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Sample records for loci controlling lymphocyte

  1. Quantitative Trait Loci for CD4:CD8 Lymphocyte Ratio Are Associated with Risk of Type 1 Diabetes and HIV-1 Immune Control

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Manuel A.R.; Mangino, Massimo; Brumme, Chanson J.; Zhao, Zhen Zhen; Medland, Sarah E.; Wright, Margaret J.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Gordon, Scott; Campbell, Megan; McEvoy, Brian P.; Henders, Anjali; Evans, David M.; Lanchbury, Jerry S.; Pereyra, Florencia; Walker, Bruce D.; Haas, David W.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Frazer, Ian H.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal expansion or depletion of particular lymphocyte subsets is associated with clinical manifestations such as HIV progression to AIDS and autoimmune disease. We sought to identify genetic predictors of lymphocyte levels and reasoned that these may play a role in immune-related diseases. We tested 2.3 million variants for association with five lymphocyte subsets, measured in 2538 individuals from the general population, including CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells, and the derived measure CD4:CD8 ratio. We identified two regions of strong association. The first was located in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), with multiple SNPs strongly associated with CD4:CD8 ratio (rs2524054, p = 2.1 × 10−28). The second region was centered within a cluster of genes from the Schlafen family and was associated with NK cell levels (rs1838149, p = 6.1 × 10−14). The MHC association with CD4:CD8 replicated convincingly (p = 1.4 × 10−9) in an independent panel of 988 individuals. Conditional analyses indicate that there are two major independent quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the MHC region that regulate CD4:CD8 ratio: one is located in the class I cluster and influences CD8 levels, whereas the second is located in the class II cluster and regulates CD4 levels. Jointly, both QTL explained 8% of the variance in CD4:CD8 ratio. The class I variants are also strongly associated with durable host control of HIV, and class II variants are associated with type-1 diabetes, suggesting that genetic variation at the MHC may predispose one to immune-related diseases partly through disregulation of T cell homeostasis. PMID:20045101

  2. Quantitative trait loci for CD4:CD8 lymphocyte ratio are associated with risk of type 1 diabetes and HIV-1 immune control.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Manuel A R; Mangino, Massimo; Brumme, Chanson J; Zhao, Zhen Zhen; Medland, Sarah E; Wright, Margaret J; Nyholt, Dale R; Gordon, Scott; Campbell, Megan; McEvoy, Brian P; Henders, Anjali; Evans, David M; Lanchbury, Jerry S; Pereyra, Florencia; Walker, Bruce D; Haas, David W; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D; de Bakker, Paul I W; Frazer, Ian H; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal expansion or depletion of particular lymphocyte subsets is associated with clinical manifestations such as HIV progression to AIDS and autoimmune disease. We sought to identify genetic predictors of lymphocyte levels and reasoned that these may play a role in immune-related diseases. We tested 2.3 million variants for association with five lymphocyte subsets, measured in 2538 individuals from the general population, including CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells, and the derived measure CD4:CD8 ratio. We identified two regions of strong association. The first was located in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), with multiple SNPs strongly associated with CD4:CD8 ratio (rs2524054, p = 2.1 x 10(-28)). The second region was centered within a cluster of genes from the Schlafen family and was associated with NK cell levels (rs1838149, p = 6.1 x 10(-14)). The MHC association with CD4:CD8 replicated convincingly (p = 1.4 x 10(-9)) in an independent panel of 988 individuals. Conditional analyses indicate that there are two major independent quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the MHC region that regulate CD4:CD8 ratio: one is located in the class I cluster and influences CD8 levels, whereas the second is located in the class II cluster and regulates CD4 levels. Jointly, both QTL explained 8% of the variance in CD4:CD8 ratio. The class I variants are also strongly associated with durable host control of HIV, and class II variants are associated with type-1 diabetes, suggesting that genetic variation at the MHC may predispose one to immune-related diseases partly through disregulation of T cell homeostasis.

  3. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies discovers multiple loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Sonja I; Camp, Nicola J; Skibola, Christine F; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Zhaoming; Gu, Jian; Nieters, Alexandra; Kelly, Rachel S; Smedby, Karin E; Monnereau, Alain; Cozen, Wendy; Cox, Angela; Wang, Sophia S; Lan, Qing; Teras, Lauren R; Machado, Moara; Yeager, Meredith; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Hartge, Patricia; Purdue, Mark P; Birmann, Brenda M; Vajdic, Claire M; Cocco, Pierluigi; Zhang, Yawei; Giles, Graham G; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Montalvan, Rebecca; Burdett, Laurie; Hutchinson, Amy; Ye, Yuanqing; Call, Timothy G; Shanafelt, Tait D; Novak, Anne J; Kay, Neil E; Liebow, Mark; Cunningham, Julie M; Allmer, Cristine; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Adami, Hans-Olov; Melbye, Mads; Glimelius, Bengt; Chang, Ellen T; Glenn, Martha; Curtin, Karen; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A; Diver, W Ryan; Link, Brian K; Weiner, George J; Conde, Lucia; Bracci, Paige M; Riby, Jacques; Arnett, Donna K; Zhi, Degui; Leach, Justin M; Holly, Elizabeth A; Jackson, Rebecca D; Tinker, Lesley F; Benavente, Yolanda; Sala, Núria; Casabonne, Delphine; Becker, Nikolaus; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; Staines, Anthony; Chaffee, Kari G; Achenbach, Sara J; Vachon, Celine M; Goldin, Lynn R; Strom, Sara S; Leis, Jose F; Weinberg, J Brice; Caporaso, Neil E; Norman, Aaron D; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Morton, Lindsay M; Severson, Richard K; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Masala, Giovanna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Travis, Ruth C; Southey, Melissa C; Milne, Roger L; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Clavel, Jacqueline; Zheng, Tongzhang; Holford, Theodore R; Villano, Danylo J; Maria, Ann; Spinelli, John J; Gascoyne, Randy D; Connors, Joseph M; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Kricker, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Ferri, Giovanni M; Miligi, Lucia; Liang, Liming; Ma, Baoshan; Huang, Jinyan; Crouch, Simon; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; North, Kari E; Snowden, John A; Wright, Josh; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Offit, Kenneth; Wu, Xifeng; de Sanjose, Silvia; Cerhan, James R; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Slager, Susan L

    2016-03-09

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a common lymphoid malignancy with strong heritability. To further understand the genetic susceptibility for CLL and identify common loci associated with risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide association studies (GWAS) composed of 3,100 cases and 7,667 controls with follow-up replication in 1,958 cases and 5,530 controls. Here we report three new loci at 3p24.1 (rs9880772, EOMES, P=2.55 × 10(-11)), 6p25.2 (rs73718779, SERPINB6, P=1.97 × 10(-8)) and 3q28 (rs9815073, LPP, P=3.62 × 10(-8)), as well as a new independent SNP at the known 2q13 locus (rs9308731, BCL2L11, P=1.00 × 10(-11)) in the combined analysis. We find suggestive evidence (P<5 × 10(-7)) for two additional new loci at 4q24 (rs10028805, BANK1, P=7.19 × 10(-8)) and 3p22.2 (rs1274963, CSRNP1, P=2.12 × 10(-7)). Pathway analyses of new and known CLL loci consistently show a strong role for apoptosis, providing further evidence for the importance of this biological pathway in CLL susceptibility.

  4. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies discovers multiple loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Sonja I.; Camp, Nicola J.; Skibola, Christine F.; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Zhaoming; Gu, Jian; Nieters, Alexandra; Kelly, Rachel S.; Smedby, Karin E.; Monnereau, Alain; Cozen, Wendy; Cox, Angela; Wang, Sophia S.; Lan, Qing; Teras, Lauren R.; Machado, Moara; Yeager, Meredith; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.; Hartge, Patricia; Purdue, Mark P.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Cocco, Pierluigi; Zhang, Yawei; Giles, Graham G.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Montalvan, Rebecca; Burdett, Laurie; Hutchinson, Amy; Ye, Yuanqing; Call, Timothy G.; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Novak, Anne J.; Kay, Neil E.; Liebow, Mark; Cunningham, Julie M.; Allmer, Cristine; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Adami, Hans-Olov; Melbye, Mads; Glimelius, Bengt; Chang, Ellen T.; Glenn, Martha; Curtin, Karen; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.; Diver, W Ryan; Link, Brian K.; Weiner, George J.; Conde, Lucia; Bracci, Paige M.; Riby, Jacques; Arnett, Donna K.; Zhi, Degui; Leach, Justin M.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Tinker, Lesley F.; Benavente, Yolanda; Sala, Núria; Casabonne, Delphine; Becker, Nikolaus; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; Staines, Anthony; Chaffee, Kari G.; Achenbach, Sara J.; Vachon, Celine M.; Goldin, Lynn R.; Strom, Sara S.; Leis, Jose F.; Weinberg, J. Brice; Caporaso, Neil E.; Norman, Aaron D.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Severson, Richard K.; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Masala, Giovanna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Chirlaque, María- Dolores; Vermeulen, Roel C. H.; Travis, Ruth C.; Southey, Melissa C.; Milne, Roger L.; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Clavel, Jacqueline; Zheng, Tongzhang; Holford, Theodore R.; Villano, Danylo J.; Maria, Ann; Spinelli, John J.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Kricker, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Ferri, Giovanni M.; Miligi, Lucia; Liang, Liming; Ma, Baoshan; Huang, Jinyan; Crouch, Simon; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; North, Kari E.; Snowden, John A.; Wright, Josh; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Offit, Kenneth; Wu, Xifeng; de Sanjose, Silvia; Cerhan, James R.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Slager, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a common lymphoid malignancy with strong heritability. To further understand the genetic susceptibility for CLL and identify common loci associated with risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide association studies (GWAS) composed of 3,100 cases and 7,667 controls with follow-up replication in 1,958 cases and 5,530 controls. Here we report three new loci at 3p24.1 (rs9880772, EOMES, P=2.55 × 10−11), 6p25.2 (rs73718779, SERPINB6, P=1.97 × 10−8) and 3q28 (rs9815073, LPP, P=3.62 × 10−8), as well as a new independent SNP at the known 2q13 locus (rs9308731, BCL2L11, P=1.00 × 10−11) in the combined analysis. We find suggestive evidence (P<5 × 10−7) for two additional new loci at 4q24 (rs10028805, BANK1, P=7.19 × 10−8) and 3p22.2 (rs1274963, CSRNP1, P=2.12 × 10−7). Pathway analyses of new and known CLL loci consistently show a strong role for apoptosis, providing further evidence for the importance of this biological pathway in CLL susceptibility. PMID:26956414

  5. Genome-wide association analysis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma identifies pleiotropic risk loci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Philip J.; Sud, Amit; Mitchell, Jonathan S.; Henrion, Marc; Orlando, Giulia; Lenive, Oleg; Broderick, Peter; Speedy, Helen E.; Johnson, David C.; Kaiser, Martin; Weinhold, Niels; Cooke, Rosie; Sunter, Nicola J.; Jackson, Graham H.; Summerfield, Geoffrey; Harris, Robert J.; Pettitt, Andrew R.; Allsup, David J.; Carmichael, Jonathan; Bailey, James R.; Pratt, Guy; Rahman, Thahira; Pepper, Chris; Fegan, Chris; von Strandmann, Elke Pogge; Engert, Andreas; Försti, Asta; Chen, Bowang; Filho, Miguel Inacio Da Silva; Thomsen, Hauke; Hoffmann, Per; Noethen, Markus M.; Eisele, Lewin; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Allan, James M.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Catovsky, Daniel; Morgan, Gareth J.; Hemminki, Kari; Houlston, Richard S.

    2017-01-01

    B-cell malignancies (BCM) originate from the same cell of origin, but at different maturation stages and have distinct clinical phenotypes. Although genetic risk variants for individual BCMs have been identified, an agnostic, genome-wide search for shared genetic susceptibility has not been performed. We explored genome-wide association studies of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL, N = 1,842), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL, N = 1,465) and multiple myeloma (MM, N = 3,790). We identified a novel pleiotropic risk locus at 3q22.2 (NCK1, rs11715604, P = 1.60 × 10‑9) with opposing effects between CLL (P = 1.97 × 10‑8) and HL (P = 3.31 × 10‑3). Eight established non-HLA risk loci showed pleiotropic associations. Within the HLA region, Ser37 + Phe37 in HLA-DRB1 (P = 1.84 × 10‑12) was associated with increased CLL and HL risk (P = 4.68 × 10‑12), and reduced MM risk (P = 1.12 × 10‑2), and Gly70 in HLA-DQB1 (P = 3.15 × 10‑10) showed opposing effects between CLL (P = 3.52 × 10‑3) and HL (P = 3.41 × 10‑9). By integrating eQTL, Hi-C and ChIP-seq data, we show that the pleiotropic risk loci are enriched for B-cell regulatory elements, as well as an over-representation of binding of key B-cell transcription factors. These data identify shared biological pathways influencing the development of CLL, HL and MM. The identification of these risk loci furthers our understanding of the aetiological basis of BCMs.

  6. Genome-wide association analysis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma identifies pleiotropic risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Law, Philip J.; Sud, Amit; Mitchell, Jonathan S.; Henrion, Marc; Orlando, Giulia; Lenive, Oleg; Broderick, Peter; Speedy, Helen E.; Johnson, David C.; Kaiser, Martin; Weinhold, Niels; Cooke, Rosie; Sunter, Nicola J.; Jackson, Graham H.; Summerfield, Geoffrey; Harris, Robert J.; Pettitt, Andrew R.; Allsup, David J.; Carmichael, Jonathan; Bailey, James R.; Pratt, Guy; Rahman, Thahira; Pepper, Chris; Fegan, Chris; von Strandmann, Elke Pogge; Engert, Andreas; Försti, Asta; Chen, Bowang; Filho, Miguel Inacio da Silva; Thomsen, Hauke; Hoffmann, Per; Noethen, Markus M.; Eisele, Lewin; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Allan, James M.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Catovsky, Daniel; Morgan, Gareth J.; Hemminki, Kari; Houlston, Richard S.

    2017-01-01

    B-cell malignancies (BCM) originate from the same cell of origin, but at different maturation stages and have distinct clinical phenotypes. Although genetic risk variants for individual BCMs have been identified, an agnostic, genome-wide search for shared genetic susceptibility has not been performed. We explored genome-wide association studies of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL, N = 1,842), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL, N = 1,465) and multiple myeloma (MM, N = 3,790). We identified a novel pleiotropic risk locus at 3q22.2 (NCK1, rs11715604, P = 1.60 × 10−9) with opposing effects between CLL (P = 1.97 × 10−8) and HL (P = 3.31 × 10−3). Eight established non-HLA risk loci showed pleiotropic associations. Within the HLA region, Ser37 + Phe37 in HLA-DRB1 (P = 1.84 × 10−12) was associated with increased CLL and HL risk (P = 4.68 × 10−12), and reduced MM risk (P = 1.12 × 10−2), and Gly70 in HLA-DQB1 (P = 3.15 × 10−10) showed opposing effects between CLL (P = 3.52 × 10−3) and HL (P = 3.41 × 10−9). By integrating eQTL, Hi-C and ChIP-seq data, we show that the pleiotropic risk loci are enriched for B-cell regulatory elements, as well as an over-representation of binding of key B-cell transcription factors. These data identify shared biological pathways influencing the development of CLL, HL and MM. The identification of these risk loci furthers our understanding of the aetiological basis of BCMs. PMID:28112199

  7. Cholesterol Homeostasis in Isolated Lymphocytes: a Differential Correlation Between Male Control and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sankanagoudar, Shrimanjunath; Singh, Govind; Mahapatra, Manaranjan; Kumar, Lalit; Chandra, Nimai Chand

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study was performed to investigate any association between cellular cholesterol homeostasis and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). CLL is characterized primarily by an abnormal accumulation of neoplastic B cells in the blood, bone marrow, lymph nodes and spleen. Methods: Men aged >50 years participated in this study. Enzyme-based plasma lipid profile estimations, peripheral blood lymphocyte isolation, lysate preparations, SDS-PAGE, western blotting, dil-LDL uptake and ultracentrifugation were employed. Results: Our study demonstrated hypocholesterolemia in lymphocytic leukemia in addition to hyper-expression of LDLRs in leukemic lymphocytes. Breakdown of intracellular cholesterol homeostasis and failure to maintain the feedback mechanism normally processed by the transcription factor SREBP-2 in the cytoplasm was apparent. The presence of cholesterol in the nucleus was noted in leukemic lymphocytes. A comparison of cholesterol homeostasis between healthy controls and CLL subjects showed that cholesterol may contribute to lymphocytic leukemia. While plasma cholesterol levels decreased (p < 0.0005), hyper-expression of LDLR (p=0.0001), SREBP-2 (transcription factor of LDLR) (p=0.0001) and PBR (nuclear cholesterol channel protein) (p=0.016) was observed in lymphocytes isolated from CLL subjects in association with a significant increase in intracellular cholesterol in the nuclear (p=0.036) and cytoplasmic (p=0.004) compartments. Conclusion: This study provided insights into cholesterol homeostasis in CLL subjects regarding LDLR, SREBP-2 and PBR. Cholesterol may enter the nucleus through highly expressed PBR and may be involved in development of leukemia by influencing cell cycle mechanisms in the lymphocytes of CLL subjects. PMID:28240002

  8. A high-density SNP genome-wide linkage search of 206 families identifies susceptibility loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sellick, Gabrielle S.; Goldin, Lynn R.; Wild, Ruth W.; Slager, Susan L.; Ressenti, Laura; Strom, Sara S.; Dyer, Martin J. S.; Mauro, Francesca R.; Marti, Gerald E.; Fuller, Stephen; Lyttelton, Matthew; Kipps, Thomas J.; Keating, Michael J.; Call, Timothy G.; Catovsky, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders display familial aggregation. To identify a susceptibility gene for CLL, we assembled families from the major European (ICLLC) and American (GEC) consortia to conduct a genome-wide linkage analysis of 101 new CLL pedigrees using a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array and combined the results with data from our previously reported analysis of 105 families. Here, we report on the combined analysis of the 206 families. Multipoint linkage analyses were undertaken using both nonparametric (model-free) and parametric (model-based) methods. After the removal of high linkage disequilibrium SNPs, we obtained a maximum nonparametric linkage (NPL) score of 3.02 (P = .001) on chromosome 2q21.2. The same genomic position also yielded the highest multipoint heterogeneity LOD (HLOD) score under a common recessive model of disease susceptibility (HLOD = 3.11; P = 7.7 × 10−5), which was significant at the genome-wide level. In addition, 2 other chromosomal positions, 6p22.1 (corresponding to the major histocompatibility locus) and 18q21.1, displayed HLOD scores higher than 2.1 (P < .002). None of the regions coincided with areas of common chromosomal abnormalities frequently observed in CLL. These findings provide direct evidence for Mendelian predisposition to CLL and evidence for the location of disease loci. PMID:17687107

  9. Annotation of pseudogenic gene segments by massively parallel sequencing of rearranged lymphocyte receptor loci.

    PubMed

    Dean, Jared; Emerson, Ryan O; Vignali, Marissa; Sherwood, Anna M; Rieder, Mark J; Carlson, Christopher S; Robins, Harlan S

    2015-11-23

    volunteers to evaluate the use of functional and non-functional alleles of individual TCRβ V gene segments. With some modifications, our method has the potential to be extended to gene segments in the α, γ, and δ TCR loci, as well as the genes encoding for B-cell receptor chains.

  10. Detection of two allotype-(Ig-1)-linked minor histocompatibility loci by the use ofH-2-restricted cytotoxic lymphocytes in congenic mice.

    PubMed

    Rolink, T; Eichmann, K; Simon, M M

    1978-12-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL) were generated betweenIg-1-congenic strains BALB/c(H-2(d),Ig-1(a)) andC.B-17(H-2(d),Ig-1(b)) by cross-immunization in both directions and rechallenge in vitro. The effector cell populations specifically lysed target cells sharing both theH-2 haplotype and theIg-1 allele of the sensitizing strain. B- and T-cell blasts were equally good targets, suggesting thatH-2-restricted cytotoxic lymphocytes are not directed against serologically defined conventional allotypic determinants, but probably against minor histocompatibility antigens controlled by genes linked to theIg-1 complex. Competition experiments using cold target cells from a series ofIg-1(b)-congenic strains of the BALB/c background (BAB-14, C.B-17, C.B-26) revealed two not yet described minor histocompatibility loci linked to theIg-1 complex: We could demonstrate that BALB/c anti-C.B-17 effector cells recognize at least two distinct antigenic determinants on C.B-17 target cells, but only one on target cells from BAB-14, which carries a recombinantIg-1 complex. From these results we conclude that one of the minor histocompatibility antigens, designated as H(C(H)), is encoded by a gene linked to the heavy-chain constant-region (C(H)) genes, whereas the second minor histocompatibility antigen, designated as H(V(H)), is coded for by a gene linked to the heavy-chain variable-region (V(H)) genes. These two new genetic markers may be useful for further analysis of the mouseIg-1 complex because the analysis of the H(C(H)) and H(V(H)) genes may facilitate the search for recombinants in that chromosomal region.

  11. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: case control epidemiological study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, R. A.; Bernard, S. M.; Bird, C. C.; Darwin, C. M.; O'Brien, C.; Richards, I. D.; Roberts, B.; McKinney, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    This is the second report of a large case control study of lymphoma/leukaemia occurring in Yorkshire during 1979-84, and deals with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia presenting either in its haematological (CLL) or more solid lymphomatous (malignant lymphoma-lymphocytic or MLL) forms. In all, 330 cases and 561 controls were interviewed. The results support the concept that CLL/MLL is a condition of multiple aetiologies with evidence for genetic predisposition through an excess of family cases, immune perturbation demonstrated by excessive previous skin diseases and phenylbutazone use, and viral involvement shown by links with infectious diseases and multiple sclerosis. PMID:3304389

  12. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: case control epidemiological study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, R A; Bernard, S M; Bird, C C; Darwin, C M; O'Brien, C; Richards, I D; Roberts, B; McKinney, P A

    1987-07-01

    This is the second report of a large case control study of lymphoma/leukaemia occurring in Yorkshire during 1979-84, and deals with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia presenting either in its haematological (CLL) or more solid lymphomatous (malignant lymphoma-lymphocytic or MLL) forms. In all, 330 cases and 561 controls were interviewed. The results support the concept that CLL/MLL is a condition of multiple aetiologies with evidence for genetic predisposition through an excess of family cases, immune perturbation demonstrated by excessive previous skin diseases and phenylbutazone use, and viral involvement shown by links with infectious diseases and multiple sclerosis.

  13. Effect of controlled ozone exposure on human lymphocyte function

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.L.; Smialowicz, R.; Harder, S.; Ketcham, B.; House, D.

    1981-04-01

    The effects of ozone (O/sub 3/) on cell-mediated immunity were studied in 16 human subjects exposed to 1176 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ O/sub 3/ (0.6 ppM) for 2 h in an environmentally controlled exposure chamber. Venous blood samples were taken before and immediately after controlled air and O/sub 3/ exposures, as well as at 72 h, 2 and 4 weeks, and at one random time at least 1 month after treatment. The relative frequency of T lymphocytes in blood and the in vitro blastogenic response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), pokeweed mitogen (PWM), and Candida albicans were determined. During the course of the experiment, no statistically significant changes were observed in the number of T lymphocytes that form spontaneous rosettes with sheep erythrocytes. The response of T lymphocytes to PHA was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in samples taken at 2 and 4 weeks, following O/sub 3/ exposure. Normal response to PHA was observed at 2 months post-O/sub 3/ exposure. No statistically significant changes in lymphocyte responses to Con A, PWM, or Candida were seen. These results show that one 2 h exposure of humans to 0.6 ppM O/sub 3/ may lead to a transient suppression of the PHA-stimulated blastogenic transformation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. The data indicate that the blastogenic response to PHA of human lymphocytes is exquisitely sensitive to O/sub 3/ exposure and could serve as a bioassay for evaluating subtle changes in cellular immunity induced by O/sub 3/ and possibly other pollutants.

  14. Proactive control of proactive interference using the method of loci.

    PubMed

    Bass, Willa S; Oswald, Karl M

    2014-01-01

    Proactive interferencebuilds up with exposure to multiple lists of similar items with a resulting reduction in recall. This study examined the effectiveness of using a proactive strategy of the method of loci to reduce proactive interference in a list recall paradigm of categorically similar words. While all participants reported using some form of strategy to recall list words, this study demonstrated that young adults were able to proactively use the method of loci after 25 min of instruction to reduce proactive interference as compared with other personal spontaneous strategies. The implications of this study are that top-down proactive strategies such as the method of loci can significantly reduce proactive interference, and that the use of image and sequence or location are especially useful in this regard.

  15. Simultaneous estimation of the locations and effects of multiple disease loci in case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Chien, Li-Chu; Chiu, Yen-Feng; Liang, Kung-Yee; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2015-04-01

    The genetic basis of complex diseases often involves multiple causative loci. Under such a disease etiology, assuming one disease locus in linkage disequilibrium mapping is likely to induce bias and lead to efficiency loss in disease locus estimation. An approach is needed for simultaneously localizing multiple functional loci within the same region. However, due to the increasing number of parameters accompanying disease loci, these estimates can be computationally infeasible. To circumvent this problem, we propose to estimate the main and two-adjacent-locus joint effects and a nuisance parameter at the disease loci separately through a linear approximation. Estimates of the genetic effects are entered into a generalized estimating equation to estimate disease loci, and the procedure is conducted iteratively until convergence. The proposed method provides estimates and confidence intervals (CIs) for the disease loci, the genetic main effects, and the joint effects of two adjacent disease loci, with the CIs for the disease loci providing useful regions for further fine-mapping. We apply the proposed approach to a data example of case-control studies. Results of the simulations and data example suggest that the developed method performs well in terms of bias, variance, and coverage probability under scenarios with up to three disease loci.

  16. Mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling adaptive traits in coastal Douglas fir. III. Quantitative trait loci-by-environment interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Jermstad, Kathleen D; Bassoni, Daniel L; Jech, Keith S; Ritchie, Gary A; Wheeler, Nicholas C; Neale, David B

    2003-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) were mapped in the woody perennial Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) for complex traits controlling the timing of growth initiation and growth cessation. QTL were estimated under controlled environmental conditions to identify QTL interactions with photoperiod, moisture stress, winter chilling, and spring temperatures. A three-generation mapping population of 460 cloned progeny was used for genetic mapping and phenotypic evaluations. An all-marker interval mapping method was used for scanning the genome for the presence of QTL and single-factor ANOVA was used for estimating QTL-by-environment interactions. A modest number of QTL were detected per trait, with individual QTL explaining up to 9.5% of the phenotypic variation. Two QTL-by-treatment interactions were found for growth initiation, whereas several QTL-by-treatment interactions were detected among growth cessation traits. This is the first report of QTL interactions with specific environmental signals in forest trees and will assist in the identification of candidate genes controlling these important adaptive traits in perennial plants. PMID:14668397

  17. Mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling adaptive traits in coastal Douglas-fir. III

    Treesearch

    Kathleen D. Jermstad; Daniel L. Bassoni; Keith S. Jech; Gary A. Ritchie; Nicholas C. Wheeler; David B. Neale

    2003-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) were mapped in the woody perennial Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) for complex traits controlling the timing of growth initiation and growth cessation. QTL were estimated under controlled environmental conditions to identify QTL interactions with photoperiod, moisture stress, winter chilling, and spring...

  18. Novel loci control variation in reproductive timing in Arabidopsis thaliana in natural environments.

    PubMed Central

    Weinig, Cynthia; Ungerer, Mark C; Dorn, Lisa A; Kane, Nolan C; Toyonaga, Yuko; Halldorsdottir, Solveig S; Mackay, Trudy F C; Purugganan, Michael D; Schmitt, Johanna

    2002-01-01

    Molecular biologists are rapidly characterizing the genetic basis of flowering in model species such as Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it is not clear how the developmental pathways identified in controlled environments contribute to variation in reproductive timing in natural ecological settings. Here we report the first study of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for date of bolting (the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth) in A. thaliana in natural seasonal field environments and compare the results with those obtained under typical growth-chamber conditions. Two QTL specific to long days in the chamber were expressed only in spring-germinating cohorts in the field, and two loci specific to short days in the chamber were expressed only in fall-germinating cohorts, suggesting differential involvement of the photoperiod pathway in different seasonal environments. However, several other photoperiod-specific QTL with large effects in controlled conditions were undetectable in natural environments, indicating that expression of allelic variation at these loci was overridden by environmental factors specific to the field. Moreover, a substantial number of QTL with major effects on bolting date in one or more field environments were undetectable under controlled environment conditions. These novel loci suggest the involvement of additional genes in the transition to flowering under ecologically relevant conditions. PMID:12524356

  19. Sensitivity to ionising radiation of lymphocytes from Huntington's chorea patients compared to controls

    SciTech Connect

    McGovern, D. ); Webb, T. )

    1982-06-01

    Blood samples were collected from 22 patients with Huntington's chorea and from 22 matched controls. Lymphocytes were separated from aliquots of each sample and cultures set up both from these and from further aliquots of whole blood. After 24 hours, half of each culture was subjected to X irradiation. Seventy-two hours later the percentages of live lymphocytes were estimated for each half of every culture and the viability ratio calculated for each sample. The lymphocytes derived from the patients with Huntington's chorea were found to be more susceptible to X irradiation than were the lymphocytes derived from controls. This was true both for whole blood and separated lymphocyte cultures. This susceptibility was found not to be the result of the main types of medication received by the patients. The small differences between viability ratios from patients and controls and the degree of overlap makes this test unsuitable for the prediction of asymptomatic carriers of the Huntington's chorea gene.

  20. Detecting Major Genetic Loci Controlling Phenotypic Variability in Experimental Crosses

    PubMed Central

    Rönnegård, Lars; Valdar, William

    2011-01-01

    Traditional methods for detecting genes that affect complex diseases in humans or animal models, milk production in livestock, or other traits of interest, have asked whether variation in genotype produces a change in that trait’s average value. But focusing on differences in the mean ignores differences in variability about that mean. The robustness, or uniformity, of an individual’s character is not only of great practical importance in medical genetics and food production but is also of scientific and evolutionary interest (e.g., blood pressure in animal models of heart disease, litter size in pigs, flowering time in plants). We describe a method for detecting major genes controlling the phenotypic variance, referring to these as vQTL. Our method uses a double generalized linear model with linear predictors based on probabilities of line origin. We evaluate our method on simulated F2 and collaborative cross data, and on a real F2 intercross, demonstrating its accuracy and robustness to the presence of ordinary mean-controlling QTL. We also illustrate the connection between vQTL and QTL involved in epistasis, explaining how these concepts overlap. Our method can be applied to a wide range of commonly used experimental crosses and may be extended to genetic association more generally. PMID:21467569

  1. Method to detect differentially methylated loci with case-control designs using Illumina arrays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang

    2011-11-01

    It is now understood that many human cancer types are the result of the accumulation of both genetic and epigenetic changes. DNA methylation is a molecular modification of DNA that is crucial for normal development. Genes that are rich in CpG dinucleotides are usually not methylated in normal tissues, but are frequently hypermethylated in cancer. With the advent of high-throughput platforms, large-scale structure of genomic methylation patterns is available through genome-wide scans and tremendous amount of DNA methylation data have been recently generated. However, sophisticated statistical methods to handle complex DNA methylation data are very limited. Here, we developed a likelihood based Uniform-Normal-mixture model to select differentially methylated loci between case and control groups using Illumina arrays. The idea is to model the data as three types of methylation loci, one unmethylated, one completely methylated, and one partially methylated. A three-component mixture model with two Uniform distributions and one truncated normal distribution was used to model the three types. The mixture probabilities and the mean of the normal distribution were used to make inference about differentially methylated loci. Through extensive simulation studies, we demonstrated the feasibility and power of the proposed method. An application to a recently published study on ovarian cancer identified several methylation loci that are missed by the existing method.

  2. Quantitative trait loci controlling light and hormone response in two accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Borevitz, Justin O; Maloof, Julin N; Lutes, Jason; Dabi, Tsegaye; Redfern, Joanna L; Trainer, Gabriel T; Werner, Jonathan D; Asami, Tadao; Berry, Charles C; Weigel, Detlef; Chory, Joanne

    2002-01-01

    We have mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for natural variation in light and hormone response between the Cape Verde Islands (Cvi) and Landsberg erecta (Ler) accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana using recombinant inbred lines (RILs). Hypocotyl length was measured in four light environments: white, blue, red, and far-red light and in the dark. In addition, white light plus gibberellin (GA) and dark plus the brassinosteroid biosynthesis inhibitor brassinazole (BRZ) were used to detect hormone effects. Twelve QTL were identified that map to loci not previously known to affect light response, as well as loci where candidate genes have been identified from known mutations. Some QTL act in all environments while others show genotype-by-environment interaction. A global threshold was established to identify a significant epistatic interaction between two loci that have few main effects of their own. LIGHT1, a major QTL, has been confirmed in a near isogenic line (NIL) and maps to a new locus with effects in all light environments. The erecta mutation can explain the effect of the HYP2 QTL in the blue, BRZ, and dark environments, but not in far-red. LIGHT2, also confirmed in an NIL, has effects in white and red light and shows interaction with GA. The phenotype and map position of LIGHT2 suggest the photoreceptor PHYB as a candidate gene. Natural variation in light and hormone response thus defines both new genes and known genes that control light response in wild accessions. PMID:11861571

  3. Transcriptional programs of lymphoid tissue capillary and high endothelium reveal control mechanisms for lymphocyte homing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mike; Kiefel, Helena; LaJevic, Melissa D.; Macauley, Matthew S.; Kawashima, Hiroto; O'Hara, Edward; Pan, Junliang; Paulson, James C.; Butcher, Eugene C.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocytes are recruited from blood by high-endothelial venules (HEVs). We performed transcriptomic analyses and identified molecular signatures that distinguish HEVs from capillary endothelium and that define tissue-specific HEV specialization. Capillaries displayed gene programs for vascular development. HEVs were enriched in genes for immune defense and lymphocyte migration. We identify capillary and HEV markers and candidate mechanisms for regulated lymphocyte recruitment including a lymph node HEV-selective transmembrane mucin; transcriptional control of functionally specialized carbohydrate ligands for lymphocyte L-selectin; HEV expression of molecules for transendothelial migration; and metabolic programs for lipid mediators of lymphocyte motility and chemotaxis. We also elucidate a carbohydrate recognition pathway that targets B cells to intestinal lymphoid tissues, defining CD22 as a lectin-homing receptor for mucosal HEVs. PMID:25173345

  4. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Milk Production in Dairy Cattle by Exploiting Progeny Testing

    PubMed Central

    Georges, M.; Nielsen, D.; Mackinnon, M.; Mishra, A.; Okimoto, R.; Pasquino, A. T.; Sargeant, L. S.; Sorensen, A.; Steele, M. R.; Zhao, X.; Womack, J. E.; Hoeschele, I.

    1995-01-01

    We have exploited ``progeny testing'' to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying the genetic variation of milk production in a selected dairy cattle population. A total of 1,518 sires, with progeny tests based on the milking performances of > 150,000 daughters jointly, was genotyped for 159 autosomal microsatellites bracketing 1645 centimorgan or approximately two thirds of the bovine genome. Using a maximum likelihood multilocus linkage analysis accounting for variance heterogeneity of the phenotypes, we identified five chromosomes giving very strong evidence (LOD score >/= 3) for the presence of a QTL controlling milk production: chromosomes 1, 6, 9, 10 and 20. These findings demonstrate that loci with considerable effects on milk production are still segregating in highly selected populations and pave the way toward marker-assisted selection in dairy cattle breeding. PMID:7713441

  5. Mapping quantitative trait loci controlling milk production in dairy cattle by exploiting progeny testing

    SciTech Connect

    Georges, M.; Nielsen, D.; Mackinnon, M.; Mishra, A.; Okimoto, R.; Sargeant, L.S.; Steele, M.R.; Zhao, X.; Pasquino, A.T.

    1995-02-01

    We have exploited {open_quotes}progeny testing{close_quotes} to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying the genetic variation of milk production in a selected dairy cattle population. A total of 1,518 sires, with progeny tests based on the milking performances of >150,000 daughters jointly, was genotyped for 159 autosomal microsatellites bracketing 1645 centimorgan or approximately two thirds of the bovine genome. Using a maximum likelihood multilocus linkage analysis accounting for variance heterogeneity of the phenotypes, we identified five chromosomes giving very strong evidence (LOD score {ge} 3) for the presence of a QTL controlling milk production: chromosomes 1, 6, 9, 10 and 20. These findings demonstrate that loci with considerable effects on milk production are still segregating in highly selected populations and pave the way toward marker-assisted selection in dairy cattle breeding. 44 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Control of T lymphocyte morphology by the GTPase Rho

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodside, Darren G.; Wooten, David K.; Teague, T. Kent; Miyamoto, Yuko J.; Caudell, Eva G.; Udagawa, Taturo; Andruss, Bernard F.; McIntyre, Bradley W.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rho family GTPase regulation of the actin cytoskeleton governs a variety of cell responses. In this report, we have analyzed the role of the GTPase Rho in maintenance of the T lymphocyte actin cytoskeleton. RESULTS: Inactivation of the GTPase Rho in the human T lymphocytic cell line HPB-ALL does not inhibit constitutively high adhesion to the integrin beta1 substrate fibronectin. It did however result in the aberrant extension of finger-like dendritic processes on the substrates VCAM-1, Fn, and mAb specific to beta1 integrins. Time-lapse video microscopy demonstrated that C3 induced extensions were primarily the result of an altered pseudopod elongation rather than retraction. Once the stellate pseudopodia extended, none retracted, and cells became completely immobile. Filipodial structures were absent and the dendritic-like processes in C3 treated cells were rich in filamentous actin. Immunolocalization of RhoA in untreated HPB-ALL cells spreading on fibronectin demonstrated a diffuse staining pattern within the pseudopodia. In C3 treated cells, clusters of RhoA were pronounced and localized within the altered extensions. CONCLUSIONS: GTPase Rho is actively involved in the regulation of T lymphocyte morphology and motility.

  7. Control of T lymphocyte morphology by the GTPase Rho

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodside, Darren G.; Wooten, David K.; Teague, T. Kent; Miyamoto, Yuko J.; Caudell, Eva G.; Udagawa, Taturo; Andruss, Bernard F.; McIntyre, Bradley W.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rho family GTPase regulation of the actin cytoskeleton governs a variety of cell responses. In this report, we have analyzed the role of the GTPase Rho in maintenance of the T lymphocyte actin cytoskeleton. RESULTS: Inactivation of the GTPase Rho in the human T lymphocytic cell line HPB-ALL does not inhibit constitutively high adhesion to the integrin beta1 substrate fibronectin. It did however result in the aberrant extension of finger-like dendritic processes on the substrates VCAM-1, Fn, and mAb specific to beta1 integrins. Time-lapse video microscopy demonstrated that C3 induced extensions were primarily the result of an altered pseudopod elongation rather than retraction. Once the stellate pseudopodia extended, none retracted, and cells became completely immobile. Filipodial structures were absent and the dendritic-like processes in C3 treated cells were rich in filamentous actin. Immunolocalization of RhoA in untreated HPB-ALL cells spreading on fibronectin demonstrated a diffuse staining pattern within the pseudopodia. In C3 treated cells, clusters of RhoA were pronounced and localized within the altered extensions. CONCLUSIONS: GTPase Rho is actively involved in the regulation of T lymphocyte morphology and motility.

  8. Preparation of Internal Quality Control Material for Lymphocyte Subset Analysis.

    PubMed

    Roh, Eun Youn; Shin, Sue; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Oh, Sohee; Park, Kyoung Un; Lee, Nuri; Song, Eun Young

    2016-07-01

    Lymphocyte subset analysis is widely used in clinical laboratories, and more than two levels of daily QC materials are required for reliable results. Commercially available, expensive QC materials have short shelf lives and may not be suitable in resource-poor settings. We compared different methods for preparing homemade QC material, including fixation with 1%, 2%, or 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA); freezing with 10% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), 0.1% bovine serum albumin-phosphate buffered saline, or after ethanolic dehydration; and using cryopreservation temperatures of -20°C, -80°C, or -196°C. We found an optimal experimental condition, which is 'fixation with 4% PFA, freezing with 10% DMSO, and storage at 80°C'. To evaluate long-term stability of QC materials prepared in this optimal condition, two levels of QC materials (QM1 and QM2) were thawed after 30, 33, 35, 37, 60, 62, 64, and 67 days of cryopreservation. Lymphocyte subset was analyzed with BD Multitest IMK kit (BD Biosciences, USA). QM1 and QM2 were stable after 1-2 months of cryopreservation (CV <3% for CD3, CD4, and CD8 and 5-7% for CD16/56 and CD19). We propose this method as an alternative cost-effective protocol for preparing homemade internal QC materials for lymphocyte subset analysis in resource-poor settings.

  9. The Utilization during Mitotic Cell Division of Loci Controlling Meiotic Recombination and Disjunction in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Bruce S.; Carpenter, Adelaide T. C.; Ripoll, P.

    1978-01-01

    are in a nondividing (G2) state.—Mitotic recombination is at or above control levels in the presence of each of the recombination-defective meiotic mutants examined, suggesting that meiotic and mitotic recombination are under separate genetic control in Drosophila.—Of the six mutants examined that are defective in processes required for regular meiotic chromosome segregation, four (l(1)TW-6cs, cand, mei-S332, ord) affect mitotic chromosome behavior. At semi-restrictive temperatures, the cold sensitive lethal l(1)TW-6cs causes very frequent somatic spots, a substantial proportion of which are attributable to nondisjunction or loss. Thus, this locus specifies a function essential for chromosome segregation at mitosis as well as at the first meiotic division in females. The patterns of mitotic effects caused by cand, mei-S332, and ord suggest that they may be leaky alleles at essential loci that specify functions common to meiosis and mitosis. Mutants at the two remaining loci (nod, pal) do not affect mitotic chromosome stability. PMID:17248870

  10. Quantitative trait loci that control the oil content variation of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Congcong; Shi, Jiaqin; Li, Ruiyuan; Long, Yan; Wang, Hao; Li, Dianrong; Zhao, Jianyi; Meng, Jinling

    2014-04-01

    This report describes an integrative analysis of seed-oil-content quantitative trait loci (QTL) in Brassica napus , using a high-density genetic map to align QTL among different populations. Rapeseed (Brassica napus) is an important source of edible oil and sustainable energy. Given the challenge involved in using only a few genes to substantially increase the oil content of rapeseed without affecting the fatty acid composition, exploitation of a greater number of genetic loci that regulate the oil content variation among rapeseed germplasm is of fundamental importance. In this study, we investigated variation in the seed-oil content among two related genetic populations of Brassica napus, the TN double-haploid population and its derivative reconstructed-F2 population. Each population was grown in multiple experiments under different environmental conditions. Mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) identified 41 QTL in the TN populations. Furthermore, of the 20 pairs of epistatic interaction loci detected, approximately one-third were located within the QTL intervals. The use of common markers on different genetic maps and the TN genetic map as a reference enabled us to project QTL from an additional three genetic populations onto the TN genetic map. In summary, we used the TN genetic map of the B. napus genome to identify 46 distinct QTL regions that control seed-oil content on 16 of the 19 linkage groups of B. napus. Of these, 18 were each detected in multiple populations. The present results are of value for ongoing efforts to breed rapeseed with high oil content, and alignment of the QTL makes an important contribution to the development of an integrative system for genetic studies of rapeseed.

  11. Control Lymphocyte Subsets: Can one country's values serve for another's?

    PubMed Central

    Mandala, Wilson L.; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Apornpong, Tanakorn; Kerr, Stephen J; MacLennan, Jenny M.; Hanson, Celine; Jaimulwong, Tanyathip; Gondwe, Esther N.; Rosenblatt, Howard M.; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Spector, Stephen A.; Pancharoen, Chitsanu; Gelman, Rebecca S; MacLennan, Calman A.; Shearer, William T

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocyte subsets can be affected by host and environmental factors, yet direct comparisons of their patterns across continents are lacking. This work compares proportions and counts of lymphocyte subsets between healthy children from Thailand, Malawi and the USA. We analyzed subsets of 1,399 healthy children aged between 0 and 15 years: 281 Thai, 397 Malawian and 721American children. Existing data for five subsets were available for all three cohorts (Total T, CD4+ T, CD8+ T, natural killer (NK) and B cells), with data for another six subsets from the Thai and American cohorts (naïve, memory and activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells). Cellular patterns between cohorts differed mainly in children under two years. Compared to American children, Thai children had higher median numbers of total T cells, CD8+ T cells and NK cells while Malawian children under 18 months, on average, had more CD8+ T cells and B cells. Both Thai and Malawian children had lower median CD4+ T cell percentages and CD4/CD8 ratios than American children. Thai children had more memory and activated CD8+ T cells than American children. Approximately one-fifth of Thai and Malawian HIV-uninfected healthy children aged 0-3 years met WHO-defined CD4+ count criteria for immune-deficiency in HIV-infected children. Healthy children from Thailand, Malawi and the USA have differences in lymphocyte subsets that are likely to be due to differences in ethnicity, exposure to infectious diseases and environmental factors. These results indicate the need for country-specific reference ranges for diagnosis and management of immunologic disorders. PMID:25171870

  12. Modular skeletal evolution in sticklebacks is controlled by additive and clustered quantitative trait Loci.

    PubMed

    Miller, Craig T; Glazer, Andrew M; Summers, Brian R; Blackman, Benjamin K; Norman, Andrew R; Shapiro, Michael D; Cole, Bonnie L; Peichel, Catherine L; Schluter, Dolph; Kingsley, David M

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of evolutionary change remains a long-standing goal in biology. In vertebrates, skeletal evolution has contributed greatly to adaptation in body form and function in response to changing ecological variables like diet and predation. Here we use genome-wide linkage mapping in threespine stickleback fish to investigate the genetic architecture of evolved changes in many armor and trophic traits. We identify >100 quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling the pattern of serially repeating skeletal elements, including gill rakers, teeth, branchial bones, jaws, median fin spines, and vertebrae. We use this large collection of QTL to address long-standing questions about the anatomical specificity, genetic dominance, and genomic clustering of loci controlling skeletal differences in evolving populations. We find that most QTL (76%) that influence serially repeating skeletal elements have anatomically regional effects. In addition, most QTL (71%) have at least partially additive effects, regardless of whether the QTL controls evolved loss or gain of skeletal elements. Finally, many QTL with high LOD scores cluster on chromosomes 4, 20, and 21. These results identify a modular system that can control highly specific aspects of skeletal form. Because of the general additivity and genomic clustering of major QTL, concerted changes in both protective armor and trophic traits may occur when sticklebacks inherit either marine or freshwater alleles at linked or possible "supergene" regions of the stickleback genome. Further study of these regions will help identify the molecular basis of both modular and coordinated changes in the vertebrate skeleton.

  13. Modular Skeletal Evolution in Sticklebacks Is Controlled by Additive and Clustered Quantitative Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Craig T.; Glazer, Andrew M.; Summers, Brian R.; Blackman, Benjamin K.; Norman, Andrew R.; Shapiro, Michael D.; Cole, Bonnie L.; Peichel, Catherine L.; Schluter, Dolph; Kingsley, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of evolutionary change remains a long-standing goal in biology. In vertebrates, skeletal evolution has contributed greatly to adaptation in body form and function in response to changing ecological variables like diet and predation. Here we use genome-wide linkage mapping in threespine stickleback fish to investigate the genetic architecture of evolved changes in many armor and trophic traits. We identify >100 quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling the pattern of serially repeating skeletal elements, including gill rakers, teeth, branchial bones, jaws, median fin spines, and vertebrae. We use this large collection of QTL to address long-standing questions about the anatomical specificity, genetic dominance, and genomic clustering of loci controlling skeletal differences in evolving populations. We find that most QTL (76%) that influence serially repeating skeletal elements have anatomically regional effects. In addition, most QTL (71%) have at least partially additive effects, regardless of whether the QTL controls evolved loss or gain of skeletal elements. Finally, many QTL with high LOD scores cluster on chromosomes 4, 20, and 21. These results identify a modular system that can control highly specific aspects of skeletal form. Because of the general additivity and genomic clustering of major QTL, concerted changes in both protective armor and trophic traits may occur when sticklebacks inherit either marine or freshwater alleles at linked or possible “supergene” regions of the stickleback genome. Further study of these regions will help identify the molecular basis of both modular and coordinated changes in the vertebrate skeleton. PMID:24652999

  14. Targeted Sequencing of Lung Function Loci in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Cases and Controls.

    PubMed

    Artigas, María Soler; Wain, Louise V; Shrine, Nick; McKeever, Tricia M; Sayers, Ian; Hall, Ian P; Tobin, Martin D

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death worldwide; smoking is the main risk factor for COPD, but genetic factors are also relevant contributors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of the lung function measures used in the diagnosis of COPD have identified a number of loci, however association signals are often broad and collectively these loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability. In order to examine the association with COPD risk of genetic variants down to low allele frequencies, to aid fine-mapping of association signals and to explain more of the missing heritability, we undertook a targeted sequencing study in 300 COPD cases and 300 smoking controls for 26 loci previously reported to be associated with lung function. We used a pooled sequencing approach, with 12 pools of 25 individuals each, enabling high depth (30x) coverage per sample to be achieved. This pooled design maximised sample size and therefore power, but led to challenges during variant-calling since sequencing error rates and minor allele frequencies for rare variants can be very similar. For this reason we employed a rigorous quality control pipeline for variant detection which included the use of 3 independent calling algorithms. In order to avoid false positive associations we also developed tests to detect variants with potential batch effects and removed them before undertaking association testing. We tested for the effects of single variants and the combined effect of rare variants within a locus. We followed up the top signals with data available (only 67% of collapsing methods signals) in 4,249 COPD cases and 11,916 smoking controls from UK Biobank. We provide suggestive evidence for the combined effect of rare variants on COPD risk in TNXB and in sliding windows within MECOM and upstream of HHIP. These findings can lead to an improved understanding of the molecular pathways involved in the development of COPD.

  15. Targeted Sequencing of Lung Function Loci in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Cases and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Wain, Louise V.; Shrine, Nick; McKeever, Tricia M.; Sayers, Ian; Hall, Ian P.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death worldwide; smoking is the main risk factor for COPD, but genetic factors are also relevant contributors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of the lung function measures used in the diagnosis of COPD have identified a number of loci, however association signals are often broad and collectively these loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability. In order to examine the association with COPD risk of genetic variants down to low allele frequencies, to aid fine-mapping of association signals and to explain more of the missing heritability, we undertook a targeted sequencing study in 300 COPD cases and 300 smoking controls for 26 loci previously reported to be associated with lung function. We used a pooled sequencing approach, with 12 pools of 25 individuals each, enabling high depth (30x) coverage per sample to be achieved. This pooled design maximised sample size and therefore power, but led to challenges during variant-calling since sequencing error rates and minor allele frequencies for rare variants can be very similar. For this reason we employed a rigorous quality control pipeline for variant detection which included the use of 3 independent calling algorithms. In order to avoid false positive associations we also developed tests to detect variants with potential batch effects and removed them before undertaking association testing. We tested for the effects of single variants and the combined effect of rare variants within a locus. We followed up the top signals with data available (only 67% of collapsing methods signals) in 4,249 COPD cases and 11,916 smoking controls from UK Biobank. We provide suggestive evidence for the combined effect of rare variants on COPD risk in TNXB and in sliding windows within MECOM and upstream of HHIP. These findings can lead to an improved understanding of the molecular pathways involved in the development of COPD. PMID:28114305

  16. Identification of genetic loci that control mammary tumor susceptibility through the host microenvironment

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Pengju; Lo, Alvin; Huang, Yurong; ...

    2015-03-09

    The interplay between host genetics, tumor microenvironment and environmental exposure in cancer susceptibility remains poorly understood. Here we assessed the genetic control of stromal mediation of mammary tumor susceptibility to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) using backcrossed F1 into BALB/c (F1Bx) between cancer susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (SPRET/EiJ) mouse strains. Tumor formation was evaluated after transplantation of non-irradiated Trp53-/- BALB/c mammary gland fragments into cleared fat pads of F1Bx hosts. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed 2 genetic loci that constitute the baseline susceptibility via host microenvironment. However, once challenged with LDIR, we discovered 13 additional loci that were enriched for genesmore » involved in cytokines, including TGFβ1 signaling. Surprisingly, LDIR-treated F1Bx cohort significantly reduced incidence of mammary tumors from Trp53-/- fragments as well as prolonged tumor latency, compared to sham-treated controls. We demonstrated further that plasma levels of specific cytokines were significantly correlated with tumor latency. Using an ex vivo 3-D assay, we confirmed TGFβ1 as a strong candidate for reduced mammary invasion in SPRET/EiJ, which could explain resistance of this strain to mammary cancer risk following LDIR. Our results open possible new avenues to understand mechanisms of genes operating via the stroma that affect cancer risk from external environmental exposures.« less

  17. Identification of genetic loci that control mammary tumor susceptibility through the host microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengju; Lo, Alvin; Huang, Yurong; Huang, Ge; Liang, Guozhou; Mott, Joni; Karpen, Gary H.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Snijders, Antoine M.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2015-03-09

    The interplay between host genetics, tumor microenvironment and environmental exposure in cancer susceptibility remains poorly understood. Here we assessed the genetic control of stromal mediation of mammary tumor susceptibility to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) using backcrossed F1 into BALB/c (F1Bx) between cancer susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (SPRET/EiJ) mouse strains. Tumor formation was evaluated after transplantation of non-irradiated Trp53-/- BALB/c mammary gland fragments into cleared fat pads of F1Bx hosts. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed 2 genetic loci that constitute the baseline susceptibility via host microenvironment. However, once challenged with LDIR, we discovered 13 additional loci that were enriched for genes involved in cytokines, including TGFβ1 signaling. Surprisingly, LDIR-treated F1Bx cohort significantly reduced incidence of mammary tumors from Trp53-/- fragments as well as prolonged tumor latency, compared to sham-treated controls. We demonstrated further that plasma levels of specific cytokines were significantly correlated with tumor latency. Using an ex vivo 3-D assay, we confirmed TGFβ1 as a strong candidate for reduced mammary invasion in SPRET/EiJ, which could explain resistance of this strain to mammary cancer risk following LDIR. Our results open possible new avenues to understand mechanisms of genes operating via the stroma that affect cancer risk from external environmental exposures.

  18. Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping of Genome Regions Controlling Permethrin Resistance in the Mosquito Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra-Rodriguez, Karla; Strode, Clare; Flores Suarez, Adriana; Fernandez Salas, Ildefonso; Ranson, Hilary; Hemingway, Janet; Black, William C.

    2008-01-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the principal vector of dengue and yellow fever flaviviruses. Permethrin is an insecticide used to suppress Ae. aegypti adult populations but metabolic and target site resistance to pyrethroids has evolved in many locations worldwide. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling permethrin survival in Ae. aegypti were mapped in an F3 advanced intercross line. Parents came from a collection of mosquitoes from Isla Mujeres, México, that had been selected for permethrin resistance for two generations and a reference permethrin-susceptible strain originally from New Orleans. Following a 1-hr permethrin exposure, 439 F3 adult mosquitoes were phenotyped as knockdown resistant, knocked down/recovered, or dead. For QTL mapping, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified at 22 loci with potential antixenobiotic activity including genes encoding cytochrome P450s (CYP), esterases (EST), or glutathione transferases (GST) and at 12 previously mapped loci. Seven antixenobiotic genes mapped to chromosome I, six to chromosome II, and nine to chromosome III. Two QTL of major effect were detected on chromosome III. One corresponds with a SNP previously associated with permethrin resistance in the para sodium channel gene and the second with the CCEunk7o esterase marker. Additional QTL but of relatively minor effect were also found. These included two sex-linked QTL on chromosome I affecting knockdown and recovery and a QTL affecting survival and recovery. On chromosome II, one QTL affecting survival and a second affecting recovery were detected. The patterns confirm that mutations in the para gene cause target-site insensitivity and are the major source of permethrin resistance but that other genes dispersed throughout the genome contribute to recovery and survival of mosquitoes following permethrin exposure. PMID:18723882

  19. A new statistical approach to detecting differentially methylated loci for case control Illumina array methylation data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongxue; Liu, Qingzhong; Nadarajah, Saralees

    2012-04-15

    As an epigenetic alteration, DNA methylation plays an important role in epigenetic controls of gene transcription. Recent advances in genome-wide scan of DNA methylation provide great opportunities in studying the impact of DNA methylation on many human diseases including various types of cancer. Due to the unique feature of this type of data, applicable statistical methods are limited and new sophisticated approaches are desirable. In this article, we propose a new statistical test to detect differentially methylated loci for case control methylation data generated by Illumina arrays. This new method utilizes the important finding that DNA methylation is highly correlated with age. The proposed method estimates the overall P-value by combining the P-values from independent individual tests each for one age group. Through real data application and simulation study, we show that the proposed test is robust and usually more powerful than other methods.

