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Sample records for locally rare pygmy

  1. Pygmy locomotion.

    PubMed

    Minetti, A E; Saibene, F; Ardigò, L P; Atchou, G; Schena, F; Ferretti, G

    1994-01-01

    The hypothesis that Pygmies may differ from Caucasians in some aspects of the mechanics of locomotion was tested. A total of 13 Pygmies and 7 Caucasians were asked to walk and run on a treadmill at 4-12 km.h-1. Simultaneous metabolic measurements and three-dimensional motion analysis were performed allowing the energy expenditure and the mechanical external and internal work to be calculated. In Pygmies the metabolic energy cost was higher during walking at all speeds (P < 0.05), but tended to be lower during running (NS). The stride frequency and the internal mechanical work were higher for Pygmies at all walking (P < 0.05) and running (NS) speeds although the external mechanical work was similar. The total mechanical work for Pygmies was higher during walking (P < 0.05), but not during running and the efficiency of locomotion was similar in all subjects and speeds. The higher cost of walking in Pygmies is consistent with the allometric prediction for smaller subjects. The major determinants of the higher cost of walking was the difference in stride frequency (+9.45, SD 0.44% for Pygmies), which affected the mechanical internal work. This explains the observed higher total mechanical work of walking in Pygmies, even when the external component was the same. Most of the differences between Pygmies and Caucasians, observed during walking, tended to disappear when the speed was normalized as the Froude number. However, this was not the case for running. Thus, whereas the tested hypothesis must be rejected for walking, the data from running, do indeed suggest that Pygmies may differ in some aspects of the mechanics of locomotion.

  2. Anisakid nematodes from stranded pygmy sperm whales, Kogia breviceps (Kogiidae), in three localities of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.

    PubMed

    González Solíz, D; Vidal-Martínez, V M; Antochiw-Alonso, D M; Ortega-Argueta, A

    2006-10-01

    The present paper reports the presence of 3 adult and juvenile anisakid nematode species: Anisakis simplex, A. brevispiculata, and Pseudoterranova ceticola, which were recovered from the digestive tract of stranded pygmy sperm whales (Kogia breviceps) from 3 localities along the coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. The presence of these anisakid adult nematodes suggests that larval stages may occur in cephalopods or fishes used for human consumption, which represents a potential danger to public health. The occurrence of the 3 anisakid species in coastal waters of the Yucatan Peninsula represents new geographical records for Mexico.

  3. Diversity among African Pygmies

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez Rozzi, Fernando V.; Sardi, Marina L.

    2010-01-01

    Although dissimilarities in cranial and post-cranial morphology among African pygmies groups have been recognized, comparative studies on skull morphology usually pull all pygmies together assuming that morphological characters are similar among them and different with respect to other populations. The main aim of this study is to compare cranial morphology between African pygmies and non-pygmies populations from Equatorial Africa derived from both the Eastern and the Western regions in order to test if the greatest morphological difference is obtained in the comparison between pygmies and non-pygmies. Thirty three-dimensional (3D) landmarks registered with Microscribe in four cranial samples (Western and Eastern pygmies and non-pygmies) were obtained. Multivariate analysis (generalized Procrustes analysis, Mahalanobis distances, multivariate regression) and complementary dimensions of size were evaluated with ANOVA and post hoc LSD. Results suggest that important cranial shape differentiation does occur between pygmies and non-pygmies but also between Eastern and Western populations and that size changes and allometries do not affect similarly Eastern and Western pygmies. Therefore, our findings raise serious doubt about the fact to consider African pygmies as a homogenous group in studies on skull morphology. Differences in cranial morphology among pygmies would suggest differentiation after divergence. Although not directly related to skull differentiation, the diversity among pygmies would probably suggest that the process responsible for reduced stature occurred after the split of the ancestors of modern Eastern and Western pygmies. PMID:21049030

  4. Changing language, remaining pygmy.

    PubMed

    Bahuchet, Serge

    2012-02-01

    In this article I am illustrating the linguistic diversity of African Pygmy populations in order to better address their anthropological diversity and history. I am also introducing a new method, based on the analysis of specialized vocabulary, to reconstruct the substratum of some languages they speak. I show that Pygmy identity is not based on their languages, which have often been borrowed from neighboring non-Pygmy farmer communities with whom each Pygmy group is linked. Understanding the nature of this partnership, quite variable in history, is essential to addressing Pygmy languages, identity, and history. Finally, I show that only a multidisciplinary approach is likely to push forward the understanding of African Pygmy societies as genetic, archeological, anthropological, and ethnological evidence suggest.

  5. Classical swine fever in the pygmy hog.

    PubMed

    Barman, N N; Bora, D P; Tiwari, A K; Kataria, R S; Desai, G S; Deka, P J

    2012-12-01

    The pygmy hog is a rare, small and highly endangered mammal belonging to the Suidae family, and it is presently found only in the Assam state of India. While investigating the cause of death of pygmy hogs housed at a conservation centre for captive breeding and research at Basistha, Assam, it was confirmed that they were susceptible to and died as a result of contracting classical swine fever (CSF), caused by CSF virus (CSFV), which is a highly infectious endemic disease of domestic pigs in India. The post-mortem findings and serum CSFV-specific antibody titres, along with the isolation of CSFV from two pygmy hogs, and further confirmation by CSFV genomic E2 and 5' untranslated region (UTR) gene amplification in PCR (polymerase chain reaction), clearly established the cause of death of the pygmy hogs. Further, on phylogenetic analysis, the pygmy hog CSFV 5' UTR sequences were grouped in the genotype 1.1 cluster of Indian CSFVs, and hence the strains causing infection were closely related to CSFV isolates circulating in domestic pigs. Therefore, the occurrence of CSF in this endangered species may pose a potent threat to their existence unless properly controlled, and thus it needs urgent attention. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report on CSF in pygmy hogs.

  6. Endometrial polyps in 2 African pygmy hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Irene D; Taylor, Jacqueline J; Allen, Andrew L

    2005-06-01

    Reports of spontaneously occurring endometrial polyps in animals are rare and have only involved a few species. This report is intended to advise veterinarians that older African pygmy hedgehogs may develop endometrial polyps and that these lesions can be a cause of bloody vaginal discharge, sometimes interpreted as hematuria.

  7. Endometrial polyps in 2 African pygmy hedgehogs

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Reports of spontaneously occurring endometrial polyps in animals are rare and have only involved a few species. This report is intended to advise veterinarians that older African pygmy hedgehogs may develop endometrial polyps and that these lesions can be a cause of bloody vaginal discharge, sometimes interpreted as hematuria. PMID:16048013

  8. Locally rare species influence grassland ecosystem multifunctionality.

    PubMed

    Soliveres, Santiago; Manning, Peter; Prati, Daniel; Gossner, Martin M; Alt, Fabian; Arndt, Hartmut; Baumgartner, Vanessa; Binkenstein, Julia; Birkhofer, Klaus; Blaser, Stefan; Blüthgen, Nico; Boch, Steffen; Böhm, Stefan; Börschig, Carmen; Buscot, Francois; Diekötter, Tim; Heinze, Johannes; Hölzel, Norbert; Jung, Kirsten; Klaus, Valentin H; Klein, Alexandra-Maria; Kleinebecker, Till; Klemmer, Sandra; Krauss, Jochen; Lange, Markus; Morris, E Kathryn; Müller, Jörg; Oelmann, Yvonne; Overmann, Jörg; Pašalić, Esther; Renner, Swen C; Rillig, Matthias C; Schaefer, H Martin; Schloter, Michael; Schmitt, Barbara; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Sikorski, Johannes; Socher, Stephanie A; Solly, Emily F; Sonnemann, Ilja; Sorkau, Elisabeth; Steckel, Juliane; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Stempfhuber, Barbara; Tschapka, Marco; Türke, Manfred; Venter, Paul; Weiner, Christiane N; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Werner, Michael; Westphal, Catrin; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Wolters, Volkmar; Wubet, Tesfaye; Wurst, Susanne; Fischer, Markus; Allan, Eric

    2016-05-19

    Species diversity promotes the delivery of multiple ecosystem functions (multifunctionality). However, the relative functional importance of rare and common species in driving the biodiversity-multifunctionality relationship remains unknown. We studied the relationship between the diversity of rare and common species (according to their local abundances and across nine different trophic groups), and multifunctionality indices derived from 14 ecosystem functions on 150 grasslands across a land-use intensity (LUI) gradient. The diversity of above- and below-ground rare species had opposite effects, with rare above-ground species being associated with high levels of multifunctionality, probably because their effects on different functions did not trade off against each other. Conversely, common species were only related to average, not high, levels of multifunctionality, and their functional effects declined with LUI. Apart from the community-level effects of diversity, we found significant positive associations between the abundance of individual species and multifunctionality in 6% of the species tested. Species-specific functional effects were best predicted by their response to LUI: species that declined in abundance with land use intensification were those associated with higher levels of multifunctionality. Our results highlight the importance of rare species for ecosystem multifunctionality and help guiding future conservation priorities.

  9. Locally rare species influence grassland ecosystem multifunctionality

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Peter; Prati, Daniel; Gossner, Martin M.; Alt, Fabian; Arndt, Hartmut; Baumgartner, Vanessa; Binkenstein, Julia; Birkhofer, Klaus; Blaser, Stefan; Blüthgen, Nico; Boch, Steffen; Böhm, Stefan; Börschig, Carmen; Buscot, Francois; Diekötter, Tim; Heinze, Johannes; Hölzel, Norbert; Jung, Kirsten; Klaus, Valentin H.; Klein, Alexandra-Maria; Kleinebecker, Till; Klemmer, Sandra; Krauss, Jochen; Lange, Markus; Morris, E. Kathryn; Müller, Jörg; Oelmann, Yvonne; Overmann, Jörg; Pašalić, Esther; Renner, Swen C.; Rillig, Matthias C.; Schaefer, H. Martin; Schloter, Michael; Schmitt, Barbara; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Sikorski, Johannes; Socher, Stephanie A.; Solly, Emily F.; Sonnemann, Ilja; Sorkau, Elisabeth; Steckel, Juliane; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Stempfhuber, Barbara; Tschapka, Marco; Türke, Manfred; Venter, Paul; Weiner, Christiane N.; Weisser, Wolfgang W.; Werner, Michael; Westphal, Catrin; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Wolters, Volkmar; Wubet, Tesfaye; Wurst, Susanne; Fischer, Markus; Allan, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Species diversity promotes the delivery of multiple ecosystem functions (multifunctionality). However, the relative functional importance of rare and common species in driving the biodiversity–multifunctionality relationship remains unknown. We studied the relationship between the diversity of rare and common species (according to their local abundances and across nine different trophic groups), and multifunctionality indices derived from 14 ecosystem functions on 150 grasslands across a land-use intensity (LUI) gradient. The diversity of above- and below-ground rare species had opposite effects, with rare above-ground species being associated with high levels of multifunctionality, probably because their effects on different functions did not trade off against each other. Conversely, common species were only related to average, not high, levels of multifunctionality, and their functional effects declined with LUI. Apart from the community-level effects of diversity, we found significant positive associations between the abundance of individual species and multifunctionality in 6% of the species tested. Species-specific functional effects were best predicted by their response to LUI: species that declined in abundance with land use intensification were those associated with higher levels of multifunctionality. Our results highlight the importance of rare species for ecosystem multifunctionality and help guiding future conservation priorities. PMID:27114572

  10. Pygmy stars: first pair.

    PubMed

    Zwicky, F

    1966-07-01

    The binary LP 101-15/16 having the proper motion of 1.62 seconds of arc per year has been studied with the prime-focus spectrograph of the 200-inch (508 cm) telescope. Indications are that LP 101-15/16 is the first pair of pygmy stars ever discovered. One of its components, LP 101-16, is probably a blue pygmy star which is at least four magnitudes fainter than the ordinary white dwarfs. Also, two of the Balmer lines in absorption appear to be displaced toward the red by amounts which indicate the existence of an Einstein gravitational red shift corresponding to about 1000 km sec-1. On the other hand LP 101-15 is red and shows an entirely new type of spectrum, which suggests that it may be a first representative of a type of red pygmy star which is 2.5 magnitudes fainter than the M-type dwarf stars of the main sequence.

  11. Pygmy rabbit surveys on state lands in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagar, Joan; Lienkaemper, George

    2007-01-01

    The pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis) is classified by the federal government as a species of concern (i.e., under review by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for consideration as a candidate for listing as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act) because of its specialized habitat requirements and evidence of declining populations. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) lists pygmy rabbits as “sensitive-vulnerable,” meaning that protective measures are needed if sustainable populations are to be maintained over time (Oregon Natural Heritage Program, 2001). The Oregon Natural Heritage Program considers this species to be threatened with extirpation from Oregon. Pygmy rabbits also are a species of concern in all the other states where they occur (NatureServe, 2004). The Washington population, known as the Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit, was listed as endangered by the federal government in 2003. Historically, pygmy rabbits have been collected from Deschutes, Klamath, Crook, Lake, Grant, Harney, Baker, and Malheur Counties in Oregon. However, the geographic range of pygmy rabbit in Oregon may have decreased in historic times (Verts and Carraway, 1998), and boundaries of the current distribution are not known. Not all potentially suitable sites appear to be occupied, and populations are susceptible to rapid declines and local extirpation (Weiss and Verts, 1984). In order to protect and manage remaining populations on State of Oregon lands, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife needs to identify areas currently occupied by pygmy rabbits, as well as suitable habitats. The main objective of this survey was document to presence or absence of pygmy rabbits on state lands in Malheur, Harney, Lake, and Deschutes counties. Knowledge of the location and extent of pygmy rabbit populations can provide a foundation for the conservation and management of this species in Oregon. The pygmy rabbit is just one of a suite of species of concern

  12. Pygmy Rabbit Surveys on State Lands in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagar, Joan; Lienkaemper, George

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis) is classified by the federal government as a species of concern (i.e., under review by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for consideration as a candidate for listing as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act) because of its specialized habitat requirements and evidence of declining populations. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) lists pygmy rabbits as 'sensitive-vulnerable,' meaning that protective measures are needed if sustainable populations are to be maintained over time (Oregon Natural Heritage Program, 2001). The Oregon Natural Heritage Program considers this species to be threatened with extirpation from Oregon. Pygmy rabbits also are a species of concern in all the other states where they occur (NatureServe, 2004). The Washington population, known as the Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit, was listed as endangered by the federal government in 2003. Historically, pygmy rabbits have been collected from Deschutes, Klamath, Crook, Lake, Grant, Harney, Baker, and Malheur Counties in Oregon. However, the geographic range of pygmy rabbit in Oregon may have decreased in historic times (Verts and Carraway, 1998), and boundaries of the current distribution are not known. Not all potentially suitable sites appear to be occupied, and populations are susceptible to rapid declines and local extirpation (Weiss and Verts, 1984). In order to protect and manage remaining populations on State of Oregon lands, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife needs to identify areas currently occupied by pygmy rabbits, as well as suitable habitats. The main objective of this survey was document to presence or absence of pygmy rabbits on state lands in Malheur, Harney, Lake, and Deschutes counties. Knowledge of the location and extent of pygmy rabbit populations can provide a foundation for the conservation and management of this species in Oregon. The pygmy rabbit is just one of a suite of species of

  13. Differences between Pygmy and Non-Pygmy Hunting in Congo Basin Forests

    PubMed Central

    Olivero, Jesús; Farfán, Miguel Angel; Lewis, Jerome; Yasuoka, Hirokazu; Noss, Andrew; Hattori, Shiho; Hirai, Masaaki; Kamgaing, Towa O. W.; Carpaneto, Giuseppe; Germi, Francesco; Márquez, Ana Luz; Duarte, Jesús; Duda, Romain; Gallois, Sandrine; Riddell, Michael; Nasi, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We use data on game harvest from 60 Pygmy and non-Pygmy settlements in the Congo Basin forests to examine whether hunting patterns and prey profiles differ between the two hunter groups. For each group, we calculate hunted animal numbers and biomass available per inhabitant, P, per year (harvest rates) and killed per hunter, H, per year (extraction rates). We assess the impact of hunting of both hunter groups from estimates of numbers and biomass of prey species killed per square kilometre, and by examining the proportion of hunted taxa of low, medium and high population growth rates as a measure of their vulnerability to overhunting. We then map harvested biomass (kg-1P-1Yr-1) of bushmeat by Pygmies and non-Pygmies throughout the Congo Basin. Hunting patterns differ between Pygmies and non-Pygmies; Pygmies take larger and different prey and non-Pygmies sell more for profit. We show that non-Pygmies have a potentially more severe impact on prey populations than Pygmies. This is because non-Pygmies hunt a wider range of species, and twice as many animals are taken per square kilometre. Moreover, in non-Pygmy settlements there was a larger proportion of game taken of low population growth rate. Our harvest map shows that the non-Pygmy population may be responsible for 27 times more animals harvested than the Pygmy population. Such differences indicate that the intense competition that may arise from the more widespread commercial hunting by non-Pygmies is a far more important constraint and source of conflict than are protected areas. PMID:27589384

  14. Differences between Pygmy and Non-Pygmy Hunting in Congo Basin Forests.

    PubMed

    Fa, John E; Olivero, Jesús; Farfán, Miguel Angel; Lewis, Jerome; Yasuoka, Hirokazu; Noss, Andrew; Hattori, Shiho; Hirai, Masaaki; Kamgaing, Towa O W; Carpaneto, Giuseppe; Germi, Francesco; Márquez, Ana Luz; Duarte, Jesús; Duda, Romain; Gallois, Sandrine; Riddell, Michael; Nasi, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We use data on game harvest from 60 Pygmy and non-Pygmy settlements in the Congo Basin forests to examine whether hunting patterns and prey profiles differ between the two hunter groups. For each group, we calculate hunted animal numbers and biomass available per inhabitant, P, per year (harvest rates) and killed per hunter, H, per year (extraction rates). We assess the impact of hunting of both hunter groups from estimates of numbers and biomass of prey species killed per square kilometre, and by examining the proportion of hunted taxa of low, medium and high population growth rates as a measure of their vulnerability to overhunting. We then map harvested biomass (kg-1P-1Yr-1) of bushmeat by Pygmies and non-Pygmies throughout the Congo Basin. Hunting patterns differ between Pygmies and non-Pygmies; Pygmies take larger and different prey and non-Pygmies sell more for profit. We show that non-Pygmies have a potentially more severe impact on prey populations than Pygmies. This is because non-Pygmies hunt a wider range of species, and twice as many animals are taken per square kilometre. Moreover, in non-Pygmy settlements there was a larger proportion of game taken of low population growth rate. Our harvest map shows that the non-Pygmy population may be responsible for 27 times more animals harvested than the Pygmy population. Such differences indicate that the intense competition that may arise from the more widespread commercial hunting by non-Pygmies is a far more important constraint and source of conflict than are protected areas.

  15. Pygmy resonances and neutron skins

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2011-03-15

    In a study motivated by a recent experiment, the distribution of electric dipole strength in the neutron-rich {sup 68}Ni isotope was computed using a relativistic random-phase approximation with a set of effective interactions that - although well calibrated - predict significantly different values for the neutron-skin thickness in {sup 208}Pb. The emergence of low-energy 'pygmy' strength that exhausts about 5%-8% of the energy-weighted sum rule (EWSR) is clearly identified. In addition to the EWSR, special emphasis is placed on the dipole polarizability. In particular, our results suggest a strong correlation between the dipole polarizability of {sup 68}Ni and the neutron-skin thickness of {sup 208}Pb. Yet we find a correlation just as strong, and an even larger sensitivity, between the neutron-skin thickness of {sup 208}Pb and the fraction of the dipole polarizability exhausted by the pygmy resonance. These findings suggest that dipole polarizability may be used as a proxy for the neutron skin.

  16. [Scapulo-thoracic mycetoma. A rare localization, a particular form].

    PubMed

    Sy, M H; Diouf, S; Ndiaye, A; Dansokho, A V; Ndiaye, P D; Diop, C A; Sèye, S I

    1998-07-01

    An uncommon form and a rare localization of mycetoma is reported. The aim of this report was to distinguish this inhabitual form of mycetoma from some tropical diseases like onchocerca and other fungal diseases. A 55 year old man was admitted 10 years after a septic worm-hole for a scapulo-thoracic tumor. This encapsulated mass was a bending and rounded polyfistular one attached to the dorsal aspect of left shoulder. The fistula discharge a serosanguineous or purulent exudate. The characteristic red granule was not visible. The tumor was removed and histological examination was performed. A typical granuloma of red granule of streptomyces pelletieri was found. A good result was obtained with associated cotrimoxazole treatment. Scapulo-thoracic form included: scapular, axillary and chest form of mycetoma. All these localizations are rare. One of them can be complicated by osteitis or pleuro-pulmonary localization. Streptomyces pellitieri is the actinomycetic causal agent. This encapsulated form is uncommon. Scapulo-thoracic mycetoma is rare. Encapsulated and pedicular form is uncommon. Around Sahel areas, differential diagnosis must be evoked such as parasitic and mycobacterial infections.

  17. Sociocultural Behavior, Sex-Biased Admixture, and Effective Population Sizes in Central African Pygmies and Non-Pygmies

    PubMed Central

    Verdu, Paul; Becker, Noémie S.A.; Froment, Alain; Georges, Myriam; Grugni, Viola; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Hombert, Jean-Marie; Van der Veen, Lolke; Le Bomin, Sylvie; Bahuchet, Serge; Heyer, Evelyne; Austerlitz, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Sociocultural phenomena, such as exogamy or phylopatry, can largely determine human sex-specific demography. In Central Africa, diverging patterns of sex-specific genetic variation have been observed between mobile hunter–gatherer Pygmies and sedentary agricultural non-Pygmies. However, their sex-specific demography remains largely unknown. Using population genetics and approximate Bayesian computation approaches, we inferred male and female effective population sizes, sex-specific migration, and admixture rates in 23 Central African Pygmy and non-Pygmy populations, genotyped for autosomal, X-linked, Y-linked, and mitochondrial markers. We found much larger effective population sizes and migration rates among non-Pygmy populations than among Pygmies, in agreement with the recent expansions and migrations of non-Pygmies and, conversely, the isolation and stationary demography of Pygmy groups. We found larger effective sizes and migration rates for males than for females for Pygmies, and vice versa for non-Pygmies. Thus, although most Pygmy populations have patrilocal customs, their sex-specific genetic patterns resemble those of matrilocal populations. In fact, our results are consistent with a lower prevalence of polygyny and patrilocality in Pygmies compared with non-Pygmies and a potential female transmission of reproductive success in Pygmies. Finally, Pygmy populations showed variable admixture levels with the non-Pygmies, with often much larger introgression from male than from female lineages. Social discrimination against Pygmies triggering complex movements of spouses in intermarriages can explain these male-biased admixture patterns in a patrilocal context. We show how gender-related sociocultural phenomena can determine highly variable sex-specific demography among populations, and how population genetic approaches contrasting chromosomal types allow inferring detailed human sex-specific demographic history. PMID:23300254

  18. Toroidal resonance: Relation to pygmy mode, vortical properties, and anomalous deformation splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, V. O.; Kvasil, J.; Repko, A.; Kleinig, W.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2016-11-01

    We review a recent progress in investigation of the isoscalar toroidal dipole resonance (TDR). A possible relation of the TDR and low-energy dipole excitations (also called a pygmy resonance) is analyzed. It is shown that the dipole strength in the pygmy region can be understood as a local manifestation of the collective vortical toroidalmotion at the nuclear surface. Application of the TDR as a measure of the nuclear dipole vorticity is discussed. An anomalous splitting of the TDR in deformed nuclei is inspected.

  19. Toroidal resonance: Relation to pygmy mode, vortical properties, and anomalous deformation splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterenko, V. O.; Kvasil, J.; Repko, A.; Kleinig, W.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2016-11-15

    We review a recent progress in investigation of the isoscalar toroidal dipole resonance (TDR). A possible relation of the TDR and low-energy dipole excitations (also called a pygmy resonance) is analyzed. It is shown that the dipole strength in the pygmy region can be understood as a local manifestation of the collective vortical toroidalmotion at the nuclear surface. Application of the TDR as a measure of the nuclear dipole vorticity is discussed. An anomalous splitting of the TDR in deformed nuclei is inspected.

  20. Systematics and evolution of the African pygmy mice, subgenus Nannomys: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton-Davidian, J.; Robinson, T. J.; Veyrunes, F.

    2012-07-01

    African pygmy mice (subgenus Nannomys) are a group of small murine rodents that are widespread throughout Sub-Saharan Africa. Although this group has long been recognized for its extensive chromosomal diversity, the highly conserved morphology of its members has made taxonomic assignments problematic. Renewed interest resulting from a series of cytogenetic and molecular investigations has led to the identification of novel patterns of diversification in these rodents that are reviewed herein. These approaches have considerably improved species delimitation and provide tentative diagnostic criteria as well as preliminary phylogenetic relationships that will be refined as more taxa are investigated. Although sparse, ecological data suggest that pygmy mice may exhibit original reproductive traits that deserve further investigation. Chromosomal diversity undoubtedly remains one of the most interesting features of African pygmy mouse biology. They display several karyotypic traits that are rare in mammals: (i) their genomes tolerate the recurrent formation of tandem fusions and sex-autosome translocations, both of which are rare in other mammals due to their highly deleterious effects on fertility; (ii) they exhibit the first case of a whole arm exchange involving an X chromosome, and (iii) two species show novel means of sex chromosome determination - one exhibits XY females, whereas the other harbors populations in which males have no Y chromosome. The diversity of African pygmy mice offers a unique opportunity to study the processes involved in their radiation, and in a broader context, the evolution of sex chromosome determination in mammals.

  1. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Couture, Émilie L; Langlois, Isabelle; Santamaria-Bouvier, Ariane; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile

    2015-12-01

    A cutaneous mass was surgically excised in a 4-year-old African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris). A squamous cell carcinoma was diagnosed based on histopathological examination and local recurrence following excision is strongly suspected. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first well-documented report of a cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in this species.

  2. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris)

    PubMed Central

    Couture, Émilie L.; Langlois, Isabelle; Santamaria-Bouvier, Ariane; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile

    2015-01-01

    A cutaneous mass was surgically excised in a 4-year-old African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris). A squamous cell carcinoma was diagnosed based on histopathological examination and local recurrence following excision is strongly suspected. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first well-documented report of a cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in this species. PMID:26663924

  3. Dynamical Coupling of Pygmy and Giant Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertulani, Carlos; Brady, Nathan; Aumann, Thomas; Thomas, James

    2016-03-01

    One of the effects overseen in studies of excitation of pygmy resonances is the fact that both pygmy and giant resonances are strongly coupled. This coupling leads to dynamical effects such as the modification of transition probabilities and and cross sections. We make an assessment of such effects by means of the relativistic coupled channels equations developed by our group. Supported by the U.S. NSF Grant No. 1415656 and the U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER41533.

  4. Relationships between gas field development and the presence and abundance of pygmy rabbits in southwestern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Germaine, Stephen; Carter, Sarah; Ignizio, Drew A.; Freeman, Aaron T.

    2017-01-01

    More than 5957 km2 in southwestern Wyoming is currently covered by operational gas fields, and further development is projected through 2030. Gas fields fragment landscapes through conversion of native vegetation to roads, well pads, pipeline corridors, and other infrastructure elements. The sagebrush steppe landscape where most of this development is occurring harbors 24 sagebrush-associated species of greatest conservation need, but the effects of gas energy development on most of these species are unknown. Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis) are one such species. In 2011, we began collecting three years of survey data to examine the relationship between gas field development density and pygmy rabbit site occupancy patterns on four major Wyoming gas fields (Continental Divide–Creston–Blue Gap, Jonah, Moxa Arch, Pinedale Anticline Project Area). We surveyed 120 plots across four gas fields, with plots distributed across the density gradient of gas well pads on each field. In a 1 km radius around the center of each plot, we measured the area covered by each of 10 gas field infrastructure elements and by shrub cover using 2012 National Agriculture Imagery Program imagery. We then modeled the relationship between gas field elements, pygmy rabbit presence, and two indices of pygmy rabbit abundance. Gas field infrastructure elements—specifically buried utility corridors and a complex of gas well pads, adjacent disturbed areas, and well pad access roads—were negatively correlated with pygmy rabbit presence and abundance indices, with sharp declines apparent after approximately 2% of the area consisted of gas field infrastructure. We conclude that pygmy rabbits in southwestern Wyoming may be sensitive to gas field development at levels similar to those observed for greater sage-grouse, and may suffer local population declines at lower levels of development than are allowed in existing plans and policies designed to conserve greater sage-grouse by limiting

  5. [Infracondylar abscess formation: a rare complication of local anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Dojcinovic, I; Hugentobler, M; Richter, M

    2006-11-01

    Ninety percent of oro-facial infections arise from a dental origin. The remaining 10% are the consequence of oro-pharyngeal, cutaneous or iatrogenic problems, such as in the present case. A 24-year-old patient consulted the emergency room because of a left mandibular swelling, accompagnied by trismus. Four days earlier, extraction of the 38 was performed under inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia. A first drainage by vestibular approach was performed under general anesthesia. Because of the absence of improvement, a CT-scan was performed and an abscess localized at the base of the condyle, surrounding the posterior margin of the mandible, very high above the lingula. Outcome was favourable after a second surgery. Formation of an abscess very high above the lingula, around the condylar neck is rarely reported in the literature. In this patient it was certainly a complication resulting from the injection of local anesthesic with a vasoconstrictor. CT-scan should be performed to guide diagnosis in the event of an unusual course after the first surgical procedure and an adequate antibiotic regimen.

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of concurrent dermal malignant melanoma and melanocytomas in a pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis).

    PubMed

    Saunders, Richard A; Killick, Rowena S; Barrows, Michelle G; Bowlt, Kelly A; Denk, Daniella

    2017-10-01

    Dermal melanocytic neoplasms are common in some even-toed ungulates (Artiodactyla), yet this entity has not been reported in the pygmy hippopotamus to date. Concurrent occurrence of multiple benign and malignant melanocytic neoplasms is unusual. Malignant transformation occurs in a small percentage of benign melanocytic tumours in people but this phenomenon has not been well documented in animals. To report the diagnosis and treatment of concurrent dermal melanocytomas and malignant melanomas in a pygmy hippopotamus. A 36-year-old intact male pygmy hippopotamus, part of a zoological collection, housed with a 10-year-old female of the same species, presented with multiple raised and pigmented skin masses. Initial impression smears of one ulcerated lesion were consistent with inflammation; subsequent histopathological findings from a skin biopsy revealed an underlying malignant melanoma. The animal was anaesthetised, ultrasonographic imaging of the local lymph nodes indicated no local involvement and all skin lesions were removed. Recovery from anaesthesia was unremarkable, skin healing was within normal limits for the species. There was no sign of recurrence 34 months post-surgery. A diagnosis of malignant melanomas and concurrent melanocytomas was made on histopathological evaluation. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of melanocytic neoplasia in the pygmy hippopotamus. The occurrence of both benign and malignant melanocytic skin tumours should be considered in this species. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  7. Pygmy resonances probed with electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertulani, C. A.

    2007-05-01

    Pygmy resonances in light nuclei excited in electron scattering are discussed. These collective modes will be explored in future electron-ion colliders such as ELISe/FAIR (spokesperson: Haik Simon - GSI). Response functions for direct breakup are explored with few-body and hydrodynamical models, including the dependence upon final state interactions.

  8. Pygmy Resonances Probed with Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bertulani, Carlos A

    2007-05-01

    Pygmy resonances in light nuclei excited in electron scattering are discussed. These collective modes will be explored in future electron-ion colliders such as ELISe/FAIR (spokesperson: Haik Simon - GSI). Response functions for direct breakup are explored with few-body and hydrodynamical models, including the dependence upon final-state interactions.

  9. Unilateral generalized morphea is a rare variant of localized scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Appelhans, C; Breuckmann, F; Gambichler, T; Brockmeyer, N H; Altmeyer, P; Kreuter, Alexander

    2006-04-28

    Localized scleroderma (LS) is a rare connective tissue disorder generally involving the entire dermis and usually limited to the subcutaneous tissue. However, it may progress to large indurated plaques, growth retardation, muscle atrophy, and even to flexion deformities or poorly healing ulcerations. LS has been classified as plaque, generalized, bullous, linear, and deep forms exhibiting different clinical subtypes. Recently, an unusual case of unilateral generalized morphea (UGM) in childhood extending from the middle dermis to the subcutaneous fat tissue has been reported. We here describe four young patients exhibiting a similar subtype of LS. All patients demonstrated a prominent unilateral skin involvement starting in childhood or adolescence. Histology revealed prominent accentuation of intradermal involvement. Except for positive anti-nuclear antibodies, no specific antibody pattern could be observed. In presenting these clinically homogenous cases we hereby introduce UGM as an extreme variant of the linear form of LS in childhood. As the onset of UGM usually occurs in pediatric patients, pediatricians should be cognizant of the presentation of this uncommon condition. Treatment with combined low-dose methotrexate and pulsed high-dose corticosteroid therapy might represent a promising treatment option for UGM.

  10. Northern pygmy right whales highlight Quaternary marine mammal interchange.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Collareta, Alberto; Fitzgerald, Erich M G; Marx, Felix G; Kohno, Naoki; Bosselaers, Mark; Insacco, Gianni; Reitano, Agatino; Catanzariti, Rita; Oishi, Masayuki; Bianucci, Giovanni

    2017-10-09

    The pygmy right whale, Caperea marginata, is the most enigmatic living whale. Little is known about its ecology and behaviour, but unusual specialisations of visual pigments [1], mitochondrial tRNAs [2], and postcranial anatomy [3] suggest a lifestyle different from that of other extant whales. Geographically, Caperea represents the only major baleen whale lineage entirely restricted to the Southern Ocean. Caperea-like fossils, the oldest of which date to the Late Miocene, are exceedingly rare and likewise limited to the Southern Hemisphere [4], despite a more substantial history of fossil sampling north of the equator. Two new Pleistocene fossils now provide unexpected evidence of a brief and relatively recent period in geological history when Caperea occurred in the Northern Hemisphere (Figure 1A,B). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hyperimmunoglobulinaemia in Babinga Pygmies is present from infancy.

    PubMed

    Meazza, C; Travaglino, P; Pagani, S; Laarej, K; Duse, M; Bozzola, M

    2009-01-01

    Pygmies, a population characterized by short stature, have high immunoglobulin (Ig) concentrations. In this study, we evaluated Ig levels in Cameroons Babinga Pygmies from infancy to adulthood and the effects of a national health program on these Ig levels. We found that IgG and IgM levels were outside the normal range for Italians of the same age and were comparable to those measured in Babinga Pygmies living in the same region by Siccardi in 1975. In conclusion, the hypergammaglobulinaemia of Babinga Pygmies is already present in infants and is not affected by sanitation improvements, suggesting that it could be partly genetically-determined.

  12. Pygmy dipole response in 238U nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guliyev, Ekber; Kuliev, Ali Akbar; Quliyev, Huseynqulu

    2017-02-01

    The presence of the El pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) in the actinide nucleus 238U was shown via QRPA. Below the particle threshold energy, 24 excitation states were calculated. The calculations, is demonstrating the presence of a PDR with evidence for K splitting. The calculations further suggest that the PDR in 238U is predominantly K=0. The obtained results show universality of the PDR in atomic nuclei.

  13. Ecological and population genetics of locally rare plants: A review

    Treesearch

    Simon A. Lei

    2001-01-01

    Plant species with limited dispersal ability, narrow geographical and physiological tolerance ranges, as well as with specific habitat and ecological requirements are likely to be rare. Small and isolated populations and species contain low levels of within-population genetic variation in many plant species. The gene pool of plants is a product of phenotype-environment...

  14. Genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Baka Pygmies and their Bantu neighbours in the north of Gabon.

    PubMed

    Mvé-Ondo, Bertrand; Nkoghe, Dieudonné; Arnathau, Céline; Rougeron, Virginie; Bisvigou, Ulrich; Mouele, Lauriane Yacka; Boundenga, Larson; Durand, Patrick; Elguero, Eric; Lemmers, Simone; Délicat-Loembet, Lucrèce M; Diamella-Moukodoum, Nancy; Paupy, Christophe; Renaud, François; Prugnolle, Franck; Ollomo, Benjamin

    2015-10-09

    There have been many reports on the population genetic structure of Plasmodium falciparum from different endemic regions especially sub-Saharan Africa. However, few studies have been performed on neglected populations, such as the Pygmy populations. In this study, the population genetic structure of P. falciparum was investigated in the Baka Pygmies of Gabon and compared to that observed in neighboring villages composed mostly of Bantu farmers. A total of 342 blood samples were collected from 170 Baka Pygmies and 172 Bantus in the north of Gabon (Woleu Ntem Province). Plasmodium infections were characterized by sequencing a portion of the parasite cytochrome b gene. Population genetic structure of P. falciparum in the different villages was analysed using microsatellite markers and genes coding for antigenic proteins (MSP1, MSP2, GLURP, and EBA-175). Overall, prevalence of P. falciparum was around 57 % and no significant difference of prevalence was observed between Pygmies and Bantus. No significant differences of population genetic structure of P. falciparum was found between Pygmy and Bantu people except for one antigen-coding gene, glurp, for which genetic data suggested the existence of a potentially disruptive selection acting on this gene in the two types of populations. The genetic structure of P. falciparum followed a pattern of isolation by distance at the scale of the study. The prevalence and genetic diversity of P. falciparum observed in Baka demonstrates a significant transmission of the parasite in this population, and some exchanges of parasites with Bantu neighbours. Despite that, some antigen-coding genes seem to have had a particular evolutionary trajectory in certain Pygmy populations due to specific local human and/or mosquito characteristics.

  15. Cystic Echinococcosis: A Rare Case of Brain Localization.

    PubMed

    Baradan Bagheri, Ali; Zibaei, Mohammad; Tayebi Arasteh, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Although Hydatid disease eradicated in many countries, it is still widespread in communities where agriculture is dominant. Cystic hydatidosis is significant public health problem in the regions with endemic echinococcosis. The hydatid cysts tend to form mostly in the liver or lung. Brain involvement is very rare. In the present report, we describe magnetic resonance imaging findings in an 18-yr-old male with cerebral echinococcosis, in Shahid Madani Hospital, Karaj, Iran in 2015. The patient, presented with headache, hemiparesis, impairment of speech, vomiting, and nausea. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and surgical exploration proved a cyst in the superior portion of left temporal lobe. Pathological examination showed it to be a solitary primary cerebral hydatid cyst.

  16. Distribution and Numbers of Pygmies in Central African Forests.

    PubMed

    Olivero, Jesús; Fa, John E; Farfán, Miguel A; Lewis, Jerome; Hewlett, Barry; Breuer, Thomas; Carpaneto, Giuseppe M; Fernández, María; Germi, Francesco; Hattori, Shiho; Head, Josephine; Ichikawa, Mitsuo; Kitanaishi, Koichi; Knights, Jessica; Matsuura, Naoki; Migliano, Andrea; Nese, Barbara; Noss, Andrew; Ekoumou, Dieudonné Ongbwa; Paulin, Pascale; Real, Raimundo; Riddell, Mike; Stevenson, Edward G J; Toda, Mikako; Vargas, J Mario; Yasuoka, Hirokazu; Nasi, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Pygmy populations occupy a vast territory extending west-to-east along the central African belt from the Congo Basin to Lake Victoria. However, their numbers and actual distribution is not known precisely. Here, we undertake this task by using locational data and population sizes for an unprecedented number of known Pygmy camps and settlements (n = 654) in five of the nine countries where currently distributed. With these data we develop spatial distribution models based on the favourability function, which distinguish areas with favourable environmental conditions from those less suitable for Pygmy presence. Highly favourable areas were significantly explained by presence of tropical forests, and by lower human pressure variables. For documented Pygmy settlements, we use the relationship between observed population sizes and predicted favourability values to estimate the total Pygmy population throughout Central Africa. We estimate that around 920,000 Pygmies (over 60% in DRC) is possible within favourable forest areas in Central Africa. We argue that fragmentation of the existing Pygmy populations, alongside pressure from extractive industries and sometimes conflict with conservation areas, endanger their future. There is an urgent need to inform policies that can mitigate against future external threats to these indigenous peoples' culture and lifestyles.

  17. Distribution and Numbers of Pygmies in Central African Forests

    PubMed Central

    Olivero, Jesús; Fa, John E.; Farfán, Miguel A.; Lewis, Jerome; Hewlett, Barry; Breuer, Thomas; Carpaneto, Giuseppe M.; Fernández, María; Germi, Francesco; Hattori, Shiho; Head, Josephine; Ichikawa, Mitsuo; Kitanaishi, Koichi; Knights, Jessica; Matsuura, Naoki; Migliano, Andrea; Nese, Barbara; Noss, Andrew; Ekoumou, Dieudonné Ongbwa; Paulin, Pascale; Real, Raimundo; Riddell, Mike; Stevenson, Edward G. J.; Toda, Mikako; Vargas, J. Mario; Yasuoka, Hirokazu; Nasi, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Pygmy populations occupy a vast territory extending west-to-east along the central African belt from the Congo Basin to Lake Victoria. However, their numbers and actual distribution is not known precisely. Here, we undertake this task by using locational data and population sizes for an unprecedented number of known Pygmy camps and settlements (n = 654) in five of the nine countries where currently distributed. With these data we develop spatial distribution models based on the favourability function, which distinguish areas with favourable environmental conditions from those less suitable for Pygmy presence. Highly favourable areas were significantly explained by presence of tropical forests, and by lower human pressure variables. For documented Pygmy settlements, we use the relationship between observed population sizes and predicted favourability values to estimate the total Pygmy population throughout Central Africa. We estimate that around 920,000 Pygmies (over 60% in DRC) is possible within favourable forest areas in Central Africa. We argue that fragmentation of the existing Pygmy populations, alongside pressure from extractive industries and sometimes conflict with conservation areas, endanger their future. There is an urgent need to inform policies that can mitigate against future external threats to these indigenous peoples’ culture and lifestyles. PMID:26735953

  18. Disseminated histoplasmosis in an African pygmy hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Snider, Timothy A; Joyner, Priscilla H; Clinkenbeard, Kenneth D

    2008-01-01

    A 2-year-old captive-bred sexually intact female African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was evaluated because of vague signs of illness including inappetence, weakness, lethargy, and weight loss over a 20-day period. Abnormalities detected via initial clinicopathologic analyses included anemia, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, hypoproteinemia, and hypoglycemia. Results of a fecal flotation test were negative. Three weeks after the initial evaluation, splenomegaly was detected via palpation and ultrasonography. The hedgehog was treated with broad-spectrum antibacterial agents, resulting in an initially favorable response. Fenbendazole was also administered against possible occult parasitic infestation. After 3 weeks of illness, the hedgehog's condition had worsened and supportive care and administration of additional antibacterial agents were instituted. The hedgehog died, and pathologic examinations revealed severe splenomegaly; granulomatous infiltrates were evident in multiple organs, and Histoplasma capsulatum yeasts were detected intralesionally. Histoplasmosis can develop in a wide range of mammalian species. African pygmy hedgehogs are becoming increasingly popular as exotic pets, and vague signs of illness and splenomegaly are often attributed to hemolymphatic malignancies, which are somewhat common in this species. Practitioners should be aware that similar clinical signs may be associated with histoplasmosis in these animals. Although the hedgehog of this report was confined indoors, it originated from an area where histoplasmosis was endemic; this indicates that the disease should be included as a differential diagnosis for hedgehogs that develop vague signs of illness and are known to originate from such geographic regions.

  19. Local hypertrichosis: A rare complication of a temporary henna tattoo.

    PubMed

    Akpolat, Nebahat Demet; Aras, Arzu

    2016-01-01

    Temporary henna tattoos have become increasingly widespread among children and young people, especially in holiday spots in recent years. Although reactions to henna tattoo are becoming progressively more common, only few cases of a henna pseudo-tattoo resulting in temporary hypertrichosis have been reported so far. Here, we have reported a 5-year-old girl who developed allergic contact dermatitis and localized hypertrichosis on her right arm after application of temporary henna tattoo during summer holiday.

  20. Navicular tuberculosis: A rare localization of bone tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lemnouer, Abdelhay; Frikh, Mohammed; Belfquih, Bouchra; Jaafar, Abdelwahab; Bouya, Ayoub; Jidal, Mohamed; Boussouga, Mustapha; Elouennass, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a global public health problem endemic to Morocco. While extrapulmonary TB uncommonly presents in osteoarticular anatomic locations, tarsal or metatarsal osteitis can occur when TB presents in the tarsal bones. Clinical symptoms are often insidious causing a delay in diagnosis that may lead to bone destruction. While diagnosis can be guided by X-ray imaging, bacteriologic and histologic examination of the tissue allows for pathogen isolation, identification of the bacillus and strain sensitivity to antibacillary treatment. We report a rare case of navicular osteitis associated with tarso-metatarsal arthritis caused by tuberculosis in a 68-year-old man. This case illustrates an exceptional location of osteoarticular TB and support diagnostic difficulties encountered: (i) imaging is not specific; (ii) lesions are paucibacillary which reduces conventional microbiological methods sensitivity and (iii) the peripheral location of the Koch bacillus within the lesion dictates surgical biopsy than percutaneous puncture. We recommend testing for tuberculosis in any case of chronic osteolysis and/or arthritis of the foot, especially in TB endemic countries.

  1. Navicular tuberculosis: A rare localization of bone tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lemnouer, Abdelhay; Frikh, Mohammed; Belfquih, Bouchra; Jaafar, Abdelwahab; Bouya, Ayoub; Jidal, Mohamed; Boussouga, Mustapha; Elouennass, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a global public health problem endemic to Morocco. While extrapulmonary TB uncommonly presents in osteoarticular anatomic locations, tarsal or metatarsal osteitis can occur when TB presents in the tarsal bones. Clinical symptoms are often insidious causing a delay in diagnosis that may lead to bone destruction. While diagnosis can be guided by X-ray imaging, bacteriologic and histologic examination of the tissue allows for pathogen isolation, identification of the bacillus and strain sensitivity to antibacillary treatment. We report a rare case of navicular osteitis associated with tarso-metatarsal arthritis caused by tuberculosis in a 68-year-old man. This case illustrates an exceptional location of osteoarticular TB and support diagnostic difficulties encountered: (i) imaging is not specific; (ii) lesions are paucibacillary which reduces conventional microbiological methods sensitivity and (iii) the peripheral location of the Koch bacillus within the lesion dictates surgical biopsy than percutaneous puncture. We recommend testing for tuberculosis in any case of chronic osteolysis and/or arthritis of the foot, especially in TB endemic countries. PMID:26793464

  2. [Brachioradial pruritus: a rare, localized, neuropathic form of itching].

    PubMed

    Schürmeyer-Horst, F; Fischbach, R; Nabavi, D; Metze, D; Ständer, S

    2006-06-01

    We report on a female patient with brachioradial pruritus, in whom the cause could be verified by purposeful diagnostics (e. g., MRI). The clinical symptoms with localized itching result from circumscribed nerve root compression and hyperexcitation of the nerve fibers. Under treatment with gabapentin, an anticonvulsant with a very good analgesic and good antipruritic effect, the itch ceased and the skin changes healed. This case shows that this special form of neuropathic itch requires targeted therapy, which apart from symptomatic treatment should primarily focus on remedying the cause, if feasible.

  3. Sampling rare events: statistics of local sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Alexander K

    2002-05-01

    A method to calculate probability distributions in regions where the events are very unlikely (e.g., p approximately 10(-40)) is presented. The basic idea is to map the underlying model on a physical system. The system is simulated at a low temperature, such that preferably configurations with originally low probabilities are generated. Since the distribution of such a physical system is known, the original unbiased distribution can be obtained. As an application, local alignment of protein sequences is studied. The deviation of the distribution p(S) of optimum scores from the extreme-value distribution is quantified. This deviation decreases with growing sequence length.

  4. Binary and microsatellite polymorphisms of the Y-chromosome in the Mbenzele pygmies from the Central African Republic.

    PubMed

    Coia, Valentina; Caglià, Alessandra; Arredi, Barbara; Donati, Francesco; Santos, Fabrício R; Pandya, Arpita; Taglioli, Luca; Paoli, Giorgio; Pascali, Vincenzo; Spedini, Gabriella; Destro-Bisol, Giovanni; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2004-01-01

    This study analyzes the variation of six binary polymorphisms and six microsatellites in the Mbenzele Pygmies from the Central African Republic. Five different haplogroups (B2b, E(xE3a), E3a, P and BR(xB2b,DE,P)) were observed, with frequencies ranging from 0.022 (haplogroup P) to 0.609 (haplogroup E3a). A comparison of haplogroup frequencies indicates a close genetic affinity between the Mbenzele and the Biaka Pygmies, a finding consistent with the common origin and the geographical proximity of the two populations. The haplogroups P, BR(xB2b,DE,P) and E(xE3a), which are rare in sub-Saharan Africa but common in western Eurasia, were observed with frequencies ranging from 0.022 (haplogroup P) to 0.087 (haplogroup E(xE3a)). Thirty different microsatellite haplotypes were detected, with frequencies ranging from 0.022 to 0.152. The Mbenzele share the highest percent of microsatellite haplotypes with the Biaka Pygmies. Five out seven haplotypes which are shared by the Mbenzele and Biaka Pygmies belong to haplogroup E3a, which suggests that they are of Bantu origin. The plot based on F(st) genetic distances calculated using microsatellite data provides a picture of population relationships which is in part congruent and in part complementary to that obtained using haplogroup frequencies. Finally, the Mbenzele and Biaka Pygmies were found to be markedly more genetically similar using Y-chromosomal than autosomal microsatellites. We suggest that this could be due to the higher phylogenetic stability of Y-chromosome and to the effect of the male-biased gene flow during the Bantu expansion. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Malignant Neuroendocrine Tumour (Carcinoid) of the Spleen in an African Pygmy Hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Lowden, L R; Davies, J L

    2016-07-01

    A malignant neuroendocrine tumour (carcinoid) of the spleen was diagnosed on post-mortem examination of a 3-year-old, male African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris). The animal presented with a history of inappetence, weight loss, lethargy, a wide-based gait and a palpable abdominal mass. The gross pathological, histopathological, histochemical and immunohistochemical findings are described. Primary splenic carcinoids are reported rarely in the human medical literature and this is believed to be the first report in a non-human animal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hierarchical spatial models for predicting pygmy rabbit distribution and relative abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, T.L.; Odei, J.B.; Hooten, M.B.; Edwards, T.C.

    2010-01-01

    Conservationists routinely use species distribution models to plan conservation, restoration and development actions, while ecologists use them to infer process from pattern. These models tend to work well for common or easily observable species, but are of limited utility for rare and cryptic species. This may be because honest accounting of known observation bias and spatial autocorrelation are rarely included, thereby limiting statistical inference of resulting distribution maps. We specified and implemented a spatially explicit Bayesian hierarchical model for a cryptic mammal species (pygmy rabbit Brachylagus idahoensis). Our approach used two levels of indirect sign that are naturally hierarchical (burrows and faecal pellets) to build a model that allows for inference on regression coefficients as well as spatially explicit model parameters. We also produced maps of rabbit distribution (occupied burrows) and relative abundance (number of burrows expected to be occupied by pygmy rabbits). The model demonstrated statistically rigorous spatial prediction by including spatial autocorrelation and measurement uncertainty. We demonstrated flexibility of our modelling framework by depicting probabilistic distribution predictions using different assumptions of pygmy rabbit habitat requirements. Spatial representations of the variance of posterior predictive distributions were obtained to evaluate heterogeneity in model fit across the spatial domain. Leave-one-out cross-validation was conducted to evaluate the overall model fit. Synthesis and applications. Our method draws on the strengths of previous work, thereby bridging and extending two active areas of ecological research: species distribution models and multi-state occupancy modelling. Our framework can be extended to encompass both larger extents and other species for which direct estimation of abundance is difficult. ?? 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation ?? 2010 British Ecological Society.

  7. Primary endobronchial plasmacytoma involving local lymph nodes and presenting with rare immunoglobulin G lambda monoclonal gammopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Sen; Li, Xin; Song, Zuoqing; Zhao, Honglin; Qiu, Xiaomin; Gong, Lei; Chen, Jun; Zhou, Qinghua

    2012-01-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytoma occurring as a primary pulmonary lesion is rare. The present report describes a 42-year-old Chinese man diagnosed with primary pulmonary plasmacytoma following left lower lobectomy. Of note, an extremely rare immunoglobulin G lambda paraprotein was documented in the patient’s serum by immunofixation electrophoresis. The patient has been well, showing no local recurrence or multifocal disease during a 15-month follow-up. PMID:22679619

  8. Effect of rare locally ordered regions on a disordered itinerant quantum antiferromagnet with cubic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Rajesh; Vojta, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    We study the quantum phase transition of an itinerant antiferromagnet with cubic anisotropy in the presence of quenched disorder, paying particular attention to the locally ordered spatial regions that form in the Griffiths region. We derive an effective action where these rare regions are described in terms of static annealed disorder. A one-loop renormalization-group analysis of the effective action shows that for order-parameter dimensions p<4, the rare regions destroy the conventional critical behavior, and the renormalized disorder flows to infinity. For order-parameter dimensions p>4, the critical behavior is not influenced by the rare regions; it is described by the conventional dirty cubic fixed point. We also discuss the influence of the rare regions on the fluctuation-driven first-order transition in this system.

  9. Male pygmy hippopotamus influence offspring sex ratio.

    PubMed

    Saragusty, Joseph; Hermes, Robert; Hofer, Heribert; Bouts, Tim; Göritz, Frank; Hildebrandt, Thomas B

    2012-02-28

    Pre-determining fetal sex is against the random and equal opportunity that both conceptus sexes have by nature. Yet, under a wide variety of circumstances, populations shift their birth sex ratio from the expected unity. Here we show, using fluorescence in situ hybridization, that in a population of pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis) with 42.5% male offspring, males bias the ratio of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa in their ejaculates, resulting in a 0.4337±0.0094 (mean±s.d.) proportion of Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa. Three alternative hypotheses for the shifted population sex ratio were compared: female counteract male, female indifferent, or male and female in agreement. We conclude that there appears little or no antagonistic sexual conflict, unexpected by prevailing theories. Our results indicate that males possess a mechanism to adjust the ratio of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa in the ejaculate, thereby substantially expanding currently known male options in sexual conflict.

  10. Male pygmy hippopotamus influence offspring sex ratio

    PubMed Central

    Saragusty, Joseph; Hermes, Robert; Hofer, Heribert; Bouts, Tim; Göritz, Frank; Hildebrandt, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Pre-determining fetal sex is against the random and equal opportunity that both conceptus sexes have by nature. Yet, under a wide variety of circumstances, populations shift their birth sex ratio from the expected unity. Here we show, using fluorescence in situ hybridization, that in a population of pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis) with 42.5% male offspring, males bias the ratio of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa in their ejaculates, resulting in a 0.4337±0.0094 (mean±s.d.) proportion of Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa. Three alternative hypotheses for the shifted population sex ratio were compared: female counteract male, female indifferent, or male and female in agreement. We conclude that there appears little or no antagonistic sexual conflict, unexpected by prevailing theories. Our results indicate that males possess a mechanism to adjust the ratio of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa in the ejaculate, thereby substantially expanding currently known male options in sexual conflict. PMID:22426218

  11. Effectiveness of broadcast surveys in determining habitat use of Ferruginous Pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum) in southern Texas

    Treesearch

    Glenn A. Proudfoot; Jody L. Mays; Sam L. Beasom; Ralph Bingham

    1997-01-01

    We compared habitat information obtained from tracking 12 radio-tagged Ferruginous Pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum) (hereafter referred to as pygmy-owls) in southern Texas during 1995 and similar information from pygmy-owl response points to evaluate the effectiveness of broadcast surveys in determining pygmy-owl habitat use.

  12. Evolution of the pygmy phenotype: evidence of positive selection fro genome-wide scans in African, Asian, and Melanesian pygmies.

    PubMed

    Migliano, Andrea Bamberg; Romero, Irene Gallego; Metspalu, Mait; Leavesley, Matthew; Pagani, Luca; Antao, Tiago; Huang, Da-Wei; Sherman, Brad T; Siddle, Katharine; Scholes, Clarissa; Hudjashov, Georgi; Kaitokai, Elton; Babalu, Avis; Belatti, Maggie; Cagan, Alex; Hopkinshaw, Byrony; Shaw, Colin; Nelis, Mari; Metspalu, Ene; Mägi, Reedik; Lempicki, Richard A; Villems, Richard; Lahr, Marta Mirazon; Kivisild, Toomas

    2013-01-01

    Human pygmy populations inhabit different regions of the world, from Africa to Melanesia. In Asia, short-statured populations are often referred to as "negritos." Their short stature has been interpreted as a consequence of thermoregulatory, nutritional, and/or locomotory adaptations to life in tropical forests. A more recent hypothesis proposes that their stature is the outcome of a life history trade-off in high-mortality environments, where early reproduction is favored and, consequently, early sexual maturation and early growth cessation have coevolved. Some serological evidence of deficiencies in the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor axis have been previously associated with pygmies' short stature. Using genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype data, we first tested whether different negrito groups living in the Philippines and Papua New Guinea are closely related and then investigated genomic signals of recent positive selection in African, Asian, and Papuan pygmy populations. We found that negritos in the Philippines and Papua New Guinea are genetically more similar to their nonpygmy neighbors than to one another and have experienced positive selection at different genes. These results indicate that geographically distant pygmy groups are likely to have evolved their short stature independently. We also found that selection on common height variants is unlikely to explain their short stature and that different genes associated with growth, thyroid function, and sexual development are under selection in different pygmy groups.

  13. Electron affinities for rare gases and some actinides from local-spin-density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Wrinn, M.C.; Whitehead, M.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The negative ions of the rare gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) and some actinides (Pu, Am, Bk, Cf, and Es) have been calculated self-consistently by the generalized exchange local-spin-density-functional theory with self-interaction correction and correlation. The electron affinities were obtained as the differences between the statistical total energies of the negative ions and neutral atoms; the electron affinities were positive around several millirydbergs. Consequently, the negative ions are predicted stable for the rare gases and actinides.

  14. Fish, fans and hydroids: host species of pygmy seahorses.

    PubMed

    Reijnen, Bastian T; van der Meij, Sancia E T; van Ofwegen, Leen P

    2011-01-01

    An overview of the octocoral and hydrozoan host species of pygmy seahorses is provided based on literature records and recently collected field data for Hippocampus bargibanti, Hippocampus denise and Hippocampus pontohi. Seven new associations are recognized and an overview of the so far documented host species is given. A detailed re-examination of octocoral type material and a review of the taxonomic history of the alcyonacean genera Annella (Subergorgiidae) and Muricella (Acanthogorgiidae) are included as baseline for future revisions. The host specificity and colour morphs of pygmy seahorses are discussed, as well as the reliability of (previous) identifications and conservation issues.

  15. Fish, fans and hydroids: host species of pygmy seahorses

    PubMed Central

    Reijnen, Bastian T.; van der Meij, Sancia E.T.; van Ofwegen, Leen P.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract An overview of the octocoral and hydrozoan host species of pygmy seahorses is provided based on literature records and recently collected field data for Hippocampus bargibanti, Hippocampus denise and Hippocampus pontohi. Seven new associations are recognized and an overview of the so far documented host species is given. A detailed re-examination of octocoral type material and a review of the taxonomic history of the alcyonacean genera Annella (Subergorgiidae) and Muricella (Acanthogorgiidae) are included as baseline for future revisions. The host specificity and colour morphs of pygmy seahorses are discussed, as well as the reliability of (previous) identifications and conservation issues. PMID:21747677

  16. Self-interaction-corrected local-spin-density calculations for rare earth materials

    SciTech Connect

    Svane, A.; Temmerman, W.M.; Szotek, Z.; Laegsgaard, J.; Winter, H.

    2000-04-20

    The ab initio self-interaction-corrected (SIC) local-spin-density (LSD) approximation is discussed with emphasis on the ability to describe localized f-electron states in rare earth solids. Two methods for minimizing the SIC-LSD total energy functional are discussed, one using a unified Hamiltonian for all electron states, thus having the advantages of Bloch's theorem, the other one employing an iterative scheme in real space. Results for cerium and cerium compounds as well as other rare earths are presented. For the cerium compounds the onset of f-electron delocalization can be accurately described, including the intricate isostructural phase transitions in elemental cerium and CeP. In Pr and Sm the equilibrium lattice constant and zero temperature equation of state is greatly improved in comparison with the LSD results.

  17. Polycystic kidney disease in the pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis).

    PubMed

    Nees, Stephanie; Schade, Benjamin; Clauss, Marcus; Steinmetz, Hanspeter W; Ehrensperger, Felix; Steck, Beatrice; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2009-09-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) was diagnosed at necropsy in a captive aged female pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis), which presented with numerous cysts in both kidneys, the liver, and the duodenum and with one single cyst in the pancreas. There were no premonitory clinical signs of a nephropathy observed prior to its death. Similar findings were made in a male cage mate 6 mo later. Both animals had been wild caught. A literature review revealed that another seven cases of PKD have been reported in pygmy hippopotamuses, and an additional screening of records available from the international studbook for the species revealed yet another six cases. In all cases, aged females were affected, and in several instances, affected animals were related to each other. These patterns indicated familiar transmission similar that associated with PKD in humans and other animals. The disease, and especially the presumptive bias in diagnosis toward females, indicated that the male animal of this report was the first case of PKD reported in a male pygmy hippopotamus; thus, further investigation is warranted. The status of the kidneys with respect to PKD should be assessed (including histology) in every deceased pygmy hippopotamus, and whenever possible by ultrasonography in live animals.

  18. Two novel arenaviruses detected in pygmy mice, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Kronmann, Karl C; Nimo-Paintsil, Shirley; Guirguis, Fady; Kronmann, Lisha C; Bonney, Kofi; Obiri-Danso, Kwasi; Ampofo, William; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth

    2013-11-01

    Two arenaviruses were detected in pygmy mice (Mus spp.) by screening 764 small mammals in Ghana. The Natal multimammate mouse (Mastomys natalensis), the known Lassa virus reservoir, was the dominant indoor rodent species in 4 of 10 sites, and accounted for 27% of all captured rodents. No rodent captured indoors tested positive for an arenavirus.

  19. Investigation of pygmy dipole resonance in 154Sm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quliyev, Huseynqulu; Zenginerler, Zemine; Guliyev, Ekber; Kuliev, Ali Akbar

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, an investigation of the pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) in 154Sm nucleus has been performed using quasi particle random-phase approximation (QRPA). Analysis of the numerical results indicates that both ΔK=1 and ΔK=0 branches plays significant role in formation of PDR.

  20. The pygmy whitefish, Coregonus coulteri, in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eschmeyer, Paul H.; Bailey, Reeve M.

    1955-01-01

    Other cold-water fishes–cottids, ninespine sticklebacks, smelt, and four species of coregonines–were the most frequent associates of the pygmy whitefish. Lake trout and trout-perch were also taken with it at the same stations or in the same trawl hauls. Its closest relative in Lake Superior, the round whitefish, was not an ecological associate.

  1. DoEstRare: A statistical test to identify local enrichments in rare genomic variants associated with disease

    PubMed Central

    Karakachoff, Matilde; Le Scouarnec, Solena; Le Clézio, Camille; Campion, Dominique; Schott, Jean-Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies made it possible to assay the effect of rare variants on complex diseases. As an extension of the “common disease-common variant” paradigm, rare variant studies are necessary to get a more complete insight into the genetic architecture of human traits. Association studies of these rare variations show new challenges in terms of statistical analysis. Due to their low frequency, rare variants must be tested by groups. This approach is then hindered by the fact that an unknown proportion of the variants could be neutral. The risk level of a rare variation may be determined by its impact but also by its position in the protein sequence. More generally, the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease architecture may involve specific protein domains or inter-genic regulatory regions. While a large variety of methods are optimizing functionality weights for each single marker, few evaluate variant position differences between cases and controls. Here, we propose a test called DoEstRare, which aims to simultaneously detect clusters of disease risk variants and global allele frequency differences in genomic regions. This test estimates, for cases and controls, variant position densities in the genetic region by a kernel method, weighted by a function of allele frequencies. We compared DoEstRare with previously published strategies through simulation studies as well as re-analysis of real datasets. Based on simulation under various scenarios, DoEstRare was the sole to consistently show highest performance, in terms of type I error and power both when variants were clustered or not. DoEstRare was also applied to Brugada syndrome and early-onset Alzheimer’s disease data and provided complementary results to other existing tests. DoEstRare, by integrating variant position information, gives new opportunities to explain disease susceptibility. DoEstRare is implemented in a user-friendly R package. PMID:28742119

  2. DoEstRare: A statistical test to identify local enrichments in rare genomic variants associated with disease.

    PubMed

    Persyn, Elodie; Karakachoff, Matilde; Le Scouarnec, Solena; Le Clézio, Camille; Campion, Dominique; Consortium, French Exome; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Redon, Richard; Bellanger, Lise; Dina, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies made it possible to assay the effect of rare variants on complex diseases. As an extension of the "common disease-common variant" paradigm, rare variant studies are necessary to get a more complete insight into the genetic architecture of human traits. Association studies of these rare variations show new challenges in terms of statistical analysis. Due to their low frequency, rare variants must be tested by groups. This approach is then hindered by the fact that an unknown proportion of the variants could be neutral. The risk level of a rare variation may be determined by its impact but also by its position in the protein sequence. More generally, the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease architecture may involve specific protein domains or inter-genic regulatory regions. While a large variety of methods are optimizing functionality weights for each single marker, few evaluate variant position differences between cases and controls. Here, we propose a test called DoEstRare, which aims to simultaneously detect clusters of disease risk variants and global allele frequency differences in genomic regions. This test estimates, for cases and controls, variant position densities in the genetic region by a kernel method, weighted by a function of allele frequencies. We compared DoEstRare with previously published strategies through simulation studies as well as re-analysis of real datasets. Based on simulation under various scenarios, DoEstRare was the sole to consistently show highest performance, in terms of type I error and power both when variants were clustered or not. DoEstRare was also applied to Brugada syndrome and early-onset Alzheimer's disease data and provided complementary results to other existing tests. DoEstRare, by integrating variant position information, gives new opportunities to explain disease susceptibility. DoEstRare is implemented in a user-friendly R package.

