics, radiation, and nonthermal ablation modalities. This article presents the current status of initial chemotherapy, surgical therapy, ablative therapy, and radiation therapy for patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Surgical resection offers the best chance of long-term disease control and the only chance for cure for patients with nonmetastatic exocrine pancreatic cancer.

  20. Patterns of treatment and costs of intermediate and advanced hepatocellular carcinoma management in four Italian centers

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Giorgio Lorenzo; Cammà, Calogero; Attili, Adolfo Francesco; Ganga, Roberto; Gaeta, Giovanni Battista; Brancaccio, Giuseppina; Franzini, Jean Marie; Volpe, Marco; Turchetti, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a severe health condition associated with high hospitalizations and mortality rates, which also imposes a relevant economic burden. Purpose The aim of the present survey is to investigate treatment strategies and related costs for HCC in the intermediate and advanced stages of the disease. Patients and methods The survey was conducted in four Italian centers through structured interviews with physicians. Information regarding the stage of disease, treatments performed, and related health care resource consumption was included in the questionnaire. Direct health care cost per patient associated with the most relevant treatments such as sorafenib, transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), and transarterial radioembolization (TARE) was evaluated. Results Between 2013 and 2014, 285 patients with HCC were treated in the four participating centers; of these, 80 were in intermediate stage HCC (Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer Classification [BCLC] B), and 57 were in the advanced stage of the disease (BCLC C). In intermediate stage HCC, the most frequent first-line treatment was TACE (63%) followed by sorafenib (15%), radiofrequency ablation (14%), and TARE (1.3%). In the advanced stage of HCC, the most frequently used first-line therapy was sorafenib (56%), followed by best supportive care (21%), TACE (18%), and TARE (3.5%). The total costs of treatment per patient amounted to €12,214.54 with sorafenib, €13,418.49 with TACE, and €26,106.08 with TARE. Both in the intermediate and in the advanced stage of the disease, variability in treatment patterns among centers was observed. Conclusion The present analysis raises for the first time the awareness of the overall costs incurred by the Italian National Healthcare System for different treatments used in intermediate and advanced HCC. Further investigations would be important to better understand the effective health care resource usage. PMID:26527877

  1. Systemic treatment and targeted therapy in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tazi, El Mehdi; Essadi, Ismail; M’rabti, Hind; Touyar, Anass; Errihani, PR Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a malignancy of global importance: it is the sixth most common cancer and the third most common cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Despite decades of efforts by many investigators, systemic chemotherapy or hormone therapy has failed to demonstrate improved survival in patients with HCC.. Ongoing studies are evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of combining Sorafenib with erlotinib and other targeted agents or chemotherapy. Aims: On the basis of placebo-controlled, randomized phase III trials, Sorafenib has shown improved survival benefits in advanced HCC and has set a new standard for future clinical trials. The successful clinical development of Sorafenib in HCC has ushered in the era of molecularly targeted agents in this disease, which is discussed in this educational review. Material and Methods: Many molecularly targeted agents that inhibit angiogenesis, epidermal growth factor receptor, and mammalian target of rapamycin are at different stages of clinical development in advanced HCC. Future research should continue to unravel the mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis and to identify key relevant molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. Identification and validation of potential surrogate and predictive biomarkers hold promise to individualize patients’ treatment to maximize clinical benefit and minimize the toxicity and cost of targeted agents. Results: Systemic therapy with various classes of agents, including hormone and cytotoxic agents, has provided no or marginal benefits. Improved understanding of the mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis, coupled with the arrival of many newly developed molecularly targeted agents, has provided the unique opportunity to study some of these novel agents in advanced HCC. Conclusions: The demonstration of improved survival benefits by Sorafenib in advanced HCC has ushered in the era of molecular-targeted therapy in this disease, with many agents

  2. Sorafenib for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with extrahepatic metastasis: a prospective multicenter cohort study.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masahito; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Kuromatsu, Ryoko; Nagamatsu, Hiroaki; Tajiri, Nobuyoshi; Satani, Manabu; Niizeki, Takashi; Aino, Hajime; Okamura, Shusuke; Iwamoto, Hideki; Shimose, Shigeo; Shirono, Tomotake; Koga, Hironori; Torimura, Takuji

    2015-12-01

    Sorafenib, an oral multikinase inhibitor, is approved for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment. However, its therapeutic effect in advanced HCC patients with extrahepatic metastasis remains uncertain. This study aimed to prospectively assess the efficacy, safety, and survival risk factors and evaluate the prognostic impact of sorafenib treatment in advanced HCC patients with or without extrahepatic metastasis. Between May 2009 and March 2014, 312 consecutive advanced HCC patients who received sorafenib were enrolled in this study. We evaluated their characteristics and compared the clinical outcomes of those with and without extrahepatic metastasis. Of the enrolled patients, 245 (81%) received sorafenib treatment for more than 1 month, with a median duration of 3.6 months. Eighteen patients demonstrated partial response to sorafenib therapy, 127 had stable disease, and 134 had progressive disease at the first radiologic assessment. The median survival time (MST) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 10.3 and 3.6 months, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified gender, Child-Pugh class, baseline serum des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin level, and treatment duration as independent risk factors for survival. Extrahepatic metastasis was detected in 178 patients. However, the MST, PFS, and therapeutic effect were comparable between patients with and without extrahepatic metastasis. The independent risk factors for decreased overall survival in patients with extrahepatic metastasis were similar to those affecting all patients. Our results indicated that sorafenib could be administered for hepatic reserve and as long-term treatment for advanced HCC patients regardless of their extrahepatic metastasis status. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A Phase II Randomized Dose Escalation Trial of Sorafenib in Patients With Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pressiani, Tiziana; Boni, Corrado; Carnaghi, Carlo; Rota Caremoli, Elena; Fagiuoli, Stefano; Foa, Paolo; Salvagni, Stefania; Cortesi, Enrico; Chiara Tronconi, Maria; Personeni, Nicola; Bozzarelli, Silvia; Chiara Banzi, Maria; Fanello, Silvia; Romano Lutman, Fabio; Giordano, Laura; Santoro, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Background. Sorafenib has proven survival benefits in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The viability of continuing sorafenib at a higher dosage in patients who experienced radiologic disease progression was investigated. Methods. Patients who experienced disease progression while on sorafenib 400 mg twice daily were randomized to sorafenib 600 mg twice daily (n = 49) or best supportive care (n = 52). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Time to progression, overall survival, and safety were also evaluated. Results. The study did not meet its primary end point. The difference in PFS between the sorafenib arm (3.91 months) and the best supportive care arm (2.69 months) did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.086). Adverse events were mainly grade 1–2 and similar across both groups. In the sorafenib arm, the most frequent events were diarrhea (80%), weight loss (75%), fatigue (67%), hand-foot-skin reaction (49%), abdominal pain (37%), and stomatitis (26%). Conclusions. Escalated-dose sorafenib in patients with advanced HCC who progressed while on sorafenib, failed to provide any clinical benefit. Second-line treatment still remains an open issue to be explored in appropriate clinical trials. PMID:23580239

  4. Safety and efficacy of sorafenib in patients with Child-Pugh B advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    DA Fonseca, Leonardo Gomes; Barroso-Sousa, Romualdo; Bento, Afonso DA Silva Alves; Blanco, Bruna Paccola; Valente, Gabriel Luis; Pfiffer, Tulio Eduardo Flesch; Hoff, Paulo Marcelo; Sabbaga, Jorge

    2015-07-01

    Sorafenib demonstrated a survival benefit in the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in phase III trials. However, almost all the patients included in those trials exhibited well-preserved liver function (Child-Pugh A). The aim of this study was to describe our experience with sorafenib in Child-Pugh B HCC patients. A database of patients with advanced HCC treated with sorafenib was retrospectively evaluated. The median overall survival of Child-Pugh B patients (n=20) was 2.53 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.33-5.92 months] and of Child-Pugh A patients (n=100) 9.71 months (95% CI: 6.22-13.04). Child-Pugh B patients had a significantly poorer survival compared to Child-Pugh A patients (P=0.002). The toxicities were similar between the two groups. Metastasis, vascular invasion and α-fetoprotein level >1,030 ng/ml were not associated with survival among Child-Pugh B patients (P=0.281, 0.189 and 0.996, respectively). Although the survival outcomes were worse in Child-Pugh B patients treated with sorafenib, the toxicity profile was manageable. Therefore, there remains the question of whether to treat this subgroup of patients and more data are required to define the role of sorafenib in the context of liver dysfunction.

  5. Trans-arterial radioembolization in intermediate-advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: systematic review and meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Rognoni, Carla; Ciani, Oriana; Sommariva, Silvia; Facciorusso, Antonio; Tarricone, Rosanna; Bhoori, Sherrie; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Trans-arterial radioembolization (TARE) is a recognized, although not explicitly recommended, experimental therapy for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A systematic literature review was performed to identify published studies on the use of TARE in intermediate and advanced stages HCC exploring the efficacy and safety of this innovative treatment. Twenty-one studies reporting data on overall survival (OS) and time to progression (TTP), were included in a meta-analysis. The pooled post-TARE OS was 63% (95% CI: 56-70%) and 27% (95% CI: 21-33%) at 1- and 3-years respectively in intermediate stage HCC, whereas OS was 37% (95% CI: 26-50%) and 13% (95% CI: 9-18%) at the same time intervals in patients with sufficient liver function (Child-Pugh A-B7) but with an advanced HCC because of the presence of portal vein thrombosis. When an intermediate and advanced case-mix was considered, OS was 58% (95% CI: 48-67%) and 17% (95% CI: 12-23%) at 1- and 3-years respectively. As for TTP, only four studies reported data: the observed progression probability was 56% (95% CI: 41-70%) and 73% (95% CI: 56-87%) at 1 and 2 years respectively. The safety analysis, focused on the risk of liver decompensation after TARE, revealed a great variability, from 0-1% to more than 36% events, influenced by the number of procedures, patient Child-Pugh stage and treatment duration. Evidence supporting the use of radioembolization in HCC is mainly based on retrospective and prospective cohort studies. Based on this evidence, until the results of the ongoing randomized trials become available, radioembolization appears to be a viable treatment option for intermediate-advanced stage HCC. PMID:27579537

  6. Prescription Patterns of Sorafenib and Outcomes of Patients with Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A National Population Study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li-Chun; Chen, Pei-Jer; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Chen, Ho-Min; Lai, Mei-Shu; Shao, Yu-Yun; Cheng, Ann-Lii

    2017-05-01

    Sorafenib is the current standard treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We analyzed national prescription patterns and treatment outcomes of patients who received sorafenib for advanced HCC. We established a nation-wide cohort of patients who started receiving treatment with sorafenib for advanced HCC between August 2012 and July 2013 from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan and also retrieved demographic and prescription data. The databases of National Death Registry and Taiwan Cancer Registry were used for survival outcomes and cancer diagnosis information, respectively. A total of 3,293 patients were enrolled. The median overall survival (OS) and time to treatment discontinuation (TTD) of all patients were 6.8 and 2.6 months, respectively. Upon the first prescription of sorafenib, 58.4% of patients received the standard dose (800 mg/day). Among them, 61.9% had subsequent dose reduction. A total of 41.6% of patients initially received lower than standard doses; 36.1% of them had subsequent dose escalation to 800 mg/day. Being male (odds ratio=1.41; p<0.001) and treatment year of 2012 (odds ratio=1.28; p=0.002) were associated with the standard initial dose. Patients who received standard initial dose of sorafenib, compared to patients who received lower initial doses, exhibited longer OS (median of 7.8 vs. 6.6 months, p<0.001) but similar TTD (median of 2.6 vs. 2.9 months, p=0.840). A considerable number of patients with advanced HCC received less than the standard dose of sorafenib. The treatment outcomes in the general population were consistent with those reported in clinical trials. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  7. Phase II study of viscum fraxini-2 in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mabed, M; El-Helw, L; Shamaa, S

    2004-01-12

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Although a wide range of therapeutic options is available, the efficacy of these methods and the prognosis of patients with HCC remain very poor. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of viscum fraxini-2 in patients with chemotherapy-naïve, advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. 23 patients with unrespectable HCC who had received no prior systemic chemotherapy with objectively measurable tumors were enrolled on this study. The mistletoe preparation for the study is an aqueous injectable solution. It contains one milliliter of viscum fraxini in dilution stage-2 (15 mg extract of 20 mg mistletoe herb from ash tree, diluted in di-natrium-mono-hydrogen phosphate, ascorbic acid and water) which is equivalent to 10 000 ng/ml injection ampoules. 2 ampoules of viscum fraxini-2 were administered subcutaneously once weekly. As assessed by conventional imaging criteria, 3 (13.1%) patients have achieved complete response, 2 (8.1%) patients have achieved a partial response. 9 (39.1%) had progressive disease while 9 (39.1%) patients didn't have evaluation of response due to early death. The median overall survival time for all patients was 5 months (range 2-38 months), for those who achieved a CR was 29 months (range 12-38 months) and, for those who achieved a PR was 6.5 months (range 6-7 months). The median progression free survival for all patients was 2 months (range 1-38 months), for those who achieved a CR, it was 29 months (range 8-38 months) and for those who achieved a partial response, it was 5 months (range 4-6 months). No hematologic toxicity has been encountered. The spectrum of non-hematologic toxicity was mild. The WHO toxicity criteria grade 3-4 were 34.8% drug related fever, 13.1% erthyma at injection site and 17.4% pain at the site of injection. No drug related discontinuation or toxic deaths have occurred. Viscum fraxini-2 seems to be particularly promising in

  8. Efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics and biomarkers of cediranib monotherapy in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Andrew X.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Supko, Jeffrey G.; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Abrams, Thomas A.; McCleary, Nadine Jackson; Bhargava, Pankaj; Muzikansky, Alona; Sheehan, Susan; Regan, Eileen; Vasudev, Eamala; Knowles, Michelle; Fuchs, Charles S.; Ryan, David P.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Duda, Dan G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We performed a single-arm phase II study of cediranib, a pan-VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients and Methods Patients with histologically confirmed measurable advanced HCC and adequate hematologic, hepatic, and renal functions received cediranib 30-mg orally once daily (4 weeks/cycle). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) rate at 3 months. Other endpoints included response rates, overall survival (OS), pharmacokinetics (PK) and biomarkers for cediranib. Results Cediranib treatment resulted in an estimated 3-month-PFS rate of 77% [60%, 99%]. Median PFS was 5.3 [3.5,9.7] months, stable disease was seen in 5/17 patients (29%), and median OS was 11.7 [7.5–13.6] months. Grade 3 toxicities included hypertension (29%), hyponatremia (29%) and hyperbilirubinemia (18%). Cediranib PK were comparable to those seen in cancer patients with normal hepatic function. Plasma levels of VEGF and PlGF increased and sVEGFR1, sVEGFR2 and Ang-2 decreased after cediranib treatment. PFS was inversely correlated with baseline levels of VEGF, sVEGFR2, and bFGF and with on-treatment levels of bFGF and IGF-1, and directly associated with on-treatment levels of IFN-γ. OS was inversely correlated with baseline levels of sVEGFR1, Ang-2, TNF-α, CAIX and CD34+CD133+CD45dim circulating progenitor cells and on-treatment levels of sVEGFR2. Conclusions Despite the limitations of primary endpoint selection, cediranib at 30-mg daily showed a high incidence of toxicity and preliminary evidence of antitumor activity in advanced HCC. Hepatic dysfunction did not appear to affect the steady-state PK of cediranib. Exploratory studies suggested pro-angiogenic and inflammatory factors as potential biomarkers of anti-VEGF therapy in HCC. PMID:23362324

  9. Systemic cytotoxic chemotherapy of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma in the era of sorafenib nonavailability.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Eileen L; Yeon, Jong Eun; Lee, Hyun Jung; Suh, Sang Jun; Lee, Sun Jae; Kang, Seong Hee; Kang, Keunhee; Yoo, Yang Jae; Kim, Ji Hoon; Yim, Hyung Joon; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2014-03-01

    The goal of the study was to compare the efficacy and safety of sorafenib with those of systemic cytotoxic chemotherapy. Sorafenib treatment has shown to improve the survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) when compared with placebo. However, whether sorafenib controls advanced-stage HCC better than systemic cytotoxic chemotherapy has not been elucidated. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 220 patients with measurable advanced HCC who had not received systemic treatment previously between January 2007 and April 2012. Among these patients, 78 had been treated with sorafenib. Another 14 patients who were treated with a 4-weekly regimen of adriamycin, cisplatin, and capecitabine were included as the historical control group for comparison. The median overall survival, the progression-free survival, response rates, and safety profiles were evaluated. Baseline characteristics were similar between the treatment groups. The median overall survival was 7.2 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 5.6-8.8] in the sorafenib group and 11.2 months (95% CI, 8.1-14.2) in the cytotoxic chemotherapy group (P=0.10). The median progression-free survival was 3.2 months (95% CI, 2.2-4.3) in the sorafenib group and 5.9 months (95% CI, 3.6-8.2) in the cytotoxic chemotherapy group (P=0.07). The deterioration of liver function and neutropenia were the most frequent serious adverse events in the sorafenib and the systemic chemotherapy group. Although a direct head-to-head comparison could not be done, there were some patients who showed a good response to systemic cytotoxic chemotherapy. Further assessment is necessary to study the role of chemotherapy in patients who are intolerant or intractable to sorafenib.

  10. Effectiveness of combined (131)I-chTNT and radiofrequency ablation therapy in treating advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jianfei; Ji, Jiansong; Wu, Fazong; Wang, Yonghui; Zhang, Dengke; Zhao, Zhongwei; Ying, Xihui

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of monoclonal antibody ((131)I-chTNT) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) combination therapy in treating middle-advanced stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Thirty-four patients diagnosed with HCC patients, divided into two groups comprised of 22 and 12 cases were included in this retrospective study. The two groups received RFA with or without ((131)I-chTNT) therapy, respectively. The patients in these groups were followed up for a median of 31 and 35 months, respectively. Patient survival was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier method and safety profiles were determined by analyzing liver, thyroid, and bone marrow toxicities. This retrospective study showed that survival time of the patients who received combination therapy was significantly longer than that of the RFA group (P = 0.052). The median progress-free survival of patients in the two groups was 23 and 7 months, respectively, and the difference was significant (P = 0.04). Tumor recurred in 3.5-8.7 months in four of the combination group patients, among which three had newly developed lesions. The red blood cells and platelets counts were not altered on day 7 and 1 month of the treatment, however, number of white blood cells was significantly increased on day 7 which was reversed back to the normal range in 2 weeks. The ALT and AST were also not significantly altered on day 7 and 1 month of therapy. In middle-advanced stage HCC patients, the combination of (131)I-chTNT and RFA therapy was found to be significantly more effective than the RFA treatment alone as assessed in short-term follow-up. However, the dose we used was insufficient to completely block the local recurrence of the lesions with a diameter of 5 cm or larger.

  11. Chinese Herbal Formulation PHY906 and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-08

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage B Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage C Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  12. Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Alcoholic Liver Disease: Current Management and Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Galati, Giovanni; Dell'Unto, Chiara; Vespasiani-Gentilucci, Umberto; Vincentis, Antonio De; Gallo, Paolo; Guidi, Alessandro; Picardi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) is a major healthcare problem. Almost ninety percent of HCCs develops on cirrhosis due to chronic viral hepatitis, Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) and alcohol abuse. Alcohol itself is defined a strong human carcinogenic agent. Some genetic polymorphisms in alcohol-metabolizing systems and more recently, some sequence variations within the genes coding for patatin-like phospholipase encoding 3 (PNPLA3) and Transmembrane 6 superfamily 2 (TM6SF2), have been found to promote liver fibrosis in alcohol abuse, until HCC development. The current management of HCC is related to tumor burden and liver function and it does not differ in alcoholics, although in alcoholics the surveillance for HCC could be less effective because socioeconomic context, such as the recall policy, the stage at the diagnosis and the prognosis are not different compared to viral HCCs. On regards of loco-regional treatment options, there have not been significant advances in the last few years, though an increasing role will be probably reserved to radio embolization and irreversible electroporation in the next future. Sorafenib (SOR) is still the only drug approved as systemic therapy in patients with HCC, whereas immunotherapy represents a promising approach for the treatment of HCC.

  13. Chemotherapies and targeted therapies in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: from laboratory to clinic.

    PubMed

    Voiculescu, Mihai; Winkler, Robert E; Moscovici, Marius; Neuman, Manuela G

    2008-09-01

    Chronic liver diseases alone or in conjunction with other risk factors result in increased liver damage leading to inflammation and fibrosis of the liver and rising rates of liver cirrhosis, hepatic decompensation and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This review will address the determinants of liver injury at the initiation of the tumor and the risk factors for rapid disease progression. Regardless of the etiology, the unifying feature of these tumors are their propensity to arise upon a background of inflammation and fibrosis. Liver disease is often associated with enhanced hepatocyte apoptosis, which is the case in viral and autoimmune hepatitis, cholestatic diseases, and metabolic disorders. Disruption of apoptosis is responsible for HCC. The mechanisms by which apoptosis occurs in the liver might provide insights into HCC and suggest possible treatments. We aim to better understand the factors that distinguish a relatively long course of HCC from one with rapid progression. We will accomplish this task with three integrated ideas: 1 - the role of epidemiology in establishing the risk factors of co-morbidity with alcohol and hepatitis viruses; 2 - the role of apoptosis and anti-apoptotic signals in the progression of HCC; and 3 - the role of new advancements that have emerged in the field of molecular-directed chemotherapeutics in HCC in recent years. This review will also aim to describe the molecular targeted therapies of non-resectable HCC and the ways of effective combination in this otherwise chemo-resistant tumor.

  14. Advanced imaging techniques in the therapeutic response of transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ke; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Lin; Xu, Hao; Peng, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic liver disease. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) can significantly improve the survival rate of patients with HCC and is the first treatment choice for patients who are not suitable for surgical resections. The evaluation of the response to TACE treatment affects not only the assessment of the therapy efficacy but also the development of the next step in the treatment plan. The use of imaging to examine changes in tumor volume to assess the response of solid tumors to treatment has been controversial. In recent years, the emergence of new imaging technology has made it possible to observe the response of tumors to treatment prior to any morphological changes. In this article, the advances in studies reporting the use of computed tomography perfusion imaging, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), intravoxel incoherent motion, diffusion kurtosis imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, magnetic resonance perfusion-weighted imaging, blood oxygen level-dependent MRI, positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography and PET/MRI to assess the TACE treatment response are reviewed. PMID:27239110

  15. Short-Term Results of Laparoscopic Radiofrequency Ablation Using a Multipolar System for Localized Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Naoki; Isoda, Norio; Takaoka, Yoshinari; Hirosawa, Takuya; Watanabe, Shunji; Otake, Toshiya; Murayama, Kozue; Fujieda, Takeshi; Tsukui, Mamiko; Miyata, Natsumi; Ono, Kohei; Yamaguchi, Shota; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim Multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is feasible for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for which a large ablative area is planned, and it imposes a light physical burden on patients. Multipolar RFA via the percutaneous approach is performed in the majority of cases, but the efficacy of multipolar RFA with a laparoscopic approach has rarely been studied. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of multipolar laparoscopic RFA (LRA) for localized HCC over the short term. Methods From January 2014 to January 2016, 77 consecutive patients with 130 HCCs treated by multipolar LRA were assessed. One to three bipolar needle applicators were inserted under laparoscopic ultrasonography guidance, regardless of tumor location. We intended to achieve parallel insertions and no-touch ablation as much as possible. Results The median size of the main tumor was 22 mm (range, 10-42 mm). The median follow-up time was 13.6 months (range, 3.1-24.8 months). In all cases, a sufficient ablative area was obtained as planned, without thermal injury of adjacent organs. During the follow-up period, all patients were alive with no local tumor progression, while intrahepatic recurrence distant from the primary site occurred in 7 patients. The 2-year local tumor progression-free survival rate and overall cancer-free survival rate were 100 and 81.6%, respectively. There were no procedural major complications caused prolonging the hospitalization, and all patients were discharged without subjective symptoms 4-7 days after LRA. Conclusions Multipolar LRA was efficacious in the treatment of localized HCCs by safely achieving a good ablative area. PMID:28275580

  16. Ablation Strategies for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Linecker, Michael; Pfammatter, Thomas; Kambakamba, Patryk; DeOliveira, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of novel and somewhat effective chemotherapy against pancreas cancer, several groups developed a new interest on locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Unresectable tumors constitute up to 80% of pancreatic cancer (PC) at the time of diagnosis and are associated with a 5-year overall survival of less than 5%. To control those tumors locally, with perhaps improved patients survival, significant advances were made over the last 2 decades in the development of ablation methods including cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, high intensity focused ultrasound and irreversible electroporation (IRE). Many suggested a call for caution for possible severe or lethal complications in using such techniques on the pancreas. Most fears were on the heating or freezing of the pancreas, while non-thermal ablation (IRE) could offer safer approaches. The multimodal therapies along with high-resolution imaging guidance have created some enthusiasm toward ablation for LAPC. The impact of ablation techniques on primarily non-resectable PC remains, however, unclear.

  17. Phase II Study of First‐Line Trebananib Plus Sorafenib in Patients with Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Jean‐Frederic; Miles, Steven; Ganten, Tom; Trojan, Jörg; Cebon, Jonathan; Liem, Andre K.; Lipton, Lara; Gupta, Charu; Wu, Benjamin; Bass, Michael; Hollywood, Ellen; Ma, Jennifer; Bradley, Margaret; Litten, Jason; Saltz, Leonard B.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lessons Learned. Trebananib leveraging anti‐angiogenic mechanism that is distinct from the classic sorafenib anti‐vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition did not demonstrate improved progression‐free survival at 4 months in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).In support of previously reported high Ang‐2 levels’ association with poor outcome in HCC for patients, trebananib treatment with lower baseline Ang‐2 at study entry was associated with improved overall survival to 22 months and may suggest future studies to be performed within the context of low baseline Ang‐2. Background. Ang‐1 and Ang‐2 are angiopoietins thought to promote neovascularization via activation of the Tie‐2 angiopoietin receptor. Trebananib sequesters Ang‐1 and Ang‐2, preventing interaction with the Tie‐2 receptor. Trebananib plus sorafenib combination has acceptable toxicity. Elevated Ang‐2 levels are associated with poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods. Patients with HCC, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group ≤2, and Childs‐Pugh A received IV trebananib at 10 mg/kg or 15 mg/kg weekly plus sorafenib 400 mg orally twice daily. The study was planned for ≥78% progression‐free survival (PFS) rate at 4 months relative to 62% for sorafenib historical control (power = 80% α = 0.20). Secondary endpoints included safety, tolerability, overall survival (OS), and multiple biomarkers, including serum Ang‐2. Results. Thirty patients were enrolled sequentially in each of the two nonrandomized cohorts. Demographics were comparable between the two arms and the historical controls. PFS rates at 4 months were 57% and 54% on the 10 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg trebananib cohorts, respectively. Median OS was 17 and 11 months, respectively. Grade 3 and above events noted in ≥10% of patients included fatigue, hypertension, diarrhea, liver failure, palmar‐plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome, dyspnea, and hypophosphatemia. One

  18. Phase II Study of First-Line Trebananib Plus Sorafenib in Patients with Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K; Blanc, Jean-Frederic; Miles, Steven; Ganten, Tom; Trojan, Jörg; Cebon, Jonathan; Liem, Andre K; Lipton, Lara; Gupta, Charu; Wu, Benjamin; Bass, Michael; Hollywood, Ellen; Ma, Jennifer; Bradley, Margaret; Litten, Jason; Saltz, Leonard B

    2017-07-01

    Trebananib leveraging anti-angiogenic mechanism that is distinct from the classic sorafenib anti-vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition did not demonstrate improved progression-free survival at 4 months in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).In support of previously reported high Ang-2 levels' association with poor outcome in HCC for patients, trebananib treatment with lower baseline Ang-2 at study entry was associated with improved overall survival to 22 months and may suggest future studies to be performed within the context of low baseline Ang-2. Ang-1 and Ang-2 are angiopoietins thought to promote neovascularization via activation of the Tie-2 angiopoietin receptor. Trebananib sequesters Ang-1 and Ang-2, preventing interaction with the Tie-2 receptor. Trebananib plus sorafenib combination has acceptable toxicity. Elevated Ang-2 levels are associated with poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients with HCC, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group ≤2, and Childs-Pugh A received IV trebananib at 10 mg/kg or 15 mg/kg weekly plus sorafenib 400 mg orally twice daily. The study was planned for ≥78% progression-free survival (PFS) rate at 4 months relative to 62% for sorafenib historical control (power = 80% α = 0.20). Secondary endpoints included safety, tolerability, overall survival (OS), and multiple biomarkers, including serum Ang-2. Thirty patients were enrolled sequentially in each of the two nonrandomized cohorts. Demographics were comparable between the two arms and the historical controls. PFS rates at 4 months were 57% and 54% on the 10 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg trebananib cohorts, respectively. Median OS was 17 and 11 months, respectively. Grade 3 and above events noted in ≥10% of patients included fatigue, hypertension, diarrhea, liver failure, palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome, dyspnea, and hypophosphatemia. One death was due to hepatic failure. Serum Ang-2 dichotomized at the median was associated with

  19. Relationship of ethnicity and overall survival in patients treated with sorafenib for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Renouf, Daniel J.; Gill, Sharlene; Cheung, Winson Y.; Lim, Howard J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although both the SHARP and the Asian-Pacific trials showed improved overall survival (OS) for sorafenib, the magnitude of benefit was substantially less for Asians, who have a higher prevalence of hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection. Whether the worse prognosis is related to ethnicity or to the etiology of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify prognostic factors among patients with HCC who received sorafenib in British Columbia (BC), which has a sizeable Asian population. Methods A total of 255 consecutive patients with advanced HCC who initiated sorafenib from January 2008 to February 2013 were identified using our pharmacy database. Clinicopathological variables and outcomes were retrospectively collected. Prognostic factors were assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Median age was 63 years, 80.2% were men, and 38% were Asian. Among them, 34.5% had HBV and 29.8% had hepatitis C viral (HCV) infection. In addition, 68.6% had cirrhosis and 45.9% had liver-limited disease. Median progression-free and OS were 3.7 [95% confidence interval (CI): 3.3-4.2] and 7.5 months (95% CI: 5.7-9.2), respectively. On multivariate analysis, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) and HCV positivity correlated with better OS (P<0.001 and 0.04, respectively), but ethnicity did not (P=0.622). Conclusions When treated with sorafenib at the same institution, Asians and Caucasians with advanced HCC had similar OS. ECOG PS and HCV were the only significant prognostic factors. A higher proportion of HCV positivity might explain why the SHARP trial achieved better OS when compared to the Asian-Pacific trial. PMID:25083298

  20. Simultaneous Multitarget Irradiation Using Helical Tomotherapy for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Multiple Extrahepatic Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Jeong Won Kay, Chul Seung You, Chan Ran; Kim, Chang Wook; Bae, Si Hyun.; Choi, Jong Young; Yoon, Seung Kew; Han, Chi Wha; Jung, Hyun Suk; Choi, Ihl Bong

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: The prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with extrahepatic metastases is extremely poor. Helical tomotherapy, an image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy system, can allow for simultaneous and precise targeting of multiple cancerous lesions, while sparing normal tissues. This study evaluated the feasibility and outcome of tomotherapy for advanced HCC with metastases. Patients and Methods: A total of 42 consecutive HCC patients with metastases were treated with tomotherapy using the Hi-Art system. A total of 152 intra- and extrahepatic lesions (3.5 lesions/patient) were treated simultaneously, with a dose of 51.03 Gy (range, 30-57.61) in 10 fractions. Transarterial chemolipiodolization using epirubicin (50 mg) and cisplatin (60 mg) was repeated in patients with intrahepatic HCC (mean size, 9.0 cm) after tomotherapy. Results: An objective response (complete response and partial response) was achieved in 45.2% of patients with intrahepatic tumors, 68.4% of patients with pulmonary lesions, 60.0% of patients with lymph node/adrenal lesions, and 66.7% of patients with soft-tissue metastases. The complete response rate for those with pulmonary and lymph node/adrenal metastases was 26.3% and 5.0%, respectively. The overall survival rate at 1 and 2 years was 50.1% and 14.9%, respectively, with a median survival of 12.3 months. The actuarial in-field tumor control rate for {<=}1 year was 79.0%. No cases of Grade 4-5 acute toxicity occurred. Conclusion: The results of this study have shown that helical tomotherapy is safe and feasible without major toxicities for the treatment of advanced HCC and results in excellent tumor control and a potential survival benefit. This approach is expected to be a useful palliative option for selected HCC patients with metastases.

  1. Advanced hepatocellular carcinoma and sorafenib: Diagnosis, indications, clinical and radiological follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Colagrande, Stefano; Regini, Francesco; Taliani, Gian Giacomo; Nardi, Cosimo; Inghilesi, Andrea Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Advanced stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a category of disease defined by radiological, clinical and hepatic function parameters, comprehending a wide range of patients with different general conditions. The main therapeutic option is represented by sorafenib treatment, a multi-kinase inhibitor with anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effect. Trans-arterial Radio Embolization also represents a promising new approach to intermediate/advanced HCC. Post-marketing clinical studies showed that only a portion of patients actually benefits from sorafenib treatment, and an even smaller percentage of patients treated shows partial/complete response on follow-up examinations, up against relevant costs and an incidence of drug related adverse effects. Although the treatment with sorafenib has shown a significant increase in mean overall survival in different studies, only a part of patients actually shows real benefits, while the incidence of drug related significant adverse effects and the economic costs are relatively high. Moreover, only a small percentage of patients also shows a response in terms of lesion dimensions reduction. Being able to properly differentiate patients who are responding to the therapy from non-responders as early as possible is then still difficult and could be a pivotal challenge for the future; in fact it could spare several patients a therapy often difficult to bear, directing them to other second line treatments (many of which are at the moment still under investigation). For this reason, some supplemental criteria to be added to the standard modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors evaluation are being searched for. In particular, finding some parameters (cellular density, perfusion grade and enhancement rate) able to predict the sensitivity of the lesions to anti-angiogenic agents could help in stratifying patients in terms of treatment responsiveness before the beginning of the therapy itself, or in the first weeks of

  2. Role of transarterial chemoembolization in relation with sorafenib for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Yeonjung; Lee, Danbi; Shim, Ju Hyun; Lim, Young-Suk; Lee, Han Chu; Chung, Young-Hwa; Lee, Yung Sang; Park, Sook Ryun; Ryu, Min-Hee; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Kim, Kang Mo

    2016-01-01

    Background Although sorafenib is considered standard therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), actual treatments vary. We evaluated the effects of different treatment strategies on overall survival. Methods A retrospective study of sorafenib-treated patients with advanced HCC was conducted. The primary outcome was overall survival. Prognostic factors were analyzed using multivariate Cox-proportional hazards model. Results A total of 658 patients (mean age, 54.5 years; 83.3% male) were analyzed; 293, 129, and 236 patients were treated with sorafenib, a combination therapy of sorafenib and transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), and TACE followed by sorafenib, respectively. Overall, 51.2% of patients treated under the combination strategy had portal vein invasion, whereas 89.9% of patients receiving sorafenib monotherapy had distant metastasis. Median overall survival durations were comparable (11.8 months for sorafenib, 16.2 months for the combination therapy, and 13.5 months for TACE followed by sorafenib; P = 0.13). However, among portal vein invasion cases, combination (25.7 months, P = 0.002) and TACE followed by sorafenib (14.0 months, P = 0.030) treatments were associated with longer overall survival duration compared with than sorafenib monotherapy (5.5 months). In a multivariate model, sorafenib duration (hazard ratio [HR], 0.96, P < 0.001) and TACE (HR, 0.24, P < 0.001) along with Child-Pugh stage (HR, 1.83, P = 0.005) were associated with better survival. Conclusions In patients with portal vein invasion, TACE performed concurrently with or before sorafenib administration is associated with better survival. PMID:27494871

  3. Advanced hepatocellular carcinoma and sorafenib: Diagnosis, indications, clinical and radiological follow-up.

    PubMed

    Colagrande, Stefano; Regini, Francesco; Taliani, Gian Giacomo; Nardi, Cosimo; Inghilesi, Andrea Lorenzo

    2015-05-18

    Advanced stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a category of disease defined by radiological, clinical and hepatic function parameters, comprehending a wide range of patients with different general conditions. The main therapeutic option is represented by sorafenib treatment, a multi-kinase inhibitor with anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effect. Trans-arterial Radio Embolization also represents a promising new approach to intermediate/advanced HCC. Post-marketing clinical studies showed that only a portion of patients actually benefits from sorafenib treatment, and an even smaller percentage of patients treated shows partial/complete response on follow-up examinations, up against relevant costs and an incidence of drug related adverse effects. Although the treatment with sorafenib has shown a significant increase in mean overall survival in different studies, only a part of patients actually shows real benefits, while the incidence of drug related significant adverse effects and the economic costs are relatively high. Moreover, only a small percentage of patients also shows a response in terms of lesion dimensions reduction. Being able to properly differentiate patients who are responding to the therapy from non-responders as early as possible is then still difficult and could be a pivotal challenge for the future; in fact it could spare several patients a therapy often difficult to bear, directing them to other second line treatments (many of which are at the moment still under investigation). For this reason, some supplemental criteria to be added to the standard modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors evaluation are being searched for. In particular, finding some parameters (cellular density, perfusion grade and enhancement rate) able to predict the sensitivity of the lesions to anti-angiogenic agents could help in stratifying patients in terms of treatment responsiveness before the beginning of the therapy itself, or in the first weeks of

  4. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kokelaar, RF; Evans, MD; Davies, M; Harris, DA; Beynon, J

    2016-01-01

    Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer). Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0) resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. PMID:27785074

  5. The efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy on huge hepatocellular carcinoma unsuitable for other local modalities.

    PubMed

    Que, Jenny Y; Lin, Li-Ching; Lin, Kuei-Li; Lin, Chia-Hui; Lin, Yu-Wei; Yang, Ching-Chieh

    2014-05-28

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of Cyberknife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its effect on survival in patients with unresectable huge hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) unsuitable of other standard treatment option. Between 2009 and 2011, 22 patients with unresectable huge HCC (≧10 cm) were treated with SBRT. dose ranged from 26 Gy to 40 Gy in five fractions. Overall survival (OS) and disease-progression free survival (DPFS) were determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Tumor response and toxicities were also assessed. After a median follow-up of 11.5 month (range 2-46 months). The objective response rate was achieved in 86.3% (complete response (CR): 22.7% and partial response (PR): 63.6%). The 1-yr. local control rate was 55.56%. The 1-year OS was 50% and median survival was 11 months (range 2-46 months). In univariate analysis, Child-Pugh stage (p = 0.0056) and SBRT dose (p = 0.0017) were significant factors for survival. However, in multivariate analysis, SBRT dose (p = 0.0072) was the most significant factor, while Child-Pugh stage of borderline significance. (p = 0.0514). Acute toxicities were mild and well tolerated. This study showed that SBRT can be delivered safely to huge HCC and achieved a substantial tumor regression and survival. The results suggest this technique should be considered a salvage treatment. However, local and regional recurrence remain the major cause of failure. Further studies of combination of SBRT and other treatment modalities may be reasonable.

  6. Analysis of Prognostic Factors After Yttrium-90 Radioembolization of Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Inarrairaegui, Mercedes; Martinez-Cuesta, Antonio; Rodriguez, Macarena; Bilbao, J. Ignacio

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze which patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors may influence outcome after {sup 90}Y radioembolization ({sup 90}Y-RE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients and Methods: Seventy-two consecutive patients with advanced HCC treated with {sup 90}Y-RE were studied to detect which factors may have influenced response to treatment and survival. Results: Median overall survival was 13 months (95% confidence interval, 9.6-16.3 months). In univariate analysis, survival was significantly better in patients with one to five lesions (19 vs. 8 months, p = 0.001) and in patients with alpha-fetoprotein <52 UI/mL (24 vs. 11 months, p = 0.002). The variation in target tumor size and the appearance of new lesions were analyzed among 50 patients with measurable tumors. A decrease in target tumor size was observed in most patients, and the intensity of such decrease was not associated with any of the factors under study. Patients who developed new lesions in the treated liver (and also in the nontargeted liver) at month 3 more frequently had more than five nodules, bilobar disease, and alpha-fetoprotein >52 UI/mL, and their survival in the multivariate analysis was significantly worse (hazard ratio, 4.7; 95% confidence interval, 13-1.73) (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Yttrium-90 radioembolization results in control of target lesions in the majority of patients with HCC but does not prevent the development of new lesions. Survival of patients treated with {sup 90}Y-RE seems to depend largely on factors related to the aggressiveness of the disease (number of nodules, levels of alpha-fetoprotein, and presence of microscopic disease).

  7. Effects of an oral iron chelator, deferasirox, on advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Saeki, Issei; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Takami, Taro; Maeda, Masaki; Fujisawa, Koichi; Iwamoto, Takuya; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Hidaka, Isao; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Uchida, Koichi; Tani, Kenji; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the inhibitory effects of deferasirox (DFX) against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) through basic and clinical studies. METHODS In the basic study, the effect of DFX was investigated in three hepatoma cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B, and Huh7), as well as in an N-nitrosodiethylamine-induced murine HCC model. In the clinical study, six advanced HCC patients refractory to chemotherapy were enrolled. The initial dose of DFX was 10 mg/kg per day and was increased by 10 mg/kg per day every week, until the maximum dose of 30 mg/kg per day. The duration of a single course of DFX therapy was 28 consecutive days. In the event of dose-limiting toxicity (according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v.4.0), DFX dose was reduced. RESULTS Administration of DFX inhibited the proliferation of hepatoma cell lines and induced the activation of caspase-3 in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. In the murine model, DFX treatment significantly suppressed the development of liver tumors (P < 0.01), and significantly upregulated the mRNA expression levels of hepcidin (P < 0.05), transferrin receptor 1 (P < 0.05), and hypoxia inducible factor-1α (P < 0.05) in both tumor and non-tumor tissues, compared with control mice. In the clinical study, anorexia and elevated serum creatinine were observed in four and all six patients, respectively. However, reduction in DFX dose led to decrease in serum creatinine levels in all patients. After the first course of DFX, one patient discontinued the therapy. We assessed the tumor response in the remaining five patients; one patient exhibited stable disease, while four patients exhibited progressive disease. The one-year survival rate of the six patients was 17%. CONCLUSION We demonstrated that DFX inhibited HCC in the basic study, but not in the clinical study due to dose-limiting toxicities. PMID:27833388

  8. Combined sorafenib and yttrium-90 radioembolization for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Salman, A.; Simoneau, E.; Hassanain, M.; Chaudhury, P.; Boucher, L.M.; Valenti, D.; Cabrera, T.; Nudo, C.; Metrakos, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims In this pilot study, we assessed the safety and tolerability of combining sorafenib with 90Y radioembolization for the treatment of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (hcc). Methods The study, conducted prospectively during 2009–2012, included eligible patients with unresectable hcc and a life expectancy of at least 12 weeks. Each patient received sorafenib (400 mg twice daily) for 6–8 weeks before 90Y treatment. Safety and tolerability were assessed. Results Of the 40 patients enrolled, 29 completed treatment (combined therapy). In the initial cohort, the most common cause of hcc was hepatitis C (32.5%), and most patients were staged Child A (82.5%). The 29 patients who completed the study had similar baseline characteristics. Grades 1 and 2 toxicities accounted for 77.8% of all adverse events reported. The most common toxicities reported were fatigue (19.0%), alteration in liver function (7.9%), and diarrhea (6.3%). There were 12 grade 3 and 2 grade 4 toxicity events reported. One patient died of liver failure within 30 days after treatment. During the study, the sorafenib dose was reduced in 6 patients (20.7%), and sorafenib had to be interrupted in 4 patients (13.8%) and discontinued in 4 patients (13.8%). The disease control rate was 72.4% per the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, and tumour necrosis was observed in 82.8% of patients. Overall survival in patients undergoing combined therapy was 12.4 months. Conclusions Preliminary results demonstrate the safety and tolerability of combining 90Y radioembolization and sorafenib for advanced hcc. A larger prospective study is needed to determine the extent of the survival benefit. PMID:27803608

  9. Hyperthermia for locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zagar, Timothy M; Oleson, James R; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Dewhirst, Mark W; Craciunescu, Oana I; Blackwell, Kimberly L; Prosnitz, Leonard R; Jones, Ellen L

    2010-01-01

    Hyperthermia (HT) has a proven benefit for treating superficial malignancies, particularly chest wall recurrences of breast cancer. There has been less research utilising HT in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), but available data are promising. HT has been combined with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in the neoadjuvant, definitive and adjuvant setting, albeit in series with small numbers of patients. There is only one phase III trial that examines hyperthermia in LABC, also with relatively small numbers of patients. The goal of this review is to highlight important research utilising HT in patients with LABC as well as to suggest future directions for its use.

  10. Hyperthermia for locally advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zagar, Timothy M.; Oleson, James R.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Craciunescu, Oana I.; Blackwell, Kimberly L.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Jones, Ellen L.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperthermia (HT) has a proven benefit for treating superficial malignancies, particularly chest wall recurrences of breast cancer. There has been less research utilising HT in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), but available data are promising. HT has been combined with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in the neoadjuvant, definitive and adjuvant setting, albeit in series with small numbers of patients. There is only one phase III trial that examines hyperthermia in LABC, also with relatively small numbers of patients. The goal of this review is to highlight important research utilising HT in patients with LABC as well as to suggest future directions for its use. PMID:20849257

  11. Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chun, Stephen G; Skinner, Heath D; Minsky, Bruce D

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer is controversial. For patients who are candidates for surgical resection, multiple prospective clinical trials have demonstrated the advantages of neoadjuvant chemoradiation. For patients who are medically inoperable, definitive chemoradiation is an alternative approach with survival rates comparable to trimodality therapy. Although trials of dose escalation are ongoing, the standard radiation dose remains 50.4 Gy. Modern radiotherapy techniques such as image-guided radiation therapy with motion management and intensity-modulated radiation therapy are strongly encouraged with a planning objective to maximize conformity to the intended target volume while reducing dose delivered to uninvolved normal tissues.

  12. Advances and Challenges in Treatment of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Joshua; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Dramatic improvements in the outcomes of patients with rectal cancer have occurred over the past 30 years. Advances in surgical pathology, refinements in surgical techniques and instrumentation, new imaging modalities, and the widespread use of neoadjuvant therapy have all contributed to these improvements. Several questions emerge as we learn of the benefits or lack thereof for components of the current multimodality treatment in subgroups of patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). What is the optimal surgical technique for distal rectal cancers? Do all patients need postoperative chemotherapy? Do all patients need radiation? Do all patients need surgery, or is a nonoperative, organ-preserving approach warranted in selected patients? Answering these questions will lead to more precise treatment regimens, based on patient and tumor characteristics, that will improve outcomes while preserving quality of life. However, the idea of shifting the treatment paradigm (chemoradiotherapy, total mesorectal excision, and adjuvant therapy) currently applied to all patients with LARC to a more individually tailored approach is controversial. The paradigm shift toward organ preservation in highly selected patients whose tumors demonstrate clinical complete response to neoadjuvant treatment is also controversial. Herein, we highlight many of the advances and resultant controversies that are likely to dominate the research agenda for LARC in the modern era. PMID:25918296

  13. [Combined radiochemotherapy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Daniilidis, J; Constantinidis, J; Fountzilas, G

    2001-09-01

    Nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) is a tumor of epidermoid origin with an entirely different biological behavior than other carcinoma of the head and neck region. A retrospective analysis was performed in 93 cases with locally advanced NPC treated with induction chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy (RT; 79 patients) or concomitant RT and chemotherapy. Totally 66 patients (71%) achieved a complete response (CR), 68% of the patients treated with induction chemotherapy followed by RT, 86% with concomitant chemoradiotherapy. After a median follow-up of 5.5 years 28 out of these 66 relapsed, 25 of them locoregionally. Median time to progression was 22.5 months, median overall survival (OS) 45 months, 5-year actuarial survival was 41.5%. Age, T and N classification, histological type and type of chemotherapy were independent significant factors for OS. Combined chemotherapy and RT in patients with locally advanced NPC result in a high CR rate. The main problem remains the locoregional control. Randomized studies are needed in order to define the optimal use of chemotherapy in combination with RT.

  14. Survival Benefit of Locoregional Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Advanced Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Kitai, Satoshi; Kudo, Masatoshi; Nishida, Naoshi; Izumi, Namiki; Sakamoto, Michiie; Matsuyama, Yutaka; Ichida, Takafumi; Nakashima, Osamu; Matsui, Osamu; Ku, Yonson; Kokudo, Norihiro; Makuuchi, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with decompensated liver cirrhosis (LC) is a life-threatening condition, which is amenable to liver transplantation (LT) as the standard first-line treatment. However, the application of LT can be limited due to a shortage of donor livers. This study aimed to clarify the effect of non-surgical therapy on the survival of patients with HCC and decompensated LC. Methods Of the 58,886 patients with HCC registered in the nationwide survey of the Liver Cancer Study Group of Japan (January 2000-December 2005), we included 1,344 patients with primary HCC and Child-Pugh (C-P) grade C for analysis in this retrospective study. Among the patients analyzed, 108 underwent LT, 273 were treated by local ablation therapy (LAT), 370 were treated by transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), and 593 received best supportive care (BSC). The effect of LT, LAT, and TACE on overall survival (OS) was analyzed using multivariate and propensity score analyses. Results Patient characteristics did not differ significantly between each treatment group and the BSC group, after propensity score matching. LAT (hazard ratio [HR]) =0.568; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40-0.80) and TACE (HR=0.691; 95% CI, 0.50-0.96) were identified as significant contributors to OS if the C-P score was less than 11 and tumor conditions met the Milan criteria. Conclusions For patients with HCC within the Milan criteria and with a C-P score of 10 or 11, locoregional treatment can be used as a salvage treatment if LT is not feasible. PMID:27493893

  15. FOLFOX4 or sorafenib as the first-line treatments for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengfei; Wen, Feng; Li, Qiu

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the pharmaco-economic implications of FOLFOX4 or sorafenib for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma in China. To conduct the analysis, we performed a Markov model to simulate the process of advanced HCC treated with sorafenib or FOLFOX4. Clinical data were obtained from the ORIENTAL trial and the EACH trial. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was regarded as the primary outcome in the analysis. One-way sensitivity analysis as well as probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed to explore the impact of essential variables on the results of the analysis. Treatment with sorafenib provided an effectiveness gain of 0.3935 quality-adjusted life year at an average cost of $18,748.00, whereas chemotherapy of FOLFOX4 brought 0.3808 quality-adjusted life year at a cost of $6876.02. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of FOLFOX4 versus sorafenib was $934,801.57/QALY. In a probabilistic sensitivity analysis based on a Monte Carlo simulation of 1000 items, the probabilities of FOLFOX4 and sorafenib being cost-effective were 100% and 0% using a willingness-to-pay threshold of $20,301.00 per quality-adjusted life year. FOLFOX4 chemotherapy is likely to be a cost-effective option compared with sorafenib in the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma in China. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Advanced information processing system: Local system services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhardt, Laura; Alger, Linda; Whittredge, Roy; Stasiowski, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is a multi-computer architecture composed of hardware and software building blocks that can be configured to meet a broad range of application requirements. The hardware building blocks are fault-tolerant, general-purpose computers, fault-and damage-tolerant networks (both computer and input/output), and interfaces between the networks and the computers. The software building blocks are the major software functions: local system services, input/output, system services, inter-computer system services, and the system manager. The foundation of the local system services is an operating system with the functions required for a traditional real-time multi-tasking computer, such as task scheduling, inter-task communication, memory management, interrupt handling, and time maintenance. Resting on this foundation are the redundancy management functions necessary in a redundant computer and the status reporting functions required for an operator interface. The functional requirements, functional design and detailed specifications for all the local system services are documented.

  17. Nal-IRI With 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and Leucovorin or Gemcitabine Plus Cisplatin in Advanced Biliary-tract Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-03

    Adenocarcinoma Metastatic; Biliary Tract Cancer; Adenocarcinoma of the Biliary Tract; Adenocarinoma Locally Advanced; Non-Resectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Intrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma

  18. Maintenance Peginterferon Therapy and Other Factors Associated with Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients with Advanced Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Lok, Anna S.; Everhart, James E.; Wright, Elizabeth C.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Kim, Hae-Young; Sterling, Richard K.; Everson, Gregory T.; Lindsay, Karen L.; Lee, William M.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Dienstag, Jules L.; Ghany, Marc G.; Morishima, Chihiro; Morgan, Timothy R.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Interferon reportedly decreases the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with chronic hepatitis C. The Hepatitis C anti-viral long-term treatment against cirrhosis (HALT-C) trial showed that 4 years of maintenance therapy with peginterferon does not reduce liver disease progression. We investigated whether peginterferon decreases the incidence of HCC in the HALT-C cohort over a longer post-treatment follow-up period. Methods The study included 1,048 patients with chronic Hepatitis C (Ishak fibrosis scores ≥3) who did not have a sustained virological response (SVR) to therapy. They were randomly assigned to groups given a half-dose of peginterferon or no treatment (controls) for 3.5 years and followed for a median 6.1 (maximum 8.7) years. Results Eighty-eight patients developed HCC (68 definite, 20 presumed): 37/515 that were given peginterferon (7.2%) and 51/533 controls (9.6%; P=0.24). There was a significantly lower incidence of HCC among patients given peginterferon therapy who had cirrhosis, but not fibrosis, based on analysis of baseline biopsy samples. After 7 years, the cumulative incidences of HCC in treated and control patients with cirrhosis were 7.8% and 24.2%, respectively (hazard ratio [HR]=0.45; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.24–0.83); in treated and control patients with fibrosis they were 8.3% and 6.8%, respectively (HR=1.44; 95% CI: 0.77–2.69). Treated patients with a ≥2-point decrease in the histologic activity index, based on a follow-up biopsy, had a lower incidence of HCC than those with unchanged or increased scores (2.9% vs. 9.4%; P=0.03). Conclusions Extended analysis of the HALT-C cohort showed that long-term peginterferon therapy does not reduce the incidence of HCC among patients with advanced hepatitis C who did not achieve SVRs. Patients with cirrhosis who received peginterferon treatment had a lower risk for HCC than controls. PMID:21129375

  19. Serial changes of clinical parameters in a patient with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein thrombosis achieving complete response after treatment with sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Kee, Kwong-Ming; Hung, Chao-Hung; Wang, Jing-Houng; Lu, Sheng-Nan

    2014-01-01

    The prognosis is usually poor in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Sorafenib is approved for Child-Pugh class A patients with unresectable and advanced HCC. We report here a rare case of a patient with advanced HCC with right portal vein thrombosis (PVT) who achieved a complete response after treatment with sorafenib. This 74-year-old man was a case of non-hepatitis B and C virus-related cirrhosis. Multiphase liver computed tomography showed an 8 cm tumor with early enhance, early wash out, and right PVT at segment 8 of the right lobe. A liver tumor biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of poorly differentiated HCC. Blood tests showed Child-Pugh class A cirrhosis and an alpha-fetoprotein level of 33,058 ng/mL. Sorafenib was initiated at 800 mg/day but was eventually reduced to 400 mg every other day because of a grade 3 hand-foot skin reaction. The alpha fetoprotein (AFP) level decreased rapidly with a linear trend after treatment. After log transformation, the calculated half-life of AFP was 6.84 days. There was no more tumor arterial enhancement, and tumor size was decreased to 3.7 cm on day 42. PVT shrank gradually and localized to the right anterior branch at month 9. There was no recurrence of tumor at the end of follow-up in month 19. Typical serial changes of clinical parameters were demonstrated in this patient.

  20. Randomized, open-label phase 2 study comparing frontline dovitinib versus sorafenib in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ann-Lii; Thongprasert, Sumitra; Lim, Ho Yeong; Sukeepaisarnjaroen, Wattana; Yang, Tsai-Shen; Wu, Cheng-Chung; Chao, Yee; Chan, Stephen L; Kudo, Masatoshi; Ikeda, Masafumi; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Pan, Hongming; Numata, Kazushi; Han, Guohong; Balsara, Binaifer; Zhang, Yong; Rodriguez, Ana-Marie; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yongyu; Poon, Ronnie T P

    2016-09-01

    Angiogenesis inhibition by the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) inhibitor sorafenib provides survival benefit in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); however, angiogenic escape from sorafenib may occur due to angiogenesis-associated fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) pathway activation. In addition to VEGFR and PDGFR, dovitinib inhibits FGFR. Frontline oral dovitinib (500 mg/day, 5 days on, 2 days off; n = 82) versus sorafenib (400 mg twice daily; n = 83) was evaluated in an open-label, randomized phase 2 study of Asian-Pacific patients with advanced HCC. The primary and key secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and time to tumor progression (TTP) as determined by a local investigator, respectively. Patients included in the study were ineligible for surgical and/or locoregional therapies or had disease progression after receiving these therapies. The median OS (95% confidence interval [CI]) was 8.0 (6.6-9.1) months for dovitinib and 8.4 (5.4-11.3) months for sorafenib. The median TTP (95% CI) per investigator assessment was 4.1 (2.8-4.2) months and 4.1 (2.8-4.3) months for dovitinib and sorafenib, respectively. Common any-cause adverse events included diarrhea (62%), decreased appetite (43%), nausea (41%), vomiting (41%), fatigue (35%), rash (34%), and pyrexia (30%) for dovitinib and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome (66%) and decreased appetite (31%) for sorafenib. Subgroup analysis revealed a significantly higher median OS for patients in the dovitinib arm who had baseline plasma soluble VEGFR1 (sVEGFR1) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) below median levels versus at or above the median levels (median OS [95% CI]: sVEGFR1, 11.2 [9.0-13.8] and 5.7 [4.3-7.0] months, respectively [P = .0002]; HGF, 11.2 [8.9-13.8] and 5.9 [5.0-7.6] months, respectively [P = 0.0002]). Dovitinib was well tolerated, but activity was not greater than sorafenib as a frontline systemic therapy for

  1. Alternative treatments in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma patients with progressive disease after sorafenib treatment: a prospective multicenter cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Masahito; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Kuromatsu, Ryoko; Nagamatsu, Hiroaki; Satani, Manabu; Niizeki, Takashi; Okamura, Shusuke; Iwamoto, Hideki; Shimose, Shigeo; Shirono, Tomotake; Noda, Yu; Koga, Hironori; Torimura, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    Sorafenib is an oral multikinase inhibitor that has been approved to treat advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), though it is unclear how much benefit advanced HCC patients with progressive disease (PD) derive from sorafenib treatment. This study aimed to assess survival risk factors and evaluate therapeutic strategies for advanced HCC patients with PD after sorafenib treatment. We analyzed the clinical data and treatment outcomes for 315 consecutive advanced HCC patients treated with sorafenib. Univariate analyses of overall survival identified therapeutic effect as an independent risk factor in all patients. Among all patients, 141 developed PD. Of those, 58 (41%) were treated with sorafenib monotherapy, 70 (50%) with agents other than sorafenib, and 13 (9%) were not treated at all. The median survival time was 6.1 months for PD patients with sorafenib monotherapy and 12.2 months for those administered alternative treatments (p < 0.0001). Our results indicated that sorafenib treatment may have negative long-term therapeutic effects in advanced HCC patients with PD, and that alternative treatments should be considered for these patients after sorafenib administration. PMID:27462865

  2. Modern management of locally advanced cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dueñas-Gonzalez, Alfonso; Cetina, Lucely; Mariscal, Ignacio; de la Garza, Jaime

    2003-10-01

    Radiation was until recently the key and only modality for the routine treatment of locally advanced cervical carcinoma. However after years of studying multi-modality treatments as an alternative to radiation alone in randomized phase III trials, the standard treatment has changed to chemo-radiation based on cisplatin. Three recent meta-analyses have confirmed that cisplatin-based chemo-radiation adds an absolute 12% benefit in five-year survival over radiation therapy alone. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiation has not been of proven benefit, but when neoadjuvant chemotherapy is followed by surgery, an absolute increase of 15% in five-year survival over radiation alone is seen. This benefit in survival is comparable to that obtained with the current chemo-radiation schedules based on cisplatin. Despite these encouraging results there remains room for improvement as the five-year survival of patients treated with chemo-radiation ranges from nearly 80% in bulky IB tumours to only 25% in stage IVA disease. Other therapeutic approaches need to be fully evaluated including the use of chemo-radiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy; the use of new drug combinations and the multi-modality combination of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical surgery plus adjuvant chemo-radiation. Likewise, the addition of radiosensitizers to cisplatin, preoperative chemo-radiation and/or adjuvant chemotherapy may eventually improve the currents results of cisplatin-based chemo-radiation. Nevertheless, it is hard to foresee a dramatic increase in cure rate, even with the most optimal combination of cytotoxic drugs, surgery and radiation, and thus the testing of molecular targeted therapies against cervical cancer is a logical step to follow.