  20. Forging T-Lymphocyte Identity: Intersecting Networks of Transcriptional Control

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Ellen V.; Ungerbäck, Jonas; Champhekar, Ameya

    2016-01-01

    T lymphocyte development branches off from other lymphoid developmental programs through its requirement for sustained environmental signals through the Notch pathway. In the thymus, Notch signaling induces a succession of T-lineage regulatory factors that collectively create the T-cell identity through distinct steps. This process involves both the staged activation of T-cell identity genes and the staged repression of progenitor-cell-inherited regulatory genes once their roles in self-renewal and population expansion are no longer needed. With the recent characterization of Innate Lymphoid Cells (ILCs) that share transcriptional regulation programs extensively with T cell subsets, T-cell identity can increasingly be seen as defined in modular terms, as the processes selecting and actuating effector function are potentially detachable from the processes generating and selecting clonally unique T-cell receptor structures. The developmental pathways of different classes of T cells and ILCs are distinguished by the numbers of prerequisites of gene rearrangement, selection, and antigen contact before the cells gain access to nearly-common regulatory mechanisms for choosing effector function. Here, the major classes of transcription factors that interact with Notch signals during T-lineage specification are discussed in terms of their roles in these programs, the evidence for their spectra of target genes at different stages, and their cross-regulatory and cooperative actions with each other. Specific topics include Notch modulation of PU.1 and GATA-3, PU.1-Notch competition, the relationship between PU.1 and GATA-3, and the roles of E proteins, Bcl11b, and GATA-3 in guiding acquisition of T-cell identity while avoiding redirection to an ILC fate. PMID:26791859

  1. CFSE flow cytometric quantification of lymphocytic proliferation in extracorporeal photopheresis: use for quality control.

    PubMed

    Evrard, Bertrand; Dosgilbert, Annie; Jacquemot, Nathalie; Demeocq, François; Gilles, Thibault; Chassagne, Jacques; Berger, Marc; Tridon, Arlette

    2010-02-01

    Quality control is essential to validate extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) processes. There is just one protocol based on PHA-induced proliferation. Since it involves the use of radioactive thymidine, we developed another technique using CFSE labeling. We compared the two tests in a paired series including 18 procedures. The thymidine test was valid. Once proliferation was obtained (10 patients out of 13), the CFSE test was in close agreement with it. In particular, two cases of residual proliferation after ECP were simultaneously detected by both techniques. Only the CFSE test allows targeted analysis of lymphocytes, thus identifying a surviving lymphocytic sub-population. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling adaptive traits in coastal Douglas-fir.II. Spring and fall cold-hardiness

    Treesearch

    K.D. Jermstad; D.L. Bassoni; N.C. Wheeler; T.S. Anekonda; S.N. Aitken; W.T. Adams; D.B. Neale

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting fall and spring cold-hardiness were identified in a three-generation outbred pedigree of coastal Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga meniziesii (Mirb.) Franco var. menziesii]. Eleven QTLs controlling fall cold-hardiness were detected on four linkage groups, and 15 QTLs controlling spring cold-hardiness were detected on four...

  3. Association mapping of loci controlling genetic and environmental interaction of soybean flowering time under various photo-thermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Mao, Tingting; Li, Jinyu; Wen, Zixiang; Wu, Tingting; Wu, Cunxiang; Sun, Shi; Jiang, Bingjun; Hou, Wensheng; Li, Wenbin; Song, Qijian; Wang, Dechun; Han, Tianfu

    2017-05-26

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) is a short day plant. Its flowering and maturity time are controlled by genetic and environmental factors, as well the interaction between the two factors. Previous studies have shown that both genetic and environmental factors, mainly photoperiod and temperature, control flowering time of soybean. Additionally, these studies have reported gene × gene and gene × environment interactions on flowering time. However, the effects of quantitative trait loci (QTL) in response to photoperiod and temperature have not been well evaluated. The objectives of the current study were to identify the effects of loci associated with flowering time under different photo-thermal conditions and to understand the effects of interaction between loci and environment on soybean flowering. Different photoperiod and temperature combinations were obtained by adjusting sowing dates (spring sowing and summer sowing) or day-length (12 h, 16 h). Association mapping was performed on 91 soybean cultivars from different maturity groups (MG000-VIII) using 172 SSR markers and 5107 SNPs from the Illumina SoySNP6K iSelectBeadChip. The effects of the interaction between QTL and environments on flowering time were also analysed using the QTXNetwork. Large-effect loci were detected on Gm 11, Gm 16 and Gm 20 as in previous reports. Most loci associated with flowering time are sensitive to photo-thermal conditions. Number of loci associated with flowering time was more under the long day (LD) than under the short day (SD) condition. The variation of flowering time among the soybean cultivars mostly resulted from the epistasis × environment and additive × environment interactions. Among the three candidate loci, i.e. Gm04_4497001 (near GmCOL3a), Gm16_30766209 (near GmFT2a and GmFT2b) and Gm19_47514601 (E3 or GmPhyA3), the Gm04_4497001 may be the key locus interacting with other loci for controlling soybean flowering time. The effects of loci associated

  4. Spinal fluid lymphocytes responsive to autologous and allogeneic cells in multiple sclerosis and control individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, G; Kotilinek, L; Schwartz, M; Sternad, M

    1984-01-01

    Spinal fluid lymphocytes from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and controls were stimulated with either autologous non-T cells or with allogeneic non-T cells followed by stimulation with autologous non-T lymphocytes. Cells responding to these stimuli were cloned and their proliferative responses to autologous and allogeneic MS and normal non-T cells were measured. Large numbers of clones with specific patterns of reaction to both autologous and allogeneic cells were obtained from lymphocytes in MS cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), but only occasionally from cells in control CSF. Patterns of responses among clones from a particular CSF were similar and often identical, which suggested that cells in MS CSF were relatively restricted in their specificities. Surface antigen phenotyping of the clones showed them to be predominantly OKT4+, with 13% OKT8+ and 11% OKT4+8+. Peripheral T cells that were stimulated and cultured in parallel with CSF cells were different in that they usually did not give rise to as many clones nor were their patterns of response similar. Many CSF clones were heteroclitic, that is they responded to particular allogeneic cells but not autologous cells. Lymphocytes in MS CSF thus appear to represent a selected population of cells with a high frequency of responsiveness to autologous and allogeneic antigens. Such responses may be evidence for immune regulation within the central nervous system or could represent responses to altered-self antigens. PMID:6237121

  5. Mapping quantitative trait loci controlling early growth in a (longleaf pine × slash pine) × slash pine BC1 family

    Treesearch

    C. Weng; Thomas L. Kubisiak; C. Dana. Nelson; M. Stine

    2002-01-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were employed to map the genome and quantitative trait loci controlling the early growth of a pine hybrid F1 tree (Pinus palustris Mill. × P. elliottii Engl.) and a recurrent slash pine tree (P. ellottii Engl.) in a (longleaf pine × slash pine...

  6. Miro-1 Links Mitochondria and Microtubule Dynein Motors To Control Lymphocyte Migration and Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Morlino, Giulia; Barreiro, Olga; Baixauli, Francesc; Robles-Valero, Javier; González-Granado, José M.; Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; Cuenca, Jesús; Sánchez-Sorzano, Carlos O.; Veiga, Esteban; Martín-Cófreces, Noa B.

    2014-01-01

    The recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation is crucial for a functional immune response. In the present work, we explored the role of mitochondria in lymphocyte adhesion, polarity, and migration. We show that during adhesion to the activated endothelium under physiological flow conditions, lymphocyte mitochondria redistribute to the adhesion zone together with the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) in an integrin-dependent manner. Mitochondrial redistribution and efficient lymphocyte adhesion to the endothelium require the function of Miro-1, an adaptor molecule that couples mitochondria to microtubules. Our data demonstrate that Miro-1 associates with the dynein complex. Moreover, mitochondria accumulate around the MTOC in response to the chemokine CXCL12/SDF-1α; this redistribution is regulated by Miro-1. CXCL12-dependent cell polarization and migration are reduced in Miro-1-silenced cells, due to impaired myosin II activation at the cell uropod and diminished actin polymerization. These data point to a key role of Miro-1 in the control of lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the regulation of mitochondrial redistribution. PMID:24492963

  7. Miro-1 links mitochondria and microtubule Dynein motors to control lymphocyte migration and polarity.

    PubMed

    Morlino, Giulia; Barreiro, Olga; Baixauli, Francesc; Robles-Valero, Javier; González-Granado, José M; Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; Cuenca, Jesús; Sánchez-Sorzano, Carlos O; Veiga, Esteban; Martín-Cófreces, Noa B; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2014-04-01

    The recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation is crucial for a functional immune response. In the present work, we explored the role of mitochondria in lymphocyte adhesion, polarity, and migration. We show that during adhesion to the activated endothelium under physiological flow conditions, lymphocyte mitochondria redistribute to the adhesion zone together with the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) in an integrin-dependent manner. Mitochondrial redistribution and efficient lymphocyte adhesion to the endothelium require the function of Miro-1, an adaptor molecule that couples mitochondria to microtubules. Our data demonstrate that Miro-1 associates with the dynein complex. Moreover, mitochondria accumulate around the MTOC in response to the chemokine CXCL12/SDF-1α; this redistribution is regulated by Miro-1. CXCL12-dependent cell polarization and migration are reduced in Miro-1-silenced cells, due to impaired myosin II activation at the cell uropod and diminished actin polymerization. These data point to a key role of Miro-1 in the control of lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the regulation of mitochondrial redistribution.

  8. Two loci control tuberculin skin test reactivity in an area hyperendemic for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cobat, Aurelie; Gallant, Caroline J; Simkin, Leah; Black, Gillian F; Stanley, Kim; Hughes, Jane; Doherty, T Mark; Hanekom, Willem A; Eley, Brian; Jaïs, Jean-Philippe; Boland-Auge, Anne; van Helden, Paul; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Abel, Laurent; Hoal, Eileen G; Schurr, Erwin; Alcaïs, Alexandre

    2009-11-23

    Approximately 20% of persons living in areas hyperendemic for tuberculosis (TB) display persistent lack of tuberculin skin test (TST) reactivity and appear to be naturally resistant to infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Among those with a positive response, the intensity of TST reactivity varies greatly. The genetic basis of TST reactivity is not known. We report on a genome-wide linkage search for loci that have an impact on TST reactivity, which is defined either as zero versus nonzero (TST-BINa) or as extent of TST in millimeters (TST-quantitative trait locus [QTL]) in a panel of 128 families, including 350 siblings, from an area of South Africa hyperendemic for TB. We detected a major locus (TST1) on chromosomal region 11p14 (P = 1.4 x 10(-5)), which controls TST-BINa, with a lack of responsiveness indicating T cell-independent resistance to M. tuberculosis. We also detected a second major locus (TST2) on chromosomal region 5p15 (P < 10(-5)), which controls TST-QTL or the intensity of T cell-mediated delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) to tuberculin. Fine mapping of this region identified SLC6A3, encoding the dopamine transporter DAT1, as a promising gene for further studies. Our results pave the way for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection in endemic areas (TST1) and for the identification of critical regulators of T cell-dependent DTH to tuberculin (TST2).

  9. Unique genetic loci identified for emotional behavior in control and chronic stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Carhuatanta, Kimberly A. K.; Shea, Chloe J. A.; Herman, James P.; Jankord, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    An individual's genetic background affects their emotional behavior and response to stress. Although studies have been conducted to identify genetic predictors for emotional behavior or stress response, it remains unknown how prior stress history alters the interaction between an individual's genome and their emotional behavior. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to identify chromosomal regions that affect emotional behavior and are sensitive to stress exposure. We utilized the BXD behavioral genetics mouse model to identify chromosomal regions that predict fear learning and emotional behavior following exposure to a control or chronic stress environment. 62 BXD recombinant inbred strains and C57BL/6 and DBA/2 parental strains underwent behavioral testing including a classical fear conditioning paradigm and the elevated plus maze. Distinct quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were identified for emotional learning, anxiety and locomotion in control and chronic stress populations. Candidate genes, including those with already known functions in learning and stress were found to reside within the identified QTLs. Our data suggest that chronic stress history reveals novel genetic predictors of emotional behavior. PMID:25374516

  10. Multi-ancestry genome-wide association study of 21,000 cases and 95,000 controls identifies new risk loci for atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Waage, Johannes; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Hotze, Melanie; Strachan, David P; Curtin, John A; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Tian, Chao; Takahashi, Atsushi; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Thyssen, Jacob P; den Dekker, Herman T; Ferreira, Manuel A; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Sleiman, Patrick Ma; Xiao, Feng Li; Gonzalez, Juan R; Marenholz, Ingo; Kalb, Birgit; Yanes, Maria Pino; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Venturini, Cristina; Pennell, Craig E; Barton, Sheila J; Levin, Albert M; Curjuric, Ivan; Bustamante, Mariona; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Lockett, Gabrielle A; Bacelis, Jonas; Bunyavanich, Supinda; Myers, Rachel A; Matanovic, Anja; Kumar, Ashish; Tung, Joyce Y; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Kubo, Michiaki; McArdle, Wendy L; Henderson, A J; Kemp, John P; Zheng, Jie; Smith, George Davey; Rüschendorf, Franz; Bauerfeind, Anja; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Schmidt, Carsten O; Mangold, Elisabeth; Cichon, Sven; Keil, Thomas; Rodríguez, Elke; Peters, Annette; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Novak, Natalija; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Horikoshi, Momoko; Pekkanen, Juha; Sebert, Sylvain; Husemoen, Lise L; Grarup, Niels; de Jongste, Johan C; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent Wv; Pasmans, Suzanne Gma; Elbert, Niels J; Uitterlinden, André G; Marks, Guy B; Thompson, Philip J; Matheson, Melanie C; Robertson, Colin F; Ried, Janina S; Li, Jin; Zuo, Xian Bo; Zheng, Xiao Dong; Yin, Xian Yong; Sun, Liang Dan; McAleer, Maeve A; O'Regan, Grainne M; Fahy, Caoimhe Mr; Campbell, Linda E; Macek, Milan; Kurek, Michael; Hu, Donglei; Eng, Celeste; Postma, Dirkje S; Feenstra, Bjarke; Geller, Frank; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Middeldorp, Christel M; Hysi, Pirro; Bataille, Veronique; Spector, Tim; Tiesler, Carla Mt; Thiering, Elisabeth; Pahukasahasram, Badri; Yang, James J; Imboden, Medea; Huntsman, Scott; Vilor-Tejedor, Natàlia; Relton, Caroline L; Myhre, Ronny; Nystad, Wenche; Custovic, Adnan; Weiss, Scott T; Meyers, Deborah A; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Ober, Carole; Raby, Benjamin A; Simpson, Angela; Jacobsson, Bo; Holloway, John W; Bisgaard, Hans; Sunyer, Jordi; Hensch, Nicole M Probst; Williams, L Keoki; Godfrey, Keith M; Wang, Carol A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Melbye, Mads; Koppelman, Gerard H; Jarvis, Deborah; McLean, Wh Irwin; Irvine, Alan D; Zhang, Xue Jun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gieger, Christian; Burchard, Esteban G; Martin, Nicholas G; Duijts, Liesbeth; Linneberg, Allan; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Noethen, Markus M; Lau, Susanne; Hübner, Norbert; Lee, Young-Ae; Tamari, Mayumi; Hinds, David A; Glass, Daniel; Brown, Sara J; Heinrich, Joachim; Evans, David M; Weidinger, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    Genetic association studies have identified 21 loci associated with atopic dermatitis risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify further susceptibility loci for this common, complex skin disease, we performed a meta-analysis of >15 million genetic variants in 21,399 cases and 95,464 controls from populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry, followed by replication in 32,059 cases and 228,628 controls from 18 studies. We identified ten new risk loci, bringing the total number of known atopic dermatitis risk loci to 31 (with new secondary signals at four of these loci). Notably, the new loci include candidate genes with roles in the regulation of innate host defenses and T cell function, underscoring the important contribution of (auto)immune mechanisms to atopic dermatitis pathogenesis.

  11. The making of a bell pepper-shaped tomato fruit: identification of loci controlling fruit morphology in Yellow Stuffer tomato.

    PubMed

    van der Knaap, E; Tanksley, S D

    2003-06-01

    The heirloom tomato cultivar Yellow Stuffer produces fruit that are similar in shape and structure to fruit produced by the bell pepper varieties of garden pepper. To determine the genetic basis of this extreme fruit type in tomato, quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis was performed on an F(2) population derived from a cross between Yellow Stuffer and the related species, Lycopersicon pimpinellifolium, which produces a small, round fruit typical of most wild species. F(2) plants were analyzed for both fruit size and the degree to which their fruit resembled the bell pepper. Three QTL were determined to influence bell pepper shape and seven QTL influenced fruit mass. The map positions of all three bell shape and six out of seven fruit size QTL appear to be allelic to components of fruit morphology analyzed in this population and to major fruit morphology QTL reported previously, adding support to the hypothesis that the majority of fruit size and shape variation in cultivated tomato is attributable to allelic variation at a limited number of loci. However, novel loci controlling components of fruit morphology, such as elongated fruit shape, bumpiness, number of seed per fruit and flowers per inflorescence were identified in this study as well. The three bell shape loci involved are: bell2.1, bell2.2 and bell8.1, and appear to correspond to locule number2.1 ( lcn2.1) and fruit weight 2.2 ( fw2.2) and fruit shape 8.1 ( fs8.1), respectively. The Yellow Stuffer alleles at lcn2.1 and fw2.2 increase locule number and fruit size, respectively, hence contributing to the overall bell pepper shape. The Yellow Stuffer allele at fs8.1 causes convex locule walls, giving the extended, bumpy shape characteristic of bell peppers. In addition, most fruit size QTL correspond to loci controlling number of flowers per inflorescence and/or stem-end blockiness. Comparisons among previously identified fruit morphology loci in tomato, eggplant and pepper suggest that loci affecting

  12. Quantitative trait loci associated with longevity of lettuce seeds under conventional and controlled deterioration storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Schwember, Andrés R; Bradford, Kent J

    2010-10-01

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seeds have poor shelf life and exhibit thermoinhibition (fail to germinate) above ∼25°C. Seed priming (controlled hydration followed by drying) alleviates thermoinhibition by increasing the maximum germination temperature, but reduces lettuce seed longevity. Controlled deterioration (CD) or accelerated ageing storage conditions (i.e. elevated temperature and relative humidity) are used to study seed longevity and to predict potential seed lifetimes under conventional storage conditions. Seeds produced in 2002 and 2006 of a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between L. sativa cv. Salinas×L. serriola accession UC96US23 were utilized to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with seed longevity under CD and conventional storage conditions. Multiple longevity-associated QTLs were identified under both conventional and CD storage conditions for control (non-primed) and primed seeds. However, seed longevity was poorly correlated between the two storage conditions, suggesting that deterioration processes under CD conditions are not predictive of ageing in conventional storage conditions. Additionally, the same QTLs were not identified when RIL populations were grown in different years, indicating that lettuce seed longevity is strongly affected by production environment. Nonetheless, a major QTL on chromosome 4 [Seed longevity 4.1 (Slg4.1)] was responsible for almost 23% of the phenotypic variation in viability of the conventionally stored control seeds of the 2006 RIL population, with improved longevity conferred by the Salinas allele. QTL analyses may enable identification of mechanisms responsible for the sensitivity of primed seeds to CD conditions and breeding for improved seed longevity.

  13. Quantitative trait loci in pepper control the effective population size of two RNA viruses at inoculation.

    PubMed

    Tamisier, Lucie; Rousseau, Elsa; Barraillé, Sebastien; Nemouchi, Ghislaine; Szadkowski, Marion; Mailleret, Ludovic; Grognard, Frederic; Fabre, Frederic; Moury, Benoit; Palloix, Alain

    2017-07-01

    Infection of plants by viruses is a complex process involving several steps: inoculation into plant cells, replication in inoculated cells and plant colonization. The success of the different steps depends, in part, on the viral effective population size (Ne), defined as the number of individuals passing their genes to the next generation. During infection, the virus population will undergo bottlenecks, leading to drastic reductions in Ne and, potentially, to the loss of the fittest variants. Therefore, it is crucial to better understand how plants affect Ne. We aimed to (i) identify the plant genetic factors controlling Ne during inoculation, (ii) understand the mechanisms used by the plant to control Ne and (iii) compare these genetic factors with the genes controlling plant resistance to viruses. Ne was measured in a doubled-haploid population of Capsicum annuum. Plants were inoculated with either a Potato virus Y (PVY) construct expressing the green fluorescent protein or a necrotic variant of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). Newas assessed by counting the number of primary infection foci on cotyledons for PVY or the number of necrotic local lesions on leaves for CMV. The number of foci and lesions was correlated (r=0.57) and showed a high heritability (h2=0.93 for PVY and h2=0.98 for CMV). The Ne of the two viruses was controlled by both common quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and virus-specific QTLs, indicating the contribution of general and specific mechanisms. The PVY-specific QTL colocalizes with a QTL that reduces PVY accumulation and the capacity to break down a major-effect resistance gene.

  14. A repressor-antirepressor pair links two loci controlling light-induced carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    López-Rubio, José Juan; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S; Murillo, Francisco José

    2002-03-01

    The light-inducible carB operon encodes all but one of the structural genes for carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus. It is transcriptionally controlled by two proteins expressed from two unlinked genetic loci: CarS from the light-inducible carQRS operon, and CarA from the light-independent carA operon. CarA represses transcription from the carB promoter (P(B)) in the dark, and CarS counteracts this on illumination. The CarA sequence revealed a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif of the type found in bacterial MerR transcriptional factors, whereas CarS contains no known DNA-binding motif. Here, we examine the molecular interplay between CarA and CarS. We demonstrate the following. (i) Whereas CarS exhibits no DNA binding in vitro, CarA binds specifically to a region encompassing P(B) to form at least two distinct complexes. (ii) A palindrome located between positions -46 and -63 relative to the transcription start point is essential but not sufficient for the formation of the two CarA-DNA complexes observed. (iii) CarS abrogates the specific DNA binding of CarA. CarA is therefore a repressor and CarS an antirepressor. (iv) CarS physically interacts with CarA; thus, the functional interaction between them is mediated by protein-protein interactions.

  15. Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling fibre length and lignin content in Arabidopsis thaliana stems.

    PubMed

    Capron, Arnaud; Chang, Xue Feng; Hall, Hardy; Ellis, Brian; Beatson, Rodger P; Berleth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Fibre properties and the biochemical composition of cell walls are important traits in many applications. For example, the lengths of fibres define the strength and quality of paper, and lignin content is a critical parameter for the use of biomass in biofuel production. Identifying genes controlling these traits is comparatively difficult in woody species, because of long generation times and limited amenability to high-resolution genetic mapping. To address this problem, this study mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs) defining fibre length and lignin content in the Arabidopsis recombinant inbred line population Col-4 × Ler-0. Adapting high-throughput phenotyping techniques for both traits for measurements in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems identified significant QTLs for fibre length on chromosomes 2 and 5, as well as one significant QTL affecting lignin content on chromosome 2. For fibre length, total variation within the population was 208% higher than between parental lines and the identified QTLs explained 50.58% of the observed variation. For lignin content, the values were 261 and 26.51%, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis of the associated intervals identified a number of candidate genes for fibre length and lignin content. This study demonstrates that molecular mapping of QTLs pertaining to wood and fibre properties is possible in Arabidopsis, which substantially broadens the use of Arabidopsis as a model species for the functional characterization of plant genes.

  16. Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling fibre length and lignin content in Arabidopsis thaliana stems

    PubMed Central

    Berleth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Fibre properties and the biochemical composition of cell walls are important traits in many applications. For example, the lengths of fibres define the strength and quality of paper, and lignin content is a critical parameter for the use of biomass in biofuel production. Identifying genes controlling these traits is comparatively difficult in woody species, because of long generation times and limited amenability to high-resolution genetic mapping. To address this problem, this study mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs) defining fibre length and lignin content in the Arabidopsis recombinant inbred line population Col-4×Ler-0. Adapting high-throughput phenotyping techniques for both traits for measurements in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems identified significant QTLs for fibre length on chromosomes 2 and 5, as well as one significant QTL affecting lignin content on chromosome 2. For fibre length, total variation within the population was 208% higher than between parental lines and the identified QTLs explained 50.58% of the observed variation. For lignin content, the values were 261 and 26.51%, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis of the associated intervals identified a number of candidate genes for fibre length and lignin content. This study demonstrates that molecular mapping of QTLs pertaining to wood and fibre properties is possible in Arabidopsis, which substantially broadens the use of Arabidopsis as a model species for the functional characterization of plant genes. PMID:23136168

  17. L-arginine metabolism in myeloid cells controls T-lymphocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Serafini, Paolo; Mazzoni, Alessandra; Segal, David M; Zanovello, Paola

    2003-06-01

    Although current attention has focused on regulatory T lymphocytes as suppressors of autoimmune responses, powerful immunosuppression is also mediated by a subset of myeloid cells that enter the lymphoid organs and peripheral tissues during times of immune stress. If these myeloid suppressor cells (MSCs) receive signals from activated T lymphocytes in the lymphoid organs, they block T-cell proliferation. MSCs use two enzymes involved in arginine metabolism to control T-cell responses: inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2), which generates nitric oxide (NO) and arginase 1 (Arg1), which depletes the milieu of arginine. Th1 cytokines induce NOS2, whereas Th2 cytokines upregulate Arg1. Induction of either enzyme alone results in a reversible block in T-cell proliferation. When both enzymes are induced together, peroxynitrites, generated by NOS2 under conditions of limiting arginine, cause activated T lymphocytes to undergo apoptosis. Thus, NOS2 and Arg1 might act separately or synergistically in vivo to control specific types of T-cell responses, and selective antagonists of these enzymes might prove beneficial in fighting diseases in which T-cell responses are inappropriately suppressed. This Opinion is the second in a series on the regulation of the immune system by metabolic pathways.

  18. Quantitative trait loci controlling leaf appearance and curd initiation of cauliflower in relation to temperature.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Yaser; Briggs, William; Matschegewski, Claudia; Ordon, Frank; Stützel, Hartmut; Zetzsche, Holger; Groen, Simon; Uptmoor, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    QTL regions on chromosomes C06 and C09 are involved in temperature dependent time to curd induction in cauliflower. Temperature is the main environmental factor influencing curding time of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis). Temperatures above 20-22 °C inhibit development towards curding even in many summer cultivars. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling curding time and its related traits in a wide range of different temperature regimes from 12 to 27 °C, a doubled haploid (DH) mapping population segregating for curding time was developed and days to curd initiation (DCI), leaf appearance rate (LAR), and final leaf number (FLN) were measured. The population was genotyped with 176 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Composite interval mapping (CIM) revealed repeatedly detected QTL for DCI on C06 and C09. The estimated additive effect increased at high temperatures. Significant QTL × environment interactions (Q × E) for FLN and DCI on C06 and C09 suggest that these hotspot regions have major influences on temperature mediated curd induction. 25 % of the DH lines did not induce curds at temperatures higher than 22 °C. Applying a binary model revealed a QTL with LOD >15 on C06. Nearly all lines carrying the allele of the reliable early maturing parental line (PL) on that locus induced curds at high temperatures while only half of the DH lines carrying the allele of the unreliable PL reached the generative phase during the experiment. Large variation in LAR was observed. QTL for LAR were detected repeatedly in several environments on C01, C04 and C06. Negative correlations between LAR and DCI and QTL co-localizations on C04 and C06 suggest that LAR has also effects on development towards curd induction.

  19. Control of lymphocyte shape and the chemotactic response by the GTP exchange factor Vav.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Cruz-Adalia, Aranzazu; Martín-Cófreces, Noa B; Cabrero, José R; Dosil, Mercedes; Alvarado-Sánchez, Brenda; Bustelo, Xosé R; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2005-04-15

    Rho GTPases control many facets of cell polarity and migration; namely, the reorganization of the cellular cytoskeleton to extracellular stimuli. Rho GTPases are activated by GTP exchange factors (GEFs), which induce guanosine diphosphate (GDP) release and the stabilization of the nucleotide-free state. Thus, the role of GEFs in the regulation of the cellular response to extracellular cues during cell migration is a critical step of this process. In this report, we have analyzed the activation and subcellular localization of the hematopoietic GEF Vav in human peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated with the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1alpha). We show a robust activation of Vav and its redistribution to motility-associated subcellular structures, and we provide biochemical evidence of the recruitment of Vav to the membrane of SDF-1alpha-activated human lymphocytes, where it transiently interacts with the SDF-1alpha receptor CXCR4. Overexpression of a dominant negative form of Vav abolished lymphocyte polarization, actin polymerization, and migration. SDF-1alpha-mediated cell polarization and migration also were impaired by overexpression of an active, oncogenic Vav, although the mechanism appears to be different. Together, our data postulate a pivotal role for Vav in the transmission of the migratory signal through the chemokine receptor CXCR4.

  20. Dynamin2 controls Rap1 activation and integrin clustering in human T lymphocyte adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Eppler, Felix J.

    2017-01-01

    Leukocyte trafficking is crucial to facilitate efficient immune responses. Here, we report that the large GTPase dynamin2, which is generally considered to have a key role in endocytosis and membrane remodeling, is an essential regulator of integrin-dependent human T lymphocyte adhesion and migration. Chemical inhibition or knockdown of dynamin2 expression significantly reduced integrin-dependent T cell adhesion in vitro. This phenotype was not observed when T cells were treated with various chemical inhibitors which abrogate endocytosis or actin polymerization. We furthermore detected dynamin2 in signaling complexes and propose that it controls T cell adhesion via FAK/Pyk2- and RapGEF1-mediated Rap1 activation. In addition, the dynamin2 inhibitor-induced reduction of lymphocyte adhesion can be rescued by Rap1a overexpression. We demonstrate that the dynamin2 effect on T cell adhesion does not involve integrin affinity regulation but instead relies on its ability to modulate integrin valency. Taken together, we suggest a previously unidentified role of dynamin2 in the regulation of integrin-mediated lymphocyte adhesion via a Rap1 signaling pathway. PMID:28273099

  1. Multi-ethnic genome-wide association study of 21,000 cases and 95,000 controls identifies new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Waage, Johannes; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Hotze, Melanie; Strachan, David P; Curtin, John A; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Tian, Chao; Takahashi, Atsushi; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Thyssen, Jacob P; den Dekker, Herman T; Ferreira, Manuel A; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Sleiman, Patrick MA; Xiao, Feng Li; Gonzalez, Juan R; Marenholz, Ingo; Kalb, Birgit; Yanes, Maria Pino; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Venturini, Cristina; Pennell, Craig E; Barton, Sheila J; Levin, Albert M; Curjuric, Ivan; Bustamante, Mariona; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Lockett, Gabrielle A; Bacelis, Jonas; Bunyavanich, Supinda; Myers, Rachel A; Matanovic, Anja; Kumar, Ashish; Tung, Joyce Y; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Kubo, Michiaki; McArdle, Wendy L; Henderson, A J; Kemp, John P; Zheng, Jie; Smith, George Davey; Rüschendorf, Franz; Bauerfeind, Anja; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Schmidt, Carsten O; Mangold, Elisabeth; Cichon, Sven; Keil, Thomas; Rodríguez, Elke; Peters, Annette; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Novak, Natalija; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Horikoshi, Momoko; Pekkanen, Juha; Sebert, Sylvain; Husemoen, Lise L; Grarup, Niels; de Jongste, Johan C; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent WV; Pasmans, Suzanne GMA; Elbert, Niels J; Uitterlinden, André G; Marks, Guy B; Thompson, Philip J; Matheson, Melanie C; Robertson, Colin F; Ried, Janina S; Li, Jin; Zuo, Xian Bo; Zheng, Xiao Dong; Yin, Xian Yong; Sun, Liang Dan; McAleer, Maeve A; O'Regan, Grainne M; Fahy, Caoimhe MR; Campbell, Linda E; Macek, Milan; Kurek, Michael; Hu, Donglei; Eng, Celeste; Postma, Dirkje S; Feenstra, Bjarke; Geller, Frank; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Middeldorp, Christel M; Hysi, Pirro; Bataille, Veronique; Spector, Tim; Tiesler, Carla MT; Thiering, Elisabeth; Pahukasahasram, Badri; Yang, James J; Imboden, Medea; Huntsman, Scott; Vilor-Tejedor, Natàlia; Relton, Caroline L; Myhre, Ronny; Nystad, Wenche; Custovic, Adnan; Weiss, Scott T; Meyers, Deborah A; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Ober, Carole; Raby, Benjamin A; Simpson, Angela; Jacobsson, Bo; Holloway, John W; Bisgaard, Hans; Sunyer, Jordi; Hensch, Nicole M Probst; Williams, L Keoki; Godfrey, Keith M; Wang, Carol A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Melbye, Mads; Koppelman, Gerard H; Jarvis, Deborah; McLean, WH Irwin; Irvine, Alan D; Zhang, Xue Jun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gieger, Christian; Burchard, Esteban G; Martin, Nicholas G; Duijts, Liesbeth; Linneberg, Allan; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Noethen, Markus M; Lau, Susanne; Hübner, Norbert; Lee, Young-Ae; Tamari, Mayumi; Hinds, David A; Glass, Daniel; Brown, Sara J; Heinrich, Joachim; Evans, David M; Weidinger, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Genetic association studies have identified 21 loci associated with atopic dermatitis risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify further susceptibility loci for this common complex skin disease, we performed a meta-analysis of >15 million genetic variants in 21,399 cases and 95,464 controls from populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry, followed by replication in 32,059 cases and 228,628 controls from 18 studies. We identified 10 novel risk loci, bringing the total number of known atopic dermatitis risk loci to 31 (with novel secondary signals at 4 of these). Notably, the new loci include candidate genes with roles in regulation of innate host defenses and T-cell function, underscoring the important contribution of (auto-)immune mechanisms to atopic dermatitis pathogenesis. PMID:26482879

  2. Laboratory control values for CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes. Implications for HIV-1 diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bofill, M; Janossy, G; Lee, C A; MacDonald-Burns, D; Phillips, A N; Sabin, C; Timms, A; Johnson, M A; Kernoff, P B

    1992-01-01

    With the advent of standard flow cytometric methods using two-colour fluorescence on samples of whole blood, it is possible to establish the ranges of CD3, CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte subsets in the routine laboratory, and also to assist the definition of HIV-1-related deviations from these normal values. In 676 HIV-1-seronegative individuals the lymphocyte subset percentages and absolute counts were determined. The samples taken mostly in the morning. The groups included heterosexual controls, people with various clotting disorders but without lymphocyte abnormalities as well as seronegative homosexual men as the appropriate controls for the HIV-1-infected groups. The stability of CD4% and CD8% values was demonstrated throughout life, and in children CD4 values less than 25% could be regarded as abnormal. The absolute counts of all T cell subsets decreased from birth until the age of 10 years. In adolescents and adults the absolute numbers (mean +/- s.d.) of lymphocytes, CD3, CD4 and CD8 cells were 1.90 +/- 0.55, 1.45 +/- 0.46, 0.83 +/- 0.29 and 0.56 +/- 0.23 x 10(9)/l, respectively. In patients with haemophilia A and B the mean values did not differ significantly. In homosexual men higher CD8 levels were seen compared with heterosexual men and 27% had an inverted CD4/CD8 ratio but mostly without CD4 lymphopenia (CD4 less than 0.4 x 10(9)/l). However, some healthy uninfected people were 'physiologically' lymphopenic without having inverted CD4/CD8 ratios. When the variations 'within persons' were studied longitudinally over a 5-year period, the absolute CD4 counts tended to be fixed at different levels. As a marked contrast, over 60% of asymptomatic HIV-1+ patients exhibited low CD4 counts less than 0.4 x 10(9)/l together with inverted CD4/CD8 ratios. Such combined changes among the heterosexual and HIV-1-seronegative homosexual groups were as rare as 1.4% and 3%, respectively. For this reason, when the lymphocyte tests show less than 0.4 x 10(9)/l CD4 count and a CD

  3. Analysis techniques for multivariate root loci. [a tool in linear control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, P. M.; Stein, G.; Laub, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis and techniques are developed for the multivariable root locus and the multivariable optimal root locus. The generalized eigenvalue problem is used to compute angles and sensitivities for both types of loci, and an algorithm is presented that determines the asymptotic properties of the optimal root locus.

  4. Two – three loci control scleral ossicle formation via epistasis in the cavefish Astyanax mexicanus

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Anastasia; Powers, Amanda K.; Gross, Joshua B.; O’Quin, Kelly E.

    2017-01-01

    The sclera is the protective outer layer of the eye. In fishes, birds, and reptiles, the sclera may be reinforced with additional bony elements called scleral ossicles. Teleost fish vary in the number and size of scleral ossicles; however, the genetic mechanisms responsible for this variation remain poorly understood. In this study, we examine the inheritance of scleral ossicles in the Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus, which exhibits both a cave morph and a surface fish morph. As these morphs and their hybrids collectively exhibit zero, one, and two scleral ossicles, they represent a microcosm of teleost scleral ossicle diversity. Our previous research in F2 hybrids of cavefish from Pachón cave and surface fish from Texas suggested that three genes likely influence the formation of scleral ossicles in this group through an epistatic threshold model of inheritance, though our sample size was small. In this study, we expand our sample size using additional hybrids of Pachón cavefish and Mexican surface fish to (1) confirm the threshold model of inheritance, (2) refine the number of genes responsible for scleral ossicle formation, and (3) increase our power to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for this trait. To answer these three questions, we scored surface fish and cavefish F2 hybrids for the presence of zero, one, or two scleral ossicles. We then analyzed their distribution among the F2 hybrids using a chi-square (χ2) test, and used a genetic linkage map of over 100 microsatellite markers to identify QTL responsible for scleral ossicle number. We found that inheritance of scleral ossicles follows an epistatic threshold model of inheritance controlled by two genes, which contrasts the three-locus model estimated from our previous study. Finally, the combined analysis of hybrids from both crosses identified two strong QTL for scleral ossicle number on linkage groups 4.2 and 21, and a weaker QTL on linkage group 4.1. Scleral ossification remains a complex

  5. Polarity and asymmetric cell division in the control of lymphocyte fate decisions and function.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Mohammed; Russell, Sarah M

    2016-04-01

    Polarity is important in several lymphocyte processes including lymphocyte migration, formation of the immunological synapse, and asymmetric cell division (ACD). While lymphocyte migration and immunological synapse formation are relatively well understood, the role of lymphocyte ACD is less clear. Recent advances in measuring polarity enable more robust analyses of asymmetric cell division. Use of these new methods has produced crucial quantification of ACD at precise phases of lymphocyte development and activation. These developments are leading to a better understanding of the drivers of fate choice during lymphocyte activation and provide a context within which to explain the effects of ACD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Unique Genetic Loci Identified for Emotional Behavior in Control and Chronic Stress Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-21

    Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 August 2010 – 21 October 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House Unique genetic loci...unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 88 ABW Cleared 02/26/2014; 88ABW-2014-0757. Report contains color. 14. ABSTRACT An individual’s genetic ...background affects their emotional behavior and response to stress. Although studies have been conducted to identify genetic predictors for emotional

  7. A replication study of genetic risk loci for ischemic stroke in a Dutch population: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hauer, Allard J; Pulit, Sara L; van den Berg, Leonard H; de Bakker, Paul I W; Veldink, Jan H; Ruigrok, Ynte M

    2017-09-22

    We aimed to replicate reported associations of 10 SNPs at eight distinct loci with overall ischemic stroke (IS) and its subtypes in an independent cohort of Dutch IS patients. We included 1,375 IS patients enrolled in a prospective multicenter hospital-based cohort in the Netherlands, and 1,533 population-level controls of Dutch descent. We tested these SNPs for association with overall IS and its subtypes (large artery atherosclerosis, small vessel disease and cardioembolic stroke (CE), as classified by TOAST) using an additive multivariable logistic regression model, adjusting for age and sex. We obtained odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the risk allele of each SNP analyzed and exact p-values by permutation. We confirmed the association at 4q25 (PITX2) (OR 1.43; 95% CI, 1.13-1.81, p = 0.029) and 16q22 (ZFHX3) (OR 1.62; 95% CI, 1.26-2.07, p = 0.001) as risk loci for CE. Locus 16q22 was also associated with overall IS (OR 1.24; 95% CI, 1.08-1.42, p = 0.016). Other loci previously associated with IS and/or its subtypes were not confirmed. In conclusion, we validated two loci (4q25, 16q22) associated with CE. In addition, our study may suggest that the association of locus 16q22 may not be limited to CE, but also includes overall IS.

  8. Mindfulness meditation training effects on CD4+ T lymphocytes in HIV-1 infected adults: a small randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Creswell, J David; Myers, Hector F; Cole, Steven W; Irwin, Michael R

    2009-02-01

    Mindfulness meditation training has stress reduction benefits in various patient populations, but its effects on biological markers of HIV-1 progression are unknown. The present study tested the efficacy of an 8-week Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) meditation program compared to a 1-day control seminar on CD4+ T lymphocyte counts in stressed HIV infected adults. A single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted with enrollment and follow-up occurring between November 2005 and December 2007. A diverse community sample of 48 HIV-1 infected adults was randomized and entered treatment in either an 8-week MBSR or a 1-day control stress reduction education seminar. The primary outcome was circulating counts of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Participants in the 1-day control seminar showed declines in CD4+ T lymphocyte counts whereas counts among participants in the 8-week MBSR program were unchanged from baseline to post-intervention (time x treatment condition interaction, p=.02). This effect was independent of antiretroviral (ARV) medication use. Additional analyses indicated that treatment adherence to the mindfulness meditation program, as measured by class attendance, mediated the effects of mindfulness meditation training on buffering CD4+ T lymphocyte declines. These findings provide an initial indication that mindfulness meditation training can buffer CD4+ T lymphocyte declines in HIV-1 infected adults. clinicaltrials.gov, Identifier: NCT00600561.

  9. Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling resistance to maize chlorotic dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mark W; Redinbaugh, Margaret G; Anderson, Robert J; Louie, R

    2004-12-01

    Ineffective screening methods and low levels of disease resistance have hampered genetic analysis of maize (Zea mays L.) resistance to disease caused by maize chlorotic dwarf virus (MCDV). Progeny from a cross between the highly resistant maize inbred line Oh1VI and the susceptible inbred line Va35 were evaluated for MCDV symptoms after multiple virus inoculations, using the viral vector Graminella nigrifrons. Symptom severity scores from three rating dates were used to calculate area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC) scores for vein banding, leaf twist and tear, and whorl chlorosis. AUDPC scores for the F(2) population indicated that MCDV resistance was quantitatively inherited. Genotypic and phenotypic analyses of 314 F(2) individuals were compared using composite interval mapping (CIM) and analysis of variance. CIM identified two major quantitative trait loci (QTL) on chromosomes 3 and 10 and two minor QTL on chromosomes 4 and 6. Resistance was additive, with alleles from Oh1VI at the loci on chromosomes 3 and 10 contributing equally to resistance.

  10. Rapid alterations of cell cycle control proteins in human T lymphocytes in microgravity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In our study we aimed to identify rapidly reacting gravity-responsive mechanisms in mammalian cells in order to understand if and how altered gravity is translated into a cellular response. In a combination of experiments using "functional weightlessness" provided by 2D-clinostats and real microgravity provided by several parabolic flight campaigns and compared to in-flight-1g-controls, we identified rapid gravity-responsive reactions inside the cell cycle regulatory machinery of human T lymphocytes. In response to 2D clinorotation, we detected an enhanced expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1 protein within minutes, less cdc25C protein expression and enhanced Ser147-phosphorylation of cyclinB1 after CD3/CD28 stimulation. Additionally, during 2D clinorotation, Tyr-15-phosphorylation occurred later and was shorter than in the 1 g controls. In CD3/CD28-stimulated primary human T cells, mRNA expression of the cell cycle arrest protein p21 increased 4.1-fold after 20s real microgravity in primary CD4+ T cells and 2.9-fold in Jurkat T cells, compared to 1 g in-flight controls after CD3/CD28 stimulation. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitor curcumin was able to abrogate microgravity-induced p21 mRNA expression, whereas expression was enhanced by a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Therefore, we suppose that cell cycle progression in human T lymphocytes requires Earth gravity and that the disturbed expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins could contribute to the breakdown of the human immune system in space. PMID:22273506

  11. The changes of circulating lymphocyte sub-populations in women with preterm labour: a case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Sendag, Fatih; Itil, Ismail Mete; Terek, Mustafa Cosan; Yilmaz, Huseyin

    2002-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the changes in circulating T-cell subpopulations, B cells and natural killer cells in patients with imminent preterm labour. Thirty-five pregnant patients with imminent preterm labour and 35 women with uncomplicated pregnancies were included in the study. The gestational ages of the patients ranged from 28 to 36 weeks in both groups. The specific lymphocyte antigens were detected using direct staining with monoclonal antibodies, and analysed by flow cytometry. We observed no significant difference in the mean percentage of T cell subpopulations, natural killer cells and active T cells in the group of patients with preterm labor when compared to controls. The mean percentage of T CD3+ lymphocytes was significantly lower and that of B CD19+ cells higher in the study group when compared to controls. The alterations in maternal circulating lymphocyte subpopulations could be associated with the mechanisms mediating preterm labour.

  12. Mapping loci controlling the concentrations of erucic and linolenic acids in seed oil of Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Thormann, C E; Romero, J; Mantet, J; Osborn, T C

    1996-07-01

    The quality of plant oil is determined by its component fatty acids. Relatively high levels of linolenic acid reduce the oxidative stability of the oil, and high levels of erucic acid in the diet have been associated with health problems. Thus, oilseed Brassica napus cultivars with low linolenic and low erucic acid contents are highly desirable for edible oil production. In order to identify genes controlling the levels of erucic and linolenic acids, we analyzed the oil composition of 99 F1-derived doubled haploid lines from a cross between cv 'Major' (high levels of erucic and linolenic acids) and cv 'Stellar' (low levels of both fatty acids). A molecular marker linkage map of 199 loci for this population was used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling oil composition. We identified two regions that accounted for nearly all of the phenotypic variation in erucic acid concentration and one region that accounted for 47% of the variation in linolenic acid concentration. The QTL associated with linolenic acid concentration mapped near a RFLP locus detected by a cDNA clone encoding an omega-3 desaturase, suggesting that the low linolenic acid content of 'Stellar' may be due to a mutation in this gene.

  13. Mst1 controls lymphocyte trafficking and interstitial motility within lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Koko; Katakai, Tomoya; Ebisuno, Yukihiko; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Okada, Takaharu; Kinashi, Tatsuo

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of lymphocyte adhesion and migration plays crucial roles in lymphocyte trafficking during immunosurveillance. However, our understanding of the intracellular signalling that regulates these processes is still limited. Here, we show that the Ste20-like kinase Mst1 plays crucial roles in lymphocyte trafficking in vivo. Mst1−/− lymphocytes exhibited an impairment of firm adhesion to high endothelial venules, resulting in an inefficient homing capacity. In vitro lymphocyte adhesion cascade assays under physiological shear flow revealed that the stopping time of Mst1−/− lymphocytes on endothelium was markedly reduced, whereas their L-selectin-dependent rolling/tethering and transition to LFA-1-mediated arrest were not affected. Mst1−/− lymphocytes were also defective in the stabilization of adhesion through α4 integrins. Consequently, Mst1−/− mice had hypotrophic peripheral lymphoid tissues and reduced marginal zone B cells and dendritic cells in the spleen, and defective emigration of single positive thymocytes. Furthermore, Mst1−/− lymphocytes had impaired motility over lymph node-derived stromal cells and within lymph nodes. Thus, our data indicate that Mst1 is a key enzyme involved in lymphocyte entry and interstitial migration. PMID:19339990

  14. Flavonoid-deficient mutants in grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.): genetic control, linkage relationships, and mapping with aconitase and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase isozyme loci.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Dibyendu

    2012-01-01

    Two flavonoid-deficient mutants, designated as fldL-1 and fldL-2, were isolated in EMS-mutagenized (0.15%, 10 h) M(2) progeny of grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.). Both the mutants contained total leaf flavonoid content only 20% of their mother varieties. Genetic analysis revealed monogenic recessive inheritance of the trait, controlled by two different nonallelic loci. The two mutants differed significantly in banding patterns of leaf aconitase (ACO) and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) isozymes, possessing unique bands in Aco 1, Aco 2, and Gsnor 2 loci. Isozyme loci inherited monogenically showing codominant expression in F(2) (1:2:1) and backcross (1:1) segregations. Linkage studies and primary trisomic analysis mapped Aco 1 and fld 1 loci on extra chromosome of trisomic-I and Aco 2, fld 2, and Gsnor 2 on extra chromosome of trisomic-IV in linked associations.

  15. A cytokine-controlled mechanism for integrated regulation of T-lymphocyte motility, adhesion and activation.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Sten-Erik; Bergdahl, Eva; Sundqvist, Karl-Gösta

    2013-12-01

    The co-ordination of T-cell motility, adhesion and activation remains poorly understood. It is also unclear how these functions are co-ordinated with external stimuli. Here we unveil a series of molecular interactions in cis at the surface of T lymphocytes with potent effects on motility and adhesion in these cells, and communicating with proliferative responses. These interactions were controlled by the signature cytokines of T helper subsets interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-4. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) was found to play a key role for T-cell motility by promoting development of polarized cell shape and cell movement. Endogenous thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) enhanced cell surface expression of LRP1 through CD47. Cell surface expressed LRP1 induced motility and processing of TSP-1 while inhibiting adhesion to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and fibronectin. Interleukin-2, but not IL-4, stimulated synthesis of TSP-1 and motility through TSP-1 and LRP1. Stimulation of the T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 complex inhibited TSP-1 expression. Inhibitor studies indicated that LRP1 regulated TSP-1 expression and promoted motility through JAK signalling. This LRP1-mediated motogenic signalling was connected to CD47/Gi protein signalling and IL-2-induced signalling through TSP-1. The motogenic TSP-1/LRP1 mechanism antagonized TCR/CD3-induced T-cell proliferation. These results indicate that LRP1 in collaboration with TSP-1 directs a counter-adhesive and counter-proliferative motogenic cascade. T cells seem programmed to prioritize movement before adhesion through this cascade. In conclusion, vital decision-making in T lymphocytes regulating motility, adhesive interactions and proliferation, are integrated through a molecular mechanism connecting different cell surface receptors and their signalling pathways. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Caspase 3 activation and PARP cleavage in lymphocytes from newborn babies of diabetic mothers with unbalanced glycaemic control.

    PubMed

    Tarquini, F; Tiribuzi, R; Crispoltoni, L; Porcellati, S; Del Pino, A M; Orlacchio, A; Coata, G; Arnone, S; Torlone, E; Cappuccini, B; Di Renzo, G C; Orlacchio, A

    2014-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies showed that gestational diabetes mellitus is the most frequent metabolic disorder of pregnancy, the pathogenesis of which has yet to be completely clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence and processing of caspase 3 (Casp3) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) in cord blood lymphocytes as markers of apoptosis in relation to glycaemic control during intrauterine life. Our results showed a specific positive correlation between the levels of active Casp3 (17-19 kDa) and the inactive form of PARP1 (89 kDa) in lymphocytes isolated from newborn babies of diabetic women with unbalanced glycaemic control, with a direct correlation between the activation of casp3 and the inactivation of PARP1, that makes lymphocytes unresponsive towards lipopolysaccharide stimulation, highlighting an altered functional response. Besides more studies are required to fully correlate the activation of the apoptotic process during the intrauterine life with the foetal health later in life, our study indicates that a cord blood lymphocyte, an easily accessible source, is informative about the activation of apoptotic stimuli in circulating cells of newborn babies in relation to the glycaemic control reached by the mother during pregnancy.

  17. Quantitative trait loci linked to PRNP gene controlling health and production traits in INRA 401 sheep

    PubMed Central

    Vitezica, Zulma G; Moreno, Carole R; Lantier, Frederic; Lantier, Isabelle; Schibler, Laurent; Roig, Anne; François, Dominique; Bouix, Jacques; Allain, Daniel; Brunel, Jean-Claude; Barillet, Francis; Elsen, Jean-Michel

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the potential association of PrP genotypes with health and productive traits was investigated. Data were recorded on animals of the INRA 401 breed from the Bourges-La Sapinière INRA experimental farm. The population consisted of 30 rams and 852 ewes, which produced 1310 lambs. The animals were categorized into three PrP genotype classes: ARR homozygous, ARR heterozygous, and animals without any ARR allele. Two analyses differing in the approach considered were carried out. Firstly, the potential association of the PrP genotype with disease (Salmonella resistance) and production (wool and carcass) traits was studied. The data used included 1042, 1043 and 1013 genotyped animals for the Salmonella resistance, wool and carcass traits, respectively. The different traits were analyzed using an animal model, where the PrP genotype effect was included as a fixed effect. Association analyses do not indicate any evidence of an effect of PrP genotypes on traits studied in this breed. Secondly, a quantitative trait loci (QTL) detection approach using the PRNP gene as a marker was applied on ovine chromosome 13. Interval mapping was used. Evidence for one QTL affecting mean fiber diameter was found at 25 cM from the PRNP gene. However, a linkage between PRNP and this QTL does not imply unfavorable linkage disequilibrium for PRNP selection purposes. PMID:17612481

  18. Quantitative trait loci and underlying candidate genes controlling agronomical and fruit quality traits in octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa).

    PubMed

    Zorrilla-Fontanesi, Yasmín; Cabeza, Amalia; Domínguez, Pedro; Medina, Juan Jesús; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Denoyes-Rothan, Beatrice; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Amaya, Iraida

    2011-09-01

    Breeding for fruit quality traits in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa, 2n = 8x = 56) is complex due to the polygenic nature of these traits and the octoploid constitution of this species. In order to improve the efficiency of genotype selection, the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and associated molecular markers will constitute a valuable tool for breeding programs. However, the implementation of these markers in breeding programs depends upon the complexity and stability of QTLs across different environments. In this work, the genetic control of 17 agronomical and fruit quality traits was investigated in strawberry using a F(1) population derived from an intraspecific cross between two contrasting selection lines, '232' and '1392'. QTL analyses were performed over three successive years based on the separate parental linkage maps and a pseudo-testcross strategy. The integrated strawberry genetic map consists of 338 molecular markers covering 37 linkage groups, thus exceeding the 28 chromosomes. 33 QTLs were identified for 14 of the 17 studied traits and approximately 37% of them were stable over time. For each trait, 1-5 QTLs were identified with individual effects ranging between 9.2 and 30.5% of the phenotypic variation, indicating that all analysed traits are complex and quantitatively inherited. Many QTLs controlling correlated traits were co-located in homoeology group V, indicating linkage or pleiotropic effects of loci. Candidate genes for several QTLs controlling yield, anthocyanins, firmness and L-ascorbic acid are proposed based on both their co-localization and predicted function. We also report conserved QTLs among strawberry and other Rosaceae based on their syntenic location.

  19. CIP4 controls CCL19-driven cell steering and chemotaxis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Malet-Engra, Gema; Viaud, Julien; Ysebaert, Loïc; Farcé, Manon; Lafouresse, Fanny; Laurent, Guy; Gaits-Iacovoni, Frédérique; Scita, Giorgio; Dupré, Loïc

    2013-06-01

    Solid tumor dissemination relies on the reprogramming of molecular pathways controlling chemotaxis. Whether the motility of nonsolid tumors such as leukemia depends on the deregulated expression of molecules decoding chemotactic signals remains an open question. We identify here the membrane remodeling F-BAR adapter protein Cdc42-interacting protein 4 (CIP4) as a key regulator of chemotaxis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). CIP4 is expressed at abnormally high levels in CLL cells, where it is required for CCL19-induced chemotaxis. Upon CCL19 stimulation of CLL cells, CIP4 associates with GTP-bound Cdc42 and is recruited to the rear of the lamellipodium and along microspikes radiating through the lamellipodium. Consistent with its cellular distribution, CIP4 removal impairs both the assembly of the polarized lamellipodium and directional migration along a diffusible CCL19 gradient. Furthermore, CIP4 depletion results in decreased activation of WASP, but increased activation of PAK1 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Notably, p38 MAPK inhibition results in impaired lamellipodium assembly and loss of directional migration. This suggests that CIP4 modulates both the WASP and p38 MAPK pathways to promote lamellipodium assembly and chemotaxis. Overall, our study reveals a critical role of CIP4 in mediating chemotaxis of CLL cells by controlling the dynamics of microspike-containing protrusions and cell steering.