  3. Structure of the pygmy dipole resonance in 124Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, J.; Savran, D.; Butler, P. A.; Harakeh, M. N.; Harissopulos, S.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Krücken, R.; Lagoyannis, A.; Litvinova, E.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Popescu, L.; Ring, P.; Scheck, M.; Schlüter, F.; Sonnabend, K.; Stoica, V. I.; Wörtche, H. J.; Zilges, A.

    2012-06-01

    Background: In atomic nuclei, a concentration of electric dipole strength around the particle threshold, commonly denoted as pygmy dipole resonance, may have a significant impact on nuclear structure properties and astrophysical scenarios. A clear identification of these states and the structure of this resonance is still under discussion.Purpose: We present an experimental and theoretical study of the isospin character of the pygmy dipole resonance and investigation of a splitting of the electric dipole strength previously observed in experiments on N=82 nuclei.Method: The pygmy dipole resonance has been studied in the semi-magic Z=50 nucleus 124Sn by means of the (α,α'γ) coincidence method at Eα=136MeV using the Big-Bite Spectrometer at the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut in Groningen, The Netherlands.Results: A splitting of the low-energy part of the electric dipole strength was identified in 124Sn by comparing the differential cross sections measured in (α,α'γ) to results stemming from (γ,γ') photon-scattering experiments. While an energetically lower-lying group of states is observed in both kinds of experiments, a higher-lying group of states is only excited in the (γ,γ') reaction. In addition, theoretical calculations using the self-consistent relativistic quasiparticle time-blocking approximation and the quasiparticle-phonon model have been performed. Both calculations show a qualitative agreement with the experimental data and predict a low-lying isoscalar component that is dominated by neutron-skin oscillations as expected for the pygmy dipole resonance. Furthermore, the states at higher energies show a pronounced isovector component and a different radial dependence of the corresponding transition densities as expected for the tail of the giant dipole resonance.Conclusions: An experimental signature of the neutron-skin oscillation of the pygmy dipole resonance has been corroborated. The combination of the presented reactions might make it

  4. Coupling of a locally implanted rare-earth ion ensemble to a superconducting micro-resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Wisby, I. Tzalenchuk, A. Ya.; Graaf, S. E. de; Adamyan, A.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Gwilliam, R.; Meeson, P. J.; Lindström, T.

    2014-09-08

    We demonstrate the coupling of rare-earth ions locally implanted in a substrate (Gd{sup 3+} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to a superconducting NbN lumped-element micro-resonator. The hybrid device is fabricated by a controlled ion implantation of rare-earth ions in well-defined micron-sized areas, aligned to lithographically defined micro-resonators. The technique does not degrade the internal quality factor of the resonators which remain above 10{sup 5}. Using microwave absorption spectroscopy, we observe electron-spin resonances in good agreement with numerical modelling and extract corresponding coupling rates of the order of 1 MHz and spin linewidths of 50–65 MHz.

  5. Higher establishment success in more diverse groups of pygmy grasshoppers under seminatural conditions.

    PubMed

    Wennersten, Lena; Johansson, Jenny; Karpestam, Einat; Forsman, Anders

    2012-12-01

    Large founder groups and habitat match have been shown to increase the establishment success of reintroduced populations. Theory posits that the diversity of founder groups should also be important, but this has rarely been investigated. Here, experimental introductions of color-polymorphic Tetrix subulata pygmy grasshoppers into outdoor enclosures were used to test whether higher phenotypic diversity promotes establishment success. We show that the number of individuals present one year after introduction increases with color morph diversity in founder groups. Variance in establishment success did not decrease with increasing founder diversity, arguing against an important contribution of sampling effects or evolutionary rescue. Color morphs in T. subulata covary with a suite of other functionally important traits and utilize different resources. The higher establishment success in more diverse founder groups may therefore result, in part, from niche complementarity. Variation in establishment among groups was not associated with differences among source populations in reproductive capacities.

  6. Eosinophilic leukemia in three African pygmy hedgehogs ( Atelerix albiventris) and validation of Luna stain.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Jiménez, David; Garner, Bridget; Coutermarsh-Ott, Sheryl; Burrell, Caitlin; Clark, Sabrina; Nabity, Mary; Díaz-Delgado, Josué; Rodrigues-Hoffmann, Aline; Zaks, Karen; Proença, Laila; Divers, Stephen; Saba, Corey; Cazzini, Paola

    2017-03-01

    Neoplasia is usually encountered in the African pygmy hedgehog at a mean age of 3.5 y, and malignancy is common. Myelogenous leukemias are rarely reported in hedgehogs. We describe 3 cases of eosinophilic leukemia in adult, middle-aged (mean age: 2.3 y) hedgehogs, for which prognosis appears grave. In 1 case, attempted treatment was unsuccessful, and in all 3 cases, the disease course was rapid and all died soon after diagnosis. Blood smear evaluation, along with complete blood count, was critical in making the diagnosis in all cases. Luna stain was validated and used to better visualize eosinophils in cytologic and histologic sections. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of specific granules in hedgehog eosinophils.

  7. Methylene blue and parathyroid adenoma localization: Three new cases of a rare cutaneous complication.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Elliot D; Thambi, Rakhi; Pytynia, Kristen B

    2016-02-01

    Methylene blue has been safely used for the localization of parathyroid glands during parathyroidectomy, and only a few adverse effects have been documented. Methylene blue administration as a cause of pulse-oximetry-related skin injury is extremely rare. We describe 2 such cases in patients who developed a blister on the second digit at the pulse oximetry site after an uncomplicated excision of a parathyroid adenoma. In another case, a patient became bradycardic intraoperatively; she was successfully resuscitated, but she incurred a second-degree burn at the pulse oximetry site. In all 3 cases, the burns resolved with local wound care. We publish this report to alert surgeons and anesthesiologists to the risk of skin complications with the use of high-dose intraoperative methylene blue.

  8. Predicting habitat suitability for rare plants at local spatial scales using a species distribution model.

    PubMed

    Gogol-Prokurat, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    If species distribution models (SDMs) can rank habitat suitability at a local scale, they may be a valuable conservation planning tool for rare, patchily distributed species. This study assessed the ability of Maxent, an SDM reported to be appropriate for modeling rare species, to rank habitat suitability at a local scale for four edaphic endemic rare plants of gabbroic soils in El Dorado County, California, and examined the effects of grain size, spatial extent, and fine-grain environmental predictors on local-scale model accuracy. Models were developed using species occurrence data mapped on public lands and were evaluated using an independent data set of presence and absence locations on surrounding lands, mimicking a typical conservation-planning scenario that prioritizes potential habitat on unsurveyed lands surrounding known occurrences. Maxent produced models that were successful at discriminating between suitable and unsuitable habitat at the local scale for all four species, and predicted habitat suitability values were proportional to likelihood of occurrence or population abundance for three of four species. Unfortunately, models with the best discrimination (i.e., AUC) were not always the most useful for ranking habitat suitability. The use of independent test data showed metrics that were valuable for evaluating which variables and model choices (e.g., grain, extent) to use in guiding habitat prioritization for conservation of these species. A goodness-of-fit test was used to determine whether habitat suitability values ranked habitat suitability on a continuous scale. If they did not, a minimum acceptable error predicted area criterion was used to determine the threshold for classifying habitat as suitable or unsuitable. I found a trade-off between model extent and the use of fine-grain environmental variables: goodness of fit was improved at larger extents, and fine-grain environmental variables improved local-scale accuracy, but fine-grain variables

  9. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis).

    PubMed

    McCurdy, Paul; Sangster, Cheryl; Lindsay, Scott; Vogelnest, Larry

    2014-12-01

    A captive, 31-yr-old, intact male pygmy hippopotamus presented with nonspecific signs of weight loss, inappetence, diarrhea, and lethargy. After 5 wk of diagnostic investigation and symptomatic treatment, an acute leukemic process with concurrent polycystic kidney disease was suspected. The animal's condition continued to deteriorate prompting euthanasia. Necropsy, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical examination confirmed acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia and polycystic kidneys. Acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia has not previously been documented in this species; however, polycystic kidney disease has been reported. This case report adds to the increasing number of pygmy hippopotamuses diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease and describes acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia, a previously unreported disease of this species.

  10. Probing surface quantum flows in deformed pygmy dipole modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Kortelainen, M.; Pei, J. C.

    2017-09-01

    To explore the nature of collective modes in weakly bound nuclei, we have investigated deformation effects and surface flow patterns of isovector dipole modes in a shape-coexisting nucleus, 40Mg. The calculations were done in a fully self-consistent continuum finite-amplitude quasiparticle random phase approximation in a large deformed spatial mesh. An unexpected result of pygmy and giant dipole modes having disproportionate deformation splittings in strength functions was obtained. Furthermore, the transition current densities demonstrate that the long-sought core-halo oscillation in pygmy resonances is collective and compressional, corresponding to the lowest excitation energy and the simplest quantum flow topology. Our calculations show that surface flow patterns become more complicated as excitation energies increase.

  11. Gastrointestinal leiomyosarcoma in a pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps).

    PubMed

    Leone, Angelique; Dark, Michael; Kondo, Hirotaka; Rotstein, David S; Kiupel, Matti; Walsh, Michael T; Erlacher-Reid, Claire; Gordon, Nadia; Conway, Julia A

    2013-09-01

    An adult male pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps) was stranded within a tidal pool on Fernandina Beach on the north Florida Atlantic coast (USA) and expired soon after discovery. Necropsy findings included a small intestinal mass markedly expanding the intestinal wall and partially obstructing the lumen. This finding likely led to the malnutrition and ultimately the stranding of this whale. The differential diagnoses for the mass based on gross evaluation included a duodenal adenocarcinoma, leiomyoma/sarcoma, gastrointestinal stroma tumor, and benign/malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, previously referred to as neurofibromas or schwannomas. The mass was presumptively diagnosed as a leiomyosarcoma via routine histopathology and confirmed by immunoreactivity for desmin and smooth actin (SMA). KIT, a gene name for CD 117, was negative, excluding a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Leiomyosarcomas have been reported within numerous wild and domestic species, although this is the first reported case of any neoplasm in a pygmy sperm whale (K. breviceps).

  12. Investigating the Pygmy Dipole Resonance Using β Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheck, M.; Mishev, S.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Chapman, R.; Gaffney, L. P.; Gregor, E. T.; Pietralla, N.; Spagnoletti, P.; Savran, D.; Simpson, G. S.

    2016-04-01

    In this contribution it is explored whether γ -ray spectroscopy following β decay with high Q values from mother nuclei with low ground-state spin can be exploited as a probe for the pygmy dipole resonance. The suitability of this approach is demonstrated by a comparison between data from photon scattering, 136Xe (γ ,γ') , and 136I [J0π=(1-)]→136Xe* β -decay data. It is demonstrated that β decay populates 1- levels associated with the pygmy dipole resonance, but only a fraction of those. The complementary insight into the wave functions probed by β decay is elucidated by calculations within the quasiparticle phonon model. It is demonstrated that β decay dominantly populates complex configurations, which are only weakly excited in inelastic scattering experiments.

  13. Evolution of the pygmy dipole resonance in Sn isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toft, H. K.; Larsen, A. C.; Bürger, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Görgen, A.; Nyhus, H. T.; Renstrøm, T.; Siem, S.; Tveten, G. M.; Voinov, A.

    2011-04-01

    Nuclear level density and γ-ray strength functions of Sn121,122 below the neutron separation energy are extracted with the Oslo method using the (He3,He3'γ) and (He3,αγ) reactions. The level densities of Sn121,122 display steplike structures, interpreted as signatures of neutron pair breaking. An enhancement in both strength functions, compared to standard models for radiative strength, is observed in our measurements for Eγ≳5.2 MeV. This enhancement is compatible with pygmy resonances centered at ≈8.4(1) and ≈8.6(2) MeV, respectively, and with integrated strengths corresponding to ≈1.8-5+1% of the classical Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule. Similar resonances were also seen in Sn116-119. Experimental neutron-capture cross reactions are well reproduced by our pygmy resonance predictions, while standard strength models are less successful. The evolution as a function of neutron number of the pygmy resonance in Sn116-122 is described as a clear increase of centroid energy from 8.0(1) to 8.6(2) MeV, but with no observable difference in integrated strengths.

  14. Localized Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis of the shoulder: a rare presentation of an uncommon pathology.

    PubMed

    Madruga Dias, João; Costa, Maria Manuela; Duarte, Artur; Pereira da Silva, José A

    2013-01-01

    Pigmented Vilonodular Synovitis is a rare clinical entity characterized as a synovial membrane benign tumour, despite possible aggressive presentation with articular destruction. The localized variant is four times less frequent and the shoulder involvement is uncommon. We present the case of a Caucasian 59 year-old patient, who presented with left shoulder pain, of uncharacteristic quality, with local swelling and marked functional limitation of 1 month duration. Shoulder ultrasonography showed subacromial bursitis. An ultrasound-guided aspiration was performed: synovial fluid was citrine-colored and translucid. One month later, the patient maintained swelling, pain and functional impairment of the left shoulder. New shoulder ultrasound revealed exuberant subacromial bursitis, which was again aspirated using ultrasound guidance. The synovial fluid was haematic, without changes in the cell count or biochemical analysis and cultural exams. We performed an injection with 60 mg of hexacetonide triamcinolone. Two months later there was a relapse, with shoulder ultrasonography once more showing subacromial bursitis with extensive synovial membrane proliferation. Shoulder MRI revealed subacromial bursitis involving the anterior, posterior and medial recesses, with deltoid distension, but without tendinous or intra-articular involvement. In the interior of the bursa hypointense images in T2 were observed, suggesting the diagnosis of Pigmented Vilonodular Synovitis. The patient had surgical bursectomy with success and without complications. The histological exam of the operatory piece confirmed the imaging diagnosis. Pigmented Vilonodular Synovitis is uncommon, rarely affecting the shoulder in a localized variant. It is a diagnosis to be considered in shoulder pain, especially if associated with recurrent subacromial bursitis.

  15. Ritual tooth modification among the Baka pygmies in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Agbor, A M; Azodo, C C; Naidoo, S

    2015-09-01

    Ritual tooth mutilation is a relatively understudied human body mutilatory practices. The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of ritual tooth modification, teeth cleaning measures and herbal medications for their oral health problems among the Baka pygmies in Cameroon. This cross-sectional study was conducted between January and March, 2012 using semi-structured questionnaire as the tool of data collection. Intra-oral examinations were carried out to determine the dental hard tissue loss using Smith and Knight Tooth Wear Index (TWI). Fifty-six pygmies with ritual tooth modification made of 34 males (60.7%) and 22 females (39.3%) with a mean age of 31 years were interviewed and had oral health examination. The reported age at which the tooth modification was done was between 10 and 15 years with mean age as 12 ± 1.66 years. More than half (58.9%) of the participants reported the tooth filing as painful and nearly two-thirds (64.3%) of the participants reported having persistent pain afterwards. The upper right central and lateral incisors were the most commonly modified teeth. A total of 42.9%, 12.5% and 7.1% of the participants had Smith and Knight TWI scores of 2, 3 and 4 respectively. All the participants reported cleaning their teeth at least once-daily with about two-thirds (66.1%) of them doing so with chewing stick. The majority (67.9%) of the participants reported cleaning their teeth for cosmetic reasons [to remove dirt' (60.7%) and 'to remove stains' (7.1%)]. The oral health problems among the participants in form of tooth sensitivity, toothache and dental abscess were treated with plant-based traditional medicines from Irvingia gabonensis, Ricinodendron heudoletti, Pterocarpus soyauxii, Alchornea cordifolia and Piptadeniastrum africanum. Ritual tooth modification is a painful mutilatory practice which is culturally significant for the Baka pygmies without health benefit. There is need for intervention to stop this harmful traditional

  16. Grand Coulee Dam Wildlife Mitigation Program : Pygmy Rabbit Programmatic Management Plan, Douglas County, Washington.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul

    1992-06-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council and the Bonneville Power Administration approved the pygmy rabbit project as partial mitigation for impacts caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The focus of this project is the protection and enhancement of shrub-steppe/pygmy rabbit habitat in northeastern Washington.

  17. 'Pygmy' old-growth redwood characteristics on an edaphic ecotone in Mendocino County, California

    Treesearch

    Will Russell; Suzie. Woolhouse

    2012-01-01

    The 'pygmy forest' is a specialized community that is adapted to highly acidic, hydrophobic, nutrient deprived soils, and exists in pockets within the coast redwood forest in Mendocino County. While coast redwood is known as an exceptionally tall tree, stunted trees exhibit unusual growth-forms on pygmy soils. We used a stratified random sampling procedure to...

  18. Effects of rare-earth co-doping on the local structure of rare-earth phosphate glasses using high and low energy X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Alisha J; Cole, Jacqueline M; FitzGerald, Vicky; Honkimaki, Veijo; Roberts, Mark A; Brennan, Tessa; Martin, Richard A; Saunders, George A; Newport, Robert J

    2013-06-14

    Rare-earth co-doping in inorganic materials has a long-held tradition of facilitating highly desirable optoelectronic properties for their application to the laser industry. This study concentrates specifically on rare-earth phosphate glasses, (R2O3)x(R'2O3)y(P2O5)(1-(x+y)), where (R, R') denotes (Ce, Er) or (La, Nd) co-doping and the total rare-earth composition corresponds to a range between metaphosphate, RP3O9, and ultraphosphate, RP5O14. Thereupon, the effects of rare-earth co-doping on the local structure are assessed at the atomic level. Pair-distribution function analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction data (Q(max) = 28 Å(-1)) is employed to make this assessment. Results reveal a stark structural invariance to rare-earth co-doping which bears testament to the open-framework and rigid nature of these glasses. A range of desirable attributes of these glasses unfold from this finding; in particular, a structural simplicity that will enable facile molecular engineering of rare-earth phosphate glasses with 'dial-up' lasing properties. When considered together with other factors, this finding also demonstrates additional prospects for these co-doped rare-earth phosphate glasses in nuclear waste storage applications. This study also reveals, for the first time, the ability to distinguish between P-O and P[double bond, length as m-dash]O bonding in these rare-earth phosphate glasses from X-ray diffraction data in a fully quantitative manner. Complementary analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction data on single rare-earth phosphate glasses of similar rare-earth composition to the co-doped materials is also presented in this context. In a technical sense, all high-energy X-ray diffraction data on these glasses are compared with analogous low-energy diffraction data; their salient differences reveal distinct advantages of high-energy X-ray diffraction data for the study of amorphous materials.

  19. Growth pattern from birth to adulthood in African pygmies of known age

    PubMed Central

    Rozzi, Fernando V. Ramirez; Koudou, Yves; Froment, Alain; Le Bouc, Yves; Botton, Jérémie

    2015-01-01

    The African pygmy phenotype stems from genetic foundations and is considered to be the product of a disturbance in the growth hormone–insulin-like growth factor (GH–IGF) axis. However, when and how the pygmy phenotype is acquired during growth remains unknown. Here we describe growth patterns in Baka pygmies based on two longitudinal studies of individuals of known age, from the time of birth to the age of 25 years. Body size at birth among the Baka is within standard limits, but their growth rate slows significantly during the first two years of life. It then more or less follows the standard pattern, with a growth spurt at adolescence. Their life history variables do not allow the Baka to be distinguished from other populations. Therefore, the pygmy phenotype in the Baka is the result of a change in growth that occurs during infancy, which differentiates them from East African pygmies revealing convergent evolution. PMID:26218408

  20. Dense genotyping identifies and localizes multiple common and rare variant association signals in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Trynka, Gosia; Hunt, Karen A; Bockett, Nicholas A; Romanos, Jihane; Mistry, Vanisha; Szperl, Agata; Bakker, Sjoerd F; Bardella, Maria Teresa; Bhaw-Rosun, Leena; Castillejo, Gemma; de la Concha, Emilio G.; de Almeida, Rodrigo Coutinho; Dias, Kerith-Rae M; van Diemen, Cleo C.; Dubois, Patrick CA; Duerr, Richard H.; Edkins, Sarah; Franke, Lude; Fransen, Karin; Gutierrez, Javier; Heap, Graham AR; Hrdlickova, Barbara; Hunt, Sarah; Izurieta, Leticia Plaza; Izzo, Valentina; Joosten, Leo AB; Langford, Cordelia; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Mein, Charles A; Midah, Vandana; Mitrovic, Mitja; Mora, Barbara; Morelli, Marinita; Nutland, Sarah; Núñez, Concepción; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Pearce, Kerra; Platteel, Mathieu; Polanco, Isabel; Potter, Simon; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; Ricaño-Ponce, Isis; Rich, Stephen S.; Rybak, Anna; Santiago, José Luis; Senapati, Sabyasachi; Sood, Ajit; Szajewska, Hania; Troncone, Riccardo; Varadé, Jezabel; Wallace, Chris; Wolters, Victorien M; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Thelma, B.K.; Cukrowska, Bozena; Urcelay, Elena; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Mearin, M Luisa; Barisani, Donatella; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Plagnol, Vincent; Deloukas, Panos; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A

    2011-01-01

    We densely genotyped, using 1000 Genomes Project pilot CEU and additional re-sequencing study variants, 183 reported immune-mediated disease non-HLA risk loci in 12,041 celiac disease cases and 12,228 controls. We identified 13 new celiac disease risk loci at genome wide significance, bringing the total number of known loci (including HLA) to 40. Multiple independent association signals are found at over a third of these loci, attributable to a combination of common, low frequency, and rare genetic variants. In comparison with previously available data such as HapMap3, our dense genotyping in a large sample size provided increased resolution of the pattern of linkage disequilibrium, and suggested localization of many signals to finer scale regions. In particular, 29 of 54 fine-mapped signals appeared localized to specific single genes - and in some instances to gene regulatory elements. We define a complex genetic architecture of risk regions, and refine risk signals, providing a next step towards elucidating causal disease mechanisms. PMID:22057235

  1. Insights into the demographic history of African Pygmies from complete mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Batini, Chiara; Lopes, Joao; Behar, Doron M; Calafell, Francesc; Jorde, Lynn B; van der Veen, Lolke; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Spedini, Gabriella; Destro-Bisol, Giovanni; Comas, David

    2011-02-01

    Pygmy populations are among the few hunter-gatherers currently living in sub-Saharan Africa and are mainly represented by two groups, Eastern and Western, according to their current geographical distribution. They are scattered across the Central African belt and surrounded by Bantu-speaking farmers, with whom they have complex social and economic interactions. To investigate the demographic history of Pygmy groups, a population approach was applied to the analysis of 205 complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from ten central African populations. No sharing of maternal lineages was observed between the two Pygmy groups, with haplogroup L1c being characteristic of the Western group but most of Eastern Pygmy lineages falling into subclades of L0a, L2a, and L5. Demographic inferences based on Bayesian coalescent simulations point to an early split among the maternal ancestors of Pygmies and those of Bantu-speaking farmers (∼ 70,000 years ago [ya]). Evidence for population growth in the ancestors of Bantu-speaking farmers has been observed, starting ∼ 65,000 ya, well before the diffusion of Bantu languages. Subsequently, the effective population size of the ancestors of Pygmies remained constant over time and ∼ 27,000 ya, coincident with the Last Glacial Maximum, Eastern and Western Pygmies diverged, with evidence of subsequent migration only among the Western group and the Bantu-speaking farmers. Western Pygmies show signs of a recent bottleneck 4,000-650 ya, coincident with the diffusion of Bantu languages, whereas Eastern Pygmies seem to have experienced a more ancient decrease in population size (20,000-4,000 ya). In conclusion, the results of this first attempt at analyzing complete mtDNA sequences at the population level in sub-Saharan Africa not only support previous findings but also offer new insights into the demographic history of Pygmy populations, shedding new light on the ancient peopling of the African continent.

  2. The role of GHR and IGF1 genes in the genetic determination of African pygmies' short stature

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Noémie SA; Verdu, Paul; Georges, Myriam; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Froment, Alain; Amselem, Serge; Le Bouc, Yves; Heyer, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    African pygmies are at the lower extreme of human variation in adult stature and many evolutionary hypotheses have been proposed to explain this phenotype. We showed in a recent study that the difference in average stature of about 10 cm observed between contemporary pygmies and neighboring non-pygmies has a genetic component. Nevertheless, the genetic basis of African pygmies' short stature remains unknown. Using a candidate-gene approach, we show that intronic polymorphisms in GH receptor (GHR) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) genes present outlying values of the genetic distance between Baka pygmies and their non-pygmy Nzimé neighbors. We further show that GHR and IGF1 genes have experienced divergent natural selection pressures between pygmies and non-pygmies throughout evolution. In addition, these SNPs are associated with stature in a sample composed of 60 pygmies and 30 non-pygmies and this association remains significant when correcting for population structure for the GHR locus. We conclude that the GHR and IGF1 genes may have a role in African pygmies' short stature. The use of phenotypically contrasted populations is a promising strategy to identify new variants associated with complex traits in humans. PMID:23047741

  3. New Insight into the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in Stable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann-Cosel, P. von

    2008-11-11

    Two examples of recent work on the structure of low-energy electric dipole modes are presented. The first part discusses the systematics of the pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) in stable tin isotopes deduced from high-resolution ({gamma},{gamma}') experiments. These help to distinguish between microscopic QRPA calculations based on either a relativistic or a nonrelativistic mean-field description, predicting significantly different properties of the PDR. The second part presents attempts to unravel the structure of dipoles modes at energies below the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in {sup 208}Pb with a high-resolution measurement of the (p-vector,p-vector') reaction under 0 deg.

  4. The demographic drivers of local population dynamics in two rare migratory birds.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Michael; Reichlin, Thomas S; Abadi, Fitsum; Kéry, Marc; Jenni, Lukas; Arlettaz, Raphaël

    2012-01-01

    The exchange of individuals among populations can have strong effects on the dynamics and persistence of a given population. Yet, estimation of immigration rates remains one of the greatest challenges for animal demographers. Little empirical knowledge exists about the effects of immigration on population dynamics. New integrated population models fitted using Bayesian methods enable simultaneous estimation of fecundity, survival and immigration, as well as the growth rate of a population of interest. We applied this novel analytical framework to the demography of two populations of long-distance migratory birds, hoopoe Upupa epops and wryneck Jynx torquilla, in a study area in south-western Switzerland. During 2002-2010, the hoopoe population increased annually by 11%, while the wryneck population remained fairly stable. Apparent juvenile and adult survival probability was nearly identical in both species, but fecundity and immigration were slightly higher in the hoopoe. Hoopoe population growth rate was strongly correlated with juvenile survival, fecundity and immigration, while that of wrynecks strongly correlated only with immigration. This indicates that demographic components impacting the arrival of new individuals into the populations were more important for their dynamics than demographic components affecting the loss of individuals. The finding that immigration plays a crucial role in the population growth rates of these two rare species emphasizes the need for a broad rather than local perspective for population studies, and the development of wide-scale conservation actions.

  5. Allometry and adaptation of body proportions and stature in African pygmies.

    PubMed

    Shea, B T; Bailey, R C

    1996-07-01

    We have analyzed the growth allometry of external body proportions in Efe pygmies from Zaire and combined these data with values from the literature for comparable dimensions in adult pygmies and nonpygmies. We sequentially tested the hypotheses that adult proportion differences between 1) male vs. female Efe, and 2) pygmies vs. nonpygmies result from ontogenetic scaling, or the differential extension of common patterns of growth allometry. Results indicate an almost complete concordance of allometric trajectories for male and female Efe. These preliminary analyses also strongly suggest that adult nonpygmy Africans generally differ from pygmies in their terminal size and correlated allometric consequences, rather than in more fundamental alterations of underlying patterns of growth. Biacromial diameter emerges as the measurement most likely to depart from this general pattern. These results provide further evidence that shifts in systemic growth hormones yielding differences in terminal overall body size may be accompanied by global and coordinated allometric transformations. Certain proportion differences previously interpreted by some as specific evidence of primitive retention in pygmies in fact reflect simple growth allometric correlates of the derive rapid size decrease in these groups. Selected divergent body proportions characterizing adult pygmies, previously interpreted by some as independent evidence of climatic adaptation, also reflect such allometric correlates of ontogenetic scaling. We critically assess arguments that the small overall body size of pygmies was specifically selected for reasons of thermoregulatory efficiency, and consider an alternative or complementary scenario, based on selection for small size in order to reduce caloric requirements.

  6. Recent Acquisition of Helicobacter pylori by Baka Pygmies

    PubMed Central

    Montano, Valeria; Maady, Ayas; Nkwescheu, Armand; Siri, Jose; Elamin, Wael F.; Falush, Daniel; Linz, Bodo; Achtman, Mark; Moodley, Yoshan; Suerbaum, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Both anatomically modern humans and the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori originated in Africa, and both species have been associated for at least 100,000 years. Seven geographically distinct H. pylori populations exist, three of which are indigenous to Africa: hpAfrica1, hpAfrica2, and hpNEAfrica. The oldest and most divergent population, hpAfrica2, evolved within San hunter-gatherers, who represent one of the deepest branches of the human population tree. Anticipating the presence of ancient H. pylori lineages within all hunter-gatherer populations, we investigated the prevalence and population structure of H. pylori within Baka Pygmies in Cameroon. Gastric biopsies were obtained by esophagogastroduodenoscopy from 77 Baka from two geographically separated populations, and from 101 non-Baka individuals from neighboring agriculturalist populations, and subsequently cultured for H. pylori. Unexpectedly, Baka Pygmies showed a significantly lower H. pylori infection rate (20.8%) than non-Baka (80.2%). We generated multilocus haplotypes for each H. pylori isolate by DNA sequencing, but were not able to identify Baka-specific lineages, and most isolates in our sample were assigned to hpNEAfrica or hpAfrica1. The population hpNEAfrica, a marker for the expansion of the Nilo-Saharan language family, was divided into East African and Central West African subpopulations. Similarly, a new hpAfrica1 subpopulation, identified mainly among Cameroonians, supports eastern and western expansions of Bantu languages. An age-structured transmission model shows that the low H. pylori prevalence among Baka Pygmies is achievable within the timeframe of a few hundred years and suggests that demographic factors such as small population size and unusually low life expectancy can lead to the eradication of H. pylori from individual human populations. The Baka were thus either H. pylori-free or lost their ancient lineages during past demographic fluctuations. Using coalescent simulations

  7. Surgical resection of peripheral odontogenic fibromas in African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris): a case study.

    PubMed

    Wozniak-Biel, Anna; Janeczek, Maciej; Janus, Izabela; Nowak, Marcin

    2015-07-04

    Neoplastic lesions of the mammary gland, lymph nodes, or oral cavity in African pygmy hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) are common in captive animals. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy protocols have not yet been established for the African pygmy hedgehog. Thus, surgical resection is the current treatment of choice in this species. A 5-year-old male African pygmy hedgehog showed multiple erythematous, round small tumors located in the oral cavity, on both sides of maxilla. The treatment of choice was surgical resection of tumors using a surgical knife under general anesthesia. Excised neoplastic lesions were diagnosed as peripheral odontogenic fibroma by histopathology. Six months after surgery relapse of tumors in the oral cavity was not observed. The treatment adopted in this case report is safe for the patient and provides the best solution for mild proliferative lesions of the oral cavity. To our knowledge this is the first report of surgical resection of oral tumors (peripheral odontogenic fibroma) in the African pygmy hedgehog.

  8. Evolution of pygmy angelfishes: recent divergences, introgression, and the usefulness of color in taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Gaither, Michelle R; Schultz, Jennifer K; Bellwood, David R; Pyle, Richard L; Dibattista, Joseph D; Rocha, Luiz A; Bowen, Brian W

    2014-05-01

    The pygmy angelfishes (genus Centropyge, family Pomacanthidae) are brightly colored species that occupy reef habitats in every tropical ocean. Some species are rarely observed because they occur below conventional scuba depths. Their striking coloration can command thousands of U.S. dollars in the aquarium trade, and closely related species are often distinguished only by coloration. These factors have impeded phylogenetic resolution, and every phylogeographic survey to date has reported discordance between coloration, taxonomy, and genetic partitions. Here we report a phylogenetic survey of 29 of the 34 recognized species (N=94 plus 23 outgroups), based on two mtDNA and three nuclear loci, totaling 2272 bp. The resulting ML and Baysian trees are highly concordant and indicate that the genus Centropyge is paraphyletic, consistent with a previous analysis of the family Pomacanthidae. Two recognized genera (Apolemichthys and Genicanthus) nest within Centropyge, and two subgenera (Xiphypops and Paracentropyge) comprise monophyletic lineages that should be elevated to genus level. Based on an age estimate of 38 Ma for the family Pomacanthidae, Centropyge diverged from the closest extant genus Pygoplites about 33 Ma, three deep lineages within Centropyge diverged about 18-28 Ma, and four species complexes diverged 3-12 Ma. However, in 11 of 13 cases, putative species in these complexes are indistinguishable based on morphology and genetics, being defined solely by coloration. These cases indicate either emerging species or excessive taxonomic splitting based on brightly colored variants.

  9. XY females do better than the XX in the African pygmy mouse, Mus minutoides.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Paul A; Perez, Julie; Rahmoun, Massilva; Ronce, Ophélie; Crochet, Pierre-André; Veyrunes, Frédéric

    2014-07-01

    All therian mammals have a similar XY/XX sex-determination system except for a dozen species. The African pygmy mouse, Mus minutoides, harbors an unconventional system in which all males are XY, and there are three types of females: the usual XX but also XX* and X*Y ones (the asterisk designates a sex-reversal mutation on the X chromosome). The long-term evolution of such a system is a paradox, because X*Y females are expected to face high reproductive costs (e.g., meiotic disruption and loss of unviable YY embryos), which should prevent invasion and maintenance of a sex-reversal mutation. Hence, mechanisms for compensating for the costs could have evolved in M. minutoides. Data gathered from our laboratory colony revealed that X*Y females do compensate and even show enhanced reproductive performance in comparison to the XX and XX*; they produce significantly more offspring due to (i) a higher probability of breeding, (ii) an earlier first litter, and (iii) a larger litter size, linked to (iv) a greater ovulation rate. These findings confirm that rare conditions are needed for an atypical sex-determination mechanism to evolve in mammals, and provide valuable insight into understanding modifications of systems with highly heteromorphic sex chromosomes. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  10. Rapid evolution of fire melanism in replicated populations of pygmy grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Forsman, Anders; Karlsson, Magnus; Wennersten, Lena; Johansson, Jenny; Karpestam, Einat

    2011-09-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts an interactive process whereby spatiotemporal environmental heterogeneity will maintain genetic variation, while genetic and phenotypic diversity will buffer populations against stress and allow for fast adaptive evolution in rapidly changing environments. Here, we study color polymorphism patterns in pygmy grasshoppers (Tetrix subulata) and show that the frequency of the melanistic (black) color variant was higher in areas that had been ravaged by fires the previous year than in nonburned habitats, that, in burned areas, the frequency of melanistic grasshoppers dropped from ca. 50% one year after a fire to 30% after four years, and that the variation in frequencies of melanistic individuals among and within populations was genetically based on and represented evolutionary modifications. Dark coloration may confer a selective benefit mediated by enhanced camouflage in recently fire-ravaged areas characterized by blackened visual backgrounds before vegetation has recovered. These findings provide rare evidence for unusually large, extremely rapid adaptive contemporary evolution in replicated natural populations in response to divergent and fluctuating selection associated with spatiotemporal environmental changes.

  11. Pygmy dipole resonance and dipole polarizability in {sup 90}Zr

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, C.; Tamii, A.; Shima, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Suzuki, T.; Fujita, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Utsunomiya, H.; Akimune, H.; Yamagata, T.; Okamoto, A.; Kondo, T.; Nakada, H.; Kawabata, T.; Fujita, Y.; Matsubara, H.; Shimbara, Y.; Nagashima, M.; Sakuda, M.; Mori, T.; and others

    2014-05-02

    Electric dipole (E1) reduced transition probability B(E1) of {sup 90}Zr was obtained by the inelastic proton scattering near 0 degrees using a 295 MeV proton beam and multipole decomposition analysis of the angular distribution by the distorted-wave Born approximation with the Hartree-Fock plus random-phase approximation model and inclusion of El Coulomb excitation, and the E1 strength of the pygmy dipole resonance was found in the vicinity of the neutron threshold in the low-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance. Using the data, we plan to determine the precise dipole polarizability α{sub D} which is defined as an inversely energy-weighted sum value of the elecrric dipole strength. The dipole polarizability is expected to constrain the symmetry energy term of the neutron matter equation of state. Thus systematical measurement of the dipole polarizability is important.

  12. Pygmy dipole resonance and dipole polarizability in 90Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, C.; Tamii, A.; Utsunomiya, H.; Akimune, H.; Nakada, H.; Shima, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Yamagata, T.; Kawabata, T.; Fujita, Y.; Matsubara, H.; Suzuki, T.; Fujita, H.; Shimbara, Y.; Nagashima, M.; Sakuda, M.; Mori, T.; Izumi, T.; Okamoto, A.; Kondo, T.; Lui, T.-W.; Bilgier, B.; Kozer, H. C.; Hatanaka, K.

    2014-05-01

    Electric dipole (E1) reduced transition probability B(E1) of 90Zr was obtained by the inelastic proton scattering near 0 degrees using a 295 MeV proton beam and multipole decomposition analysis of the angular distribution by the distorted-wave Born approximation with the Hartree-Fock plus random-phase approximation model and inclusion of El Coulomb excitation, and the E1 strength of the pygmy dipole resonance was found in the vicinity of the neutron threshold in the low-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance. Using the data, we plan to determine the precise dipole polarizability αD which is defined as an inversely energy-weighted sum value of the elecrric dipole strength. The dipole polarizability is expected to constrain the symmetry energy term of the neutron matter equation of state. Thus systematical measurement of the dipole polarizability is important.

  13. Pygmy MicroRNA: Surveillance Cops in Therapy Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Bhadra, Utpal; Patra, Pradipta; Chhatai, Jagamohan; Pal-Bhadra, Manika

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are well preserved in every animal. These pygmy-sized (21–23 nt) noncoding RNAs scattered in the genome are responsible for micromanaging versatile gene regulation. There is involvement of miRNAs as surveillance cops in all human diseases including cardiovascular defects, tumor formation, reproductive pathways, and neurological and autoimmune disorders. The effective functional role of miRNA can be reduced by chemical entities of antisense oligonucleotides and versatile small molecules that support the views of novel therapies of different human diseases. In this study, we have updated our current understanding of designing and synthesizing miRNA-controlled therapeutic chemicals. We have also proposed various in vivo delivery strategies and discuss their ongoing challenges to combat incorporation hurdles in live cells and animals. Lastly, we have demonstrated the current progress of miRNA modulation in the treatment of human diseases to provide an alternative approach to gene therapy. PMID:27704139

  14. Age, growth, and size of Lake Superior Pygmy Whitefish (Prosopium coulterii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, Taylor; Derek Ogle,; Gorman, Owen T.; Vinson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Pygmy Whitefish (Prosopium coulterii) are a small, glacial relict species with a disjunct distribution in North America and Siberia. In 2013 we collected Pygmy Whitefish at 28 stations from throughout Lake Superior. Total length was recorded for all fish and weight and sex were recorded and scales and otoliths were collected from a subsample. We compared the precision of estimated ages between readers and between scales and otoliths, estimated von Bertalanffy growth parameters for male and female Pygmy Whitefish, and reported the first weight-length relationship for Pygmy Whitefish. Age estimates between scales and otoliths differed significantly with otolith ages significantly greater for most ages after age-3. Maximum otolith age was nine for females and seven for males, which is older than previously reported for Pygmy Whitefish from Lake Superior. Growth was initially fast but slowed considerably after age-3 for males and age-4 for females, falling to 3–4 mm per year at maximum estimated ages. Females were longer than males after age-3. Our results suggest the size, age, and growth of Pygmy Whitefish in Lake Superior have not changed appreciably since 1953.

  15. Life history trade-offs explain the evolution of human pygmies.

    PubMed

    Migliano, Andrea Bamberg; Vinicius, Lucio; Lahr, Marta Mirazón

    2007-12-18

    Explanations for the evolution of human pygmies continue to be a matter of controversy, recently fuelled by the disagreements surrounding the interpretation of the fossil hominin Homo floresiensis. Traditional hypotheses assume that the small body size of human pygmies is an adaptation to special challenges, such as thermoregulation, locomotion in dense forests, or endurance against starvation. Here, we present an analysis of stature, growth, and individual fitness for a large population of Aeta and a smaller one of Batak from the Philippines and compare it with data on other pygmy groups accumulated by anthropologists for a century. The results challenge traditional explanations of human pygmy body size. We argue that human pygmy populations and adaptations evolved independently as the result of a life history tradeoff between the fertility benefits of larger body size against the costs of late growth cessation, under circumstances of significant young and adult mortality. Human pygmies do not appear to have evolved through positive selection for small stature-this was a by-product of selection for early onset of reproduction.

  16. Music induces universal emotion-related psychophysiological responses: comparing Canadian listeners to Congolese Pygmies.

    PubMed

    Egermann, Hauke; Fernando, Nathalie; Chuen, Lorraine; McAdams, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Subjective and psychophysiological emotional responses to music from two different cultures were compared within these two cultures. Two identical experiments were conducted: the first in the Congolese rainforest with an isolated population of Mebenzélé Pygmies without any exposure to Western music and culture, the second with a group of Western music listeners, with no experience with Congolese music. Forty Pygmies and 40 Canadians listened in pairs to 19 music excerpts of 29-99 s in duration in random order (eight from the Pygmy population and 11 Western instrumental excerpts). For both groups, emotion components were continuously measured: subjective feeling (using a two- dimensional valence and arousal rating interface), peripheral physiological activation, and facial expression. While Pygmy music was rated as positive and arousing by Pygmies, ratings of Western music by Westerners covered the range from arousing to calming and from positive to negative. Comparing psychophysiological responses to emotional qualities of Pygmy music across participant groups showed no similarities. However, Western stimuli, rated as high and low arousing by Canadians, created similar responses in both participant groups (with high arousal associated with increases in subjective and physiological activation). Several low-level acoustical features of the music presented (tempo, pitch, and timbre) were shown to affect subjective and physiological arousal similarly in both cultures. Results suggest that while the subjective dimension of emotional valence might be mediated by cultural learning, changes in arousal might involve a more basic, universal response to low-level acoustical characteristics of music.

  17. Music induces universal emotion-related psychophysiological responses: comparing Canadian listeners to Congolese Pygmies

    PubMed Central

    Egermann, Hauke; Fernando, Nathalie; Chuen, Lorraine; McAdams, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Subjective and psychophysiological emotional responses to music from two different cultures were compared within these two cultures. Two identical experiments were conducted: the first in the Congolese rainforest with an isolated population of Mebenzélé Pygmies without any exposure to Western music and culture, the second with a group of Western music listeners, with no experience with Congolese music. Forty Pygmies and 40 Canadians listened in pairs to 19 music excerpts of 29–99 s in duration in random order (eight from the Pygmy population and 11 Western instrumental excerpts). For both groups, emotion components were continuously measured: subjective feeling (using a two- dimensional valence and arousal rating interface), peripheral physiological activation, and facial expression. While Pygmy music was rated as positive and arousing by Pygmies, ratings of Western music by Westerners covered the range from arousing to calming and from positive to negative. Comparing psychophysiological responses to emotional qualities of Pygmy music across participant groups showed no similarities. However, Western stimuli, rated as high and low arousing by Canadians, created similar responses in both participant groups (with high arousal associated with increases in subjective and physiological activation). Several low-level acoustical features of the music presented (tempo, pitch, and timbre) were shown to affect subjective and physiological arousal similarly in both cultures. Results suggest that while the subjective dimension of emotional valence might be mediated by cultural learning, changes in arousal might involve a more basic, universal response to low-level acoustical characteristics of music. PMID:25620935

  18. Forelimb myology of the pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis).

    PubMed

    Fisher, Rebecca E; Scott, Kathleen M; Naples, Virginia L

    2007-06-01

    Based on morphological analyses, hippos have traditionally been classified as Suiformes, along with pigs and peccaries. However, molecular data indicate hippos and cetaceans are sister taxa (see review in Uhen, 2007, this issue). This study analyzes soft tissue characters of the pygmy hippo forelimb to elucidate the functional anatomy and evolutionary relationships of hippos within Artiodactyla. Two specimens from the National Zoological Park in Washington, D.C. were dissected, revealing several adaptations to an aquatic lifestyle. However, these adaptations differ functionally from most aquatic mammals as hippos walk along river or lake bottoms, rather than swim. Several findings highlight a robust mechanism for propelling the trunk forward through the water. For example, mm. pectoralis superficialis and profundus demonstrate broad sites of origin, while the long flexor tendons serve each of the digits, reflecting the fact that all toes are weight-bearing. Pygmy hippos also have eight mm. interossei and a well-developed m. lumbricalis IV. Retention of intrinsic adductors functions to prevent splaying of the toes, an advantageous arrangement in an animal walking on muddy substrates. Published descriptions indicate common hippos share all of these features. Hippo and ruminant forelimbs share several traits; however, hippos are unique among artiodactyls in retaining several primitive muscles (e.g., mm. palmaris longus and flexor digitorum brevis). These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that hippos diverged from other Artiodactyla early in the history of this group. Additional analyses of hindlimb and axial muscles may help determine whether this trajectory was closely allied to that of Cetacea. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Universality of chaotic rare fluctuations in a locally coupled phase map model.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takeshi; Tsubo, Yasuhiro; Fujisaka, Hirokazu

    2002-02-01

    Chaotic fluctuations of the order parameter in a coupled two-dimensional phase map model are numerically investigated. We discuss the system-size N dependence of the statistical properties of rare fluctuations observed in the transition range between the quasiordered chaotic state and the fully developed one. It is found that the normalized probability distribution function (PDF) has a unique functional form irrespective of N. The asymptotic form of the PDF is discussed in connection with the universal distribution for correlated systems proposed by Bramwell et al. [Nature (London) 396, 552 (1998)]. Moreover, it is observed that the power spectrum P(N)(omega) of rare fluctuations asymptotically takes the power-law form P(N)(omega) equivalent to omega(-(1+alpha)) (alpha=0.6 equivalent to 0.7) irrespective of N. This result suggests that the temporal correlation decays as a stretched exponential.

  20. Extranodal right-optic nerve Rosai–Dorfman disease: A rare localization case report

    PubMed Central

    Nemir, Jakob; Trninic, Ines; Duric, Kresimir S.; Jakovcevic, Antonia; Mrak, Goran; Paladino, Josip

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rosai–Dorfman is a rare disease that usually occurs in young adults. It is characterized with massive painless cervical lymphadenopathy and histiocyte proliferation. Isolated intracranial involvement is extremely rare. Our aim is to present a new rare case of extranodal Rosai–Dorfman disease that involved the right optic nerve in a 4-year-old boy. Case Description: A 4-year-old boy with right-sided convergent strabismus and amblyopia lasting for 1 year was treated at the Department of pediatric ophthalmology. Initial optical fundus examination was normal. Examination repeated after 1 year noted the atrophy of the optic nerve papilla. Visual evoked potentials of the right eye showed normal findings of prechiasmatic visual pathway with severe dysfunction of the right optic nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and orbits showed expansive changed and elongated right optic nerve with contrast enhancement, and smaller lesion in the right temporal operculum region visible in T2 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence. Through small eyebrow “keyhole” osteoplastic frontoorbital craniotomy the fusiform enlarged (to 2 cm) right optic nerve was identified, resected between the eyeball and optic chiasm, and transferred for pathohistological analysis. Early postoperative course had no complications. Histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural analyses revealed extranodal Rosai–Dorfman disease. Right periorbital edema was verified on the 7th postoperative day and regressed to supportive therapy. Control multi slice computed tomography (MSCT) and MRI of endocranium and orbits showed total tumor removal with no signs of complications. Conclusion: Although rare, extranodular intracranial Rosai–Dorfman disease should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of intracranial and intraorbital lesions, especially in the pediatric age group. PMID:28194305

  1. Local order around rare earth ions during the devitrification of oxyfluoride glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Maurício A. P.; Dantelle, Geraldine; Mortier, Michel; Monteil, André; Ribeiro, Sidney J. L.; Messaddeq, Younès; Briois, Valérie; Poulain, Marcel

    2008-06-01

    Erbium L3-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements were performed on rare earth doped fluorosilicate and fluoroborate glasses and glass ceramics. The well known nucleating effects of erbium ions for the crystallization of cubic lead fluoride (based on x-ray diffraction measurements) and the fact that the rare earth ions are present in the crystalline phase (as indicated by Er3+ emission spectra) seem in contradiction with the present EXAFS analysis, which indicates a lack of medium range structural ordering around the Er3+ ions and suggests that the lead fluoride crystallization does not occur in the nearest neighbor distance of the rare earth ion. Molecular dynamics simulations of the devitrification process of a lead fluoride glass doped with Er3+ ions were performed, and results indicate that Er3+ ions lower the devitrification temperature of PbF2, in good agreement with the experimental results. The genuine role of Er3+ ions in the devitrification process of PbF2 has been investigated. Although Er3+ ions could indeed act as seeds for crystallization, as experiments suggest, molecular dynamics simulation results corroborate the experimental EXAFS observation that the devitrification does not occur at its nearest neighbor distance.

  2. Mycotic dermatitis in an Atlantic white-sided dolphin, a pygmy sperm whale, and two harbor seals.

    PubMed

    Frasca, S; Dunn, J L; Cooke, J C; Buck, J D

    1996-03-01

    An Atlantic white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus), a pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps), 2 harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) developed raised, firm, erythematous, cutaneous nodules that were most prominent on their heads, trunks, and on the caudal portions of their bodies. Prior to the onset of the condition, all 4 animals may have been stressed by factors such as being stranded on a beach, being transported long distances, or being relocated locally. Microbial culturing of the lesions on multiple media yielded fungal isolates containing conidia characteristic of Fusarium spp. Hyphae consistent with those of an ascomycete were evident on histologic examination of lesions. In each treated animal, the dermatitis resolved 3 to 4 weeks after completing treatment with ketoconazole. Fusarium spp may be opportunistic invaders of the skin of marine mammals that have decreased immunocompetence or integumentary compromise.

  3. Adaptive, convergent origins of the pygmy phenotype in African rainforest hunter-gatherers.

    PubMed

    Perry, George H; Foll, Matthieu; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; Patin, Etienne; Nédélec, Yohann; Pacis, Alain; Barakatt, Maxime; Gravel, Simon; Zhou, Xiang; Nsobya, Sam L; Excoffier, Laurent; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Dominy, Nathaniel J; Barreiro, Luis B

    2014-09-02

    The evolutionary history of the human pygmy phenotype (small body size), a characteristic of African and Southeast Asian rainforest hunter-gatherers, is largely unknown. Here we use a genome-wide admixture mapping analysis to identify 16 genomic regions that are significantly associated with the pygmy phenotype in the Batwa, a rainforest hunter-gatherer population from Uganda (east central Africa). The identified genomic regions have multiple attributes that provide supporting evidence of genuine association with the pygmy phenotype, including enrichments for SNPs previously associated with stature variation in Europeans and for genes with growth hormone receptor and regulation functions. To test adaptive evolutionary hypotheses, we computed the haplotype-based integrated haplotype score (iHS) statistic and the level of population differentiation (FST) between the Batwa and their agricultural neighbors, the Bakiga, for each genomic SNP. Both |iHS| and FST values were significantly higher for SNPs within the Batwa pygmy phenotype-associated regions than the remainder of the genome, a signature of polygenic adaptation. In contrast, when we expanded our analysis to include Baka rainforest hunter-gatherers from Cameroon and Gabon (west central Africa) and Nzebi and Nzime neighboring agriculturalists, we did not observe elevated |iHS| or FST values in these genomic regions. Together, these results suggest adaptive and at least partially convergent origins of the pygmy phenotype even within Africa, supporting the hypothesis that small body size confers a selective advantage for tropical rainforest hunter-gatherers but raising questions about the antiquity of this behavior.

  4. Colonization of Ireland: revisiting 'the pygmy shrew syndrome' using mitochondrial, Y chromosomal and microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, A D; Vega, R; Rambau, R V; Yannic, G; Herman, J S; Hayden, T J; Searle, J B

    2011-12-01

    There is great uncertainty about how Ireland attained its current fauna and flora. Long-distance human-mediated colonization from southwestern Europe has been seen as a possible way that Ireland obtained many of its species; however, Britain has (surprisingly) been neglected as a source area for Ireland. The pygmy shrew has long been considered an illustrative model species, such that the uncertainty of the Irish colonization process has been dubbed 'the pygmy shrew syndrome'. Here, we used new genetic data consisting of 218 cytochrome (cyt) b sequences, 153 control region sequences, 17 Y-intron sequences and 335 microsatellite multilocus genotypes to distinguish between four possible hypotheses for the colonization of the British Isles, formulated in the context of previously published data. Cyt b sequences from western Europe were basal to those found in Ireland, but also to those found in the periphery of Britain and several offshore islands. Although the central cyt b haplotype in Ireland was found in northern Spain, we argue that it most likely occurred in Britain also, from where the pygmy shrew colonized Ireland as a human introduction during the Holocene. Y-intron and microsatellite data are consistent with this hypothesis, and the biological traits and distributional data of pygmy shrews argue against long-distance colonization from Spain. The compact starburst of the Irish cyt b expansion and the low genetic diversity across all markers strongly suggests a recent colonization. This detailed molecular study of the pygmy shrew provides a new perspective on an old colonization question.

  5. Similar Local and Landscape Processes Affect Both a Common and a Rare Newt Species

    PubMed Central

    Denoël, Mathieu; Perez, Amélie; Cornet, Yves; Ficetola, Gentile Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Although rare species are often the focus of conservation measures, more common species may experience similar decline and suffer from the same threatening processes. We tested this hypothesis by examining, through an information-theoretic approach, the importance of ecological processes at multiple scales in the great crested newt Triturus cristatus, regionally endangered and protected in Europe, and the more common smooth newt, Lissotriton vulgaris. Both species were similarly affected by the same processes, i.e. suitability of aquatic and terrestrial components of their habitat at different scales, connectivity among breeding sites, and the presence of introduced fish. T. cristatus depended more on water depth and aquatic vegetation than L. vulgaris. The results show that environmental pressures threaten both common and rare species, and therefore the more widespread species should not be neglected in conservation programs. Because environmental trends are leading to a deterioration of aquatic and terrestrial habitat features required by newt populations, populations of the common species may follow the fate of the rarest species. This could have substantial conservation implications because of the numerical importance of common species in ecosystems and because commonness could be a transient state moving towards rarity. On the other hand, in agreement with the umbrella species concept, targeting conservation efforts on the most demanding species would also protect part of the populations of the most common species. PMID:23658765

  6. Collection and preservation of pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis) semen.

    PubMed

    Saragusty, J; Hildebrandt, T B; Bouts, T; Göritz, F; Hermes, R

    2010-09-01

    Knowledge about the reproduction of the endangered pygmy hippopotamus is almost non-existent. This study takes the first step toward changing this by devising a protocol for the collection, evaluation, and short-term preservation of semen of this endangered species. Semen was collected successfully from seven bulls by electroejaculation, using a specially designed rectal probe. Mean +/- SEM values of native sperm parameters from combined best fractions were: motility-80.0 +/- 4.1%, concentration-2421 +/- 1530 x 10(6) cells/mL, total collected cell number-759 +/- 261 x 10(6) cells, intact acrosome-87.8 +/- 1.2%, intact morphology-52.7 +/- 4.3%, and, for some, hypoosmotic swelling test-79.3 +/- 4.4% and seminal plasma osmolarity-297.5 +/- 3.3 mOsm. Seven different extenders were tested for sperm storage under chilling conditions: Berliner Cryomedium (BC), Biladyl, modification of Kenney modified Tyrode's medium (KMT), MES medium, Androhep((R)), boar M III() extender and Human Sperm Refrigeration Medium. While differences between males were apparent, the BC was consistently superior to all other extenders in sperm motility and facilitated storage for 7 d with up to 30% motility and some motility even after 3 weeks. With this knowledge in hand, the obvious two directions for future research are to conduct artificial insemination and to develop a technique for sperm cryopreservation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hopping and climbing gait of Japanese Pygmy Woodpeckers (Picoides kizuki).

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masaki; Kawakami, Kazuto; Higuchi, Hiroyoshi

    2007-12-01

    Single cycles of hopping and climbing were investigated in Japanese Pygmy Woodpeckers Picoides kizuki using motion analyses on video. Body movements on substrate angled from 0-90 degrees were compared for every 10 degrees. The body was inclined forward during stance phase for both small and large substrate angles, and the inclination amplitude increased when the substrate angle increased. The tail was bent ventrally almost simultaneously to this body inclination, and its amplitude was apparently high at large substrate angles. Most of the gait parameters changed when the stride length increased. The minimum body-tail angle and most of the parameters representing body movements during stance phase changed when the substrate angle increased, probably because gravity pulled the birds further backward when they were moving on a steeper slope. These parameters showed a clear difference between the data on substrate steeper than 40 degrees and lower than 30 degrees. The abrupt changes in these parameters most likely mean that the motor pattern changed from hopping to climbing between these angles.

  8. Pygmy Dipole Strength and Neutron Skins in Exotic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimkiewicz, A.; Paar, N.; Adrich, P.; Fallot, M.; Boretzky, K.; Aumann, T.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Pramanik, U. Datta; Elze, Th. W.; Emling, H.; Geissel, H.; Hellström, M.; Jones, K. L.; Kratz, J. V.; Kulessa, R.; Nociforo, C.; Palit, R.; Simon, H.; Surówka, G.; Sümmerer, K.; Vretenar, D.; Waluś, W.

    2008-05-01

    Dipole strength distributions were determined for the neutron-rich nuclei 129-132Sn and 133,134Sb from electromagnetic excitation in an experiment using the FRS-LAND setup. For all nuclei, a sizeable fraction of ``pygmy'' dipole strength at excitation energies well below the giant dipole resonance was observed. The integrated low-lying dipole strength of the nuclei with low neutron separation energies can be compared to results for stable nuclei (e.g. N = 82 isotopes) determined for the energy regime of 5-9 MeV. A clear increase of the dipole strength with increasing asymmetry of the nuclei is observed. Comparing the ratio of the low-lying dipole over the giant dipole strength to recent relativistic mean field calculations, values for the parameters a4 and p0 of the symmetry energy and for the neutron skin thickness are derived. Averaged over 130Sn and 132Sn we extract a4 = 31.8+/-1.3 MeV and p0 = 2.2+/-0.5 MeV/fm3. The neutron skin sizes are determined to Rn-Rp = 0.23+/-0.03 fm and 0.24+/-0.03 fm for 130Sn and 132Sn, respectively. For 208Pb a neutron skin thickness of Rn-Rp = 0.18+/-0.035 fm follows, when applying the same method and using earlier published experimental findings on the dipole strength.

  9. Chondroid Syringoma of the Forearm: A Case Report of a Rare Localization

    PubMed Central

    Askari, Koroush; Ghorbani, Ghazaleh; Yousefi, Navid; Saadat, Seyed Mohammad Seyed; Saadat, Seyedeh Nazanin Seyed; Zargari, Omid

    2014-01-01

    Chondroid syringoma (CS) is an uncommon benign adnexal tumor of the skin with eccrine and apocrine origin, which usually involves the head and neck region. The presentation of CS in other areas of the body is rare. A 45-year-old male patient presented to the dermatology clinic with a chief complaint of a painless, slow-growing mass on his left forearm, which gradually developed over the course of 2 years. A solitary, firm, purple, mobile, non-tender nodule was located in the distal part of left dorsal forearm, which was 1.8 cm in diameter. The tumor was surgically excised and sent for the histopathological evaluation. Results of biopsy and hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed the diagnosis of CS and showed no evidence of malignancy. Although CS is an uncommon tumor in uppr limb region, it should be considered as one of the differential diagnoses, when dealing with tumors of this area. PMID:25284863

  10. Primary Pleomorphic Undifferentiated Sarcoma—a Rare Renal Localization: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mellas, Soufiane; Bouchikhi, Ahmed Amine; Tazi, Mohamed-Fadl; Khallouk, Abdelhak; Elammari, Jallal-Eddin; El Fassi, Mohamed-Jamal; Mellas, Naoufal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma is known as a soft tissue sarcoma. Very few cases of this tumor originating from the renal parenchyma or renal capsule have been reported. We report a case of a 70-year-old patient admitted for enormous ureterohydronephrosis and pyelonephritis due to a pelvic ureter lithiasis. After draining by ureteral double J catheter, a nephroureterectomy was performed for nonfunctional kidney confirmed by scintigraphy. The histopathological study shows a pleomorphic undifferentiated sarcoma. The patient was sent to oncologists. Chemotherapy was proposed but the family decided to stop the treatment. The patient passed away 10 months later. Clinicians and pathologists should be aware of the very low occurrence of this renal tumor, which is extremely rare. Currently there is no consensus about its management. Our case extends the literature concerning this tumor. PMID:23213617

  11. Primary Pleomorphic Undifferentiated Sarcoma-a Rare Renal Localization: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mellas, Soufiane; Bouchikhi, Ahmed Amine; Tazi, Mohamed-Fadl; Khallouk, Abdelhak; Elammari, Jallal-Eddin; El Fassi, Mohamed-Jamal; Mellas, Naoufal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma is known as a soft tissue sarcoma. Very few cases of this tumor originating from the renal parenchyma or renal capsule have been reported. We report a case of a 70-year-old patient admitted for enormous ureterohydronephrosis and pyelonephritis due to a pelvic ureter lithiasis. After draining by ureteral double J catheter, a nephroureterectomy was performed for nonfunctional kidney confirmed by scintigraphy. The histopathological study shows a pleomorphic undifferentiated sarcoma. The patient was sent to oncologists. Chemotherapy was proposed but the family decided to stop the treatment. The patient passed away 10 months later. Clinicians and pathologists should be aware of the very low occurrence of this renal tumor, which is extremely rare. Currently there is no consensus about its management. Our case extends the literature concerning this tumor.

  12. [Bone hydatid cyst: a rare localization at the level of the hip bone].

    PubMed

    Nhamoucha, Yassine; Alaoui, Othmane; Doumbia, Aliou; Oukhoya, Mohammed; Abdellaoui, Hicham; Tazi, Mohammed; Chater, Lamyae; Atarraf, Karima; Arroud, Mounir; Afifi, Abderahman

    2016-01-01

    Hydatid disease is a parasitic disease caused by the development in humans of the larval form of a tapeworm, namely a very small tænia called Echinococcus Granulosus. This anthropozoonosis is characterized by the presence of different types of anatomo-radiologic variants associated with various topographic and evolutionary aspects of the cysts. Bone hydatid disease is a rare condition, it accounts for only 0.9-2.5% of all locations. We report the case of a 9 year old child, who was admitted with febrile lameness and with a mass in the right iliac fossa, revealing a hydatid cyst at the level of the hip bone. Lesion assessment objectified a hydatid cyst of the hip bone with extension into adjacent soft tissues. An infected cyst was detected during surgery, hence the performance of a surgical excision of the cyst with drainage. Hydatic osteopathy is infiltrating, diffuse, slow and gradual, causing delays in diagnosis and compromising the quality of care.

  13. Centrally necrotizing breast carcinoma: a rare histological subtype, which was cause of misdiagnosis in an evident clinical local recurrence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Centrally necrotizing carcinoma is a rare subtype of breast carcinoma, which is characterized by an extensive central necrotic zone accounting for at least 70% of the cross-sectional area of the neoplasm. This central necrotic zone, in turn, is surrounded by a narrow rim of proliferative viable tumor cells. We report an unusual clinical situation in which a patient whose evident breast mass suggested an ipsilateral local recurrence and for which numerous attempts to confirm the histological diagnosis had failed. The patient was treated with a radical mastectomy based on clinical suspicion of breast cancer recurrence after an undesirable delay. In this case, the narrow rim of viable malignant tissue had a thickness of 0.5 to 8 mm, and the centrally necrotizing carcinoma had a central zone with a predominance of fibrosis. The special features of this case led to a misdiagnosis and to an evident clinical local recurrence. PMID:22852765

  14. Yellow Pygmy Rice Rat (Oligoryzomys flavescens) and Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Delfraro, Adriana; Clara, Mario; Tomé, Lorena; Achaval, Federico; Levis, Silvana; Calderón, Gladys; Enria, Delia; Lozano, Mario; Russi, José

    2003-01-01

    During 5,230 trapping nights, 672 small mammals were trapped in the areas where most hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases occur in Uruguay. Yellow pygmy rice rats (Oligoryzomys flavescens) were the only rodents that showed evidence of antibodies to hantavirus, with a seroprevalence of 2.6%. The rodents were trapped in all the explored environments, and most of the seropositive rodents were found in habitats frequented by humans. Nucleotide sequences were obtained from four HPS case-patients and four yellow pygmy rice rats of the M genome segment. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis showed that rodent-borne viruses and viruses from three HPS case-patients form a well-supported clade and share a 96.4% identity with the previously characterized Central Plata hantavirus. These results suggest that yellow pygmy rice rat (O. flavescens) may be the host for Central Plata, a hantavirus associated with HPS in the southern area of Uruguay.[ PMID:12890326

  15. Localization studies of rare missense mutations in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) facilitate interpretation of genotype-phenotype relationships.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Kristina V; Tzetis, Maria; Cheng, Jie; Guggino, William B; Cutting, Garry R

    2008-11-01

    We have been investigating the functional consequences of rare disease-associated amino acid substitutions in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Mutations of the arginine residue at codon 1070 have been associated with different disease consequences; R1070P and R1070Q with "severe" pancreatic insufficient cystic fibrosis (CF) and R1070W with "mild" pancreatic sufficient CF or congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens. Intriguingly, CFTR bearing each of these mutations is functional when expressed in nonpolarized cells. To determine whether R1070 mutations cause disease by affecting CFTR localization, we created polarized Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell lines that express either wild-type or mutant CFTR from the same genomic integration site. Confocal microscopy and biotinylation studies revealed that R1070P was not inserted into the apical membrane, R1070W was inserted at levels reduced from wild-type while R1070Q was present in the apical membrane at levels comparable to wild-type. The abnormal localization of CFTR bearing R1070P and R1070W was consistent with deleterious consequences in patients; however, the profile of CFTR R1070Q was inconsistent with a "severe" phenotype. Reanalysis of 16 patients with the R1070Q mutation revealed that 11 carried an in cis nonsense mutation, S466X. All 11 patients carrying the complex allele R1070Q-S466X had severe disease, while 4 out of 5 patients with R1070Q had "mild" disease, thereby reconciling the apparent discrepancy between the localization studies of R1070Q and the phenotype of patients bearing this mutation. Our results emphasize that localization studies in relevant model systems can greatly assist the interpretation of the disease-causing potential of rare missense mutations.