  3. Efficacy of radioembolization according to tumor morphology and portal vein thrombosis in intermediate-advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Golfieri, Rita; Mosconi, Cristina; Cappelli, Alberta; Giampalma, Emanuela; Galaverni, Maria Cristina; Pettinato, Cinzia; Renzulli, Matteo; Monari, Fabio; Angelelli, Bruna; Pini, Patrizia; Terzi, Eleonora; Ascanio, Salvatore; Garzillo, Giorgio; Piscaglia, Fabio; Bolondi, Luigi; Trevisani, Franco

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed overall survival (OS) following radioembolization according to macroscopic growth pattern (nodular vs infiltrative) and vascular invasion in intermediate-advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Between September 2005 and November 2013, 104 patients (50.0% portal vein thrombosis [PVT], 29.8% infiltrative morphology) were treated. Median OS differed significantly between patients with segmental and lobar or main PVT (p = 0.031), but was 17 months in both those with patent vessels and segmental PVT. Median OS did not differ for infiltrative and nodular HCC. Median OS was prolonged in patients with a treatment response at 3 months (p = 0.023). Prior TACE was also a significant predictor of improved OS. A further indication for radioembolization might be infiltrative HCC, since OS was similar to nodular types.

  4. Radioembolization using 90Y-resin microspheres for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sangro, Bruno . E-mail: bsangro@unav.es; Bilbao, Jose I.; Boan, Jose; Martinez-Cuesta, Antonio; Benito, Alberto; Rodriguez, Javier; Panizo, Angel; Gil, Belen; Inarrairaegui, Mercedes; Herrero, Ignacio; Quiroga, Jorge; Prieto, Jesus

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the antitumor effect of resin microspheres loaded with 90-yttrium against hepatocellular carcinoma and their safety in the setting of liver cirrhosis. Patients and Methods: Data from 24 consecutive patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated by radioembolization in the period from September 2003 to February 2005 were reviewed. Patients received no further antineoplastic therapy. A comprehensive evaluation was performed to prevent the risk of damage due to microsphere misplacing. Patients were discharged the day after microspheres injection. Results: Serious liver toxicity observed among cirrhotic patients in a first period was subsequently prevented by modifying the selection criteria and the method for calculating the activity to be administered. Among 21 patients evaluable for response using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria, a reduction in size of target lesions was observed in all but 1 patient. When considering only target lesions, disease control rate and response rate were 100% and 23.8%, respectively. However, 43% of patients progressed in the liver in the form of new lesions appearing a median time of 3 months after radioembolization. Conclusion: Our experience in these series of patients indicates that radioembolization using resin microspheres has a significant antitumor effect against HCC and that using stringent selection criteria and conservative models for calculating Radiation activity to be administered, radioembolization can be performed safely even in cirrhotic patients.

  5. Novel Pretreatment Scoring Incorporating C-reactive Protein to Predict Overall Survival in Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Sorafenib Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Kurosaki, Masayuki; Tsuchiya, Kaoru; Yasui, Yutaka; Higuchi, Mayu; Yoshida, Tsubasa; Komiyama, Yasuyuki; Takaura, Kenta; Hayashi, Tsuguru; Kuwabara, Konomi; Nakakuki, Natsuko; Takada, Hitomi; Ueda, Masako; Tamaki, Nobuharu; Suzuki, Shoko; Itakura, Jun; Takahashi, Yuka; Izumi, Namiki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to build a prediction score of prognosis for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after sorafenib treatment. Methods A total of 165 patients with advanced HCC who were treated with sorafenib were analyzed. Readily available baseline factors were used to establish a scoring system for the prediction of survival. Results The median survival time (MST) was 14.2 months. The independent prognostic factors were C-reactive protein (CRP) <1.0 mg/dL [hazard ratio (HR) =0.51], albumin >3.5 g/dL (HR =0.55), alpha-fetoprotein <200 ng/mL (HR =0.45), and a lack of major vascular invasion (HR =0.39). Each of these factors had a score of 1, and after classifying the patients into five groups, the total scores ranged from 0 to 4. Higher scores were linked to significantly longer survival (p<0.0001). Twenty-nine patients (17.6%) with a score of 4 had a MST as long as 36.5 months, whereas MST was as short as 2.4 and 3.7 months for seven (4.2%) and 22 (13.3%) patients with scores of 0 and 1, respectively. Conclusions A novel prognostic scoring system, which includes the CRP level, has the ability to stratify the prognosis of patients with advanced stage HCC after treatment with sorafenib. PMID:27781198

  6. Systemic gemcitabine combined with intra-arterial low-dose cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: Seven cases

    PubMed Central

    Uka, Kiminori; Aikata, Hiroshi; Takaki, Shintaro; Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Saneto, Hiromi; Miki, Daiki; Takahashi, Shoichi; Toyota, Naoyuki; Ito, Katsuhide; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2008-01-01

    The combination of intra-arterial low-dose cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is effective against advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Systemic gemcitabine chemotherapy seems effective in many cancers. We report the results of combination therapy with systemic gemcitabine, intra-arterial low-dose cisplatin and 5-FU (GEMFP). Seven patients with non-resectable advanced HCC were treated with GEMFP. One course of chemotherapy consisted of daily intra-arterial cisplatin (20 mg/body weight/hour on d 1, 10 mg/body weight per 0.5 h on d 2-5 and 8-12), followed by 5-FU (250 mg/body weight per 5 h on d 1-5 and 8-12) via an injection port. Gemcitabine at 1000 mg/m2 was administered intravenously at 0.5 h on d 1 and 8. The objective response was 57%. The response to GEMFP was as follows: complete response (no patients), partial response (four patients), stable disease (three patients), and progressive disease (no patients). The median survival period was 8 mo (range, 5-55). With regard to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI-CTC) grade 3 or 4 adverse reactions, seven (100%), seven, six (86%) and one (14%) patients developed leukopenia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and anemia, respectively. GEMFP may potentially be effective for non-resectable advanced HCC, but it has severe hematologic toxicity. PMID:18442216

  7. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation and Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Hypervascular Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Rate and Risk Factors for Local Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Tomonori Ishimaru, Hideki; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Uetani, Masataka; Matsuoka, Yohjiro; Daikoku, Manabu; Honda, Sumihisa; Koshiishi, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Toshifumi

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. To analyze local recurrence-free rates and risk factors for recurrence following percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods. One hundred and nine nodules treated by RFA and 173 nodules treated by TACE were included. Hypovascular nodules were excluded from this study. Overall local recurrence-free rates of each treatment group were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The independent risk factors of local recurrence and the hazard ratios were analyzed using Cox's proportional-hazards regression model. Based on the results of multivariate analyses, we classified HCC nodules into four subgroups: central nodules {<=}2 cm or >2 cm and peripheral nodules {<=}2 cm or >2 cm. The local recurrence-free rates of these subgroups for each treatment were also calculated. Results. The overall local recurrence-free rate was significantly higher in the RFA group than in the TACE group (p = 0.013). The 24-month local recurrence-free rates in the RFA and TACE groups were 60.0% and 48.9%, respectively. In the RFA group, the only significant risk factor for recurrence was tumor size >2 cm in greatest dimension. In the TACE group, a central location was the only significant risk factor for recurrence. In central nodules that were {<=}2 cm, the local recurrence-free rate was significantly higher in the RFA group than in the TACE group (p < 0.001). In the remaining three groups, there was no significant difference in local recurrence-free rate between the two treatment methods. Conclusion. A tumor diameter of >2 cm was the only independent risk factor for local recurrence in RFA treatment, and a central location was the only independent risk factor in TACE treatment. Central lesions measuring {<=}2 cm should be treated by RFA.

  8. Surgical adjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, C M; Abston, S; Fish, J C

    1985-01-01

    The reported incidence of local recurrence after mastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer (TNM Stage III and IV) is between 30% and 50%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of radiation therapy (XRT) followed by total mastectomy on the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Fifty-three patients who presented with locally advanced breast cancer, without distant metastases, were treated with XRT (4500-5000 R) to the breast, chest wall, and regional lymph nodes. Five weeks after completion of XRT, total mastectomy was performed. There were no operative deaths. The complications that occurred in 22 patients after surgery were flap necrosis, wound infection, and seroma. Patients have been followed from 3 to 134 months. Twenty-five patients are alive (3-134 months), 12 free of disease; 28 patients have died with distant metastases (6-67 months). Isolated local recurrence occurred in only two patients. Four patients had local and distant recurrence (total local recurrence is 6/53). The remaining patients all developed distant metastases. We have devised a treatment strategy which significantly decreases the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. However, the rapid appearance of distant metastases emphasizes the need for systemically active therapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:3994434

  9. Comparison of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy and sorafenib in elderly patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A case series.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Tomoyuki; Matsuda, Hidetaka; Nosaka, Takuto; Saito, Yasushi; Ozaki, Yoshihiko; Hayama, Ryoko; Naito, Tatsushi; Takahashi, Kazuto; Ofuji, Kazuya; Ohtani, Masahiro; Hiramatsu, Katsushi; Suto, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Yasunari

    2014-11-01

    Sorafenib and hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) are both indicated for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we compared the efficacy and safety of HAIC to that of sorafenib in elderly patients with HCC. Eligible patients included those aged ≥70 years, with histologically or clinically confirmed advanced HCC. A total of 12 patients received sorafenib (800 mg per day) and 8 patients received HAIC with 5-fluorouracil (300 mg/m(2) on days 1-5 and 8-12) with or without cisplatin (20 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8), with interferon-α (3 times per week for 4 weeks). The response rate was significantly higher in patients treated with HAIC (37.5%) compared to that in patients treated with sorafenib (no response). The median overall survival (18.6 and 11.7 months) and progression-free survival (4.0 and 5.0 months) were similar between the sorafenib and HAIC groups, respectively. In the sorafenib group, 58.3% of the patients discontinued treatment compared to none in the HAIC group. The most frequent adverse event leading to discontinuation of sorafenib was anorexia. Similar to sorafenib, HAIC appears to be a feasible treatment and may also have the advantage of an adequate safety profile for elderly patients with advanced HCC. Further study of HAIC in a larger population of elderly patients is required to assess its potential as an alternative to sorafenib for HCC.

  10. Comparison of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy and sorafenib in elderly patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A case series

    PubMed Central

    NEMOTO, TOMOYUKI; MATSUDA, HIDETAKA; NOSAKA, TAKUTO; SAITO, YASUSHI; OZAKI, YOSHIHIKO; HAYAMA, RYOKO; NAITO, TATSUSHI; TAKAHASHI, KAZUTO; OFUJI, KAZUYA; OHTANI, MASAHIRO; HIRAMATSU, KATSUSHI; SUTO, HIROYUKI; NAKAMOTO, YASUNARI

    2014-01-01

    Sorafenib and hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) are both indicated for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we compared the efficacy and safety of HAIC to that of sorafenib in elderly patients with HCC. Eligible patients included those aged ≥70 years, with histologically or clinically confirmed advanced HCC. A total of 12 patients received sorafenib (800 mg per day) and 8 patients received HAIC with 5-fluorouracil (300 mg/m2 on days 1–5 and 8–12) with or without cisplatin (20 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8), with interferon-α (3 times per week for 4 weeks). The response rate was significantly higher in patients treated with HAIC (37.5%) compared to that in patients treated with sorafenib (no response). The median overall survival (18.6 and 11.7 months) and progression-free survival (4.0 and 5.0 months) were similar between the sorafenib and HAIC groups, respectively. In the sorafenib group, 58.3% of the patients discontinued treatment compared to none in the HAIC group. The most frequent adverse event leading to discontinuation of sorafenib was anorexia. Similar to sorafenib, HAIC appears to be a feasible treatment and may also have the advantage of an adequate safety profile for elderly patients with advanced HCC. Further study of HAIC in a larger population of elderly patients is required to assess its potential as an alternative to sorafenib for HCC. PMID:25279193

  11. MRI-detectable polymeric micelles incorporating platinum anticancer drugs enhance survival in an advanced hepatocellular carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Vinh, Nguyen Quoc; Naka, Shigeyuki; Cabral, Horacio; Murayama, Hiroyuki; Kaida, Sachiko; Kataoka, Kazunori; Morikawa, Shigehiro; Tani, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most intractable and lethal cancers; most cases are diagnosed at advanced stages with underlying liver dysfunction and are frequently resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The development of tumor-targeting systems may improve treatment outcomes. Nanomedicine platforms are of particular interest for enhancing chemotherapeutic efficiency, and they include polymeric micelles, which enable targeting of multiple drugs to solid tumors, including imaging and therapeutic agents. This allows concurrent diagnosis, targeting strategy validation, and efficacy assessment. We used polymeric micelles containing the T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent gadolinium-diethylenetriaminpentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and the parent complex of the anticancer drug oxaliplatin [(1,2-diaminocyclohexane)platinum(II) (DACHPt)] for simultaneous imaging and therapy in an orthotopic rat model of HCC. The Gd-DTPA/DACHPt-loaded micelles were injected into the hepatic artery, and magnetic resonance imaging performance and antitumor activity against HCC, as well as adverse drug reactions were assessed. After a single administration, the micelles achieved strong and specific tumor contrast enhancement, induced high levels of tumor apoptosis, and significantly suppressed tumor size and growth. Moreover, the micelles did not induce severe adverse reactions and significantly improved survival outcomes in comparison to oxaliplatin or saline controls. Our results suggest that Gd-DTPA/DACHPt-loaded micelles are a promising approach for effective diagnosis and treatment of advanced HCC.

  12. Role of regorafenib as second-line therapy and landscape of investigational treatment options in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Trojan, Jörg; Waidmann, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Sorafenib is still the only systemic drug approved for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In recent years, several investigational agents mainly targeting angiogenesis failed in late-phase clinical development due to either toxicity or lack of benefit. Recently, data of the RESORCE trial, a placebo-controlled Phase III study that evaluated the efficacy and safety of regorafenib in patients with HCC and documented disease progression after systemic first-line treatment with sorafenib, were presented at the ESMO World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer, 2016. Regorafenib treatment resulted in a 2.8-month survival benefit compared to placebo (10.6 months vs 7.8 months). Side effects were consistent with the known profile of regorafenib. The approval of regorafenib for this indication is expected in 2017. Further candidate agents in Phase III evaluation for second-line treatment of patients with HCC are the MET inhibitors tivantinib and cabozantinib, the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 antibody ramucirumab, and the programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1) blocking antibody pembrolizumab. Furthermore, results from two first-line trials with either the tyrosine kinase inhibitor lenvatinib or the PD-1 antibody nivolumabin in comparison to sorafenib are awaited in the near future and might further change the treatment sequence of advanced HCC.

  13. Role of regorafenib as second-line therapy and landscape of investigational treatment options in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Trojan, Jörg; Waidmann, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Sorafenib is still the only systemic drug approved for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In recent years, several investigational agents mainly targeting angiogenesis failed in late-phase clinical development due to either toxicity or lack of benefit. Recently, data of the RESORCE trial, a placebo-controlled Phase III study that evaluated the efficacy and safety of regorafenib in patients with HCC and documented disease progression after systemic first-line treatment with sorafenib, were presented at the ESMO World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer, 2016. Regorafenib treatment resulted in a 2.8-month survival benefit compared to placebo (10.6 months vs 7.8 months). Side effects were consistent with the known profile of regorafenib. The approval of regorafenib for this indication is expected in 2017. Further candidate agents in Phase III evaluation for second-line treatment of patients with HCC are the MET inhibitors tivantinib and cabozantinib, the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 antibody ramucirumab, and the programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1) blocking antibody pembrolizumab. Furthermore, results from two first-line trials with either the tyrosine kinase inhibitor lenvatinib or the PD-1 antibody nivolumabin in comparison to sorafenib are awaited in the near future and might further change the treatment sequence of advanced HCC. PMID:27703962

  14. Assessment of a model based optimization engine for volumetric modulated arc therapy for patients with advanced hepatocellular cancer.

    PubMed

    Fogliata, Antonella; Wang, Po-Ming; Belosi, Francesca; Clivio, Alessandro; Nicolini, Giorgia; Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca

    2014-10-28

    To evaluate in-silico the performance of a model-based optimization process for volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) applied to hepatocellular cancer treatments. 45 clinically accepted RA plans were selected to train a knowledge-based engine for the prediction of individualized dose-volume constraints. The model was validated on the same plans used for training (closed-loop) and on a set of other 25 plans not used for the training (open-loop). Dose prescription, target size, localization in the liver and arc configuration were highly variable in both sets to appraise the power of generalization of the engine. Quantitative dose volume histogram analysis was performed as well as a pass-fail analysis against a set of 8 clinical dose-volume objectives to appraise the quality of the new plans. Qualitative and quantitative equivalence was observed between the clinical and the test plans. The use of model-based optimization lead to a net improvement in the pass-rate of the clinical objectives compared to the plans originally optimized with standard methods (this pass-rate is the frequency of cases where the objectives are respected vs. the cases where constraints are not fulfilled). The increase in the pass-rate resulted of 2.0%, 0.9% and 0.5% in a closed-loop and two different open-loop validation experiments. A knowledge-based engine for the optimization of RapidArc plans was tested and lead to clinically acceptable plans in the case of hepatocellular cancer radiotherapy. More studies are needed before a broad clinical use.

  15. Treatment algorithm based on the multivariate survival analyses in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma treated with trans-arterial chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Prajapati, Hasmukh J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To develop the treatment algorithm from multivariate survival analyses (MVA) in patients with Barcelona clinic liver cancer (BCLC) C (advanced) Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients treated with Trans-arterial Chemoembolization (TACE). Methods Consecutive unresectable and non-tranplantable patients with advanced HCC, who received DEB TACE were studied. A total of 238 patients (mean age, 62.4yrs) was included in the study. Survivals were analyzed according to different parameters from the time of the 1st DEB TACE. Kaplan Meier and Cox Proportional Hazard model were used for survival analysis. The SS was constructed from MVA and named BCLC C HCC Prognostic (BCHP) staging system (SS). Results Overall median survival (OS) was 16.2 months. In HCC patients with venous thrombosis (VT) of large vein [main portal vein (PV), right or left PV, hepatic vein, inferior vena cava] (22.7%) versus small vein (segmental/subsegmental PV) (9.7%) versus no VT had OSs of 6.4 months versus 20 months versus 22.8 months respectively (p<0.001). On MVA, the significant independent prognostic factors (PFs) of survival were CP class, eastern cooperative oncology group (ECOG) performance status (PS), single HCC<5 cm, site of VT, metastases, serum creatinine and serum alpha-feto protein. Based on these PFs, the BCHP staging system was constructed. The OSs of stages I, II and III were 28.4 months, 11.8 months and 2.4 months accordingly (p<0.001). The treatment plan was proposed according to the different stages. Conclusion On MVA of patients with advanced HCC treated with TACE, significant independent prognostic factors (PFs) of survival were CP class, ECOG PS, single HCC<5 cm or others, site of VT, metastases, serum creatinine and serum alpha-feto protein. New BCHP SS was proposed based on MVA data to identify the suitable advanced HCC patients for TACE treatments. PMID:28170405

  16. Sorafenib With and Without Transarterial Chemoembolization for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Main Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis: A Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingqiang; Fan, Wenzhe; Wang, Yu; Lu, Ligong; Fu, Sirui; Yang, Jianyong; Huang, Yonghui; Yao, Wang; Li, Jiaping

    2015-12-01

    The survival benefit of combining sorafenib and transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) therapy compared with sorafenib monotherapy for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and main portal vein tumor thrombosis (MPVTT) is unclear. Between January 2009 and June 2013, 183 consecutive patients with advanced HCC (Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage C) and MPVTT were retrospectively reviewed. Of these, 89 patients with advanced HCC and MPVTT were enrolled in this study: 45 were treated with combination therapy (sorafenib-TACE group), and the other 44 treated with sorafenib monotherapy (sorafenib group). The mean number of TACE sessions per patient was 2.6 (range: 1-5). The median duration of sorafenib in the sorafenib-TACE group and sorafenib group was 5.6 months and 5.4 months, respectively. The disease control rate was similar between the two groups. Median time to progression was 3.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.2, 3.7) in the sorafenib-TACE group, and 3.0 months (95% CI: 2.1, 3.8) in the sorafenib group (p = .924). Median overall survival was 7.0 months (95% CI: 6.1, 7.8) and 6.0 months (95% CI: 4.7, 7.3) in the sorafenib-TACE group and the sorafenib group, respectively (p = .544). The adverse events related to sorafenib were comparable between the two groups. Twenty-one adverse events of grade 3-4 related to TACE occurred in 12 patients (26.7%), and 2 of them died (4.4%). This study demonstrated no advantage of combination therapy over sorafenib monotherapy. Considering the patients' morbidity after TACE, sorafenib monotherapy is appropriate for managing patients with advanced HCC and MPVTT. ©AlphaMed Press.

  17. HATT: a phase IV, single-arm, open-label study of sorafenib in Taiwanese patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Ming; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Chen, Ping-Tsung; Jeng, Long-Bin; Chen, Shinn-Cherng; Hu, Chi-Tan; Yang, Sien-Sing; Le Berre, Marie-Aude; Liu, Xuan; Mitchell, David Y; Prins, Klaas; Grevel, Joachim; Peña, Carol A E; Meinhardt, Gerold

    2017-03-01

    Sorafenib significantly improves survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This phase IV study assessed sorafenib efficacy/safety in Taiwanese patients with advanced HCC and Child-Pugh A status. All patients received 400 mg sorafenib BID. Safety, efficacy, sorafenib pharmacokinetics, and Child-Pugh progression were evaluated. A hand-foot skin reaction (HFSR) prevention substudy assessed HFSR incidence and grade/severity and time to HFSR in 29 and 34 patients randomized to corticosteroid and noncorticosteroid ointments, respectively, and in 88 nonrandomized patients. The 151 patients included 120 (80%) male patients and 81 (54%) with stage IV disease. Mean sorafenib dose was 626 mg/day, and median treatment duration was 4.2 months. Median overall survival (OS), progression-free survival, and time to progression (TTP) were 8.6, 2.7, and 3.8 months, respectively. Disease control and response rates (partial responses only) were 48 and 6.6%, respectively. Median TTP from Child-Pugh A to B/C was 88 days. Drug-related adverse events (AEs) occurred in 89.4% of patients; none were new or unexpected. The most frequent grade ≥3 drug-related, treatment-emergent AEs were HFSR (13.2%), diarrhea (11.9%), and hypertension (6.6%). Corticosteroid ointment tended to reduce the severity and incidence of all HFSR-associated parameters. Pharmacokinetic exposure was unaltered by Child-Pugh progression. The final pharmacokinetic model predicted 13.1 and 33.8% reductions in sorafenib exposure over 6 and 12 months, respectively. There was a trend of longer OS and TTP in Taiwanese patients with advanced HCC compared with patients with advanced HCC in the Asia-Pacific trial. Sorafenib exposure did not correlate with liver function. Reduced pharmacokinetic exposure over time was unrelated to reduced or interrupted dosing.

  18. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  19. [A successful case of systemic chemotherapy followed by liver resection for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with highly vascular invasion and multiple pulmonary metastases].

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Tatsuzo; Kamiyama, Toshiya; Nakanishi, Kazuaki; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Yokoo, Hideki; Tahara, Munenori; Kakisaka, Tatsuhiko; Kamachi, Hirofumi; Matsushita, Michiaki; Todo, Satoru

    2011-05-01

    The prognosis for hepatocellular carcinoma with extrahepatic metastasis or vascular invasion is very poor. We treated a case successfully by combining chemotherapy and liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma with multiple pulmonary metastases and vascular invasion. A 56-year-old man who complained of abdominal pain in his right side was transported to the hospital by ambulance. Because CT scan revealed the rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma, he underwent emergency transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). A close examination revealed tumor thrombus in the inferior vena cava and posterior segment of the portal vein branch, with multiple pulmonary metastases. We conducted right hepatic lobectomy and removal of the inferior vena cava tumor thrombus. After the operation, pulmonary metastatic lesions gradually grew larger, so the oral administration of S-1 at 120 mg per day was started. At the end of the first course, the CT scan revealed that multiple pulmonary metastases were significantly reduced, and treatment was maintained until the end of 4 courses. A prolongation of survival could be expected by combining systemic chemotherapy and liver resection for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma such as the present case.

  20. Advances in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hennedige, Tiffany; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K

    2016-01-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver cancer. Imaging is important for establishing a diagnosis of HCC and early diagnosis is imperative as several potentially curative treatments are available when HCC is small. Hepatocarcinogenesis occurs in a stepwise manner on a background of chronic liver disease or cirrhosis wherein multiple genes are altered resulting in a range of cirrhosis-associated nodules. This progression is related to increased cellularity, neovascularity and size of the nodule. An understanding of the stepwise progression may aid in early diagnosis. Dynamic and multiphase contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging still form the cornerstone in the diagnosis of HCC. An overview of the current diagnostic standards of HCC in accordance to the more common practicing guidelines and their differences will be reviewed. Ancillary features contribute to diagnostic confidence and has been incorporated into the more recent Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System. The use of hepatocyte-specific contrast agents is increasing and gradually changing the standard of diagnosis of HCC; the most significant benefit being the lack of uptake in the hepatocyte phase in the earlier stages of HCC progression. An outline of supplementary techniques in the imaging of HCC will also be reviewed.

  1. Correlation of skin toxicity and hypertension with clinical benefit in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma patients treated with sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sun Young; Lee, Yu Jeung

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the correlation of skin toxicity and hypertension with clinical benefit in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients treated with sorafenib by analyzing medical records retrospectively. Data from medical records was statistically analyzed to identify a correlation of skin toxicity and hypertension with treatment response and prognosis in advanced HCC patients who had received sorafenib at the Asan Medical Center from July 2010 to June 2012. This study investigated prognostic factors for overall survival and the correlation between the development of skin toxicities and hypertension. A total of 99 patients receiving sorafenib were included in this study. 29 patients who developed skin toxicities Grade 2 or higher showed significantly longer survival than the 70 patients who developed skin toxicities less than Grade 2 or those without skin toxicity (p = 0.024). However, development of hypertension was not related to survival (p = 0.262). In a multivariate analysis, skin toxicities were found to be good prognostic factors for overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.320; 95% CI, 0.119 - 0.861; p = 0.024) as well as low α-fetoprotein level (hazard ratio, 0.195; 95% CI, 0.076 - 0.500; p = 0.001). On the other hand, no correlation was found between the development of skin toxicities and hypertension (p = 0.109). Skin toxicities that are common adverse reactions in advanced HCC patients treated with sorafenib may be used as surrogate markers for clinical benefit. Therefore, early detection and proper management of these toxicities is crucial for continuing treatment with sorafenib.

  2. Therapies for Advanced Stage Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Macrovascular invasion or Metastatic Disease: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Finn, Richard S; Zhu, Andrew X; Wigdan, Farah; Almasri, Jehad; Zaiem, Feras; Prokop, Larry J; Hassan Murad, Mohammad; Mohammed, Khaled

    2017-09-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a complex disease most commonly arising in the background of chronic liver disease. In the past two decades there has been a significant increase in our understanding of both the clinical and molecular heterogeneity of HCC. There has been a robust increase in clinical trial activity in patients with poor prognostic factors such as macrovascular invasion and extrahepatic spread. We aimed to synthesize the evidence for the treatment of patients with advanced HCC based on these baseline characteristics including patients with both Child-Pugh scores of A and B. A comprehensive search of several databases from each database inception to February 15th 2016, any language was conducted.We included 14 studies (3 randomized controlled studies (RCTs) and 11 observational studies).We included studies that compared sorafenib, transarterial bland embolisation/transarterial chemoembolization, yttrium-90/radiation therapy, ablation (or combination) and no therapy. Two RCTs comparing sorafenib to best supportive care demonstrated a consistent improvement in OS for patients with advanced HCC and MVI and/or EHS and Child Pugh-A liver disease (HR 0.66 (95% CI 0.51-0.87), I(2) = 0%). Several observational studies evaluated loco-regional therapies alone or in combination with other treatments and were limited by very low quality of evidence. This was true for both patients with EHS and MVI. In patients with advanced HCC and Child-Pugh A liver function, sorafenib is the only treatment that has been shown to improve overall survival in randomized studies. High quality data supporting the use of other treatment modalities in this setting, or in the setting of patients with less compensated (CP B) liver disease is lacking. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  3. To treat or not to treat - Successful hepatitis C virus eradication in a patient with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma and complete response to sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Waidmann, Oliver; Peveling-Oberhag, Jan; Eichler, Katrin; Schulze, Falko; Vermehren, Johannes

    2017-06-01

    Background and aims Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the most frequent underlying diseases leading to HCC development. Sorafenib is the standard of care for HCC patients not amenable to local treatment, resection, or liver transplantation. Although overall survival can be increased, objective response rates in patients treated with sorafenib are low. In HCC patients who underwent resection or ablation, HCV eradication with interferon-based regimens reduces the risk of recurrence. However, it is not known and under strong debate if patients with HCC should be treated with interferon-free regimens. Furthermore, it is not known if patients with advanced HCC at the time of diagnosis should be treated with antiviral therapy. Methods A patient with histologically confirmed advanced-stage HCC due to HCV-related cirrhosis was treated with sorafenib according to current guideline recommendations. Furthermore, he received subsequent treatment with direct antiviral agents (DAAs). Results The patient achieved a complete response after sorafenib treatment was initiated. Sorafenib treatment was terminated 1 year after complete response. As no recurrence of HCC was evident after treatment cessation, antiviral treatment was initiated with paritaprevir/ritonavir, ombitasvir, dasabuvir, and dose-reduced ribavirin because of chronic kidney disease. The patient achieved a sustained viral response. Conclusions Complete response to sorafenib treatment is scarce. Antiviral treatment should be considered in such patients as well as in patients with HCC who underwent resection or ablation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Molecular mechanism by which acyclic retinoid induces nuclear localization of transglutaminase 2 in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, R; Tatsukawa, H; Shrestha, R; Ishibashi, N; Matsuura, T; Kagechika, H; Kose, S; Hitomi, K; Imamoto, N; Kojima, S

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear accumulation of transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is an important step in TG2-dependent cell death. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for nuclear translocation of TG2 are still poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that acyclic retinoid (ACR) induced nuclear accumulation of TG2 in JHH-7 cells, a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) leading to their apoptosis. We further demonstrated molecular mechanism in nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of TG2 and an effect of ACR on it. We identified a novel 14-amino acid nuclear localization signal (NLS) 466AEKEETGMAMRIRV479 in the ‘C' domain and a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) 657LHMGLHKL664 in the ‘D' domain that allowed TG2 to shuttle between the nuclear and cytosolic milieu. Increased nuclear import of GAPDH myc-HIS fused with the identified NLS was observed, confirming its nuclear import ability. Leptomycin B, an inhibitor of exportin-1 as well as point mutation of all leucine residues to glutamine residues in the NES of TG2 demolished its nuclear export. TG2 formed a trimeric complex with importin-α and importin-β independently from transamidase activity which strongly suggested the involvement of a NLS-based translocation of TG2 to the nucleus. ACR accelerated the formation of the trimeric complex and that may be at least in part responsible for enhanced nuclear localization of TG2 in HCC cells treated with ACR. PMID:26633708

  5. The Treatment Responses in Cases of Radiation Therapy to Portal Vein Thrombosis in Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.-J.; Hsu, H.-C.; Wang, C.-Y.; Wang, C.-J.; Chen, H.-C.; Huang, E.-Y.; Fang, F.-M.; Lu, S.-N.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To review the response to radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and determine the factors favoring its efficacy. Methods and Materials: Patients with HCC and PVT referred for radiation therapy between 1997 and 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who had undergone treatment to primary HCC before radiation or had extrahepatic metastasis were excluded. A radiation dose of 60 Gy with 2 to 3Gy per fraction was prescribed. Clinical features before therapy were investigated, and the most significant imaging change after radiotherapy was regarded as the treatment response. Survival times were compared and the hazard ratios of independent variables were determined. Results: The treatment response rate of the 326 patients included in the study was 25.2% (n = 82). The median survival times were 13.3, 11.6, 9.0, 4.5, and 2.1 months for complete response, partial response, vascular transformation, no response, and the lost follow-up patients, respectively. Statistically significant differences in survival were not found among responder groups (p = 0.224-0.916) but were found between responders and nonresponders (p = 0.002). The most significant independent variables associated with survival (p < 0.001) were performance status and radiation dose. Minor independent factors were ascites, alfa-fetoprotein, albumin, and HBsAg (p = 0.009-0.038). In patients with favorable performance status, those with no more than one minor risk factor had a superior prognosis after radiation therapy (p = 0.013). This result was verified by a review of similar patients in 2006. Conclusion: Radiation therapy is the treatment of choice for selected HCC patients with PVT.

  6. Transcript Profiling Identifies Iqgap2−/− Mouse as a Model for Advanced Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Xu, Xiao; Zhu, Wei; Schmidt, Valentina A.

    2013-01-01

    It is broadly accepted that genetically engineered animal models do not always recapitulate human pathobiology. Therefore identifying best-fit mouse models of human cancers that truly reflect the corresponding human disease is of vital importance in elucidating molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis and developing preventive and therapeutic approaches. A new hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) mouse model lacking a novel putative tumor suppressor IQGAP2 has been generated by our laboratory. The aim of this study was to obtain the molecular signature of Iqgap2−/− HCC tumors and establish the relevance of this model to human disease. Here we report a comprehensive transcriptome analysis of Iqgap2−/− livers and a cross-species comparison of human and Iqgap2−/− HCC tumors using Significance Analysis of Microarray (SAM) and unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis. We identified the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway as the top canonical pathway dysregulated in Iqgap2−/− livers. We also demonstrated that Iqgap2−/− hepatic tumors shared genetic signatures with HCC tumors from patients with advanced disease as evidenced by a 78% mouse-to-human microarray data set concordance rate with 117 out of 151 identified ortholog genes having similar expression profiles across the two species. Collectively, these results indicate that the Iqgap2 knockout mouse model closely recapitulates human HCC at the molecular level and supports its further application for the study of this disease. PMID:23951254

  7. Phase I study of TAC-101, an oral synthetic retinoid, in Japanese patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Okusaka, Takuji; Ueno, Hideki; Ikeda, Masafumi; Takezako, Yoriko; Morizane, Chigusa

    2012-08-01

    Preclinical models have shown that TAC-101 (4-[3,5-bis(trimethylsilyl) benzamide] benzoic acid), an oral synthetic retinoid, has antitumor activity in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We conducted a phase I study in Japanese patients with advanced HCC to examine the pharmacokinetics, recommended dose, safety, and efficacy of TAC-101. The administered dose of TAC-101 was 10 mg/day in four patients (level 1), 20 mg/day in six (level 2), and 30 mg/day in three (level 3). There was no dose-limiting toxicity at level 1. Only one patient each had dose-limiting toxicity at level 2 (grade 2 fatigue, recovery requiring eight or more consecutive days of rest) and at level 3 (grade 3 splenic vein thrombosis). Level 3 (30 mg/day) was considered the maximum tolerated dose and 20 mg/day the recommended dose by a panel of medical experts, placing maximum emphasis on safety. The most frequent adverse events were fatigue, headache, and dermal symptoms such as rash. Pharmacokinetic parameters in Japanese patients with HCC were similar to those in patients in the United States, most of whom were Caucasian. Although no patient had a complete or partial response, the disease control rate was 38.5%. In conclusion, the recommended dose of TAC-101 for patients with HCC is 20 mg/day. TAC-101 had an acceptable toxicity profile, warranting further evaluation in clinical trials.

  8. Contribution of the toxic advanced glycation end-products-receptor axis in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Takino, Jun-ichi; Nagamine, Kentaro; Hori, Takamitsu; Sakasai-Sakai, Akiko; Takeuchi, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. The main etiologies of HCC are hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus (HCV), and non-hepatitis B/non-hepatitis C HCC (NBNC-HCC) has also been identified as an etiological factor. Although the incidence of HCV-related HCC in Japan has decreased slightly in recent years, that of NBNC-HCC has increased. The onset mechanism of NBNC-HCC, which has various etiologies, remains unclear; however, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a severe form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, is known to be an important risk factor for NBNC-HCC. Among the different advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) formed by the Maillard reaction, glyceraldehyde-derived AGEs, the predominant components of toxic AGEs (TAGE), have been associated with NASH and NBNC-HCC, including NASH-related HCC. Furthermore, the expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) has been correlated with the malignant progression of HCC. Therefore, TAGE induce oxidative stress by binding with RAGE may, in turn, lead to adverse effects, such as fibrosis and malignant transformation, in hepatic stellate cells and tumor cells during NASH or NASH-related HCC progression. The aim of this review was to examine the contribution of the TAGE-RAGE axis in NASH-related HCC. PMID:26483867

  9. A phase I/II trial of TAC-101, an oral synthetic retinoid, in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Kimberly B; Lozano, Richard; Brown, Thomas; Patt, Yehuda Z; Arima, Takashi; Abbruzzese, James L; Thomas, Melanie B

    2008-12-01

    Preclinical models showed TAC-101 (4-[3,5-bis(trimethylsilyl) benzamide] benzoic acid), an oral synthetic retinoid, has anti-tumor activity in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A phase I/II study was performed in advanced HCC patients (pts). Thirty-three patients were enrolled. During Phase I, pts received 40 mg daily for 14 days q3 weeks; 2 of 5 patients developed DLT so dose was reduced to 20 mg/day. Twenty-eight patients received 20 mg/day. No pt had a CR or PR, but 12 of 21 (57%) had SD. Two pts (9.5%) had late PR after discontinuing TAC-101. Median survival (MS) for all 28 pts treated with 20 mg/day was 12.7 months (95% CI 8.8-22.7); MS for 21 evaluable pts was 19.2 months (95% CI 10.4-27.6). 20 mg of TAC- was well tolerated. Significant disease stabilization (12/21 pts, 57%), 2 late PRs, and prolonged MS (19.2 months) suggest that TAC-101 provides meaningful patient benefit.

  10. A combination of sorafenib and SC-43 is a synergistic SHP-1 agonist duo to advance hepatocellular carcinoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Chao, Tzu-I; Tai, Wei-Tien; Hung, Man-Hsin; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Chen, Min-Hsuan; Chang, Mao-Ju; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2016-02-28

    Sorafenib is the first and currently the only standard treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We previously developed a sorafenib derivative SC-43, which exhibits much more enhanced anti-HCC activity than sorafenib and also promotes apoptosis in sorafenib-resistant HCC cells. Herein, a novel "sorafenib plus" combination therapy was developed by coupling sorafenib treatment with SC-43. Both sorafenib and SC-43 are proven Src homology region 2 domain containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) agonists. The combined actions of sorafenib and SC-43 enhanced SHP-1 activity, which was associated with diminished STAT3-related signals and stronger expression of apoptotic genes above that of either drug alone, culminating in increased cell death. Decreased p-STAT3 signaling and tumor size, as well as increased SHP-1 activity were observed in mice receiving the combination therapy in a subcutaneous HCC model. More reduced orthotopic HCC tumor size and prolonged survival were also observed in mice in the combination treatment arm compared to mice in either of the monotherapy arms. These results in the preclinical setting pave the way for further clinical studies to treat unresectable HCC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of hepatocellular carcinoma in chronic hepatitis B patients with advanced fibrosis is independent of viral genotype.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajneesh; Testoni, Barbara; Fresquet, Judith; Lim, Tony Kiat Hon; Hao, Ying; Tan, Hui Hui; Chow, Wan Cheng; Zoulim, Fabien

    2017-05-01

    Hepatitis B is leading cause of liver related morbidity in Asia with predominant genotypes B and C in East-Asia. Data on Serum, intrahepatic viral-markers, and long-term follow-up of prevalent genotypes (GT) B and C in patients with biopsy proven advanced fibrosis are sparse. To compare serum, intrahepatic viral-markers and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in GT-B and C in patients with advanced fibrosis (Ishak ≥ 4). Sixty-three treatment-naïve patients identified with advanced fibrosis on liver-biopsy performed between 1998 and 2000 at Singapore General Hospital. FFPE tissue was available for 59 patients and serum for 42 patients. HBV-DNA was quantified in serum and liver while qHBsAg quantified in serum. Patients were followed-up till December 2015. The median age was 47 ± 16 years, with 77.7% males. About 19 were GT-B, 43 patients were GT-C, and 1 had both GT-B and C. Mean follow-up was 13.5 years. The median serum HBV-DNA was 6.25 ± 2.17 and 6.58 ± 1.85 log IU/ml, serum HBsAg was 3.29 ± 0.80 and 3.45 ± 1.85 log IU/ml, and intrahepatic HBV-DNA was 0.52 ± 3.73 copies/cell and 0.4 ± 1.37 copies/cell in the GT-B and C, respectively (P > 0.1 in all). Complete cirrhosis (Ishak-6) was present in 47.6%, Ishak-5 fibrosis in 33.3%, and Ishak-4 fibrosis in 19% at recruitment. On follow-up HCC developed in 8/43 in GT-C and in 3/19 GT-B (P = 0.86). Advanced age and cirrhosis were significant factors for development of HCC. No difference in serum HBV-DNA, qHBsAg or intrahepatic HBV-DNA was seen in the two genotypes. HCC development seen over long-term follow-up was independent of genotypes in patients with advanced fibrosis. J. Med. Virol. 89:845-848, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Survival and cost-effectiveness of sorafenib therapy in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: An analysis of the SEER-Medicare database.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Neehar D; Marshall, Vincent D; Singal, Amit G; Nathan, Hari; Lok, Anna S; Balkrishnan, Rajesh; Shahinian, Vahakn

    2017-01-01

    Sorafenib is the only chemotherapeutic approved for treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, its effectiveness in patients with Child-Pugh class B cirrhosis and any moderating effects of health system characteristics are unclear. We examined the survival and cost-effectiveness associated with sorafenib in elderly patients with advanced HCC. We performed an analysis of Medicare beneficiaries with HCC diagnoses from 2007 to 2009. We compared advanced stage patients with HCC (American Joint Committee on Cancer stage III/IV) who received sorafenib within 6 months of diagnosis (and were otherwise untreated) to advanced stage patients with HCC who received no therapy (control). We performed univariate and multivariate analyses to identify predictors of survival. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated for sorafenib-treated and control patients. We included 228 sorafenib-treated patients and 870 control patients. The median survival of the sorafenib-treated patients was 150.5 days versus 62 days for control patients. On multivariate analysis, significant predictors of improved survival were treatment with sorafenib (hazard ratio [HR], 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57-0.77), being seen at a National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center (HR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.62-0.97), and being seen at a transplantation center (HR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.65-0.93). Predictors of worse survival included stage IV disease (HR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.24-1.58), decompensated cirrhosis (HR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.30-1.70), and treatment in an urban setting (HR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.21-1.73.) Although sorafenib use was associated with a survival benefit (HR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.47-0.79) among patients with decompensated cirrhosis, the median survival benefit was 31 days, and it was not cost-effective (ICER, $224,914 per life year gained). Sorafenib is associated with improved survival in elderly patients with advanced HCC; however, it is not cost-effective among those with

  13. Phase 2 Study of Combined Sorafenib and Radiation Therapy in Patients With Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shang-Wen; Lin, Li-Ching; Kuo, Yu-Cheng; Liang, Ji-An; Kuo, Chia-Chun; Chiou, Jeng-Fong

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: This phase 2 study evaluated the efficacy of radiation therapy (RT) with concurrent and sequential sorafenib therapy in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: Forty patients with unresectable HCC unfit for transarterial chemoembolization were treated with RT with concurrent and sequential sorafenib. Sorafenib was administered from the commencement of RT at a dose of 400 mg twice daily and continued to clinical or radiologic progression, unacceptable adverse events, or death. All patients had underlying Child-Pugh A cirrhosis. The maximal tumor diameter ranged from 3.0 cm to 15.5 cm. Coexisting portal vein thrombosis was found in 24 patients and was irradiated simultaneously. The cumulative RT dose ranged from 40 Gy to 60 Gy (median, 50 Gy). Image studies were done 1 month after RT and then every 3 months thereafter. Results: Thirty-three (83%) completed the allocated RT. During RT, the incidence of hand-foot skin reactions ≥ grade 2 and diarrhea were 37.5% and 25%, respectively, and 35% of patients had hepatic toxicities grade ≥2. Twenty-two (55.0%) patients achieved complete or partial remission at the initial assessment, and 18 (45%) had stable or progressive disease. The 2-year overall survival and infield progression-free survival (IFPS) were 32% and 39%, respectively. A Cancer of the Liver Italian Program (CLIP) score ≥2 was associated with an inferior outcome in overall survival. Six patients (15%) developed treatment-related hepatic toxicity grade ≥3 during the sequential phase, and 3 of them were fatal. Conclusions: When RT and sorafenib therapy were combined in patients with unresectable HCC, the initial complete or partial response rate was 55% with a 2-year IFPS of 39%. A CLIP score ≥2 was associated with an inferior outcome in overall survival. Hepatic toxicities are a major determinant of the safety; the combination should be used with caution and needs further investigation.

  14. Efficacy and safety of sorafenib in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: subanalyses of a phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Bruix, Jordi; Raoul, Jean-Luc; Sherman, Morris; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Bolondi, Luigi; Craxi, Antonio; Galle, Peter R; Santoro, Armando; Beaugrand, Michel; Sangiovanni, Angelo; Porta, Camillo; Gerken, Guido; Marrero, Jorge A; Nadel, Andrea; Shan, Michael; Moscovici, Marius; Voliotis, Dimitris; Llovet, Josep M

    2012-10-01

    The Sorafenib Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) Assessment Randomized Protocol (SHARP) trial demonstrated that sorafenib improves overall survival and is safe for patients with advanced HCC. In this trial, 602 patients with well-preserved liver function (>95% Child-Pugh A) were randomized to receive either sorafenib 400mg or matching placebo orally b.i.d. on a continuous basis. Because HCC is a heterogeneous disease, baseline patient characteristics may affect individual responses to treatment. In a comprehensive series of exploratory subgroup analyses, data from the SHARP trial were analyzed to discern if baseline patient characteristics influenced the efficacy and safety of sorafenib. Five subgroup domains were assessed: disease etiology, tumor burden, performance status, tumor stage, and prior therapy. Overall survival (OS), time to progression (TTP), disease control rate (DCR), and safety were assessed for subgroups within each domain. Subgroup analyses showed that sorafenib consistently improved median OS compared with placebo, as reflected by hazard ratios (HRs) of 0.50-0.85, similar to the complete cohort (HR=0.69). Sorafenib also consistently improved median TTP (HR, 0.40-0.64), except in HBV-positive patients (HR, 1.03), and DCR. Results are limited by small patient numbers in some subsets. The most common grade 3/4 adverse events included diarrhea, hand-foot skin reaction, and fatigue; the incidence of which did not differ appreciably among subgroups. These exploratory subgroup analyses showed that sorafenib consistently improved median OS and DCR compared with placebo in patients with advanced HCC, irrespective of disease etiology, baseline tumor burden, performance status, tumor stage, and prior therapy. Copyright © 2012 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Irreversible electroporation of locally advanced pancreatic neck/body adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Irreversible electroporation (IRE) of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the neck has been used to palliate appropriate stage 3 pancreatic cancers without evidence of metastasis and who have undergone appropriate induction therapy. Currently there has not been a standardized reported technique for pancreatic mid-body tumors for patient selection and intra-operative technique. Patients Subjects are patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body/neck who have undergone appropriate induction chemotherapy for a reasonable duration. Main outcome measures Technique of open IRE of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the neck/body is described, with the emphasis on intra-operative ultrasound and intra-operative electroporation management. Results The technique of open IRE of the pancreatic neck/body with bracketing of the celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery with continuous intraoperative ultrasound imaging and consideration of intraoperative navigational system is described. Conclusions IRE of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body/neck is feasible for appropriate patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:26029461

  16. Ginkgo biloba extract in combination with sorafenib is clinically safe and tolerable in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhen; Wang, Chunge; Liu, Peiwen; Shen, Peng; Han, Yingying; Liu, Nawen

    2016-11-15

    Sorafenib is the only therapy shown to improve overall survival in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the clinical efficacy of sorafenib is limited. Combination therapy targeting multiple signaling pathways may improve outcomes. Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) has exhibited antitumor activity in multiple human cancers. This study was designed to evaluate the tolerability and effectiveness of GBE combined with sorafenib in patients with advanced HCC. Patients with advanced HCC were treated with increasing doses of GBE in combination with sorafenib. We first determined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of GBE, then the patients were treated with GBE at the MTD to evaluate its safety and efficacy. 27 patients were enrolled in the first part of our study and treated with sorafenib 400mg twice daily (BID) and increasing doses (cohort 1: 60mg, cohort 2: 120mg, cohort 3: 240mg, cohort 4: 360mg) of GBE once daily (QD). An additional group of 32 new patients next to the 27 described before were accrued for the second part of our study, and all these 32 patients were eligible for the evaluation of toxicity and efficacy. No patient in cohort 1 and 2 experienced a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). One of the ten patients in cohort 3 experienced a DLT. DLT occurred in two of the three initial patients in cohort 4. Cohort 3 (GBE 240mg QD plus sorafenib 400mg BID) was considered to be the MTD. Three patients had a partial response, 21 had stable disease, and 8 had progressive disease. The median times to progression and overall survival were 2.5 and 11.6 months, respectively. Compared with previous study, the toxicities of the combination therapy were similar with those observed in sorafenib monotherapy, GBE in combination with sorafenib slightly improved OS. The combination of GBE (240mg QD) and standard dose sorafenib (400mg BID) is safe and tolerable among patients with advanced HCC. Early signs of antitumor activity may warrant further development of this combination

  17. Frequency of Elevated Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) Biomarkers in Patients with Advanced Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Richard K.; Wright, Elizabeth C.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Seeff, Leonard B.; Hoefs, John C.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Dienstag, Jules L.; Lok, Anna S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prospective studies of serum HCC biomarkers in patients with advanced hepatitis C are lacking. Aims To determine frequencies and performance of elevated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), AFP-L3, and des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) levels as HCC biomarkers in advanced hepatitis C. Methods Patients in the HALT-C Trial were tested every 3 months for 42 months. Screening ultrasound was performed every 12 months. Levels of biomarkers were compared in patients in whom HCC did or did not develop. Results 855 patients were evaluated; HCC developed in 46. Among patients without HCC, 73.2% had AFP consistently <20, 24.5% had at least one AFP between 20-199, while 2.3% had at least one AFP value ≥200 ng/mL; 73.7% had DCP consistently <90, 11.6% had at least one DCP between 90-149, and 14.7% had at least one DCP value ≥150 mAU/mL. AFP-L3 ≥10% was present at least once in 9.0% and in 17.1% of those with AFP >20 ng/mL. Among all patients with elevated biomarkers, a diagnosis of HCC was made in 0-31.6% (depending on the biomarker and cutoff) during the subsequent 24 months. AFP ≥200 ng/mL had the highest specificity (99%), but sensitivity was ≤20%. DCP ≥40 mAU/mL had the highest sensitivity (76%), but specificity was ≤58%. Independent predictors of elevated AFP were gender (female), race (Black), more advanced disease, and HCC. Elevated DCP was associated with more advanced disease and HCC. Conclusions Mild-moderate elevations in total AFP and DCP but not AFP-L3 occur frequently in patients with chronic hepatitis C and advanced fibrosis, are related to factors other than HCC, and are poor predictors of HCC. PMID:21931376

  18. Locally advanced breast cancer in the elderly: curettage mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Solej, Mario; Ferronato, Marco; Nano, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Locally advanced breast tumor represents 5-20% of new cases diagnosed every year. The purpose of this study was to report our experience and to compare it with the literature. From 1998 to 2003 at the Molinette Hospital in the Turin University Third Division of General Surgery, there were 34 cases of breast cancer in older women (between 70 and 94 years of age), 14 of which (41.18%) were locally advanced breast tumor. We evaluated the type of surgical intervention and anesthesia used, muscular invasion, the presence of receptors positive to estrogens and progesterone, the operative mortality, the percentage of local-regional recurrence, and relapses after a period of time. Among the patients with locally advanced breast tumor, 21.43% (3/14) were at stage IIIA and 78.57% (11/14) at stage IIIB. In 14.29% (2/14) of the cases, Patey's radical mastectomy was performed, in 57.14% (8/14) Halsted's radical mastectomy, and in 28.57% (4/14) a simple mastectomy with the removal of the fascia of the major pectoral muscle. Three (21.43%) patients underwent a second intervention for local-regional disease. None of the patients had distant metastasis in the first 2 years after the operation. Mortality after 2 years was 23.1% (3/13). None of the patients who underwent surgery had adjuvant therapy, usually because it was refused by the patients themselves or their families. All the negative and positive hormone receptor patients received tamoxifen. Locally advanced breast tumors are frequent in elderly women. In the past, there has been a tendency to surgical under-treatment. As regards locally advanced breast tumor, curettage operations represent the only possibility to improve the quality of life of the elderly. These should be performed after carefully evaluating a series of variables in the general and local condition of the patient, the aggressiveness of the intervention and the life expectancy.

  19. Vismodegib: in locally advanced or metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2012-07-30

    Vismodegib is the first Hedgehog pathway inhibitor to be approved in the US, where it is indicated for the treatment of adults with metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC), or with locally advanced BCC that has recurred following surgery or who are not candidates for surgery, and who are not candidates for radiation. Vismodegib selectively and potently inhibits the Hedgehog signalling pathway by binding to Smoothened, thereby inhibiting the activation of Hedgehog target genes. Oral vismodegib was effective in the treatment of patients with locally advanced (n = 63) or metastatic (n = 33) BCC, according to the results of an ongoing, noncomparative, multinational, pivotal, phase II trial (ERIVANCE BCC). In this trial (using a clinical cutoff date of 26 November 2010), the independent review facility overall response rate was 42.9% in patients with locally advanced BCC and 30.3% in patients with metastatic BCC. In both patients with locally advanced BCC and those with metastatic BCC, the median duration of response was 7.6 months and median progression-free survival was 9.5 months. Oral vismodegib had an acceptable tolerability profile in patients with advanced BCC.

  20. Intra-arterial injection of 131I-labeled Lipiodol for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: a 7 years' experience.

    PubMed

    Lintia-Gaultier, Alina; Perret, Christophe; Ansquer, Catherine; Eugène, Thomas; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Frampas, Eric

    2013-07-01

    Internal irradiation with iodine-131 (I)-labeled Lipiodol is one of the currently available forms of palliative therapy for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Despite a cumulative experience of more than 10 years with this treatment, only a few studies have reported on its efficacy and safety. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy of intra-arterial I-labeled Lipiodol injection for treatment against advanced HCC. Fifty patients (47 men and three women; mean age 64 years) given an intra-arterial injection of I-Lipiodol (5 ml of 2.2 GBq Lipiodol labeled with I; number of mean sessions per patient, 1.3; range 1-4) were retrospectively compared with 36 patients (31 men and five women; mean age 64 years) who were given only medical support. Portal vein thrombosis was present in 86 and 100% of patients, respectively. Efficacy was determined on the basis of overall survival as the endpoint using the Kaplan-Meier method. Tumor response was evaluated with computed tomography according to Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST 1.1) and European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) criteria. For patients treated with I-Lipiodol, median survival was 32 weeks, compared with 8 weeks for the untreated group (P=0.007). Survival at 6 months and at 1 and 2 years was 65, 35, and 22%, respectively, for patients treated with I-Lipiodol compared with 28, 8, and 0% for the untreated group. At 1 month, more than 80% of patients were responders (complete response, partial response, and stable disease) on the basis of the RECIST and EASL criteria, and at 6 months 39% were responders. No radiotoxic effect was observed, especially with respect to interstitial pneumonia. No significant difference was observed between survival and α-fetoprotein levels, Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer clinical score, and portal vein thrombosis. Intra-arterial injection of I-Lipiodol is safe and provides significant survival benefit in terms of

  1. Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Inferior Vena Cava and Right Atrial Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, M. C. Chuang, V. P. Cheng, T. Lin, Z. H. Lin, Y. M.

    2008-07-15

    Advanced hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) with invasion of venous systems usually indicates not only a poor prognosis but also a contraindication for transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). This study evaluated the feasibility of TACE for advanced HCC with inferior vena cava (IVC) and right atrium (RA) tumors and, also, to search for the ideal embolization particle size. Twenty-six patients who had HCC invasion into the IVC included five patients with coexistent RA tumors that were treated with TACE. The chemoembolization method was cisplatin, doxorubicin, and mitomycin C mixed with Lipiodol and Ivalon. The selection of Ivalon particles was divided into two groups based on their size: (A) >180 {mu}m, N = 9; and (B) 47-180 {mu}m, N = 17. The overall response rate was 53.8% (14/26). Based on the response to TACE, the median survival period of the entire group was 4.2 months (range, 1.5 to 76.7 months). The median survival period of the 14 responders was 13.5 months (1.5-76.7 months), and that of the 12 nonresponders, 3.3 months (2.1 to 24.3 months) (p < 0.002). Comparing the two Ivalon particle sizes, the response rate was 12.5% (1/9 patients) for group A and 76.5% for group B (13/17 patients) (p < 0.02). No serious complication was observed post-chemoembolization. In conclusion, TACE is a safe and effective treatment for advanced HCC with IVC and RA tumors, and small Ivalon particles (47-180 {mu}m) are superior to large ones (>180 {mu}m).

  2. Second-line ramucirumab therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (REACH): an East Asian and non-East Asian subgroup analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joon Oh; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Yen, Chia-Jui; Kudo, Masatoshi; Yang, Ling; Abada, Paolo B.; Cheng, Rebecca; Orlando, Mauro; Zhu, Andrew X.; Okusaka, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose REACH investigated second-line ramucirumab therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Results Median overall survival was 8.2 months for ramucirumab and 6.9 months for placebo (HR, 0.835; 95% CI, 0.634–1.100; p = 0.2046) for East Asians, and 10.1 months for ramucirumab and 8.0 months for placebo (HR, 0.895; 95% CI, 0.690–1.161; p = 0.4023) for non-East Asians. Median overall survival in patients with baseline alpha-fetoprotein ≥ 400 ng/mL was 7.8 months for ramucirumab and 4.2 months for placebo (HR, 0.749; 95% CI, 0.519–1.082; p = 0.1213) for East Asians (n = 139), and 8.2 months for ramucirumab and 4.5 months for placebo (HR, 0.579; 95% CI, 0.371–0.904; p = 0.0149) for non-East Asians (n = 111). The most common grade ≥ 3 treatment-emergent adverse events in East Asians and non-East Asians included hypertension and malignant neoplasm progression. Materials and methods A post-hoc analysis of East Asians (N = 252) and non-East Asians (N = 313) in the intent-to-treat population was performed. Conclusions In East Asians and non-East Asians, ramucirumab did not significantly prolong overall survival. In patients with baseline alpha-fetoprotein ≥ 400 ng/mL, a potentially larger survival benefit was observed in both subgroups. Safety for East Asians was similar to non-East Asians. PMID:27776351

  3. Second-line ramucirumab therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (REACH): an East Asian and non-East Asian subgroup analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Joon Oh; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Yen, Chia-Jui; Kudo, Masatoshi; Yang, Ling; Abada, Paolo B; Cheng, Rebecca; Orlando, Mauro; Zhu, Andrew X; Okusaka, Takuji

    2016-11-15

    REACH investigated second-line ramucirumab therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Median overall survival was 8.2 months for ramucirumab and 6.9 months for placebo (HR, 0.835; 95% CI, 0.634-1.100; p = 0.2046) for East Asians, and 10.1 months for ramucirumab and 8.0 months for placebo (HR, 0.895; 95% CI, 0.690-1.161; p = 0.4023) for non-East Asians. Median overall survival in patients with baseline alpha-fetoprotein ≥ 400 ng/mL was 7.8 months for ramucirumab and 4.2 months for placebo (HR, 0.749; 95% CI, 0.519-1.082; p = 0.1213) for East Asians (n = 139), and 8.2 months for ramucirumab and 4.5 months for placebo (HR, 0.579; 95% CI, 0.371-0.904; p = 0.0149) for non-East Asians (n = 111). The most common grade ≥ 3 treatment-emergent adverse events in East Asians and non-East Asians included hypertension and malignant neoplasm progression. A post-hoc analysis of East Asians (N = 252) and non-East Asians (N = 313) in the intent-to-treat population was performed. In East Asians and non-East Asians, ramucirumab did not significantly prolong overall survival. In patients with baseline alpha-fetoprotein ≥ 400 ng/mL, a potentially larger survival benefit was observed in both subgroups. Safety for East Asians was similar to non-East Asians.

  4. Safety and toxicity of radioembolization plus Sorafenib in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: analysis of the European multicentre trial SORAMIC.