  20. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in patients with peripheral vertigo: a prospective controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Ozbay, Isa; Kahraman, Cuneyt; Balikci, Hasan Huseyin; Kucur, Cuneyt; Kahraman, Nilufer Kuzeyli; Ozkaya, Derya Pınar; Oghan, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the relationship between peripheral vertigo and inflammation by using the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) as an inflammatory marker. We recruited 103 patients with peripheral vertigo (71 women, 32 men; mean age, 39.8 ± 14.7 years) who presented to the Otolaryngology Department of Dumlupinar University Hospital. Vertigo patients with systemic diseases, neurological disorders, malignancy or any inflammatory disease that could alter the NLR were excluded from the study. We also enrolled 103 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects (controls; 82 women, 21 men; mean age, 36.7 ± 13.5 years) who underwent routine checkups in our hospital. The vertigo patients underwent full otolaryngologic and neurologic examinations and audiometric tests to rule out any other pathology causing the peripheral vertigo. NLR was calculated in all subjects and was compared between the patient and control groups. There were no significant differences between the study and control groups in terms of lipid profiles, liver-function tests, white blood cell (WBC) count, hemoglobin level, mean platelet volume, and vitamin B12 and folate levels. The mean NLR was significantly higher in the patients than in the controls (P<0.05). In conclusion, this study, which was the first to investigate the relationship between the NLR and peripheral vertigo, found that the NLR is significantly higher among peripheral vertigo patients than among healthy controls. This result suggests that the NLR is a novel potential marker of stress in peripheral vertigo patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Using crossover breakpoints in recombinant inbred lines to identify quantitative trait loci controlling the global recombination frequency.

    PubMed

    Esch, Elisabeth; Szymaniak, Jessica M; Yates, Heather; Pawlowski, Wojciech P; Buckler, Edward S

    2007-11-01

    Recombination is a crucial component of evolution and breeding, producing new genetic combinations on which selection can act. Rates of recombination vary tremendously, not only between species but also within species and for specific chromosomal segments. In this study, by examining recombination events captured in recombinant inbred mapping populations previously created for maize, wheat, Arabidopsis, and mouse, we demonstrate that substantial variation exists for genomewide crossover rates in both outcrossed and inbred plant and animal species. We also identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) that control this variation. The method that we developed and employed here holds promise for elucidating factors that regulate meiotic recombination and for creation of hyperrecombinogenic lines, which can help overcome limited recombination that hampers breeding progress.

  2. CD8+ Lymphocytes Can Control HIV Infection in vitro by Suppressing Virus Replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Christopher M.; Moody, Dewey J.; Stites, Daniel P.; Levy, Jay A.

    1986-12-01

    Lymphocytes bearing the CD8 marker were shown to suppress replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The effect was dose-dependent and most apparent with autologous lymphocytes; it did not appear to be mediated by a cytotoxic response. This suppression of HIV replication could be demonstrated by the addition of CD8+ cells at the initiation of virus production as well as after several weeks of virus replication by cultured cells. The observations suggest a potential approach to therapy in which autologous CD8 lymphocytes could be administered to individuals to inhibit HIV replication and perhaps progression of disease.

  3. Correlates of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-mediated virus control: implications for immunosuppressive infections and their treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Wodarz, D; Nowak, M A

    2000-01-01

    A very important question in immunology is to determine which factors decide whether an immune response can efficiently clear or control a viral infection, and under what circumstances we observe persistent viral replication and pathology. This paper summarizes how mathematical models help us gain new insights into these questions, and explores the relationship between antiviral therapy and long-term immunological control in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We find that cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) memory, defined as antigen-independent persistence of CTL precursors, is necessary for the CTL response to clear an infection. The presence of such a memory response is associated with the coexistence of many CTL clones directed against multiple epitopes. If CTL memory is inefficient, then persistent replication can be established. This outcome is associated with a narrow CTL response directed against only one or a few viral epitopes. If the virus replicates persistently, occurrence of pathology depends on the level of virus load at equilibrium, and this can be determined by the overall efficacy of the CTL response. Mathematical models suggest that controlled replication is reflected by a positive correlation between CTLs and virus load. On the other hand, uncontrolled viral replication results in higher loads and the absence of a correlation between CTLs and virus load. A negative correlation between CTLs and virus load indicates that the virus actively impairs immunity, as observed with HIV. Mathematical models and experimental data suggest that HIV persistence and pathology are caused by the absence of sufficient CTL memory. We show how mathematical models can help us devise therapy regimens that can restore CTL memory in HIV patients and result in long-term immunological control of the virus in the absence of life-long treatment. PMID:11186307

  4. Self-(in)compatibility in apricot germplasm is controlled by two major loci, S and M.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Sanz, Juan Vicente; Zuriaga, Elena; López, Inmaculada; Badenes, María L; Romero, Carlos

    2017-04-26

    Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) exhibits a gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) system and it is mostly considered as a self-incompatible species though numerous self-compatible exceptions occur. These are mainly linked to the mutated S C-haplotype carrying an insertion in the S-locus F-box gene that leads to a truncated protein. However, two S-locus unlinked pollen-part mutations (PPMs) termed m and m' have also been reported to confer self-compatibility (SC) in the apricot cultivars 'Canino' and 'Katy', respectively. This work was aimed to explore whether other additional mutations might explain SC in apricot as well. A set of 67 cultivars/accessions with different geographic origins were analyzed by PCR-screening of the S- and M-loci genotypes, contrasting results with the available phenotype data. Up to 20 S-alleles, including 3 new ones, were detected and sequence analysis revealed interesting synonymies and homonymies in particular with S-alleles found in Chinese cultivars. Haplotype analysis performed by genotyping and determining linkage-phases of 7 SSR markers, showed that the m and m' PPMs are linked to the same m 0-haplotype. Results indicate that m 0-haplotype is tightly associated with SC in apricot germplasm being quite frequent in Europe and North-America. However, its prevalence is lower than that for S C in terms of frequency and geographic distribution. Structures of 34 additional M-haplotypes were inferred and analyzed to depict phylogenetic relationships and M 1-2 was found to be the closest haplotype to m 0. Genotyping results showed that four cultivars classified as self-compatible do not have neither the S C- nor the m 0-haplotype. According to apricot germplasm S-genotyping, a loss of genetic diversity affecting the S-locus has been produced probably due to crop dissemination. Genotyping and phenotyping data support that self-(in)compatibility in apricot relies mainly on the S- but also on the M-locus. Regarding this latter, we have shown

  5. GPR18 Controls Reconstitution of Mouse Small Intestine Intraepithelial Lymphocytes following Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Becker, Amy M; Callahan, Derrick J; Richner, Justin M; Choi, Jaebok; DiPersio, John F; Diamond, Michael S; Bhattacharya, Deepta

    2015-01-01

    Specific G protein coupled receptors (GPRs) regulate the proper positioning, function, and development of immune lineage subsets. Here, we demonstrate that GPR18 regulates the reconstitution of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) of the small intestine following bone marrow transplantation. Through analysis of transcriptional microarray data, we find that GPR18 is highly expressed in IELs, lymphoid progenitors, and mature follicular B cells. To establish the physiological role of this largely uncharacterized GPR, we generated Gpr18-/- mice. Despite high levels of GPR18 expression in specific hematopoietic progenitors, Gpr18-/- mice have no defects in lymphopoiesis or myelopoiesis. Moreover, antibody responses following immunization with hapten-protein conjugates or infection with West Nile virus are normal in Gpr18-/- mice. Steady-state numbers of IELs are also normal in Gpr18-/- mice. However, competitive bone marrow reconstitution experiments demonstrate that GPR18 is cell-intrinsically required for the optimal restoration of small intestine TCRγδ+ and TCRαβ+ CD8αα+ IELs. In contrast, GPR18 is dispensable for the reconstitution of large intestine IELs. Moreover, Gpr18-/- bone marrow reconstitutes small intestine IELs similarly to controls in athymic recipients. Gpr18-/- chimeras show no changes in susceptibility to intestinal insults such as Citrobacter rodentium infections or graft versus host disease. These data reveal highly specific requirements for GPR18 in the development and reconstitution of thymus-derived intestinal IEL subsets in the steady-state and after bone marrow transplantation.

  6. Identification of internal control genes for quantitative expression analysis by real-time PCR in bovine peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Spalenza, Veronica; Girolami, Flavia; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Riondato, Fulvio; Rasero, Roberto; Nebbia, Carlo; Sacchi, Paola; Martin, Patrice

    2011-09-01

    Gene expression studies in blood cells, particularly lymphocytes, are useful for monitoring potential exposure to toxicants or environmental pollutants in humans and livestock species. Quantitative PCR is the method of choice for obtaining accurate quantification of mRNA transcripts although variations in the amount of starting material, enzymatic efficiency, and the presence of inhibitors can lead to evaluation errors. As a result, normalization of data is of crucial importance. The most common approach is the use of endogenous reference genes as an internal control, whose expression should ideally not vary among individuals and under different experimental conditions. The accurate selection of reference genes is therefore an important step in interpreting quantitative PCR studies. Since no systematic investigation in bovine lymphocytes has been performed, the aim of the present study was to assess the expression stability of seven candidate reference genes in circulating lymphocytes collected from 15 dairy cows. Following the characterization by flow cytometric analysis of the cell populations obtained from blood through a density gradient procedure, three popular softwares were used to evaluate the gene expression data. The results showed that two genes are sufficient for normalization of quantitative PCR studies in cattle lymphocytes and that YWAHZ, S24 and PPIA are the most stable genes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Reflections on Speech Motor Control Based on Phonatory and DDK Tasks in Dysarthric Subjects with Lesions in Different Cerebellar Loci

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandana, V. P.

    2007-01-01

    There are very few acoustic studies reflecting on the localization of speech function within the different loci of the cerebellum. Task based performance profile of subjects with lesion in different cerebellar loci is not reported. Also, the findings on nonfocal cerebellar lesions cannot be generalized to lesions restricted to the cerebellum.…

  8. Reflections on Speech Motor Control Based on Phonatory and DDK Tasks in Dysarthric Subjects with Lesions in Different Cerebellar Loci

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandana, V. P.

    2007-01-01

    There are very few acoustic studies reflecting on the localization of speech function within the different loci of the cerebellum. Task based performance profile of subjects with lesion in different cerebellar loci is not reported. Also, the findings on nonfocal cerebellar lesions cannot be generalized to lesions restricted to the cerebellum.…

  9. Case-control study of allele frequencies of 15 short tandem repeat loci in males with impulsive violent behavior.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Ba, Huajie; Gao, Zhiqin; Zhao, Hanqing; Yu, Haiying; Guo, Wei

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of genetic polymorphisms in short tandem repeats (STRs) is an accepted method for detecting associations between genotype and phenotype but it has not previously been used in the study of the genetics of impulsive violent behavior. Compare the prevalence of different polymorphisms in 15 STR loci (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818 and FGA) between men with a history of impulsive violence and male control subjects without a history of impulsive violence. The distributions of the alleles of the 15 STR loci were compared between 407 cases with impulsive violent behavior and 415 controls using AmpFlSTR(®) Identifiler™ kits. COMPARED TO CONTROLS, THE AVERAGE FREQUENCIES OF THE FOLLOWING ALLELES WERE SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER IN INDIVIDUALS WITH A HISTORY OF VIOLENT BEHAVIOR: allele 10 of TH01 (OR=0.29, 95%CI=0.16-0.52, p<0.0001,), allele 8 of TPOX (OR=0.71, 95%CI=0.58-0.86, p=0.0005), allele 9 of TPOX (OR=0.65, 95%CI=0.47-0.89, p=0.0072) and allele 14 of CSF1PO (OR=0.27, 95%CI=0.11-0.68, p=0.0035). One allele was significantly higher in cases than controls: allele 11 of TPOX (OR=1.79, 95%CI=1.45-2.22, p<0.0001). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first behavioral genetic study that clearly demonstrates a close relationship between specific genetic markers and impulsive aggression in non-psychiatric offenders. Further prospective work will be needed to determine whether or not the alleles identified can be considered risk factors for impulsive aggression and, if so, the underlying mechanisms that result in this relationship.

  10. Suppressor lymphocytes induced by epicutaneous sensitization of UV-irradiated mice control multiple immunological pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, S E; Yee, G K; Kripke, M L

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the formation of hapten-specific suppressor T lymphocytes induced by the epicutaneous sensitization of UV-irradiated mice could suppress other hapten-specific immune responses in addition to contact hypersensitivity (CHS). Suppressor cells were induced by applying trinitrochlorobenzene (TNCB) to the unexposed skin of mice irradiated several days earlier with 40 kJ/m2 UVB (280-320 nm) radiation. Previous work demonstrated that the spleens of such animals contain Lyt-1+, 2-T lymphocytes which prevent the induction of CHS to TNCB when transferred to normal mice, and inhibit proliferation of normal lymphocytes in vitro to TNP-modified syngeneic cells. These studies show that addition of T lymphocytes from UV-irradiated, TNCB-sensitized mice to cultures of normal lymphocytes and TNP-modified syngeneic cells inhibited the generation of TNP-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). The inhibition was dose-dependent and occurred only when the suppressor cells were present during the first 24 hr of culture. The suppressor cells had no effect on the activity of preformed CTL. In addition, injection of the suppressor lymphocytes into mice at the time of i.v. injection of TNP-modified sheep red blood cells (TNP-SRBC) reduced the number of direct plaque-forming cells against TNP, but had no effect on the production of antibody against SRBC. Cells that inhibited anti-TNP antibody formation were Thy-1+, Lyt-1+, 2-. These results indicate that hapten-specific suppressor cells from UV-irradiated mice prevent the activation of several different hapten-specific immunological pathways. PMID:2940172

  11. MicroRNA-150 controls differentiation of intraepithelial lymphocytes via TGF-β receptor II regulation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang-Hwan; Jang, Min Seong; Kim, Doo-Jin; Kim, Seok-Min; Oh, Se-Chan; Jung, Cho-Rok; Park, Yunji; Ha, Sang-Jun; Jung, Haiyoung; Park, Young-Jun; Yoon, Suk Ran; Choi, Inpyo; Kim, Tae-Don

    2017-08-07

    Intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) in the intestines play pivotal roles in maintaining the integrity of the mucosa, regulating the immune cells, and protecting against pathogenic invasion. Although several extrinsic factors such as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) have been identified to contribute to IEL generation, intrinsic regulatory factors have not been fully determined. Here, we investigated the regulation of IEL differentiation and the underlying mechanisms in mice. We analyzed IELs and the expression of molecules associated with IEL differentiation in wildtype control and microRNA-150-knockout mice. Methotrexate (MTX) was administered to mice lacking microRNA (miR)-150 and control mice. miR-150 deficiency reduced the IEL population in the small intestine and increased susceptibility to MTX-induced mucositis. Evaluation of expression of IEL differentiation-associated molecules showed that miR-150-deficient IELs exhibited decreased expression of TGF-β receptor II (TGF-βRII), CD103, CD8αα, and RUNX3 in all the IEL subpopulations. The reduced expression of TGF-βRII in miR-150-deficient IELs was caused by the increased expression of c-Myb/miR-20a. Restoration of miR-150 or inhibition of miR-20a recovered the TGF-βRII expression. miR-150 is an intrinsic regulator of IEL differentiation through TGF-βRII regulation. miR-150-mediated IEL generation is crucial for maintaining intestinal integrity against anticancer drug-induced mucositis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. SIPA1L2, MIR4697, GCH1 and VPS13C loci and risk of Parkinson's diseases in Iranian population: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Safaralizadeh, Tannaz; Jamshidi, Javad; Esmaili Shandiz, Ehsan; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Fazeli, Atena; Emamalizadeh, Babak; Manafi, Navid; Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Tafakhori, Abbas; Darvish, Hossein

    2016-10-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. Prevalence of PD increases steadily with age. A recent meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies has identified six new loci to be linked with PD. Here we investigated the association of four of these new loci, SIPA1L2, MIR4697, GCH1 and VPS13C with PD in an Iranian population. Through a case-control study a total of 1800 subjects comprising 600 PD patients and 1200 unrelated healthy controls were recruited. Rs10797576, rs329648, rs11158026 and rs2414739 related to SIPA1L2, MIR4697, GCH1 and VPS13C loci respectively, were genotyped in all subjects. The difference of genotype and allele frequencies between case and control groups were investigated using chi-square test and logistic regression models with R software. Genotype and allele frequencies were significantly different in PD patients and control group for rs329648, rs11158026 and rs2414739 (p-value=0.018, 0.025, and 0.009 respectively for allele frequency differences). There was no difference in genotype nor allele frequencies between the two groups for rs10797576. We replicated the association of three new loci which are proposed for PD. More studies in other populations and also functional analysis are required to clear the role of these variants in PD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. QTL meta-analysis provides a comprehensive view of loci controlling partial resistance to Aphanomyces euteiches in four sources of resistance in pea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    More knowledge about diversity of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) controlling polygenic disease resistance in natural genetic variation of crop species is required for durably improving plant genetic resistances to pathogens. Polygenic partial resistance to Aphanomyces root rot, due to Aphanomcyces eu...

  14. Genes and quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling trace element concentrations in perennial grasses grown on phytotoxic soil contaminated with heavy metals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Perennial grasses cover diverse soils throughout the world, including sites contaminated with heavy metals, producing forages that must be safe for livestock and wildlife. Chromosome regions known as quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling forage mineral concentrations were mapped in a populatio...

  15. Mapping of genomic regions (quantitative trait loci) controlling production and quality in industrial cultures of the edible basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Larraya, Luis M; Alfonso, Mikel; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Ramírez, Lucía

    2003-06-01

    Industrial production of the edible basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom) is based on a solid fermentation process in which a limited number of selected strains are used. Optimization of industrial mushroom production depends on improving the culture process and breeding new strains with higher yields and productivities. Traditionally, fungal breeding has been carried out by an empirical trial and error process. In this study, we used a different approach by mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling culture production and quality within the framework of the genetic linkage map of P. ostreatus. Ten production traits and four quality traits were studied and mapped. The production QTLs identified explain nearly one-half of the production variation. More interestingly, a single QTL mapping to the highly polymorphic chromosome VII appears to be involved in control of all the productivity traits studied. Quality QTLs appear to be scattered across the genome and to have less effect on the variation of the corresponding traits. Moreover, some of the new hybrid strains constructed in the course of our experiments had production or quality values higher than those of the parents or other commercial strains. This approach opens the possibility of marker-assisted selection and breeding of new industrial strains of this fungus.

  16. Mapping of Genomic Regions (Quantitative Trait Loci) Controlling Production and Quality in Industrial Cultures of the Edible Basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Larraya, Luis M.; Alfonso, Mikel; Pisabarro, Antonio G.; Ramírez, Lucía

    2003-01-01

    Industrial production of the edible basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom) is based on a solid fermentation process in which a limited number of selected strains are used. Optimization of industrial mushroom production depends on improving the culture process and breeding new strains with higher yields and productivities. Traditionally, fungal breeding has been carried out by an empirical trial and error process. In this study, we used a different approach by mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling culture production and quality within the framework of the genetic linkage map of P. ostreatus. Ten production traits and four quality traits were studied and mapped. The production QTLs identified explain nearly one-half of the production variation. More interestingly, a single QTL mapping to the highly polymorphic chromosome VII appears to be involved in control of all the productivity traits studied. Quality QTLs appear to be scattered across the genome and to have less effect on the variation of the corresponding traits. Moreover, some of the new hybrid strains constructed in the course of our experiments had production or quality values higher than those of the parents or other commercial strains. This approach opens the possibility of marker-assisted selection and breeding of new industrial strains of this fungus. PMID:12788770

  17. The granzyme B-Serpinb9 axis controls the fate of lymphocytes after lysosomal stress

    PubMed Central

    Bird, C H; Christensen, M E; Mangan, M S J; Prakash, M D; Sedelies, K A; Smyth, M J; Harper, I; Waterhouse, N J; Bird, P I

    2014-01-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes (CLs) contain lysosome-related organelles (LROs) that perform the normal degradative functions of the lysosome, in addition to storage and release of powerful cytotoxins employed to kill virally infected or abnormal cells. Among these cytotoxins is granzyme B (GrB), a protease that has also been implicated in activation (restimulation)-induced cell death of natural killer (NK) and T cells, but the underlying mechanism and its regulation are unclear. Here we show that restimulation of previously activated human or mouse lymphocytes induces lysosomal membrane permeabilisation (LMP), followed by GrB release from LROs into the CL cytosol. The model lysosomal stressors sphingosine and Leu-Leu-methyl-ester, and CLs from gene-targeted mice were used to show that LMP releases GrB in both a time- and concentration-dependent manner, and that the liberated GrB is responsible for cell death. The endogenous GrB inhibitor Serpinb9 (Sb9) protects CLs against LMP-induced death but is decreasingly effective as the extent of LMP increases. We also used these model stressors to show that GrB is the major effector of LMP-mediated death in T cells, but that in NK cells additional effectors are released, making GrB redundant. We found that limited LMP and GrB release occurs constitutively in proliferating lymphocytes and in NK cells engaged with targets in vitro. In Ectromelia virus-infected lymph nodes, working NK cells lacking Sb9 are more susceptible to GrB-mediated death. Taken together, these data show that a basal level of LMP occurs in proliferating and activated lymphocytes, and is increased on restimulation. LMP releases GrB from LROs into the lymphocyte cytoplasm and its ensuing interaction with Sb9 dictates whether or not the cell survives. The GrB-Sb9 nexus may therefore represent an additional mechanism of limiting lymphocyte lifespan and populations. PMID:24488096

  18. Identification of quantitative trait loci(QTL) controlling important fatty acids in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fatty acids play important role in controlling oil quality of peanut. In addition to the major fatty acids, oleic acid (C18:1) and linoleic acid (C18:2) accounting for about 80%, there are several minor fatty acids accounting for about 20% in peanut oil, such as palmitic acid (PA, C16:0), stearic (S...

  19. Comparative analysis of quantitative trait loci controlling glucosinolates, myrosinase and insect resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Kliebenstein, Daniel; Pedersen, Deana; Barker, Bridget; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Evolutionary interactions among insect herbivores and plant chemical defenses have generated systems where plant compounds have opposing fitness consequences for host plants, depending on attack by various insect herbivores. This interplay complicates understanding of fitness costs and benefits of plant chemical defenses. We are studying the role of the glucosinolate-myrosinase chemical defense system in protecting Arabidopsis thaliana from specialist and generalist insect herbivory. We used two Arabidopsis recombinant inbred populations in which we had previously mapped QTL controlling variation in the glucosinolate-myrosinase system. In this study we mapped QTL controlling resistance to specialist (Plutella xylostella) and generalist (Trichoplusia ni) herbivores. We identified a number of QTL that are specific to one herbivore or the other, as well as a single QTL that controls resistance to both insects. Comparison of QTL for herbivory, glucosinolates, and myrosinase showed that T. ni herbivory is strongly deterred by higher glucosinolate levels, faster breakdown rates, and specific chemical structures. In contrast, P. xylostella herbivory is uncorrelated with variation in the glucosinolate-myrosinase system. This agrees with evolutionary theory stating that specialist insects may overcome host plant chemical defenses, whereas generalists will be sensitive to these same defenses. PMID:12019246

  20. Bias in effect size of systemic lupus erythematosus susceptibility loci across Europe: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to investigate whether the effect size of the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) risk alleles varies across European subpopulations. Methods European SLE patients (n = 1,742) and ethnically matched healthy controls (n = 2,101) were recruited at 17 centres from 10 different countries. Only individuals with self-reported ancestry from the country of origin were included. In addition, participants were genotyped for top ancestry informative markers and for 25 SLE associated SNPs. The results were used to compare effect sizes between the Central Eureopan and Southern European subgroups. Results Twenty of the 25 SNPs showed independent association with SLE, These SNPs showed a significant bias to larger effect sizes in the Southern subgroup, with 15/20 showing this trend (P = 0.019) and a larger mean odds ratio of the 20 SNPs (1.46 vs. 1.34, P = 0.02) as well as a larger difference in the number of risk alleles (2.06 vs. 1.63, P = 0.027) between SLE patients and controls than for Central Europeans. This bias was reflected in a very significant difference in the cumulative genetic risk score (4.31 vs. 3.48, P = 1.8 × 10-32). Effect size bias was accompanied by a lower number of SLE risk alleles in the Southern subjects, both patients and controls, the difference being more marked between the controls (P = 1.1 × 10-8) than between the Southern and Central European patients (P = 0.016). Seven of these SNPs showed significant allele frequency clines. Conclusion Our findings showed a bias to larger effect sizes of SLE loci in the Southern Europeans relative to the Central Europeans together with clines of SLE risk allele frequencies. These results indicate the need to study risk allele clines and the implications of the polygenic model of inheritance in SLE. PMID:22541939

  1. Genotyping-by-sequencing markers facilitate the identification of quantitative trait loci controlling resistance to Penicillium expansum in Malus sieversii.

    PubMed

    Norelli, John L; Wisniewski, Michael; Fazio, Gennaro; Burchard, Erik; Gutierrez, Benjamin; Levin, Elena; Droby, Samir

    2017-01-01

    Blue mold caused by Penicillium expansum is the most important postharvest disease of apple worldwide and results in significant financial losses. There are no defined sources of resistance to blue mold in domesticated apple. However, resistance has been described in wild Malus sieversii accessions, including plant introduction (PI)613981. The objective of the present study was to identify the genetic loci controlling resistance to blue mold in this accession. We describe the first quantitative trait loci (QTL) reported in the Rosaceae tribe Maleae conditioning resistance to P. expansum on genetic linkage group 3 (qM-Pe3.1) and linkage group 10 (qM-Pe10.1). These loci were identified in a M.× domestica 'Royal Gala' X M. sieversii PI613981 family (GMAL4593) based on blue mold lesion diameter seven days post-inoculation in mature, wounded apple fruit inoculated with P. expansum. Phenotypic analyses were conducted in 169 progeny over a four year period. PI613981 was the source of the resistance allele for qM-Pe3.1, a QTL with a major effect on blue mold resistance, accounting for 27.5% of the experimental variability. The QTL mapped from 67.3 to 74 cM on linkage group 3 of the GMAL4593 genetic linkage map. qM-Pe10.1 mapped from 73.6 to 81.8 cM on linkage group 10. It had less of an effect on resistance, accounting for 14% of the experimental variation. 'Royal Gala' was the primary contributor to the resistance effect of this QTL. However, resistance-associated alleles in both parents appeared to contribute to the least square mean blue mold lesion diameter in an additive manner at qM-Pe10.1. A GMAL4593 genetic linkage map composed of simple sequence repeats and 'Golden Delicious' single nucleotide polymorphism markers was able to detect qM-Pe10.1, but failed to detect qM-Pe3.1. The subsequent addition of genotyping-by-sequencing markers to the linkage map provided better coverage of the PI613981 genome on linkage group 3 and facilitated discovery of qM-Pe3.1. A DNA

  2. Genotyping-by-sequencing markers facilitate the identification of quantitative trait loci controlling resistance to Penicillium expansum in Malus sieversii

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Michael; Fazio, Gennaro; Burchard, Erik; Gutierrez, Benjamin; Levin, Elena; Droby, Samir

    2017-01-01

    Blue mold caused by Penicillium expansum is the most important postharvest disease of apple worldwide and results in significant financial losses. There are no defined sources of resistance to blue mold in domesticated apple. However, resistance has been described in wild Malus sieversii accessions, including plant introduction (PI)613981. The objective of the present study was to identify the genetic loci controlling resistance to blue mold in this accession. We describe the first quantitative trait loci (QTL) reported in the Rosaceae tribe Maleae conditioning resistance to P. expansum on genetic linkage group 3 (qM-Pe3.1) and linkage group 10 (qM-Pe10.1). These loci were identified in a M.× domestica ‘Royal Gala’ X M. sieversii PI613981 family (GMAL4593) based on blue mold lesion diameter seven days post-inoculation in mature, wounded apple fruit inoculated with P. expansum. Phenotypic analyses were conducted in 169 progeny over a four year period. PI613981 was the source of the resistance allele for qM-Pe3.1, a QTL with a major effect on blue mold resistance, accounting for 27.5% of the experimental variability. The QTL mapped from 67.3 to 74 cM on linkage group 3 of the GMAL4593 genetic linkage map. qM-Pe10.1 mapped from 73.6 to 81.8 cM on linkage group 10. It had less of an effect on resistance, accounting for 14% of the experimental variation. ‘Royal Gala’ was the primary contributor to the resistance effect of this QTL. However, resistance-associated alleles in both parents appeared to contribute to the least square mean blue mold lesion diameter in an additive manner at qM-Pe10.1. A GMAL4593 genetic linkage map composed of simple sequence repeats and ‘Golden Delicious’ single nucleotide polymorphism markers was able to detect qM-Pe10.1, but failed to detect qM-Pe3.1. The subsequent addition of genotyping-by-sequencing markers to the linkage map provided better coverage of the PI613981 genome on linkage group 3 and facilitated discovery of q

  3. Quantitative trait loci that control body weight in DDD/Sgn and C57BL/6J inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Suto, Jun-Ichi; Kojima, Misaki

    2017-02-01

    Inbred DDD/Sgn mice are heavier than inbred C57BL/6J mice. In the present study, we performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping for body weight using R/qtl in reciprocal F2 male populations between the two strains. We identified four significant QTL on Chrs 1, 2, 5, and 17 (proximal region). The DDD/Sgn allele was associated with increased body weight at QTL on Chrs 1 and 5, and the DDD/Sgn allele was associated with decreased body weight at QTL on Chrs 2 and 17. A multiple regression analysis indicated that the detected QTL explain 30.94 % of the body weight variation. Because DDD/Sgn male mice have extremely high levels of circulating testosterone relative to other inbred mouse strains, we performed QTL mapping for plasma testosterone level to examine the effect of testosterone levels on body weight. We identified one suggestive QTL on Chr 5, which overlapped with body weight QTL. The DDD/Sgn allele was associated with increased testosterone level. Thus, we confirmed that there was a genetic basis for the changes in body weight and testosterone levels in male mice. These findings provide insights into the genetic mechanism by which body weight is controlled in male mice.

  4. Major quantitative trait loci control divergence in critical photoperiod for flowering between selfing and outcrossing species of monkeyflower (Mimulus).

    PubMed

    Fishman, Lila; Sweigart, Andrea L; Kenney, Amanda M; Campbell, Samantha

    2014-03-01

    • Divergence in flowering time is a key contributor to reproductive isolation between incipient species, as it enforces habitat specialization and causes assortative mating even in sympatry. Understanding the genetic basis of flowering time divergence illuminates the origins and maintenance of species barriers. • We investigated the genetics of divergence in critical photoperiod for flowering between yellow monkeyflowers Mimulus guttatus (outcrosser, summer flowering) and Mimulus nasutus (selfer, spring flowering). We used quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping of F2 hybrids and fine-mapping in nearly isogenic lines to characterize the genomic regions underlying a > 2 h critical photoperiod difference between allopatric populations, and then tested whether the same QTLs control flowering time in sympatry. • We identified two major QTLs that almost completely explain M. nasutus's ability to flower in early spring; they are shared by allopatric and sympatric population pairs. The smaller QTL is coincident with one that differentiates ecotypes within M. guttatus, but the larger effect QTL appears unique to M. nasutus. • Unlike floral traits associated with mating system divergence, large interspecific differences in flowering phenology depend on only a few loci. Major critical photoperiod QTLs may be 'speciation genes' and also restrict interspecific gene flow in secondary sympatry.

  5. Mapping quantitative trait loci controlling early growth in a (longleaf pine x slash pine) x slash pine BC(1) family.

    PubMed

    Weng, C.; Kubisiak, L.; Nelson, D.; Stine, M.

    2002-04-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were employed to map the genome and quantitative trait loci controlling the early growth of a pine hybrid F(1) tree ( Pinus palustris Mill. x P. elliottii Engl.) and a recurrent slash pine tree ( P. elliottii Engl.) in a (longleaf pine x slash pine) x slash pine BC(1) family consisting of 258 progeny. Of the 150 hybrid F(1) parent-specific RAPD markers, 133 were mapped into 17 linkage groups covering a genetic distance of 1,338.2 cM. Of the 116 slash pine parent-specific RAPD markers, 83 were mapped into 19 linkage groups covering a genetic distance of 994.6 cM. A total of 11 different marker intervals were found to be significantly associated with 13 of the 20 traits on height and diameter growth using MAPMAKER/QTL. Nine of the eleven marker intervals were unique to the hybrid parent 488 genome, and two were unique to the recurrent parent 18-27 genome. The amount of phenotypic variance explained by the putative QTLs ranged from 3.6% to 11.0%. Different QTLs were detected at different ages. Two marker intervals from the hybrid parent 488 were found to have QTL by environment interactions.

  6. Orthogonal control of expression mean and variance by epigenetic features at different genomic loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Siddharth S.; Foley, Jonathan E.; Limsirichai, Prajit; Schaffer, David V.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-05-05

    While gene expression noise has been shown to drive dramatic phenotypic variations, the molecular basis for this variability in mammalian systems is not well understood. Gene expression has been shown to be regulated by promoter architecture and the associated chromatin environment. However, the exact contribution of these two factors in regulating expression noise has not been explored. Using a dual-reporter lentiviral model system, we deconvolved the influence of the promoter sequence to systematically study the contribution of the chromatin environment at different genomic locations in regulating expression noise. By integrating a large-scale analysis to quantify mRNA levels by smFISH and protein levels by flow cytometry in single cells, we found that mean expression and noise are uncorrelated across genomic locations. Furthermore, we showed that this independence could be explained by the orthogonal control of mean expression by the transcript burst size and noise by the burst frequency. Finally, we showed that genomic locations displaying higher expression noise are associated with more repressed chromatin, thereby indicating the contribution of the chromatin environment in regulating expression noise.

  7. Orthogonal control of expression mean and variance by epigenetic features at different genomic loci

    DOE PAGES

    Dey, Siddharth S.; Foley, Jonathan E.; Limsirichai, Prajit; ...

    2015-05-05

    While gene expression noise has been shown to drive dramatic phenotypic variations, the molecular basis for this variability in mammalian systems is not well understood. Gene expression has been shown to be regulated by promoter architecture and the associated chromatin environment. However, the exact contribution of these two factors in regulating expression noise has not been explored. Using a dual-reporter lentiviral model system, we deconvolved the influence of the promoter sequence to systematically study the contribution of the chromatin environment at different genomic locations in regulating expression noise. By integrating a large-scale analysis to quantify mRNA levels by smFISH andmore » protein levels by flow cytometry in single cells, we found that mean expression and noise are uncorrelated across genomic locations. Furthermore, we showed that this independence could be explained by the orthogonal control of mean expression by the transcript burst size and noise by the burst frequency. Finally, we showed that genomic locations displaying higher expression noise are associated with more repressed chromatin, thereby indicating the contribution of the chromatin environment in regulating expression noise.« less

  8. Two Loci Control Phytoglycogen Production in the Monocellular Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    PubMed Central

    Dauvillée, David; Colleoni, Christophe; Mouille, Gregory; Buléon, Alain; Gallant, Daniel J.; Bouchet, Brigitte; Morell, Matthew K.; d'Hulst, Christophe; Myers, Alan M.; Ball, Steven G.

    2001-01-01

    The STA8 locus of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was identified in a genetic screen as a factor that controls starch biosynthesis. Mutations of STA8 cause a significant reduction in the amount of granular starch produced during nutrient limitation and accumulate phytoglycogen. The granules remaining in sta8 mutants are misshapen, and the abundance of amylose and long chains in amylopectin is altered. Mutations of the STA7 locus, which completely lack isoamylase activity, also cause accumulation of phytoglycogen, although sta8 and sta7 mutants differ in that there is a complete loss of granular starch in the latter. This is the first instance in which mutations of two different genetic elements in one plant species have been shown to cause phytoglycogen accumulation. An analytical procedure that allows assay of isoamylase in total extracts was developed and used to show that sta8 mutations cause a 65% reduction in the level of this activity. All other enzymes known to be involved in starch biosynthesis were shown to be unaffected in sta8 mutants. The same amount of total isoamylase activity (approximately) as that present in sta8 mutants was observed in heterozygous triploids containing two sta7 mutant alleles and one wild-type allele. This strain, however, accumulates normal levels of starch granules and lacks phytoglycogen. The total level of isoamylase activity, therefore, is not the major determinant of whether granule production is reduced and phytoglycogen accumulates. Instead, a qualitative property of the isoamylase that is affected by the sta8 mutation is likely to be the critical factor in phytoglycogen production. PMID:11299352

  9. Vav1 and Rac Control Chemokine-promoted T Lymphocyte Adhesion Mediated by the Integrin α4β1D⃞

    PubMed Central

    García-Bernal, David; Wright, Natalia; Sotillo-Mallo, Elena; Nombela-Arrieta, César; Stein, Jens V.; Bustelo, Xosé R.; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2005-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL12 promotes T lymphocyte adhesion mediated by the integrin α4β1. CXCL12 activates the GTPase Rac, as well as Vav1, a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor for Rac, concomitant with up-regulation of α4β1-dependent adhesion. Inhibition of CXCL12-promoted Rac and Vav1 activation by transfection of dominant negative Rac or Vav1 forms, or by transfection of their siRNA, remarkably impaired the increase in T lymphocyte attachment to α4β1 ligands in response to this chemokine. Importantly, inhibition of Vav1 expression by RNA interference resulted in a blockade of Rac activation in response to CXCL12. Adhesions in flow chambers and soluble binding assays using these transfectants indicated that initial ligand binding and adhesion strengthening mediated by α4β1 were dependent on Vav1 and Rac activation by CXCL12. Finally, CXCL12-promoted T-cell transendothelial migration involving α4β1-mediated adhesion was notably inhibited by expression of dominant negative Vav1 and Rac. These results indicate that activation of Vav1-Rac signaling pathway by CXCL12 represents an important inside-out event controlling efficient up-regulation of α4β1-dependent T lymphocyte adhesion. PMID:15872091

  10. Quality control of the total lymphocyte count parameter obtained from routine haematology analyzers, and its relevance in HIV management.

    PubMed

    Marshall, S; Sippy, N; Broome, H; Abayomi, A

    2006-06-01

    Lylmphocyte subsets/CD4 T Helper cell enumeration in HIV care and treatment in resource constrained settings can be difficult to ascertain as a result of the lack of the necessary instrumentation, capacity and infrastructure. However. it is imperative to gain such information for patient monitoring in HIV. The Total Lymphocyte Count (TLC) is useful as a surrogate marker for CD4 count as recommended by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and to calculate CD4% for pacdiatric use. This study therefore sets out to determine and compare the accuracy of the total lymphocyte counts obtained from three haematology analysers designated A. B and C. that are in regular use for routine haemnatological parameters at the main referral hospital in Barbados. West Indies. The TLC of 263 HIV treatment naive individuals attending the HIV Reference Unit in Barbados were enumnerated on the three haematology analysers. The lymphosumn (Sum of lymphocyte subsets: T-helper cell. T-cytotoxic cells. B lymphocytes and Natural killer cells) should be equal to the TLC. and is derived by immunophenotypic analysis on a 4-colour flowcytometer. Machine C had the highest positive correlation between the TLC and the lymphosumn with and R' of 0.9031 compared to machine A with an R values of 0.7119 and Machine B with R(2) values of 0.637. These results show that there can be dramatic inaccuracies when using routine haematology analysers for both routine use. as a surrogate marker of CD4 or for derivation of CD4% in HIV management. It further demonstrates that all haematology analyzers require some form of Quality control. The possible lack of accuracy of the TLC by haematology analysers should be taken into consideration when following the recommendations of the WHO in resource poor settings or using it as a denominator for calculating CD4%.

  11. A search for quantitative trait loci controlling within-individual variation of physical activity traits in mice.

    PubMed

    Leamy, Larry J; Pomp, Daniel; Lightfoot, J Timothy

    2010-09-21

    In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that physical inactivity can predispose individuals to a host of health problems. While many studies have analyzed the effect of various environmental factors on activity, we know much less about the genetic control of physical activity. Some studies in mice have discovered quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing various physical activity traits, but mostly have analyzed inter-individual variation rather than variation in activity within individuals over time. We conducted a genome scan to identify QTLs controlling the distance, duration, and time run by mice over seven consecutive three-day intervals in an F2 population created by crossing two inbred strains (C57L/J and C3H/HeJ) that differed widely (average of nearly 300%) in their activity levels. Our objectives were (a) to see if we would find QTLs not originally discovered in a previous investigation that assessed these traits over the entire 21-day period and (b) to see if some of these QTLs discovered might affect the activity traits only in the early or in the late time intervals. This analysis uncovered 39 different QTLs, over half of which were new. Some QTLs affected the activity traits only in the early time intervals and typically exhibited significant dominance effects whereas others affected activity only in the later age intervals and exhibited less dominance. We also analyzed the regression slopes of the activity traits over the intervals, and found several QTLs affecting these traits that generally mapped to unique genomic locations. It was concluded that the genetic architecture of physical activity in mice is much more complicated than has previously been recognized, and may change considerably depending on the age at which various activity measures are assessed.

  12. Romidepsin Controls Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia in a Patient with Mycosis Fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Lemchak, David. M.; Akilov, Oleg. E.

    2016-01-01

    Romidepsin belongs to a class of medications called histone deacetylase inhibitors and is currently approved for treatment of cutaneous and peripheral T-cell lymphomas. Romidepsin was previously investigated for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and demonstrated potential benefit, but interest in its use declined following phase I clinical trials that showed poor tolerance of a significant side effect profile. We presented a patient with a history of stage II CLL, referred to dermatology for treatment of new-onset of mycosis fungoides (MF), who was treated with romidepsin over seven months. The patient achieved a partial response with 50% decrease in body surface area occupied by MF, thinning of remaining plaques, and near complete response in his CLL. His absolute lymphocyte count remained within the normal range for four months following discontinuation of romidepsin. Side effects were well-tolerated and did not limit therapy. Current literature on romidepsin is reviewed and compared to existing treatments for CLL. PMID:27994839

  13. T-lymphocyte passive deformation is controlled by unfolding of membrane surface reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Guillou, Lionel; Babataheri, Avin; Saitakis, Michael; Bohineust, Armelle; Dogniaux, Stéphanie; Hivroz, Claire; Barakat, Abdul I.; Husson, Julien

    2016-01-01

    T-lymphocytes in the human body routinely undergo large deformations, both passively, when going through narrow capillaries, and actively, when transmigrating across endothelial cells or squeezing through tissue. We investigate physical factors that enable and limit such deformations and explore how passive and active deformations may differ. Employing micropipette aspiration to mimic squeezing through narrow capillaries, we find that T-lymphocytes maintain a constant volume while they increase their apparent membrane surface area upon aspiration. Human resting T-lymphocytes, T-lymphoblasts, and the leukemic Jurkat T-cells all exhibit membrane rupture above a critical membrane area expansion that is independent of either micropipette size or aspiration pressure. The unfolded membrane matches the excess membrane contained in microvilli and membrane folds, as determined using scanning electron microscopy. In contrast, during transendothelial migration, a form of active deformation, we find that the membrane surface exceeds by a factor of two the amount of membrane stored in microvilli and folds. These results suggest that internal membrane reservoirs need to be recruited, possibly through exocytosis, for large active deformations to occur. PMID:27605708

  14. Quantitative trait loci associated with constitutive traits control water use in pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br].

    PubMed

    Aparna, K; Nepolean, T; Srivastsava, R K; Kholová, J; Rajaram, V; Kumar, S; Rekha, B; Senthilvel, S; Hash, C T; Vadez, V

    2015-09-01

    There is substantial genetic variation for drought adaption in pearl millet in terms of traits controlling plant water use. It is important to understand genomic regions responsible for these traits. Here, F7 recombinant inbred lines were used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) and allelic interactions for traits affecting plant water use, and their relevance is discussed for crop productivity in water-limited environments. Four QTL contributed to increased transpiration rate under high vapour pressure deficit (VPD) conditions, all with alleles from drought-sensitive parent ICMB 841. Of these four QTL, a major QTL (35.7%) was mapped on linkage group (LG) 6. The alleles for 863B at this QTL decreased transpiration rate and this QTL co-mapped to a previously detected LG 6 QTL, with alleles from 863B for grain weight and panicle harvest index across severe terminal drought stress environments. This provided additional support for a link between water saving from a lower transpiration rate under high VPD and drought tolerance. 863B alleles in this same genomic region also increased shoot weight, leaf area and total transpiration under well-watered conditions. One unexpected outcome was reduced transpiration under high VPD (15%) from the interaction of two alleles for high VPD transpiration (LG 6 (B), 40.7) and specific leaf mass and biomass (LG 7 (A), 35.3), (A, allele from ICMB 841, B, allele from 863B, marker position). The LG 6 QTL appears to combine alleles for growth potential, beneficial for non-stress conditions, and for saving water under high evaporative demand, beneficial under stressful conditions. Mapping QTL for water-use traits, and assessing their interactions offers considerable potential for improving pearl millet adaptation to specific stress conditions through physiology-informed marker-assisted selection. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  15. Mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling adaptive traits in coastal Douglas-fir. I. Timing of vegetative bud flush.

    Treesearch

    K.D. Jermstad; D.L. Bassoni; K.S. Jech; N.C. Wheeler; D.B. Neale

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Thirty three unique quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting the timing of spring bud flush have been identified in an intraspecific mapping population of coastal Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco var. menziesii]. Both terminal and lateral bud flush were measured over a 4-year period on clonal replicates at two test sites, allowing for the...

  16. Design of high-affinity major histocompatibility complex-specific antagonist peptides that inhibit cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity: implications for control of viral disease.

    PubMed

    Gairin, J E; Oldstone, M B

    1992-11-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) recognize viral antigens presented by infected cells in the context of their major histocompatibility complex glycoproteins. The irreversible killing of virus-infected cells by virus-specific CTLs can be the cause of serious disease, particularly in the central nervous, hepatic, and cardiovascular systems. Design of molecules controlling (blocking) interaction between CTLs and infected cells, and their further use to inhibit (or antagonize) T-lymphocyte activity, is an important pharmacologic goal. In this report, we describe the design of a new family of peptides which selectively inhibit activity of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes, which recognize endogenously processed viral epitopes presented by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules.

  17. Design of high-affinity major histocompatibility complex-specific antagonist peptides that inhibit cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity: implications for control of viral disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gairin, J E; Oldstone, M B

    1992-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) recognize viral antigens presented by infected cells in the context of their major histocompatibility complex glycoproteins. The irreversible killing of virus-infected cells by virus-specific CTLs can be the cause of serious disease, particularly in the central nervous, hepatic, and cardiovascular systems. Design of molecules controlling (blocking) interaction between CTLs and infected cells, and their further use to inhibit (or antagonize) T-lymphocyte activity, is an important pharmacologic goal. In this report, we describe the design of a new family of peptides which selectively inhibit activity of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes, which recognize endogenously processed viral epitopes presented by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. PMID:1383569

  18. Species-specific differences in tissue-specific expression of alcohol dehydrogenase are under the control of complex cis-acting loci: Evidence from Drosophila hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ranganayakulu, G.; Reddy, A.R. ); Kirkpatrick, R.B.; Martin, P.F. )

    1991-12-01

    Differences in the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase in the hindgut and testis of adult Drosophila virilis, D. texana, D. novamexicana and D. borealis flies were observed. These heritable differences do not arise due to chromosomal rearrangements, since the polytene chromosome banding patterns did not reveal any such gross chromosomal rearrangements near the Adh locus in any of the tested species. Analysis of the interspecific hybrids revealed that these differences are controlled by complex cis-acting genetic loci. Further, the cis-acting locus controlling the expression of ADH in testis was found to be separable by crossing-over.

  19. Epigenomic analysis of the HOX gene loci reveals mechanisms that may control canonical expression patterns in AML and normal hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D H; Young, M A; Lamprecht, T L; Helton, N M; Fulton, R; O'Laughlin, M; Fronick, C; Magrini, V; Demeter, R T; Miller, C A; Klco, J M; Wilson, R K; Ley, T J

    2015-06-01

    HOX genes are highly expressed in many acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples, but the patterns of expression and associated regulatory mechanisms are not clearly understood. We analyzed RNA sequencing data from 179 primary AML samples and normal hematopoietic cells to understand the range of expression patterns in normal versus leukemic cells. HOX expression in AML was restricted to specific genes in the HOXA or HOXB loci, and was highly correlated with recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities. However, the majority of samples expressed a canonical set of HOXA and HOXB genes that was nearly identical to the expression signature of normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Transcriptional profiles at the HOX loci were similar between normal cells and AML samples, and involved bidirectional transcription at the center of each gene cluster. Epigenetic analysis of a subset of AML samples also identified common regions of chromatin accessibility in AML samples and normal CD34(+) cells that displayed differences in methylation depending on HOX expression patterns. These data provide an integrated epigenetic view of the HOX gene loci in primary AML samples, and suggest that HOX expression in most AML samples represents a normal stem cell program that is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms at specific regulatory elements.

  20. Genetic bases of estrogen-induced tumorigenesis in the rat: mapping of loci controlling susceptibility to mammary cancer in a Brown Norway x ACI intercross.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Beverly S; Lachel, Cynthia M; Pennington, Karen L; Murrin, Clare R; Strecker, Tracy E; Tochacek, Martin; Gould, Karen A; Meza, Jane L; McComb, Rodney D; Shull, James D

    2006-08-01

    Exposure to estrogens is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Our laboratory has shown that the ACI rat is uniquely susceptible to 17beta-estradiol (E2)-induced mammary cancer. We previously mapped two loci, Emca1 and Emca2 (estrogen-induced mammary cancer), that act independently to determine susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer in crosses between the susceptible ACI rat strain and the genetically related, but resistant, Copenhagen (COP) rat strain. In this study, we evaluate susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer in a cross between the ACI strain and the unrelated Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. Whereas nearly 100% of the ACI rats developed mammary cancer when treated continuously with E2, BN rats did not develop palpable mammary cancer during the 196-day course of E2 treatment. Susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer segregated as a dominant or incompletely dominant trait in a cross between BN females and ACI males. In a population of 251 female (BN x ACI)F(2) rats, we observed evidence for a total of five genetic determinants of susceptibility. Two loci, Emca4 and Emca5, were identified when mammary cancer status at sacrifice was evaluated as the phenotype, and three additional loci, Emca6, Emca7, and Emca8, were identified when mammary cancer number was evaluated as the phenotype. A total of three genetic interactions were identified. These data indicate that susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer in the BN x ACI cross behaves as a complex trait controlled by at least five loci and multiple gene-gene interactions.

  1. Human T lymphocytes express N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors functionally active in controlling T cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Miglio, Gianluca; Varsaldi, Federica; Lombardi, Grazia . E-mail: lombardi@pharm.unipmn.it

    2005-12-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and the functional role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in human T cells. RT-PCR analysis showed that human resting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and Jurkat T cells express genes encoding for both NR1 and NR2B subunits: phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated PBL also expresses both these genes and the NR2A and NR2D genes. Cytofluorimetric analysis showed that NR1 expression increases as a consequence of PHA (10 {mu}g/ml) treatment. D-(-)-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5), and (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine [(+)-MK 801], competitive and non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists, respectively, inhibited PHA-induced T cell proliferation, whereas they did not affect IL-2 (10 U/ml)-induced proliferation of PHA blasts. These effects were due to the prevention of T cell activation (inhibition of cell aggregate formation and CD25 expression), but not to cell cycle arrest or death. These results demonstrate that human T lymphocytes express NMDA receptors, which are functionally active in controlling cell activation.

  2. Directionality of Fission Yeast Mating-Type Interconversion Is Controlled by the Location of the Donor Loci

    PubMed Central

    Thon, G.; Klar, AJS.

    1993-01-01

    Cells of homothallic strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe efficiently switch between two mating types called P and M. The phenotypic switches are due to conversion of the expressed mating-type locus (mat1) by two closely linked silent loci, mat2-P and mat3-M, that contain unexpressed information for the P and M mating types, respectively. In this process, switching-competent cells switch to the opposite mating type in 72-90% of the cell divisions. Hence, mat2-P is a preferred donor of information to mat1 in M cells, whereas mat3-M is a preferred donor in P cells. We investigated the reason for the donor preference by constructing a strain in which the genetic contents of the donor loci were swapped. We found that switching to the opposite mating type was very inefficient in that strain. This shows that the location of the silent cassettes in the chromosome, rather than their content, is the deciding factor for recognition of the donor for each cell type. We propose a model in which switching is achieved by regulating accessibility of the donor loci, perhaps by changing the chromatin structure in the mating-type region, thus promoting an intrachromosomal folding of mat2 or mat3 onto mat1 in a cell type-specific fashion. We also present evidence for the involvement of the Swi6 and Swi6-mod trans-acting factors in the donor-choice mechanism. We suggest that these factors participate in forming the proposed folded structure. PMID:8375648

  3. Directionality of fission yeast mating-type interconversion is controlled by the location of the donor loci.

    PubMed

    Thon, G; Klar, A J

    1993-08-01

    Cells of homothallic strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe efficiently switch between two mating types called P and M. The phenotypic switches are due to conversion of the expressed mating-type locus (mat1) by two closely linked silent loci, mat2-P and mat3-M, that contain unexpressed information for the P and M mating types, respectively. In this process, switching-competent cells switch to the opposite mating type in 72-90% of the cell divisions. Hence, mat2-P is a preferred donor of information to mat1 in M cells, whereas mat3-M is a preferred donor in P cells. We investigated the reason for the donor preference by constructing a strain in which the genetic contents of the donor loci were swapped. We found that switching to the opposite mating type was very inefficient in that strain. This shows that the location of the silent cassettes in the chromosome, rather than their content, is the deciding factor for recognition of the donor for each cell type. We propose a model in which switching is achieved by regulating accessibility of the donor loci, perhaps by changing the chromatin structure in the mating-type region, thus promoting an intrachromosomal folding of mat2 or mat3 onto mat1 in a cell type-specific fashion. We also present evidence for the involvement of the Swi6 and Swi6-mod trans-acting factors in the donor-choice mechanism. We suggest that these factors participate in forming the proposed folded structure.

  4. Successful use of Bruton's kinase inhibitor, ibrutinib, to control paraneoplastic pemphigus in a patient with paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew; Sandhu, Suneet; Imlay-Gillespie, Louise; Mulligan, Stephen; Shumack, Stephen

    2017-03-13

    We present the case of a 51-year-old man who developed paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP) in the context of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). His CLL was successfully controlled with ibrutinib. Concurrently, there was significant improvement of his PNP, suggesting that ibrutinib may be a very useful addition to the treatment options in this potentially life-threatening autoimmune disorder.

  5. Proteomic analysis of resistance mediated by Rcm 2.0 and Rcm 5.1, two loci controlling resistance to bacterial canker of tomato.

    PubMed

    Coaker, Gitta L; Willard, Belinda; Kinter, Michael; Stockinger, Eric J; Francis, David M

    2004-09-01

    Two quantitative trait loci from Lycopersicon hirsutum, Rcm 2.0 and Rcm 5.1, control resistance to Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, the causal agent of bacterial canker of tomato. Lines containing Rcm 2.0 and Rcm 5.1 and a susceptible control line were compared at 72 and 144 h postinoculation, using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis to identify proteins regulated in response to C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis infection. A total of 47 proteins were subjected to tandem mass spectrometry. Database queries with resulting spectra identified tomato genes for 26 proteins. The remaining 21 proteins were either identified in other species or possessed no homology to known proteins. Spectra were interpreted to deduce peptide amino acid sequences that were then used to query publicly available data. This approach identified tomato genes or expressed sequence tags for 44 of the proteins analyzed. Three superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes were differentially regulated among genotypes, and patterns of hydrogen peroxide accumulation were genotype- and tissue-specific, indicating a role for oxidative stress in response to C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. Steady-state mRNA and protein levels for SOD, thioredoxin M-type, S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase, and pathogenesis-related proteins demonstrated similar patterns of differential regulation. Lines containing Rcm 2.0 and Rcm 5.1 accumulate different proteins and steady-state mRNAs in response to inoculation, suggesting that the two loci may confer resistance through distinct mechanisms.

  6. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strains expressing nitrate reductase under control of the cabII-1 promoter: isolation of chlorate resistant mutants and identification of new loci for nitrate assimilation.

    PubMed

    Navarro, María Teresa; Mariscal, Vicente; Macías, María Isabel; Fernández, Emilio; Galván, Aurora

    2005-01-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain Tx11-8 is a transgenic alga that bears the nitrate reductase gene (Nia1) under control of the CabII-1 gene promoter (CabII-1-Nia1). Approximately nine copies of the chimeric CabII-1-Nia1 gene were found to be integrated in this strain and to confer a phenotype of chlorate sensitivity in the presence of ammonium. We have used this strain for the isolation of spontaneous chlorate resistant mutants in the presence of ammonium that were found to be defective at loci involved in MoCo metabolism and light-dependent growth in nitrate media. Of a total of 45 mutant strains analyzed first, 44 were affected in the MoCo activity (16 Nit(-), unable to grow in nitrate, and 28 Nit(+), able to grow in nitrate). All the Nit(-) strains lacked MoCo activity. Diploid complementation of Nit(-), MoCo(-) strains with C. reinhardtii MoCo mutants and genetic analysis indicated that some strains were defective at known loci for MoCo biosynthesis, while three strains were defective at two new loci, hereafter named Nit10 and Nit11. The other 28 Nit(+) strains showed almost undetectable MoCo activity or activity was below 20% of the parental strain. Second, only one strain (named 23c(+)) showed MoCo and NR activities comparable to those in the parental strain. Strain 23c(+) seems to be affected in a locus, Nit12, required for growth in nitrate under continuous light. It is proposed that this locus is required for nitrate/chlorate transport activity. In this work, mechanisms of chlorate toxicity are reviewed in the light of our results.