  16. Speciation on a local geographic scale: the evolution of a rare rock outcrop specialist in Mimulus

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Kathleen G.; Sexton, Jason P.; Willis, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Speciation can occur on both large and small geographical scales. In plants, local speciation, where small populations split off from a large-ranged progenitor species, is thought to be the dominant mode, yet there are still few examples to verify speciation has occurred in this manner. A recently described morphological species in the yellow monkey flowers, Mimulus filicifolius, is an excellent candidate for local speciation because of its highly restricted geographical range. Mimulus filicifolius was formerly identified as a population of M. laciniatus due to similar lobed leaf morphology and rocky outcrop habitat. To investigate whether M. filicifolius is genetically divergent and reproductively isolated from M. laciniatus, we examined patterns of genetic diversity in ten nuclear and eight microsatellite loci, and hybrid fertility in M. filicifolius and its purported close relatives: M. laciniatus, M. guttatus and M. nasutus. We found that M. filicifolius is genetically divergent from the other species and strongly reproductively isolated from M. laciniatus. We conclude that M. filicifolius is an independent rock outcrop specialist despite being morphologically and ecologically similar to M. laciniatus, and that its small geographical range nested within other wide-ranging members of the M. guttatus species complex is consistent with local speciation. PMID:24958929

  17. Speciation on a local geographic scale: the evolution of a rare rock outcrop specialist in Mimulus.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Kathleen G; Sexton, Jason P; Willis, John H

    2014-08-05

    Speciation can occur on both large and small geographical scales. In plants, local speciation, where small populations split off from a large-ranged progenitor species, is thought to be the dominant mode, yet there are still few examples to verify speciation has occurred in this manner. A recently described morphological species in the yellow monkey flowers, Mimulus filicifolius, is an excellent candidate for local speciation because of its highly restricted geographical range. Mimulus filicifolius was formerly identified as a population of M. laciniatus due to similar lobed leaf morphology and rocky outcrop habitat. To investigate whether M. filicifolius is genetically divergent and reproductively isolated from M. laciniatus, we examined patterns of genetic diversity in ten nuclear and eight microsatellite loci, and hybrid fertility in M. filicifolius and its purported close relatives: M. laciniatus, M. guttatus and M. nasutus. We found that M. filicifolius is genetically divergent from the other species and strongly reproductively isolated from M. laciniatus. We conclude that M. filicifolius is an independent rock outcrop specialist despite being morphologically and ecologically similar to M. laciniatus, and that its small geographical range nested within other wide-ranging members of the M. guttatus species complex is consistent with local speciation. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Local coordination state of rare earth in eutectic scintillators for neutron detector applications.

    PubMed

    Masai, Hirokazu; Yanagida, Takayuki; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Ina, Toshiaki; Miyazaki, Takamichi; Kawaguti, Noriaki; Fukuda, Kentaro

    2015-08-21

    Atomic distribution in phosphors for neutron detection has not been fully elucidated, although their ionization efficiency is strongly dependent on the state of the rare earth in the matrix. In this work, we examine optical properties of Eu-doped 80LiF-20CaF2 eutectics for neutron detector applications based on the Eu distribution. At low concentrations, aggregation of Eu cations is observed, whereas homogeneous atomic dispersion in the CaF2 layer, to substitute Ca(2+) ions, is observed in the eutectics at high concentrations. Eu LIII edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis suggests that neutron responses do not depend on the amount of Eu(2+) ions. However, transparency, which depends on an ordered lamellar structure, is found to be important for a high light yield in neutron detection. The results confirm the effectiveness of the basic idea concerning the separation of radiation absorbers and activators in particle radiation scintillation and present potential for further improvement of novel bulk detectors.

  19. Local coordination state of rare earth in eutectic scintillators for neutron detector applications

    PubMed Central

    Masai, Hirokazu; Yanagida, Takayuki; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Ina, Toshiaki; Miyazaki, Takamichi; Kawaguti, Noriaki; Fukuda, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    Atomic distribution in phosphors for neutron detection has not been fully elucidated, although their ionization efficiency is strongly dependent on the state of the rare earth in the matrix. In this work, we examine optical properties of Eu-doped 80LiF-20CaF2 eutectics for neutron detector applications based on the Eu distribution. At low concentrations, aggregation of Eu cations is observed, whereas homogeneous atomic dispersion in the CaF2 layer, to substitute Ca2+ ions, is observed in the eutectics at high concentrations. Eu LIII edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis suggests that neutron responses do not depend on the amount of Eu2+ ions. However, transparency, which depends on an ordered lamellar structure, is found to be important for a high light yield in neutron detection. The results confirm the effectiveness of the basic idea concerning the separation of radiation absorbers and activators in particle radiation scintillation and present potential for further improvement of novel bulk detectors. PMID:26292726

  20. Ancestor-descendant relationships in evolution: origin of the extant pygmy right whale, Caperea marginata.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Fordyce, R Ewan

    2015-01-01

    Ancestor-descendant relationships (ADRs), involving descent with modification, are the fundamental concept in evolution, but are usually difficult to recognize. We examined the cladistic relationship between the only reported fossil pygmy right whale, †Miocaperea pulchra, and its sole living relative, the enigmatic pygmy right whale Caperea marginata, the latter represented by both adult and juvenile specimens. †Miocaperea is phylogenetically bracketed between juvenile and adult Caperea marginata in morphologically based analyses, thus suggesting a possible ADR-the first so far identified within baleen whales (Cetacea: Mysticeti). The †Miocaperea-Caperea lineage may show long-term morphological stasis and, in turn, punctuated equilibrium.

  1. Ancestor–descendant relationships in evolution: origin of the extant pygmy right whale, Caperea marginata

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Fordyce, R. Ewan

    2015-01-01

    Ancestor–descendant relationships (ADRs), involving descent with modification, are the fundamental concept in evolution, but are usually difficult to recognize. We examined the cladistic relationship between the only reported fossil pygmy right whale, †Miocaperea pulchra, and its sole living relative, the enigmatic pygmy right whale Caperea marginata, the latter represented by both adult and juvenile specimens. †Miocaperea is phylogenetically bracketed between juvenile and adult Caperea marginata in morphologically based analyses, thus suggesting a possible ADR—the first so far identified within baleen whales (Cetacea: Mysticeti). The †Miocaperea–Caperea lineage may show long-term morphological stasis and, in turn, punctuated equilibrium. PMID:25589485

  2. Control of luminescence from pygmy shark (Squaliolus aliae) photophores.

    PubMed

    Claes, Julien M; Ho, Hsuan-Ching; Mallefet, Jérôme

    2012-05-15

    The smalleye pygmy shark (Squaliolus aliae) is a dwarf pelagic shark from the Dalatiidae family that harbours thousands of tiny photophores. In this work, we studied the organisation and physiological control of these photogenic organs. Results show that they are mainly situated on the ventral side of the shark, forming a homogeneous ventral photogenic area that appears well suited for counterillumination, a well-known camouflage technique of pelagic organisms. Isolated ventral skin patches containing photophores did not respond to classical neurotransmitters and nitric oxide but produced light after melatonin (MT) application. Prolactin and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone inhibited this hormonally induced luminescence as well as the spontaneous luminescence from the photogenic tissue. The action of MT seems to be mediated by binding to the MT(2) receptor subtype, as the MT(2) receptor agonist 4P-PDOT inhibited the luminescence induced by this hormone. Binding to this receptor probably decreases the intracellular cAMP concentration because forskolin inhibited spontaneous and MT-induced luminescence. In addition, a GABA inhibitory tonus seems to be present in the photogenic tissue as well, as GABA inhibited MT-induced luminescence and the application of bicuculline provoked luminescence from S. aliae photophores. Similarly to what has been found in Etmopteridae, the other luminous shark family, the main target of the luminescence control appears to be the melanophores covering the photocytes. Results suggest that bioluminescence first appeared in Dalatiidae when they adopted a pelagic style at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary, and was modified by Etmopteridae when they started to colonize deep-water niches and rely on this light for intraspecific behaviours.

  3. A case of lupus vulgaris with rare localization diagnosed 30 years after onset.

    PubMed

    Laudańska, H; Reduta, T; Zalewski, G; Chodynicka, B

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis (tuberculosis cutis) is one of the extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis, which may affect the skin only or co-exist with tuberculosis of other organs, particularly the lungs. We describe a case of lupus vulgaris in a 72-year-old male patient with a single lesion localized on his lower extremity, developing for 30 years before correct diagnosis and previously treated with topical steroids. Bacillus infection in other organs was not detected. Diagnosis of tuberculosis was made based on personal history, clinical picture, hypersensitivity to tuberculin, histopathology and polymerase chain reaction. A multidrug therapy with rifampicin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide resulted in regression of the lesion. The common lack of knowledge about the clinical picture of cutaneous tuberculosis causes its late diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Induced, local anisotropy and anisotropy dispersion in amorphous Co-Zr-rare earth thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Rivoire, M.; Ouahmane, H.; Suran, G. . Lab. de Magnetisme et Materiaux Magnetiques); Rivas, M.; Contreras, M.C. ); Corrales, J.A. . Dept. de Fisica)

    1993-11-01

    When prepared under adequate conditions, rf sputtered amorphous (Co[sub 0.93]Zr[sub 0.07])[sub 100[minus]x]Tb[sub x] thin films are obtained with fairly uniform magnetic properties and with a very well defined in-plane uniaxial anisotropy K[sub u]. These layers, in consequence, are particularly well adapted in order to investigate the overall effect of the random local anisotropy K[sub loc] upon the micromagnetic properties of the films. The experimental data were obtained by the transverse biased Initial susceptibility and ferromagnetic resonance measurement. The value of K[sub loc] was determined using the ripple theory. K[sub loc] increases with increasing amount of Tb in the layers, which can be explained by the single-ion anisotropy mechanism.

  5. Accurate statistics for local sequence alignment with position-dependent scoring by rare-event sampling.

    PubMed

    Wolfsheimer, Stefan; Herms, Inke; Rahmann, Sven; Hartmann, Alexander K

    2011-02-03

    Molecular database search tools need statistical models to assess the significance for the resulting hits. In the classical approach one asks the question how probable a certain score is observed by pure chance. Asymptotic theories for such questions are available for two random i.i.d. sequences. Some effort had been made to include effects of finite sequence lengths and to account for specific compositions of the sequences. In many applications, such as a large-scale database homology search for transmembrane proteins, these models are not the most appropriate ones. Search sensitivity and specificity benefit from position-dependent scoring schemes or use of Hidden Markov Models. Additional, one may wish to go beyond the assumption that the sequences are i.i.d. Despite their practical importance, the statistical properties of these settings have not been well investigated yet. In this paper, we discuss an efficient and general method to compute the score distribution to any desired accuracy. The general approach may be applied to different sequence models and and various similarity measures that satisfy a few weak assumptions. We have access to the low-probability region ("tail") of the distribution where scores are larger than expected by pure chance and therefore relevant for practical applications. Our method uses recent ideas from rare-event simulations, combining Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations with importance sampling and generalized ensembles. We present results for the score statistics of fixed and random queries against random sequences. In a second step, we extend the approach to a model of transmembrane proteins, which can hardly be described as i.i.d. sequences. For this case, we compare the statistical properties of a fixed query model as well as a hidden Markov sequence model in connection with a position based scoring scheme against the classical approach. The results illustrate that the sensitivity and specificity strongly depend on the

  6. Accurate statistics for local sequence alignment with position-dependent scoring by rare-event sampling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Molecular database search tools need statistical models to assess the significance for the resulting hits. In the classical approach one asks the question how probable a certain score is observed by pure chance. Asymptotic theories for such questions are available for two random i.i.d. sequences. Some effort had been made to include effects of finite sequence lengths and to account for specific compositions of the sequences. In many applications, such as a large-scale database homology search for transmembrane proteins, these models are not the most appropriate ones. Search sensitivity and specificity benefit from position-dependent scoring schemes or use of Hidden Markov Models. Additional, one may wish to go beyond the assumption that the sequences are i.i.d. Despite their practical importance, the statistical properties of these settings have not been well investigated yet. Results In this paper, we discuss an efficient and general method to compute the score distribution to any desired accuracy. The general approach may be applied to different sequence models and and various similarity measures that satisfy a few weak assumptions. We have access to the low-probability region ("tail") of the distribution where scores are larger than expected by pure chance and therefore relevant for practical applications. Our method uses recent ideas from rare-event simulations, combining Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations with importance sampling and generalized ensembles. We present results for the score statistics of fixed and random queries against random sequences. In a second step, we extend the approach to a model of transmembrane proteins, which can hardly be described as i.i.d. sequences. For this case, we compare the statistical properties of a fixed query model as well as a hidden Markov sequence model in connection with a position based scoring scheme against the classical approach. Conclusions The results illustrate that the sensitivity and specificity

  7. Local and Conjugate Ionospheric Disturbances from Rare High Peak Current Oceanic Lightning Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, N. C.; Golkowski, M.; Moore, R. C.; Cotts, B.

    2013-12-01

    Very low frequency (VLF) remote sensing is an important tool for determining the causative mechanism for D-region ionospheric disturbances due to lightning discharges. While previous works have used VLF remote sensing to focus on defining a solitary disturbance mechanism from a lightning strike, little attention has been given to multifaceted disturbances from a single strike. We present three distinct and geographically separated ionospheric disturbances, all caused by a single, large (388 kA), positive polarity cloud to ground lightning discharge in the Atlantic Ocean. The disturbances include a so called Early/Fast event, a northern hemisphere lightning-induced electron precipitation (LEP) event, and a conjugate region LEP event. The LEP mechanism is driven by cyclotron resonant interactions between the lightning induced whistler waves and radiation belt electrons. Using the location and peak current of the lightning strike given by the new GLD360 lightning detection network, we model the electron precipitation characteristics for both hemispheres. Modeling is performed by using the power spectral density of the lightning strike to determine the magnetospheric whistler induced particle precipitation, which in turn an atmospheric backscattering and Monte Carlo model is used to predict the D-region ionospheric electron deposition, accounting for latitudinal and longitudinal dependence of equatorial loss cone angles. Our modeling results agree with LEP event observations in both local and conjugate hemispheres. These first simultaneous observations of both direct (Early/Fast) and magnetospherically coupled (LEP) ionospheric disturbances from a single causative lightning strike indicate that future works involving VLF remote sensing need to take into account these multifaceted processes and their unique signatures. This work is supported by DARPA grant HR0011-10-1-0061 with subaward UF-EIES-1005017-UCD to CU Denver and by NSF grant ANT-0944639 to the University of

  8. 78 FR 60766 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Threatened Species Status for Spring Pygmy Sunfish

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... isolated populations within the spring pools and spring runs. These pools and runs are connected spatially... individual spring pygmy sunfish populations within the metapopulation are intermittently connected via.... 2012). The species is short-lived (essentially an ``annual'') and becomes shorter-lived and...

  9. 78 FR 60307 - Spring Pygmy Sunfish Candidate Conservation Agreement With Assurances; Receipt of Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Spring Pygmy Sunfish Candidate Conservation Agreement With Assurances... includes a proposed candidate conservation agreement with assurances (CCAA) between the applicant and the Service as parties and the Land Trust of North Alabama as a cooperator for the conservation of the spring...

  10. Pygmy Rice Rat as Potential Host of Castelo dos Sonhos Hantavirus

    PubMed Central

    Travassos da Rosa, Elizabeth S.; Medeiros, Daniele B. A.; Nunes, Márcio R.T.; Simith, Darlene B.; Pereira, Armando de Souza; Elkhoury, Mauro R.; Lavocat, Marília; Marques, Aparecido A.R.; Via, Alba Valéria; D’Andrea, Paulo; Bonvicino, Cibele R.; Lemos, Elba Regina S.

    2011-01-01

    To study the dynamics of wild rodent populations and identify potential hosts for hantavirus, we conducted an eco-epidemiologic study in Campo Novo do Parecis, Mato Grosso State, Brazil. We detected and genetically characterized Castelo dos Sonhos virus found in a species of pygmy rice rat (Oligoryzomys utiaritensis). PMID:21801642

  11. Chapter 5: Research on the ferruginous pygmy-owl in Southern Texas: Methodology and applications

    Treesearch

    Glenn A. Proudfoot; Jody L. Mays; Sam L. Beasom

    2000-01-01

    Using broadcasted conspecific calls, nest boxes, miniature-video cameras, a fiberoptic stratascope, and radio-telemetry, researchers from Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research Institute conducted studies to assess the viability and profile the natural history of ferruginous pygmy-owls in Texas (Mays 1996, Proudfoot 1996a, Proudfoot and Beasom 1996, Proudfoot and Beasom 1997...

  12. The pygmy dipole resonance in 68Ni and the neutron skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieland, O.; Bracco, A.

    2011-04-01

    A search of the pygmy resonance in 68Ni was made using the virtual photon technique. The experiment was carried out using the radioactive beam 68Ni at 600 A MeV, produced with fragmentation of 86Kr at 900 A MeV on a 9Be target. The 68Ni beam was separated by a fragment separator, and the γ-rays produced at the interaction with the Au target were detected with the RISING and FRS set-up at the GSI laboratory in Germany, also including the HECTOR array. The measured γ-ray spectra show a peak centered at approximately 11 MeV, whose intensity can be explained in term of an enhanced strength of the dipole response function (pygmy resonance). A pygmy structure of this type was also predicted by different models for this unstable neutron-rich nucleus. Correlations between the behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy, the neutron skins, and the percentage of energy-weighted sum rule (EWSR) exhausted by the pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) are investigated by using different random phase approximation (RPA) models.

  13. Ecology and conservation of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona

    Treesearch

    Jean-Luc E. Cartron; Deborah M. Finch

    2000-01-01

    This report is the result of a cooperative effort by the Rocky Mountain Research Station and the USDA Forest Service Region 3, with participation by the Arizona Game and Fish Department and the Bureau of Land Management. It assesses the state of knowledge related to the conservation status of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona. The population decline of this...

  14. 77 FR 9958 - Spring Pygmy Sunfish Candidate Conservation Agreement With Assurances; Receipt of Application for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ...: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability; request for comments. SUMMARY: We, the Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), have received an application from Mr. Banks Sewell of Belle... Fish and Wildlife Service Spring Pygmy Sunfish Candidate Conservation Agreement With...

  15. Ancient DNA forces reconsideration of evolutionary history of Mediterranean pygmy elephantids

    PubMed Central

    Poulakakis, Nikos; Parmakelis, Aris; Lymberakis, Petros; Mylonas, Moysis; Zouros, Eleftherios; Reese, David S; Glaberman, Scott; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2006-01-01

    During the Pleistocene pygmy elephantids, some only a quarter of their ancestors' size, were present on Mediterranean islands until about 10 000 years ago (y.a.). Using a new methodology for ancient DNA (aDNA) studies, the whole genomic multiple displacement amplification method, we were able to retrieve cytochrome b (cytb) DNA fragments from 4200 to 800 000 y.a. specimens from island and mainland samples, including pygmy and normal-sized forms. The short DNA sequence (43 bp) retrieved from the 800 000 y.a. sample is one of the oldest DNA fragment ever retrieved. Duplication of the experiments in two laboratories, the occurrence of three diagnostic sites and the results of the phylogenetic analyses strongly support its authenticity. Our results challenge the prevailing view that pygmy elephantids of the eastern Mediterranean originated exclusively from Elephas, suggesting independent histories of dwarfism and the presence of both pygmy mammoths and elephant-like taxa on these islands. Based on our molecular data, the origin of the Tilos and Cyprus elephantids from a lineage within the genus Elephas is confirmed, while the DNA sequence from the Cretan sample falls clearly within the mammoth clade. Thus, the name Mammuthus creticus rather than Elephas creticus, seems to be justified for this form. Our findings also suggest a need to re-evaluate the evolutionary history of the Sicilian/Maltese species, traditionally included in the genus Elephas. PMID:17148428

  16. Chapter 6: Research needs for the conservation of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona

    Treesearch

    Jean-Luc E. Cartron; W. Scott Richardson; Deborah M. Finch; David J. Krueper

    2000-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe research needs for the conservation of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum cactorum) in Arizona. Estimates of population size, structure, and dynamics, as well as demographic data, are needed for the recovery team to formulate sound population objectives. Habitat loss due to residential development...

  17. A remarkable new pygmy grasshopper (Orthoptera, Tetrigidae) in Miocene amber from the Dominican Republic

    PubMed Central

    Heads, Sam W.; Thomas, M. Jared; Wang, Yinan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new genus and species of pygmy grasshopper (Orthoptera: Tetrigidae) is described from Early Miocene (Burdigalian) Dominican amber. Electrotettix attenboroughi Heads & Thomas, gen. et sp. n. is assigned to the subfamily Cladonotinae based on the deeply forked frontal costa, but is remarkable for the presence of tegmina and hind wings, hitherto unknown in this subfamily. PMID:25147472

  18. Chapter 1: The cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl: Taxonomy, distribution, and natural history

    Treesearch

    Jean-Luc E. Cartron; W. Scott Richardson; Glenn A. Proudfoot

    2000-01-01

    The cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum cactorum) is a small, cryptic owl that is often difficult to observe. Its natural history and conservation needs are poorly understood. Despite ongoing research in Texas and Arizona, the available information remains limited. In addition, factors influencing demographics (e.g., habitat...

  19. A retrospective analysis of mortality in captive pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis) from 1912 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Flacke, Gabriella L; Tkalčić, Suzana; Steck, Beatrice; Warren, Kristin; Martin, Graeme B

    2016-11-01

    The pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis) is an IUCN Red List Endangered species (CITES Appendix II) that has been housed in zoological collections since 1912. As wild populations continue to decline throughout the species' range, successful ex situ breeding and management, including an understanding of morbidity and mortality, are of utmost importance. This study is the first comprehensive review of mortality data from the captive population since 1982 and significantly expands on previous analyses. We solicited necropsy reports from 129/187 zoological institutions worldwide that currently or previously held pygmy hippos and received data for 404 animals (177 ♂, 220 ♀, 7 undermined sex), representing 43% of pygmy hippos that have died in captivity. Mortality in neonates was primarily due to perinatal causes (51.8%-stillbirth, failure to thrive, weakness, poor suckling reflex, maternal neglect) or parent-inflicted trauma (28%). Common causes of mortality in adult and geriatric animals included cardiovascular disease (16%), degenerative musculoskeletal conditions (10%), obstructive gastrointestinal disease (9%), and renal insufficiency (13%), sometimes associated with advanced polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Although not the direct cause of mortality, a number of adult and geriatric pygmy hippos were also overweight to obese. Infectious causes of mortality in included leptospirosis and encephalomyocarditis virus, the latter usually presenting as acute death due to cardiovascular demise. This comprehensive overview presents a useful guide for recommendations in preventative veterinary care and for improved husbandry and management of pygmy hippos in captivity. Zoo Biol. 35:556-569, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Adaptive, convergent origins of the pygmy phenotype in African rainforest hunter-gatherers

    PubMed Central

    Perry, George H.; Foll, Matthieu; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; Patin, Etienne; Nédélec, Yohann; Pacis, Alain; Barakatt, Maxime; Gravel, Simon; Zhou, Xiang; Nsobya, Sam L.; Excoffier, Laurent; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Dominy, Nathaniel J.; Barreiro, Luis B.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary history of the human pygmy phenotype (small body size), a characteristic of African and Southeast Asian rainforest hunter-gatherers, is largely unknown. Here we use a genome-wide admixture mapping analysis to identify 16 genomic regions that are significantly associated with the pygmy phenotype in the Batwa, a rainforest hunter-gatherer population from Uganda (east central Africa). The identified genomic regions have multiple attributes that provide supporting evidence of genuine association with the pygmy phenotype, including enrichments for SNPs previously associated with stature variation in Europeans and for genes with growth hormone receptor and regulation functions. To test adaptive evolutionary hypotheses, we computed the haplotype-based integrated haplotype score (iHS) statistic and the level of population differentiation (FST) between the Batwa and their agricultural neighbors, the Bakiga, for each genomic SNP. Both |iHS| and FST values were significantly higher for SNPs within the Batwa pygmy phenotype-associated regions than the remainder of the genome, a signature of polygenic adaptation. In contrast, when we expanded our analysis to include Baka rainforest hunter-gatherers from Cameroon and Gabon (west central Africa) and Nzebi and Nzime neighboring agriculturalists, we did not observe elevated |iHS| or FST values in these genomic regions. Together, these results suggest adaptive and at least partially convergent origins of the pygmy phenotype even within Africa, supporting the hypothesis that small body size confers a selective advantage for tropical rainforest hunter-gatherers but raising questions about the antiquity of this behavior. PMID:25136101

  1. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of rare events: a different look at local structure and chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Glatzel, Pieter; Robblee, John H.; Messinger, Johannes; Fernandez, Carmen; Cinco, Roehl; Visser, Henk; McFarlane, Karen; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Pizarro, Shelly; Sauer, Kenneth; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Klein, Melvin P.; Cox, Billie L.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    The combination of large-acceptance high-resolution X-ray optics with bright synchrotron sources permits quantitative analysis of rare events such as X-ray fluorescence from very dilute systems, weak fluorescence transitions or X-ray Raman scattering. Transition-metal Kβ fluorescence contains information about spin and oxidation state; examples of the characterization of the Mn oxidation states in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II and Mn-consuming spores from the marine bacillus SG-1 are presented. Weaker features of the Kβ spectrum resulting from valence-level and ‘interatomic’ ligand to metal transitions contain detailed information on the ligand-atom type, distance and orientation. Applications of this spectral region to characterize the local structure of model compounds are presented. X-ray Raman scattering (XRS) is an extremely rare event, but also represents a unique technique to obtain bulk-sensitive low-energy (<600 eV) X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra using hard (~10 keV) X-rays. A photon is inelastically scattered, losing part of its energy to promote an electron into an unoccupied level. In many cases, the cross section is proportional to that of the corresponding absorption process yielding the same X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) features. XRS finds application for systems that defy XAFS analysis at low energies, e.g. liquids or highly concentrated complex systems, reactive compounds and samples under extreme conditions (pressure, temperature). Recent results are discussed. PMID:11512725

  2. Pygmy dipole response of proton-rich argon nuclei in random-phase approximation and no-core shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, C.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Caurier, E.; Langanke, K.

    2008-02-15

    The occurrence of a pygmy dipole resonance in proton rich {sup 32,34}Ar is studied using the unitary correlator operator method interaction V{sub UCOM}, based on Argonne V18. Predictions from the random-phase approximation (RPA) and the shell model in a no-core basis are compared. It is found that the inclusion of configuration mixing up to two-particles-two-holes broadens the pygmy strength slightly and reduces sensibly its strength, as compared to the RPA predictions. For {sup 32}Ar, a clear peak associated with a pygmy resonance is found. For {sup 34}Ar, the pygmy states are obtained close to the giant dipole resonance and mix with it.

  3. Metagenomic analysis of the pygmy loris fecal microbiome reveals unique functional capacity related to metabolism of aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Xu, Weijiang; Yang, Fuya; Li, Junjun; Yang, Yunjuan; Tang, Xianghua; Mu, Yuelin; Zhou, Junpei; Huang, Zunxi

    2013-01-01

    The animal gastrointestinal tract contains a complex community of microbes, whose composition ultimately reflects the co-evolution of microorganisms with their animal host. An analysis of 78,619 pyrosequencing reads generated from pygmy loris fecal DNA extracts was performed to help better understand the microbial diversity and functional capacity of the pygmy loris gut microbiome. The taxonomic analysis of the metagenomic reads indicated that pygmy loris fecal microbiomes were dominated by Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria phyla. The hierarchical clustering of several gastrointestinal metagenomes demonstrated the similarities of the microbial community structures of pygmy loris and mouse gut systems despite their differences in functional capacity. The comparative analysis of function classification revealed that the metagenome of the pygmy loris was characterized by an overrepresentation of those sequences involved in aromatic compound metabolism compared with humans and other animals. The key enzymes related to the benzoate degradation pathway were identified based on the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway assignment. These results would contribute to the limited body of primate metagenome studies and provide a framework for comparative metagenomic analysis between human and non-human primates, as well as a comparative understanding of the evolution of humans and their microbiome. However, future studies on the metagenome sequencing of pygmy loris and other prosimians regarding the effects of age, genetics, and environment on the composition and activity of the metagenomes are required.

  4. Metagenomic Analysis of the Pygmy Loris Fecal Microbiome Reveals Unique Functional Capacity Related to Metabolism of Aromatic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bo; Xu, Weijiang; Yang, Fuya; Li, Junjun; Yang, Yunjuan; Tang, Xianghua; Mu, Yuelin; Zhou, Junpei; Huang, Zunxi

    2013-01-01

    The animal gastrointestinal tract contains a complex community of microbes, whose composition ultimately reflects the co-evolution of microorganisms with their animal host. An analysis of 78,619 pyrosequencing reads generated from pygmy loris fecal DNA extracts was performed to help better understand the microbial diversity and functional capacity of the pygmy loris gut microbiome. The taxonomic analysis of the metagenomic reads indicated that pygmy loris fecal microbiomes were dominated by Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria phyla. The hierarchical clustering of several gastrointestinal metagenomes demonstrated the similarities of the microbial community structures of pygmy loris and mouse gut systems despite their differences in functional capacity. The comparative analysis of function classification revealed that the metagenome of the pygmy loris was characterized by an overrepresentation of those sequences involved in aromatic compound metabolism compared with humans and other animals. The key enzymes related to the benzoate degradation pathway were identified based on the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway assignment. These results would contribute to the limited body of primate metagenome studies and provide a framework for comparative metagenomic analysis between human and non-human primates, as well as a comparative understanding of the evolution of humans and their microbiome. However, future studies on the metagenome sequencing of pygmy loris and other prosimians regarding the effects of age, genetics, and environment on the composition and activity of the metagenomes are required. PMID:23457582

  5. Local structure around rare-earth ions in B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Funabiki, Fuji; Matsuishi, Satoru; Hosono, Hideo

    2013-06-14

    Melt quenching of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} with less than 25 mol. % rare-earth oxide (RE{sub 2}O{sub 3}) at ambient pressure results in a milky white glass because of liquid-liquid phase separation into B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and RE{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}3B{sub 2}O phases. In contrast, we have found that melt quenching under GPa-order pressure realizes a transparent RE-doped B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass. This study investigates the local structure around the RE ions in the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass prepared at 3 GPa using optical measurements and electron-spin-echo envelope modulation spectroscopy. It is shown that the RE-rich microparticles disappear and the RE ions are isolated from each other in a highly symmetric crystal field formed by triangular and tetrahedral boron units. This result is consistent with that extrapolated from the data for RE-doped sodium borate glasses.

  6. A rare chronic constrictive pericarditis with localized adherent visceral pericardium and normal parietal pericardium: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qingqiang; Yun, Lin; Xu, Rui; Li, Guohua; Yao, Yucai; Li, Jiamin

    2016-09-01

    Classic constrictive pericarditis (CP) is characterized by fibrous scarring and adhesion of both the visceral pericardium and the parietal pericardium, which leads to restricted cardiac filling. However, diagnosing CP with normal thickness pericardium and without calcification is still a challenge. The predominant cause in the developed world is idiopathic or viral pericarditis followed by post-cardiac surgery and post-radiation. Tuberculosis still remains a common cause of CP in developing countries. In this report, we describe a rare case of idiopathic localized constrictive visceral pericardium with normal thickness of the parietal pericardium in a middle-aged man. The patient presented with unexplained right heart failure and echocardiography showed moderate bi-atrial enlargement which should be identified with the restrictive cardiomyopathy. After 10 months of conservative treatment, the progression of right heart failure was remaining. A pericardiectomy was performed and the patient recovered. This case serves as a reminder to consider CP in patients with unexplained right heart failure, so that timely investigation and treatment can be initiated.

  7. The decay pattern of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance of 140Ce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löher, B.; Savran, D.; Aumann, T.; Beller, J.; Bhike, M.; Cooper, N.; Derya, V.; Duchêne, M.; Endres, J.; Hennig, A.; Humby, P.; Isaak, J.; Kelley, J. H.; Knörzer, M.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Romig, C.; Scheck, M.; Scheit, H.; Silva, J.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Wamers, F.; Weller, H.; Werner, V.; Zilges, A.

    2016-05-01

    The decay properties of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR) have been investigated in the semi-magic N = 82 nucleus 140Ce using a novel combination of nuclear resonance fluorescence and γ-γ coincidence techniques. Branching ratios for transitions to low-lying excited states are determined in a direct and model-independent way both for individual excited states and for excitation energy intervals. Comparison of the experimental results to microscopic calculations in the quasi-particle phonon model exhibits an excellent agreement, supporting the observation that the Pygmy Dipole Resonance couples to the ground state as well as to low-lying excited states. A 10% mixing of the PDR and the [21+ × PDR ] is extracted.

  8. THE MANAGEMENT OF AN ORAL ANAPLASTIC SARCOMA IN A PYGMY HIPPOPOTAMUS (CHOEROPSIS LIBERIENSIS) USING INTRALESIONAL CHEMOTHERAPY.

    PubMed

    Franklinos, Lydia H V; Masters, Nicholas; Feltrer, Yedra; Pocknell, Ann; Bolt, David M; Dakin, Stephanie; Berry, Karla; Molenaar, Fieke M

    2017-03-01

    An adult female captive pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis) was diagnosed with an oral anaplastic sarcoma. The tumor was surgically debulked and intralesional chemotherapy with mitomycin C (0.4 mg/cm(3) of tumor) and cisplatin (1 mg/cm(3) of tumor) was administered. Chemotherapeutic treatment proved difficult due to the risks of repeated anesthetics and unknown drug efficacies. Marked proliferation of the mass was observed during estrus, and chemotherapy was repeated as an experimental treatment to slow tumor progression in order for the animal to remain in the species breeding program. Tumor proliferation was detected during the first trimester of pregnancy; however, in the lactation period, the mass became quiescent. No adverse reactions to chemotherapeutic drugs were observed and the animal continues to be monitored for tumor progression. This is the first report of an anaplastic sarcoma and of chemotherapy use in a pygmy hippopotamus and it highlights logistical considerations for treating neoplasia in this species.

  9. Search for the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in Ni68 at 600MeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieland, O.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Nicolini, R.; Maj, A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Grebosz, J.; Kmiecik, M.; Meczynski, W.; Styczen, J.; Aumann, T.; Banu, A.; Beck, T.; Becker, F.; Caceres, L.; Doornenbal, P.; Emling, H.; Gerl, J.; Geissel, H.; Gorska, M.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Lozeva, R.; Saito, N.; Saito, T.; Schaffner, H.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Jolie, J.; Reiter, P.; Warr, N.; Deangelis, G.; Gadea, A.; Napoli, D.; Lenzi, S.; Lunardi, S.; Balabanski, D.; Lobianco, G.; Petrache, C.; Saltarelli, A.; Castoldi, M.; Zucchiatti, A.; Walker, J.; Bürger, A.

    2009-03-01

    The γ decay from Coulomb excitation of Ni68 at 600MeV/nucleon on a Au target was measured using the RISING setup at the fragment separator of GSI. The Ni68 beam was produced by a fragmentation reaction of Kr86 at 900MeV/nucleon on a Be9 target and selected by the fragment separator. The γ rays produced at the Au target were measured with HPGe detectors at forward angles and with BaF2 scintillators at backward angles. The measured spectra show a peak centered at approximately 11 MeV, whose intensity can be explained in terms of an enhanced strength of the dipole response function (pygmy resonance). Such pygmy structure has been predicted in this unstable neutron-rich nucleus by theory.

  10. Controlling populations of invasive pygmy mussel (Xenostrobus securis) through citizen science and environmental DNA.

    PubMed

    Miralles, Laura; Dopico, Eduardo; Devlo-Delva, Floriaan; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2016-09-15

    Early detection of dangerous exotic species is crucial for stopping marine invasions. The New Zealand pygmy mussel Xenostrobus securis is a problematic species in coasts of temperate regions in the northern hemisphere. In this study we have controlled a population of this invader that recently expanded in a north Iberian estuary with both a participatory approach involving researchers and citizens, and employing a sensitive eDNA-based tool to monitor the population expansion in the estuary. Results demonstrate successful eradication of pygmy mussels in the outer part of the estuary with citizen science and the practical utility of eDNA for controlling biological invasions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The decay pattern of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance of 140 Ce

    DOE PAGES

    Löher, B.; Savran, D.; Aumann, T.; ...

    2016-05-01

    The decay properties of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR) have been investigated in the semi-magic N=82 nucleus 140Ce using a novel combination of nuclear resonance fluorescence and γ–γ coincidence techniques. Branching ratios for transitions to low-lying excited states are determined in a direct and model-independent way both for individual excited states and for excitation energy intervals. Comparison of the experimental results to microscopic calculations in the quasi-particle phonon model exhibits an excellent agreement, supporting the observation that the Pygmy Dipole Resonance couples to the ground state as well as to low-lying excited states. A 10% mixing of the PDR andmore » the [21+×PDR] is extracted.« less

  12. The decay pattern of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance of 140 Ce

    SciTech Connect

    Löher, B.; Savran, D.; Aumann, T.; Beller, J.; Bhike, M.; Cooper, N.; Derya, V.; Duchêne, M.; Endres, J.; Hennig, A.; Humby, P.; Isaak, J.; Kelley, J. H.; Knörzer, M.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Romig, C.; Scheck, M.; Scheit, H.; Silva, J.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Wamers, F.; Weller, H.; Werner, V.; Zilges, A.

    2016-05-01

    The decay properties of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR) have been investigated in the semi-magic N=82 nucleus 140Ce using a novel combination of nuclear resonance fluorescence and γ–γ coincidence techniques. Branching ratios for transitions to low-lying excited states are determined in a direct and model-independent way both for individual excited states and for excitation energy intervals. Comparison of the experimental results to microscopic calculations in the quasi-particle phonon model exhibits an excellent agreement, supporting the observation that the Pygmy Dipole Resonance couples to the ground state as well as to low-lying excited states. A 10% mixing of the PDR and the [21+×PDR] is extracted.

  13. Cryopreservation and in vitro culture of primary cell types from lung tissue of a stranded pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps).

    PubMed

    Annalaura Mancia; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; McFee, Wayne E; Newton, Danforth A; Baatz, John E

    2012-01-01

    Current models for in vitro studies of tissue function and physiology, including responses to hypoxia or environmental toxins, are limited and rely heavily on standard 2-dimensional (2-D) cultures with immortalized murine or human cell lines. To develop a new more powerful model system, we have pursued methods to establish and expand cultures of primary lung cell types and reconstituted tissues from marine mammals. What little is known about the physiology of the deep-sea diving pygmy sperm whale (PSW), Kogia breviceps, comes primarily from stranding events that occur along the coast of the southeastern United States. Thus, development of a method for preserving live tissues and retrieving live cells from deceased stranded individuals was initiated. This report documents successful cryopreservation of PSW lung tissue. We established in vitro cultures of primary lung cell types from tissue fragments that had been cryopreserved several months earlier at the stranding event. Dissociation of cryopreserved lung tissues readily provides a variety of primary cell types that, to varying degrees, can be expanded and further studied/manipulated in cell culture. In addition, PSW-specific molecular markers have been developed that permitted the monitoring of fibroblast, alveolar type II, and vascular endothelial cell types. Reconstitution of 3-D cultures of lung tissues with these cell types is now underway. This novel system may facilitate the development of rare or disease-specific lung tissue models (e.g., to test causes of PSW stranding events and lead to improved treatments for pulmonary hypertension or reperfusion injury in humans). Also, the establishment of a "living" tissue bank biorepository for rare/endangered species could serve multiple purposes as surrogates for freshly isolated samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Detection experiments with humans implicate visual predation as a driver of colour polymorphism dynamics in pygmy grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Karpestam, Einat; Merilaita, Sami; Forsman, Anders

    2013-05-02

    Animal colour patterns offer good model systems for studies of biodiversity and evolution of local adaptations. An increasingly popular approach to study the role of selection for camouflage for evolutionary trajectories of animal colour patterns is to present images of prey on paper or computer screens to human 'predators'. Yet, few attempts have been made to confirm that rates of detection by humans can predict patterns of selection and evolutionary modifications of prey colour patterns in nature. In this study, we first analyzed encounters between human 'predators' and images of natural black, grey and striped colour morphs of the polymorphic Tetrix subulata pygmy grasshoppers presented on background images of unburnt, intermediate or completely burnt natural habitats. Next, we compared detection rates with estimates of capture probabilities and survival of free-ranging grasshoppers, and with estimates of relative morph frequencies in natural populations. The proportion of grasshoppers that were detected and time to detection depended on both the colour pattern of the prey and on the type of visual background. Grasshoppers were detected more often and faster on unburnt backgrounds than on 50% and 100% burnt backgrounds. Striped prey were detected less often than grey or black prey on unburnt backgrounds; grey prey were detected more often than black or striped prey on 50% burnt backgrounds; and black prey were detected less often than grey prey on 100% burnt backgrounds. Rates of detection mirrored previously reported rates of capture by humans of free-ranging grasshoppers, as well as morph specific survival in the wild. Rates of detection were also correlated with frequencies of striped, black and grey morphs in samples of T. subulata from natural populations that occupied the three habitat types used for the detection experiment. Our findings demonstrate that crypsis is background-dependent, and implicate visual predation as an important driver of evolutionary

  15. Detection experiments with humans implicate visual predation as a driver of colour polymorphism dynamics in pygmy grasshoppers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal colour patterns offer good model systems for studies of biodiversity and evolution of local adaptations. An increasingly popular approach to study the role of selection for camouflage for evolutionary trajectories of animal colour patterns is to present images of prey on paper or computer screens to human ‘predators’. Yet, few attempts have been made to confirm that rates of detection by humans can predict patterns of selection and evolutionary modifications of prey colour patterns in nature. In this study, we first analyzed encounters between human ‘predators’ and images of natural black, grey and striped colour morphs of the polymorphic Tetrix subulata pygmy grasshoppers presented on background images of unburnt, intermediate or completely burnt natural habitats. Next, we compared detection rates with estimates of capture probabilities and survival of free-ranging grasshoppers, and with estimates of relative morph frequencies in natural populations. Results The proportion of grasshoppers that were detected and time to detection depended on both the colour pattern of the prey and on the type of visual background. Grasshoppers were detected more often and faster on unburnt backgrounds than on 50% and 100% burnt backgrounds. Striped prey were detected less often than grey or black prey on unburnt backgrounds; grey prey were detected more often than black or striped prey on 50% burnt backgrounds; and black prey were detected less often than grey prey on 100% burnt backgrounds. Rates of detection mirrored previously reported rates of capture by humans of free-ranging grasshoppers, as well as morph specific survival in the wild. Rates of detection were also correlated with frequencies of striped, black and grey morphs in samples of T. subulata from natural populations that occupied the three habitat types used for the detection experiment. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that crypsis is background-dependent, and implicate visual predation

  16. Detection of shrew-borne hantavirus in Eurasian pygmy shrew (Sorex minutus) in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Radosa, Lukáš; Schlegel, Mathias; Gebauer, Petra; Ansorge, Hermann; Heroldová, Marta; Jánová, Eva; Stanko, Michal; Mošanský, Ladislav; Fričová, Jana; Pejčoch, Milan; Suchomel, Josef; Purchart, Luboš; Groschup, Martin H; Krüger, Detlev H; Ulrich, Rainer G; Klempa, Boris

    2013-10-01

    Recently, it was found that not only rodents but also shrews are reservoir hosts of hantaviruses. In Central Europe, only Seewis virus, associated with the Eurasian common shrew (Sorex araneus), has been recognized until now. In the present report, tissue samples from shrews belonging to Crocidurinae and Soricinae subfamilies, trapped in Czech Republic, Germany, and Slovakia, were screened for the presence of novel hantaviruses. Three new hantavirus partial L-segment sequences were obtained from pygmy shrews (Sorex minutus) trapped in Czech Republic and Germany. Complete nucleocapsid protein- and glycoprotein precursor-coding S- and M-segment sequences were then determined for the newly recognized hantavirus strains, CZ/Beskydy/412/2010/Sm, CZ/Drahany/420/2010/Sm, and DE/Dürrbach/1912/2009/Sm. Phylogenetic analyses showed that they represent strains of Asikkala virus (ASIV), a novel hantavirus also found in pygmy shrews from Finland. Our study reveals a broad geographic distribution of ASIV across Europe and indicates pygmy shrew as the primary reservoir host. Future studies will have to determine the pathogenic relevance of ASIV.

  17. How did pygmy shrews colonize Ireland? Clues from a phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial cytochrome b sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Mascheretti, Silvia; Rogatcheva, Margarita B; Gündüz, Islam; Fredga, Karl; Searle, Jeremy B

    2003-01-01

    There is a long-standing debate as to how Ireland attained its present fauna; we help to inform this debate with a molecular study of one species. A 1110 base pair fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene was sequenced in 74 specimens of the pygmy shrew, Sorex minutus, collected from throughout its western Palaearctic range. Phylogenetic analysis of these sequences revealed several well-supported lineages. Most of the 65 haplotypes belonged to a northern lineage, which ranged from Britain in the west to Lake Baikal in the east. The other lineages were largely limited to Iberia, Italy and the Balkans. One exception, however, was a lineage found in both Ireland and Andorra. This affinity, and the large difference between the mitochondrial sequences of Irish and British individuals, suggest that pygmy shrews did not colonize Ireland via a land connection from Britain, as has been previously supposed, but instead were introduced by boat from southwest continental Europe. All the Irish pygmy shrews analysed were identical or very similar in cytochrome b sequence, suggesting an extreme founding event. PMID:12908980

  18. Vocal characteristics of pygmy blue whales and their change over time.

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, Alexander N; McCauley, Robert D; Salgado-Kent, Chandra; Tripovich, Joy; Burton, Chris

    2011-12-01

    Vocal characteristics of pygmy blue whales of the eastern Indian Ocean population were analyzed using data from a hydroacoustic station deployed off Cape Leeuwin in Western Australia as part of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty monitoring network, from two acoustic observatories of the Australian Integrated Marine Observing System, and from individual sea noise loggers deployed in the Perth Canyon. These data have been collected from 2002 to 2010, inclusively. It is shown that the themes of pygmy blue whale songs consist of ether three or two repeating tonal sounds with harmonics. The most intense sound of the tonal theme was estimated to correspond to a source level of 179 ± 2 dB re 1 μPa at 1 m measured for 120 calls from seven different animals. Short-duration calls of impulsive downswept sound from pygmy blue whales were weaker with the source level estimated to vary between 168 to 176 dB. A gradual decrease in the call frequency with a mean rate estimated to be 0.35 ± 0.3 Hz/year was observed over nine years in the frequency of the third harmonic of tonal sound 2 in the whale song theme, which corresponds to a negative trend of about 0.12 Hz/year in the call fundamental frequency.

  19. Fluralaner as a single dose oral treatment for Caparinia tripilis in a pygmy African hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Romero, Camilo; Sheinberg Waisburd, Galia; Pineda, Jocelyn; Heredia, Rafael; Yarto, Enrique; Cordero, Alberto M

    2017-07-09

    African pygmy hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) are popular pets belonging to the Erinaceidae family of spined mammals. Amongst the most common skin diseases occurring in this species is infestation caused by the mite Caparinia spp. Due to their skin anatomy and spiny coat, detection of skin lesions in these hedgehogs can be difficult. This may result in delays in seeking medical care, which may lead to secondary bacterial infection and self-inflicted trauma. Multiple therapies have been used in the treatment of this skin condition including ivermectin, amitraz, fipronil and selamectin. A drug which could be administered as a single oral dose would be advantageous to these pets and their owners. To evaluate the effect of a single oral dose (15 mg/kg) of fluralaner on Caparinia tripilis infestation in the African pygmy hedgehog. A 10-month-old African pygmy hedgehog weighing 184 g. Response to treatment was monitored by dermatological examination and superficial skin scrapings repeated at 7, 14, 21, 30, 60, 90 and 120 days following fluralaner administration. On Day 7 after treatment, adult mites were observed exhibiting normal movement. On Day 14, only dead mites were observed. No life stages of the mites were found after Day 21. A single oral dose at 15 mg/kg of fluralaner was effective within 21 days after treatment for capariniasis in this case. Further studies are required to evaluate the drug's safety and toxicology in hedgehogs, and to confirm efficacy. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  20. Inferring the demographic history of African farmers and pygmy hunter-gatherers using a multilocus resequencing data set.

    PubMed

    Patin, Etienne; Laval, Guillaume; Barreiro, Luis B; Salas, Antonio; Semino, Ornella; Santachiara-Benerecetti, Silvana; Kidd, Kenneth K; Kidd, Judith R; Van der Veen, Lolke; Hombert, Jean-Marie; Gessain, Antoine; Froment, Alain; Bahuchet, Serge; Heyer, Evelyne; Quintana-Murci, Lluís

    2009-04-01

    The transition from hunting and gathering to farming involved a major cultural innovation that has spread rapidly over most of the globe in the last ten millennia. In sub-Saharan Africa, hunter-gatherers have begun to shift toward an agriculture-based lifestyle over the last 5,000 years. Only a few populations still base their mode of subsistence on hunting and gathering. The Pygmies are considered to be the largest group of mobile hunter-gatherers of Africa. They dwell in equatorial rainforests and are characterized by their short mean stature. However, little is known about the chronology of the demographic events-size changes, population splits, and gene flow--ultimately giving rise to contemporary Pygmy (Western and Eastern) groups and neighboring agricultural populations. We studied the branching history of Pygmy hunter-gatherers and agricultural populations from Africa and estimated separation times and gene flow between these populations. We resequenced 24 independent noncoding regions across the genome, corresponding to a total of approximately 33 kb per individual, in 236 samples from seven Pygmy and five agricultural populations dispersed over the African continent. We used simulation-based inference to identify the historical model best fitting our data. The model identified included the early divergence of the ancestors of Pygmy hunter-gatherers and farming populations approximately 60,000 years ago, followed by a split of the Pygmies' ancestors into the Western and Eastern Pygmy groups approximately 20,000 years ago. Our findings increase knowledge of the history of the peopling of the African continent in a region lacking archaeological data. An appreciation of the demographic and adaptive history of African populations with different modes of subsistence should improve our understanding of the influence of human lifestyles on genome diversity.

  1. Inferring the Demographic History of African Farmers and Pygmy Hunter–Gatherers Using a Multilocus Resequencing Data Set

    PubMed Central

    Patin, Etienne; Laval, Guillaume; Barreiro, Luis B.; Salas, Antonio; Semino, Ornella; Santachiara-Benerecetti, Silvana; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Kidd, Judith R.; Van der Veen, Lolke; Hombert, Jean-Marie; Gessain, Antoine; Froment, Alain; Bahuchet, Serge; Heyer, Evelyne; Quintana-Murci, Lluís

    2009-01-01

    The transition from hunting and gathering to farming involved a major cultural innovation that has spread rapidly over most of the globe in the last ten millennia. In sub-Saharan Africa, hunter–gatherers have begun to shift toward an agriculture-based lifestyle over the last 5,000 years. Only a few populations still base their mode of subsistence on hunting and gathering. The Pygmies are considered to be the largest group of mobile hunter–gatherers of Africa. They dwell in equatorial rainforests and are characterized by their short mean stature. However, little is known about the chronology of the demographic events—size changes, population splits, and gene flow—ultimately giving rise to contemporary Pygmy (Western and Eastern) groups and neighboring agricultural populations. We studied the branching history of Pygmy hunter–gatherers and agricultural populations from Africa and estimated separation times and gene flow between these populations. We resequenced 24 independent noncoding regions across the genome, corresponding to a total of ∼33 kb per individual, in 236 samples from seven Pygmy and five agricultural populations dispersed over the African continent. We used simulation-based inference to identify the historical model best fitting our data. The model identified included the early divergence of the ancestors of Pygmy hunter–gatherers and farming populations ∼60,000 years ago, followed by a split of the Pygmies' ancestors into the Western and Eastern Pygmy groups ∼20,000 years ago. Our findings increase knowledge of the history of the peopling of the African continent in a region lacking archaeological data. An appreciation of the demographic and adaptive history of African populations with different modes of subsistence should improve our understanding of the influence of human lifestyles on genome diversity. PMID:19360089

  2. [On the taxonomic rank of ciscaucasicus and its relationships with the pygmy wood mouse Sylvaemus uralensis inferred from the mtDNA cytochrome b gene sequence].

    PubMed

    Balakirev, A E; Baskevich, M I; Gmyl', A P; Okulova, N M; Andreeva, T A; Sokolenko, O V; Malygin, V M; Khliap, L A; Opatin, M L; Orlov, V N

    2007-12-01

    To specify the taxonomic rank of form ciscaucasoides (independent species Sylvaemus ciscaucasoides, or intraspecific form of pygmy wood mouse, S. uralensis), a 402-bp the mtDNA cytochrome b gene fragment (402 bp) was examined in S. ciscaucasoides individuals from six geographic localities of the Caucasus and Ciscaucasus, (Krasnodar krai and Adygeya Republic) and 17 S. uralensis individuals from seven localities of the Russian Plai (Saratov oblast, Smolensk oblast, Voronezh oblast, Tula oblast, Moscow oblast, and Tver' oblast). For comparison, the cytochrome b gene was partly sequenced in the samples of yellow necked, S. flavicollis (n = 2, Samara oblast), and Caucasian, S. ponticus (n = 6, Krasnodar krai), wood mice. One Mus musculus specimen from Western Europe, whose nucleotide sequences were deposed in the GenBank, was used as intergeneric outgroup. Phylogenetic trees for the forms examined were constructed based on the mtDNA sequence variation and using the neighbor joining and maximum parsimony methods. The network of the cytochrome b haplotypes was also constructed. The level of genetic divergence was evaluated using Kimura's two-parameter algorithm. Based on the data on the sequence variation in a 402-bp mtDNA cytochrome b gene fragment, the hypothesis on the species status of the ciscaucasicus form was. The mean intergroup distances (d) between the geographic groups of S. uralensis varied from 0.0036 to 0.0152. At the same time, the distances between the pygmy wood mice and the group of S.flavicollis-S. ponticus varies in the range from 0.0860 to 0.0935, and the level of intergeneric genetic differentiation (Sylvaemus-Mus) is higher than the latter index (d = 0.142). Ciscaucasoides should be considered as geographic substitution form of S. uralensis. Furthermore, the Caucasian populations of S. uralensis (= ciscaucasoides) were characterized by a threefold lower value of intergroup genetic divergence (d = 0.0062) than the East European populations (d= 0

  3. Catchment-Scale Conservation Units Identified for the Threatened Yarra Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) in Highly Modified River Systems

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, Chris J.; Unmack, Peter J.; Hammer, Michael P.; Adams, Mark; Beheregaray, Luciano B.

    2013-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation caused by human activities alters metapopulation dynamics and decreases biological connectivity through reduced migration and gene flow, leading to lowered levels of population genetic diversity and to local extinctions. The threatened Yarra pygmy perch, Nannoperca obscura, is a poor disperser found in small, isolated populations in wetlands and streams of southeastern Australia. Modifications to natural flow regimes in anthropogenically-impacted river systems have recently reduced the amount of habitat for this species and likely further limited its opportunity to disperse. We employed highly resolving microsatellite DNA markers to assess genetic variation, population structure and the spatial scale that dispersal takes place across the distribution of this freshwater fish and used this information to identify conservation units for management. The levels of genetic variation found for N. obscura are amongst the lowest reported for a fish species (mean heterozygosity of 0.318 and mean allelic richness of 1.92). We identified very strong population genetic structure, nil to little evidence of recent migration among demes and a minimum of 11 units for conservation management, hierarchically nested within four major genetic lineages. A combination of spatial analytical methods revealed hierarchical genetic structure corresponding with catchment boundaries and also demonstrated significant isolation by riverine distance. Our findings have implications for the national recovery plan of this species by demonstrating that N. obscura populations should be managed at a catchment level and highlighting the need to restore habitat and avoid further alteration of the natural hydrology. PMID:24349405

  4. Catchment-scale conservation units identified for the threatened Yarra pygmy perch (Nannoperca obscura) in highly modified river systems.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Chris J; Unmack, Peter J; Hammer, Michael P; Adams, Mark; Beheregaray, Luciano B

    2013-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation caused by human activities alters metapopulation dynamics and decreases biological connectivity through reduced migration and gene flow, leading to lowered levels of population genetic diversity and to local extinctions. The threatened Yarra pygmy perch, Nannoperca obscura, is a poor disperser found in small, isolated populations in wetlands and streams of southeastern Australia. Modifications to natural flow regimes in anthropogenically-impacted river systems have recently reduced the amount of habitat for this species and likely further limited its opportunity to disperse. We employed highly resolving microsatellite DNA markers to assess genetic variation, population structure and the spatial scale that dispersal takes place across the distribution of this freshwater fish and used this information to identify conservation units for management. The levels of genetic variation found for N. obscura are amongst the lowest reported for a fish species (mean heterozygosity of 0.318 and mean allelic richness of 1.92). We identified very strong population genetic structure, nil to little evidence of recent migration among demes and a minimum of 11 units for conservation management, hierarchically nested within four major genetic lineages. A combination of spatial analytical methods revealed hierarchical genetic structure corresponding with catchment boundaries and also demonstrated significant isolation by riverine distance. Our findings have implications for the national recovery plan of this species by demonstrating that N. obscura populations should be managed at a catchment level and highlighting the need to restore habitat and avoid further alteration of the natural hydrology.

  5. Localized pigmented villonodular synovitis of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee: an exceptional presentation of a rare disease with neoplastic and inflammatory features.

    PubMed

    Galli, M; Ciriello, V; Menghi, A; Perisano, C; Maccauro, G; Marzetti, E

    2012-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare condition, most commonly involving the knee joint. PVNS is locally aggressive and can invade and destroy surrounding soft tissue and bone, leading to anatomical and functional deterioration of the affected joint. Localized PVNS is an unusual presentation of the disease, generally consisting of a nodular lesion protruding into the articular cavity. Localized PVNS of the knee can mimic other joint disorders which may pose a challenge for a correct diagnosis. Given the locally aggressive behavior of PVNS, prompt identification and excision of the lesion are instrumental to avoid complications. Here, we report a rare case of localized cystic PVNS involving the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee in a 32-year-old woman with persistent knee pain, in whom magnetic resonance imaging was inconclusive. The diagnosis was achieved via arthroscopy and histology. We also present a concise review of the literature on this pathological entity as well as a discussion on the differential diagnosis between localized PVNS and other intra-articular cystic lesions.

  6. Lupus erythematosus and localized scleroderma coexistent at the same sites: a rare presentation of overlap syndrome of connective-tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Pascucci, Anabella; Lynch, Peter J; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-05-01

    Overlap syndromes are known to occur with connective-tissue diseases (CTDs). Rarely, the overlap occurs at the same tissue site. We report the case of a patient with clinical and histopathologic findings consistent with the presence of discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) and localized scleroderma within the same lesions. Based on our case and other reported cases in the literature, the following features are common in patients with an overlap of lupus erythematosus (LE) and localized scleroderma: predilection for young women, photodistributed lesions, DLE, linear morphology clinically, and positivity along the dermoepidermal junction on direct immunofluorescence. Most patients showed good response to antimalarials, topical steroids, or systemic steroids.

  7. Maternal traces of deep common ancestry and asymmetric gene flow between Pygmy hunter–gatherers and Bantu-speaking farmers

    PubMed Central

    Quintana-Murci, Lluís; Quach, Hélène; Harmant, Christine; Luca, Francesca; Massonnet, Blandine; Patin, Etienne; Sica, Lucas; Mouguiama-Daouda, Patrick; Comas, David; Tzur, Shay; Balanovsky, Oleg; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Kidd, Judith R.; van der Veen, Lolke; Hombert, Jean-Marie; Gessain, Antoine; Verdu, Paul; Froment, Alain; Bahuchet, Serge; Heyer, Evelyne; Dausset, Jean; Salas, Antonio; Behar, Doron M.

    2008-01-01

    Two groups of populations with completely different lifestyles—the Pygmy hunter–gatherers and the Bantu-speaking farmers—coexist in Central Africa. We investigated the origins of these two groups and the interactions between them, by analyzing mtDNA variation in 1,404 individuals from 20 farming populations and 9 Pygmy populations from Central Africa, with the aim of shedding light on one of the most fascinating cultural transitions in human evolution (the transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture). Our data indicate that this region was colonized gradually, with an initial L1c-rich ancestral population ultimately giving rise to current-day farmers, who display various L1c clades, and to Pygmies, in whom L1c1a is the only surviving clade. Detailed phylogenetic analysis of complete mtDNA sequences for L1c1a showed this clade to be autochthonous to Central Africa, with its most recent branches shared between farmers and Pygmies. Coalescence analyses revealed that these two groups arose through a complex evolutionary process characterized by (i) initial divergence of the ancestors of contemporary Pygmies from an ancestral Central African population no more than ≈70,000 years ago, (ii) a period of isolation between the two groups, accounting for their phenotypic differences, (iii) long-standing asymmetric maternal gene flow from Pygmies to the ancestors of the farming populations, beginning no more than ≈40,000 years ago and persisting until a few thousand years ago, and (iv) enrichment of the maternal gene pool of the ancestors of the farming populations by the arrival and/or subsequent demographic expansion of L0a, L2, and L3 carriers. PMID:18216239

  8. Demographics of polycystic kidney disease and captive population viability in pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis).

    PubMed

    Flacke, Gabriella L; Tomkins, Joseph L; Black, Robert; Steck, Beatrice

    2017-03-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) was previously diagnosed at necropsy in several pygmy hippopotami (Choeropsis liberiensis) from the Smithsonian National Zoo and Zoo Basel, suggesting a threat to the long-term viability of the captive population. We determined the incidence and demographics of PKD in the captive population historically; we tested if the condition is linked to pedigree; we investigated mode of inheritance; we examined effects of PKD on longevity; we conducted survival analysis; and we examined long-term population viability. Thirty-seven percent of 149 necropsied adult pygmy hippos were affected by PKD, and it was more common in females, controlling for the overall female-biased sex-ratio. Prevalence increased significantly with age, but most hippos were beyond their reproductive prime before developing clinical signs; thus fecundity was likely unaffected. PKD was linked to pedigree and may exhibit X-linked dominance, but further research is needed to definitively establish the mode of inheritance. PKD did not affect longevity, overall or within any age class. There was no significant correlation between inbreeding coefficient (F) and PKD, and the prevalence in wild-caught and captive-born animals was similar. Longevity for both captive-born and inbred hippos (F > 0) was significantly shorter than longevity for their wild-caught and non-inbred counterparts. Demographic projections indicated the extant population will likely experience a slow increase over time, provided there are no space constraints. We conclude that although PKD is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in pygmy hippos, the condition is not a primary concern for overall viability of the captive population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Dynamical coupling of pygmy and giant resonances in relativistic Coulomb excitation

    DOE PAGES

    Brady, N. S.; Aumann, T.; Bertulani, C. A.; ...

    2016-04-20

    We study the Coulomb excitation of pygmy dipole resonances (PDR) in heavy ion reactions at 100 MeV/nucleon and above. The reactions Ni-68 + Au-197 and Ni-68 + Pb-208 are taken as practical examples. Our goal is to address the question of the influence of giant resonances on the PDR as the dynamics of the collision evolves. We show that the coupling to the giant resonances affects considerably the excitation probabilities of the PDR, a result that indicates the need of an improved theoretical treatment of the reaction dynamics at these bombarding energies. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Microscopic nature of the pygmy dipole resonance: the stable Ca isotopes.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, T; Babilon, M; Kamerdzhiev, S; Litvinova, E; Savran, D; Volz, S; Zilges, A

    2004-11-05

    The electric dipole strength distribution in 44Ca has been measured up to 10 MeV in high resolution photon scattering experiments for the first time. The data obtained have been compared to earlier measurements on (40,48)Ca in order to view the evolution of the electric pygmy dipole resonance (PDR). Calculations that were performed within the framework of the microscopic extended theory of finite Fermi systems, which adds contributions of the quasiparticle-phonon coupling to random phase approximation calculations, give a qualitative agreement with the experimental data for all three isotopes. We have shown that it is necessary to include this coupling to describe the PDR.

  11. Costal Mesenchymal Chondrosarcoma with Diffuse Pleural and Pericardial Explantation in a Pygmy Goat

    PubMed Central

    Lombardini, Eric D.; de la Concha, Andres; Pierce, Virginia; Pool, Roy R.

    2014-01-01

    A 3 year old intact male pygmy goat developed progressive weakness and eventual recumbancy over the course of 1 week, while maintaining its ability to eat and drink. The animal died and at necropsy, the parietal pleural surfaces and the pericardial surface were noted to be covered with firm, white, variably sized nodules that often formed linear arrays or coalesced into larger clumped aggregates. The visceral pleural surfaces of the ventral lung lobes were also covered with similar nodules. Histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation of the submitted tissues revealed a diagnosis of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma with extensive seeding throughout the thoracic cavity. PMID:24791071

  12. Non-song vocalizations of pygmy blue whales in Geographe Bay, Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Recalde-Salas, A; Salgado Kent, C P; Parsons, M J G; Marley, S A; McCauley, R D

    2014-05-01

    Non-song vocalizations of migrating pygmy blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus brevicauda) in Western Australia are described. Simultaneous land-based visual observations and underwater acoustic recordings detected 27 groups in Geographe Bay, WA over 2011 to 2012. Six different vocalizations were recorded that were not repeated in a pattern or in association with song, and thus were identified as non-song vocalizations. Five of these were not previously described for this population. Their acoustic characteristics and context are presented. Given that 56% of groups vocalized, 86% of which produced non-song vocalizations and 14% song units, the inclusion of non-song vocalizations in passive-acoustic monitoring is proposed.

  13. New and little-known pygmy grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Tetrigidae) from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Storozhenko, Sergey Yu; Dawwrueng, Pattarawich

    2015-12-07

    An annotated list of 39 species in 25 genera and seven subfamilies of the pygmy grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Tetrididae) from Thailand is given; from these 18 species are recorded from this country for the first time. Five new species are described: Cotysoides gaponi sp. nov. (subfamily Metrodorinae), Eucriotettix anisyutkini sp. nov., Gavialidium bufocrocodil sp. nov., Scelimena bellula sp. nov. (subfamily Scelimeninae) and Phaesticus uvarovi sp. nov. (subfamily Discotettiginae). One species is transferred from Scelimena to Amphibotettix and a new combination is proposed: Scelimena hafizhaii Mahmmod, Idris et Salman, 2007 = Amphibotettix hafizhaii (Mahmmod, Idris et Salman, 2007), comb. nov. The previously unknown male of Falconius tschernovi Storozhenko, 2014 is described.