    PubMed

    Ricke, Jens; Bulla, Karsten; Kolligs, Frank; Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus; Reimer, Peter; Sangro, Bruno; Schott, Eckart; Schütte, Kerstin; Verslype, Chris; Walecki, Jerzy; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The benefits of combined systemic and liver-directed treatments in inoperable intermediate- or advanced-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have yet to be defined. This article presents the planned safety analyses for the first 40 patients randomized to radioembolization with yttrium-90 ((90) Y) resin microspheres followed by sorafenib (n = 20) or sorafenib only (n = 20) in the SORAMIC study. Patients identified for palliative treatment who were poor candidates for transarterial (chemo)embolization (including those failing TACE) with preserved liver function (Child-Pugh ≤B7) and ECOG performance status <2 were screened. Radioembolization was administered using a sequential lobar approach. On day 3 after the last radioembolization procedure, sorafenib 200 mg twice daily was initiated escalating to 400 mg twice daily 1 week later; a matching sorafenib dose schedule was initiated in the control arm. Patients were followed up for a median of 8.3 months. Median total implanted activity of (90) Y was 1.87 (range: 0.54-2.35) GBq. Patients received a similar intensity and duration of sorafenib in the combination-treatment arm (median daily dose 614 mg over 8.5 months) and control arm (557 mg over 9.6 months). The incidence of total (196 vs. 222) and grade ≥3 (43 vs. 47) adverse events was similar in combination-treatment arm and control arm respectively (P > 0.05). No significant differences in the number of total or grade 3/4 toxicities were recorded for: total bilirubin, albumin, liver enzymes, ascites, Child-Pugh, fatigue, hand-foot skin reaction, blood pressure or diarrhoea. Radioembolization followed by sorafenib appears to be as well tolerated as sorafenib alone. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A phase I and pharmacokinetic study of ganetespib (STA-9090) in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Lipika; Wadlow, Raymond C; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S; Wolpin, Brian M; Abrams, Thomas A; McCleary, Nadine Jackson; Sheehan, Susan; Sundaram, Eamala; Karol, Michael D; Chen, John; Zhu, Andrew X

    2015-02-01

    Ganetespib (STA-9090) is an Hsp90 inhibitor that downregulates VEGFR, c-MET, HER2, IGF-IR, EGFR, and other Hsp90 client proteins involved in hepatocarcinogenesis, thereby making it an attractive therapy for HCC. This Phase I study was performed to establish the safety, tolerability, recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D), and preliminary clinical activity of ganetespib in previously treated patients with advanced HCC. Patients with advanced HCC, Child-Pugh A cirrhosis, progression on or intolerance to sorafenib, and ECOG PS ≤ 1 were enrolled in a standard 3x3 dose escalation study at doses of 100 mg/m(2), 150 mg/m(2), and 200 mg/m(2) IV given on days 1, 8, and 15 of each 28-day cycle. Objective response by RECIST version 1.1 criteria was evaluated by CT/MRI every 8 weeks. Fourteen patients were enrolled in this trial and received at least one dose of the study drug. Of the 14 patients: median age, 57 years old; male 71 %; Asian 36 %; HCC etiology (HBV 36 %, HCV 43 %, Hemachromatosis 7 %, unknown 21 %); Child Pugh Class (A 93 %, B 7 %); median number of prior treatments 2; median baseline AFP 70.1 ng/mL. The RP2D was determined to be 200 mg/m(2). The most commonly seen AEs were diarrhea (93 %), fatigue (71 %), AST elevation (64 %), and hyperglycemia (64 %). The most common Gr 3/4 AEs were hyperglycemia (21 %) and lipasemia (21 %). One (7 %) patient had a fatal AE, septic shock, within 30 days of receiving the study drug. One dose-limiting toxicity, grade 3 lipasemia, was observed at the 100 mg/m(2) dose. Pharmacokinetics studies showed a t1/2, CL, Tmax, and Vss of 6.45 h, 48.28 L/h (25.56 L/h/m(2)), 0.76 h, and 191 L (100.4 L/m(2)), respectively. No objective responses were seen; one patient (7 %) had stable disease at 16 weeks. Median time to progression was 1.8 months, and median overall survival was 7.2 months. Ganetespib had a manageable safety profile in patients with advanced HCC who had progressed on at least one line of systemic therapy. The pharmacokinetic

  6. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Young Seok; Kim, Mi-Sook; Yoo, Sung Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Yang, Kwang Mo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Choi, Chul Won; Lee, Dong Han; Kim, Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kang, Hye Jin; Kim, YoungHan

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical application of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost in locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients with a focus on local efficacy and toxicity. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients with locally advanced and nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer who had been treated between 2004 and 2006. Follow-up duration ranged from 4 to 41 months (median, 14.5 months). A total dose of 40 Gy was delivered in 20 fractions using a conventional three-field technique, and then a single fraction of 14, 15, 16, or 17 Gy SBRT was administered as a boost without a break. Twenty-one patients received chemotherapy. Overall and local progression-free survival were calculated and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: One-year overall survival and local progression-free survival rates were 60.0% and 70.2%, respectively. One patient (3%) developed Grade 4 toxicity. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 response was found to be an independent prognostic factor for survival. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that a SBRT boost provides a safe means of increasing radiation dose. Based on the results of this study, we recommend that a well controlled Phase II study be conducted on locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  7. Type 1 interferon receptor in peripheral blood mononuclear cells may predict response to intra-arterial 5-fluorouracil + interferon therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tomiyama, Yasuyuki; Yoshioka, Naoko; Yanai, Yoshiaki; Kawase, Tomoya; Nishina, Sohji; Hara, Yuichi; Yoshida, Koji; Korenaga, Keiko; Korenaga, Masaaki; Hino, Keisuke

    2011-01-01

    Background Type 1 interferon alpha receptor 2 (IFNAR2) in the liver has been reported to be a predictive factor for the response to intra-arterial 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) + systemic interferon (IFN)-alpha combination therapy in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. We tested whether IFNAR2 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells could predict the response to 5-FU + IFN. Methods Predictive factors for survival and response to therapy were determined in 30 patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent treatment with 5-FU + IFN. IFNAR2 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was measured in 11 of the 30 patients. Results With a mean number of 4.2 courses of combination therapy, one patient (3%) showed a complete response, eight (27%) showed partial responses, 13 (43%) had stable disease, and eight (27%) showed progressive disease. The median survival time of responders (complete response/partial response) was 12.7 months and that of nonresponders (stable disease/progressive disease) was 7.5 months. The one-year and two-year cumulative survival rates of responders and nonresponders were 87/69% and 40/11%, respectively (P = 0.019). Multivariate analysis identified response to therapy (P = 0.037) as the sole independent determinant of survival. The expression level of IFNAR2 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was significantly (P = 0.012) higher in responders (6.5 ± 2.4) than in nonresponders (2.4 ± 0.6), even though no clinical factors were identified as being associated with the response to the combination therapy. Conclusion IFNAR2 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells may predict the response to 5-FU + IFN therapy in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, although these data are preliminary. PMID:24367220

  8. [Relationship between sorafenib-associated hand-food skin reaction and efficacy in treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao-ning; Lu, Li-gong; Shao, Pei-jian; Hu, Bao-shan; Li, Yong; Yu, Xian-yi; He, Xu

    2012-04-03

    To investigate the link between the antitumor efficacy of sorafenib and its cutaneous side effects in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We retrospectively analyzed the incidence of hand-foot skin reactions (HFRS) of 51 patients with advanced HCC who treated by sorafenib combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE), comparing tumor disease control rate (DCR), median progression free survival (mPFS) and median overall survival (mOS) in the different severity HFRS groups. The Cox proportional hazard model was applied to the multivariate survival analysis for the PFS. Fifty-one HCC patients treated with sorafenib combined with TACE were included in this study. 13/51 without HFRS (grade 0), 38/51 developed at all grade 1-3, 27 developed at grade 1-2, 11 developed at grade 3. The DCR were 38.5%, 70.4% and 90.9% in the three groups (P < 0.05). Group grade 0 vs grade 1-3, P = 0.031, the difference had statistical significance. Group grade 1-2 vs grade 3, P = 0.352, the difference had no statistical significance. The mPFS were 2.8 months (95%CI 1.6 - 4.0), 4.5 (95%CI 1.3 - 7.7) months and 12.8 (95%CI 3.7 - 21.9) months (P < 0.05), group grade 0 vs grade 1-2, P = 0.019, HR (hazard ratio): 2.8 (95%CI 1.3 - 6.3), P = 0.010, group grade 0 vs grade 3, P < 0.01, HR 6.6 (95%CI 2.3 - 19.0), P < 0.01, group grade 1-2 vs grade 3, P = 0.054; the three groups' mOS were 8.5 months (95%CI 5.9 - 11.1), 13.0 (95%CI 10.1 - 15.9) months and 25.4 months, P < 0.05, there were statistically significant differences between the any two groups. HFRS should be closely monitored in HCC patients treated with sorafenib in relation to its potential role as a surrogate marker of efficacy, but it has yet to be demonstrated whether the efficacy increasing with the severity of HFRS or not.

  9. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  10. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice.

  11. High-dose stereotactic body radiotherapy correlates increased local control and overall survival in patients with inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have reported high tumor response and local control. However, the optimal SBRT dose remains unknown, and it is still not clear whether a dose response relationship for local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) exist or not. We performed this study to determine whether a dose response relationship for LC and OS is observed in SBRT for inoperable HCC. Methods Between 2003 and 2011, 108 patients with HCC were treated with SBRT. All patients were unsuitable for surgery or local ablation and had incomplete response to transarterial chemoembolization. Eighty-two patients with a longest tumor diameter (LD) less than or equal to 7.0 cm who were treated with 3-fraction SBRT and were analyzed. This cohort comprised 74 Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) class A patients and 8 CTP class B7 patients. The median LD was 3.0 cm (range, 1.0–7.0 cm), and the median dose was 51 Gy (range, 33–60 Gy). Results LC and OS rates at 2 years after SBRT were 87% and 63%, respectively, with a median follow-up duration of 30 months for all patients. The 2-year LC/OS rates for patients treated with doses of > 54, 45–54, and < 45 Gy were 100/71, 78/64, and 64%/30%, respectively (p = .009/p < .001). Multivariate analysis revealed that the SBRT dose (p = .005) and Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage (p = .015) were significant prognostic factors for OS. Correlation analysis revealed a positive linear relationship between the SBRT dose and LC (p = .006, R = .899)/OS (p = .002, R = .940) at 2 years. Based on the tumor-control probability model, a dose of 54.8 Gy provides 2-year LC with a 90% probability. Five patients experienced grade 3 or higher gastrointestinal toxicity, and 6 had deteriorating of CTP score by greater than or equal to 2 within 3 months of SBRT. Conclusions This study demonstrated a dose response relationship for LC and OS with SBRT for HCC. Higher LC rates resulting from an

  12. Hepatocellular carcinoma in patients without advanced fibrosis after HCV eradication antiviral treatment.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Torrijos, Yolanda; Ternero Vega, Jara Eloísa; Cepeda Franco, Carmen

    2017-10-01

    From the last few years, hepatitis C virus and the new direct antiviral treatments are being more and more important. In consequence, case studies like the one we present, the appearance of hepatocelullar carcinoma after its eradication with fibrosis grade 2, are getting special interest. In 2007, our patient was treated with pegylated interferon α-2a and ribavirin, having a sustained virological response after it. In this way, liver fibrosis grade 2 was confirmed by a biopsy. Finally, after corroborating a good liver functioning, the patient was discharged (as, according to the guidebooks, an ultrasound scan of screeing every 6 months was not required). In 2014, the patient came to hospital because of a pain at right hypochondrium and he was diagnosed with hepatocelullar carcinoma. A hepatectomy was done objectifying the surgical piece, liver fibrosis grade 2, one more time. Subsequently, a tumour relapse through an abdominal CT scan, a tumour relapse was found and despite the Sorafenib treatment, the patient died on January 2015. This case study provokes curiosity and uncertainty about the attitude which should be taken respect to the monitoring, and hepatocelullar carcinoma screening overall, in patients with a sustained virological response after eradicator treatment and without advanced fibrosis. Nowadays, with the benefits of the new treatments, the amount of patients in this situation is increasing significantly.

  13. Randomized phase II study of axitinib versus placebo plus best supportive care in second-line treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y-K; Yau, T; Park, J-W; Lim, H Y; Lee, T-Y; Obi, S; Chan, S L; Qin, Sk; Kim, R D; Casey, M; Chen, C; Bhattacharyya, H; Williams, J A; Valota, O; Chakrabarti, D; Kudo, M

    2015-12-01

    The efficacy and safety of axitinib, a potent and selective vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1-3 inhibitor, combined with best supportive care (BSC) was evaluated in a global, randomized, placebo-controlled phase II trial in patients with locally advanced or metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients with HCC and Child-Pugh Class A who progressed on or were intolerant to one prior antiangiogenic therapy were stratified by tumour invasion (presence/absence of extrahepatic spread and/or vascular invasion) and region (Asian/non-Asian) and randomized (2:1) to axitinib/BSC (starting dose 5 mg twice-daily) or placebo/BSC. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). The estimated hazard ratio for OS was 0.907 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.646-1.274; one-sided stratified P = 0.287] for axitinib/BSC (n = 134) versus placebo/BSC (n = 68), with the median (95% CI) of 12.7 (10.2-14.9) versus 9.7 (5.9-11.8) months, respectively. Results of prespecified subgroup analyses in Asian versus non-Asian patients or presence versus absence of tumour invasion were consistent with the overall population. Improvements favouring axitinib/BSC (P < 0.01) were observed in secondary efficacy end point analyses [progression-free survival (PFS), time to tumour progression (TTP), and clinical benefit rate (CBR)], and were retained among Asian patients in the prespecified subgroup analyses. Overall response rate did not differ significantly between treatments and patient-reported outcomes favoured placebo/BSC. Most common all-causality adverse events with axitinib/BSC were diarrhoea (54%), hypertension (54%), and decreased appetite (47%). Baseline serum analyses identified potential new prognostic (interleukin-6, E-selectin, interleukin-8, angiopoietin-2, migration inhibitory factor, and c-MET) or predictive (E-selectin and stromal-derived factor-1) factors for survival. Axitinib/BSC did not improve OS over placebo/BSC in the overall population or in stratification

  14. Concurrent apatinib and local radiation therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Deng, Weiye; Cao, Xiaoci; Shi, Xiaoming; Zhao, Huanfen; Duan, Zheping; Lv, Bonan; Liu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Apatinib is a novel anti-angiogenic agent targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, which is effective in patients with chemotherapy-refractory gastric cancer. There are no reports of concurrent apatinib with local radiation therapy in elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer. Patient concerns and Diagnoses: we present the first published report of a 70-year-old male patient with advanced gastric cancer who received concurrent apatinib and local radiation therapy after failure of oxaliplatin and S-1 chemotherapy. Interventions and Outcomes: The patient received concurrent apatinib and local radiation therapy and was followed up 7 months after therapy without disease progress, 14 months later indicated extensive metastasis and this patient died of pulmonary infection. Lessons: Elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer may benefit from concurrent apatinib with local radiation therapy when chemotherapy is not tolerated or successful. Further studies are needed to investigate the clinical outcomes and toxicities associated with concurrent apatinib and radiation therapy in gastric cancer. PMID:28248891

  15. Exceptional serological and radiological response to sorafenib in 2 patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma and chronic hepatitis C viral infection: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Atkin, Catherine; Earwaker, Philip; Pallan, Arvind; Shetty, Shishir; Punia, Pankaj; Ma, Yuk Ting

    2017-02-14

    In patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib is the only systemic treatment that has been shown to increase overall survival. However, similar to other tyrosine kinase inhibitors, most patients achieve disease stabilisation radiologically, and only 2-3% of patients achieve a partial response. Recent exploratory subgroup analyses of the large phase 3 trials have demonstrated that patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection associated HCC survive longer than those who are negative for HCV. The mechanism underlying this currently remains unknown. A small number of cases of complete response to sorafenib treatment have now been reported worldwide, however a prolonged response has only been reported in 2 cases, both of whom had HCV-related HCC. A 55 year old gentleman was diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma and concomitant chronic hepatitis C viral infection. He progressed following transarterial chemoemoblisation treatment and was commenced on sorafenib treatment. His serum alphafetoprotein level normalised within 2 months of treatment and he achieved an almost complete radiological response. This response was maintained for 20 months before the patient progressed. A 75 year old lady was diagnosed with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma and concomitant chronic hepatitis C viral infection. She was commenced on sorafenib treatment but required early dose reductions due to palmar plantar erythrodysesthesia, and liver decompensation. Despite this she achieved an excellent serological and radiological response that was maintained for 24 months. Our two cases show that patients with HCV-associated HCC can attain excellent responses to sorafenib treatment that is durable. Furthermore, such exceptional responses can be achieved even with dose reductions and treatment breaks.

  16. Early Clinical Response after 2 Weeks of Sorafenib Therapy Predicts Outcomes and Anti-Tumor Response in Patients with Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuzuya, Teiji; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Ishizu, Yoji; Honda, Takashi; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Katano, Yoshiaki; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nakano, Isao; Goto, Hidemi

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims We evaluated the relationship between the early clinical response after 2 weeks of sorafenib therapy and the outcomes and anti-tumor response in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods Fifty-seven patients who had intrahepatic hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma and Child-Pugh (CP) class A disease at baseline were enrolled in this prospective, multicenter, observational, non-interventional study. As an early clinical response after 2 weeks of sorafenib therapy, changes in intra-tumor blood flow on contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, and remnant liver function were investigated. Results After 2 weeks of sorafenib therapy, there were 26 patients (45.6%) without disappearance of arterial tumor enhancement on CE-CT, 15 patients (26.3%) with an AFP ratio of >1.2, and seven patients (12.3%) with two or more increments in the CP score. Multivariate analysis showed that the absence of disappearance of arterial tumor enhancement on CE-CT, AFP ratio of >1.2, and two or more increments in the CP score after 2 weeks of sorafenib therapy were significant and independent predictors of worse survival. Upon scoring these three variables as "poor prognostic factors", patients with poor prognostic score 4, 3 or 2 (n = 17) had significantly worse outcomes and a significantly higher progressive disease (PD) rate based on modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors at 6 weeks after sorafenib therapy than those with poor prognostic score 1 or 0 (n = 40) (median overall survival: 194 days vs. 378 days; p = 0.0010, PD rate: 70.6% vs. 20.0%; p = 0.0003, respectively). Conclusions Changes in intra-tumor blood flow on CE-CT, AFP levels, and remnant liver function after 2 weeks of sorafenib therapy may be useful for predicting the outcomes and anti-tumor response to sorafenib in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26421430

  17. Selective Mastectomy in the Management of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ahern, Verity . E-mail: verity.ahern@swahs.healthnsw.gov.au; Boyages, John; Gebski, Val M. Stat; Moon, Dominic; Wilcken, Nicholas

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate local control for patients with locally advanced noninflammatory breast cancer (LABC) managed by selective mastectomy. Methods and Materials: Between 1979 and 1996, 176 patients with LABC were prospectively managed by chemotherapy (CT)-irradiation (RT)-CT without routine mastectomy. All surviving patients were followed for a minimum of 5 years. Results: A total of 132 patients (75%) had a T4 tumor and 22 (12.5%) supraclavicular nodal disease. The clinical complete response rate was 91% (160/176), which included 13 patients who underwent mastectomy and 2 an iridium wire implant. The first site of failure was local for 43 patients (breast {+-} axilla for 38); 27 of these patients underwent salvage mastectomy and 11 did not for an overall mastectomy rate of 23% (40/176). If all 176 patients had undergone routine mastectomy (136 extra mastectomies), 11 additional patients may have avoided an unsalvageable first local relapse. The others would have either have not had a local relapse or would have suffered local relapse after distant disease. No tumor or treatment related factor was found to predict local disease at death. Median disease-free and overall survival for all patients was 26 and 52 months, respectively. Conclusions: Selective mastectomy in LABC may not jeopardize local control or survival.

  18. Combined approach to hepatocellular carcinoma: a new treatment concept for nonresectable disease.

    PubMed

    Strebel, Bruno M; Dufour, Jean-François

    2008-11-01

    Depending on tumor burden, hepatic function and patients' performance status, hepatocellular carcinoma is treated by surgery, local procedures, systemic therapy or palliation. The majority of patients are diagnosed at a stage where local therapy is the treatment of choice. Recently, the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib was found to improve the survival of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma and conserved liver function. In this manuscript, we summarize the experimental evidence supporting the combination of a systemic targeted therapy with a local therapy. We also discuss the pros and cons of different schedules of combining such treatments. We conclude that there is enough of a theoretical argument to design clinical trials testing this strategy.

  19. Evolving treatment paradigms for locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Dorff, Tanya B; Quek, Marcus L; Daneshmand, Siamak; Pinski, Jacek

    2006-11-01

    While men with early stage prostate cancer typically enjoy long-term survival after definitive management, for those who present with locally advanced or metastatic disease, survival is compromised. Multimodality therapy can prolong survival in these patients, with state-of-the-art options including intensity-modulated radiation or brachytherapy in conjunction with androgen ablation, adjuvant androgen ablation and/or chemotherapy with radical retropubic prostatectomy. In addition, novel biological therapies are being explored to target the unique molecular changes in prostate cancer cells and their interactions with the microenvironment. With these advances the outlook will undoubtedly improve, even for patients presenting with advanced disease. Careful application of these emerging therapies to a select group of prostate cancer patients most likely to obtain benefit from them is the challenge for urologists, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists for the future.

  20. Definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Yoo-Kang; Lee, Jong Hoon; Lee, Myung-Ah; Chun, Hoo-Geun; Kim, Dong-Goo; You, Young Kyoung; Hong, Tae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Survival outcome of locally advanced pancreatic cancer has been poor and little is known about prognostic factors of the disease, especially in locally advanced cases treated with concurrent chemoradiation. This study was to analyze overall survival and prognostic factors of patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Materials and Methods Medical records of 34 patients diagnosed with unresectable pancreatic cancer and treated with definitive CCRT, from December 2003 to December 2012, were reviewed. Median prescribed radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 41.4 to 55.8 Gy), once daily, five times per week, 1.8 to 3 Gy per fraction. Results With a mean follow-up of 10 months (range, 0 to 49 months), median overall survival was 9 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 40% and 10%, respectively. Median and mean time to progression were 5 and 7 months, respectively. Prognostic parameters related to overall survival were post-CCRT CA19-9 (p = 0.02), the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) status (p < 0.01), and radiation dose (p = 0.04) according to univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, post-CCRT CA19-9 value below 180 U/mL and ECOG status 0 or 1 were statistically significant independent prognostic factors associated with improved overall survival (p < 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). Conclusion Overall treatment results in locally advanced pancreatic cancer are relatively poor and few improvements have been accomplished in the past decades. Post-treatment CA19-9 below 180 U/mL and ECOG performance status 0 and 1 were significantly associated with an improved overall survival. PMID:25061572

  1. Management of locally advanced primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Ambarish S; Kumar, Rajiv; Purandare, Nilendu; Jiwnani, Sabita; Karimundackal, George; Pramesh, CS

    2017-01-01

    Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma (PMSS) is a relatively rare disease, and patients are treated predominantly with surgery for resectable disease. Management of locally advanced borderline resectable and unresectable PMSS is not only challenging but also lacks standard guidelines. We present three patients with PMSS, who were unresectable or borderline resectable at presentation and were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. PMID:28360472

  2. Photodynamic therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandanayake, N. S.; Huggett, M. T.; Bown, S. G.; Pogue, B. W.; Hasan, T.; Pereira, S. P.

    2010-02-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma ranks as the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the USA. Patients usually present late with advanced disease, limiting attempted curative surgery to 10% of cases. Overall prognosis is poor with one-year survival rates of less than 10% with palliative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Given these dismal results, a minimally invasive treatment capable of local destruction of tumor tissue with low morbidity may have a place in the treatment of this disease. In this paper we review the preclinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) studies which have shown that it is possible to achieve a zone of necrosis in normal pancreas and implanted tumour tissue. Side effects of treatment and evidence of a potential survival advantage are discussed. We describe the only published clinical study of pancreatic interstitial PDT, which was carried out by our group (Bown et al Gut 2002), in 16 patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. All patients had evidence of tumor necrosis on follow-up imaging, with a median survival from diagnosis of 12.5 months. Finally, we outline a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin single fibre PDT followed by standard gemcitabine chemotherapy which our group is currently undertaking in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Randomized controlled studies are also planned.

  3. Nivolumab in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (CheckMate 040): an open-label, non-comparative, phase 1/2 dose escalation and expansion trial.

    PubMed

    El-Khoueiry, Anthony B; Sangro, Bruno; Yau, Thomas; Crocenzi, Todd S; Kudo, Masatoshi; Hsu, Chiun; Kim, Tae-You; Choo, Su-Pin; Trojan, Jörg; Welling, Theodore H; Meyer, Tim; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Yeo, Winnie; Chopra, Akhil; Anderson, Jeffrey; Dela Cruz, Christine; Lang, Lixin; Neely, Jaclyn; Tang, Hao; Dastani, Homa B; Melero, Ignacio

    2017-06-24

    For patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, sorafenib is the only approved drug worldwide, and outcomes remain poor. We aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of nivolumab, a programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) immune checkpoint inhibitor, in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with or without chronic viral hepatitis. We did a phase 1/2, open-label, non-comparative, dose escalation and expansion trial (CheckMate 040) of nivolumab in adults (≥18 years) with histologically confirmed advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with or without hepatitis C or B (HCV or HBV) infection. Previous sorafenib treatment was allowed. A dose-escalation phase was conducted at seven hospitals or academic centres in four countries or territories (USA, Spain, Hong Kong, and Singapore) and a dose-expansion phase was conducted at an additional 39 sites in 11 countries (Canada, UK, Germany, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan). At screening, eligible patients had Child-Pugh scores of 7 or less (Child-Pugh A or B7) for the dose-escalation phase and 6 or less (Child-Pugh A) for the dose-expansion phase, and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 1 or less. Patients with HBV infection had to be receiving effective antiviral therapy (viral load <100 IU/mL); antiviral therapy was not required for patients with HCV infection. We excluded patients previously treated with an agent targeting T-cell costimulation or checkpoint pathways. Patients received intravenous nivolumab 0·1-10 mg/kg every 2 weeks in the dose-escalation phase (3+3 design). Nivolumab 3 mg/kg was given every 2 weeks in the dose-expansion phase to patients in four cohorts: sorafenib untreated or intolerant without viral hepatitis, sorafenib progressor without viral hepatitis, HCV infected, and HBV infected. Primary endpoints were safety and tolerability for the escalation phase and objective response rate (Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors version 1.1) for the expansion phase

  4. Trametinib or Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Refractory or Advanced Biliary or Gallbladder Cancer or That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-11

    Adult Cholangiocarcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage C Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage D Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Stage II Gallbladder Cancer; Stage III Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IV Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IV Distal Bile Duct Cancer; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma

  5. Hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Z Y

    2000-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has ranked second in cancer mortality in China since the 1990s and is increasing in frequency among males in many countries. Hepatitis B and C viruses, aflatoxin and algal toxin in the contaminated drinking water remain major aetiological factors and hepatitis G virus and transfusion-transmitted virus can not be excluded. A prospective randomized control trial screening for HCC in a high-risk population using alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and ultrasonography has demonstrated a decrease in HCC mortality. Rapidly progressing medical imaging has continuously contributed to the improving treatment results. Surgical resection still plays a major role in influencing prognosis of HCC. Studies on recurrence and metastasis after curative resection have become a key issue for further improvement of the surgical outcome. Regional cancer therapies are progressing rapidly, based on the advances in early diagnosis. The advantages and disadvantages of these are noted. Multimodality combination and sequential treatment has been accepted as an important approach for unresectable HCC and cytoreduction and sequential resection have attracted attention. Conformal radiotherapy has shown important potential for HCC treatment. Intra-arterial chemotherapy has been repeatedly proved effective; however, systemic chemotherapy for HCC remains disappointing. The effects of tamoxifen are questionable, whereas alpha-interferon has been shown to have significant potential, particularly in prevention of recurrence. All of these treatments have resulted in continuing improvement of HCC prognosis in some centres.

  6. Advances in local ablation of malignant liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Eisele, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Local ablation of liver tumors matured during the recent years and is now proven to be an effective tool in the treatment of malignant liver lesions. Advances focus on the improvement of local tumor control by technical innovations, individual selection of imaging modalities, more accurate needle placement and the free choice of access to the liver. Considering data found in the current literature for conventional local ablative treatment strategies, virtually no single technology is able to demonstrate an unequivocal superiority. Hints at better performance of microwave compared to radiofrequency ablation regarding local tumor control, duration of the procedure and potentially achievable larger size of ablation areas favour the comparably more recent treatment modality; image fusion enables more patients to undergo ultrasound guided local ablation; magnetic resonance guidance may improve primary success rates in selected patients; navigation and robotics accelerate the needle placement and reduces deviation of needle positions; laparoscopic thermoablation results in larger ablation areas and therefore hypothetically better local tumor control under acceptable complication rates, but seems to be limited to patients with no, mild or moderate adhesions following earlier surgical procedures. Apart from that, most techniques appear technically feasible, albeit demanding. Which technology will in the long run become accepted, is subject to future work. PMID:27099433

  7. [Locally advanced prostate cancer: definition, prognosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Plantade, Anne; Massard, Christophe; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Fizazi, Karim

    2007-07-01

    According to d'Amico's criteria, high-risk localized prostate cancer are defined either by an extracapsular extension (T3 or T4), either by a high Gleason score (> 7) or a PSA rate higher than 20 ng/ml. Pelvic lymph node involvement also corresponds to locally advanced prostate cancer. Statistical models called nomograms have been developed to predict the probability of prostate cancer recurrence and are also used to define locally advanced patients. Prostate MRI may help to detect an extracapsular extension or a seminal vesicles involvement but remains still discussed. A bone scan, an abdominal and pelvic CT scan have to be performed in order to detect metastases. A pelvic lymph node dissection is recommended in order to adapt the treatment of these patients. Standard treatment for high-risk localized prostate cancer without lymph node involvement is now well defined. The association of both local radiation and a long androgen deprivation (GnHR agonist) showed an overall survival benefit (more than 10%). The radiation dose of 74 Gy is recommended. Other questions are still debating : the optimal duration of the hormonotherapy , the use of the bicalutamide 150 mg instead of GnRH agonists, the optimal radiation dose. Radical prostatectomy is no more considered as a standard treatment for these patients. Since the use of chemotherapy for metastatic patients showed a benefit in overall survival, the place of chemotherapy as adjuvant or neo-adjuvant treatment is questionned in several randomized phase III studies. Sometimes high-risk disease is diagnosed after performance of a radical prostatectomy. A postoperative radiation may be performed in order to decrease clinical and biochemical progression. The use of bicalutamide 150 mg in this situation may have a positive impact too on progression free survival. In case of lymph node involvement, androgen deprivation is the standard treatment with an overall survival benefit. The place of local radiation therapy is still

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Jain, Sanjay; Goldstein, Michael; Miksad, Rebecca; Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Brennan, Darren M.D.; Callery, Mark; Vollmer, Charles

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis. Conventional concurrent chemoradiotherapy requires 6 weeks of daily treatment and can be arduous. We explored the safety and effectiveness of a 3-day course of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) followed by gemcitabine in this population. Patients and Methods: A total of 36 patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with {>=}12 months of follow-up were included. They received three fractions of 8, 10, or 12 Gy (total dose, 24-36 Gy) of SBRT according to the tumor location in relation to the stomach and duodenum, using fiducial-based respiratory motion tracking on a robotic radiosurgery system. The patients were then offered gemcitabine for 6 months or until tolerance or disease progression. Results: With an overall median follow-up of 24 months (range, 12-33), the local control rate was 78%, the median overall survival time was 14.3 months, the median carbohydrate antigen 19-9-determined progression-free survival time was 7.9 months, and the median computed tomography-determined progression-free survival time was 9.6 months. Of the 36 patients, 28 (78%) eventually developed distant metastases. Six patients (17%) were free of progression at the last follow-up visit (range, 13-30 months) as determined by normalized tumor markers with stable computed tomography findings. Nine Grade 2 (25%) and five Grade 3 (14%) toxicities attributable to SBRT occurred. Conclusion: Hypofractionated SBRT can be delivered quickly and effectively in patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with acceptable side effects and minimal interference with gemcitabine chemotherapy.

  9. MK2206 in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Biliary Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Stage IV Distal Bile Duct Cancer; Stage IV Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma

  10. 18F-FDG PET/CT can predict survival of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma patients: A multicenter retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Na, Sae Jung; Oh, Jin Kyoung; Hyun, Seung Hyup; Lee, Jeong Won; Hong, Il Ki; Song, Bong-Il; Kim, Tae-Sung; Eo, Jae Seon; Lee, Sung Won; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Chung, Yong An; Yun, Mijin

    2016-10-27

    Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage C hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) consists of a heterogeneous group of patients with a wide range of survival times, requiring further prognostic stratification to facilitate treament allocation. We evaluated the prognostic value of (18)F-flurodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) at the time of presentation in patients with BCLC stage C HCC.

  11. Locally advanced rectal cancer: time for precision therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Martin R; Zhang, Zhen; Schrag, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The year 2015 marks the 30th anniversary of the publication of NSABP-R01, a landmark trial demonstrating the benefit of adding pelvic radiation to the treatment regimen for locally advanced rectal cancer with a resultant decrease in local recurrence from 25% to 16%. These results ushered in the era of multimodal therapy for rectal cancer, heralding modern treatment and changing the standard of care in the United States. We have seen many advances over the past 3 decades, including optimization of the administration and timing of radiation, widespread adoption of total mesorectal excision (TME), and the implementation of more effective systemic chemotherapy. The current standard is neoadjuvant chemoradiation with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and a radiosensitizer, TME, and adjuvant chemotherapy including 5-FU and oxaliplatin. The results of this regimen have been impressive, with a reported local recurrence rate of less than 10%. However, the rates of distant relapse remain 30% to 40%, indicating room for improvement. In addition, trimodality therapy is arduous and many patients are unable to complete the full course of treatment. In this article we discuss the current standard of care and alternative strategies that have evolved in an attempt to individualize therapy according to risk of recurrence.

  12. Locally advanced colon cancer with cutaneous invasion: case report.

    PubMed

    Tenreiro, Nádia; Ferreira, Cátia; Silva, Silvia; Marques, Rita; Ribeiro, Artur; Sousa, Paulo Jorge; Luís, Fernando Próspero

    2017-03-01

    Locally advanced colon cancer with direct abdominal wall and skin invasion is an extremely rare finding with most data being derived from case reports, historical autopsy-based or single-center retrospective studies. We present a unique case of a colon cancer with direct cutaneous invasion and colocutaneous fistulization. Eighty-six year old Caucasian female with multiple comorbidities, referred to Surgical Consultation due to ulcerated skin lesion in the abdomen. She had a long-standing large umbilical hernia but with no previous episodes of incarceration or occlusive symptoms. She denied any digestive or constitutional symptoms. Physical examination showed a large non-reducible umbilical hernia, with an associated painless firm mass within the hernia sac and cutaneous ulcerated growth. Colonoscopy revealed transverse colon cancer (endoscopic biopsy of the tumor and skin punch biopsy confirmed adenocarcinoma of the colon). Computed tomography showed a tumoral mass within the umbilical hernia, with cutaneous infiltration and enlarged regional lymph nodes. Rapid local progression led to colocutaneous fistula with total fecal diversion. We performed an extended right hemicolectomy with en bloc excision of the hernia sac and infiltrating cutaneous mass. In the current era of widespread use of screening colonoscopies, initial diagnosis of locally advanced colon cancer is decreasing. However, this unique case presented an opportunity to recall the advantages of multivisceral resections.

  13. Bilateral Blindness Following Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, K. Liang; Kuruvilla, Sara; Sanatani, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a life-threatening neurologic complication of thiamine deficiency. Though the presentation of symptoms can vary widely, the classical triad is founded on ophthalmoplegia, alteration of mental status, and gait disturbance. We describe a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in an oncology patient shortly after concurrent 5-fluorouracil, carboplatin, and radiotherapy for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer, presenting as complete bilateral blindness, ataxia, nystagmus, and confusion. Thiamine was given based on clinical suspicion and rapid improvement of clinical findings occurred. An MRI performed later supported the diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy. A multifactorial etiology of thiamine deficiency from nutritional deficits and neurotoxic effects of chemotherapy are hypothesized. PMID:26623207

  14. Resection versus other treatments for locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Kumar, Senthil; Davidson, Brian R; Fusai, Giuseppe

    2014-02-27

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive cancer. Resection of the cancer is the only treatment with the potential to achieve long-term survival. However, a third of patients with pancreatic cancer have locally advanced cancer involving adjacent structures such as blood vessels which are not usually removed because of fear of increased complications after surgery. Such patients often receive palliative treatment. Resection of the pancreas along with the involved vessels is an alternative to palliative treatment for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. To compare the benefits and harms of surgical resection versus palliative treatment in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 12), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, and trial registers until February 2014. We included randomised controlled trials comparing pancreatic resection versus palliative treatments for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (irrespective of language or publication status). Two authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and independently extracted the data. We analysed the data with both the fixed-effect and random-effects models using Review Manager (RevMan). We calculated the hazard ratio (HR), risk ratio (RR) or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on an intention-to-treat analysis. We identified two trials comparing pancreatic resection versus other treatments for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Ninety eight patients were randomised to pancreatic resection (n = 47) or palliative treatment (n = 51) in the two trials included in this review. Both trials were at high risk of bias. Both trials included patients who had locally advanced pancreatic cancer which involved the serosa anteriorly or retroperitoneum posteriorly or involved the blood vessels. Such pancreatic cancers would be considered

  15. Locally advanced prostate cancer: current controversies and optimisation opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, S; Dal Pra, A; Catton, C; Bristow, R G; Warde, P

    2013-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men worldwide. The rate of patients presenting with locally advanced prostate cancer has declined in recent decades, mainly due to prostate-specific antigen screening, but the management of these patients still remains controversial. Current literature suggests that the standard of care for these patients is a combination approach with radiation therapy and androgen deprivation therapy. However, there remain many unresolved issues, including the role of dose-escalated radiation therapy, the additional benefit of surgery and the role of systemic therapy, both standard chemotherapeutic agents and novel agents. Furthermore, in the era of personalised medicine, additional research is needed to evaluate the role of biomarkers to better predict the risk of local and systemic relapse in this population.

  16. A Review of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Wang, Ji; Ma, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Hui, Beina; Liu, Rui; Ma, Hailin; Ren, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has become the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy not only can reduce tumor size and recurrence, but also increase the tumor resection rate and anus retention rate with very slight side effect. Comparing with preoperative chemotherapy, preoperative chemoradiotherapy can further reduce the local recurrence rate and downstage. Middle and low rectal cancers can benefit more from neoadjuvant chemradiotherapy than high rectal cancer. It needs to refine the selection of appropriate patients and irradiation modes for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Different therapeutic reactions to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy affect the type of surgical techniques, hence calling for the need of much attention. Furthermore, many problems such as accurate staging before surgery, selection of suitable neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy method, and sensitivity prediction to preoperative radiotherapy need to be well settled. PMID:27489505

  17. Hepatocellular carcinoma: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Lisa P; Deshpande, Vrushak; Pyrsopoulos, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is rapidly becoming one of the most prevalent cancers worldwide. With a rising rate, it is a prominent source of mortality. Patients with advanced fibrosis, predominantly cirrhosis and hepatitis B are predisposed to developing HCC. Individuals with chronic hepatitis B and C infections are most commonly afflicted. Different therapeutic options, including liver resection, transplantation, systemic and local therapy, must be tailored to each patient. Liver transplantation offers leading results to achieve a cure. The Milan criteria is acknowledged as the model to classify the individuals that meet requirements to undergo transplantation. Mean survival remains suboptimal because of long waiting times and limited donor organ resources. Recent debates involve expansion of these criteria to create options for patients with HCC to increase overall survival. PMID:26609342

  18. Transarterial Therapies for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, Ezio; Donadon, Matteo; Poretti, Dario; Pedicini, Vittorio; Tramarin, Marco; Roncalli, Massimo; Rhee, Hyungjin; Park, Young Nyun; Torzilli, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Background The treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is still a major health issue because of its increasing incidence and because of the complexity of its management. Transarterial embolization (TAE) and transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) are two widely used locoregional therapies in the treatment of HCC, especially for unresectable intermediate and advanced HCCs. Summary The modern use of TAE and TACE opens new scenarios for the treatment of unresectable HCC and has yielded interesting results. The present work describes the role of transarterial therapies for HCC and focuses on the different Western and Eastern approaches to the study of response predictors. Key Messages Recent refinements in interventional radiology techniques and in HCC patient selection have facilitated better local control of the disease. The molecular profiling of HCC to predict the response to TACE and TAE will greatly help clinicians identify the optimum therapy. PMID:27995085

  19. Locally advanced rectal cancer: The importance of a multidisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    Berardi, Rossana; Maccaroni, Elena; Onofri, Azzurra; Morgese, Francesca; Torniai, Mariangela; Tiberi, Michela; Ferrini, Consuelo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Rectal cancer accounts for a relevant part of colorectal cancer cases, with a mortality of 4-10/100000 per year. The development of locoregional recurrences and the occurrence of distant metastases both influences the prognosis of these patients. In the last two decades, new multimodality strategies have improved the prognosis of locally advanced rectal cancer with a significant reduction of local relapse and an increase in terms of overall survival. Radical surgery still remains the principal curative treatment and the introduction of total mesorectal excision has significantly achieved a reduction in terms of local recurrence rates. The employment of neoadjuvant treatment, delivered before surgery, also achieved an improved local control and an increased sphincter preservation rate in low-lying tumors, with an acceptable acute and late toxicity. This review describes the multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer, focusing on the effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and of post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy both in the standard combined modality treatment programs and in the ongoing research to improve these regimens. PMID:25516638

  20. Experience with fast neutron therapy for locally advanced sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Salinas, R.; Hussey, D.H.; Fletcher, G.H.; Lindberg, R.D.; Martin, R.G.; Peters, L.J.; Sinkovics, J.G.

    1980-03-01

    Between October 1972 and April 1978, 34 patients with locally advanced sarcomas were treated with fast neutrons using the Texas A and M variable energy cyclotron. The clinical material included 29 patients with soft tissue sarcomas, 4 with chondrosarcomas, and one with an osteosarcoma. The best results were achieved for patients with soft tissue sarcomas; 69% (20/29) had local control of their tumor. Only one of 4 patients with chondrosarcomas was classified as having local tumor control, and one patient with osteosarcoma had persistent disease. With most fractionation schedules, local tumor control was superior for patients who received doses greater than 6500 rad/sub eq/ (2100 rad/sub n..gamma../ with 50 MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons). The incidence of major complications was notably increased when maximum radiation doses of 7500 rad/sub eq/ or greater were administered (2400 rad/sub n..gamma../ with 50 MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons). In patients who underwent subsequent surgery, healing was satisfactory if the maximum radiation dose was limited to 4500 to 5500 rad/sub eq/(1450 to 1775 rad/sub n..gamma../ with 50 MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons).

  1. Locally advanced rectal cancer: the importance of a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Rossana; Maccaroni, Elena; Onofri, Azzurra; Morgese, Francesca; Torniai, Mariangela; Tiberi, Michela; Ferrini, Consuelo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2014-12-14

    Rectal cancer accounts for a relevant part of colorectal cancer cases, with a mortality of 4-10/100000 per year. The development of locoregional recurrences and the occurrence of distant metastases both influences the prognosis of these patients. In the last two decades, new multimodality strategies have improved the prognosis of locally advanced rectal cancer with a significant reduction of local relapse and an increase in terms of overall survival. Radical surgery still remains the principal curative treatment and the introduction of total mesorectal excision has significantly achieved a reduction in terms of local recurrence rates. The employment of neoadjuvant treatment, delivered before surgery, also achieved an improved local control and an increased sphincter preservation rate in low-lying tumors, with an acceptable acute and late toxicity. This review describes the multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer, focusing on the effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and of post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy both in the standard combined modality treatment programs and in the ongoing research to improve these regimens.

  2. Evaluation of rational extent lymphadenectomy for local advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Han; Deng, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    Based upon studies from randomized clinical trials, the extended (D2) lymph node dissection is now recommended as a standard procedure for local advanced gastric cancer worldwide. However, the rational extent lymphadenectomy for local advanced gastric cancer has remained a topic of debate in the past decades. Due to the limitation of low metastatic rate in para-aortic nodes (PAN) in JCOG9501, the clinical benefit of D2+ para-aortic nodal dissection (PAND) for patients with stage T4 and/or stage N3 disease, which is very common in China and other countries except Japan and Korea, cannot be determined. Furthermore, the role of splenectomy for complete resection of No.10 and No.11 nodes has been controversial, and however, the final results from the randomized trial of JCOG0110 have yet to be completed. Gastric cancer with the No.14 and No.13 lymph node metastasis is defined as M1 stage in the current version of the Japanese classification. We propose that D2+No.14v and +No.13 lymphadenectomy may be an option in a potentially curative gastrectomy for tumors with apparent metastasis to the No.6 nodes or infiltrate to duodenum. The examined lymph node and extranodal metastasis are significantly associated with the survival of gastric cancer patients. PMID:27647967

  3. Concurrent chemoradiation in locally advanced carcinoma cervix patients.

    PubMed

    Negi, R R; Gupta, Manish; Kumar, Muninder; Gupta, M K; Seam, R; Rastogi, Madhup

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of concurrent chemo radiation in locally advanced carcinoma cervix patients in our clinical setting. From Sept. 1st 2005 to Aug. 31st 2006, 102 patients of carcinoma cervix belonging to stage IIA to IV A were enrolled in the study. External beam radiation therapy was administered using Cobalt 60 teletherapy machine. Cisplatinum (40 mg/m 2) and 5 Fluorouracil (500 mg/m 2 ) continuous infusions with radiotherapy on D2-D5 in first and last 5 # of radiation therapy were administered. Response to treatment and toxicities were monitored and analyzed in 102 patients (50 study group and 52 control group). All 102 patients completed treatment. Out of 50 patients in the study group, 30, 10 and 4 patients had complete, partial and progressive disease, respectively. While out of 52 patients in the control group, 26 had complete and 12 showed partial response. No difference in overall renal, hematological and cutaneous toxicity was seen between two groups. This study did not show any benefit of concurrent chemo radiation as compared to radiotherapy alone in locally advanced cervical cancer patients. This could be due to more bulk of tumor stage per stage, poor nutritional status, less number of patients in both arms, not enough to pick up statistically significant small difference in outcome.

  4. Vismodegib induces significant clinical response in locally advanced trichoblastic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lepesant, P; Crinquette, M; Alkeraye, S; Mirabel, X; Dziwniel, V; Cribier, B; Mortier, L

    2015-10-01

    Patients with advanced basal cell carcinoma due to local extension or metastatic disease were previously at a therapeutic impasse. Targeted inhibition of the sonic hedgehog pathway by vismodegib represents a new therapeutic strategy. Adnexal carcinomas are rare malignant skin tumours derived from epithelial annexes. Conventional treatment of adnexal tumours is based on surgical excision. Although the radiosensitivity of adnexal carcinomas has not been established, radiotherapy could be offered alone or in combination in locally advanced or inoperable disease. Chemotherapy represents a therapeutic option in the treatment of metastatic adnexal tumours. Currently there is no effective treatment for these tumours when they become metastatic or unresectable, and treatment is palliative. Sunitinib represents a new therapeutic strategy, with efficiency described in the literature for a small number of patients. However, its efficacy is partial, and its tolerance is not always good. We report a patient with trichoblastic carcinoma, initially diagnosed as basal cell carcinoma, treated effectively with vismodegib. The remarkable response we have observed in this patient suggests an encouraging therapeutic role of vismodegib in trichoblastic carcinoma that should be evaluated in a carefully designed trial.

  5. Defining and recognising locally advanced basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Amici, Jean Michel; Battistella, Maxime; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Chatellier, Anne; Dalac-Ra, Sophie; Dreno, Brigitte; Falandry, Claire; Froget, Nicolas; Giacchero, Damien; Grob, Jean Jacques; Guerreschir, Pierre; Leccia, Marie-Thérèse; Malard, Olivier; Mortier, Laurent; Routier, Emilie; Stefan, Andreea; Stefan, Dinu; Stoebner, Pierre-Emmanuel; Basset-Seguin, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Rarely, basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) have the potential to become extensively invasive and destructive, a phenomenon that has led to the term "locally advanced BCC" (laBCC). We identified and described the diverse settings that could be considered "locally advanced". The panel of experts included oncodermatologists, dermatological and maxillofacial surgeons, pathologists, radiotherapists and geriatricians. During a 1-day workshop session, an interactive flow/sequence of questions and inputs was debated. Discussion of nine cases permitted us to approach consensus concerning what constitutes laBCC. The expert panel retained three major components for the complete assessment of laBCC cases: factors of complexity related to the tumour itself, factors related to the operability and the technical procedure, and factors related to the patient. Competing risks of death should be precisely identified. To ensure homogeneous multidisciplinary team (MDT) decisions in different clinical settings, the panel aimed to develop a practical tool based on the three components. The grid presented is not a definitive tool, but rather, it is a method for analysing the complexity of laBCC.

  6. Advances in spike localization with EEG dipole modeling.

    PubMed

    Rose, Sandra; Ebersole, John S

    2009-10-01

    EEG interpretation by visual inspection of waveforms, using the assumption that activity at a given electrode is a representation of only the activity of the cortex immediately beneath it, has been the traditional form of EEG analysis since its inception. The relatively recent advent of digital EEG has allowed more advanced analysis of EEG data and has shown that the simple visual inspection described above is a simplistic form of analysis. This is especially true when one is attempting to localize an epileptogenic focus using EEG spikes or seizure onset data. Spatiotemporal analysis of scalp voltage fields has allowed for improved localization of likely cerebral origins of such waveforms. Equivalent dipole source modeling is one such technique and, although not perfect, provides improved characterization of spike and seizure sources as compared to previous methods when properly interpreted. The use of other modern techniques, such as 3D MRI reconstructions and realistic head models, can further improve accuracy of dipole localization and allow for the synthesis of EEG and imaging data, which may be invaluable, especially in cases of pre-surgical epilepsy evaluation.

  7. Expression of P53 and HSP70 in Chronic Hepatitis, Liver Cirrhosis, and Early and Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Tissues and Their Diagnostic Value in Hepatocellular Carcinoma: An Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi; Gou, Wenbin; Liu, Ming; Sang, Wei; Chu, Hui; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background Tumor protein (P53) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) play key roles in chronic liver diseases. This study aimed to characterize P53 and HSP70 expression in chronic hepatitis (CH), liver cirrhosis (LC), early and advanced HCC, and to analyze their diagnostic value in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Material/Methods Immunohistochemical staining was conducted to evaluate the expression of P53 and HSP70 in 200 human liver tissue specimens, with advanced HCC (n=80), early HCC (n=30), CH (n=30), LC (n=30), and Controls (n=30). Results P53 expression levels were lower in LC than those of HCC, but remained on par with those of CH and Controls. HSP70 expression levels were higher in HCC than those of LC, CH, and Controls. The sensitivity and specificity for HCC diagnosis were: 50.9% and 98.9% for P53, and 78.2 and 77.8% for HSP70, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of different combinations were: 95.5% and 85.5% with either P53 or HSP70 being positive, and 33.6% and 98.9% if both were positive. Among the differentiation stages marked low, intermediate, and high in HCC, the P53 positive rate was higher in the low than in the intermediate, which was higher than that in the high. HSP70 positive rate was higher in the low and the intermediate than in the high, but no obvious changes were found between the low and the intermediate. Conclusions P53 and HSP70 could be potential biomarkers for HCC diagnosis, and proper combinations of these 2 markers could improve diagnostic accuracy. PMID:26494212

  8. Operative management of locally advanced, differentiated thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Laura Y.; Nixon, Iain J.; Patel, Snehal G.; Palmer, Frank L.; Tuttle, R. Michael; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin P.; Ganly, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of differentiated thyroid cancer tends to present with limited locoregional disease, leading to excellent long-term survival after operative treatment. Even patients with advanced local disease may survive for long periods with appropriate treatment. The aim of this study is to present our institutional experience of the management of locally advanced differentiated thyroid cancer and to analyze factors predictive of outcome. Methods We reviewed our institutional database of 3,664 previously untreated patients with differentiated thyroid cancer operated between 1986 and 2010. A total of 153 patients had tumor extension beyond the thyroid capsule that invaded the subcutaneous soft tissues, recurrent laryngeal nerve, larynx, trachea, or esophagus. Details on extent of operation and adjuvant therapy were recorded. Disease-specific survival and locoregional recurrence-free probability were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Factors predictive of outcome were determined by multivariate analysis. Results The median age of the 153 patients with tumor extension beyond the thyroid capsule was 55 years (range 11–91 years). Eighty-nine patients (58.2%) were female. Twenty-three patients (15.0%) were staged as M1 at presentation, and 122 (79.7%) had pathologically involved lymph nodes. The most common site of extrathyroidal extension was the recurrent laryngeal nerve (51.0%) followed by the trachea (46.4%) and esophagus (39.2%). Sixty-three patients (41%) required resection of the recurrent laryngeal nerve due to tumor involvement. After surgery, 20 patients (13.0%) had gross residual disease (R2), 63 (41.2%) had a positive margin of resection (R1), and 70 (45.8%) had complete resection with negative margins (R0). With a median follow-up of 63.9 months, 5-year, disease-specific survival, when stratified by R0/R1/R2 resection, was 94.4%, 87.6%, and 67.9%, respectively (P = .030). The data do not demonstrate a statistical difference in survival

  9. Fast neutron irradiation for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.P.; Schein, P.S.; MacDonald, J.S.; Woolley, P.V.; Ornitz, R.; Rogers, C.

    1981-11-01

    Nineteen patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer and one patient with islet cell cancer were treated with 1700-1500 neutron rad alone or in combination with 5-fluorouracil to exploit the theoretic advantages of higher linear energy of transfer, and lower oxygen enhancement ratio of neutrons. Only 5 of 14 (36%) obtained partial tumor regression. The median survival for all patients with pancreatic cancer was 6 months, which is less than that reported with 5-fluorouracil and conventional photon irradiation. Gastrointestinal toxicity was considerable; hemorhagic gastritis in five patients, colitis in two and esophagitis in one. One patient developed radiation myelitis. We therefore, caution any enthusiasm for this modality of therapy until clear evidence of a therapeutic advantage over photon therapy is demonstrated in controlled clinical trials.

  10. [Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy treatment in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Carau, B; Orrù, P; Orrù, S; Dessì, M; Nagliati, M; Lay, G; Maxia, V; Casula, G; Amichetti, M

    2003-01-01

    A prospective phase II study was conducted to evacuate toxicity and results of preoperative radiochemotherapy in locoregionally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). A total of 33 patients entered the study and received 45 Gy to the pelvis plus a supplemental boost of 5.4-9 Gy concurrently with 5 FU c.i. at a dose of 225-275 mg/m2. Thirty patients were operated after 5-7 weeks (20 anterior resection and 10 abdominoperineal excision). In 14 patients (47%) a downstaging was observed, 5 patients experienced a complete clearance of the primary tumor. After a median of 14 months (range, 5-27), 23 patients, are alive and well. And 8 patients experienced a disease progression (4 local-regional and 4 distant). Our results provide further evidence of the utility and effectiveness of preoperative radiochemotherapy in LARC.

  11. Advances of Intracranial Electroencephalography in Localizing the Epileptogenic Zone.

    PubMed

    Jin, Bo; So, Norman K; Wang, Shuang

    2016-10-01

    Intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) provides the best precision in estimating the location and boundary of an epileptogenic zone. Analysis of iEEG in the routine EEG frequency range (0.5-70 Hz) remains the basis in clinical practice. Low-voltage fast activity is the most commonly reported ictal onset pattern in neocortical epilepsy, and low-frequency high-amplitude repetitive spiking is the most commonly reported ictal onset pattern in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Recent studies using wideband EEG recording have demonstrated that examining higher (80-1000 Hz) and lower (0.016-0.5 Hz) EEG frequencies can provide additional diagnostic information and help to improve the surgical outcome. In addition, novel computational techniques of iEEG signal analysis have provided new insights into the epileptic network. Here, we review some of these recent advances. Although these sophisticated and advanced techniques of iEEG analysis show promise in localizing the epileptogenic zone, their utility needs to be further validated in larger studies.

  12. Localization of thymidine phosphorylase in advanced gastric and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michiya; Okamoto, Ken; Akimori, Toyokazu; Tochika, Naoshige; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Sugimoto, Takeki; Araki, Keijiro

    2004-01-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is known to be more concentrated in human cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue based on findings using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry. However, the ultrastructural localization of TP in cancer tissues has not previously been demonstrated. We investigated the localization of TP in gastric cancer and colorectal cancer tissue by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Between April 1997 and May 2000, we obtained surgically resected specimens from 42, 46, and 36 cases of advanced gastric, colon, and rectal cancer, respectively. ELISA demonstrated that the TP level was higher in cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue. Immunohistochemically, cancer cells were positive for the enzyme in some cases. However, in a number of cases immunopositive inflammatory cells were also present in cancerous tissues. At the electron microscope level, TP was diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm of cancer cells and in the mitochondria of the neutrophil in gastric cancer tissue. In rectal cancer tissues, cytoplasmic granules in macrophages in cancer tissues were immunoreactive for the TP. These findings suggest that TP is produced by macrophages and exists in neutrophils and cancer cells.

  13. [Research advances in diagnostic and therapeutic application of long-chain non-coding RNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Li, W X; Li, Q; Lin, Y; Huang, Y X; Chen, L

    2016-08-20

    In recent years, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has become one of the serious health-threatening malignancies worldwide, and its incidence and mortality rates continue to rise. Hepatitis B (HBV) is moderately endemic in China, with enormous numbers of HBV-related HCC cases. Although serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and ultrasound are the major diagnostic methods for HCC, they have limited application for screening out early or small HCC. The current management of HCC is based on tumor size and location, not on suppressing tumorigenesis, and therefore patients are often faced with low 5-year survival and high relapse rates. Recent studies have shown that long-chain non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are closely associated with HCC tumorigenesis, which may have considerable utility as new diagnostic marker and treatment target for HCC. Here, we review the application of lncRNAs in the diagnosis, metastasis, treatment, recurrence, and prognosis of HCC.

  14. Outcomes and predictors of localized or locally-advanced prostate cancer treated by radiotherapy in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Supit, Wempy; Mochtar, Chaidir Arif; Santoso, Rachmat Budi; Umbas, Rainy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Presently there is no published data on the outcomes of localized or locally-advanced prostate cancer (PCa) treated by external-beam radiotherapy (RT) in Indonesia. Methods: This study retrospectively analyzed 96 patients with localized or locally-advanced PCa treated by RT from year 1995 to 2009, at the national referral hospital and the national cancer hospital of Indonesia. Cumulative prostate and pelvic radiation dose/type was <70 Gy conventional RT in 84.4% patients, and ≥70 Gy Three dimensional-conformal or intensity modulated RT in 15.6% patients. Overall survival (OS) and biochemical progression-free survival (BFS) were estimated by Kaplan-Meier. Predictors of OS and biochemical recurrence were analyzed by multivariate Cox regressions. Results: The median follow-up was 61 months (range, 24 to 169 months). There were 3.1% low-risk, 26% intermediate-risk, and 70.8% high-risk cases. More than half of the patients (52.1%) had pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >20 ng/mL. The 5-year survival outcome of low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk patients were: OS, 100%, 94.7%, and 67.9% (P=0.297); and BFS, 100%, 94.1%, and 57.1% (P=0.016), respectively. In the high-risk group, the 5-year OS was 88.3% in patients who received adjuvant hormonal androgen deprivation therapy (HT), compared to 53% in RT only, P=0.08. Significant predictors of OS include high-risk group (hazard Ratio [HR], 9.35; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.52 to 57.6; P=0.016), adjuvant therapy (HR, 0.175; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.58; P=0.005), detection by transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P) (HR, 6.81; 95% CI, 2.28 to 20.33; P=0.001), and pretreatment PSA (HR, 1.003; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.005; P=0.039). The sole predictor of biochemical failure was pretreatment PSA (P=0.04), with odds ratio of 4.52 (95% CI, 1.61 to 12.65) for PSA >20 ng/mL. Conclusions: RT is an effective treatment modality for localized or locally-advanced PCa in Indonesian patients, with outcomes and

  15. Sorafenib therapy following resection prolongs disease-free survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma at a high risk of recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yadi; Zheng, Yun; He, Wei; Li, Qijiong; Shen, Jingxian; Hong, Jian; Zou, Ruhai; Qiu, Jiliang; Li, Binkui; Yuan, Yunfei

    2017-01-01

    Sorafenib is the standard systemic treatment for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); however, its therapeutic value in patients with HCC following resection remains controversial. The current retrospective study was undertaken to assess the effects of sorafenib treatment following surgical resection in patients with advanced HCC disease who were at a high risk for recurrence. Between July 2010 and July 2013, a consecutive cohort of 42 patients with advanced HCC and at a high risk of recurrence (i.e., those with portal vein tumor thrombosis, adjacent organ involvement or tumor rupture) who underwent resection were analyzed. The patients were categorized into the sorafenib group (n=14) or the best supportive care (BSC) group (n=28). Although the histological grade, Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer Stage, tumor size, nodule number and proportion of patients with high serum α-fetoprotein levels were comparable between the sorafenib and BSC groups, those receiving sorafenib following resection had significantly longer disease-free survival (DFS) of 5.2 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.2–9.2 months] compared with the BSC group [1.8 months (95% CI, 0.6–3.0 months)]. No differences in overall survival were noted between the groups. Furthermore, no drug-related adverse events resulted in discontinuation of sorafenib therapy. Univariate log-rank analysis revealed that sorafenib treatment (P=0.002) and treatment prior to resection (P=0.012) were significantly associated with longer DFS; however, sorafenib therapy (P=0.027) and tumor size (P=0.028) were associated with longer DFS by multivariate analysis. Furthermore, sorafenib was well-tolerated and improved DFS in patients with advanced HCC who underwent hepatic resection. Thus, tumor resection followed by sorafenib therapy may represent an effective therapeutic strategy for patients with advanced HCC. This possibility should be confirmed in larger, multicenter studies. PMID:28356989

  16. Short-term and long-term efficacy of 7 targeted therapies for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: a network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Meng; Hong, Duo; Ma, Teng-Chuang; Chen, Xiao-Wei; Han, Jin-Hang; Sun, Jun; Xu, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: A variety of targeted drug therapies in clinical trials have been proven to be effective for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Our study aims to compare the short-term and long-term efficacies of different targeted drugs in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (AHCC) treatment using a network meta-analysis approach. Methods: PubMed, Embase, Ovid, EBSCO, and Cochrane central register of controlled trials were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of different targeted therapies implemented to patients with AHCC. And the retrieval resulted in 7 targeted drugs, namely, sorafenib, ramucirumab, everolimus, brivanib, tivantinib, sunitinib, and sorafenib+erlotinib. Direct and indirect evidence were combined to evaluate stable disease (SD), progressive disease (PD), complete response (CR), partial response (PR), disease control rate (DCR), overall response ratio (ORR), overall survival (OS), and surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) of patients with AHCC. Results: A total of 11 RCTs were incorporated into our analysis, including 6594 patients with AHCC, among which 1619 patients received placebo treatment and 4975 cases had targeted therapies. The results revealed that in comparison with placebo, sorafenib, and ramucirumab displayed better short-term efficacy in terms of PR and ORR, and brivanib was better in ORR. Regarding long-term efficacy, sorafenib and sorafenib+erlotinib treatments exhibited longer OS. The data of cluster analysis showed that ramucirumab or sorafenib+erlotinib presented relatively better short-term efficacy for the treatment of AHCC. Conclusion: This network meta-analysis shows that ramucirumab and sorafenib+erlotinib may be the better targeted drugs for AHCC patients, and sorafenib+erlotinib achieved a better long-term efficacy. PMID:27930578

  17. Impact of Viral Status on Survival in Patients Receiving Sorafenib for Advanced Hepatocellular Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Phase III Trials.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Richard; Psarelli, Eftychia-Eirini; Berhane, Sarah; Khan, Harun; Johnson, Philip

    2017-02-20

    Purpose Following the Sorafenib Hepatocellular Carcinoma Assessment Randomized Protocol (SHARP) trial, sorafenib has become the standard of care for patients with advanced unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma, but the relation between survival advantage and disease etiology remains unclear. To address this, we undertook an individual patient data meta-analysis of three large prospective randomized trials in which sorafenib was the control arm. Methods Of a total of 3,256 patients, 1,643 (50%) who received sorafenib were available. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). A Bayesian hierarchical approach for individual patient data meta-analyses was applied using a piecewise exponential model. Results are presented in terms of hazard ratios comparing sorafenib with alternative therapies according to hepatitis C virus (HCV) or hepatitis B virus (HBV) status. Results Hazard ratios show improved OS for sorafenib in patients who are both HBV negative and HCV positive (log [hazard ratio], -0.27; 95% CI, -0.46 to -0.06). Median unadjusted survival is 12.6 (11.15 to 13.8) months for sorafenib and 10.2 (8.88 to 12.2) months for "other" treatments in this subgroup. There was no evidence of improvement in OS for any other patient subgroups defined by HBV and HCV. Results were consistent across all trials with heterogeneity assessed using Cochran's Q statistic. Conclusion There is consistent evidence that the effect of sorafenib on OS is dependent on patients' hepatitis status. There is an improved OS for patients negative for HBV and positive for HCV when treated with sorafenib. There was no evidence of any improvement in OS attributable to sorafenib for patients positive for HBV and negative for HCV.