  7. Identification of sex-specific quantitative trait loci controlling alcohol preference in C57BL/ 6 mice.

    PubMed

    Melo, J A; Shendure, J; Pociask, K; Silver, L M

    1996-06-01

    Mice from various inbred strains consume alcoholic beverages at highly reproducible and strain-specific levels. While most mice consume alcohol in moderate amounts, C57BL/6J animals exhibit sustained oral ingestion of high levels of alcohol in the presence of competing water and food. We now report a genetic investigation of this phenotype as one potential model for alcoholism. An intercross-backcross breeding protocol was used to identify two recessive alcohol preference quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that are both sex-restricted in expression. A comparison of our results with those of an earlier morphine preference study argues against the hypothesis of a single unified phenotype defined by a preference for all euphoria-producing drugs.

  8. An Image-Based Genetic Assay Identifies Genes in T1D Susceptibility Loci Controlling Cellular Antiviral Immunity in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Juan; Jijon, Humberto B.; Kim, Ira R.; Goel, Gautam; Doan, Aivi; Sokol, Harry; Bauer, Hermann; Herrmann, Bernhard G.; Lassen, Kara G.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of complex diseases, such as type 1 diabetes (T1D), derives from interactions between host genetics and environmental factors. Previous studies have suggested that viral infection plays a significant role in initiation of T1D in genetically predisposed individuals. T1D susceptibility loci may therefore be enriched in previously uncharacterized genes functioning in antiviral defense pathways. To identify genes involved in antiviral immunity, we performed an image-based high-throughput genetic screen using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) against 161 genes within T1D susceptibility loci. RAW 264.7 cells transduced with shRNAs were infected with GFP-expressing herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and fluorescent microscopy was performed to assess the viral infectivity by fluorescence reporter activity. Of the 14 candidates identified with high confidence, two candidates were selected for further investigation, Il27 and Tagap. Administration of recombinant IL-27 during viral infection was found to act synergistically with interferon gamma (IFN-γ) to activate expression of type I IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines, and to enhance the activities of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). Consistent with a role in antiviral immunity, Tagap-deficient macrophages demonstrated increased viral replication, reduced expression of proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, and decreased production of IFN-β. Taken together, our unbiased loss-of-function genetic screen identifies genes that play a role in host antiviral immunity and delineates roles for IL-27 and Tagap in the production of antiviral cytokines. PMID:25268627

  9. Genetic control of pear rootstock-induced dwarfing and precocity is linked to a chromosomal region syntenic to the apple Dw1 loci.

    PubMed

    Knäbel, Mareike; Friend, Adam P; Palmer, John W; Diack, Robert; Wiedow, Claudia; Alspach, Peter; Deng, Cecilia; Gardiner, Susan E; Tustin, D Stuart; Schaffer, Robert; Foster, Toshi; Chagné, David

    2015-09-22

    The vigour and precocity of trees highly influences their efficiency in commercial production. In apple, dwarfing rootstocks allow high-density plantings while their precocious flowering enables earlier fruit production. Currently, there is a lack of pear (Pyrus communis L.) rootstocks that are equivalent to the high yielding apple rootstock 'M9'. For the efficient breeding of new Pyrus rootstocks it is crucial to understand the genetic determinants of vigour control and precocity. In this study we used quantitative trait loci (QTLs) analysis to identify genetic loci associated with the desired traits, using a segregating population of 405 F1 P. communis seedlings from a cross between 'Old Home' and 'Louise Bonne de Jersey' (OHxLBJ). The seedlings were grafted as rootstocks with 'Doyenne du Comice' scions and comprehensively phenotyped over four growing seasons for traits related to tree architecture and flowering, in order to describe the growth of the scions. A high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genetic map comprising 597 polymorphic pear and 113 apple markers enabled the detection of QTLs influencing expression of scion vigour and precocity located on linkage groups (LG)5 and LG6 of 'Old Home'. The LG5 QTL maps to a position that is syntenic to the apple 'Malling 9' ('M9') Dw1 locus at the upper end of LG5. An allele of a simple sequence repeat (SSR) associated with apple Dw1 segregated with dwarfing and precocity in pear and was identified in other pear germplasm accessions. The orthology of the vigour-controlling LG5 QTL between apple and pear raises the possibility that the dwarfing locus Dw1 arose before the divergence of apple and pear, and might therefore be present in other Rosaceae species. We report the first QTLs associated with vigour control and flowering traits in pear rootstocks. Orthologous loci were found to control scion growth and precocity in apple and pear rootstocks. The application of our results may assist in the

  10. Additional rabbit IgA allotypes, f69, f70, g76,g77: control by the C alphaf and C alphag loci.

    PubMed

    Lammert, J M; Dray, S; Knight, K L; Hanly, W C

    1977-04-01

    Genetic and immunochemical studies have led to the identification of four additional rabbit IgA allotypes controlled by the Calphaf and Calphag loci. The folowing linkage combinations of the VHa and the 'new' alleles were observed among the populations of rabbits studied: a1f70g76, a1f69g77, and a2f69g77. Cross-reactions among g74, g76, and g77 molecules with various anti-g anti-allotype antisera indicate that the IgA-g allotypic specificities are comprised of multiple antigenic determinants. These studies provide a basis for further understanding of the evolution and gnetic control of the immunoglobulin heavy chain chromosomal region.

  11. Lymphocyte Transformation in Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tschudi, E. Irene; Anziano, Dante F.; Dalmasso, Agustin P.

    1972-01-01

    The in vitro response of human peripheral lymphocytes to Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) cruzi antigens and to phytohemagglutinin was used to study the role of cellular immunity in Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis). Solubilized T. cruzi antigens elicited 5 to 30% transformed cells in 5-day cultures of lymphocytes from adults chronically infected with T. cruzi. No major difference was noted between the response of 22 asymptomatic individuals and of 3 patients with chagasic cardiopathy. No correlation was found between degree of lymphocytic transformation and serum antibody titer. Lymphocytes from 15 normal controls yielded no significant transformation. Intradermal tests provoked a local delayed hypersensitivity reaction in infected individuals only, as evaluated clinically and histologically. The response to phytohemagglutinin of lymphocytes from chronically infected individuals was identical with that of normal controls. Images PMID:4629392

  12. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 expression in macrophages is controlled by lymphocytes during macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chong; Yang, Xiqiang; Yao, Lan; Jiang, Liping; Liu, Wei; Li, Xin; Wang, Lijia

    2012-01-01

    The viewpoints on the control of innate immune cells by the adaptive immune system during sepsis remain controversial. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) is essential to the negative control of innate immunity and suppresses the activation of macrophages by inhibiting activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). The purpose of the current study was to observe inflammatory response and macrophage activation in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with endotoxemia and to determine the role of MKP-1 in the control of macrophage activation by the adaptive immune system. Endotoxemia was induced in wild-type and SCID mice by an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and all of the SCID mice died. SCID mice produced more inflammatory cytokines than BALB/c mice systemically and locally. TNF-α mRNA expression was higher and MKP-1 mRNA expression was lower in peritoneal macrophages (PMa) from SCID mice compared to PMa from wild-type mice after and even before LPS injection. Thioglycollate-stimulated PMa from wild-type mice were stimulated with LPS in vitro in the presence or absence of pan-T cells. The levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were higher in the supernatants from PMa cultured alone compared to PMa co-cultured with pan-T cells, and PMa MKP-1 mRNA and protein expression were higher when PMa were co-cultured with pan-T cells. Therefore, pan-T cells can up-regulate MKP-1 expression in macrophages and inhibit the secretion of inflammatory cytokines secretion by macrophages. In SCID mice, lymphocyte deficiency, especially T cell deficiency, causes insufficient MKP-1 expression in macrophages, which can be responsible for the severe inflammation and bad prognosis of septic SCID mice. MKP-1 plays an important role in the control of macrophage activation by the adaptive immune system.

  13. Identification of genes for controlling swine adipose deposition by integrating transcriptome, whole-genome resequencing, and quantitative trait loci data

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Kai; Zhu, Feng; Zhai, LiWei; Chen, ShaoKang; Tan, Zhen; Sun, YangYang; Hou, ZhuoCheng; Wang, ChuDuan

    2016-01-01

    Backfat thickness is strongly associated with meat quality, fattening efficiency, reproductive performance, and immunity in pigs. Fat storage and fatty acid synthesis mainly occur in adipose tissue. Therefore, we used a high-throughput massively parallel sequencing approach to identify transcriptomes in adipose tissue, and whole-genome differences from three full-sibling pairs of pigs with opposite (high and low) backfat thickness phenotypes. We obtained an average of 38.69 million reads for six samples, 78.68% of which were annotated in the reference genome. Eighty-nine overlapping differentially expressed genes were identified among the three pair comparisons. Whole-genome resequencing also detected multiple genetic variations between the pools of DNA from the two groups. Compared with the animal quantitative trait loci (QTL) database, 20 differentially expressed genes were matched to the QTLs associated with fatness in pigs. Our technique of integrating transcriptome, whole-genome resequencing, and QTL database information provided a rich source of important differentially expressed genes and variations. Associate analysis between selected SNPs and backfat thickness revealed that two SNPs and one haplotype of ME1 significantly affected fat deposition in pigs. Moreover, genetic analysis confirmed that variations in the differentially expressed genes may affect fat deposition. PMID:26996612

  14. Genetic control of T cell responsiveness to the Friend murine leukemia virus envelope antigen. Identification of class II loci of the H-2 as immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    T cells primed specifically for the envelope glycoprotein of Friend murine leukemia helper virus (F-MuLV) were prepared by immunizing mice with a recombinant vaccinia virus that expressed the entire env gene of F-MuLV. Significant proliferative responses of F-MuLV envelope- specific, H-2a/b T cells were observed when the T cells were stimulated with antigen-pulsed peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) having the b allele at the K, A beta, A alpha, and E beta loci of the H-2. On the other hand, PEC having only the kappa allele at these loci did not induce the envelope-specific T cell proliferation, even when the PEC had the b allele at the E alpha, S, or D loci. F-MuLV envelope-specific proliferation of H-2a/b T cells under the stimulation of antigen- pulsed, H-2a/b PEC was specifically blocked with anti-I-Ab and anti-I- Ek mAbs but not with anti-Kb, anti-Kk, or anti-I-Ak mAbs. Moreover, (B10.MBR x A/WySn)F1 mice that have the b allele only at the K locus but not in I-A subregion were nonresponders to the envelope glycoprotein, and the bm12 mutation at the A beta locus completely abolished the T cell responsiveness to this antigen. These results indicate that proliferative T cells recognize a limited number of epitopes on F-MuLV envelope protein in the context of I-Ab, hybrid I- Ak/b, and/or hybrid I-Ek/b class II MHC molecules but fail to recognize the same envelope protein in the context of I-Ak or I-Ek molecules. This influence of the H-2I region on T cell recognition of the envelope glycoprotein appeared to control in vivo induction of protective immunity against Friend virus complex after immunization with the vaccinia-F-MuLV env vaccine. Thus, these results provide, for the first time, direct evidence for Ir gene-controlled responder/nonresponder phenotypes influencing the immune response to a pathogenic virus of mice. PMID:3141552

  15. Genetic evidence that two independent S-loci control RNase-based self-incompatibility in diploid strawberry

    PubMed Central

    Bošković, Radovan I.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Tobutt, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    The self-incompatibility mechanism that reduces inbreeding in many plants of the Rosaceae is attributed to a multi-allelic S locus which, in the Prunoideae and Maloideae subfamilies, comprises two complementary genes, a stylar-expressed S-RNase and a pollen-expressed SFB. To elucidate incompatibility in the subfamily Rosoideae, stylar-specific RNases and self-(in)compatibility status were analysed in various diploid strawberries, especially Fragaria nubicola and F. viridis, both self-incompatible, and F. vesca, self-compatible, and in various progenies derived from them. Unexpectedly, two unlinked RNase loci, S and T, were found, encoding peptides distinct from Prunoideae and Maloideae S-RNases; the presence of a single active allele at either is sufficient to confer self-incompatibility. By contrast, in diploid Maloideae and Prunoideae a single locus encodes S-RNases that share several conserved regions and two active alleles are required for self-incompatibility. Our evidence implicates the S locus in unilateral inter-specific incompatibility and shows that S and T RNases can, remarkably, confer not only allele-specific rejection of cognate pollen but also unspecific rejection of Sn Tn pollen, where n indicates a null allele, consistent with the the presence of the pollen component, SFB, activating the cognitive function of these RNases. Comparison of relevant linkage groups between Fragaria and Prunus suggests that Prunus S-RNases, unique in having two introns, may have resulted from gene conversion in an ancestor of Prunus. In addition, it is shown that there is a non-S locus that is essential for self-incompatibility in diploid Fragaria. PMID:20008462

  16. A Well-Controlled Experimental System to Study Interactions of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes with Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Natalie J; Soneson, Charlotte; Barras, David; Baumgaertner, Petra; Rimoldi, Donata; Delorenzi, Mauro; Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A; Speiser, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    While T cell-based immunotherapies are steadily improving, there are still many patients who progress, despite T cell-infiltrated tumors. Emerging evidence suggests that T cells themselves may provoke immune escape of cancer cells. Here, we describe a well-controlled co-culture system for studying the dynamic T cell - cancer cell interplay, using human melanoma as a model. We explain starting material, controls, and culture parameters to establish reproducible and comparable cultures with highly heterogeneous tumor cells. Low passage melanoma cell lines and melanoma-specific CD8+ T cell clones generated from patient blood were cultured together for up to 3 days. Living melanoma cells were isolated from the co-culture system by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We demonstrate that the characterization of isolated melanoma cells is feasible using flow cytometry for protein expression analysis as well as an Agilent whole human genome microarray and the NanoString technology for differential gene expression analysis. In addition, we identify five genes (ALG12, GUSB, RPLP0, KRBA2, and ADAT2) that are stably expressed in melanoma cells independent of the presence of T cells or the T cell-derived cytokines IFNγ and TNFα. These genes are essential for correct normalization of gene expression data by NanoString. Further to the characterization of melanoma cells after exposure to CTLs, this experimental system might be suitable to answer a series of questions, including how the affinity of CTLs for their target antigen influences the melanoma cell response and whether CTL-induced gene expression changes in melanoma cells are reversible. Taken together, our human T cell - melanoma cell culture system is well suited to characterize immune-related mechanisms in cancer cells.

  17. A Well-Controlled Experimental System to Study Interactions of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes with Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Natalie J.; Soneson, Charlotte; Barras, David; Baumgaertner, Petra; Rimoldi, Donata; Delorenzi, Mauro; Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A.; Speiser, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    While T cell-based immunotherapies are steadily improving, there are still many patients who progress, despite T cell-infiltrated tumors. Emerging evidence suggests that T cells themselves may provoke immune escape of cancer cells. Here, we describe a well-controlled co-culture system for studying the dynamic T cell – cancer cell interplay, using human melanoma as a model. We explain starting material, controls, and culture parameters to establish reproducible and comparable cultures with highly heterogeneous tumor cells. Low passage melanoma cell lines and melanoma-specific CD8+ T cell clones generated from patient blood were cultured together for up to 3 days. Living melanoma cells were isolated from the co-culture system by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We demonstrate that the characterization of isolated melanoma cells is feasible using flow cytometry for protein expression analysis as well as an Agilent whole human genome microarray and the NanoString technology for differential gene expression analysis. In addition, we identify five genes (ALG12, GUSB, RPLP0, KRBA2, and ADAT2) that are stably expressed in melanoma cells independent of the presence of T cells or the T cell-derived cytokines IFNγ and TNFα. These genes are essential for correct normalization of gene expression data by NanoString. Further to the characterization of melanoma cells after exposure to CTLs, this experimental system might be suitable to answer a series of questions, including how the affinity of CTLs for their target antigen influences the melanoma cell response and whether CTL-induced gene expression changes in melanoma cells are reversible. Taken together, our human T cell – melanoma cell culture system is well suited to characterize immune-related mechanisms in cancer cells. PMID:27625650

  18. Characterization of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Genetic Variation for Preharvest Sprouting in Synthetic Backcross-Derived Wheat Lines

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, Muhammad; Ogbonnaya, Francis C.; Oman, Jason; van Ginkel, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Aegilops tauschii, the wild relative of wheat, has stronger seed dormancy, a major component of preharvest sprouting resistance (PHSR), than bread wheat. A diploid Ae. tauschii accession (AUS18836) and a tetraploid (Triticum turgidum L. ssp. durum var. Altar84) wheat were used to construct a synthetic wheat (Syn37). The genetic architecture of PHS was investigated in 271 BC1F7 synthetic backcross lines (SBLs) derived from Syn37/2*Janz (resistant/susceptible). The SBLs were evaluated in three environments over 2 years and PHS was assessed by way of three measures: the germination index (GI), which measures grain dormancy, the whole spike assay (SI), which takes into account all spike morphology, and counted visually sprouted seeds out of 200 (VI). Grain color was measured using both Chroma Meter- and NaOH-based approaches. QTL for PHSR and grain color were mapped and their additive and epistatic effects as well as their interactions with environment were estimated by a mixed linear-model approach. Single-locus analysis following composite interval mapping revealed four QTL for GI, two QTL for SI, and four QTL for VI on chromosomes 3DL and 4AL. The locus QPhs.dpiv-3D.1 on chromosome 3DL was tightly linked to the red grain color (RGC) at a distance of 5 cM. The other locus on chromosome 3D, “QPhs.dpiv-3D.2” was independent of RGC locus. Two-locus analysis detected nine QTL with main effects and 18 additive × additive interactions for GI, SI, and VI. Two of the nine main effects QTL and two epistatic QTL showed significant interactions with environments. Both additive and epistatic effects contributed to phenotypic variance in PHSR and the identified markers are potential candidates for marker-assisted selection of favorable alleles at multiple loci. SBLs derived from Ae. tauschii proved to be a promising tool to dissect, introgress, and pyramid different PHSR genes into adapted wheat genetic backgrounds. The enhanced expression of PHS resistance in SBLs enabled

  19. Genetic Control of Schistosome Infections by the SM1 Locus of the 5q31-q33 Region Is Linked to Differentiation of Type 2 Helper T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Virmondes; Piper, Karen; Couissinier-Paris, Patricia; Bacelar, Olivia; Dessein, Hélia; Dessein, Alain J.

    1999-01-01

    Human susceptibility to Schistosoma mansoni infections is controlled by the SM1 locus on chromosome 5 in q31-q33. This genetic region encodes cytokines which regulate the development of helper T lymphocytes. In the present work, a clonal analysis of CD4+ T lymphocytes of homozygous resistant and homozygous susceptible subjects was undertaken to evaluate whether SM1 controls helper T-cell differentiation. Of 121 CD4+ T-cell clones (TCC) from three susceptible (S) and three resistant (R) subjects, 68 proliferated when stimulated by parasite antigens. Parasite-specific TCC derived from susceptible subjects (33 STCC) produced 10- to 1,000-fold less interleukin-4 and -5 than TCC from resistant subjects (25 RTCC). Clones from both patient groups produced, however, the same amount of gamma interferon. Parasite-specific STCC were type 1 helper (Th1) or Th0/1, whereas RTCC were either Th2 or Th0/2. These results, together with the localization of SM1 in 5q31-q33, indicate that the SM1 locus controls the differentiation of Th2 lymphocytes. PMID:10456917

  20. Distinct transcriptional control in major immunogenetic subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia exhibiting subset-biased global DNA methylation profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kanduri, Meena; Marincevic, Millaray; Halldórsdóttir, Anna M.; Mansouri, Larry; Junevik, Katarina; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Kultima, Hanna Göransson; Isaksson, Anders; Juliusson, Gunnar; Andersson, Per-Ola; Ehrencrona, Hans; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) can be divided into prognostic subgroups based on the IGHV gene mutational status, and is further characterized by multiple subsets of cases with quasi-identical or stereotyped B cell receptors that also share clinical and biological features. We recently reported differential DNA methylation profiles in IGHV-mutated and IGHV-unmutated CLL subgroups. For the first time, we here explore the global methylation profiles of stereotyped subsets with different prognosis, by applying high-resolution methylation arrays on CLL samples from three major stereotyped subsets: the poor-prognostic subsets #1 (n = 15) and #2 (n = 9) and the favorable-prognostic subset #4 (n = 15). Overall, the three subsets exhibited significantly different methylation profiles, which only partially overlapped with those observed in our previous study according to IGHV gene mutational status. Specifically, gene ontology analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed a clear enrichment of genes involved in immune response, such as B cell activation (e.g., CD80, CD86 and IL10), with higher methylation levels in subset #1 than subsets #2 and #4. Accordingly, higher expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 was demonstrated in subset #4 vs. subset #1, pointing to a key role for these molecules in the crosstalk of CLL subset #4 cells with the microenvironment. In summary, investigation of three prototypic, stereotyped CLL subsets revealed distinct DNA methylation profiles for each subset, which suggests subset-biased patterns of transcriptional control and highlights a key role for epigenetics during leukemogenesis. PMID:23154584

  1. Distinct transcriptional control in major immunogenetic subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia exhibiting subset-biased global DNA methylation profiles.

    PubMed

    Kanduri, Meena; Marincevic, Millaray; Halldórsdóttir, Anna M; Mansouri, Larry; Junevik, Katarina; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Kultima, Hanna Göransson; Isaksson, Anders; Juliusson, Gunnar; Andersson, Per-Ola; Ehrencrona, Hans; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2012-12-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) can be divided into prognostic subgroups based on the IGHV gene mutational status, and is further characterized by multiple subsets of cases with quasi-identical or stereotyped B cell receptors that also share clinical and biological features. We recently reported differential DNA methylation profiles in IGHV-mutated and IGHV-unmutated CLL subgroups. For the first time, we here explore the global methylation profiles of stereotyped subsets with different prognosis, by applying high-resolution methylation arrays on CLL samples from three major stereotyped subsets: the poor-prognostic subsets #1 (n = 15) and #2 (n = 9) and the favorable-prognostic subset #4 (n = 15). Overall, the three subsets exhibited significantly different methylation profiles, which only partially overlapped with those observed in our previous study according to IGHV gene mutational status. Specifically, gene ontology analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed a clear enrichment of genes involved in immune response, such as B cell activation (e.g., CD80, CD86 and IL10), with higher methylation levels in subset #1 than subsets #2 and #4. Accordingly, higher expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 was demonstrated in subset #4 vs. subset #1, pointing to a key role for these molecules in the crosstalk of CLL subset #4 cells with the microenvironment. In summary, investigation of three prototypic, stereotyped CLL subsets revealed distinct DNA methylation profiles for each subset, which suggests subset-biased patterns of transcriptional control and highlights a key role for epigenetics during leukemogenesis.

  2. Non-alloreactive T Cells Prevent Donor Lymphocyte Infusion-Induced Graft-vs.-Host Disease by Controlling Microbial Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao Wei; Sachs, Jessica; Pichardo, Clarimel; Bronson, Roderick; Zhao, Guiling; Sykes, Megan

    2012-01-01

    In mice, graft-versus-host reactions (GVHR), associated with powerful graft-versus-tumor effects, can be achieved without graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) by delayed administration of donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) to established mixed chimeras (MCs). However, GVHD sometimes occurrs after DLI in established mixed chimeric patients. In contrast to mice, in which T cell recovery from the thymus occurs prior to DLI administration, human T cell reconstitution following T cell-depleted hematopoietic cell transplantation is slow, resulting in lymphopenia at the time of DLI. We demonstrate here that T cell lymphopenia is an independent risk factor for GVHD following DLI in the absence of known inflammatory stimuli. DLI-induced GVHD was prevented in lymphopenic recipients by prior administration of a small number of non-alloreactive polyclonal T cells, insufficient to prevent lymphopenia-associated expansion of subsequently administered T cells, through a Treg-independent mechanism, but not by T cells with irrelevant specificity. Moreover, administration of antibiotics reduced the severity of GVHD in lymphopenic hosts. Accumulation of DLI-derived effector T cells and host hematopoietic cell elimination were markedly diminished by Treg-depleted, non-alloreactive T cells. Finally, thymectomized mixed chimeras showed increased GVHD following delayed DLI. Collectively, our data demonstrate that in the absence of known conditioning-induced inflammatory stimuli, T cell lymphopenia is a risk factor for GVHD in MCs receiving delayed DLI and suggest that the predisposition to GVHD can at least in part be explained by the presence of occult inflammatory stimuli due to the absence of T cells to control microbial infections. PMID:23136200

  3. Association mapping of loci controlling genetic and environmental interaction of soybean flowering time under various photo-thermal conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean (Glycine max) is a short day plant. Its flowering and maturity time are controlled by genetic and environmental factors, as well as their interaction. Previous studies have shown that both genetic and environmental factors, mainly photoperiod and temperature control flowering time of soybean...

  4. Migratory and adhesive cues controlling innate-like lymphocyte surveillance of the pathogen-exposed surface of the lymph node

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Roth, Theodore L; Gray, Elizabeth E; Chen, Hsin; Rodda, Lauren B; Liang, Yin; Ventura, Patrick; Villeda, Saul; Crocker, Paul R; Cyster, Jason G

    2016-01-01

    Lymph nodes (LNs) contain innate-like lymphocytes that survey the subcapsular sinus (SCS) and associated macrophages for pathogen entry. The factors promoting this surveillance behavior have not been defined. Here, we report that IL7RhiCcr6+ lymphocytes in mouse LNs rapidly produce IL17 upon bacterial and fungal challenge. We show that these innate-like lymphocytes are mostly LN resident. Ccr6 is required for their accumulation near the SCS and for efficient IL17 induction. Migration into the SCS intrinsically requires S1pr1, whereas movement from the sinus into the parenchyma involves the integrin LFA1 and its ligand ICAM1. CD169, a sialic acid-binding lectin, helps retain the cells within the sinus, preventing their loss in lymph flow. These findings establish a role for Ccr6 in augmenting innate-like lymphocyte responses to lymph-borne pathogens, and they define requirements for cell movement between parenchyma and SCS in what we speculate is a program of immune surveillance that helps achieve LN barrier immunity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18156.001 PMID:27487469

  5. Genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling growth and wood quality traits in Eucalyptus grandis using a maternal half-sib family and RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Grattapaglia, D; Bertolucci, F L; Penchel, R; Sederoff, R R

    1996-11-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of forest productivity traits was performed using an open pollinated half-sib family of Eucalyptus grandis. For volume growth, a sequential QTL mapping approach was applied using bulk segregant analysis (BSA), selective genotyping (SG) and cosegregation analysis (CSA). Despite the low heritability of this trait and the heterogeneous genetic background employed for mapping, BSA detected one putative QTL and SG two out of the three later found by CSA. The three putative QTL for volume growth were found to control 13.7% of the phenotypic variation, corresponding to an estimated 43.7% of the genetic variation. For wood specific gravity five QTL were identified controlling 24.7% of the phenotypic variation corresponding to 49% of the genetic variation. Overlapping QTL for CBH, WSG and percentage dry weight of bark were observed. A significant case of digenic epistasis was found, involving unlinked QTL for volume. Our results demonstrate the applicability of the within half-sib design for QTL mapping in forest trees and indicate the existence of major genes involved in the expression of economically important traits related to forest productivity in Eucalyptus grandis. These findings have important implications for marker-assisted tree breeding.

  6. Genetic Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Growth and Wood Quality Traits in Eucalyptus Grandis Using a Maternal Half-Sib Family and Rapd Markers

    PubMed Central

    Grattapaglia, D.; Bertolucci, FLG.; Penchel, R.; Sederoff, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of forest productivity traits was performed using an open pollinated half-sib family of Eucalyptus grandis. For volume growth, a sequential QTL mapping approach was applied using bulk segregant analysis (BSA), selective genotyping (SG) and cosegregation analysis (CSA). Despite the low heritability of this trait and the heterogeneous genetic background employed for mapping. BSA detected one putative QTL and SG two out of the three later found by CSA. The three putative QTL for volume growth were found to control 13.7% of the phenotypic variation, corresponding to an estimated 43.7% of the genetic variation. For wood specific gravity five QTL were identified controlling 24.7% of the phenotypic variation corresponding to 49% of the genetic variation. Overlapping QTL for CBH, WSG and percentage dry weight of bark were observed. A significant case of digenic epistasis was found, involving unlinked QTL for volume. Our results demonstrate the applicability of the within half-sib design for QTL mapping in forest trees and indicate the existence of major genes involved in the expression of economically important traits related to forest productivity in Eucalyptus grandis. These findings have important implications for marker-assisted tree breeding. PMID:8913761

  7. COPD and levels of Hsp70 (HSPA1A) and Hsp27 (HSPB1) in plasma and lymphocytes among coal workers: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiuqing; Xing, Jingcai; Liu, Yuewei; Zhou, Yun; Luo, Xin; Zhang, Zhihong; Han, Wenhui; Wu, Tangchun; Chen, Weihong

    2015-05-01

    This case-control study aimed to investigate whether the levels of Hsp70 (HSPA1A) and Hsp27 (HSPB1) in plasma and lymphocytes were associated with the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among coal workers. A total of 76 COPD cases and 48 age-matched healthy controls from a group of coal workers were included. The case group consisted of 35 COPD patients whose condition was complicated with coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) and 41 COPD patients without CWP. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) in plasma and lymphocytes were detected by ELISA and flow cytometry, respectively. Multiple logistic regression models were applied to estimate the association between Hsp levels and COPD risk. Our results showed that plasma Hsp70 and lymphocyte Hsp27 levels were significantly higher and plasma Hsp27 levels were significantly lower in COPD cases than in controls (p < 0.01). No significant differences in lymphocyte Hsp70 levels were found between COPD cases and the matched subjects. Higher plasma Hsp70 levels (odds ratio (OR) = 13.8, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 5.7-33.5) and lower plasma Hsp27 levels (OR = 4.6, 95 % CI = 2.0-10.5) were significantly associated with an increased risk of COPD after adjusting for confounders. Higher lymphocyte Hsp27 levels were only associated with an increased risk of COPD with CWP (OR = 6.6, 95 % CI = 2.0-22.1) but not with an increased risk of COPD without CWP (OR = 3.0, 95 % CI = 0.9-8.9). Additionally, there were strong joint effects of different Hsps on COPD risk. These results showed that higher levels of plasma Hsp70 and lower levels of plasma Hsp27 might be associated with an increased risk of COPD among coal workers. They may have the potential to serve as monitoring markers for COPD in coal workers.

  8. Known glioma risk loci are associated with glioma with a family history of brain tumours -- a case-control gene association study.

    PubMed

    Melin, Beatrice; Dahlin, Anna M; Andersson, Ulrika; Wang, Zhaoming; Henriksson, Roger; Hallmans, Göran; Bondy, Melissa L; Johansen, Christoffer; Feychting, Maria; Ahlbom, Anders; Kitahara, Cari M; Wang, Sophia S; Ruder, Avima M; Carreón, Tania; Butler, Mary Ann; Inskip, Peter D; Purdue, Mark; Hsing, Ann W; Mechanic, Leah; Gillanders, Elizabeth; Yeager, Meredith; Linet, Martha; Chanock, Stephen J; Hartge, Patricia; Rajaraman, Preetha

    2013-05-15

    Familial cancer can be used to leverage genetic association studies. Recent genome-wide association studies have reported independent associations between seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of glioma. The aim of this study was to investigate whether glioma cases with a positive family history of brain tumours, defined as having at least one first- or second-degree relative with a history of brain tumour, are associated with known glioma risk loci. One thousand four hundred and thirty-one glioma cases and 2,868 cancer-free controls were identified from four case-control studies and two prospective cohorts from USA, Sweden and Denmark and genotyped for seven SNPs previously reported to be associated with glioma risk in case-control designed studies. Odds ratios were calculated by unconditional logistic regression. In analyses including glioma cases with a family history of brain tumours (n = 104) and control subjects free of glioma at baseline, three of seven SNPs were associated with glioma risk: rs2736100 (5p15.33, TERT), rs4977756 (9p21.3, CDKN2A-CDKN2B) and rs6010620 (20q13.33, RTEL1). After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, only one marker was statistically significantly associated with glioma risk, rs6010620 (ORtrend for the minor (A) allele, 0.39; 95% CI: 0.25-0.61; Bonferroni adjusted ptrend , 1.7 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, as previously shown for glioma regardless of family history of brain tumours, rs6010620 (RTEL1) was associated with an increased risk of glioma when restricting to cases with family history of brain tumours. These findings require confirmation in further studies with a larger number of glioma cases with a family history of brain tumours. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  9. Known glioma risk loci are associated with glioma with a family history of brain tumours - a case-control gene association study

    PubMed Central

    Melin, Beatrice; Dahlin, Anna M.; Andersson, Ulrika; Wang, Zhaoming; Henriksson, Roger; Hallmans, Göran; Bondy, Melissa L.; Johansen, Christoffer; Feychting, Maria; Ahlbom, Anders; Kitahara, Cari M.; Wang, Sophia S.; Ruder, Avima M.; Carreón, Tania; Butler, Mary Ann; Inskip, Peter D.; Purdue, Mark; Hsing, Ann W.; Mechanic, Leah; Gillanders, Elizabeth; Yeager, Meredith; Linet, Martha; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hartge, Patricia; Rajaraman, Preetha

    2012-01-01

    Familial cancer can be used to leverage genetic association studies. Recent genome-wide association studies have reported independent associations between seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of glioma. The aim of this study was to investigate whether glioma cases with a positive family history of brain tumours, defined as having at least one first or second degree relative with a history of brain tumour, are associated with known glioma risk loci. 1431 glioma cases and 2868 cancer-free controls were identified from four case-control studies and two prospective cohorts from USA, Sweden, and Denmark and genotyped for seven SNPs previously reported to be associated with glioma risk in case-control designed studies. Odds ratios were calculated by unconditional logistic regression. In analyses including glioma cases with a family history of brain tumours (n=104) and control subjects free of glioma at baseline, three out of seven SNPs were associated with glioma risk; rs2736100 (5p15.33, TERT), rs4977756 (9p21.3, CDKN2A-CDKN2B), and rs6010620 (20q13.33, RTEL1). After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, only one marker was statistically significantly associated with glioma risk, rs6010620 (ORtrend for the minor (A) allele, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.25–0.61; Bonferroni adjusted ptrend, 1.7×10−4). In conclusion, as previously shown for glioma regardless of family history of brain tumours, rs6010620 (RTEL1) was associated with an increased risk of glioma when restricting to cases with family history of brain tumours. These findings require confirmation in further studies with a larger number of glioma cases with a family history of brain tumours. PMID:23115063

  10. Aod1 controlling day 3 thymectomy-induced autoimmune ovarian dysgenesis in mice encompasses two linked quantitative trait loci with opposing allelic effects on disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Roper, Randall J; McAllister, Ryan D; Biggins, Julia E; Michael, Sandra D; Min, Soo Hong; Tung, Kenneth S K; Call, Stanford B; Gao, Jianfeng; Teuscher, Cory

    2003-06-15

    Day 3 thymectomy (D3Tx) leads to a paucity of CD4(+)CD25(+) suppressor T cells, a loss of peripheral tolerance, and the development of organ-specific autoimmune disease in adult mice. Importantly, D3Tx does not lead to autoimmune disease in all mouse strains, indicating that this process is genetically controlled. Previously, we reported linkage of D3Tx-induced autoimmune ovarian dysgenesis (AOD) and its intermediate phenotypes, antiovarian autoantibody responsiveness, oophoritis, and atrophy, to five quantitative trait loci (QTL), designated Aod1 through Aod5. We also showed interaction between these QTL and H2 as well as Gasa2, a QTL controlling susceptibility to D3Tx-induced autoimmune gastritis. To physically map Aod1, interval-specific bidirectional recombinant congenic strains of mice were generated and studied for susceptibility to D3Tx-induced AOD. Congenic mapping studies revealed that Aod1 controls susceptibility to oophoritis and comprises two linked QTL with opposing allelic effects. Aod1a resides between D16Mit211 (23.3 cM) and D16Mit51 (66.75 cM) on chromosome 16. Aod1b maps proximal of Aod1a between D16Mit89 (20.9 cM) and D16Mit211 (23.3 cM) and includes the candidate genes stefin A1, A2, and A3 (Stfa1-Stfa3), inhibitors of cathepsin S, a cysteine protease required for autoantigen presentation, and the development of autoimmune disease of the salivary and lacrimal glands following D3Tx. cDNA sequencing revealed the existence of structural polymorphisms for both Stfa1 and Stfa2. Given the roles of cathepsins in Ag processing and presentation, Stfa1 and Stfa2 alleles have the potential to control susceptibility to autoimmune disease at the level of both CD4(+)CD25(+) suppressor and CD4(+)CD25(-) effector T cells.

  11. Asymptotic unbounded root loci - Formulas and computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, S. S.; Desoer, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    A new geometric way of computing the asymptotic behavior of unbounded root loci of a strictly proper linear time-invariant control system as loop gain goes to infinity is presented. Properties of certain restricted linear maps and nested restrictions of linear maps are developed, and formulas are obtained for the leading coefficient of the asymptotic values of the unbounded multivariable root loci are obtained in terms of eigenvalues of those maps. Published results and a certain simple null structure assumption are used to relate these asymptotic values to the structure at infinity of the Smith-McMillan form of the open loop transfer function. Explicit matrix formulas for the more abstract derived formulas are given and additional geometric insights are developed with orthogonal projections and singular value decomposition. Formulas for the pivots of the unbounded root loci are calculated and shown to have the same form as the coefficients of the unbounded asymptotic root loci.

  12. Asymptotic unbounded root loci - Formulas and computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, S. S.; Desoer, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    A new geometric way of computing the asymptotic behavior of unbounded root loci of a strictly proper linear time-invariant control system as loop gain goes to infinity is presented. Properties of certain restricted linear maps and nested restrictions of linear maps are developed, and formulas are obtained for the leading coefficient of the asymptotic values of the unbounded multivariable root loci are obtained in terms of eigenvalues of those maps. Published results and a certain simple null structure assumption are used to relate these asymptotic values to the structure at infinity of the Smith-McMillan form of the open loop transfer function. Explicit matrix formulas for the more abstract derived formulas are given and additional geometric insights are developed with orthogonal projections and singular value decomposition. Formulas for the pivots of the unbounded root loci are calculated and shown to have the same form as the coefficients of the unbounded asymptotic root loci.

  13. Multiple Avirulence Loci and Allele-Specific Effector Recognition Control the Pm3 Race-Specific Resistance of Wheat to Powdery Mildew[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Roffler, Stefan; Stirnweis, Daniel; Treier, Georges; Herren, Gerhard; Korol, Abraham B.; Wicker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In cereals, several mildew resistance genes occur as large allelic series; for example, in wheat (Triticum aestivum and Triticum turgidum), 17 functional Pm3 alleles confer agronomically important race-specific resistance to powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis). The molecular basis of race specificity has been characterized in wheat, but little is known about the corresponding avirulence genes in powdery mildew. Here, we dissected the genetics of avirulence for six Pm3 alleles and found that three major Avr loci affect avirulence, with a common locus_1 involved in all AvrPm3-Pm3 interactions. We cloned the effector gene AvrPm3a2/f2 from locus_2, which is recognized by the Pm3a and Pm3f alleles. Induction of a Pm3 allele-dependent hypersensitive response in transient assays in Nicotiana benthamiana and in wheat demonstrated specificity. Gene expression analysis of Bcg1 (encoded by locus_1) and AvrPm3 a2/f2 revealed significant differences between isolates, indicating that in addition to protein polymorphisms, expression levels play a role in avirulence. We propose a model for race specificity involving three components: an allele-specific avirulence effector, a resistance gene allele, and a pathogen-encoded suppressor of avirulence. Thus, whereas a genetically simple allelic series controls specificity in the plant host, recognition on the pathogen side is more complex, allowing flexible evolutionary responses and adaptation to resistance genes. PMID:26452600

  14. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci and a candidate locus for freezing tolerance in controlled and outdoor environments in the overwintering crucifer Boechera stricta

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jae-Yun; Feng, Dongsheng; Niu, Xiaomu; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; van Tienderen, Peter H.; Tomes, Dwight; Schranz, M. Eric

    2015-01-01

    Development of chilling and freezing tolerance is complex and can be affected by photoperiod, temperature and photosynthetic performance; however, there has been limited research on the interaction of these three factors. We evaluated 108 recombinant inbred lines of Boechera stricta, derived from a cross between lines originating from Idaho and Colorado, under controlled Long-Day (LD), Short-Day (SD) and in an Outdoor Environment (OE). We measured maximum quantum yield of photosystem II, lethal temperature for 50% survival and electrolyte leakage of leaves. Our results revealed significant variation for chilling and freezing tolerance and photosynthetic performance in different environments. Using both single and multi-trait analyses, three main-effect Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) were identified. QTL on LG3 were SD-specific, whereas QTL on LG4 were found under both LD and SD. Under all conditions, QTL on LG7 were identified, but were particularly predictive for the Outdoor Experiment. The co-localization of photosynthetic performance and freezing tolerance effects supports these traits being co-regulated. Finally, the major QTL on LG7 is syntenic to the Arabidopsis CBF locus, known regulators of chilling and freezing responses in A. thaliana and other species. PMID:24811132

  15. ER-mitochondria contacts control surface glycan expression and sensitivity to killer lymphocytes in glioma stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Bassoy, Esen Yonca; Kasahara, Atsuko; Chiusolo, Valentina; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Boydell, Emma; Zamorano, Sebastian; Riccadonna, Cristina; Pellegatta, Serena; Hulo, Nicolas; Dutoit, Valérie; Derouazi, Madiha; Dietrich, Pierre Yves; Walker, Paul R; Martinvalet, Denis

    2017-03-10

    Glioblastoma is a highly heterogeneous aggressive primary brain tumor, with the glioma stem-like cells (GSC) being more sensitive to cytotoxic lymphocyte-mediated killing than glioma differentiated cells (GDC). However, the mechanism behind this higher sensitivity is unclear. Here, we found that the mitochondrial morphology of GSCs modulates the ER-mitochondria contacts that regulate the surface expression of sialylated glycans and their recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. GSCs displayed diminished ER-mitochondria contacts compared to GDCs. Forced ER-mitochondria contacts in GSCs increased their cell surface expression of sialylated glycans and reduced their susceptibility to cytotoxic lymphocytes. Therefore, mitochondrial morphology and dynamism dictate the ER-mitochondria contacts in order to regulate the surface expression of certain glycans and thus play a role in GSC recognition and elimination by immune effector cells. Targeting the mitochondrial morphology, dynamism, and contacts with the ER could be an innovative strategy to deplete the cancer stem cell compartment to successfully treat glioblastoma.

  16. High IFN-gamma production of individual CD8 T lymphocytes is controlled by CD152 (CTLA-4).

    PubMed

    Pandiyan, Pushpa; Hegel, J Kolja E; Krueger, Manuela; Quandt, Dagmar; Brunner-Weinzierl, Monika C

    2007-02-15

    CD8 T cell expansion and cytokine production is needed to generate an effective defense against viral invasion of the host. These features of CD8 T lymphocytes are regulated, especially during primary responses, by positive and negative costimulation. We show in this study that surface expression of CD152 is highly up-regulated on activated CD8 T lymphocytes during primary immune responses, suggesting a prominent regulatory role. Indeed, production of the proinflammatory cytokine IFN-gamma, but not TNF-alpha, by CD8 T cells was inhibited by CD152 engagement. The inhibition was regulated independent of proliferation and IL-2 production, but dependent on the quality of the TCR signaling. We show that signals induced by CD152 on activated CD8 T lymphocytes reduce the frequency of IFN-gamma(high)-expressing cells. Our data also show that in activated CD8 T cells, the CD152-mediated inhibition of cytokine production is more pronounced than inhibition of their proliferation.

  17. Lymphocyte-platelet crosstalk in Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Kuznik, Boris I; Vitkovsky, Yuri A; Gvozdeva, Olga V; Solpov, Alexey V; Magen, Eli

    2014-03-01

    Platelets can modulate lymphocytes' role in the pathophysiology of thyroid autoimmune diseases. The present study was performed to clarify the status of platelet-lymphocyte subpopulations aggregation in circulating blood in patients with Graves' disease (GD). One hundred and fifty patients with GD (GD group) and 45 hyperthyroid patients with toxic multinodular goiter (TMG group) were recruited in the study. Control group consisted 150 healthy subjects. Immunophenotyping of lymphocytes was performed by flow cytometry. Detection of lymphocyte-platelet aggregates (LPAs) was done using light microscope after Ficoll-gradient centrifugation. The group of GD patients exhibited reduced CD8 lymphocyte and higher CD19 cell counts compared with TMG group and healthy controls. A greater number of activated CD3, HLA-DR+ lymphocytes were observed in GD than in TMG group and control group. GD group was characterized by lower blood platelet count (232 ± 89 × 10 cells/µL) than TMG group (251 ± 97 × 10 cells/µL; P < 0.05) and control group (262 ± 95 × 10 cells/µL; P < 0.05). In GD group, more platelet-bound lymphocytes (332 ± 91 /µL) were found than that in TMG group (116 ± 67/µL, P < 0.005) and control group (104 ± 58 /µL; P < 0.001). GD is associated with higher levels of activated lymphocytes and lymphocyte-platelet aggregates.

  18. Deciphering the conserved genetic loci implicated in plant disease control through comparative genomics of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad J.; Ran, Chao; Liu, Ke; Ryu, Choong-Min; Rasmussen-Ivey, Cody R.; Williams, Malachi A.; Hassan, Mohammad K.; Choi, Soo-Keun; Jeong, Haeyoung; Newman, Molli; Kloepper, Joseph W.; Liles, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    To understand the growth-promoting and disease-inhibiting activities of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strains, the genomes of 12 Bacillus subtilis group strains with PGPR activity were sequenced and analyzed. These B. subtilis strains exhibited high genomic diversity, whereas the genomes of B. amyloliquefaciens strains (a member of the B. subtilis group) are highly conserved. A pairwise BLASTp matrix revealed that gene family similarity among Bacillus genomes ranges from 32 to 90%, with 2839 genes within the core genome of B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum. Comparative genomic analyses of B. amyloliquefaciens strains identified genes that are linked with biological control and colonization of roots and/or leaves, including 73 genes uniquely associated with subsp. plantarum strains that have predicted functions related to signaling, transportation, secondary metabolite production, and carbon source utilization. Although B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strains contain gene clusters that encode many different secondary metabolites, only polyketide biosynthetic clusters that encode difficidin and macrolactin are conserved within this subspecies. To evaluate their role in plant pathogen biocontrol, genes involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis were deleted in a B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strain, revealing that difficidin expression is critical in reducing the severity of disease, caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria in tomato plants. This study defines genomic features of PGPR strains and links them with biocontrol activity and with host colonization. PMID:26347755

  19. Multicentre search for genetic susceptibility loci in sporadic epilepsy syndrome and seizure types: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Weale, Michael E; Shianna, Kevin V; Singh, Rinki; Lynch, John M; Grinton, Bronwyn; Szoeke, Cassandra; Murphy, Kevin; Kinirons, Peter; O'Rourke, Deirdre; Ge, Dongliang; Depondt, Chantal; Claeys, Kristl G; Pandolfo, Massimo; Gumbs, Curtis; Walley, Nicole; McNamara, James; Mulley, John C; Linney, Kristen N; Sheffield, Leslie J; Radtke, Rodney A; Tate, Sarah K; Chissoe, Stephanie L; Gibson, Rachel A; Hosford, David; Stanton, Alice; Graves, Tracey D; Hanna, Michael G; Eriksson, Kai; Kantanen, Anne-Mari; Kalviainen, Reetta; O'Brien, Terence J; Sander, Josemir W; Duncan, John S; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel F; Wood, Nicholas W; Doherty, Colin P; Delanty, Norman; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Goldstein, David B

    2007-11-01

    The Epilepsy Genetics (EPIGEN) Consortium was established to undertake genetic mapping analyses with augmented statistical power to detect variants that influence the development and treatment of common forms of epilepsy. We examined common variations across 279 prime candidate genes in 2717 case and 1118 control samples collected at four independent research centres (in the UK, Ireland, Finland, and Australia). Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and combined set-association analyses were used to examine the contribution of genetic variation in the candidate genes to various forms of epilepsy. We did not identify clear, indisputable common genetic risk factors that contribute to selected epilepsy subphenotypes across multiple populations. Nor did we identify risk factors for the general all-epilepsy phenotype. However, set-association analysis on the most significant p values, assessed under permutation, suggested the contribution of numerous SNPs to disease predisposition in an apparent population-specific manner. Variations in the genes KCNAB1, GABRR2, KCNMB4, SYN2, and ALDH5A1 were most notable. The underlying genetic component to sporadic epilepsy is clearly complex. Results suggest that many SNPs contribute to disease predisposition in an apparently population-specific manner. However, subtle differences in phenotyping across cohorts, combined with a poor understanding of how the underlying genetic component to epilepsy aligns with current phenotypic classifications, might also account for apparent population-specific genetic risk factors. Variations across five genes warrant further study in independent cohorts to clarify the tentative association.

  20. QTL for several metabolic traits map to loci controlling growth and body composition in an F2 intercross between high- and low-growth chicken lines.

    PubMed

    Nadaf, Javad; Pitel, Frédérique; Gilbert, Hélène; Duclos, Michel J; Vignoles, Florence; Beaumont, Catherine; Vignal, Alain; Porter, Tom E; Cogburn, Larry A; Aggrey, Samuel E; Simon, Jean; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth

    2009-08-07

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) for metabolic and body composition traits were mapped at 7 and 9 wk, respectively, in an F(2) intercross between high-growth and low-growth chicken lines. These lines also diverged for abdominal fat percentage (AFP) and plasma insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), insulin, and glucose levels. Genotypings were performed with 129 microsatellite markers covering 21 chromosomes. A total of 21 QTL with genomewide level of significance were detected by single-trait analyses for body weight (BW), breast muscle weight (BMW) and percentage (BMP), AF weight (AFW) and percentage (AFP), shank length (ShL) and diameter (ShD), fasting plasma glucose level (Gluc), and body temperature (T(b)). Other suggestive QTL were identified for these parameters and for plasma IGF-I and nonesterified fatty acid levels. QTL controlling adiposity and Gluc were colocalized on GGA3 and GGA5 and QTL for BW, ShL and ShD, adiposity, and T(b) on GGA4. Multitrait analyses revealed two QTL controlling Gluc and AFP on GGA5 and Gluc and T(b) on GGA26. Significant effects of the reciprocal cross were observed on BW, ShD, BMW, and Gluc, which may result from mtDNA and/or maternal effects. Most QTL regions for Gluc and adiposity harbor genes for which alleles have been associated with increased susceptibility to diabetes and/or obesity in humans. Identification of genes responsible for these metabolic QTL will increase our understanding of the constitutive "hyperglycemia" found in chickens. Furthermore, a comparative approach could provide new information on the genetic causes of diabetes and obesity in humans.

  1. Cholecalciferol decreases inflammation and improves vitamin D regulatory enzymes in lymphocytes in the uremic environment: A randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, José Tarcisio G; Schneider, Marion; Cuppari, Lilian; Grabulosa, Caren C; T Aoike, Danilo; Q Redublo, Beata Marie; C Batista, Marcelo; Cendoroglo, Miguel; Maria Moyses, Rosa; Dalboni, Maria Aparecida

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported that vitamin D regulates the immune system. However, whether vitamin D repletion modulates inflammatory responses in lymphocytes from dialysis patients is unclear. In the clinical trial, thirty-two (32) dialysis patients with 25 vitamin D ≤ 20ng/mL were randomized to receive either supplementation of cholecalciferol 100,000 UI/week/3 months (16 patients) or placebo (16 patients). In the in vitro study, B and T lymphocytes from 12 healthy volunteers (HV) were incubated with or without uremic serum in the presence or absence of 25 or 1,25 vitamin D. We evaluated the intracellular expression of IL-6, IFN-γ TLR7, TLR9, VDR, CYP27b1 and CYP24a1 by flow cytometry. We observed a reduction in the expression of TLR7, TLR9, INF-γ and CYP24a1 and an increase in VDR and CYP27b1 expression in patients which were supplemented with cholecalciferol, whereas no differences were found in the placebo group. Uremic serum increased the intracellular expression of IL-6, IFN-γ, TLR7, TLR9, VDR, CYP27b1 and CYP24a1. Treatment with 25 or 1,25 vitamin D decreased IL-6 and TLR9. CYP24a1 silencing plus treatment with 25 and/or 1,25 vitamin D had an additional reduction effect on IL-6, IFN-γ, TLR7 and TLR9 expression. This is the first study showing that cholecalciferol repletion has an anti-inflammatory effect and improves vitamin D intracellular regulatory enzymes on lymphocytes from dialysis patients.

  2. Differential RNA expression between schizophrenic patients and controls of the dystrobrevin binding protein 1 and neuregulin 1 genes in immortalized lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Chagnon, Y C; Roy, M-A; Bureau, A; Mérette, C; Maziade, M

    2008-03-01

    The dystrobrevin binding protein 1 (DTNBP1) and neuregulin 1 (NRG1) genes have been related to schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BP) by several whole-genome linkage and associations studies. Few expression studies in post-mortem brains have also reported a lower or a higher expression of DTNBP1 and NRG1, respectively, in SZ. Since the difficulty to access post-mortem brains, we evaluated RNA expression of DTNBP1 and NRG1 in immortalized lymphocytes of SZ patients and unrelated-family controls. An antipsychotic stimulation was also used to challenge the genetic background of the subjects and enhance differential expression. Immortalized lymphocytes of twelve SZ and twelve controls were grown individually in the presence or not of the antipsychotic olanzapine (Zyprexa; EliLilly). RNA was extracted and pooled in four groups of three SZ and four groups of three controls, and used to probe Agilent 18K microchips. Mean gene expression values were contrasted between SZ and control groups using a T-test. For DTNBP1, RNA expression was lower in SZ than in controls before (-28%; p=0.02) and after (-30%; p=0.01) olanzapine stimulation. Similarly, NRG1 GGF2 isoform showed a lower expression in SZ before (-29%; p=0.04) and after (-33%; p=0.02) olanzapine stimulation. In contrast, NRG1 GGF isoform showed no significant difference between SZ and controls (-7%; p=0.61, +3%; p=0.86, respectively), but was slightly repressed by olanzapine in controls (-8%; p=0.008) but not in SZ (+1%; p=0.91). These results are in agreement with those observed in post-mortem brain when the isoforms involved are considered.