  14. A rare presentation of locally re-recurrent colon cancer involving the iliac bone and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Andrew; Babikir, Osman Mahdi; Abboud, Amer; Theodorakis, Spyridon

    2014-10-29

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in the USA. While locally advanced rectal cancer involving bone has been described extensively, colon cancer locally involving bone has only been described, to our knowledge, in a single case report. In this case report, we describe the presentation and treatment of locally advanced re-recurrent colon cancer involving the iliac bone. We also discuss the available literature on treatment for recurrent and re-recurrent colorectal cancer.

  15. A rare presentation of locally re-recurrent colon cancer involving the iliac bone and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Andrew; Mahdi Babikir, Osman; Abboud, Amer; Theodorakis, Spyridon

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in the USA. While locally advanced rectal cancer involving bone has been described extensively, colon cancer locally involving bone has only been described, to our knowledge, in a single case report. In this case report, we describe the presentation and treatment of locally advanced re-recurrent colon cancer involving the iliac bone. We also discuss the available literature on treatment for recurrent and re-recurrent colorectal cancer. PMID:25355743

  16. Sharp-Tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    Untied States. Bonneville Power Adminsitration.

    1992-10-01

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  17. Sharp-tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  18. Inbreeding and Offspring Sex Ratio in the Pygmy Hippopotamus (Cheoropsis liberiensis) Population Kept in Zoological Gardens.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, Magdalena; Cwiertnia, Piotr; Borowska, Alicja; Barczak, Elżbieta; Szwaczkowski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the inbreeding level and its impact on offspring sex ratio in the pygmy hippopotamus population kept in zoological gardens. Records of pygmy hippopotamus born between 1873-2013 were extracted from the international studbook. Totally, 1357 individuals originating from 148 breeding units were included (individuals with unknown sex were omitted). The offspring sex ratio is defined as the number of sons to the total number of progeny of each dam and sire. Spearman's rank correlation was employed to examine the relationships between the inbreeding level and offspring sex ratio. Inbreeding coefficients and individual increase in inbreeding coefficients (included as a linear co-variable) were examined as well as the geographic region and birth period using general linear models. The average inbreeding coefficient was 5.39%. The following sex proportion was observed for the inbred population: 57% and 43% for females and males, respectively. A significant relationship between inbreeding level of parents and their offspring sex ratio were estimated for European zoological gardens, whereas in others geographic regions the dependencies were insignificant.

  19. Organochlorine Pesticides in the Ferruginous Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium brasilianum) in Chiapas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Arrona-Rivera, Alicia E; Enríquez, Paula L; García-Feria, Luis M; Orellana, Sergio Alvarado; von Osten, Jaime Rendón

    2016-09-01

    Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides were quantified in samples of feathers (n = 17) and blood (n = 15) of the ferruginous pygmy owl (Glaucidium brasilianum). The individuals were captured near the Protected Natural Area Cerro Sonsonate, Chiapas, Mexico, between February and June 2014. In both tissues, pesticides belonging to seven organochlorine chemical families were detected. However, the organochlorine pesticide concentrations differed between feathers and blood. The highest concentrations of hexachlorocyclohexanes were found in feathers (0.63 ± 0.89 μg/g), whereas the highest concentrations of ΣDrines were found in blood (0.31 ± 0.47 μg/mL). By using the summed concentrations for each of the seven families of pesticides found in feathers, we did not find any significant correlation between the pesticides and pectoral muscle or body weight (p > 0.15). The ΣDDT group was the only pesticide family that showed a positive correlation with owl body weight (r = 0.60, p = 0.05); the concentrations of these pesticides were also high in feather and blood tissues (r = 0.87, p = 0.02). Our results confirm that ferruginous pygmy owls in the study area are exposed to these pesticides.

  20. Patterns of Ancestry, Signatures of Natural Selection, and Genetic Association with Stature in Western African Pygmies

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Joseph P.; Ferwerda, Bart; Froment, Alain; Bodo, Jean-Marie; Beggs, William; Hoffman, Gabriel; Mezey, Jason; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2012-01-01

    African Pygmy groups show a distinctive pattern of phenotypic variation, including short stature, which is thought to reflect past adaptation to a tropical environment. Here, we analyze Illumina 1M SNP array data in three Western Pygmy populations from Cameroon and three neighboring Bantu-speaking agricultural populations with whom they have admixed. We infer genome-wide ancestry, scan for signals of positive selection, and perform targeted genetic association with measured height variation. We identify multiple regions throughout the genome that may have played a role in adaptive evolution, many of which contain loci with roles in growth hormone, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor signaling pathways, as well as immunity and neuroendocrine signaling involved in reproduction and metabolism. The most striking results are found on chromosome 3, which harbors a cluster of selection and association signals between approximately 45 and 60 Mb. This region also includes the positional candidate genes DOCK3, which is known to be associated with height variation in Europeans, and CISH, a negative regulator of cytokine signaling known to inhibit growth hormone-stimulated STAT5 signaling. Finally, pathway analysis for genes near the strongest signals of association with height indicates enrichment for loci involved in insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling. PMID:22570615

  1. Nuclear deformation and neutron excess as competing effects for dipole strength in the pygmy region.

    PubMed

    Massarczyk, R; Schwengner, R; Dönau, F; Frauendorf, S; Anders, M; Bemmerer, D; Beyer, R; Bhatia, C; Birgersson, E; Butterling, M; Elekes, Z; Ferrari, A; Gooden, M E; Hannaske, R; Junghans, A R; Kempe, M; Kelley, J H; Kögler, T; Matic, A; Menzel, M L; Müller, S; Reinhardt, T P; Röder, M; Rusev, G; Schilling, K D; Schmidt, K; Schramm, G; Tonchev, A P; Tornow, W; Wagner, A

    2014-02-21

    The electromagnetic dipole strength below the neutron-separation energy has been studied for the xenon isotopes with mass numbers A=124, 128, 132, and 134 in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments using the γELBE bremsstrahlung facility at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and the HIγS facility at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory Durham. The systematic study gained new information about the influence of the neutron excess as well as of nuclear deformation on the strength in the region of the pygmy dipole resonance. The results are compared with those obtained for the chain of molybdenum isotopes and with predictions of a random-phase approximation in a deformed basis. It turned out that the effect of nuclear deformation plays a minor role compared with the one caused by neutron excess. A global parametrization of the strength in terms of neutron and proton numbers allowed us to derive a formula capable of predicting the summed E1 strengths in the pygmy region for a wide mass range of nuclides.

  2. Morbilliviral infection in a pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps) from Taiwanese waters.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-Cheng; Pang, Victor Fei; Jeng, Chian-Ren; Chou, Lien-Siang; Chueh, Ling-Ling

    2006-08-25

    Morbilliviral infection was diagnosed in an adult male pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps) from southwestern Taiwan on the basis of pathological findings, immunohistochemical staining, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The whale was found alive stranded on the beach and died after 5 days of medical care. It was thin and had dozens of nematode in the first stomach. The lungs were dark red and heavy. Histopathological examination revealed diffuse, moderate bronchointerstitial pneumonia. Intranuclear and intracytoplasmic inclusions with occasional syncytial cell formation were noted in the lungs, lymph nodes, and spleen. The RNA extracted from lung tissue was subjected to morbilliviral gene amplification. After priming with specific oligonucleotides, the cDNA covering the phosphoprotein (P) gene was copied and then amplified by PCR. The gene fragment amplified from the lung tissue was sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis of partial P gene revealed 97.6% sequence identity to the dolphin morbillivirus and 90.2% similarity to the pilot whale morbillivirus. Morbilliviral antigens were detected in the lungs, lymph nodes, and spleen by immunohistochemistry using polyclonal antibody against rinderpest virus. This is the first report of morbilliviral infection with genetic evidence in a pygmy sperm whale from the Western Pacific Ocean around Taiwan.

  3. The pygmy right whale Caperea marginata: the last of the cetotheres.

    PubMed

    Fordyce, R Ewan; Marx, Felix G

    2013-02-22

    The pygmy right whale, Caperea marginata, is the most enigmatic of the living baleen whales (Mysticeti). Its highly disparate morphology and the virtual absence of a described fossil record have made it extremely difficult to place Caperea into a broader evolutionary context, and molecular and morphological studies have frequently contradicted each other as to the origins and phylogenetic relationships of the species. Our study of a wealth of material from New Zealand collections, representing a wide range of ontogenetic stages, has identified several new features previously unreported in Caperea, which suggest that the pygmy right whale may be the last survivor of the supposedly extinct family Cetotheriidae. This hypothesis is corroborated by both morphology-based and total evidence cladistic analyses, including 166 morphological characters and 23 taxa, representing all the living and extinct families of toothless baleen whales. Our results allow us to formally refer Caperea to Cetotheriidae, thus resurrecting the latter from extinction and helping to clarify the origins of a long-problematic living species.

  4. Nuclear Deformation and Neutron Excess as Competing Effects for Dipole Strength in the Pygmy Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massarczyk, R.; Schwengner, R.; Dönau, F.; Frauendorf, S.; Anders, M.; Bemmerer, D.; Beyer, R.; Bhatia, C.; Birgersson, E.; Butterling, M.; Elekes, Z.; Ferrari, A.; Gooden, M. E.; Hannaske, R.; Junghans, A. R.; Kempe, M.; Kelley, J. H.; Kögler, T.; Matic, A.; Menzel, M. L.; Müller, S.; Reinhardt, T. P.; Röder, M.; Rusev, G.; Schilling, K. D.; Schmidt, K.; Schramm, G.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Wagner, A.

    2014-02-01

    The electromagnetic dipole strength below the neutron-separation energy has been studied for the xenon isotopes with mass numbers A =124, 128, 132, and 134 in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments using the γELBE bremsstrahlung facility at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and the HIγS facility at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory Durham. The systematic study gained new information about the influence of the neutron excess as well as of nuclear deformation on the strength in the region of the pygmy dipole resonance. The results are compared with those obtained for the chain of molybdenum isotopes and with predictions of a random-phase approximation in a deformed basis. It turned out that the effect of nuclear deformation plays a minor role compared with the one caused by neutron excess. A global parametrization of the strength in terms of neutron and proton numbers allowed us to derive a formula capable of predicting the summed E1 strengths in the pygmy region for a wide mass range of nuclides.

  5. Novel mastadenovirus infection and clinical disease in a pygmy marmoset (Callithrix [Cebuella] pygmaea).

    PubMed

    Gál, János; Hornyák, Ákos; Mándoki, Míra; Bakonyi, Tamás; Balka, Gyula; Szeredi, Levente; Marosán, Miklós; Ludányi, Tibor; Forgách, Petra; Sós, Endre; Demeter, Zoltán; Farkas, Szilvia L

    2013-12-27

    We describe the detection and successful isolation of a novel mastadenovirus from a pygmy marmoset (Callithrix [Cebuella] pygmaea) that died following an episode of severe respiratory signs. Pathologic/histopathologic examination revealed hydrothorax and catarrhal bronchopneumonia with pronounced desquamation of the bronchiolar epithelial cells, while in other airways a marked hyperplasia of the epithelial lining and numerous giant cells could be observed. We obtained partial sequence data from the adenoviral DNA-dependent DNA-polymerase gene of the isolated strain and analyses of this region showed the highest level of identity to the recently described bat adenoviruses (strains PPV1 and TJM) and the type 2 canine adenovirus. Similar results were gained by phylogenetic calculations indicating that this novel marmoset adenovirus is only distantly related to reference Old and New World primate adenoviruses and formed a monophyletic group with bat and canine adenoviruses and the equine adenovirus 1. Even though the source of the infection remained unknown, our results could imply the possibility of a cross-species transmission of the virus from an anonymous host to the pygmy marmoset.

  6. Reduced predation risk for melanistic pygmy grasshoppers in post-fire environments

    PubMed Central

    Karpestam, Einat; Merilaita, Sami; Forsman, Anders

    2012-01-01

    The existence of melanistic (black) color forms in many species represents interesting model systems that have played important roles for our understanding of selective processes, evolution of adaptations, and the maintenance of variation. A recent study reported on rapid evolutionary shifts in frequencies of the melanistic forms in replicated populations of Tetrix subulata pygmy grasshoppers; the incidence of the melanistic form was higher in recently burned areas with backgrounds blackened by fire than in nonburned areas, and it declined over time in postfire environments. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the frequency shifts of the black color variant were driven, at least in part, by changes in the selective regime imposed by visual predators. To study detectability of the melanistic form, we presented human “predators” with images of black grasshoppers and samples of the natural habitat on computer screens. We demonstrate that the protective value of black coloration differs between burnt and nonburnt environments and gradually increases in habitats that have been more blackened by fire. These findings support the notion that a black color pattern provides improved protection from visually oriented predators against blackened backgrounds and implicate camouflage and predation as important drivers of fire melanism in pygmy grasshoppers. PMID:23139879

  7. Reduced predation risk for melanistic pygmy grasshoppers in post-fire environments.

    PubMed

    Karpestam, Einat; Merilaita, Sami; Forsman, Anders

    2012-09-01

    The existence of melanistic (black) color forms in many species represents interesting model systems that have played important roles for our understanding of selective processes, evolution of adaptations, and the maintenance of variation. A recent study reported on rapid evolutionary shifts in frequencies of the melanistic forms in replicated populations of Tetrix subulata pygmy grasshoppers; the incidence of the melanistic form was higher in recently burned areas with backgrounds blackened by fire than in nonburned areas, and it declined over time in postfire environments. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the frequency shifts of the black color variant were driven, at least in part, by changes in the selective regime imposed by visual predators. To study detectability of the melanistic form, we presented human "predators" with images of black grasshoppers and samples of the natural habitat on computer screens. We demonstrate that the protective value of black coloration differs between burnt and nonburnt environments and gradually increases in habitats that have been more blackened by fire. These findings support the notion that a black color pattern provides improved protection from visually oriented predators against blackened backgrounds and implicate camouflage and predation as important drivers of fire melanism in pygmy grasshoppers.

  8. Diversity in tooth eruption and life history in humans: illustration from a Pygmy population

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez Rozzi, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Life history variables (LHV) in primates are closely correlated with the ages of tooth eruption, which are a useful proxy to predict growth and development in extant and extinct species. However, it is not known how tooth eruption ages interact with LHV in polymorphic species such as modern humans. African pygmies are at the one extreme in the range of human size variation. LHV in the Baka pygmies are similar to those in standard populations. We would therefore expect tooth eruption ages to be similar also. This mixed (longitudinal and cross-sectional) study of tooth eruption in Baka individuals of known age reveals that eruption in all tooth classes occurs earlier than in any other human population. Earlier tooth eruption can be related to the particular somatic growth in the Baka but cannot be correlated with LHV. The link between LHV and tooth eruption seems disrupted in H. sapiens, allowing adaptive variations in tooth eruption in response to different environmental constraints while maintaining the unique human life cycle. PMID:27305976

  9. The pygmy right whale Caperea marginata: the last of the cetotheres

    PubMed Central

    Fordyce, R. Ewan; Marx, Felix G.

    2013-01-01

    The pygmy right whale, Caperea marginata, is the most enigmatic of the living baleen whales (Mysticeti). Its highly disparate morphology and the virtual absence of a described fossil record have made it extremely difficult to place Caperea into a broader evolutionary context, and molecular and morphological studies have frequently contradicted each other as to the origins and phylogenetic relationships of the species. Our study of a wealth of material from New Zealand collections, representing a wide range of ontogenetic stages, has identified several new features previously unreported in Caperea, which suggest that the pygmy right whale may be the last survivor of the supposedly extinct family Cetotheriidae. This hypothesis is corroborated by both morphology-based and total evidence cladistic analyses, including 166 morphological characters and 23 taxa, representing all the living and extinct families of toothless baleen whales. Our results allow us to formally refer Caperea to Cetotheriidae, thus resurrecting the latter from extinction and helping to clarify the origins of a long-problematic living species. PMID:23256199

  10. Spatial sorting may explain evolutionary dynamics of wing polymorphism in pygmy grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Berggren, H; Tinnert, J; Forsman, A

    2012-10-01

    Wing polymorphism in insects provides a good model system for investigating evolutionary dynamics and population divergence in dispersal-enhancing traits. This study investigates the contribution of divergent selection, trade-offs, behaviour and spatial sorting to the evolutionary dynamics of wing polymorphism in the pygmy grasshopper Tetrix subulata (Tetrigidae: Orthoptera). We use data for > 2800 wild-caught individuals from 13 populations and demonstrate that the incidence of the long-winged (macropterous) morph is higher and changes faster between years in disturbed habitats characterized by succession than in stable habitats. Common garden and mother-offspring resemblance studies indicate that variation among populations and families is genetically determined and not influenced to any important degree by developmental plasticity in response to maternal condition, rearing density or individual growth rate. Performance trials show that only the macropterous morph is capable of flight and that propensity to fly differs according to environment. Mark-recapture data reveal no difference in the distance moved between free-ranging long- and short-winged individuals. There is no consistent difference across populations and years in number of hatchlings produced by long- and shorter-winged females. Our findings suggest that the variable frequency of the long-winged morph among and within pygmy grasshopper populations may reflect evolutionary modifications driven by spatial sorting due to phenotype- and habitat type-dependent emigration and immigration.

  11. Chapter 2: A historical perspective on the population decline of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona

    Treesearch

    R. Roy Johnson; Jean-Luc E. Cartron; Lois T. Haight; Russell B. Duncan; Kenneth J. Kingsley

    2000-01-01

    The cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum cactorum) was discovered in the U.S. by Bendire in 1872 in the Tucson area (Coues 1872). During the next five decades, naturalists collected many specimens of this owl and typically described the subspecies as common or fairly common along some streams and rivers of central and southern Arizona...

  12. The complete mitochondrial genome of the pygmy squid, Idiosepius (Cephalopoda: Decapodiformes): the first representative from the family Idiosepiidae.

    PubMed

    Hall, Nathan E; Hanzak, Jan; Allcock, A Louise; Cooke, Ira R; Ogura, Atsushi; Strugnell, Jan M

    2016-01-01

    We report the first complete mitochondrial genome of the pygmy squid, Idiosepius, (Idiosepiidae). The mtDNA genome is 16,183 bp long with an AT content of 75.4%. All conserved metazoan mitochondrial genes are identified with the addition of a 1018 bp non-coding region. Idiosepius gene order most closely resembles that of the bobtail squid Semirossia (Sepiolidae).

  13. Chapter 3: The status of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona: Population surveys and habitat assessment

    Treesearch

    W. Scott Richardson; Jean-Luc E. Cartron; David J. Krueper; Lauren Turner; Thomas H. Skinner

    2000-01-01

    In 1993, the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD) began formal population surveys in an attempt to document the numbers and distribution of cactus ferruginous pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum cactorum) in Arizona. Surveys were initiated to gather information on this little-known subspecies which was considered for listing at the time. Prior to...

  14. Geographical Range of Rio Mamoré Virus (Family Bunyaviridae, Genus Hantavirus) in Association with the Small-Eared Pygmy Rice Rat (Oligoryzomys microtis)

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Martin H.; Hanson, John Delton; Cajimat, Maria N.; Milazzo, Mary Louise

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Hantavirus HTN·007 was originally isolated from a small-eared pygmy rice rat (Oligoryzomys microtis) captured in northeastern Peru. The results of analyses of nucleotide and amino acid sequence data in this study indicated that HTN·007 is a strain of Rio Mamoré virus (RIOMV) which is enzootic in small-eared pygmy rice rat populations in Bolivia. As such, the results of this study extend our knowledge of the geographical range of RIOMV and support the notion that the small-eared pygmy rice rat is the principal host of RIOMV. PMID:20687859

  15. Proton pygmy resonances: Predictions for N = 20 isotones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Papakonstantinou, P.

    2016-06-01

    We study theoretically the low-energy electric-dipole response of N = 20 isotones. We present results from a quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) and a continuum random-phase approximation (CRPA), and we compare them with results for the mirror Z = 20 nuclei. According to our analysis, enhanced E1 strength is expected energetically well below the giant dipole resonance in the proton-rich isotones. Large amounts of E1 strength in the asymmetric N = 20 isotones are predicted, markedly unlike their equally asymmetric Z = 20 mirror nuclei, pointing unambiguously to the role of structural effects such as loose binding. A proton-skin oscillation could develop especially in 46Fe . The isoscalar response is predicted strong in all isotones. The proper description of non-localized threshold transitions and the nucleon effective mass in mean-field treatments may affect theoretical predictions. We call for systematic theoretical investigations to quantify the role of bulk-matter properties in anticipation of measurements of E1 transitions in proton-rich nuclei.

  16. Experimental Level Densities and {gamma}-Strength Functions in rare earth nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Siem, S.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Nyhus, H. T.; Ingebretsen, F.; Messelt, S.; Rekstad, J.; Syed, N. U. H.; Chankova, R.; Schiller, A.; Voinov, A.; Oedegaard, S. W.

    2008-04-17

    The level density and radiative strength function for {sup 146,147}Sm and {sup 163,164}Dy have been extracted from primary {gamma} spectra using the Oslo method. As one approaches the closed N = 82 neutron shell, the structures in the level density become more pronounced due to shell effects. The experimental level densities can be used to explore thermodynamic properties of the nucleus within the microcanonical ensemble. Pygmy resonances, which are based on the scissors mode and seen in deformed rare-earth nuclei, are not observed in near-spherical {sup 146,147}Sm, as expected. Pygmy resonances in {sup 163,164}Dy were studied after {sup 3}He-induced reactions and their width was found to be twice as wide as compared to results reported after neutron-capture reactions.

  17. Predicting occupancy for pygmy rabbits in Wyoming: an independent evaluation of two species distribution models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Germaine, Stephen S.; Ignizio, Drew; Keinath, Doug; Copeland, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Species distribution models are an important component of natural-resource conservation planning efforts. Independent, external evaluation of their accuracy is important before they are used in management contexts. We evaluated the classification accuracy of two species distribution models designed to predict the distribution of pygmy rabbit Brachylagus idahoensis habitat in southwestern Wyoming, USA. The Nature Conservancy model was deductive and based on published information and expert opinion, whereas the Wyoming Natural Diversity Database model was statistically derived using historical observation data. We randomly selected 187 evaluation survey points throughout southwestern Wyoming in areas predicted to be habitat and areas predicted to be nonhabitat for each model. The Nature Conservancy model correctly classified 39 of 77 (50.6%) unoccupied evaluation plots and 65 of 88 (73.9%) occupied plots for an overall classification success of 63.3%. The Wyoming Natural Diversity Database model correctly classified 53 of 95 (55.8%) unoccupied plots and 59 of 88 (67.0%) occupied plots for an overall classification success of 61.2%. Based on 95% asymptotic confidence intervals, classification success of the two models did not differ. The models jointly classified 10.8% of the area as habitat and 47.4% of the area as nonhabitat, but were discordant in classifying the remaining 41.9% of the area. To evaluate how anthropogenic development affected model predictive success, we surveyed 120 additional plots among three density levels of gas-field road networks. Classification success declined sharply for both models as road-density level increased beyond 5 km of roads per km-squared area. Both models were more effective at predicting habitat than nonhabitat in relatively undeveloped areas, and neither was effective at accounting for the effects of gas-energy-development road networks. Resource managers who wish to know the amount of pygmy rabbit habitat present in an

  18. Extraction of swallowed toothbrush in stomach by pneumatic insufflation and gastrotomy under local anesthesia: A rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mahesh; Gupta, Pooja; Gupta, Manoj

    2014-05-01

    Most of the ingested foreign bodies pass uneventfully through the gastrointestinal tract. However, long and rigid foreign bodies are associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal impaction, perforation, and bleeding. Spontaneous passage of a toothbrush has not been reported till date and the technique of its removal is a curiosity for surgeons. Endoscopy is a recommended technique for the removal of such complex foreign bodies. However, if it fails, the foreign body can be removed successfully with a laparoscopic gastrotomy. We devised an innovative technique by using pneumatic gastric insufflation and extracted the toothbrush by a tiny gastrotomy under local anesthesia.

  19. In vivo covalent cross-linking of photon-converted rare-earth nanostructures for tumour localization and theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Xiangzhao; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Aw, Junxin; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Mu, Jing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaogang; Chen, Huabing; Gao, Mingyuan; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Yeow, Edwin K.L.; Liu, Gang; Olivo, Malini; Xing, Bengang

    2016-01-01

    The development of precision nanomedicines to direct nanostructure-based reagents into tumour-targeted areas remains a critical challenge in clinics. Chemical reaction-mediated localization in response to tumour environmental perturbations offers promising opportunities for rational design of effective nano-theranostics. Here, we present a unique microenvironment-sensitive strategy for localization of peptide-premodified upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) within tumour areas. Upon tumour-specific cathepsin protease reactions, the cleavage of peptides induces covalent cross-linking between the exposed cysteine and 2-cyanobenzothiazole on neighbouring particles, thus triggering the accumulation of UCNs into tumour site. Such enzyme-triggered cross-linking of UCNs leads to enhanced upconversion emission upon 808 nm laser irradiation, and in turn amplifies the singlet oxygen generation from the photosensitizers attached on UCNs. Importantly, this design enables remarkable tumour inhibition through either intratumoral UCNs injection or intravenous injection of nanoparticles modified with the targeting ligand. Our strategy may provide a multimodality solution for effective molecular sensing and site-specific tumour treatment. PMID:26786559

  20. In vivo covalent cross-linking of photon-converted rare-earth nanostructures for tumour localization and theranostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Xiangzhao; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Aw, Junxin; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Mu, Jing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaogang; Chen, Huabing; Gao, Mingyuan; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Yeow, Edwin K. L.; Liu, Gang; Olivo, Malini; Xing, Bengang

    2016-01-01

    The development of precision nanomedicines to direct nanostructure-based reagents into tumour-targeted areas remains a critical challenge in clinics. Chemical reaction-mediated localization in response to tumour environmental perturbations offers promising opportunities for rational design of effective nano-theranostics. Here, we present a unique microenvironment-sensitive strategy for localization of peptide-premodified upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) within tumour areas. Upon tumour-specific cathepsin protease reactions, the cleavage of peptides induces covalent cross-linking between the exposed cysteine and 2-cyanobenzothiazole on neighbouring particles, thus triggering the accumulation of UCNs into tumour site. Such enzyme-triggered cross-linking of UCNs leads to enhanced upconversion emission upon 808 nm laser irradiation, and in turn amplifies the singlet oxygen generation from the photosensitizers attached on UCNs. Importantly, this design enables remarkable tumour inhibition through either intratumoral UCNs injection or intravenous injection of nanoparticles modified with the targeting ligand. Our strategy may provide a multimodality solution for effective molecular sensing and site-specific tumour treatment.

  1. Myxoma of the penis in an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris)

    PubMed Central

    TAKAMI, Yoshinori; YASUDA, Namie; UNE, Yumi

    2016-01-01

    A penile tumor (4 × 2.5 × 1 cm) was surgically removed from an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) aged 3 years and 5 months. The tumor was continuous with the dorsal fascia of the penile head. Histopathologically, tumor cells were pleomorphic (oval-, short spindle- and star-shaped cells) with low cell density. Abundant edematous stroma was weakly positive for Alcian blue staining and positive for colloidal iron reaction. Tumor cells displayed no cellular atypia or karyokinesis. Tumor cell cytoplasm was positive for vimentin antibody, while cytoplasm and nuclei were positive for S-100 protein antibody. Tumor cell ultrastructure matched that of fibroblasts, and the rough endoplasmic reticulum was enlarged. The tumor was diagnosed as myxoma. This represents the first report of myxoma in a hedgehog. PMID:27784859

  2. Source parameter estimates of echolocation clicks from wild pygmy killer whales (Feresa attenuata) (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, P. T.; Kerr, I.; Payne, R.

    2004-10-01

    Pods of the little known pygmy killer whale (Feresa attenuata) in the northern Indian Ocean were recorded with a vertical hydrophone array connected to a digital recorder sampling at 320 kHz. Recorded clicks were directional, short (25 μs) transients with estimated source levels between 197 and 223 dB re. 1 μPa (pp). Spectra of clicks recorded close to or on the acoustic axis were bimodal with peak frequencies between 45 and 117 kHz, and with centroid frequencies between 70 and 85 kHz. The clicks share characteristics of echolocation clicks from similar sized, whistling delphinids, and have properties suited for the detection and classification of prey targeted by this odontocete. .

  3. Pygmy dipole resonance in 140Ce via inelastic scattering of 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzysiek, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Bracco, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Lanza, E. G.; Litvinova, E.; Paar, N.; Avigo, R.; Bazzacco, D.; Benzoni, G.; Birkenbach, B.; Blasi, N.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Ceruti, S.; Ciemała, M.; de Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Giaz, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grebosz, J.; Hess, H.; Isocarte, R.; Jungclaus, A.; Leoni, S.; Ljungvall, J.; Lunardi, S.; Mazurek, K.; Menegazzo, R.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Milion, B.; Morales, A. I.; Napoli, D. R.; Nicolini, R.; Pellegri, L.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Rosso, D.; Salsac, M. D.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Söderström, P.-A.; Ur, C.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Wieland, O.; Ziebliński, M.

    2016-04-01

    The γ decay from the high-lying states of 140Ce excited via inelastic scattering of 17O at a bombarding energy of 340 MeV was measured using the high-resolution AGATA-demonstrator array in coincidence with scattered ions detected in two segmented Δ E -E silicon detectors. Angular distributions of scattered ions and emitted γ rays were measured, as well as their differential cross sections. The excitation of 1- states below the neutron separation energy is similar to the one obtained in reactions with the α isoscalar probe. The comparison between the experimental differential cross sections and the corresponding predictions using the distorted-wave Born approximation allowed us to extract the isoscalar component of identified 1- pygmy states. For this analysis the form factor obtained by folding microscopically calculated transition densities and optical potentials was used.

  4. Nature of the pygmy dipole resonance in 140Ce studied in (alpha, alpha' gamma) experiments.

    PubMed

    Savran, D; Babilon, M; van den Berg, A M; Harakeh, M N; Hasper, J; Matic, A; Wörtche, H J; Zilges, A

    2006-10-27

    A concentration of electric-dipole excitations below the particle threshold, which is frequently denoted as the pygmy dipole resonance, has been studied in the semimagic nucleus 140Ce in (alpha, alpha' gamma) experiments at E alpha = 136 MeV. The technique of alpha-gamma coincidence experiments allows the separation of E1 excitations from states of other multipolarities in the same energy region and provides an excellent energy resolution to allow a detailed analysis for each state. The experimental results show that the PDR splits into two parts with different nuclear structure: one part which is excited in (alpha, alpha' gamma) as well as (gamma, gamma') experiments and one part which is excited only in (gamma, gamma').

  5. Pygmy dipole strength close to particle-separation energies --The case of the Mo isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Grosse, E.; Erhard, M.; Junghans, A.; Kosev, K.; Schilling, K.-D.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2006-03-01

    The distribution of electromagnetic dipole strength in 92, 98, 100Mo has been investigated by photon scattering using bremsstrahlung from the new ELBE facility. The experimental data for well-separated nuclear resonances indicate a transition from a regular to a chaotic behaviour above 4MeV of excitation energy. As the strength distributions follow a Porter-Thomas distribution much of the dipole strength is found in weak and in unresolved resonances appearing as fluctuating cross section. An analysis of this quasi-continuum --here applied to nuclear resonance fluorescence in a novel way-- delivers dipole strength functions, which are combining smoothly to those obtained from (γ, n) data. Enhancements at 6.5MeV and at ˜ 9MeV are linked to the pygmy dipole resonances postulated to occur in heavy nuclei.

  6. Extra γ-ray strength for 116,117Sn arising from pygmy dipole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamata, M.; Utsunomiya, H.; Akimune, H.; Yamagata, T.; Itoh, O.; Iwamoto, C.; Kondo, T.; Toyokawa, H.; Lui, Y.-W.; Goriely, S.

    2010-06-01

    Photoneutron cross sections were measured for 117Sn and 116Sn near neutron thresholds with quasi-monochromatic laser Compton scattering γ-rays. The measured cross sections for 117Sn and 116Sn are strongly enhanced from the threshold behavior expected for L = 1 neutron emissions after E1 photoexcitation. This suggests the presence of extra γ-ray strength in the low-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance. The present cross sections were analyzed together with radiative neutron capture cross sections for 116Sn within the framework of the statistical model calculation. It is shown that the extra γ-ray strength can be interpreted as pygmy E1 resonance which was previously reported in the nuclear resonance fluorescence experiment for 116Sn and 124Sn.

  7. Study of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance with Hadronic and Electromagnetic Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, J.; Zilges, A.; Litvinova, E.; Savran, D.; Butler, P. A.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Harakeh, M. N.; Stoica, V. I.; Wörtche, H. J.; Harissopulos, S.; Lagoyannis, A.; Krücken, R.; Ring, P.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Scheck, M.; Sonnabend, K.; Popescu, L.

    2013-03-01

    The structure of the pygmy dipole resonance has been investigated in the nuclei 140Ce, 138Ba, 124Sn, and 94Mo by performing experiments using different probes. On the one hand, real-photon scattering experiments have been conducted using the nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) method. On the other hand, α-scattering experiments have been done using the (α, α', γ) coincidence technique. An unexpected difference in the excitation cross sections of the dipole strength below the particle threshold has been observed. While a group of PDR states could be excited in both kinds of experiments, a group of energetically higher-lying states could only be excited in NRF. In order to understand this phenomenon, theoretical calculations using the quasiparticle-phonon model (QPM) and the relativistic quasiparticle time-blocking approximation (RQTBA) have been performed for the nucleus 124Sn. A possible explanation for the observed splitting was found.

  8. Extra gamma-ray strength for {sup 116,117}Sn arising from pygmy dipole resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kamata, M.; Utsunomiya, H.; Akimune, H.; Yamagata, T.; Itoh, O.; Iwamoto, C.; Kondo, T.; Toyokawa, H.; Lui, Y.-W.; Goriely, S.

    2010-06-01

    Photoneutron cross sections were measured for {sup 117}Sn and {sup 116}Sn near neutron thresholds with quasi-monochromatic laser Compton scattering gamma-rays. The measured cross sections for {sup 117}Sn and {sup 116}Sn are strongly enhanced from the threshold behavior expected for L = 1 neutron emissions after E1 photoexcitation. This suggests the presence of extra gamma-ray strength in the low-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance. The present cross sections were analyzed together with radiative neutron capture cross sections for {sup 116}Sn within the framework of the statistical model calculation. It is shown that the extra gamma-ray strength can be interpreted as pygmy E1 resonance which was previously reported in the nuclear resonance fluorescence experiment for {sup 116}Sn and {sup 124}Sn.

  9. Polyphenols, fungal enzymes, and the fate of organic nitrogen in a Californian pygmy forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slessarev, E.

    2011-12-01

    Polyphenols are a diverse family of plant secondary compounds which may influence litter decay and soil nutrient turnover. The "short circuit" hypothesis for polyphenol function proposes that polyphenolic compounds provision plants with nitrogen in nutrient-poor soils by facilitating the accumulation of organic nitrogen in soil humus. By binding peptides, polyphenols may sequester nitrogen in a bank of recalcitrant organic matter, granting competitive advantage to plants with the mycorrhizal fungi most capable of recapturing the tightly bound organic nitrogen. Specifically, fungi may retrieve nitrogen from polyphenol-peptide complexes with an extracellular enzyme, polyphenol oxidase (PPO). In order to evaluate the "short circuit" hypothesis, I measured soil PPO activity during four seasons in the Mendocino "ecological staircase," a soil age-gradient consisting of a series of wave-cut terraces along stretches of the northern California coast. Stunted, pygmy-forest plants growing in the nutrient-poor soils of the older marine terraces produce more polyphenols than their con-specifics on nutrient-rich younger terraces, potentially influencing PPO facilitated nitrogen cycling. I found that PPO activity reached its maximum in the younger terrace forest during the spring, achieving levels nearly twice as high as those observed on the younger terrace in other seasons and in the older terrace forest year-round. In both terraces, PPO activity was greatest in the organic humus at the soil surface, decreasing dramatically in the lower mineral horizon. When PPO activity reached its maximum in the younger terrace, I found that soil polyphenol content positively correlated (Rsq=0.63) with enzyme activity, suggesting that polyphenols might induce enzyme production. However, in the tannin-rich soil of the pygmy forest on the older terrace, enzyme activity remained low, and was most strongly correlated with soil moisture. The results do not support the hypothesis that nutrient

  10. Seroprevalence, attitudes and practices of the Baka Pygmies of eastern Cameroon towards HIV and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Essomba, Noel Emmanuel; Adiogo, Dieudonné; Koum, Danielle Kedy; Ndonnang, Carine; Ngo Ngwe, Madeleine Irma; Njock Ayuck, Léo; Lehman, Leopold; Coppieters, Yves

    2015-08-29

    The vulnerable health status of Pygmies is the result of their continual exposure to the modern world. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of HIV and the attitudes and practices of Baka populations towards HIV infection. A descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted over a five-month period in 12 Pygmy camps. A questionnaire was completed to collect information, and anonymous screenings were held. For screening, whole blood was collected. The Determine HIV-1/2 test was used as the rapid test, and the SD Bioline HIV-1/2 test was used as the second test. Associations between variables were checked. A total of 560 Baka were recruited. The sex ratio was 0.92. Among the means of transmission, sexual intercourse was the most frequently cited (37.6%). A minority (28.5%) knew where to undergo an HIV test, 24.2% did not know that there exists treatment enabling patients to have a higher quality of life, and 75.7% had never used a condom. A total of 86.9% had never been tested for HIV. Subjects who had sex with the Bantu were three times more likely to be infected (p = 0.02), as well as those who had had more than three sexual partners. The changes affecting contemporary societies are inevitably influenced by the dominant factors of modernity, particularly progress, development, and social dynamics in all their aspects. Baka knowledge about HIV/AIDS is limited. Educational efforts, increased awareness, and guidance are needed.

  11. Head Lice of Pygmies Reveal the Presence of Relapsing Fever Borreliae in the Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Amanzougaghene, Nadia; Akiana, Jean; Mongo Ndombe, Géor; Davoust, Bernard; Nsana, Nardiouf Sjelin; Parra, Henri-Joseph; Fenollar, Florence; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg

    2016-12-01

    Head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis, occur in four divergent mitochondrial clades (A, B, C and D), each having particular geographical distributions. Recent studies suggest that head lice, as is the case of body lice, can act as a vector for louse-borne diseases. Therefore, understanding the genetic diversity of lice worldwide is of critical importance to our understanding of the risk of louse-borne diseases. Here, we report the results of the first molecular screening of pygmies' head lice in the Republic of Congo for seven pathogens and an analysis of lice mitochondrial clades. We developed two duplex clade-specific real-time PCRs and identified three major mitochondrial clades: A, C, and D indicating high diversity among the head lice studied. We identified the presence of a dangerous human pathogen, Borrelia recurrentis, the causative agent of relapsing fever, in ten clade A head lice, which was not reported in the Republic of Congo, and B. theileri in one head louse. The results also show widespread infection among head lice with several species of Acinetobacter. A. junii was the most prevalent, followed by A. ursingii, A. baumannii, A. johnsonii, A. schindleri, A. lwoffii, A. nosocomialis and A. towneri. Our study is the first to show the presence of B. recurrentis in African pygmies' head lice in the Republic of Congo. This study is also the first to report the presence of DNAs of B. theileri and several species of Acinetobacter in human head lice. Further studies are needed to determine whether the head lice can transmit these pathogenic bacteria from person to another.

  12. Transcriptome Analysis of Nautilus and Pygmy Squid Developing Eye Provides Insights in Lens and Eye Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sousounis, Konstantinos; Ogura, Atsushi; Tsonis, Panagiotis A.

    2013-01-01

    Coleoid cephalopods like squids have a camera-type eye similar to vertebrates. On the other hand, Nautilus (Nautiloids) has a pinhole eye that lacks lens and cornea. Since pygmy squid and Nautilus are closely related species they are excellent model organisms to study eye evolution. Having being able to collect Nautilus embryos, we employed next-generation RNA sequencing using Nautilus and pygmy squid developing eyes. Their transcriptomes were compared and analyzed. Enrichment analysis of Gene Ontology revealed that contigs related to nucleic acid binding were largely up-regulated in squid, while the ones related to metabolic processes and extracellular matrix-related genes were up-regulated in Nautilus. These differences are most likely correlated with the complexity of tissue organization in these species. Moreover, when the analysis focused on the eye-related contigs several interesting patterns emerged. First, contigs from both species related to eye tissue differentiation and morphogenesis as well as to cilia showed best hits with their Human counterparts, while contigs related to rabdomeric photoreceptors showed the best hit with their Drosophila counterparts. This bolsters the idea that eye morphogenesis genes have been generally conserved in evolution, and compliments other studies showing that genes involved in photoreceptor differentiation clearly follow the diversification of invertebrate (rabdomeric) and vertebrate (ciliated) photoreceptors. Interestingly some contigs showed as good a hit with Drosophila and Human homologues in Nautilus and squid samples. One of them, capt/CAP1, is known to be preferentially expressed in Drosophila developing eye and in vertebrate lens. Importantly our analysis also provided evidence of gene duplication and diversification of their function in both species. One of these genes is the Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1/Nf1), which in mice has been implicated in lens formation, suggesting a hitherto unsuspected role in the evolution

  13. Transcriptome analysis of Nautilus and pygmy squid developing eye provides insights in lens and eye evolution.

    PubMed

    Sousounis, Konstantinos; Ogura, Atsushi; Tsonis, Panagiotis A

    2013-01-01

    Coleoid cephalopods like squids have a camera-type eye similar to vertebrates. On the other hand, Nautilus (Nautiloids) has a pinhole eye that lacks lens and cornea. Since pygmy squid and Nautilus are closely related species they are excellent model organisms to study eye evolution. Having being able to collect Nautilus embryos, we employed next-generation RNA sequencing using Nautilus and pygmy squid developing eyes. Their transcriptomes were compared and analyzed. Enrichment analysis of Gene Ontology revealed that contigs related to nucleic acid binding were largely up-regulated in squid, while the ones related to metabolic processes and extracellular matrix-related genes were up-regulated in Nautilus. These differences are most likely correlated with the complexity of tissue organization in these species. Moreover, when the analysis focused on the eye-related contigs several interesting patterns emerged. First, contigs from both species related to eye tissue differentiation and morphogenesis as well as to cilia showed best hits with their Human counterparts, while contigs related to rabdomeric photoreceptors showed the best hit with their Drosophila counterparts. This bolsters the idea that eye morphogenesis genes have been generally conserved in evolution, and compliments other studies showing that genes involved in photoreceptor differentiation clearly follow the diversification of invertebrate (rabdomeric) and vertebrate (ciliated) photoreceptors. Interestingly some contigs showed as good a hit with Drosophila and Human homologues in Nautilus and squid samples. One of them, capt/CAP1, is known to be preferentially expressed in Drosophila developing eye and in vertebrate lens. Importantly our analysis also provided evidence of gene duplication and diversification of their function in both species. One of these genes is the Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1/Nf1), which in mice has been implicated in lens formation, suggesting a hitherto unsuspected role in the evolution

  14. Spermatangium formation and sperm discharge in the Japanese pygmy squid Idiosepius paradoxus.

    PubMed

    Sato, Noriyosi; Kasugai, Takashi; Munehara, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-01

    In cephalopods, sperm discharge is an important event not only for sperm transfer but also influencing sperm storage capacity of attached spermatangia (everted spermatophores). To investigate sperm discharge from spermatangia and the condition of naturally attached spermatangia in Japanese pygmy squid (Idiosepius paradoxus) we (i) investigated the morphology of spermatophores and spermatangia, and the process of spermatophore evagination and sperm discharge from spermatangia obtained in vitro; (ii) observed spermatangia that were naturally attached to female squids at 6, 12, 18, 24 and 48 h after copulation to investigate alterations in naturally attached spermatangia with time. The spermatophore of I. paradoxus is slender and cylindrical and consists of a sperm mass, a cement body and an ejaculatory apparatus, which is similar to those of loliginid squids. The spermatangium is fishhook-shaped, its distal end being open and narrow. After the spermatangium is formed, the sperm mass gradually moves to the open end of the spermatangium, from where sperm are released. Sperm discharge is a rapid process immediately after the beginning of sperm release, but within 5 min changes to an intermittent release of sperm. Although the volume of residual spermatozoa differed among spermatangia that were naturally attached to a single individual, the probability that spermatangia would be empty increased with time. Most naturally attached spermatangia discharged almost all of their spermatozoa within 24h after copulation, and no spermatangia were attached to females 48 h after copulation. These results suggest that sperm transfer from the spermatangium to the seminal receptacle must occur within 24h, and that the spermatangium functions as a transient sperm storage organ in pygmy squids. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization and analysis of a de novo transcriptome from the pygmy grasshopper Tetrix japonica.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhongying; Liu, Fei; Lu, Huimeng; Huang, Yuan

    2016-06-11

    The pygmy grasshopper Tetrix japonica is a common insect distributed throughout the world, and it has the potential for use in studies of body colour polymorphism, genomics and the biology of Tetrigoidea (Insecta: Orthoptera). However, limited biological information is available for this insect. Here, we conducted a de novo transcriptome study of adult and larval T. japonica to provide a better understanding of its gene expression and develop genomic resources for future work. We sequenced and explored the characteristics of the de novo transcriptome of T. japonica using Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. A total of 107 608 206 paired-end clean reads were assembled into 61 141 unigenes using the trinity software; the mean unigene size was 771 bp, and the N50 length was 1238 bp. A total of 29 225 unigenes were functionally annotated to the NCBI nonredundant protein sequences (Nr), NCBI nonredundant nucleotide sequences (Nt), a manually annotated and reviewed protein sequence database (Swiss-Prot), Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases. A large number of putative genes that are potentially involved in pigment pathways, juvenile hormone (JH) metabolism and signalling pathways were identified in the T. japonica transcriptome. Additionally, 165 769 and 156 796 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms occurred in the adult and larvae transcriptomes, respectively, and a total of 3162 simple sequence repeats were detected in this assembly. This comprehensive transcriptomic data for T. japonica will provide a usable resource for gene predictions, signalling pathway investigations and molecular marker development for this species and other pygmy grasshoppers.

  16. Linkage disequilibrium between HLA-G*0104 and HLA-E*0103 alleles in Tswa Pygmies.

    PubMed

    Di Cristofaro, J; Julie, D C; Buhler, S; Frassati, C; Basire, A; Galicher, V; Baier, C; Essautier, A; Regnier, A; Granier, T; Lepfoundzou, A D; Chiaroni, J; Picard, C

    2011-03-01

    Nonclassical human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G and -E loci are separated by approximately 660 kb on the short arm of chromosome 6. Interestingly, some functional and expression characteristics are relatively identical or associated for both molecules. For example, expression of HLA-E on the cell surface has been linked to preferential binding of nonameric leader peptides derived from the signal sequence of HLA-G. It has been suggested that these two molecules act synergistically in modulating susceptibility to infectious or chronic inflammatory diseases. A possible explanation for these observations is that HLA-E and HLA-G are evolving under analogous selective pressures and have functions that place them under selective regimes differing from classical HLA genes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the consistency of this hypothesis based on the characterization of the molecular polymorphism of these two genes and their linkage disequilibrium (LD) in three populations, i.e. Southeastern French (n = 57), Teke Congolese (n = 84) and Tswa Pygmies (n = 74). Allelic frequencies observed for HLA-G and HLA-E and for 14-bp ins/del polymorphism in the three populations were similar to those observed in the literature for populations from corresponding geographic areas. Only one of the recently described HLA-G polymorphisms (HLA-G*01:07-01:16) was found, i.e. HLA-G*01:15 in one individual from Congo. We showed that two haplotypes in Tswa Pygmies, i.e. HLA-G*01:04-E*01:03:01 and G*01:04-E*01:01, exhibited highly significant positive and negative D' values respectively. Although these LD could have functional implications, it is more likely because of the genetic drift as the two other populations did not display any significant LD. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. The Costa Rican Systenus Loew (Diptera: Dolichopodidae): rich local sympatry in an otherwise rare genus.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Daniel J

    2015-09-21

    The Costa Rican Systenus Loew (Diptera: Dolichopodidae: Medeterinae) are described, illustrated and keyed, and comprise nine new species: Systenus divericatus sp. nov., S. eboritibia sp. nov., S. emusorum sp. nov., S. flavifemoratus sp. nov., S. maculipennis sp. nov., S. naranjensis sp. nov., S. parkeri sp. nov., S. tenorio sp. nov., and S. zurqui sp. nov. Eight species are known only from Malaise traps at a locale in Guanacaste Province, in contrast to a single species collected as part of the long running INBio survey of the Costa Rican insect fauna. On a global scale, Systenus is uncommon in collections, possibly the result of its known larval tree hole habitat and adult arboreal associations, making the genus less likely to be captured by ground-level trapping. This makes the high level of sympatry at one site even more remarkable and suggesting that more cryptic species-rich arboreal faunas await discovery.

  18. Movements and Habitat Use of Dwarf and Pygmy Sperm Whales using Remotely-Deployed LIMPET Satellite Tags

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    spotted dolphins, and examining false killer whale movements”, funded by the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) under Grant Number...will be undertaken in association with a project on “False killer whale movements in relation to longline fishing activity: assessment of interactions...Movements of two satellite-tagged pygmy killer whales (Feresa attenuata) off the island of Hawai‘i. Marine Mammal Science 27:E332-E337. Baird, R.W., G.S

  19. Movements and Habitat use of Dwarf and Pygmy Sperm Whales using Remotely-Deployed LIMPET Satellite Tags

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    pantropical spotted dolphins, and examining false killer whale movements”, funded by the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries under Grant Number...tagged pygmy killer whales (Feresa attenuata) off the island of Hawai‘i. Marine Mammal Science 27:E332-E337. Baird, R.W., G.S. Schorr, D.L. Webster... Whales using Remotely-Deployed LIMPET Satellite Tags Robin W. Baird Cascadia Research Collective 218 ½ W. 4th Avenue Olympia, WA 98501 phone: (360

  20. Ecological consequences of temperature regulation: Why might the mountain pygmy possum Burramys parvus need to hibernate near underground streams?

    PubMed

    Cooper, Chrisitne; Withers, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus) is an endangered marsupial restricted to boulder fields in the Australian Alps, where it hibernates under the snow during winter. Understanding its habitat requirements is essential for conservation, so we examine here ecological implications of the thermal consequences of maintaining water balance during the hibernation season. Hibernating mountain pygmy possums arousing to consume water must either drink liquid water or consume snow. If they drink water, then the energy required to warm that water to body temperature (4.18 J g(-1 o)C(-1)) increases linearly with mass ingested. If they eat snow, then the energy required melt the snow (latent heat of fusion = 332 J g(-1)) and then warm it to body temperature is much higher than just drinking. For mountain pygmy possums, these energetic costs are a large proportion (up to 19%) of their average daily metabolic rate during the hibernation period and may dramatically shorten it. If mountain pygmy possums lose water equivalent to 5% of body mass before arousing to rehydrate, then the potential hibernation period is reduced by 30 days for consuming snow compared with 8.6 days for drinking water. The consequences of ingesting snow rather than liquid water are even more severe for juvenile possums. A reduction in the hibernation period can impact on the overwinter survival, a key factor determining demographics and population size. Therefore, habitats with subnivean access to liquid water during winter, such as those with subterranean streams running under boulder fields, may be of particular value.

  1. Cryopreservation and in vitro culture of primary cell types from lung tissue of a stranded pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps)☆

    PubMed Central

    Mancia, Annalaura; Spyropoulos, Demetri D.; McFee, Wayne E.; Newton, Danforth A.; Baatz, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Current models for in vitro studies of tissue function and physiology, including responses to hypoxia or environmental toxins, are limited and rely heavily on standard 2-dimensional (2-D) cultures with immortalized murine or human cell lines. To develop a new more powerful model system, we have pursued methods to establish and expand cultures of primary lung cell types and reconstituted tissues from marine mammals. What little is known about the physiology of the deep-sea diving pygmy sperm whale (PSW), Kogia breviceps, comes primarily from stranding events that occur along the coast of the southeastern United States. Thus, development of a method for preserving live tissues and retrieving live cells from deceased stranded individuals was initiated. This report documents successful cryopreservation of PSW lung tissue. We established in vitro cultures of primary lung cell types from tissue fragments that had been cryopreserved several months earlier at the stranding event. Dissociation of cryopreserved lung tissues readily provides a variety of primary cell types that, to varying degrees, can be expanded and further studied/manipulated in cell culture. In addition, PSW-specific molecular markers have been developed that permitted the monitoring of fibroblast, alveolar type II, and vascular endothelial cell types. Reconstitution of 3-D cultures of lung tissues with these cell types is now underway. This novel system may facilitate the development of rare or disease-specific lung tissue models (e.g., to test causes of PSW stranding events and lead to improved treatments for pulmonary hypertension or reperfusion injury in humans). Also, the establishment of a “living” tissue bank biorepository for rare/endangered species could serve multiple purposes as surrogates for freshly isolated samples. PMID:21501697

  2. Introducing Euro-Glo, a rare earth metal chelate with numerous applications for the fluorescent localization of myelin and amyloid plaques in brain tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Schmued, Larry; Raymick, James

    2017-03-01

    The vast majority of fluorochromes are organic in nature and none of the few existing chelates have been applied as histological tracers for localizing brain anatomy and pathology. In this study we have developed and characterized a Europium chelate with the ability to fluorescently label normal and pathological myelin in control and toxicant-exposed rats, as well as the amyloid plaques in aged AD/Tg mice. This study demonstrates how Euro-Glo can be used for the detailed labeling of both normal myelination in the control rat as well as myelin pathology in the kainic acid exposed rat. In addition, this study demonstrates how E-G will label the shell of amyloid plaques in an AD/Tg mouse model of Alzheimer's disease a red color, while the plaque core appears blue in color. The observed E-G staining pattern is compared with that of well characterized tracers specific for the localization of myelin (Black-Gold II), degenerating neurons (Fluoro-Jade C), A-beta aggregates (Amylo-Glo) and glycolipids (PAS). This study represents the first time a rare earth metal (REM) chelate has been used as a histochemical tracer in the brain. This novel tracer, Euro-Glo (E-G), exhibits numerous advantages over conventional organic fluorophores including high intensity emission, high resistance to fading, compatibility with multiple labeling protocols, high Stoke's shift value and an absence of bleed-through of the signal through other filters. Euro-Glo represents the first fluorescent metal chelate to be used as a histochemical tracer, specifically to localize normal and pathological myelin as well as amyloid plaques. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Structure, material characteristics and function of the upper respiratory tract of the pygmy sperm whale.

    PubMed

    Davenport, John; Cotter, Liz; Rogan, Emer; Kelliher, Denis; Murphy, Colm

    2013-12-15

    Cetaceans are neckless, so the trachea is very short. The upper respiratory tract is separate from the mouth and pharynx, and the dorsal blowhole connects, via the vestibular and nasopalatine cavities, directly to the larynx. Toothed cetaceans (Odontoceti) are capable of producing sounds at depth, either for locating prey or for communication. It has been suggested that during dives, air from the lungs and upper respiratory tract can be moved to the vestibular and nasal cavities to permit sound generation to continue when air volume within these cavities decreases as ambient pressure rises. The pygmy sperm whale, Kogia breviceps, is a deep diver (500-1000 m) that is known to produce hunting clicks. Our study of an immature female shows that the upper respiratory tract is highly asymmetrical: the trachea and bronchi are extremely compressible, whereas the larynx is much more rigid. Laryngeal and tracheal volumes were established. Calculations based on Boyle's Law imply that all air from the lungs and bronchi would be transferred to the larynx and trachea by a depth of 270 m and that the larynx itself could not accommodate all respiratory air mass at a depth of 1000 m. This suggests that no respiratory air would be available for vocalisation. However, the bronchi, trachea and part of the larynx have a thick vascular lining featuring large, thin-walled vessels. We propose that these vessels may become dilated during dives to reduce the volume of the upper respiratory tract, permitting forward transfer of air through the larynx.

  4. Two new pathogenic ascomycetes in Guignardia and Rosenscheldiella on New Zealand's pygmy mistletoes (Korthalsella: Viscaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, A.; Johnston, P.R.; Park, D.; Robertson, A.W.

    2011-01-01

    Two new pathogens, Guignardia korthalsellae and Rosenscheldiella korthalsellae, are described from New Zealand's pygmy mistletoes (Korthalsella, Viscaceae). Both form ascomata on living phylloclades with minimal disruption of the tissue. Fungal hyphae within the phylloclade are primarily intercellular. Guignardia korthalsellae disrupts a limited number of epidermal cells immediately around the erumpent ascoma, while the ascomata of Rosenscheldiella korthalsellae develop externally on small patches of stromatic tissue that form above stomatal cavities. Rosenscheldiella is applied in a purely morphological sense. LSU sequences show that R. korthalsellae as well as another New Zealand species, Rosenscheldiella brachyglottidis, are members of the Mycosphaerellaceae sensu stricto. Genetically, Rosenscheldiella, in the sense we are using it, is polyphyletic; LSU and ITS sequences place the two New Zealand species in different clades within the Mycosphaerellaceae. Rosenscheldiella is retained for these fungi until generic relationships within the family are resolved. Whether or not the type species of Rosenscheldiella, R. styracis, is also a member of the Mycosphaerellaceae is not known, but it has a similar morphology and relationship to its host as the two New Zealand species. PMID:21523197

  5. The cerebral cortex of the pygmy hippopotamus, Hexaprotodon liberiensis (Cetartiodactyla, Hippopotamidae): MRI, cytoarchitecture, and neuronal morphology.

    PubMed

    Butti, Camilla; Ewan Fordyce, R; Ann Raghanti, Mary; Gu, Xiaosi; Bonar, Christopher J; Wicinski, Bridget A; Wong, Edmund W; Roman, Jessica; Brake, Alanna; Eaves, Emily; Spocter, Muhammad A; Tang, Cheuk Y; Jacobs, Bob; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R

    2014-04-01

    The structure of the hippopotamus brain is virtually unknown because few studies have examined more than its external morphology. In view of their semiaquatic lifestyle and phylogenetic relatedness to cetaceans, the brain of hippopotamuses represents a unique opportunity for better understanding the selective pressures that have shaped the organization of the brain during the evolutionary process of adaptation to an aquatic environment. Here we examined the histology of the cerebral cortex of the pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis) by means of Nissl, Golgi, and calretinin (CR) immunostaining, and provide a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) structural and volumetric dataset of the anatomy of its brain. We calculated the corpus callosum area/brain mass ratio (CCA/BM), the gyrencephalic index (GI), the cerebellar quotient (CQ), and the cerebellar index (CI). Results indicate that the cortex of H. liberiensis shares one feature exclusively with cetaceans (the lack of layer IV across the entire cerebral cortex), other features exclusively with artiodactyls (e.g., the morphologiy of CR-immunoreactive multipolar neurons in deep cortical layers, gyrencephalic index values, hippocampus and cerebellum volumetrics), and others with at least some species of cetartiodactyls (e.g., the presence of a thick layer I, the pattern of distribution of CR-immunoreactive neurons, the presence of von Economo neurons, clustering of layer II in the occipital cortex). The present study thus provides a comprehensive dataset of the neuroanatomy of H. liberiensis that sets the ground for future comparative studies including the larger Hippopotamus amphibius. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Acoustic property reconstruction of a pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps) forehead based on computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhongchang; Xu, Xiao; Dong, Jianchen; Xing, Luru; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Xuecheng; Zhang, Yu; Li, Songhai; Berggren, Per

    2015-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging and sound experimental measurements were used to reconstruct the acoustic properties (density, velocity, and impedance) of the forehead tissues of a deceased pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps). The forehead was segmented along the body axis and sectioned into cross section slices, which were further cut into sample pieces for measurements. Hounsfield units (HUs) of the corresponding measured pieces were obtained from CT scans, and regression analyses were conducted to investigate the linear relationships between the tissues' HUs and velocity, and HUs and density. The distributions of the acoustic properties of the head at axial, coronal, and sagittal cross sections were reconstructed, revealing that the nasal passage system was asymmetric and the cornucopia-shaped spermaceti organ was in the right nasal passage, surrounded by tissues and airsacs. A distinct dense theca was discovered in the posterior-dorsal area of the melon, which was characterized by low velocity in the inner core and high velocity in the outer region. Statistical analyses revealed significant differences in density, velocity, and acoustic impedance between all four structures, melon, spermaceti organ, muscle, and connective tissue (p < 0.001). The obtained acoustic properties of the forehead tissues provide important information for understanding the species' bioacoustic characteristics.

  7. Vulnerability of indigenous health to climate change: a case study of Uganda's Batwa Pygmies.

    PubMed

    Berrang-Ford, Lea; Dingle, Kathryn; Ford, James D; Lee, Celine; Lwasa, Shuaib; Namanya, Didas B; Henderson, Jim; Llanos, Alejandro; Carcamo, Cesar; Edge, Victoria

    2012-09-01

    The potential impacts of climate change on human health in sub-Saharan Africa are wide-ranging, complex, and largely adverse. The region's Indigenous peoples are considered to be at heightened risk given their relatively poor health outcomes, marginal social status, and resource-based livelihoods; however, little attention has been given to these most vulnerable of the vulnerable. This paper contributes to addressing this gap by taking a bottom-up approach to assessing health vulnerabilities to climate change in two Batwa Pygmy communities in rural Uganda. Rapid Rural Appraisal and PhotoVoice field methods complemented by qualitative data analysis were used to identify key climate-sensitive, community-identified health outcomes, describe determinants of sensitivity at multiple scales, and characterize adaptive capacity of Batwa health systems. The findings stress the importance of human drivers of vulnerability and adaptive capacity and the need to address social determinants of health in order to reduce the potential disease burden of climate change.

  8. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence off 54Cr: The Onset of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, P. C.; Beck, T.; Beller, J.; Krishichayan; Gayer, U.; Isaak, J.; Löher, B.; Mertes, L.; Pai, H.; Pietralla, N.; Romig, C.; Savran, D.; Schilling, M.; Tornow, W.; Werner, V.; Zweidinger, M.

    2016-06-01

    Low-lying electric and magnetic dipole excitations (E1 and M1) below the neutron separation threshold, particularly the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR), have drawn considerable attention in the last years. So far, mostly moderately heavy nuclei in the mass regions around A = 90 and A = 140 were examined with respect to the PDR. In the present work, the systematics of the PDR have been extended by measuring excitation strengths and parity quantum numbers of J = 1 states in lighter nuclei near A = 50 in order to gather information on the onset of the PDR. The nuclei 50,52,54Cr and 48,50Ti were examined via bremsstrahlung produced at the DArmstadt Superconducting electron Linear Accelerator (S-DALINAC) with photon energies up to 9.7 MeV with the method of nuclear resonance fluorescence. Numerous excited states were observed, many of which for the first time. The parity quantum numbers of these states have been determined at the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIγS) of the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory in Durham, NC, USA. Informations to the methods and the experimental setups will be provided and the results on 54Cr achieved will be discussed with respect to the onset of the PDR.

  9. Pygmy Dipole Strength in Exotic Nuclei and the Equation of State

    SciTech Connect

    Klimkiewicz, A.; Adrich, P.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.; Fallot, M.; Boretzky, K.; Aksouh, F.; Chatillon, A.; Pramanik, U. Datta; Emling, H.; Ershova, O.; Geissel, H.; Gorska, M.; Heil, M.; Hellstroem, M.; Jones, K. L.; Kurz, N.; Litvinov, Y.; Mahata, K.; Simon, H.

    2009-08-26

    A concentration of dipole strength at energies below the giant dipole resonance was observed in neutron-rich nuclei around {sup 132}Sn in an experiment using the FRS-LAND setup. This so-called 'pygmy' dipole strength can be related to the parameters of the symmetry energy and to the neutron skin thickness on the grounds of a relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation. Using this ansatz and the experimental findings for {sup 130}Sn and {sup 132}Sn, we derive a value of the symmetry energy pressure of p-bar{sub 0} = 2.2+-0.5 MeV/fm{sup 3}. Neutron skin thicknesses of R{sub n}-R{sub p} 0.23+-0.03 fm and 0.24+-0.03 fm for {sup 130}Sn and {sup 132}Sn, respectively, have been determined. Preliminary results on {sup 68}Ni from a similar experiment using an improved setup indicate an enhanced cross section at low energies, while the results for {sup 58}Ni are in accordance with results from photoabsorption measurements.

  10. Morphology of the Nasal Apparatus in Pygmy (Kogia Breviceps) and Dwarf (K. Sima) Sperm Whales.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Steven W; Mclellan, William A; Rommel, Sentiel A; Dillaman, Richard M; Nowacek, Douglas P; Koopman, Heather N; Pabst, D Ann

    2015-07-01

    Odontocete echolocation clicks are generated by pneumatically driven phonic lips within the nasal passage, and propagated through specialized structures within the forehead. This study investigated the highly derived echolocation structures of the pygmy (Kogia breviceps) and dwarf (K. sima) sperm whales through careful dissections (N = 18 K. breviceps, 6 K. sima) and histological examinations (N = 5 K. breviceps). This study is the first to show that the entire kogiid sound production and transmission pathway is acted upon by complex facial muscles (likely derivations of the m. maxillonasolabialis). Muscles appear capable of tensing and separating the solitary pair of phonic lips, which would control echolocation click frequencies. The phonic lips are enveloped by the "vocal cap," a morphologically complex, connective tissue structure unique to kogiids. Extensive facial muscles appear to control the position of this structure and its spatial relationship to the phonic lips. The vocal cap's numerous air crypts suggest that it may reflect sounds. Muscles encircling the connective tissue case that surrounds the spermaceti organ may change its shape and/or internal pressure. These actions may influence the acoustic energy transmitted from the phonic lips, through this lipid body, to the melon. Facial and rostral muscles act upon the length of the melon, suggesting that the sound "beam" can be focused as it travels through the melon and into the environment. This study suggests that the kogiid echolocation system is highly tunable. Future acoustic studies are required to test these hypotheses and gain further insight into the kogiid echolocation system.