  18. A block matching-based registration algorithm for localization of locally advanced lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Scott P.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To implement and evaluate a block matching-based registration (BMR) algorithm for locally advanced lung tumor localization during image-guided radiotherapy. Methods: Small (1 cm{sup 3}), nonoverlapping image subvolumes (“blocks”) were automatically identified on the planning image to cover the tumor surface using a measure of the local intensity gradient. Blocks were independently and automatically registered to the on-treatment image using a rigid transform. To improve speed and robustness, registrations were performed iteratively from coarse to fine image resolution. At each resolution, all block displacements having a near-maximum similarity score were stored. From this list, a single displacement vector for each block was iteratively selected which maximized the consistency of displacement vectors across immediately neighboring blocks. These selected displacements were regularized using a median filter before proceeding to registrations at finer image resolutions. After evaluating all image resolutions, the global rigid transform of the on-treatment image was computed using a Procrustes analysis, providing the couch shift for patient setup correction. This algorithm was evaluated for 18 locally advanced lung cancer patients, each with 4–7 weekly on-treatment computed tomography scans having physician-delineated gross tumor volumes. Volume overlap (VO) and border displacement errors (BDE) were calculated relative to the nominal physician-identified targets to establish residual error after registration. Results: Implementation of multiresolution registration improved block matching accuracy by 39% compared to registration using only the full resolution images. By also considering multiple potential displacements per block, initial errors were reduced by 65%. Using the final implementation of the BMR algorithm, VO was significantly improved from 77% ± 21% (range: 0%–100%) in the initial bony alignment to 91% ± 8% (range: 56%–100%;p < 0

  19. Biomarkers for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Behne, Tara; Copur, M. Sitki

    2012-01-01

    The hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors and carries a poor survival rate. The management of patients at risk for developing HCC remains challenging. Increased understanding of cancer biology and technological advances have enabled identification of a multitude of pathological, genetic, and molecular events that drive hepatocarcinogenesis leading to discovery of numerous potential biomarkers in this disease. They are currently being aggressively evaluated to establish their value in early diagnosis, optimization of therapy, reducing the emergence of new tumors, and preventing the recurrence after surgical resection or liver transplantation. These markers not only help in prediction of prognosis or recurrence but may also assist in deciding appropriate modality of therapy and may represent novel potential targets for therapeutic interventions. In this paper, a summary of most relevant available data from published papers reporting various tissue and serum biomarkers involved in hepatocellular carcinoma was presented. PMID:22655201

  20. Prospects for Observing and Localizing Gravitational-Wave Transients with Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amariutei, D. V.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J. M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Pereira, R.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    We present a possible observing scenario for the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave detectors over the next decade, with the intention of providing information to the astronomy community to facilitate planning for multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves. We determine the expected sensitivity of the network to transient gravitational-wave signals, and study the capability of the network to determine the sky location of the source. We report our findings for gravitational-wave transients, with particular focus on gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of binary neutron-star systems, which are considered the most promising for multi-messenger astronomy. The ability to localize the sources of the detected signals depends on the geographical distribution of the detectors and their relative sensitivity, and 90% credible regions can be as large as thousands of square degrees when only two sensitive detectors are operational. Determining the sky position of a significant fraction of detected signals to areas of 5 deg2 to 20 deg2 will require at least three detectors of sensitivity within a factor of ˜ 2 of each other and with a broad frequency bandwidth. Should the third LIGO detector be relocated to India as expected, a significant fraction of gravitational-wave signals will be localized to a few square degrees by gravitational-wave observations alone.

  1. Prospects for Observing and Localizing Gravitational-Wave Transients with Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present a possible observing scenario for the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave detectors over the next decade, with the intention of providing information to the astronomy community to facilitate planning for multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves. We determine the expected sensitivity of the network to transient gravitational-wave signals, and study the capability of the network to determine the sky location of the source. We report our findings for gravitational-wave transients, with particular focus on gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of binary neutron-star systems, which are considered the most promising for multi-messenger astronomy. The ability to localize the sources of the detected signals depends on the geographical distribution of the detectors and their relative sensitivity, and 90% credible regions can be as large as thousands of square degrees when only two sensitive detectors are operational. Determining the sky position of a significant fraction of detected signals to areas of 5 sq. deg to 20 sq. deg will require at least three detectors of sensitivity within a factor of approximately 2 of each other and with a broad frequency bandwidth. Should the third LIGO detector be relocated to India as expected, a significant fraction of gravitational-wave signals will be localized to a few square degrees by gravitational-wave observations alone.

  2. Prospects for Observing and Localizing Gravitational-Wave Transients with Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo.

    PubMed

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Amariutei, D V; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; 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Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Pereira, R; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poggiani, R; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Setyawati, Y; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepanczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; van den Broeck, C; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2016-01-01

    We present a possible observing scenario for the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave detectors over the next decade, with the intention of providing information to the astronomy community to facilitate planning for multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves. We determine the expected sensitivity of the network to transient gravitational-wave signals, and study the capability of the network to determine the sky location of the source. We report our findings for gravitational-wave transients, with particular focus on gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of binary neutron-star systems, which are considered the most promising for multi-messenger astronomy. The ability to localize the sources of the detected signals depends on the geographical distribution of the detectors and their relative sensitivity, and 90% credible regions can be as large as thousands of square degrees when only two sensitive detectors are operational. Determining the sky position of a significant fraction of detected signals to areas of 5 deg(2) to 20 deg(2) will require at least three detectors of sensitivity within a factor of ∼ 2 of each other and with a broad frequency bandwidth. Should the third LIGO detector be relocated to India as expected, a significant fraction of gravitational-wave signals will be localized to a few square degrees by gravitational-wave observations alone.

  3. Water-Exchange-Modified Kinetic Parameters from Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI as Prognostic Biomarkers of Survival in Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Treated with Antiangiogenic Monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Ho; Hayano, Koichi; Zhu, Andrew X.; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background To find prognostic biomarkers in pretreatment dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) water-exchange-modified (WX) kinetic parameters for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with antiangiogenic monotherapy. Methods Twenty patients with advanced HCC underwent DCE-MRI and were subsequently treated with sunitinib. Pretreatment DCE-MRI data on advanced HCC were analyzed using five different WX kinetic models: the Tofts-Kety (WX-TK), extended TK (WX-ETK), two compartment exchange, adiabatic approximation to tissue homogeneity (WX-AATH), and distributed parameter (WX-DP) models. The total hepatic blood flow, arterial flow fraction (γ), arterial blood flow (BFA), portal blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, permeability-surface area product, fractional interstitial volume (vI), extraction fraction, mean intracellular water molecule lifetime (τC), and fractional intracellular volume (vC) were calculated. After receiver operating characteristic analysis with leave-one-out cross-validation, individual parameters for each model were assessed in terms of 1-year-survival (1YS) discrimination using Kaplan-Meier analysis, and association with overall survival (OS) using univariate Cox regression analysis with permutation testing. Results The WX-TK-model-derived γ (P = 0.022) and vI (P = 0.010), and WX-ETK-model-derived τC (P = 0.023) and vC (P = 0.042) were statistically significant prognostic biomarkers for 1YS. Increase in the WX-DP-model-derived BFA (P = 0.025) and decrease in the WX-TK, WX-ETK, WX-AATH, and WX-DP-model-derived vC (P = 0.034, P = 0.038, P = 0.028, P = 0.041, respectively) were significantly associated with an increase in OS. Conclusions The WX-ETK-model-derived vC was an effective prognostic biomarker for advanced HCC treated with sunitinib. PMID:26366997

  4. Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3–5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 15–28 fractions. The keys to the delivery of ablative doses are computed tomography (CT) image guidance and respiratory gating. Higher doses have resulted in encouraging long-term survival results. In this review, we present a comprehensive solution to achieving ablative doses for selected patients with pancreatic tumors by using a combination of classical, modern and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, CT image guidance, respiratory gating, intentional dose heterogeneity, and simultaneous integrated protection. PMID:27029741

  5. [Contemporary methods of treatment in local advanced prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, Anna; Mazurkiewicz, Maria; Starosławska, Elzbieta; Stasiewicz, Dominika; Mocarska, Agnieszka; Burdan, Franciszek

    2012-10-01

    The prostate cancer is one of the most often cancers amongst males. Its frequency is increasing with age. Thanks to widespread of screening denomination of specific prostate specific antigen (PSA), ultrasonography including the one in transrectal (TRUS), computed tomography, magnetic resonance and especially the awareness of society, the number of patients with low local advance of illness is increasing. The basic method of treatment in such cases is still the surgical removal of prostate with seminal bladder or radiotherapy. To this purpose tele-(IMRT, VMAT) or brachytherapy (J125, Ir192, Pa103) is used. In patients with higher risk of progression the radiotherapy may be associated with hormonotherapy (total androgen blockage-LH-RH analog and androgen). Despite numerous clinical researches conducted there is still no selection of optimal sequence of particular methods. Moreover, no explicit effectiveness was determined. The general rule of treatment in patients suffering from prostate cancer still remains individual selection of therapeutic treatment depending on the age of a patient, general condition and especially patient's general preferences. In case of elderly patients and patients with low risk of progression, recommendation of direct observation including systematical PSA denomination, clinical transrectal examination, TRUS, MR of smaller pelvis or scintigraphy of the whole skeleton may be considered.

  6. Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Crane, Christopher H

    2016-08-01

    The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3-5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 15-28 fractions. The keys to the delivery of ablative doses are computed tomography (CT) image guidance and respiratory gating. Higher doses have resulted in encouraging long-term survival results. In this review, we present a comprehensive solution to achieving ablative doses for selected patients with pancreatic tumors by using a combination of classical, modern and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, CT image guidance, respiratory gating, intentional dose heterogeneity, and simultaneous integrated protection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  7. Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Elderly Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Musio, Daniela; Izzo, Luciano; Pugliese, Federico; Izzo, Paolo; Bolognese, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the treatment tolerance and clinical outcomes in patients aged 70 and older with locally advanced rectal carcinoma treated with multimodality approach. Methods and Materials. We retrospectively analysed 20 consecutive elderly patients, with histologically proven rectal adenocarcinoma, staged T3-4, and/or node-positive tumour, who received chemoradiotherapy and proceeded to surgical approach. Performance status score and adult comorbidity evaluation-27 score were calculated, and their influence on treatment tolerance and clinical outcomes was analysed. Results. All patients completed programmed chemoradiotherapy treatment. Gastrointestinal toxicity was the most common acute side effects: proctitis in 70% of patients and diarrhoea in 55%, classified as Grade 3 in 3 patients only. Radiation dermatitis was reported in 7 patients (35%) and it was graded G3 in one patient. There was no haematological toxicity. Eighteen patients out of 20 underwent surgery. Sphincter preservation was assured in 13 patients. Comorbidity index was related to higher severe acute toxicity (P = 0.015) but no influenced treatment outcomes. Conclusion. Treatment tolerance with combined modality is good in elderly patients. Due to age, no dose reduction for radiation therapy and chemotherapy should be considered. PMID:24392453

  8. Management of locally advanced and disseminated breast cancer--chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bisel, H F

    1980-08-15

    Breast cancer is one of the most responsive of the common solid tumors when systemic therapy is indicated in the treatment of locally advanced or disseminated cancer. Many single agents have been useful in inducing remission in mammary carcinoma, but in recent years various drug combinations have been developed that appear more effective than individual drugs and in some instances with reduced toxicity levels. Adriamycin is the most interesting of the newer drugs and is the most effective single agent. Polychemotherapy of breast cancer was tried years ago, but remained for Cooper to arouse professional interest in multiple-drug therapy. Many modifications of this original five-drug regimens have been tried. One of the most widely used combinations is the CMF program, which includes cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil. The program that we have come to regard as our standard program in controlled clinical trials (CFP) employs cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, and prednisone. Toxicity with this program has been clinically acceptable, and in multiple comparative trials we have found no combination with greater therapeutic efficacy.

  9. Outcomes of temporal bone resection for locally advanced parotid cancer.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Saral; Morris, Luc G; Shah, Jatin; Bilsky, Mark; Selesnick, Samuel; Kraus, Dennis H

    2011-11-01

    This study was conducted to report outcomes and identify factors predictive of survival and recurrence in patients undergoing lateral temporal bone resection (LTBR) as part of an extended radical parotidectomy for parotid cancer. This is a retrospective cohort study which includes all patients undergoing LTBR for parotid cancer between 1994 and 2010 at two affiliated academic centers. Survival and recurrence rates were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox multivariate regression. A total of 12 patients with median follow-up duration of 30.6 months were included: 6 de novo cases and 6 patients referred after local recurrence. Actuarial locoregional control at 2 years was 73%. Most patients (11; 92%) developed disease recurrence with distant metastases the most common site of first failure (83%). Overall and disease-specific survival rates were 80% at 2 years and 22.5% at 5 years. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 67% at 2 years and 8.3% at 5 years. On multivariate analysis, surgical margin status was an independent predictor of RFS (hazard ratio = 3.85, p = 0.045). In advanced parotid cancer, LTBR with a goal of gross total resection offers good locoregional control with an acceptable complication rate. The benefits of this surgery must be balanced with the morbidity and low likelihood of long-term survival, with most patients ultimately experiencing disease recurrence and death.

  10. Outcomes of Temporal Bone Resection for Locally Advanced Parotid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Saral; Morris, Luc G.; Shah, Jatin; Bilsky, Mark; Selesnick, Samuel; Kraus, Dennis H.

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to report outcomes and identify factors predictive of survival and recurrence in patients undergoing lateral temporal bone resection (LTBR) as part of an extended radical parotidectomy for parotid cancer. This is a retrospective cohort study which includes all patients undergoing LTBR for parotid cancer between 1994 and 2010 at two affiliated academic centers. Survival and recurrence rates were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox multivariate regression. A total of 12 patients with median follow-up duration of 30.6 months were included: 6 de novo cases and 6 patients referred after local recurrence. Actuarial locoregional control at 2 years was 73%. Most patients (11; 92%) developed disease recurrence with distant metastases the most common site of first failure (83%). Overall and disease-specific survival rates were 80% at 2 years and 22.5% at 5 years. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 67% at 2 years and 8.3% at 5 years. On multivariate analysis, surgical margin status was an independent predictor of RFS (hazard ratio = 3.85, p = 0.045). In advanced parotid cancer, LTBR with a goal of gross total resection offers good locoregional control with an acceptable complication rate. The benefits of this surgery must be balanced with the morbidity and low likelihood of long-term survival, with most patients ultimately experiencing disease recurrence and death. PMID:22547966

  11. SEARCH: a phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of sorafenib plus erlotinib in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Andrew X; Rosmorduc, Olivier; Evans, T R Jeffry; Ross, Paul J; Santoro, Armando; Carrilho, Flair Jose; Bruix, Jordi; Qin, Shukui; Thuluvath, Paul J; Llovet, Josep M; Leberre, Marie-Aude; Jensen, Markus; Meinhardt, Gerold; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2015-02-20

    To compare the clinical outcomes of sorafenib plus either erlotinib or placebo in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a multicenter, multinational, randomized, phase III trial. Patients with advanced HCC and underlying Child-Pugh class A cirrhosis, who were naive to systemic treatment (N = 720), were randomly assigned to sorafenib plus either erlotinib (n = 362) or placebo (n = 358). The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Median OS was similar in the sorafenib plus erlotinib and sorafenib plus placebo groups (9.5 v 8.5 months, respectively; hazard ratio [HR], 0.929; P = .408), as was median time to progression (3.2 v 4.0 months, respectively; HR, 1.135; P = .18). In the sorafenib/erlotinib arm versus the sorafenib/placebo arm, the overall response rate trended higher (6.6% v 3.9%, respectively; P = .102), whereas the disease control rate was significantly lower (43.9% v 52.5%, respectively; P = .021). The median durations of treatment with sorafenib were 86 days in the sorafenib/erlotinib arm and 123 days in the sorafenib/placebo arm. In the sorafenib/erlotinib and sorafenib/placebo arms, the rates of treatment-emergent serious AEs (58.0% v 54.6%, respectively) and drug-related serious AEs (21.0% v 22.8%, respectively) were similar. AEs matched the known safety profiles of both agents, but rates of rash/desquamation, anorexia, and diarrhea were higher in the sorafenib/erlotinib arm, whereas rates of alopecia and hand-foot skin reaction were higher in the sorafenib/placebo arm. Withdrawal rates for AEs during cycles 1 to 3 were higher in the sorafenib/erlotinib arm. Adding erlotinib to sorafenib did not improve survival in patients with advanced HCC. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  12. Analysis of therapeutic effectiveness and prognostic factor on argon-helium cryoablation combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen; Zhuang, Weizhao; Feng, Huigang; Guo, Huizhuang; Tang, Yukuan; Chen, Hanwei; Huang, Yi

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness on argon-helium cryoablation combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) in treating advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its influence factor. This trial was approved by the Guangzhou Panyu Central Hospital Ethics Committee. This was a prospective, single-center study conducted in Guangzhou Panyu Central Hospital. After informed consent was obtained, the prospective randomized clinical data of 120 patients with advanced HCC were collected. Based on the therapeutic scheme, the patients were divided into control group (TACE + argon-helium cryoablation) and observed group (TACE group). All the patients were followed up for 60 months. The pre- and post-operative cancer situation, hepatic function situation, complete remission (CR) rate, total effective rate, and survival time were evaluated. The short-term and long-term effectiveness were compared between the two groups. Both the CR rate and total effective rate of the combination group were significantly higher than those of TACE group (P < 0.05). Liver function damage of the combination group was lower than those of TACE group. The survival rate of the combination group was significantly longer than that of TACE group P < 0.05). The Cox regression model revealed that ages, tumor diameter, tumor periportal location, and liver function (Child-Pugh) were significant variables influencing survival time P < 0.05). For the treatment of advanced HCC, argon-helium cryoablation combined with TACE is obviously effective and safe. The ages, tumor diameter, tumor periportal location, and grade of liver function (Child-Pugh) have obvious impacted the treatment effectiveness.

  13. A comparative study of high-dose hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy and transarterial chemoembolization using doxorubicin for intractable, advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Yeon; Kim, Jin Dong; Park, Jun Yong; Han, Kwang Hyub; Woo, Hyun Young; Choi, Jong Young; Yoon, Seung Kew; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Hwang, Jae Seok; Kim, Sang Gyune; Kim, Young Seok; Seo, Yeon Seok; Yim, Hyung Joon; Um, Soon Ho

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) has long been used as a palliative therapy for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). High-dose hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) has showed favorable outcomes in patients with intractable, advanced HCC. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness and safety of high-dose HAIC and conventional TACE using doxorubicin for advanced HCC. Methods The high-dose HAIC group comprised 36 patients who were enrolled prospectively from six institutions. The enrollment criteria were good liver function, main portal vein invasion (including vascular shunt), infiltrative type, bilobar involvement, and/or refractory to prior conventional treatment (TACE, radiofrequency ablation, or percutaneous ethanol injection), and documented progressive disease. Patients received 5-fluorouracil (500 mg/m2 on days 1~3) and cisplatin (60 mg/m2 on day 2 every 4 weeks) via an implantable port system. In the TACE group, 31 patients with characteristics similar to those in the high-dose HAIC group were recruited retrospectively from a single center. Patients underwent a transarterial infusion of doxorubicin every 4~8 weeks. Results Overall, 6 patients (8.9%) achieved a partial response and 20 patients (29.8%) had stable disease. The objective response rate (complete response+partial response) was significantly better in the high-dose HAIC group than in the TACE group (16.7% vs. 0%, P=0.030). Overall survival was longer in the high-dose HAIC group than in the TACE group (median survival, 193 vs. 119 days; P=0.026). There were no serious adverse effects in the high-dose HAIC group, while hepatic complications occurred more often in the TACE group. Conclusions High-dose HAIC appears to improve the tumor response and survival outcome compared to conventional TACE using doxorubicin in patients with intractable, advanced HCC. PMID:21415578

  14. Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Thrombosis: Impact of Early Response to 4 Weeks of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen-Chun; Hung, Chien-Fu; Chen, Wei-Ting; Lin, Shi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of early response (ER) to hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) on outcomes of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) complicated with major portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). Methods Thirty-nine patients receiving HAIC with low-dose cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil (5FU), and leucovorin were enrolled. One course of HAIC consisted of 5 days of treatment and 2 days rest per week for 4 consecutive weeks. ER was categorized as complete response, partial response, or minor response and was determined by World Health Organization criteria with dynamic computed tomography findings performed within 1 week after the first course of HAIC. Results Thirteen (33%) patients achieved an ER. Twelve (92.3%) of these 13 ER patients achieved a higher overall response than all but one (3.8%) of the 26 non-early responders (NERs) (p<0.001). ER was the exclusive independent favorable factor for survival (p=0.003). Downstaging of tumors was noted in 76.9% of ERs, and these patients could proceed to locoregional therapies. ER patients subsequently had a higher 1-year survival (76.9% vs. 3.8%, p<0.001) and 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) (84.6% vs. 15.4%, p<0.001) than those for NERs. Only 8% of patients experienced grade 3 or higher toxicity during the first 4-week course of HAIC. Conclusions HAIC can yield a satisfactory ER for advanced HCC with PVTT. Moreover, achievement of ER after HAIC in advanced HCC with PVTT is strongly associated with better overall survival and PFS. PMID:26734578

  15. Cost-effectiveness analysis of antiviral therapy in patients with advanced hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma treated with sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Yu; Wen, Feng; Wheeler, John; Fu, Ping; Li, Qiu

    2016-12-01

    Antiviral therapy has been demonstrated to significantly improve the survival in patients with advanced hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of the study was to investigate the cost-effectiveness of antiviral therapy in patients with advanced HBV-related HCC treated with sorafenib. To conduct the analysis, a Markov model comprising three health states (progression-free survival, progressive disease, and death) was created. The efficacy data were derived from medical records. Cost data were collected based on the Chinese national drug prices. Utility data came from the previously published studies. One-way sensitivity analyses as well as probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to explore model uncertainties. In the base-case analysis, addition of antiviral therapy to sorafenib generated an effectiveness of 0.68 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) at a cost of $25 026.04, while sorafenib monotherapy gained an effectiveness of 0.42 QALYs at a cost of $20 249.64. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was $18 370.77/QALY for antiviral therapy group versus non-antiviral therapy group. On the other hand, the ICER between the two groups in patients with high or low HBV-DNA load, with or without cirrhosis, normal or elevated alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase were $16 613.97/QALY, $19 774.16/QALY, $14 587.66/QALY, $19 873.84/QALY, $17 947.07/QALY, and $18 785.58/QALY, respectively. Based on the cost-effectiveness threshold ($20 301.00/QALY in China), addition of antiviral therapy to sorafenib is considered to be a cost-effective option compared with sorafenib monotherapy in patients with advanced HBV-related HCC in China from the patient's perspective. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II study to assess the efficacy and safety of mapatumumab with sorafenib in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ciuleanu, T; Bazin, I; Lungulescu, D; Miron, L; Bondarenko, I; Deptala, A; Rodriguez-Torres, M; Giantonio, B; Fox, N L; Wissel, P; Egger, J; Ding, M; Kalyani, R N; Humphreys, R; Gribbin, M; Sun, W

    2016-04-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II study evaluated the efficacy and safety of mapatumumab (a human agonistic monoclonal antibody against tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor 1) in combination with sorafenib in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients with advanced HCC (stratified by Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status) were randomized 1:1 to receive sorafenib (400 mg, twice daily per 21-day cycle) and either placebo (placebo-sorafenib arm) or mapatumumab (30 mg/kg on day 1 per 21-day cycle; mapatumumab-sorafenib arm). The primary end point was time to (radiologic) progression (TTP), assessed by blinded independent central review. Key secondary end points included progression-free survival, overall survival, and objective response. In total, 101 patients were randomized (placebo-sorafenib arm: N = 51; mapatumumab-sorafenib arm: N = 50). There was no significant difference in median TTP between both arms [5.6 versus 4.1 months, respectively; adjusted hazard ratio (one-sided 90% confidence interval) 1.192 (0-1.737)]. No mapatumumab-related benefit was identified when TTP was evaluated in the stratified subgroups. The addition of mapatumumab to sorafenib did not demonstrate improvement in the secondary efficacy end points. The reported frequency of adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs was comparable in both treatment arms. The addition of mapatumumab to sorafenib did not improve TTP or other efficacy end points, nor did it substantially change the toxicity profile of sorafenib in patients with advanced HCC. Based on these results, further development of the combination of mapatumumab and sorafenib in HCC is not planned. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Patterns of lymph node metastasis in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhikai; Hu, Ke; Liu, An; Shen, Jie; Hou, Xiaorong; Lian, Xin; Sun, Shuai; Yan, Junfang; Zhang, Fuquan

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate patterns and locations of lymph node metastasis in locally advanced cervical cancers.A total of 244 consecutive patients with stage IIb cervical cancer were retrospectively evaluated. Contrast-enhanced CT scans were used for lymph node grading. Lymph nodes with the shortest axis (>1 cm) were categorized as positive and those between 0.5 and 1 cm were categorized as suspicious. All lymph nodes (LNs) were also classified by their anatomic locations.Nine hundred thirty-one LNs (136 positive and 795 suspicious) were identified. Sixty-three (25.8%) patients had positive LNs, and 153 (62.7%) patients had only suspicious LNs. The metastatic pattern was predictable traveling from level 1 (external iliac, internal iliac, obturator, and mesorectum groups) through level 2 (common iliac and presacral groups) to level 3 (para-aortic groups). In most groups, LNs were located within 1.0 cm of main blood vessels. Our novel findings were: presacral LNs metastases were rare (2/244, 0.82%); the left common iliac group (LCI) had significantly more enlarged nodes than the right common iliac group (P = 0.00); the LCI and left down-para-aortic group were further away from blood vessels than expected (1.2 cm and 1.4 cm, respectively); no additional margin was needed in anterolateral direction for external iliac groups.The lymph node metastatic patterns are relatively predicable. Different expansions from vessels should be used to include LNs for different groups. Presacral nodes metastases are rare, and further study is warranted to see whether this region can be excluded from nodal CTV.

  18. Optimizing CIGB-300 intralesional delivery in locally advanced cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sarduy, M R; García, I; Coca, M A; Perera, A; Torres, L A; Valenzuela, C M; Baladrón, I; Solares, M; Reyes, V; Hernández, I; Perera, Y; Martínez, Y M; Molina, L; González, Y M; Ancízar, J A; Prats, A; González, L; Casacó, C A; Acevedo, B E; López-Saura, P A; Alonso, D F; Gómez, R; Perea-Rodríguez, S E

    2015-01-01

    Background: We conducted a phase 1 trial in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer by injecting 0.5 ml of the CK2-antagonist CIGB-300 in two different sites on tumours to assess tumour uptake, safety, pharmacodynamic activity and identify the recommended dose. Methods: Fourteen patients were treated with intralesional injections containing 35 or 70 mg of CIGB-300 in three alternate cycles of three consecutive days each before standard chemoradiotherapy. Tumour uptake was determined using 99Tc-radiolabelled peptide. In situ B23/nucleophosmin was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: Maximum tumour uptake for CIGB-300 70-mg dose was significantly higher than the one observed for 35 mg: 16.1±8.9 vs 31.3±12.9 mg (P=0.01). Both, AUC24h and biological half-life were also significantly higher using 70 mg of CIGB-300 (P<0.001). Unincorporated CIGB-300 diffused rapidly to blood and was mainly distributed towards kidneys, and marginally in liver, lungs, heart and spleen. There was no DLT and moderate allergic-like reactions were the most common systemic side effect with strong correlation between unincorporated CIGB-300 and histamine levels in blood. CIGB-300, 70 mg, downregulated B23/nucleophosmin (P=0.03) in tumour specimens. Conclusion: Intralesional injections of 70 mg CIGB-300 in two sites (0.5 ml per injection) and this treatment plan are recommended to be evaluated in phase 2 studies. PMID:25880012

  19. Efficacy of combination treatment modalities for intermediate and advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: intra-arterial therapies, sorafenib and novel small molecules.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Julio A; Gish, Robert G

    2013-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a growing epidemic with a high mortality rate and clear need for improved therapies. In patients with Barcelona-Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) B and C, treatment with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) has been the gold standard in therapy as it delays progression; however, recurrence proves common. In the US, transarterial bead embolization (TABE) has uniformly replaced TACE. With this limited armamentarium, there is need for a shift to novel strategies combining different modalities to further improve patient outcomes. Historically, HCC drug discovery concentrated on common features of HCC including its highly vascular nature and dependence on growth factors (GFs). The multikinase inhibitor sorafenib acts on angiogenesis via modulation of vascular endothelial GF expression and was the first step toward systemic targeted therapy against HCC. Sorafenib has provided clinicians with a tool to modestly improve survival by 2-6 months or longer. Despite the progress in survival provided by TACE, TABE and sorafenib independently, rigorous combination clinical trials do not consistently show significant improvement over TACE/TABE monotherapy. Other novel small molecules targeting angiogenesis such as brivanib, linifanib and everolimus have failed or are in development. Anti-HCV treatment became more feasible with the novel direct-acting antiviral agents; with the much higher and more durable treatment responses that they provide, the risk of HCC progression may be reduced. The most effective strategies in developing combination therapies are hampered by the complexities of FDA testing along with intellectual property and economic issues. To achieve significant progress, more basic science studies are necessary to help understand which novel molecules demonstrate the greatest synergy. Individual patient genomic profiling and biomarkers may help guide therapy and improve the clinician's ability to tailor treatment and to know when it could

  20. Circulating tumor DNA profiling reveals clonal evolution and real-time disease progression in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhi-Xiong; Chen, Geng; Zeng, Yong-Yi; Dong, Xiu-Qing; Lin, Min-Jie; Huang, Xin-Hui; Zhang, Da; Liu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Jing-Feng

    2017-09-01

    Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) provides a potential non-invasive biomarker for cancer diagnosis and prognosis, but whether it could reflect tumor heterogeneity and monitor therapeutic responses in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unclear. Focusing on 574 cancer genes known to harbor actionable mutations, we identified the mutation repertoire of HCC tissues, and monitored the corresponding ctDNA features in blood samples to evaluate its clinical significance. Analysis of 3 HCC patients' mutation profiles revealed that ctDNA could overcome tumor heterogeneity and provide information of tumor burden and prognosis. Further analysis was conducted on the 4th HCC case with multiple lesion samples and sequential plasma samples. We identified 160 subclonal SNVs in tumor tissues as well as matched peritumor tissues with PBMC as control. 96.9% of this patient's tissue mutations could be also detected in plasma samples. These subclonal SNVs were grouped into 9 clusters according to their trends of cellular prevalence shift in tumor tissues. Two clusters constituted of tumor stem somatic mutations showed circulating levels relating with cancer progression. Analysis of tumor somatic mutations revealed that circulating level of such tumor stem somatic mutations could reflect tumor burden and even predict prognosis earlier than traditional strategies. Furthermore, HCK (p.V174M), identified as a recurrent/metastatic related mutation site, could promote migration and invasion of HCC cells. Taken together, study of mutation profiles in biopsy and plasma samples in HCC patients showed that ctDNA could overcome tumor heterogeneity and real-time track the therapeutic responses in the longitudinal monitoring. © 2017 UICC.

  1. Prognostic significance of catalase expression and its regulatory effects on hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in HBV-related advanced hepatocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Cho, Mi-Young; Cheong, Jae Youn; Lim, Wonchung; Jo, Sujin; Lee, Youngsoo; Wang, Hee-Jung; Han, Kyou-Hoon; Cho, Hyeseong

    2014-12-15

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) plays a role in liver cancer development. We previously showed that ROS increased HBx levels and here, we investigated the role of antioxidants in the regulation of HBx expression and their clinical relevance. We found that overexpression of catalase induced a significant loss in HBx levels. The cysteine null mutant of HBx (Cys-) showed a dramatic reduction in its protein stability. In clonogenic proliferation assays, Huh7-X cells produced a significant number of colonies whereas Huh7-Cys- cells failed to generate them. The Cys at position 69 of HBx was crucial to maintain its protein stability and transactivation function in response to ROS. Among 50 HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) specimens, 72% of HCCs showed lower catalase levels than those of surrounding non-tumor tissues. In advanced stage IV, catalase levels in non-tumor tissues were increased whereas those in tumors were further reduced. Accordingly, patients with a high T/N ratio for catalase showed significantly longer survival than those with a low T/N ratio. Together, catalase expression in HCC patients can be clinically useful for prediction of patient survival, and restoration of catalase expression in HCCs could be an important strategy for intervention in HBV-induced liver diseases.

  2. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals Distinct Molecular Characteristics of Hepatitis B-Related Hepatocellular Carcinomas from Very Early to Advanced Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer Stages.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fan-Yun; Wei, Xiao; Zhou, Kai; Hu, Wei; Kou, Yan-Bo; You, Hong-Juan; Liu, Xiao-Mei; Zheng, Kui-Yang; Tang, Ren-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)is the fifth most common malignancy associated with high mortality. One of the risk factors for HCC is chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The treatment strategy for the disease is dependent on the stage of HCC, and the Barcelona clinic liver cancer (BCLC) staging system is used in most HCC cases. However, the molecular characteristics of HBV-related HCC in different BCLC stages are still unknown. Using GSE14520 microarray data from HBV-related HCC cases with BCLC stages from 0 (very early stage) to C (advanced stage) in the gene expression omnibus (GEO) database, differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including common DEGs and unique DEGs in different BCLC stages, were identified. These DEGs were located on different chromosomes. The molecular functions and biology pathways of DEGs were identified by gene ontology (GO) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis, and the interactome networks of DEGs were constructed using the NetVenn online tool. The results revealed that both common DEGs and stage-specific DEGs were associated with various molecular functions and were involved in special biological pathways. In addition, several hub genes were found in the interactome networks of DEGs. The identified DEGs and hub genes promote our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of HBV-related HCC through the different BCLC stages, and might be used as staging biomarkers or molecular targets for the treatment of HCC with HBV infection.

  3. Prognostic significance of catalase expression and its regulatory effects on hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in HBV-related advanced hepatocellular carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Mi-Young; Cheong, Jae Youn; Lim, Wonchung; Jo, Sujin; Lee, Youngsoo; Wang, Hee-Jung; Han, Kyou-Hoon; Cho, Hyeseong

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) plays a role in liver cancer development. We previously showed that ROS increased HBx levels and here, we investigated the role of antioxidants in the regulation of HBx expression and their clinical relevance. We found that overexpression of catalase induced a significant loss in HBx levels. The cysteine null mutant of HBx (Cys−) showed a dramatic reduction in its protein stability. In clonogenic proliferation assays, Huh7-X cells produced a significant number of colonies whereas Huh7-Cys− cells failed to generate them. The Cys at position 69 of HBx was crucial to maintain its protein stability and transactivation function in response to ROS. Among 50 HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) specimens, 72% of HCCs showed lower catalase levels than those of surrounding non-tumor tissues. In advanced stage IV, catalase levels in non-tumor tissues were increased whereas those in tumors were further reduced. Accordingly, patients with a high T/N ratio for catalase showed significantly longer survival than those with a low T/N ratio. Together, catalase expression in HCC patients can be clinically useful for prediction of patient survival, and restoration of catalase expression in HCCs could be an important strategy for intervention in HBV-induced liver diseases. PMID:25361011

  4. The Prognostic Value of Alpha-Fetoprotein Response for Advanced-Stage Hepatocellular Carcinoma Treated with Sorafenib Combined with Transarterial Chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Zhao, Yan; Jia, Jia; Chen, Hui; Bai, Wei; Yang, Man; Yin, Zhanxin; He, Chuangye; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Wengang; Niu, Jing; Yuan, Jie; Cai, Hongwei; Xia, Jielai; Fan, Daiming; Han, Guohong

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of the alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) response in advanced-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients treated with sorafenib combined with transarterial chemoembolization. From May 2008 to July 2012, 118 HCC patients with baseline AFP levels >20 ng/ml treated with combination therapy were enrolled. A receiver operating characteristic curve was used to generate a cutoff point for AFP changes for predicting survival. The AFP response was defined as an AFP decrease rate [ΔAFP(%)] greater than the cutoff point. The ΔAFP(%) was defined as the percentage of changes between the baseline and the nadir values within 2 months after therapy. The median follow-up time was 8.8 months (range 1.2–66.9). A level of 46% was chosen as the threshold value for ΔAFP (sensitivity = 53.7%, specificity = 83.3%). The median overall survival was significantly longer in the AFP response group than in the AFP non-response group (12.8 vs. 6.4 months, P = 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that ECOG ≥ 1 (HR = 1.95; 95% CI 1.24–3.1, P = 0.004) and AFP nonresponse (HR = 1.71; 95% CI 1.15–2.55, P = 0.009) were associated with increased risk of death. In conclusion, AFP response could predict the survival of patients with advanced-stage HCC at an early time point after combination therapy. PMID:26831408

  5. Preliminary efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and quality of life study of pegylated recombinant human arginase 1 in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yau, Thomas; Cheng, Paul N; Chan, Pierre; Chen, Li; Yuen, Jimmy; Pang, Roberta; Fan, Sheung Tat; Wheatley, Denys N; Poon, Ronnie T

    2015-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy, safety profile, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and quality of life of pegylated recombinant human arginase 1 (Peg-rhAgr1) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients were given weekly doses of Peg-rhAgr1 (1600 U/kg). Tumour response was assessed every 8 weeks using RECIST 1.1 and modified RECIST criteria. A total of 20 patients were recruited, of whom 15 were deemed evaluable for treatment efficacy. Eighteen patients (90%) were hepatitis B carriers. Median age was 61.5 (range 30-75). Overall disease control rate was 13%, with 2 of the 15 patients achieving stable disease for >8 weeks. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 1.7 (95% CI: 1.67-1.73) months, with median overall survival (OS) of all 20 enrolled patients being 5.2 (95% CI: 3.3-12.0) months. PFS was significantly prolonged in patients with adequate arginine depletion (ADD) >2 months versus those who had ≤2 months of ADD (6.4 versus 1.7 months; p = 0.01). The majority of adverse events (AEs) were grade 1/2 non-hematological toxicities. Transient liver dysfunctions (25%) were the most commonly reported serious AEs and likely due to disease progression. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data showed that Peg-rhAgr1 induced rapid and sustained arginine depletion. The overall quality of life of the enrolled patients was well preserved. Peg-rhAgr1 is well tolerated with a good toxicity profile in patients with advanced HCC. A weekly dose of 1600 U/kg is sufficient to induce ADD. Significantly longer PFS times were recorded for patients who had ADD for >2 months.

  6. A randomized study of cisplatin and 5-FU hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with or without adriamycin for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Song, Myeong Jun; Bae, Si Hyun; Chun, Ho Jong; Choi, Jong Young; Yoon, Seung Kew; Park, Jun Young; Han, Kwang Hyub; Kim, Young Seok; Yim, Hyung Joon; Um, Soon Ho; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok; Cho, Sung-Bum; Eun, Jong Ryul

    2015-04-01

    This multicenter, randomized, open-labeled, clinical trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (5-FU) hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (CF-HAIC) versus adriamycin adding to CF-HAIC (ACF-HAIC) in advanced HCC patients. Fifty-six patients with advanced HCC were randomized to two treatment groups: (1) CF-HAIC group [n = 29, 5-FU, 500 mg/m(2) on days 1-3, and cisplatin, 60 mg/m(2) on day 2] and (2) ACF-HAIC group [n = 27, adriamycin, 50 mg/m(2) on day 1, 5-FU, 500 mg/m(2) on days 1-3, and cisplatin, 60 mg/m(2) on day 2] every 4 weeks via an implantable port system. Primary efficacy endpoint was overall survival (OS). Treatment response and time to progression were secondary endpoints. Treatment response rates did not differ significantly between the two treatment groups. Time to progression (5.4 vs. 5.8 months, P = 0.863) and OS (11.1 vs. 8.8 months, P = 0.448) were not significantly different. When the factors affecting patient OS were analyzed, disease control rate [P < 0.001, HR 6.437 (95% CI 2.580-16.064)] was independently associated with OS. Age (≥60 years) and serum AFP level (≥200 ng/dL) also were significant factors for OS [P = 0.007, HR 4.945 (95% CI 1.543-15.850), P = 0.048, HR 2.677 (95% CI 1.010-7.095), respectively]. Grade 4 treatment-related toxicity and mortality was not observed in both groups. Although both HAIC regimens are safe and effective in patients with advanced HCC, HAIC adding adriamycin did not show delayed tumor progression and survival benefit compared to CF-HAIC in advanced HCC.

  7. Is it time to adopt external beam radiotherapy in the NCCN guidelines as a therapeutic strategy for intermediate/advanced hepatocellular carcinoma?.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Zeng, Zhao-Chong

    2013-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is recommended as a therapeutic strategy for stage III hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in national guidelines of the Chinese Society of Liver Disease and in Korea Liver Cancer Study Group practice guidelines, but has not been considered a therapeutic option for HCC in Western countries. In this study, we review evidence supporting EBRT as an option for HCC treatment. Retrospective investigation was made of 775 patient records of intermediate/advanced HCC treated in our hospital during the last 10 years, including 98 patients with confined intrahepatic tumor, 181 with portal vein (PV) or inferior vena cava (IVC) tumor thrombi, 191 with lymph node metastases, 55 with adrenal gland metastases, 205 with bone metastases, 13 with lung metastases and 32 with brain metastases. Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization combined with radiotherapy was found to constitute an improved therapeutic strategy for unresectable but confined intrahepatic HCC with poor lipid accumulation. Survival of HCC patients with PV/IVC tumor thrombi was prolonged to 10.7 months by radiotherapy, and it was 8.0 months in patients with abdominal lymph node metastasis. Radiotherapy also shrinks adrenal and lung metastatic HCC lesions, resulting in median survival times of 13.6 and progression-free survival of 13.4 months, respectively. In bone metastatic HCC, radiotherapy significantly relieved symptoms, although median survival time was only 7.4 months. Radiotherapy is effective for treatment of intermediate/advanced stages of HCC. Although our finding is based only on retrospective analysis, no therapeutic option that provides better treatment than EBRT in this indication has thus far been identified. Because sorafenib has been recommended as a treatment strategy by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) for HCC, we compared the survival after EBRT with sorafenib treatment on the basis of published clinical data. From this comparison, we found that EBRT

  8. Randomized controlled trial of the prophylactic effect of urea-based cream on sorafenib-associated hand-foot skin reactions in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ren, ZhengGang; Zhu, KangShun; Kang, HaiYan; Lu, MinQiang; Qu, ZengQiang; Lu, LiGong; Song, TianQiang; Zhou, WeiPing; Wang, Hui; Yang, WeiZhu; Wang, Xuan; Yang, YongPing; Shi, LeHua; Bai, YuXian; Guo, XiaoFeng; Ye, Sheng-Long

    2015-03-10

    To assess whether urea-based cream (UBC) has prophylactic benefits on sorafenib-induced hand-foot skin reaction (HFSR) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this randomized, open-label trial, 871 patients with advanced HCC throughout China were treated with 10% UBC three times per day plus best supportive care (BSC; n = 439) or BSC alone excluding all creams (n = 432), starting on day 1 of sorafenib treatment, for up to 12 weeks. HFSR was assessed every 2 weeks and at 14 weeks for patients completing the study. Once HFSR occurred, patients were allowed any cream, including a UBC. The 12-week incidence of any grade HFSR was significantly lower in the UBC group versus the BSC-alone group (56.0% v 73.6%, respectively; odds ratio [OR], 0.457; 95% CI, 0.344 to 0.608; P < .001), as was the incidence of grade ≥ 2 HFSR (20.7% v 29.2%, respectively; OR, 0.635; 95% CI, 0.466 to 0.866; P = .004). Median time to first occurrence of HFSR was significantly longer in the UBC group than the BSC-alone group (84 v 34 days, respectively; hazard ratio, 0.658; 95% CI, 0.541 to 0.799; P < .001). Elevated AST was associated with increased risk of HFSR but did not alter the treatment effect of UBC. UBC plus BSC, compared with BSC alone, did not affect the sorafenib dose reduction or interruption rate (9.1% v 11.8%, respectively; P = .1937), response rate (11.1% v 10.1%, respectively; P = .6674), or disease control rate (98.8% v 98.2%, respectively; P = .5350) at week 12. UBC prophylaxis in patients with advanced HCC starting sorafenib reduced HFSR rates, extended the time to first occurrence of HFSR, and improved patient quality of life compared with BSC. Blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trials to determine the role of UBC on the incidence and severity of HFSR are warranted. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  9. Influence of Tumor Thrombus Location on the Outcome of External-beam Radiation Therapy in Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Macrovascular Invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Jiazhou; Zeng Zhaochong; Zhang Jianying; Fan Jia; Zhou Jian; Zeng Mengsu

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The present study evaluates the influence of portal vein (PV) vs. inferior vena cava (IVC) tumor thrombosis sites on the effectiveness of external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with macrovascular invasion. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 181 HCC patients with PV and/or IVC tumor thrombi who were referred for EBRT at our institution between 2000 and 2009. EBRT was designed to focus on the tumor thrombi with or without primary intrahepatic tumors to deliver a median total conventional dose of 50 Gy (range, 30-60 Gy). Predictors of survival were identified using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median survival was 10.2, 7.4, 17.4, and 8.5 months for patients with PV branch, PV trunk, IVC, and PV plus IVC tumor thrombosis, respectively. Unfavorable pretreatment predictors were associated by multivariate analysis with lower albumin and higher {alpha}-fetoprotein levels, poorer Child-Pugh liver function classification, multiple intrahepatic foci, lymph node metastases, thrombus location, less chance to receive post-EBRT transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and the two-dimensional EBRT technique. In comparison to patients with PV tumor thrombosis, patients with IVC thrombi had a higher occurrence of solitary intrahepatic lesions (p = 0.027), well-controlled intrahepatic tumors (p < 0.001), and a better response to EBRT (p < 0.001), and they were more likely to receive post-EBRT TACE (p = 0.033). Conclusions: In HCC, patients with IVC thrombus treated with EBRT had a better response rate and longer survival than those with PV thrombus.

  10. Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization Plus 131I-Labelled Metuximab versus Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization Alone in Intermediate/Advanced Stage Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ze-xin; Liao, Ming-heng; Wang, Xiao-xue

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to compare transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) plus 131I-labelled metuximab with TACE alone for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and Methods A comprehensive search was conducted in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Chinese BioMedical Literature Database with published date from the earliest to February 29th, 2016. No language restrictions were applied, but only prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or non-RCTs were eligible for a full-text review. The primary outcome was the overall survival (OS) and effective rate (the rate of partial atrophy or complete clearance of the tumor lesion). The odds ratios (ORs) were combined using either the fixed-effects model or random-effects model. Results Eight trials (3 RCTs and 5 non-RCTs) were included, involving a total of 1121 patients. Patients receiving combined therapy of TACE plus 131I-labelled metuximab showed significant improvement in effective rate {OR = 4.00, (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.40–6.66), p < 0.001}, 1-year OS (OR = 2.03 [95% CI: 1.55–2.67], p < 0.001) and 2-year OS (OR = 2.57 [95% CI: 1.41–4.66], p = 0.002]. Conclusion TACE plus 131I-labelled metuximab is more beneficial for treating advanced HCCs than TACE alone in terms of tumor response and OS. Large, multi-center, and blinded randomized trials are required to confirm these findings. PMID:27833404

  11. Quality of life as a prognostic factor of overall survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: results from two French clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bonnetain, Franck; Paoletti, Xavier; Collette, Sandra; Doffoel, Michel; Bouché, Olivia; Raoul, Jean Luc; Rougier, Philippe; Masskouri, Fadil; Barbare, Jean Claude; Bedenne, Laurent

    2008-08-01

    The aims of our study were to assess quality of life (QoL) as a prognostic factor of overall survival (OS) and to determine whether QoL data improved three prognostic classifications among French patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We pooled two randomized clinical trials conducted by the Fédération Francophone de Cancérologie Digestive in a palliative setting. In each trial QoL was assessed at baseline using the Spitzer QoL Index (0-10). Three prognostic classifications were calculated: Okuda, Cancer of the Liver Italian Program (CLIP), and Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer group (BCLC) scores. To explore whether the scores could be improved by including QoL, univariate Cox analyses of all potential baseline predictors were performed. A final multivariate Cox model was constructed including only significant multivariate baseline variables likely to result in improvement of each scoring system. In order to retain the best prognostic variable to add for each score, we compared Akaike information criterion, likelihood ratio, and Harrell's C-index. Cox analyses were stratified for each trial. Among 538 included patients, QoL at baseline was available for 489 patients (90%). Longer median OS was significantly associated with higher Spitzer scores at baseline, ranging from 2.17 months (Spitzer=3) to 8.93 months (Spitzer=10). Variables retained in the multivariate Cox model were: jaundice, hepatomegaly, hepatalgia, portal thrombosis, alphafetoprotein, bilirubin, albumin, small HCC, and Spitzer QoL Index (hazard ratio=0.84 95% CI [0.79-0.90]). According to Harrell's C-index, QoL was the best prognostic variable to add. CLIP plus the Spitzer QoL Index had the most discriminating value (C=0.71). Our results suggest that QoL is an independent prognostic factor for survival in HCC patients with mainly alcoholic cirrhosis. The prognostic value of CLIP score could be improved by adding Spitzer QOL Index scores.

  12. The comparison of outcomes between hypofractionated and conventional 3D-CRT regimens used in combination with TACE as first-line treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuanxi; Li, Suping; Sun, Aimin; Chen, Longhua; Liang, Rongxiang; Li, Guanzhen; Han, Junqing

    2015-07-01

    Treatment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with transcatheter hepatic arterial chemoembolization (TACE) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) achieves good short-term but poor long-term survival. We retrospectively assessed whether outcomes differ between hypofractionated and conventional 3D-CRT regimens. Patients were treated in our institution between June 2005 and October 2009. All patients received two cycles of TACE followed by either hypofractionated 3D-CRT (6-8 Gy fractions for 3-4 weeks to 48-64 Gy) or conventional 3D-CRT (2 Gy fractions for 6-7 weeks to 60-70 Gy) 4 weeks later. We assessed data from 110 patients (55 in each 3D-CRT group). Overall response rates were similar in the two groups. Acute adverse event rates were not significantly higher in the hypofractionated 3D-CRT group than in the conventional 3D-CRT group; two patients and one patient, respectively, died of late radiation-induced liver failure. Overall survival at 1 year was 83.6 % in the hypofractionated 3D-CRT group versus 68.8 % in the conventional 3D-CRT group (P = 0.019), and at 3 years, it was 31.7 versus 13.9 % (P = 0.004). Median survival was 27.97 versus 16.13 months (P = 0.002). Hypofractionated 3D-CRT seemed to provide better overall survival than conventional 3D-CRT regimens combined with TACE as a first-line treatment for advanced HCC.

  13. Randomized Phase II Study of the X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis (XIAP) Antisense AEG35156 in Combination With Sorafenib in Patients With Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC).

    PubMed

    Lee, Francis A S; Zee, Benny Chung-Ying; Cheung, Foon Yiu; Kwong, Philip; Chiang, Chi Leung; Leung, Kwong Chuen; Siu, Steven W K; Lee, Conrad; Lai, Maria; Kwok, Chloe; Chong, Marc; Jolivet, Jacques; Tung, Steward

    2016-12-01

    This multicenter, randomized, open-label, phase II trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of AEG35156 in addition to sorafenib in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), as compared with sorafenib alone. Eligible patients were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive AEG35156 (300 mg weekly intravenous infusion) in combination with sorafenib (400 mg twice daily orally) or sorafenib alone. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Other endpoints include overall survival (OS), objective response rates (ORR), and safety profile. A total of 51 patients were enrolled; of them, 48 were evaluable. At a median follow-up of 16.2 months, the median PFS and OS were 4.0 months (95% CI, 1.2-4.1) and 6.5 months (95% CI, 3.9-11.5) for combination arm, and 2.6 (95% CI, 1.2-5.4) and 5.4 months (95% CI, 4.3-11.2) for sorafenib arm. Patients who had the study treatment interrupted or had dose modifications according to protocol did significantly better, in terms of PFS and OS, than those who had no dose reduction in combination arm and those in sorafenib arm. The ORR based on Choi and RECIST criteria were 16.1% and 9.7% in combination arm, respectively. The ORR was 0 in control arm. One drug-related serious adverse event of hypersensitivity occurred in the combination arm, whereas 2 gastrointestinal serious adverse events in the sorafenib arm. AEG35156 in combination with sorafenib showed additional activity in terms of ORR and was well tolerated. The benefit on PFS is moderate but more apparent in the dose-reduced subgroups.

  14. pERK/pAkt phenotyping in circulating tumor cells as a biomarker for sorafenib efficacy in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Shi, Lehua; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Sun, Bin; Yang, Yefa; Ge, Naijian; Liu, Huiying; Yang, Xia; Chen, Lei; Qian, Haihua; Wu, Mengchao; Yin, Zhengfeng

    2016-01-19

    Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor approved for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, therapeutic response to sorafenib was not equal among HCC patients. Here we present a novel system to provide quantitative information concerning sorafenib-related targets by simultaneous detection of phosphorylated ERK (pERK) and pAkt expressions in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) isolated from HCC patients. Our results showed that 90.0% of patients had a molecular classification of tissues concordant with that of CTCs. CTC counts showed a shaper decline in patients with pERK+/pAkt- CTCs after two weeks of sorafenib treatment (P < 0.01). Disease control rates were significantly different between patients with pERK+/pAkt- CTCs (11/15; 73.3%) and those without (13/44; 29.5%) (P < 0.05). Univariate and multivariate analysis indicated pERK+/pAkt- CTCs as an independent predictive factor of progression-free survival (PFS) (hazard ratio = 9.389; P < 0.01). PFS correlated with the proportion of pERK+/pAkt- CTCs (r = 0.968, P < 0.01), and was higher in patients with ≥ 40% pERK+/pAkt- CTCs compared to those with < 40% (8.4 vs. 1.3 mo; P < 0.05). In a validation set of twenty HCC patients, CTCs from patients with ≥ 40% pERK+/pAkt- CTCs had significantly higher inhibition rates of spheroid formation compared to those with < 40% (61.2 vs. 19.8%; P < 0.01). Our findings demonstrated that CTCs can be used in place of tumor tissue for characterization of pERK/pAkt expression. pERK+/pAkt- CTCs are most sensitive to sorafenib and an independent predictive factor of PFS in HCC patients treated with sorafenib.

  15. Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Johung, Kimberly; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Chang, Bryan W.

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Surgical resection can be curative, but the majority of patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Treatment for patients with locally advanced disease is controversial. Therapeutic options include systemic therapy alone, concurrent chemoradiation, or induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. We review the evidence to date regarding the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), as well as evolving strategies including the emerging role of targeted therapies. We propose that if radiation is used for patients with LAPC, it should be delivered with concurrent chemotherapy and following a period of induction chemotherapy.

  16. Advanced Algorithms for Local Routing Strategy on Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Benchuan; Chen, Bokui; Gao, Yachun; Tse, Chi K.; Dong, Chuanfei; Miao, Lixin; Wang, Binghong

    2016-01-01

    Despite the significant improvement on network performance provided by global routing strategies, their applications are still limited to small-scale networks, due to the need for acquiring global information of the network which grows and changes rapidly with time. Local routing strategies, however, need much less local information, though their transmission efficiency and network capacity are much lower than that of global routing strategies. In view of this, three algorithms are proposed and a thorough investigation is conducted in this paper. These algorithms include a node duplication avoidance algorithm, a next-nearest-neighbor algorithm and a restrictive queue length algorithm. After applying them to typical local routing strategies, the critical generation rate of information packets Rc increases by over ten-fold and the average transmission time 〈T〉 decreases by 70–90 percent, both of which are key physical quantities to assess the efficiency of routing strategies on complex networks. More importantly, in comparison with global routing strategies, the improved local routing strategies can yield better network performance under certain circumstances. This is a revolutionary leap for communication networks, because local routing strategy enjoys great superiority over global routing strategy not only in terms of the reduction of computational expense, but also in terms of the flexibility of implementation, especially for large-scale networks. PMID:27434502

  17. Advanced Algorithms for Local Routing Strategy on Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Benchuan; Chen, Bokui; Gao, Yachun; Tse, Chi K; Dong, Chuanfei; Miao, Lixin; Wang, Binghong

    2016-01-01

    Despite the significant improvement on network performance provided by global routing strategies, their applications are still limited to small-scale networks, due to the need for acquiring global information of the network which grows and changes rapidly with time. Local routing strategies, however, need much less local information, though their transmission efficiency and network capacity are much lower than that of global routing strategies. In view of this, three algorithms are proposed and a thorough investigation is conducted in this paper. These algorithms include a node duplication avoidance algorithm, a next-nearest-neighbor algorithm and a restrictive queue length algorithm. After applying them to typical local routing strategies, the critical generation rate of information packets Rc increases by over ten-fold and the average transmission time 〈T〉 decreases by 70-90 percent, both of which are key physical quantities to assess the efficiency of routing strategies on complex networks. More importantly, in comparison with global routing strategies, the improved local routing strategies can yield better network performance under certain circumstances. This is a revolutionary leap for communication networks, because local routing strategy enjoys great superiority over global routing strategy not only in terms of the reduction of computational expense, but also in terms of the flexibility of implementation, especially for large-scale networks.