  3. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Root and Shoot Traits Associated with Drought Tolerance in a Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) Recombinant Inbred Line Population

    PubMed Central

    Idrissi, Omar; Udupa, Sripada M.; De Keyser, Ellen; McGee, Rebecca J.; Coyne, Clarice J.; Saha, Gopesh C.; Muehlbauer, Fred J.; Van Damme, Patrick; De Riek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Drought is one of the major abiotic stresses limiting lentil productivity in rainfed production systems. Specific rooting patterns can be associated with drought avoidance mechanisms that can be used in lentil breeding programs. In all, 252 co-dominant and dominant markers were used for Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) analysis on 132 lentil recombinant inbred lines based on greenhouse experiments for root and shoot traits during two seasons under progressive drought-stressed conditions. Eighteen QTLs controlling a total of 14 root and shoot traits were identified. A QTL-hotspot genomic region related to a number of root and shoot characteristics associated with drought tolerance such as dry root biomass, root surface area, lateral root number, dry shoot biomass and shoot length was identified. Interestingly, a QTL (QRSratioIX-2.30) related to root-shoot ratio, an important trait for drought avoidance, explaining the highest phenotypic variance of 27.6 and 28.9% for the two consecutive seasons, respectively, was detected. This QTL was closed to the co-dominant SNP marker TP6337 and also flanked by the two SNP TP518 and TP1280. An important QTL (QLRNIII-98.64) related to lateral root number was found close to TP3371 and flanked by TP5093 and TP6072 SNP markers. Also, a QTL (QSRLIV-61.63) associated with specific root length was identified close to TP1873 and flanked by F7XEM6b SRAP marker and TP1035 SNP marker. These two QTLs were detected in both seasons. Our results could be used for marker-assisted selection in lentil breeding programs targeting root and shoot characteristics conferring drought avoidance as an efficient alternative to slow and labor-intensive conventional breeding methods. PMID:27602034

  4. PRODUCTS OF ACTIVATED LYMPHOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, Clemens; Bloom, Barry R.

    1973-01-01

    General methods were developed and applied to the biosynthesis and purification of products of activated lymphocytes available in minute quantities. The activity studied here was the migration inhibitory factor (MIF) produced by purified protein derivative (PPD)- or concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated lymphocytes obtained from one guinea pig or less. The methods selected yielded results in terms of two chemical parameters characteristic of the molecules involved, namely Kd on Sephadex G-75 and isoionic point, pI, on isoelectric focusing. When supernatants were fractionated on G-75 columns, there were several areas even in control supernatants which produced migration inhibition relative to medium controls. However, in PPD- and Con A-stimulated supernatants, at least one peak of MIF activity was found solely in the stimulated cultures, with a Kd of 0.15. A double-labeling technique was used to characterize the proteins of this peak. Control, unstimulated cultures were labeled with [14C]leucine and stimulated cultures were labeled with [3H]leucine. After mixing the supernatants and G-75 filtration, a major "ratiolabeled" broad peak. i.e. one with increased 3H/14C ratio, was found. When a narrow portion of this peak about Kd 0.15, containing most of the MIF activity, was subjected to analytical isoelectric focusing, all of the label was associated with proteins of lower net charge than albumin. A unique ratiolabeled peak was found in PPD- and Con A-stimulated fractions with a pI of approx. 5.3. A micropreparative isoelectric focusing technique was developed and yielded MIF activity in the same region as the major ratiolabeled peak. Further study will be required to ascertain whether the ratiolabeled protein is MIF. By following the Kd, pI, and 3H/14C labeling ratio, at least 14 products of activated lymphocytes, synthesized either de novo or in increased amounts, could be distinguished. PMID:4688317

  5. Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling sucrose content based on an enriched genetic linkage map of sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) cultivar ‘LCP 85-384’

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since sugarcane cultivars possess >100 chromosomes (2n = 100-130) and are genetically complex polyploid and aneuploids, identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with sugar content is considered the best option to improve sugar content through molecular breeding. Also, improving su...

  6. Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling sucrose content based on an enriched genetic linkage map of sugarcane (saccharum spp. hybrids) cultivar ‘LCP 85-384’

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sucrose content is the most important trait in sugarcane breeding. Since sugarcane cultivars possess 100 to 130 chromosomes and are genetically complex polyploids and aneuploids, identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with sucrose content is considered the best option to improve...

  7. Genome Sequence of the Thermotolerant Foodborne Pathogen Salmonella enterica Serovar Senftenberg ATCC 43845 and Phylogenetic Analysis of Loci Encoding Increased Protein Quality Control Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Scott V.; Harhay, Gregory P.; Bono, James L.; Smith, Timothy P. L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica bacteria are important foodborne pathogens with major economic impact. Some isolates exhibit increased heat tolerance, a concern for food safety. Analysis of a finished-quality genome sequence of an isolate commonly used in heat resistance studies, S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Senftenberg 775W (ATCC 43845), demonstrated an interesting observation that this strain contains not just one, but two horizontally acquired thermotolerance locus homologs. These two loci reside on a large 341.3-kbp plasmid that is similar to the well-studied IncHI2 R478 plasmid but lacks any antibiotic resistance genes found on R478 or other IncHI2 plasmids. As this historical Salmonella isolate has been in use since 1941, comparative analysis of the plasmid and of the thermotolerance loci contained on the plasmid will provide insight into the evolution of heat resistance loci as well as acquisition of resistance determinants in IncHI2 plasmids. IMPORTANCE Thermal interventions are commonly used in the food industry as a means of mitigating pathogen contamination in food products. Concern over heat-resistant food contaminants has recently increased, with the identification of a conserved locus shown to confer heat resistance in disparate lineages of Gram-negative bacteria. Complete sequence analysis of a historical isolate of Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg, used in numerous studies because of its novel heat resistance, revealed that this important strain possesses two distinct copies of this conserved thermotolerance locus, residing on a multireplicon IncHI2/IncHI2A plasmid. Phylogenetic analysis of these loci in comparison with homologs identified in various bacterial genera provides an opportunity to examine the evolution and distribution of loci conferring resistance to environmental stressors, such as heat and desiccation. PMID:28293682

  8. Genome Sequence of the Thermotolerant Foodborne Pathogen Salmonella enterica Serovar Senftenberg ATCC 43845 and Phylogenetic Analysis of Loci Encoding Increased Protein Quality Control Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Scott V; Harhay, Gregory P; Bono, James L; Smith, Timothy P L; Harhay, Dayna M

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica bacteria are important foodborne pathogens with major economic impact. Some isolates exhibit increased heat tolerance, a concern for food safety. Analysis of a finished-quality genome sequence of an isolate commonly used in heat resistance studies, S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Senftenberg 775W (ATCC 43845), demonstrated an interesting observation that this strain contains not just one, but two horizontally acquired thermotolerance locus homologs. These two loci reside on a large 341.3-kbp plasmid that is similar to the well-studied IncHI2 R478 plasmid but lacks any antibiotic resistance genes found on R478 or other IncHI2 plasmids. As this historical Salmonella isolate has been in use since 1941, comparative analysis of the plasmid and of the thermotolerance loci contained on the plasmid will provide insight into the evolution of heat resistance loci as well as acquisition of resistance determinants in IncHI2 plasmids. IMPORTANCE Thermal interventions are commonly used in the food industry as a means of mitigating pathogen contamination in food products. Concern over heat-resistant food contaminants has recently increased, with the identification of a conserved locus shown to confer heat resistance in disparate lineages of Gram-negative bacteria. Complete sequence analysis of a historical isolate of Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg, used in numerous studies because of its novel heat resistance, revealed that this important strain possesses two distinct copies of this conserved thermotolerance locus, residing on a multireplicon IncHI2/IncHI2A plasmid. Phylogenetic analysis of these loci in comparison with homologs identified in various bacterial genera provides an opportunity to examine the evolution and distribution of loci conferring resistance to environmental stressors, such as heat and desiccation.

  9. QTL meta-analysis provides a comprehensive view of loci controlling partial resistance to Aphanomyces euteiches in four sources of resistance in pea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    the moderately low diversity of loci controlling partial resistance to A. euteiches in four main sources of resistance in pea. Seven highly consistent genomic regions with potential use in marker-assisted-selection were identified. Confidence intervals at several main QTL regions were reduced and co-segregation among resistance and morphological/phenological alleles was identified. Further work will be required to identify the best combinations of QTL for durably increasing partial resistance to A. euteiches. PMID:23497245

  10. Adipose tissue lymphocytes: types and roles.

    PubMed

    Caspar-Bauguil, S; Cousin, B; Bour, S; Casteilla, L; Castiella, L; Penicaud, L; Carpéné, C

    2009-12-01

    Besides adipocytes, specialized in lipid handling and involved in energy balance regulation, white adipose tissue (WAT) is mainly composed of other cell types among which lymphocytes represent a non-negligible proportion. Different types of lymphocytes (B, alphabetaT, gammadeltaT, NK and NKT) have been detected in WAT of rodents or humans, and vary in their relative proportion according to the fat pad anatomical location. The lymphocytes found in intra-abdominal, visceral fat pads seem representative of innate immunity, while those present in subcutaneous fat depots are part of adaptive immunity, at least in mice. Both the number and the activity of the different lymphocyte classes, except B lymphocytes, are modified in obesity. Several of these modifications in the relative proportions of the lymphocyte classes depend on the degree of obesity, or on leptin concentration, or even fat depot anatomical location. Recent studies suggest that alterations of lymphocyte number and composition precede the macrophage increase and the enhanced inflammatory state of WAT found in obesity. Lymphocytes express receptors to adipokines while several proinflammatory chemokines are produced in WAT, rendering intricate crosstalk between fat and immune cells. However, the evidences and controversies available so far are in favour of an involvement of lymphocytes in the control of the number of other cells in WAT, either adipocytes or immune cells and of their secretory and metabolic activities. Therefore, immunotherapy deserves to be considered as a promising approach to treat the endocrino-metabolic disorders associated to excessive fat mass development.

  11. GA-binding protein factors, in concert with the coactivator CREB binding protein/p300, control the induction of the interleukin 16 promoter in T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bannert, Norbert; Avots, Andris; Baier, Michael; Serfling, Edgar; Kurth, Reinhard

    1999-01-01

    Interleukin 16 (IL-16) is a chemotactic cytokine that binds to the CD4 receptor and affects the activation of T cells and replication of HIV. It is expressed as a large 67-kDa precursor protein (pro-IL-16) in lymphocytes, macrophages, and mast cells, as well as in airway epithelial cells from asthmatics after challenge with allergen. This pro-IL-16 is subsequently processed to the mature cytokine of 13 kDa. To study the expression of IL-16 at the transcriptional level, we cloned the human chromosomal IL-16 gene and analyzed its promoter. The human IL-16 gene consists of seven exons and six introns. The 5′ sequences up to nucleotide −120 of the human and murine IL-16 genes share >84% sequence homology and harbor promoter elements for constitutive and inducible transcription in T cells. Although both promoters lack any TATA box, they contain two CAAT box-like motifs and three binding sites of GA-binding protein (GABP) transcription factors. Two of these motifs are part of a highly conserved and inducible dyad symmetry element shown previously to control a remote IL-2 enhancer and the CD18 promoter. In concert with the coactivator CREB binding protein/p300, which interacts with GABPα, the binding of GABPα and -β to the dyad symmetry element controls the induction of IL-16 promoter in T cells. Supplementing the data on the processing of pro-IL-16, our results indicate the complexity of IL-16 expression, which is tightly controlled at the transcriptional and posttranslational levels in T lymphocytes. PMID:9990060

  12. The impact of coronary artery disease risk loci on ischemic heart failure severity and prognosis: association analysis in the COntrolled ROsuvastatin multiNAtional trial in heart failure (CORONA).

    PubMed

    Haver, Vincent G; Verweij, Niek; Kjekshus, John; Fox, Jayne C; Wedel, Hans; Wikstrand, John; van Gilst, Wiek H; de Boer, Rudolf A; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; van der Harst, Pim

    2014-12-21

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified multiple loci that are associated with an increased risk of developing coronary artery disease (CAD). The impact of these loci on the disease severity and prognosis of ischemic heart failure due to CAD is currently unknown. We undertook association analysis of 7 single nucleotide polymorphism (rs599839, rs17465637, rs2972147, rs6922269, rs1333049, rs501120, and rs17228212) at 7 well established CAD risk loci (1p13.3, 1q41, 2q36.3, 6q25.1, 9p21.3, 10q11.21, and 15q22.33, respectively) in 3,320 subjects diagnosed with systolic heart failure of ischemic aetiology and participating in the COntrolled ROsuvastatin multiNAtional Trial in Heart Failure (CORONA) trial. The primary outcome was the composite of time to first event of cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction and non-fatal stroke, secondary outcomes included mortality and hospitalization due to worsening heart failure. None of the 7 loci were significantly associated with the primary composite endpoint of the CORONA trial (death from cardiovascular cases, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and nonfatal stroke). However, the 1p13.3 locus (rs599839) showed evidence for association with all-cause mortality (after adjustment for covariates; HR 0.74, 95%CI [0.61 to 0.90]; P = 0.0025) and we confirmed the 1p13.3 locus (rs599839) to be associated with lipid parameters (total cholesterol (P = 1.1x10(-4)), low-density lipoprotein levels (P = 3.5 × 10(-7)) and apolipoprotein B (P = 2.2 × 10(-10))). Genetic variants strongly associated with CAD risk are not associated with the severity and outcome of ischemic heart failure. The observed association of the 1p13.3 locus with all-cause mortality requires confirmation in further studies.

  13. The Inhibitory Receptor B and T Lymphocyte Attenuator Controls γδ T cell Homeostasis and Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Macauley, Matthew G.; Rhode-Kurnow, Antje; Ware, Carl F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY γδ T cells rapidly secrete inflammatory cytokines at barrier sites that aid in protection from pathogens, however mechanisms limiting inflammatory damage remain unclear. We found that retinoid-related orphan receptor gamma-t (RORγt) and interleukin (IL)-7 influence γδ T cell homeostasis and function by regulating expression of the inhibitory receptor, B and T Lymphocyte Attenuator (BTLA). The transcription factor RORγt, via its activating function-2 domain, repressed Btla transcription, whereas IL-7 increased BTLA levels on the cell surface. BTLA expression limited γδ T cell numbers and sustained normal γδ T cell subset frequencies by restricting IL-7 responsiveness and expansion of the CD27−RORγt+ population. BTLA also negatively regulated IL-17 and TNF production in CD27− γδ T cells. Consequently, BTLA-deficient mice exhibit enhanced disease in a γδ T cell-dependent model of dermatitis, while BTLA agonism reduced inflammation. Therefore, by coordinating expression of BTLA, RORγt and IL-7 balance suppressive and activation stimuli to regulate γδ T cell homeostasis and inflammatory responses. PMID:24315996

  14. A minor role of CD4+ T lymphocytes in the control of a primary infection of cattle with Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, is an important livestock disease in Africa. The current control measures rely on a vaccine with limited efficacy and occasional severe side effects. Knowledge of the protective arms of immunity involved in this disease will be beneficial for the development of an improved vaccine. In previous studies on cattle infected with M. mycoides subsp. mycoides, a correlation was detected between the levels of mycoplasma-specific IFN-γ-secreting CD4+ T lymphocytes and reduced clinical signs. However, no cause and effect has been established, and the role of such cells and of protective responses acquired during a primary infection is not known. We investigated the role of CD4+ T lymphocytes in CBPP by comparing disease patterns and post mortem findings between CD4+ T cell depleted and non-depleted cattle. The depletion was carried out using several injections of BoCD4 specific murine monoclonal antibody on day 6 after experimental endotracheal infection with the strain Afadé. All cattle were monitored clinically daily and sacrificed 28-30 days post-infection. Statistically significant but small differences were observed in the mortality rate between the depleted and non-depleted animals. However, no differences in clinical parameters (fever, signs of respiratory distress) and pathological lesions were observed, despite elimination of CD4+ T cells for more than a week. The slightly higher mortality in the depleted group suggests a minor role of CD4+ T cells in control of CBPP. PMID:21663697

  15. Apolizumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-15

    Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  16. Lymphocyte Functions in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Risin, Diane; Sundaresan, A.; Cooper, D.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of immunity impairment in space it is important to analyze the direct effects of space-related conditions on different lymphocytes functions. Since 1992, we are investigating the effect of modeled and true microgravity (MG) on numerous lymphocyte functions. We had shown that modeled (MMG) and true microgravity inhibit lymphocyte locomotion through type I collagen. Modeled microgravity also suppresses polyclonal and antigen-specific lymphocyte activation. Polyclonal activation of lymphocytes prior to exposure to MMG abrogates the MG-induced inhibition of lymphocyte locomotion. The relationship between activation deficits and the loss of locomotion in MG was investigated using PKC activation by phorbol ester (PMA) and calcium ionophore (ionomycin). Direct activation of PKC by PMA substantially restored the MMG-inhibited lymphocyte locomotion and PHA-induced lymphocyte activation lonomycin by itself did not restore either locomotion or activation of the lymphocytes, indicating that these changes are not related to the impairment in the calcium flux in MMG. Treatment of lymphocytes with PMA before exposure to MMG prevented the loss of locomotion. It was observed that DNA synthesis is not necessary for restoration of locomotion since mitomicin C treated and untreated cells recovered their locomotion to the same level after PKC activation. Our recent data indicate that microgravity may selectively effect the expression of novel Ca2+ independent isoforms of PKC, in particularly PKC sigma and delta. This provides a new insight in understanding of the mechanisms of MG-sensitive cellular functions.

  17. Lymphocyte Functions in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Risin, Diane; Sundaresan, A.; Cooper, D.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of immunity impairment in space it is important to analyze the direct effects of space-related conditions on different lymphocytes functions. Since 1992, we are investigating the effect of modeled and true microgravity (MG) on numerous lymphocyte functions. We had shown that modeled (MMG) and true microgravity inhibit lymphocyte locomotion through type I collagen. Modeled microgravity also suppresses polyclonal and antigen-specific lymphocyte activation. Polyclonal activation of lymphocytes prior to exposure to MMG abrogates the MG-induced inhibition of lymphocyte locomotion. The relationship between activation deficits and the loss of locomotion in MG was investigated using PKC activation by phorbol ester (PMA) and calcium ionophore (ionomycin). Direct activation of PKC by PMA substantially restored the MMG-inhibited lymphocyte locomotion and PHA-induced lymphocyte activation lonomycin by itself did not restore either locomotion or activation of the lymphocytes, indicating that these changes are not related to the impairment in the calcium flux in MMG. Treatment of lymphocytes with PMA before exposure to MMG prevented the loss of locomotion. It was observed that DNA synthesis is not necessary for restoration of locomotion since mitomicin C treated and untreated cells recovered their locomotion to the same level after PKC activation. Our recent data indicate that microgravity may selectively effect the expression of novel Ca2+ independent isoforms of PKC, in particularly PKC sigma and delta. This provides a new insight in understanding of the mechanisms of MG-sensitive cellular functions.

  18. Fetuin-A levels and free leptin index are reduced in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a hospital-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Dalamaga, Maria; Polyzos, Stergios A; Karmaniolas, Konstantinos; Chamberland, John; Lekka, Antigoni; Triantafilli, Maria; Migdalis, Ilias; Papadavid, Evangelia; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2016-01-01

    There are limited data on fetuin-A, soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R) and free leptin index (FLI) in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The aim of this study was to compare circulating fetuin-A, sOB-R levels and FLI between 95 patients with CLL and 95 matched controls, as well as among different stages of CLL. Circulating fetuin-A was significantly lower in cases than controls (241.9 ± 99.2 vs. 288.8 ± 127.7 μg/mL; p = 0.005). Although circulating sOB-R levels were similar between groups, FLI was lower in cases than controls (0.45 ± 0.42 vs. 0.67 ± 0.57; p = 0.003). Furthermore, lower fetuin-A or FLI, but not sOB-R, were independently associated with CLL (p < 0.05), particularly among overweight/obese individuals. Fetuin-A, s-OB-R and FLI were similar between different stages of CLL severity, or between symptomatic and asymptomatic disease. In conclusion, circulating fetuin-A and FLI, but not sOB-R, were lower in patients with CLL than controls, a finding warranting further investigation.

  19. Response of lymphocytes to a mitogenic stimulus during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1989-01-01

    Several studies were performed that demonstrate that immunological activities of lymphocytes can be affected by spaceflight or by models that attempt to simulate some aspects of weightlessness. Included among these are the responses of lymphocytes to external stimuli such as mitogens and viruses. When cultures of lymphocytes were flown in space, the ability of the lymphocytes to respond to mitogens was inhibited. Similar results were obtained when lymphocytes from astronauts or animals just returned from space were placed into culture immediately upon return to earth, and when models of hypogravity were used. Lymphocytes placed in culture during spaceflights produced enhanced levels of interferon compared to control cultures. When cultures of lymphocytes were prepared for cosmonauts or rodents immediately upon return to earth, interferon production was inhibited. These results suggest that space flight can have profound effects on lymphocyte function, and that effects on isolated cells may be different from that on cells in the whole organism.

  20. Microsatellite instability in patients with chronic B-cell lymphocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Niv, E; Bomstein, Y; Yuklea, M; Lishner, M

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the microsatellite instability (MSI) at selected loci with known involvement in the oncogenesis of chronic B-cell lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL). DNA from B cells (tumour cells) and from T cells (normal controls) of 27 samples of 26 patients with previously untreated B-CLL was extracted. Microsatellite instability in six microsatellite markers was tested using GeneScan Analysis Software. The rate of replication errors positive phenotype (RER+) was determined (MSI in more than 30% of examined loci). RER+ was found in four out of 27 paients (14.8%). A larger proportion of patients with stage C B-CLL exhibited RER+ than those with stage A or B (P<0.05). A higher prevalence of RER+ was demonstrated in a subgroup of patients with additional malignancies (three out of eight patients) in comparison with patients with B-CLL alone (1/19) (P=0.031). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that MSI might have a more prominent role in pathogenesis of B-CLL than reported todate. This may result from a selection of microsatellite markers adjacent to chromosomal loci, which are involved in B-cell malignancies, and using GeneScan Analysis Software, which is most modern and precise method of microsatellite analysis. PMID:15812543

  1. Genome-wide association analysis implicates dysregulation of immunity genes in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Law, Philip J; Berndt, Sonja I; Speedy, Helen E; Camp, Nicola J; Sava, Georgina P; Skibola, Christine F; Holroyd, Amy; Joseph, Vijai; Sunter, Nicola J; Nieters, Alexandra; Bea, Silvia; Monnereau, Alain; Martin-Garcia, David; Goldin, Lynn R; Clot, Guillem; Teras, Lauren R; Quintela, Inés; Birmann, Brenda M; Jayne, Sandrine; Cozen, Wendy; Majid, Aneela; Smedby, Karin E; Lan, Qing; Dearden, Claire; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Hall, Andrew G; Purdue, Mark P; Mainou-Fowler, Tryfonia; Vajdic, Claire M; Jackson, Graham H; Cocco, Pierluigi; Marr, Helen; Zhang, Yawei; Zheng, Tongzhang; Giles, Graham G; Lawrence, Charles; Call, Timothy G; Liebow, Mark; Melbye, Mads; Glimelius, Bengt; Mansouri, Larry; Glenn, Martha; Curtin, Karen; Diver, W Ryan; Link, Brian K; Conde, Lucia; Bracci, Paige M; Holly, Elizabeth A; Jackson, Rebecca D; Tinker, Lesley F; Benavente, Yolanda; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; Albanes, Demetrius; Weinstein, Stephanie; Wang, Zhaoming; Caporaso, Neil E; Morton, Lindsay M; Severson, Richard K; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Southey, Melissa C; Milne, Roger L; Clavel, Jacqueline; Topka, Sabine; Spinelli, John J; Kraft, Peter; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Summerfield, Geoffrey; Ferri, Giovanni M; Harris, Robert J; Miligi, Lucia; Pettitt, Andrew R; North, Kari E; Allsup, David J; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Bailey, James R; Offit, Kenneth; Pratt, Guy; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Pepper, Chris; Chanock, Stephen J; Fegan, Chris; Rosenquist, Richard; de Sanjose, Silvia; Carracedo, Angel; Dyer, Martin J S; Catovsky, Daniel; Campo, Elias; Cerhan, James R; Allan, James M; Rothman, Nathanial; Houlston, Richard; Slager, Susan

    2017-02-06

    Several chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) susceptibility loci have been reported; however, much of the heritable risk remains unidentified. Here we perform a meta-analysis of six genome-wide association studies, imputed using a merged reference panel of 1,000 Genomes and UK10K data, totalling 6,200 cases and 17,598 controls after replication. We identify nine risk loci at 1p36.11 (rs34676223, P=5.04 × 10(-13)), 1q42.13 (rs41271473, P=1.06 × 10(-10)), 4q24 (rs71597109, P=1.37 × 10(-10)), 4q35.1 (rs57214277, P=3.69 × 10(-8)), 6p21.31 (rs3800461, P=1.97 × 10(-8)), 11q23.2 (rs61904987, P=2.64 × 10(-11)), 18q21.1 (rs1036935, P=3.27 × 10(-8)), 19p13.3 (rs7254272, P=4.67 × 10(-8)) and 22q13.33 (rs140522, P=2.70 × 10(-9)). These new and established risk loci map to areas of active chromatin and show an over-representation of transcription factor binding for the key determinants of B-cell development and immune response.

  2. Genome-wide association analysis implicates dysregulation of immunity genes in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Law, Philip J.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Speedy, Helen E.; Camp, Nicola J.; Sava, Georgina P.; Skibola, Christine F.; Holroyd, Amy; Joseph, Vijai; Sunter, Nicola J.; Nieters, Alexandra; Bea, Silvia; Monnereau, Alain; Martin-Garcia, David; Goldin, Lynn R.; Clot, Guillem; Teras, Lauren R.; Quintela, Inés; Birmann, Brenda M.; Jayne, Sandrine; Cozen, Wendy; Majid, Aneela; Smedby, Karin E.; Lan, Qing; Dearden, Claire; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.; Hall, Andrew G.; Purdue, Mark P.; Mainou-Fowler, Tryfonia; Vajdic, Claire M.; Jackson, Graham H.; Cocco, Pierluigi; Marr, Helen; Zhang, Yawei; Zheng, Tongzhang; Giles, Graham G.; Lawrence, Charles; Call, Timothy G.; Liebow, Mark; Melbye, Mads; Glimelius, Bengt; Mansouri, Larry; Glenn, Martha; Curtin, Karen; Diver, W Ryan; Link, Brian K.; Conde, Lucia; Bracci, Paige M.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Tinker, Lesley F.; Benavente, Yolanda; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; Albanes, Demetrius; Weinstein, Stephanie; Wang, Zhaoming; Caporaso, Neil E.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Severson, Richard K.; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Vermeulen, Roel C. H.; Southey, Melissa C.; Milne, Roger L.; Clavel, Jacqueline; Topka, Sabine; Spinelli, John J.; Kraft, Peter; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Summerfield, Geoffrey; Ferri, Giovanni M.; Harris, Robert J.; Miligi, Lucia; Pettitt, Andrew R.; North, Kari E.; Allsup, David J.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Bailey, James R.; Offit, Kenneth; Pratt, Guy; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Pepper, Chris; Chanock, Stephen J.; Fegan, Chris; Rosenquist, Richard; de Sanjose, Silvia; Carracedo, Angel; Dyer, Martin J. S.; Catovsky, Daniel; Campo, Elias; Cerhan, James R.; Allan, James M.; Rothman, Nathanial; Houlston, Richard; Slager, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Several chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) susceptibility loci have been reported; however, much of the heritable risk remains unidentified. Here we perform a meta-analysis of six genome-wide association studies, imputed using a merged reference panel of 1,000 Genomes and UK10K data, totalling 6,200 cases and 17,598 controls after replication. We identify nine risk loci at 1p36.11 (rs34676223, P=5.04 × 10−13), 1q42.13 (rs41271473, P=1.06 × 10−10), 4q24 (rs71597109, P=1.37 × 10−10), 4q35.1 (rs57214277, P=3.69 × 10−8), 6p21.31 (rs3800461, P=1.97 × 10−8), 11q23.2 (rs61904987, P=2.64 × 10−11), 18q21.1 (rs1036935, P=3.27 × 10−8), 19p13.3 (rs7254272, P=4.67 × 10−8) and 22q13.33 (rs140522, P=2.70 × 10−9). These new and established risk loci map to areas of active chromatin and show an over-representation of transcription factor binding for the key determinants of B-cell development and immune response. PMID:28165464

  3. Ofatumumab, Pentostatin, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-30

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  4. Beneficial effects of Korean red ginseng on lymphocyte DNA damage, antioxidant enzyme activity, and LDL oxidation in healthy participants: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Park, Ju Yeon; Kang, Hee Jung; Kim, Oh Yoen; Lee, Jong Ho

    2012-07-17

    The reported health benefits of Korean red ginseng (KRG) include antioxidant, antitumor, antimutagenic, and immunomodulatory activities; however, the effects on oxidative stress have not yet been evaluated. Therefore, we assessed the effect of KRG on antioxidant enzymes and oxidative stress markers in humans. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study with three groups, including placebo, low-dose (3 g/day), and high-dose (6 g/day), which were randomly assigned to healthy subjects aged 20-65 years. Lymphocyte DNA damage, antioxidative enzyme activity, and lipid peroxidation were assessed before and after the 8-week supplementation. Fifty-seven subjects completed the protocol. Plasma superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity after the 8-week KRG supplementation was significantly higher in the low-and high-dose groups compared to baseline. Plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase activities were also increased after the high-dose supplementation. Furthermore, the DNA tail length and tail moment were significantly reduced after the supplementation (low-dose and high-dose), and plasma oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels were reduced in low-dose and high-dose groups, but increased in the placebo group. The net changes in oxidized LDL after the supplementation differed significantly between both KRG supplementation groups and the placebo group. Net changes in GPx, SOD and catalase activities, and DNA tail length and tail moment were significantly different between the high-dose group and the placebo group. Additionally, the net changes in urinary 8-epi-PGF(2α) were significantly different between the KRG supplementation groups and the placebo group. KRG supplementation may attenuate lymphocyte DNA damage and LDL oxidation by upregulating antioxidant enzyme activity.

  5. FATE OF THE LYMPHOCYTE

    PubMed Central

    Bunting, C. H.; Huston, John

    1921-01-01

    Although the count of circulating lymphocytes in the blood stream remains constant, more lymphocytes enter the blood from the thoracic duct during 24 hours than are present in the blood at any one time. This excess of lymphocytes is not destroyed in the blood stream. The cells migrate from the blood vessels into the mucous membranes and through them to their surface. This occurs chiefly in the gastrointestinal tract, and it is apparently in the mucosa and especially within the intestinal lumen that the function of the lymphocyte is normally performed. PMID:19868519

  6. A method to detect differentially methylated loci with next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongyan; Podolsky, Robert H; Ryu, Duchwan; Wang, Xiaoling; Su, Shaoyong; Shi, Huidong; George, Varghese

    2013-05-01

    Epigenetic changes, especially DNA methylation at CpG loci have important implications in cancer and other complex diseases. With the development of next-generation sequencing (NGS), it is feasible to generate data to interrogate the difference in methylation status for genome-wide loci using case-control design. However, a proper and efficient statistical test is lacking. There are several challenges. First, unlike methylation experiments using microarrays, where there is one measure of methylation for one individual at a particular CpG site, here we have the counts of methylation allele and unmethylation allele for each individual. Second, due to the nature of sample preparation, the measured methylation reflects the methylation status of a mixture of cells involved in sample preparation. Therefore, the underlying distribution of the measured methylation level is unknown, and a robust test is more desirable than parametric approach. Third, currently NGS measures methylation at over 2 million CpG sites. Any statistical tests have to be computationally efficient in order to be applied to the NGS data. Taking these challenges into account, we propose a test for differential methylation based on clustered data analysis by modeling the methylation counts. We performed simulations to show that it is robust under several distributions for the measured methylation levels. It has good power and is computationally efficient. Finally, we apply the test to our NGS data on chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The results indicate that it is a promising and practical test.

  7. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  8. Remote Symbolic Computation of Loci

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abanades, Miguel A.; Escribano, Jesus; Botana, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a web-based tool designed to compute certified equations and graphs of geometric loci specified using standard Dynamic Geometry Systems (DGS). Complementing the graphing abilities of the considered DGS, the equations of the loci produced by the application are remotely computed using symbolic algebraic techniques from the…

  9. 52 Genetic Loci Influencing Myocardial Mass

    PubMed Central

    van der Harst, Pim; van Setten, Jessica; Verweij, Niek; Vogler, Georg; Franke, Lude; Maurano, Matthew T.; Wang, Xinchen; Leach, Irene Mateo; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Hayward, Caroline; Sorice, Rossella; Meirelles, Osorio; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Polašek, Ozren; Tanaka, Toshiko; Arking, Dan E.; Ulivi, Sheila; Trompet, Stella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Smith, Albert V.; Dörr, Marcus; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Magnani, Jared W.; Fabiola Del Greco, M.; Zhang, Weihua; Nolte, Ilja M.; Silva, Claudia T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tragante, Vinicius; Esko, Tõnu; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Adriaens, Michiel E.; Andersen, Karl; Barnett, Phil; Bis, Joshua C.; Bodmer, Rolf; Buckley, Brendan M.; Campbell, Harry; Cannon, Megan V.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chen, Lin Y.; Delitala, Alessandro; Devereux, Richard B.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B.; Haugen, Eric; Heinig, Matthias; Hernandez, Dena G.; Hillege, Hans L.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Hubner, Norbert; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Iorio, Annamaria; Kähönen, Mika; Kellis, Manolis; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooner, Ishminder K.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kors, Jan A.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Lage, Kasper; Launer, Lenore J.; Levy, Daniel; Lundby, Alicia; Macfarlane, Peter W.; May, Dalit; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Nappo, Stefania; Naitza, Silvia; Neph, Shane; Nord, Alex S.; Nutile, Teresa; Okin, Peter M.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Oostra, Ben A.; Penninger, Josef M.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Pers, Tune H.; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Pinto, Yigal M.; Pfeufer, Arne; Pilia, Maria Grazia; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Prins, Bram P.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rice, Ken M.; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Schafer, Sebastian; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Sehmi, Jobanpreet; Silljé, Herman H.W.; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Sinner, Moritz F.; Slowikowski, Kamil; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Spector, Timothy D.; Spiering, Wilko; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Strauch, Konstantin; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Trinh, Bosco; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van den Boogaard, Malou; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Visscher, Peter M.; Vitart, Veronique; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Weichenberger, Christian X.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.; Yang, Jian; Bezzina, Connie R.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Snieder, Harold; Wright, Alan F.; Rudan, Igor; Boyer, Laurie A.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Ciullo, Marina; Sanna, Serena; Lehtimäki, Terho; Wilson, James F.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Alonso, Alvaro; Gasparini, Paolo; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kääb, Stefan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Felix, Stephan B.; Heckbert, Susan R.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Hicks, Andrew A.; Chambers, John C.; Jamshidi, Yalda; Visel, Axel; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Isaacs, Aaron; Samani, Nilesh J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Myocardial mass is a key determinant of cardiac muscle function and hypertrophy. Myocardial depolarization leading to cardiac muscle contraction is reflected by the amplitude and duration of the QRS complex on the electrocardiogram (ECG). Abnormal QRS amplitude or duration reflect changes in myocardial mass and conduction, and are associated with increased risk of heart failure and death. OBJECTIVES This meta-analysis sought to gain insights into the genetic determinants of myocardial mass. METHODS We carried out a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 4 QRS traits in up to 73,518 individuals of European ancestry, followed by extensive biological and functional assessment. RESULTS We identified 52 genomic loci, of which 32 are novel, that are reliably associated with 1 or more QRS phenotypes at p < 1 × 10−8. These loci are enriched in regions of open chromatin, histone modifications, and transcription factor binding, suggesting that they represent regions of the genome that are actively transcribed in the human heart. Pathway analyses provided evidence that these loci play a role in cardiac hypertrophy. We further highlighted 67 candidate genes at the identified loci that are preferentially expressed in cardiac tissue and associated with cardiac abnormalities in Drosophila melanogaster and Mus musculus. We validated the regulatory function of a novel variant in the SCN5A/SCN10A locus in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS Taken together, our findings provide new insights into genes and biological pathways controlling myocardial mass and may help identify novel therapeutic targets. PMID:27659466

  10. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 plays an essential role in the function of CD25(+)CD4(+) regulatory cells that control intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Read, S; Malmström, V; Powrie, F

    2000-07-17

    It is now clear that functionally specialized regulatory T (Treg) cells exist as part of the normal immune repertoire, preventing the development of pathogenic responses to both self- and intestinal antigens. Here, we report that the Treg cells that control intestinal inflammation express the same phenotype (CD25(+)CD45RB(low)CD4(+)) as those that control autoimmunity. Previous studies have failed to identify how CD25(+) Treg cells function in vivo. Our studies reveal that the immune-suppressive function of these cells in vivo is dependent on signaling via the negative regulator of T cell activation cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4), as well as secretion of the immune-suppressive cytokine transforming growth factor beta. Strikingly, constitutive expression of CTLA-4 among CD4(+) cells was restricted primarily to Treg cells, suggesting that CTLA-4 expression by these cells is involved in their immune-suppressive function. These findings raise the possibility that Treg cell function contributes to the immune suppression characteristic of CTLA-4 signaling. Identification of costimulatory molecules involved in the function of Treg cells may facilitate further characterization of these cells and development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  11. Role of CD8+ Lymphocytes in Control of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Resistance to Rechallenge after Transient Early Antiretroviral Treatment†

    PubMed Central

    Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Rossio, Jeffrey L.; Piatak, Michael; Parks, Thomas; Li, Li; Kiser, Rebecca; Coalter, Vicky; Fisher, Brad; Flynn, Bernard M.; Czajak, Susan; Hirsch, Vanessa M.; Reimann, Keith A.; Schmitz, Joern E.; Ghrayeb, John; Bischofberger, Norbert; Nowak, Martin A.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.; Wodarz, Dominik

    2001-01-01

    Transient antiretroviral treatment with tenofovir, (R)-9-(2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine, begun shortly after inoculation of rhesus macaques with the highly pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) isolate SIVsmE660, facilitated the development of SIV-specific lymphoproliferative responses and sustained effective control of the infection following drug discontinuation. Animals that controlled plasma viremia following transient postinoculation treatment showed substantial resistance to subsequent intravenous rechallenge with homologous (SIVsmE660) and highly heterologous (SIVmac239) SIV isolates, up to more than 1 year later, despite the absence of measurable neutralizing antibody. In some instances, resistance to rechallenge was observed despite the absence of detectable SIV-specific binding antibody and in the face of SIV lymphoproliferative responses that were low or undetectable at the time of challenge. In vivo monoclonal antibody depletion experiments demonstrated a critical role for CD8+ lymphocytes in the control of viral replication; plasma viremia rose by as much as five log units after depletion of CD8+ cells and returned to predepletion levels (as low as <100 copy Eq/ml) as circulating CD8+ cells were restored. The extent of host control of replication of highly pathogenic SIV strains and the level of resistance to heterologous rechallenge achieved following transient postinoculation treatment compared favorably to the results seen after SIVsmE660 and SIVmac239 challenge with many vaccine strategies. This impressive control of viral replication was observed despite comparatively modest measured immune responses, less than those often achieved with vaccination regimens. The results help establish the underlying feasibility of efforts to develop vaccines for the prevention of AIDS, although the exact nature of the protective host responses involved remains to be elucidated. PMID:11581387

  12. Bendamustine Plus Alemtuzumab for Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-20

    Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  13. Alvocidib in Treating Patients With B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  14. Variation of ATM protein expression in response to irradiation of lymphocytes in lung cancer patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Jianlin, Lou; Jiliang, He; Lifen, Jin; Wei, Zheng; Zhijian, Chen; Shijie, Chen; Shijie, Xu

    2006-07-05

    The aim of this research work was to study the cellular response to ionizing radiation (IR) and its relationship with the ATM protein expression levels in lung cancer patients. Heparinized blood samples were collected from 22 controls and 22 lung cancer patients. Each sample was divided into two parts: non-irradiated sample and irradiated sample, which was exposed to 3 Gy X-ray. The spontaneous and IR-induced genetic damage in both lung cancer patients and controls was measured with comet assay and micronucleus (MN) assay, and the ATM protein expression levels of non-irradiated samples in lung cancer patients and controls were detected by Western blotting. The results indicated that the baseline values of average mean tail moment (MTM) and micronucleus rate (MNR) in lung cancer patients were 0.86 and 11.41 per thousand, respectively, which was significantly higher than those (0.64 and 6.77 per thousand) of controls (P<0.05 for MTM, P<0.01 for MNR). The IR-induced average MTM and MNR in lung cancer patients were 1.23 and 77.64 per thousand, respectively, which was also significantly higher than those (0.71 and 66.05 per thousand) of controls (P<0.05 for MTM, P<0.01 for MNR). The results of Western blotting showed that the ATM protein expression levels in lung cancer patients and controls were 0.64 and 1.71, respectively, and there was significant (P<0.01) difference between lung cancer patients and controls. In present investigation, it was found that the genetic instability measured with comet assay and MN assay in lung cancer patients were significantly higher than those in controls, on the contrary, ATM protein expression level in lung cancer patients were significantly lower than that in controls. However, no good correlation was found either between ATM protein expression and IR-induced MTM or between ATM protein expression and IR-induced MNR in lung cancer patients.

  15. Lymphocyte emperipolesis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Sandilands, G. P.; Reid, Fiona M.; Gray, Kathleen G.; Anderson, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    A surprisingly high proportion of antibody (IgG) sensitized Chang liver cells apparently contained one or more intracytoplasmic human peripheral blood lymphocytes following a period of contact at 37°. Since various technical factors were found to influence this phenomenon of lymphocyte `emperipolesis', optimum conditions were selected for use in a standard quantitative in vitro assay. Lymphocytes from normal individuals varied considerably in their ability to participate in emperipolesis; an observation which suggested that a particular lymphocyte subpopulation may be involved. Preliminary characterization of emperipoletic cells indicated that they are Fc receptor bearing, non-T lymphocytes. The significance of these findings in relation to immune mechanisms is discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:312253

  16. Lenalidomide and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Early-Stage Asymptomatic Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-24

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  17. The effect of dietary walnuts compared to fatty fish on eicosanoids, cytokines, soluble endothelial adhesion molecules and lymphocyte subsets: a randomized, controlled crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yu-Lan; Haddad, Ella; Rajaram, Sujatha; Shavlik, David; Sabaté, Joan

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that walnut consumption can exert effects on markers of inflammation and endothelial activation similar to those produced by fish consumption. In a crossover dietary intervention trial, 25 normal to mildly hyperlipidemic men and women were randomly assigned to one of three isoenergetic diets: a walnut diet incorporating 42.5 g of walnuts per 10.1 mJ 6 times per week (1.8% of energy n-3 fat); a fish diet providing 113 g of fatty fish per 10.1 mJ 2 times per week (0.8% of energy n-3 fat), or a control diet (no nuts or fish, 0.4% of energy n-3 fat) for 4 weeks on each diet. Both the walnut and fish diets inhibited circulating concentrations of prostaglandin E metabolite (PGEM) and 11-dehydro thromboxane B2, but demonstrated no effect on blood interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α¯ (TNF-α¯), and C-reactive protein (CRP) or the number of circulating lymphocyte subsets. On the walnut diet the proportion of plasma phospholipid α¯-linolenic acid (ALA) increased 140% and arachidonic acid (AA) decreased 7% compared to both the control and fish diets. The proportion of plasma phospholipid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) increased about 200% and 900% respectively on the fish diet relative to either the control or walnut diet. The walnut diet inhibited E-selectin by 12.7% relative to the fish diet, and the fish diet inhibited secretory intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (s-ICAM-1) by 4.5% relative to the control diet. Both walnuts and fish in commonly consumed amounts may have modest albeit distinct effects on circulating adhesion molecules.

  18. Discriminated selection among viral peptides with the appropriate anchor residues: implications for the size of the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte repertoire and control of viral infection.

    PubMed

    Oldstone, M B; Lewicki, H; Borrow, P; Hudrisier, D; Gairin, J E

    1995-12-01

    Structural characterization of peptides restricted by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules has identified residues critical for MHC class I binding and for T-cell receptor recognition. For example, optimal peptides fitting into the murine MHC class I Db groove are 9 to 11 amino acids long and require as MHC anchor residues an Asn (N) at position 5 and also either a hydrophobic residue, a Met (M) or a Cys (C), at the carboxy terminus. The three known Db-restricted peptides of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are glycoproteins GP1 (amino acids [aa] 33 KAVYNFATC), GP2 (aa 276 SGVENPGGYCL), and nucleoprotein NP (aa 396 FQPQNGQFI). In addition to these two GP and one NP peptides, computer search revealed 11 other GP peptide sequences and 20 additional NP sequences that contained the Db binding motif. By Db competitive binding analysis, only two of these 11 GP peptides and 1 of these 20 NP peptides bound to the MHC Db molecule with an affinity equivalent to the measured affinities for the three known GP1, GP2, and NP cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes. No CTL specific for these three peptides were generated when H-2b mice were inoculated with viral variants in which either the two known GP epitopes (GP1 and GP2; termed GPV) or the GPV and NP epitopes (termed GPV + NPV) were mutated. However, a novel CD8+ anti-LCMV CTL response ordinarily not seen in H-2b mice inoculated with wild-type virus was noted when such mice were inoculated with the GPV + NPV-mutated variant. This result indicates that (i) despite large numbers of peptides containing the appropriate anchor residues within a viral protein, only a restricted number induce CTL, thereby maintaining a limited CTL repertoire, (ii) despite the limited repertoire, the immune system retains the flexibility to generate an immune response(s) to a previously silent protein(s), suggesting a hierarchial control mechanism, and (iii) identification of a primary amino acid sequence is not sufficient

  19. Discriminated selection among viral peptides with the appropriate anchor residues: implications for the size of the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte repertoire and control of viral infection.

    PubMed Central

    Oldstone, M B; Lewicki, H; Borrow, P; Hudrisier, D; Gairin, J E

    1995-01-01

    Structural characterization of peptides restricted by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules has identified residues critical for MHC class I binding and for T-cell receptor recognition. For example, optimal peptides fitting into the murine MHC class I Db groove are 9 to 11 amino acids long and require as MHC anchor residues an Asn (N) at position 5 and also either a hydrophobic residue, a Met (M) or a Cys (C), at the carboxy terminus. The three known Db-restricted peptides of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are glycoproteins GP1 (amino acids [aa] 33 KAVYNFATC), GP2 (aa 276 SGVENPGGYCL), and nucleoprotein NP (aa 396 FQPQNGQFI). In addition to these two GP and one NP peptides, computer search revealed 11 other GP peptide sequences and 20 additional NP sequences that contained the Db binding motif. By Db competitive binding analysis, only two of these 11 GP peptides and 1 of these 20 NP peptides bound to the MHC Db molecule with an affinity equivalent to the measured affinities for the three known GP1, GP2, and NP cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes. No CTL specific for these three peptides were generated when H-2b mice were inoculated with viral variants in which either the two known GP epitopes (GP1 and GP2; termed GPV) or the GPV and NP epitopes (termed GPV + NPV) were mutated. However, a novel CD8+ anti-LCMV CTL response ordinarily not seen in H-2b mice inoculated with wild-type virus was noted when such mice were inoculated with the GPV + NPV-mutated variant. This result indicates that (i) despite large numbers of peptides containing the appropriate anchor residues within a viral protein, only a restricted number induce CTL, thereby maintaining a limited CTL repertoire, (ii) despite the limited repertoire, the immune system retains the flexibility to generate an immune response(s) to a previously silent protein(s), suggesting a hierarchial control mechanism, and (iii) identification of a primary amino acid sequence is not sufficient

  20. Confirmation of five novel susceptibility loci for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and integrated network analysis of 82 SLE susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Molineros, Julio E; Yang, Wanling; Zhou, Xu-Jie; Sun, Celi; Okada, Yukinori; Zhang, Huoru; Heng Chua, Kek; Lau, Yu-Lung; Kochi, Yuta; Suzuki, Akari; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Ma, Jianyang; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Kwangwoo; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Zhang, Hong; Shen, Nan; Looger, Loren L; Nath, Swapan K

    2017-03-15

    We recently identified ten novel SLE susceptibility loci in Asians and uncovered several additional suggestive loci requiring further validation. This study aimed to replicate five of these suggestive loci in a Han Chinese cohort from Hong Kong, followed by meta-analysis (11,656 cases and 23,968 controls) on previously reported Asian and European populations, and to perform bioinformatic analyses on all 82 reported SLE loci to identify shared regulatory signatures. We performed a battery of analyses for these five loci, as well as joint analyses on all 82 SLE loci. All five loci passed genome-wide significance: MYNN (rs10936599, Pmeta = 1.92 × 10-13, OR = 1.14), ATG16L2 (rs11235604, Pmeta = 8.87 × 10 -12, OR = 0.78), CCL22 (rs223881, Pmeta = 5.87 × 10-16, OR = 0.87), ANKS1A (rs2762340, Pmeta = 4.93 × 10-15, OR = 0.87) and RNASEH2C (rs1308020, Pmeta = 2.96 × 10-19, OR = 0.84) and co-located with annotated gene regulatory elements. The novel loci share genetic signatures with other reported SLE loci, including effects on gene expression, transcription factor binding, and epigenetic characteristics. Most (56%) of the correlated (r2 > 0.8) SNPs from the 82 SLE loci were implicated in differential expression (9.81 × 10-198 < P < 5 × 10-3) of cis-genes. Transcription factor binding sites for p53, MEF2A and E2F1 were significantly (P < 0.05) over-represented in SLE loci, consistent with apoptosis playing a critical role in SLE. Enrichment analysis revealed common pathways, gene ontology, protein domains, and cell type-specific expression. In summary, we provide evidence of five novel SLE susceptibility loci. Integrated bioinformatics using all 82 loci revealed that SLE susceptibility loci share many gene regulatory features, suggestive of conserved mechanisms of SLE etiopathogenesis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  1. Micronuclei related to anti-B[a]PDE-DNA adduct in peripheral blood lymphocytes of heavily polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-exposed nonsmoking coke-oven workers and controls.

    PubMed

    Pavanello, Sofia; Kapka, Lucyna; Siwinska, Ewa; Mielzyñska, Danuta; Bolognesi, Claudia; Clonfero, Erminio

    2008-10-01

    Micronuclei (MN) frequency associated to biologically effective dose of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAH; anti-benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide (B[a]PDE)-DNA] within the same subjects' peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) was evaluated. Study subjects were nonsmoking male Polish coke-oven workers (n=49) and matched controls (n=45) verified for PAH exposure by urinary 1-pyrenol. We found that coke-oven workers, heavily exposed to PAHs (80% workers exceeded the urinary 1-pyrenol biological exposure index value), presented significantly higher MN frequency in PBLs than controls (P<0.01). Substantial difference was also found for adduct levels in PBLs (P<0.01). Increase in MN levels was significantly related to anti-B[a]PDE-DNA formation, key adduct of the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of B[a]P (n=94; r=0.47; P<0.001). The dose-response relationship was improved when subjects with adduct levels above the 3rd tertile (>or=4.35 adducts/10(8) nucleotides) were excluded (n=61; r=0.69; P<0.001). Saturation of adduct/MN formation at high levels may disturb the underlying relationship. Linear multiple regression analysis, without subjects of 3rd tertile adduct level (n=61), revealed that adduct formation (t=4.61; P<0.001), but not 1-pyrenol, was the significant determinant in increasing MN. In conclusion, the increase in MN frequency is mainly related to the specific anti-B[a]PDE-DNA formation within PBLs of the same subject. Our results substantiate, with the use of an early indicator of biological effect as well, that workers are at higher cancer risk than controls.

  2. Quantification of newly produced B and T lymphocytes in untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The immune defects occurring in chronic lymphocytic leukemia are responsible for the frequent occurrence of infections and autoimmune phenomena, and may be involved in the initiation and maintenance of the malignant clone. Here, we evaluated the quantitative defects of newly produced B and T lymphocytes. Methods The output of B and T lymphocytes from the production and maturation sites was analyzed in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients and healthy controls by quantifying kappa-deleting recombination excision circles (KRECs) and T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) by a Real-Time PCR assay that simultaneously detects both targets. T-lymphocyte subsets were analyzed by six-color flow cytometric analysis. Data comparison was performed by two-sided Mann-Whitney test. Results KRECs level was reduced in untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients studied at the very early stage of the disease, whereas the release of TRECs+ cells was preserved. Furthermore, the observed increase of CD4+ lymphocytes could be ascribed to the accumulation of CD4+ cells with effector memory phenotype. Conclusions The decreased number of newly produced B lymphocytes in these patients is likely related to a homeostatic mechanism by which the immune system balances the abnormal B-cell expansion. This feature may precede the profound defect of humoral immunity characterizing the later stages of the disease. PMID:21054858

  3. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Treating Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia In recent years, new drugs that target specific ... Typical Treatment of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  4. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  5. Supportive Care for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Supportive Care for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Supportive care for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is ... Treating Hairy Cell Leukemia More In Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  6. Characterization of metabolite quantitative trait loci and metabolic networks that control glucosinolate concentration in the seeds and leaves of Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ji; Long, Yan; Shi, Lei; Shi, Jiaqin; Barker, Guy; Meng, Jinling

    2012-01-01

    • Glucosinolates are a major class of secondary metabolites found in the Brassicaceae, whose degradation products are proving to be increasingly important for human health and in crop protection. • The genetic and metabolic basis of glucosinolate accumulation was dissected through analysis of total glucosinolate concentration and its individual components in both leaves and seeds of a doubled-haploid (DH) mapping population of oilseed rape/canola (Brassica napus). • The quantitative trait loci (QTL) that had an effect on glucosinolate concentration in either or both of the organs were integrated, resulting in 105 metabolite QTL (mQTL). Pairwise correlations between individual glucosinolates and prior knowledge of the metabolic pathways involved in the biosynthesis of different glucosinolates allowed us to predict the function of genes underlying the mQTL. Moreover, this information allowed us to construct an advanced metabolic network and associated epistatic interactions responsible for the glucosinolate composition in both leaves and seeds of B. napus. • A number of previously unknown potential regulatory relationships involved in glucosinolate synthesis were identified and this study illustrates how genetic variation can affect a biochemical pathway. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Genetic control of autoantibody expression in autoimmune myasthenia gravis: role of the self-antigen and of HLA-linked loci.

    PubMed

    Giraud, M; Beaurain, G; Eymard, B; Tranchant, C; Gajdos, P; Garchon, H-J

    2004-08-01

    Autoantibodies against the muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) play an essential role in the pathophysiology of autoimmune myasthenia gravis (MG). Their serum titers, however, vary considerably among patients. Our aim was to investigate whether their variation might be explained by genetic factors. Using different methods, we have obtained strong evidence for a three-locus association influencing autoantibody titers in MG patients with thymus hyperplasia or with a normal thymus. Two of the loci, one encoding the AChR alpha-subunit, the other encoding the alpha-chain of the class II antigen-presentation molecule, HLA-DQ, demonstrated interaction to determine high autoantibody titers. The third locus was associated with the 8.1 ancestral HLA haplotype. It exerted an additive effect and it is postulated to have a nonantigen specific immunoregulatory function. Our study demonstrates for the first time that polymorphism of an autoantigen gene may quantitatively modify the immune response against it. Altogether, the data lend support to a three-gene model to explain autoantibody expression in a subset of MG patients.

  8. Nonequivalent Loci and the distribution of mutant effects.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, J J; Waxman, D

    2002-01-01

    It has been observed repeatedly that the distribution of new mutations of a quantitative trait has a kurtosis (a statistical measure of the distribution's shape) that is systematically larger than that of a normal distribution. Here we suggest that rather than being a property of individual loci that control the trait, the enhanced kurtosis is highly likely to be an emergent property that arises directly from the loci being mutationally nonequivalent. We present a method of incorporating nonequivalent loci into quantitative genetic modeling and give an approximate relation between the kurtosis of the mutant distribution and the degree of mutational nonequivalence of loci. We go on to ask whether incorporating the experimentally observed kurtosis through nonequivalent loci, rather than at locus level, affects any biologically important conclusions of quantitative genetic modeling. Concentrating on the maintenance of quantitative genetic variation by mutation-selection balance, we conclude that typically nonequivalent loci yield a genetic variance that is of order 10% smaller than that obtained from the previous approaches. For large populations, when the kurtosis is large, the genetic variance may be <50% of the result of equivalent loci, with Gaussian distributions of mutant effects. PMID:12072483

  9. Type 1 diabetes risk for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR3 haplotypes depends on genotypic context: association of DPB1 and HLA class I loci among DR3- and DR4-matched Italian patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Noble, Janelle A; Martin, Adelle; Valdes, Ana M; Lane, Julie A; Galgani, Andrea; Petrone, Antonio; Lorini, Renata; Pozzilli, Paolo; Buzzetti, Raffaella; Erlich, Henry A

    2008-01-01

    Patients with high-risk human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR-DQ genotypes for type 1 diabetes (T1D) were compared with HLA-matched controls to evaluate T1D risk for other HLA loci, including HLA-A, -B, -Cw, and DPB1. Patients (n = 133) with high-risk genotypes (DR3/DR3, DR3/DR4, DR4/DR4) were selected from the Lazio (Rome) region of Italy. Screening of more than 9000 patients from the Lazio region and northern Italy yielded 162 controls with high-T1D-risk haplotypes. Although the overall distributions did not differ significantly, allele frequency differences were discovered between the controls from Lazio and controls from northern Italy for some alleles previously determined to affect T1D risk, such as A*3002, DPB1*0301, and DPB1*0402. Therefore, Lazio patient data were compared both with the Lazio subset of controls (n = 53) and with the entire group of controls for association analyses. Significant allele frequency differences between patients and DR-DQ-matched controls existed for specific alleles at all loci. Data for the DR3/DR3 subset of patients and controls demonstrated an increase of Cw*0702 in patients. Compared with controls, reduced patient frequencies were seen for several alleles, including A*0101, B*0801, and Cw*0701, all on the highly conserved, extended DR3 haplotype known as 8.1 in DR3/DR3, but not DR3/DR4, subgroup. DPB1*0101, often reported on 8.1 haplotypes, was also less frequent in DR3/DR3 patients than controls. Analysis of family-based data from the HBDI repository was consistent with the observed results from the Italian patients, indicating the presence of a T1D-protective locus at or near A*0101 and a second T1D-protective locus at or near DPB1*0101. These data indicate that T1D risk conferred by the 8.1 haplotype is genotype dependent.