  11. Decay Pattern of Pygmy States Observed in Neutron-Rich Ne26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibelin, J.; Beaumel, D.; Motobayashi, T.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Aoi, N.; Baba, H.; Elekes, Z.; Fortier, S.; Frascaria, N.; Fukuda, N.; Gomi, T.; Ishikawa, K.; Kondo, Y.; Kubo, T.; Lima, V.; Nakamura, T.; Saito, A.; Satou, Y.; Scarpaci, J.-A.; Takeshita, E.; Takeuchi, S.; Teranishi, T.; Togano, Y.; Vinodkumar, A. M.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Yoshida, K.

    2008-11-01

    Coulomb excitation of the exotic neutron-rich nucleus Ne26 on a Pb208 target was measured at 58MeV/u in order to search for low-lying E1 strength above the neutron emission threshold. This radioactive beam experiment was carried out at the RIKEN Accelerator Research Facility. Using the invariant mass method in the Ne25+n channel, we observe a sizable amount of E1 strength between 6 and 10 MeV excitation energy. By performing a multipole decomposition of the differential cross section, a reduced dipole transition probability of B(E1)=0.49±0.16e2fm2 is deduced, corresponding to 4.9±1.6% of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule. For the first time, the decay pattern of low-lying strength in a neutron-rich nucleus is measured. The extracted decay pattern is not consistent with several mean-field theory descriptions of the pygmy states.

  12. Polygyny without wealth: popularity in gift games predicts polygyny in BaYaka Pygmies.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Nikhil; Salali, Gul Deniz; Thompson, James; Dyble, Mark; Page, Abigail; Smith, Daniel; Mace, Ruth; Migliano, Andrea Bamberg

    2015-05-01

    The occurrence of polygynous marriage in hunter-gatherer societies, which do not accumulate wealth, remains largely unexplored since resource availability is dependent on male hunting capacity and limited by the lack of storage. Hunter-gatherer societies offer the greatest insight in to human evolution since they represent the majority of our species' evolutionary history. In order to elucidate the evolution of hunter-gatherer polygyny, we study marriage patterns of BaYaka Pygmies. We investigate (i) rates of polygyny among BaYaka hunter-gatherers; (ii) whether polygyny confers a fitness benefit to BaYaka men; (iii) in the absence of wealth inequalities, what are the alternative explanations for polygyny among the BaYaka. To understand the latter, we explore differences in phenotypic quality (height and strength), and social capital (popularity in gift games). We find polygynous men have increased reproductive fitness; and that social capital and popularity but not phenotypic quality might have been important mechanisms by which some male hunter-gatherers sustained polygynous marriages before the onset of agriculture and wealth accumulation.

  13. Cardiac autonomic innervation of the western pygmy possum (Cercatetus concinnus) and golden bandicoot (Isoodon auratus).

    PubMed

    Zosky, Graeme R; O'Shea, James E

    2017-01-01

    Evidence for a functional ventricular parasympathetic innervation of the mammalian heart between and within taxa remains controversial. We have previously proposed that the presence of a functional parasympathetic innervation of the ventricle was indicative of heterothermy, and is essential for maintaining ventricular stability at low body temperature. However, it is possible that the presence of such an innervation is also representative of the primitive mammalian state. In this study, we aimed to determine whether a functional parasympathetic innervation of the ventricle, that is capable of actively reducing the force of contraction, is present across metatherian mammals. Using in vitro isolated cardiac preparations, we examined evidence for a functional ventricular parasympathetic innervation of the ventricle in two species of metatherian mammal, one heterotherm (Western pygmy possum; Cercatetus concinnus) and one homeotherm (Golden bandicoot; Isoodon auratus), from different families to complement existing data from a heterothermic dasyurid. Both C. concinnus and I. auratus had a potent biphasic response to transmural electrical stimulation in both atrial and ventricular preparations. Both the decrease and increase in the force of contraction in response to stimulation were almost entirely blocked by the cholinergic and adrenergic antagonists, atropine and propranolol, respectively. These observations provide clear evidence for a parasympathetic innervation of the ventricle that is capable of directly influencing the force of contraction across metatherian mammals with different thermoregulatory strategies. While this innervation may facilitate heterothermy, this suggests that the presence of such an innervation pattern is indicative of the primitive mammalian state.

  14. Local magnetic moment formation at 119Sn Mössbauer impurity in RFe2 ( R=rare-earth metals) Laves phases compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, A. L.; de Oliveira, N. A.; Troper, A.

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of the present work is to theoretically study the local magnetic moment formation and the systematics of the magnetic hyperfine fields at a non-magnetic s-p Mössbauer 119Sn impurity diluted on R sites ( R=rare-earth metals) of the cubic Laves phases intermetallic compounds RFe2. One considers that the magnetic hyperfine field has two contributions (i) the contribution from R ions, calculated via an extended Daniel-Friedel [J. Phys. Chem. Solids 24 (1963) 1601] model and (ii) the contribution from the induced magnetic moments arising from the Fe neighboring sites. We have in this case a two-center Blandin-Campbell-like [Phys. Rev. Lett. 31 (1973) 51; J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 1 (1975) 1] problem, where a magnetic 3d-element located at a distance from the 119Sn impurity gives an extra magnetization to a polarized electron gas which is strongly charge perturbed at the 119Sn impurity site. We also include in the model, the nearest-neighbor perturbation due to the translational invariance breaking introduced by the impurity. Our self-consistent total magnetic hyperfine field calculations are in a very good agreement with recent experimental data.

  15. Whole-genome sequence analyses of Western Central African Pygmy hunter-gatherers reveal a complex demographic history and identify candidate genes under positive natural selection

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, PingHsun; Veeramah, Krishna R.; Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah A.; Wall, Jeffrey D.; Hammer, Michael F.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.

    2016-01-01

    African Pygmies practicing a mobile hunter-gatherer lifestyle are phenotypically and genetically diverged from other anatomically modern humans, and they likely experienced strong selective pressures due to their unique lifestyle in the Central African rainforest. To identify genomic targets of adaptation, we sequenced the genomes of four Biaka Pygmies from the Central African Republic and jointly analyzed these data with the genome sequences of three Baka Pygmies from Cameroon and nine Yoruba famers. To account for the complex demographic history of these populations that includes both isolation and gene flow, we fit models using the joint allele frequency spectrum and validated them using independent approaches. Our two best-fit models both suggest ancient divergence between the ancestors of the farmers and Pygmies, 90,000 or 150,000 yr ago. We also find that bidirectional asymmetric gene flow is statistically better supported than a single pulse of unidirectional gene flow from farmers to Pygmies, as previously suggested. We then applied complementary statistics to scan the genome for evidence of selective sweeps and polygenic selection. We found that conventional statistical outlier approaches were biased toward identifying candidates in regions of high mutation or low recombination rate. To avoid this bias, we assigned P-values for candidates using whole-genome simulations incorporating demography and variation in both recombination and mutation rates. We found that genes and gene sets involved in muscle development, bone synthesis, immunity, reproduction, cell signaling and development, and energy metabolism are likely to be targets of positive natural selection in Western African Pygmies or their recent ancestors. PMID:26888263

  16. Ferruginous pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum) and eastern screech-owl (Megascopes asio): new hosts for Philornis mimicola (Diptera: Muscidae) and Ornithodoros concanensis (Acari: Argasidae).

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Glenn A; Teel, Pete D; Mohr, Rachel M

    2006-10-01

    While banding ferruginous pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum) and Eastern screech-owls (Megascops asio) in south Texas during 2004, we recorded Philornis mimicola (Diptera: Muscidae) and Ornithodoros concanensis (Acari: Argasidae) parasitizing nestlings. Inspection of nestlings revealed 54 P. mimicola and one O. concanensis. Inspection of nest material revealed 111 P. mimicola, including 57 puparia. The effect (e.g., blood loss, anemia) of these hematophagous parasites might have contributed to the demise of at least one Eastern screech-owl nestling. This is the first record of P. mimicola and O. concanensis parasitizing ferruginous pygmy-owls and Eastern screech-owls.

  17. Clinical outcome of skin yaws lesions after treatment with benzathinebenzylpenicillin in a pygmy population in Lobaye, Central African Republic

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Yaws is a bacterial skin and bone infectious disease caused by Treponema pallidum pertenue. It is endemic, particularly among pygmies in Central African Republic. To assess the clinical cure rate after treatment with benzathinepenicillin in this population, we conducted a cohort survey of 243 patients in the Lobaye region. Findings and conclusion The rate of healing of lesions after 5 months was 95.9%. This relatively satisfactory level of therapeutic response implies that yaws could be controlled in the Central African Republic. Thus, reinforcement of the management of new cases and of contacts is suggested. PMID:22171605

  18. Movements and Habitat Use of Dwarf and Pygmy Sperm Whales using Remotely-deployed LIMPET Satellite Tags

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Hawai‘i. Endangered Species Research 10:203-213. Scott, M.D., A.A. Hohn, A.J. Westgate, J.R. Nicholas, B.R. Whitaker, and W.B. Campbell. 2001. A...hawaii.htm LONG-TERM GOALS Dwarf (Kogia sima) and pygmy (K. breviceps) sperm whales are among the least known species of odontocetes, despite their...distribution in oceanic waters world-wide. There is some evidence that both species may be at least occasionally impacted by Navy sonar activity

  19. A different kind of hedgehog pathway: tinea manus due to Trichophyton erinacei transmitted by an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Weishaupt, Julia; Kolb-Mäurer, Annette; Lempert, Sigrid; Nenoff, Pietro; Uhrlaß, Silke; Hamm, Henning; Goebeler, Matthias

    2014-02-01

    The unusual case of a 29-year-old woman with tinea manus caused by infection due to Trichophyton erinacei is described. The patient presented with marked erosive inflammation of the entire fifth finger of her right hand. Mycological and genomic diagnostics resulted in identification of T. erinacei as the responsible pathogen, which had been transmitted by a domestic African pygmy hedgehog, Atelerix albiventris. Upon prolonged treatment with topical and systemic antifungal agents skin lesions slowly resolved. This case illustrates that the increasingly popular keeping of extraordinary pets such as hedgehogs may bear the risk of infections with uncommon dermatophytes.

  20. Elasticity of nuclear medium as a principal macrodynamical promoter of electric pygmy dipole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastrukov, S. I.; Molodtsova, I. V.; Podgainy, D. V.; Mişicu, Ş.; Chang, H.-K.

    2008-06-01

    Motivated by arguments of the nuclear core-layer model formulated in [S.I. Bastrukov, J.A. Maruhn, Z. Phys. A 335 (1990) 139], the macroscopic excitation mechanism of the electric pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) is considered as owing its origin to perturbation-induced effective decomposition of a nucleus into two spherical domains-undisturbed inner region treated as a static core and dynamical layer undergoing elastic shear vibrations. The elastic restoring force is central to the excitation mechanism under consideration and has the same physical meaning as in macroscopic model of nuclear giant resonances involving distortions of the Fermi-sphere providing unified description of isoscalar giant electric and magnetic resonances of multipole degree ℓ ⩾ 2 in terms of two fundamental vibrational modes in an elastic sphere, to wit, as spheroidal (electric) and torsional (magnetic) modes of shear elastic oscillations of the nodeless field of material displacements excited in the entire nucleus volume. In the present Letter focus is placed on the emergence of dipole overtone in the frequency spectrum of spheroidal elastic vibrations as Goldstone soft mode. To emphasis this feature of dipole resonant excitation imprinted in the core-layer model we regain spectral equation for the frequency of spheroidal elastic vibrations trapped in the finite-depth layer, derived in the above paper, but using canonical equation of an elastic continuous medium. The obtained analytic equations for the frequency of dipole vibrational state in question and its excitation strength lead to the following estimates for the PDR energy centroid EPDR (E 1) = [ 31 ± 1 ]A - 1 / 3 MeV and the total excitation probability BPDR (E 1) = [ 1.85 ± 0.05 ]10-3Z2A - 2 / 3e2fm2 throughout the nuclear chart exhibiting fundamental character of this soft dipole mode of nuclear resonant response.

  1. Pygmy and core polarization dipole modes in 206Pb: Connecting nuclear structure to stellar nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, A. P.; Tsoneva, N.; Bhatia, C.; Arnold, C. W.; Goriely, S.; Hammond, S. L.; Kelley, J. H.; Kwan, E.; Lenske, H.; Piekarewicz, J.; Raut, R.; Rusev, G.; Shizuma, T.; Tornow, W.

    2017-10-01

    A high-resolution study of the electromagnetic response of 206Pb below the neutron separation energy is performed using a (γ → ,γ‧) experiment at the HI γ → S facility. Nuclear resonance fluorescence with 100% linearly polarized photon beams is used to measure spins, parities, branching ratios, and decay widths of excited states in 206Pb from 4.9 to 8.1 MeV. The extracted ΣB (E 1) ↑ and ΣB (M 1) ↑ values for the total electric and magnetic dipole strength below the neutron separation energy are 0.9 ± 0.2 e2fm2 and 8.3 ± 2.0 μN2, respectively. These measurements are found to be in very good agreement with the predictions from an energy-density functional (EDF) plus quasiparticle phonon model (QPM). Such a detailed theoretical analysis allows to separate the pygmy dipole resonance from both the tail of the giant dipole resonance and multi-phonon excitations. Combined with earlier photonuclear experiments above the neutron separation energy, one extracts a value for the electric dipole polarizability of 206Pb of αD = 122 ± 10 mb /MeV. When compared to predictions from both the EDF+QPM and accurately calibrated relativistic EDFs, one deduces a range for the neutron-skin thickness of Rskin206 = 0.12- 0.19 fm and a corresponding range for the slope of the symmetry energy of L = 48- 60 MeV. This newly obtained information is also used to estimate the Maxwellian-averaged radiative cross section 205Pb (n , γ)206Pb at 30 keV to be σ = 130 ± 25 mb. The astrophysical impact of this measurement-on both the s-process in stellar nucleosynthesis and on the equation of state of neutron-rich matter-is discussed.

  2. Hibernation in the pygmy slow loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus): multiday torpor in primates is not restricted to Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Ruf, Thomas; Streicher, Ulrike; Stalder, Gabrielle L; Nadler, Tilo; Walzer, Chris

    2015-12-03

    Hibernation and short daily torpor are states of energy conservation with reduced metabolism and body temperature. Both hibernation, also called multiday torpor, and daily torpor are common among mammals and occur in at least 11 orders. Within the primates, there is a peculiar situation, because to date torpor has been almost exclusively reported for Malagasy lemurs. The single exception is the African lesser bushbaby, which is capable of daily torpor, but uses it only under extremely adverse conditions. For true hibernation, the geographical restriction was absolute. No primate outside of Madagascar was previously known to hibernate. Since hibernation is commonly viewed as an ancient, plesiomorphic trait, theoretically this could mean that hibernation as an overwintering strategy was lost in all other primates in mainland Africa, Asia, and the Americas. However, we hypothesized that a good candidate species for the use of hibernation, outside of Madagascar should be the pygmy slow loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus), a small primate inhabiting tropical forests. Here, we show that pygmy slow lorises exposed to natural climatic conditions in northern Vietnam during winter indeed undergo torpor lasting up to 63 h, that is, hibernation. Thus, hibernation has been retained in at least one primate outside of Madagascar.

  3. Hibernation in the pygmy slow loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus): multiday torpor in primates is not restricted to Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Ruf, Thomas; Streicher, Ulrike; Stalder, Gabrielle L.; Nadler, Tilo; Walzer, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Hibernation and short daily torpor are states of energy conservation with reduced metabolism and body temperature. Both hibernation, also called multiday torpor, and daily torpor are common among mammals and occur in at least 11 orders. Within the primates, there is a peculiar situation, because to date torpor has been almost exclusively reported for Malagasy lemurs. The single exception is the African lesser bushbaby, which is capable of daily torpor, but uses it only under extremely adverse conditions. For true hibernation, the geographical restriction was absolute. No primate outside of Madagascar was previously known to hibernate. Since hibernation is commonly viewed as an ancient, plesiomorphic trait, theoretically this could mean that hibernation as an overwintering strategy was lost in all other primates in mainland Africa, Asia, and the Americas. However, we hypothesized that a good candidate species for the use of hibernation, outside of Madagascar should be the pygmy slow loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus), a small primate inhabiting tropical forests. Here, we show that pygmy slow lorises exposed to natural climatic conditions in northern Vietnam during winter indeed undergo torpor lasting up to 63 h, that is, hibernation. Thus, hibernation has been retained in at least one primate outside of Madagascar. PMID:26633602

  4. Influence of mercury and selenium chemistries on the progression of cardiomyopathy in pygmy sperm whales, Kogia breviceps.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Colleen E; Davis, W Clay; McFee, Wayne E; Neumann, Carola A; Schulte, Jennifer; Bossart, Gregory D; Christopher, Steven J

    2012-10-01

    More than half of pygmy sperm whales (Kogia breviceps) that strand exhibit signs of cardiomyopathy (CMP). Many factors may contribute to the development of idiopathic CMP in K. breviceps, including genetics, infectious agents, contaminants, biotoxins, and dietary intake (e.g. selenium, mercury, and pro-oxidants). This study assessed trace elements in K. breviceps at various stages of CMP progression using fresh frozen liver and heart samples collected from individuals that stranded along US Atlantic and Gulf coasts between 1993 and 2007. Standard addition calibration and collision cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were employed for total Se analysis and pyrolysis atomic absorption (AA) was utilized for total Hg analysis to examine if the Se/Hg detoxification pathway inhibits the bioavailability of Se. Double spike speciated isotope dilution gas chromatography ICP-MS was utilized to measure methyl Hg and inorganic Hg. Immunoblot detection and colorimetric assays were used to assess protein oxidation status. Data collected on trace elements, selenoproteins, and oxidative status were evaluated in the context of animal life history and other complementary histological information to gain insight into the biochemical pathways contributing to the development of CMP in K. breviceps. Cardiomyopathy was only observed in adult pygmy sperm whales, predominantly in male animals. Both Hg:Se molar ratios and overall protein oxidation were greater in males than females and increased with progression of CMP.

  5. Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    1997-01-01

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

  6. Acoustic detection and long-term monitoring of pygmy blue whales over the continental slope in southwest Australia.

    PubMed

    Gavrilova, Alexander N; McCauley, Robert D

    2013-09-01

    A 9-yr dataset of continuous sea noise recording made at the Cape Leeuwin station of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty hydroacoustic network in 2002-2010 was processed to detect calls from pygmy blue whales and to analyze diurnal, seasonal, and interannual variations in their vocal activity. Because the conventional spectrogram correlation method for recognizing whale calls in sea noise resulted in a too high false detection rate, alternative algorithms were tested and the most robust one applied to the multi-year dataset. The detection method was based on multivariate classification using two spectrogram features of transients in sea noise and Fisher's linear discriminant, which provided a misclassification rate of approximately 1% for missed and false detections at moderate sensitivity settings. An analysis of the detection results revealed a consistent seasonal pattern in the whale presence and considerable interannual changes with a steady increase in the number of calls detected in 2002-2006. An apparent diurnal pattern of whales' vocal activity was also observed. The acoustic detection range for pygmy blue whales was estimated to vary from about 50 km to nearly 200 km from the Cape Leeuwin station, depending on the ambient noise level, source level, and azimuth to a vocalizing whale.

  7. More efficient mastication allows increasing intake without compromising digestibility or necessitating a larger gut: comparative feeding trials in banteng (Bos javanicus) and pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis).

    PubMed

    Schwarm, Angela; Ortmann, Sylvia; Wolf, Christian; Streich, W Jürgen; Clauss, Marcus

    2009-04-01

    The digestion of plant material in mammalian herbivores basically depends on the chemical and structural composition of the diet, the mean particle size to which the forage is processed, and the ingesta retention time. These different factors can be influenced by the animal, and they can presumably compensate for each other. The pygmy hippopotamus, a non-ruminating foregut fermenter, has longer mean retention times than ruminants; however hippos do not achieve higher (fibre) digestibilities on comparable diets, which could be due to ineffective mastication. We performed feeding trials with six pygmy hippos (Hexaprotodon liberiensis) and six banteng cattle (Bos javanicus) on a grass diet. As predicted, both species achieved similar dry matter, organic matter, crude protein and gross energy digestibilities. However, neutral and acid detergent fibre digestibility was lower in pygmy hippos. Apparently, in these species, fibre digestibility was more influenced by particle size, which was larger in pygmy hippos compared to banteng, than by retention time. In spite of their higher relative food intake, the banteng in this study did not have greater relative gut fills than the hippos. Ruminants traditionally appear intake-limited when compared to equids, because feed particles above a certain size cannot leave the rumen. But when compared to nonruminating foregut fermenters, rumination seems to free foregut fermenters from an intrinsic food intake limitation. The higher energy intakes and metabolic rates in wild cattle compared to hippos could have life-history consequences, such as a higher relative reproductive rate.

  8. Chapter 4: The ferruginous pygmy-owl in the tropics and at the northern end of its range: Habitat relations and requirements

    Treesearch

    Jean-Luc E. Cartron; Scott H. Stoleson; Stephen M. Russell; Glenn A. Proudfoot; W. Scott Richardson

    2000-01-01

    The habitat needs of the ferruginous pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum) are poorly understood. In the tropics, this common bird of prey inhabits many distinct vegetation communities or environments (e.g., Monroe 1968, Meyer de Schauensee 1970, Stiles and Skutch 1989, Sick 1993). A resident of woodlands and open forests, it is also found in the open,...

  9. The importance of validated alpha taxonomy for phylogenetic and DNA barcoding studies: a comment on species identification of pygmy grasshoppers (Orthoptera, Tetrigidae).

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Arne W; Devriese, Hendrik; Tumbrinck, Josef; Skejo, Josip; Lehmann, Gerlind U C; Hochkirch, Axel

    2017-01-01

    In a recently published paper on colour polymorphism in a Pygmy grasshopper from China (Zhao et al 2016) an unidentified Paratettix sp. was misidentified as Tetrix bolivari. This case highlights the need for correct species identification and provides an opportunity to recommend some aspects of Good Taxonomic Practice (GTP) in Tetrigidae to reduce the number of erroneous identifications.

  10. Rare earths

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayan, S.; Melnyk, A.J.; Singh, R.D.; Nuttall, K.

    1989-01-01

    For conventional applications, there is limited demand for rare earth elements as well as yttrium and scandium. But the emergence of new high technology applications such as supermagnets, lasers, and superconductors should result in significant demand for some of these elements. This article examines the anticipated applications and demands for rare earth elements over the next decade. It also looks at the implications on the use of available resources. In the context of a growing demand, process methods are reviewed for the recovery of rare earth elements from conventional and unconventional resources. And the article also discusses the challenges facing the mining industry in meeting this opportunity.

  11. Excretion patterns of fluid and different sized particle passage markers in banteng (Bos javanicus) and pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis): two functionally different foregut fermenters.

    PubMed

    Schwarm, Angela; Ortmann, Sylvia; Wolf, Christian; Streich, W Jürgen; Clauss, Marcus

    2008-05-01

    Processing of ingesta particles plays a crucial role in the digestive physiology of herbivores. In the ruminant forestomach different sized particles are stratified into a small and a large particle fraction and only the latter is regurgitated and remasticated to smaller, easier-to-digest particles. In contrast, it has been suggested that in non-ruminating foregut fermenters, such as hippopotamuses, larger particles should be selectively excreted since they tend to be digested at a slower rate and hence can be considered intake-limiting bulk. In our study we determined the mean retention time (MRT) of fluids and different sized particles (2 mm and 10 mm) in six pygmy hippos (Hexaprotodon liberiensis) and six banteng (Bos javanicus) on a diet of fresh grass at two intake levels. We used cobalt ethylendiamintetraacetate (Co-EDTA) as fluid and chromium (Cr)-mordanted fibre (2 mm) and cerium (Ce)-mordanted fibre (10 mm) as particle markers, mixed in the food. Average total tract MRT for fluid, small and large particles at the high intake level was 32, 76 and 73 h in pygmy hippos and 25, 56 and 60 h in banteng, and at the low intake level 39, 109, and 105 h in pygmy hippos and 22, 51 and 58 h in banteng, respectively. In accordance with the prediction, large particles moved faster than, or as fast as the small particles, through the gut of pygmy hippos. In contrast, large particles were excreted slower than the small particles in the ruminant of this study, the banteng. Pygmy hippos had longer retention times than the banteng, which probably compensate for the less efficient particle size reduction. Although the results were not as distinct as expected, most likely due to the fact that ingestive mastication of the larger particle marker could not be prevented, they confirm our hypothesis of a functional difference in selective particle retention between ruminating and non-ruminating foregut fermenters.

  12. Twisted sister species of pygmy angelfishes: discordance between taxonomy, coloration, and phylogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBattista, Joseph D.; Waldrop, Ellen; Bowen, Brian W.; Schultz, Jennifer K.; Gaither, Michelle R.; Pyle, Richard L.; Rocha, Luiz A.

    2012-09-01

    The delineation of reef fish species by coloration is problematic, particularly for the pygmy angelfishes (genus Centropyge), whose vivid colors are sometimes the only characters available for taxonomic classification. The Lemonpeel Angelfish ( Centropyge flavissima) has Pacific and Indian Ocean forms separated by approximately 3,000 km and slight differences in coloration. These disjunct populations hybridize with Eibl's Angelfish ( Centropyge eibli) in the eastern Indian Ocean and the Pearl-Scaled Angelfish ( Centropyge vrolikii) in the western Pacific. To resolve the evolutionary history of these species and color morphs, we employed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cytochrome b and three nuclear introns (TMO, RAG2, and S7). Phylogenetic analyses reveal three deep mtDNA lineages ( d = 7.0-8.3 %) that conform not to species designation or color morph but to geographic region: (1) most Pacific C. flavissima plus C. vrolikii, (2) C. flavissima from the Society Islands in French Polynesia, and (3) Indian Ocean C. flavissima plus C. eibli. In contrast, the nuclear introns each show a cluster of closely related alleles, with frequency differences between the three geographic groups. Hence, the mtDNA phylogeny reveals a period of isolation (ca . 3.5-4.2 million years) typical of congeneric species, whereas the within-lineage mtDNA ΦST values and the nuclear DNA data reveal recent or ongoing gene flow between species. We conclude that an ancient divergence of C. flavissima, recorded in the non-recombining mtDNA, was subsequently swamped by introgression and hybridization in two of the three regions, with only the Society Islands retaining the original C. flavissima haplotypes among our sample locations. Alternatively, the yellow color pattern of C. flavissima may have appeared independently in the central Pacific Ocean and eastern Indian Ocean. Regardless of how the pattern arose, C. flavissima seems to be retaining species identity where it interbreeds with C. vrolikii and C

  13. [Comparative FISH analysis of C-positive blocks of centromeric chromosomal regions of pygmy wood mice Sylvaemus uralensis (Rodentia, Muridae)].

    PubMed

    Karamysheva, T V; Bogdanov, A S; Kartavtseva, I V; Likhoshvaĭ, T V; Bochkarev, M N; Kolcheva, N E; Marochkina, V V; Rubtsov, N B

    2010-06-01

    The composition and homology of centromeric heterochromatin DNA has been compared in representatives of the Asian race and two chromosomal forms (Eastern European and Southern European) of the European race of the pygmy wood mouse Sylvaemus uralensis by means of in situ hybridization with metaphase chromosomes of microdissection DNA probes obtained from centromeric C-blocks of mice of the Southern European chromosomal form and the Asian race. Joint hybridization of both DNA probes yielded all possible variants of centromeric regions in terms of the presence of repetitive sequences homologous to those of some or another dissection region, which indicates a diversity of centromeric regions differing in DNA composition. However, most variations of the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) patterns are apparently related to quantitative differences of repetitive elements of the genome. Experiments with the DNA probe obtained from the genome of the Southern European form of the pygmy wood mouse have shown that the number of intense FISH signals roughly corresponds to the number of large C-segments in representatives of the European race, which is characterized by a large amount of the centromeric C-heterochromatin in the karyotype. However, intense signals have been also detected in experiments on hybridization of this probe with chromosomes of representatives of the Asian race, which has no large C-blocks in the karyotype; thus, DNA sequences homologous to heterochromatic ones are also present in nonheterochromatic regions adjacent to C-segments. Despite the variations of the numbers of both intense and weak FISH signals, all chromosomal forms/races of S. uralensis significantly differ from one another in these characters. The number of intense FISH signals in DNA from the samples of pygmy wood mice from eastern Turkmenistan (the Kugitang ridge) and southern Omsk oblast (the vicinity of the Talapker railway station) was intermediate between those in the European and

  14. Characterizing the reproductive biology of the female pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis) through non-invasive endocrine monitoring.

    PubMed

    Flacke, Gabriella L; Schwarzenberger, Franz; Penfold, Linda M; Walker, Susan L; Martin, Graeme B; Millar, Robert Peter; Paris, Monique C J

    2017-10-15

    The pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis) is endangered in the wild and very little is known about its reproductive biology. In zoological facilities, this species experiences a number of reproductive issues that complicate breeding management, including a high rate of stillbirths and failure of many pairs to reproduce. We conducted a comprehensive study to evaluate reproductive cycles and pregnancy in this species using enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) for fecal hormone metabolite analysis. Fresh fecal samples were collected twice weekly for a one to three year period from 36 female pygmy hippos housed at 24 zoological institutions. Samples were analyzed in three separate laboratories. Three progestogen metabolite EIAs (Pg-diol: 5β-pregnane-3α,20α-diol 3HS:BSA; PdG: pregnanediol-3-glucuronide R13904; mono-P4: Quidel clone 425) and three estrogen metabolite EIAs (E2a: estradiol-17β-OH 17-HS:BSA; E2b: estradiol 17β R0008; E2c: estradiol 17β R4972) accurately reflected reproductive events. Average estrous cycle length was 31.8 ± 7.4 days based on estrogen metabolite peaks and 30.9 ± 7.3 days based on nadir to nadir progestogen metabolite concentrations. Cyclical patterns in both estrogen and progestogen metabolites were detected throughout the year, indicating a lack of seasonality. Estrogen metabolite peaks were also observed during pregnancy and lactation, suggesting that follicular development occurs during both reproductive states. Pregnancy was most reliably demonstrated by elevation in progestogen metabolites (Pg-diol or PdG) in the second half of gestation. Average gestation length based on breeding to calving date was 203 ± 4 days for 15 pregnancies. This comprehensive overview of the reproductive biology of the female pygmy hippo provides valuable data for guiding long-term breeding management for this endangered species and serves as a baseline for future studies addressing the potential influence of social structure, diet, body condition

  15. New strain of human T lymphotropic virus (HTLV) type 3 in a Pygmy from Cameroon with peculiar HTLV serologic results.

    PubMed

    Calattini, Sara; Betsem, Edouard; Bassot, Sylviane; Chevalier, Sébastien Alain; Mahieux, Renaud; Froment, Alain; Gessain, Antoine

    2009-02-15

    A search for human T lymphotropic virus (HTLV) types 1 and 2 and related viruses was performed by serological and molecular means on samples obtained from 421 adult villagers from the southern Cameroon forest areas. One individual (a 56-year-old Baka Pygmy hunter) was found to be HTLV-3 infected; however, there was a low proviral load in blood cells. Complete sequence analysis of this virus (HTLV-3Lobak18) indicated a close relationship to human HTLV-3Pyl43 and simian STLV-3CTO604 strains. Plasma samples from Lobak18, the HTLV-3 infected individual, exhibited a peculiar "HTLV-2-like" pattern on Western blot analysis and were serologically untypeable by line immunoassay. These results were different from those for the 2 previously reported HTLV-3 strains, raising questions about serological confirmation of infection with such retroviruses.

  16. Isospin character of low-lying pygmy dipole states in 208Pb via inelastic scattering of 17O ions.

    PubMed

    Crespi, F C L; Bracco, A; Nicolini, R; Mengoni, D; Pellegri, L; Lanza, E G; Leoni, S; Maj, A; Kmiecik, M; Avigo, R; Benzoni, G; Blasi, N; Boiano, C; Bottoni, S; Brambilla, S; Camera, F; Ceruti, S; Giaz, A; Million, B; Morales, A I; Vandone, V; Wieland, O; Bednarczyk, P; Ciemała, M; Grebosz, J; Krzysiek, M; Mazurek, K; Zieblinski, M; Bazzacco, D; Bellato, M; Birkenbach, B; Bortolato, D; Calore, E; Cederwall, B; Charles, L; de Angelis, G; Désesquelles, P; Eberth, J; Farnea, E; Gadea, A; Görgen, A; Gottardo, A; Isocrate, R; Jolie, J; Jungclaus, A; Karkour, N; Korten, W; Menegazzo, R; Michelagnoli, C; Molini, P; Napoli, D R; Pullia, A; Recchia, F; Reiter, P; Rosso, D; Sahin, E; Salsac, M D; Siebeck, B; Siem, S; Simpson, J; Söderström, P-A; Stezowski, O; Theisen, Ch; Ur, C; Valiente-Dobón, J J

    2014-07-04

    The properties of pygmy dipole states in 208Pb were investigated using the 208Pb(17O, 17O'γ) reaction at 340 MeV and measuring the γ decay with high resolution with the AGATA demonstrator array. Cross sections and angular distributions of the emitted γ rays and of the scattered particles were measured. The results are compared with (γ, γ') and (p, p') data. The data analysis with the distorted wave Born approximation approach gives a good description of the elastic scattering and of the inelastic excitation of the 2+ and 3- states. For the dipole transitions a form factor obtained by folding a microscopically calculated transition density was used for the first time. This has allowed us to extract the isoscalar component of the 1- excited states from 4 to 8 MeV.

  17. Isospin Character of Low-Lying Pygmy Dipole States in Pb208 via Inelastic Scattering of O17 Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespi, F. C. L.; Bracco, A.; Nicolini, R.; Mengoni, D.; Pellegri, L.; Lanza, E. G.; Leoni, S.; Maj, A.; Kmiecik, M.; Avigo, R.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Ceruti, S.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Vandone, V.; Wieland, O.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemała, M.; Grebosz, J.; Krzysiek, M.; Mazurek, K.; Zieblinski, M.; Bazzacco, D.; Bellato, M.; Birkenbach, B.; Bortolato, D.; Calore, E.; Cederwall, B.; Charles, L.; de Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Isocrate, R.; Jolie, J.; Jungclaus, A.; Karkour, N.; Korten, W.; Menegazzo, R.; Michelagnoli, C.; Molini, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Pullia, A.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Rosso, D.; Sahin, E.; Salsac, M. D.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Simpson, J.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stezowski, O.; Theisen, Ch.; Ur, C.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.

    2014-07-01

    The properties of pygmy dipole states in Pb208 were investigated using the Pb208(O17, O17'γ) reaction at 340 MeV and measuring the γ decay with high resolution with the AGATA demonstrator array. Cross sections and angular distributions of the emitted γ rays and of the scattered particles were measured. The results are compared with (γ, γ') and (p, p') data. The data analysis with the distorted wave Born approximation approach gives a good description of the elastic scattering and of the inelastic excitation of the 2+ and 3- states. For the dipole transitions a form factor obtained by folding a microscopically calculated transition density was used for the first time. This has allowed us to extract the isoscalar component of the 1- excited states from 4 to 8 MeV.

  18. Splitting of the pygmy dipole resonance in Ba138 and Ce140 observed in the (α,α'γ) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, J.; Savran, D.; Berg, A. M. Van Den; Dendooven, P.; Fritzsche, M.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hasper, J.; Wörtche, H. J.; Zilges, A.

    2009-09-01

    The N=82 nuclei Ce140 and Ba138 have been investigated by means of the (α,α'γ) coincidence method to study the pygmy dipole resonance (PDR). The experiments have been performed at the AGOR cyclotron at KVI, Groningen, at a primary beam energy of Eα=136 MeV. The Big-Bite Spectrometer and seven large-volume high-purity germanium detectors were used in coincidence to perform a simultaneous spectroscopy of the scattered α particles and the γ decay. The comparison with results of nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments reveals a splitting of the PDR into two components. Up to about 6 MeV the same states that could be observed in (γ,γ') are also excited in α-scattering experiments, whereas the higher-lying states are missing in the (α,α'γ) reaction. This indicates a structural splitting of the PDR into two modes with different underlying structure.

  19. Rare earths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, J.

    2013-01-01

    Global mine production of rare earths was estimated to have declined slightly in 2012 relative to 2011 (Fig. 1). Production in China was estimated to have decreased to 95 from 105 kt (104,700 from 115,700 st) in 2011, while new mine production in the United States and Australia increased.

  20. Migratory Movements of Pygmy Blue Whales (Balaenoptera musculus brevicauda) between Australia and Indonesia as Revealed by Satellite Telemetry

    PubMed Central

    Double, Michael C.; Andrews-Goff, Virginia; Jenner, K. Curt S.; Jenner, Micheline-Nicole; Laverick, Sarah M.; Branch, Trevor A.; Gales, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    In Australian waters during the austral summer, pygmy blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus brevicauda) occur predictably in two distinct feeding areas off western and southern Australia. As with other blue whale subspecies, outside the austral summer their distribution and movements are poorly understood. In order to describe the migratory movements of these whales, we present the satellite telemetry derived movements of eleven individuals tagged off western Australia over two years. Whales were tracked from between 8 and 308 days covering an average distance of 3,009±892 km (mean ± se; range: 832 km–14,101 km) at a rate of 21.94±0.74 km per day (0.09 km–455.80 km/day). Whales were tagged during March and April and ultimately migrated northwards post tag deployment with the exception of a single animal which remained in the vicinity of the Perth Canyon/Naturaliste Plateau for its eight day tracking period. The tagged whales travelled relatively near to the Australian coastline (100.0±1.7 km) until reaching a prominent peninsula in the north-west of the state of Western Australia (North West Cape) after which they travelled offshore (238.0±13.9 km). Whales reached the northern terminus of their migration and potential breeding grounds in Indonesian waters by June. One satellite tag relayed intermittent information to describe aspects of the southern migration from Indonesia with the animal departing around September to arrive in the subtropical frontal zone, south of western Australia in December. Throughout their migratory range, these whales are exposed to impacts associated with industry, fishing and vessel traffic. These movements therefore provide a valuable tool to industry when assessing potential interactions with pygmy blue whales and should be considered by conservation managers and regulators when mitigating impacts of development. This is particularly relevant for this species as it continues to recover from past exploitation. PMID:24718589

  1. Migratory movements of pygmy blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus brevicauda) between Australia and Indonesia as revealed by satellite telemetry.

    PubMed

    Double, Michael C; Andrews-Goff, Virginia; Jenner, K Curt S; Jenner, Micheline-Nicole; Laverick, Sarah M; Branch, Trevor A; Gales, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    In Australian waters during the austral summer, pygmy blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus brevicauda) occur predictably in two distinct feeding areas off western and southern Australia. As with other blue whale subspecies, outside the austral summer their distribution and movements are poorly understood. In order to describe the migratory movements of these whales, we present the satellite telemetry derived movements of eleven individuals tagged off western Australia over two years. Whales were tracked from between 8 and 308 days covering an average distance of 3,009±892 km (mean ± se; range: 832 km-14,101 km) at a rate of 21.94±0.74 km per day (0.09 km-455.80 km/day). Whales were tagged during March and April and ultimately migrated northwards post tag deployment with the exception of a single animal which remained in the vicinity of the Perth Canyon/Naturaliste Plateau for its eight day tracking period. The tagged whales travelled relatively near to the Australian coastline (100.0±1.7 km) until reaching a prominent peninsula in the north-west of the state of Western Australia (North West Cape) after which they travelled offshore (238.0±13.9 km). Whales reached the northern terminus of their migration and potential breeding grounds in Indonesian waters by June. One satellite tag relayed intermittent information to describe aspects of the southern migration from Indonesia with the animal departing around September to arrive in the subtropical frontal zone, south of western Australia in December. Throughout their migratory range, these whales are exposed to impacts associated with industry, fishing and vessel traffic. These movements therefore provide a valuable tool to industry when assessing potential interactions with pygmy blue whales and should be considered by conservation managers and regulators when mitigating impacts of development. This is particularly relevant for this species as it continues to recover from past exploitation.

  2. Metabolism and temperature regulation during daily torpor in the smallest primate, the pygmy mouse lemur (Microcebus myoxinus) in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Schmid, J; Ruf, T; Heldmaier, G

    2000-02-01

    Thermoregulation, energetics and patterns of torpor in the pygmy mouse lemur, Microcebus myoxinus, were investigated under natural conditions of photoperiod and temperature in the Kirindy/CFPF Forest in western Madagascar. M. myoxinus entered torpor spontaneously during the cool dry season. Torpor only occurred on a daily basis and torpor bout duration was on average 9.6 h, and ranged from 4.6 h to 19.2 h. Metabolic rates during torpor were reduced to about 86% of the normothermic value. Minimum body temperature during daily torpor was 6.8 degrees C at an ambient temperature of 6.3 degrees C. Entry into torpor occurred randomly between 2000 and 0620 hours, whereas arousals from torpor were clustered around 1300 hours within a narrow time window of less than 4 h. Arousal from torpor was a two-step process with a first passive climb of body temperature to a mean of 27 degrees C, carried by the daily increase of ambient temperature when oxygen consumption remained more or less constant, followed by a second active increase of oxygen consumption to further raise the body temperature to normothermic values. In conclusion, daily body temperature rhythms in M. myoxinus further reduce the energetic costs of daily torpor seen in other species: they extend to unusually low body temperatures and consequently low metabolic rates in torpor, and they employ passive warming to reduce the energetic costs of arousal. Thus, these energy-conserving adaptations may represent an important energetic aid to the pygmy mouse lemur and help to promote their individual fitness.

  3. Is Drosera meristocaulis a pygmy sundew? Evidence of a long-distance dispersal between Western Australia and northern South America

    PubMed Central

    Rivadavia, F.; de Miranda, V. F. O.; Hoogenstrijd, G.; Pinheiro, F.; Heubl, G.; Fleischmann, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims South America and Oceania possess numerous floristic similarities, often confirmed by morphological and molecular data. The carnivorous Drosera meristocaulis (Droseraceae), endemic to the Neblina highlands of northern South America, was known to share morphological characters with the pygmy sundews of Drosera sect. Bryastrum, which are endemic to Australia and New Zealand. The inclusion of D. meristocaulis in a molecular phylogenetic analysis may clarify its systematic position and offer an opportunity to investigate character evolution in Droseraceae and phylogeographic patterns between South America and Oceania. Methods Drosera meristocaulis was included in a molecular phylogenetic analysis of Droseraceae, using nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and plastid rbcL and rps16 sequence data. Pollen of D. meristocaulis was studied using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy techniques, and the karyotype was inferred from root tip meristem. Key Results The phylogenetic inferences (maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches) substantiate with high statistical support the inclusion of sect. Meristocaulis and its single species, D. meristocaulis, within the Australian Drosera clade, sister to a group comprising species of sect. Bryastrum. A chromosome number of 2n = approx. 32–36 supports the phylogenetic position within the Australian clade. The undivided styles, conspicuous large setuous stipules, a cryptocotylar (hypogaeous) germination pattern and pollen tetrads with aperture of intermediate type 7–8 are key morphological traits shared between D. meristocaulis and pygmy sundews of sect. Bryastrum from Australia and New Zealand. Conclusions The multidisciplinary approach adopted in this study (using morphological, palynological, cytotaxonomic and molecular phylogenetic data) enabled us to elucidate the relationships of the thus far unplaced taxon D. meristocaulis. Long-distance dispersal between southwestern

  4. New tools suggest local variation in tool use by a montane community of the rare Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes ellioti, in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Paul; Chapman, Hazel

    2015-01-01

    Regional variations in tool use among chimpanzee subspecies and between populations within the same subspecies can often be explained by ecological constraints, although cultural variation also occurs. In this study we provide data on tool use by a small, recently isolated population of the endangered Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee Pan troglodytes ellioti, thus demonstrating regional variation in tool use in this rarely studied subspecies. We found that the Ngel Nyaki chimpanzee community has its own unique tool kit consisting of five different tool types. We describe a tool type that has rarely been observed (ant-digging stick) and a tool type that has never been recorded for this chimpanzee subspecies or in West Central Africa (food pound/grate stone). Our results suggest that there is fine- scale variation in tool use among geographically close communities of P. t. ellioti, and that these variations likely reflect both ecological constraints and cultural variation.

  5. Nuclear organization of cholinergic, putative catecholaminergic, serotonergic and orexinergic systems in the brain of the African pygmy mouse (Mus minutoides): organizational complexity is preserved in small brains.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Jean-Leigh; Patzke, Nina; Fuxe, Kjell; Bennett, Nigel C; Manger, Paul R

    2012-05-01

    This study investigated the nuclear organization of four immunohistochemically identifiable neural systems (cholinergic, catecholaminergic, serotonergic and orexinergic) within the brain of the African pygmy mouse (Mus minutoides). The African pygmy mice studied had a brain mass of around 275 mg, making these the smallest rodent brains to date in which these neural systems have been investigated. In contrast to the assumption that in this small brain there would be fewer subdivisions of these neural systems, we found that all nuclei generally observed for these systems in other rodent brains were also present in the brain of the African pygmy mouse. As with other rodents previously studied in the subfamily Murinae, we observed the presence of cortical cholinergic neurons and a compactly organized locus coeruleus. These two features of these systems have not been observed in the non-Murinae rodents studied to date. Thus, the African pygmy mouse displays what might be considered a typical Murinae brain organization, and despite its small size, the brain does not appear to be any less complexly organized than other rodent brains, even those that are over 100 times larger such as the Cape porcupine brain. The results are consistent with the notion that changes in brain size do not affect the evolution of nuclear organization of complex neural systems. Thus, species belonging to the same order generally have the same number and complement of the subdivisions, or nuclei, of specific neural systems despite differences in brain size, phenotype or time since evolutionary divergence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. African Origin of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 2 (HTLV-2) Supported by a Potential New HTLV-2d Subtype in Congolese Bambuti Efe Pygmies

    PubMed Central

    Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Salemi, Marco; Van Brussel, Marianne; Liu, Hsin-Fu; Van Laethem, Kristel; Van Ranst, Marc; Michels, Ludovic; Desmyter, Jan; Goubau, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    We identified a potential new subtype within human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2), HTLV-2d, present in members of an isolated Efe Bambuti Pygmy tribe. Two of 23 Efe Pygmies were HTLV-2 seropositive, with HTLV-2 Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay reactivities. From one of them the entire genome of the HTLV-2 strain Efe2 could be amplified and sequenced. In all gene regions analyzed, this strain was the most divergent HTLV-2 strain, differing by 2.4% (tax/rex) to 10.7% (long terminal repeat) from both subtypes HTLV-2a and HTLV-2b, yet major functional elements are conserved. The similarity between the HTLV-2 Efe2 Gag and Env proteins and the corresponding HTLV-2a and -2b proteins is consistent with the observed serological reactivity. In the proximal pX region, one of the two alternative splice acceptor sites is abolished in HTLV-2 Efe2. Another interesting feature of this potential new subtype is that it has a Tax protein of 344 amino acids (aa), which is intermediate in length between the HTLV-2a Tax protein (331 aa) and the HTLV-2b and -2c Tax proteins (356 aa) and similar to the simian T-cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (STLV-2) PP1664 Tax protein. Together these two findings suggest a different phenotype for the HTLV-2 Efe2 strain. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed that the Pygmy Efe2 strain potentially belonged to a new and quite divergent subtype, HTLV-2d. When the STLV-2 bonobo viruses PP1664 and PanP were used as an outgroup, it was clear that the Pygmy HTLV-2 Efe2 strain had the longest independent evolution and that HTLV-2 evolution is consistent with an African origin. PMID:9557723

  7. Not so Rare, Rare Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Munter, Beverly L.; Chaudhry, Ramiz A.

    2008-01-01

    A rare disease or condition is defined by federal legislation such that it: (1) affects less than 200,000 persons in the U.S.; or (2) affects more than 200,000 persons in the U.S. but for which there is no reasonable expectation that the cost of developing and making available in the U.S. a drug for such disease or condition will be recovered from…

  8. Not so Rare, Rare Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Munter, Beverly L.; Chaudhry, Ramiz A.

    2008-01-01

    A rare disease or condition is defined by federal legislation such that it: (1) affects less than 200,000 persons in the U.S.; or (2) affects more than 200,000 persons in the U.S. but for which there is no reasonable expectation that the cost of developing and making available in the U.S. a drug for such disease or condition will be recovered from…

  9. A summary of niobium and rare earth localities from Ha'il and other areas in western Saudi Arabia: a preliminary study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matzko, John J.; Naqvi, Mohammed Ibne

    1978-01-01

    Investigations in 1965 located veins containing radioactive material in the Halaban Group on the east side of a granite pluton at Jabal Aja near Ha'il. Later study extended the known area of radioactivity to a total length of about 30 km. Mineralogic studies indicated that the samples were low in uranium and that the radioactivity was due principally to thorium in niobium-bearing minerals. Two samples were reexamined to identify the sources of radioactivity, but X-ray and alpha plate studies did not reveal the radioactive minerals, even though uranium mineralization was indicated by the alpha plates. Further sampling is suggested to isolate the sources of radioactivity. This study indicates that niobium occurrences are related to alkaline intrusives in many areas of western Saudi Arabia. These areas should be investigated for their possible niobium and rare earth contents; their uranium content is apparently too low to be of economic interest.

  10. Mechanism of the high transition temperature for the 1111-type iron-based superconductors R FeAsO (R =rare earth ): Synergistic effects of local structures and 4 f electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lifang; Meng, Junling; Liu, Xiaojuan; Yao, Fen; Meng, Jian; Zhang, Hongjie

    2017-07-01

    Among the iron-based superconductors, the 1111-type Fe-As-based superconductors REFeAs O1 -xFx (RE = rare earth) exhibit high transition temperatures (Tc) above 40 K. We perform first-principles calculations based on density functional theory with the consideration of both electronic correlations and spin-orbit couplings on rare earths and Fe ions to study the underlying mechanism as the microscopic structural distortions in REFeAsO tuned by both lanthanide contraction and external strain. The electronic structures evolve similarly in both cases. It is found that there exist an optimal structural regime that will not only initialize but also optimize the orbital fluctuations due to the competing Fe-As and Fe-Fe crystal fields. We also find that the key structural features in REFeAsO, such as As-Fe-As bond angle, intrinsically induce the modification of the Fermi surface and dynamic spin fluctuation. These results suggest that the superconductivity is mediated by antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations. Simultaneously, we show that the rare-earth 4 f electrons play important roles on the high transition temperature whose behavior might be analogous to that of the heavy-fermion superconductors. The superconductivity of these 1111-type iron-based superconductors with high-Tc is considered to originate from the synergistic effects of local structures and 4 f electrons.

  11. Hawaiian imprint on dissolved Nd and Ra isotopes and rare earth elements in the central North Pacific: Local survey and seasonal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröllje, Henning; Pahnke, Katharina; Schnetger, Bernhard; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen; Dulai, Henrietta; Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.

    2016-09-01

    Dissolved neodymium isotopes (143Nd/144Nd, expressed as εNd) and rare earth elements (REEs) have the potential to trace the provenance of lithogenic material as well as water masses. The central North Pacific is poorly investigated with respect to its Nd isotope signature and REE cycling, and little is known about the contributions of volcanic islands, such as Hawaii, relative to dust input from Asian deserts to the surface water REE budgets. Here we present dissolved Nd isotope and REE data along with long-lived radium isotope activities from Hawaii Ocean Time-Series Station ALOHA and coastal waters from Oahu, sampled for a GEOTRACES process study in February 2011. The data are supplemented with seasonal samples from ALOHA. Our results show a clear influence of the Hawaiian Islands on the coastal ocean and surface waters at ALOHA during February, expressed by higher surface water Ra activities, radiogenic surface εNd (εNd = +1.4 to -1.0), and elevated Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu∗ ⩾ 1.3). Seasonal cycles of Asian dust deposition most likely contribute to the seasonal εNd variability of surface waters at ALOHA, as suggested by more negative εNd and the lack of Eu anomalies in summer. Neodymium isotopes in the intermediate and deep water column at ALOHA trace typical North Pacific water masses, such as North Pacific Intermediate Water and North Pacific Deep Water. We suggest that a radiogenic εNd excursion in 1000-2000 m water depth, observed in various North Pacific profiles, is controlled by advection of a modified Upper Circumpolar Deep Water or North Equatorial Pacific Intermediate Water. We further present an updated average εNd signature of -3.5 ± 0.5 for North Pacific Deep Water and show that REE patterns of deep waters at ALOHA are dominantly controlled by vertical processes.

  12. Slow and fast orthodromic and antidromic variants in acute 9-h jet-lagged pygmy field mice.

    PubMed

    Basu, Priyoneel; Kumar, Dhanananajay; Singaravel, Muniyandi

    2014-05-01

    Biological clocks help organism to adapt temporally to a variety of rhythmic environmental cues. Acute changes in the rhythmicity of entraining cues causes short- to long-term physiological distress in individuals, for example, those occurring during jet-lag after long-haul transmeridial flights, or shift work. Variations in the rate of re-entrainment to a 9 h advanced schedule (simulation of acute Jet-lag/shift work) in the Indian pygmy field mouse, Mus terricolor are reported. Wheel- and lab-acclimated adult male mice were entrained to a 12:12 h light:dark (LD) cycles, followed by a 9 h advance in the LD cycle. In response, these mice either advanced or delayed their activity onsets, with individual variation in the rate and direction. Rapid orthodromic (advancing) re-entrainers exhibited a coincidence of activity onsets with the new dark onset in < = 3 days, while gradually advancing re-entrainers took -9 days or more. Delayers (antidromic) also either re-entrained very rapidly (< = 2 days), or gradually (-9 days). Acrophase measurement confirmed the direction of the transients, which did not depend on the free-running period. Such different patterns might determine the differential survival of individuals under the pressure of re-entrainment schedules seen in jet-lag and shift work.

  13. Observations on the Endemic Pygmy Three-Toed Sloth, Bradypus pygmaeus of Isla Escudo de Veraguas, Panamá

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to ascertain the population status of the Pygmy Three-toed Sloth, Bradypus pygmaeus, an IUCN Critically Endangered species, on Isla Escudo de Veraguas, Panama. Bradypus pygmaeus are thought to be folivorous mangrove specialists; therefore we conducted a visual systematic survey of all 10 mangrove thickets on the island. The total mangrove habitat area was measured to be 1.67 ha, comprising 0.024% of the total island area. The population survey found low numbers of B. pygmaeus in the mangrove thickets and far lower numbers outside of them. The connectivity of subpopulations between these thickets on the island is not established, as B. pygmaeus movement data is still lacking. We found 79 individuals of B. pygmaeus; 70 were found in mangroves and 9 were observed just beyond the periphery of the mangroves in non-mangrove tree species. Low population number, habitat fragmentation and habitat loss could lead to inbreeding, a loss of genetic diversity, and extinction of B. pygmaeus. PMID:23185461

  14. The role of continental shelf width in determining freshwater phylogeographic patterns in south-eastern Australian pygmy perches (Teleostei: Percichthyidae).

    PubMed

    Unmack, Peter J; Hammer, Michael P; Adams, Mark; Johnson, Jerald B; Dowling, Thomas E

    2013-03-01

    Biogeographic patterns displayed by obligate freshwater organisms are intimately related to the nature and extent of connectivity between suitable habitats. Two of the more significant barriers to freshwater connections are seawater and major drainage divides. South-eastern Australia provides a contrast between these barriers as it has discrete areas that are likely influenced to a greater or lesser extent by each barrier type. We use continental shelf width as a proxy for the potential degree of river coalescence during low sea levels. Our specific hypothesis is that the degree of phylogeographic divergence between coastal river basins should correspond to the continental shelf width of each region. This predicts that genetic divergences between river basins should be lowest in regions with a wider continental shelf and that regions with similar continental shelf width should have similar genetic divergences. Pygmy perches (Nannoperca australis and Nannoperca 'flindersi') in south-eastern Australia provide an ideal opportunity to test these biogeographic hypotheses. Phylogeographic patterns were examined based on range-wide sampling of 82 populations for cytochrome b and 23 polymorphic allozyme loci. Our results recovered only limited support for our continental shelf width hypothesis, although patterns within Bass clade were largely congruent with reconstructed low sea-level drainage patterns. In addition, we identified several instances of drainage divide crossings, typically associated with low elevational differences. Our results demonstrate high levels of genetic heterogeneity with important conservation implications, especially for declining populations in the Murray-Darling Basin and a highly restricted disjunct population in Ansons River, Tasmania.

  15. Low genetic diversity in pygmy blue whales is due to climate-induced diversification rather than anthropogenic impacts.

    PubMed

    Attard, Catherine R M; Beheregaray, Luciano B; Jenner, K Curt S; Gill, Peter C; Jenner, Micheline-Nicole M; Morrice, Margaret G; Teske, Peter R; Möller, Luciana M

    2015-05-01

    Unusually low genetic diversity can be a warning of an urgent need to mitigate causative anthropogenic activities. However, current low levels of genetic diversity in a population could also be due to natural historical events, including recent evolutionary divergence, or long-term persistence at a small population size. Here, we determine whether the relatively low genetic diversity of pygmy blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus brevicauda) in Australia is due to natural causes or overexploitation. We apply recently developed analytical approaches in the largest genetic dataset ever compiled to study blue whales (297 samples collected after whaling and representing lineages from Australia, Antarctica and Chile). We find that low levels of genetic diversity in Australia are due to a natural founder event from Antarctic blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia) that occurred around the Last Glacial Maximum, followed by evolutionary divergence. Historical climate change has therefore driven the evolution of blue whales into genetically, phenotypically and behaviourally distinct lineages that will likely be influenced by future climate change.

  16. High diversity and unique composition of gut microbiomes in pygmy (Kogia breviceps) and dwarf (K. sima) sperm whales.

    PubMed

    Erwin, Patrick M; Rhodes, Ryan G; Kiser, Kevin B; Keenan-Bateman, Tiffany F; McLellan, William A; Pabst, D Ann

    2017-08-03

    Mammals host diverse bacterial and archaeal symbiont communities (i.e. microbiomes) that play important roles in digestive and immune system functioning, yet cetacean microbiomes remain largely unexplored, in part due to sample collection difficulties. Here, fecal samples from stranded pygmy (Kogia breviceps) and dwarf (K. sima) sperm whales were used to characterize the gut microbiomes of two closely-related species with similar diets. 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed diverse microbial communities in kogiid whales dominated by Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. Core symbiont taxa were affiliated with phylogenetic lineages capable of fermentative metabolism and sulfate respiration, indicating potential symbiont contributions to energy acquisition during prey digestion. The diversity and phylum-level composition of kogiid microbiomes differed from those previously reported in toothed whales, which exhibited low diversity communities dominated by Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. Community structure analyses revealed distinct gut microbiomes in K. breviceps and K. sima, driven by differential relative abundances of shared taxa, and unique microbiomes in kogiid hosts compared to other toothed and baleen whales, driven by differences in symbiont membership. These results provide insight into the diversity, composition and structure of kogiid gut microbiomes and indicate that host identity plays an important role in structuring cetacean microbiomes, even at fine-scale taxonomic levels.

  17. [Rare metastases].

    PubMed

    Carzaniga, P L; Radaelli, F; Russo, R; Sforza, M; Stradiotti, G; Vertemati, G

    1992-11-01

    The paper reports a number of cases of uncommon metastasis confirmed by histological tests in surgical biopsies; following a brief discussion of the literature on this topic and in particular on the basis of an earlier study by one of the authors, the paper affirms that metastasis is related to general and local biological factors, that the diffusion of neoplastic cells is an early and generalised phenomenon opposed by organic defence mechanisms, and that the concept of uncommon metastasis should be revised, without resorting to fixed anatomical references, according to a general "impregnation" of tumour cells.

  18. A rare association of localized scleroderma type morphea, vitiligo, autoimmune hypothyroidism, pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case report.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Abadía, Fabio; Muñoz-Buitrón, Evelyn; Ochoa, Carlos D; Carrascal, Edwin; Cañas, Carlos A

    2012-12-20

    The localized scleroderma (LS) known as morphea, presents a variety of clinical manifestations that can include systemic involvement. Current classification schemes divide morphea into categories based solely on cutaneous morphology, without reference to systemic disease or autoimmune phenomena. This classification is likely incomplete. Autoimmune phenomena such as vitiligo and Hashimoto thyroiditis associated with LS have been reported in some cases suggesting an autoimmune basis. To our knowledge this is the first case of a morphea forming part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) and presenting simultaneously with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. We report an uncommon case of a white 53 year old female patient with LS as part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome associated with pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis presenting a favorable response with thrombopoietin receptor agonists, pulses of methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Is likely that LS have an autoimmune origin and in this case becomes part of MAS, which consist on the presence of three or more well-defined autoimmune diseases in a single patient.

  19. A rare association of localized scleroderma type morphea, vitiligo, autoimmune hypothyroidism, pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The localized scleroderma (LS) known as morphea, presents a variety of clinical manifestations that can include systemic involvement. Current classification schemes divide morphea into categories based solely on cutaneous morphology, without reference to systemic disease or autoimmune phenomena. This classification is likely incomplete. Autoimmune phenomena such as vitiligo and Hashimoto thyroiditis associated with LS have been reported in some cases suggesting an autoimmune basis. To our knowledge this is the first case of a morphea forming part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) and presenting simultaneously with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case presentation We report an uncommon case of a white 53 year old female patient with LS as part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome associated with pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis presenting a favorable response with thrombopoietin receptor agonists, pulses of methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Conclusion Is likely that LS have an autoimmune origin and in this case becomes part of MAS, which consist on the presence of three or more well-defined autoimmune diseases in a single patient. PMID:23256875

  20. A Phylogeographic Survey of the Pygmy Mouse Mus minutoides in South Africa: Taxonomic and Karyotypic Inference from Cytochrome b Sequences of Museum Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Chevret, Pascale; Robinson, Terence J.; Perez, Julie; Veyrunes, Frédéric; Britton-Davidian, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The African pygmy mice (Mus, subgenus Nannomys) are a group of small-sized rodents that occur widely throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Chromosomal diversity within this group is extensive and numerous studies have shown the karyotype to be a useful taxonomic marker. This is pertinent to Mus minutoides populations in South Africa where two different cytotypes (2n = 34, 2n = 18) and a modification of the sex determination system (due to the presence of a Y chromosome in some females) have been recorded. This chromosomal diversity is mirrored by mitochondrial DNA sequences that unambiguously discriminate among the various pygmy mouse species and, importantly, the different M. minutoides cytotypes. However, the geographic delimitation and taxonomy of pygmy mice populations in South Africa is poorly understood. To address this, tissue samples of M. minutoides were taken and analysed from specimens housed in six South African museum collections. Partial cytochrome b sequences (400 pb) were successfully amplified from 44% of the 154 samples processed. Two species were identified: M. indutus and M. minutoides. The sequences of the M. indutus samples provided two unexpected features: i) nuclear copies of the cytochrome b gene were detected in many specimens, and ii) the range of this species was found to extend considerably further south than is presently understood. The phylogenetic analysis of the M. minutoides samples revealed two well-supported clades: a Southern clade which included the two chromosomal groups previously identified in South Africa, and an Eastern clade that extended from Eastern Africa into South Africa. Congruent molecular phylogenetic and chromosomal datasets permitted the tentative chromosomal assignments of museum specimens within the different clades as well as the correction of misidentified museum specimens. PMID:24905736

  1. High prevalence of IgG antibodies to Ebola virus in the Efé pygmy population in the Watsa region, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    PubMed

    Mulangu, Sabue; Borchert, Matthias; Paweska, Janusz; Tshomba, Antoine; Afounde, Afongenda; Kulidri, Amayo; Swanepoel, Robert; Muyembe-Tamfum, Jean-Jacques; Van der Stuyft, Patrick

    2016-06-10

    Factors related to the natural transmission of Ebola virus (EBOV) to humans are still not well defined. Results of previous sero-prevalence studies suggest that circulation of EBOV in human population is common in sub-Saharan Africa. The Efé pygmies living in Democratic Republic of the Congo are known to be exposed to potential risk factors of EBOV infection such as bush meat hunting, entry into caves, and contact with bats. We studied the pygmy population of Watsa region to determine seroprevalence to EBOV infection and possible risks factors. Volunteer participants (N = 300) aged 10 years or above were interviewed about behavior that may constitute risk factors for transmission of EBOV, including exposures to rats, bats, monkeys and entry into caves. Samples of venous blood were collected and tested for IgG antibody against EBOV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The χ2-test and Fisher's exact test were used for the comparison of proportions and the Student's t-test to compare means. The association between age group and anti-EBOV IgG prevalence was analysed by a nonparametric test for trend. The prevalence of anti-EBOV IgG was 18.7 % overall and increased significantly with age (p = 0.023). No association was observed with exposure to risk factors (contacts with rats, bats, monkeys, or entry into caves). The seroprevalence of IgG antibody to EBOV in pygmies in Watsa region is among the highest ever reported, but it remains unclear which exposures might lead to this high infection rate calling for further ecological and behavioural studies.

  2. Molecular evolution of Azagny virus, a newfound hantavirus harbored by the West African pygmy shrew (Crocidura obscurior) in Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hae Ji; Kadjo, Blaise; Dubey, Sylvain; Jacquet, François; Yanagihara, Richard

    2011-07-28

    Tanganya virus (TGNV), the only shrew-associated hantavirus reported to date from sub-Saharan Africa, is harbored by the Therese's shrew (Crocidura theresae), and is phylogenetically distinct from Thottapalayam virus (TPMV) in the Asian house shrew (Suncus murinus) and Imjin virus (MJNV) in the Ussuri white-toothed shrew (Crocidura lasiura). The existence of myriad soricid-borne hantaviruses in Eurasia and North America would predict the presence of additional hantaviruses in sub-Saharan Africa, where multiple shrew lineages have evolved and diversified. Lung tissues, collected in RNAlater®, from 39 Buettikofer's shrews (Crocidura buettikoferi), 5 Jouvenet's shrews (Crocidura jouvenetae), 9 West African pygmy shrews (Crocidura obscurior) and 21 African giant shrews (Crocidura olivieri) captured in Côte d'Ivoire during 2009, were systematically examined for hantavirus RNA by RT-PCR. A genetically distinct hantavirus, designated Azagny virus (AZGV), was detected in the West African pygmy shrew. Phylogenetic analysis of the S, M and L segments, using maximum-likelihood and Bayesian methods, under the GTR+I+Γ model of evolution, showed that AZGV shared a common ancestry with TGNV and was more closely related to hantaviruses harbored by soricine shrews than to TPMV and MJNV. That is, AZGV in the West African pygmy shrew, like TGNV in the Therese's shrew, did not form a monophyletic group with TPMV and MJNV, which were deeply divergent and basal to other rodent- and soricomorph-borne hantaviruses. Ancestral distributions of each hantavirus lineage, reconstructed using Mesquite 2.74, suggested that the common ancestor of all hantaviruses was most likely of Eurasian, not African, origin. Genome-wide analysis of many more hantaviruses from sub-Saharan Africa are required to better understand how the biogeographic origin and radiation of African shrews might have contributed to, or have resulted from, the evolution of hantaviruses.