  18. Advances in the management of localized radiation injuries.

    PubMed

    Müller, Kerstin; Meineke, Viktor

    2010-06-01

    Localized radiation injuries account for the vast majority of accidental radiation exposures and mainly occur due to direct handling of highly intense radioactive sources. Their clinical course and severity mainly depend on the type of radiation, radiation source, dose and dose rate, duration of exposure, dose distribution, and location and size of the area exposed. Local injuries appear as skin injuries; however, they may involve radiation damage to other organs and tissues. Local injuries evolve slowly over time and clinical signs and symptoms usually take days to weeks to manifest. Although in most cases not life threatening, their delayed effects may result in serious impairments. Standardized therapeutic protocols and evidence-based approaches for the management of local injuries do not exist yet. Local injuries should therefore be treated symptomatically. The two main approaches comprise conservative and surgical treatment. Conservative methods focus on pain control, reduction of inflammation, prevention of infection and of further vasculature insult, improvement of circulation, healing acceleration, wound cleaning, and minimizing fibrosis. Surgical treatment and plastic remodeling of anatomic structures may be required. During recent years, significant progress has been made in the management of local injuries. There is increasing evidence that injections of human mesenchymal stem cells may be a promising therapeutic approach in the treatment of cutaneous radiation reactions. A consistent follow-up of radiation patients keeping in mind the possible onset of late radiation effects will contribute to the comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of the radiation reaction which is crucial to establish evidence-based diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  19. Advanced techniques and armamentarium for dental local anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Clark, Taylor M; Yagiela, John A

    2010-10-01

    Computer-controlled local anesthetic delivery (C-CLAD) devices and systems for intraosseous (IO) injection are important additions to the dental anesthesia armamentarium. C-CLAD using slow infusion rates can significantly reduce the discomfort of local anesthetic infusion, especially in palatal tissues, and facilitate palatal approaches to pulpal nerve block that find special use in cosmetic dentistry, periodontal therapy, and pediatric dentistry. Anesthesia of single teeth can be obtained using either C-CLAD intraligamentary injections or IO injections. Supplementary IO anesthesia is particularly suited for providing effective pain control of teeth diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Leuprorelin, triptorelin: new indications. Locally advanced prostate cancer: minimally assessed me-toos.

    PubMed

    2007-12-01

    Unlike goserelin, leuprorelin and triptorelin have not been assessed for their impact on survival in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. The main adverse effects of these two drugs are similar, but convenience of use differs.

  1. Primary radiation therapy for locally advanced breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon, T.; Hayes, D.F.; Cady, B.; Parker, L.; Osteen, R.; Silver, B.; Recht, A.; Come, S.; Henderson, I.C.; Harris, J.R.

    1987-09-15

    The optimal local-regional treatment for patients with Stage III breast cancer has not been determined. To evaluate the effectiveness of radiation therapy as local treatment for such patients, the results of 192 patients (five with bilateral disease) treated with radiation therapy without mastectomy between July 1, 1968 and December 31, 1981 were reviewed. Excisional biopsy (gross tumor removal) was performed in only 54 of the 197 breasts. Patients typically received 4500 to 5000 cGy in 5 weeks to the breast and draining lymph nodes; a local boost to areas of gross disease was delivered to 157 patients. Multi-agent chemotherapy was given to 53 patients. The median follow-up was 65 months. The actuarial probability of survival for the entire group was 41% at 5 years and 23% at 10 years. The probability of relapse-free survival (RFS) was 30% at 5 years and 19% at 10 years. The addition of multi-agent chemotherapy was associated with a significantly improved 5-year RFS (40% versus 26%, P = 0.02). The 5-year survival rate was 51% for patients who received adjuvant multi-agent chemotherapy and 38% for patients who did not (P = 0.16). The actuarial rate of local-regional tumor control (not censored for distant failure) for all patients was 73% at 5 years and 68% at ten years, and the crude incidence of local-regional control was 78%. Local-regional tumor control was principally influenced by radiation dose. Patients who received 6000 cGy or greater to the primary site had a better 5-year rate of control in the breast than did patients who received less than 6000 cGy (83% versus 70%, P = 0.06). Significant complications were seen in 15 patients (8%); these included moderate or severe arm edema in six patients and brachial plexopathy in four patients. Cosmetic results at last evaluation were excellent or good in 56% of evaluable patients, fair in 25%, and poor in 19%.

  2. Transarterial chemoembolization for early stage hepatocellular carcinoma decrease local tumor control and overall survival compared to radiofrequency ablation

    PubMed Central

    Hocquelet, Arnaud; Seror, Olivier; Blanc, Jean-Frédéric; Frulio, Nora; Salut, Cécile; Nault, Jean-Charles; Hervé Trillaud

    2017-01-01

    Background & Aims To compare treatment failure and survival associated with ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and trans-arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for early-stage HCC in Child-Pugh A cirrhosis patients. Methods 122 cirrhotic patients (RFA: 61; TACE: 61) were well matched according to cirrhosis severity; tumor size and serum alpha-fetoprotein. TACE was performed in case of inconspicuous nodule on US or nodule with “at risk location”. Treatment failure was defined as local tumor progression (LTP) and primary treatment failure (failing to obtain complete response after two treatment session). Treatment failure and overall survival (OS) were compared after coarsened exact matching. Cox proportional model to assess independent predictive factors was performed. Results No significant difference was seen for baseline characteristics between the two groups. Mean tumor size was 3cm in both group with 41% HCC>3cm. Treatment failure rates after TACE was 42.6% (14 primary treatment failures and 12 LTP) and 9.8% after RFA (no primary treatment failure and 6 LTP) P < 0.001. TACE was the only predictive factor of treatment failure (Hazard ratio: 5.573). The 4-years OS after RFA and TACE were 54.1% and 31.5% (P = 0.042), respectively. Conclusion For Child-Pugh A patients with early-stage HCC, alternative treatment as supra-selective TACE to RFA regarded as too challenging using common US guidance decrease significantly the local tumor control and overall survival. Efforts to improve feasibility of RFA especially for inconspicuous target have to be made. PMID:27793027

  3. Vismodegib: a guide to its use in locally advanced or metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A; Keating, Gillian M

    2013-02-01

    Vismodegib is the first Hedgehog pathway inhibitor to be approved in the USA, where it is indicated for the treatment of adults with metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC), or with locally advanced BCC that has recurred following surgery or who are not candidates for surgery, and who are not candidates for radiation. In an ongoing, noncomparative, phase II trial, oral vismodegib was effective in and had an acceptable tolerability profile in the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic BCC.

  4. Complete pathological response following down-staging chemoradiation in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: Challenging the boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Khan, AZ; Pitsinis, V; Mudan, SS

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy, relatively resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which usually presents late. Disease specific mortality approaches unity despite advances in adjuvant therapy. We present the first reported case of complete pathological response following neoadjuvant therapy in a locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:18081235

  5. Target localization of 3D versus 4D cone beam computed tomography in lipiodol-guided stereotactic radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chan, Mark; Chiang, Chi Leung; Lee, Venus; Cheung, Steven; Leung, Ronnie; Wong, Matthew; Lee, Frankle; Blanck, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this study was to comparatively evaluate the accuracy of respiration-correlated (4D) and uncorrelated (3D) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in localizing lipiodolized hepatocellular carcinomas during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). 4D-CBCT scans of eighteen HCCs were acquired during free-breathing SBRT following trans-arterial chemo-embolization (TACE) with lipiodol. Approximately 1320 x-ray projections per 4D-CBCT were collected and phase-sorted into ten bins. A 4D registration workflow was followed to register the reconstructed time-weighted average CBCT with the planning mid-ventilation (MidV) CT by an initial bone registration of the vertebrae and then tissue registration of the lipiodol. For comparison, projections of each 4D-CBCT were combined to synthesize 3D-CBCT without phase-sorting. Using the lipiodolized tumor, uncertainties of the treatment setup estimated from the absolute and relative lipiodol position to bone were analyzed separately for 4D- and 3D-CBCT. Qualitatively, 3D-CBCT showed better lipiodol contrast than 4D-CBCT primarily because of a tenfold increase of projections used for reconstruction. Motion artifact was observed to subside in 4D-CBCT compared to 3D-CBCT. Group mean, systematic and random errors estimated from 4D- and 3D-CBCT agreed to within 1 mm in the cranio-caudal (CC) and 0.5 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP) and left-right (LR) directions. Systematic and random errors are largest in the CC direction, amounting to 4.7 mm and 3.7 mm from 3D-CBCT and 5.6 mm and 3.8 mm from 4D-CBCT, respectively. Safety margin calculated from 3D-CBCT and 4D-CBCT differed by 2.1, 0.1 and 0.0 mm in the CC, AP, and LR directions. 3D-CBCT is an adequate alternative to 4D-CBCT when lipoid is used for localizing HCC during free-breathing SBRT. Similar margins are anticipated with 3D- and 4D-CBCT.

  6. FoxO3a Nuclear Localization and Its Association with β-Catenin and Smads in IFN-α-Treated Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, María Paula; Parody, Juan Pablo; Quiroga, Ariel Darío; Casella, María Laura; Francés, Daniel Eleazar; Larocca, María Cecilia; Carnovale, Cristina Ester; Alvarez, María de Luján

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-α2b (IFN-α2b) reduces proliferation and increases apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells by decreasing β-catenin/TCF4/Smads interaction. Forkhead box O-class 3a (FoxO3a) participates in proliferation and apoptosis and interacts with β-catenin and Smads. FoxO3a is inhibited by Akt, IκB kinase β (IKKβ), and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (Erk), which promote FoxO3a sequestration in the cytosol, and accumulates in the nucleus upon phosphorylation by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated kinase (p38 MAPK). We analyzed FoxO3a subcellular localization, the participating kinases, FoxO3a/β-catenin/Smads association, and FoxO3a target gene expression in IFN-α2b-stimulated HepG2/C3A and Huh7 cells. Total FoxO3a and Akt-phosphorylated FoxO3a levels decreased in the cytosol, whereas total FoxO3a levels increased in the nucleus upon IFN-α2b stimulus. IFN-α2b reduced Akt, IKKβ, and Erk activation, and increased JNK and p38 MAPK activation. p38 MAPK inhibition blocked IFN-α2b-induced FoxO3a nuclear localization. IFN-α2b enhanced FoxO3a association with β-catenin and Smad2/3/7. Two-step coimmunoprecipitation experiments suggest that these proteins coexist in the same complex. The expression of several FoxO3a target genes increased with IFN-α2b. FoxO3a knockdown prevented the induction of these genes, suggesting that FoxO3a acts as mediator of IFN-α2b action. Results suggest a β-catenin/Smads switch from TCF4 to FoxO3a. Such events would contribute to the IFN-α2b-mediated effects on cellular proliferation and apoptosis. These results demonstrate new mechanisms for IFN-α action, showing the importance of its application in antitumorigenic therapies. PMID:24950290

  7. Targeting EGFR and sonic hedgehog pathways for locally advanced eyelid and periocular carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Vivian T; Merritt, Helen; Esmaeli, Bita

    2014-01-01

    For patients with metastatic or locally advanced eyelid and periocular carcinoma not amenable to surgical excision, targeted therapies have shown efficacy with better tolerability compared to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Overexpression of epithelial growth factor receptor was found in squamous cell carcinomas. Vismodegib targets the mutation in the hedgehog pathway identified in basal cell carcinoma and basal cell nevus syndrome. Targeted therapies provide a novel and potentially effective treatment alternative for patients with eyelid carcinoma not amendable for surgery, including those with metastatic, locally advanced disease, advanced age, and significant comorbidities. High cost, need for long-term treatment, and toxicity are relative limitations. PMID:25232546

  8. A Challenging Surgical Approach to Locally Advanced Primary Urethral Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Spilotros, Marco; Vavallo, Antonio; Palazzo, Silvano; Miacola, Carlos; Forte, Saverio; Matera, Matteo; Campagna, Marcello; Colamonico, Ottavio; Schiralli, Francesco; Sebastiani, Francesco; Di Cosmo, Federica; Bettocchi, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Buonerba, Carlo; Vincenti, Leonardo; Ludovico, Giuseppe; Ditonno, Pasquale; Battaglia, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary urethral carcinoma (PUC) is a rare and aggressive cancer, often underdetected and consequently unsatisfactorily treated. We report a case of advanced PUC, surgically treated with combined approaches. A 47-year-old man underwent transurethral resection of a urethral lesion with histological evidence of a poorly differentiated squamous cancer of the bulbomembranous urethra. Computed tomography (CT) and bone scans excluded metastatic spread of the disease but showed involvement of both corpora cavernosa (cT3N0M0). A radical surgical approach was advised, but the patient refused this and opted for chemotherapy. After 17 months the patient was referred to our department due to the evidence of a fistula in the scrotal area. CT scan showed bilateral metastatic disease in the inguinal, external iliac, and obturator lymph nodes as well as the involvement of both corpora cavernosa. Additionally, a fistula originating from the right corpus cavernosum extended to the scrotal skin. At this stage, the patient accepted the surgical treatment, consisting of different phases. Phase I: Radical extraperitoneal cystoprostatectomy with iliac-obturator lymph nodes dissection. Phase II: Creation of a urinary diversion through a Bricker ileal conduit. Phase III: Repositioning of the patient in lithotomic position for an overturned Y skin incision, total penectomy, fistula excision, and “en bloc” removal of surgical specimens including the bladder, through the perineal breach. Phase IV: Right inguinal lymphadenectomy. The procedure lasted 9-and-a-half hours, was complication-free, and intraoperative blood loss was 600 mL. The patient was discharged 8 days after surgery. Pathological examination documented a T4N2M0 tumor. The clinical situation was stable during the first 3 months postoperatively but then metastatic spread occurred, not responsive to adjuvant chemotherapy, which led to the patient's death 6 months after surgery. Patients with advanced stage tumors of

  9. Sorafenib with or without everolimus in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): a randomized multicenter, multinational phase II trial (SAKK 77/08 and SASL 29).

    PubMed

    Koeberle, D; Dufour, J-F; Demeter, G; Li, Q; Ribi, K; Samaras, P; Saletti, P; Roth, A D; Horber, D; Buehlmann, M; Wagner, A D; Montemurro, M; Lakatos, G; Feilchenfeldt, J; Peck-Radosavljevic, M; Rauch, D; Tschanz, B; Bodoky, G

    2016-05-01

    Sorafenib (S), a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is the standard of care for first-line systemic treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Everolimus (E) is a potent inhibitor of mTOR, a pathway frequently activated in HCC. Preclinical data suggest that the combination S + E has additive effects compared with single-agent S. Patients with unresectable or metastatic HCC and Child-Pugh ≤7 liver dysfunction were randomized to receive daily S 800 mg alone or with E 5 mg until progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary end point was progression-free survival at 12 weeks (PFS12). The secondary end points included response rate, PFS, time to progression (TTP), overall survival (OS), duration of disease stabilization (DDS), safety, and quality-of-life (QoL) assessments. A total of 106 patients were randomized: 46 patients received S and 60 patients received S + E. Ninety-three patients were assessable for the primary end point and 105 patients for the safety analysis. The PFS12 rate was 70% [95% confidence interval (CI) 54-83] and 68% (95% CI 53-81) in patients randomized to S and S + E, respectively. The RECIST (mRECIST) response rate was 0% (23%) in the S arm and 10% (35%) in the S + E arm. Median PFS (6.6 versus 5.7 months), TTP (7.6 versus 6.3 months), DDS (6.7 versus 6.7 months), and OS (10 versus 12 months) were similar in the S and S + E arms, respectively. Grade 3/4 adverse events occurred in 72% and 86% of patients in arm S and arm S + E, respectively. Patients had similar QoL scores over time, except for a greater worsening in physical well-being and mood in the arm S + E. No evidence was found that S + E improves the efficacy compared with S alone. Combining 5 mg E with full-dose S is feasible, but more toxic than S alone. Further testing of this drug combination in molecularly unselected HCCs appears unwarranted. NCT01005199. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical

  10. Application of advanced reliability methods to local strain fatigue analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, T. T.; Wirsching, P. H.

    1983-01-01

    When design factors are considered as random variables and the failure condition cannot be expressed by a closed form algebraic inequality, computations of risk (or probability of failure) might become extremely difficult or very inefficient. This study suggests using a simple, and easily constructed, second degree polynomial to approximate the complicated limit state in the neighborhood of the design point; a computer analysis relates the design variables at selected points. Then a fast probability integration technique (i.e., the Rackwitz-Fiessler algorithm) can be used to estimate risk. The capability of the proposed method is demonstrated in an example of a low cycle fatigue problem for which a computer analysis is required to perform local strain analysis to relate the design variables. A comparison of the performance of this method is made with a far more costly Monte Carlo solution. Agreement of the proposed method with Monte Carlo is considered to be good.

  11. Neoadjuvant Treatment Strategies for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gollins, S; Sebag-Montefiore, D

    2016-02-01

    Improved surgical technique plus selective preoperative radiotherapy have decreased rectal cancer pelvic local recurrence from, historically, 25% down to about 5-10%. However, this improvement has not reduced distant metastatic relapse, which is the main cause of death and a key issue in rectal cancer management. The current standard is local pelvic treatment (surgery ± preoperative radiotherapy) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, depending on resection histology. For circumferential resection margin (CRM)-threatened cancer on baseline magnetic resonance imaging, downstaging long-course preoperative chemoradiation (LCPCRT) is generally used. However, for non-CRM-threatened disease, varying approaches are currently adopted in the UK, including straight to surgery, short-course preoperative radiotherapy and LCPCRT. Clinical trials are investigating intensification of concurrent chemoradiation. There is also increasing interest in investigating preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) as a way of exposing micro-metastatic disease to full-dose systemic chemotherapy as early as possible and potentially reducing metastatic relapse. Phase II trials suggest that this strategy is feasible, with promising histological response and low rates of tumour progression during NAC. Phase III trials are needed to determine the benefit of NAC when added to standard therapy and also to determine if it can be used instead of neoadjuvant radiotherapy-based schedules. Although several measures of neoadjuvant treatment response assessment based on imaging or pathology are promising predictive biomarkers for long-term survival, none has been validated in prospective phase III studies. The phase III setting will enable this, also providing translational opportunities to examine molecular predictors of response and survival. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy of gemcitabine for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: comparison with 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tada, Minoru; Arizumi, Toshihiko; Arizumi, Masatoshi; Nakai, Yousuke; Sasaki, Takashi; Kogure, Hirofumi; Togawa, Osamu; Matsubara, Saburo; Tsujino, Takeshi; Hirano, Kenji; Sasahira, Naoki; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Kawabe, Takao; Omata, Masao

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of gemcitabine alone has not been established in comparison with conventional chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Of 180 consecutive patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer, 93 were locally advanced. Among these 93 patients, 45 were treated with gemcitabine, 18 with concurrent radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy, and 30 received best supportive care (BSC). In cases of metastatic disease, 42 were treated with gemcitabine and 32 received BSC. Overall survival and adverse events were analyzed retrospectively. Median survival time and 1-year survival rate were 11.6, 9.3, 6.7, 7.8 and 2.4 months and 47, 39, 27, 21 and 7% in the groups of gemcitabine, chemoradiotherapy, BSC of locally advanced cancer, and in those of gemcitabine, BSC of metastatic disease, respectively. Gemcitabine and chemoradiotherapy prolonged overall survival time compared with BSC (p = 0.0071). No significant difference in survival was observed between gemcitabine and chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cases. Adverse events >grade 3 were observed in 25 of 87 (29%) of gemcitabine-treated and in 3 of 18 (17%) of chemoradiotherapy-treated patients. Gemcitabine monotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer could be as effective as previous chemoradiotherapy. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Immunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pardee, Angela D.; Butterfield, Lisa H.

    2012-01-01

    Current therapies for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are marginally effective and exacerbate underlying liver disease. The ability of immunotherapy to elicit nontoxic, systemic, long-lived anti-tumor activity makes it particularly well-suited for use in the setting of HCC. While therapeutic benefit has been achieved in early clinical trials, the efficacy of immune-based therapies is limited by several unique properties of HCC, most notably the inherently tolerogenic character of the liver in both healthy and diseased (chronically-infected or tumor-bearing) states. Therapeutic regimens that both counteract these immunosuppressive mechanisms and amplify tumor-specific immunity are expected to profoundly improve clinical outcomes for HCC patients. PMID:22720211

  14. [Hypofractionation in locally advanced breast cancer: "flash" scheme].

    PubMed

    Padilha, Marisa; Gonçalves, Sara; Fardilha, Carlos; Melo, Gilberto; Miranda, Cristina; Alves, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: O carcinoma da mama é uma das principais causas de morte no nosso país. No Serviço de Radioterapia do Instituto Português de Oncologia de Coimbra de Coimbra utilizamos, desde há mais de 30 anos, um esquema de hipofraccionamento de radioterapia, denominado “Flash”, como opção terapêutica em doentes idosos ou com baixo Performance Status, portadores de carcinoma da mama localmente avançado ou com estádios IIb ou IV, com intenção neoadjuvante ou paliativa. Objectivos: Avaliar a resposta ao tratamento, nomeadamente sobrevivência global aos três anos, resposta local e toxicidades aguda e crónica, no grupo de doentes seleccionados submetidos a esquema de hipofraccionamento, em estudo retrospectivo. Metodologia: Entre Janeiro de 2006 e Dezembro de 2008, um total de 83 doentes com diagnóstico de Carcinoma da Mama Localmente Avançado ou com estádios IIb ou IV, foi submetido a “Flash” mamário. A dose de radioterapia prescrita foi de 13Gy / 2Fr / 3 dias (em 23 doentes - 27,7%) e 26Gy / 4Fr / 2,5 semanas (em 60 doentes - 72,3%), com fotões de 4 MV, sobre a mama afectada. Foi avaliada sobrevivência global segundo o método de Kaplan-Meier. A análise estatística foi efectuada através da aplicação SPSS, versão 17.0 e os testes estatísticos foram avaliados ao nível de significância de 5%. Resultados: 80 doentes (96,4%) que efectuaram “Flash” mamário eram do género feminino, com idades compreendidas entre os 59 e os 93 anos (idade média 80,72 + 5,87 anos) e Performance Status (Karnosfsky: 0 - 100) entre 90 e 50%. Em 72 doentes (86,7%) o diagnóstico histológico foi Carcinoma Ductal Invasivo. A cirurgia após a realização do “Flash” Mamário foi realizada em 44 doentes (53%) após evidência de resposta local à radioterapia, sendo a Mastectomia Radical Modificada a técnica cirúrgica mais frequente. Efectuou-se o diagnóstico de metastização óssea em 10 doentes (12%), sendo que a taxa de sobrevivência global foi

  15. Multi-Institutional Phase II Study of High-Dose Hypofractionated Proton Beam Therapy in Patients With Localized, Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wo, Jennifer Y.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; McDonnell, Erin I.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Allen, Jill N.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Goyal, Lipika; Murphy, Janet E.; Javle, Milind M.; Wolfgang, John A.; Drapek, Lorraine C.; Arellano, Ronald S.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Mullen, John T.; Yoon, Sam S.; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Ryan, David P.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Crane, Christopher H.; Zhu, Andrew X.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and safety of high-dose, hypofractionated proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). Materials and Methods In this single-arm, phase II, multi-institutional study, 92 patients with biopsy-confirmed HCC or ICC, determined to be unresectable by multidisciplinary review, with a Child-Turcotte-Pugh score (CTP) of A or B, ECOG performance status of 0 to 2, no extrahepatic disease, and no prior radiation received 15 fractions of proton therapy to a maximum total dose of 67.5 Gy equivalent. Sample size was calculated to demonstrate > 80% local control (LC) defined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.0 criteria at 2 years for HCC patients, with the parallel goal of obtaining acceptable precision for estimating outcomes for ICC. Results Eighty-three patients were evaluable: 44 with HCC, 37 with ICC, and two with mixed HCC/ICC. The CTP score was A for 79.5% of patients and B for 15.7%; 4.8% of patients had no cirrhosis. Prior treatment had been given to 31.8% of HCC patients and 61.5% of ICC patients. The median maximum dimension was 5.0 cm (range, 1.9 to 12.0 cm) for HCC patients and 6.0 cm (range, 2.2 to 10.9 cm) for ICC patients. Multiple tumors were present in 27.3% of HCC patients and in 12.8% of ICC patients. Tumor vascular thrombosis was present in 29.5% of HCC patients and in 28.2% of ICC patients. The median dose delivered to both HCC and ICC patients was 58.0 Gy. With a median follow-up among survivors of 19.5 months, the LC rate at 2 years was 94.8% for HCC and 94.1% for ICC. The overall survival rate at 2 years was 63.2% for HCC and 46.5% ICC. Conclusion High-dose hypofractionated proton therapy demonstrated high LC rates for HCC and ICC safely, supporting ongoing phase III trials of radiation in HCC and ICC. PMID:26668346

  16. Radiotherapy for the management of locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Christine; Citrin, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Background Squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) affect approximately 35,000 people in the United States yearly. Although survival has improved with advances in therapy, patients with advanced stages of SCCHN continue to have a poor prognosis. An understanding of rationale for treatment selection, newer developments in therapy, and treatment toxicity is critical. Methods Standard methods of treating locally advanced SCCHN are reviewed. Advances in medical and radiotherapeutic management are discussed and the toxicities of therapy are described. Results Post-operative chemoradiation is used in patients with high risk characteristics. Induction chemotherapy and altered fractionation radiation treatment have been evaluated as alternatives to definitive chemo-radiotherapy. Targeted agents such as cetuximab may prove to increase survival with minimal increase in toxicity profile. Technological improvements such as the use of intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) have proven to decrease some debilitating side effects from radiation treatment. Conclusions Locally advanced SCCHN continues to present a therapeutic challenge. Survival, local control, and quality of life are all goals of treatment. The optimal method of treating locally advanced SCCHN is the subject of ongoing research. Long term side effects can be minimized with the use of newer technologies and with careful treatment planning. PMID:19036056

  17. Clinical trials of antiangiogenic therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-04-01

    Angiogenesis is a promising therapeutic target to inhibit tumor growth. This review summarizes data from clinical trials of antiangiogenic agents in hepatocellular carcinoma. A systematic search of PubMed was performed to identify clinical trials of specific antiangiogenic agents in hepatocellular carcinoma treatment, particularly phase III trials involving treatment guidelines for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Sorafenib is the only systemic drug approved for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Two large-scale, randomized phase III trials using sorafenib involving patients with unresectable HCC showed a significant survival benefit compared with placebo control groups. However, subsequent phase III trials of antiangiogenic agents in hepatocellular carcinoma have failed to improve survival compared with standard treatment protocols using sorafenib. The efficacy of antiangiogenic agents in combination with other drugs, transarterial chemoembolization, and surgical resection is currently being investigated. Future research is expected to optimize antiangiogenic therapies in combination with standard treatment with sorafenib.

  18. Successful multimodality treatment for locally advanced primary thymic adenocarcinoma: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Tomohiro; Wakahara, Makoto; Taniguchi, Yuji; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Nishimura, Motonobu; Nakamura, Hiroshige

    2016-08-31

    Although the optimal treatment strategy for locally advanced thymic carcinomas has yet to be determined, complete resection of the tumor after induction chemoradiotherapy (CRT) can sometimes provide a good chance of being cured. A 61-year-old woman was diagnosed with locally advanced primary thymic carcinoma, which invaded bilateral brachiocephalic veins and superior vena cava with intraluminal tumor thrombus. Induction CRT was performed, and a partial response to the treatment was achieved. Subsequent radical surgery was successfully performed by the median full sternotomy with a right transmanubrial osteomuscular sparing approach (TMA). The patient is currently alive and has remained disease-free for a year. The TMA is useful for extensive surgery of locally advanced thymic carcinoma because it can provide good exposure of the operative field without post-operative functional limitation of upper limbs.

  19. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Controlling Severe Bleeding From Recurrent Locally-Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Şefika; Akçe, Bülent; Kılıçkesmez, Özgür; Gürsü, Rıza Umar; Çakır, Mehmet Semih; Nazlı, Mehmet Ali; Aren, Acar

    2016-01-01

    One of the rare but most challenging issues in the management of the locally-advanced breast cancer (LABC) is life-threatening bleeding from the fungating and/or ulcerating focus (foci) of these tumors. Breast surgeons may need the assistance of interventional radiologists to solve this urgent condition if surgery cannot provide sufficient benefit. Herein, we report a case of recurrent locally-advanced breast cancer that presented with sudden severe bleeding, which was stopped by an interventional radiologist via transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). In addition, we evaluate the role of interventional radiology in patients with breast cancer who present with bleeding from the breast by reviewing the relevant literature.

  20. Personalized Combined Modality Therapy for Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, D. Nathan; Nam, Taek-Keun; Choe, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    Locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a heterogeneous disease, and we have embarked on an era where patients will benefit from individualized therapeutic strategies based on identifiable molecular characteristics of the tumor. The landmark studies demonstrating the importance of molecular characterization of tumors for NSCLC patients, the promising molecular pathways, and the potential molecular targets/agents for treatment of this disease will be reviewed. Understanding these issues will aid in the development of rationally designed clinical trials, so as to determine best means of appropriately incorporating these molecular strategies, to the current standard of radiation and chemotherapy regimens, for the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC. PMID:22802745

  1. Ramucirumab as Second-Line Treatment in Patients With Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Analysis of REACH Trial Results by Child-Pugh Score.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Andrew X; Baron, Ari David; Malfertheiner, Peter; Kudo, Masatoshi; Kawazoe, Seiji; Pezet, Denis; Weissinger, Florian; Brandi, Giovanni; Barone, Carlo A; Okusaka, Takuji; Wada, Yoshiyuki; Park, Joon Oh; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Cho, Jae Yong; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Li, Chung-Pin; Yen, Chia-Jui; Lee, Kuan-Der; Chang, Shao-Chun; Yang, Ling; Abada, Paolo B; Chau, Ian

    2016-09-22

    REACH is the first phase 3 trial to provide information on hepatocellular cancer (HCC) in the second-line (postsorafenib) setting categorized by Child-Pugh score, a scoring system used to measure the severity of chronic liver disease. This exploratory analysis demonstrates the relationship between a potential ramucirumab survival benefit, severity of liver disease, and baseline α-fetoprotein (αFP). To assess treatment effects and tolerability of ramucirumab by Child-Pugh score in patients with HCC enrolled in the REACH trial. Randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trial of ramucirumab and best supportive care vs placebo and best supportive care as second-line treatment in patients with HCC enrolled between November 4, 2010 and April 18, 2013, from 154 global sites. Overall, 643 patients were randomized and included in this analysis; 565 patients considered Child-Pugh class A (Child-Pugh scores 5 and 6) and 78 patients considered class B (Child-Pugh scores 7 and 8). Ramucirumab (8 mg/kg) or placebo intravenously plus best supportive care every 2 weeks. Overall survival (OS), defined as time from randomization to death from any cause. In the randomized population of 643 patients (mean [SD] age, 62.8 [11.1] years) in this analysis, a potential ramucirumab OS benefit was observed for patients with a Child-Pugh score of 5 (hazard ratio [HR], 0.80; 95% CI, 0.63-1.02; P = .06) but no apparent benefit for patients with Child-Pugh scores of 6 or 7 and 8. In patients with baseline αFP levels of 400 ng/mL (to convert ng/mL to μg/L, multiply by 1.0) or more, a ramucirumab OS benefit was significant for a score of Child-Pugh 5 (HR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.43-0.87; P = .01) and Child-Pugh 6 (HR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.42-0.98; P = .04), but was not significant for Child-Pugh 7 and 8. The overall safety profile of ramucirumab, regardless of Child-Pugh score, was considered manageable. Regardless of treatment arm, patients with Child-Pugh scores of 7 and 8 experienced a higher

  2. Hepatocellular carcinoma: clinicopathological profile and challenges of management in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Jaka, Hyasinta; Mshana, Stephen E; Rambau, Peter F; Masalu, Nestory; Chalya, Phillipo L; Kalluvya, Samuel E

    2014-08-02

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most common cancers worldwide and its incidence is reported to be increasing in resource-limited countries. There is a paucity of published data regarding hepatocellular carcinoma in Tanzania, and the study area in particular. This study describes the clinicopathological profile of hepatocellular carcinoma in our local setting and highlights the challenging problems in the management of this disease. This was a retrospective study of histopathologically confirmed cases of hepatocellular carcinoma seen at Bugando Medical Center between March 2009 and February 2013. A total of 142 patients (M: F = 2.2: 1) were studied representing 4.6% of all malignancies. The median age of patients was 45 years. Hepatitis B virus infection (66.2%) and heavy alcohol consumption (60.6%) were the most frequently identified risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma. The majority of patients (88.0%) presented late with advanced stages. HBsAg was positive in 66.2% of the patients and Hepatitis C Virus antibody in 16.9%. Thirteen (9.2%) patients tested positive for HIV infection. Most patients (52.8%) had both right and left lobe involvement. The trabecular pattern (47.9%) was the most frequent histopathological type. None of patients had curative therapy because of the advanced nature of the disease. Coagulopathy (45.7%) was the most common complications. The overall mortality rate was 46.5% and it was significantly associated with comorbidity, HIV positivity, CD4+ count <200 cells/μl, high histological grade, advanced stage of the tumor, presence of distant metastases at the time of diagnosis, and associated complications (P < 0.001). The overall median duration of hospital stay was 14 days. The majority of patients (71.1%) were lost to follow-up at the end of the follow-up period. Hepatocellular carcinoma patients in this region are relatively young at diagnosis and the majority of them present late with an advanced stage and high rate

  3. Neoadjuvant imatinib in locally advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Seon; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Kim, Mi-Jung; Ryu, Min-Hee; Chang, Heung Moon; Kim, Tae Won; Jang, Se Jin; Yook, Jeong Hwan; Oh, Sung Tae; Kim, Byung Sik; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2006-01-01

    Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy used to treat locally advanced or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GI ST) remains under active investigation. We studied three cases of locally advanced gastric GISTs treated with imatinib on a neoadjuvant basis, followed by a complete surgical resection. Three patients were diagnosed with locally advanced unresectable GIST of the stomach and were started on imatinib 400 mg/day. After the imatinib treatment, partial responses were achieved in all patients and the tumors were considered resectable. Surgical resection was done after 7, 11, and 8 months of imatinib therapy, respectively. In one case, a metastatic liver lesion was detected during the imatinib treatment using computed tomography scans, so the imatinib therapy was maintained for 11 months postoperatively. In the other two patients without distant metastasis, imatinib treatment was not restarted after surgery. Mutational analysis revealed a mutation in exon 11 of the c-kit gene in two patients, and wild-type c-kit and PDGFRA in one patient. During pathology review of all three cases, we noted several features common to imatinib treatment. There was no evidence of tumor recurrence in all three patients at respective follow-up visits of 22, 15, and 7 months. These results suggest that the neoadjuvant imatinib therapy is a potentially curative approach for selected patients with locally advanced GIST.

  4. Why a D2 gastrectomy plus adjuvant chemotherapy is insufficient in locally advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sebastián Solé, Z; Larsen, Francisco E; Solé, Claudio V

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses all the important published evidence regarding adjuvant treatments in locally advanced gastric cancer. In this process it revealed facts that demonstrate the superiority of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy to chemotherapy alone. Some outstanding work that has not yet been published is also discussed. PMID:28105077

  5. A Case of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Complicated by Pulmonary Tumor Thrombotic Microangiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak Jin; Kwak, Mi Hyang; Kong, Sun-Young; Seong, Moon-Woo; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, Keun Seok

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM) is a rare, malignancy-related complication that causes marked pulmonary hypertension, right heart failure, and death. We report on a patient with locally advanced breast cancer whose course was complicated by fatal PTTM based on clinical and laboratory findings. PMID:23341791

  6. Why a D2 gastrectomy plus adjuvant chemotherapy is insufficient in locally advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sebastián Solé, Z; Larsen, Francisco E; Solé, Claudio V

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses all the important published evidence regarding adjuvant treatments in locally advanced gastric cancer. In this process it revealed facts that demonstrate the superiority of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy to chemotherapy alone. Some outstanding work that has not yet been published is also discussed.

  7. Curing patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer: an update on multimodality therapy.

    PubMed

    McKian, K P; Miller, R C; Cassivi, S D; Jatoi, A

    2006-01-01

    Combining different treatment modalities--such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy--is often utilized to treat patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. However, it remains controversial how best to combine these modalities to provide patients with the greatest chance of cure. This review discusses recent studies in this field and outlines promising versus less promising therapeutic strategies.

  8. Individualised 3D printed vaginal template for MRI guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Madsen, Mikkel Lænsø; Traberg, Anders; Meisner, Bjarne; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Tanderup, Kari; Spejlborg, Harald; Fokdal, Lars Ulrik; Nørrevang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Intracavitary-interstitial applicators for MRI guided brachytherapy are becoming increasingly important in locally advanced cervical cancer. The 3D printing technology enables a versatile method for obtaining a high degree of individualisation of the implant. Our clinical workflow is presented and exemplified by a stage IVA cervical cancer with superior dose distribution.

  9. Parenteral Nutrition for Patients Treated for Locally Advanced Inoperable Tumors of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-08

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx Stage III; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx Stage IV; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage III; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage IV; Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage III; Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage IV; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity Stage III; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity Stage IV; Locally Advanced Malignant Neoplasm

  10. Locally Advanced Lung Cancer: An Optimal Setting for Vaccines and Other Immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, Puneeth; Gerber, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer has traditionally been considered relatively resistant to immunotherapies. However, recent advances in the understanding of tumor-associated antigens, anti-tumor immune responses, and tumor immunosuppression mechanisms have resulted in a number of promising immunomodulatory therapies such as vaccines and checkpoint inhibitors. Locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is an optimal setting for these treatments because standard therapies such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy may enhance anti-tumor immune effects by debulking the tumor, increasing tumor antigen presentation, and promoting T-cell response and trafficking. Clinical trials incorporating immunomodulatory agents into combined modality therapy of locally advanced NSCLC have shown promising results. Future challenges include identifying biomarkers to predict those patients most likely to benefit from this approach, radiographic assessment of treatment effects, the timing and dosing of combined modality treatment including immunotherapies, and avoidance of potentially overlapping toxicities. PMID:23708072

  11. Phase II Study of Concurrent Chemoradiation in Combination With Erlotinib for Locally Advanced Esophageal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Li Gang; Hu Wei; Wang Jianhua; Deng Xia; Zhang Ping; Zhang Xuebang; Xie Congyin; Wu Shixiu

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and efficacy of concurrent chemoradiation in combination with erlotinib for locally advanced esophageal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients with locally advanced esophageal carcinoma were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. A daily fraction of 2.0 Gy was prescribed to a total dose of 60 Gy over 6 weeks. Concurrent paclitaxel (135 mg/m{sup 2}, d{sub 1}) and cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}, d{sub 1-3}) were administered on Day 1 and Day 29 of the radiotherapy. Erlotinib, an oral epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was taken by every patient at the dose of 150 mg daily during the chemoradiotherapy. Results: The median follow-up of the 24 patients was 18.6 months (range, 7.1-29.6 months). The 2-year overall survival, local-regional control, and relapse-free survival were 70.1% (95% CI, 50.4-90%), 87.5% (95% CI, 73.5-100%), and 57.4% (95% CI, 36.3-78.7%), respectively. During the chemoradiotheapy, the incidences of acute toxicities of Grade 3 or greater, such as leucopenia and thrombocytopenia, were 16.7 % (4/24) and 8.3% (2/24). Conclusions: Application of concurrent chemoradiotherapy in combination with erlotinib for locally advanced esophageal carcinoma yielded satisfactory 2-year overall survival and local-regional control. The toxicities were well tolerated.

  12. Locally advanced primary recto-sigmoid cancers: Improved survival with multivisceral resection.

    PubMed

    Laurence, Graham; Ahuja, Vanita; Bell, Ted; Grim, Rod; Ahuja, Nita

    2017-09-01

    Multivisceral resection (MVR) is considered a radical operation with many surgeons only using it as a last resort. However, when locally advanced colorectal cancers invade adjacent organs, MVR is an important consideration for select patients. The current study addresses the outcomes of MVR in locally advanced recto-sigmoid cancer patients subsequent to these recommendations and hypothesizes that MVR yields improved survival. SEER data (1988-2008) was used to identify all eligible patients with MVR. Patients were limited to single primary locally advanced non-metastatic colorectal cancers originating from the sigmoid and rectum. A total of 4111 locally advanced non-metastatic recto sigmoid cancer patients were included in the study. Cox regression analysis showed variables predictive of MVR were female (OR = 1.95) and late year period (OR = 1.90). Kaplan Meier analysis showed that five-year survival was highest for MVR (52.7%, 48 months), followed by standard surgery (SS; 38.9%, 32 months) and no surgery (NS; 16.6%, 12 months, P < 0.001). With radiation treatment, five year survival improved for all groups, with the highest being MVR (57%, 52 months). With no radiation treatment, five year survival decreased for all groups, with the highest being MVR (45.1%, 44 months), followed by SS (27.3%, 19 months), and NS (8.7%, 6 months, P < 0.001). The present study supports that MVR offers greater survival advantage in patients with locally advanced colorectal cancer. MVR are extensive surgical procedures with significant associated morbidity that usually require specialized training and sometimes the coordination of multiple surgical specialists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Hepatocellular carcinoma. Part 2. Treatment].

    PubMed

    Conte, V P

    2000-01-01

    Recent improvements on the therapeutical management of hepatocellular carcinoma are revised with special attention to evaluate the role of surgery for the disease. Considering that definitive surgical intervention is not feasible in most cases because of extreme tumor extension, multiplicity of tumor foci, and associated advanced liver cirrhosis at the time of diagnosis, others forms of treatment are listed, such as transcatheterarterial chemoembolization, percutaneous ethanol and acetic acid injections, and chemotherapy only to a small portion of patients with no indication for standard treatments. The emerging role of retinoic acid metabolism blocking agents, was examined and may offer a significant new potential treatment for cancer, inclusive the possibility of combining other anticancer drugs with exogenous retinoids or modulation of endogenous retinoids as a real opportunity to advance our ability to treat or prevent human cancer effectively Octreotide, nitrosamine and other drugs are analyzed and is concluded that improves survival and is a valuable alternative in the treatment of inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma. The potential role of intersticial laser coagulation for patients with irresectable hepatic tumors was investigated, and in terms of experience, it has now been developed sufficiently to study its effect on these patients survival. The homeostatic control of angiogenesis and its influences on the tumor growth and for migration of metastatic cells, was focused in this concise review, given that hepatocytes are the source of much of the precursor pool, regulation of angiogenesis may be regarded as a new liver function with important consequences for tissue repair and cancer. Early hepatocellular carcinoma and its recognition in routine clinical practice contributes to improved patients survival. Recombinant-Interferon-alpha therapy surely prevents, the development of cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma in about one-third of patients, with

  14. Yttrium-90 Radioembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Ryan M; Lewandowski, Robert J; Salem, Riad

    2016-03-01

    (90)Y radioembolization refers to the selective, transcatheter, and intra-arterial injection of micrometer-sized particles loaded with the radioisotope yttrium-90 for the treatment of primary and metastatic hepatic malignancies. In the treatment of intermediate- and advanced-stage hepatocellular carcinoma, (90)Y radioembolization provides favorable outcomes with minimal side effects, offering an alternative treatment option to other transarterial therapies, such as bland embolization and chemoembolization. This review provides an overview of the use of (90)Y radioembolization in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma, including patient selection criteria, dosimetry, and clinical outcomes.

  15. Current status and perspectives of immune-based therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, Maridi; Benteyn, Daphné; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Thielemans, Kris; Reynaert, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a frequent cancer with a high mortality. For early stage cancer there are potentially curative treatments including local ablation, resection and liver transplantation. However, for more advanced stage disease, there is no optimal treatment available. Even in the case of a “curative” treatment, recurrence or development of a new cancer in the precancerous liver is common. Thus, there is an urgent need for novel and effective (adjuvant) therapies to treat HCC and to prevent recurrence after local treatment in patients with HCC. The unique immune response in the liver favors tolerance, which remains a genuine challenge for conventional immunotherapy in patients with HCC. However, even in this “immunotolerant” organ, spontaneous immune responses against tumor antigens have been detected, although they are insufficient to achieve significant tumor death. Local ablation therapy leads to immunogenic tumor cell death by inducing the release of massive amounts of antigens, which enhances spontaneous immune response. New immune therapies such as dendritic cell vaccination and immune checkpoint inhibition are under investigation. Immunotherapy for cancer has made huge progress in the last few years and clinical trials examining the use of immunotherapy to treat hepatocellular carcinoma have shown some success. In this review, we discuss the current status of and offer some perspectives on immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma, which could change disease progression in the near future. PMID:26755874

  16. Oncogenic viruses and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ben Ari, Ziv; Weitzman, Ella; Safran, Michal

    2015-05-01

    About 80% of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections especially in the setting of established cirrhosis or advanced fibrosis, making HCC prevention a major goal of antiviral therapy. HCC tumors are highly complex and heterogeneous resulting from the aberrant function of multiple molecular pathways. The roles of HCV or HBV in promoting HCC development are still either directly or indirectly are still speculative, but the evidence for both effects is compelling. In patients with chronic hepatitis viral infection, cirrhosis is not a prerequisite for tumorigenesis.

  17. Stereotactic radiation therapy and selective internal radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bujold, A; Dawson, L A

    2011-02-01

    Recent technological advances allow precise and safe radiation delivery in hepatocellular carcinoma. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is a conformal external beam radiation technique that uses a small number of relatively large fractions to deliver potent doses of radiation therapy to extracranial sites. It requires stringent breathing motion control and image guidance. Selective internal radiotherapy or radioembolization refers to the injection of radioisotopes, usually delivered to liver tumors via the hepatic artery. Clinical results for both treatments show that excellent local control is possible with acceptable toxicity. Most appropriate patient populations and when which type of radiation therapy should be best employed in the vast therapeutic armamentarium of hepatocellular carcinoma are still to be clarified. Copyright © 2010 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. [A case of curative resection after downsizing chemotherapy in initially unresectable locally advanced intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yu; Suzuki, Takayuki; Kato, Atsushi; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Yoshitomi, Hideyuki; Furukawa, Katsunori; Takayashiki, Tsukasa; Kuboki, Satoshi; Takano, Shigetsugu; Okamura, Daiki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Sakai, Nozomu; Kagawa, Shingo; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2014-11-01

    This case report describes an 83-year-old man with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma who was referred by a local hospital. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed a large tumor in hepatic segments 4, 5, and 8 involving the right hepatic vein and inferior vena cava, which is normally indicative of an unresectable locally advanced tumor. After systemic chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin, the observed decrease in the level of tumor marker suggested that the cancer was responding to treatment, while radiological findings showed the main tumor shrunk without the presence of distant metastases. Thus, hepatic left trisectionectomy with bile duct resection was performed after portal vein embolization. Pathological examination revealed negative margins (R0). Eighteen months after surgery, the patient is free of disease and shows no signs of recurrence. An initially unresectable, locally advanced biliary tract cancer may be down sized by chemotherapy, which makes radical resection possible, at least in a proportion of patients. This approach provides longer survival and may have a potential for disease eradication as a new multidisciplinary approach for patients with unresectable locally advanced biliary tract cancer.

  19. Yttrium-90 microsphere radioembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Edeline, Julien; Gilabert, Marine; Garin, Etienne; Boucher, Eveline; Raoul, Jean-Luc

    2015-03-01

    Yttrium-90 (Y90) radioembolization is an emerging strategy to treat liver malignancies, and clinical data supporting its use have accumulated in recent years. Y90-radioembolization has shown clinical effectiveness in intermediate and advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, with a favorable safety profile. Retrospective data show similar levels of effectiveness to transarterial chemoembolization in intermediate hepatocellular carcinoma, with some evidence of better tolerance. While phase 3 studies comparing Y90-radioembolization to chemoembolization in intermediate hepatocellular carcinoma would be difficult to conduct, studies comparing or combining Y90-radioembolization with sorafenib are under way. Questions also remain about the most suitable modalities for defining the dose to administer. Phase 3 studies are under way to clarify the place of Y90-radioembolization in the algorithm of HCC treatment.

  20. Liver-Directed Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Florence K.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) continues to increase world-wide. Many patients present with advanced disease with extensive local tumor or vascular invasion and are not candidates for traditionally curative therapies such as orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) or resection. Radiotherapy (RT) was historically limited by its inability to deliver a tumoricidal dose; however, modern RT techniques have prompted renewed interest in the use of liver-directed RT to treat patients with primary hepatic malignancies. Summary The aim of this review was to discuss the use of external beam RT in the treatment of HCC, with particular focus on the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We review the intricacies of SBRT treatment planning and delivery. Liver-directed RT involves accurate target identification, precise and reproducible patient immobilization, and assessment of target and organ motion. We also summarize the published data on liver-directed RT, and demonstrate that it is associated with excellent local control and survival rates, particularly in patients who are not candidates for OLT or resection. Key Messages Modern liver-directed RT is safe and effective for the treatment of HCC, particularly in patients who are not candidates for OLT or resection. Liver-directed RT, including SBRT, depends on accurate target identification, precise and reproducible patient immobilization, and assessment of target and organ motion. Further prospective studies are needed to fully delineate the role of liver-directed RT in the treatment of HCC. PMID:27493895

  1. Localization of Short Duration Gravitational-wave Transients with the Early Advanced LIGO and Virgo Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Katsavounidis, Erik; Vedovato, Gabriele; Klimenko, Sergey

    2015-02-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors will begin collecting science data in 2015. With first detections expected to follow, it is important to quantify how well generic gravitational-wave transients can be localized on the sky. This is crucial for correctly identifying electromagnetic counterparts as well as understanding gravitational-wave physics and source populations. We present a study of sky localization capabilities for two search and parameter estimation algorithms: coherent WaveBurst, a constrained likelihood algorithm operating in close to real-time, and LALInferenceBurst, a Markov chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation algorithm developed to recover generic transient signals with latency of a few hours. Furthermore, we focus on the first few years of the advanced detector era, when we expect to only have two (2015) and later three (2016) operational detectors, all below design sensitivity. These detector configurations can produce significantly different sky localizations, which we quantify in detail. We observe a clear improvement in localization of the average detected signal when progressing from two-detector to three-detector networks, as expected. Although localization depends on the waveform morphology, approximately 50% of detected signals would be imaged after observing 100-200 deg2 in 2015 and 60-110 deg2 in 2016, although knowledge of the waveform can reduce this to as little as 22 deg2. This is the first comprehensive study on sky localization capabilities for generic transients of the early network of advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors, including the early LIGO-only two-detector configuration.

  2. LOCALIZATION OF SHORT DURATION GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE TRANSIENTS WITH THE EARLY ADVANCED LIGO AND VIRGO DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Katsavounidis, Erik; Vedovato, Gabriele; Klimenko, Sergey

    2015-02-20

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors will begin collecting science data in 2015. With first detections expected to follow, it is important to quantify how well generic gravitational-wave transients can be localized on the sky. This is crucial for correctly identifying electromagnetic counterparts as well as understanding gravitational-wave physics and source populations. We present a study of sky localization capabilities for two search and parameter estimation algorithms: coherent WaveBurst, a constrained likelihood algorithm operating in close to real-time, and LALInferenceBurst, a Markov chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation algorithm developed to recover generic transient signals with latency of a few hours. Furthermore, we focus on the first few years of the advanced detector era, when we expect to only have two (2015) and later three (2016) operational detectors, all below design sensitivity. These detector configurations can produce significantly different sky localizations, which we quantify in detail. We observe a clear improvement in localization of the average detected signal when progressing from two-detector to three-detector networks, as expected. Although localization depends on the waveform morphology, approximately 50% of detected signals would be imaged after observing 100-200 deg{sup 2} in 2015 and 60-110 deg{sup 2} in 2016, although knowledge of the waveform can reduce this to as little as 22 deg{sup 2}. This is the first comprehensive study on sky localization capabilities for generic transients of the early network of advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors, including the early LIGO-only two-detector configuration.

  3. Locally advanced rectal cancer: Preliminary results of rectal preservation after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, Carlos Alberto; Yazyi, Federico Julio; Ojra Quintana, Guillermo; Santino, Juan Pablo; Sardi, Mabel Edith; Beder, Damián; Tognelli, Joaquin; Bonadeo, Fernando; Lastiri, José María; Rossi, Gustavo Leandro

    2016-05-01

    The standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer is total mesorectal excision. However, organ preservation has been proposed for tumors with good response to neoadjuvant treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the oncologic results of this strategy. This is a retrospective cohort study (2005-2014) including a consecutive series of patients with rectal adenocarcinoma with complete or almost complete clinical response after preoperative chemo-radiotherapy, that were treated according to a strategy of preservation of the rectum. A total of 204 patients with rectal cancer received neoadjuvant therapy. Thirty (14.7%) had a good response and were treated with rectal preservation (23 «Watch and Wait» and 7 local resections). Median follow-up was 46 months (interquartile range: 30-68). In the group of «Watch & Wait», 4 patients had local recurrence before 12 months (actuarial local recurrence rate=18.5%). All of them underwent salvage surgery (2 with radical surgery and 2 local resections) without any further recurrence. Disease-free survival actuarial rate at 3 years follow-up was 94.1% (95% CI 82.9-100). None of the 7 patients that were treated by local excision had local recurrence. The organ preservation rate for the whole group was 93%. The strategy of organ preservation in locally advanced rectal cancer is feasible in cases with good response to neoadjuvant therapy. When implemented in a highly selected group of patients this strategy is associated with satisfactory oncologic results. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Radiosensitization of Chemotherapy-Refractory, Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer With Trastuzumab: A Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Janet K.; Halle, Jan; Ferraro, Madlyn; Carey, Lisa; Moore, Dominic T.; Ollila, David; Sartor, Carolyn I.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Trastuzumab (Herceptin), an anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) antibody, has been shown to be an effective radiosensitizer in preclinical studies. The present Phase II trial evaluated trastuzumab plus radiotherapy in patients with HER2-positive, chemotherapy-refractory, locally advanced or locoregionally recurrent breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had measurable disease, normal cardiac function, and biopsy-confirmed residual HER2-positive disease. Patients received weekly trastuzumab (2 mg/kg intravenously), concurrent with radiotherapy (50 Gy) to the breast and regional lymph nodes for 5 weeks. If feasible, surgery followed radiotherapy. The primary endpoint was safety, and the secondary endpoint was efficacy (pathologic response and interval to symptomatic local progression). Results: Of the 19 patients enrolled, 7 were ineligible and received radiotherapy alone and 12 received therapy per protocol. Of these 12 patients, 11 had a Stage T4 diagnosis. Grade 3 toxicities included skin (n = 2) and lymphopenia (n = 1). One patient experienced delayed wound healing after surgery. No patients developed symptomatic cardiac dysfunction. Of the 7 patients who had undergone mastectomy, 3 (43%) had a substantial pathologic response (complete response or microscopic residual disease), significantly more than a comparison cohort (2 of 38 or 5%, p = .02). The median interval to symptomatic local progression was not reached. The median overall survival was 39 months. Conclusion: This is the first prospective trial providing evidence for a radiosensitizing effect of trastuzumab in breast cancer. The combination of trastuzumab and radiotherapy was well tolerated.

  5. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Creates Surgery Opportunities For Inoperable Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minghao; Hou, Lingmi; Chen, Maoshan; Zhou, Yan; Liang, Yueyang; Wang, Shushu; Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), the systematic chemotherapy given to patients with locally advanced and inoperable breast caner, has been proven to be of great clinical values. Many scientific reports confirmed NAC could effectively eliminate sub-clinical disseminated lesions of tumor, and improve long-term and disease-free survival rate of patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC); however, up to now, LABC is still a serious clinical issue given improved screening and early diagnosis. This study, with main focus on inoperable LABC, investigated the values of NAC in converting inoperable LABC into operable status and assessed the prognosis. Sixty-one patients with inoperable LABC were initially treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy; their local conditions were improved to operable status. Radical surgery was exerted on 49 patients. Original chemotherapy was performed after surgery, followed by local radiotherapy. And endocrine therapy was optional according to the hormone receptor status. The quality of life for most patients with skin diabrosis was obviously improved because their local conditions were under control. For all recruited cases, the survival duration and life quality were significantly improved in patients who finished both NAC and surgery compared to those who did not. Further more, this study demonstrates improved prognostic consequences. PMID:28327615

  6. Effect of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy on Locally Advanced Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma: A Propensity Score-Matched Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan-wu; Lin, Hui-ming; Lu, Xing-rong; Huang, Ying; Xu, Zong-bin; Huang, Sheng-hui; Wang, Xiao-jie

    2017-01-01

    Aims. To compare the surgical and oncological outcomes of rectal mucinous adenocarcinomas treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy versus surgery alone. Methods. A total of 167 locally advanced rectal mucinous adenocarcinoma patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgery alone between 2008 and 2014 were matched using propensity score; the surgical and oncological outcomes were compared. Results. Ninety-six patients were matched. Postoperative morbidity was similar between groups. Sphincter preservation rate was higher in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (79.2% versus 60.4%, P = 0.045), especially for tumors ≥ 3 cm but ≤5 cm from the anal verge (75.0% versus 44.0%, P = 0.036). With a median follow-up of 54.8 months, the 5-year overall survival rate (neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy versus surgery alone: 79.6% versus 67.1%; P = 0.599) and disease-free survival rate (75.6% versus 64.2%; P = 0.888) were similar. The 5-year local recurrence rate was lower in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (7.7% versus 26.0%, P = 0.036), while no difference was observed in distant metastasis. A poor response to chemoradiation was associated with higher local recurrence (P = 0.037). Conclusions. Compared with surgery alone, neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was found to increase the sphincter preservation rate and reduce local recurrence, thus being beneficial for locally advanced rectal mucinous adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:28400820

  7. Local Institutional Development and Organizational Change for Advancing Sustainable Urban Water Futures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Rebekah R.

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents the local institutional and organizational development insights from a five-year ongoing interdisciplinary research project focused on advancing the implementation of sustainable urban water management. While it is broadly acknowledged that the inertia associated with administrative systems is possibly the most significant obstacle to advancing sustainable urban water management, contemporary research still largely prioritizes investigations at the technological level. This research is explicitly concerned with critically informing the design of methodologies for mobilizing and overcoming the administrative inertia of traditional urban water management practice. The results of fourteen in-depth case studies of local government organizations across Metropolitan Sydney primarily reveal that (i) the political institutionalization of environmental concern and (ii) the commitment to local leadership and organizational learning are key corporate attributes for enabling sustainable management. A typology of five organizational development phases has been proposed as both a heuristic and capacity benchmarking tool for urban water strategists, policy makers, and decision makers that are focused on improving the level of local implementation of sustainable urban water management activity. While this investigation has focused on local government, these findings do provide guideposts for assessing the development needs of future capacity building programs across a range of different institutional contexts.

  8. Local institutional development and organizational change for advancing sustainable urban water futures.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebekah R

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents the local institutional and organizational development insights from a five-year ongoing interdisciplinary research project focused on advancing the implementation of sustainable urban water management. While it is broadly acknowledged that the inertia associated with administrative systems is possibly the most significant obstacle to advancing sustainable urban water management, contemporary research still largely prioritizes investigations at the technological level. This research is explicitly concerned with critically informing the design of methodologies for mobilizing and overcoming the administrative inertia of traditional urban water management practice. The results of fourteen in-depth case studies of local government organizations across Metropolitan Sydney primarily reveal that (i) the political institutionalization of environmental concern and (ii) the commitment to local leadership and organizational learning are key corporate attributes for enabling sustainable management. A typology of five organizational development phases has been proposed as both a heuristic and capacity benchmarking tool for urban water strategists, policy makers, and decision makers that are focused on improving the level of local implementation of sustainable urban water management activity. While this investigation has focused on local government, these findings do provide guideposts for assessing the development needs of future capacity building programs across a range of different institutional contexts.

  9. Arterial complication of irreversible electroporation procedure for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Yahya; Tezcaner, Tugan; Aydın, Hüseyin Onur; Boyvat, Fatih; Moray, Gökhan

    2016-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a non-thermal ablation technique used especially in locally advanced pancreatic carcinomas that are considered surgically unresectable. We present the first case of acute superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion secondary to pancreatic IRE procedure that has not been reported before in the literature. A 66-year-old man underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. IRE procedure was applied to the patient during laparotomy under general anesthesia. After finishing the procedure, an acute intestinal ischemia was detected. A conventional vascular angiography was performed and a metallic stent was successfully placed to the SMA and blood flow was maintained. It is important to be careful in such cases of tumor involvement of SMA when evaluating for IRE procedure of pancreatic tumor. PMID:27795815

  10. Systematic review of minimally invasive ablation treatment for locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Lucchina, Natalie; Petrillo, Mario; Floridi, Chiara; Piacentino, Filippo; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Fonio, Paolo; Fontana, Federico; Fugazzola, Carlo; Brunese, Luca; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2014-07-01

    Unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer with or without metastatic disease is associated with a very poor prognosis. Ablation techniques are based on direct application of chemical, thermal, or electrical energy to a tumor, which leads to cellular necrosis. Initial studies about ablation therapies of the pancreas were associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which limited widespread adoption. Modifications to the various applications, in particular combining the techniques with high-quality imaging and intra-operative approach has enabled real-time treatment monitoring and significant improvements in safety. Inoperable cases of pancreatic cancer have been treated by various ablation techniques in the last few years with promising results. The purpose of this review is to present the current status of local ablative therapies in the treatment of pancreatic advanced tumor.