  10. T helper cell IL-4 drives intestinal Th2 priming to oral peanut antigen, under the control of OX40L and independent of innate-like lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Chu, D K; Mohammed-Ali, Z; Jiménez-Saiz, R; Walker, T D; Goncharova, S; Llop-Guevara, A; Kong, J; Gordon, M E; Barra, N G; Gillgrass, A E; Van Seggelen, H; Khan, W I; Ashkar, A A; Bramson, J L; Humbles, A A; Kolbeck, R; Waserman, S; Jordana, M

    2014-11-01

    Intestinal T helper type 2 (Th2) immunity in food allergy results in IgG1 and IgE production, and antigen re-exposure elicits responses such as anaphylaxis and eosinophilic inflammation. Although interleukin-4 (IL-4) is critically required for allergic sensitization, the source and control of IL-4 during the initiation of Th2 immunity in vivo remains unclear. Non-intestinal and non-food allergy systems have suggested that natural killer-like T (NKT) or γδ T-cell innate lymphocytes can supply the IL-4 required to induce Th2 polarization. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a novel IL-4-competent population, but their contribution to initiating adaptive Th2 immunity is unclear. There are also reports of IL-4-independent Th2 responses. Here, we show that IL-4-dependent peanut allergic Th2 responses are completely intact in NKT-deficient, γδ T-deficient or ILC-deficient mice, including antigen-specific IgG1/IgE production, anaphylaxis, and cytokine production. Instead, IL-4 solely from CD4(+) Th cells induces full Th2 immunity. Further, CD4(+) Th cell production of IL-4 in vivo is dependent on OX40L, a costimulatory molecule on dendritic cells (DCs) required for intestinal allergic priming. However, both Th2 cells and ILCs orchestrated IL-13-dependent eosinophilic inflammation. Thus, intestinal Th2 priming is initiated by an autocrine/paracrine acting CD4(+) Th cell-intrinsic IL-4 program that is controlled by DC OX40L, and not by NKT, γδ T, or ILC cells.

  11. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemias and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas by histological type in farming-animal breeding workers: a population case-control study based on job titles.

    PubMed Central

    Amadori, D; Nanni, O; Falcini, F; Saragoni, A; Tison, V; Callea, A; Scarpi, E; Ricci, M; Riva, N; Buiatti, E

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--A population based case-control study was conducted in a highly agricultural area in the north east of Italy to evaluate the association between farming and animal breeding and the risk of developing non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). METHODS--Occupational histories and other data were collected by personal interview on 164 NHLs, 23 CLLs, diagnosed in 1988-90, and on 977 controls. This paper only reports the results of the analysis relative to the coding of job titles through the modified International Labour Office (ILO) classification. Estimates of odds ratios (ORs) for occupational variables were calculated, after adjustment for sex, age, altitude of municipality, first degree familiarity, and previous Herpes zoster infection. RESULTS--From the analysis of the most frequent occupational categories, no occupation showed a significantly high risk. When the two job titles farmers only and farmer-breeders who are also involved in animal breeding are classified within the extremely varied occupation of agriculture or animal-breeding or fishing, a high risk for NHLs and CLLs is seen in the farmer-breeders (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.22 - 2.63). Analyses according to histological type show that the risks are concentrated in CLLs and in low grade NHLs. No effect or trend by period at work or duration of employment in farming and animal breeding was found. CONCLUSION--Subjects working in agriculture associated with animal breeding are at high risk of NHL/CLLs, particularly CLLs and low grade NHLs. This finding could be related to the use of chemicals in agriculture or to exposure to animal transmitted diseases or specific chemicals used in animal breeding. PMID:7627313

  12. Enhanced responsiveness to T-cell help causes loss of B-lymphocyte tolerance to a β-cell neo-self-antigen in type 1 diabetes prone NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Cox, Selwyn Lewis; Stolp, Jessica; Hallahan, Nicole L; Counotte, Jacqueline; Zhang, Wenyu; Serreze, David V; Basten, Antony; Silveira, Pablo A

    2010-12-01

    Self-reactive B lymphocytes contribute to type 1 diabetes pathogenesis as APC and auto-Ab producers in NOD mice and humans. To shed light on the mechanisms responsible for the breakdown in B-lymphocyte self-tolerance to β-cell Ag, we utilised a model whereby hen-egg lysozyme (HEL)-specific Ig Tg (IgHEL-Tg)-Tg B lymphocytes were allowed to develop in or were transferred into mice expressing the HEL Tg under an insulin promoter (insHEL-Tg). IgHEL-Tg B lymphocytes enhanced type 1 diabetes susceptibility of insHEL-Tg NOD mice. A comparison of the tolerogenic activity of IgHEL-Tg B lymphocytes with NOD and non-autoimmune-prone C57BL/6 genetic backgrounds showed that both were rendered anergic in the presence of insHEL when competing with polyclonal B lymphocytes. Nevertheless, NOD IgHEL-Tg B lymphocytes transferred into insHEL-Tg mice were more readily susceptible to rescue from anergy than their C57BL/6 counterparts, following provision of in vivo T-cell help. The different tolerogenic outcomes were an intrinsic property of B lymphocytes rather than being related to the quality of T-cell help, with the defective response being at least partially controlled by genes mapping to insulin-dependent diabetes (Idd) susceptibility loci on Chromosome 1 (Idd5) and 4 (Idd9/11). Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. T and B lymphocytes in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Itoyama, Y; Kawanami, S; Goto, I; Kuroiwa, Y

    1979-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes from seventeen non-thymectomized and nine thymectomized patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) and thirteen healthy controls were examined for the presence of surface markers characteristic of T and B lymphocytes by rosette formation with sheep red blood cells (SRBC). T cells were identified by their capacity to spontaneously form rosettes with SRBCs. The percentage of B lymphocytes was determined by the erythrocyte antibody complement (EAC) rosette-forming test. The EAC complex was prepared with either whole rabbit anti-SRBC serum or with the IgM fraction of rabbit anti-SRBC serum. The two kind of erythrocyte complement rosette-forming cells (EAC-RFC) are designated erythrocyte-haemolysin-complement RFC (EA(H)C-RFC), and erythrocyte-IgM-complement RFC (EA(M)C-RFC). The percentage of total lymphocytes and T cells was not altered in MG patients. The percentage of 'active' T cells, which have been considered to be more actively involved in cellular immunity, was also similar in MG patients and controls. A significant increase in EA(H)C-RFC occurred in both thymectomized and non-thymectomized MG patients, while in B cells detected by EA(M)C-RFC no alterations were found. The increase in EA(H)C-RFC in lymphocytes from MG patients may be due to an increase in the 19S antibody-forming B lymphocytes or to an increase in T cells which have Fc receptors on their surface. PMID:315844

  14. Interleukin 21 Controls mRNA and MicroRNA Expression in CD40-Activated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Cecco, Loris; Capaia, Matteo; Zupo, Simona; Cutrona, Giovanna; Matis, Serena; Brizzolara, Antonella; Orengo, Anna Maria; Croce, Michela; Marchesi, Edoardo; Ferrarini, Manlio; Canevari, Silvana; Ferrini, Silvano

    2015-01-01

    Several factors support CLL cell survival in the microenvironment. Under different experimental conditions, IL21 can either induce apoptosis or promote CLL cell survival. To investigate mechanisms involved in the effects of IL21, we studied the ability of IL21 to modulate gene and miRNA expressions in CD40-activated CLL cells. IL21 was a major regulator of chemokine production in CLL cells and it modulated the expression of genes involved in cell movement, metabolism, survival and apoptosis. In particular, IL21 down-regulated the expression of the chemokine genes CCL4, CCL3, CCL3L1, CCL17, and CCL2, while it up-regulated the Th1-related CXCL9 and CXCL10. In addition, IL21 down-regulated the expression of genes encoding signaling molecules, such as CD40, DDR1 and PIK3CD. IL21 modulated a similar set of genes in CLL and normal B-cells (e.g. chemokine genes), whereas other genes, including MYC, TNF, E2F1, EGR2 and GAS-6, were regulated only in CLL cells. An integrated analysis of the miRNome and gene expression indicated that several miRNAs were under IL21 control and these could, in turn, influence the expression of potential target genes. We focused on hsa-miR-663b predicted to down-regulate several relevant genes. Transfection of hsa-miR-663b or its specific antagonist showed that this miRNA regulated CCL17, DDR1, PIK3CD and CD40 gene expression. Our data indicated that IL21 modulates the expression of genes mediating the crosstalk between CLL cells and their microenvironment and miRNAs may take part in this process. PMID:26305332

  15. Interleukin 21 Controls mRNA and MicroRNA Expression in CD40-Activated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    De Cecco, Loris; Capaia, Matteo; Zupo, Simona; Cutrona, Giovanna; Matis, Serena; Brizzolara, Antonella; Orengo, Anna Maria; Croce, Michela; Marchesi, Edoardo; Ferrarini, Manlio; Canevari, Silvana; Ferrini, Silvano

    2015-01-01

    Several factors support CLL cell survival in the microenvironment. Under different experimental conditions, IL21 can either induce apoptosis or promote CLL cell survival. To investigate mechanisms involved in the effects of IL21, we studied the ability of IL21 to modulate gene and miRNA expressions in CD40-activated CLL cells. IL21 was a major regulator of chemokine production in CLL cells and it modulated the expression of genes involved in cell movement, metabolism, survival and apoptosis. In particular, IL21 down-regulated the expression of the chemokine genes CCL4, CCL3, CCL3L1, CCL17, and CCL2, while it up-regulated the Th1-related CXCL9 and CXCL10. In addition, IL21 down-regulated the expression of genes encoding signaling molecules, such as CD40, DDR1 and PIK3CD. IL21 modulated a similar set of genes in CLL and normal B-cells (e.g. chemokine genes), whereas other genes, including MYC, TNF, E2F1, EGR2 and GAS-6, were regulated only in CLL cells. An integrated analysis of the miRNome and gene expression indicated that several miRNAs were under IL21 control and these could, in turn, influence the expression of potential target genes. We focused on hsa-miR-663b predicted to down-regulate several relevant genes. Transfection of hsa-miR-663b or its specific antagonist showed that this miRNA regulated CCL17, DDR1, PIK3CD and CD40 gene expression. Our data indicated that IL21 modulates the expression of genes mediating the crosstalk between CLL cells and their microenvironment and miRNAs may take part in this process.

  16. Increased mitogenic response in lymphocytes from chronically centrifuged mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Otfried; Hunzinger, E.; Cogoli, Augusto; Bechler, B.; Lee, J.; Moore, J.; Duke, J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects upon the mitogenic response of splenic lymphocytes when exposing mice to prolonged hypergravity conditions (3.5 G for 1 year) were studied. Cultures of splenic lymphocytes isolated from both centrifuged and control (1 G) animals were stimulated with Concanavalin A and the response measured using both morphological and biochemical means. Lymphocytes obtained from centrifuged mice exhibited much higher activation rates (as measured by the incorporation of H-3 thymidine) and larger cell aggregates consisting of more lymphoblasts and mitotic figures than those observed in non centrifuged control animals. Isolated splenic lymphocytes thus appear to have been conditioned by hypergravity state.

  17. Increased mitogenic response in lymphocytes from chronically centrifuged mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Otfried; Hunzinger, E.; Cogoli, Augusto; Bechler, B.; Lee, J.; Moore, J.; Duke, J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects upon the mitogenic response of splenic lymphocytes when exposing mice to prolonged hypergravity conditions (3.5 G for 1 year) were studied. Cultures of splenic lymphocytes isolated from both centrifuged and control (1 G) animals were stimulated with Concanavalin A and the response measured using both morphological and biochemical means. Lymphocytes obtained from centrifuged mice exhibited much higher activation rates (as measured by the incorporation of H-3 thymidine) and larger cell aggregates consisting of more lymphoblasts and mitotic figures than those observed in non centrifuged control animals. Isolated splenic lymphocytes thus appear to have been conditioned by hypergravity state.

  18. Quantitative trait loci that control plasma lipid levels in an F2 intercross between C57BL/6J and DDD.Cg-A(y) inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Suto, Jun-ichi

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize plasma lipid phenotypes and dissect the genetic basis of plasma lipid levels in an obese DDD.Cg-A(y) mouse strain. Plasma triglyceride (TG) levels were significantly higher in the DDD.Cg-A(y) strain than in the B6.Cg-A(y) strain. In contrast, plasma total-cholesterol (CHO) levels did not substantially differ between the two strains. As a rule, the A(y) allele significantly increased TG levels, but did not increase CHO levels. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses for plasma TG and CHO levels were performed in two types of F(2) female mice [F(2)A(y) (F(2) mice carrying the A(y) allele) and F(2) non- A(y) mice (F(2) mice without the A(y) allele)] produced by crossing C57BL/6J females and DDD.Cg-A(y) males. Single QTL scan identified one significant QTL for TG levels on chromosome 1, and two significant QTLs for CHO levels on chromosomes 1 and 8. When the marker nearest to the QTL on chromosome 1 was used as covariates, four additional significant QTLs for CHO levels were identified on chromosomes 5, 6, and 17 (two loci). In contrast, consideration of the agouti locus genotype as covariates did not detect additional QTLs. DDD.Cg-A(y) showed a low CHO level, although it had Apoa2(b), which was a CHO-increasing allele at the Apoa2 locus. This may have been partly due to the presence of multiple QTLs, which were associated with decreased CHO levels, on chromosome 8.

  19. Quantitative trait loci that control body weight and obesity in an F2 intercross between C57BL/6J and DDD.Cg-Ay mice.

    PubMed

    Suto, Jun-ichi

    2011-07-01

    I have developed a congenic mouse strain for the A(y) allele at the agouti locus in an inbred DDD/Sgn strain, DDD.Cg-A(y). DDD.Cg-A(y) females are extremely obese and significantly heavier than B6.Cg-A(y) females. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic basis of obesity in DDD.Cg-A(y) mice, and to determine whether or not their high body weight was due to the presence of DDD background-specific modifiers. I performed quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses for body weight and body mass index in two types of F(2) mice [F2 A(y) (F(2) mice carrying the A(y) allele) and F(2) non-A(y) (F2 mice without the A(y) allele)] produced by crossing C57BL/6J females and DDD.Cg-A(y) males. The results of the QTL analysis of F(2) A(y) mice were very similar to those obtained for F(2) non-A(y) mice. It was unlikely that the high body weight of DDD.Cg-A(y) mice was due to the presence of specific modifiers. When both F(2) datasets were merged and analyzed, four significant body weight QTLs were identified on chromosomes 6, 9, and 17 (2 loci) and four significant obesity QTLs were identified on chromosomes 1, 6, 9, and 17. Although the presence of DDD background-specific modifiers was not confirmed, a multifactorial basis of obesity in DDD.Cg-A(y) females was thus revealed.

  20. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling High Iron and Zinc Content in Self and Open Pollinated Grains of Pearl Millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sushil; Hash, Charles T.; Thirunavukkarasu, Nepolean; Singh, Govind; Rajaram, Vengaldas; Rathore, Abhishek; Senapathy, Senthilvel; Mahendrakar, Mahesh D.; Yadav, Rattan S.; Srivastava, Rakesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Pearl millet is a multipurpose grain/fodder crop of the semi-arid tropics, feeding many of the world’s poorest and most undernourished people. Genetic variation among adapted pearl millet inbreds and hybrids suggests it will be possible to improve grain micronutrient concentrations by selective breeding. Using 305 loci, a linkage map was constructed to map QTLs for grain iron [Fe] and zinc [Zn] using replicated samples of 106 pearl millet RILs (F6) derived from ICMB 841-P3 × 863B-P2. The grains of the RIL population were evaluated for Fe and Zn content using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Grain mineral concentrations ranged from 28.4 to 124.0 ppm for Fe and 28.7 to 119.8 ppm for Zn. Similarly, grain Fe and Zn in open pollinated seeds ranged between 22.4–77.4 and 21.9–73.7 ppm, respectively. Mapping with 305 (96 SSRs; 208 DArT) markers detected seven linkage groups covering 1749 cM (Haldane) with an average intermarker distance of 5.73 cM. On the basis of two environment phenotypic data, two co-localized QTLs for Fe and Zn content on linkage group (LG) 3 were identified by composite interval mapping (CIM). Fe QTL explained 19% phenotypic variation, whereas the Zn QTL explained 36% phenotypic variation. Likewise for open pollinated seeds, the QTL analysis led to the identification of two QTLs for grain Fe content on LG3 and 5, and two QTLs for grain Zn content on LG3 and 7. The total phenotypic variance for Fe and Zn QTLs in open pollinated seeds was 16 and 42%, respectively. Analysis of QTL × QTL and QTL × QTL × environment interactions indicated no major epistasis. PMID:27933068

  1. Identification of nine novel loci associated with white blood cell subtypes in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yukinori; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Takahashi, Atsushi; Ohmiya, Hiroko; Kumasaka, Natsuhiko; Higasa, Koichiro; Yamaguchi-Kabata, Yumi; Hosono, Naoya; Nalls, Michael A; Chen, Ming Huei; van Rooij, Frank J A; Smith, Albert V; Tanaka, Toshiko; Couper, David J; Zakai, Neil A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Longo, Dan L; Hernandez, Dena G; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Harris, Tamara B; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Ganesh, Santhi K; Matsuda, Koichi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tamari, Mayumi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kamatani, Naoyuki

    2011-06-01

    White blood cells (WBCs) mediate immune systems and consist of various subtypes with distinct roles. Elucidation of the mechanism that regulates the counts of the WBC subtypes would provide useful insights into both the etiology of the immune system and disease pathogenesis. In this study, we report results of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and a replication study for the counts of the 5 main WBC subtypes (neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, basophils, and eosinophils) using 14,792 Japanese subjects enrolled in the BioBank Japan Project. We identified 12 significantly associated loci that satisfied the genome-wide significance threshold of P<5.0×10(-8), of which 9 loci were novel (the CDK6 locus for the neutrophil count; the ITGA4, MLZE, STXBP6 loci, and the MHC region for the monocyte count; the SLC45A3-NUCKS1, GATA2, NAALAD2, ERG loci for the basophil count). We further evaluated associations in the identified loci using 15,600 subjects from Caucasian populations. These WBC subtype-related loci demonstrated a variety of patterns of pleiotropic associations within the WBC subtypes, or with total WBC count, platelet count, or red blood cell-related traits (n = 30,454), which suggests unique and common functional roles of these loci in the processes of hematopoiesis. This study should contribute to the understanding of the genetic backgrounds of the WBC subtypes and hematological traits.

  2. An autosomal dominant locus, Nka, mapping to the Ly-49 region of a rat natural killer (NK) gene complex, controls NK cell lysis of allogeneic lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells can recognize and kill MHC-incompatible normal bone marrow-derived cells. Presently characterized MHC-binding receptors on NK cells, including the Ly-49 family in the mouse, transmit inhibitory signals upon binding to cognate class I MHC ligands. Here we study in vivo NK-mediated lysis of normal allogeneic lymphocytes in crosses between alloreactivity-competent PVG rats and alloreactivity-deficient DA rats. NK cells from both strains are able to lyse standard tumor targets. We identify an autosomal dominant locus, Nka, that controls NK-mediated alloreactivity. Individuals carrying the dominant PVG allele in single dose were fully competent in eliminating allogeneic target cells, suggesting that Nka encodes or regulates a gene product inducing or activating alloreactivity. By linkage analysis and pulsed field gel electrophoresis, a natural killer gene complex (NKC) on rat chromosome 4 is described that contains the rat NKR-P1 and Ly-49 multigene families plus a rat NKG2D homologue. Nka maps within the NKC, together with the most telomeric Ly-49 family members, but separate from NKG2D and the NKR-P1 family. The Nka-encoded response, moreover, correlates with the expression of transcripts for Ly-49 receptors in NK cell populations, as Northern blot analysis demonstrated low expression of Ly-49 genes in DA NK cells, in contrast to high expression in alloreactivity-competent PVG, (DA X PVG)F1, and PVG.1AVI NK cells. The low Ly-49 expression in DA is not induced by MHC haplotype, as demonstrated by high expression of Ly-49 in the DA MHC- congenic PVG.1AVI strain. Finally, we have cloned and characterized the first four members of the rat Ly-49 gene family. Their cytoplasmic domains demonstrate substantial heterogeneity, consistent with the hypothesis that different Ly-49 family members may subserve different signaling functions. PMID:8642329

  3. Case-control, exploratory study of cerebrospinal fluid chemokines/cytokines and lymphocyte subsets in childhood Tourette syndrome with positive streptococcal markers.

    PubMed

    Pranzatelli, Michael R; Tate, Elizabeth D; Allison, Tyler J

    2017-08-01

    A longstanding question is whether neuroinflammation is present in children symptomatic for Tourette syndrome (TS) with positive streptococcal serology and throat cultures. The objective was to directly test for it using modern hypothesis-driven approaches. Profiling studies for 14 immune cell types (flow cytometry), 7 chemokines/cytokines (ELISA), oligoclonal bands, and other immunoglobulins were performed in this IRB-approved study of 5 children with TS and streptococcal markers compared to data from 26 non-inflammatory pediatric neurological controls. Subjects were well-characterized clinically and with standardized scales for tics and obsessions/compulsions. Three subjects with TS (60%) had positive throat cultures for Group A beta-hemolytic strep, five had elevated anti-deoxyribonuclease-B titers (mean=444), and 4 (80%) had elevated anti-streptolysin O titers (981). There were no significant differences between groups in the frequency of CSF B and T cell subsets or NK cells; the proportion of intracellularly-stained T helper type 1 (IFN-γ) or type 2 (IL-4) cells; the concentrations of B cell chemoattractants CXCL13, CXCL10; the B cell proliferation/survival cytokines BAFF and APRIL, or other chemokines (CCL19, CCL21, CCL22). None of the patients had positive CSF oligoclonal bands or an abnormal IgG index/synthesis rate. Parallel blood studies were negative. This novel study found no group CSF lymphocyte phenotypic abnormalities or elevated inflammatory mediators in childhood TS despite positive serology and throat cultures for Group A beta-hemolytic streptococci. It demonstrates feasibility of the methodology, and should serve as the basis for a larger study of putative streptococcal-associated neuroimmunological disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic complexity at expression quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Rita M; Pan, Calvin; Siegmund, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Identifying variants that regulate gene expression and delineating their genetic architecture is a critical next step in our endeavors to better understand the genetic etiology of complex diseases. The appropriate genomic tools are in place, and preliminary analytic strategies have been developed. Here we used Genetic Analysis Workshop (GAW) 19 data to investigate the genetic complexity of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), chromosomal regions likely to harbor regulatory elements responsible for gene expression. For this investigation, we analyzed the lymphocyte expression profiles of 653 individuals in 20 pedigrees who were also genotyped by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, followed by sequencing and imputation. We used these data to examine the degree of allelic heterogeneity, a contributor to genetic complexity at eQTL, by sequentially conditioning on the most significantly associated SNPs. SOLAR (Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines)-MGA (measured genotype approach) and FaST-LMM (Factored Spectrally Transformed Linear Mixed Model) software allowed us to analyze pedigree data. The power and Type 1 error rates for single SNP association testing and multiple SNP sequential association testing were consistent for these programs. Sequential conditioning of the real expression data revealed substantial levels of allelic heterogeneity at the 2 eQTL examined, illustrating this feature of genetic complexity. eQTL exhibit substantial genetic complexity among and within pedigrees.

  5. GLANET: genomic loci annotation and enrichment tool.

    PubMed

    Otlu, Burçak; Firtina, Can; Keles, Sündüz; Tastan, Oznur

    2017-09-15

    Genomic studies identify genomic loci representing genetic variations, transcription factor (TF) occupancy, or histone modification through next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Interpreting these loci requires evaluating them with known genomic and epigenomic annotations. We present GLANET as a comprehensive annotation and enrichment analysis tool which implements a sampling-based enrichment test that accounts for GC content and/or mappability biases, jointly or separately. GLANET annotates and performs enrichment analysis on these loci with a rich library. We introduce and perform novel data-driven computational experiments for assessing the power and Type-I error of its enrichment procedure which show that GLANET has attained high statistical power and well-controlled Type-I error rate. As a key feature, users can easily extend its library with new gene sets and genomic intervals. Other key features include assessment of impact of single nucleotide variants (SNPs) on TF binding sites and regulation based pathway enrichment analysis. GLANET can be run using its GUI or on command line. GLANET's source code is available at https://github.com/burcakotlu/GLANET . Tutorials are provided at https://glanet.readthedocs.org . burcak@ceng.metu.edu.tr or oznur.tastan@cs.bilkent.edu.tr. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  6. Injurious effect on rat liver mitochondria by lymphocytes from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bootello, A; Fernandez-Cruz, E; Escartin, P; Blanco, M F; Gosalvez, M; Segovia De Arana, J M

    1976-01-01

    Lymphocytes from primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) patients were shown to have an injurious effect on rat liver mitochondria, as was demonstrated by the inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory control by these cells. The incubation of the PBC patients' lymphocytes with isolated rat liver mitochondria produced a significant inhibition of mitochondrial respiration in the presence of ADP. However, no significant effect on respiration was seen with control lymphocytes of normal persons or with lymphocytes from patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and miscellaneous liver diseases. The results suggest that this injurious effect of PBC lymphocytes on mitochondria might be a consequence of sensitization in vivo of the PBC patients' lymphocytes by the mitochondrial antigens. PMID:1277585

  7. Round fruit shape in WI7239 cucumber is controlled by two interacting quantitative trait loci with one putatively encoding a tomato SUN homolog.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yupeng; Liang, Xinjing; Gao, Meiling; Liu, Hanqiang; Meng, Huanwen; Weng, Yiqun; Cheng, Zhihui

    2017-03-01

    QTL analysis revealed two interacting loci, FS1.2 and FS2.1, underlying round fruit shape in WI7239 cucumber; CsSUN , a homolog of tomato fruit shape gene SUN , was a candidate for FS1.2. Fruit size is an important quality and yield trait in cucumber, but its genetic basis remains poorly understood. Here we reported QTL mapping results on fruit size with segregating populations derived from the cross between WI7238 (long fruit) and WI7239 (round fruit) inbred cucumber lines. Phenotypic data of fruit length and diameter were collected at anthesis, immature and mature fruit stages in four environments. Ten major-effect QTL were detected for six traits; synthesis of information from these QTL supported two genes, FS1.2 and FS2.1, underlying fruit size variation in the examined populations. Under the two-gene model, deviation from expected segregation ratio in fruit length and diameter among segregating populations was observed, which could be explained mainly by the interactions between FS1.2 and FS2.1, and segregation distortion in the FS2.1 region. Genome-wide candidate gene search identified CsSUN, a homolog of the tomato fruit shape gene SUN, as the candidate for FS1.2. The round-fruited WI7239 had a 161-bp deletion in the first exon of CsSUN, and its expression in WI7239 was significantly lower than that in WI7238. A marker derived from this deletion was mapped at the peak location of FS1.2 in QTL analysis. Comparative analysis suggested the melon gene CmSUN-14, a homolog of CsSUN as a candidate of the fl2/fd2/fw2 QTL in melon. This study revealed the unique genetic architecture of round fruit shape in WI7239 cucumber. It also highlights the power of QTL analysis for traits with a simple genetic basis but their expression is complicated by other factors.

  8. Novel biphasic role for lymphocytes revealed during resolving inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rajakariar, Ravindra; Lawrence, Toby; Bystrom, Jonas; Hilliard, Mark; Colville-Nash, Paul; Bellingan, Geoff; Fitzgerald, Desmond; Yaqoob, Muhammad M.

    2008-01-01

    Acute inflammation is traditionally described as the influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) followed by monocyte-derived macrophages, leading to resolution. This is a classic view, and despite subpopulations of lymphocytes possessing innate immune-regulatory properties, seldom is their role in acute inflammation and its resolution discussed. To redress this we show, using lymphocyte-deficient RAG1−/− mice, that peritoneal T/B lymphocytes control PMN trafficking by regulating cytokine synthesis. Once inflammation ensues in normal mice, lymphocytes disappear in response to DP1 receptor activation by prostaglandin D2. However, upon resolution, lymphocytes repopulate the cavity comprising B1, natural killer (NK), γ/δ T, CD4+/CD25+, and B2 cells. Repopulating lymphocytes are dispensable for resolution, as inflammation in RAG1−/− and wild-type mice resolve uniformly. However, repopulating lymphocytes are critical for modulating responses to superinfection. Thus, in chronic granulomatous disease using gp91phox−/− mice, not only is resolution delayed compared with wild-type, but there is a failure of lymphocyte re-appearance predisposing to exaggerated immune responses upon secondary challenge that is rescued by resolution-phase lymphocytes. In conclusion, as lymphocyte repopulation is also evident in human peritonitis, we hereby describe a transition in T/B cells from acute inflammation to resolution, with a central role in modulating the severity of early onset and orchestrating responses to secondary infection. PMID:18218853

  9. Studies in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia II. Lymphocyte markers, cellular and humoral immunity and the effect of treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Bazerbashi, M. B.; Chanarin, I.; Denman, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    Observations were made on 15 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, 3 with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and 18 healthy controls. These include characterization of lymphocytes, assessment of humoral and cell-mediated immunity and the effect of treatment. Those responding to therapy showed a disappearance of 'null' lymphocytes from the blood with improvement in clinical and haematological parameters. Their immune capacity, however, remained unchanged or continued to deteriorate. PMID:7393803

  10. Comprehensive Survey of miRNA-mRNA Interactions Reveals That Ccr7 and Cd247 (CD3 zeta) are Posttranscriptionally Controlled in Pancreas Infiltrating T Lymphocytes of Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Claudia; Sakamoto-Hojo, Elza T.; Donadi, Eduardo A.; Passos, Geraldo A.

    2015-01-01

    In autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D), auto-reactive clones of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the periphery evolve into pancreas-infiltrating T lymphocytes (PILs), which destroy insulin-producing beta-cells through inflammatory insulitis. Previously, we demonstrated that, during the development of T1D in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, a set of immune/inflammatory reactivity genes were differentially expressed in T lymphocytes. However, the posttranscriptional control involving miRNA interactions that occur during the evolution of thymocytes into PILs remains unknown. In this study, we postulated that miRNAs are differentially expressed during this period and that these miRNAs can interact with mRNAs involved in auto-reactivity during the progression of insulitis. To test this hypothesis, we used NOD mice to perform, for the first time, a comprehensive survey of miRNA and mRNA expression as thymocytes mature into peripheral CD3+ T lymphocytes and, subsequently, into PILs. Reconstruction of miRNA-mRNA interaction networks for target prediction revealed the participation of a large set of miRNAs that regulate mRNA targets related to apoptosis, cell adhesion, cellular regulation, cellular component organization, cellular processes, development and the immune system, among others. The interactions between miR-202-3p and the Ccr7 chemokine receptor mRNA or Cd247 (Cd3 zeta chain) mRNA found in PILs are highlighted because these interactions can contribute to a better understanding of how the lack of immune homeostasis and the emergence of autoimmunity (e.g., T1D) can be associated with the decreased activity of Ccr7 or Cd247, as previously observed in NOD mice. We demonstrate that these mRNAs are controlled at the posttranscriptional level in PILs. PMID:26606254

  11. A PQL (protein quantity loci) analysis of mature pea seed proteins identifies loci determining seed protein composition.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Michael; Jacquin, Françoise; Cassecuelle, Florence; Savois, Vincent; Belghazi, Maya; Aubert, Grégoire; Quillien, Laurence; Huart, Myriam; Marget, Pascal; Burstin, Judith

    2011-05-01

    Legume seeds are a major source of dietary proteins for humans and animals. Deciphering the genetic control of their accumulation is thus of primary significance towards their improvement. At first, we analysed the genetic variability of the pea seed proteome of three genotypes over 3 years of cultivation. This revealed that seed protein composition variability was under predominant genetic control, with as much as 60% of the spots varying quantitatively among the three genotypes. Then, by combining proteomic and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping approaches, we uncovered the genetic architecture of seed proteome variability. Protein quantity loci (PQL) were searched for 525 spots detected on 2-D gels obtained for 157 recombinant inbred lines. Most protein quantity loci mapped in clusters, suggesting that the accumulation of the major storage protein families was under the control of a limited number of loci. While convicilin accumulation was mainly under the control of cis-regulatory regions, vicilins and legumins were controlled by both cis- and trans-regulatory regions. Some loci controlled both seed protein composition and protein content and a locus on LGIIa appears to be a major regulator of protein composition and of protein in vitro digestibility. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Genetic loci associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap with loci for lung function and pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Brian D; de Jong, Kim; Lamontagne, Maxime; Bossé, Yohan; Shrine, Nick; Artigas, María Soler; Wain, Louise V; Hall, Ian P; Jackson, Victoria E; Wyss, Annah B; London, Stephanie J; North, Kari E; Franceschini, Nora; Strachan, David P; Beaty, Terri H; Hokanson, John E; Crapo, James D; Castaldi, Peter J; Chase, Robert P; Bartz, Traci M; Heckbert, Susan R; Psaty, Bruce M; Gharib, Sina A; Zanen, Pieter; Lammers, Jan W; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Groen, H J; Locantore, Nicholas; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Rennard, Stephen I; Vestbo, Jørgen; Timens, Wim; Paré, Peter D; Latourelle, Jeanne C; Dupuis, Josée; O'Connor, George T; Wilk, Jemma B; Kim, Woo Jin; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Vonk, Judith M; de Koning, Harry J; Leng, Shuguang; Belinsky, Steven A; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Rich, Stephen S; Barr, R Graham; Sparrow, David; Litonjua, Augusto A; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Lahousse, Lies; Brusselle, Guy G; Stricker, Bruno H; Uitterlinden, André G; Ampleford, Elizabeth J; Bleecker, Eugene R; Woodruff, Prescott G; Meyers, Deborah A; Qiao, Dandi; Lomas, David A; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Hawrylkiewicz, Iwona; Sliwinski, Pawel; Hardin, Megan; Fingerlin, Tasha E; Schwartz, David A; Postma, Dirkje S; MacNee, William; Tobin, Martin D; Silverman, Edwin K; Boezen, H Marike; Cho, Michael H

    2017-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. We performed a genetic association study in 15,256 cases and 47,936 controls, with replication of select top results (P < 5 × 10(-6)) in 9,498 cases and 9,748 controls. In the combined meta-analysis, we identified 22 loci associated at genome-wide significance, including 13 new associations with COPD. Nine of these 13 loci have been associated with lung function in general population samples, while 4 (EEFSEC, DSP, MTCL1, and SFTPD) are new. We noted two loci shared with pulmonary fibrosis (FAM13A and DSP) but that had opposite risk alleles for COPD. None of our loci overlapped with genome-wide associations for asthma, although one locus has been implicated in joint susceptibility to asthma and obesity. We also identified genetic correlation between COPD and asthma. Our findings highlight new loci associated with COPD, demonstrate the importance of specific loci associated with lung function to COPD, and identify potential regions of genetic overlap between COPD and other respiratory diseases.

  13. Lymphocyte Surface Markers and Serum Immunoglobulins in Persons with Down's Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Hann, Hie-Won L.

    1979-01-01

    Distributions of the serum immunoglobulins (IgM), of T and B lymphocytes, and subpopulations of B lymphocytes were studied in children and institutionalized adults with Down's syndrome and appropriate mentally retarded controls. (Author)

  14. Evolution of V genes from the TRV loci of mammals.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, David N; Gambón-Cerdá, Santiago; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Information concerning the evolution of T lymphocyte receptors (TCR) can be deciphered from that part of the molecule that recognizes antigen presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC), namely the variable (V) regions. The genes that code for these variable regions are found within the TCR loci. Here, we describe a study of the evolutionary origin of V genes that code for the α and β chains of the TCR loci of mammals. In particular, we demonstrate that most of the 35 TRAV and 25 TRBV conserved genes found in Primates are also found in other Eutheria, while in Marsupials, Monotremes, and Reptiles, these genes diversified in a different manner. We also show that in mammals, all TRAV genes are derived from five ancestral genes, while all TRBV genes originate from four such genes. In Reptiles, the five TRAV and three out of the four TRBV ancestral genes exist, as well as other V genes not found in mammals. We also studied the TRGV and TRDV loci from all mammals, and we show a relationship of the TRDV to the TRAV locus throughout evolutionary time.

  15. Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase activity in human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, G.D.; Schuresko, D.D.

    1981-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase (AHM), an enzyme of key importance in metabolism of xenobiotic chemicals such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA), is present in human lymphocytes. Studies investing the relation of activity of AHM in human lymphocytes to parameters such as disease state, PNA exposure, in vitro mitogen stimulation, etc. have been summarized in this report. Some studies have demonstrated increased AHM activity in lymphocytes from cigarette smokers (compared to nonsmokers), and in lung cancer patients when compared to appropriate control groups. These observations are confused by extreme variability in human lymphocyte AHM activities, such variability arising from factors such as genetic variation in AHM activity, variation in in vitro culture conditions which affect AHM activity, and the problematical relationship of common AHM assays to actual PNA metabolism taking place in lymphocytes. If some of the foregoing problems can be adequately addressed, lymphocyte AHM activity could hold the promise of being a useful biomarker system for human PNA exposure.

  16. Benefit from B-Lymphocyte Depletion Using the Anti-CD20 Antibody Rituximab in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. A Double-Blind and Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Fluge, Øystein; Bruland, Ove; Risa, Kristin; Storstein, Anette; Kristoffersen, Einar K.; Sapkota, Dipak; Næss, Halvor; Dahl, Olav; Nyland, Harald; Mella, Olav

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disease of unknown aetiology. Major CFS symptom relief during cancer chemotherapy in a patient with synchronous CFS and lymphoma spurred a pilot study of B-lymphocyte depletion using the anti-CD20 antibody Rituximab, which demonstrated significant clinical response in three CFS patients. Methods and Findings In this double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II study (NCT00848692), 30 CFS patients were randomised to either Rituximab 500 mg/m2 or saline, given twice two weeks apart, with follow-up for 12 months. Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) was not detected in any of the patients. The responses generally affected all CFS symptoms. Major or moderate overall response, defined as lasting improvements in self-reported Fatigue score during follow-up, was seen in 10 out of 15 patients (67%) in the Rituximab group and in two out of 15 patients (13%) in the Placebo group (p = 0.003). Mean response duration within the follow-up period for the 10 responders to Rituximab was 25 weeks (range 8–44). Four Rituximab patients had clinical response durations past the study period. General linear models for repeated measures of Fatigue scores during follow-up showed a significant interaction between time and intervention group (p = 0.018 for self-reported, and p = 0.024 for physician-assessed), with differences between the Rituximab and Placebo groups between 6–10 months after intervention. The primary end-point, defined as effect on self-reported Fatigue score 3 months after intervention, was negative. There were no serious adverse events. Two patients in the Rituximab group with pre-existing psoriasis experienced moderate psoriasis worsening. Conclusion The delayed responses starting from 2–7 months after Rituximab treatment, in spite of rapid B-cell depletion, suggests that CFS is an autoimmune disease and may be consistent with the gradual elimination of autoantibodies preceding clinical

  17. Benefit from B-lymphocyte depletion using the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in chronic fatigue syndrome. A double-blind and placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Fluge, Øystein; Bruland, Ove; Risa, Kristin; Storstein, Anette; Kristoffersen, Einar K; Sapkota, Dipak; Næss, Halvor; Dahl, Olav; Nyland, Harald; Mella, Olav

    2011-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disease of unknown aetiology. Major CFS symptom relief during cancer chemotherapy in a patient with synchronous CFS and lymphoma spurred a pilot study of B-lymphocyte depletion using the anti-CD20 antibody Rituximab, which demonstrated significant clinical response in three CFS patients. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II study (NCT00848692), 30 CFS patients were randomised to either Rituximab 500 mg/m(2) or saline, given twice two weeks apart, with follow-up for 12 months. Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) was not detected in any of the patients. The responses generally affected all CFS symptoms. Major or moderate overall response, defined as lasting improvements in self-reported Fatigue score during follow-up, was seen in 10 out of 15 patients (67%) in the Rituximab group and in two out of 15 patients (13%) in the Placebo group (p = 0.003). Mean response duration within the follow-up period for the 10 responders to Rituximab was 25 weeks (range 8-44). Four Rituximab patients had clinical response durations past the study period. General linear models for repeated measures of Fatigue scores during follow-up showed a significant interaction between time and intervention group (p = 0.018 for self-reported, and p = 0.024 for physician-assessed), with differences between the Rituximab and Placebo groups between 6-10 months after intervention. The primary end-point, defined as effect on self-reported Fatigue score 3 months after intervention, was negative. There were no serious adverse events. Two patients in the Rituximab group with pre-existing psoriasis experienced moderate psoriasis worsening. The delayed responses starting from 2-7 months after Rituximab treatment, in spite of rapid B-cell depletion, suggests that CFS is an autoimmune disease and may be consistent with the gradual elimination of autoantibodies preceding clinical responses. The present findings will impact future

  18. Subsets of T lymphocytes in relation to T lymphocyte function in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, J C; Hawkins, S A; Swallow, M W; Lyttle, J A; Patterson, V H; Merrett, J D; Haire, M

    1985-01-01

    T lymphocyte control of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of autologous B lymphocytes was examined in parallel to the enumeration of subpopulations of mononuclear cells in 22 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and in 22 healthy individuals. All were seropositive for EBV. The incidence of lack of T cell control was significantly higher in patients than in controls, confirming previous published work. In the present study, we have shown in addition a significantly reduced proportion of OKT8+ cells and a significantly increased ratio of OKT4/OKT8 cells in the group of patients with lack of control. The findings point to abnormal immunoregulation in MS. PMID:3000660

  19. Cyclophosphamide, Alvocidib, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With High Risk B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-10

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  20. CD39 Expression on T Lymphocytes Correlates With Severity of Disease in Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pulte, Dianne; Furman, Richard R.; Broekman, M. Johan; Drosopoulos, Joan H. F.; Ballard, Harold S.; Olson, Kim E.; Kizer, Jorge R.; Marcus, Aaron J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a B-cell disorder, but it is also associated with abnormalities in T-lymphocyte function. In this study we examine changes in T-lymphocyte CD39 and CD73 expression in patients with CLL. Methods Blood samples were drawn from 34 patients with CLL and 31 controls. The cells were stained for CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19, CD39, and CD73 and analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Overall, patients with CLL had a higher percentage of CD39+ T lymphocytes than did controls. The percentage of cells expressing CD39 was higher in both CD4+ cells and CD8+ cells. Higher CD3/CD39 expression was associated with a later disease stage. No correlations between T-lymphocyte CD39 levels and CD38 or Zap-70 expression were observed. In contrast, the percentage of T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes that expressed CD73 was decreased in patients with CLL. Average B-lymphocyte CD73 expression was decreased in CLL because the majority of CLL clones were CD73. However a minority of CLL clones were CD73+, and patients with CD73+ clones tended to have earlier stage disease. Conclusion T-lymphocyte CD39 and CD73 expression may be useful prognostic markers in patients with CLL. Expression of CD73 on the malignant cell population in CLL may be a marker of better prognosis. PMID:21816376

  1. Human mixed lymphocyte culture using separated lymphocyte populations.

    PubMed Central

    Potter, M R; Moore, M

    1977-01-01

    The ability of human blood lymphocyte populations enriched with T or B cells to act as responder and stimulator populations in the one-way mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) was investigated. T- and B-cell-enriched populations were obtained by separation of rosette-forming and non rosette-forming cells and T-cell-enriched populations were also obtained by nylon-fibre column filtration. Using cells prepared by rosette sedimentation, control unseparated and T-cell-enriched populations responded well when stimulated by mitomycin C-treated unseparated cells from a second individual; and stimulation by T- and B-enriched populations generally produced some response, although the magnitude was variable. B-cell-enriched populations gave virtually no response regardless of the composition of the stimulating populations. Nylon-column-enriched T-cell populations responded to stimulation by control unseparated cells but not to T cells purified by the same procedure. T-cell enriched populations prepared by the two methods thus had different activities in the MLR despite containing similar numbers of T cells suggesting that other factors, such as the presence of small numbers of accessory cells, are important in determining the magnitude of the MLR. PMID:139361

  2. PHA induced blastoid transformation of lymphocytes in leprosy contacts.

    PubMed

    Hardas, U D; Jalgaonkar, S V

    1982-04-01

    PHA-induced blastoid transformation of lymphocytes was studied in 29 contacts of leprosy patients. 21 contacts taking DDS as prophylaxis showed significant depression of lymphocyte transformation while 8 contacts not taking DDS showed no depression as compared to controls. DDS thus has an inhibitory effect on cell mediated immune response.

  3. What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts in the ...

  4. Unlinked genetic loci control the reduced transcription of aminopeptidase N 1 and 3 in the European corn borer and determine tolerance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crystalline (Cry) toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) control insect feeding damage on crop plants via foliar applications or by expression within transgenic plants, but continued Bt use is threatened by the buildup of insect resistance traits. Aminopeptidase N (apn) gene family members encode m...

  5. Lymphocyte suppressor activity in atopic eczema

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, B. E.; Krueger, G. G.; Hill, H. R.

    1979-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients with atopic eczema have depressed cell-mediated immunity. Whether this defect can be attributed to abnormal suppressor cell activity or to the presence of mediators of the allergic response has not been studied before. Lymphocyte transformation was found to be enhanced in patients with mild eczema and markedly depressed in patients with severe eczema, when compared with normal controls. Pre-incubation of cultures for 48 hr without mitogen prior to transformation studies restored normal lymphocyte thymidine uptake in cells from severe atopics, suggesting a labile suppressor cell population, or a labile suppressor substance. Since mononuclear cell supernatants from patients with severe eczema failed to suppress lymphocyte transformation more than supernatants from normals, it is unlikely that the depressed lymphocyte function seen in severe eczema is due to an abnormal suppressor cell population. The possibility that mediators of the allergic response may be acting as a labile suppressor substance was evaluated by adding various concentrations of histamine, cyclic-AMP, or prostaglandin E1 to lymphocytes undergoing mitogenesis. Histamine enhanced thymidine incorporation at low concentrations and depressed uptake at high concentrations; cyclic-AMP and prostaglandin E1 have similar effects on transformation. It is possible that the enhancement of transformation seen in mild eczema and the depression of this response in severe eczema may be related to the concentrations or degree of allergic mediator release. PMID:219977

  6. Effect of spaceflight on lymphocyte proliferation and interleukin-2 production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Patricia V.; Konstantinova, Irina V.; Fuchs, Boris B.; Rakhmilevich, Alexandr L.; Lesniak, A. T.; Mastro, Andrea M.

    1992-01-01

    In this study, inguinal lymp node lymphocytes from rats flown on the Cosmos 2044 mission were tested for proliferation and interleukin-2 (IL-2) production. Cells cultured with mitogenic lectins, phorbol ester, and calcium ionophore, or T-cell mitogen and lymphokine, were assayed for DNA synthesis by (H-3) thymidine incorporation. Lymphocytes incubated with a T-cell mitogen alone also were tested for IL-2 production. Proliferation of lymphocytes from flight rats was not significantly different from controls for any of the mitogens tested. Furthermore, lymph node lymphocytes from control and flown rats produced similar amounts of IL-23. Thus microgravity may act on lymphocytes in a tissue-specific manner, a new finding that could impact on the evaluation of spaceflight effects on immunocompetence.

  7. Effect of spaceflight on lymphocyte proliferation and interleukin-2 production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Patricia V.; Konstantinova, Irina V.; Fuchs, Boris B.; Rakhmilevich, Alexandr L.; Lesniak, A. T.; Mastro, Andrea M.

    1992-01-01

    In this study, inguinal lymp node lymphocytes from rats flown on the Cosmos 2044 mission were tested for proliferation and interleukin-2 (IL-2) production. Cells cultured with mitogenic lectins, phorbol ester, and calcium ionophore, or T-cell mitogen and lymphokine, were assayed for DNA synthesis by (H-3) thymidine incorporation. Lymphocytes incubated with a T-cell mitogen alone also were tested for IL-2 production. Proliferation of lymphocytes from flight rats was not significantly different from controls for any of the mitogens tested. Furthermore, lymph node lymphocytes from control and flown rats produced similar amounts of IL-23. Thus microgravity may act on lymphocytes in a tissue-specific manner, a new finding that could impact on the evaluation of spaceflight effects on immunocompetence.

  8. High-density genotyping of immune loci in Koreans and Europeans identifies eight new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jun, Jae-Bum; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Kang, Young Mo; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Suh, Chang-Hee; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Jisoo; Chung, Won Tae; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Lee, Jong-Young; Han, Bok-Ghee; Nath, Swapan K; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Pappas, Dimitrios A; Kremer, Joel M; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Okada, Yukinori; Diogo, Dorothée; Liao, Katherine P; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Martin, Javier; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Plenge, Robert M; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2015-03-01

    A highly polygenic aetiology and high degree of allele-sharing between ancestries have been well elucidated in genetic studies of rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, the high-density genotyping array Immunochip for immune disease loci identified 14 new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci among individuals of European ancestry. Here, we aimed to identify new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci using Korean-specific Immunochip data. We analysed Korean rheumatoid arthritis case-control samples using the Immunochip and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) array to search for new risk alleles of rheumatoid arthritis with anticitrullinated peptide antibodies. To increase power, we performed a meta-analysis of Korean data with previously published European Immunochip and GWAS data for a total sample size of 9299 Korean and 45,790 European case-control samples. We identified eight new rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci (TNFSF4, LBH, EOMES, ETS1-FLI1, COG6, RAD51B, UBASH3A and SYNGR1) that passed a genome-wide significance threshold (p<5×10(-8)), with evidence for three independent risk alleles at 1q25/TNFSF4. The risk alleles from the seven new loci except for the TNFSF4 locus (monomorphic in Koreans), together with risk alleles from previously established RA risk loci, exhibited a high correlation of effect sizes between ancestries. Further, we refined the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that represent potentially causal variants through a trans-ethnic comparison of densely genotyped SNPs. This study demonstrates the advantage of dense-mapping and trans-ancestral analysis for identification of potentially causal SNPs. In addition, our findings support the importance of T cells in the pathogenesis and the fact of frequent overlap of risk loci among diverse autoimmune diseases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. High-Density Genotyping of Immune Loci in Koreans and Europeans Identifies Eight New Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Loci

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jun, Jae-Bum; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Kang, Young Mo; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Suh, Chang-Hee; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Jisoo; Chung, Won Tae; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Lee, Jong-Young; Han, Bok-Ghee; Nath, Swapan K.; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Pappas, Dimitrios A.; Kremer, Joel M.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Okada, Yukinori; Diogo, Dorothée; Liao, Katherine P.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Martin, Javier; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Plenge, Robert M.; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Objective A highly polygenic etiology and high degree of allele-sharing between ancestries have been well-elucidated in genetic studies of rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, the high-density genotyping array Immunochip for immune disease loci identified 14 new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci among individuals of European ancestry. Here, we aimed to identify new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci using Korean-specific Immunochip data. Methods We analyzed Korean rheumatoid arthritis case-control samples using the Immunochip and GWAS array to search for new risk alleles of rheumatoid arthritis with anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies. To increase power, we performed a meta-analysis of Korean data with previously published European Immunochip and GWAS data, for a total sample size of 9,299 Korean and 45,790 European case-control samples. Results We identified 8 new rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci (TNFSF4, LBH, EOMES, ETS1–FLI1, COG6, RAD51B, UBASH3A and SYNGR1) that passed a genome-wide significance threshold (p<5×10−8), with evidence for three independent risk alleles at 1q25/TNFSF4. The risk alleles from the 7 new loci except for the TNFSF4 locus (monomorphic in Koreans), together with risk alleles from previously established RA risk loci, exhibited a high correlation of effect sizes between ancestries. Further, we refined the number of SNPs that represent potentially causal variants through a trans-ethnic comparison of densely genotyped SNPs. Conclusion This study demonstrates the advantage of dense-mapping and trans-ancestral analysis for identification of potentially causal SNPs. In addition, our findings support the importance of T cells in the pathogenesis and the fact of frequent overlap of risk loci among diverse autoimmune diseases. PMID:24532676

  10. Risk of Classic Kaposi Sarcoma With Combinations of Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor and Human Leukocyte Antigen Loci: A Population-Based Case-control Study

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, James J.; Martin, Maureen P.; Vitale, Francesco; Lauria, Carmela; Whitby, Denise; Qi, Ying; Gao, Xiaojiang; Carrington, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background. Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a complication of KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection. Other oncogenic viral infections and malignancies are associated with certain HLA alleles and their natural killer (NK) cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) ligands. We tested whether HLA-KIR influences the risk of KSHV infection or KS. Methods. In population-based case-control studies, we compared HLA class I and KIR gene frequencies in 250 classic (non-AIDS) KS cases, 280 KSHV-seropositive controls, and 576 KSHV-seronegative controls composing discovery and validation cohorts. Logistic regression was used to calculate sex- and age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals. Results. In both the discovery and validation cohorts, KS was associated with HLA-A*11:01 (adjusted OR for the combined cohorts, 0.4; P = .002) and HLA-C*07:01 (adjusted OR, 1.6; P = .002). Consistent associations across cohorts were also observed with activating KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I and homozygosity for HLA-C group 1. With KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I, the KSHV seroprevalence was 40% lower (adjusted OR for the combined cohorts, 0.6; P = .01), but the KS risk was 2-fold higher (adjusted OR, 2.1; P = .002). Similarly, the KSHV seroprevalence was 40% lower (adjusted OR, 0.6; P = .01) but the KS risk 80% higher with HLA-C group 1 homozygosity (adjusted OR, 1.8; P = .005). Conclusions. KIR-mediated NK cell activation may decrease then risk of KSHV infection but enhance KSHV dissemination and progression to KS if infection occurs. PMID:26268853

  11. Risk Prediction for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in 11 United States-Based Case-Control Studies: Incorporation of Epidemiologic Risk Factors and 17 Confirmed Genetic Loci.

    PubMed

    Clyde, Merlise A; Palmieri Weber, Rachel; Iversen, Edwin S; Poole, Elizabeth M; Doherty, Jennifer A; Goodman, Marc T; Ness, Roberta B; Risch, Harvey A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Terry, Kathryn L; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bandera, Elisa V; Berchuck, Andrew; Carney, Michael E; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cushing-Haugen, Kara L; Edwards, Robert P; Fridley, Brooke L; Goode, Ellen L; Lurie, Galina; McGuire, Valerie; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Olson, Sara H; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Pike, Malcolm C; Rothstein, Joseph H; Sellers, Thomas A; Sieh, Weiva; Stram, Daniel; Thompson, Pamela J; Vierkant, Robert A; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wu, Anna H; Ziogas, Argyrios; Tworoger, Shelley S; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2016-10-15

    Previously developed models for predicting absolute risk of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer have included a limited number of risk factors and have had low discriminatory power (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) < 0.60). Because of this, we developed and internally validated a relative risk prediction model that incorporates 17 established epidemiologic risk factors and 17 genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using data from 11 case-control studies in the United States (5,793 cases; 9,512 controls) from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (data accrued from 1992 to 2010). We developed a hierarchical logistic regression model for predicting case-control status that included imputation of missing data. We randomly divided the data into an 80% training sample and used the remaining 20% for model evaluation. The AUC for the full model was 0.664. A reduced model without SNPs performed similarly (AUC = 0.649). Both models performed better than a baseline model that included age and study site only (AUC = 0.563). The best predictive power was obtained in the full model among women younger than 50 years of age (AUC = 0.714); however, the addition of SNPs increased the AUC the most for women older than 50 years of age (AUC = 0.638 vs. 0.616). Adapting this improved model to estimate absolute risk and evaluating it in prospective data sets is warranted. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Risk of Classic Kaposi Sarcoma With Combinations of Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor and Human Leukocyte Antigen Loci: A Population-Based Case-control Study.