  3. A phylogeographic survey of the pygmy mouse Mus minutoides in South Africa: taxonomic and karyotypic inference from cytochrome b sequences of museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Chevret, Pascale; Robinson, Terence J; Perez, Julie; Veyrunes, Frédéric; Britton-Davidian, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The African pygmy mice (Mus, subgenus Nannomys) are a group of small-sized rodents that occur widely throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Chromosomal diversity within this group is extensive and numerous studies have shown the karyotype to be a useful taxonomic marker. This is pertinent to Mus minutoides populations in South Africa where two different cytotypes (2n = 34, 2n = 18) and a modification of the sex determination system (due to the presence of a Y chromosome in some females) have been recorded. This chromosomal diversity is mirrored by mitochondrial DNA sequences that unambiguously discriminate among the various pygmy mouse species and, importantly, the different M. minutoides cytotypes. However, the geographic delimitation and taxonomy of pygmy mice populations in South Africa is poorly understood. To address this, tissue samples of M. minutoides were taken and analysed from specimens housed in six South African museum collections. Partial cytochrome b sequences (400 pb) were successfully amplified from 44% of the 154 samples processed. Two species were identified: M. indutus and M. minutoides. The sequences of the M. indutus samples provided two unexpected features: i) nuclear copies of the cytochrome b gene were detected in many specimens, and ii) the range of this species was found to extend considerably further south than is presently understood. The phylogenetic analysis of the M. minutoides samples revealed two well-supported clades: a Southern clade which included the two chromosomal groups previously identified in South Africa, and an Eastern clade that extended from Eastern Africa into South Africa. Congruent molecular phylogenetic and chromosomal datasets permitted the tentative chromosomal assignments of museum specimens within the different clades as well as the correction of misidentified museum specimens.

  4. Local foods can meet micronutrient needs for women in urban Burkina Faso, but only if rarely consumed micronutrient-dense foods are included in daily diets: A linear programming exercise.

    PubMed

    Arimond, Mary; Vitta, Bineti S; Martin-Prével, Yves; Moursi, Mourad; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2017-05-02

    Women of reproductive age are at nutritional risk due to their need for nutrient-dense diets. Risk is further elevated in resource-poor environments. In one such environment, we evaluated feasibility of meeting micronutrient needs of women of reproductive age using local foods alone or using local foods and supplements, while minimizing cost. Based on dietary recall data from Ouagadougou, we used linear programming to identify the lowest cost options for meeting 10 micronutrient intake recommendations, while also meeting energy needs and following an acceptable macronutrient intake pattern. We modeled scenarios with maximum intake per food item constrained at the 75th percentile of reported intake and also with more liberal maxima based on recommended portions per day, with and without the addition of supplements. Some scenarios allowed only commonly consumed foods (reported on at least 10% of recall days). We modeled separately for pregnant, lactating, and nonpregnant, nonlactating women. With maxima constrained to the 75th percentile, all micronutrient needs could be met with local foods but only when several nutrient-dense but rarely consumed items were included in daily diets. When only commonly consumed foods were allowed, micronutrient needs could not be met without supplements. When larger amounts of common animal-source foods were allowed, all needs could be met for nonpregnant, nonlactating women but not for pregnant or lactating women, without supplements. We conclude that locally available foods could meet micronutrient needs but that to achieve this, strategies would be needed to increase consistent availability in markets, consistent economic access, and demand. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Multitude of 2+ discrete states in 124Sn observed via the (17O 17O'γ) reaction: Evidence for pygmy quadrupole states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegri, L.; Bracco, A.; Tsoneva, N.; Avigo, R.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Bottoni, S.; Camera, F.; Ceruti, S.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Giaz, A.; Leoni, S.; Lenske, H.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Nicolini, R.; Wieland, O.; Bazzacco, D.; Bednarczyk, P.; Birkenbach, B.; Ciemała, M.; de Angelis, G.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grebosz, J.; Isocrate, R.; Kmiecik, M.; Krzysiek, M.; Lunardi, S.; Maj, A.; Mazurek, K.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Napoli, D. R.; Recchia, F.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Ur, C.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.

    2015-07-01

    A multitude of discrete 2+ states in 124Sn with energy up to 5 MeV were populated and identified with the (17O, 17O'γ) reaction at 340 MeV. Cross sections were compared with distorted wave Born approximation predictions and in general a good agreement was found. The measured energy and intensity distributions of the 2+ states are very similar to the predictions based on self-consistent density functional theory and extended QRPA approach accounting for multiphonon degrees of freedom. This provides evidence of the excitation of the pygmy quadrupole resonance in skin nuclei.

  6. Aspects of the biology of the pygmy ribbontail catshark Eridacnis radcliffei (Proscylliidae: Carcharhiniformes) from the south-west coast of India.

    PubMed

    Akhilesh, K V; Bineesh, K K; White, W T; Pillai, N G K

    2012-08-01

    Biological data are presented for the pygmy ribbontail catshark Eridacnis radcliffei based on specimens collected from the by-catch of the commercial deep-sea shrimp trawl fishery operating in the Arabian Sea off the south-west coast of India. A total of 549 individuals, from 101 to 257 mm total length (L(T)) and 2·2 to 56 g, were collected. The L(T) at first maturity (L(T50)) of females and males was estimated at 183 and 170 mm, respectively, and analysis of stomach contents revealed that E. radcliffei feeds primarily on crustaceans.

  7. l-5-hydroxytryptophan resets the circadian locomotor activity rhythm of the nocturnal Indian pygmy field mouse, Mus terricolor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Priyoneel; Singaravel, Muniyandi; Haldar, Chandana

    2012-03-01

    We report that l-5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), a serotonin precursor, resets the overt circadian rhythm in the Indian pygmy field mouse, Mus terricolor, in a phase- and dose-dependent manner. We used wheel running to assess phase shifts in the free-running locomotor activity rhythm. Following entrainment to a 12:12 h light-dark cycle, 5-HTP (100 mg/kg in saline) was intraperitoneally administered in complete darkness at circadian time (CT)s 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, and 21, and the ensuing phase shifts in the locomotor activity rhythm were calculated. The results show that 5-HTP differentially shifts the phase of the rhythm, causing phase advances from CT 0 to CT 12 and phase delays from CT 12 to CT 21. Maximum advance phase shift was at CT 6 (1.18 ± 0.37 h) and maximum delay was at CT 18 (-2.36 ± 0.56 h). No extended dead zone is apparent. Vehicle (saline) at any CT did not evoke a significant phase shift. Investigations with different doses (10, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) of 5-HTP revealed that the phase resetting effect is dose-dependent. The shape of the phase-response curve (PRC) has a strong similarity to PRCs obtained using some serotonergic agents. There was no significant increase in wheel-running activity after 5-HTP injection, ruling out behavioral arousal-dependent shifts. This suggests that this phase resetting does not completely depend on feedback of the overt rhythmic behavior on the circadian clock. A mechanistic explanation of these shifts is currently lacking.

  8. The burden and determinants of self-reported acute gastrointestinal illness in an Indigenous Batwa Pygmy population in southwestern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Clark, S; Berrang-Ford, L; Lwasa, S; Namanya, D B; Edge, V L; Harper, S

    2015-08-01

    Acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) is an important public health priority worldwide. Few studies have captured the burden of AGI in developing countries, and even fewer have focused on Indigenous populations. This study aimed to estimate the incidence and determinants of AGI within a Batwa Pygmy Indigenous population in southwestern Uganda. A retrospective cross-sectional survey was conducted in January 2013 via a census of 10 Batwa communities (n = 583 participants). The AGI case definition included any self-reported symptoms of diarrhoea or vomiting in the past 2 weeks. The 14-day prevalence of AGI was 6·17% [95% confidence interval (CI) 4·2-8·1], corresponding to an annual incidence rate of 1·66 (95% CI 1·1-2·2) episodes of AGI per person-year. AGI prevalence was greatest in children aged <3 years (11·3%). A multivariable mixed-effects logistic regression model controlling for clustering at the community level indicated that exposure to goats [odds ratio (OR) 2·6, 95% CI 1·0-6·8], being a child aged <3 years (OR 4·8, 95% CI 1·2-18·9), and being a child, adolescent or senior Batwa in the higher median of wealth (OR 7·0, 95% CI 3·9-9·2) were significantly associated with having AGI. This research represents the first Indigenous community-census level study of AGI in Uganda, and highlights the substantial burden of AGI within this population.

  9. Efficacy of a combination of 10% imidacloprid and 1% moxidectin against Caparinia tripilis in African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The efficacy and safety of a combination formulation of 10% imidacloprid + 1.0% moxidectin spot-on (Advocate® for Cats, Bayer Animal Health GmbH, Leverkusen, Germany) was tested in 40 African pygmy hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) naturally infested with Caparinia tripilis. Methods The optimal dosage level of the combination for hedgehogs was determined by assigning 20 hedgehogs into three treatment groups (0.1, 0.4 and 1.6 ml/Kg b.w.), and one untreated control group of 5 hedgehogs each. Twenty naturally infested hedgehogs were then randomly assigned to either treatment or control group with 10 animals each, and the number of live mites was counted from 13 body regions on day 0, 3, 9, 16, and 30 after single treatment at the dosage level of 0.1 ml/Kg. Results Before the chemotherapy, the highest density of mite was observed in external ear canals followed by the dorsal and the lowest in the ventral regions of the body surface. The dosage level of 0.1 ml/Kg, which corresponded to the recommended dosage level for cats, containing 10 mg imidacloprid and 1 mg moxidectin was also the optimal dosage level for hedgehogs. No hedgehogs in the treatment group showed live mites from day 3 post treatment. Side effects such as ataxia, depression, nausea, and weight fluctuation were not observed during the whole period of study. Conclusions This report suggests that a combination formulation of 0.1 ml/Kg of 10% imidacloprid + 1% moxidectin spot-on for cats is also useful for the control of Caparinia tripilis infestation in hedgehogs. PMID:22871121

  10. Efficacy of a combination of 10% imidacloprid and 1% moxidectin against Caparinia tripilis in African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyu-Rim; Ahn, Kyu-Sung; Oh, Dae-Sung; Shin, Sung-Shik

    2012-08-07

    The efficacy and safety of a combination formulation of 10% imidacloprid + 1.0% moxidectin spot-on (Advocate® for Cats, Bayer Animal Health GmbH, Leverkusen, Germany) was tested in 40 African pygmy hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) naturally infested with Caparinia tripilis. The optimal dosage level of the combination for hedgehogs was determined by assigning 20 hedgehogs into three treatment groups (0.1, 0.4 and 1.6 ml/Kg b.w.), and one untreated control group of 5 hedgehogs each. Twenty naturally infested hedgehogs were then randomly assigned to either treatment or control group with 10 animals each, and the number of live mites was counted from 13 body regions on day 0, 3, 9, 16, and 30 after single treatment at the dosage level of 0.1 ml/Kg. Before the chemotherapy, the highest density of mite was observed in external ear canals followed by the dorsal and the lowest in the ventral regions of the body surface. The dosage level of 0.1 ml/Kg, which corresponded to the recommended dosage level for cats, containing 10 mg imidacloprid and 1 mg moxidectin was also the optimal dosage level for hedgehogs. No hedgehogs in the treatment group showed live mites from day 3 post treatment. Side effects such as ataxia, depression, nausea, and weight fluctuation were not observed during the whole period of study. This report suggests that a combination formulation of 0.1 ml/Kg of 10% imidacloprid + 1% moxidectin spot-on for cats is also useful for the control of Caparinia tripilis infestation in hedgehogs.

  11. Camouflage Effects of Various Colour-Marking Morphs against Different Microhabitat Backgrounds in a Polymorphic Pygmy Grasshopper Tetrix japonica

    PubMed Central

    Tsurui, Kaori; Honma, Atsushi; Nishida, Takayoshi

    2010-01-01

    Background Colour-marking polymorphism is widely distributed among cryptic species. To account for the adaptive significance of such polymorphisms, several hypotheses have been proposed to date. Although these hypotheses argue over the degree of camouflage effects of marking morphs (and the interactions between morphs and their microhabitat backgrounds), as far as we know, most empirical evidence has been provided under unnatural conditions (i.e., using artificial prey). Methodology/Principal Findings Tetrix japonica, a pygmy grasshopper, is highly polymorphic in colour-markings and occurs in both sand and grass microhabitats. Even within a microhabitat, T. japonica is highly polymorphic. Using humans as dummy predators and printed photographs in which various morphs of grasshoppers were placed against different backgrounds, we addressed three questions to test the neutral, background heterogeneity, and differential crypsis hypotheses in four marking-type morphs: 1) do the morphs differ in the degree of crypsis in each microhabitat, 2) are different morphs most cryptic in specific backgrounds of the microhabitats, and 3) does the morph frequency reflect the degree of crypsis? Conclusions/Significance The degree of camouflage differed among the four morphs; therefore, the neutral hypothesis was rejected. Furthermore, the order of camouflage advantage among morphs differed depending on the two types of backgrounds (sand and grass), although the grass background consistently provided greater camouflage effects. Thus, based on our results, we could not reject the background heterogeneity hypothesis. Under field conditions, the more cryptic morphs comprised a minority of the population. Overall, our results demonstrate that the different morphs were not equivalent in the degree of crypsis, but the degree of camouflage of the morphs was not consistent with the morph frequency. These findings suggest that trade-offs exist between the camouflage benefit of body colouration

  12. Nitrogen Starvation and TorC1 Inhibition Differentially Affect Nuclear Localization of the Gln3 and Gat1 Transcription Factors Through the Rare Glutamine tRNACUG in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Jennifer J.; Rai, Rajendra; Cooper, Terrance G.

    2015-01-01

    A leucine, leucyl-tRNA synthetase–dependent pathway activates TorC1 kinase and its downstream stimulation of protein synthesis, a major nitrogen consumer. We previously demonstrated, however, that control of Gln3, a transcription activator of catabolic genes whose products generate the nitrogenous precursors for protein synthesis, is not subject to leucine-dependent TorC1 activation. This led us to conclude that excess nitrogen-dependent down-regulation of Gln3 occurs via a second mechanism that is independent of leucine-dependent TorC1 activation. A major site of Gln3 and Gat1 (another GATA-binding transcription activator) control occurs at their access to the nucleus. In excess nitrogen, Gln3 and Gat1 are sequestered in the cytoplasm in a Ure2-dependent manner. They become nuclear and activate transcription when nitrogen becomes limiting. Long-term nitrogen starvation and treatment of cells with the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (Msx) also elicit nuclear Gln3 localization. The sensitivity of Gln3 localization to glutamine and inhibition of glutamine synthesis prompted us to investigate the effects of a glutamine tRNA mutation (sup70-65) on nitrogen-responsive control of Gln3 and Gat1. We found that nuclear Gln3 localization elicited by short- and long-term nitrogen starvation; growth in a poor, derepressive medium; Msx or rapamycin treatment; or ure2Δ mutation is abolished in a sup70-65 mutant. However, nuclear Gat1 localization, which also exhibits a glutamine tRNACUG requirement for its response to short-term nitrogen starvation or growth in proline medium or a ure2Δ mutation, does not require tRNACUG for its response to rapamycin. Also, in contrast with Gln3, Gat1 localization does not respond to long-term nitrogen starvation. These observations demonstrate the existence of a specific nitrogen-responsive component participating in the control of Gln3 and Gat1 localization and their downstream production of nitrogenous precursors

  13. Separation of Pygmy Dipole and M1 Resonances in Zr90 by a High-Resolution Inelastic Proton Scattering Near 0°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, C.; Utsunomiya, H.; Tamii, A.; Akimune, H.; Nakada, H.; Shima, T.; Yamagata, T.; Kawabata, T.; Fujita, Y.; Matsubara, H.; Shimbara, Y.; Nagashima, M.; Suzuki, T.; Fujita, H.; Sakuda, M.; Mori, T.; Izumi, T.; Okamoto, A.; Kondo, T.; Bilgier, B.; Kozer, H. C.; Lui, Y.-W.; Hatanaka, K.

    2012-06-01

    A high-resolution measurement of inelastic proton scattering off Zr90 near 0° was performed at 295 MeV with a focus on a pronounced strength previously reported in the low-energy tail of giant dipole resonance. A forest of fine structure was observed in the excitation energy region 7-12 MeV. A multipole decomposition analysis of the angular distribution for the forest was carried out using the ECIS95 distorted-wave Born approximation code with the Hartree-Fock plus random-phase approximation model of E1 and M1 transition densities and inclusion of E1 Coulomb excitation. The analysis separated pygmy dipole and M1 resonances in the forest at EPDR=9.15±0.18MeV with ΓPDR=2.91±0.64MeV and at EM1=9.53±0.06MeV with ΓM1=2.70±0.17MeV in the Lorentzian function, respectively. The B(E1)↑ value for pygmy dipole resonance over 7-11 MeV is 0.75±0.08e2fm2, which corresponds to 2.1±0.2% of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule.

  14. Relative Undernourishment and Food Insecurity Associations with Plasmodium falciparum Among Batwa Pygmies in Uganda: Evidence from a Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Lewnard, Joseph A.; Berrang-Ford, Lea; Lwasa, Shuaib; Namanya, Didacus Bambaiha; Patterson, Kaitlin A.; Donnelly, Blánaid; Kulkarni, Manisha A.; Harper, Sherilee L.; Ogden, Nicholas H.; Carcamo, Cesar P.

    2014-01-01

    Although malnutrition and malaria co-occur among individuals and populations globally, effects of nutritional status on risk for parasitemia and clinical illness remain poorly understood. We investigated associations between Plasmodium falciparum infection, nutrition, and food security in a cross-sectional survey of 365 Batwa pygmies in Kanungu District, Uganda in January of 2013. We identified 4.1% parasite prevalence among individuals over 5 years old. Severe food insecurity was associated with increased risk for positive rapid immunochromatographic test outcome (adjusted relative risk [ARR] = 13.09; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 2.23–76.79). High age/sex-adjusted mid-upper arm circumference was associated with decreased risk for positive test among individuals who were not severely food-insecure (ARR = 0.37; 95% CI = 0.19–0.69). Within Batwa pygmy communities, where malnutrition and food insecurity are common, individuals who are particularly undernourished or severely food-insecure may have elevated risk for P. falciparum parasitemia. This finding may motivate integrated control of malaria and malnutrition in low-transmission settings. PMID:24821844

  15. Relative undernourishment and food insecurity associations with Plasmodium falciparum among Batwa pygmies in Uganda: evidence from a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Lewnard, Joseph A; Berrang-Ford, Lea; Lwasa, Shuaib; Namanya, Didacus Bambaiha; Patterson, Kaitlin A; Donnelly, Blánaid; Kulkarni, Manisha A; Harper, Sherilee L; Ogden, Nicholas H; Carcamo, Cesar P

    2014-07-01

    Although malnutrition and malaria co-occur among individuals and populations globally, effects of nutritional status on risk for parasitemia and clinical illness remain poorly understood. We investigated associations between Plasmodium falciparum infection, nutrition, and food security in a cross-sectional survey of 365 Batwa pygmies in Kanungu District, Uganda in January of 2013. We identified 4.1% parasite prevalence among individuals over 5 years old. Severe food insecurity was associated with increased risk for positive rapid immunochromatographic test outcome (adjusted relative risk [ARR] = 13.09; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 2.23-76.79). High age/sex-adjusted mid-upper arm circumference was associated with decreased risk for positive test among individuals who were not severely food-insecure (ARR = 0.37; 95% CI = 0.19-0.69). Within Batwa pygmy communities, where malnutrition and food insecurity are common, individuals who are particularly undernourished or severely food-insecure may have elevated risk for P. falciparum parasitemia. This finding may motivate integrated control of malaria and malnutrition in low-transmission settings.

  16. {gamma}-ray strength function for {sup 116,117}Sn with the pygmy dipole resonance balanced in the photoneutron and neutron capture channels

    SciTech Connect

    Utsunomiya, H.; Kamata, M.; Kondo, T.; Itoh, O.; Akimune, H.; Yamagata, T.; Goriely, S.; Toyokawa, H.; Lui, Y.-W.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A. J.

    2009-11-15

    Photoneutron cross sections were measured for {sup 117}Sn and {sup 116}Sn near the neutron thresholds at 6.94 and 9.56 MeV, respectively, with quasi-monochromatic laser-Compton scattering {gamma} rays. The {sup 117}Sn cross section, which is strongly enhanced near the low threshold, provides evidence for the presence of extra {gamma} strength in the low-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance. A coherent analysis of the photoneutron data for {sup 117}Sn together with the neutron capture on {sup 116}Sn shows that the {gamma}-ray strength function is balanced in the photoneutron and neutron capture channels in terms of the microscopic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov plus quasiparticle random-phase approximation model of E1 strength combined with a pygmy E1 resonance at 8.5 MeV. The high-energy part of the pygmy resonance is also suggested in the photoneutron cross section for {sup 116}Sn.

  17. An outbreak of Caparinia tripilis in a colony of African pygmy hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) from Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Da-Hee; Oh, Dae-Sung; Ahn, Kyu-Sung; Shin, Sung-Shik

    2012-06-01

    In February 2010, dermatitis characterized by scale and self-trauma due to puritis was recognized in a group of 22 four-toed hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris Wagner, 1841) from a local pet shop in Gwangju, Korea. Microscopic examinations of skin scraping samples showed numerous mites of all developmental stages. Morphologically, pedicels of adult mites were short and unjointed. Tarsal caruncles were bell-shaped on all legs of males while they were absent on legs III and IV of females. Three long setae on the third pair of legs in both sexes were present. Adult males had posterior end of the abdomen with trilobate projection on each side, each lobe with a long seta. Based on these features, the mites were identified as Caparinia tripilis. This is the first report of caparinic mite infestation in hedgehogs from Korea. Identification keys for the family Psoroptidae and the genus Caparinia are provided.

  18. An Outbreak of Caparinia tripilis in a Colony of African Pygmy Hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) from Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Da-Hee; Oh, Dae-Sung; Ahn, Kyu-Sung

    2012-01-01

    In February 2010, dermatitis characterized by scale and self-trauma due to puritis was recognized in a group of 22 four-toed hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris Wagner, 1841) from a local pet shop in Gwangju, Korea. Microscopic examinations of skin scraping samples showed numerous mites of all developmental stages. Morphologically, pedicels of adult mites were short and unjointed. Tarsal caruncles were bell-shaped on all legs of males while they were absent on legs III and IV of females. Three long setae on the third pair of legs in both sexes were present. Adult males had posterior end of the abdomen with trilobate projection on each side, each lobe with a long seta. Based on these features, the mites were identified as Caparinia tripilis. This is the first report of caparinic mite infestation in hedgehogs from Korea. Identification keys for the family Psoroptidae and the genus Caparinia are provided. PMID:22711928

  19. Pygmy resonance and low-energy enhancement in the γ-ray strength functions of Pd isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, T. K.; Nyhus, H. T.; Guttormsen, M.; Görgen, A.; Larsen, A. C.; Renstrøm, T.; Ruud, I. E.; Siem, S.; Toft, H. K.; Tveten, G. M.; Wilson, J. N.

    2014-10-01

    Background: An unexpected enhancement in the γ-ray strength function, as compared to the low-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance (GDR), has been observed for Sc, Ti, V, Fe, and Mo isotopes for Eγ<4 MeV. This enhancement was not observed in subsequent analyses on Sn isotopes, but a pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) centered at Eγ≈8 MeV was however detected. The γ-ray strength functions measured for Cd isotopes exhibit both features over the range of isotopes, with the low-energy enhancement decreasing and PDR strength increasing as a function of neutron number. This suggests a transitional region for the onset of low-energy enhancement, and also that the PDR strength depends on the number of neutrons. Purpose: The γ-ray strength functions of Pd105-108 have been measured in order to further explore the proposed transitional region. Method: Experimental data were obtained at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory by using the charged particle reactions (He3,He3'γ) and (He3,αγ) on Pd106,108 target foils. Particle-γ coincidence measurements provided information on initial excitation energies and the corresponding γ-ray spectra, which were used to extract the level densities and γ-ray strength functions according to the Oslo method. Results: The γ-ray strength functions indicate a sudden increase in magnitude for Eγ>4 MeV, which is interpreted as a PDR centered at Eγ≈8 MeV. An enhanced γ-ray strength at low energies is also observed for Pd105, which is the lightest isotope measured in this work. Conclusions: A PDR is clearly identified in the γ-ray strength functions of Pd105-108, and a low-energy enhancement is observed for Pd105. Further, the results correspond and agree very well with the observations from the Cd isotopes, and support the suggested transitional region for the onset of low-energy enhancement with decreasing mass number. The neutron number dependency of the PDR strength is also evident.

  20. Transcriptome Markers of Viral Persistence in Naturally-Infected Andes Virus (Bunyaviridae) Seropositive Long-Tailed Pygmy Rice Rats

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Corey L.; Torres-Perez, Fernando; Acuna-Retamar, Mariana; Schountz, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Long-tailed pygmy rice rats (Oligoryzomys longicaudatus) are principal reservoir hosts of Andes virus (ANDV) (Bunyaviridae), which causes most hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome cases in the Americas. To develop tools for the study of the ANDV-host interactions, we used RNA-Seq to generate a de novo transcriptome assembly. Splenic RNA from five rice rats captured in Chile, three of which were ANDV-infected, was used to generate an assembly of 66,173 annotated transcripts, including noncoding RNAs. Phylogenetic analysis of selected predicted proteins showed similarities to those of the North American deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), the principal reservoir of Sin Nombre virus (SNV). One of the infected rice rats had about 50-fold more viral burden than the others, suggesting acute infection, whereas the remaining two had levels consistent with persistence. Differential expression analysis revealed distinct signatures among the infected rodents. The differences could be due to 1) variations in viral load, 2) dimorphic or reproductive differences in splenic homing of immune cells, or 3) factors of unknown etiology. In the two persistently infected rice rats, suppression of the JAK-STAT pathway at Stat5b and Ccnot1, elevation of Casp1, RIG-I pathway factors Ppp1cc and Mff, and increased FC receptor-like transcripts occurred. Caspase-1 and Stat5b activation pathways have been shown to stimulate T helper follicular cell (TFH) development in other species. These data are also consistent with reports suggestive of TFH stimulation in deer mice experimentally infected with hantaviruses. In the remaining acutely infected rice rat, the apoptotic pathway marker Cox6a1 was elevated, and putative anti-viral factors Abcb1a, Fam46c, Spp1, Rxra, Rxrb, Trmp2 and Trim58 were modulated. Transcripts for preproenkephalin (Prenk) were reduced, which may be predictive of an increased T cell activation threshold. Taken together, this transcriptome dataset will permit rigorous

  1. Pygmy dipole mode in deformed neutron-rich Mg isotopes close to the drip line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kenichi

    2009-10-01

    We investigate the microscopic structure of the low-lying isovector-dipole excitation mode in neutron-rich Mg36,38,40 close to the drip line by means of the deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation employing the Skyrme and the local pairing energy-density functionals. It is found that the low-lying bump structure above the neutron emission-threshold energy develops when the drip line is approached, and that the isovector dipole strength at Ex<10 MeV exhausts about 6.0% of the classical Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn dipole sum rule in Mg40. We obtained the collective dipole modes at around 8-10 MeV in Mg isotopes, that consist of many two-quasiparticle excitations of the neutron. The transition density clearly shows an oscillation of the neutron skin against the isoscalar core. We found significant coupling effects between the dipole and octupole excitation modes due to the nuclear deformation. It is also found that the responses for the compressional dipole and isoscalar octupole excitations are much enhanced in the lower energy region.

  2. [Adamantinoma of the clavicle: rare tumor for rare location].

    PubMed

    Rifi, M; Mahfoud, M; Zouaidia, F; El Yaacoubi, M

    2013-06-01

    Adamantinoma is a rare primary low-grade malignant tumor composed of cells with epithelial and fibrous characteristics. It represents 0.4% of all primitive malignant bone tumours. It is predominantly located in the mid-shaft of tibia. We report an adamantinoma of the clavicle, occurring in a 19-year-old female patient. The lateral half of the clavicle was excised. After a period of 3 years, she is still remaining free of local recurrence and metastatic disease.

  3. Pygmy Gamow-Teller resonance in the N =50 region: New evidence from staggering of β -delayed neutron-emission probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verney, D.; Testov, D.; Ibrahim, F.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.; Roussière, B.; Smirnov, V.; Didierjean, F.; Flanagan, K.; Franchoo, S.; Kuznetsova, E.; Li, R.; Marsh, B.; Matea, I.; Pai, H.; Sokol, E.; Stefan, I.; Suzuki, D.

    2017-05-01

    We report on the β -delayed neutron emission probability (P1 n) measurements of the 82,83,84Ga (N =51 ,52 ,53 ) precursors performed in one single experiment using the 3He neutron-counter TETRA at the ALTO facility in Orsay. Altogether our results for the three A =82 ,83 , and 84 Ga precursors point towards a sizable P1 n staggering in the N =50 region, similar to the one already observed just after the N =28 shell closure in the K isotopes chain, hinting at a similar mechanism. We will discuss the possible microscopic origin of this behavior, i.e., the existence in the light N =51 isotones of low-lying components of the so called pygmy Gamow-Teller resonance, already well established at Z =36 , and persisting toward 79Ni.

  4. Molecular epidemiology of 58 new African human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) strains: identification of a new and distinct HTLV-1 molecular subtype in Central Africa and in Pygmies.

    PubMed Central

    Mahieux, R; Ibrahim, F; Mauclere, P; Herve, V; Michel, P; Tekaia, F; Chappey, C; Garin, B; Van Der Ryst, E; Guillemain, B; Ledru, E; Delaporte, E; de The, G; Gessain, A

    1997-01-01

    To gain new insights on the origin, evolution, and modes of dissemination of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1), we performed a molecular analysis of 58 new African HTLV-1 strains (18 from West Africa, 36 from Central Africa, and 4 from South Africa) originating from 13 countries. Of particular interest were eight strains from Pygmies of remote areas of Cameroon and the Central African Republic (CAR), considered to be the oldest inhabitants of these regions. Eight long-term activated T-cell lines producing HTLV-1 gag and env antigens were established from peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures of HTLV-1 seropositive individuals, including three from Pygmies. A fragment of the env gene encompassing most of the gp21 transmembrane region was sequenced for the 58 new strains, while the complete long terminal repeat (LTR) region was sequenced for 9 strains, including 4 from Pygmies. Comparative sequence analyses and phylogenetic studies performed on both the env and LTR regions by the neighbor-joining and DNA parsimony methods demonstrated that all 22 strains from West and South Africa belong to the widespread cosmopolitan subtype (also called HTLV-1 subtype A). Within or alongside the previously described Zairian cluster (HTLV-1 subtype B), we discovered a number of new HTLV-1 variants forming different subgroups corresponding mainly to the geographical origins of the infected persons, Cameroon, Gabon, and Zaire. Six of the eight Pygmy strains clustered together within this Central African subtype, suggesting a common origin. Furthermore, three new strains (two originating from Pygmies from Cameroon and the CAR, respectively, and one from a Gabonese individual) were particularly divergent and formed a distinct new phylogenetic cluster, characterized by specific mutations and occupying in most analyses a unique phylogenetic position between the large Central African genotype (HTLV-1 subtype B) and the Melanesian subtype (HTLV-1 subtype C). We have

  5. The Lombardy Rare Donor Programme.

    PubMed

    Revelli, Nicoletta; Villa, Maria Antonietta; Paccapelo, Cinzia; Manera, Maria Cristina; Rebulla, Paolo; Migliaccio, Anna Rita; Marconi, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    In 2005, the government of Lombardy, an Italian region with an ethnically varied population of approximately 9.8 million inhabitants including 250,000 blood donors, founded the Lombardy Rare Donor Programme, a regional network of 15 blood transfusion departments coordinated by the Immunohaematology Reference Laboratory of the Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico in Milan. During 2005 to 2012, Lombardy funded LORD-P with 14.1 million euros. During 2005-2012 the Lombardy Rare Donor Programme members developed a registry of blood donors and a bank of red blood cell units with either rare blood group phenotypes or IgA deficiency. To do this, the Immunohaematology Reference Laboratory performed extensive serological and molecular red blood cell typing in 59,738 group O or A, Rh CCDee, ccdee, ccDEE, ccDee, K- or k- donors aged 18-55 with a record of two or more blood donations, including both Caucasians and ethnic minorities. In parallel, the Immunohaematology Reference Laboratory implemented a 24/7 service of consultation, testing and distribution of rare units for anticipated or emergent transfusion needs in patients developing complex red blood cell alloimmunisation and lacking local compatible red blood cell or showing IgA deficiency. Red blood cell typing identified 8,747, 538 and 33 donors rare for a combination of common antigens, negative for high-frequency antigens and with a rare Rh phenotype, respectively. In June 2012, the Lombardy Rare Donor Programme frozen inventory included 1,157 red blood cell units. From March 2010 to June 2012 one IgA-deficient donor was detected among 1,941 screened donors and IgA deficiency was confirmed in four previously identified donors. From 2005 to June 2012, the Immunohaematology Reference Laboratory provided 281 complex red blood cell alloimmunisation consultations and distributed 8,008 Lombardy Rare Donor Programme red blood cell units within and outside the region, which were transfused to 2,365 patients with no

  6. Rare Disorders and Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umlauf, Mary; Monaco, Jana; FitzZaland, Mary; FitzZaland, Richard; Novitsky, Scott

    2008-01-01

    According to the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD), a rare or "orphan" disease affects fewer than 200,000 people in the United States. There are more than 6,000 rare disorders that, taken together, affect approximately 25 million Americans. "Exceptional Parent" ("EP") recognizes that when a disorder affects a child or adult, it…

  7. Rare Disorders and Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umlauf, Mary; Monaco, Jana; FitzZaland, Mary; FitzZaland, Richard; Novitsky, Scott

    2008-01-01

    According to the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD), a rare or "orphan" disease affects fewer than 200,000 people in the United States. There are more than 6,000 rare disorders that, taken together, affect approximately 25 million Americans. "Exceptional Parent" ("EP") recognizes that when a disorder affects a child or adult, it…

  8. Rare earth lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    In this brief survey, some of the key spectroscopic properties of rare earths are reviewed that account for their versatility, examine recent research trends and developments, and comment upon future projects for rare earth lasers. For gaseous and liquid lasers, other elements and molecules have thus far demonstrated lasing properties more attractive than those available using rare earths. Therefore, remarks shall be limited to solid state lasers.

  9. Pediatric vasitis: A rare complication of epididymitis

    PubMed Central

    Schurr, Efrat; Cytter-Kuint, Ruth; Ehrlichman, Matityahu; Weiser, Giora

    2014-01-01

    Vasitis represents an inflammation of the vas deferens. This is a rare entity seen mostly in adult males following local surgery (e.g., vasectomy, hernia repair). Children with groin masses have a wide differential diagnosis. We describe a child with a groin mass following epididymitis diagnosed with vasitis and review the known literature regarding diagnostic tools and treatment. Vasitis in children, although rare, can be seen as a complication of epididymitis. PMID:25024800

  10. A Guide to the Recorded Distribution of Endangered, Threatened and Rare Species in Michigan. Providing a Bibliographic Discussion of the Subject, Annotated List of Reference Sources and Directory of Local Nature Associations, Centers, Agencies, and University Field Stations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakes, Nancy A.

    This document is a guide to sources of information on endangered species distribution in Michigan. It was prepared for CETA (Comprehensive Employment and Training Act) students who will collect the documents. The guide is divided into three major sections. The first section includes an introduction (briefly discussing endangered, rare, threatened…

  11. A Guide to the Recorded Distribution of Endangered, Threatened and Rare Species in Michigan. Providing a Bibliographic Discussion of the Subject, Annotated List of Reference Sources and Directory of Local Nature Associations, Centers, Agencies, and University Field Stations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakes, Nancy A.

    This document is a guide to sources of information on endangered species distribution in Michigan. It was prepared for CETA (Comprehensive Employment and Training Act) students who will collect the documents. The guide is divided into three major sections. The first section includes an introduction (briefly discussing endangered, rare, threatened…

  12. Rare Parotid Gland Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sanan, Akshay; Cognetti, David M

    2016-04-01

    The differential diagnosis for "rare" parotid gland diseases is broad and encompasses infectious, neoplastic, autoimmune, metabolic, and iatrogenic etiologies. The body of knowledge of parotid gland diseases has grown owing to advances in imaging and pathologic analysis and molecular technology. This article reviews rare parotid diseases, discussing the respective disease's clinical presentation, diagnosis, imaging, pathogenesis, treatment, and prognosis.

  13. Is schizophrenia rare if grain is rare?

    PubMed

    Dohan, F C; Harper, E H; Clark, M H; Rodrigue, R B; Zigas, V

    1984-03-01

    If, as hypothesized, neuroactive peptides from grain glutens are the major agents evoking schizophrenia in those with the genotype(s), it should be rare if grain is rare. To test this, we analyzed the results of our clinical examinations (e.g., kuru) and observations of anthropologists on peoples consuming little or no grain. Only two overtly insane chronic schizophrenics were found among over 65,000 examined or closely observed adults in remote regions of Papua New Guinea (PNG, 1950-1967) and Malaita , Solomon Islands (1980-1981), and on Yap , Micronesia (1947-1948). In preneuroleptic Europe over 130 would have been expected. When these peoples became partially westernized and consumed wheat, barley beer, and rice, the prevalence reached European levels. Our findings agree with previous epidemiologic and experimental results indicating that grain glutens are harmful to schizophrenics.

  14. Rare cancers: Challenges & issues.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Raveendran K; Jayasree, K

    2017-01-01

    Rare cancers account for about 22 per cent of all cancers diagnosed worldwide, disproportionately affecting some demographic groups, with an occurrence of less than 6 per 100,000 individuals annually. Many rare cancers in adults, adolescents and children are not curable, and patients and care providers have little option to take therapeutic decisions. The epidemiology of rare cancers is a challenging area of study but is inadequately addressed. Despite efforts mainly in some European nations, a few improvements have been observed in the management of rare cancers. Reasons for this obvious stagnation are multifactorial and are mainly inherent to logistical difficulties in carrying out clinical trials in very small patient populations, hesitation of the pharmaceutical industry to spend in small markets and complexity in creating adequate information for the development of cost-effective drugs. Rare cancers also face specific challenges that include late and incorrect diagnosis, lack of clinical expertise and lack of research interest and development of new therapies. The utilization of nationally representative study findings for the patients' evaluation may possibly offer chances to find out pathogenesis and prevalence, and this will eventually lead to control and prevention. Currently, advancing targeted therapies offer a great opportunity for the better management of rare cancers. Conducting clinical trials with small patient population, innovative clinical trial approach, prevailing controlling obstacles for international cooperation and financial support for research are the present challenges for rare cancers. The International Rare Cancers Initiative functions as a main platform for achieving new international clinical trials in rare tumours. This review delineates the current challenges and issues in the interpretation, management and research scenarios of rare cancers.

  15. Rare Diseases Research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Extensive public-private partnerships, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the rare diseases community, which is seeing a renewed industry interest in smaller niche markets, have resulted in an increase of interventions for rare diseases. Significant collaborative efforts are required among the pharmaceutical industry, foundations, patient-advocacy groups, academic and government investigators and funding programs, regulatory scientists, and reimbursement agencies to meet the unmet diagnostic and treatment needs for approximately 25 million people in the United States with 7,000 rare diseases. The expanding role and outreach activities of patient-advocacy groups have increased public awareness. In the United States, a rare disease is defined as a disorder or condition with a prevalence of < 200,000 people. In 2011, the NIH provided > $3.5 billion for rare diseases research, including $750 million for orphan product development activities, nearly 11.4% of the NIH research budget. Several research institutes and centers of the NIH, including the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, have initiated varied translational research efforts to address the absence of preclinical and clinical data required for regulatory review purposes. Clinicians can expect to see significant increases in requests from patients and their families to participate in patient registries and natural history or observational studies to gather specific information from a larger pool of patients on the progression of the disease or response to treatments. An expanding emphasis on rare diseases provides hope for the millions of patients with rare diseases. PMID:23880676

  16. Methane production by two non-ruminant foregut-fermenting herbivores: The collared peccary (Pecari tajacu) and the pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis).

    PubMed

    Vendl, Catharina; Frei, Samuel; Dittmann, Marie Theres; Furrer, Samuel; Ortmann, Sylvia; Lawrenz, Arne; Lange, Bastian; Munn, Adam; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4) production varies between herbivore species, but reasons for this variation remain to be elucidated. Here, we report open-circuit chamber respiration measurements of CH4 production in four specimens each of two non-ruminant mammalian herbivores with a complex forestomach but largely differing in body size, the collared peccary (Pecari tajacu, mean body mass 17kg) and the pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis, 229kg) fed lucerne-based diets. In addition, food intake, digestibility and mean retention times were measured in the same experiments. CH4 production averaged 8 and 72L/d, 18 and 19L/kg dry matter intake, and 4.0 and 4.2% of gross energy intake for the two species, respectively. When compared with previously reported data on CH4 production in other non-ruminant and ruminant foregut-fermenting as well as hindgut-fermenting species, it is evident that neither the question whether a species is a foregut fermenter or not, or whether it ruminates or not, is of the relevance previously suggested to explain variation in CH4 production between species. Rather, differences in CH4 production between species on similar diets appear related to species-specific differences in food intake and digesta retention kinetics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A comparison of the nitrogen requirements of the eastern pygmy possum, Cercartetus nanus, on a pollen and on a mealworm diet.

    PubMed

    van Tets, I G; Hulbert, A J

    1999-01-01

    The eastern pygmy possum, Cercartetus nanus, is known to feed both on flower products and on invertebrates. This study compares its ability to meet its nitrogen requirements on pollen and on insect larvae. Captive C. nanus were fed diets in which nitrogen was provided either by Eucalyptus pollen or by the mealworm Tenebrio molitor. The apparent digestibility of the nitrogen from both sources was high, with a mean value of 76% for the pollen and 73% for the mealworms. This was much higher than would have been inferred from the common practice of measuring the percentage of empty pollen grains in fecal samples. The truly digestible maintenance nitrogen requirements of C. nanus on pollen were exceptionally low: 2.6 mg N d-1 compared with 9.5 mg N d-1 on mealworms. The value for pollen is the lowest yet recorded for any mammal. The difference between the requirements of C. nanus on the two diets appeared to be related to the composition of the mealworm and pollen protein. The biological value of the pollen nitrogen was exceptionally high for a plant protein, at 72%, whereas the biological value of the mealworm nitrogen was only 42%. This suggests that the amino acid composition of the pollen corresponded more closely to the requirements of C. nanus than the composition of the mealworm protein did. Pollen is an excellent source of nitrogen for C. nanus, and it should be considered as a potential nitrogen source for other flower-feeding animals.

  18. Model-based analyses of whole-genome data reveal a complex evolutionary history involving archaic introgression in Central African Pygmies.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, PingHsun; Woerner, August E; Wall, Jeffrey D; Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah A; Gutenkunst, Ryan N; Hammer, Michael F

    2016-03-01

    Comparisons of whole-genome sequences from ancient and contemporary samples have pointed to several instances of archaic admixture through interbreeding between the ancestors of modern non-Africans and now extinct hominids such as Neanderthals and Denisovans. One implication of these findings is that some adaptive features in contemporary humans may have entered the population via gene flow with archaic forms in Eurasia. Within Africa, fossil evidence suggests that anatomically modern humans (AMH) and various archaic forms coexisted for much of the last 200,000 yr; however, the absence of ancient DNA in Africa has limited our ability to make a direct comparison between archaic and modern human genomes. Here, we use statistical inference based on high coverage whole-genome data (greater than 60×) from contemporary African Pygmy hunter-gatherers as an alternative means to study the evolutionary history of the genus Homo. Using whole-genome simulations that consider demographic histories that include both isolation and gene flow with neighboring farming populations, our inference method rejects the hypothesis that the ancestors of AMH were genetically isolated in Africa, thus providing the first whole genome-level evidence of African archaic admixture. Our inferences also suggest a complex human evolutionary history in Africa, which involves at least a single admixture event from an unknown archaic population into the ancestors of AMH, likely within the last 30,000 yr.

  19. Anisakis Dujardin, 1845 infection (Nematoda: Anisakidae) in Pygmy Sperm Whale Kogia breviceps Blainville, 1838 from west Pacific region off the coast of Philippine archipelago.

    PubMed

    Quiazon, Karl Marx A

    2016-09-01

    Cetaceans are definitive hosts of anisakid nematodes known to cause human anisakidosis. Despite the reported strandings of different cetaceans in the Philippines, studies on anisakids from these definitive hosts are limited. Here, the morphologically and molecularly identified anisakid species, specifically those of the genus Anisakis Dujardin, 1845 in stranded Pygmy Sperm Whale Kogia breviceps Blainville, 1838 in the west Pacific region off Philippine waters are presented. Morphological data using SEM and LM revealed multi-infections with different Anisakis species belonging to Anisakis type I and type II groups. Molecularly, PCR-RFLP on the ITS rDNA and sequence data analyses of both ITS rDNA and mtDNA cox2 regions identified those from Anisakis type I group as A. typica (Diesing, 1860), whereas those from type II group as A. brevispiculata Dollfus, 1968, and A. paggiae Mattiucci et al. (Syst Parasitol 61:157-171, 2005). This is the first record of Anisakis infection from this host stranded in the west Pacific region off the coast of Philippine waters and new geographical record for A. paggiae.

  20. Model-based analyses of whole-genome data reveal a complex evolutionary history involving archaic introgression in Central African Pygmies

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, PingHsun; Woerner, August E.; Wall, Jeffrey D.; Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah A.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Hammer, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Comparisons of whole-genome sequences from ancient and contemporary samples have pointed to several instances of archaic admixture through interbreeding between the ancestors of modern non-Africans and now extinct hominids such as Neanderthals and Denisovans. One implication of these findings is that some adaptive features in contemporary humans may have entered the population via gene flow with archaic forms in Eurasia. Within Africa, fossil evidence suggests that anatomically modern humans (AMH) and various archaic forms coexisted for much of the last 200,000 yr; however, the absence of ancient DNA in Africa has limited our ability to make a direct comparison between archaic and modern human genomes. Here, we use statistical inference based on high coverage whole-genome data (greater than 60×) from contemporary African Pygmy hunter-gatherers as an alternative means to study the evolutionary history of the genus Homo. Using whole-genome simulations that consider demographic histories that include both isolation and gene flow with neighboring farming populations, our inference method rejects the hypothesis that the ancestors of AMH were genetically isolated in Africa, thus providing the first whole genome-level evidence of African archaic admixture. Our inferences also suggest a complex human evolutionary history in Africa, which involves at least a single admixture event from an unknown archaic population into the ancestors of AMH, likely within the last 30,000 yr. PMID:26888264

  1. A rare opportunity beckons

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, K

    2011-02-01

    There is a great deal of uncertainty for the future of rare-earth production. Rare-earths are a collection of 17 chemical elements in the periodic table, which include scandium and yttrium as well as the 15 lanthanides, such as dysprosium and ytterbium. China has a stranglehold on today's rare-earth market, which was worth about $3bn in 2010, with the country accounting for about 95% of worldwide production. Yet China's future actions can only be guessed at best. In September it halted shipments of rare-earth elements to Japan over a diplomatic spat concerning the detention of a Chinese trawler captain. Although the ban was later lifted, the episode raised concerns around the world about China's rare-earth monopoly and its use in diplomacy. China has already warned that it will not export any rare-earth material in the coming years as it expects its own consumption of rare-earth metals to increase. The country has introduced export taxes as well as production and export quotas, and also refused to grant any new rare-earth mining licences. Furthermore, because its reserves are limited and China's internal markets are growing so rapidly, the country has suggested it will no longer export products that require rare-earth elements, especially those that need heavy rare-earth elements, such as terbium and dysprosium. China's actions have led to huge rises in the cost of rare-earth materials and products. Dysprosium oxide, for example, has shot up from $36 per kilogram in 2005 to a massive $305 per kilogram by late last year. This could have a huge impact on much of today's electronics industry, given that rare-earth elements are ubiquitous in electric motors, computers, batteries, liquid-crystal displays (LCDs) and mobile phones. Neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets, for example, are used as computer spindle drives. The question is: what can be done to ensure that China's dominance of the rare-earth industry does not affect the military and energy security of the US

  2. Rare earth gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, W.F.

    1975-10-31

    A high energy gas laser with light output in the infrared or visible region of the spectrum is described. Laser action is obtained by generating vapors of rare earth halides, particularly neodymium iodide or, to a lesser extent, neodymium bromide, and disposing the rare earth vapor medium in a resonant cavity at elevated temperatures; e.g., approximately 1200/sup 0/ to 1400/sup 0/K. A particularly preferred gaseous medium is one involving a complex of aluminum chloride and neodymium chloride, which exhibits tremendously enhanced vapor pressure compared to the rare earth halides per se, and provides comparable increases in stored energy densities.

  3. Medical rare book provenance.

    PubMed Central

    Overmier, J A; Sentz, L

    1987-01-01

    Provenance is defined as the record of a book's ownership history. Its value and uses are explored. A survey of provenance practices in medical school rare book libraries found that only 21% of the reporting libraries maintain this important file. Examples of the uses and value of a provenance file in a medical rare book collection are presented. Decisions necessary to institute and maintain such a file are outlined and discussed. PMID:3828606

  4. Peripheral neuropathy: the importance of rare subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Brian C.; Price, Ray S.; Chen, Kevin S.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Peripheral neuropathy is a prevalent condition that usually warrants a thorough history and examination, but limited diagnostic evaluation. Rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy, however, often require more extensive diagnostic testing and different treatments. Objective To describe rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy, including the appropriate diagnostic evaluation and available treatments. Evidence Review References were identified from PubMed searches with an emphasis on systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials. Articles were also identified through the use of the author's own files. Search terms included common rare neuropathy localizations and their causes, as well as epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Findings Diffuse, non-length dependent neuropathies, multiple mononeuropathies, polyradiculopathies, plexopathies, and radiculoplexus neuropathies are rare peripheral neuropathy localizations that often require extensive diagnostic testing. Atypical neuropathy features, such as acute/subacute onset, asymmetry, and/or motor predominant signs, are frequently present. The most common diffuse, non-length dependent neuropathies are Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Effective disease modifying therapies exist for many diffuse, non-length dependent neuropathies including GBS, CIDP, MMN, and some paraprotein-associated demyelinating neuropathies. Vasculitic neuropathy (multiple mononeuropathy) also has efficacious treatment options, but definitive evidence of a treatment effect for IgM anti-MAG neuropathy and diabetic amyoptrophy (radiculoplexus neuropathy) is lacking. Conclusions and Relevance Recognition of rare localizations of periperhal neuropathy is essential given the implications for diagnostic testing and treatment. Electrodiagnostic studies are an important early step in the

  5. Auricular erythromelalgia: report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Messeguer, Francesc; Agusti-Mejias, Anna; Vilata Corell, Juan José; Requena, Celia

    2013-02-15

    Erythromelalgia is a rare disorder characterized by 3 major symptoms: warmth, redness, and burning pain. It involves the feet and, to a lesser extent, the hands, head, and ears. We report the case of a 27-year-old man presenting with a 15-year history of episodes with edema, local hyperthermia, and burning pain of both ears.

  6. How rare are diffusive rare events?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, D. P.; Larralde, H.

    2008-05-01

    We study the time until first occurrence, the first-passage time, of rare density fluctuations in diffusive systems. We approach the problem using a model consisting of many independent random walkers on a lattice. The existence of spatial correlations makes this problem analytically intractable. However, for a mean-field approximation in which the walkers can jump anywhere in the system, we obtain a simple asymptotic form for the mean first-passage time to have a given number k of particles at a distinguished site. We show numerically, and argue heuristically, that for large enough k, the mean-field results give a good approximation for first-passage times for systems with nearest-neighbour dynamics, especially for two and higher spatial dimensions. Finally, we show how the results change when density fluctuations anywhere in the system, rather than at a specific distinguished site, are considered.

  7. A rare splenic pseudocyst

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ankit; Yadav, Amit; Sharma, Sourabh; Saini, Devender; Om, Prabha; Khoja, Hanuman; Banerjee, Kinjal; NL, Harish

    2013-01-01

    Pseudocysts of the spleen are very rare, found in <1% of the splenectomies done and usually develop secondary to trauma. Pseudocysts of spleen rarely grow to large size and most of these remain asymptomatic, they require exploration only in symptomatic cases and chances for spleen preservation in these cases are usually less. Here, we present two cases of this rare entity developing secondary to abdominal trauma in the past, both presented with complaints of pain and lump in the abdomen. After thorough investigations, laparotomy was done preserving spleen in one case and doing splenectomy in the other. On histopathological examination, diagnosis of splenic pseudocysts was confirmed by the absence of lining epithelium. We would like to report these two cases because of their rarity and as diagnostic dilemmas. PMID:24963908

  8. Positive skin and serologic test results of diagnostic assays for bovine tuberculosis and subsequent isolation of Mycobacterium interjectum in a pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis).

    PubMed

    Bouts, Tim; Vordermeier, Martin; Flach, Edmund; Routh, Andrew

    2009-09-01

    A 20-yr-old male pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis), weighing 250 kg, arrived at Zoological Society London Whipsnade Zoo (United Kingdom) from a captive collection in Portugal. A quarantine health check was performed including a comparative intradermal tuberculosis (IDTB) test. Assessment of the comparative IDTB test at 72 hr revealed a strong positive reaction at the bovine site. Serum was tested with a rapid immunochromatographic assay (TB STAT-PAK) and was positive for tuberculosis antibodies. The tuberculosis tests were repeated 6 wk later with the same positive test outcome. In addition, a broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) was submitted for mycobacterial culture. The positive IDTB test and TB STAT-PAK results were supported by multiantigen print immunoassay (MAPIA). Based on these results, the animal was suspected to be infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms and was euthanized. No gross or histologic signs of tuberculosis were found at postmortem examination. Mycobacterium interjectum was cultured from the BAL but not from necropsy samples. The antigens used in the TB STAT-PAK and MAPIA tests are reportedly specific for the M. tuberculosis complex, and so it is possible this animal presented with a latent case of tuberculosis or had a previous tuberculosis infection that resolved prior to testing. Cross-reactions with nontuberculous mycobacteria have been described with TB STAT-PAK and MAPIA tests. However, Western blotting analysis using serum from this animal did not recognize M. interjectum proteins of equivalent size to the M. tuberculosis-Mycobacterium bovis proteins recognized in the MAPIA. Thus, antigenic cross-reactivity with M. interjectum can be deemed less likely, but other nontuberculous mycobacterial proteins cannot be ruled out. It is therefore possible that false-positive reactions were obtained. These results highlight the difficulty of diagnosing tuberculosis in the absence of pathology and the presence of

  9. Diets high in fruits and low in gum exudates promote the occurrence and development of dental disease in pygmy slow loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus).

    PubMed

    Cabana, Francis; Nekaris, K A I

    2015-11-01

    Asian slow lorises are found in zoos and rescue centres worldwide with Nycticebus pygmaeus, the pygmy slow loris, boasting the largest population in captivity. Diet are reportedly high in fruit and concentrates and low in insects and exudates. Wild feeding studies place insects, nectar, and gums as the most important diet components. Captive populations also show high incidences of health afflictions, many of which may be caused by nutrition. Our study, aims at identifying a causative agent within the diets of N. pygmaeus in regards to diseases prominent within captive populations. We sent out 55 diet and health questionnaires to institutions worldwide. Returned diets were nutritionally analyzed. Nutrient values and proportions of each ingredient were used in a principle components analysis. Resulting factors were used as variables in a binary logistic regression (BLR), with dental disease as the dependent variable. 39 questionnaires were returned with a total of 47 diets. 20 (51.7%) institutions reported the presence of diseases with dental issues being prominent. Factors that were significant in the principle components analysis included gum, nectar, protein, acid detergent fibre, calcium, ash, phosphorus, potassium, Ca:P, magnesium, vitamin D, and energy. Gum was the only significant predictor in the BLR. Lastly, a chi square test for association was performed with the presence of dental disease as the dependent variable and the amount of fruit in the diet. The combination of high fruits and little to no gum promotes the occurrence of dental diseases. Current captive diets do not reflect the evolutionary adaptations of Nycticebus primates.

  10. Antibacterial activities of plants from Central Africa used traditionally by the Bakola pygmies for treating respiratory and tuberculosis-related symptoms.

    PubMed

    Fomogne-Fodjo, M C Y; Van Vuuren, S; Ndinteh, D T; Krause, R W M; Olivier, D K

    2014-08-08

    The antibacterial activities of 18 plants from 10 different families were investigated for their antimicrobial efficacy, based on the traditional uses of these species by Bakola pygmies living in Central Africa, especially along the Ngoyang area in Cameroon for the treatment of respiratory and tuberculosis-related symptoms. The aim of the study is to test the antimicrobial efficacy of these plants against some pathogens associated with respiratory disease and to determine if there is any validation for the traditional use against Mycobacterium species. Medium polar extracts were prepared in MeOH/DCM (1:1, v/v) from the plant parts of each species used traditionally and were assayed against pathogens associated with respiratory tract ailments [Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC 13883) and Morexella cattarhalis (ATCC 14468)] using the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method. Two additional faster growing Mycobacterium strains [Mycobacterium smegmatis (ATCC 23246) and Mycobacterium aurum (NCTC 10437)] were included in the assay as predictive test organisms for the more pathogenic strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Some plant species, such as Alchornea floribunda, Musanga cecropioides (both leaves and stem bark), Tetracera potatoria and Xylopia aethiopica (stem bark), were effective in inhibiting Morexella cattarhalis, having MIC values between 65 and 250 μg/mL. Some noteworthy antimycobacterial inhibition (MIC≤200 μg/mL and as low as MIC 6.5 µg/mL) for 54% of the extracts were observed. While moderate activity was shown for pathogens causing respiratory tract infections, these plant species seems to be selectively targeting Mycobacteria spp. suggesting that the traditional use for treating tuberculosis related symptoms may be indeed be accurate. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. A functional comparison of the hyolingual complex in pygmy and dwarf sperm whales (Kogia breviceps and K. sima), and bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)

    PubMed Central

    Bloodworth, Brian E; Marshall, Christopher D

    2007-01-01

    The function of the hyolingual complex in three odontocete species was investigated to compare adaptations of divergent feeding strategies, suction and ram feeding. Pygmy and dwarf sperm whales, members of the genus Kogia (or kogiids), are known to be strong suction feeders. We tested the hypotheses that kogiids would have a larger, more robust hyolingual complex, and that hyolingual muscles would have a greater maximum theoretical muscle tension compared with ram-based feeders such as bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). A robustness index and surface area was calculated for bony hyoid elements in kogiids and bottlenose dolphins. The anatomy, muscle architecture, pinnation, two-dimensional angle of attachment and maximum theoretical muscle tension were measured in each hyolingual muscle. A functional model incorporating vector analyses of hyolingual musculature was created for kogiids and bottlenose dolphins to assess differences in function of their hyolingual complexes. Kogiid hyoid surface areas were significantly greater (P = 0.01) than in bottlenose dolphins. Most maximum theoretical muscle tensions of hyolingual complexes were not significantly different within or between species. The data suggest that associated orofacial and tongue morphology, particularly the relationship of hyoid shape and tongue retractor muscles, greatly influences suction capability in odontocetes. Kogiids demonstrated adaptations that occlude lateral gape, including a novel vertical ridge on each side of the mandible, and a shortened mandible that is capable of a large gape, and gape angle. These adaptations presumably assist in maintaining negative intraoral pressure generated by the depression and retraction of the relatively short and wide kogiid tongue. The tongues of kogiids should be capable of generating greater intraoral volume changes compared with the long, narrow tongue of bottlenose dolphins. PMID:17555545

  12. Lipid class and depth-specific thermal properties in the blubber of the short-finned pilot whale and the pygmy sperm whale.

    PubMed

    Bagge, Laura E; Koopman, Heather N; Rommel, Sentiel A; McLellan, William A; Pabst, D A

    2012-12-15

    Blubber, the specialized hypodermis of cetaceans, provides thermal insulation through the quantity and quality of lipids it contains. Quality refers to percent lipid content; however, not all lipids are the same. Certain deep-diving cetacean groups possess blubber with lipids - wax esters (WE) - that are not typically found in mammals, and the insulative quality of 'waxy' blubber is unknown. Our study explored the influence of lipid storage class - specifically WE in pygmy sperm whales (Kogia breviceps; N=7) and typical mammalian triacylglycerols in short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus; N=7) - on blubber's thermal properties. Although the blubber of both species had similar total lipid contents, the thermal conductivity of G. macrorhynchus blubber (0.20±0.01 W m(-1) °C(-1)) was significantly higher than that of K. breviceps (0.15±0.01 W m(-1) °C(-1); P=0.0006). These results suggest that lipid class significantly influences the ability of blubber to resist heat flow. In addition, because the lipid content of blubber is known to be stratified, we measured its depth-specific thermal conductivities. In K. breviceps blubber, the depth-specific conductivity values tended to vary inversely with lipid content. In contrast, G. macrorhynchus blubber displayed unexpected depth-specific relationships between lipid content and conductivity, which suggests that temperature-dependent effects, such as melting, may be occurring. Differences in heat flux measurements across the depth of the blubber samples provide evidence that both species are capable of storing heat in their blubber. The function of blubber as an insulator is complex and may rely upon its lipid class, stratified composition and dynamic heat storage capabilities.

  13. Local Foods, Local Places

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Local Foods, Local Places technical assistance program protects human health and the environment, spurs revitalization, increases access to healthy foods, and creates economic opportunities by promoting local foods.

  14. Endangered Species: Wild & Rare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Endangered Species: Wild and Rare." Contents are organized into the…

  15. Rare Jejunal Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Christman, Emily; Hassell, Lewis A.; Kastens, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) secondary to jejunal diverticulosis (JD) is very rare. Delay in establishing a diagnosis is common and GIB from JD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We report an illustrative case diagnosed by push enteroscopy and managed with surgery. PMID:27800518

  16. A Rare Opportunity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dean B.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews programs in the state of Maine that are designed to inventory the natural heritage of critical areas, rare species, and exemplary natural features. Discusses how the information acquired by these programs is being used for public information efforts and educational programs in the schools. (ML)

  17. Rare Species (RS)

    Treesearch

    Steve Sutherland

    2006-01-01

    The FIREMON Rare Species (RS) method is used to assess changes in uncommon, perennial plant species when other monitoring methods are not effective. This method monitors individual plants and statistically quantifies changes in plant survivorship, growth, and reproduction over time. Plants are spatially located using distance along and from a permanent baseline, and...

  18. Endangered Species: Wild & Rare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Endangered Species: Wild and Rare." Contents are organized into the…

  19. Palmoplantar hyperkeratotic lesions: a rare presentation of lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Almodovar-Real, Ana; Aneiros-Fernández, Jose; Molina-Leyva, Alejandro; Fernandez-Pugnaire, Ma Antonia

    2015-03-15

    Palmoplantar lichen planus is a localized and rare subtype of lichen planus (LP) often underdiagnosed. Several morphological types of palmoplantar lesions have been defined in LP. We present an unusual case of the palmoplantar kyperkeratotic variant of LP. Histopathology examination confirmed our diagnosis. We emphasize the importance of this rare entity in the differential diagnosis of palmoplantar dermatoses.

  20. Rare earth thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G.D.

    1997-09-01

    The author reviews the thermoelectric properties of metallic compounds which contain rare-earth atoms. They are the group of metals with the largest value ever reported of the Seebeck coefficient. An increase by 50% of the Seebeck would make these compounds useful for thermoelectric devices. The largest Seebeck coefficient is found for compounds of cerium (e.g., CePd{sub 3}) and ytterbium (e.g., YbAl{sub 3}). Theoretical predictions are in agreement with the maximum observed Seebeck. The author discusses the theoretical model which has been used to calculate the Seebeck coefficient. He is solving this model for other configurations (4f){sup n} of rare-earth ground states.