  11. Complete Remission of Locally Advanced Penile Squamous Cell Carcinoma after Multimodality Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yifan; Bernie, Helen Levey; Weng, Tzu-Hua; Ling, Dean-An; Messing, Edward M.; Guancial, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of locally advanced penile squamous cell carcinoma (pSCC) remains highly controversial secondary to disease rarity and lack of prospective randomized controlled trials. The current mainstays of care are multi-modality treatment with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery. However, clinicians often have difficulty making recommendations for patients unable to tolerate chemotherapy or surgery due to scarcity of data to guide clinical decision-making. We report two cases of locally advanced pSCC that achieved complete remission after treatment with cisplatin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery in one case, and concurrent cisplatin chemoradiation in a second, supporting the use of chemotherapy as part of first-line multimodal therapy. We also discuss additional treatment options for patients unable to tolerate traditional chemotherapy regimens. PMID:28191294

  12. Identifying locally advanced basal cell carcinoma eligible for treatment with vismodegib: an expert panel consensus.

    PubMed

    Peris, Ketty; Licitra, Lisa; Ascierto, Paolo A; Corvò, Renzo; Simonacci, Marco; Picciotto, Franco; Gualdi, Giulio; Pellacani, Giovanni; Santoro, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer worldwide. Most occur on the head and neck, where cosmetic and functional outcomes are critical. BCC can be locally destructive if not diagnosed early and treated appropriately. Surgery is the treatment of choice for the majority of high-risk lesions. Aggressive, recurrent or unresectable tumors can be difficult to manage. Until recently, no approved systemic therapy was available for locally advanced or metastatic BCC inappropriate for surgery or radiotherapy. Vismodegib provides a systemic treatment option. However, a consensus definition of advanced BCC is lacking. A multidisciplinary panel with expertise in oncology, dermatology, dermatologic surgery and radiation oncology proposes a consensus definition based on published evidence and clinical experience.

  13. Ramucirumab versus placebo as second-line treatment in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma following first-line therapy with sorafenib (REACH): a randomised, double-blind, multicentre, phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Andrew X; Park, Joon Oh; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Yen, Chia-Jui; Poon, Ronnie; Pastorelli, Davide; Blanc, Jean-Frederic; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Baron, Ari D; Pfiffer, Tulio Eduardo Flesch; Okusaka, Takuji; Kubackova, Katerina; Trojan, Jorg; Sastre, Javier; Chau, Ian; Chang, Shao-Chun; Abada, Paolo B; Yang, Ling; Schwartz, Jonathan D; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2015-07-01

    VEGF and VEGF receptor-2-mediated angiogenesis contribute to hepatocellular carcinoma pathogenesis. Ramucirumab is a recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibody and VEGF receptor-2 antagonist. We aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of ramucirumab in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma following first-line therapy with sorafenib. In this randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicentre, phase 3 trial (REACH), patients were enrolled from 154 centres in 27 countries. Eligible patients were aged 18 years or older, had hepatocellular carcinoma with Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage C disease or stage B disease that was refractory or not amenable to locoregional therapy, had Child-Pugh A liver disease, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1, had previously received sorafenib (stopped because of progression or intolerance), and had adequate haematological and biochemical parameters. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive intravenous ramucirumab (8 mg/kg) or placebo every 2 weeks, plus best supportive care, until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or death. Randomisation was stratified by geographic region and cause of liver disease with a stratified permuted block method. Patients, medical staff, investigators, and the funder were masked to treatment assignment. The primary endpoint was overall survival in the intention-to-treat population. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01140347. Between Nov 4, 2010, and April 18, 2013, 565 patients were enrolled, of whom 283 were assigned to ramucirumab and 282 were assigned to placebo. Median overall survival for the ramucirumab group was 9·2 months (95% CI 8·0-10·6) versus 7·6 months (6·0-9·3) for the placebo group (HR 0·87 [95% CI 0·72-1·05]; p=0·14). Grade 3 or greater adverse events occurring in 5% or more of patients in either treatment group were ascites (13 [5%] of 277 patients treated with ramucirumab vs 11 [4%] of 276 patients treated

  14. [Efficacy of whole body gamma-knife radiotherapy combined with thermochemotherapy on locally advanced pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Ping; Nie, Qing; Kang, Jing-Bo; Wang, Bin; Cai, Chang-Lan; Li, Jian-Guo; Qi, Wen-Jie

    2008-11-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are major therapies for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. This study was to evaluate the efficacy of three-dimensional conformal gamma-knife radiotherapy combined with thermochemotherapy on locally advanced pancreatic cancer. From December 2001 to January 2006, 75 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer were divided into radiotherapy group (37 patients) and combination group (38 patients). All patients received gamma-knife radiotherapy using Stereotactic Radiotherapy Gamma Rays System, with iso-dose curves of 50%-60%, tumor encircling dose of 3.0-4.5 Gy per fraction, 8-11 fractions. The patients in combination group received simultaneous thermotherapy at 41.5-43.5 celsius (1 h/fraction, twice a week for 6 times), and chemotherapy with venous administration of tegafur (0.5-1.0 g) and calcium folinate (CF, 0.2 g) for 4-6 times, or venous administration of gemcitabine (0.6-1.0 g/m2) on Days 1 and 8 and cisplatin (DDP) (20-30 mg/m2) on Days 1-3, repeated every 28 days for 3-6 cycles. At 3 months after treatment, the total response (complete remission and partial remission) rate was 70.7% (53/75); the response rate was 73.7% in combination group and 67.5% in radiotherapy group. The 1-year survival rate was 48.3%, and the 2-year survival rate was 22.1%. The 1-and 2-year survival rates were 51.2% and 26.5% in combination group, and 45.2% and 17.6% in radiotherapy group. No serious complications, such as perforation, bleeding and high fever, were seen during treatment and follow-up. 3-D conformal gamma-knife radiotherapy combined with thermochemotherapy is well tolerated and is relatively effective for most patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  15. A microRNA expression signature for clinical response in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-Torres, Abraham; Fernández-Retana, Jorge; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Jacobo-Herrera, Nadia; Cantú de Leon, David; Cerna-Cortés, Jorge F; Lopez-Camarillo, Cesar; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Nearly 50% of patients who are diagnosed with locally advanced cervical cancer have an unfavorable pathological response to conventional treatment. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potential biomarkers in cervical cancer; however, their role in identifying patients who do not respond to conventional treatment remains poorly investigated. Here, we identify a set of miRNAs that can be used as molecular markers to predict the pathological response in locally advanced cervical cancer patients receiving radiation and chemotherapy treatment. Forty-one patients diagnosed with locally advanced cervical cancer were invited to participate in this study and enrolled after they signed an informed consent. Two patient cohorts were randomized for miRNA expression profiling, a discovery cohort (n=10) and a validation cohort (n=31); profiling was performed by means of a miScript miRNA PCR Array. After a median clinical follow-up of 45months, statistical analysis was performed to identify miRNAs that could discriminate non-responders from complete pathological responders to conventional treatment. miRNA expression profiling identified 101 miRNAs that showed significant differences between non-responders and complete pathological responders (p<0.05). Seven differentially expressed miRNAs were selected, and their expression patterns were confirmed in the validation phase; thus, miR-31-3p, -3676, -125a-5p, -100-5p, -125b-5p, and -200a-5p and miR-342 were significantly associated with clinical response. Expression of this miRNA signature above the median level was a significant predictor of non-response to standard treatment (p<0.001). These seven validated miRNA signatures could be used as molecular biomarkers of chemo- and radio-resistance in locally advanced cervical cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Safety and efficacy of nimotuzumab combined with chemoradiotherapy in Chinese patients with locally advanced cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong-Fa; Tang, Wu-Bin; Pan, Xin-Xi; Wu, Chu-Rong; Cao, Yang; Yang, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate efficacy and safety of nimotuzumab combined with chemotherapy and radiotherapy in women with locally advanced cervical cancer. Materials and methods Women with locally advanced cervical cancer (stage IIB, III, or IVA) who experienced relapse after first-line chemoradiotherapy and one or more lines of palliative chemotherapy were enrolled. All patients received nimotuzumab weekly at 200 mg/m2 as single agent for 4 weeks (induction phase), then concurrent with 6 cycles (21-day per cycle) of gemcitabine (800 mg/m2) or cisplatin (50 mg/m2) for 18 weeks (concurrent phase) and then once every 2 weeks (maintenance phase). Overall response rate (ORR) was assessed after 4 weeks of induction therapy and then every 3 months according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors version 1.1 (primary end point). Secondary end points include progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and drug toxicity. Descriptive statistics was used for ORR, and Kaplan–Meier curves were generated for OS and PFS. Results A total of 80 women with locally advanced cervical cancer were enrolled and evaluated for safety and efficacy. Our results demonstrated that none of the patients had a complete response (0%), 11 patients had a partial response (14%), and 10 patients had progressive disease (13%), giving a tumor response rate of 14%. A total of 59 patients had stable disease (74%), giving a disease control rate of 88% (70/80). Median PFS was 8.21 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.09–12.45). Median OS was 11.96 months (95% CI: 8.11–23.95). The most common adverse events were mucositis, myelosuppression, and gastrointestinal disturbance. Conclusion Our study results suggested that nimotuzumab in combination with chemotherapy and radiotherapy is well tolerated, and could be a better treatment alternative in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer. PMID:28860820

  17. Safety and efficacy of nimotuzumab combined with chemoradiotherapy in Chinese patients with locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-Fa; Tang, Wu-Bin; Pan, Xin-Xi; Wu, Chu-Rong; Cao, Yang; Yang, Wen

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate efficacy and safety of nimotuzumab combined with chemotherapy and radiotherapy in women with locally advanced cervical cancer. Women with locally advanced cervical cancer (stage IIB, III, or IVA) who experienced relapse after first-line chemoradiotherapy and one or more lines of palliative chemotherapy were enrolled. All patients received nimotuzumab weekly at 200 mg/m(2) as single agent for 4 weeks (induction phase), then concurrent with 6 cycles (21-day per cycle) of gemcitabine (800 mg/m(2)) or cisplatin (50 mg/m(2)) for 18 weeks (concurrent phase) and then once every 2 weeks (maintenance phase). Overall response rate (ORR) was assessed after 4 weeks of induction therapy and then every 3 months according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors version 1.1 (primary end point). Secondary end points include progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and drug toxicity. Descriptive statistics was used for ORR, and Kaplan-Meier curves were generated for OS and PFS. A total of 80 women with locally advanced cervical cancer were enrolled and evaluated for safety and efficacy. Our results demonstrated that none of the patients had a complete response (0%), 11 patients had a partial response (14%), and 10 patients had progressive disease (13%), giving a tumor response rate of 14%. A total of 59 patients had stable disease (74%), giving a disease control rate of 88% (70/80). Median PFS was 8.21 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.09-12.45). Median OS was 11.96 months (95% CI: 8.11-23.95). The most common adverse events were mucositis, myelosuppression, and gastrointestinal disturbance. Our study results suggested that nimotuzumab in combination with chemotherapy and radiotherapy is well tolerated, and could be a better treatment alternative in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer.

  18. Spotlight on bicalutamide 150mg in the treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wellington, Keri; Keam, Susan J

    2007-01-01

    Bicalutamide (Casodex) is a competitive androgen receptor antagonist that inactivates androgen-regulated prostate cell growth and function, leading to cell apoptosis and inhibition of prostate cancer growth. It is administered orally as a once-daily dose. In the EU and a number of other countries, bicalutamide 150 mg/day is approved in men with locally advanced nonmetastatic prostate cancer as immediate therapy either as an adjuvant to active treatment or as monotherapy as an alternative to surgical or medical castration. Combined analysis of the three trials that comprise the bicalutamide Early Prostate Cancer programme showed that bicalutamide administered in conjunction with standard care in men with locally advanced prostate cancer offers disease-free survival benefits over standard care alone and is generally well tolerated. Overall survival was improved to a greater extent in the subgroup of patients who received bicalutamide plus radiation therapy compared with radiation therapy alone. Men with localised prostate cancer do not benefit from the addition of bicalutamide to standard care. Combined analysis of two other studies in men with locally advanced prostate cancer show that bicalutamide monotherapy offers better tolerability and higher health-related quality-of-life scores for sexual interest and physical capacity compared with surgical or medical castration, while achieving disease-free and overall survival durations that were not significantly different. Thus, when treatment options are being evaluated, bicalutamide as adjuvant therapy or monotherapy should be considered as an alternative to other available hormonal therapies in men with locally advanced prostate cancer, especially in those who wish to maintain an active lifestyle.

  19. Variation in apparent diffusion coefficient measurements among women with locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Gladwish, Adam P; Han, Kathy; Foltz, Warren D

    2015-12-01

    ADC variability from mixed data sets acquired from women with locally advanced cervical cancer appears to be predominantly of biologic origin. Intra-histology ADC variance was similar when pooled across technical factors. Inter-histology pooling increased ADC variance. Normalization to urine ADC improved intra-histology variance and receiver-operator curve test performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Factors that influence survival in unresectable metastatic or locally advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chao-Wen; King, Tai-Ming; Wang, Hsin-Tai; Wang, Jui-Ho

    2011-12-01

    Half of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) have metastasis during the whole course of the disease. Fewer than 10% of those are still alive at 5 years. Locally advanced CRC accounts for 7% to 33% of CRC relapses. Of these, only a small number of patients are resectable with a curative intent. Management of unresectable metastatic or locally advanced CRC is a significant challenge. In this study, we focus on patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic CRC and analyze survival rate and prognostic factors influencing the survival. There were 277 patients identified. Several clinicopathologic parameters were evaluated. To determine the prognostic impact of the factors in survival, all parameters were tested from their relationship in Cox-regression model and Cox proportional hazards model. Survival curves were generated according to Kaplan-Meier method and the differences in survival were determined by employing the log-rank test. Three factors that influence the survival were identified: one or more than two organs involved (p = 0.041), higher carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level (p = 0.001), and different salvage treatment (p < 0.001). In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, there were significant differences between patients with one and more than two organs involved (p = 0.027), different ranges of CEA level (p = 0.004), and different salvage treatment (p < 0.001). We clearly demonstrated three factors that influence the survival, including more than two organs involved, higher CEA level, and different salvage treatment. The higher the CEA level and the more organs (≥2) involved, the worse the survival. Even in patients with unresectable metastatic or locally advanced, aggressive treatment with target therapy seems to have survival benefit.

  1. Short-term and long-term efficacy of 7 targeted therapies for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: a network meta-analysis: Efficacy of 7 targeted therapies for AHCC.

    PubMed

    Niu, Meng; Hong, Duo; Ma, Teng-Chuang; Chen, Xiao-Wei; Han, Jin-Hang; Sun, Jun; Xu, Ke

    2016-12-01

    A variety of targeted drug therapies in clinical trials have been proven to be effective for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Our study aims to compare the short-term and long-term efficacies of different targeted drugs in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (AHCC) treatment using a network meta-analysis approach. PubMed, Embase, Ovid, EBSCO, and Cochrane central register of controlled trials were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of different targeted therapies implemented to patients with AHCC. And the retrieval resulted in 7 targeted drugs, namely, sorafenib, ramucirumab, everolimus, brivanib, tivantinib, sunitinib, and sorafenib+erlotinib. Direct and indirect evidence were combined to evaluate stable disease (SD), progressive disease (PD), complete response (CR), partial response (PR), disease control rate (DCR), overall response ratio (ORR), overall survival (OS), and surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) of patients with AHCC. A total of 11 RCTs were incorporated into our analysis, including 6594 patients with AHCC, among which 1619 patients received placebo treatment and 4975 cases had targeted therapies. The results revealed that in comparison with placebo, sorafenib, and ramucirumab displayed better short-term efficacy in terms of PR and ORR, and brivanib was better in ORR. Regarding long-term efficacy, sorafenib and sorafenib+erlotinib treatments exhibited longer OS. The data of cluster analysis showed that ramucirumab or sorafenib+erlotinib presented relatively better short-term efficacy for the treatment of AHCC. This network meta-analysis shows that ramucirumab and sorafenib+erlotinib may be the better targeted drugs for AHCC patients, and sorafenib+erlotinib achieved a better long-term efficacy.

  2. Leukocytosis and neutrophilia predict outcome in locally advanced esophageal cancer treated with definitive chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Schernberg, Antoine; Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence; Del Campo, Eleonor Rivin; Escande, Alexandre; Ducreux, Michel; Nguyen, France; Goere, Diane; Chargari, Cyrus; Deutsch, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the prognostic value of leukocyte and neutrophil count as biomarkers in patients with locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) undergoing exclusive chemoradiation. Results A total of 126 patients were identified. Respectively, 33% and 35% displayed baseline leukocytosis and neutrophilia. Estimated 3-year OS and PFS from chemoradiation completion were 31% and 25%, respectively. In univariate analysis, both leukocytosis and neutrophilia were associated with worse OS, PFS, and LRC (p < 0.01). In multivariate analysis, leukocytosis remained an independent risk factor associated with poorer OS, PFS and LRC (p < 0.05), independently from tumor stage and length, with higher prognostic value for OS compared with patients’ performance status (PS). Materials and Methods Bi-institutional clinical records from consecutive non-operable patients treated between 2003 and 2015 with definitive chemoradiation for locally advanced esophageal carcinoma were reviewed. Leukocytosis and neutrophilia were defined as a leukocyte or neutrophil count over 10 G/L and 7 G/L, respectively. These parameters were studied for their potential correlation with overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), locoregional control (LRC) and distant metastases control (DMC). Conclusions Leukocytosis and neutrophilia were independent prognostic factors of poor OS, PFS, and LRC in this bi-institutional series of locally advanced esophageal SCC treated with definitive chemoradiation. Although prospective confirmation is warranted, it is suggested that the leukocyte and neutrophil count parameters might be clinically relevant biomarkers to be considered for further clinical investigations. PMID:28086222

  3. Denosumab treatment of inoperable or locally advanced giant cell tumor of bone

    PubMed Central

    Borkowska, Aneta; Goryń, Tomasz; Pieńkowski, Andrzej; Wągrodzki, Michał; Jagiełło-Wieczorek, Ewelina; Rogala, Paweł; Szacht, Milena; Rutkowski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is an osteolytic, locally aggressive tumor that rarely metastasizes and typically occurs in the bones. At present, the primary treatment for GCTB is curettage with local adjuvants. Giant cells express receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). Denosumab, a RANKL inhibitor appears to present an effective therapeutic option in advanced cases of GCTB. The aim of the present study was to confirm the efficacy of denosumab in large group of patients with locally advanced GCTB. A total of 35 patients with histologically confirmed GCTB that were treated with denosumab with no participation in clinical trials between May 2013 and September 2015 were included in the present study. Denosumab treatment was administered until complete tumor resection was feasible or tumor progression or unacceptable toxicity had occurred. The mean denosumab treatment duration was 7.4 months. A total of 17 patients received surgery following denosumab treatment: 11 patients underwent wide en bloc resection with prosthesis implantation in 10 cases and 6 patients were treated with intralesional curettage. Tumor progression was observed in 2 patients that underwent intralesional curettage without prosthesis implantation. In addition, tumor progression was observed during denosumab treatment in 2 patients that had previously undergone radiotherapy. The overall 1-year progression-free survival rate was 92.8%. Thus, for patients with advanced, unresectable, progressive or symptomatic pretreated GCTB, denosumab provides a therapeutic option not previously available, which has become the standard therapy in multidisciplinary management of GCTB. PMID:28101196

  4. Denosumab treatment of inoperable or locally advanced giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Borkowska, Aneta; Goryń, Tomasz; Pieńkowski, Andrzej; Wągrodzki, Michał; Jagiełło-Wieczorek, Ewelina; Rogala, Paweł; Szacht, Milena; Rutkowski, Piotr

    2016-12-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is an osteolytic, locally aggressive tumor that rarely metastasizes and typically occurs in the bones. At present, the primary treatment for GCTB is curettage with local adjuvants. Giant cells express receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). Denosumab, a RANKL inhibitor appears to present an effective therapeutic option in advanced cases of GCTB. The aim of the present study was to confirm the efficacy of denosumab in large group of patients with locally advanced GCTB. A total of 35 patients with histologically confirmed GCTB that were treated with denosumab with no participation in clinical trials between May 2013 and September 2015 were included in the present study. Denosumab treatment was administered until complete tumor resection was feasible or tumor progression or unacceptable toxicity had occurred. The mean denosumab treatment duration was 7.4 months. A total of 17 patients received surgery following denosumab treatment: 11 patients underwent wide en bloc resection with prosthesis implantation in 10 cases and 6 patients were treated with intralesional curettage. Tumor progression was observed in 2 patients that underwent intralesional curettage without prosthesis implantation. In addition, tumor progression was observed during denosumab treatment in 2 patients that had previously undergone radiotherapy. The overall 1-year progression-free survival rate was 92.8%. Thus, for patients with advanced, unresectable, progressive or symptomatic pretreated GCTB, denosumab provides a therapeutic option not previously available, which has become the standard therapy in multidisciplinary management of GCTB.

  5. Nimotuzumab Combined with Chemotherapy is a Promising Treatment for Locally Advanced and Metastatic Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Xinghua; Lu, Nannan; Pan, Yueyin; Xu, Jianming

    2017-01-24

    BACKGROUND Nimotuzumab is an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody which has been widely used in cancer treatment. However, the safety and efficacy of nimotuzumab combined with chemotherapy in locally advanced or metastatic esophageal cancer patients remain unclear. MATERIAL AND METHODS To address this open question, we collected a total data of 21 patients diagnosed with locally advanced or metastatic esophageal cancer between 2012 and 2016 in a, retrospective study. The patient characteristics, efficacy safety, and toxicity were evaluated in our study. RESULTS We observed 1 (4.8%) patient with complete response, 7 (33.3%) patients with partial response, 9 (42.9%) patients with stable response and 4 (19%) patients with progression response. The objective response rate was 38.1% and disease control rate was 81%. The mean progression-free-survival was 7 months and the 18-month overall survival (OS) was 10%. The incidence rate of anemia and leukopenia was 71.4% and 81%, respectively. Two patients showed the serious adverse event of myelosuppression, with nausea, fatigue, and anorexia. No long-term drug-related toxicity was observed during the follow-up. CONCLUSIONS Nimotuzumab combined with chemotherapy can achieve promising clinical outcomes in locally advanced or metastatic esophageal cancer, without accumulation of toxicity and was well-tolerated.

  6. Nimotuzumab Combined with Chemotherapy is a Promising Treatment for Locally Advanced and Metastatic Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xinghua; Lu, Nannan; Pan, Yueyin; Xu, Jianming

    2017-01-01

    Background Nimotuzumab is an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody which has been widely used in cancer treatment. However, the safety and efficacy of nimotuzumab combined with chemotherapy in locally advanced or metastatic esophageal cancer patients remain unclear. Material/Methods To address this open question, we collected a total data of 21 patients diagnosed with locally advanced or metastatic esophageal cancer between 2012 and 2016 in a, retrospective study. The patient characteristics, efficacy safety, and toxicity were evaluated in our study. Results We observed 1 (4.8%) patient with complete response, 7 (33.3%) patients with partial response, 9 (42.9%) patients with stable response and 4 (19%) patients with progression response. The objective response rate was 38.1% and disease control rate was 81%. The mean progression-free-survival was 7 months and the 18-month overall survival (OS) was 10%. The incidence rate of anemia and leukopenia was 71.4% and 81%, respectively. Two patients showed the serious adverse event of myelosuppression, with nausea, fatigue, and anorexia. No long-term drug-related toxicity was observed during the follow-up. Conclusions Nimotuzumab combined with chemotherapy can achieve promising clinical outcomes in locally advanced or metastatic esophageal cancer, without accumulation of toxicity and was well-tolerated. PMID:28115730

  7. [Application value of core needle biopsy technique in the pathological diagnosis of locally advanced pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Che, Xu; Zhang, Jianwei; Chen, Yingtai; Sun, Yuemin; Wang, Chengfeng

    2015-04-14

    To explore the application value of core needle biopsy technique in the pathological diagnosis of locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients. During April 2007 to April 2014, retrospective analysis was conducted for 36 patients of locally advanced pancreatic cancer to summarize the clinical data of core needle biopsy technique. And the relevant data included clinical features, pathological findings and puncture-related complications. Regular postoperative follow-ups were conducted. All received pathological examination of core needle biopsy. And the pathological diagnoses were pancreatic cancer (n=29), pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (n=2) and chronic pancreatitis (n=5). During the follow-ups, liver metastasis was pathologically confirmed postoperatively at Months 4 and 6 months among 5 chronic pancreatitis patients. The remainder was followed up for over 12 months. There was neither change in size nor metastasis. One case was diagnosed at Peking Union Hospital as autoimmune pancreatitis while another 2 cases had a clinical diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. The accuracy of core needle puncture was 94.4%. There were 2 cases of postoperative pancreatic fistula in class A. Bleeding complication was absent. The application of core needle biopsy technique is both safe and effective in the pathological diagnosis of locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  8. Chest wall resection and reconstruction for locally advanced primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hille, Ursula; Soergel, Philipp; Zardo, Patrick; Pertschy, Stefanie; Busch, Kai; Fischer, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    We sought to evaluate clinical and oncologic outcomes of selected patients with locally advanced breast cancer undergoing full thickness chest wall resection (FTCWR) and reconstruction in a multidisciplinary setting. Between 2008 and 2010, five women underwent FTCWR followed by chest wall repair for locally advanced primary breast cancer. In all cases, chest wall repair was performed with a Peri-Guard Repair Patch (Synovis, St. Paul, MN, USA). At follow-up (7-12 months) quality of life, respiratory function and oncologic status were assessed. Successful chest wall resection and repair were achieved in all patients. Plastic reconstruction of post-mastectomy tissue defects was necessary in one case. One patient was treated by breast conserving therapy. Chest ultrasound imaging confirmed absence of adhesions, haematoma or seroma and normal expansion and respiratory movement of the underlying lung in all patients. On follow-up all patients reported good quality of life. Multidisciplinary surgical approaches to chest wall resection and reconstruction in selected patients with locally advanced primary breast cancer are feasible, safe, associated with short operation time and hospital stay and negligible morbidity.

  9. Rate of para-aortic lymph node micrometastasis in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zand, Behrouz; Euscher, Elizabeth D.; Soliman, Pamela T.; Schmeler, Kathleen M.; Coleman, Robert L.; Frumovitz, Michael; Jhingran, Anuja; Ramondetta, Lois M.; Ramirez, Pedro T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Patients with micrometastasis to para-aortic lymph nodes may benefit from extended field chemoradiation. To determine the rate of para-aortic node micrometastasis in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer undergoing laparoscopic extraperitoneal para-aortic lymphadenectomy Methods We prospectively identified consecutive patients diagnosed with stage IB2-IVA biopsy-proven cervical cancer. Eligible patients included those who were candidates for treatment with radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy and had no evidence of para-aortic lymphadenopathy (all lymph nodes < 2 cm in diameter) by preoperative computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. All patients underwent preoperative positron emission tomography/computed tomography and laparoscopic extraperitoneal para-aortic lymphadenectomy. All lymph nodes were assessed for metastasis by routine hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining. Ultrastaging (serial sectioning) and immunohistochemical analysis were performed in H&E-negative specimens. Results Thirteen (22%) of 60 consecutive patients had para-aortic lymph node metastases detected on routine H&E staining. Of the remaining 47 patients, one (2.1%) had evidence of micrometastasis, which was detected by ultrastaging. This patient completed whole pelvic radiotherapy and chemotherapy but had a recurrence 27 months after completion of therapy. Conclusions The rate of para-aortic node micrometastasis in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer is low. The role of routine ultrastaging and immunohistochemical analysis in such patients remains uncertain. Future studies are needed to determine the clinical impact of para-aortic node micrometastasis in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer. PMID:20837355

  10. Progress in the treatment of locally advanced clinically resectable rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2011-12-01

    There have been significant developments in the adjuvant treatment of locally advanced clinically resectable (T3 and/or N+) rectal cancer. Postoperative systemic chemotherapy plus concurrent pelvic irradiation (chemoradiation) significantly improves local control and survival compared with surgery alone. The German Rectal Cancer Trial confirmed that when chemoradiation is delivered preoperatively there is a significant decrease in acute and late toxicity and a corresponding increase in local control and sphincter preservation. Despite these advances, controversies remain. Among these controversies are the role of short-course radiation, whether postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary for all patients, and if the type of surgery after chemoradiation can be modified based on tumor response. Are there more accurate imaging techniques and/or molecular markers to help identify patients with positive pelvic nodes with the goal of reducing the chance of overtreatment with preoperative therapy. Will more effective systemic agents both improve outcome and modify the need for pelvic irradiation? This review examines the advances in chemoradiation as well as addresses these and other opportunities for improvement.

  11. Concomitant boost chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer: treatment tolerance and acute side effects.

    PubMed

    Majdaeen, Mehrsa; Kazemian, Ali; Babaei, Mohammad; Haddad, Peiman; Hashemi, Farnaz Amouzegar

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated treatment tolerance and side effects of 6 days a week accelerated radiation therapy using concomitant boost methods with chemotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Thirty patients suffered locally advanced head and neck malignancies were included into this clinical trial. The patients were scheduled for accelerated radiotherapy with total dose of 70 Gy 6 days a week (5 days radiotherapy and 1-day concomitant boost radiotherapy) for 5 weeks and also concurrently for chemotherapy with cisplatin and also celecoxib. The average age of the patients was 51.47 ± 11.49 years. The incidence of acute mucositis at the end of the 1st week was 33.3% that was gradually increased until the end of the 5th week (93.3%) and then had a decreasing trend within the 6th week (70.0%). The incidence of acute dysphagia was estimated 23.3% at the end of the 1st week and reached 60% at completion of treatment. Scheduling a treatment approach with 6 days a week, accelerated radiation therapy using concomitant boost methods with chemotherapy, and celecoxib leads to significant reducing the incidence of complications in the final weeks of therapy in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

  12. Management of locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Kurniali, Peter C; Hrinczenko, Borys; Al-Janadi, Anas

    2014-02-28

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States with a median age at diagnosis of 69 years. Sixty percent are diagnosed over the age of 65 years and 36% are 75 years or older. At diagnosis, approximately 58% of patients will have locally advanced and metastatic disease, for which systemic chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival. Treatment of cancer in elderly patients is more challenging due to multiple factors, including disabling co-morbidities as well as a decline in organ function. Cancer treatment of elderly patients is often associated with more toxicities that may lead to frequent hospitalizations. In locally advanced disease, fewer older patients receive adjuvant chemotherapy despite survival benefit and similar toxicity when compared to their younger counterparts. A survival benefit is also observed in the palliative chemotherapy setting for elderly patients with metastatic disease. When treating elderly patients with colon cancer, one has to consider drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Since chronological age is a poor marker of a patient's functional status, several methods of functional assessment including performance status and activities of daily living (ADL) or instrumental ADL, or even a comprehensive geriatric assessment, may be used. There is no ideal chemotherapy regimen that fits all elderly patients and so a regimen needs to be tailored for each individual. Important considerations when treating elderly patients include convenience and tolerability. This review will discuss approaches to the management of elderly patients with locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer.

  13. Surgical outcome after docetaxel-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally-advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Biffi, Roberto; Fazio, Nicola; Luca, Fabrizio; Chiappa, Antonio; Andreoni, Bruno; Zampino, Maria Giulia; Roth, Arnaud; Schuller, Jan Christian; Fiori, Giancarla; Orsi, Franco; Bonomo, Guido; Crosta, Cristiano; Huber, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate feasibility, morbidity and surgical mortality of a docetaxel-based chemotherapy regimen randomly administered before or after gastrectomy in patients suffering from locally-advanced resectable gastric cancer. METHODS: Patients suffering from locally-advanced (T3-4 any N M0 or any T N1-3 M0) gastric carcinoma, staged with endoscopic ultrasound, bone scan, computed tomography, and laparoscopy, were assigned to receive four 21 d/cycles of TCF (docetaxel 75 mg/m2 day 1, cisplatin 75 mg/m2 day 1, and fluorouracil 300 mg/m2 per day for days 1-14), either before (Arm A) or after (Arm B) gastrectomy. Operative morbidity, overall mortality, and severe adverse events were compared by intention-to-treat analysis. RESULTS: From November 1999 to November 2005, 70 patients were treated. After preoperative TCF (Arm A), thirty-two (94%) resections were performed, 85% of which were R0. Pathological response was complete in 4 patients (11.7%), and partial in 18 (55%). No surgical mortality and 28.5% morbidity rate were observed, similar to those of immediate surgery arm (P = 0.86). Serious chemotherapy adverse events tended to be more frequent in arm B (23% vs 11%, P = 0.07), with a single death per arm. CONCLUSION: Surgery following docetaxel-based chemotherapy was safe and with similar morbidity to immediate surgery in patients with locally-advanced resectable gastric carcinoma. PMID:20143466

  14. 6.3 MeV fast neutrons in the treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Velikaya, V. V. Startseva, Zh. A.; Musabaeva, L. I. Lisin, V. A.

    2016-08-02

    The study included 135 breast cancer patients (70 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer and 65 patients with locally advanced breast cancer with unfavorable prognostic factors) who received the neutron therapy alone or in combination with the photon therapy. The neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer. The 8-year survival rate in patients without repeated breast cancer recurrence was 87.6 ± 8.7% after the neutron and neutron-photon therapy and 54.3 ± 9.2% after the electron beam therapy.

  15. 6.3 MeV fast neutrons in the treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikaya, V. V.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Lisin, V. A.; Startseva, Zh. A.

    2016-08-01

    The study included 135 breast cancer patients (70 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer and 65 patients with locally advanced breast cancer with unfavorable prognostic factors) who received the neutron therapy alone or in combination with the photon therapy. The neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer. The 8-year survival rate in patients without repeated breast cancer recurrence was 87.6 ± 8.7% after the neutron and neutron-photon therapy and 54.3 ± 9.2% after the electron beam therapy.

  16. Hyperthermia and radiation therapy for locally advanced or recurrent breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer; Sachdev, Sean; Sathiaseelan, Vythialinga; Helenowski, Irene; Abdelmoneim, Salah; Pierce, Margaret C; Woloschak, Gayle; Small, William; Mittal, Bharat; Kiel, Krystyna D

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to report the outcome and toxicity of combined hyperthermia (HT) and radiation therapy (RT) in treatment of locally advanced or loco-regionally recurrent breast cancer. Patients treated with HT and RT from January 1991 to December 2007 were reviewed. RT doses for previously irradiated patients were > 40 Gy and for RT naïve patients > 60 Gy, at 1.8-2 Gy/day. HT was planned for 2 sessions/week, immediately after RT, for a minimum of 20 min and for > 4 sessions. Superficial or interstitial applicators were used with temperature measured by superficial or interstitial thermistors based on target thickness. HT treatment was assessed by thermal equivalent dose (TED), > 42.5 °C and > 43 °C. Endpoints included treatment response, lack of local progression (local control), and survival. 127 patients received HT and RT to 167 sites. These included the intact breast (24.4%), chest wall/skin (67.7%), and breast/chest wall and nodes (7.9%). At a median follow-up of 13 months (mean 30 ± 38), improved overall survival was significantly associated with increasing RT dose (p < 0.0001), median TED 42.5 °C ≥ 200 min (p = 0.003), and local control (p = 0.0002). Local control at last follow-up was seen in 55.1% of patients. Complete response was significantly associated with median TED 42.5 °C ≥ 200 min (p = 0.002) and median TED 43 °C ≥ 100 min (p = 0.03). HT and RT are effective for locally advanced or recurrent breast cancer in patients that have been historically difficult to treat by RT alone. Over 50% of patients achieved control of locoregional disease. Overall survival was improved with local control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. HYPERTHERMIA AND RADIATION THERAPY FOR LOCALLY ADVANCED OR RECURRENT BREAST CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Refaat, Tamer; Sachdev, Sean; Sathiaseelan, Vythialinga; Helenowski, Irene; Abdelmoneim, Salah; Pierce, Margaret C; Woloschak, Gayle; Small, William; Mittal, Bharat; Kiel, Krystyna D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to report the outcome and toxicity of combined hyperthermia (HT) and radiation therapy (RT) in treatment of locally advanced or loco-regionally recurrent breast cancer. Patients and Methods Patients treated with HT and RT from January 1991 to December 2007 were reviewed. RT doses for previously irradiated patients were >40 Gy and for RT naïve patients >60 Gy, at 1.8–2 Gy/day. HT was planned for 2 sessions/week, immediately after RT, for a minimum of 20 minutes and for >4 sessions. Superficial or interstitial applicators were used with temperature measured by superficial or interstitial thermisters based on target thickness. HT treatment was assessed by thermal equivalent dose (TED), >42.5°C and >43°C. Endpoints included treatment response, lack of local progression (local control), and survival. Results 127 patients received HT and RT to 167 sites. These included the intact breast (24.4%), chest wall/skin (67.7%), and breast/chest wall and nodes (7.9%). At a median follow-up of 13 months (mean 30±38), improved overall survival was significantly associated with increasing RT dose (p<0.0001), median TED 42.5°C≥200 minutes (p=0.003), and local control (p=0.0002). Local control at last follow-up was seen in 55.1% of patients. Complete response was significantly associated with median TED 42.5°C≥200 minutes (p=0.002) and median TED 43°C≥100 minutes (p=0.03). Conclusion HT and RT are effective for locally advanced or recurrent breast cancer in patients that have been historically difficult to treat by RT alone. Over 50% of patients achieved control of locoregional disease. Overall survival was improved with local control. PMID:25900383

  18. Postoperative 125I brachytherapy delivered by digital model obturators for recurrent or locally advanced maxillary cancers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-wei; Zhang, Jian-guo; Tong, Dai; Zhang, Jie; Zheng, Lei; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Guang-yan

    2012-11-01

    We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of postoperative (125) I brachytherapy delivered by use of digital model obturators for recurrent or locally advanced maxillary cancers. Retrospective study. From 2006 to 2008, 12 patients (seven females; median age, 65 years; range, 22-86 years) with recurrent or locally advanced maxillary cancers showing positive margins after surgery underwent (125) I brachytherapy by use of digital model obturators and interstitial implants. The radioactivity was 18.5 to 33.3 MBq per seed, and the prescription dose was 80 to 160 Gy. Functional outcome of patients was evaluated by the Performance Status Scale (PSS) for head and neck cancer before and after brachytherapy. The (125) I seeds and dosages were well distributed in the radiation fields, and all patients had higher PSS scores after than before treatment with obturators. During a median follow-up of 53 months (range, 28-62 months), local control at 3 and 5 years was 83.3% and 66.7%, respectively, with a mean local control time of 53.5 ± 3.79 months. Overall survival at 3 and 5 years was 91.7% and 71.4%, respectively, with a mean survival time of 56.6 ± 2.99 months. Two patients died due to local recurrence, and one patient died due to lung metastasis. No patient had severe complications during follow-up. (125) I brachytherapy delivered by digital model obturator is effective in treating maxillary cancers with positive margins after maxillectomy for advanced or recurrent cancer. The method may improve the quality of life of patients with maxillary defects. Laryngoscope, 2012. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma: present and future.

    PubMed

    Genco, Chiara; Cabibbo, Giuseppe; Maida, Marcello; Brancatelli, Giuseppe; Galia, Massimo; Alessi, Nicola; Butera, Giuseppe; Genova, Claudio; Romano, Piero; Raineri, Maurizio; Giarratano, Antonello; Midiri, Massimo; Cammà, Calogero

    2013-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a major health problem. It is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and the third most common cause of cancer-related death. Despite the availability of several treatment opportunities, diagnosis is still made in an advanced phase, limiting application of most therapeutic choices that currently are based on the Barcelona Clinic Cancer Liver Classification and include surgical resection, orthotopic liver transplantation and ablative methods for very early and early disease, arterial chemoembolization for intermediate stages and systemic therapy with sorafenib for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Thanks to novel advancements in knowledge of molecular pathogenesis of this tumor, many new systemic agents and locoregional treatments are in different stages of clinical development and they represent an important promise of further improvements in patients' survival.

  20. Hepatocellular carcinoma: a review

    PubMed Central

    Balogh, Julius; Victor, David; Asham, Emad H; Burroughs, Sherilyn Gordon; Boktour, Maha; Saharia, Ashish; Li, Xian; Ghobrial, R Mark; Monsour, Howard P

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver malignancy and is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. In the United States, HCC is the ninth leading cause of cancer deaths. Despite advances in prevention techniques, screening, and new technologies in both diagnosis and treatment, incidence and mortality continue to rise. Cirrhosis remains the most important risk factor for the development of HCC regardless of etiology. Hepatitis B and C are independent risk factors for the development of cirrhosis. Alcohol consumption remains an important additional risk factor in the United States as alcohol abuse is five times higher than hepatitis C. Diagnosis is confirmed without pathologic confirmation. Screening includes both radiologic tests, such as ultrasound, computerized tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, and serological markers such as α-fetoprotein at 6-month intervals. Multiple treatment modalities exist; however, only orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) or surgical resection is curative. OLT is available for patients who meet or are downstaged into the Milan or University of San Francisco criteria. Additional treatment modalities include transarterial chemoembolization, radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, percutaneous ethanol injection, cryoablation, radiation therapy, systemic chemotherapy, and molecularly targeted therapies. Selection of a treatment modality is based on tumor size, location, extrahepatic spread, and underlying liver function. HCC is an aggressive cancer that occurs in the setting of cirrhosis and commonly presents in advanced stages. HCC can be prevented if there are appropriate measures taken, including hepatitis B virus vaccination, universal screening of blood products, use of safe injection practices, treatment and education of alcoholics and intravenous drug users, and initiation of antiviral therapy. Continued improvement in both surgical and nonsurgical approaches has demonstrated

  1. Clinicopathologic analysis of combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma according to the latest WHO classification.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Jun; Nakashima, Osamu; Hattori, Satoshi; Tanikawa, Ken; Takenaka, Miki; Nakayama, Masamich; Kondo, Reiichiro; Nomura, Yoriko; Koura, Keiko; Ueda, Kousuke; Sanada, Sakiko; Naito, Yoshiki; Yamaguchi, Rin; Yano, Hirohisa

    2013-04-01

    Combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma comprises <1% of all liver carcinomas. The histogenesis of combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma has remained unclear for many years. However, recent advances in hepatic progenitor cell (HPC) investigations have provided new insights. The concept that combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma originates from HPCs is adopted in the chapter "combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma" of the latest World Health Organization (WHO) classification. In this study, we conducted clinicopathologic analysis of combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma according to the latest WHO classification. Fifty-four cases were included in this study. Pathologic diagnosis was made according to the WHO classification. When a tumor contained plural histologic patterns, predominant histologic pattern (≥50%) was defined. Minor histologic patterns were also appended. Immunohistochemical staining with biliary markers (CK7, CK19, and EMA), hepatocyte paraffin (HepPar)-1, HPC markers (CD56, c-kit, CD133, and EpCAM), and vimentin was performed. Forty-five and 50 patients were analyzed for progression-free survival and overall survival, respectively. Ten, 1, 32, and 11 cases were diagnosed as: combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma, classical type; combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma, stem cell features, typical subtype; combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma, stem cell features, intermediate cell subtype; and combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma, stem cell features, cholangiolocellular type, respectively. Combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinomas usually have high expression of biliary markers. CD56, c-kit, and EpCAM were expressed to various degrees in all combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinomas apart from the hepatocellular carcinoma component of combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma, classical type. The expression of CD133 and vimentin was observed only in combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma, stem cell

  2. Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Mechanistic Distinction From Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Riggle, Kevin M.; Turnham, Rigney; Scott, John D.; Yeung, Raymond S.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FL‐HCC) has historically been classified as a rare subtype of HCC. However, unlike “classic” HCC, it occurs in children and young adults without underlying liver disease. The recent discovery of a deletion mutation in all FL‐HCCs represented a major advancement in understanding the pathogenesis of this disease. This deletion results in the fusion of the genes encoding a heat shock protein (DNAJB1) and the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (PKA, PRKACA), and overexpression of PRKACA and enhanced cAMP‐dependent PKA activity. This review summarizes recent advancements in FL‐HCC pathogenesis and characteristics of the HSP40‐PKA C protein. PMID:26990031

  3. Could tumor characteristics identified by colonoscopy predict the locally advanced rectal carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Cao, Fu-ao; Gong, Hai-feng; Zheng, Jian-ming; Fu, Chuan-gang

    2010-09-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation is now considered the standard care for locally advanced rectal carcinoma (T3-4 or/and N1-2 lesions), but the accuracy of staging examinations including endorectal ultrasonography (ERUS) and MRI is far from excellent. In addition, the above staging equipment or professionals who perform the examinations may not be available in some hospitals, while preoperative colonoscopy and biopsy are usually obtainable in most hospitals. The objective of the present study was to investigate the clinical and pathological characteristics of locally advanced rectal carcinoma and identify candidates for neoadjuvant chemoradiation. This was a retrospective study. Patients who were treated for rectal cancer at Changhai Hospital from January 1999 to July 2008 were identified from our prospectively collected database. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS Software System (version 15.0). The Mann-Whitney test, chi-square test and multivariate Logistic regression analysis were performed. A total of 1005 cases were included in this research, of which 761 cases were identified as locally advanced rectal carcinoma depending on postoperative TNM staging. The results of multivariate Logistic regression analysis indicated seven independent risk factors that could be used to predict a locally advanced rectal carcinoma independently: a high grade (including poor differentiation and undifferentiation) (OR: 3.856; 95% CI: 2.064 to 7.204; P = 0.000); large tumor size (OR: 2.455; 95% CI: 1.755 to 3.436; P = 0.000); elevated preoperative serum CEA level (OR: 1.823; 95% CI: 1.309 to 2.537; P = 0.000); non-polypoid tumor type (OR: 1.758; 95% CI: 1.273 to 2.427; P = 0.001); the absence of synchronous polyps (OR: 1.602; 95% CI: 1.103 to 2.327; P = 0.013); the absence of blood in stool (OR: 1.659; 95% CI: 1.049 to 2.624; P = 0.030); and a greater circumferential tumor extent (OR: 1.813; 95% CI: 1.055 to 3.113; P = 0.031). Based on these findings, a Logistic equation was

  4. Advanced age decreases local calcium signaling in endothelium of mouse mesenteric arteries in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Boerman, Erika M.; Everhart, Jesse E.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with vascular dysfunction that impairs tissue perfusion, physical activity, and the quality of life. Calcium signaling in endothelial cells (ECs) is integral to vasomotor control, exemplified by localized Ca2+ signals within EC projections through holes in the internal elastic lamina (IEL). Within these microdomains, endothelium-derived hyperpolarization is integral to smooth muscle cell (SMC) relaxation via coupling through myoendothelial gap junctions. However, the effects of aging on local EC Ca2+ signals (and thereby signaling between ECs and SMCs) remain unclear, and these events have not been investigated in vivo. Furthermore, it is unknown whether aging affects either the number or the size of IEL holes. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that local EC Ca2+ signaling is impaired with advanced age along with a reduction in IEL holes. In anesthetized mice expressing a Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent protein (GCaMP2) selectively in ECs, our findings illustrate that for mesenteric arteries controlling splanchnic blood flow the frequency of spontaneous local Ca2+ signals in ECs was reduced by ∼85% in old (24–26 mo) vs. young (3–6 mo) animals. At the same time, the number (and total area) of holes per square millimeter of IEL was reduced by ∼40%. We suggest that diminished signaling between ECs and SMCs contributes to dysfunction of resistance arteries with advanced age. Listen to this article's corresponding podcast at http://ajpheart.podbean.com/e/aging-impairs-endothelial-ca2-signaling/. PMID:26945073

  5. The role of palliative radiation therapy in symptomatic locally advanced gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tey, Jeremy . E-mail: Jeremy_Tey@mail.nhg.com.sg; Back, Michael F.; Shakespeare, Thomas P.; Mukherjee, Rahul K.; Lu, Jiade J.; Lee, Khai Mun; Wong, Lea Choung; Leong, Cheng Nang; Zhu Ming

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To review the outcome of palliative radiotherapy (RT) alone in patients with symptomatic locally advanced or recurrent gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with symptomatic locally advanced or recurrent gastric cancer who were managed palliatively with RT at Cancer Institute, Singapore were retrospectively reviewed. Study end points included symptom response, median survival, and treatment toxicity (retrospectively scored using the Common Toxicity Criteria v3.0 [CTC]). Results: Between November 1999 and December 2004, 33 patients with locally advanced or recurrent gastric cancer were managed with palliative intent using RT alone. Median age was 76 years (range, 38-90 years). Twenty-one (64%) patients had known distant metastatic disease at time of treatment. Key index symptoms were bleeding (24 patients), obstruction (8 patients), and pain (8 patients). The majority of patients received 30 Gy/10 fractions (17 patients). Dose fractionation regimen ranged from an 8-Gy single fraction to 40 Gy in 16 fractions. Median survival was 145 days, actuarial 12-month survival 8%. A total of 54.3% of patients (13/24) with bleeding responded (median duration of response of 140 days), 25% of patients (2/8) with obstruction responded (median duration of response of 102 days), and 25% of patients (2/8) with pain responded (median duration of response of 105 days). No obvious dose-response was evident. One Grade 3 CTC equivalent toxicity was recorded. Conclusion: External beam RT alone is an effective and well tolerated modality in the local palliation of gastric cancer, with palliation lasting the majority of patients' lives.

  6. Interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy in locally advanced and recurrent vulvar cancer

    PubMed Central

    Białas, Brygida; Fijałkowski, Marek; Wojcieszek, Piotr; Szlag, Marta; Cholewka, Agnieszka; Ślęczka, Maciej; Kołosza, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to report our experience with high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) in locally advanced and recurrent vulvar cancer. Material and methods Between 2004 and 2014, fourteen women with locally advanced or recurrent vulvar cancer were treated using HDR-ISBT in our Centre. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy was performed as a separate treatment or in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (given prior to brachytherapy). Results Patients were divided into: group I (n = 6) with locally advanced tumors, stages III-IVA after an incisional biopsy only, and group II (n = 8) with recurrent vulvar cancer after previous radical surgery. In group I, median follow up was 12 months (range 7-18 months); 1-year overall survival (OS) was 83%. Transient arrest of cancer growth or tumor regression was noticed in all patients but 4/6 developed relapse. Median time to failure was 6.3 months (range 3-11 months). The 1-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 33%. In group II, median follow up was 28 months (range 13-90 months). The 1-year and 3-year OS was 100% and 80%, respectively. The arrest of cancer growth or tumor regression was achieved in all patients. In 4/8 patients neither clinical nor histological symptoms of relapse were observed but 4/8 women experienced relapse. Median time to failure was 31 months (range 13-76 months). The 1-year and 3-year PFS was 100% and 62.5%, respectively. Two patients (14.3%) in group II had severe late toxicity (G3). Conclusions High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a well-tolerated treatment option in selected patients with advanced or recurrent vulvar cancer. It is a safe and effective treatment modality for advanced and recurrent vulvar cancer, yielding good local control with acceptable late treatment related side effects. In our study, patients with recurrent vulvar cancer had better results in HDR-ISBT treatment, probably because of the smaller tumor volume. This

  7. Hepatocellular carcinoma: clinical frontiers and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bruix, Jordi; Gores, Gregory J; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death and is currently the main event leading to death in patients with cirrhosis. Evolving information suggests that the metabolic syndrome with non-alcoholic liver disease may be an important cause of HCC in addition to viral hepatitis and alcohol-induced liver disease. The molecular pathogenesis is extremely complex and heterogeneous. To date the molecular information has not impacted on treatment decisions. Periodic surveillance imaging of patients with cirrhosis is widely practiced, especially because diagnostic, radiographic criteria for early-stage HCC have been defined (including nodules between 1 and 2 cm) and effective treatment is available for tumours detected at an early stage. Worldwide the approach to resection versus transplantation varies depending upon local resources, expertise and donor availability. The criteria for transplantation are discussed, and the controversial areas highlighted with evidence-based recommendations provided. Several approaches are available for intermediate stage disease, including radiofrequency ablation, transarterial chemoembolisation and radioembolisation; the rationale for these therapies is buttressed by appropriate outcome-based studies. For advanced disease, systemic therapy with sorafenib remains the option best supported by current data. Thus, while several trials have failed to improve the benefits of established therapies, studies assessing the sequential or combined application of those already known to be beneficial are needed. Also, new concepts are provided in regards to selecting and stratifying patients for second-line studies, which may help explain the failure of prior studies. PMID:24531850

  8. Status of hepatocellular carcinoma in Gulf region.

    PubMed

    Rasul, Kakil Ibrahim; Al-Azawi, Safaa H; Chandra, Prem; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K; Knuth, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has a unique geographic distribution that is likely to be determined by specific etiologic factors. There is a distinctive difference in sex and age related occurrence of disease. In the Gulf region, there are contradicting data on the prevalence and death rates due to HCC. In this review we highlight some aspects of HCC specific to the Gulf region. A retrospective analysis of 150 patient's data is presented, including demographic, epidemiological, aetiological disease status assessment with child Pugh criteria, modes of treatment and treatment related outcome. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection was the most common (45%) documented etiology, similar to Western European countries, followed by hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in 27% of cases, alcoholic liver disease only in six patients (4%). Child-Pugh assessment was A in 33%, B in 37% and C in 30% of observed patients. Surgery (liver resection or transplantation) was performed in 12% and local ablation in 5% of cases. The others were treated by chemo-embolization in 17% and by systemic therapy with sorafenib in 13% of patients. Nearly half of the patients (53%) were in advanced stages and received palliative treatment. To improve the outcome of treatment in HCC patients in the Gulf region, an effective and strategic screening program must be implemented for early diagnosis and treatment to improve the outcome of this mostly fatal disease.

  9. Application of Laparoscopic Extralevator Abdominoperineal Excision in Locally Advanced Low Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Lei; Dai, Yong; Jiang, Jin-Bo; Yuan, Hui-Yang; Hu, San-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background: When compared with conventional abdominoperineal resection (APR), extralevator abdominoperineal excision (ELAPE) has been demonstrated to reduce the risk of local recurrence for the treatment of locally advanced low rectal cancer. Combined with the laparoscopic technique, laparoscopic ELAPE (LELAPE) has the potential to reduce invasion and hasten postoperative recovery. In this study, we aim to investigate the advantages of LELAPE in comparison with conventional APR. Methods: From October 2010 to February 2013, 23 patients with low rectal cancer (T3–4N0–2M0) underwent LELAPE; while during the same period, 25 patients were treated with conventional APR. The patient characteristics, intraoperative data, postoperative complications, and follow-up results were retrospectively compared and analyzed. Results: The basic patient characteristics were similar; but the total operative time for the LELAPE was longer than that of the conventional APR group (P = 0.014). However, the operative time for the perineal portion was comparable between the two groups (P = 0.328). The LELAPE group had less intraoperative blood loss (P = 0.022), a lower bowel perforation rate (P = 0.023), and a positive circumferential margin (P = 0.028). Moreover, the patients, who received the LELAPE, had a lower postoperative Visual Analog Scale, quicker recovery of bowel function (P = 0.001), and a shorter hospital stay (P = 0.047). However, patients in the LELAPE group suffered more chronic perineal pain (P = 0.002), which may be related to the coccygectomy (P = 0.033). Although the metastasis rate and mortality rate were similar between the two groups, the local recurrence rate of the LELAPE group was statistically improved (P = 0.047). Conclusions: When compared with conventional APR, LELAPE has the potential to reduce the risk of local recurrence, and decreases operative invasion for the treatment of locally advanced low rectal cancer. PMID:25963355

  10. Induction Gemcitabine and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Nonmetastatic Pancreas Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Miksad, Rebecca; Goldstein, Michael; Sullivan, Ryan; Bullock, Andrea; Buchbinder, Elizabeth; Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Kent, Tara; Vollmer, Charles; Callery, Mark

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been used successfully to treat patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer. However, many patients develop metastatic disease soon after diagnosis and may receive little benefit from such therapy. We therefore retrospectively analyzed a planned strategy of initial chemotherapy with restaging and then treatment for those patients with no evidence of metastatic progression with SBRT. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients received gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} per week for 3 weeks then 1 week off) until tolerance, at least six cycles, or progression. Patients without metastases after two cycles were treated with SBRT (tolerance-based dose of 24-36 Gy in 3 fractions) between the third and fourth cycles without interrupting the chemotherapy cycles. Results: Eight of the 47 patients (17%) were found to have metastatic disease after two cycles of gemcitabine; the remaining 39 patients received SBRT. The median follow-up for survivors was 21 months (range, 6-36 months). The median overall survival for all patients who received SBRT was 20 months, and the median progression-free survival was 15 months. The local control rate was 85% (33 of 39 patients); and 54% of patients (21 of 39) developed metastases. Late Grade III toxicities such as GI bleeding and obstruction were observed in 9% (3/39) of patients. Conclusion: For patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer, this strategy uses local therapy for those who are most likely to benefit from it and spares those patients with early metastatic progression from treatment. SBRT delivers such local therapy safely with minimal interruption to systemic chemotherapy, thereby potentially improving the outcome in these patients.

  11. Gemcitabine Chemotherapy and Single-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, Devin; Goodman, Karyn A.; Lee, Florence; Chang, Stephanie; Kuo, Timothy; Quon, Andrew; Desser, Terry S.; Norton, Jeffrey; Greco, Ralph; Yang, George P.; Koong, Albert C.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: Fractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer achieves only modest local control. This prospective trial evaluated the efficacy of a single fraction of 25 Gy stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) delivered between Cycle 1 and 2 of gemcitabine chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, pancreatic adenocarcinoma received gemcitabine with SBRT delivered 2 weeks after completion of the first cycle. Gemcitabine was resumed 2 weeks after SBRT and was continued until progression or dose-limiting toxicity. The gross tumor volume, with a 2-3-mm margin, was treated in a single 25-Gy fraction by Cyberknife. Patients were evaluated at 4-6 weeks, 10-12 weeks, and every 3 months after SBRT. Results: All 16 patients completed SBRT. A median of four cycles (range one to nine) of chemotherapy was delivered. Three patients (19%) developed local disease progression at 14, 16, and 21 months after SBRT. The median survival was 11.4 months, with 50% of patients alive at 1 year. Patients with normal carbohydrate antigen (CA)19-9 levels either at diagnosis or after Cyberknife SBRT had longer survival (p <0.01). Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was mild, with 2 cases of Grade 2 (13%) and 1 of Grade 3 (6%) toxicity. Late gastrointestinal toxicity was more common, with five ulcers (Grade 2), one duodenal stenosis (Grade 3), and one duodenal perforation (Grade 4). A trend toward increased duodenal volumes radiated was observed in those experiencing late effects (p = 0.13). Conclusion: SBRT with gemcitabine resulted in comparable survival to conventional chemoradiotherapy and good local control. However, the rate of duodenal ulcer development was significant.

  12. Carbon-ion radiotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer with bladder invasion

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Shintaro; Wakatsuki, Masaru; Kato, Shingo; Ohno, Tatsuya; Okonogi, Noriyuki; Karasawa, Kumiko; Kiyohara, Hiroki; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nakano, Takashi; Kamada, Tadashi; Shozu, Makio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicities of carbon-ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) for locally advanced cervical cancer with bladder invasion by a subset analysis of pooled data from eight prospective clinical trials at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. Between June 1995 and January 2014, 29 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer with bladder invasion were identified. The median age was 56 years old (range 31–79 years old). The median tumor size at diagnosis on magnetic resonance imaging was 6.7 cm (range 3.5–11.0 cm). Histologically, 20 patients had squamous cell carcinoma and 9 had adenocarcinoma. C-ion RT was performed as a dose-escalation study in the initial trials. All patients received prophylactic whole-pelvic or extended-field irradiation and local boost. The total dose to the cervical tumor was 52.8–74.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) in 20 or 24 fractions. Weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m2/week, five cycles) was concurrently given to four patients. The median follow-up of all patients was 28.6 months (range 8.8–238.6 months). Grade 2 or higher late complications in the bladder were observed in eight patients, with seven developing vesicovaginal fistula. Six patients had Grade 2 or higher complications in the rectosigmoid colon. The 3-year overall survival rate was 47%, the 3-year local control rate was 66%, and the 3-year disease-free survival rate was 28%. In this study, C-ion RT showed favorable local control with reasonable toxicities, but the results were still unsatisfactory. We have the expectation of improvement of therapeutic effects by using C-ion RT with concurrent chemotherapy. PMID:27422932

  13. Nimotuzumab combined with concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Gang; Zhao, Yu; Tang, Jiao; Zhou, Yu-Juan; Yang, Wen-Juan; Qiu, Yan-Fang; Wang, Hui

    2016-04-26

    Nimotuzumab is a blocking monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). However, little is known about the safety and preliminary efficacy of nimotuzumab combined with concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced NPC patients. A total of 42 patients diagnosed between 2011 and 2013 were enrolled. Our results demonstrated 38 patients had a complete response (90.5%), 4 patients had a partial response (9.5%). And no patients had progressive disease at early treatment response evaluation, giving an ORR of 100%. The 2-year local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS) were 96.4%, 93.1% and 96.6% respectively. The most common adverse events were mucositis (19 patients), hematology toxicity (14 patients) with 6 and 3 cases of grade 3/4 toxicity respectively. Skin rash was not developed in our 43 patients. Thus, nimotuzumab combined with concurrent chemoradiotherapy showed encouraging outcomes in the treatment of locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma, without accumulation of toxicity and well-tolerated.