    PubMed

    Goedert, James J; Martin, Maureen P; Vitale, Francesco; Lauria, Carmela; Whitby, Denise; Qi, Ying; Gao, Xiaojiang; Carrington, Mary

    2016-02-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a complication of KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection. Other oncogenic viral infections and malignancies are associated with certain HLA alleles and their natural killer (NK) cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) ligands. We tested whether HLA-KIR influences the risk of KSHV infection or KS. In population-based case-control studies, we compared HLA class I and KIR gene frequencies in 250 classic (non-AIDS) KS cases, 280 KSHV-seropositive controls, and 576 KSHV-seronegative controls composing discovery and validation cohorts. Logistic regression was used to calculate sex- and age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals. In both the discovery and validation cohorts, KS was associated with HLA-A*11:01 (adjusted OR for the combined cohorts, 0.4; P = .002) and HLA-C*07:01 (adjusted OR, 1.6; P = .002). Consistent associations across cohorts were also observed with activating KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I and homozygosity for HLA-C group 1. With KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I, the KSHV seroprevalence was 40% lower (adjusted OR for the combined cohorts, 0.6; P = .01), but the KS risk was 2-fold higher (adjusted OR, 2.1; P = .002). Similarly, the KSHV seroprevalence was 40% lower (adjusted OR, 0.6; P = .01) but the KS risk 80% higher with HLA-C group 1 homozygosity (adjusted OR, 1.8; P = .005). KIR-mediated NK cell activation may decrease then risk of KSHV infection but enhance KSHV dissemination and progression to KS if infection occurs. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Mapping quantitative trait loci for expression abundance.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhenyu; Xu, Shizhong

    2007-05-01

    Mendelian loci that control the expression levels of transcripts are called expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). When mapping eQTL, we often deal with thousands of expression traits simultaneously, which complicates the statistical model and data analysis. Two simple approaches may be taken in eQTL analysis: (1) individual transcript analysis in which a single expression trait is mapped at a time and the entire eQTL mapping involves separate analysis of thousands of traits and (2) individual marker analysis where differentially expressed transcripts are detected on the basis of their association with the segregation pattern of an individual marker and the entire analysis requires scanning markers of the entire genome. Neither approach is optimal because data are not analyzed jointly. We develop a Bayesian clustering method that analyzes all expressed transcripts and markers jointly in a single model. A transcript may be simultaneously associated with multiple markers. Additionally, a marker may simultaneously alter the expression of multiple transcripts. This is a model-based method that combines a Gaussian mixture of expression data with segregation of multiple linked marker loci. Parameter estimation for each variable is obtained via the posterior mean drawn from a Markov chain Monte Carlo sample. The method allows a regular quantitative trait to be included as an expression trait and subject to the same clustering assignment. If an expression trait links to a locus where a quantitative trait also links, the expressed transcript is considered to be associated with the quantitative trait. The method is applied to a microarray experiment with 60 F(2) mice measured for 25 different obesity-related quantitative traits. In the experiment, approximately 40,000 transcripts and 145 codominant markers are investigated for their associations. A program written in SAS/IML is available from the authors on request.

  14. Alzheimer disease (AD) specific transcription, DNA methylation and splicing in twenty AD associated loci.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Crystal; Kohli, Martin A; Whitehead, Patrice; Mash, Deborah C; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Gilbert, John

    2015-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified twenty loci associated with late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD). We examined each of the twenty loci, specifically the ±50kb region surrounding the most strongly associated variant, for changes in gene(s) transcription specific to LOAD. Post-mortem human brain samples were examined for expression, methylation, and splicing differences. LOAD specific differences were detected by comparing LOAD to normal and "disease" controls. Eight loci, prominently ABCA7, contain LOAD specific differences. Significant changes in the CELF1 and ZCWPW1 loci occurred in genes not located nearest the associated variant, suggesting that these genes should be investigated further as LOAD candidates.

  15. Angles of multivariable root loci

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, P. M.; Stein, G.; Laub, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A generalized eigenvalue problem is demonstrated to be useful for computing the multivariable root locus, particularly when obtaining the arrival angles to finite transmission zeros. The multivariable root loci are found for a linear, time-invariant output feedback problem. The problem is then employed to compute a closed-loop eigenstructure. The method of computing angles on the root locus is demonstrated, and the method is extended to a multivariable optimal root locus.

  16. THE ENHANCEMENT OF MACROPHAGE BACTERIOSTASIS BY PRODUCTS OF ACTIVATED LYMPHOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Fowles, Robert E.; Fajardo, Ileana M.; Leibowitch, Jacques L.; David, John R.

    1973-01-01

    It was reported previously that the incubation of normal guinea pig macrophages with partially purified products of activated lymphocytes resulted in altered macrophage function including increased cell adherence to culture vessels, spreading, phagocytosis, and glucose carbon-1 oxidation. Studies reported here demonstrate that such macrophages also exhibit enhanced bacteriostasis. Lymphocytes were stimulated with concanavalin A, the culture supernatant was chromatographed over Sephadex G-100 and the fraction of mol wt 25,000–55,000, rich in lymphocyte mediators, was cultured with normal guinea pig macrophages for 1–3 days. Macrophages incubated with fractions from unstimulated lymphocyte cultures served as controls. The resulting macrophage monolayers were infected with Listeria monocytogenes. Macrophages incubated with mediator-rich fractions exhibited 2- to 10-fold enhanced bacteriostasis compared to controls. Further studies indicate that this enhancement was attributable to intrinsic changes in the macrophages and not simply a consequence of the number of macrophages on the monolayers. The studies support the concept that macrophage bacteriostasis can be enhanced by lymphocyte mediators. However, macrophages, which have been preincubated directly with sensitive lymphocytes and antigen exhibit even greater bacteriostasis and sometimes bactericidal capacity, suggesting that either a labile lymphocyte factor or direct lymphocyte macrophage interaction may also be involved in bactericidal activity. PMID:4200649

  17. Human monocyte-derived suppressor cells control graft-versus-host disease by inducing regulatory forkhead box protein 3-positive CD8+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Janikashvili, Nona; Trad, Malika; Gautheron, Alexandrine; Samson, Maxime; Lamarthée, Baptiste; Bonnefoy, Francis; Lemaire-Ewing, Stéphanie; Ciudad, Marion; Rekhviashvili, Khatuna; Seaphanh, Famky; Gaugler, Béatrice; Perruche, Sylvain; Bateman, Andrew; Martin, Laurent; Audia, Sylvain; Saas, Philippe; Larmonier, Nicolas; Bonnotte, Bernard

    2015-06-01

    Adoptive transfer of immunosuppressive cells has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of immune-mediated disorders. However, only a limited number of such cells can be isolated from in vivo specimens. Therefore efficient ex vivo differentiation and expansion procedures are critically needed to produce a clinically relevant amount of these suppressive cells. We sought to develop a novel, clinically relevant, and feasible approach to generate ex vivo a subpopulation of human suppressor cells of monocytic origin, referred to as human monocyte-derived suppressive cells (HuMoSCs), which can be used as an efficient therapeutic tool to treat inflammatory disorders. HuMoSCs were generated from human monocytes cultured for 7 days with GM-CSF and IL-6. The immune-regulatory properties of HuMoSCs were investigated in vitro and in vivo. The therapeutic efficacy of HuMoSCs was evaluated by using a graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) model of humanized mice (NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc(-/-) [NSG] mice). CD33+ HuMoSCs are highly potent at inhibiting the proliferation and activation of autologous and allogeneic effector T lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. The suppressive activity of these cells depends on signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation. Of therapeutic relevance, HuMoSCs induce long-lasting memory forkhead box protein 3-positive CD8+ regulatory T lymphocytes and significantly reduce GvHD induced with human PBMCs in NSG mice. Ex vivo-generated HuMoSCs inhibit effector T lymphocytes, promote the expansion of immunosuppressive forkhead box protein 3-positive CD8+ regulatory T cells, and can be used as an efficient therapeutic tool to prevent GvHD. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic localization of diuron- and mucidin-resistant mutants relative to a group of loci of the mitochondrial DNA controlling coenzyme QH2-cytochrome c reductase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Colson, A M; Slonimski, P P

    1979-01-02

    Diuron-resistance, DIU (Colson et al., 1977), antimycin-resistance, ANA (Michaelis, 1976; Burger et al., 1976), funiculosin-resistance, FUN (Pratje and Michaelis, 1977; Burger et al., 1977) and mucidin-resistance, MUC (Subik et al., 1977) are each coded by a pair of genetic loci on the mit DNA of S. cerevisiae. In the present paper, these respiratiory-competent, drug-resistant loci are localized relative to respiratory-deficient BOX mutants deficient in coenzyme QH2-cytochrome c reductase (Kotylak and Slonimski, 1976, 1977) using deletion and recombination mapping. Three drug-resistant loci possessing distinct mutated allelic forms are distinguished. DIU1 is allelic or closely linked to ANA2, FUN1 and BOX1; DIU2 is allelic or closely linked to ANA1, MUC1 and BOX4/5; MUC2 is allelic to BOX6. The high recombinant frequencies observed between the three loci (13% on the average for 33 various combinations analyzed) suggest the existence of either three genes coding for three distinct polypeptides or of a single gene coding for a single polypeptide but subdivided into three easily separable segments. The resistance of the respiratory-chain observed in vitro in the drug-resistant mutants and the allelism relationships between respiratory-competent, drug-resistant loci and coQH2-cyt c reductase deficient, BOX, loci strongly suggest that each of the three drug-resistant loci codes for a structural gene-product which is essential for the normal coQH2-cyt c reductase activity and is obviously a good candidate for a gene product of the drug-resistant loci mapped in this paper. Polypeptide length modifications of cytochrome b were observed in mutants deficient in the coQH2-cyt c red and localized at the BOX1, BOX4 and BOX6 genetic loci (Claisse et al., 1977, 1978) which are precisely the loci allelic to drug resistant mutants as shown in the present work. Taken together these two sets of data provide a strong evidence in favor of the idea that there exist three non contiguous

  19. Two major quantitative trait loci controlling the number of seminal roots in maize co-map with the root developmental genes rtcs and rum1.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Silvio; Giuliani, Silvia; Ricciolini, Claudia; Carraro, Nicola; Maccaferri, Marco; Presterl, Thomas; Ouzunova, Milena; Tuberosa, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    The genetic dissection of root architecture and functions allows for a more effective and informed design of novel root ideotypes and paves the way to evaluate their effects on crop resilience to a number of abiotic stresses. In maize, limited attention has been devoted to the genetic analysis of root architecture diversity at the early stage. The difference in embryonic (including seminal and primary) root architecture between the maize reference line B73 (which mostly develops three seminal roots) and the landrace Gaspé Flint (with virtually no seminal roots) was genetically dissected using a collection of introgression lines grown in paper rolls and pots. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis identified three QTLs controlling seminal root number (SRN) on chromosome bins 1.02, 3.07, and 8.04-8.05, which collectively explained 66% of the phenotypic variation. In all three cases, Gaspé Flint contributed the allele for lower SRN. Primary root dry weight was negatively correlated with SRN (r= -0.52), and QTLs for primary root size co-mapped with SRN QTLs, suggesting a pleiotropic effect of SRN QTLs on the primary root, most probably caused by competition for seed resources. Interestingly, two out of three SRN QTLs co-mapped with the only two known maize genes (rtcs and rum1) affecting the number of seminal roots. The strong additive effect of the three QTLs and the development of near isogenic lines for each QTL in the elite B73 background provide unique opportunities to characterize functionally the genes involved in root development and to evaluate how root architecture affects seedling establishment, early development, and eventually yield in maize.

  20. Two major quantitative trait loci controlling the number of seminal roots in maize co-map with the root developmental genes rtcs and rum1

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Silvio; Giuliani, Silvia; Ricciolini, Claudia; Carraro, Nicola; Maccaferri, Marco; Presterl, Thomas; Ouzunova, Milena; Tuberosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The genetic dissection of root architecture and functions allows for a more effective and informed design of novel root ideotypes and paves the way to evaluate their effects on crop resilience to a number of abiotic stresses. In maize, limited attention has been devoted to the genetic analysis of root architecture diversity at the early stage. The difference in embryonic (including seminal and primary) root architecture between the maize reference line B73 (which mostly develops three seminal roots) and the landrace Gaspé Flint (with virtually no seminal roots) was genetically dissected using a collection of introgression lines grown in paper rolls and pots. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis identified three QTLs controlling seminal root number (SRN) on chromosome bins 1.02, 3.07, and 8.04–8.05, which collectively explained 66% of the phenotypic variation. In all three cases, Gaspé Flint contributed the allele for lower SRN. Primary root dry weight was negatively correlated with SRN (r= −0.52), and QTLs for primary root size co-mapped with SRN QTLs, suggesting a pleiotropic effect of SRN QTLs on the primary root, most probably caused by competition for seed resources. Interestingly, two out of three SRN QTLs co-mapped with the only two known maize genes (rtcs and rum1) affecting the number of seminal roots. The strong additive effect of the three QTLs and the development of near isogenic lines for each QTL in the elite B73 background provide unique opportunities to characterize functionally the genes involved in root development and to evaluate how root architecture affects seedling establishment, early development, and eventually yield in maize. PMID:26880748

  1. Physiological implications of NTBI uptake by T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Jorge P.; Arezes, João; Dias, Vera; Oliveira, Susana; Vieira, Inês; Costa, Mónica; Vos, Matthijn; Carlsson, Anna; Rikers, Yuri; Rangel, Maria; Porto, Graça

    2014-01-01

    In iron overload disorders a significant fraction of the total iron circulates in the plasma as low molecular weight complexes not bound to transferrin, known as non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI). By catalyzing the formation of free radicals, NTBI accumulation results in oxidative stress and cellular damage, being a major cause of organ toxicity. NTBI is rapidly and preferentially cleared from circulation by the liver and the myocardium, the main disease targets in iron overload conditions. We have recently demonstrated that human peripheral blood T lymphocytes take up NTBI in vitro, with a pattern that resembles that of hepatocytes. Since T lymphocytes constitute a numerically important component of the circulating cell pool, these findings support a putative role for this cell type in the systemic protection against iron toxicity. Here we tested the hypothesis that the circulating peripheral blood T lymphocyte pool constitutes an important storage compartment for NTBI and is thus a modifier of NTBI deposition in target organs. First we show that NTBI uptake by human T lymphocytes increases the expression of the iron-storage protein ferritin and of the iron exporter ferroportin via an IRE-dependent mechanism. NTBI retention by T lymphocytes is shown to be critically controlled by the hepcidin-mediated modulation of ferroportin both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, the protective effect of T lymphocytes was tested by analyzing the patterns of iron accumulation in the T lymphocyte-deficient mouse model Foxn1nu before and after reconstitution with T lymphocytes by adoptive transfer. The results confirmed a significant increase of liver and pancreas iron accumulation in T lymphocyte-deficient mice. NTBI accumulation in the liver and spleen was prevented by reconstitution with syngeneic T lymphocytes. Altogether, our results demonstrate that T lymphocytes are important components of a circulating “NTBI storage compartment” and show its physiological relevance as a

  2. Plasmodium genetic loci linked to host cytokine and chemokine responses

    PubMed Central

    Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Li, Jian; Wu, Jian; Qi, Yanwei; Eastman, Richard T.; Zilversmit, Martine; Nair, Sethu C.; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Quinones, Mariam; Jiang, Hongying; Li, Na; Zhu, Jun; Zhao, Keji; Kaneko, Osamu; Long, Carole A.; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2014-01-01

    Both host and parasite factors contribute to disease severity of malaria infection; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the disease and the host-parasite interactions involved remain largely unresolved. To investigate effects of parasite factors on host immune responses and pathogenesis, we measured levels of plasma cytokines/chemokines (CC) and growth rates in mice infected with two Plasmodium yoelii strains having different virulence phenotypes and in progeny from a genetic cross of the two parasites. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis linked levels of many CCs, particularly IL-1β, IP-10, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and MIG, and early parasite growth rate to loci on multiple parasite chromosomes, including chromosomes 7, 9, 10, 12, and 13. Comparison of the genome sequences spanning the mapped loci revealed various candidate genes. The loci on chromosome 7 and 13 had significant (p < 0.005) additive effects on IL-1β, IL-5, and IP-10 responses, and the chromosome 9 and 12 loci had significant (p = 0.017) interaction. Infection of knockout mice showed critical roles of MCP-1 and IL-10 in parasitemia control and host mortality. These results provide important information for better understanding of malaria pathogenesis and can be used to examine the role of these factors in human malaria infection. PMID:24452266

  3. Plasmodium genetic loci linked to host cytokine and chemokine responses.

    PubMed

    Pattaradilokrat, S; Li, J; Wu, J; Qi, Y; Eastman, R T; Zilversmit, M; Nair, S C; Huaman, M C; Quinones, M; Jiang, H; Li, N; Zhu, J; Zhao, K; Kaneko, O; Long, C A; Su, X-z

    2014-01-01

    Both host and parasite factors contribute to disease severity of malaria infection; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the disease and the host-parasite interactions involved remain largely unresolved. To investigate the effects of parasite factors on host immune responses and pathogenesis, we measured levels of plasma cytokines/chemokines (CCs) and growth rates in mice infected with two Plasmodium yoelii strains having different virulence phenotypes and in progeny from a genetic cross of the two parasites. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis linked levels of many CCs, particularly IL-1β, IP-10, IFN-γ, MCP-1 and MIG, and early parasite growth rate to loci on multiple parasite chromosomes, including chromosomes 7, 9, 10, 12 and 13. Comparison of the genome sequences spanning the mapped loci revealed various candidate genes. The loci on chromosomes 7 and 13 had significant (P<0.005) additive effects on IL-1β, IL-5 and IP-10 responses, and the chromosome 9 and 12 loci had significant (P=0.017) interaction. Infection of knockout mice showed critical roles of MCP-1 and IL-10 in parasitemia control and host mortality. These results provide important information for a better understanding of malaria pathogenesis and can be used to examine the role of these factors in human malaria infection.

  4. Lymphocyte subpopulations in Sheehan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Atmaca, Hulusi; Araslı, Mehmet; Yazıcı, Zihni Acar; Armutçu, Ferah; Tekin, Ishak Özel

    2013-06-01

    The role of autoimmunity in the development of Sheehan's syndrome is obscure. There are a limited number of studies investigating the immunological alterations accompanying Sheehan's Syndrome. Our objective was to evaluate lymphocyte subsets in these patients. We conducted a cross-sectional clinical study. Cytofluorometry was used for the immunophenotyping of peripheral blood leukocytes from patients with Sheehan's syndrome followed up in the endocrine clinic during 2005-2009. Fifteen consecutive patients (mean age 61.6 ± 11.3, range 34-75 years) and 25 healthy controls (mean age 56.7 ± 10.6, range 34-80 years) were included. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of mean age. The percentages of CD19(+), CD16(+)/56(+), CD8(+)28(-), γδTCR(+), CD8(+); the total lymphocyte counts; and the ratio of CD8(+)28(-)/CD8(+)28(+) were similar (p > 0.05) between patients and controls. Whereas the leucocyte counts (p = 0.003), the percentage of CD3 (+) DR (+) (p < 0.001), CD8(+)28(+) (p = 0.030), CD4(+)CD25(+) (p = 0.007), the ratio of CD3 (+) DR(+)/CD3 (p < 0.001) were higher; the percentage of CD3 (p = 0.020), CD4 (p < 0.001) and the ratio of CD4/CD8 (p = 0.006) were lower in patients with Sheehan's syndrome compared to healthy controls. There was a positive correlation between the duration of illness and the percentage of CD3(+)DR(+) (r = 0.53, p = 0.03) expression. Some peripheral lymphocyte cell subsets show marked variation in patients with Sheehan's syndrome in comparison to matched healthy subjects, which may have implications for altered immune regulation in these patients. High CD3 (+) DR (+) expression that correlates with the duration of illness in Sheehan's patients is suggestive of an ongoing inflammation accompanying the slow progression of pituitary dysfunction in Sheehan's syndrome. It is not clear if these cellular alterations contribute to the cause or consequence of pituitary deficiency in

  5. Medical History, Lifestyle, Family History, and Occupational Risk Factors for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Benavente, Yolanda; Blair, Aaron; Vermeulen, Roel; Cerhan, James R.; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Monnereau, Alain; Nieters, Alexandra; Clavel, Jacqueline; Call, Timothy G.; Maynadié, Marc; Lan, Qing; Clarke, Christina A.; Lightfoot, Tracy; Norman, Aaron D.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Casabonne, Delphine; Cocco, Pierluigi; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) are two subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. A number of studies have evaluated associations between risk factors and CLL/SLL risk. However, these associations remain inconsistent or lacked confirmation. This may be due, in part, to the inadequate sample size of CLL/SLL cases. Methods We performed a pooled analysis of 2440 CLL/SLL cases and 15186 controls from 13 case-control studies from Europe, North America, and Australia. We evaluated associations of medical history, family history, lifestyle, and occupational risk factors with CLL/SLL risk. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results We confirmed prior inverse associations with any atopic condition and recreational sun exposure. We also confirmed prior elevated associations with usual adult height, hepatitis C virus seropositivity, living or working on a farm, and family history of any hematological malignancy. Novel associations were identified with hairdresser occupation (OR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.05 to 2.98) and blood transfusion history (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.66 to 0.94). We also found smoking to have modest protective effect (OR = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.81 to 0.99). All exposures showed evidence of independent effects. Conclusions We have identified or confirmed several independent risk factors for CLL/SLL supporting a role for genetics (through family history), immune function (through allergy and sun), infection (through hepatitis C virus), and height, and other pathways of immune response. Given that CLL/SLL has more than 30 susceptibility loci identified to date, studies evaluating the interaction among genetic and nongenetic factors are warranted. PMID:25174025

  6. STAT3 and NF-κB cooperatively control in vitro spontaneous apoptosis and poor chemo-responsiveness in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng-Ting; Jia, Li; Wang, Ping; Wang, Huaqing; Farren, Timothy W.; Agrawal, Samir G.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is an adult disease characterized by in vivo accumulation of mature CD5/CD19/CD23 triple positive B cells and is currently incurable. CLL cells undergo spontaneous apoptosis in response to in vitro cell culture condition but the underlying mechanism is unclear. We hypothesize that the sensitivity of CLL cells to spontaneous apoptosis may be associated with the constitutive activities of transcription factors STAT3 and/or NF-κB. We now show that the sensitivity of fresh CLL cells to spontaneous apoptosis is highly variable among different patients during 48 hours’ cell culture and inversely correlated with in vivo constitutively activated STAT3 and NF-κB (p < 0.001). Both activated STAT3 and NF-κB maintain the levels of anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1/Bcl-xL and autocrine IL-6 production. CLL cells with higher susceptibility to in vitro spontaneous apoptosis show the greatest chemosensitivity (p < 0.001), which is reflected clinically as achieving a complete response (CR) (p < 0.001), longer lymphocyte doubling times (p < 0.01), time to first treatment (p < 0.01), and progression free survival (p < 0.05). Our data suggest that the sensitivity of CLL cells to in vitro spontaneous apoptosis is co-regulated by constitutively activated STAT3 and NF-κB and reflects the in vivo chemo-responsiveness and clinical outcomes. PMID:27074565

  7. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Palifermin (Recombinant Human Keratinocyte Growth Factor) for the Treatment of Inadequate CD4+ T-Lymphocyte Recovery in Patients with HIV-1 Infection on Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Wang, Hongying; Bordi, Rebeka; Zheng, Lu; Gross, Barry H.; Landay, Alan L.; Spritzler, John; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Benson, Constance; Aberg, Judith; Tebas, Pablo; Haas, David W.; Tiu, Jennifer; Coughlin, Kristine; Purdue, Lynette; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor CD4 lymphocyte recovery on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is associated with reduced function of the thymus. Palifermin (keratinocyte growth factor), by providing support to the thymic epithelium, promotes lymphopoiesis in animal models of bone marrow transplantation and graft-versus-host disease. Methods In AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5212, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 99 HIV-infected patients on ART with plasma HIV-1 RNA levels ≤200 copies/mL for ≥6 months and CD4 lymphocyte counts <200 cells/mm3 were randomized 1:1:1:1 to receive once daily intravenous administrations of placebo or 20, 40, or 60 µg/kg of palifermin on 3 consecutive days. Results The median change in CD4+ T-cell count from baseline to week 12 was not significantly different between the placebo arm [15 (-16, 23) cells/mm3] and the 20-μg/kg dose [11 (2, 32) cells/mm3], the 40-μg/kg dose [12 (−2, 25) cells/mm3], or the 60-μg/kg dose arm [8 (−13, 35) cells/mm3] of palifermin. No significant changes were observed in thymus size or in the number of naïve T cells or recent thymic emigrants. Conclusions Palifermin in the doses studied was not effective in improving thymic function and did not raise CD4 lymphocyte counts in HIV-infected patients with low CD4 cell counts despite virologically effective ART. PMID:24815851

  8. Genome-Wide Interaction with Insulin Secretion Loci Reveals Novel Loci for Type 2 Diabetes in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Keaton, Jacob M.; Hellwege, Jacklyn N.; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Pankow, James S.; Fornage, Myriam; Wilson, James G.; Correa, Adolfo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Taylor, Kent D.; Rich, Stephen S.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Freedman, Barry I.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the result of metabolic defects in insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, yet most T2D loci identified to date influence insulin secretion. We hypothesized that T2D loci, particularly those affecting insulin sensitivity, can be identified through interaction with insulin secretion loci. To test this hypothesis, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg), a dynamic measure of first-phase insulin secretion, were identified in African Americans from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRASFS; n = 492 subjects). These SNPs were tested for interaction, individually and jointly as a genetic risk score (GRS), using genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from five cohorts (ARIC, CARDIA, JHS, MESA, WFSM; n = 2,725 cases, 4,167 controls) with T2D as the outcome. In single variant analyses, suggestively significant (Pinteraction<5×10−6) interactions were observed at several loci including LYPLAL1 (rs10746381), CHN2 (rs7796525), and EXOC1 (rs4289500). Notable AIRg GRS interactions were observed with SAMD4A (rs11627203) and UTRN (rs17074194). These data support the hypothesis that additional genetic factors contributing to T2D risk can be identified by interactions with insulin secretion loci. PMID:27448167

  9. Tositumomab and Iodine I 131 Tositumomab in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma in First Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Lymphoid Leukemia in Remission; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  10. Curcumin and Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage 0-II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  11. Lymphocyte 'homing' and chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Motohiro

    2015-07-01

    Chronic inflammation is a response to prolonged exposure to injurious stimuli that harm and destroy tissues and promote lymphocyte infiltration into inflamed sites. Following progressive accumulation of lymphocytes, the histology of inflamed tissue begins to resemble that of peripheral lymphoid organs, which can be referred to as lymphoid neogenesis or formation of tertiary lymphoid tissues. Lymphocyte recruitment to inflamed tissues is also reminiscent of lymphocyte homing to peripheral lymphoid organs. In the latter, under physiological conditions, homing receptors expressed on lymphocytes adhere to vascular addressin expressed on high endothelial venules (HEVs), initiating a lymphocyte migration process composed of sequential adhesive interactions. Intriguingly, in chronic inflammation, HEV-like vessels are induced de novo, despite the fact that the inflamed site is not originally lymphoid tissue, and these vessels contribute to lymphocyte recruitment in a manner similar to physiological lymphocyte homing. In this review, we first describe physiological lymphocyte homing mechanisms focusing on vascular addressins. We then describe HEV-like vessel-mediated pathogenesis seen in various chronic inflammatory disorders such as Helicobacter pylori gastritis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), autoimmune pancreatitis and sclerosing sialadenitis, as well as chronic inflammatory cell neoplasm MALT lymphoma, with reference to our work and that of others.

  12. Lymphocyte function in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Kawanami, S; Kanaide, A; Itoyama, Y; Kuroiwa, Y

    1979-01-01

    Mitogen-induced blastoid transformation of peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with myasthenia gravis was studied using a microplate culture technique and evaluated with 3H-thymidine incorporation. It was found that both phytohaemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen responses decreased significantly in patients with myasthenia gravis. In myasthenic crisis, indices of stimulation by phytohaemagglutination became very low. The autologous plasma neither inhibited nor facilitated mitogenic responses of lymphocytes. The decreased mitogen responsiveness of lymphocytes suggests that part of the T lymphocyte function is subnormal in myasthenia. PMID:490180

  13. Lymphocytic Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Farver, Carol; Highland, Kristin B

    2016-09-01

    Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP) is a rare lung disease on the spectrum of benign pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders. LIP is frequently associated with connective tissue diseases or infections. Idiopathic LIP is rare; every attempt must be made to diagnose underlying conditions when LIP is diagnosed. Computed tomography of the chest in patients with LIP may reveal ground-glass opacities, centrilobular and subpleural nodules, and randomly distributed thin-walled cysts. Demonstrating polyclonality with immunohistochemistry is the key to differentiating LIP from lymphoma. The 5-year mortality remains between 33% and 50% and is likely to vary based on the underlying disease process.

  14. [Painful lymphocytic subacute thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Cortázar, A; Ruiz de Gordejuela, J; Zabalza, I; Acinas, O; Beitia, J J

    1992-01-25

    Subacute granulomatous thyroiditis (SGT) and subacute lymphocytic thyroiditis (SLT) present a similar evolution during the first year, however, posteriorly, except on rare occasions, SGT maintains normofunction while SLT may present relapse with persistent goiter or permanent hypothyroidism requiring periodic follow up. The presence of spontaneous pain and very elevated VSG have been described accompanying SGT but not SLT histologically proven to be used for differentiating these entities. Two cases with clinical criteria and cytological diagnosis of SLT consulted for spontaneous thyroid pain are presented. VSG greater than 50 mm/1st hour was suggestive of SGT. The importance of cytology for the correct management of subacute thyroiditis is emphasized.

  15. MicroRNA-155 controls RB phosphorylation in normal and malignant B lymphocytes via the noncanonical TGF-β1/SMAD5 signaling module.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Daifeng; Aguiar, Ricardo C T

    2014-01-02

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) plays pleiotropic roles in the biology of normal and malignant B lymphocytes, including the modulation of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) pathway via the targeting of SMAD5. However, the extent of the miR-155-mediated disruption of the TGF-β1/SMAD5 axis remains to be elucidated. To address this issue, we used the miR-155 knockout (KO) mouse and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cell lines ectopically expressing miR-155. In the DLBCL models, expression of miR-155 blocked TGF-β1-mediated activation of the retinoblastoma protein (RB), decreasing the abundance of the inhibitory pRB-E2F1 complex and limiting G0/G1 arrest. Genetic knockdown of SMAD5, p15, or p21 recapitulated these effects, establishing a circuitry whereby the targeting of SMAD5 by miR-155 blunts the TGF-β1-induced transcription of p15 and p21, thus sustaining RB phosphorylation and inactivity. Next, we demonstrated that SMAD5 levels are elevated in mature B lymphocytes from the miR-155 KO mice, which display a heightened sensitivity to TGF-β1 characterized by suppression of RB phosphorylation and more pronounced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Our findings suggest that a miR-155-mediated perturbation of the RB/E2F axis may play a role in DLBCL pathogenesis, and contribute to the reduced number of germinal center B cells and impaired T cell-dependent antibody response found in the miR-155 KO mice.

  16. Lymphocyte transformation studies in drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, R.J.; Tse, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    In a group of patients with clinically diagnosed drug hypersensitivity the in vitro lymphocyte response to the suspected drug was assessed by the lymphocyte transformation test. The test gave positive results in all 15 patients with penicillin-induced immediate or accelerated allergic reactions and positive immediate skin-test reactivity to the major or the minor antigenic determinant of penicillin, or both, but in only 3 of the 12 patients with delayed-onset maculopapular rashes induced by penicillin, despite positive immediate reactivity to the skin-test reagents. Lymphocyte stimulation greater than five times the control level was demonstrated for five patients with penicillin-induced erythroderma, Stevens-Johnson syndrome or a serum-sickness-like illness, or with methicillin-induced interstitial nephritis, all of whom had negative reactions to the appropriate skin-test reagents. A low level of stimulation was seen in eight other skin-test-negative patients with possible allergic reactions induced by penicillins. However, in all subjects tested the stimulation was significantly greater than the mean for control subjects. For 9 of 11 patients with isoniazid-induced hepatitis or maculopapular rashes, but for only 8 of 31 patients with eruptions induced by a variety of drugs other than penicillins and isoniazid, significant stimulation occurred in the lymphocyte transformation test. It is concluded that the lymphocyte transformation test is useful in the detection of hypersensitivity to the penicillins (although in IgE-mediated reactions skin testing is clearly preferable) and isoniazid but is of limited value in the demonstration of hypersensitivity to other drugs. PMID:445303

  17. Lymphocyte transformation studies in drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Warrington, R J; Tse, K S

    1979-05-05

    In a group of patients with clinically diagnosed drug hypersensitivity the in vitro lymphocyte response to the suspected drug was assessed by the lymphocyte transformation test. The test gave positive results in all 15 patients with penicillin-induced immediate or accelerated allergic reactions and positive immediate skin-test reactivity to the major or the minor antigenic determinant of penicillin, or both, but in only 3 of the 12 patients with delayed-onset maculopapular rashes induced by penicillin, despite positive immediate reactivity to the skin-test reagents.Lymphocyte stimulation greater than five times the control level was demonstrated for five patients with penicillin-induced erythroderma, Stevens-Johnson syndrome or a serum-sickness-like illness, or with methicillin-induced interstitial nephritis, all of whom had negative reactions to the appropriate skin-test reagents. A low level of stimulation was seen in eight other skin-test-negative patients with possible allergic reactions induced by penicillins. However, in all subjects tested the stimulation was significantly greater than the mean for control subjects.For 9 of 11 patients with isoniazid-induced hepatitis or maculopapular rashes, but for only 8 of 31 patients with eruptions induced by a variety of drugs other than penicillins and isoniazid, significant stimulation occurred in the lymphocyte transformation test.It is concluded that the lymphocyte transformation test is useful in the detection of hypersensitivity to the penicillins (although in IgE-mediated reactions skin testing is clearly preferable) and isoniazid but is of limited value in the demonstration of hypersensitivity to other drugs.

  18. Lenalidomide, Ibrutinib, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma That Is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-04

    Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  19. Quantitative diagnosis of lymphocytic myocarditis in forensic medicine.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Trine Skov; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Møller, Jesper; Banner, Jytte; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Baandrup, Ulrik Thorngren

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to establish quantitative diagnostic criteria for lymphocytic myocarditis on autopsy samples by using a stereological cell profile counting method. We quantified and compared the presence of lymphocytes and macrophages in myocardial autopsy specimens from 112 deceased individuals who had been diagnosed with myocarditis according to the Dallas criteria and 86 control subjects with morphologically normal hearts. We found the mean number to be 52.7 lymphocyte profiles/mm(2) (range 3.7-946; standard deviation 131) in the myocarditis group and 9.7 (range 2.1-25.9; standard deviation 4.6) in the control group. The cut-off value for the diagnosis of myocarditis was determined by calculating sensitivity plus specificity, which reached the highest combination at 13 lymphocyte profiles/mm(2) (sensitivity 68%; specificity 83%). A considerable proportion of subjects in both the myocarditis and control groups had lymphocyte profile counts below 30/mm(2), representing a diagnostic challenge due to the increased risk of creating false negative or false positive results. We found it practically impossible to obtain a reliable macrophage count. The present data add new important information on lymphocyte counts in inflamed and non-inflamed myocardium. We suggest a cut-off value in the range of 11-16 lymphocyte profiles/mm(2) for a reliable diagnosis of lymphocytic myocarditis from autopsy samples. To evaluate small inflammatory changes at low lymphocyte counts, a multidisciplinary approach should be implemented, in which diagnostic tools are used ancillary to histological examination. We advise against semi-quantification of macrophages based on cell profile counting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Vorinostat, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-21

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  1. Is lymphocytic (hashimoto) thyroiditis associated with suicide?

    PubMed

    Cina, Stephen J; Perper, Joshua A

    2009-09-01

    The histologic diagnosis of lymphocytic (Hashimoto) thyroiditis requires lymphocytic inflammation of the thyroid gland in combination with Hourthle cell metaplasia of follicular epithelial cells. Clinically, this autoimmune process has been associated with hypothyroidism and psychiatric conditions including depression. This retrospective study was designed to quantify the incidence and severity of lymphocytic thyroiditis in a series of nonconsecutive suicides compared with a cohort of motor vehicle accident victim controls. Eighty-one suicide victims (61 male, 20 female; age range 13-79 years, average 43) were compared with 88 age and gender matched controls (64 males, 24 females; age range 19-85 years, average 36). The degree of lymphocytic inflammation of the thyroid gland was graded on a scale of 0 to 3 (0 = no inflammation, 1 = mild inflammation, 2-3 moderate-to-marked inflammation with Hourthle cell metaplasia). Slides from each case were reviewed while blinded to the cause and manner of death in each case. Of these 169 total cases, 8 (4.7%) received a score of 3, whereas additional 7 (4.1%) received a grade of 2. Eighty-six percent of all of the cases showed no significant inflammation and recorded a score of 0. Of the 81 suicides, 3 had a score of 3, and 3 had a score of 2 (combined incidence of 7.4%). Within the control group, 5 of 88 cases scored 3 and another 4 scored 2 (combined incidence = 10.2%). Three males and 5 females scored 3 with an age range of 23 to 63 years, average 42. Incidental data tabulated showed that 19% of suicide victims were on psychoactive medications compared with 6% in the motor vehicle accident control group. No one on this study was on thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Depression is strongly linked to suicide and lymphocytic thyroiditis may be a cause of depression. Based on this study, however, the presence of lymphocytic thyroiditis cannot be used as a histologic adjunct to discriminate between suicide and accident in

  2. Control of V(D)J Recombination through Transcriptional Elongation and Changes in Locus Chromatin Structure and Nuclear Organization.

    PubMed

    Del Blanco, Beatriz; García, Vanina; García-Mariscal, Alberto; Hernández-Munain, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    V(D)J recombination is the assembly of gene segments at the antigen receptor loci to generate antigen receptor diversity in T and B lymphocytes. This process is regulated, according to defined developmental programs, by the action of a single specific recombinase complex formed by the recombination antigen gene (RAG-1/2) proteins that are expressed in immature lymphocytes. V(D)J recombination is strictly controlled by RAG-1/2 accessibility to specific recombination signal sequences in chromatin at several levels: cellular lineage, temporal regulation, gene segment order, and allelic exclusion. DNA cleavage by RAG-1/2 is regulated by the chromatin structure, transcriptional elongation, and three-dimensional architecture and position of the antigen receptor loci in the nucleus. Cis-elements specifically direct transcription and V(D)J recombination at these loci through interactions with transacting factors that form molecular machines that mediate a sequence of structural events. These events open chromatin to activate transcriptional elongation and to permit the access of RAG-1/2 to their recombination signal sequences to drive the juxtaposition of the V, D, and J segments and the recombination reaction itself. This chapter summarizes the advances in this area and the important role of the structure and position of antigen receptor loci within the nucleus to control this process.

  3. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Kipps, Thomas J.; Stevenson, Freda K.; Wu, Catherine J.; Croce, Carlo M.; Packham, Graham; Wierda, William G.; O’Brien, Susan; Gribben, John; Rai, Kanti

    2017-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a malignancy of CD5+ B cells that is characterized by the accumulation of small, mature-appearing lymphocytes in the blood, marrow and lymphoid tissues. Signalling via surface immunoglobulin, which constitutes the major part of the B cell receptor, and several genetic alterations play a part in CLL pathogenesis, in addition to interactions between CLL cells and other cell types, such as stromal cells, T cells and nurse-like cells in the lymph nodes. The clinical progression of CLL is heterogeneous and ranges from patients who require treatment soon after diagnosis to others who do not require therapy for many years, if at all. Several factors, including the immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region gene (IGHV) mutational status, genomic changes, patient age and the presence of comorbidities, should be considered when defining the optimal management strategies, which include chemotherapy, chemoimmunotherapy and/or drugs targeting B cell receptor signalling or inhibitors of apoptosis, such as BCL-2. Research on the biology of CLL has profoundly enhanced our ability to identify patients who are at higher risk for disease progression and our capacity to treat patients with drugs that selectively target distinctive phenotypic or physiological features of CLL. How these and other advances have shaped our current understanding and treatment of patients with CLL is the subject of this Primer. PMID:28102226

  4. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Kipps, Thomas J; Stevenson, Freda K; Wu, Catherine J; Croce, Carlo M; Packham, Graham; Wierda, William G; O'Brien, Susan; Gribben, John; Rai, Kanti

    2017-01-19

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a malignancy of CD5(+) B cells that is characterized by the accumulation of small, mature-appearing lymphocytes in the blood, marrow and lymphoid tissues. Signalling via surface immunoglobulin, which constitutes the major part of the B cell receptor, and several genetic alterations play a part in CLL pathogenesis, in addition to interactions between CLL cells and other cell types, such as stromal cells, T cells and nurse-like cells in the lymph nodes. The clinical progression of CLL is heterogeneous and ranges from patients who require treatment soon after diagnosis to others who do not require therapy for many years, if at all. Several factors, including the immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region gene (IGHV) mutational status, genomic changes, patient age and the presence of comorbidities, should be considered when defining the optimal management strategies, which include chemotherapy, chemoimmunotherapy and/or drugs targeting B cell receptor signalling or inhibitors of apoptosis, such as BCL-2. Research on the biology of CLL has profoundly enhanced our ability to identify patients who are at higher risk for disease progression and our capacity to treat patients with drugs that selectively target distinctive phenotypic or physiological features of CLL. How these and other advances have shaped our current understanding and treatment of patients with CLL is the subject of this Primer.

  5. Decreased deformability of lymphocytes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Wen, Jun; Nguyen, John; Cachia, Mark A.; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the first study of stiffness/deformability changes of lymphocytes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients, demonstrating that at the single cell level, leukemic metastasis progresses are accompanied by biophysical property alterations. A microfluidic device was utilized to electrically measure cell volume and transit time of single lymphocytes from healthy and CLL patients. The results from testing thousands of cells reveal that lymphocytes from CLL patients have higher stiffness (i.e., lower deformability), as compared to lymphocytes in healthy samples, which was also confirmed by AFM indentation tests. This observation is in sharp contrast to the known knowledge on other types of metastatic cells (e.g., breast and lung cancer cells) whose stiffness becomes lower as metastasis progresses.

  6. [Morphometric analysis of lymphocyte nuclei in chronic lymphocytic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Ostapenko, V A; Kruchinskiĭ, N G; Smirnova, L A; Cherednik, A B; Nesterov, V N; Tepliakov, A I

    1994-01-01

    This work is dedicated to the study of use of quantitative analysis of cell nucleus structure for the analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. The structure of lymphocytic nuclei of healthy donors was evaluated by means of staining by toluidine blue purified cell suspensions smears. The preparations were analysed on the television measuring system "omnicon" with measurements of the following parameters: square of the nucleus, euchromatin, heterochromatin, and the ratio of heterochromatin and euchromatin squares. Actuarial analysis and nuclei classification of the previously mentioned parameters showed, that in peripheral blood of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia a large amount of atypical lymphocytes is present with reduced nucleus sizes. Atypical cells retain the ratio of structural components of chromatine, characteristic to normal cells, which show their low proliferative activity.

  7. Seven new loci associated with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Fritsche, Lars G; Chen, Wei; Schu, Matthew; Yaspan, Brian L; Yu, Yi; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zack, Donald J; Arakawa, Satoshi; Cipriani, Valentina; Ripke, Stephan; Igo, Robert P; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Sim, Xueling; Weeks, Daniel E; Guymer, Robyn H; Merriam, Joanna E; Francis, Peter J; Hannum, Gregory; Agarwal, Anita; Armbrecht, Ana Maria; Audo, Isabelle; Aung, Tin; Barile, Gaetano R; Benchaboune, Mustapha; Bird, Alan C; Bishop, Paul N; Branham, Kari E; Brooks, Matthew; Brucker, Alexander J; Cade, William H; Cain, Melinda S; Campochiaro, Peter A; Chan, Chi-Chao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chew, Emily Y; Chin, Kimberly A; Chowers, Itay; Clayton, David G; Cojocaru, Radu; Conley, Yvette P; Cornes, Belinda K; Daly, Mark J; Dhillon, Baljean; Edwards, Albert O; Evangelou, Evangelos; Fagerness, Jesen; Ferreyra, Henry A; Friedman, James S; Geirsdottir, Asbjorg; George, Ronnie J; Gieger, Christian; Gupta, Neel; Hagstrom, Stephanie A; Harding, Simon P; Haritoglou, Christos; Heckenlively, John R; Holz, Frank G; Hughes, Guy; Ioannidis, John P A; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Joseph, Peronne; Jun, Gyungah; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Katsanis, Nicholas; N Keilhauer, Claudia; Khan, Jane C; Kim, Ivana K; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Kovach, Jaclyn L; Kozak, Igor; Lee, Clara J; Lee, Kristine E; Lichtner, Peter; Lotery, Andrew J; Meitinger, Thomas; Mitchell, Paul; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Moore, Anthony T; Morgan, Denise J; Morrison, Margaux A; Myers, Chelsea E; Naj, Adam C; Nakamura, Yusuke; Okada, Yukinori; Orlin, Anton; Ortube, M Carolina; Othman, Mohammad I; Pappas, Chris; Park, Kyu Hyung; Pauer, Gayle J T; Peachey, Neal S; Poch, Olivier; Priya, Rinki Ratna; Reynolds, Robyn; Richardson, Andrea J; Ripp, Raymond; Rudolph, Guenther; Ryu, Euijung; Sahel, José-Alain; Schaumberg, Debra A; Scholl, Hendrik P N; Schwartz, Stephen G; Scott, William K; Shahid, Humma; Sigurdsson, Haraldur; Silvestri, Giuliana; Sivakumaran, Theru A; Smith, R Theodore; Sobrin, Lucia; Souied, Eric H; Stambolian, Dwight E; Stefansson, Hreinn; Sturgill-Short, Gwen M; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Truitt, Barbara J; Tsironi, Evangelia E; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vijaya, Lingam; Vingerling, Johannes R; Vithana, Eranga N; Webster, Andrew R; Wichmann, H-Erich; Winkler, Thomas W; Wong, Tien Y; Wright, Alan F; Zelenika, Diana; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Ling; Zhang, Kang; Klein, Michael L; Hageman, Gregory S; Lathrop, G Mark; Stefansson, Kari; Allikmets, Rando; Baird, Paul N; Gorin, Michael B; Wang, Jie Jin; Klaver, Caroline C W; Seddon, Johanna M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Iyengar, Sudha K; Yates, John R W; Swaroop, Anand; Weber, Bernhard H F; Kubo, Michiaki; Deangelis, Margaret M; Léveillard, Thierry; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Haines, Jonathan L; Farrer, Lindsay A; Heid, Iris M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2013-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness in older individuals. To accelerate the understanding of AMD biology and help design new therapies, we executed a collaborative genome-wide association study, including >17,100 advanced AMD cases and >60,000 controls of European and Asian ancestry. We identified 19 loci associated at P < 5 × 10(-8). These loci show enrichment for genes involved in the regulation of complement activity, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. Our results include seven loci with associations reaching P < 5 × 10(-8) for the first time, near the genes COL8A1-FILIP1L, IER3-DDR1, SLC16A8, TGFBR1, RAD51B, ADAMTS9 and B3GALTL. A genetic risk score combining SNP genotypes from all loci showed similar ability to distinguish cases and controls in all samples examined. Our findings provide new directions for biological, genetic and therapeutic studies of AMD.

  8. Management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Furman, Richard R; Zent, Clive S

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL) is usually diagnosed in asymptomatic patients with early-stage disease. The standard management approach is careful observation, irrespective of risk factors unless patients meet the International Workshop on CLL (IWCLL) criteria for "active disease," which requires treatment. The initial standard therapy for most patients combines an anti-CD20 antibody (such as rituximab, ofatumumab, or obinutuzumab) with chemotherapy (fludarabine/cyclophosphamide [FC], bendamustine, or chlorambucil) depending on multiple factors including the physical fitness of the patient. However, patients with very high-risk CLL because of a 17p13 deletion (17p-) with or without mutation of TP53 (17p-/TP53mut) have poor responses to chemoimmunotherapy and require alternative treatment regimens containing B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway inhibitors. The BCR signaling pathway inhibitors (ibrutinib targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase [BTK] and idelalisib targeting phosphatidyl-inositol 3-kinase delta [PI3K-delta], respectively) are currently approved for the treatment of relapsed/refractory CLL and all patients with 17p- (ibrutinib), and in combination with rituximab for relapsed/refractory patients (idelalisib). These agents offer great efficacy, even in chemotherapy refractory CLL, with increased tolerability, safety, and survival. Ongoing studies aim to determine the best therapy combinations with the goal of achieving long-term disease control and the possibility of developing a curative regimen for some patients. CLL is associated with a wide range of infectious, autoimmune, and malignant complications. These complications result in considerable morbidity and mortality that can be minimized by early detection and aggressive management. This active monitoring requires ongoing patient education, provider vigilance, and a team approach to patient care.

  9. Activated T lymphocytes in uveitis.

    PubMed Central

    Deschênes, J.; Char, D. H.; Kaleta, S.

    1988-01-01

    Two colour flow cytometry techniques were used to assess the activation stages of peripheral and intraocular T lymphocytes in uveitis. Increased numbers of T lymphocytes bearing the interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptors were found in intraocular fluids or peripheral blood or both of 35/51 patients with uveitis. This increased expression of IL-2 receptors on lymphocytes correlated with increased expression of other early T lymphocyte activation markers, HLA-DR and L-35. Both T helper cells (Leu-3A+) and suppressor cells (Leu 2A+) were activated in vivo. A positive correlation was seen between lymphocyte activation and clinical uveitis activity. In idiopathic uveitis activation of Leu-3A lymphocytes (helper/inducer) was significantly increased, and intraocular activation of the Leu-2A lymphocytes (cytotoxic/suppressor) was significantly decreased. These data show that some patients with idiopathic uveitis have a perturbation of T helper cells. Twenty-two of 31 patients with idiopathic uveitis, not associated with systemic disease, had increased peripheral T lymphocyte activation. This finding indicates that in some inflammations believed to be restricted to the eye an abnormal systemic immune activation exists. PMID:2964862

  10. Obinutuzumab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Jehan

    2015-09-01

    Obinutuzumab is the second next-generation monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody (after ofatumumab) to enter clinical practice in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Its superiority in association with chlorambucil as compared with chlorambucil alone has led to its approval as a first-line treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, for patients who are not candidates for a more intensive treatment.

  11. [Diminished zinc plasma concentrations and alterations in the number of lymphocyte subpopulations in Down's syndrome patients].

    PubMed

    Soto-Quintana, Marisol; Alvarez-Nava, Francisco; Rojas-Atencio, Alicia; Granadillo, Victor; Fernández, Denny; Ocando, Ana; López, Ealys; Fulcado, Waleska

    2003-03-01

    Alterations of plasma levels of zinc and in the immune system in Down's syndrome (DS) have been reported. These alterations have been associated with a high rate of infectious diseases, which represent the main cause of mortality in affected individuals. The objectives of this study were to determine plasma zinc levels and to evaluate the immune system in DS patients. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 43 DS patients examined at the Unidad de Genética Médica, Universidad del Zulia in Maracaibo, Venezuela. Their mean age (+/- SD) was 2.3 +/- 2.0 years. As control group, 40 healthy children were studied (mean +/- SD 2.3 +/- 2.0 years). Karyotypes by a standard technique, the determination of plasma levels of zinc by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and the evaluation of the immune system by flow cytometry were carried out in the study groups. All DS patients had free trisomy 21. Significantly disminished zinc plasma levels, helper T lymphocyte (CD4) percentage, helper/cytotoxic (CD4/CD8) ratio and B-cells (CD19) were found in DS patients by matching with control group. An increase in CD8 was also found. No significative difference in the lymphocyte subpopulations between DS patients with disminished plasma levels of zinc and DS patients with normal zinc were found. These findings suggest that zinc deficiency is not the sole etiology involved in the disorders of immune system seen in DS patients. Other factors, such as thymic alterations and molecular abnormalities due to gene overexpression of loci located on chromosome 21 could be involved. Although, zinc supplementation is recommended in these patients with zinc deficiency, further studies with a double-blind, placebo versus zinc design are needed to evaluate the potentially beneficial effects of zinc treatment in DS patients.

  12. Human lymphocyte polymorphisms detected by quantitative two-dimensional electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, D.; Merril, C.R.

    1983-09-01

    A survey of 186 soluble lymphocyte proteins for genetic polymorphism was carried out utilizing two-dimensional electrophoresis of /sup 14/C-labeled phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human lymphocyte proteins. Nineteen of these proteins exhibited positional variation consistent with independent genetic polymorphism in a primary sample of 28 individuals. Each of these polymorphisms was characterized by quantitative gene-dosage dependence insofar as the heterozygous phenotype expressed approximately 50% of each allelic gene product as was seen in homozygotes. Patterns observed were also identical in monozygotic twins, replicate samples, and replicate gels. The three expected phenotypes (two homozygotes and a heterozygote) were observed in each of 10 of these polymorphisms while the remaining nine had one of the homozygous classes absent. The presence of the three phenotypes, the demonstration of gene-dosage dependence, and our own and previous pedigree analysis of certain of these polymorphisms supports the genetic basis of these variants. Based on this data, the frequency of polymorphic loci for man is: P . 19/186 . .102, and the average heterozygosity is .024. This estimate is approximately 1/3 to 1/2 the rate of polymorphism previously estimated for man in other studies using one-dimensional electrophoresis of isozyme loci. The newly described polymorphisms and others which should be detectable in larger protein surveys with two-dimensional electrophoresis hold promise as genetic markers of the human genome for use in gene mapping and pedigree analyses.

  13. Scaling Aspects of Lymphocyte Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Perelson, Alan S.; Wiegel, Frederik W.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the long lived pool of B and T cells that recirculate through blood, tissues and the lymphatic system of an animal with body mass M. We derive scaling rules (allometric relations) for: (1) the rate of production of mature lymphocytes; (2) the accumulation of lymphocytes in the tissues; (3) the flux of lymphocytes through the lymphatic system; (4) the number of lymph nodes, (5) the number of lymphocytes per clone within a lymph node, and (6) the total number of lymphocytes within a lymph node. Mass-dependent aspects of immune learning and of the immunological self are shown to be not very significant. Our treatment is somewhat heuristic and aims at a combination of immunological data with recent progress in biological scaling. PMID:19084024

  14. Meta-analysis of 375,000 individuals identifies 38 susceptibility loci for migraine

    PubMed Central

    Gormley, Padhraig; Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S; Palta, Priit; Esko, Tonu; Pers, Tune H.; Farh, Kai-How; Cuenca-Leon, Ester; Muona, Mikko; Furlotte, Nicholas A; Kurth, Tobias; Ingason, Andres; McMahon, George; Ligthart, Lannie; Terwindt, Gisela M; Kallela, Mikko; Freilinger, Tobias M; Ran, Caroline; Gordon, Scott G; Stam, Anine H; Steinberg, Stacy; Borck, Guntram; Koiranen, Markku; Quaye, Lydia; Adams, Hieab HH; Lehtimäki, Terho; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Wedenoja, Juho; Hinds, David A; Buring, Julie E; Schürks, Markus; Ridker, Paul M; Hrafnsdottir, Maria Gudlaug; Stefansson, Hreinn; Ring, Susan M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Penninx, Brenda WJH; Färkkilä, Markus; Artto, Ville; Kaunisto, Mari; Vepsäläinen, Salli; Malik, Rainer; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Kurki, Mitja I; Kals, Mart; Mägi, Reedik; Pärn, Kalle; Hämäläinen, Eija; Huang, Hailiang; Byrnes, Andrea E; Franke, Lude; Huang, Jie; Stergiakouli, Evie; Lee, Phil H; Sandor, Cynthia; Webber, Caleb; Cader, Zameel; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schreiber, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Eriksson, Johan G; Salomaa, Veikko; Heikkilä, Kauko; Loehrer, Elizabeth; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Cherkas, Lynn; Pedersen, Linda M.; Stubhaug, Audun; Nielsen, Christopher S; Männikkä, Minna; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Göbel, Hartmut; Esserlind, Ann-Louise; Christensen, Anne Francke; Hansen, Thomas Folkmann; Werge, Thomas; Kaprio, Jaakko; Aromaa, Arpo J; Raitakari, Olli; Ikram, M Arfan; Spector, Tim; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Metspalu, Andres; Kubisch, Christian; Strachan, David P; Ferrari, Michel D; Belin, Andrea C; Dichgans, Martin; Wessman, Maija; van den Maagdenberg, Arn MJM; Zwart, John-Anker; Boomsma, Dorret I; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Eriksson, Nicholas; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Olesen, Jes; Chasman, Daniel I; Nyholt, Dale R; Palotie, Aarno

    2017-01-01

    Migraine is a debilitating neurological disorder affecting around 1 in 7 people worldwide, but its molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Some debate exists over whether migraine is a disease of vascular dysfunction or a result of neuronal dysfunction with secondary vascular changes. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have thus far identified 13 independent loci associated with migraine. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed the largest genetic study of migraine to date, comprising 59,674 cases and 316,078 controls from 22 GWA studies. We identified 44 independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with migraine risk (P < 5 × 10−8) that map to 38 distinct genomic loci, including 28 loci not previously reported and the first locus identified on chromosome X. In subsequent computational analyses, the identified loci showed enrichment for genes expressed in vascular and smooth muscle tissues, consistent with a predominant theory of migraine that highlights vascular etiologies. PMID:27322543

  15. Functional implications of disease-specific variants in loci jointly associated with coeliac disease and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Zorro, Maria Magdalena; Ricaño-Ponce, Isis; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Diogo, Dorothée; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Franke, Lude; Trynka, Gosia; Wijmenga, Cisca; Zhernakova, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of genomic loci have been associated with a significant number of immune-mediated diseases, and a large proportion of these associated loci are shared among traits. Both the molecular mechanisms by which these loci confer disease susceptibility and the extent to which shared loci are implicated in a common pathogenesis are unknown. We therefore sought to dissect the functional components at loci shared between two autoimmune diseases: coeliac disease (CeD) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We used a cohort of 12 381 CeD cases and 7827 controls, and another cohort of 13 819 RA cases and 12 897 controls, all genotyped with the Immunochip platform. In the joint analysis, we replicated 19 previously identified loci shared by CeD and RA and discovered five new non-HLA loci shared by CeD and RA. Our fine-mapping results indicate that in nine of 24 shared loci the associated variants are distinct in the two diseases. Using cell-type-specific histone markers, we observed that loci which pointed to the same variants in both diseases were enriched for marks of promoters active in CD14+ and CD34+ immune cells (P < 0.001), while loci pointing to distinct variants in one of the two diseases showed enrichment for marks of more specialized cell types, like CD4+ regulatory T cells in CeD (P < 0.0001) compared with Th17 and CD15+ in RA (P = 0.0029). PMID:26546613

  16. Autologous stem cell transplantation as a first-line treatment strategy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial from the SFGM-TC and GFLLC.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Laurent; Chevret, Sylvie; Tournilhac, Olivier; Diviné, Marine; Leblond, Véronique; Corront, Bernadette; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Eghbali, Houchingue; Van Den Neste, Eric; Michallet, Mauricette; Maloisel, Frédéric; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Decaudin, Didier; Berthou, Christian; Brice, Pauline; Gonzalez, Hugo; Chapiro, Elise; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Leporrier, Nathalie; Maloum, Karim; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Davi, Frédéric; Lejeune, Julie; Merle-Béral, Hélène; Leporrier, Michel

    2011-06-09

    Long-term responses have been reported after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We conducted a prospective, randomized trial of ASCT in previously untreated CLL patients. We enrolled 241 patients < 66 years of age with Binet stage B or C CLL. They received 3 courses of mini-CHOP (cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, oncovin, and prednisone/prednisolone) and then 3 courses of fludarabine. Patients in complete response (CR) were then randomized to ASCT or observation, whereas the other patients were randomized to dexamethasone, high-dose aracytin, cisplatin (DHAP) salvage followed by either ASCT or 3 courses of fludarabine plus cyclophosphamide (FC). The primary end point was event-free survival (EFS). After up-front treatment, 105 patients entered CR and were randomized between ASCT (n = 52) and observation (n = 53); their respective 3-year EFS rates were 79.8% and 35.5%; the adjusted hazard ratio was 0.3 (95% CI: 0.1-0.7; P = .003). Ninety-four patients who did not enter CR were randomized between ASCT (n = 46) and FC (n = 48); their respective 3-year EFS rates were 48.9% and 44.4%, respectively; the adjusted hazard ratio was 1.7 (95% CI: 0.9-3.2; P = .13). No difference in overall survival was found between the 2 response subgroups. In young CLL patients in CR, ASCT consolidation markedly delayed disease progression. No difference was observed between ASCT and FC in patients requiring DHAP salvage.