  1. Rare causes of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Gemma; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disease characterized by loss of bone mass and strength, resulting in increased risk of fractures. It is classically divided into primary (post-menopausal or senile), secondary and idiopathic forms. There are many rare diseases, that cause directly or indirectly osteoporosis. The identification and classification of most of these rare causes of osteoporosis is crucial for the specialists in endocrinology and not, in order to prevent this bone complication and to provide for an early therapy. Several pathogenic mechanisms are involved, including various aspects of bone metabolism such as: decreased bone formation, increased bone resorption, altered calcium, phosphorus and/or vitamin D homeostasis, and abnormal collagen synthesis. In this review, less common forms of primary and secondary osteoporosis are described, specifying, if applicable: genetic causes, epidemiology, clinical features, and pathogenic mechanisms causing osteoporosis. A greater awareness of all rare causes of osteoporosis could reduce the number of cases classified as idiopathic osteoporosis and allow the introduction of appropriate and timely treatments. PMID:26604941

  2. Pygmy chameleons of the Rhampholeon platyceps compex (Squamata: Chamaeleonidae): description of four new species from isolated 'sky islands' of northern Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Branch, William R; Bayliss, Julian; Tolley, Krystal A

    2014-06-06

    The taxonomic status of recently discovered populations of pygmy chameleons (Rhampholeon) from the northern Mozambique montane isolates of Mt. Chiperone, Mt. Mabu, Mt. Inago and Mt. Namuli are assessed, and compared with the closest geographical congeners, including Rhampholeon platyceps Günther 1893 from Mt. Mulanje, and Rh. chapmanorum Tilbury 1992 from the Malawi Hills, both in southern Malawi. Relationships were examined using morphological features and a phylogenetic analysis incorporating two mitochondrial and one nuclear marker. The phylogeny showed that each montane isolate contained a distinct, well-supported clade of chameleons. Chameleons from the Mozambican montane isolates are within a monophyletic clade inclusive of species from southern Malawi (Rh. platyceps and Rh. chapmanorum). Although some relationships are unresolved, the southern Malawi and Mozambican isolates appear to share their most recent common ancestor with species from the Eastern Arc Mountains and Southern Highlands of Tanzania and Malawi (Rh. moyeri, Rh. uluguruesis, Rh. nchisiensis). Along with Rh. beraduccii and Rh. acuminatus, all are included in the subgenus Rhinodigitum. Sister to this larger clade are species from west/central Africa (Rh. temporalis, Rh. spectrum) and the Rh. marshalli-gorongosae complex from southwest Mozambique and adjacent Zimbabwe. Morphological and molecular results confirm that Brookesia platyceps carri Loveridge 1953 is a junior subjective synonym of Rhampholeon platyceps Günther 1892. Historical records of Rh. platyceps from the Shire Highlands (Chiromo) and the Zomba Plateau, are incorrect and the species is now considered endemic to the Mulanje massif. All of the four newly discovered, isolated populations are genetically and morphologically distinct, and we take the opportunity to describe each as a new species. Rhampholeon (Rhinodigitum) maspictus sp. nov. is restricted to Mt. Mabu and distinguished by its large size, well-developed dorsal

  3. Auriculotemporal neuralgia secondary to TMJ synovial cyst: a rare presentation of a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Hossein; Robertson, Carrie E; Lane, John I; Viozzi, Christopher F; Garza, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint are rare, and to our knowledge, only 14 cases have been reported. The most common presentation is local pain and swelling. We present a case of a synovial cyst presenting with neuralgia in the distribution of the auriculotemporal nerve, initially misdiagnosed as trigeminal neuralgia. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  4. Rare Earth Polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Boskovic, Colette

    2017-09-05

    Longstanding and important applications make use of the chemical and physical properties of both rare earth metals and polyoxometalates of early transition metals. The catalytic, optical, and magnetic features of rare earth metal ions are well-known, as are the reversible multielectron redox and photoredox capabilities of polyoxomolybdates and polyoxotungstates. The combination of rare earth ions and polyoxometalates in discrete molecules and coordination polymers is of interest for the unique combination of chemical and physical properties that can arise. This Account surveys our efforts to synthesize and investigate compounds with rare earth ions and polyoxometalates (RE-POMs), sometimes with carboxylate-based organic coligands. Our general synthetic approach is "bottom-up", which affords well-defined nanoscale molecules, typically in crystalline form and amenable to single-crystal X-ray diffraction for structure determination. Our particular focus is on elucidation of the physical properties conferred by the different structural components with a view to ultimately being able to tune these properties chemically. For this purpose, we employ a variety of spectroscopic, magnetochemical, electrochemical, and scattering techniques in concert with theoretical modeling and computation. Studies of RE-POM single-molecule magnets (SMMs) have utilized magnetic susceptibility, inelastic neutron scattering, and ab initio calculations. These investigations have allowed characterization of the crystal field splitting of the rare earth(III) ions that is responsible for the SMM properties of slow magnetic relaxation and magnetization quantum tunneling. Such SMMs are promising for applications in quantum computing and molecular spintronics. Photophysical measurements of a family of hybrid RE-POMs with organic ligands have afforded insights into sensitization of Tb(III) and Eu(III) emission through both organic and polyoxometalate chromophores in the same molecule. Detailed

  5. Rare B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, P.D.; /Victoria U.

    2006-02-24

    Recent results from Belle and BaBar on rare B decays involving flavor-changing neutral currents or purely leptonic final states are presented. Measurements of the CP asymmetries in B {yields} K*{gamma} and b {yields} s{gamma} are reported. Also reported are updated limits on B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}, B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu} and the recent measurement of B {yields} X{sub s}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  6. [Rarely seen fractures].

    PubMed

    Subaşi, M; Kapukaya, A; Kesemenli, C; Coban, V

    2001-10-01

    Rarely seen fractures are presented in this study. One case was a calcaneal spur, 2 cases osteochondroma pedicule fractures and talus posteromedial tubercle fracture due to direct trauma. Calcaneal spur and osteochondromas were removed surgically and posteromedial tubercle was treated by short-leg cast immobilization. In conclusion, we think that fractures of osteochondroma and calcaneal spur may be treated by surgical removal which do not cause any functional disorders after this operation, but fractures like the talus posteromedial tubercle should be treated conservatively by short-leg immobilization in the early period.

  7. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    ScienceCinema

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2016-07-12

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  8. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2010-01-01

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  9. Cytotoxic Chemotherapy Tooth Ache Following Chemotherapy: a Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kuzekanani, Maryam; Haghani, Jahangir

    2012-01-01

    Currently, localized pulpalgia is listed as a rare manifestation of chemotherapy treatments in patients with malignant tumors. The neuropathy originated from neurotoxicity of anticancer drugs is usually described as a diffuse jaw pain or numbness in orofacial structures. This article reports localized tooth pain as a possible outcome of administrating high dosage chemotherapy drugs particularly in the last cycles of application. PMID:25628837

  10. Rare adrenal tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Radu

    2014-04-01

    Apart from neuroblastomas, adrenal tumors are exceedingly rare in children and young adults. In this age group, the vast majority of patients present with clinical signs associated with excess hormone production. The most common tumor to arise from the adrenal cortex is an adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). Similar to the situation in adults, this tumor is frequently diagnosed at a late stage and carries a very poor prognosis. ACCs require extensive/aggressive local resection followed by mitotane chemotherapy. A multidisciplinary approach is essential, and these children should be referred to units that have previous experience in managing ACCs. International registries are an invaluable source for evidence-based care, and such collaborations should be further developed in the future. Pheochromocytomas are derived from the adrenal medulla and present with symptoms caused by high secretion of catecholamines. At least one-third of these children will be found to carry genetic mutations, most commonly the RET gene (MEN2 syndrome) or the VHL gene. Open radical adrenalectomy should be offered to children with adrenocortical cancers. For all other cases, laparoscopic adrenalectomy is the treatment of choice. It is possible that the retroperitoneoscopic approach will gain increasing favor. The role of robotic adrenalectomy remains controversial.

  11. Relativistic Coulomb excitation within the time dependent superfluid local density approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Stetcu, I.; Bertulani, C. A.; Bulgac, A.; Magierski, P.; Roche, K. J.

    2015-01-06

    Within the framework of the unrestricted time-dependent density functional theory, we present for the first time an analysis of the relativistic Coulomb excitation of the heavy deformed open shell nucleus 238U. The approach is based on the superfluid local density approximation formulated on a spatial lattice that can take into account coupling to the continuum, enabling self-consistent studies of superfluid dynamics of any nuclear shape. We compute the energy deposited in the target nucleus as a function of the impact parameter, finding it to be significantly larger than the estimate using the Goldhaber-Teller model. The isovector giant dipole resonance, the dipole pygmy resonance, and giant quadrupole modes are excited during the process. As a result, the one-body dissipation of collective dipole modes is shown to lead a damping width Γ↓≈0.4 MeV and the number of preequilibrium neutrons emitted has been quantified.

  12. How to model rare events?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieser, J.; Jewson, S.

    2009-04-01

    The risk of extreme meteorological events is often estimated using extreme value theory (EVT). However, EVT can't be expected to work well in all cases. Two examples are (a) very rare events which are not adequately captured in short observational records and (b) nonstationary situations where observations alone cannot provide risk estimates for the future. For these reasons Risk Management Solutions (RMS) develops models of extreme weather risks that are based on a combination of both, physics and statistics, rather than just statistics. One example is the RMS TC-Rain model. In addition to wind and storm surge, tropical cyclones (TCs) can lead to torrential rain that may cause widespread flooding and landslides. The most prominent recent historical example is tropical storm Alison (2001) which inundated Houston and caused roughly US 5bn of damage. Since Alison was only tropical storm, rather than a hurricane, no damage due to wind and storm surge was expected and no serious warnings were issued. RMS now has developed a TC-Rain Model which is based on a combination of observations, experience and physical parameterizations. It is an example on how the use of physical principles helps to estimate the risk of rare and devastating events. Based on an event set of TC tracks it allows the calculation of several hundred thousand TC rain footprints which can then be used for the estimation of flood levels and their return periods via a complex dynamical hydrological model. The TC-Rain Model takes a number of physical mechanisms into account, including (a) the effect of surface roughness change at land fall, (b) orographic rain enhancement, (c) drift of rain due to strong horizontal winds, (d) asymmetry, (e) outer rain bands and (f) the dependence on sea surface temperature. It is calibrated using 35 US-landfalling tropical cyclones from 1998 to the 2008, and verified against all US-landfalling TCs since 1948. The model is not designed as a forecasting tool, but rather a

  13. Oral lymphangioma: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Bhayya, Harsha; Pavani, D.; Avinash Tejasvi, M. L.; Geetha, P.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphangiomas are benign hamartomatous tumors of the lymphatic channels which present as developmental malformations arising from sequestration of lymphatic tissue that do not communicate with the rest of the lymphatic channels. Lymphatic vessels are filled with a clear protein-rich fluid containing few lymph cells. It can also occur in association with hemangioma. The onset of lymphangiomas are either at birth (60% to 70%) or up to two years of age (90%) and rare in adults. Lymphangiomas have marked predilection for the head and neck region (50-70%). The most common location in the mouth is the dorsum of tongue, followed by lips, buccal mucosa, soft palate, and floor of the mouth. On tongue, they may present as a localized or a diffused growth which may enlarge to cause macroglossia, impaired speech and difficulty in mastication. Herewith, we present a rare case of lymphangioma of tongue leading to macroglossia in a 8-year-old boy. PMID:26681873

  14. A rare complication of reduction malarplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Seok; Lee, Jeong Woo; Yang, Jung Dug; Chung, Ho Yun; Cho, Byung Chae; Choi, Kang Young

    2015-04-01

    In this report, the authors introduce a rare complication after reduction malarplasty in a 21-year-old male patient. The patient underwent two-jaw surgery and reduction malarplasty at a local plastic surgery clinic in December 2012. He presented with mass-like swelling of the left temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and a clicking sound with jaw movement that began 5 months after surgery. Physical examination, ultrasonography, and enhanced facial 3-dimensional computed tomography indicated suspicion of TMJ capsule injury. Therefore, mass excisional biopsy was performed with plate and screw removal. Biopsy results of the excised cystic mass revealed bursitis. The patient's symptoms disappeared after surgery. This is the first report of bursitis as a rare complication after reduction malarplasty. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  15. Rare times rare: The hyponatremia, rhabdomyolysis, anterior compartment syndrome sequence.

    PubMed

    Dubin, Ina; Gelber, Moshe; Schattner, Ami

    2016-05-01

    Primary polydipsia occurs in up to 25% of patients with chronic psychiatric disorders (especially schizophrenia), related to the disease, its treatment or both. Urine output fails to match intake >10 L/day and water intoxication may develop. Rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication of hyponatremia, and an acute anterior compartment syndrome of the leg, an emergency, may be very rarely associated.

  16. Care for patients with ultra-rare disorders.

    PubMed

    Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing attention by policy makers and health authorities for rare disorders (by definition prevalence <1:2000). The attention for ultra-rare disorders (suggested prevalence one-thousandth of rare disorders, so <1:2,000,000) is very limited however. Here some aspects of organizing adequate care for individuals with ultra-rare disorders in a European setting are discussed. Individual ultra-rare disorders are by definition very uncommon but it can be calculated that as a group they form a considerable part of the total group of persons with rare disorders in the European Community (EC). Diagnostics and regular care for individuals with rare disorders is being arranged in national centres of expertise, but due to small individual numbers this is not possible for ultra-rare disorders. A secure database on the internet to which patients with unknown diagnoses from all countries within the EC can be uploaded using standardized terminology and including clinical pictures will be needed to allow for recognition of comparable phenotypes in patients and, thus, establishing rare diagnoses. Due to the large distances between the places where patients live and their large numbers regular care has to be provided locally and centres of excellence will have to function virtually through e-mail consulting. The use of wiki's that are accessible to patients and families to upload data will help to disseminate knowledge and experience. It will be extremely difficult to obtain sufficient funds for research in ultra-rare disorders. It is suggested that the many very small support groups for ultra-rare disorders organize themselves in umbrella organisations of such size that policy makers and grant providing bodies will consult them for their strategies. The role of individuals with ultra-rare disorders themselves, or their families, in obtaining access to all advantages modern medicine can provide will therefore be large.

  17. A rare localization of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Case report

    PubMed Central

    CARANGELO, B.; LAVALLE, L.; TIEZZI, G.; BRANCO, D.; LIPPA, L.; MILEO, E.; COSTANTINO, G.; MARIOTTINI, A.; MUSCAS, G.; MATURO, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work the Authors report their experience on the treatment of a case of cavernous venous sinus thrombosis. The diagnosis is clinical and neuroradiological, CT, MRN, cerebral angiography and orbital venography have aided in establishing the diagnosis during life. Very interesting is the therapeutic approach. PMID:26017108

  18. Bladder metastasis from maxillary sinus undifferentiated carcinoma: a rare case.

    PubMed

    Nouhaud, François-Xavier; Le Gal, Sophie

    2012-05-01

    We report the rare case of a 72-year-old woman with maxillary sinus undifferentiated carcinoma with metachronous metastasis localized to the bladder. Bladder metastases and maxillary sinus carcinoma are rare tumors. The bladder is not 1 of the usual sites of distant extension for parasinus tumors. To our knowledge, no data have been reported regarding bladder metastasis originating from a maxillary sinus carcinoma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. China's rare-earth industry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tse, Pui-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction China's dominant position as the producer of over 95 percent of the world output of rare-earth minerals and rapid increases in the consumption of rare earths owing to the emergence of new clean-energy and defense-related technologies, combined with China's decisions to restrict exports of rare earths, have resulted in heightened concerns about the future availability of rare earths. As a result, industrial countries such as Japan, the United States, and countries of the European Union face tighter supplies and higher prices for rare earths. This paper briefly reviews China's rare-earth production, consumption, and reserves and the important policies and regulations regarding the production and trade of rare earths, including recently announced export quotas. The 15 lanthanide elements-lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium, and lutetium (atomic numbers 57-71)-were originally known as the rare earths from their occurrence in oxides mixtures. Recently, some researchers have included two other elements-scandium and yttrium-in their discussion of rare earths. Yttrium (atomic number 39), which lies above lanthanum in transition group III of the periodic table and has a similar 3+ ion with a noble gas core, has both atomic and ionic radii similar in size to those of terbium and dysprosium and is generally found in nature with lanthanides. Scandium (atomic number 21) has a smaller ionic radius than yttrium and the lanthanides, and its chemical behavior is intermediate between that of aluminum and the lanthanides. It is found in nature with the lanthanides and yttrium. Rare earths are used widely in high-technology and clean-energy products because they impart special properties of magnetism, luminescence, and strength. Rare earths are also used in weapon systems to obtain the same properties.

  20. Phase stable rare earth garnets

    DOEpatents

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2013-06-11

    A transparent ceramic according to one embodiment includes a rare earth garnet comprising A.sub.hB.sub.iC.sub.jO.sub.12, where h is 3.+-.10%, i is 2.+-.10%, and j is 3.+-.10%. A includes a rare earth element or a mixture of rare earth elements, B includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, and C includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, where A is at a dodecahedral site of the garnet, B is at an octahedral site of the garnet, and C is at a tetrahedral site of the garnet. In one embodiment, the rare earth garment has scintillation properties. A radiation detector in one embodiment includes a transparent ceramic as described above and a photo detector optically coupled to the rare earth garnet.

  1. Rare times rare: The hyponatremia, rhabdomyolysis, anterior compartment syndrome sequence

    PubMed Central

    Dubin, Ina; Gelber, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Lesson Primary polydipsia occurs in up to 25% of patients with chronic psychiatric disorders (especially schizophrenia), related to the disease, its treatment or both. Urine output fails to match intake >10 L/day and water intoxication may develop. Rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication of hyponatremia, and an acute anterior compartment syndrome of the leg, an emergency, may be very rarely associated. PMID:27186379

  2. Rare earth speciality inorganic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is a comprehensive review of the rare earth elements which include the Group IIIA elements Sc, Y and the lanthanide elements La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu. It covers their abundances, electronic structure, ionic radii, energy levels, thermodynamic properties, optical applications, separation chemistry, markets and statistics, electronic and magnetic applications, as well as mineral ores that contain rare earths, mixed rare earth chemical, and special uses of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/. 30 references.

  3. Systematic variation of rare earths in monazite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murata, K.J.; Rose, H.J.; Carron, M.K.

    1953-01-01

    Ten monazites from widely scattered localities have been analyzed for La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Y and Th by means of a combined chemical and emission spectrographic method. The analytical results, calculated to atomic percent of total rare earths (thorium excluded), show a considerable variation in the proportions of every element except praseodymium, which is relatively constant. The general variation trends of the elements may be calculated by assuming that the monazites represent different stages in a fractional precipitation process, and by assuming that there is a gradational increase in the precipitability of rare earth elements with decreasing ionic radius. Fractional precipitation brings about an increase in lanthanum and cerium, little change in praseodymium, and a decrease in neodymium, samarium, gadolinium, and yttrium. Deviations from the calculated lines of variation consist of a simultaneous, abnormal increase or decrease in the proportions of cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium with antipathetic decrease or increase in the proportions of the other elements. These deviations are ascribed to abnormally high or low temperatures that affect the precipitability of the central trio of elements (Ce, Pr, Nd) relatively more than that of the other elements. The following semiquantitative rules have been found useful in describing the composition of rare earths from monazite: 1. 1. The sum of lanthanum and neodymium is very nearly a constant at 42 ?? 2 atomic percent. 2. 2. Praseodymium is very nearly constant at 5 ?? 1 atomic percent. 3. 3. The sum of Ce, Sm, Gd, and Y is very nearly a constant at 53 ?? 3 atomic percent. No correlation could be established between the content of Th and that of any of the rare earth elements. ?? 1953.

  4. A rare case of multiple rattlesnake bites.

    PubMed

    Iliev, Yanko T; Kristeva, Sasha A; Prancheva, Maria G

    2013-01-01

    The rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) is a venomous viper inhabiting the southeastern parts of the United States. It is not found in the Balkans and Europe habitats. Subjects of the species are grown and seen in museums, exhibitions and terrariums, and sometimes in private collections. This may generate potentially toxic exposures to the venom in accidental contact. Acute poisoning with rattlesnake poison in Bulgaria is exotic, rare and even casuistic. The venom of the rattlesnake exhibits neuropathic, proteolytic and hemolytic activities. Antivenom is not currently easily available in Bulgaria--it is not usually stored in hospitals because it is very rarely used and therefore rather expensive. We present a case of multiple envenomation (two different occasions) of one and the same person who kept rattlesnakes in a private terrarium. Local toxic syndrome was observed with burning and stinging pain at bite site combined with limited hemorrhage and necrosis. The hemolytic reaction and the local toxic results were successfully managed without resorting to any specific antidotal therapy.

  5. Rare Earth Optical Temperature Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Jenkins, Phillip (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A rare earth optical temperature sensor is disclosed for measuring high temperatures. Optical temperature sensors exist that channel emissions from a sensor to a detector using a light pipe. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform the sensed thermal energy into a narrow band width optical signal that travels to a detector using a light pipe. An optical bandpass filter at the detector removes any noise signal outside of the band width of the signal from the emitter.

  6. Rare beauty and charm decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, T.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Rare beauty and charm decays can provide powerful probes of physics beyond the Standard Model. These proceedings summarise the latest measurements of rare beauty and charm decays from the LHCb experiment at the end of Run 1 of the LHC. Whilst the majority of the measurements are consistent with SM predictions, small differences are seen in the rate and angular distribution of ℓ- decay processes.

  7. Predators target rare prey in coral reef fish assemblages.

    PubMed

    Almany, Glenn R; Peacock, Lisa F; Syms, Craig; McCormick, Mark I; Jones, Geoffrey P

    2007-07-01

    Predation can result in differing patterns of local prey diversity depending on whether predators are selective and, if so, how they select prey. A recent study comparing the diversity of juvenile fish assemblages among coral reefs with and without predators concluded that decreased prey diversity in the presence of predators was most likely caused by predators actively selecting rare prey species. We used several related laboratory experiments to explore this hypothesis by testing: (1) whether predators prefer particular prey species, (2) whether individual predators consistently select the same prey species, (3) whether predators target rare prey, and (4) whether rare prey are more vulnerable to predation because they differ in appearance/colouration from common prey. Rare prey suffered greater predation than expected and were not more vulnerable to predators because their appearance/colouration differed from common prey. Individual predators did not consistently select the same prey species through time, suggesting that prey selection behaviour was flexible and context dependent rather than fixed. Thus, selection of rare prey was unlikely to be explained by simple preferences for particular prey species. We hypothesize that when faced with multiple prey species predators may initially focus on rare, conspicuous species to overcome the sensory confusion experienced when attacking aggregated prey, thereby minimizing the time required to capture prey. This hypothesis represents a community-level manifestation of two well-documented and related phenomena, the "confusion effect" and the "oddity effect", and may be an important, and often overlooked, mechanism by which predators influence local species diversity.

  8. A novel trypanoplasm-like flagellate Jarrellia atramenti n. g., n. sp. (Kinetoplastida: Bodonidae) and ciliates from the blowhole of a stranded pygmy sperm whale Kogia breviceps (Physeteridae): morphology, life cycle and potential pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Poynton, S L; Whitaker, B R; Heinrich, A B

    2001-04-10

    The successful 6 mo rehabilitation of a stranded juvenile pygmy sperm whale Kogia breviceps afforded the opportunity to study the poorly known protozoan fauna of the upper respiratory tract of cetaceans. Mucus samples were collected by holding either a petri dish or glass slides over the blowhole for 3 to 5 exhalations; preparations were examined as wet mounts, and then stained with Wrights-Giemsa or Gram stain. Blood smears were stained with Wrights-Giemsa. Unidentified spindle-shaped and unidentified broad ciliates, reported from the blowhole of the pygmy sperm whale for the first time, were seen only initially, while yeast-like organisms and bacteria were seen intermittently. Epithelial cells and white blood cells were often present in the blowhole mucus, but red blood cells were never seen. A novel trypanoplasm-like bodonid kinetoplastid biflagellate (Order Kinetoplastida) was commonly encountered in the blowhole mucus, but never in the blood. Both mature flagellates and those undergoing longitudinal binary fission were present. The elongate flagellate had a long whiplash anterior flagellum; the recurrent flagellum was attached along at least two-thirds of the body length, forming a prominent undulating membrane, and the trailing portion was short. The kinetoplast was irregularly fragmented. The flagellates were either free-swimming, or attached to host material via the free portion of the posterior flagellum. The prominent undulating membrane was characteristic of Trypanoplasma, while the fragmented kinetoplast was characteristic of some species of Cryptobia. For the novel bodonid kinetoplastid, with its unique combination of morphological features (prominent undulating membrane and fragmented kinetoplast), we propose the creation of a new genus Jarrellia. We believe this to be the first published description of a flagellate from a marine mammal, and among the first reports of a trypanoplasm-like flagellate from a warm-blooded host. We expect that a diversity

  9. [Adult-onset rare diseases].

    PubMed

    Pfliegler, György; Kovács, Erzsébet; Kovács, György; Urbán, Krisztián; Nagy, Valéria; Brúgós, Boglárka

    2014-03-02

    The present paper is focusing on rare diseases manifesting in late childhood or adulthood. A part of these syndromes are not of genetic origin, such as relatively or absolutely rare infections, autoimmune diseases, tumours, or diseases due to rare environmental toxic agents. In addition, even a large proportion of genetic disorders may develop in adulthood or may have adult forms as well, affecting are almost each medical specialization. Examples are storage disorders (e.g. adult form of Tay-Sachs disease, Gaucher-disease), enzyme deficiencies (e.g. ornithin-transcarbamylase deficiency of the urea cycle disorders), rare thrombophilias (e.g. homozygous factor V. Leiden mutation, antithrombin deficiency), or some rare monogenic disorders such as Huntington-chorea and many others. It is now generally accepted that at least half of the 6-8000 "rare diseases" belong either to the scope of adult-care (e.g. internal medicine, neurology), or to "age-neutral" specialities such as ophtalmology, dermatology etc.).

  10. The Not-So-Rare Earths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muecke, Gunter K.; Moller, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of rare earth elements. Details the physical chemistry of rare earths. Reviews the history of rare earth chemistry and mineralogy. Discusses the mineralogy and crystallography of the formation of rare earth laden minerals found in the earth's crust. Characterizes the geologic history of rare earth elements. (CW)

  11. The Not-So-Rare Earths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muecke, Gunter K.; Moller, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of rare earth elements. Details the physical chemistry of rare earths. Reviews the history of rare earth chemistry and mineralogy. Discusses the mineralogy and crystallography of the formation of rare earth laden minerals found in the earth's crust. Characterizes the geologic history of rare earth elements. (CW)

  12. On a Rare Cutaneous Metastasis from a Sacrococcygeal Chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Brunelli, Matteo; Floccari, Federica; De Caro, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Chordomas are rare malignant tumors of notochordal origin and are rare locally aggressive ones with a metastatic potential. The skin rarely is seen as metastatic site. We describe a case of an adult woman with cutaneous metastasis of a primary sacral chordoma excised ten years before, which appeared as a painless cutaneous mass located in the dorsal region. Once removed, the surgical specimen was formalin fixed and in paraffin embedded. Sections were stained with haematoxylin-eosin, and histochemical and immunohistochemical investigations were performed. Histologically, the neoplasia was characterized by cords or single tumor cells with an abundant myxoid stroma, conspicuous pale vacuolated cytoplasm (the classic “physaliphorous cells”), and mild nuclear atypia. Mitotic activity was scanty. At immunohistochemistry, the tumor cells were diffusely positive for S-100 protein, pan-keratins, EMA, and vimentin. A diagnosis of cutaneous metastasis of chordoma was performed. This case illustrates a diagnostic challenge because of the unusual presentation of an already rare tumor. PMID:28409046

  13. Rare metastases of differentiated thyroid carcinoma: pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Song, Hong-Jun; Xue, Yan-Li; Xu, Yan-Hong; Qiu, Zhong-Ling; Luo, Quan-Yong

    2011-10-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is usually indolent with good prognosis and long-term survival. However, DTC distant metastasis is often a grave event and accounts for most of its disease-specific mortality. The major sites of distant metastases are the lung and bone. Metastases to the brain, breast, liver, kidney, muscle, and skin are rare or relatively rare. Nevertheless, recognizing rare metastases from DTC has a significant impact on the clinical decision making and prognosis of patients. (131)I single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography ((131)I-SPECT/CT) can provide both metabolic and anatomic information about a lesion; therefore, it can better localize and define the (131)I-WBS findings in DTC patients. In this pictorial review, the imaging features of a range of rare metastases from DTC are demonstrated, with a particular emphasis on the (131)I-SPECT/CT diagnostic aspect.

  14. Bayesian analysis of rare events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Daniel; Papaioannou, Iason; Betz, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    In many areas of engineering and science there is an interest in predicting the probability of rare events, in particular in applications related to safety and security. Increasingly, such predictions are made through computer models of physical systems in an uncertainty quantification framework. Additionally, with advances in IT, monitoring and sensor technology, an increasing amount of data on the performance of the systems is collected. This data can be used to reduce uncertainty, improve the probability estimates and consequently enhance the management of rare events and associated risks. Bayesian analysis is the ideal method to include the data into the probabilistic model. It ensures a consistent probabilistic treatment of uncertainty, which is central in the prediction of rare events, where extrapolation from the domain of observation is common. We present a framework for performing Bayesian updating of rare event probabilities, termed BUS. It is based on a reinterpretation of the classical rejection-sampling approach to Bayesian analysis, which enables the use of established methods for estimating probabilities of rare events. By drawing upon these methods, the framework makes use of their computational efficiency. These methods include the First-Order Reliability Method (FORM), tailored importance sampling (IS) methods and Subset Simulation (SuS). In this contribution, we briefly review these methods in the context of the BUS framework and investigate their applicability to Bayesian analysis of rare events in different settings. We find that, for some applications, FORM can be highly efficient and is surprisingly accurate, enabling Bayesian analysis of rare events with just a few model evaluations. In a general setting, BUS implemented through IS and SuS is more robust and flexible.

  15. Factor XIII deficiency: a rare cause of repeated abortions.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, L D; Mhaskar, R; Mhaskar, A; Ross, C R

    2004-04-01

    Factor XIII deficiency is a rare cause of early abortion. The obstetrical outcome of four pregnancies in two women with factor XIII deficiency is reported. Both women were treated with substitution therapy using locally-prepared cryoprecipitate. The outcome in these two women demonstrated the need for substitution therapy in early pregnancy leading to an increased chance of obstetrical success.

  16. Aneurysmal bone cyst of maxillary alveolus: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Subhas Chandra; Adhyapok, Apurba Kumar; Hazarika, Kriti; Malik, Kapil; Vatsyayan, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a nonneoplastic rare pathologic entity of the jaws. Its locally aggressive nature and high recurrence rate after curettage make surgical resection a better treatment option. Here, we present a case of ABC of maxillary alveolus and its management by alveolectomy followed by white head varnish pack application in the surgical defect. PMID:27041915

  17. Rare species occupy uncommon niches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markham, John

    2014-08-01

    The fact that temperate grasslands often contain upwards of 30 vascular plant species per m2 yet these species seem to have relatively similar life histories and resource requirements has made explaining species coexistence in these communities a major focus of research. While the reduction of competition by disturbance has been a popular explanation for species coexistence, in tallgrass prairies any level of disturbance either has no effect, or decreases diversity, since it favors the dominant plants. Although there has long been speculation that grassland species could coexist by niche partitioning the concept received renewed interest when it was shown that soil hydrology could explain species coexistence. One aspect of community structure that has not been explained by niche partitioning is the rareness and commonness of species within communities. There are three classes of explanations for rareness: narrow habitat requirements, low competitive ability combined with frequency dependent fitness and, dispersal ability. However, evidence for these explanations tend to be anecdotal, focusing on particular species. Here I show that in tallgrass prairies common and rare species consistently occupy different parts of niche space, with rare species being restricted by the cover of common species and occupying the rare available niches.

  18. Rare species occupy uncommon niches

    PubMed Central

    Markham, John

    2014-01-01

    The fact that temperate grasslands often contain upwards of 30 vascular plant species per m2 yet these species seem to have relatively similar life histories and resource requirements has made explaining species coexistence in these communities a major focus of research. While the reduction of competition by disturbance has been a popular explanation for species coexistence, in tallgrass prairies any level of disturbance either has no effect, or decreases diversity, since it favors the dominant plants. Although there has long been speculation that grassland species could coexist by niche partitioning the concept received renewed interest when it was shown that soil hydrology could explain species coexistence. One aspect of community structure that has not been explained by niche partitioning is the rareness and commonness of species within communities. There are three classes of explanations for rareness: narrow habitat requirements, low competitive ability combined with frequency dependent fitness and, dispersal ability. However, evidence for these explanations tend to be anecdotal, focusing on particular species. Here I show that in tallgrass prairies common and rare species consistently occupy different parts of niche space, with rare species being restricted by the cover of common species and occupying the rare available niches. PMID:25110113

  19. A synopsis of records of myxozoan parasites (Cnidaria: Myxozoa) from shrews, with additional data on Soricimyxum fegati from common shrew Sorex araneus in Hungary and pygmy shrew Sorex minutus in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Szekely, Csaba; Atkinson, Stephen D; Molnar, Kalman; Egyed, Laszlo; Gubanyi, Andras; Cech, Gabor

    2016-06-13

    Myxozoans (Cnidaria: Myxozoa) are almost exclusively endoparasites of aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates, with the notable exception being two species of Soricimyxum Prunescu, Prunescu, Pucek et Lom, 2007 described from terrestrial shrews (Soricidae) in central Europe. Myxospores of the two parasites are morphologically indistinguishable, but have SSU rDNA sequences that differ by about 4%. Herein, we report additional molecular and histology data from Soricimyxum fegati Prunescu, Prunescu, Pucek et Lom, 2007 from common shrew (Sorex araneus Linnaeus) from Hungary, and add a new geographic record for S. fegati in pygmy shrew (Sorex minutus Linnaeus) from Slovakia. A limited survey of shrews from the northern United States, Blarina brevicauda Say and Sorex sp. from New York, and Sorex spp. from Oregon, did not discover any infections, which is in stark contrast to the relatively high infection rates (up to 66%) in European shrew populations. We also provide a summary and discussion of literature records of species of Soricimyxum and a host survey. Given the lack of distinguishing morphological or morphometric characters between Soricimyxum spp., and the overlap in vertebrate hosts and geographic ranges, unambiguous identification of these closely related shrew parasites can presently only be achieved through sequence comparison of one or more variable SSU rDNA regions.

  20. Building treasures for rare disorders.

    PubMed

    Baas, Melanie; Huisman, Sylvia; van Heukelingen, John; Koekkoek, Gerritjan; Laan, Henk-Willem; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2015-01-01

    The internet pre-eminently marks an era with unprecedented chances for patient care. Especially individuals with rare disorders and their families can benefit. Their handicap of low numbers vanishes and can become a strength, as small, motivated and well-organized international support groups allow easily fruitful collaborations with physicians and researchers. Jointly setting research agendas and building wikipedias has eventually led to building of multi-lingual databases of longitudinal data on physical and behavioural characteristics of individuals with several rare disorders which we call waihonapedias (waihona meaning treasure in Hawaiian). There are hurdles to take, like online security and reliability of diagnoses, but sharing experiences and true collaborations will allow better research and patient care for fewer costs to patients with rare disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Upconversion of rare Earth nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ling-Dong; Dong, Hao; Zhang, Pei-Zhi; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2015-04-01

    Rare earth nanomaterials, which feature long-lived intermediate energy levels and intraconfigurational 4f-4f transitions, are promising supporters for photon upconversion. Owing to their unique optical properties, rare earth upconversion nanomaterials have found applications in bioimaging, theranostics, photovoltaic devices, and photochemical reactions. Here, we review recent advances in the photon upconversion processes of these nanomaterials. We start by considering energy transfer models involved in the study of upconversion emissions, as well as well-established synthesis strategies to control the size and shape of rare earth upconversion nanomaterials. Progress in engineering energy transfer pathways, which play a dominant role in determining upconversion emission outputs, is then discussed. Lastly, representative optical applications of these materials are considered. The aim of this review is to provide inspiration for researchers to explore novel upconversion nanomaterials and extended optical applications.

  2. Structure and Properties of Rare Earth Aluminosilicate Glasses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohli, Jeffrey Todd

    1991-02-01

    Rare earth aluminosilicate (REAS) glasses have been formed using conventional melting techniques. The glass-forming regions of six different ternary systems have been defined with praseodymium, neodymium, samarium, terbium, erbium, or ytterbium oxides, with alumina and silica. The glass-forming regions systematically decreased in size as the atomic number of the particular rare earth in the ternary systems increased. Glasses, of the molar composition 2R_2O_3 -2Al_2O_3 -6SiO_2, were formed with twelve of the fourteen true rare earth oxides in order to investigate further effects related to the identity of the rare earth ion in the glasses. Several properties of the rare earth aluminosilicate glasses were measured. These properties include: thermal expansion, glass transformation temperature, dilatometric softening point, density, molar volume, index of refraction, Vicker's hardness, magnetic susceptibility and the Faraday rotatory response. The structures of rare earth aluminosilicate glasses were investigated using infrared and Raman spectroscopies as well as magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR). MAS-NMR provided information regarding the local environments of silicon and aluminum ions in yttrium aluminosilicate (YAS) glasses. Since the size and valence of the yttrium ion are similar to the true rare earth ions, and the properties of the REAS and YAS glasses are similar, it is believed that the structures of yttrium aluminosilicate glasses are similar to those of the true rare earth aluminosilicate glasses. Several rare earth aluminogermanate glasses, having the molar formula 2R_2O _3-2Al_2O _3-6GeO_2, were also formed using conventional melting techniques. The properties of these glasses were compared and contrasted with those of the REAS glasses. Finally, a chapter on the study of magnetic susceptibility in common insulator glasses was added to the thesis. Several techniques used to measure magnetic susceptibility are reviewed in this chapter

  3. Angiomatous Hamartoma - A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Wadhera, Raman; Kaintura, Madhuri; Bhukar, Sandeep; Pillai, Dheeraj Shashikumar

    2016-01-01

    Eccrine Angiomatous Hamartoma (EAH) is a benign rare skin neoplasm characterised histologically by abnormal proliferation of sweat glands and surrounding capillaries and other dermal elements like fatty lobules and hair. It usually presents at birth or in early childhood in the form of solitary nodules mostly affecting the extremities. Here, we report a case of angiomatous hamartoma over the face which presented as a cystic swelling in preauricular region in a 55-year-old man. The late onset and a rare site for presentation of EAH prompted us to report the case. There is not even a single case of EAH arising in the “preauricular” region, reported. PMID:27790478

  4. Metacomprehension during Rare Word Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mcginnis, Debra; Saunders, Nikola N.; Burns, Ryan J.

    2007-01-01

    To examine metacomprehension during comprehension, undergraduates (n = 133) were asked to provide descriptions of how they determined the meaning of four rare words presented in short passages. Content analysis of these written descriptions revealed task-specific metacomprehension reflecting lexical, textbase, and situation model processes.…

  5. Metacomprehension during Rare Word Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mcginnis, Debra; Saunders, Nikola N.; Burns, Ryan J.

    2007-01-01

    To examine metacomprehension during comprehension, undergraduates (n = 133) were asked to provide descriptions of how they determined the meaning of four rare words presented in short passages. Content analysis of these written descriptions revealed task-specific metacomprehension reflecting lexical, textbase, and situation model processes.…

  6. Rare B decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, Sinead M.; /Liverpool U.

    2006-10-01

    The confidence level limits of the CDF search for the B{sub s}{sup 0} and B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} rare decays and the branching ratio measurement of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +} D{sub s}{sup -} are presented.

  7. Cherubism: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manpreet; Shah, Sonali; Babaji, Prashant; Singh, Jaideep; Nair, Divya; Kamble, Suresh S

    2014-01-01

    Cherubism is a rare congenital disease resulting in malformation of the jaw. It occurs before the age of 5 years and regress spontaneously after puberty. It can result into enlargement of the jaw bone, tooth displacement, facial disfigurement and psychological trauma to patient. Hence, the understanding about the condition, its progression and management is necessary. PMID:25097445

  8. RARE II: The Administration's View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, M. Rupert

    1977-01-01

    RARE II is a new Roadless Area Review and Evaluation of the National Forest system. Administrators are attempting to inventory existing wilderness areas and to determine criteria for setting aside additional ones. This information will be used for the required 1980 update of the national assessment of forests and rangelands. (MA)

  9. Treatable inherited rare movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Jinnah, H A; Albanese, Alberto; Bhatia, Kailash P; Cardoso, Francisco; Da Prat, Gustavo; de Koning, Tom J; Espay, Alberto J; Fung, Victor; Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro J; Gershanik, Oscar; Jankovic, Joseph; Kaji, Ryuji; Kotschet, Katya; Marras, Connie; Miyasaki, Janis M; Morgante, Francesca; Munchau, Alexander; Pal, Pramod Kumar; Rodriguez Oroz, Maria C; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela; Schöls, Ludger; Stamelou, Maria; Tijssen, Marina; Uribe Roca, Claudia; de la Cerda, Andres; Gatto, Emilia M

    2017-09-01

    There are many rare movement disorders, and new ones are described every year. Because they are not well recognized, they often go undiagnosed for long periods of time. However, early diagnosis is becoming increasingly important. Rapid advances in our understanding of the biological mechanisms responsible for many rare disorders have enabled the development of specific treatments for some of them. Well-known historical examples include Wilson disease and dopa-responsive dystonia, for which specific and highly effective treatments have life-altering effects. In recent years, similarly specific and effective treatments have been developed for more than 30 rare inherited movement disorders. These treatments include specific medications, dietary changes, avoidance or management of certain triggers, enzyme replacement therapy, and others. This list of treatable rare movement disorders is likely to grow during the next few years because a number of additional promising treatments are actively being developed or evaluated in clinical trials. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  10. Rare decays at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, S.M.; /Liverpool U.

    2006-01-01

    The confidence level limits of the CDF and D0 searches for the B{sub s}{sup 0}, B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{phi} rare decays are presented.

  11. Exome sequencing deciphers rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Maxmen, Amy

    2011-03-04

    Two years ago, NIH's Undiagnosed Diseases Program began delivering genomics to the clinic on an unprecedented scale. Now, with 128 exomes sequenced and 39 rare diseases diagnosed, the program's success is paving the way for widespread personal genomics while pioneering new techniques for reigning in the "tsunami" of genomics data.

  12. Rare gastrointestinal lymphomas: The endoscopic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Vetro, Calogero; Bonanno, Giacomo; Giulietti, Giorgio; Romano, Alessandra; Conticello, Concetta; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Spina, Paolo; Coppolino, Francesco; Cunsolo, Rosario; Raimondo, Francesco Di

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent up to 10% of gastrointestinal malignancies and about one third of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The most prominent histologies are mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. However, the gastrointestinal tract can be the site of rarer lymphoma subtypes as a primary or secondary localization. Due to their rarity and the multifaceted histology, an endoscopic classification has not been validated yet. This review aims to analyze the endoscopic presentation of rare gastrointestinal lymphomas from disease diagnosis to follow-up, according to the involved site and lymphoma subtype. Existing, new and emerging endoscopic technologies have been examined. In particular, we investigated the diagnostic, prognostic and follow-up endoscopic features of T-cell and natural killer lymphomas, lymphomatous polyposis and mantle cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, plasma cell related disease, gastrointestinal lymphomas in immunodeficiency and Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract. Contrarily to more frequent gastrointestinal lymphomas, data about rare lymphomas are mostly extracted from case series and case reports. Due to the data paucity, a synergism between gastroenterologists and hematologists is required in order to better manage the disease. Indeed, clinical and prognostic features are different from nodal and extranodal or the bone marrow (in case of plasma cell disease) counterpart. Therefore, the approach should be based on the knowledge of the peculiar behavior and natural history of disease. PMID:26265987

  13. Selective Emitter Pumped Rare Earth Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Patton, Martin O. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A selective emitter pumped rare earth laser provides an additional type of laser for use in many laser applications. Rare earth doped lasers exist which are pumped with flashtubes or laser diodes. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform thermal energy input to a spectral band matching the absorption band of a rare earth in the laser in order to produce lasing.

  14. A Rare Breast Tumor: Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Tevhide Bilgen; Hacıhasanoğlu, Ezgi; Nazlı, Mehmet Ali; Aksoy, Şefika; Leblebici, Cem; Talu, Canan Kelten

    2016-01-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans is a slow-growing, local aggressive fibrous tumor of the subcutaneous tissue, frequently seen in the proximal extremities and the trunk. Its occurrence in the breast is very rare. Herein, we present a female who presented with a breast mass, and aim to discuss pathological features and differential diagnosis of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. A 44-year-old female presented to our clinic with a mass on her breast. Physical examination revealed a 8×5.5 cm mass with multilobular nodules on the skin in the lower inner quadrant of her right breast. Her mammography revealed a hyperdense, 7.5×6.5 cm, well-demarcated, lobulated mass in the right breast, which caused nodules on the lower para-areolar portion of the breast skin. There was no axillary lymphadenopathy on both clinical and radiologic examinations. A core needle biopsy had been performed prior to her referral to our center, which revealed a ‘spindle cell lesion’. The patient underwent simple mastectomy. On macroscopic examination; the skin over the lesion appeared ulcerated, and there was a well-defined solid mass, which was pale white-tan on the cut surface. Microscopic examination revealed monotonous spindle cell proliferation arranged in storiform pattern within the collagenous stroma with irregular extensions into deep adipose tissue. There were no necrosis or nuclear pleomorphism. The mitotic rate was 2–3/10 HPF. Immunohistochemically tumor cells showed diffuse CD34 positivity, and S100, EMA and SMA negativity. Based on histopathological and immunohistochemical findings, the lesion was diagnosed as dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. Local recurrence is expected in 20–50% of these cases. Its treatment requires complete surgical excision with wide margins. Distant metastases, although rare, have been reported.

  15. Rare flavor processes in Maximally Natural Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Isabel García; March-Russell, John

    2015-01-01

    We study CP-conserving rare flavor violating processes in the recently proposed theory of Maximally Natural Supersymmetry (MNSUSY). MNSUSY is an unusual supersymmetric (SUSY) extension of the Standard Model (SM) which, remarkably, is untuned at present LHC limits. It employs Scherk-Schwarz breaking of SUSY by boundary conditions upon compactifying an underlying 5-dimensional (5D) theory down to 4D, and is not well-described by softly-broken SUSY, with much different phenomenology than the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and its variants. The usual CP-conserving SUSY-flavor problem is automatically solved in MNSUSY due to a residual almost exact U(1) R symmetry, naturally heavy and highly degenerate 1st- and 2nd-generation sfermions, and heavy gauginos and Higgsinos. Depending on the exact implementation of MNSUSY there exist important new sources of flavor violation involving gauge boson Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations. The spatial localization properties of the matter multiplets, in particular the brane localization of the 3rd generation states, imply KK-parity is broken and tree-level contributions to flavor changing neutral currents are present in general. Nevertheless, we show that simple variants of the basic MNSUSY model are safe from present flavor constraints arising from kaon and B-meson oscillations, the rare decays B s, d → μ + μ -, μ → ēee and μ- e conversion in nuclei. We also briefly discuss some special features of the radiative decays μ → eγ and . Future experiments, especially those concerned with lepton flavor violation, should see deviations from SM predictions unless one of the MNSUSY variants with enhanced flavor symmetries is realized.

  16. Where less may be more: how the rare biosphere pulls ecosystems strings.

    PubMed

    Jousset, Alexandre; Bienhold, Christina; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Gallien, Laure; Gobet, Angélique; Kurm, Viola; Küsel, Kirsten; Rillig, Matthias C; Rivett, Damian W; Salles, Joana F; van der Heijden, Marcel G A; Youssef, Noha H; Zhang, Xiaowei; Wei, Zhong; Hol, W H Gera

    2017-04-01

    Rare species are increasingly recognized as crucial, yet vulnerable components of Earth's ecosystems. This is also true for microbial communities, which are typically composed of a high number of relatively rare species. Recent studies have demonstrated that rare species can have an over-proportional role in biogeochemical cycles and may be a hidden driver of microbiome function. In this review, we provide an ecological overview of the rare microbial biosphere, including causes of rarity and the impacts of rare species on ecosystem functioning. We discuss how rare species can have a preponderant role for local biodiversity and species turnover with rarity potentially bound to phylogenetically conserved features. Rare microbes may therefore be overlooked keystone species regulating the functioning of host-associated, terrestrial and aquatic environments. We conclude this review with recommendations to guide scientists interested in investigating this rapidly emerging research area.

  17. Where less may be more: how the rare biosphere pulls ecosystems strings

    PubMed Central

    Jousset, Alexandre; Bienhold, Christina; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Gallien, Laure; Gobet, Angélique; Kurm, Viola; Küsel, Kirsten; Rillig, Matthias C; Rivett, Damian W; Salles, Joana F; van der Heijden, Marcel G A; Youssef, Noha H; Zhang, Xiaowei; Wei, Zhong; Hol, W H Gera

    2017-01-01

    Rare species are increasingly recognized as crucial, yet vulnerable components of Earth's ecosystems. This is also true for microbial communities, which are typically composed of a high number of relatively rare species. Recent studies have demonstrated that rare species can have an over-proportional role in biogeochemical cycles and may be a hidden driver of microbiome function. In this review, we provide an ecological overview of the rare microbial biosphere, including causes of rarity and the impacts of rare species on ecosystem functioning. We discuss how rare species can have a preponderant role for local biodiversity and species turnover with rarity potentially bound to phylogenetically conserved features. Rare microbes may therefore be overlooked keystone species regulating the functioning of host-associated, terrestrial and aquatic environments. We conclude this review with recommendations to guide scientists interested in investigating this rapidly emerging research area. PMID:28072420

  18. Rare events: a state of the art

    SciTech Connect

    Uppuluri, V.R.R.

    1980-12-01

    The study of rare events has become increasingly important in the context of nuclear safety. Some philosophical considerations, such as the framework for the definition of a rare event, rare events and science, rare events and trans-science, and rare events and public perception, are discussed. The technical work of the Task Force on problems of Rare Events in the Reliability Analysis of Nuclear Plants (1976-1978), sponsored by OECD, is reviewed. Some recent technical considerations are discussed, and conclusions are drawn. The appendix contains an essay written by Anne E. Beachey, under the title: A Study of Rare Events - Problems and Promises.

  19. Rare essentials: drugs for rare diseases as essential medicines.

    PubMed

    Stolk, Pieter; Willemen, Marjolein J C; Leufkens, Hubert G M

    2006-09-01

    Since 1977, the WHO Model List of Essential Medicines (EML), published by WHO, has provided advice for Member States that struggle to decide which pharmaceutical technologies should be provided to patients within their public health systems. Originating from outside WHO, an incentive system has been put in place by various governments for the development of medicines for rare diseases ("orphan drugs"). With progress in pharmaceutical research (e.g. drugs targeted for narrower indications), these medicines will feature more often on future public health agendas. However, when current definitions for selecting essential medicines are applied strictly, orphan drugs cannot be part of the WHO Essential Medicines Programme, creating the risk that WHO may lose touch with this field. In our opinion WHO should explicitly include orphan drugs in its policy sphere by composing a complementary Orphan Medicines Model List as an addition to the EML. This complementary list of "rare essentials" could aid policy-makers and patients in, for example, emerging countries to improve access to these drugs and stimulate relevant policies. Furthermore, inconsistencies in the current EML with regard to medicines for rare diseases can be resolved. In this paper we propose selection criteria for an Orphan Medicines Model List that could form a departure point for future work towards an extensive WHO Orphan Medicines Programme.

  20. Rare essentials: drugs for rare diseases as essential medicines.

    PubMed Central

    Stolk, Pieter; Willemen, Marjolein J. C.; Leufkens, Hubert G. M.

    2006-01-01

    Since 1977, the WHO Model List of Essential Medicines (EML), published by WHO, has provided advice for Member States that struggle to decide which pharmaceutical technologies should be provided to patients within their public health systems. Originating from outside WHO, an incentive system has been put in place by various governments for the development of medicines for rare diseases ("orphan drugs"). With progress in pharmaceutical research (e.g. drugs targeted for narrower indications), these medicines will feature more often on future public health agendas. However, when current definitions for selecting essential medicines are applied strictly, orphan drugs cannot be part of the WHO Essential Medicines Programme, creating the risk that WHO may lose touch with this field. In our opinion WHO should explicitly include orphan drugs in its policy sphere by composing a complementary Orphan Medicines Model List as an addition to the EML. This complementary list of "rare essentials" could aid policy-makers and patients in, for example, emerging countries to improve access to these drugs and stimulate relevant policies. Furthermore, inconsistencies in the current EML with regard to medicines for rare diseases can be resolved. In this paper we propose selection criteria for an Orphan Medicines Model List that could form a departure point for future work towards an extensive WHO Orphan Medicines Programme. PMID:17128345

  1. Rare Earth Garnet Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.75, sup 4)|(sub 15/2) - (sup 4)|(sub 13/2),for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.65, (sup 5)|(sub 7) - (sup 5)|(sub 8) for Ho-YAG) at 1500 K. In addition, low out-of-band spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda) less than 0.2, suggest these materials would be excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500 K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. Selective emitters in the near IR are of special interest for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion. The most promising solid selective emitters for use in a TPV system are rare earth oxides. Early spectral emittance work on rare earth oxides showed strong emission bands in the infrared (0.9 - 3 microns). However, the emittance outside the emission band was also significant and the efficiency of these emitters was low. Recent improvements in efficiency have been made with emitters fabricated from fine (5 - 10 microns) rare earth oxide fibers similar to the Welsbach mantle used in gas lanterns. However, the rare earth garnet emitters are more rugged than the mantle type emitters. A thin film selective emitter on a low emissivity substrate such as gold, platinum etc., is rugged and easily adapted to a wide variety of thermal sources. The garnet structure and its many subgroups have been successfully used as hosts for rare earth ions, introduced as substitutional

  2. [Care for patients with rare diseases].

    PubMed

    Smetsers, Stephanie E; Takkenberg, J J M Hanneke; Bierings, Marc B

    2014-01-01

    A rare disease usually concerns only a handful of patients, but all patients with a rare disease combined represent a significant health burden. Due to limited knowledge and the absence of treatment guidelines, patients with rare diseases usually experience delayed diagnosis and suboptimal treatment. Historically, rare diseases have never been considered a major health problem. However, rare diseases have recently been receiving increased attention. In the Netherlands, a national plan for rare diseases was published in late 2013, with recommendations on how to improve the organisation of healthcare for people with rare diseases. Using the example of the rare disease Fanconi anemia, this paper describes the challenges and opportunities in organising healthcare for rare diseases. Two critical steps in optimising healthcare for rare diseases are developing multidisciplinary healthcare teams and stimulating patient empowerment. Optimal cooperation between patients, patient organisations, multidisciplinary healthcare teams and scientists is of great importance. In this respect, transition to adult healthcare requires special attention.

  3. A rare case of angiofibroma of the mandible: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ul Khaliq, Mohammed Israr; Shah, Ajaz A.; Dar, Nahida

    2016-01-01

    Angiofibroma is a rare, highly vascular nonencapsulated tumor, which is locally invasive. A rare case of angiofibroma of the mandible in a 16-year-old female patient is reported here. The lesion was excised along with surgical removal of right mandibular third molar tooth. Patient was followed up for 1 year without any recurrence. PMID:27195217

  4. Adenomyoma of the small intestine in children: a rare cause of intussusception: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mouravas, Vassilios; Koutsoumis, Georgios; Patoulias, John; Kostopoulos, Ioannis; Kottakidou, Rodosula; Kallergis, Kanstantinos; Kepertis, Chrysostomos; Liolios, Nikolaos

    2003-01-01

    Adenomyomas are hamartomas of the alimentary tract with exceptionally rare localization at the ileum. The case presented here concerns an infant aged 18 months suffering from adenomyoma of the ileum, which was responsible for the development of ileoileac intussusception. Our paper aims at underlining the particularities of this extremely rare entity, while adding the 13th case reported to the international bibliographic references.

  5. EXCLUSION OF RARE TAXA AFFECTS PERFORMANCE OF THE O/E INDEX IN BIOASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The contribution of rare taxa to bioassessments based on multispecies assemblages is the subject of continued debate. As a result, users of predictive models such as River InVertebrate Prediction and Classification System (RIVPACS) disagree on whether to exclude locally rare taxa...

  6. Locally invasive primary splenic angiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Hasiloglu, Zehra Isik; Metin, Duygu Yegul; Ozbayrak, Mustafa; Havan, Nuri

    2010-12-01

    Primary angiosarcoma of the spleen is a very rare vascular neoplasm, but it represents the most common non-hematolymphoid malignant tumor of the spleen. In this report, we present the case of a 48-year-old man with primary splenic angiosarcoma with local invasion to the left diaphragm and the radiological imaging findings for this cancer.

  7. Neonatal Hemophilia: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Proença, Elisa; Godinho, Cristina; Oliveira, Dulce; Guedes, Ana; Morais, Sara; Carvalho, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a X-linked hereditary condition that lead to decreased factor VIII activity, occurs mainly in males. Decreased factor VIII activity leads to increased risk of bleeding events. During neonatal period, diagnosis is made after post-partum bleeding complication or unexpected bleeding after medical procedures. Subgaleal hemorrhage during neonatal period is a rare, severe extracranial bleeding with high mortality and usually related to traumatic labor or coagulation disorders. Subgaleal hemorrhage complications result from massive bleeding. We present a neonate with unremarkable family history and uneventful pregnancy with a vaginal delivery with no instrumentation, presenting with severe subgaleal bleeding at 52 hours of life. Aggressive support measures were implemented and bleeding managed. The unexpected bleeding lead to a coagulation study and the diagnosis of severe hemophilia A. There were no known sequelae. This case shows a rare hemophilia presentation reflecting the importance of coagulation studies when faced with unexplained severe bleeding. PMID:26734126

  8. Replica trick for rare samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Tommaso

    2014-05-01

    In the context of disordered systems with quenched Hamiltonians I address the problem of characterizing rare samples where the thermal average of a specific observable has a value different from the typical one. These rare samples can be selected through a variation of the replica trick which amounts to replicating the system and dividing the replicas intwo two groups containing, respectively, M and -M replicas. Replicas in the first (second) group experience a positive (negative) small field O (1/M) conjugate to the observable considered and the M →∞ limit is to be taken in the end. Applications to the random-field Ising model and to the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model are discussed.

  9. Ectopic testis: a rare case.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Congenital undescending testis is a common anomaly of testis, but we had a rare case of ectopic testis. A 15-month-old infant was operated emergently because of left incarcerate inguinal hernia. Intraoperative exploration of hernial sac revealed two ectopic testes with one spermatic cord proximally but in the middle divided to two spermatic cords in a 8 shape. There was an important point about vas deferens as it was single proximal to the chord, but divided into two in the middle of the chord. Vessels showed a similar condition about. We released both testes and brought down both of them into scrotum. This is a rare case of ectopic testis transectopia with partially common vas and vessels.

  10. Chondroectodermal Dysplasia: A Rare Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tahririan, Dana; Eshghi, Alireza; Givehchian, Pirooz; Tahririan, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Chondroectodermal dysplasia (Ellis-Van Creveld syndrome) is a rare autosomal recessive congenital abnormality. This syndrome is characterized by a spectrum of clinical findings, among which chondrodystrophy, polydactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and congenital cardiac anomalies are the most common. It is imperative to not overlook the cardiac complications in patients with this syndrome during dental procedures. The case presented here, although quite rare, was detected under normal conditions and can be alarming for dental care providers. Clinical reports outline the classical and unusual oral and dental manifestations, which help health care providers diagnose chondroectodermal dysplasia, and refer patients with this syndrome to appropriate health care professionals to receive treatment to prevent further cardiac complications and bone deformities. PMID:25628672

  11. Rare Earth Optical Temperature Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Wolford, David S.

    2000-01-01

    A new optical temperature sensor suitable for high temperatures (greater than 1700 K) and harsh environments is introduced. The key component of the sensor is the rare earth material contained at the end of a sensor that is in contact with the sample being measured. The measured narrow wavelength band emission from the rare earth is used to deduce the sample temperature. A simplified relation between the temperature and measured radiation was verified experimentally. The upper temperature limit of the sensor is determined by material limits to be approximately 2000 C. The lower limit, determined by the minimum detectable radiation, is found to be approximately 700 K. At high temperatures 1 K resolution is predicted. Also, millisecond response times are calculated.

  12. Erythromelalgia: a rare microvascular disease.

    PubMed

    Latessa, Victoria

    2010-06-01

    Erythromelalgia (EM) is a rare condition of unknown etiology that results in intense, burning pain and redness primarily of the feet, and, even more rarely, in the hands. Most cases are idiopathic (primary EM); others occur secondary to medical conditions, such as autoimmune diseases, and neurological or hematological disorders. Symptoms are episodic and can result in severe disability. Triggers, such as exposure to warmth, pressure or exercise, become apparent to those afflicted with this condition; however, triggers may be unavoidable during the course of daily living. There are no diagnostic tests for EM. Diagnosis is based on history, physical examination during symptomatic episode and the exclusion of other probable causes for the syndrome. Early recognition of the signs and symptoms as well as early treatment offer patients the best hope of remissions and improved quality of life. (c) 2010 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Testicular calculus: A rare case.

    PubMed

    Sen, Volkan; Bozkurt, Ozan; Demır, Omer; Tuna, Burcin; Yorukoglu, Kutsal; Esen, Adil

    2015-01-01

    Testicular calculus is an extremely rare case with unknown etiology and pathogenesis. To our knowledge, here we report the third case of testicular calculus. A 31-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with painful solid mass in left testis. After diagnostic work-up for a possible testicular tumour, he underwent inguinal orchiectomy and histopathologic examination showed a testicular calculus. Case hypothesis: Solid testicular lesions in young adults generally correspond to testicular cancer. Differential diagnosis should be done carefully. Future implications: In young adults with painful and solid testicular mass with hyperechogenic appearance on scrotal ultrasonography, testicular calculus must be kept in mind in differential diagnosis. Further reports on this topic may let us do more clear recommendations about the etiology and treatment of this rare disease.

  14. Sirenomelia apus: a rare deformity.

    PubMed

    Kshirsagar, Vinayak Y; Ahmed, Minhajuddin; Colaco, Sylvia M

    2012-07-01

    Sirenomelia also known as the mermaid syndrome, is a rare congenital malformation of uncertain etiology. It is characterized by fusion of the lower limbs and commonly associated with severe urogenital and gastrointestinal malformations. There are approximately 300 cases reported in the literature, 15% of which are associated with twinning, most often monozygotic. The syndrome of caudal regression is thought to be the result of injury to the caudal mesoderm early in gestation.

  15. Intracranial chondroma: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Veena; Mehdi, Ghazala; Varshney, Manoranjan; Jain, Anshu; Vashishtha, Sonal; Gaur, Kavita; Srivastava, Vinod Kumar

    2011-05-12

    Intracranial chondroma is a rare benign cartilaginous tumour with an incidence of less than 1% of all primary intracranial tumours. The authors are reporting here a case of intracranial chondroma in a 40-year-old man who presented with 5-month history of headache and gradual diminution of vision. A tentative diagnosis of chondroma was made on imprint cytology which was confirmed on histopathological examination.

  16. Rare mutations in evolutionary dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadori, Anna Lisa; Calzolari, Antonella; Natalini, Roberto; Torti, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we study the effect of rare mutations, driven by a marked point process, on the evolutionary behavior of a population. We derive a Kolmogorov equation describing the expected values of the different frequencies and prove some rigorous analytical results about their behavior. Finally, in a simple case of two different quasispecies, we are able to prove that the rarity of mutations increases the survival opportunity of the low fitness species.

  17. Os Odontoideum: Rare Cervical Lesion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    the articulation between C1 and the os odontoideum on flexion imaging. The remainder of his cervical vertebral bodies had normal alignment with no...appears normal. Figure 3. Flexion view of plain cervical spine. This image shows abnormal translation of the articulation between C1 and the C2 os...worldwide. Peer Reviewed Title: Os Odontoideum: Rare Cervical Lesion Journal Issue: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, 12(4) Author: Robson

  18. A rare case modafinil dependence.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Raman; Chary, Krishnan Vengadaragava

    2015-01-01

    Modafinil, a non-amphetamine psychostimulant, is indicated for narcolepsy, shift work sleep disorder and severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Modafinil is prescribed at the dose of 100 mg once in a day or as two doses, 12 h apart in a day. It has also been found that it reduces cocaine dependence and withdrawal phenomenon. Modafinil is claimed to have very low liability for abuse and dependence. Here we report a rare case of modafinil dependence.

  19. Os Odontoideum: Rare Cervical Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Kristie A

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 22-year-old Marine who presented to the emergency department, after a martial arts exercise, with transient weakness and numbness in all extremities. Computed tomography cervical spine radiographs revealed os odontoideum. Lateral flexion–extension radiographs identified atlanto-axillary instability. This abnormality is rare and can be career ending for military members who do not undergo surgical fusion. PMID:22224150

  20. Hepatic cysticercosis: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina; Kumar, Praveen; Narula, Mahender Kaur; Anand, Rama

    2014-12-01

    Hepatic cysticercosis is a very rare entity; only four cases have been reported to date. High-resolution ultrasonography of the abdomen is the initial and most reliable modality for evaluation of hepatic cysticercosis. Medical therapy is the mainstay of treatment. We report a case of hepatic cysticercosis in a 28-year-old male who presented with right upper quadrant pain, fever, and jaundice. The article also describes the imaging patterns of hepatic cysticercosis based on different stages of evolution.