  14. Nimotuzumab combined with concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu-juan; Yang, Wen-juan; Qiu, Yan-fang; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Nimotuzumab is a blocking monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). However, little is known about the safety and preliminary efficacy of nimotuzumab combined with concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced NPC patients. A total of 42 patients diagnosed between 2011 and 2013 were enrolled. Our results demonstrated 38 patients had a complete response (90.5%), 4 patients had a partial response (9.5%). And no patients had progressive disease at early treatment response evaluation, giving an ORR of 100%. The 2-year local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS) were 96.4%, 93.1% and 96.6% respectively. The most common adverse events were mucositis (19 patients), hematology toxicity (14 patients) with 6 and 3 cases of grade 3/4 toxicity respectively. Skin rash was not developed in our 43 patients. Thus, nimotuzumab combined with concurrent chemoradiotherapy showed encouraging outcomes in the treatment of locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma, without accumulation of toxicity and well-tolerated. PMID:27016412

  15. [Concomitant radiochemotherapy for locally advanced oro- and hypopharyngeal cancer: tolerance and early results].

    PubMed

    Kawecki, A; Jarzabski, A; Szutkowski, Z; Kiprian, D; Jagielska, B

    2000-01-01

    Combination of radio- and chemotherapy is one of the methods which may improve results of treatment in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer. Currently, the most promising sequence of radio- and chemotherapy is concomitant. In Head and Neck Cancer Department of Cancer Center in Warsaw since 1995 is continued study estimated tolerance and effectiveness of the concomitant radiochemotherapy for patients with locally advanced oro- and hypopharyngeal cancer. Chemotherapy consist of cisplatinum and 5-fluorouracil in continuous infusion during first week of irradiation followed by 24-hours infusion of 5-fluorouracil one weekly until radiotherapy is finished. Radiotherapy is used with conventional fractionation 2 Gy per fraction, 5 fractions weekly to total dose 66 Gy. Between October 1995 and September 1998 fifty seven patients with oropharyngeal cancer were entered to study. Tolerance of treatment was acceptable. Complete regression of the tumor was obtained in 41/57 patients (72%). Five other patients after radiotherapy were referred for successful radical neck dissection. Including this group, local control was obtained in 81%. At this moment, 60% of patients are alive without evidence of disease. In 12 patients with hypopharyngeal cancer tolerance of treatment and early results were poor, so the study was stopped in this group.

  16. National Trends and Predictors of Locally Advanced Penile Cancer in the United States (1998-2012).

    PubMed

    Chipollini, Juan; Chaing, Sharon; Peyton, Charles C; Sharma, Pranav; Kidd, Laura C; Giuliano, Anna R; Johnstone, Peter A; Spiess, Philippe E

    2017-08-12

    We analyzed the trends in presentation of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis and determined the socioeconomic predictors for locally advanced (cT3-cT4) disease in the United States. The National Cancer Database was queried for patients with clinically nonmetastatic penile SCC and staging available from 1998 to 2012. Temporal trends per tumor stage were evaluated, and a multivariable logistic regression model was used to identify predictors for advanced presentation during the study period. A total of 5767 patients with stage ≤ T1-T2 (n = 5423) and T3-T4 (n = 344) disease were identified. Increasing trends were noted in all stages of penile SCC with a greater proportion of advanced cases over time (P = .001). Significant predictors of advanced presentation were age > 55 years, the presence of comorbidities, and Medicaid or no insurance (P < .05 for all). More penile SCC is being detected in the United States. Our results have demonstrated older age, presence of comorbidities, and Medicaid or no insurance as potential barriers to early access of care in the male population. Understanding the current socioeconomic gaps could help guide targeted interventions in vulnerable populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Aggressive Surgery for Locally Advanced Gallbladder Cancer with Obstructive Jaundice: Result of a Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Yuya; Hirano, Satoshi; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Shichinohe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the clinical impact of our departmental policy for advanced gallbladder cancer (GBC) even with obstructive jaundice. Obstructive jaundice was defined as serum T-bil ≥2.0 mg/dl. Between 1998 and 2008, 112 patients with GBC were scheduled for surgical resection with curative intent. Thirty-six patients were converted to palliative surgery or exploration alone because of advanced disease. After excluding pathological T1 (UICC) patients (n = 11), the remaining 65 patients were divided into 2 groups; jaundiced group (n = 37) and non-jaundiced group (n = 28). Surgical procedures were conducted based on our departmental guidelines concerning each type of infiltration of GBC. Bile duct resection and major hepatectomy were performed more frequently in patients with jaundice. Although patients in jaundiced group had more advanced disease, 5-year overall survival rates of the patients with or without jaundice were 27 vs. 31% (p = 0.742), which was not statistically significant. Aggressive surgery might improve long-term survival in patients with locally advanced GBC even in the condition of obstructive jaundice with no distant metastasis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. V-CLIP: Integrating plasma VEGF into a new scoring system to stratify patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Kaseb, Ahmed O.; Hassan, Manal M.; Lin, E; Xiao, Lianchun; Kumar, Vikas; Pathak, Priyanka; Lozano, Richard; Rashid, Asif; Abbruzzese, James L.; Morris, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Several staging systems have been proposed for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), however, none has incorporated circulating angiogenic biomarkers. This study sought to determine whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) could independently predict overall survival in patients with HCC, and whether adding VEGF level into the Cancer of the Liver Italian Program (CLIP) score could improve patients stratification and prediction of overall survival. Methods Between 2001 and 2008, baseline plasma VEGF levels were available from 288 patients and multivariate Cox regression models and median survival (95% confidence intervals) were calculated. Recursive partitioning was used to determine the optimal cut point for VEGF, using 10 repeated training/validation samples, each using 2/3 of the data to determine the best cut point and the remaining 1/3 to validate it. Prognostic ability of CLIP and V-CLIP was compared using C-index. Results Plasma VEGF was a significant independent predictor of overall survival, with an optimal VEGF cut point of 450 pg/ml. After CLIP validation in our patients, we added VEGF to the CLIP score and found that the new V-CLIP score better separates patients into homogenous prognostic groups (p-value=0.005). Conclusion The assessment of baseline plasma VEGF levels increases the precision of the CLIP scoring system for predicting HCC prognosis, which may assist in equally randomizing patients with HCC in clinical trials. Prospective validation of the V-CLIP scoring system is warranted. PMID:24048796

  19. Cediranib (AZD2171) in Patients with Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Phase II North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG) Clinical Trial1

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Steven R.; Fitch, Tom R.; Kim, George P.; Morlan, Bruce W.; Dakhil, Shaker R.; Gross, Howard M.; Nair, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been shown to be overexpressed in several studies of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Cediranib is a potent inhibitor of VEGF signaling. We assessed the efficacy and toxicity of cediranib in patients with HCC. Methods Twenty-eight patients with unresectable or metastatic HCC were enrolled on this study. Patients received 45 mg of cediranib orally, once daily, for 28 day cycles. The primary objective of this Phase II study was to assess six-month survival. Secondary objectives were to assess tumor response, time-to-progression, and toxicity. Results All 28 patients were evaluable for efficacy outcomes. Twelve patients (42.9%) survived 6 months, 15 (53.6%) died within 6 months, and one (3.6%) was lost to follow-up before 6 months. The median overall survival was 5.8 months (95% CI: 3.4–7.3 months). No patients experienced confirmed response. The median time-to-progression was 2.8 months (95% CI: 2.3 – 4.4 months). Twenty-six patients (93%) experienced a grade 3+ adverse event (AE) with the most common AEs being fatigue (46%), anorexia (25%), hypertension (21%), and elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (18%). Conclusions Due to toxicity, cediranib at this dose and schedule is not an effective treatment in patients with unresectable or metastatic HCC. PMID:21422991

  20. Prognostic value of the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in the ARQ 197-215 second-line study for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Personeni, Nicola; Giordano, Laura; Abbadessa, Giovanni; Porta, Camillo; Borbath, Ivan; Daniele, Bruno; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Trojan, Jörg; De Toni, Enrico N; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Lencioni, Monica; Lamar, Maria E; Wang, Yunxia; Shuster, Dale; Schwartz, Brian; Santoro, Armando; Rimassa, Lorenza

    2017-02-28

    The ARQ 197-215 study randomized patients to tivantinib or placebo and pre-specified efficacy analyses indicated the predictive value of MET expression as a marker of benefit from tivantinib in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We aimed to explore the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) in 98 ARQ 197-215 patients with available absolute neutrophil count and absolute lymphocyte count at baseline. The cut-off value used to define high versus low NLR was 3.0. In univariate analysis, high NLR was associated with hazard ratio (HR) for overall survival (OS) of 1.58 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01; 2.47; P <0.046], corresponding to median OS of 5.1 months versus 7.8 months in patients with low NLR (P = 0.044). In contrast, time to progression was not significantly affected by NLR (P = 0.20). Multivariable model confirmed that both NLR >3 (P = 0.03) and presence of vascular invasion (P = 0.017) were negatively associated with OS. After adjustment for vascular invasion, NLR independently predicted survival in both the placebo and the tivantinib cohort. For OS, no interaction was detected between NLR status and treatment (Pinteraction = 0.40). Baseline NLR is an independent prognostic biomarker in patients with HCC and compensated liver function who are candidate for second-line treatments.

  1. Locally advanced breast cancer in Jamaica: prevalence, disease characteristics and response to preoperative therapy.

    PubMed

    Chin, Sheray Nicole; Green, Cheryl May Antoinette; Gordon-Strachan, Georgiana Marie; Wharfe, Gilian Helen Frances

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in Jamaican women. Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) is associated with aggressive biology and poor prognosis, and has a predilection for African-American women. In this retrospective review, we assessed the prevalence of LABC as a breast cancer presentation in a population of mainly Afro-centric ethnicity, and determined disease characteristics and response to pre-operative chemotherapy. LABC was prevalent (20%), and had a low pathological response rate to pre-operative chemotherapy, with a high risk of disease recurrence. Increased utilization of breast cancer screening may help detect cancer at less advanced stages, and optimizing pre-operative chemotherapy is recommended to improve response rates and ultimately survival.

  2. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma Using the Dorsal Approach: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffer, Hester J. Melenhorst, Marleen C. A. M.; Vogel, Jantien A.; Tilborg, Aukje A. J. M. van; Nielsen, Karin Kazemier, Geert; Meijerink, Martijn R.

    2015-06-15

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel image-guided ablation technique that is increasingly used to treat locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). We describe a 67-year-old male patient with a 5 cm stage III pancreatic tumor who was referred for IRE. Because the ventral approach for electrode placement was considered dangerous due to vicinity of the tumor to collateral vessels and duodenum, the dorsal approach was chosen. Under CT-guidance, six electrodes were advanced in the tumor, approaching paravertebrally alongside the aorta and inferior vena cava. Ablation was performed without complications. This case describes that when ventral electrode placement for pancreatic IRE is impaired, the dorsal approach could be considered alternatively.

  3. Impact of locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer on the quality of life.

    PubMed

    López-Calderero, I; López-Fando, L; Ríos-González, E; Maisonobe, P; Hernández-Yuste, E; Sarmiento-Jordán, M

    The aim of this study was to assess the health-related quality of life of patients with prostate cancer in advanced phases to obtain additional information on the patients' health. The growing interest in understanding the patient's perspective and the scarcity of prospective studies of this population motivated this research study. We present an observational study performed on 131 urology consultations, with a sample of 601 patients with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer, assessed during 2 visits: baseline and at 12 months. We collected demographic, clinical, quality-of-life (PROSQoLI and EuroQoL-5D-5L questionnaires) and anxiety/depression (HADS questionnaire) endpoints. The mean age (SD) was 73.8 (8.2) years, and 87.2% of the participants were retired or pensioners. Some 58.7% of the patients presented locally advanced prostate cancer. Urinary symptoms were the most common, decreasing significantly after one year (P<.05). Urinary problems and fatigue were the most affected measures, and pain/discomfort was the dimension present in most patients (65.3%). According to the linear regression model, asthenia and pain were 2 of the factors most closely related to a poorer quality of life. The presence of anxiety/depression was low. Finally, the health condition as assessed by the clinician was more positive than when assessed by the patients. This study broadens the scarce information on the quality of life of the population with advanced prostate cancer, information of use for the clinical management of these patients. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Disparities in the Use of Radiation Therapy in Patients With Local-Regionally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Steve R.; Beal, Shannon H.; Chen, Steven L.; Canter, Robert J.; Khatri, Vijay P.; Chen, Allen; Bold, Richard J.

    2010-11-01

    Background: Radiation therapy (RT) is indicated for the treatment of local-regionally advanced breast cancer (BCa). Hypothesis: We hypothesized that black and Hispanic patients with local-regionally advanced BCa would receive lower rates of RT than their white counterparts. Methods: The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database was used to identify white, black, Hispanic, and Asian patients with invasive BCa and {>=}10 metastatic lymph nodes diagnosed between 1988 and 2005. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression evaluated the relationship of race/ethnicity with use of RT. Multivariate models stratified for those undergoing mastectomy or lumpectomy. Results: Entry criteria were met by 12,653 patients. Approximately half of the patients did not receive RT. Most patients were white (72%); the remainder were Hispanic (10.4%), black (10.3%), and Asian (7.3%). On univariate analysis, Hispanics (odd ratio [OR] 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-1.00) and blacks (OR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.70-0.89) were less likely to receive RT than whites. On multivariate analysis, blacks (OR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.67-0.86) and Hispanics (OR 0.80; 95% CI, 0.70-0.90) were less likely than whites to receive RT. Disparities persisted for blacks (OR 0.74; 95% CI, 0.64-0.85) and Hispanics (OR 0.77; 95% CI, 0.67-0.89) who received mastectomy, but not for those who received lumpectomy. Conclusions: Many patients with local-regionally advanced BCa do not receive RT. Blacks and Hispanics were less likely than whites to receive RT. This disparity was noted predominately in patients who received mastectomy. Future efforts at improving rates of RT are warranted. Efforts at eliminating racial/ethnic disparities should focus on black and Hispanic candidates for postmastectomy RT.

  5. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Followed by Surgery for Locally Advanced Gallbladder Cancers: A New Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Reena; Goel, Mahesh; Chopra, Supriya; Patil, Prachi; Purandare, Nilendu; Rangarajan, Venkatesh; Ph, Reena; Bal, Munita; Shrikhande, Shailesh; Shrivastava, S K; Mehta, S

    2016-09-01

    Locally advanced (T3/T4) gallbladder cancers with large fixed portal nodes have a dismal prognosis. If undertaken, surgery entails extensive resections with high morbidity; therefore, in many centers, patients are offered palliative chemotherapy. In this prospective study, we used neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation with the intention of downstaging and facilitating R0 resection of these tumors. Twenty-eight patients with locally advanced carcinoma gallbladder (stage III, having deep liver infiltrations and/or large portal nodes) underwent prior positron emission tomography/computed tomography to rule out metastatic disease. All were treated with concomitant chemoradiation using helical tomotherapy (dose of 57 Gy over 25 fractions to the gross tumor and 45 Gy over 25 fractions to the surrounding nodes) with injectable gemcitabine (300 mg/m(2)/week × 5 weeks). Of the 28 patients, 25 (89 %) successfully completed planned chemoradiation and 20 (71 %) achieved partial or complete radiologic response. Eighteen (64 %) patients were surgically explored, of whom 14 (56 %) achieved R0 resection. At the median follow-up of 37 months for the surviving patients, the median overall survival (OS) was 20 months for all patients. Only one patient recurred in the common bile duct postsurgery, whereas six patients had distant metastasis. The 5-year OS was 24 % for all patients and 47 % for patients with R0 resection. Biliary leak was seen in 6 (43 %) patients, of whom two required interventions. Locally advanced unresectable cancers may benefit from neoadjuvant chemoradiation to facilitate a curative resection with a good survival.

  6. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva.

    PubMed

    Gaudineau, A; Weitbruch, D; Quetin, P; Heymann, S; Petit, T; Volkmar, P; Bodin, F; Velten, M; Rodier, J F

    2012-10-01

    Alternative therapies have been sought to alleviate mutilation and morbidity associated with surgery for vulvar neoplasms. Our prime objective was to assess tumor absence in pathological vulvar and nodal specimens following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced vulvar neoplasms. Data were retrospectively collected from January 2001 to May 2009 from 22 patients treated with neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva. Neoadjuvant treatment consisted of inguino-pelvic radiotherapy (50 Gy) in association with chemotherapy when possible. Surgery occurred at intervals of between 5 to 8 weeks. The median age of patients at diagnosis was 74.1 years. All patients were primarily treated with radiotherapy and 15 received a concomitant chemotherapy. Additionally, all patients underwent radical vulvectomy and bilateral inguino-femoral lymphadenectomy. Tumor absence in the vulvar and nodal pathological specimens was achieved for 6 (27%) patients, while absence in the vulvar pathological specimens was only achieved for 10 (45.4%) patients. Postoperative follow-up revealed breakdown of groin wounds, vulvar wounds and chronic lymphedema in 3 (14.3%), 7 (31.8%) and 14 cases (63.6%), respectively. Within a median follow-up time of 2.3 years [interquartile range (IQR), 0.6-4.6], 12 (54.6%) patients experienced complete remission and 6 cases succumbed to metastatic evolution within a median of 2.2 years (IQR, 0.6-4.6), with 1 case also experiencing perineal recurrence. Median survival time, estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, was 5.1 years (IQR, 1.0-6.8). We suggest that neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy may represent a reliable and promising strategy in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva.

  7. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva

    PubMed Central

    GAUDINEAU, A.; WEITBRUCH, D.; QUETIN, P.; HEYMANN, S.; PETIT, T.; VOLKMAR, P.; BODIN, F.; VELTEN, M.; RODIER, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative therapies have been sought to alleviate mutilation and morbidity associated with surgery for vulvar neoplasms. Our prime objective was to assess tumor absence in pathological vulvar and nodal specimens following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced vulvar neoplasms. Data were retrospectively collected from January 2001 to May 2009 from 22 patients treated with neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva. Neoadjuvant treatment consisted of inguino-pelvic radiotherapy (50 Gy) in association with chemotherapy when possible. Surgery occurred at intervals of between 5 to 8 weeks. The median age of patients at diagnosis was 74.1 years. All patients were primarily treated with radiotherapy and 15 received a concomitant chemotherapy. Additionally, all patients underwent radical vulvectomy and bilateral inguino-femoral lymphadenectomy. Tumor absence in the vulvar and nodal pathological specimens was achieved for 6 (27%) patients, while absence in the vulvar pathological specimens was only achieved for 10 (45.4%) patients. Postoperative follow-up revealed breakdown of groin wounds, vulvar wounds and chronic lymphedema in 3 (14.3%), 7 (31.8%) and 14 cases (63.6%), respectively. Within a median follow-up time of 2.3 years [interquartile range (IQR), 0.6–4.6], 12 (54.6%) patients experienced complete remission and 6 cases succumbed to metastatic evolution within a median of 2.2 years (IQR, 0.6–4.6), with 1 case also experiencing perineal recurrence. Median survival time, estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, was 5.1 years (IQR, 1.0–6.8). We suggest that neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy may represent a reliable and promising strategy in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva. PMID:23205089

  8. Efficacy and Factors Affecting Outcome of Gemcitabine Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, P.-I.; Chao, Yee; Li, C.-P.; Lee, R.-C.; Chi, K.-H.; Shiau, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-W.; Yen, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and prognostic factors of gemcitabine (GEM) concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2005, 55 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with GEM (400 mg/m{sup 2}/wk) concurrently with radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 26-61.2) at Taipei Veterans General Hospital were enrolled. GEM (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) was continued after CCRT as maintenance therapy once weekly for 3 weeks and repeated every 4 weeks. The response, survival, toxicity, and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: With a median follow-up of 10.8 months, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 52% and 19%, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) and median time to progression (TTP) was 12.4 and 5.9 months, respectively. The response rate was 42% (2 complete responses and 21 partial responses). The major Grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (22%) and anorexia (19%). The median OS and TTP was 15.8 and 9.5 months in the GEM CCRT responders compared with 7.5 and 3.5 months in the nonresponders, respectively (both p < 0.001). The responders had a better Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (86 {+-} 2 vs. 77 {+-} 2, p = 0.002) and had received a greater GEM dose intensity (347 {+-} 13 mg/m{sup 2}/wk vs. 296 {+-} 15 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, p = 0.02) than the nonresponders. KPS and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were the most significant prognostic factors of OS and TTP. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that GEM CCRT is effective and tolerable for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The KPS and GEM dose correlated with response. Also, the KPS and CA 19-9 level were the most important factors affecting OS and TTP.

  9. Evaluation of overall tumor cellularity after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patient with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chitose, Shun-ichi; Chijiwa, Hideki; Maeda, Akiteru; Umeno, Hirohito; Nakashima, Tadashi; Kiyokawa, Kensuke; Hayabuchi, Naofumi; Fujita, Hiromasa

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the prognostic value of the pathological overall tumor cellularity after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer. In consecutive series of 45 operable patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer, neoadjuvant chemotherapy by cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil was administered. Pathological image analysis was performed in 30 patients using the large cross-section specimen after total resection to evaluate the overall tumor cellularity. The chemotherapeutic responses were classified according to the pathological grading scale by dividing into four categories; more than 70% overall tumor cellularity in Grade 1, between an estimated 10 and 70% in Grade 2, less than 10% in Grade 3, and no identifiable malignant tumor cells in Grade 4. The pathological grades were taken into account for analysis of the survival. In 30 available patients, 40% had Grade 1 pathological response, 30% had Grade 2, and 30% had Grade 3. There was no Grade 4 patient. The overall 5-year survival rate for these 30 patients was 53.33%. The survival rate (61.66%) for patients with Grade 2 and 3 responses was significantly higher than that (27.78%) for patients with Grade 1 response (p = 0.009). Cox regression analysis revealed that the increasing pathological grade was an independent predictor of a better survival in patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We have shown that the prognosis of patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer, who had been treated by neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by total resection, can be predicted by evaluation of pathological overall tumor cellularity from the large section specimen.

  10. Effectiveness of Androgen-Deprivation Therapy and Radiotherapy for Older Men With Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Mitra, Nandita; Handorf, Elizabeth A.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Hahn, Stephen A.; Polsky, Daniel; Armstrong, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We examined whether the survival advantage of androgen-deprivation therapy with radiotherapy (ADT plus RT) relative to ADT alone for men with locally advanced prostate cancer reported in two randomized trials holds in real-world clinical practice and extended the evidence to patients poorly represented in the trials. Methods We conducted nonrandomized effectiveness studies of ADT plus RT versus ADT in three groups of patients diagnosed between 1995 and 2007 and observed through 2009 in the SEER-Medicare data set: (1) the randomized clinical trial (RCT) cohort, which included men age 65 to 75 years and was most consistent with participants in the randomized trials; (2) the elderly cohort, which included men age > 75 years with locally advanced prostate cancer; and (3) the screen-detected cohort, which included men age ≥ 65 years with screen-detected high-risk prostate cancer. We evaluated cause-specific and all-cause mortality using propensity score, instrumental variable (IV), and sensitivity analyses. Results In the RCT cohort, ADT plus RT was associated with reduced cause-specific and all-cause mortality relative to ADT alone (cause-specific propensity score–adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.43; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.49; all-cause propensity score–adjusted HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.67). Effectiveness estimates for the RCT cohort were not significantly different from those from randomized trials (P > .1). In the elderly and screen-detected cohorts, ADT plus RT was also associated with reduced cause-specific and all-cause mortality. IV analyses produced estimates similar to those from propensity score–adjusted methods. Conclusion Older men with locally advanced or screen-detected high-risk prostate cancer who receive ADT alone risk decrements in cause-specific and overall survival. PMID:25559808

  11. Predictive Factors of Tumor Response After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence; Farnault, Bertrand; de Chaisemartin, Cecile; Esterni, Benjamin; Lelong, Bernard; Viret, Frederic; Giovannini, Marc; Monges, Genevieve; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Bories, Erwan; Turrini, Olivier; Viens, Patrice; Salem, Naji

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by surgery is the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer. The aim of this study was to correlate tumor response to survival and to identify predictive factors for tumor response after chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2008, 168 patients with histologically proven locally advanced adenocarcinoma treated by preoperative chemoradiation before total mesorectal excision were retrospectively studied. They received a radiation dose of 45 Gy with a concomitant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. Analysis of tumor response was based on lowering of the T stage between pretreatment endorectal ultrasound and pathologic specimens. Overall and progression-free survival rates were correlated with tumor response. Tumor response was analyzed with predictive factors. Results: The median follow-up was 34 months. Five-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were, of 44.4% and 74.5% in the whole population, 83.4% and 83.4%, respectively, in patients with pathological complete response, 38.6% and 71.9%, respectively, in patients with tumor downstaging, and 29.1and 58.9% respectively, in patients with absence of response. A pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level of <5 ng/ml was significantly independently associated with pathologic complete tumor response (p = 0.019). Pretreatment small tumor size (p = 0.04), pretreatment CEA level of <5 ng/ml (p = 0.008), and chemotherapy with capecitabine (vs. 5-FU) (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with tumor downstaging. Conclusions: Downstaging and complete response after CRT improved progression-free survival and overall survival of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma. In multivariate analysis, a pretreatment CEA level of <5 ng/ml was associated with complete tumor response. Thus, small tumor size, a pretreatment CEA level of < 5ng/ml, and use of capecitabine were associated with tumor downstaging.

  12. Radiation or chemoradiation: initial utility study of selected therapy for local advanced stadium cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramitasari, D. A.; Gondhowiardjo, S.; Nuranna, L.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to compare radiation only or chemo radiation treatment of local advanced cervical cancers by examining the initial response of tumors and acute side effects. An initial assessment employed value based medicine (VBM) by obtaining utility values for both types of therapy. The incidences of acute lower gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and hematology side effects in patients undergoing chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those undergoing radiation alone. Utility values for patients who underwent radiation alone were higher compared to those who underwent chemoradiation. It was concluded that the complete response of patients who underwent chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those who underwent radiation alone.

  13. Multi-organ resection for locally advanced adrenocortical cancer: surgical strategy and literature review

    PubMed Central

    GUIDA, F.; CLEMENTE, M.; VALVANO, L.; NAPOLITANO, C.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare and aggressive endocrine malignancy with an estimated worldwide incidence of 0.5–2 per million/year. Complete surgical removal of ACC represents the current treatment of choice for this tumor. A disease-free resection margin (R0) is an important predictor of long-term survival: surgery is demanding and must be performed by a highly experienced surgical team. We report the surgical strategy adopted in a patient with locally advanced ACC and virilization to obtain a R0 resection. PMID:26712261

  14. Relationship of Th17/Treg Cells and Radiation Pneumonia in Locally Advanced Esophageal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Xu, Gang; Wang, Jie; Li, Xin-Hua; Sun, Ping; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jun-Xia; Wu, Chao-Yang

    2017-08-01

    Radiation pneumonia is a main side-effect that has limited the clinical usage of radiotherapy in locally advanced esophageal carcinoma. T helper cells 17 (Th 17) and T regulatory cells (Tregs) play an important role in inflammatory diseases. The balance between Treg and Th17 cells is a key factor in the progression of many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Whether Tregs and Th17 cells are predictive factors of radiation pneumonia has not yet been reported. In this study, we investigated the relationships of Treg/Th17 cells and radiation pneumonia in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who received radiotherapy. One hundred and forty-eight patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who received radical and palliative radiotherapy were enrolled. The levels of Th17 and Treg cells in the blood of patients were detected using flow cytometry at the time point of pre-radiotherapy, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th week from the start of radiation and 4 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Radiation pneumonia was evaluated according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group's acute radiation pneumonia standards, with the endpoint being grade 2 or above radiation pneumonia. There were 24 cases of radiation pneumonia in 148 cases of locally advanced esophageal cancer patients who underwent radiotherapy. Th17 cells increased and, in contrast, Treg cells decreased in the radiation pneumonia group. The change in the ratio of Th17/Treg was more pronounced and the difference was statistically significant from the 5th week after irradiation compared to patients with no radiation pneumonia (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in dosimetric parameters, including V5, V20, V30 and mean lung dose (MLD) and clinical factors, such as gender, age, smoking history, history of surgery and chemotherapy. The ratio of Th17/Treg cells may be an effective predictive factor of radiation pneumonia. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr

  15. An Unusual Case of Locally Advanced Glycogen-Rich Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Martín, Beatriz; Berná-Serna, Juan D.; Sánchez-Henarejos, Pilar; López-Poveda, María J.; Berná-Mestre, Juan D.; Rodríguez-García, José R.

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen-rich clear cell (GRCC) is a rare subtype of breast carcinoma characterized by carcinoma cells containing an optically clear cytoplasm and intracytoplasmic glycogen. We present the case of a 55-year-old woman with a palpable mass in the right breast and clinical signs of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). The diagnosis of GRCC carcinoma was based on certain histopathological characteristics of the tumor and immunohistochemical analysis. To our knowledge, this is the first case of GRCC LABC with intratumoral calcifications. There is no evidence of recurrence or metastatic disease after 14 months’ follow-up. PMID:22087097

  16. Definitive radiotherapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: dose and fractionation.

    PubMed

    Dağoğlu, Nergiz; Karaman, Şule; Arifoğlu, Alptekin; Küçücük, Seden; Oral, Ethem N

    2014-12-01

    Definitive radiotherapy plays a major role in the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA NSCLC). After the impact of RT dose for lung cancer was established, a number of trials were structured with the aim of better local control and overall survival by either dose escalation or shortening the total treatment time through conventional/altered fractionation, even in combination with chemotherapy (CT) and other targeted agents. In spite of the increased number of these studies, the optimal dose or fractionation still remains to be determined. Another aspect questioned is the incorporation of these higher doses and shorter treatment times with chemotherapy or targeted agents. This review summarises the results of significant trials on dose and altered fractionation in the treatment of LA-NSCLC with an emphasis on possible future perspectives.

  17. Prognostic Value of Survivin in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Study Based on RTOG 8610

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Min; Ho, Alex; Hammond, Elizabeth H.; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Bermudez, R. Scott; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Pilepich, Michael; Shipley, William U.; Sandler, Howard; Khor, Li-Yan; Pollack, Alan; Chakravarti, Arnab

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To examine the prognostic value of nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin expression in men with locally advanced prostate cancer who were enrolled in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 8610. Methods and Materials: RTOG 8610 was a Phase III randomized study comparing the effect of radiotherapy plus short-term androgen deprivation with radiotherapy alone. Of the 456 eligible patients, 68 patients had suitably stained tumor material for nuclear survivin analysis and 65 patients for cytoplasmic survivin. Results: Compared with patients with nuclear survivin intensity scores of {<=}191.2, those with intensity scores >191.2 had significantly improved prostate cancer survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20-1.00, p = 0.0452). On multivariate analysis, nuclear survivin intensity scores >191.2 were significantly associated with improved overall survival (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.25-0.86; p = 0.0156) and prostate cancer survival (HR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.16-0.84; p = 0.0173). On univariate analysis, compared with patients with cytoplasmic survivin integrated optical density {<=}82.7, those with an integrated optical density >82.7 showed a significantly increased risk of local progression (HR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.03-6.01; p = 0.0421). Conclusion: Nuclear overexpression of survivin was associated with improved overall and prostate cancer survival on multivariate analysis, and cytoplasmic overexpression of survivin was associated with increased rate of local progression on univariate analysis in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer treated on RTOG 8610. Our results might reflect the different functions of survivin and its splice variants, which are known to exist in distinct subcellular compartments.

  18. Cost-effectiveness of Gemcitabine Plus Modern Radiotherapy in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Leung, Henry W C; Chan, Agnes L F; Muo, Chih-Hsin

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of gemcitabine plus modern radiotherapy versus gemcitabine alone in the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer in Taiwan. A Markov decision-analytic model was performed to compare the cost-effectiveness of 3 treatment regimens; gemcitabine alone (gem-alone), gemcitabine plus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (gem-IMRT), and gemcitabine plus stereotactic body radiotherapy (gem-SBRT). Patients transitioned between 5 health states: stable disease, local progression, distant metastasis, local and distant metastasis, and death. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for gem-IMRT and gem-SBRT compared with gem-alone were NT$27,120,168 and NT$2,145,683 per quality-adjusted life-year gained, respectively. A willingness to pay threshold of 3 times the per capita gross domestic product was adopted according to the definition of the World Health Organization. The Taiwan per capita gross domestic product in 2015 was NT$673,920 (US$22,464; 1 NT$ = US$0.03333 in Taiwan); thus, a threshold was considered as NT$2,021,760 (US$67,392). The Monte-Carlo simulation found that the probability of cost-effectiveness at a willingness to pay threshold of NT$2,021,760 per quality-adjusted life-year was 0% chance for gem-IMRT and 50% for gem-SBRT. This study indicated that gem-IMRT or gem-SBRT in locally advanced pancreatic cancer is not cost-effective at a willingness to pay as defined by World Health Organization guideline in Taiwan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-term results after neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for locally advanced resectable extraperitoneal rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Coco, Claudio; Valentini, Vincenzo; Manno, Alberto; Mattana, Claudio; Verbo, Alessandro; Cellini, Numa; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Covino, Marcello; Mantini, Giovanna; Miccichè, Francesco; Pedretti, Giorgio; Petito, Luigi; Rizzo, Gianluca; Cosimelli, Maurizio; Impiombato, Fabrizio Ambesi; Picciocchi, Aurelio

    2006-03-01

    This study was designed to evaluate long-term outcome in locally advanced resectable extraperitoneal rectal cancer treated by preoperative radiochemotherapy. Eighty-three consecutive patients who developed locally advanced resectable extraperitoneal rectal cancer underwent preoperative concomitant radiochemotherapy followed by surgery, including total mesorectal excision. Median follow-up was 108 (range, 10-169) months. The living patients underwent complete follow-up of, at least, nine years. Fourteen patients developed local recurrence. The time to detection was longer than two years in eight cases and longer than five years in four. Twenty-one patients developed metastases, 19 within the first five years from surgery. At the univariate analysis, clinical stage at presentation, lymph node involvement at clinical restaging after neoadjuvant therapy, and pT and pN stage were found positively correlated to the incidence of metastases. At the multivariate analysis, the only factors which confirmed a positive correlation were pT stage and pN stage. The actuarial overall survival at five, seven, and ten years was 75.5, 67.8, and 60.4 percent, respectively. The same figures for cancer-related survival were 77.9, 70, and 65.8 percent. At the univariate analysis, factors directly correlated with worse survival were: TNM stage at clinical restaging after neoadjuvant therapy (in particular lymph node involvement) pTNM, pT, and pN. At the multivariate analysis the only factors that confirmed a correlation with worse survival were pTNM, pT, and pN. Long- term follow-up allows to individuate 28 percent of all local relapses after the first five years from surgery. Postoperative stage is highly predictive of prognosis.

  20. Advanced age decreases local calcium signaling in endothelium of mouse mesenteric arteries in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boerman, Erika M; Everhart, Jesse E; Segal, Steven S

    2016-05-01

    Aging is associated with vascular dysfunction that impairs tissue perfusion, physical activity, and the quality of life. Calcium signaling in endothelial cells (ECs) is integral to vasomotor control, exemplified by localized Ca(2+) signals within EC projections through holes in the internal elastic lamina (IEL). Within these microdomains, endothelium-derived hyperpolarization is integral to smooth muscle cell (SMC) relaxation via coupling through myoendothelial gap junctions. However, the effects of aging on local EC Ca(2+) signals (and thereby signaling between ECs and SMCs) remain unclear, and these events have not been investigated in vivo. Furthermore, it is unknown whether aging affects either the number or the size of IEL holes. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that local EC Ca(2+) signaling is impaired with advanced age along with a reduction in IEL holes. In anesthetized mice expressing a Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent protein (GCaMP2) selectively in ECs, our findings illustrate that for mesenteric arteries controlling splanchnic blood flow the frequency of spontaneous local Ca(2+) signals in ECs was reduced by ∼85% in old (24-26 mo) vs. young (3-6 mo) animals. At the same time, the number (and total area) of holes per square millimeter of IEL was reduced by ∼40%. We suggest that diminished signaling between ECs and SMCs contributes to dysfunction of resistance arteries with advanced age.Listen to this article's corresponding podcast at http://ajpheart.podbean.com/e/aging-impairs-endothelial-ca2-signaling/. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Dose escalation study of carbon ion radiotherapy for locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Shingo . E-mail: s.kato@nirs.go.jp; Ohno, Tatsuya; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nakano, Takashi; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Kamada, Tadashi; Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Kandatsu, Susumu; Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Ezawa, Hidefumi; Suzuki, Michiya

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer by two phase I/II clinical trials. Methods and Materials: Between June 1995 and January 2000, 44 patients were treated with CIRT. Thirty patients had Stage IIIB disease, and 14 patients had Stage IVA disease. Median tumor size was 6.5 cm (range, 4.2-11.0 cm). The treatment consisted of 16 fractions of whole pelvic irradiation and 8 fractions of local boost. In the first study, the total dose ranged from 52.8 to 72.0 gray equivalents (GyE) (2.2-3.0 GyE per fraction). In the second study, the whole pelvic dose was fixed at 44.8 GyE, and an additional 24.0 or 28.0 GyE was given to the cervical tumor (total dose, 68.8 or 72.8 GyE). Results: No patient developed severe acute toxicity. In contrast, 8 patients developed major late gastrointestinal complications. The doses resulting in major complications were {>=}60 GyE. All patients with major complications were surgically salvaged. The 5-year local control rate for patients in the first and second studies was 45% and 79%, respectively. When treated with {>=}62.4 GyE, the local control was favorable even for the patients with stage IVA disease (69%) or for those with tumors {>=}6.0 cm (64%). Conclusions: In CIRT for advanced cervical cancer, the dose to the intestines should be limited to <60 GyE to avoid major complications. Although the number of patients in this study was small, the results support continued investigation to confirm therapeutic efficacy.

  2. Edge localized mode characteristics during edge localized mode mitigation by supersonic molecular beam injection in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H. Y.; Hong, J. H.; Jang, J. H.; Park, J. S.; Choe, Wonho; Hahn, S. H.; Bak, J. G.; Lee, J. H.; Ko, W. H.; Lee, K. D.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, H. H.; Juhn, J.-W.; Kim, H. S.; Yoon, S. W.; Han, H.; Ghim, Y.-C.

    2015-12-15

    It has been reported that supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) is an effective means of edge localized mode (ELM) mitigation. This paper newly reports the changes in the ELM, plasma profiles, and fluctuation characteristics during ELM mitigation by SMBI in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. During the mitigated ELM phase, the ELM frequency increased by a factor of 2–3 and the ELM size, which was estimated from the D{sub α} amplitude, the fractional changes in the plasma-stored energy and the line-averaged electron density, and divertor heat flux during an ELM burst, decreased by a factor of 0.34–0.43. Reductions in the electron and ion temperatures rather than in the electron density were observed during the mitigated ELM phase. In the natural ELM phase, frequency chirping of the plasma fluctuations was observed before the ELM bursts; however, the ELM bursts occurred without changes in the plasma fluctuation frequency in the mitigated ELM phase.

  3. Chemoembolization and Radioembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Riad; Lewandowski, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) continues to represent a major worldwide problem. While treatments such as resection, transplantation and ablation may provide a chance for cure, these options are often precluded because of advanced disease presentation. Palliative treatments include transarterial embolization and systemic therapies. This review will summarize the state of the science for embolic therapies in HCC (conventional and drug-eluting chemoembolization, radioembolization), as well as discuss related topics including HCC staging, assessment of response and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:23357493

  4. Safety and feasibility of uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jie; Wang, Qi; Chang, Zhibo

    2016-01-01

    Background Conventional video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) lobectomy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a feasible and safe surgery in high-volume centers with significant VATS experience. Uniportal VATS lobectomy has been recently been reported to be a promising, less invasive approach. The purpose of this study is to explore the safety and feasibility of uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (U-VATS) for the treatment of patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Methods From January 2013 to September 2015, a total of 132 patients with locally advanced NSCLC underwent U-VATS or open thoracotomy major pulmonary resections and standard mediastinal lymph node dissection. Patients were divided into two groups: (I) locally advanced NSCLC underwent U-VATS (U-VATS); (II) locally advanced NSCLC underwent open thoracotomy (open). A descriptive and retrospective study was performed, including the operative time, operative blood loss, postoperative chest tube duration, postoperative hospital stay, lymph node dissection, postoperative complications and postoperative recovery. Results A total of 132 patients with locally advanced NSCLC were included in this study: 64 (U-VATS) vs. 68 (open) patients. The patient demographic data was similar in both groups. Median operative time (157.0 vs. 160.6) and median number of lymph nodes (35.5 vs. 32.5) were similar in both groups. Chest tube duration and hospital of stay were statistically shorter in U-VATS group while rate of complications were higher in open thoracotomy group. One patient died on the 55th postoperative day because of tumor metastasis and bronchopleural fistula. A higher percentage of patients who underwent UVATS resections were able to receive adjuvant therapy timely compared to the open group. Conclusions Uniportal VATS major pulmonary resections and mediastinal lymph node dissection is a safe and feasible procedure for the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC. Particularly it is

  5. What is changing in radiotherapy for the treatment of locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer patients? A review.

    PubMed

    Giaj-Levra, Niccoló; Ricchetti, Francesco; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy treatment continues to have a relevant impact in the treatment of nonsmall cell cancer (NSCLC). Use of concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy is considered the gold standard in the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC but clinical outcomes are not satisfactory. Introduction of new radiotherapy technology and chemotherapy regimens are under investigation in this setting with the goal to improve unsatisfactory results. We report how radiotherapy is changing in the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC.

  6. [A Case of Successful Curative Resection Following Downsizing Chemotherapy in Initially Unresectable Locally Advanced Gallbladder Carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Shinmura, Kazuyasu; Kaiho, Takashi; Yanagisawa, Shinji; Okamoto, Ryo; Nishimura, Masaki; Kobayashi, Soichi; Okaniwa, Akira; Mun, Yangi; Tsuchiya, Shunichi; Chiba, Ryoji

    2015-11-01

    A 58-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with high fever and right upper abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a bulky tumor of the gallbladder with liver invasion, metastases to para-aortic lymph nodes, and extensive infiltration to Glisson's sheath. The tumor was initially considered to be unresectable locally advanced gallbladder carcinoma with inflammation, and she received 6 courses of chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus cisplatin. Subsequently, the inflammation was extinguished, and CT showed the main tumor shrunk and the Glisson's sheath infiltration disappeared; however, a liver metastasis existed in segment 5. Thus, S4a plus S5 hepatic segmentectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection and regional and para-aortic lymphadenectomy was performed. The pathological diagnosis was pT3a, pN1, pM1 (Hep, LYM), fStage ⅣB. Curative resection was then performed. If selected according to their response to downsizing chemotherapy, conversion therapy might therefore be an effective multidisciplinary treatment for patients with initially unresectable locally advanced gallbladder carcinoma.

  7. Early transient radiation-induced brachial plexopathy in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Etiz, Durmus

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Early transient brachial plexopathy following radiotherapy (RT) in patients with head and neck cancer may be underreported and associated with a dose-response. Our purpose was to determine the incidence of early transient radiation-ınduced brachial plexopathy (RIBP) in patients receiving primary RT (± chemotherapy) for locally advanced head and neck cancer (HNC). Material and methods Twenty-seven locally advanced HNC patients who have no finding of brachial plexopathy at the diagnosis were evaluated 3 times by a specifically developed 13-item questionnaire for determining early transient RIBP. The 54 brachial plexus in 27 patients were delineated and dose volume histograms were calculated. Results Median follow-up period was 28 (range: 15–40) months. The mean BP volume was 7.9 ±3.6 cm3, and the mean and maximum doses to the BP were 45.3 (range: 32.3–59.3) Gy, and 59.4 (range: 41.4–70.3) Gy, respectively. Maximum dose to the BP was ≥ 70 Gy only in 2 nasopharyngeal cancer patients. Two (7%) early transient RIBP were reported at 7th and 8th month after RT under maximum 67.17 and 55.37 Gy, and mean 52.95 and 38.60 Gy RT doses. Conclusions Two (7%) early RIBP were seen in the patient group, although brachial plexus maximum doses were ≥ 66 Gy in 75% of patients. PMID:27095943

  8. Modified approach for extraperitoneal laparoscopic staging for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Gil-Moreno, A; Maffuz, A; Díaz-Feijoo, B; Puig, O; Martínez-Palones, J M; Pérez, A; García, A; Xercavins, J

    2007-12-01

    Describe a modified approach to the technique for staging laparoscopic extraperitoneal aortic and common iliac lymph node dissection for locally advanced cervical cancer.Retrospective, nonrandomized clinical study. (Canadian Task Force classification II-2), setting in an acute-care, teaching hospital. Thirty-six patients with locally advanced cervical cancer underwent laparoscopic surgical staging via extraperitoneal approach with the conventional or the modified technique from August 2001 through September 2004. Clinical outcomes in 23 patients who were operated on with the conventional technique using index finger for first trocar entrance; 12 patients with the modified technique using direct trocar entrance, were compared. One patient was excluded due to peritoneal carcinomatosis. Technique, baseline characteristics, histopathologic variables and surgical outcome were measured. There were no significant differences in patients basal characteristics on comparative analysis between conventional and modified technique. With our proposed modified technique, we obtained a reduced surgical procedure duration and blood loss. The proposed modified surgical technique offers some advantages, is an easier approach because the parietal pelvic peritoneum is elastic and this helps to avoid its disruption at time of trocar insertion, size of incision is shorter, we achieved no CO2 leak through the trocar orifice, and wound suture is fast and simple.

  9. Prognosis and value of preoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal signet-ring cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chun-Run; Wang, Rui; Wang, Mo-Jin; Ping, Jie; Zhuang, Wen

    2017-01-01

    As well known, signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is a rare histological subtype of colorectal adenocarcinoma, which has been associated with poor prognosis and resistant to non-surgery therapy compared with common adenocarcinoma. In this study, we assessed the effect of preoperative radiotherapy (PRT) for locally advanced rectal SRCC in a large patient group from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program (SEER, 1988–2011) database. SRCC was found in 0.9% (n = 622) rectal cancer (RC) patients in our study. In the PRT setting, SRCC had significantly worse cancer-specific survival than mucinous adenocarcinoma and nonmucinous adenocarcinoma patients (log-rank, P < 0.001). In terms of SRCC, stage III RC patients benefited from PRT (log-rank, P < 0.001) while stage II did not (P = 0.095). The multivariate Cox proportional hazard model showed that PRT was an independent benefit factor in stage III rectal SRCC patients (HR, 0.611; 95% CI, 0.407–0.919; P = 0.018). In conclusion, SRCC was an independent predictor of poor prognosis in stage III RC patients, but not in stage II. In the PRT setting of locally advanced RC, SRCC patients had significantly worse prognosis. PRT was an independent prognostic factor associated with improved survival in stage III rectal SRCC. PMID:28345614

  10. [HER2/neu expression in Venezuelan patients with locally advanced breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Morales, Luisa; Reigosa, Aldo; Caleiras, Eduardo; Mora, Richard; Marrero, Nuria; Payares, Eliécer; Molina, Karla; Sucre, Luis

    2008-03-01

    To know the prognosis of a patient with cancer allows choosing the most appropriate therapeutic. The expression of the oncogen HER2/neu has been related to an unfavourable prognosis in patients with infiltrating breast carcinoma, for this reason, the purpose of this work was to analyze its predictive and prognostic value in patients with locally advanced breast cancer, treated in the Oncological Institute "Dr Miguel Perez Carreño". Information about personal data of 58 patients was compiled, as well as the received treatment, clinical response data of the biopsy report, histological grade, nuclear grade, node status and evolution of the patient. The determination of the HER2/neu expression was made by inmunohistochemistry, using the avidina-estreptavidin-peroxidasa technique. For the interpretation of the HER2/neu, an agreed score from 0 to 3+ was assigned, using the guidelines of interpretation of the Hercep-Test (DAKO). 37.9% of the cases displayed expression of the HER2/neu in the membrane of the tumour cells. The node state and the hormonal receptors state turned out to be significant to predict the disease-free interval. Patients with strong oncoprotein expression seem to have a quimioresistant tendency to the FAC (5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide) regime. The expression of the HER2/neu receptor is related to a reduction of the disease-free interval and global survival in patients with infiltrating ductal breast carcinoma locally advanced, confirming, in this work, to be a good prognostic factor.

  11. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer: Long-term results of a phase I trial

    SciTech Connect

    Allal, Abdelkarim S. . E-mail: abdelkarim.allal@hcuge.ch; Zwahlen, Daniel; Bruendler, Marie-Anne; Peyer, Raymond de; Morel, Philippe; Huber, Olivier; Roth, Arnaud D.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the long-term results of radiation therapy (RT) when added preoperatively to systemic chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients presenting with T3-4 or N+ gastric cancer received two cycles of cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} d1, 5FU 800 mg/m{sup 2} d1-4, and Leucovorin 60 mg twice daily d1-4; one cycle before and one concomitantly with hyperfractionated RT (median dose, 38.4; range, 31.2-45.6 Gy). All patients underwent a total or subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node resection. Results: Nineteen patients were accrued and 18 completed the neoadjuvant therapeutic program. All patients were subsequently operated and no fatality occurred. At a mean follow-up of 8 years for the surviving patients, no severe late toxicity was observed. The 5-year locoregional control, disease-free, and overall survival were of 85%, 41%, and 35%, respectively. The peritoneum was the most frequent site of relapse. Among long terms survivors, no severe (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3-4) late complication was reported. Conclusions: The present neoadjuvant treatment does not seem to increase the operative risk, nor the late side effects. The encouraging locoregional control rate suggests that the neoadjuvant approach should be considered for future trials in locally advanced gastric cancer. Also, the frequency of peritoneal recurrence stresses the need for a more efficient systemic or intraperitoneal treatment.

  12. Results of total laryngectomy as treatment for locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    García-Cabo Herrero, Patricia; Fernández-Vañes, Laura; López Álvarez, Fernando; Álvarez Marcos, César; Llorente, José Luis; Rodrigo, Juan Pablo

    2017-01-19

    Total laryngectomy (TL), with eventual postoperative radiotherapy, has proven to be effective in treating cases of locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer. The aim of this study was to analyse the oncological outcomes of this procedure in patients with hypopharyngeal cancer classified T3 and T4. We studied 59 patients (33 T3 and 26 T4a) with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the hypopharynx treated with TL from 1998 to 2012. Mean age was 61 years with a male predominance (96.6%). All the patients were smokers and 96% consumed alcohol. Unilateral selective neck dissection (ND) was performed in 12 patients, unilateral radical ND in 11 patients, bilateral selective ND in 20 patients and radical ND plus selective ND in 14 patients. 66% of the patients received postoperative radiotherapy. Lymph node metastases occurred in 81% of the patients and extranodal invasion in 56% of them. 29% of the patients had loco-regional recurrence, 17% developed distant metastases, and 25% a second primary tumour. The 5-year disease-specific survival was 46%. TL extended to pharynx (with eventual postoperative radiotherapy) offers good oncological results in terms of loco-regional control and survival in locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer, so organ preservation protocols should achieve similar oncological results to those shown by TL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  13. Bevacizumab in the pre-operative treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fornaro, Lorenzo; Caparello, Chiara; Vivaldi, Caterina; Rotella, Virginia; Musettini, Gianna; Falcone, Alfredo; Baldini, Editta; Masi, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in the management of patients with locally advanced, non-metastatic rectal adenocarcinoma (LARC), prognosis remains largely unsatisfactory due to a high rate of distant relapse. In fact, currently available neoadjuvant protocols, represented by fluoropyrimidine-based chemo-radiotherapy (CT-RT) or short-course RT, together with improved surgical techniques, have largely reduced the risk of local relapse, with limited impact on distant recurrence. Available results of phase III trials with additional cytotoxic agents combined with standard CT-RT are disappointing, as no significant reduction in the risk of recurrence has been demonstrated. In order to improve the control of micrometastatic disease, integrating targeted agents into neoadjuvant treatment protocols thus offers a rational approach. In particular, the antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab has demonstrated synergistic activity with both CT and RT in pre-clinical and clinical models, and thus may represent a suitable companion in the neoadjuvant treatment of LARC. Preliminary results of phase I-II clinical studies are promising and suggest potential clinical parameters and molecular predictive biomarkers useful for patient selection: treatment personalization is indeed the key in order to maximize the benefit while reducing the risk of more complex neoadjuvant treatment schedules. PMID:24876730

  14. Qualification of local advanced cryogenic cleaning technology for 14nm photomask fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taumer, Ralf; Krome, Thorsten; Bowers, Chuck; Varghese, Ivin; Hopkins, Tyler; White, Roy; Brunner, Martin; Yi, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    The march toward tighter design rules, and thus smaller defects, implies stronger surface adhesion between defects and the photomask surface compared to past generations, thereby resulting in increased difficulty in photomask cleaning. Current state-of-the-art wet clean technologies utilize functional water and various energies in an attempt to produce similar yield to the acid cleans of previous generations, but without some of the negative side effects. Still, wet cleans have continued to be plagued with issues such as persistent particles and contaminations, SRAF and feature damages, leaving contaminants behind that accelerate photo-induced defect growth, and others. This paper details work done through a design of experiments (DOE) utilized to qualify an improved cryogenic cleaning technology for production in the Advanced Mask Technology Center (AMTC) advanced production lines for 20 and 14 nm processing. All work was conducted at the AMTC facility in Dresden, Germany utilizing technology developed by Eco-Snow Systems and RAVE LLC for their cryogenic local cleaning VC1200F platform. This system uses a newly designed nozzle, improved gaseous CO2 delivery, extensive filtration to remove hydrocarbons and minimize particle adders, and other process improvements to overcome the limitations of the previous generation local cleaning tool. AMTC has successfully qualified this cryogenic cleaning technology and is currently using it regularly to enhance production yields even at the most challenging technology nodes.

  15. Cetuximab concurrent with IMRT versus cisplatin concurrent with IMRT in locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xin; Huang, Jingwen; Liu, Lei; Li, Hongmei; Li, Ping; Zhang, Jing; Xie, Li

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the treatment efficacies and toxicities of concurrent cetuximab-based bioradiotherapy (BRT) or cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma. :Patients with previously untreated locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma were matched into pairs, and enrolled into the study. All patients were given either BRT or CRT. Survival outcomes, toxicities, and prognostic factors were evaluated. :A total of 112 patients were enrolled. The 5-year overall survival was 79.3% and 79.5% in CRT and BRT arm, respectively (P = 0.797) and the 5-year DFS was 73.5% and 74.6%, respectively (P = 0.953). In toxicity analysis, CRT arm had more significant decrease in white blood cell, platelet, hemoglobin, and severe vomiting, while more severe skin reactions and mucositis were shown in BRT arm. :BRT was not less efficacious than traditional CRT. They lead to different aspects of toxicities. If patients cannot stand more severe toxicities caused by CRT, BRT could be an ideal alternative. PMID:27684830

  16. Could preoperative short-course radiotherapy be the treatment of choice for localized advanced rectal carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Ciria, Juan Pablo; Eguiguren, Mikel; Cafiero, Sergio; Uranga, Intza; Diaz de Cerio, Ivan; Querejeta, Arrate; Urraca, Jose Maria; Minguez, Julian; Guimon, Elena; Puertolas, Jose Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Short-course preoperative radiotherapy (RT) is widely used in northern Europe for locally advanced resectable rectal cancer, but its role in the era of advanced imaging techniques is uncertain. Here, we reviewed articles and abstracts on SCRT published from 1974 through 2013 with the goal of identifying patients who might be best suited for short-course RT. We included relevant articles comparing surgery with or without preoperative radiation published before and after the advent of total mesorectal excision. We also analyzed two randomized trials directly comparing short-course RT with conventionally fractionated chemoradiation (the Polish Colorectal Study Group and the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group) that compared short-course RT with conventional chemoradiotherapy. We conclude from our review that short-course RT can be generally applied for operable rectal cancer and produces high rates of pelvic control with acceptable toxicity; it reduces local recurrence rates but does not increase overall survival. SCRT seems to be best used for tumors considered “low risk,” i.e., those that are >5 cm from the anal margin, without circumferential margin involvement, and involvement of fewer than 4 lymph nodes. Whether sequential chemotherapy can further improve outcomes remains to be seen, as does the best time for surgery (immediately or 6–8 weeks after RT). We further recommend that selection of patients for short-course RT should be based on findings from magnetic resonance imaging or transrectal ultrasonography. PMID:25535578

  17. Chemoradioimmunotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic and biliary tree adenocarcinoma: a multicenter phase II study.

    PubMed

    Recchia, Francesco; Sica, Gigliola; Candeloro, Giampiero; Bisegna, Roberta; Bratta, Massimo; Bonfili, Pierluigi; Necozione, Stefano; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Rea, Silvio

    2009-08-01

    The antitumor activity and toxicity of a multi-step treatment were evaluated in patients with locally advanced, inoperable, or incompletely resected pancreatic (Pa) and biliary tree (Bt) adenocarcinomas (ADKs). Fifty-four patients, 63% with Pa and 37% with Bt ADK, received 3 courses of cisplatin-gemcitabine induction chemotherapy. Progression-free (PF) patients were given consolidation radiotherapy with concurrent capecitabine. PF patients had, as maintenance immunotherapy (MI), interleukin 2 (1.8x10 IU) and 13-cis-retinoic acid (0.5 mg/kg) [DOSAGE ERROR CORRECTED]. Thirty-eight patients, 27 with Pa and 11 with Bt ADKs, PF after cisplatin/gemcitabine, were treated with consolidation radiotherapy with concurrent capecitabine. Fourteen PF patients, 7 with Pa and 7 with Bt ADK, received MI. Median PF and overall survivals (OS) for all 54 patients were 6.8 and 12.1 months, respectively. Patients treated with MI had a median PF survival of 16.2 months, whereas median OS had not been reached yet, after a median follow-up of 27.5 months. Grades 3 and 4 hematological and gastrointestinal in 30% and 37% of patients, respectively; grades 1 and 2 autoimmune reactions in 28% of patients. These results support the efficacy and safety of a multi-step sequential treatment in patients with locally advanced, inoperable or incompletely resected Pa and Bt ADKs.

  18. SPARC gene variants predict clinical outcome in locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Arqueros, Cristina; Salazar, Juliana; Arranz, M J; Sebio, Ana; Mora, Josefina; Sullivan, Ivana; Tobeña, María; Martín-Richard, Marta; Barnadas, Agustí; Baiget, Montserrat; Páez, David

    2017-08-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is a glycoprotein of the extracellular matrix whose expression can be altered in malignant pancreatic cells and in the adjacent stromal fibroblasts. We evaluated the possible role of SPARC gene variants as prognostic markers for locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer. We analyzed eight tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (TagSNPs) in the SPARC gene in 74 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma treated with chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy. TagSNPs were chosen using the HapMap genome browser and Haploview software 4.2 based on two predefined criteria: (1) coefficient cutoff of 0.80 and (2) minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥ 0.10. Univariate analyses revealed significant associations between four SNPs (rs17718347, rs2347128, rs3210714, and rs967527) and PFS. The rs3210714 genetic variant was also associated with OS. In the multivariate analyses, rs17718347 (HR 0.4; 95% CI 0.2-0.8; p = 0.013) and rs2347128 (HR 0.5; 95% CI 0.3-0.9; p = 0.049) remained statistically associated with PFS. In addition, patients harboring the T-A-G haplotype (rs17718347, rs1978707, rs2347128) had a better PFS (p = 0.002). Our findings suggest that SPARC polymorphisms may be useful in predicting outcome in patients with locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer.

  19. Retrospective Analysis of Locally Advanced Noninflammatory Breast Cancer From Chennai, South India, 1990-1999

    SciTech Connect

    Shanta, Viswanathan Swaminathan, Rajaraman; Rama, Ranganathan M.Sc.; Radhika, Ramachandran M.S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This was a retrospective observational study to elicit the outcome of the therapeutic strategy of concurrent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy protocol for locally advanced breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A large series of 1,117 consecutive cases of locally advanced breast cancer treated at the Cancer Institute (WIA), in Chennai, South India, between 1990 and 1999 and followed through 2004 formed the basis for this study. Disease-free survival was the main outcome, and nodal and tumor downstaging were the intermediate outcome measures studied. Results: Primary tumor downstaging was observed in 45% and nodal downstaging in 57.5%. The disease-free survival rate of nodal downstaged patients at 5, 10, and 15 years was 75%, 65%, and 58%, respectively. The corresponding rates for pre- and postoperative node-negative patients were 70%, 60%, and 59%. The best survival was seen among those who were tumor and node negative postoperatively. Nodal downstaging halved the risk of disease recurrence and death compared with node positivity, irrespective of tumor sterility. Conclusions: A randomized trial using cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil vs. an anthracycline-based regimen in the setting of concurrent chemoradiotherapy appears indicated. Additional preoperative chemotherapy to maximize nodal and tumor downstaging should be investigated. A change in postoperative chemotherapy according to nodal status could also be explored.

  20. Advancing age alters the influence of eye position on sound localization.

    PubMed

    Cui, Qi N; O'Neill, William E; Paige, Gary D

    2010-10-01

    Vision and audition provide spatial information about the environment to guide natural behavior. Because the eyes move in the head while the ears remain head-fixed, input conveying eye position in the head is required to maintain audiovisual congruence. Human perception of auditory space was previously shown to shift with changes in eye position, regardless of the target's frequency content and spatial cues underlying horizontal and vertical localization. In this study, we examined whether this interaction is altered by advancing age. Head-restrained young (18-44 yo), middle-aged (45-64 yo), and elderly (65-81 yo) human subjects localized noise bursts under conditions of transient and sustained ocular deflection. All three age groups demonstrated a time-dependent shift of auditory space in the direction of eye position. Moreover, this adaptation showed a clear decline with advancing age, but only for peripheral auditory space (beyond ±10° from midline). Alternatively, adaptation in the periphery may occur, but is more sluggish than in the central field and therefore not fully observed in this experiment. The age-dependent effect cannot be readily explained by senescent peripheral hearing loss, suggesting a change in central processing of auditory space in relation to the control of gaze.

  1. Quantitative ultrasound characterization of locally advanced breast cancer by estimation of its scatterer properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tadayyon, Hadi; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Czarnota, Gregory; Wirtzfeld, Lauren; Wright, Frances C.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Tumor grading is an important part of breast cancer diagnosis and currently requires biopsy as its standard. Here, the authors investigate quantitative ultrasound parameters in locally advanced breast cancers that can potentially separate tumors from normal breast tissue and differentiate tumor grades. Methods: Ultrasound images and radiofrequency data from 42 locally advanced breast cancer patients were acquired and analyzed. Parameters related to the linear regression of the power spectrum—midband fit, slope, and 0-MHz-intercept—were determined from breast tumors and normal breast tissues. Mean scatterer spacing was estimated from the spectral autocorrelation, and the effective scatterer diameter and effective acoustic concentration were estimated from the Gaussian form factor. Parametric maps of each quantitative ultrasound parameter were constructed from the gated radiofrequency segments in tumor and normal tissue regions of interest. In addition to the mean values of the parametric maps, higher order statistical features, computed from gray-level co-occurrence matrices were also determined and used for characterization. Finally, linear and quadratic discriminant analyses were performed using combinations of quantitative ultrasound parameters to classify breast tissues. Results: Quantitative ultrasound parameters were found to be statistically different between tumor and normal tissue (p < 0.05). The combination of effective acoustic concentration and mean scatterer spacing could separate tumor from normal tissue with 82% accuracy, while the addition of effective scatterer diameter to the combination did not provide significant improvement (83% accuracy). Furthermore, the two advanced parameters, including effective scatterer diameter and mean scatterer spacing, were found to be statistically differentiating among grade I, II, and III tumors (p = 0.014 for scatterer spacing, p = 0.035 for effective scatterer diameter). The separation of the tumor

  2. Pre-treatment surgical para-aortic lymph node assessment in locally advanced cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brockbank, Elly; Kokka, Fani; Bryant, Andrew; Pomel, Christophe; Reynolds, Karina

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is the most common cause of death from gynaecological cancers worldwide. Locally advanced cervical cancer, FIGO stage equal or more than IB1 is treated with chemotherapy and external beam radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy. If there is metastatic para-aortic nodal disease radiotherapy is extended to additionally cover this area. Due to increased morbidity, ideally extended-field radiotherapy is given only when para-aortic nodal disease is proven. Therefore accurate assessment of the extent of the disease is very important for planning the most appropriate treatment. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of pre-treatment surgical para-aortic lymph node assessment for woman with locally advanced cervical cancer (FIGO stage IB2 to IVA). Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 1), MEDLINE and EMBASE (up to January 2011). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared surgical para-aortic lymph node assessment and dissection with radiological staging techniques, in adult women diagnosed with locally advanced cervical cancer. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently assessed whether potentially relevant trials met the inclusion criteria, abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. One RCT was identified so no meta-analyses were performed. Main results We found only one trial, which included 61 women, that met our inclusion criteria. This trial reported data on surgical versus clinical staging and an assessment of the two surgical staging techniques; laparoscopic (LAP) versus extraperitoneal (EXP) surgical staging. The clinical staging was either a contrast-enhanced CT scan or MRI scan of the abdomen and

  3. Clinically apparent internal mammary nodal metastasis in patients with advanced breast cancer: incidence and local control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Jing; Oh, Julia L; Whitman, Gary J; Iyengar, Puneeth; Yu, Tse-Kuan; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A; Perkins, George; Buchholz, Thomas A; Strom, Eric A

    2010-07-15

    To investigate the incidence and local control of internal mammary lymph node metastases (IMN+) in patients with clinical N2 or N3 locally advanced breast cancer. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 809 breast cancer patients diagnosed with advanced nodal disease (clinical N2-3) who received radiation treatment at our institution from January 2000 December 2006. Patients were considered IMN+ on the basis of imaging studies. We identified 112 of 809 patients who presented with IMN+ disease (13.8%) detected on ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. All 112 patients with IMN+ disease received anthracycline and taxane-based chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) resulted in a complete response (CR) on imaging studies of IMN disease in 72.1% of patients. Excluding 16 patients with progressive disease, 96 patients received adjuvant radiation to the breast or the chest wall and the regional lymphatics including the IMN chain with a median dose of 60 Gy if the internal mammary lymph nodes normalized after chemotherapy and 66 Gy if they did not. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 41 months (8-118 months). For the 96 patients able to complete curative therapy, the actuarial 5-year IMN control rate, locoregional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 89%, 80%, 76%, and 56%. Over ten percent of patients with advanced nodal disease will have IMN metastases on imaging studies. Multimodality therapy including IMN irradiation achieves excellent rates of control in the IMN region and a DFS of more than 50% after curative treatment. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Clinically Apparent Internal Mammary Nodal Metastasis in Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer: Incidence and Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yujing; Oh, Julia L.; Whitman, Gary J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence and local control of internal mammary lymph node metastases (IMN+) in patients with clinical N2 or N3 locally advanced breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 809 breast cancer patients diagnosed with advanced nodal disease (clinical N2-3) who received radiation treatment at our institution from January 2000 December 2006. Patients were considered IMN+ on the basis of imaging studies. Results: We identified 112 of 809 patients who presented with IMN+ disease (13.8%) detected on ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. All 112 patients with IMN+ disease received anthracycline and taxane-based chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) resulted in a complete response (CR) on imaging studies of IMN disease in 72.1% of patients. Excluding 16 patients with progressive disease, 96 patients received adjuvant radiation to the breast or the chest wall and the regional lymphatics including the IMN chain with a median dose of 60 Gy if the internal mammary lymph nodes normalized after chemotherapy and 66 Gy if they did not. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 41 months (8-118 months). For the 96 patients able to complete curative therapy, the actuarial 5-year IMN control rate, locoregional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 89%, 80%, 76%, and 56%. Conclusion: Over ten percent of patients with advanced nodal disease will have IMN metastases on imaging studies. Multimodality therapy including IMN irradiation achieves excellent rates of control in the IMN region and a DFS of more than 50% after curative treatment.

  5. Contemporary Management of Borderline Resectable and Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Andrew; Cardona, Kenneth; Alese, Olatunji B.; Maithel, Shishir K.; Kooby, David; Landry, Jerome; El-Rayes, Bassel F.

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas remains a highly lethal disease, with less than 5% survival at 5 years. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) and locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) account for approximately 30% of newly diagnosed cases of PC. The objective of BRPC therapy is to downstage the tumor to allow resection; the objective of LAPC therapy is to control disease and improve survival. There is no consensus on the definitions of BRPC and LAPC, which leads to major limitations in designing clinical trials and evaluating their results. A multimodality approach is always needed to ensure proper utilization and timing of chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery in the management of this disease. Combination chemotherapy regimens (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, and gemcitabine [FOLFIRINOX] and gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel) have improved overall survival in metastatic disease. The role of combination chemotherapy regimens in BRPC and LAPC is an area of active investigation. There is no consensus on the dose, modality, and role of radiation therapy in the treatment of BRPC and LAPC. This article reviews the literature and highlights the areas of controversy regarding management of BRPC and LAPC. Implications for Practice: Pancreatic cancer is one of the worst cancers with regard to survival, even at early stages of the disease. This review evaluates all the evidence for the stages in which the cancer is not primarily resectable with surgery, known as borderline resectable or locally advanced unresectable. Recently, advancements in radiation techniques and use of better combination chemotherapies have improved survival and tolerance. There is no consensus on description of stages or treatment sequences (chemotherapy, chemoradiation, radiation), nor on the best chemotherapy regimen. The evidence behind the treatment paradigm for these stages of pancreatic cancer is summarized. PMID:26834159

  6. Changes in aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 expression during neoadjuvant chemotherapy predict outcome in locally advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) for locally advanced breast cancer can improve operability and local disease control, there is a lack of reliable biomarkers that predict response to chemotherapy or long-term survival. Since expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 (ALDH1) is associated with the stem-like properties of self-renewal and innate chemoresistance in breast cancer, we asked whether expression in serial tumor samples treated with NAC could identify women more likely to benefit from this therapy. Methods Women with locally advanced breast cancer were randomly assigned to receive four cycles of anthracycline-based chemotherapy, followed by four cycles of taxane therapy (Arm A), or the same regimen in reverse order (Arm B). Tumor specimens were collected at baseline, after four cycles, and then at surgical resection. ALDH1 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry and correlated with tumor response using Fisher’s exact test while Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival. Results A hundred and nineteen women were enrolled into the study. Fifty seven (48%) were randomized to Arm A and 62 (52%) to Arm B. Most of the women (90%) had ductal carcinoma and 10% had lobular carcinoma. Of these, 26 (22%) achieved a pathological complete response (pCR) after NAC. There was no correlation between baseline ALDH1 expression and tumor grade, stage, hormone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status and Ki67 index. ALDH1 negativity at baseline was significantly associated with pCR (P = 0.004). The presence of ALDH1(+) cells in the residual tumor cells in non-responding women was strongly predictive of worse overall survival (P = 0.024). Moreover, serial analysis of specimens from non-responders showed a marked increase in tumor-specific ALDH1 expression (P = 0.028). Overall, there was no survival difference according to the chemotherapy sequence. However, poorly responding tumours from women receiving

  7. A practical alternative to conventional five-field irradiation postmastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Steeves, R A; Thomadsen, B R; Hansen, H; Phromratanapongse, P; Paliwal, B R

    1994-01-01

    A combination of electron and photon beams has been used as an alternative for the conventional five-field method to irradiate patients postmastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer. Anterior and posterior opposed photon beams treat in continuity the lateral chest wall, axilla, and supraclavicular lymph nodes. An adjacent anterior electron beam is used at an energy matched to the depth of the internal mammary nodes. It includes the anterior chest wall, but bolus is used in the lateral aspect to spare underlying lung. This electron beam eliminates the diverging junction between the internal mammary and medial tangential fields used in the conventional five-field technique. Overlaps along the junction between the photon and electron beams are minimized by placing the center of the photon field along its medial border. Measurements with an Alderson-Rando phantom show dose-distribution advantages for this technique over the conventional five-field approach. There is less chance of underdosing tumor cells or of overdosing normal tissue along beam junctions. Clinical studies on 29 patients treated by this technique between July 1985 and December 1989 show increased rates of acute skin reactions, but otherwise similar side effects compared with 57 breast cancer patients treated with the five-field technique over the same time period. Local recurrence rates and patient survival rates were similar for the two groups. Given the dose-distribution advantages of this technique and its simple adaptation to accommodate unusual surgical scars or cancer recurrences, its use should be considered for postmastectomy patients with locally advanced breast cancer in well-equipped cancer treatment centers.

  8. Long-term local hyperthermia in the treatment of advanced breast cancer (case report).

    PubMed

    Ostapenko, V V; Yamazaki, M; Nishide, T; Tanaka, H; Miyano, M; Sonobe, M; Toda, K; Mune, M; Nishide, I; Yukawa, S

    2001-01-01

    It is difficult to control non-resectable locally advanced primary and recurrent breast cancer by conventional modalities. Recently, hyperthermia (HT) has been recognized as an effective adjuvant to radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) in treatment of various malignancies, including breast cancer. The patient was a 58-year-old female Japanese, with breast cancer, T4N2M0, stage IIIb (papillo-tubular carcinoma). Previous treatment included RT and neoadjuvant CT Local HT was performed with a total number of 87 sessions given over 12 months. The mean time of each session was 40 minutes. Elevation of temperature to a tumoricidal level of 43 degrees C was confirmed. The patient received cyclophosphamide (50 mg p.o./day) and tamoxifen (20 mg p.o./day) during the whole period of HT. Due to the decreased amount of WBC, further CT was not possible, except for one course of CMF performed 3 months after the start of HT. The patient had a decrease in the intensity of pain even after the first 3 sessions. In one month, movement in the right shoulder became possible in an anterio-posterior direction. By 5 months, the healing of ulceration became evident. At present, the patient is in continuous CR for 15 months after HT. The movement in the shoulder joint is markedly improved in all directions. In addition, HT did not cause any notable complications. Long-term HT may be useful in the management of locally advanced breast cancer and these results should encourage further clinical study.

  9. Neutrophilia in locally advanced cervical cancer: A novel biomarker for image-guided adaptive brachytherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Escande, Alexandre; Haie-Meder, Christine; Maroun, Pierre; Gouy, Sébastien; Mazeron, Renaud; Leroy, Thomas; Bentivegna, Enrica; Morice, Philippe; Deutsch, Eric; Chargari, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the prognostic value of leucocyte disorders in a prospective cohort of cervical cancer patients receiving definitive chemoradiation plus image—guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). Results 113 patients were identified. All patients received a pelvic irradiation concomitant with chemotherapy, extended to the para-aortic area in 13 patients with IVB disease. Neutrophilia and leukocytosis were significant univariate prognostic factors for poorer local failure-free survival (p = 0.000 and p = 0.002, respectively), associated with tumor size, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) and anemia. No effect was shown for distant metastases but leukocytosis and neutrophila were both poor prognostic factors for in-field relapses (p = 0.003 and p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, HR-CTV volume (p = 0.026) and neutrophils count > 7,500/μl (p = 0.018) were independent factors for poorer survival without local failure, with hazard ratio (HR) of 3.1. Materials and methods We examined patients treated in our Institution between April 2009 and July 2015 by concurrent chemoradiation (45 Gy in 25 fractions +/− lymph node boosts) followed by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided adaptive pulse-dose rate brachytherapy (15 Gy to the intermediate-risk clinical target volume). The prognostic value of pretreatment leucocyte disorders was examined. Leukocytosis and neutrophilia were defined as a leukocyte count or a neutrophils count exceeding 10,000 and 7,500/μl, respectively. Conclusions Neutrophilia is a significant prognostic factor for local relapse in locally advanced cervical cancer treated with MRI-based IGABT. This biomarker could help identifying patients with higher risk of local relapse and requiring dose escalation. PMID:27713124

  10. Comparison of intra-arterial chemoembolization with and without radiotherapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qianqian; Zhu, Kunli; Yue, Jinbo; Qi, Zhonghua; Jiang, Shumei; Xu, Xiaoqing; Feng, Rui; Wang, Renben

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Numerous studies have tried to combine transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) or hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) with radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). However, the efficacy of TACE or HAIC combined with RT versus TACE or HAIC alone remains controversial. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to compare the efficacy and safety of intra-arterial chemoembolization combined with RT versus intra-arterial chemoembolization alone for the treatment of HCC patients with PVTT. Methods PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases were systematically searched for eligible studies. Two authors independently reviewed the abstracts, extracted relevant data and rated the quality of studies. The major end points were objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), and adverse events. Results Eight studies with a total of 1,760 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled results showed that intra-arterial chemoembolization combined with RT significantly improved ORR of PVTT (OR, 4.22; 95% CI, 3.07–5.80; P<0.001) and OS (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.57–0.83; P=0.001), but did not affect ORR of primary liver tumor (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 0.67–2.79; P=0.390). The incidence of grade 3 or 4 leukopenia (OR, 5.80; 95% CI, 2.478–13.56; P<0.001) and thrombocytopenia (OR, 3.77; 95% CI, 1.06–13.43; P=0.041) was higher in the intra-arterial chemoembolization plus RT group than in the intra-arterial chemoembolization group. Conclusion Combination therapy of intra-arterial chemoembolization and RT for HCC patients with PVTT could bring higher ORR of PVTT and better survival benefits. This combination therapy was also associated with a significantly increased risk of adverse events. However, they were mostly mild to moderate and successfully treated with conservative treatment. PMID:28053537

  11. Immunotherapeutic approaches for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gardini, Andrea Casadei; Pisconti, Salvatore; Licchetta, Antonella; Scartozzi, Mario; Memeo, Riccardo; Palmieri, Vincenzo Ostilio; Aprile, Giuseppe; Santini, Daniele; Nardulli, Patrizia; Silvestris, Nicola; Brunetti, Oronzo

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a cancer with a high mortality rate due to the fact that the diagnosis usually occurs at anadvanced stage. Even in case of curative surgical treatment, recurrence is common. Sorafenib and regorafenib are the only therapeutic agents that have been demonstrated to be effective in advanced HCC, thus novel curative approaches are urgently needed. Recent studies focus on the role of immune system in HCC. In fact, the unique immune response in the liver favors tolerance, which can represent a real challenge for conventional immunotherapy in these patients. Spontaneous immune responses against tumor antigens have been detected, and new immune therapies are under investigation: dendritic cell vaccination, immune-modulator strategy, and immune checkpoint inhibition. In recent years different clinical trials examining the use of immunotherapy to treat HCC have been conducted with initial promising results. This review article will summarize the literature data concerning the potential immunotherapeutic approaches in HCC patients. PMID:28420805

  12. Giant cell tumor locally advanced around the knee: treatment and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rigollino, Ana Valeria; Fernando, Thiago Santos; Tanaka, Marcos Hajime; Souza, Marcello Martins

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a benign bone tumor with aggressive characteristics. They are more prevalent in the third decade of life and demonstrate a preference for locating in the epiphyseal region of long bones. They have a high local recurrence rate, which depends on the type of treatment and initial tumor presentation. The risk of lung metastases is around 3%. Between October 2010 and August 2014, nine patients diagnosed with locally advanced GCT or with pathological fracture to the knee level underwent surgical treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of the treatment, particularly with regard to relapse, and to conduct a literature review. There was a predominance of males (77.7%). The most common location was the distal femur. Four patients (44%) developed local recurrence in the first year after surgery, three in distal femur and one in proximal tibia. Of the two patients with pathologic fracture at diagnosis, one of them presented recurrence after five months. The treatment of GCT is still a challenge. The authors believe that the best treatment method is wide resection and reconstruction of bone defects with non-conventional endoprostheses. Patients should be aware and well informed about the possible complications and functional losses that may occur as a result of the surgical treatment chosen and the need for further surgery in the medium and long term.

  13. Irreversible electroporation in the treatment of locally advanced pancreas and liver metastases of colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wichtowski, Mateusz; Nowaczyk, Piotr; Kocur, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Irreversible electroporation is a new, non-thermal ablation technique in the treatment of parenchymal organ tumors which uses short high voltage pulses of electricity in order to induce apoptosis of targeted cells. In this paper the application of this method of treatment in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and liver cancer is analyzed. Material and methods Between 04.2014 and 09.2014 two patients with LAPC and one with colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM) were qualified for treatment with irreversible electroporation. Both patients remained under constant observation and control. PubMed/Medline, Embase and Google Scholar databases were searched and eight original reports on irreversible electroporation of pancreatic and liver tumors based on the biggest groups of patients were found. Results Two patients with LAPC and one with CRLM were qualified for ablation with irreversible electroporation. In all three patients a successful irreversible electroporation (IRE) procedure of the whole tumor was conducted. In the minimum seven-month follow-up 100% local control was achieved – without progression. In the literature review the local response to treatment ranged from 41% to 100%. The event-free survival rate in six-month observation was 94%. Conclusions Ablation with irreversible electroporation is a new non-thermal ablation technique which has been demonstrated, both in the previously published studies and in the cases described in this paper, as a safe and efficient therapeutic method for patients with LAPC and CRLM. PMID:27095938

  14. Clinical implications of preoperative chemoradiotherapy prior to laparoscopic surgery for locally advanced low rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Keisaku; Shimbo, Taiju; Tanaka, Keitaro; Yamamoto, Masashi; Narumi, Yoshifumi; Okuda, Junji; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has any adverse effects on laparoscopic surgery (LS) for locally advanced low rectal cancer (LARC). The study was performed at the Osaka Medical College Hospital, and included patients who were operated on between July 2006 and December 2013. The short-term outcomes in 156 patients who underwent surgery for LARC following CRT were evaluated, of whom 152 underwent LS. Among the patients who were followed for >40 months, 77 patients (the CRT group) were compared with 39 patients who underwent LS without CRT (the surgery-alone group) for long-term outcomes. The total number of patients who received sphincter-preserving surgery was 74%. No positive longitudinal resection margins were identified, and only 1.3% had identifiable positive circumferential resection margins. The complication rate was 14%, and no serious complications occurred. There were no significant differences between the CRT and the surgery-alone groups in terms of the 5-year relapse-free survival rate (70.1 vs. 61.5%; P=0.81) or the 5-year overall survival rate (88.3 vs. 69.2%; P=0.06). However, the 5-year local recurrence-free survival rate was significantly improved in the CRT group patients (96.1 vs. 79.5%; P=0.009). In conclusion, our results have demonstrated that LS with preoperative CRT appears to be feasible and safe, and may have beneficial effects on local recurrence. PMID:28123724

  15. Concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost for locally advanced cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bailleux, Caroline; Falk, Alexander Tuan; Chand-Fouche, Marie-Eve; Gautier, Mathieu; Barranger, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is no consensus for parametrial boost technic while both transvaginal and transperineal approaches are discussed. A prototype was developed consisting of a perineal template, allowing transperineal needle insertion. This study analyzed acute toxicity of concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost for locally advanced cervical cancer. Material and methods From 01.2011 to 12.2014, 33 patients (pts) presenting a locally advanced cervical cancer with parametrial invasion were treated. After the first course of external beam radiation therapy with cisplatinum, HDRB was performed combining endocavitary and interstitial technique for cervical and parametrial disease. Post-operative delineation (CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid) and planification were based on CT-scan/MRI. HDRB was delivered in 3-5 fractions over 2-3 consecutive days. Acute toxicities occurring within 6 months after HDRB were retrospectively reviewed. Results Median age was 56.4 years (27-79). Clinical stages were: T2b = 23 pts (69.7%), T3a = 1 pt (3%), T3b = 6 pts (18.2%), and T4a = 3 pts (9.1%). Median HDRB prescribed dose was 21 Gy (21-27). Median CTVCT (16 pts) and HR-CTVMRI (17 pts) were 52.6 cc (28.5-74.3), 31.9 cc (17.1-58), respectively. Median EQD2αβ10 for D90CTV and D90HR-CTV were 82.9 Gy (78.2-96.5), 84.8 Gy (80.6-91.4), respectively. Median EQD2αβ3 (CT/MRI) for D2cc bladder, rectum and sigmoid were 75.5 Gy (66.6-90.9), 64.4 Gy (51.9-77.4), and 60.4 Gy (50.9-81.1), respectively. Median follow-up was 14 months (ranged 6-51). Among the 24 pts with MFU = 24 months, 2-year LRFS rate, RRFS, and OS were 86.8%, 88.8%, and 94.1%, respectively. The rates of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 36% (G1 dysuria = 8 pts, G2 infection = 2 pts, G3 infection = 2 pts), and 27% (G1 diarrhea = 9 pts), respectively. One patient presented vaginal bleeding at the time of applicator withdrawal (G3-blood transfusion); no bleeding was

  16. A prospective study of the efficacy of magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging for predicting locally advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Ali; Parizi, Mehdi Kardoust; Kazemeini, Seid Mohammad; Abedi, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) for predicting locally advanced prostate cancer (PC). Materials and methods: Between April 2009 and July 2012, 80 consecutive patients with clinically localized PC had undergone endorectal MRSI before radical retropubic prostatectomy. Clinicopathological parameters, including age, preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score (GS) at biopsy, perinural invasion at biopsy, prostate weight at surgery, GS of surgical specimen, and pathological staging were recorded. The MRSI findings were compared with the histopathological findings of the radical prostatectomy. The diagnostic accuracy measures consisting of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) of MRSI, and other variables in the diagnosis of locally advanced PC (Pathology Stages pT3a, pT3b, or pT4) were evaluated. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRSI in detecting locally advanced PC is 42.4%, 93.6%, 82.3%, and 69.8%, respectively [area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve=0.658, p value <0.0001]. MRSI, cancer-positive core percentage at biopsy, and GS at biopsy are more accurate factors among all the predictive variables in predicting locally advanced PC. Conclusion: MRSI may be considered as a complementary diagnostic modality with high specificity and moderate sensitivity in predicting locally advanced PC. Combination of this modality with other predictive factors helps the surgeon and patient to select an appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26328204

  17. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery after neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for locally advanced extraperitoneal rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, G; Zaccone, G; Magnocavallo, M; Mattana, C; Pafundi, D P; Gambacorta, M A; Valentini, V; Coco, C

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a prospective analysis of post-operative and oncological outcomes in patients affected by locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), who obtained a major/complete clinical response after pre-operative radio-chemotherapy (RCT) and were treated with local excision (LE) by trans-anal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) to confirm a pathological complete response (pCR) after to neo-adjuvant RCT. All patients with LARC treated by pre-operative RCT and full-thickness LE by TEM (2000-2014) were included in the study. If the pathological analysis confirmed near complete or pCR, intensive follow up was proposed. If the pathological response was incomplete, a radical resection with TME was proposed. Post-operative (according to Clavien's classification), functional and long-term oncological outcome were analyzed. 36 patients were treated by TEM. The median post-operative hospital stay was 5 days. The post-operative morbidity was 41.6% (no grade ≥3). At pathological analysis, 23 specimens were ypT0 TRG1, and 4 were ypT1 TRG2. In 9 cases (ypT>1 and/or TRG>2), radical surgery with TME was proposed but 3 refused it. Median follow-up was 68 months. One local recurrence and 4 distant metastases occurred. The 5-yr actuarial local control, overall survival and disease-free survival were 96.0%, 92.0% and 82.8%. In case of major or complete clinical response of LARC after pre-operative RCT, LE by TEM can be used to confirm the pathological response. This avoids the necessity of radical surgery and, in our experience, this approach seems to guarantee oncological safety with the functional advantages of an organ-sparing procedure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiotherapy and Hyperthermia for Treatment of Primary Locally Advanced Cervix Cancer: Results in 378 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Franckena, Martine Lutgens, Ludy C.; Koper, Peter C.; Kleynen, Catharina E.; Steen-Banasik, Elsbieta M. van der; Jobsen, Jan J.; Leer, Jan Willem; Creutzberg, Carien L.; Dielwart, Michel F.; Norden, Yvette van; Canters, Richard A.M.; Rhoon, Gerard C. van; Zee, Jacoba van der

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To report response rate, pelvic tumor control, survival, and late toxicity after treatment with combined radiotherapy and hyperthermia (RHT) for patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma (LACC) and compare the results with other published series. Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2005, a total of 378 patients with LACC (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IB2-IVA) were treated with RHT. External beam radiotherapy (RT) was applied to 46-50.4 Gy and combined with brachytherapy. The hyperthermia (HT) was prescribed once weekly. Primary end points were complete response (CR) and local control. Secondary end points were overall survival, disease-specific survival, and late toxicity. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics predictive for the end points were identified in univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Overall, a CR was achieved in 77% of patients. At 5 years, local control, disease-specific survival, and incidence of late toxicity Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Grade 3 or higher were 53%, 47%, and 12%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, number of HT treatments emerged as a predictor of outcome in addition to commonly identified prognostic factors. Conclusions: The CR, local control, and survival rates are similar to previously observed results of RHT in the randomized Dutch Deep Hyperthermia Trial. Reported treatment results for currently applied combined treatment modalities (i.e., RT with chemotherapy and/or HT) do not permit definite conclusions about which combination is superior. The present results confirm previously shown beneficial effects from adding HT to RT and justify the application of RHT as first-line treatment in patients with LACC as an alternative to chemoradiation.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging for planning intracavitary brachytherapy for the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Oñate Miranda, M; Pinho, D F; Wardak, Z; Albuquerque, K; Pedrosa, I

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common gynecological cancer. Its treatment depends on tumor staging at the time of diagnosis, and a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is the treatment of choice in locally advanced cervical cancers. The combined use of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy increases survival in these patients. Brachytherapy enables a larger dose of radiation to be delivered to the tumor with less toxicity for neighboring tissues with less toxicity for neighboring tissues compared to the use of external beam radiotherapy alone. For years, brachytherapy was planned exclusively using computed tomography (CT). The recent incorporation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides essential information about the tumor and neighboring structures making possible to better define the target volumes. Nevertheless, MRI has limitations, some of which can be compensated for by fusing CT and MRI. Fusing the images from the two techniques ensures optimal planning by combining the advantages of each technique.

  20. Nonsurgical Management of Cervical Cancer: Locally Advanced, Recurrent, and Metastatic Disease, Survivorship, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Helen J.; Wenzel, Lari; Mileshkin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Overview Despite the declining incidence of cervical cancer as a result of the introduction of screening programs, globally it remains a leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Outcomes for patients who are diagnosed with anything but early-stage disease remain poor. Here we examine emerging strategies to improve the treatment of locally advanced disease. We discuss emerging biologic data, which are informing our investigation of new therapeutic interventions in persistent, recurrent, and metastatic cervical cancer. We recognize the importance of interventions to improve quality of life and to prevent long-term sequelae in women undergoing treatment. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we recognize the need for global collaboration and advocacy to improve the outcome for all women at risk of and diagnosed with this disease. PMID:25993189

  1. Effectiveness of prophylactic retropharyngeal lymph node irradiation in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the study is to assess the effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for the prevention of retropharyngeal nodal recurrences in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Methods A retrospective review of 76 patients with head and neck cancer undergoing concurrent chemoradiation or postoperative radiotherapy with IMRT or IGRT who were at risk for retropharyngeal nodal recurrences because of anatomic site (hypopharynx, nasopharynx, oropharynx) and/or the presence of nodal metastases was undertaken. The prevalence of retropharyngeal nodal recurrences was assessed on follow-up positron emission tomography (PET)-CT scans. Results At a median follow-up of 22 months (4–53 months), no patient developed retropharyngeal nodal recurrences. Conclusion Prophylactic irradiation of retropharyngeal lymph nodes with IMRT or IGRT provides effective regional control for individuals at risk for recurrence in these nodes. PMID:22708791

  2. The safety and efficacy of sonidegib for the treatment of locally advanced basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Collier, Nicholas J; Ali, Faisal R; Lear, John T

    2016-10-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are the commonest malignancy in the Western world. Locally advanced BCCs (laBCCs) represent tumours that have developed in difficult-to-treat facial sites, aggressively recurrent tumours, large neglected tumours and those in which current treatment options are excluded by clinical or patient-driven criteria. It is estimated laBCCs represent 1% of BCCs. Sonidegib is an oral hedgehog pathway inhibitor with a novel structure. It has recently been licensed for the treatment of laBCC. This article provides a comprehensive review of the literature regarding sonidegib, detailing the pharmacology of the compound, clinical trial data, competitor compounds and a future perspective. Expert commentary: Sonidegib is a novel smoothened (SMO) inhibitor with comparable efficacy to vismodegib, with patient response rates of 44% (sonidegib) and 43% (vismodegib). The adverse effect profile of these two treatments is similar with the main effects being considered to be class effects of SMO inhibitors.

  3. Locally advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma: molecular pathways, treatment options and new targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Salas, Veronica; Alegre, Marta; Garcés, Joan Ramón; Puig, Lluis

    2014-06-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been identified as important to normal embryonic development in living organisms and it is implicated in processes including cell proliferation, differentiation and tissue patterning. Aberrant Hh pathway has been involved in the pathogenesis and chemotherapy resistance of different solid and hematologic malignancies. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and medulloblastoma are two well-recognized cancers with mutations in components of the Hh pathway. Vismodegib has recently approved as the first inhibitor of one of the components of the Hh pathway (smoothened). This review attempts to provide current data on the molecular pathways involved in the development of BCC and the therapeutic options available for the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic BCC, and the new targeted therapies in development.

  4. [Axillary pathologic response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer with axillary involvement].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ballvé, A; Serrano-Palacio, A; García-Sáenz, J A; Ortega Candil, A; Salsidua-Arroyo, O; Román-Santamaría, J M; Pelayo Alarcón, A; Fuentes Ferrer, M E; Carreras-Delgado, J L

    2015-01-01

    To compare axillary involvement (N+) at initial staging in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) with axillary lymphadenectomy histologic results after neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment (NeoChemo). Retrospective study between November 2011 and September 2013 of LABC cases treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy based on docetaxel (associated with trastuzumab in HER2 positive cases and carboplatin/adriamycin in HER2 negative cases). Those clinically or radiologically suspected cases of axillary involvement were histologically confirmed. When there was no suspicion of axillary involvement, sentinel lymph node radioguided biopsy (SLNRB) was performed using intradermal injection of (99m)Tc-nanocolloid albumin prior to neoadjuvant treatment. Axillary lymphadenectomy after NeoChemo was undertaken in all cases with positive axilla. Final pathologic response was classified as complete (pCR) when there was no evidence of tumoral disease and as non-pathologic complete response (no pCR) in the opposite case. A total of 346 patients treated with docetaxel were reviewed, identifying 105 LABC. Axillary involvement at initial staging was detected in 70 (67%) before starting NeoChemo. From these 70, 73% (n=51) were N+ (fine needle biopsy and/or biopsy) and the remaining 19 (27%) were occult N+ detected by SLNRB. Axillary lymphadenectomy detected pCR in 56% (39/70), increasing up to 84% pCR when initial N+ status was reached using SNLB. On the other hand, when N+ was detected using fine needle biopsy/lymph biopsy, pCR was only 45%. More than 50% of women affected by locally advanced breast cancer with tumoral axillary involvement at initial diagnosis present free metastatic axilla after therapeutic neoadjuvant chemotherapy effect. This increases up to almost 90% in case of occult metastatic axilla detected with sentinel node biopsy prior starting neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  5. CEP55 overexpression predicts poor prognosis in patients with locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenpeng; Wang, Zhou; Jia, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) involves alterations in multiple genes with corresponding proteins. Recent studies have demonstrated that centrosomal protein 55 (CEP55) shares certain features with oncogenes, and CEP55 overexpression is associated with the development and progression of malignant tumors. The present study aimed to analyze, for the first time, whether CEP55 expression is related to clinicopothalogic features in the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), as well as patient survival. A total of 110 patients with mid-thoracic ESCC who suffered from Ivor-Lewis were enrolled. The CEP55 expression profile of these patients in tumour tissues and corresponding healthy esophageal mucosa (CHEM) was detected by immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses. Correlations between CEP55 expression and clinicopathological factors were analyzed using χ2 test. The log-rank test was employed to calculate survival rate. A Cox regression multivariate analysis was performed to determine independent prognostic factors. The results demonstrated that CEP55 expression in ESCC was significantly higher than that of CHEM (P<0.001). Overexpression of CEP55 was significantly associated with differentiation degree (P=0.022), T stage (P=0.019), lymph node metastasis (P=0.033), clinicopathological staging (P=0.002) and tumor recurrence (P=0.021) in locally advanced ESCC patients. In addition, CEP55 overexpression was significantly associated with reduced overall survival of patients after surgery (P=0.012). The 5-year survival rate of patients without CEP55 overexpression was significantly higher than that of patients with CEP55 overexpression (P=0.012). Therefore, these findings suggest that CEP55 overexpression correlates with poor prognosis in locally advanced ESCC patients. PMID:28123547

  6. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, mitoxantrone, and 5-fluorouracil in locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Erol, Kutlu; Baltali, Esmen; Altundag, Kadri; Guler, Nilufer; Ozisik, Yavuz; Onat, Demir Ali; Sayek, Iskender; Cengiz, Mustafa; Atahan, Lale; Tekuzman, Gülten

    2005-02-01

    Our primary objective was to determine the response rate; secondary objectives were to assess the toxicity rate, and disease-free and overall survival rates in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) receiving a cyclophosphamide (500 mg/m2), mitoxantrone (12 mg/m2) and 5-fluorouracil (500 mg/m2) (CMF) chemotherapy regimen. The data from 74 patients with LABC with neoadjuvant CMF chemotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. Preoperatively, all patients received 3 cycles of CMF on day 1, repeated every 21 days. In 3 (4.1%) patients, breast-conserving surgery was given and in 71 (95.9%) modified radical mastectomy. All patients received radiotherapy and 3 additional cycles of CMF chemotherapy after surgery. Median age of the patients was 47 years (range: 17-74). 43 patients were premenopausal, whereas 31 were postmenopausal. 54 patients were in stage IIIA, and 20 were in stage IIIB. The overall clinical response rate was 88%; 11 (14.9%) had a complete response, 54 (73%) had a partial response, and 2 (2.8%) had progression. 14 (18.9%) had a pathological complete response. The median follow-up was 62 months. The median disease-free survival was 64.9 months, and the median overall survival was 97.5 months. The 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 52% and 79.9%, respectively. Most frequent side-effects were nausea/vomiting, mucositis, alopecia and leukopenia. The CMF regimen has a high overall response rate and an acceptable side effect profile in the treatment of locally advanced breast cancer. Further studies are needed to evaluate its effectiveness in breast-conserving strategies.

  7. Phase II trial to evaluate gemcitabine and etoposide for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Marianne K; Webb, Craig P; Richardson, Patrick J; Luttenton, Charles R; Campbell, Alan D; Monroe, Thomas J; O'Rourke, Timothy J; Yost, Kathleen J; Szczepanek, Connie M; Bassett, Michelle R; Truszkowski, Kimberly J; Stein, Phyllis; Van Brocklin, Matthew W; Davis, Alan T; Bedolla, Gabriela; Vande Woude, George F; Koo, Han-Mo

    2010-08-01

    Prior studies suggest that tumor cell lines harboring RAS mutations display remarkable sensitivity to gemcitabine and etoposide. In a phase II clinical trial of patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer, we evaluated the response rate to a combination of these drugs. Forty chemo-naïve patients with nonresectable and histologically confirmed pancreatic cancer were accrued. Patients received gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) (days 1 and 8) and etoposide 80 mg/m(2) (days 8, 9, and 10; 21-day cycle). The primary end point was radiological response rate. Secondary objectives were determination of overall survival, response duration (time to progression), quality of life, toxicity, and CA 19-9 biomarker response. In 35 evaluable patients, 10 exhibited a radiological partial response and 12 had stable disease in response to treatment. Twenty patients exhibited a >20% decrease in CA 19-9 biomarker levels. Median overall survival was 6.7 months for all patients (40) and 7.2 months for evaluable patients (35). Notably, four patients survived for longer than 1 year, with two patients surviving for more than 2 years. Median time to progression for evaluable patients was 3.1 months. The median overall survival for locally advanced patients was 8.8 months and 6.75 months for metastatic patients. One-year survival was 10% for all patients and 11.4% for evaluable patients. Quality of life improved in 12 patients and remained stable in 3 of the evaluable patients. The primary dose-limiting toxicities were hematologic toxicity and fatigue. These results show that the gemcitabine and etoposide combination is generally well-tolerated and exhibits a response rate similar to other published studies. (c) 2010 AACR.

  8. Intraoperative Radiotherapy Combined With Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Shen; Lu Jiade; Zhang Qing Yang Zhe; Peng Lihua; Xiong, Fei

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) followed by concurrent chemotherapy and external beam RT (EBRT) in the treatment of locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 97 consecutive and nonselected patients with newly diagnosed Stage T3, T4, or N+ adenocarcinoma of the stomach underwent gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection between March 2003 and October 2005. Of the 97 patients, 51 received adjuvant concurrent chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, docetaxel, and cisplatin) and EBRT (EBRT group) and 46 received IORT (dose range, 12-15 Gy) immediately after gastrectomy and lymph node dissection before concurrent chemoradiotherapy (EBRT+IORT group). Results: After a median follow-up of 24 months, the 3-year locoregional control rate was 77% and 63% in the two groups with or without IORT, respectively (p = 0.05). The 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 47% and 36% in the EBRT group and 56% and 44% in the EBRT+IORT group, respectively (p > 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that the use of IORT, presence of residual disease after surgery, and pN category were independent prognostic factors for locoregional control and that IORT, pN, and pT categories were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (p < 0.05). Four patients experienced Grade 3 or 4 late complications, but no significant difference was observed between the two groups. Conclusions: Radical gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection and IORT followed by adjuvant chemoradiotherapy appeared to be feasible and well-tolerated in the treatment of locally advanced gastric cancer. The addition of IORT to the trimodality treatment significantly improved the 3-year locoregional control rate.

  9. The Quality-of-Life Effects of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Joseph M.; Narang, Amol K.; Griffith, Kent A.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Reese, Jennifer B.; Gearhart, Susan L.; Azad, Nolifer S.; Chan, June; Olsen, Leah; Efron, Jonathan E.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Existing studies that examine the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer on patient quality of life (QOL) are limited. Our goals were to prospectively explore acute changes in patient-reported QOL endpoints during and after treatment and to establish a distribution of scores that could be used for comparison as new treatment modalities emerge. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled at 2 institutions. Validated cancer-specific European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQ-CR30) and colorectal cancer-specific (EORTC QLQ-CR38 and EORTC QLQ-CR 29) QOL questionnaires were administered to patients 1 month before they began CRT, at week 4 of CRT, and 1 month after they had finished CRT. The questionnaires included multiple symptom scales, functional domains, and a composite global QOL score. Additionally, a toxicity scale was completed by providers 1 month before the beginning of CRT, weekly during treatment, and 1 month after the end of CRT. Results: Global QOL showed a statistically significant and borderline clinically significant decrease during CRT (-9.50, P=.0024) but returned to baseline 1 month after the end of treatment (-0.33, P=.9205). Symptoms during treatment were mostly gastrointestinal (nausea/vomiting +9.94, P<.0001; and diarrhea +16.67, P=.0022), urinary (dysuria +13.33, P<.0001; and frequency +11.82, P=.0006) or fatigue (+16.22, P<.0001). These symptoms returned to baseline after therapy. However, sexual enjoyment (P=.0236) and sexual function (P=.0047) remained persistently diminished after therapy. Conclusions: Rectal cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT may experience a reduction in global QOL along with significant gastrointestinal and genitourinary symptoms during treatment. Moreover, provider-rated toxicity scales may not fully capture this decrease in patient-reported QOL. Although most symptoms are transient

  10. Comparison of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin and capecitabine in preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dae Yong; Jung, Kyung Hae . E-mail: khjung@ncc.re.kr; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Duck-Woo; Chang, Hee Jin; Jeong, Jun Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Son, Seok-Hyun; Yun, Tak; Hong, Chang Won; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Jae-Gahb

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To describe our experience with a bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin (FL) vs. capecitabine in terms of radiologic and pathologic findings in preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: The study enrolled 278 patients scheduled for preoperative CRT using two protocols with different chemotherapeutic regimens. Pelvic radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) was delivered concurrently with FL (n = 145) or capecitabine (n = 133). Surgery was performed 6 weeks after CRT completion. Tumor responses to CRT were measured using both radiologic and pathologic examination. Magnetic resonance volumetry was performed at the initial workup and just before surgery after completion of preoperative CRT. Post-CRT pathology tests were used to determine tumor stage and regression. Results: Radiologic examination showed that tumor volume decreased by 68.2% {+-} 20.5% in the FL group and 68.3% {+-} 22.3% in the capecitabine group (p = 0.970). Postoperative pathologic T stage determination showed that downstaging occurred in 44.3% of FL and 49.9% of capecitabine patients (p = 0.571). The tumor regression grades after CRT were Grade 1 (minimal response) in 22.6% and 21.0%, Grade 2 (moderate response) in 53.2% and 50.0%, Grade 3 (near-complete response) in 12.9% and 12.9%, and Grade 4 (complete response) in 11.3% and 16.1% of the FL and capecitabine groups, respectively (p = 0.758). Conclusion: In the present study, the radiologic and pathologic findings did not reveal significant differences in short-term tumor responses between preoperative FL and capecitabine CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. Long-term results and a prospective randomized trial are needed.

  11. Sentinel node (SLN) biopsy in the management of locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Cibula, D; Kuzel, D; Sláma, J; Fischerova, D; Dundr, P; Freitag, P; Zikán, M; Pavlista, D; Tomancova, V

    2009-10-01

    Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy can significantly contribute to the management of locally advanced cervical cancers with high risk of lymph node (LN) positivity. However, low detection rate and sensitivity were reported in larger tumors, albeit on a small number of cases. It was the aim of our study to verify the SLN reliability in large tumors, with modified dye application technique and a careful identification of side-specific lymphatic drainage. The study involved 44 patients with tumors 3 cm in diameter or larger, stages IB1 to IIA, or selected IIB. In cases where SLN could not be detected, systematic pelvic lymphadenectomy was performed on the respective side. Systematic pelvic lymphadenectomy was performed during the second step radical procedure if not already done. Detection rate in the whole cohort reached 77% per patient and 59% bilaterally. No significant difference was found whether a blue dye or a combined method was used (75% vs 80%, and 55% vs 67%). Systematic pelvic lymphadenectomy was performed in cases with undetected SLN unilaterally in 8 and bilaterally in 10 women. A systematic pelvic lymphadenectomy was included in the second step radical procedure in 19 cases and no positive LN were found. There was no case of false-negative SLN result in patients who underwent surgical treatment. Detection rate in locally advanced cervical cancer could be improved by a careful dye application technique. Low false-negative SLN rate could be achieved if pelvic lymphatic drainage is evaluated on a side-specific principle by performing systematic lymphadenectomy if SLN is not detected.

  12. Radiotherapy Technical Considerations in the Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: American-French Consensus Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Huguet, Florence; Goodman, Karyn A.; Azria, David; Racadot, Severine; Abrams, Ross A.

    2012-08-01

    Summary: Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose

  13. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition, proliferation, and angiogenesis in locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Puentes, Leonardo; Cardona, Andrés F; Carranza, Hernán; Vargas, Carlos; Jaramillo, Luis F; Zea, Delma; Cetina, Lucely; Wills, Beatriz; Ruiz-Garcia, Erika; Arrieta, Oscar

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the association between epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-derived markers and expression of proteins associated with cell proliferation and tumor growth, as well as their prognostic roles, in 61 patients (mean age 52 ± 10 years) with locally advanced cervical cancer, all of whom were treated with chemoradiation and intracavitary brachytherapy. We used immunohistochemical analysis to assess the expression of proteins targeted in our investigation. Various statistical analyses were then conducted to assess protein marker associations with survival outcomes. Forty-six percent of the patients were positive for human papilloma virus. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 6.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.0-9.1, whereas overall survival (OS) was 30.0 months (95% CI: 11-48). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (P = 0.002), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (P = 0.001), and TWIST2 (P = 0.001) expression levels, as well as a tumor size <6 cm (P = 0.02), influenced OS. Changes in TWIST2 levels and loss of E-cadherin expression were correlated with VEGF and EGFR levels; furthermore, patients with high TWIST2 expression had shorter OS (P = 0.0001), as those with loss of E-cadherin (P = 0.02). OS was even shorter when positive EGFR or VEGF expression was related with EMT markers (positive EGFR + negative E-cadherin: median 14 months, 95% CI: 3-24; negative EGFR + positive E-cadherin: median 31 months, 95% CI: 14-NA; P = 0.02.). The presence of EMT markers was associated with proliferative and pro-angiogenic protein expression and influenced the prognosis of locally advanced cervical cancer. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Meta-analysis comparing higher and lower dose radiotherapy for palliation in locally advanced lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie-Tao; Zheng, Jia-He; Han, Cheng-Bo; Guo, Qi-Yong

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to compare higher dose (≥30 Gy) and lower dose (<30 Gy) radiotherapy (RT) on palliation of symptoms and survival in patients with locally advanced lung cancer. A search of PubMed and Google Scholar was conducted on 10 June 2013 using combinations of the search terms: radiotherapy, non-small-cell lung carcinoma, palliative, supportive, symptom relief. Inclusion criteria were: (i) palliative thoracic RT; (ii) randomized controlled trial; (iii) English language; and (iv) compared outcomes between higher dose (≥30 Gy) and lower dose (<30 Gy) RT. The primary outcome was palliation of symptoms (cough, chest pain, hemoptysis), and 1- and 2-year overall survival. Tests of heterogeneity, sensitivity, and publication bias were performed. Five randomized controlled trials with a total of 1730 patients with lung cancer were included in the meta-analysis. There were 925 patients treated with a higher RT dose (≥30 Gy) and 805 treated with a lower RT dose (<30 Gy). The combined odds ratios (ORs) indicated no significant difference in palliation of cough, chest pain, and hemoptysis between the higher dose and lower dose RT groups (combined ORs = 0.88, 1.83, 1.39, respectively). The 1- and 2-year OS rates were similar between the high and low dose RT groups (combined ORs = 1.09 and 1.38, respectively). This meta-analysis indicates that high dose (≥30 Gy) and lower dose (<30 Gy) RT provide similar symptom palliation and 1- and 2-year OS in patients with locally advanced lung cancer. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  15. A Younger Dryas re-advance of local glaciers in north Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Nicolaj K.; Funder, Svend; Linge, Henriette; Möller, Per; Schomacker, Anders; Fabel, Derek; Xu, Sheng; Kjær, Kurt H.

    2016-09-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD) is a well-constrained cold event from 12,900 to 11,700 years ago but it remains unclear how the cooling and subsequent abrupt warming recorded in ice cores was translated into ice margin fluctuations in Greenland. Here we present 10Be surface exposure ages from three moraines in front of local glaciers on a 50 km stretch along the north coast of Greenland, facing the Arctic Ocean. Ten ages range from 11.6 ± 0.5 to 27.2 ± 0.9 ka with a mean age of 12.5 ± 0.7 ka after exclusion of two outliers. We consider this to be a minimum age for the abandonment of the moraines. The ages of the moraines are furthermore constrained using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating of epishelf sediments, which were deposited prior to the ice advance that formed the moraines, yielding a maximum age of 12.4 ± 0.6 ka, and bracketing the formation and subsequent abandonment of the moraines to within the interval 11.8-13.0 ka ago. This is the first time a synchronous YD glacier advance and subsequent retreat has been recorded for several independent glaciers in Greenland. In most other areas, there is no evidence for re-advance and glaciers were retreating during YD. We explain the different behaviour of the glaciers in northernmost Greenland as a function of their remoteness from the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), which in other areas has been held responsible for modifying the YD drop in temperatures.

  16. Palliative Hypo-fractionated Radiotherapy in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer with Fixed Neck Nodes.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, Rajan; Kumar-Patidar, Arvind; Walke, Rahul; Hirapara, Pushpendra; Jain, Sandeep; Raj-Bardia, Megh

    2012-01-01

    The locally advanced head and neck cancer with fixed nodes are incurable and has a short survival. This study aims to evaluate the symptom relief, disease response and acute toxicity after palliative hypo-fractionated radiotherapy. Between December 2010 to June 2011, previously untreated 50 patients who had histopathologically proved of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with fixed node of stage IV, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 2-3 were offered palliative radiotherapy (20 Gy/5Fr/5 Days). Patients were evaluated at 15th and 30th day after completion of treatment for disease response (WHO), palliation of symptoms using symptomatic response grading and acute toxicities (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, RTOG). The most common presenting complaint was pain followed by dysphagia. Majority of patients (60-70%) had appreciable relief in their presenting symptom. In our study, we observed Partial Response (PR) in majority of patients (92 %); no patient had progressive or stable disease. None of the patients experienced radiation toxicities that required hospital admission. Almost all patients showed grade one and two acute skin and mucosal toxicities one month after completion of treatment. Advanced head and neck cancer with fixed neck node should be identified for suitable palliative hypo-fractionated radiotherapy to achieve acceptable symptom relief in great proportion of patients.

  17. Survival and failure outcomes in locally advanced esthesioneuroblastoma: a single centre experience of 15 patients.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ritesh; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Khosla, Divya; Bharti, Shreekant; Das, Ashim; Kumar, Narendra; Kapoor, Rakesh; Sharma, Suresh Chander

    2013-05-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) constitutes 3 % of all malignant intranasal tumors. As the tumor is very rare, the number of patients of ENB treated in individual departments is small. We present our institute's experience in combined modality management of 15 successive patients of ENB treated from 2006 to 2010. Clinical characteristics and treatment modality in form of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy were noted. Kadish stage C was the most common stage (12 patients) followed by stage B (3 patients). Fourteen patients underwent primary surgery, of which nine had total excision and five had subtotal excision. One patient was treated with combination of chemotherapy (CT) and radiotherapy (RT). Median RT dose delivered was 54 Gy. Twelve patients received CT with cisplatin and etoposide. Overall, eight patients had complete response, five had partial response, while one had static disease and progressive disease each. Two patients had distant metastases. Four-year loco-regional control (LRC) was 25 % and 4-year overall survival (OS) was 45 %. Most common presentation in our series was locally advanced tumors. Most of these patients require adjuvant RT, which helps in significant LRC. Systemic CT benefits in inoperable, advanced and high risk tumors. Risk-adapted and multimodality approach is the need of hour to achieve good control rates while minimizing treatment related toxicity.

  18. Role of radiotherapy in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kalogeridi, Maria-Aggeliki; Zygogianni, Anna; Kyrgias, George; Kouvaris, John; Chatziioannou, Sofia; Kelekis, Nikolaos; Kouloulias, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    Many patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) present with advanced disease, not amenable to curative therapies such as surgery, transplantation or radiofrequency ablation. Treatment options for this group of patients include transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and radiation therapy. Especially TACE, delivering a highly concentrated dose of chemotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing systemic toxicity of chemotherapy, has given favorable results on local control and survival. Radiotherapy, as a therapeutic modality of internal radiation therapy with radioisotopes, has also achieved efficacious tumor control in advanced disease. On the contrary, the role of external beam radiotherapy for HCC has been limited in the past, due to the low tolerance of surrounding normal liver parenchyma. However, technological innovations in the field of radiotherapy treatment planning and delivery, have provided the means of delivering radical doses to the tumor, while sparing normal tissues. Advanced and highly conformal radiotherapy approaches such as stereotactic body radiotherapy and proton therapy, evaluated for efficacy and safety for HCC, report encouraging results. In this review, we present the role of radiotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma patients not suitable for radical treatment. PMID:25625001

  19. Percutaneous cryoablation for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyoung Doo

    2016-01-01

    Local ablation therapy is considered as a conventional treatment option for patients with early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although radiofrequency (RF) ablation is widely used for HCC, the use of cryoablation has been increasing as newer and safer cryoablation systems have developed. The thermodynamic mechanism of freezing and thawing used in cryoablation is the Joule-Thomson effect. Cryoablation destroys tissue via direct tissue destruction and vascular-related injury. A few recent comparative studies have shown that percutaneous cryoablation for HCCs is comparable to percutaneous RF ablation in terms of long term therapeutic outcomes and complications. Cryoablation has several advantages over RF ablation such as well visualization of iceball, no causation of severe pain, and lack of severe damage to great vessels and gallbladder. It is important to know the advantages and disadvantages of cryoablation compared with RF ablation for improvement of therapeutic efficacy and safety. PMID:28081593

  20. Epigenomic Characterization of Locally Advanced Anal Cancer: An RTOG 98-11 Specimen Study

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Erin M; Eschrich, Steven; Winter, Kathryn; Riggs, Bridget; Berglund, Anders; Ajidahun, Abidemi; Simko, Jeff; Moughan, Jennifer; Ajani, Jaffer; Magliocco, Anthony; Elahi, Abul; Hoffe, Sarah; Shibata, David

    2014-01-01

    Background The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 98-11 clinical trial demonstrated the superiority of standard 5FU/mitomycin-C over 5FU/cisplatin in combination with radiation in the treatment of anal squamous cell cancer. Tumor size (>5cm) and lymph node metastases are associated with disease progression. There may be key molecular differences (e.g. DNA methylation changes) in tumors at high-risk for progression. Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine if there are differences in DNA methylation at individual CpG sites and within genes among locally advanced anal cancers, with large tumor size and/or nodal involvement, compared to those that are less advanced. Design Case-case study among 121 patients defined as high-risk (tumor size>5cm and/or nodal involvement; n=59) or low-risk (≤5cm, node negative; n=62) within the mitomycin-C arm of RTOG98-11 trial. DNA methylation was measured using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 Array. Settings Tertiary care cancer center in collaboration with a national clinical trials cooperative group. Patients The patients consisted of 74 women and 47 men with a median age of 54 years (minmax 25-79). Main Outcome Measures DNA methylation differences at individual CpG sites and within genes between low and high-risk patients were compared using Mann-Whitney test (p-value<0.001). Results A total of 16 CpG loci were differentially methylated (14 increased and 2 decreased) in high vs. low-risk cases. Genes harboring differentially methylated CpG sites included known tumor suppressor genes and novel targets. Limitations This study only included patients in mitomycin-C arm with tumor tissue; however, this sample was representative of the trial. Conclusions This is the first study to apply genome-wide methylation analysis to anal cancer. Biologically relevant differences in methylated targets were found to discriminate locally advanced from early anal cancer. Epigenetic events likely play a significant role in the

  1. Adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy in locally advanced breast cancer: a randomized clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Schaake-Koning, C.; van der Linden, E.H.; Hart, G.; Engelsman, E.

    1985-10-01

    Between 1977 and 1980, 118 breast cancer patients with locally advanced disease, T3B-4, any N, M0 or T1-3, tumor positive axillary apex biopsy, were randomized to one of three arms: I: radiotherapy (RT) to the breast and adjacent lymph node areas; II: RT followed by 12 cycles of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5 fluorouracil (CMF) and tamoxifen during the chemotherapy period; III: 2 cycles of adriamycin and vincristine (AV), alternated with 2 cycles of CMF, then RT, followed by another 4 cycles of AV, alternated with 4 CMF; tamoxifen during the entire treatment period. The median follow-up period was 5 1/2 years. The adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy did not improve the overall survival; the 5-year survival was 37% for all three treatment arms. There was no statistically significant difference in RFS between the three modalities, nor when arm I was compared to arm II and III together. LR was not statistically different over the three treatment arms. In 18 of the 24 patients with LR, distant metastases appeared within a few months from the local recurrence. The menopausal status did not influence the treatment results. Dose reduction in more than 4 cycles of chemotherapy was accompanied by better results. In conclusion: adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy did not improve RFS and overall survival. These findings do not support the routine use of adjuvant chemo- and endocrine therapy for inoperable breast cancer.

  2. Induction chemotherapy for the treatment of non-endemic locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lina; Xu, Man; Jiang, Wen; Pan, Haitao; Zang, Jian; Luo, Shanquan; Wang, Jianhua; Zhou, Yongchun; Shi, Mei

    2017-01-01

    Background The role of induction chemotherapy is less clear in non-endemic locally advanced nanopharyngeal carcinomas (NPC). Results With a total of 233 eligible patients and a median follow-up of 36 months, 3-year overall survival (OS), local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease free survival (DFS) were 84.5%, 94.9%, 78.6% and 69.2%, respectively. The overall failure rate was 21.0% and distant metastasis occurred in 17.2% patients. Multivariate analyses showed that retropharyngeal and bilateral neck lymph node metastasis were significant prognostic factors for DFS and OS. Moreover, patients receiving both GP (gemcitabine+cisplatin) and TP (docetaxel+cisplatin) regimes had significantly higher DFS and OS compared with PF (cisplatin+5-FU) regime. GP regimes lead to significantly improved OS than TP/PF in some subgroup of patients. No severe toxicities were observed. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed stage III-IVb NPC patients treated between Jan 2006 and Dec 2014, with induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation (IC-CCRT). Statistical analyses were performed on survival and failure patterns. Conclusions These results suggested IC-CCRT was safe and effective for NPCs from non-endemic region. The choice of induction regimen appeared to affect patient outcomes. PMID:28036270

  3. Anterior chest wall resection and reconstruction for locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wee, Hide Elfrida; Akbar, Fazuludeen Ali; Rajapaksha, Keerthi; Aneez, Dokev Basheer Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    With breast cancer awareness, the incidence of large invasive tumours is rare. We present a video of locally advanced breast cancer invading the anterior chest wall requiring en bloc resection that resulted in a large chest wall defect with exposed pleural and pericardial surface. Skeletal reconstruction and provision of adequate soft tissue coverage in order to avoid respiratory failure was challenging. A 58-year-old female presented with a 3-year history of locally invasive breast carcinoma with contiguous spread to sternum, clavicles, sternoclavicular joints and bilateral second to fifth ribs. She underwent total sternectomy, bilateral second to fifth ribs and chest wall resection resulting in a 21 × 18 cm chest wall defect. Reconstruction of her sternum was with methyl-methacrylate cement prosthesis. Ribs were reconstructed with titanium plates. Soft tissue coverage was achieved with left vertical rectus abdominis pedicle flap, right external oblique transposition flap and a right latissimus dorsi free flap. Flap failure necessitated a right vastus lateralis free flap. She was discharged ambulant without respiratory compromise. Resection and reconstruction of large chest wall defects is possible due to new bioprosthetic materials and is possible w