  1. Thalamic abscess caused by a rare pathogen: streptococcus constellatus

    PubMed Central

    Şenol, Özgür; Süslü, Hikmet Turan; Tatarlı, Necati; Tiryaki, Mehmet; Güçlü, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus constellatus is a microorganism that lives commensally in the oropharyngeal region, urogenital region, and intestinal tract. However, it can cause infection in patients with certain predisposing factors. Rarely, this microorganism can cause a brain abscess. Thalamic localization of brain abscesses is much rarer than abscesses in other locations of the brain. Brain abscess caused by streptococcus constellatus are very rarely been reported in the literature. We present a rare case of a left-sided thalamic abscess caused by streptococcus constellatus in a 25-year-old male patient who was injured by shrapnel pieces in the head and who was malnourished. The patient was successfully treated by stereotactic aspiration and antibiotherapy. PMID:27800109

  2. Isolation and molecular characterization of a human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II (HTLV-II), subtype B, from a healthy Pygmy living in a remote area of Cameroon: an ancient origin for HTLV-II in Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Gessain, A; Mauclère, P; Froment, A; Biglione, M; Le Hesran, J Y; Tekaia, F; Millan, J; de Thé, G

    1995-01-01

    We report characterization of a human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II (HTLV-II) isolated from an interleukin 2-dependent CD8 T-cell line derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy, HTLV-II-seropositive female Bakola Pygmy, aged 59, living in a remote equatorial forest area in south Cameroon. This HTLLV-II isolate, designated PYGCAM-1, reacted in an indirect immunofluorescence assay with HTLV-II and HTLV-I polyclonal antibodies and with an HTLV-I/II gp46 monoclonal antibody but not with HTLV-I gag p19 or p24 monoclonal antibodies. The cell line produced HTLV-I/II p24 core antigen and retroviral particles. The entire env gene (1462 bp) and most of the long terminal repeat (715 bp) of the PYGCAM-1 provirus were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction using HTLV-II-specific primers. Comparison with the long terminal repeat and envelope sequences of prototype HTLV-II strains indicated that PYGCAM-1 belongs to the subtype B group, as it has only 0.5-2% nucleotide divergence from HTLV-II B strains. The finding of antibodies to HTLV-II in sera taken from the father of the woman in 1984 and from three unrelated members of the same population strongly suggests that PYGCAM-1 is a genuine HTLV-II that has been present in this isolated population for a long time. The low genetic divergence of this African isolate from American isolates raises questions about the genetic variability over time and the origin and dissemination of HTLV-II, hitherto considered to be predominantly a New World virus. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7732027

  3. Rare Species Support Vulnerable Functions in High-Diversity Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Mouillot, David; Bellwood, David R.; Baraloto, Christopher; Chave, Jerome; Galzin, Rene; Harmelin-Vivien, Mireille; Kulbicki, Michel; Lavergne, Sebastien; Lavorel, Sandra; Mouquet, Nicolas; Paine, C. E. Timothy; Renaud, Julien; Thuiller, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Around the world, the human-induced collapses of populations and species have triggered a sixth mass extinction crisis, with rare species often being the first to disappear. Although the role of species diversity in the maintenance of ecosystem processes has been widely investigated, the role of rare species remains controversial. A critical issue is whether common species insure against the loss of functions supported by rare species. This issue is even more critical in species-rich ecosystems where high functional redundancy among species is likely and where it is thus often assumed that ecosystem functioning is buffered against species loss. Here, using extensive datasets of species occurrences and functional traits from three highly diverse ecosystems (846 coral reef fishes, 2,979 alpine plants, and 662 tropical trees), we demonstrate that the most distinct combinations of traits are supported predominantly by rare species both in terms of local abundance and regional occupancy. Moreover, species that have low functional redundancy and are likely to support the most vulnerable functions, with no other species carrying similar combinations of traits, are rarer than expected by chance in all three ecosystems. For instance, 63% and 98% of fish species that are likely to support highly vulnerable functions in coral reef ecosystems are locally and regionally rare, respectively. For alpine plants, 32% and 89% of such species are locally and regionally rare, respectively. Remarkably, 47% of fish species and 55% of tropical tree species that are likely to support highly vulnerable functions have only one individual per sample on average. Our results emphasize the importance of rare species conservation, even in highly diverse ecosystems, which are thought to exhibit high functional redundancy. Rare species offer more than aesthetic, cultural, or taxonomic diversity value; they disproportionately increase the potential breadth of functions provided by ecosystems across

  4. Rare species support vulnerable functions in high-diversity ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Mouillot, David; Bellwood, David R; Baraloto, Christopher; Chave, Jerome; Galzin, Rene; Harmelin-Vivien, Mireille; Kulbicki, Michel; Lavergne, Sebastien; Lavorel, Sandra; Mouquet, Nicolas; Paine, C E Timothy; Renaud, Julien; Thuiller, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Around the world, the human-induced collapses of populations and species have triggered a sixth mass extinction crisis, with rare species often being the first to disappear. Although the role of species diversity in the maintenance of ecosystem processes has been widely investigated, the role of rare species remains controversial. A critical issue is whether common species insure against the loss of functions supported by rare species. This issue is even more critical in species-rich ecosystems where high functional redundancy among species is likely and where it is thus often assumed that ecosystem functioning is buffered against species loss. Here, using extensive datasets of species occurrences and functional traits from three highly diverse ecosystems (846 coral reef fishes, 2,979 alpine plants, and 662 tropical trees), we demonstrate that the most distinct combinations of traits are supported predominantly by rare species both in terms of local abundance and regional occupancy. Moreover, species that have low functional redundancy and are likely to support the most vulnerable functions, with no other species carrying similar combinations of traits, are rarer than expected by chance in all three ecosystems. For instance, 63% and 98% of fish species that are likely to support highly vulnerable functions in coral reef ecosystems are locally and regionally rare, respectively. For alpine plants, 32% and 89% of such species are locally and regionally rare, respectively. Remarkably, 47% of fish species and 55% of tropical tree species that are likely to support highly vulnerable functions have only one individual per sample on average. Our results emphasize the importance of rare species conservation, even in highly diverse ecosystems, which are thought to exhibit high functional redundancy. Rare species offer more than aesthetic, cultural, or taxonomic diversity value; they disproportionately increase the potential breadth of functions provided by ecosystems across

  5. The Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferlet, Roger

    Substantial progress in the field of the Local Interstellar Medium has been largely due to recent launches of space missions, mostly in the UV and X-ray domains, but also to ground-based observations, mainly in high resolution spectroscopy. However, a clear gap seems to remain between the wealth of new data and the theoretical understanding. This paper gives an overview of some observational aspects, with no attempt of completeness or doing justice to all the people involved in the field. As progress rarely evolves in straight paths, we can expect that our present picture of the solar system surroundings is not definitive.

  6. Pygmy squids and giant brains: mapping the complex cephalopod CNS by phalloidin staining of vibratome sections and whole-mount preparations.

    PubMed

    Wollesen, T; Loesel, R; Wanninger, A

    2009-04-30

    Among bilaterian invertebrates, cephalopod molluscs (e.g., squids, cuttlefish and octopuses) have a central nervous system (CNS) that rivals in complexity that of the phylogenetically distant vertebrates (e.g., mouse and human). However, this prime example of convergent evolution has rarely been the subject of recent developmental and evolutionary studies, which may partly be due to the lack of suitable neural markers and the large size of cephalopod brains. Here, we demonstrate the usefulness of fluorescence-coupled phalloidin to characterize the CNS of cephalopods using histochemistry combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Whole-mount preparations of developmental stages as well as vibratome sections of embryonic and adult brains were analyzed and the benefits of this technique are illustrated. Compared to classical neuroanatomical and antibody-based studies, phalloidin labeling experiments are less time-consuming and allow a high throughput of samples. Besides other advantages summarized here, phalloidin reliably labels the entire neuropil of the CNS of all squids, cuttlefish and octopuses investigated. This facilitates high-resolution in toto reconstructions of the CNS and contributes to a better understanding of the organization of neural networks. Amenable for multi-labeling experiments employing antibodies against neurotransmitters, proteins and enzymes, phalloidin constitutes an excellent neuropil marker for the complex cephalopod CNS.

  7. Acral papular mucinosis: a new case of this rare entity*

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Sánchez, María Encarnación; de Manueles Marcos, Fernando; Martínez Martínez, Maria Luisa; Vera Berón, Roberto; Azaña Défez, Jose Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Acral persistent papular mucinosis (APPM) is a rare subtype of localized lichen myxedematosus. It consists of small papules localized exclusively on the back of the hands, wrists and extensor aspects of distal forearms with no other clinical or laboratory manifestations. The lesions tend to persist and may increase slowly in number. Histologically, hematoxylin-eosin and Alcian blue staining demonstrate mucin accumulation in the upper reticular dermis with separation of collagen fibers as a result of hyaluronic acid deposition. Treatment is rarely necessary due to the absence of symptoms. We present a 27-year-old healthy woman with asymptomatic papules on her upper extremities, which adequately meet clinical and pathological criteria of acral papular mucinosis.

  8. Rare allelic forms of PRDM9 associated with childhood leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hussin, Julie; Sinnett, Daniel; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Bruat, Vanessa; Saillour, Virginie; Healy, Jasmine; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; de Malliard, Thibault; Busche, Stephan; Spinella, Jean-François; Larivière, Mathieu; Gibson, Greg; Andersson, Anna; Holmfeldt, Linda; Ma, Jing; Wei, Lei; Zhang, Jinghui; Andelfinger, Gregor; Downing, James R.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Awadalla, Philip

    2013-01-01

    One of the most rapidly evolving genes in humans, PRDM9, is a key determinant of the distribution of meiotic recombination events. Mutations in this meiotic-specific gene have previously been associated with male infertility in humans and recent studies suggest that PRDM9 may be involved in pathological genomic rearrangements. In studying genomes from families with children affected by B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), we characterized meiotic recombination patterns within a family with two siblings having hyperdiploid childhood B-ALL and observed unusual localization of maternal recombination events. The mother of the family carries a rare PRDM9 allele, potentially explaining the unusual patterns found. From exomes sequenced in 44 additional parents of children affected with B-ALL, we discovered a substantial and significant excess of rare allelic forms of PRDM9. The rare PRDM9 alleles are transmitted to the affected children in half the cases; nonetheless there remains a significant excess of rare alleles among patients relative to controls. We successfully replicated this latter observation in an independent cohort of 50 children with B-ALL, where we found an excess of rare PRDM9 alleles in aneuploid and infant B-ALL patients. PRDM9 variability in humans is thought to influence genomic instability, and these data support a potential role for PRDM9 variation in risk of acquiring aneuploidies or genomic rearrangements associated with childhood leukemogenesis. PMID:23222848

  9. Rare allelic forms of PRDM9 associated with childhood leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hussin, Julie; Sinnett, Daniel; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Bruat, Vanessa; Saillour, Virginie; Healy, Jasmine; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; de Malliard, Thibault; Busche, Stephan; Spinella, Jean-François; Larivière, Mathieu; Gibson, Greg; Andersson, Anna; Holmfeldt, Linda; Ma, Jing; Wei, Lei; Zhang, Jinghui; Andelfinger, Gregor; Downing, James R; Mullighan, Charles G; Awadalla, Philip

    2013-03-01

    One of the most rapidly evolving genes in humans, PRDM9, is a key determinant of the distribution of meiotic recombination events. Mutations in this meiotic-specific gene have previously been associated with male infertility in humans and recent studies suggest that PRDM9 may be involved in pathological genomic rearrangements. In studying genomes from families with children affected by B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), we characterized meiotic recombination patterns within a family with two siblings having hyperdiploid childhood B-ALL and observed unusual localization of maternal recombination events. The mother of the family carries a rare PRDM9 allele, potentially explaining the unusual patterns found. From exomes sequenced in 44 additional parents of children affected with B-ALL, we discovered a substantial and significant excess of rare allelic forms of PRDM9. The rare PRDM9 alleles are transmitted to the affected children in half the cases; nonetheless there remains a significant excess of rare alleles among patients relative to controls. We successfully replicated this latter observation in an independent cohort of 50 children with B-ALL, where we found an excess of rare PRDM9 alleles in aneuploid and infant B-ALL patients. PRDM9 variability in humans is thought to influence genomic instability, and these data support a potential role for PRDM9 variation in risk of acquiring aneuploidies or genomic rearrangements associated with childhood leukemogenesis.

  10. Esophageal Lipoma: A Rare Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jeremy; Tejerina, Manfred; Hallowell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal lipomas are rare tumors, making up 0.4% of all digestive tract benign neoplasms. Most of these lesions are clinically silent as a result of their small size, however, the majority of lesions over 4 cm have been reported to cause dysphagia, regurgitation and/or epigastralgia. We report a case of a 53 year-old African American female who presented with dysphagia. Computed tomography of the chest and esophagram confirmed esophageal lipoma as the cause of the patient’s symptoms. Accurately diagnosing an esophageal lipoma is crucial in order to rule out potential malignant lesions, relieve patient symptoms and plan the appropriate treatment. PMID:23365708

  11. Rare Gas Halide (RGH) Kinetics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    Technolog , Inc.. 2755 Northup Way, Bellevue, Washington 98004-1495 (Received Il August 1987; accepted for publication 12 October 1987) Time-dependent density...8217 - Z ¢L --- ;-; Z¢ < : 2 2 2 e - 2 l ¢ - -- - P-2 -V, 2 " ’ ’’’ 2.,..’ * -x ’ ,’* - SSpectra Technology flT U Fr CoPY CContract N00014-85-C-084 3...RARE GAS HALIDE (RGH) in KINETICS FINAL REPORT< S Submitted to OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY Submitted by SPECTRA TECHNOLOGY , INC

  12. Rare B Decays at Babar

    SciTech Connect

    Palombo, Fernando; Collaboration, for the BABAR

    2009-01-12

    The author presents some of the most recent BABAR measurements for rare B decays. These include rate asymmetries in the B decays to K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} and K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and branching fractions in the B decays to l{sup +}{nu}{sub l}, K{sub 1}(1270){sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K{sub 1}(1400){sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The author also reports a search for the B{sup +} decay to K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}.

  13. [Rare renal anomalies in childhood].

    PubMed

    Arambasić, Jadranka; Puseljić, Silvija; Angebrandt, Snjezana; Puseljić, Ivo

    2003-01-01

    Three patients with megacalycosis, a rare ren anomaly which includes dilatation of all ren calices, are presented. The symptoms of acute uroinfection were present in all three patients. The patients underwent clinical observation, laboratory testing, and renal ultrasound. Ultrasound revealed unilateral hydronephrosis in all three patients. Additional examinations included static and dynamic renal scintigraphy, voiding cystourethrography, and intravenous urography which pointed to unilateral megacalycosis. The symptoms of acute uroinfection were probably triggered by urinary stasis in dilated calices. Surgical intervention is not indicated in megacalycosis. The increasing incidence of uroinfection, urolithiasis and hematuria imposed the need of continuous follow-up in these patients.

  14. Pseudohypoparathyroidism, Rare Cause of Hypocalcaemia!

    PubMed Central

    Dosi, Rupal V.; Ambaliya, Annirudh P.; Joshi, Harshal K.; Patell, Rushad D.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism is a rare disorder which is characterized by end organ parathormone resistance, which causes hypocalcaemia, hyperphosphataemia and high parathormone levels. We are reporting here case of a young male who had symptoms of chronic hypocalcaemia, with a positive Trousseau’s and Chvostek’s sign on examination, without any features of Albright’s hereditary osteodystrophy. Lab investigations revealed low calcium, high phosphate and high PTH levels. The patient was diagnosed as having Pseudohypoparathyroidism and he was treated successfully with Calcium and Vitamin D supplements. PMID:24298504

  15. Rare B Decays in BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Hicheur, A

    2004-08-25

    Measurements and searches for rare B decays have been performed with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric B Factory, operating at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. The authors report some recent branching fraction measurements on hadronic and radiative B decays, occurring from b --> s/d and b --> u transitions. Most of the results presented here are based on a data sample corresponding to a luminosity of 81.9 fb{sup -1}.

  16. Odontogenic Myxoma of the Maxilla- A Rare case Report

    PubMed Central

    Subramaiam, Ramkumar; Narasimhan, Malathi; Giri, Veda; Kumar, Santhosh

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an uncommon, benign, locally invasive, non-metastasizing neoplasm arising from the odontogenic ectomesenchyme that usually occurs in the tooth bearing areas of the jaws. These lesions arouse special interest as they pose high diagnostic challenge. Here, we present a rare case of OM of the maxilla in an 18-year-old male. The clinical, radiographic and histopathological features of the lesion are discussed in this paper. PMID:26155585

  17. Rare presentation of small bowel intussusception in childhood.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chung-Yan Grace; Tsang, Pui-Ki Jane; Chu, Ping-Yung; Wong, Yiu-Chung

    2016-07-01

    Small bowel intussusception complicated simultaneously by volvulus in an older child is rare but clinically significant, necessitating urgent operative management. We report a local case of jejuno-jejunal intussusception complicated by volvulus and bowel infarction in a 9-year-old Chinese girl, with diagnosis made on preoperative computed tomography and confirmed at laparotomy. An intestinal polyp as the lead point for intussusception was identified operatively. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  18. Synovial sarcomna of larynx-a rare site.

    PubMed

    Sridhar Reddy, D; Shobhan Babu, A; Lenin, A

    2007-03-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a soft tissue sarcoma of unknown histiogenesis and occurs predominantly in the lower limbs of young adults and the head and neck is a relatively rare site, there are about 10 cases with laryngeal localization in the world literature. We present a 52 year old male with synovial sarcoma of larynx. Total laryngectomy was done and patient is free from disease till date.

  19. Lymphocytic hypophysitis: a rare or underestimated disease?

    PubMed

    Bellastella, Antonio; Bizzarro, Antonio; Coronella, Concetta; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Sinisi, Antonio Agostino; De Bellis, Annamaria

    2003-11-01

    Lymphocytic hypophysitis (LYH) is an uncommon autoimmune disease in which the pituitary gland is infiltrated by lymphocytes, plasma cells and macrophages and its function is usually impaired. It has to be suspected in pregnant women and in women with recent delivery presenting with hyperprolactinemia, headache, visual field alterations and changes of one or more pituitary hormone secretions with secondary impairment of related peripheral target glands, especially when associated with other autoimmune endocrine or non-endocrine disorders. It can also occur less frequently in prepubertal or post-menopausal women and in men. Headache, visual field impairment and more rarely diplopia are due to extrasellar pituitary enlargement with optic chiasma compression and/or to invasion of cavernous sinuses. Among the 'isolated' pituitary hormone deficiencies, ACTH deficit is usually the earliest and most frequent hormonal impairment and in rare cases can induce an acute secondary hyposurrenalism as the first sign of the disease, with high mortality in affected patients. Histopathological findings from pituitary biopsy show lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with lymphoid aggregates surrounding atropic acini of pituitary cells; immunohistochemical analysis shows numerous mast cells randomly distributed and also localized in the vicinity of capillaries, suggesting a possible influence on capillary permeability and angiogenesis, thus favoring the inflammatory and immunological aggression against pituitary cells. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging shows uniform sellar floor depression and an extrasellar symmetrical pituitary enlargement, usually displacing the optic chiasma, which shows a rapid homogeneous enhancement after gadolinium also involving the adjacent dura (dural tail). Antipituitary antibodies have been detected in several patients with LYH but their role needs to be clarified. Since a possible spontaneous remission can occur, a careful follow-up is required in subclinical

  20. Rare Tumors in Children: Progress Through Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Furman, Wayne L.; Schultz, Kris A.; Ferrari, Andrea; Helman, Lee; Krailo, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Rare pediatric tumors account for approximately 10% of all childhood cancers, which in themselves are a rare entity. The diverse histologies and clinical behaviors of rare pediatric tumors pose challenges to the investigation of their biologic and clinical features. National and international cooperative groups such as the Rare Tumor Committee of the Children's Oncology Group, Rare Tumors in Pediatric Age Project, and European Cooperative Study Group for Pediatric Rare Tumors have developed several initiatives to advance knowledge about rare pediatric cancers. However, these programs have been only partially effective, necessitating the development of alternative mechanisms to study these challenging diseases. In this article, we review the current national and international collaborative strategies to study rare pediatric cancers and alternative methods under exploration to enhance those efforts, such as independent registries and disease-specific, National Cancer Institute–sponsored clinics. PMID:26304909

  1. Ethical aspects on rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Luis A; Galindo, Gilberto Cely

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss several of the most relevant subjects related to ethics on Rare Diseases. Some general aspects are discussed such as the socio-psychological problems that confront the patients and their families that finally lead to marginalization and exclusion of patients affected by these diseases from the health programs, even in wealthy countries. Then we address problems related to diagnosis and some ethical aspects of newborn screening, prenatal, pre-implantation diagnosis and reference centers, as well as some conditions that should be met by the persons and institutions performing such tasks. Alternatives of solutions for the most critical situations are proposed. Subsequently the orphan drugs subject is discussed not only from the availability point of view, prizes, industrial practices, and purchasing power in developed and developing societies. The research related to rare disease in children and other especially vulnerable conditions, the need for informed consent, review boards or ethics comities, confidentiality of the information, biobanks and pharmacogenetics are discussed.

  2. Rare earth garnet selective emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.74, ((4)l(sub 15/2)) - ( (4)l(sub13/2)), for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.65, ((5)l(sub 7))-((5)l(sub 8)) for Ho-YAG) at excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in the thermophotovoltaics (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. This paper presents normal spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda), measurements of holmium (Ho), and erbium (Er) doped YAG thin film selective emitters at 1500 K, and compares those results with the theoretical spectral emittance.

  3. Scarcity of rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    de Boer, M A; Lammertsma, K

    2013-11-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are important for green and a large variety of high-tech technologies and are, therefore, in high demand. As a result, supply with REEs is likely to be disrupted (the degree of depends on the REE) in the near future. The 17 REEs are divided into heavy and light REEs. Other critical elements besides REEs, identified by the European Commission, are also becoming less easily available. Although there is no deficiency in the earth's crust of rare earth oxides, the economic accessibility is limited. The increased demand for REEs, the decreasing export from China, and geopolitical concerns on availability contributed to the (re)opening of mines in Australia and the USA and other mines are slow to follow. As a result, short supply of particularly terbium, dysprosium, praseodymium, and neodymium is expected to be problematic for at least the short term, also because they cannot be substituted. Recycling REEs from electronic waste would be a solution, but so far there are hardly any established REE recycling methods. Decreasing the dependency on REEs, for example, by identifying possible replacements or increasing their efficient use, represents another possibility.

  4. Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffee, M.; Elmore, D.; Granger, D.; Muzikar, P.

    2002-12-01

    The Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) is a dedicated research and service facility for accelerator mass spectrometry. AMS is an ultra-sensitive analytical technique used to measure low levels of long-lived cosmic-ray-produced and anthropogenic radionuclides, and rare trace elements. We measure 10Be (T1/2 = 1.5 My), 26Al (.702 My), 36Cl (.301 My), and 129I (16 My), in geologic samples. Applications include dating the cosmic-ray-exposure time of rocks on Earth's surface, determining rock and sediment burial ages, measuring the erosion rates of rocks and soils, and tracing and dating ground water. We perform sample preparation and separation chemistries for these radio-nuclides for our internal research activities and for those external researchers not possessing this capability. Our chemical preparation laboratories also serve as training sites for members of the geoscience community developing these techniques at their institutions. Research at Purdue involves collaborators among members of the Purdue Departments of Physics, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Chemistry, Agronomy, and Anthropology. We also collaborate and serve numerous scientists from other institutions. We are currently in the process of modernizing the facility with the goals of higher precision for routinely measured radio-nuclides, increased sample throughput, and the development of new measurement capabilities for the geoscience community.

  5. Local Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Yvonne; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Annotates 30 local government publications that describe local community efforts to improve policing; find alternative ways of dealing with violence; attract businesses; preserve neighborhoods and buildings; provide open space; and improve employment opportunities. Several publications' statistics were based on 1990 census data. (KRN)

  6. 75 FR 47458 - TRICARE; Rare Diseases Definition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... Office of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 199 RIN 0720-AB26 TRICARE; Rare Diseases Definition AGENCY: Office of... diseases to adopt the definition of a rare disease as promulgated by the National Institutes of Health, Office of Rare Diseases. The rule modification will result in the definition used by the TRICARE...

  7. Rare Z decays and new physics

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, E.W.N.

    1990-04-01

    Although the signatures for rare Z decays are often spectacular, the predicted standard model rates are usually extremely small. In many cases, however, rare decays are very sensitive to new phenomena and may lead to an observable rate. In this talk, I select some interesting rare decays and discuss how new physics might be identified. 25 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Local gravitomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid-Saless, Bahman

    1990-10-01

    In a simple two-body system, the gravitomagnetic components of the metric in the local quasi-inertial frame of one of the bodies is calculated. The local geometry in this frame which is freely falling along the geodesic but is directionally fixed with respect to distant stars is primarily defined by the gravitomagnetic components of the local metric. This metric serves to track down the various contributions from the local and distant source and thus provides further insight to the nature of gravitomagnetism. As a result it is shown that in the quasi-inertial frame geodetic precession is a gravitomagnetic phenomenon. Furthermore a connection between local gravitomagnetic effects and Einstein's principle of equivalence is established.

  9. Rare earths, the lanthanides, yttrium and scandium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, rare earths were not mined in the United States. The major supplier, Molycorp, continued to maintain a large stockpile of rare-earth concentrates and compounds. Consumption decreased of refined rare-earth products. The United States remained a major importer and exporter of rare earths in 2005. During the same period, yttrium was not mined or refined in the US. Hence, supply of yttrium compounds for refined yttrium products came from China, France and Japan. Scandium was not also mined. World production was primarily in China, Russia and Ukraine. Demand for rare earths in 2006 is expected to be closely tied to economic conditions in the US.

  10. Mineral resource of the month: rare earths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, James B.

    2004-01-01

    As if classified as a top-secret project, the rare earths have been shrouded in secrecy. The principal ore mineral of the group, bastnäsite, rarely appears in the leading mineralogy texts. The long names of the rare-earth elements and some unusual arrangements of letters, many Scandinavian in origin, may have intimidated even those skilled in phonics. Somewhat obscurely labeled, the rare earths are neither rare nor earths (the historical term for oxides). They are a relatively abundant group of metallic elements that occur in nature as nonmetallic compounds and have hundreds of commercial applications.

  11. [Psychiatry in local newspapers].

    PubMed

    Nowack, Nicolas; Tonn, Bianka; Unter Mitarbeit von Volker, Thomas; Oberste-Ufer, Ralf; Müller, Christin

    2011-04-01

    The media influences public opinion. Although it can provide objective information, it can also create prejudices. For the first time German local newspapers were examined with respect to HOW and HOW OFTEN they use psychiatric terminology. All newspapers of the East German Altmark were analyzed with respect to their usage of selected psychiatric terms for a period of one year. None of these newspapers could be described as tabloids or as predominantly sensation-seeking. For comparative purposes, our chosen methodology was similar to that of an earlier study of respected, German, internationally-read print media. In 14 % of the newspapers studied, at least one term of the predefined psychiatric vocabulary appeared. A negative context was common (45 %), but for the most part this was in crime-related articles supplied by press agencies. In contrast with reputable, German language newspapers with a nationwide or international audience, in purely local reports, a negative context was rare, and no alienating usage of preselected psychiatric terms was found. Local editorial teams seem to be closer to - and perhaps better informed about - regional psychiatric institutions. Hence, they can provide the public with more factual information. For this reason, anti-stigma mental health campaigns will likely be more effective when carried out using local media, as opposed to nationwide or even international media. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Developments in rare earth intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchmayr, H.R.

    1984-09-01

    The magnetic properties of rare earth intermetallics have been the subject of numerous investigations in recent years. However, while the preparation of new intermetallic compounds and the determination of their properties have been the prime concern in former years, more recently the analysis and theoretical explanation of the available data has become most important. Furthermore single crystals have now become available, which permit new experiments. Also many investigations on pseudo-binary systems have permitted the systematic determination of the primary magnetic properties. After a summary of the magnetic properties of intermetallics where the B-moment is zero and nonzero, some examples of pseudobinary systems and especially applications of R-3d multicomponent systems as the basis for advanced permanent magnets are discussed. Finally RE-3d alloys with metalloids and non-metals are discussed with emphasis on the newly developed R-Fe-B permanent magnets.

  13. Rare and radiative kaon decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D’Ambrosio, Giancarlo

    2017-01-01

    We discuss theoretical issues in radiative rare kaon decays. The interest is twofold: to extract useful short-distance information and understand the underlying dynamics. We emphasize channels where either we can understand non-perturbative aspects of QCD or there is a chance to test the Standard Model. An interesting channel, K + → π + π 0 e + e ‑, is studied also in connection with the recent experimental NA48 results. Motivated by LHCB results on KS → μ + μ ‑ we discuss other channels like KS,L → l + l ‑ l + l ‑. Motivated by recent theoretical work by Buras and collaborators we study also the K ± → π±l + l ‑ form factor.

  14. Liposarcome dorsal: aspect clinique rare

    PubMed Central

    Agbessi, Odry; Arrob, Adil; Fiqhi, Kamal; Khalfi, Lahcen; Nassih, Mohammed; El Khatib, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Décrit la première fois par Virchow en 1860, le liposarcome est une tumeur mésenchymateuse rare. Cette rareté est relative car les liposarcomes représentent quand même 14 à 18% de l'ensemble des tumeurs malignes des parties molles et ils constituent le plus fréquent des sarcomes des parties molles. Pour la majorité des auteurs, il ne se développerait jamais sur un lipome ou une lipomatose préexistant. Nous rapportons un cas de volumineux liposarcome de la face dorsale du tronc. L'histoire de la maladie, l'aspect clinique inhabituel « de tumeur dans tumeur », l'aspect de la pièce opératoire nous fait évoquer la possibilité de la transformation maligne d'un lipome bénin préexistant. PMID:26113914

  15. Why are Pulsar Planets Rare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Rebecca G.; Livio, Mario; Palaniswamy, Divya

    2016-12-01

    Pulsar timing observations have revealed planets around only a few pulsars. We suggest that the rarity of these planets is due mainly to two effects. First, we show that the most likely formation mechanism requires the destruction of a companion star. Only pulsars with a suitable companion (with an extreme mass ratio) are able to form planets. Second, while a dead zone (a region of low turbulence) in the disk is generally thought to be essential for planet formation, it is most probably rare in disks around pulsars, because of the irradiation from the pulsar. The irradiation strongly heats the inner parts of the disk, thus pushing the inner boundary of the dead zone out. We suggest that the rarity of pulsar planets can be explained by the low probability for these two requirements to be satisfied: a very low-mass companion and a dead zone.

  16. Epidemiological analysis of rare polydactylies

    SciTech Connect

    Castilla, E.E.; Fonseca, R.L. da; Dutra, M.G. da

    1996-11-11

    This work includes all cases with extra digits (polydactyly) registered from a birth sample of over four million births aggregated from two comparable birth series: the Latin-American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations: ECLAMC (3,128,957 live and still births from the 1967 to 1993 period), and the Spanish Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations: ECEMC. All but 2 of 6,912 registered polydactyly cases fit well into one of the following 11 preestablished polydactyly types (observed number of cases in parentheses): Postaxial hexadactyly (5,345), Preaxial-I hexadactyly (1,018), Seven or more digits (57), synpolydactyly (15), crossed polydactyly (45), 1st digit triphalangism (33), 2nd digit duplication (39), 3rd digit duplication (18), 4th digit duplication (22), Haas polysyndactyly (3), and high degree of duplication (4). The birth prevalence rates observed in both series were similar except for postaxial polydactyly, which was more frequent in the ECLAMC (150.2/100,000) than in the ECEMC (67.4/100,000), as expected due to the higher African Black ethnic extraction of the South-American than of the Spanish populations. This similar frequency for the rare polydactylies (5.4 per 100,000 in South America and 5.7 in Spain), and for each one of the 9 categories, suggests that the values reported here are valid for most populations. The rare polydactylies are frequently syndromal: one third of them (77/236) were found in association with other congenital anomalies, 11.0% (26/236) in MCA cases and 21.6% (51/236) in recognized syndromes. 19 refs., 7 tabs.

  17. Rare Earth Element Mines, Deposits, and Occurrences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orris, Greta J.; Grauch, Richard I.

    2002-01-01

    Data on rare earth (including yttrium) mines, deposits, and occurrences were compiled as part of an effort by the USGS and the University of Arizona Center for Mineral Resources to summarize current knowledge on the supply and demand outlook and related topics for this group of elements. Economic competition and environmental concerns are increasingly constraining the mining and processing of rare earths from the Mountain Pass mine in California. For many years, the deposit at Mountain Pass was the world's dominant source of rare earth elements and the United States was essentially self-sufficient. Starting approximately 10 years ago, the U.S. has become increasingly dependent (> 90 percent of separated rare earths) upon imports from China, now the dominant source of rare earths. A knowledge of the known economic and noneconomic sources of rare earths is basic to evaluating the outlook for rare earth supply and associated issues.

  18. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R.W.; Ellis, T.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Hofer, R.J.; Branagan, D.J.

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g., a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g., a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g., Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B or LaNi{sub 5}) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  19. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R. William; Ellis, Timothy W.; Dennis, Kevin W.; Hofer, Robert J.; Branagan, Daniel J.

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g. a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g. a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g. Nd.sub.2 Fe.sub.14 B or LaNi.sub.5) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  20. Rare earth elements: end use and recyclability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2011-01-01

    Rare earth elements are used in mature markets (such as catalysts, glassmaking, lighting, and metallurgy), which account for 59 percent of the total worldwide consumption of rare earth elements, and in newer, high-growth markets (such as battery alloys, ceramics, and permanent magnets), which account for 41 percent of the total worldwide consumption of rare earth elements. In mature market segments, lanthanum and cerium constitute about 80 percent of rare earth elements used, and in new market segments, dysprosium, neodymium, and praseodymium account for about 85 percent of rare earth elements used. Regardless of the end use, rare earth elements are not recycled in large quantities, but could be if recycling became mandated or very high prices of rare earth elements made recycling feasible.

  1. Localized Scleroderma

    MedlinePlus

    ... form of scleroderma which affects internal organs, called systemic sclerosis or, often incorrectly stated, as systemic scleroderma. Localized ... condition and to explain how it differs from systemic sclerosis, which is quite different and affects internal organs ...

  2. Melioidosis: A Rare Cause of Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Catherine S. C.; Casupang, Ma. Amornetta J.

    2016-01-01

    Case Presentation. This is a case of a 44-year-old male, farmer, known to be diabetic, presenting with two-week history of vague abdominal pain associated with high grade fever. Abdominal CT scan showed localized liver abscess at segment 8 measuring 7.5 × 6.8 × 6.1 cm. Patient subsequently underwent laparoscopic ultrasound guided pigtail insertion for drainage of abscess. Culture studies showed moderate growth of Burkholderia pseudomallei in which the patient completed seven days of IV Meropenem. On follow-up after 12 weeks of oral Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim, taken twice a day, the patient remained asymptomatic with no residual findings based on the abdominal ultrasound. Discussion. Diagnosis of melioidosis, a known “great masquerader,” relies heavily on culture studies. Consensus with regard to the management of liver abscess caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei has not yet been established due to the rarity of cases. Surgical intervention through either a percutaneous or open drainage has shown good outcomes compared to IV antibiotics alone. In Philippines, the possibility of underreporting is highly plausible. This write-up serves not only to report a rare presentation of melioidosis but also to add to the number of cases reported in the country, possibly indicative of disease emergence. PMID:27529039

  3. Ameloblastic fibrosarcoma: a rare malignant odontogenic tumor.

    PubMed

    Gilani, S M; Raza, A; Al-Khafaji, B M

    2014-02-01

    Ameloblastic fibrosarcoma (AFS) is a rare malignant odontogenic tumor. It can arise de novo, however one-third of cases may arise from a recurrent ameloblastic fibroma, in which case they appear to present at an older age. A 16-year-old female presented with one month history of right mandibular mass. Computerized tomography (CT) scan showed a large destructive mass. A biopsy of the mass was performed. Histologically, it consisted of a mixed epithelial-mesenchymal odontogenic neoplasm composed of benign islands of well-differentiated ameloblastic epithelium within a malignant fibrous stroma consisting of spindle cells or fibroblasts with a brisk mitotic activity. The malignant spindle cell proliferation showed positive staining with p-53 and a high proliferation index with ki-67. A diagnosis of AFS was rendered. The differential diagnosis includes other odontogenic sarcomas, ameloblastic carcinosarcoma and spindle cell carcinoma. Treatment of choice is wide surgical excision, with long-term follow-up. Postoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy has been used successfully in a few reported cases. AFS is a locally aggressive malignant tumor, with regional and distant metastases being uncommon. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Alleged allergy to local anaesthetics.

    PubMed

    Fisher, M M; Bowey, C J

    1997-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of true local anaesthetic allergy in patients with an alleged history of local anaesthetic allergy and whether subsequent exposure to local anaesthetics is safe. Two hundred and eight patients with a history of allergy to local anaesthesia were referred over a twenty-year period to our Anaesthetic Allergy Clinic. In this open study, intradermal testing was performed in three patients and progressive challenge in 202 patients. Four patients had immediate allergy and four patients delayed allergic reactions. One hundred and ninety-seven patients were not allergic to local anaesthetics. In 39 patients an adverse response to additives in local anaesthetic solutions could not be excluded. In all but one patient local anaesthesia has been given uneventfully subsequently. A history of allergy to local anaesthesia is unlikely to be genuine and local anaesthetic allergy is rare. In most instances LA allergy can be excluded from the history and the safety of LA verified by progressive challenge.

  5. Instability of some divalent rare earth ions and photochromic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egranov, A. V.; Sizova, T. Yu.; Shendrik, R. Yu.; Smirnova, N. A.

    2016-03-01

    It was shown that the divalent rare earth ions (La, Ce, Gd, Tb, Lu, and Y) in cubic sites in alkaline earth fluorides are unstable with respect to electron autodetachment since its d1(eg) ground state is located in the conduction band which is consistent with the general tendency of these ions in various compounds. The localization of doubly degenerate d1(eg) level in the conduction band creates a configuration instability around the divalent rare earth ion that leading to the formation of anion vacancy in the nearest neighborhood, as was reported in the previous paper [A. Egranov, T. Sizova, Configurational instability at the excited impurity ions in alkaline earth fluorites, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 74 (2013) 530-534]. Thus, the formation of the stable divalent ions as La, Ce, Gd, Tb, Lu, and Y (PC+ centers) in CaF2 and SrF2 crystals during x-ray irradiation occurs via the formation of charged anion vacancies near divalent ions (Re2+va), which lower the ground state of the divalent ion relative to the conductivity band. Photochromic effect occurs under thermally or optically stimulated electron transition from the divalent rare earth ion to the neighboring anion vacancy and reverse under ultraviolet light irradiation. It is shown that the optical absorption of the PC+ centers due to d → d and d → f transitions of the divalent rare-earth ion.

  6. Recycling of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Tom; Bertau, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Any development of an effective process for rare earth (RE) recycling has become more and more challenging, especially in recent years. Since 2011, when commodity prices of REs had met their all-time maximum, prices have dropped rapidly by more than 90 %. An economic process able to offset these fluctuations has to take unconventional methods into account beside well-known strategies like acid/basic leaching or solvent extraction. The solid-state chlorination provides such an unconventional method for mobilizing RE elements from waste streams. Instead of hydrochloric acid this kind of chlorination decomposes NH4Cl thermally to release up to 400 °C hot HCl gas. After cooling the resulting solid metal chlorides may be easily dissolved in pH-adjusted water. Without producing strongly acidic wastes and with NH4Cl as cheap source for hydrogen chloride, solid-state chlorination provides various advantages in terms of costs and disposal. In the course of the SepSELSA project this method was examined, adjusted and optimized for RE recycling from fluorescent lamp scraps as well as Fe14Nd2B magnets. Thereby many surprising influences and trends required various analytic methods to examine the reasons and special mechanisms behind them.

  7. Pachyonychia congenita: A rare genodermatosis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Puneet; Chhaperwal, Mahendra K; Singh, Apurva; Verma, Arvind; Nijhawan, Manisha; Singh, Kishore; Mathur, Dinesh

    2013-07-01

    Pachyonychia congenita (PC) is a rare genodermatosis with only 450 cases reported since 1906. It is of two types, type I due to mutation in genes 6a and 16, and 6b and 17 in type II with an autosomal dominant inheritance in both types. A 22 yr old female patient presented in our OPD with hypertrophy of finger and toe nails, palmoplantar keratoderma, oral punctuate leukokeratosis, hyperhidrosis in palms and soles with maceration and malodour since childhood. She had a positive family history with father and grandfather affected but less severely. Microscopy and culture of nail clippings and scrapping were done to rule out fungal infection. On biopsy acanthotic epidermis, parakeratosis, orthokeratosis were seen. No evidence of any associated malignancy was found after thorough workup. She was diagnosed as PC Type 1. She was put on topical steroids and orally on acetretin 25 mg OD. Paring of the nails was done too reduce the thickness of nails & to provide symptomatic relief. She was on a regular treatment for 3-4 months and showed some improvement in the form of reduced palmoplantar hyperkeratosis and reduced oral punctate keratosis but was later lost on followup. She showed no adverse effect to therapy during this period. This case is being reported because of its rarity.

  8. Rare types of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mihai, B; Mihai, Cătălina; Cijevschi-Prelipcean, Cristina; Lăcătuşu, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a heterogenous disorder characterized by chronic hyperglycemia and induced by a large number of etiopathogenic conditions. Beside type 1 and type 2 diabetes, which account for almost 90% of all cases, practitioners may encounter patients with more infrequent forms of diabetes, as those induced by mutations of a single gene, atypical immune disorders or neonatal diabetes. Monogenic diabetes is represented by genetic disorders in the structure of the beta-cell (the MODY syndromes and the mutations of mitochondrial DNA) or in the insulin's action (type A insulin resistance syndrome, Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, leprechaunism, lipodystrophies). The rare forms of immune diabetes are determined by antibodies against insulin or insulin receptor or appear as a component of the "stiff man syndrome". Neonatal diabetes is induced by mutations in genes that control beta-cell development and function and may have a transient or permanent nature. Knowledge of the uncommon forms of diabetes mellitus enables physicians to apply the optimal treatment, to estimate the evolution of the patient and to apply a complete family screening in order to diagnose all other blood relatives as soon as possible.

  9. Tale of two rare diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Ravindra; Basu, Asish Kumar; Mandal, Biplab; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Maity, Animesh; Sinha, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) phenotype is variable &various genes have been decribed in association with IHH. We describe association of IHH with mosaic trisomy 13. A 20 year old male presented with lack of development of secondary sexual characters, normal height, micropenis, small testes, gynaecomastia, absence of axillary and pubic hairs, hyposmia, synkinesis, bilateral horizontal nystagmus and high arched palate. Investigations showed low gonadotropin, low total testosterone, LH after stimulation with 100 mcg tryptorelin sc was 11.42 mU/mL at 40 min. MRI of hypothalamo-pituitary region showed normal olfactory bulb and tract but shallow olfactory sulcus. Karyotype showed homologous Robertsonian translocation of chromosome 13. This case fits classical IHH except for LH rise on stimulation. Features of Patau syndrome which is associated with trisomy 13 are absent in our case. Mosaic trisomy 13, which can otherwise be rare incidental finding, has not been described in association with IHH. Causal association of novel mutation on chromosome 13 leading to aforementioned phenotype cannot be rule out. PMID:24251138

  10. Localized scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Laxer, Ronald M; Zulian, Francesco

    2006-11-01

    Localized scleroderma, also known as morphoea, has a variety of clinical manifestations that can include systemic involvement. Early recognition, diagnosis and treatment may improve the long-term outcome. A large multicentre study coordinated by the Pediatric Rheumatology European Society has yielded important information on the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of juvenile localized scleroderma, especially as it pertains to systemic manifestations. Previous results using methotrexate and corticosteroids have been confirmed. Studies on phototherapy have also demonstrated efficacy. A new immunomodulator, imiquimod, has shown promise in an initial case series. Studies over the past year highlight the wide range of extracutaneous manifestations and different forms of localized scleroderma and suggest that treatment may be beneficial.

  11. Local Acausality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wüthrich, Adrian

    2014-06-01

    A fair amount of recent scholarship has been concerned with correcting a supposedly wrong, but wide-spread, assessment of the consequences of the empirical falsification of Bell-type inequalities. In particular, it has been claimed that Bell-type inequalities follow from "locality tout court" without additional assumptions such as "realism" or "hidden variables". However, this line of reasoning conflates restrictions on the spatio-temporal relation between causes and their effects ("locality") and the assumption of a cause for every event ("causality"). It thus fails to recognize a substantial restriction of the class of theories that is falsified through Bell-type inequalities.

  12. Minimum memory for generating rare events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghamohammadi, Cina; Crutchfield, James P.

    2017-03-01

    We classify the rare events of structured, memoryful stochastic processes and use this to analyze sequential and parallel generators for these events. Given a stochastic process, we introduce a method to construct a process whose typical realizations are a given process' rare events. This leads to an expression for the minimum memory required to generate rare events. We then show that the recently discovered classical-quantum ambiguity of simplicity also occurs when comparing the structure of process fluctuations.

  13. Rare earths, the lanthanides, yttrium and scandium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedinger, G.; Bleiwas, D.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, rare earths were recovered from bastnasite concentrates at the Mountain Pass Mine in California. Consumption of refined rare-earth products decreased in 2011 from 2010. U.S. rare-earth imports originated primarily from China, with lesser amounts from Austria, Estonia, France and Japan. The United States imported all of its demand for yttrium metal and yttrium compounds, with most of it originating from China. Scandium was imported in various forms and processed domestically.

  14. Localized scleroderma: clinical spectrum and therapeutic update.

    PubMed

    Careta, Mariana Figueiroa; Romiti, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Scleroderma is a rare connective tissue disease that is manifested by cutaneous sclerosis and variable systemic involvement. Two categories of scleroderma are known: systemic sclerosis, characterized by cutaneous sclerosis and visceral involvement, and localized scleroderma or morphea which classically presents benign and self-limited evolution and is confined to the skin and/or underlying tissues. Localized scleroderma is a rare disease of unknown etiology. Recent studies show that the localized form may affect internal organs and have variable morbidity. Treatment should be started very early, before complications occur due to the high morbidity of localized scleroderma. In this review, we report the most important aspects and particularities in the treatment of patients diagnosed with localized scleroderma.

  15. Localized scleroderma: clinical spectrum and therapeutic update*

    PubMed Central

    Careta, Mariana Figueiroa; Romiti, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Scleroderma is a rare connective tissue disease that is manifested by cutaneous sclerosis and variable systemic involvement. Two categories of scleroderma are known: systemic sclerosis, characterized by cutaneous sclerosis and visceral involvement, and localized scleroderma or morphea which classically presents benign and self-limited evolution and is confined to the skin and/or underlying tissues. Localized scleroderma is a rare disease of unknown etiology. Recent studies show that the localized form may affect internal organs and have variable morbidity. Treatment should be started very early, before complications occur due to the high morbidity of localized scleroderma. In this review, we report the most important aspects and particularities in the treatment of patients diagnosed with localized scleroderma. PMID:25672301

  16. Improved method for preparing rare earth sesquichalcogenides

    DOEpatents

    Takeshita, T.; Beaudry, B.J.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1982-04-14

    An improved method for the preparation of high purity rare earth sesquichalcogenides is described. The rare earth, as one or more pieces of the metal, is sealed under a vacuum with a stoichiometric amount of sulfur or selenium and a small amount of iodine into a quartz reaction vessel. The sealed vessel is then heated to above the vaporization temperature of the chalcogen and below the melting temperature of the rare earth metal and maintained until the product has been formed. The iodine is then vaporized off leaving a pure product. The rare earth sulfides and selenides thus formed are useful as semiconductors and as thermoelectric generators. 3 tables.

  17. Alaska's rare earth deposits and resource potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, James C.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2012-01-01

    Alaska’s known mineral endowment includes some of the largest and highest grade deposits of various metals, including gold, copper and zinc. Recently, Alaska has also been active in the worldwide search for sources of rare earth elements (REE) to replace exports now being limitedby China. Driven by limited supply of the rare earths, combined with their increasing use in new ‘green’ energy, lighting, transportation, and many other technological applications, the rare earth metals neodymium, europium and, in particular, the heavy rare earth elements terbium, dysprosium and yttrium are forecast to soon be in critical short supply (U.S. Department of Energy, 2010).

  18. Mass Measurement with Rare-RI Rin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Akira

    2014-09-01

    Mass measurement with Rare-RI Ring in RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF) will be presented. The main purpose of Rare-RI Ring is to measure the mass for very neutron-rich nuclei, the production rate of which is very small (rare RI) and the life-time of which is predicted to be very short (less than 10 ms). In Rare-RI Ring, mass measurements will be performed based on isochronous mass spectrometry. There are two innovative apparatus in Rare-RI Ring: individual injection, which can realize the injection of 200 A MeV rare RI one-by-one, and a cyclotron-like storage ring, which allows high isochronous magnetic fields with large angular and momentum acceptances (~1%). By these apparatus, we will achieve a 10-6 mass resolution, and will be able to access rare RI, the production rate of which is down to 1 event/day/pnA in RIBF. Construction of Rare-RI Ring has started from the 2012 fiscal year. Construction of the storage ring itself was almost completed. In this fiscal year, we succeeded to store alphas from 241Am source and to check the production of isochronous fields in the storage ring. In this talk, present status of Rare-RI Ring and the possible mass measurement there will be presented.

  19. [Rare diseases from a life insurance perspective].

    PubMed

    Senn, A; Filzmaier, K

    2015-12-01

    A rare disease is defined as a disease that affects a maximum of 5 in 10,000 people. As of today there are roughly 7000 different rare diseases known. On account of this one can say that "rare diseases are rare, but people affected by them are common". For Germany this amounts to: 4 million people that are affected by a rare disease. Diagnosis, therapeutic options and prognosis have substantially improved for some of the rare diseases. Besides the general medical advances--especially in the area of genetics--this is also due to networking and sharing information by so-called Centres of Competence on a national and international scale. This results in a better medical care for the corresponding group of patients. Against this backdrop, the number of people applying for life assurance who are suffering from a complex or rare disease has risen steadily in the last years. Due to the scarce availability of data regarding long-term prognosis of many rare diseases, a biomathematical, medical and actuarial expertise on the part of the insurer is necessary in order to adequately assess the risk of mortality and morbidity. Furthermore there is quite a focus on the issue of rare diseases from not only politics but society as well. Therefore evidence based medical assessment by insurers is especially important in this group of applicants--thinking of legal compliance and reputational risk.

  20. [Recurrent benign multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma: Approach to this rare condition].

    PubMed

    García-Mayor Fernández, Ricardo Lucas; Fernández-González, María; López-Rodríguez, Alberto; Martínez-Almeida Fernández, Rafael

    Benign multicystic mesothelioma is a rare benign tumour derived from the peritoneal mesothelium. The aim of this paper is to present a case of this rare tumour and review the clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of this disease. The case is presented of a 22-year-old female diagnosed with multicystic mesothelioma after an urgent resection of intra-abdominal tumour in the context of acute abdominal pain. In the subsequent follow-up, the patient had a recurrence of the lesion, and at 2 years was treated by further resection. Benign multicystic mesothelioma is a benign tumour of unknown origin, and with a non-specific clinical manifestation. The most effective treatment is surgical, although there is a high tendency to local recurrence. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. Glomus tumor of the back: a rare location.

    PubMed

    Lee, Il Jae; Yoo, Young Moon; Lim, Hyoseob; Park, Myong Chul

    2009-11-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with a 5-year history of localized pain on his back, and a 1.5-cm round, touch-induced painful mass was palpated. A subsequent diagnostic evaluation revealed the presence of a glomus tumor. Glomus tumors are rare, benign, small vascular tumors, which originate from glomus bodies present in the reticular dermis. Glomus tumors constitute less than 2.0% of all primary soft tissue tumors, approximately 80% of the lesions are located in the upper extremity, and more than 75% are subungually located. However, many locations have been reported in the literature. Nevertheless, to the best of our knowledge, this glomus tumor that occurred on the back is very rare.

  2. Oral verrucous carcinoma and ameloblastoma: a rare coincidence.

    PubMed

    Dalirsani, Zohreh; Falaki, Farnaz; Mohtasham, Nooshin; Vazifeh Mostaan, Leila

    2015-03-01

    Oral verrucous carcinoma (OVC) is a rare malignancy of the oral cavity that was first described by Ackerman. This tumor is a well-differentiated low-grade, slow growing cancer that is locally invasive without metastasis. Ameloblastoma is one of the most common odontogenic tumors, which originates from the odontogenic epithelium. Verrucous carcinoma along with central ambloblastoma is a rare phenomenon. A case of verrucous carcinoma along with central ambloblastoma in a 49-year-old man, which was referred with a painless exophytic lesion with a verrucous and granular surface, is reported. Panoramic radiography revealed a well-defined radiolucency with sclerotic borders. To the best available knowledge, this phenomenon has not yet been reported. Verrucous carcinoma could occur in the wall of odontogenic cysts and tumors and should be considered during the differential diagnosis of a radiolucency, which is observed in the jaws with rapid growth or which presents some changes from its previous appearance.

  3. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy - A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Neelam Noel; Mathai, Paul C; Sahu, Vyankatesh; Aggarwal, Neha; Andrade, Tanvi

    2016-01-01

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy (MNTI) is rare, rapidly growing, pigmented neoplasm of neural crest origin. It is generally accepted as a benign tumour despite of its rapid and locally destructive growth. It primarily affects the maxilla of infants during the first year of life. Surgical excision is considered as the treatment of choice. The recurrence rate varies between 10% and 15%, and malignant behaviour has been reported in 6.5% of cases. We report a case of MNTI, associated with an erupted primary tooth in a 5-month-old male child. We discuss the clinical, radiographic and histologic features of this rare tumour, as well as its surgical management and the follow-up.

  4. Magnetomigration of rare-earth ions in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Franczak, Agnieszka; Binnemans, Koen; Jan Fransaer

    2016-10-05

    The effects of external inhomogenous (gradient) magnetic fields on the movement of the rare-earth ions: Dy(3+), Gd(3+) and Y(3+), in initially homogeneous aqueous solutions have been investigated. Differences in the migration of rare-earth ions in gradient magnetic fields were observed, depending on the magnetic character of the ions: paramagnetic ions of Dy(3+) and Gd(3+) move towards regions of the sample where the magnetic field gradient is the strongest, while diamagnetic ions of Y(3+) move in the opposite direction. It has been showed that the low magnetic field gradients, such the ones generated by permanent magnets, are sufficient to observe the magnetomigration effects of the ions in solution. The present work clearly establishes the behavior of magnetically different ions in initially homogeneous aqueous solutions exposed to magnetic field gradients. To this avail, a methodology for measuring the local concentration differences of metal ions in liquid samples was developed.

  5. Papilliferous Keratoameloblastoma of the Mandible - A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika Manoj; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Makarla, Soumya; Venugopal, Reshma

    2016-01-01

    Ameloblastomas are common odontogenic tumours that are benign and locally aggressive. Histopathologically, the tumor exhibits significant diversity with common and rare variants. Here, we report an unusual variant of a common odontogenic tumour in the mandibular posterior region on the right side in a 44-year old male patient. This is the sixth case of Papilliferous Keratoameloblastoma (PKA) to be reported in the English literature till date. More case reports are vital to determine the clinical, radiological, histopathological and behavioural aspects of this extremely rare histological type of ameloblastoma. This tumour awaits re-inclusion as a distinct entity in the future classifications of the WHO Classification of head and neck tumours upon further case accrual. PMID:27656576

  6. A rare case of malignant paraganglioma of urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vinaya B; Bhandare, Amit T

    2015-01-01

    Paraganglioma of the urinary bladder is a rare pathologic entity with no definitive histological, immunohistochemical or molecular features to determine its malignant potential. Malignancy is essentially determined by the presence of deep local invasion, invasion of adjacent structures and lymph node or distant metastases. So far, up to 180 cases of paraganglioma have been reported, with <30 being malignant. A 50-year-old male presented with painless hematuria for 6 months. Cystoscopic biopsy of the bladder mass was given as invasive urothelial carcinoma. Patient underwent radical cystectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy. The gross morphological brown discoloration of mass on formalin fixation was suspicious of paraganglioma and was confirmed on immunohistochemistry. The diagnosis of malignant paraganglioma was made based on regional lymph node metastases. We describe a rare case of a patient with malignant urinary bladder paraganglioma with main differential diagnostic considerations on the histomorphology.

  7. Gall bladder carcinoma presenting with spinal metastasis: a rare phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Mohit K; Joshi, Richa; Chadha, Manish; Alam, Shan E; Varshneya, Hemant; Kumar, Sunil

    2013-05-01

    Skeletal metastasis as a primary presentation of gall bladder carcinoma is rare. A 50-year-old lady presented with neck pain and weakness in her right upper limb of 3 months duration. Clinical and imaging work-up suggested locally advanced gall bladder carcinoma with metastasis to cervical vertebra and sternum. Only one case till date has been reported where the patient presented with neurological symptoms due to pathological fracture secondary to metastasis from an occult gall bladder carcinoma. Although rare, an occult gall bladder cancer may present with neurological symptoms due to pathological fracture of spine secondary to metastasis. We present a brief review of literature of patients who presented with skeletal metastases in clinically silent gall bladder malignancy. Palliative care issues in advanced gall bladder carcinoma have also been discussed.

  8. Local Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Association of Classroom Teachers.

    Twenty-four local projects which are intended to serve as sources of ideas for professional group action are described in this pamphlet. The projects are reported within the framework of four areas of improving teaching. Under "professional development" projects are portrayed concerning the use of student tutors and the improvement of…

  9. Localized scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Kreuter, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Localized scleroderma (also called morphea) is a term encompassing a spectrum of sclerotic autoimmune diseases that primarily affect the skin, but also might involve underlying structures such as the fat, fascia, muscle, and bones. Its exact pathogenesis is still unknown, but several trigger factors in genetically predisposed individuals might initially lead to an immunologically triggered release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, resulting in a profound dysregulation of the connective tissue metabolism and ultimately to induction of fibrosis. To date, there are no specific serological markers available for localized scleroderma. Within the last years, several validated clinical scores have been introduced as potential outcome measures for the disease. Given the rarity of localized scleroderma, only few evidence-based therapeutical treatment options exist. So far, the most robust data is available for ultraviolet A1 phototherapy in disease that is restricted to the skin, and methotrexate alone or in combination with systemic corticosteroids in more severe disease that additionally affects extracutaneous structures. This practical review summarizes relevant information on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical subtypes and classifications, differential diagnoses, clinical scores and outcome measures, and current treatment strategies of localized scleroderma. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Local Heroes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uehling, Barbara

    1996-01-01

    As critics complain about higher education's shortcomings, trustees may need to communicate their institution's economic, cultural, and intellectual contributions to the local community. The most obvious and easily understood benefit is purchasing power, but it also contributes to small business growth, individual quality of life, the social,…

  11. Rare Books As Teaching Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gino, M. C.; Wise, G.

    2003-05-01

    The use of historic science illustrations in the classroom offers unique opportunities to meet the National Science Standard that "students should develop understanding of science as a human endeavor, of the nature of scientific knowledge, and of historical perspectives" (Content Standard G, Science Education Standards, 1996, National Academy Press, Washington, DC). The Dudley Observatory has launched an effort to use its outstanding collection of rare astronomy books to meet this challenge. The example featured here is the illustration "Systema Solare et Planetarium" from the book Atlas novus coelestis (1742) by Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr (1671-1750). This illustration is significant in the evolution of astronomy because it is one of the first popular depictions of the solar system picturing the planets in their accurate relative sizes and providing numerical estimates of planetary and solar dimensions and distances. Perhaps at least as important, from the educational viewpoint, it is visually appealing, culturally intriguing and filled with puzzling items that might serve as the basis for inquiry-based learning. For example, why is the page sprinkled with what appear to be appeals to theology ("Ex His Creatorem") and expressions of wonder or even horror ("perceptum horridem")? Why does its map of the world depict California as an island? A structure for using this and other historic illustrations in the classroom might be based on the following general questions: What is the purpose of the illustration? What is included that a modern scientist might leave out, or left out that a modern scientist might include? How accurate are the quantitative results presented? How does the conceptual treatment resemble and differ from modern treatments? Viewing the heavens as an 18th century astronomer wanted his public to see them is an excellent approach to achieving the humanistic and historical perspective that the educational standard seeks.

  12. Electronic and magnetic coupling between rare-earth adatoms and the Fe(001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, C. ); Rochow, R. ); Braicovich, L. ); Jungblut, R. ); Kachel, T. ); Tillmann, D.; Kisker, E. )

    1990-02-15

    The spin-dependent electronic structure of monolayer coverages of rare-earth metals on Fe(001) has been studied by spin-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. The highly spin-polarized photoemission from the localized 4{ital f} levels of Gd, Tb, and Dy on Fe(001) reveals the antiparallel coupling between these heavy rare earths and the Fe spin moment. Exchange-split final-state multiplet terms of the 4{ital f} spectra of the heavy rare earths are explicitly distinguished by direct observation of opposite polarization. For 1 monolayer of the light rare-earth Nd on Fe(001) the rare-earth magnetic moment couples parallel to the Fe magnetic moment.

  13. Management of human bite injury of the upper and lower eyelids: a rare case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Human bite injury to the eyelid is extremely rare and poses a significant challenge in surgical reconstruction. We report an extremely rare case of human bite injury to the eyelid in a 43-year-old male with approximately 60% full thickness loss of the upper eyelid and 80% to 90% full thickness loss of the lower eyelid and its successful reconstruction using the local advancement cheek flap. PMID:28053909

  14. Secretory Carcinoma in a 79- Year-Old Woman: An Exceptionally Rare Type of Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Posso, Veronica; Redrobán, Ligia

    2016-01-01

    Secretory breast carcinoma is an exceptionally rare mammary gland neoplasia described mainly in adult females and children of both sexes, and very rarely in the elderly. It has particular histopathological and immunohistochemical features and a favorable prognosis. We report the case of a 79-year-old Hispanic woman with a palpable breast mass. Currently, the patient is disease free after a followup period of 6 years without local recurrence or axillary lymph-nodes nor distant metastases. PMID:28058101

  15. Challenges of developing and conducting clinical trials in rare disorders.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Lucas; Goldsmith, Jonathan C; Temple, Robert

    2017-08-16

    Rare disease drug development is a rapidly expanding field. Clinical researchers in rare diseases face many challenges when conducting trials in small populations. Disease natural history is often poorly understood and the ability to detect clinically meaningful outcomes requires understanding of their rate of occurrence and variability, both of which contribute to difficulties in powering a study. Standard trial designs are not optimized to obtain adequate safety and efficacy data from small numbers of patients, so alternative designs (enrichment, crossover, adaptive, N-of 1) need to be considered. The affected patients can be hard to identify, especially early in the course of their disease, are generally geographically dispersed, and are often children. Trials are frequently conducted on an international scale and may be subject to complex or multiple regulatory agency oversights and may be affected by local customs, cultures, and practices. A basic understanding of the FDA programs supporting development of drugs for rare diseases is provided by this review and the role of early consultation with the FDA is emphasized. Of recent FDA New Molecular Entities (NME) approvals, 41% (17 approvals) in 2014, 47% (21 approvals) in 2015, and 41% (9 approvals) in 2016 were for rare disease indications. Through effective interactions and collaborations with physicians, institutions, and patient groups, sponsors have been successful in bringing new treatments to market for individuals affected by rare diseases. Challenges to drug development have been overcome through the focused efforts of patients/families, non-profit patient advocacy groups, drug developers, and regulatory authorities. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma- A rare Differential Diagnosis for a mass in the External Auditory Canal.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vishnu; Shenoy, Vijendra S; Rao, Raghavendra A; Kamath, Panduranga M; Shihab, Haseena

    2015-01-01

    Primary external auditory canal malignancies are very rare; in which, adenoid cystic carcinoma is extremely rare tumour accounting for approximately 5%. Majority of the patients presents with unilateral severe or dull aching constant ear pain of prolonged duration, reduced hearing and mass in the External Ear. These tumours are treated with aggressive surgical excision and adjuvant radiotherapy. Despite this, the overall prognosis is poor due to recurrences and distant metastasis. We report a rare case of adenoid cystic carcinoma in a 36-year-old female, who presented with right ear pain for the last one year. She was treated with wide local excision of the mass followed by adjuvant radiotherapy.

  17. Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma– A rare Differential Diagnosis for a mass in the External Auditory Canal

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Vijendra S; Rao, Raghavendra A; Kamath, Panduranga M; Shihab, Haseena

    2015-01-01

    Primary external auditory canal malignancies are very rare; in which, adenoid cystic carcinoma is extremely rare tumour accounting for approximately 5%. Majority of the patients presents with unilateral severe or dull aching constant ear pain of prolonged duration, reduced hearing and mass in the External Ear. These tumours are treated with aggressive surgical excision and adjuvant radiotherapy. Despite this, the overall prognosis is poor due to recurrences and distant metastasis. We report a rare case of adenoid cystic carcinoma in a 36-year-old female, who presented with right ear pain for the last one year. She was treated with wide local excision of the mass followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. PMID:25738012

  18. Photoionization of rare gas clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huaizhen

    This thesis concentrates on the study of photoionization of van der Waals clusters with different cluster sizes. The goal of the experimental investigation is to understand the electronic structure of van der Waals clusters and the electronic dynamics. These studies are fundamental to understand the interaction between UV-X rays and clusters. The experiments were performed at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The experimental method employs angle-resolved time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometry, one of the most powerful methods for probing the electronic structure of atoms, molecules, clusters and solids. The van der Waals cluster photoionization studies are focused on probing the evolution of the photoelectron angular distribution parameter as a function of photon energy and cluster size. The angular distribution has been known to be a sensitive probe of the electronic structure in atoms and molecules. However, it has not been used in the case of van der Waals clusters. We carried out outer-valence levels, inner-valence levels and core-levels cluster photoionization experiments. Specifically, this work reports on the first quantitative measurements of the angular distribution parameters of rare gas clusters as a function of average cluster sizes. Our findings for xenon clusters is that the overall photon-energy-dependent behavior of the photoelectrons from the clusters is very similar to that of the corresponding free atoms. However, distinct differences in the angular distribution point at cluster-size-dependent effects were found. For krypton clusters, in the photon energy range where atomic photoelectrons have a high angular anisotropy, our measurements show considerably more isotropic angular distributions for the cluster photoelectrons, especially right above the 3d and 4p thresholds. For the valence electrons, a surprising difference between the two spin-orbit components was found. For argon clusters, we found that the

  19. Discovery of rare variants for complex phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Kosmicki, Jack A; Churchhouse, Claire L; Rivas, Manuel A; Neale, Benjamin M

    2016-06-01

    With the rise of sequencing technologies, it is now feasible to assess the role rare variants play in the genetic contribution to complex trait variation. While some of the earlier targeted sequencing studies successfully identified rare variants of large effect, unbiased gene discovery using exome sequencing has experienced limited success for complex traits. Nevertheless, rare variant association studies have demonstrated that rare variants do contribute to phenotypic variability, but sample sizes will likely have to be even larger than those of common variant association studies to be powered for the detection of genes and loci. Large-scale sequencing efforts of tens of thousands of individuals, such as the UK10K Project and aggregation efforts such as the Exome Aggregation Consortium, have made great strides in advancing our knowledge of the landscape of rare variation, but there remain many considerations when studying rare variation in the context of complex traits. We discuss these considerations in this review, presenting a broad range of topics at a high level as an introduction to rare variant analysis in complex traits including the issues of power, study design, sample ascertainment, de novo variation, and statistical testing approaches. Ultimately, as sequencing costs continue to decline, larger sequencing studies will yield clearer insights into the biological consequence of rare mutations and may reveal which genes play a role in the etiology of complex traits.

  20. [The observatory of rare malignant gynecologic tumors].

    PubMed

    Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan; Vacher-Lavenu, Marie-Cécile

    2014-02-01

    The observatory of gynecological rare tumors (TMRG) has been initially created for ovarian rare neoplasms (TMRO). Because of the similarities between ovarian and other gynecological tumors, this observatory has been then extended to all gynecological rare tumors. The recognition by INCa of three national expert centers (centre Léon-Bérard, hôpitaux de Paris, institut Gustave-Roussy) in rare gynecological cancers and a network of regional expert centers in 2010, expend the experience of the website "Observatoire francophone des tumeurs rares de l'ovaire". The major goals of this gynecology rare tumors experts network, are to promote systematic second opinion for initial diagnostic by experts in gynecopathology, systematic multidisciplinary advice by surgeons and medical oncologist experts, to disseminate clinical guidelines dedicated to rare gynecological tumors, to promote specific fundamental and translational research within clinical trials dedicated to rare tumors. At the end, we would like to improve benefit in term of survival and/or fertility for all these potential young patients.