  17. [Towards an industrial control of the cloning of lymphocytes B human for the manufacturing of monoclonal antibodies stemming from the human repertoire].

    PubMed

    Guillot-Chene, P; Lebecque, S; Rigal, D

    2009-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are efficient drugs for treating infectious, inflammatory and cancer diseases. Antibodies secreted by human lymphocytes that have been isolated from either peripheral blood or tissues present the definite interest of being part of the physiological or disease-related response to antigens present in the human body. However, attempts to generate hybridomas with human B cells have been largely unsuccessful, and cloning of human B cells has been achieved only via their inefficient immortalization with Epstein Barr Virus (EBV). However, recent progress in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of polyclonal B cell activation has dramatically increased the capacity to clone human B cells. In particular, activation of human naïve and memory B cells through CD40 or memory B cells only through TLR9 was shown to greatly facilitate their immortalization by EBV. Industrial development based on these observations will soon provide large collections of high affinity human mAbs of every isotype directly selected by the human immune system directed to recognize epitopes relevant for individual patients. Moreover, after CD40 activation, these mAbs will cover the full human repertoire, including the natural auto-immune repertoire. Full characterization of the biological activity of these mAbs will in turn bring useful information for selecting vaccine epitopes. This breakthrough in human B cell cloning opens the way into new areas for therapeutic use of mAbs.

  18. Integrin α4β1 controls G9a activity that regulates epigenetic changes and nuclear properties required for lymphocyte migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Cook, Peter C.; Zindy, Egor; Williams, Craig J.; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Streuli, Charles H.; MacDonald, Andrew S.; Redondo-Muñoz, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the cell nucleus change to allow cells to migrate, but how chromatin modifications contribute to nuclear deformability has not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that a major factor in this process involves epigenetic changes that underpin nuclear structure. We investigated the link between cell adhesion and epigenetic changes in T-cells, and demonstrate that T-cell adhesion to VCAM1 via α4β1 integrin drives histone H3 methylation (H3K9me2/3) through the methyltransferase G9a. In this process, active G9a is recruited to the nuclear envelope and interacts with lamin B1 during T-cell adhesion through α4β1 integrin. G9a activity not only reorganises the chromatin structure in T-cells, but also affects the stiffness and viscoelastic properties of the nucleus. Moreover, we further demonstrated that these epigenetic changes were linked to lymphocyte movement, as depletion or inhibition of G9a blocks T-cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Thus, our results identify a novel mechanism in T-cells by which α4β1 integrin signaling drives specific chromatin modifications, which alter the physical properties of the nucleus and thereby enable T-cell migration. PMID:26657637

  19. Palifermin and Chlorhexidine Mouthwashes in Prevention of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis in Children with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, Narges; Mehdipoor, Masoumeh; Sajadi, Hasan; Moosavi, Mahdieh-Sadat

    2016-12-01

    Over the past three decades, significant improvements have been achieved in the survival of children with cancer. However, the considerable morbidity which occurs as a result of chemotherapy often restricts the treatment intensity. One of the important dose-limiting and costly adverse effects of cancer therapy is mucositis. Children with hematological malignancies are greatly at risk of developing mucositis. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of palifermin in preventing mucositis in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who undergo chemotherapy. In this clinical trial, 90 children with ALL were randomized to receive chlorhexidine (n=45) or palifermin (n=45). One group received 60 μg/ kg/ day palifermin as an intravenous bolus once daily for 3 days before and 3 days after the chemotherapy. Chlorhexidine mouthwash was administered once daily for 3 days before and 3 days after the chemotherapy. The world health organization (WHO) oral toxicity scale was employed for grading the mucositis. The data were analyzed by using two-way ANOVA. The two groups were matched for age and gender. The study groups were significantly different in terms of mucositis grading (P values after 1 and 2 week therapy were 0.00). Palifermin decreased the incidence and severity of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. Palifermin reduces the oral mucositis in children with ALL. Several mechanisms of action are suggested for keratinocyte growth factor (such as palifermin) including promotion of cell proliferation and cytoprotection, restraining the apoptosis, and changing the cytokine profile.

  20. Control of polyclonal immunoglobulin production from human lymphocytes by leukotrienes; leukotriene B4 induces an OKT8(+), radiosensitive suppressor cell from resting, human OKT8(-) T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Atluru, D.; Goodwin, J.S.

    1984-10-01

    We report that leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a 5-lipoxygenase metabolite of arachidonic acid, is a potent suppressor of polyclonal Ig production in pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-stimulated cultures of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, while LTC4 and LTD4 have little activity in this system. Preincubation of T cells with LTB4 in nanomolar to picomolar concentrations rendered these cells suppressive of Ig production in subsequent PWM-stimulated cultures of fresh, autologous B + T cells. This LTB4-induced suppressor cell was radiosensitive, and its generation could be blocked by cyclohexamide but not by mitomycin C. The LTB4-induced suppressor cell was OKT8(+), while the precursor for the cell could be OKT8(-). The incubation of OKT8(-) T cells with LTB4 for 18 h resulted in the appearance of the OKT8(+) on 10-20% of the cells, and this could be blocked by cyclohexamide but not by mitomycin C. Thus, LTB4 in very low concentrations induces a radiosensitive OKT8(+) suppressor cell from OKT8(-) cells. In this regard, LTB4 is three to six orders of magnitude more potent than any endogenous hormonal inducer of suppressor cells previously described. Glucocorticosteroids, which block suppressor cell induction in many systems, may act by inhibiting endogenous production of LTB4.

  1. Interaction of Choriocarcinoma Cells and Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    August, Charles S.; Cox, Sheila T.; Naughton, Michael A.

    1979-01-01

    Cultured choriocarcinoma (Be Wo) cells exist that share many of the morphologic and bio-synthetic properties of normal human trophoblasts. In an attempt to develop a model for the immunologic relationship between a sensitized mother and fetus, we mixed Be Wo cells with mitogen-activated cytotoxic lymphocytes in vitro. Be Wo cells were resistant to the cytolytic effects of the activated lymphocytes despite 24-h exposure and intimate cell-to-cell contact as determined by microscopy. Control target cells, a line of human hepatoma cells, were readily destroyed. Cytotoxicity was measured by determining residual radioactivity of [3H]thymidine-labeled target cells after exposure to activated lymphocytes. Employing the quantitative assay, we confirmed the morphologic results and showed that Be Wo and a number of other choriocarcinoma cell lines were resistant to the cytotoxic effects of lymphocytes activated by phytohemagglutinin, pokeweed mitogen, and allogeneic cells in mixed lymphocyte cultures. Moreover, Be Wo cells were resistant to injury over a wide range of killer to target cell ratios. Significant killing of the Be Wo cells occurred only after prolonged exposure (48 and 72 h) to the activated lymphocytes. We suggest that one mechanism that may assist the fetus (or a choriocarcinoma) in its immunologic survival is the intrinsic resistance of trophoblast cells to lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity. Images PMID:570981

  2. Increase of peripheral B lymphocytes in Graves' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mori, H; Amino, N; Iwatani, Y; Kabutomori, O; Asari, S; Motoi, S; Miyai, K; Kumahara, Y

    1980-01-01

    Peripheral T and B lymphocytes were examined in autoimmune thyroid diseases. The percentages of T and B lymphocytes were calculated from the proportions of E and EAC rosette-forming cells and peroxidase-positive cells determined by micromethods. In thyrotoxic Graves' disease, the percentage of T cells was significantly lower, and the percentage of B cells was higher than in normal controls. The absolute count of B lymphocytes was also markedly increased. The serum levels of thyroid hormones showed a significant correlation with the percentage of B cells and an inverse correlation with that of T cells in untreated cases of Graves' disease. Similar abnormalities of lymphocyte subpopulations were observed in patients with thyrotoxic Graves' disease under drug therapy, but the proportions and absolute counts of T and B lymphocytes were normal in euthyroid patients with Graves' disease, either under drug therapy or in remission. No abnormalities in T and B cells were found in Hashimoto's disease. The data indicate that the main feature of the abnormality of the lymphocyte subpopulations in thyrotoxic Graves' disease is an increase of B lymphocytes. The reasons for the discrepancy between our results and those of earlier reports and for the B cell abnormality in Graves' disease are discussed. PMID:6970099

  3. Blood lymphocyte subsets in rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Franch, A; Castellote, C; Castell, M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine the phenotype of peripheral blood lymphocytes during the time-course of adjuvant arthritis (AA) to detect alterations that could be involved in the pathogenesis of the arthritic process. METHODS--Phenotype analysis was performed on days 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, 56 and 70 after arthritis induction using monoclonal antibodies to CD5, CD4 and CD8 subsets, and flow cytometry. The proportion of activated lymphocytes and lymphocytes was also assessed with monoclonal antibodies to IL-2R (CD25), to Ia antigen and by polyclonal antibodies to rat Ig. RESULTS--Adjuvant arthritis produced leukocytosis with neutrophilia. Rats with AA showed a marked increase in the number of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells. The ratio CD4/CD8 decreased because the rise in CD8+ cells was more pronounced than the increase in CD4+ cells. Changes in lymphocyte counts showed two well-defined periods: the first, from day 14 to day 28, during which the inflammation of the joints reached a maximum and changes in lymphocyte subsets were more pronounced, that is, there was a threefold increase in CD8+ lymphocytes over normal counts, and the second, from day 42 to day 70, in which modified parameters improved considerably but remained different from controls. CONCLUSION--Alterations were detected in the phenotype of peripheral blood lymphocytes in AA, which provides an additional marker of disease activity. PMID:7944619

  4. Blood lymphocyte subsets in rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Franch, A; Castellote, C; Castell, M

    1994-07-01

    To determine the phenotype of peripheral blood lymphocytes during the time-course of adjuvant arthritis (AA) to detect alterations that could be involved in the pathogenesis of the arthritic process. Phenotype analysis was performed on days 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, 56 and 70 after arthritis induction using monoclonal antibodies to CD5, CD4 and CD8 subsets, and flow cytometry. The proportion of activated lymphocytes and lymphocytes was also assessed with monoclonal antibodies to IL-2R (CD25), to Ia antigen and by polyclonal antibodies to rat Ig. Adjuvant arthritis produced leukocytosis with neutrophilia. Rats with AA showed a marked increase in the number of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells. The ratio CD4/CD8 decreased because the rise in CD8+ cells was more pronounced than the increase in CD4+ cells. Changes in lymphocyte counts showed two well-defined periods: the first, from day 14 to day 28, during which the inflammation of the joints reached a maximum and changes in lymphocyte subsets were more pronounced, that is, there was a threefold increase in CD8+ lymphocytes over normal counts, and the second, from day 42 to day 70, in which modified parameters improved considerably but remained different from controls. Alterations were detected in the phenotype of peripheral blood lymphocytes in AA, which provides an additional marker of disease activity.

  5. Genotoxic effects of borax on cultured lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Pongsavee, Malinee

    2009-03-01

    The effect of borax on human chromosomes was analyzed in this study. Venous blood from 30 male students at Thammasat University, Thailand (age 18-25 years) was collected for lymphocyte cell cultures. This experiment was divided into two groups: the first group was the control group and the second group was the experimental group. The lymphocyte cells in the control group were cultured without borax. The experimental group was divided into four subgroups. The lymphocyte cells in each experimental subgroup were cultured with different concentrations of borax (0.1 mg/ml, 0.15 mg/ml, 0.2 mg/ml and 0.3 mg/ml). Human chromosomes were studied for abnormalities through Giemsa-staining and G-banding. The results show that the numbers of metaphase plates (the metaphase plate which contained 46 chromosomes; 46, XY) and metaphase chromosomes were reduced when lymphocyte cells were cultured with 0.15 mg/ml (57.2%), 0.2 mg/ml (50.8%) and 0.3 mg/ml (42.3%) concentrations of borax. There was a statistically significant difference between the control and experimental subgroups (p < 0.05). Sister chromatid separation was found in the 0.3 mg/ml borax concentration experimental subgroup. This shows that borax (at 0.15, 0.2 and 0.3 mg/ml concentrations) affects the cell and human chromosomes (both numerical and structural abnormalities). Borax may cause human chromosome abnormalities and lead to genetic defects.

  6. B Lymphocytes in Multiple Sclerosis: Bregs and BTLA/CD272 Expressing-CD19+ Lymphocytes Modulate Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Piancone, Federica; Saresella, Marina; Marventano, Ivana; La Rosa, Francesca; Zoppis, Martina; Agostini, Simone; Longhi, Renato; Caputo, Domenico; Mendozzi, Laura; Rovaris, Marco; Clerici, Mario

    2016-01-01

    B lymphocytes contribute to the pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) by secreting antibodies and producing cytokines. This latter function was analyzed in myelin olygodendrocyte protein (MOG)-stimulated CD19+ B lymphocytes of 71 MS patients with different disease phenotypes and 40 age-and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). Results showed that: 1) CD19+/TNFα+, CD19+/IL-12+ and CD19+/IFNγ+ lymphocytes are significantly increased in primary progressive (PP) compared to secondary progressive (SP), relapsing-remitting (RR), benign (BE) MS and HC; 2) CD19+/IL-6+ lymphocytes are significantly increased in PP, SP and RR compared to BEMS and HC; and 3) CD19+/IL-13+, CD19+/IL-10+, and CD19+/IL-10+/TGFβ+ (Bregs) B lymphocytes are reduced overall in MS patients compared to HC. B cells expressing BTLA, a receptor whose binding to HVEM inhibits TcR-initiated cytokine production, as well as CD19+/BTLA+/IL-10+ cells were also significantly overall reduced in MS patients compared to HC. Analyses performed in RRMS showed that fingolimod-induced disease remission is associated with a significant increase in Bregs, CD19+/BTLA+, and CD19+/BTLA+/IL-10+ B lymphocytes. B lymphocytes participate to the pathogenesis of MS via the secretion of functionally-diverse cytokines that might play a role in determining disease phenotypes. The impairment of Bregs and CD19+/BTLA+ cells, in particular, could play an important pathogenic role in MS. PMID:27412504

  7. Palifermin and Chlorhexidine Mouthwashes in Prevention of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis in Children with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gholizadeh, Narges; Mehdipoor, Masoumeh; Sajadi, Hasan; Moosavi, Mahdieh-Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Over the past three decades, significant improvements have been achieved in the survival of children with cancer. However, the considerable morbidity which occurs as a result of chemotherapy often restricts the treatment intensity. One of the important dose-limiting and costly adverse effects of cancer therapy is mucositis. Children with hematological malignancies are greatly at risk of developing mucositis. Purpose: This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of palifermin in preventing mucositis in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who undergo chemotherapy. Materials and Method: In this clinical trial, 90 children with ALL were randomized to receive chlorhexidine (n=45) or palifermin (n=45). One group received 60 μg/ kg/ day palifermin as an intravenous bolus once daily for 3 days before and 3 days after the chemotherapy. Chlorhexidine mouthwash was administered once daily for 3 days before and 3 days after the chemotherapy. The world health organization (WHO) oral toxicity scale was employed for grading the mucositis. The data were analyzed by using two-way ANOVA. Results: The two groups were matched for age and gender. The study groups were significantly different in terms of mucositis grading (P values after 1 and 2 week therapy were 0.00). Palifermin decreased the incidence and severity of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. Conclusion: Palifermin reduces the oral mucositis in children with ALL. Several mechanisms of action are suggested for keratinocyte growth factor (such as palifermin) including promotion of cell proliferation and cytoprotection, restraining the apoptosis, and changing the cytokine profile. PMID:27942550

  8. Genome-wide association and expression quantitative trait loci studies identify multiple susceptibility loci for thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Son, Ho-Young; Hwangbo, Yul; Yoo, Seong-Keun; Im, Sun-Wha; Yang, San Duk; Kwak, Soo-Jung; Park, Min Seon; Kwak, Soo Heon; Cho, Sun Wook; Ryu, Jun Sun; Kim, Jeongseon; Jung, Yuh-Seog; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Su-jin; Lee, Kyu Eun; Park, Do Joon; Cho, Nam Han; Sung, Joohon; Seo, Jeong-Sun; Lee, Eun Kyung; Park, Young Joo; Kim, Jong-Il

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common cancer in Korea. Several susceptibility loci of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) were identified by previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in Europeans only. Here we conducted a GWAS and a replication study in Koreans using a total of 1,085 DTC cases and 8,884 controls, and validated these results using expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis and clinical phenotypes. The most robust associations were observed in the NRG1 gene (rs6996585, P=1.08 × 10−10) and this SNP was also associated with NRG1 expression in thyroid tissues. In addition, we confirmed three previously reported loci (FOXE1, NKX2-1 and DIRC3) and identified seven novel susceptibility loci (VAV3, PCNXL2, INSR, MRSB3, FHIT, SEPT11 and SLC24A6) associated with DTC. Furthermore, we identified specific variants of DTC that have different effects according to cancer type or ethnicity. Our findings provide deeper insight into the genetic contribution to thyroid cancer in different populations. PMID:28703219

  9. What Are the Key Statistics about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia (ALL) What Are the Key Statistics About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? The American Cancer Society’s estimates for acute lymphocytic ... Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  10. Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia by Risk Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Typical Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treatment options for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) vary ... Treating Hairy Cell Leukemia More In Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  11. [Influence of radiotherapy on lymphocyte subpopulations].

    PubMed

    Ceschia, T; Beorchia, A; Guglielmi, R; Mandoliti, G; Fongione, S; Cereghini, M; Tonutti, E; Sala, P G; Pizzi, G

    1991-04-01

    The authors investigated the effects of radiation therapy on the immune system by studying lymphocyte subsets and other parameters in 32 patients undergoing radiation therapy for solid cancer. With monoclonal antibody techniques, we studied both T- and B-lymphocytes; cell suspensions were analyzed by means of a Facs Spectrum III Ortho (Ortho-Diagnostic) unit. The first control was performed right after the beginning of radiotherapy, when the dose to the patients was 50 Gy or higher. The second control was performed at 40 Gy because all patients received this dose. 30% of the patients exhibited lymphopenia from the beginning of the study; at 40 Gy the number of T-lymphocytes was low and helper/suppressor ratio was altered. A variable response of B-cells was observed, although all patients exhibited restoration of normal values at 6 months. Four patients only suffered from side-effects: a patient with tongue cancer presented oral mycosis, and a woman--treated for breast cancer--presented vaginal mycosis. Two cases of cystitis were also observed, after 18 Gy, in patients with uterine carcinoma undergoing pelvic irradiation. Disease progression was observed in 2 patients with head and neck cancer, while 3 patients died from lung cancer progression. Another one, with head and neck cancer, died because of heart failure.

  12. Lymphocyte transformation in presumed ocular histoplasmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ganley, J.P.; Nemo, G.J.; Comstock, G.W.; Brody, J.A.

    1981-08-01

    Lymphocytes from individuals with inactive macular disciform lesions of presumed ocular histoplasmosis challenged with three histoplasmin antigens incorporated tritiated thymidine at a significantly higher rate than histoplasmin-stimulated lymphocytes of matched control and peripheral scar groups. This finding is consistent with the etiologic association of the disciform ocular syndrome and previous systemic infection with Histoplasma capsulatum. The disciform group had a higher mean response than the other two groups to pokeweed mitogen but not to phytohemagglutinin and had higher mean counts per minute to the specific antigens Toxoplasma gondii, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M battery, and M gaus, but not to Candida albicans. These data would suggest that individuals with the disciform lesion of presumed ocular histoplasmosis have a hyperreactive cellular immune response; this response may play an important role in the development of the disciform.

  13. Effect of weightlessness on lymphocyte proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, A.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment to study the effect of weightlessness on lymphocyte proliferation to detect possible alteration of the cells responsible for the immune response during long-duration space flights is described. Human lymphocytes in culture medium will be delivered shortly before launch in an incubator which will be kept at 37C. Mitogen will be added to the culture. A control without mitogen will be run in parallel. After 70 hours of incubation, radioactive thymidine will be added. After two hours, cellular activity will be stopped by fixation and incubator power switched off. Later, the amount of incorporated thymidine will be determined and the cell morphology and the distribution of cell organelles will be investigated.

  14. Effect of weightlessness on lymphocyte proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, A.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment to study the effect of weightlessness on lymphocyte proliferation to detect possible alteration of the cells responsible for the immune response during long-duration space flights is described. Human lymphocytes in culture medium will be delivered shortly before launch in an incubator which will be kept at 37C. Mitogen will be added to the culture. A control without mitogen will be run in parallel. After 70 hours of incubation, radioactive thymidine will be added. After two hours, cellular activity will be stopped by fixation and incubator power switched off. Later, the amount of incorporated thymidine will be determined and the cell morphology and the distribution of cell organelles will be investigated.

  15. Starved human T lymphocytes keep fighting.

    PubMed

    Finlay, David K

    2015-09-01

    Cellular metabolism is emerging as a key determinant of T-lymphocyte differentiation and function. While this new paradigm has been primarily characterized in murine systems, research is now characterizing a role for different aspects of cellular metabolism in controlling human T-lymphocyte biology. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Renner et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 2504-2516] analyze the glycolytic and mitochondrial activity of activated human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and correlate it to T-cell function. The authors show that although neither glucose deprivation nor mitochondrial restriction affects cytokine production, the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose severely affects T-cell function. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Lymphocyte abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed Central

    Fan, P T; Clements, P J; Yu, D T; Opelz, G; Bluestone, R

    1977-01-01

    Peripheral blood T (SRBC rosette) and B (AgG- and C-receptor) lymphocyte subpopulations and responsiveness to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) were assayed in 40 patients with ankylosing spondylitis and in 55 normal subjects. There was no significant difference in the lymphocyte concentrations or responsiveness to PHA between the two groups. However, the percentages of T lymphocytes were significantly lower in the patients irrespective of their HLA typing. This was probably due to an increase in the 'null' population since the percentages of both the AgG- and C-receptor cells were normal. PMID:303501

  17. High-density genotyping of immune-related loci identifies new SLE risk variants in individuals with Asian ancestry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E; Looger, Loren L; Zhou, Xu-Jie; Kim, Kwangwoo; Okada, Yukinori; Ma, Jianyang; Qi, Yuan-Yuan; Kim-Howard, Xana; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Bhattarai, Krishna; Adler, Adam; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Kochi, Yuta; Suzuki, Akari; Kubo, Michiaki; Sumida, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Young Jin; Han, Bok-Ghee; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Wren, Jonathan D; Harley, John B; Shen, Nan; Chua, Kek Heng; Zhang, Hong; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Nath, Swapan K

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a strong but incompletely understood genetic architecture. We conducted an association study with replication in 4,478 SLE cases and 12,656 controls from six East Asian cohorts to identify new SLE susceptibility loci and better localize known loci. We identified ten new loci and confirmed 20 known loci with genome-wide significance. Among the new loci, the most significant locus was GTF2IRD1-GTF2I at 7q11.23 (rs73366469, Pmeta = 3.75 × 10(-117), odds ratio (OR) = 2.38), followed by DEF6, IL12B, TCF7, TERT, CD226, PCNXL3, RASGRP1, SYNGR1 and SIGLEC6. We identified the most likely functional variants at each locus by analyzing epigenetic marks and gene expression data. Ten candidate variants are known to alter gene expression in cis or in trans. Enrichment analysis highlights the importance of these loci in B cell and T cell biology. The new loci, together with previously known loci, increase the explained heritability of SLE to 24%. The new loci share functional and ontological characteristics with previously reported loci and are possible drug targets for SLE therapeutics.

  18. Phenotype markers and cytokine intracellular production by CD8+ gammadelta T lymphocytes do not support a regulatory T profile in Behçet's disease patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Antonio; Cambra, Ana; Munoz-Saá, Iván; Crespí, Catalina; Pallarés, Lucio; Juan, Antonio; Matamoros, Núria; Julià, Maria Rosa

    2010-04-08

    gammadelta T lymphocytes (GD) have been suggested as one of the causes of cytokine dysregulation that results in neutrophils hyperactivation in Behçet's disease (BD) patients. In addition, GD can provoke cytotoxic lesions in autoimmune diseases by interaction with MICA (MHC class I chain-related A) molecules, through NKG2D receptor on its surface. In contrast, the CD8+ subset of gammadelta T lymphocytes (GDCD8+) has been related to regulatory T activity. The aim of this study was to determine the phenotype and the intracellular cytokine profile in GD from peripheral blood, to discern if they were skewed to an effector or regulatory pattern in BD. We performed phenotype analysis, by three-colour flow cytometry, in 28 BD, 15 healthy controls (HC) and 14 patients with recurrent bucal ulcers (RBU). We studied intracellular cytokine production in 10 BD and 14 HC, after polyclonal stimulation. In addition, we analysed serum IL-15 and soluble MICA, by ELISA, in 27 BD, 21 HC and 40 rheumatoid arthritis patients. The hallmark in BD was a specific increase in CD8 expression by GD, and in GDCD8+ absolute numbers. Most of GDCD8+ presented CD8 alphaalpha homodimers and were negative for CD103, Foxp3 and CTLA-4. GDCD8+ and GDCD8- were high IFNgamma-, but poor IL-2, IL-10, TGFbeta and IL-4-producing cells, with no differences between BD and HC. NKG2D expression on CD8+ T cells, serum IL-15 and soluble MICA were not significantly increased in BD. Our results do not suggest a T regulatory profile for GDCD8+ neither in HC, nor in BD. We cannot rule out other suppression mechanisms or some heterogeneity within this subset that could contribute to regulatory function.

  19. Transformation of Lymphocytes in Gonorrhea Before and After Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Esquenazi, Violet; Streitfeld, Murray M.

    1973-01-01

    Patients were studied for lymphocyte transformation responses to a variety of Neisseria gonorrhoeae antigens and to a Neisseria catarrhalis sonicate. Cells from infected patients manifested significant uptake of tritiated thymidine in response to one or more gonococcal antigens. In some cases, deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis was so marked in lymphocytes not challenged by antigens in vitro that added blastogenesis was either obscured or inhibited. At five weeks posttherapy, lymphocytes were relatively nonreactive to gonococcal antigenic stimulation. Blastogenesis in response to N. catarrhalis was also seen for a few gonorrhea patients and normal controls. Cross-antigenicity of catarrhalis organisms and gonococci was indicated by the disappearance of reactivity to catarrhalis sonicate by the lymphocytes of almost all convalescent gonorrhea patients. PMID:4200538

  20. Matched and Mismatched Metabolic Fuels in Lymphocyte Function

    PubMed Central

    Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Gerriets, Valerie A.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Immunological function requires metabolic support to suit the needs of lymphocytes at a variety of distinct differentiation and activation states. It is now evident that the signaling pathways that drive lymphocyte survival and activity can directly control cellular metabolism. This linkage provides a mechanism by which activation and specific signaling pathways provide a supply of appropriate and required nutrients to support cell functions in a pro-active supply rather than consumption-based metabolic model. In this way, the metabolism and fuel choices of lymphocytes are guided to specifically match the anticipated needs. If the fuel choice or metabolic pathways of lymphocytes are dysregulated, however, metabolic checkpoints can become activated to disrupt immunological function. These changes are now shown in several immunological diseases and may open new opportunities to selectively enhance or suppress specific immune functions through targeting of glucose, lipid, or amino acid metabolism. PMID:23290889

  1. Tempol protects human lymphocytes from genotoxicity induced by cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Khabour, Omar F; Alzoubi, Karem H; Mfady, Doa’a S; Alasseiri, Mohammed; Hasheesh, Taghrid F

    2014-01-01

    The use of cisplatin in treatments of human malignancies is limited by its side effects that include DNA damage and the subsequent risk of developing secondary cancer. In this study, we examined the possible protective effect of Tempol against DNA damage induced by cisplatin in human lymphocytes using chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) assays. Cisplatin induced significant elevation in the frequencies of CAs and SCEs in cultured human lymphocytes (P < 0.01). Treatment of lymphocytes with Tempol significantly lowered CAs and SCEs induced by cisplatin. Tempol alone did not affect spontaneous levels of SCEs and CAs observed in the control group (P > 0.05). In conclusion, Tempol protects human lymphocytes against genotoxicity induced by the anticancer drug cisplatin. PMID:24955171

  2. Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Guzman, Roberto E; Radi, Zaher A

    2007-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis characterized by multifocal follicular lymphoid cell infiltrates with germinal centers, thyroid acinar atrophy and pituitary cell hyperplasia/hypertrophy of the adenohypophysis was detected in a vehicle control, 4-year-old female Cynomolgus macaque in a routine toxicology study. Lymphoid cells of germinal centers were positive for the B-cell marker CD20 by immunohistochemistry (IHC), while remaining lymphocytes were positive for the T-cell marker CD3. Hypertrophied/hyperplastic pituitary cells were positive for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) by IHC, consistent with an adaptive response due to removal of hormonal negative feedback from the diseased thyroid gland. Features of this case are similar to chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis in humans, an autoimmune disorder also known as Hashimoto's disease. Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis with compensatory pituitary changes may occur spontaneously in young, clinically normal cynomolgus macaques and its presence in drug treated animals should be interpreted with caution.

  3. Abnormal lymphocyte response to ultraviolet radiation in multiple skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Munch-Petersen, B.; Frentz, G.; Squire, B.; Wallevik, K.; Horn, C.C.; Reymann, F.; Faber, M. )

    1985-06-01

    The lymphocyte response to ultraviolet radiation (254 nm) was investigated by two different methods in 29 unselected patients with multiple epidermal cancer. The ultraviolet-induced DNA synthesis was determined as the increase in incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine in irradiated cells compared with non-irradiated cells after incubation for 2 h. The ultraviolet tolerance was measured as the ultraviolet dose necessary for 50% reduction in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. Patients with both squamous cell differentiated tumours and basal cell carcinomas had very high ultraviolet-induced DNA synthesis values. The ultraviolet tolerance in patient lymphocytes was considerably lower than in control lymphocytes with the lowest values occurring in patients with clinical sun intolerance. These investigations may be of predictive value in skin carcinogenesis.

  4. The Expression Quantitative Trait Loci in Immune Pathways and their Effect on Cutaneous Melanoma Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Vogelsang, Matjaz; Martinez, Carlos N; Rendleman, Justin; Bapodra, Anuj; Malecek, Karolina; Romanchuk, Artur; Kazlow, Esther; Shapiro, Richard L; Berman, Russell S; Krogsgaard, Michelle; Osman, Iman; Kirchhoff, Tomas

    2016-07-01

    The identification of personalized germline markers with biologic relevance for the prediction of cutaneous melanoma prognosis is highly demanded but to date, it has been largely unsuccessful. As melanoma progression is controlled by host immunity, here we present a novel approach interrogating immunoregulatory pathways using the genome-wide maps of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) to reveal biologically relevant germline variants modulating cutaneous melanoma outcomes. Using whole genome eQTL data from a healthy population, we identified 385 variants significantly impacting the expression of 268 immune-relevant genes. The 40 most significant eQTLs were tested in a prospective cohort of 1,221 patients with cutaneous melanoma for their association with overall (OS) and recurrence-free survival using Cox regression models. We identified highly significant associations with better melanoma OS for rs6673928, impacting IL19 expression (HR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.41-0.77; P = 0.0002) and rs6695772, controlling the expression of BATF3 (HR, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.19-2.24; P = 0.0019). Both associations map in the previously suspected melanoma prognostic locus at 1q32. Furthermore, we show that their combined effect on melanoma OS is substantially enhanced reaching the level of clinical applicability (HR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.43-2.60; P = 2.38e-5). Our unique approach of interrogating lymphocyte-specific eQTLs reveals novel and biologically relevant immunomodulatory eQTL predictors of cutaneous melanoma prognosis that are independent of current histopathologic markers. The significantly enhanced combined effect of identified eQTLs suggests the personalized utilization of both SNPs in a clinical setting, strongly indicating the promise of the proposed design for the discovery of prognostic or risk germline markers in other cancers. Clin Cancer Res; 22(13); 3268-80. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. The expression quantitative trait loci in immune pathways and their effect on cutaneous melanoma prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Vogelsang, Matjaz; Martinez, Carlos N; Rendleman, Justin; Bapodra, Anuj; Malecek, Karolina; Romanchuk, Artur; Kazlow, Esther; Shapiro, Richard; Berman, Russell; Krogsgaard, Michelle; Osman, Iman; Kirchhoff, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The identification of personalized germline markers with biological relevance for the prediction of cutaneous melanoma (CM) prognosis is highly demanded but to date it has been largely unsuccessful. As melanoma progression is controlled by host immunity, here we present a novel approach interrogating immunoregulatory pathways using the genome-wide maps of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) to reveal biologically relevant germline variants modulating CM outcomes. Experimental Design Using whole genome eQTL data from a healthy population, we identified 385 variants -significantly impacting the expression of 268 immune-relevant genes. The 40 most significant eQTLs were tested in a prospective cohort of 1,221 CM patients for their association with overall (OS) and recurrence-free survival using Cox regression models. Results We identified highly significant associations with better melanoma OS for rs6673928, impacting IL19 expression (HR 0.56, 95%CI 0.41–0.77; P=0.0002) and rs6695772, controlling the expression of BATF3 (HR 1.64, 95%CI 1.19–2.24; P=0.0019). Both associations map in the previously suspected melanoma prognostic locus at 1q32. Furthermore, we show that their combined effect on melanoma OS is substantially enhanced reaching the level of clinical applicability (HR 1.92, 95%CI 1.43–2.60; P=2.38e–5). Conclusions Our unique approach of interrogating lymphocyte-specific eQTLs reveals novel and biologically relevant immunomodulatory eQTL predictors of CM prognosis that are independent of current histopathological markers. The significantly enhanced combined effect of identified eQTLs suggests the personalized utilization of both SNPs in a clinical setting, strongly indicating the promise of the proposed design for the discovery of prognostic or risk germline markers in other cancers. PMID:26733611

  6. Seven newly identified loci for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jason D; Simmonds, Matthew J; Walker, Neil M; Burren, Oliver; Brand, Oliver J; Guo, Hui; Wallace, Chris; Stevens, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), is one of the most common of the immune-mediated diseases. To further investigate the genetic determinants of AITD, we conducted an association study using a custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, the ImmunoChip. The SNP array contains all known and genotype-able SNPs across 186 distinct susceptibility loci associated with one or more immune-mediated diseases. After stringent quality control, we analysed 103 875 common SNPs (minor allele frequency >0.05) in 2285 GD and 462 HT patients and 9364 controls. We found evidence for seven new AITD risk loci (P < 1.12 × 10(-6); a permutation test derived significance threshold), five at locations previously associated and two at locations awaiting confirmation, with other immune-mediated diseases.

  7. Genomewide meta-analysis identifies novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To perform a one-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility and explore functional consequences of new susceptibility loci. Methods We synthesized 7 MS GWAS. Each dataset was imputed using HapMap phase II and a per-SNP meta-analysis was performed across the 7 datasets. We explored RNA expression data using a quantitative trait analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 228 subjects with demyelinating disease. Results We meta-analyzed 2,529,394 unique SNPs in 5,545 cases and 12,153 controls. We identified three novel susceptibility alleles: rs170934T at 3p24.1 (OR=1.17, P = 1.6 × 10−8) near EOMES, rs2150702G in the second intron of MLANA on chromosome 9p24.1 (OR = 1.16, P = 3.3 × 10−8), and rs6718520A in an intergenic region on chromosome 2p21, with THADA as the nearest flanking gene (OR = 1.17, P = 3.4 × 10−8). The three new loci do not have a strong “cis” effect on RNA expression in PBMCs. Ten other susceptibility loci had a suggestive P<1×10−6, some of which have evidence of association in other inflammatory diseases, i.e. IL12B, TAGAP, PLEK, and ZMIZ1. Interpretation We have performed a meta-analysis of GWAS in MS that more than doubles the size of previous gene discovery efforts and highlights three novel MS susceptibility loci. These and additional loci with suggestive evidence of association are excellent candidates for further investigations to refine and validate their role in the genetic architecture of MS. PMID:22190364

  8. NK Cell Proportion and Number Are Influenced by Genetic Loci on Chromosomes 8, 9, and 17.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Adam-Nicolas; Guilbault, Lorie; Guimont-Desrochers, Fanny; Hillhouse, Erin E; Lesage, Sylvie

    2016-03-15

    NK cells play a crucial role in innate immunity due to their direct cytotoxicity toward tumors, virally infected cells, and stressed cells, and they also contribute to the orchestration of the adaptive response by their ability to produce immunoregulatory cytokines. In secondary lymphoid organs, NK cells compose the third most abundant lymphocyte subset after T cells and B cells. In this study, we perform an unbiased linkage analysis to determine the genetic loci that may limit the size of the NK cell compartment. Specifically, we exploit differences in NK cell proportion and absolute number between the C57BL/6 and the NOD mice. In addition to the previously identified linkage to chromosome 8, we find that a locus on chromosome 17, which encompasses the MHC locus, impacts NK cell number. Moreover, we identify a locus on mouse chromosome 9 that is strongly linked to the proportion and absolute number of NK cells. Using NOD congenic mice, we validate that both the MHC and the chromosome 9 loci influence the proportion and absolute number of NK cells. We have thus identified additional loci specifically linked to the proportion of NK cells and present some of the potential candidate genes comprised within these loci.

  9. Mechanisms of Type 2 Diabetes Risk Loci.

    PubMed

    Gaulton, Kyle J

    2017-09-01

    Deciphering the mechanisms of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) risk loci can greatly inform on disease pathology. This review discusses current knowledge of mechanisms through which genetic variants influence T2DM risk and considerations for future studies. Over 100 T2DM risk loci to date have been identified. Candidate causal variants at risk loci map predominantly to non-coding sequence. Physiological, epigenomic and gene expression data suggest that variants at many known T2DM risk loci affect pancreatic islet regulation, although variants at other loci also affect protein function and regulatory processes in adipose, pre-adipose, liver, skeletal muscle and brain. The effects of T2DM variants on regulatory activity in these tissues appear largely, but not exclusively, due to altered transcription factor binding. Putative target genes of T2DM variants have been defined at an increasing number of loci and some, such as FTO, may entail several genes and multiple tissues. Gene networks in islets and adipocytes have been implicated in T2DM risk, although the molecular pathways of risk genes remain largely undefined. Efforts to fully define the mechanisms of T2DM risk loci are just beginning. Continued identification of risk mechanisms will benefit from combining genetic fine-mapping with detailed phenotypic association data, high-throughput epigenomics data from diabetes-relevant tissue, functional screening of candidate genes and genome editing of cellular and animal models.

  10. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A.; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K.; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V.; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S.; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chung, Wendy K.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C.; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M.; Eccles, Diana M.; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B.; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gayther, Simon A.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G.; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Goldgar, David E.; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H.; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E.; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hopper, John L.; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J.; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y.; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Knight, Julia A.; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L.; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E.; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W. M.; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L.; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M.; Muranen, Taru A.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K.; Peeters, Petra H.; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B.; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E.; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Monteiro, Alvaro A. N.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10−8) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. PMID:27117709

  11. High-density genetic mapping identifies new susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Diogo, Dorothée; Lee, Annette; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli; Viatte, Sebastien; McAllister, Kate; Amos, Christopher I; Padyukov, Leonid; Toes, Rene E M; Huizinga, Tom W J; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hu, Xinli; Sandor, Cynthia; de Bakker, Paul I W; Davila, Sonia; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heng, Khai Koon; Andrews, Robert; Edkins, Sarah; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Symmons, Deborah; Concannon, Pat; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S; Deloukas, Panos; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlsetig, Lisbeth; Martin, Javier; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Plenge, Robert M; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane

    2012-12-01

    Using the Immunochip custom SNP array, which was designed for dense genotyping of 186 loci identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we analyzed 11,475 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (cases) of European ancestry and 15,870 controls for 129,464 markers. We combined these data in a meta-analysis with GWAS data from additional independent cases (n = 2,363) and controls (n = 17,872). We identified 14 new susceptibility loci, 9 of which were associated with rheumatoid arthritis overall and five of which were specifically associated with disease that was positive for anticitrullinated peptide antibodies, bringing the number of confirmed rheumatoid arthritis risk loci in individuals of European ancestry to 46. We refined the peak of association to a single gene for 19 loci, identified secondary independent effects at 6 loci and identified association to low-frequency variants at 4 loci. Bioinformatic analyses generated strong hypotheses for the causal SNP at seven loci. This study illustrates the advantages of dense SNP mapping analysis to inform subsequent functional investigations.

  12. High density genetic mapping identifies new susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Diogo, Dorothée; Lee, Annette; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli; Viatte, Sebastien; McAllister, Kate; Amos, Christopher I.; Padyukov, Leonid; Toes, Rene E.M.; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hu, Xinli; Sandor, Cynthia; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Davila, Sonia; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heng, Khai Koon; Andrews, Robert; Edkins, Sarah; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Symmons, Deborah; Concannon, Pat; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S; Deloukas, Panos; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlsetig, Lisbeth; Martin, Javier; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Plenge, Robert; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Summary Using the Immunochip custom single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, designed for dense genotyping of 186 genome wide association study (GWAS) confirmed loci we analysed 11,475 rheumatoid arthritis cases of European ancestry and 15,870 controls for 129,464 markers. The data were combined in meta-analysis with GWAS data from additional independent cases (n=2,363) and controls (n=17,872). We identified fourteen novel loci; nine were associated with rheumatoid arthritis overall and 5 specifically in anti-citrillunated peptide antibody positive disease, bringing the number of confirmed European ancestry rheumatoid arthritis loci to 46. We refined the peak of association to a single gene for 19 loci, identified secondary independent effects at six loci and association to low frequency variants (minor allele frequency <0.05) at 4 loci. Bioinformatic analysis of the data generated strong hypotheses for the causal SNP at seven loci. This study illustrates the advantages of dense SNP mapping analysis to inform subsequent functional investigations. PMID:23143596

  13. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-04-27

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction.

  14. Design III with Marker Loci

    PubMed Central

    Cockerham, C. C.; Zeng, Z. B.

    1996-01-01

    Design III is an experimental design originally proposed by R. E. COMSTOCK and H. F. ROBINSON for estimating genetic variances and the average degree of dominance for quantitative trait loci (QTL) and has recently been extended for mapping QTL. In this paper, we first extend COMSTOCK and ROBINSON's analysis of variance to include linkage, two-locus epistasis and the use of F(3) parents. Then we develop the theory and statistical analysis of orthogonal contrasts and contrast X environment interaction for a single marker locus to characterize the effects of QTL. The methods are applied to the maize data of C. W. STUBER. The analyses strongly suggest that there are multiple linked QTL in many chromosomes for several traits examined. QTL effects are largely environment-independent for grain yield, ear height, plant height and ear leaf area and largely environment dependent for days to tassel, grain moisture and ear number. There is significant QTL epistasis. The results are generally in favor of the hypothesis of dominance of favorable genes to explain the observed heterosis in grain yield and other traits, although epistasis could also play an important role and overdominance at individual QTL level can not be ruled out. PMID:8807314

  15. Interaction of immune lymphocytes with the mixtures of target cells possessing selected specificities of the H-2 immunizing allele

    PubMed Central

    Brondz, B. D.; Snegiröva, Antonina E.

    1971-01-01

    Optimum conditions have been found for a specific quantitative absorption of mouse lymphocytes on to allogeneic target cells. Using this technique, it has been established that C3H anti-A lymphocytes immune to the specificities of a single H-2 sub-locus (D) were absorbed neither on cells bearing only some of the components of the immunizing complex (DBA/1 and I/St targets) nor on their mixture. Conversely, C57BL anti-A lymphocytes immune to the specificities of two H-2 sub-loci (D and K) reacted separately with each of the components on corresponding third-party targets (B10.D2(H-2d) and C3H (H-2k) as shown both by the direct cytotoxic effect and by the quantitative absorption technique. The results of absorption of these lymphocytes on mixtures of B10.D2 and C3H target cells used in various proportions indicate that C57BL anti-A lymphocytes represent a mixture of two `polyvalent' populations in ratio of 1:3. This, together with the previous data indicates that `committed' lymphocytes may be `polyvalent' and that the initial recognition step of H-2 antigens may result from a direct contact between membranes of grafted cells and `unprimed' host lymphocytes. Structural matching of the membrane antigenic complex and of normal and immune lymphocytes is suggested as a decisive factor of immunological recognition initiation in a transplantation context. PMID:5553067

  16. Proteolysis of lymphocytic surface immunoglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Hough, D W; McIlroy, B M; Stevenson, G T

    1977-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of lymphocytic surface immunoglobulins in guinea-pig, rabbit and man was investigated by immunofluorescence using conjugated antisera specific for immunoglobulin fragments. The cell surface IgM of guinea pig L2C leukaemic lymphocytes and rabbit blood lymphocytes was cleaved in situ at its hinge region by papain. The Fcmicron fragment remained attached to the membrane and could be stained with the appropriate anti-Fc conjugate. The surface IgD and IgM of human chronic lymphocytic leukaemia cells was cleared from the cell surface by papain, as shown by reagents directed against both Fab and Fc region determinants. This could be due either to proteolytic degradation of membrane bound Fc or to initial cleavage of Ig from the membrane at some point other than the hinge region. PMID:321347

  17. Quantifying T Lymphocyte Turnover

    PubMed Central

    De Boer, Rob J.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral T cell populations are maintained by production of naive T cells in the thymus, clonal expansion of activated cells, cellular self-renewal (or homeostatic proliferation), and density dependent cell life spans. A variety of experimental techniques have been employed to quantify the relative contributions of these processes. In modern studies lymphocytes are typically labeled with 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU), deuterium, or the fluorescent dye carboxy-fluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE), their division history has been studied by monitoring telomere shortening and the dilution of T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) or the dye CFSE, and clonal expansion has been documented by recording changes in the population densities of antigen specific cells. Proper interpretation of such data in terms of the underlying rates of T cell production, division, and death has proven to be notoriously difficult and involves mathematical modeling. We review the various models that have been developed for each of these techniques, discuss which models seem most appropriate for what type of data, reveal open problems that require better models, and pinpoint how the assumptions underlying a mathematical model may influence the interpretation of data. Elaborating various successful cases where modeling has delivered new insights in T cell population dynamics, this review provides quantitative estimates of several processes involved in the maintenance of naive and memory, CD4+ and CD8+ T cell pools in mice and men. PMID:23313150

  18. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Marina; Wierda, William G.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Patients with purine analogue-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have short survival and limited treatment options. Defining the best salvage strategies for this population is challenging, because limited data are available from clinical trials, and because studies have enrolled mixed populations (patients with recurrent and refractory disease or patients with refractory disease and Richter transformation). Moreover, patients with refractory CLL have a high incidence of unfavorable molecular and clinical features, such as high-risk genomic profiles, unmutated immunoglobulin heavy-chain genes, expression of zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70, and bulky lymphadenopathies. These patients are also severely immunosuppressed because of the underlying disease and the treatments received, and experience a high rate of infectious complications that pose an additional difficulty in selecting treatment. Despite these challenges, in parallel with better characterizations of the biologic features of refractory CLL, the number of available treatment modalities for this population has increased. Several chemoimmunotherapy combinations have been developed, and novel agents with a different mechanism of action are being investigated in clinical trials. Furthermore, allogeneic stem cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens is a therapeutic strategy that is increasingly offered to patients with refractory CLL. PMID:19536902

  19. Molecular genomics resource for the parasitic nematode Spirocerca lupi: Identification of 149 microsatellite loci using FIASCO and next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Reid, Kerry; Mitha, Janishtha R; Greeff, Jaco M; de Waal, Pamela J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding genetic diversity and movement patterns in parasitic organisms is paramount to establish control and management strategies. In this study we developed a microsatellite resource as well as a diagnostic multiplex for the cosmopolitan parasitic nematode Spirocerca lupi, known to cause spirocercosis in canids. A combination of microsatellite enrichment and 454 sequencing was used to identify 149 unique microsatellite loci in S. lupi. Twenty loci were characterized further in two sampling sites in South Africa, with 10 loci identified as polymorphic (allele ranges from 4 to 17). These loci were designed into a single diagnostic multiplex suitable for species identification and population genetics studies. The markers were also successful in cross-species amplification in Cylicospirura felineus, Philonema oncorhynchi and Gongylonema pulchrum. Our resource provides a large set of candidate loci for a number of nematode studies as well as loci suitable for diversity and population genetics studies of S. lupi within the South African context as well as globally.

  20. Multiple loci on 8q24 associated with prostate cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Giles, Graham G; Guy, Michelle; Morrison, Jonathan; Severi, Gianluca; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Jhavar, Sameer; Saunders, Ed; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Muir, Kenneth R; English, Dallas R; Dearnaley, David P; Ardern-Jones, Audrey T; Hall, Amanda L; O'Brien, Lynne T; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Sawyer, Emma; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A; Khoo, Vincent S; Parker, Christopher C; Woodhouse, Christopher J; Thompson, Alan; Christmas, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Cooper, Colin; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Neal, David E; Eeles, Rosalind A; Easton, Douglas F

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies have identified multiple loci on 8q24 associated with prostate cancer risk. We performed a comprehensive analysis of SNP associations across 8q24 by genotyping tag SNPs in 5,504 prostate cancer cases and 5,834 controls. We confirmed associations at three previously reported loci and identified additional loci in two other linkage disequilibrium blocks (rs1006908: per-allele OR = 0.87, P = 7.9 x 10(-8); rs620861: OR = 0.90, P = 4.8 x 10(-8)). Eight SNPs in five linkage disequilibrium blocks were independently associated with prostate cancer susceptibility.

  1. T lymphocytes infiltration promotes blood-brain barrier injury after experimental intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Wei; Yuan, Jichao; Zhu, Haitao; Yang, Yang; Wen, Zexian; Chen, Yaxing; Li, Lan; Lin, Jiangkai; Feng, Hua

    2017-09-01

    T lymphocytes migrate into the brain after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and promote cerebral inflammation, thus exacerbating neuronal injury. However, the relationship between of T lymphocytes infiltration and blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury after ICH has not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the spatial-temporal distribution of infiltrating T lymphocytes after ICH in C57BL/6 mice by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, and the accompanying change rules of BBB permeability were detected by Evans blue dye leakage and tight junction protein expression. Furthermore, T lymphocyte-deficient nude mice and T lymphocyte-decreased C57BL/6 mice treated with fingolimod were used to verify the relationship between T lymphocytes infiltration and BBB leakage after ICH. Here, we reported that brain-infiltrating T lymphocytes in the hemorrhagic hemisphere began to accumulate on the first day and peaked on the fifth day after ICH; BBB leakage also at peaked on the fifth day. Moreover, T lymphocyte-deficient nude mice showed minor BBB leakage after ICH compared with C57BL/6 control mice. Similarly, fingolimod treatment can significantly decrease T lymphocyte infiltration and promote BBB integrity compared with a vehicle control. Overall, our results suggested that suppression of T lymphocyte infiltration may be a novel way to improve BBB integrity after ICH. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Immunochip Analysis Identifies Multiple Susceptibility Loci for Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, Maureen D.; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Gorlova, Olga; Martin, José Ezequiel; Zhou, Xiaodong; Chen, Wei V.; Assassi, Shervin; Ying, Jun; Tan, Filemon K.; Arnett, Frank C.; Reveille, John D.; Guerra, Sandra; Teruel, María; Carmona, Francisco David; Gregersen, Peter K.; Lee, Annette T.; López-Isac, Elena; Ochoa, Eguzkine; Carreira, Patricia; Simeón, Carmen Pilar; Castellví, Iván; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Ríos, Raquel; Callejas, José Luis; Navarrete, Nuria; García Portales, Rosa; Camps, María Teresa; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; González-Escribano, María F.; Sánchez-Román, Julio; García-Hernández, Francisco José; Castillo, María Jesús; Aguirre, María Ángeles; Gómez-Gracia, Inmaculada; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Vicente, Esther; Andreu, José Luis; Fernández de Castro, Mónica; García de la Peña, Paloma; López-Longo, Francisco Javier; Martínez, Lina; Fonollosa, Vicente; Espinosa, Gerard; Tolosa, Carlos; Pros, Anna; Rodríguez Carballeira, Mónica; Narváez, Francisco Javier; Rubio Rivas, Manel; Ortiz Santamaría, Vera; Díaz, Bernardino; Trapiella, Luis; Freire, María del Carmen; Sousa, Adrián; Egurbide, María Victoria; Fanlo Mateo, Patricia; Sáez-Comet, Luis; Díaz, Federico; Hernández, Vanesa; Beltrán, Emma; Román-Ivorra, José Andrés; Grau, Elena; Alegre Sancho, Juan José; Blanco García, Francisco J.; Oreiro, Natividad; Fernández Sueiro, Luis; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Padyukov, Leonid; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Wijmenga, Cisca; Brown, Matthew; Beretta, Lorenzo; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jörg H.W.; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Schuerwegh, Annemie J.; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Airó, Paolo; Lunardi, Claudio; Shiels, Paul; van Laar, Jacob M.; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Hummers, Laura K.; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique E.; Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Pope, Janet E.; Furst, Daniel E.; Khanna, Dinesh; Phillips, Kristin; Schiopu, Elena; Segal, Barbara M.; Molitor, Jerry A.; Silver, Richard M.; Steen, Virginia D.; Simms, Robert W.; Lafyatis, Robert A.; Fessler, Barri J.; Frech, Tracy M.; AlKassab, Firas; Docherty, Peter; Kaminska, Elzbieta; Khalidi, Nader; Jones, Henry Niall; Markland, Janet; Robinson, David; Broen, Jasper; Radstake, Timothy R.D.J.; Fonseca, Carmen; Koeleman, Bobby P.; Martin, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 1,833 systemic sclerosis (SSc) cases and 3,466 controls were genotyped with the Immunochip array. Classical alleles, amino acid residues, and SNPs across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region were imputed and tested. These analyses resulted in a model composed of six polymorphic amino acid positions and seven SNPs that explained the observed significant associations in the region. In addition, a replication step comprising 4,017 SSc cases and 5,935 controls was carried out for several selected non-HLA variants, reaching a total of 5,850 cases and 9,401 controls of European ancestry. Following this strategy, we identified and validated three SSc risk loci, including DNASE1L3 at 3p14, the SCHIP1-IL12A locus at 3q25, and ATG5 at 6q21, as well as a suggested association of the TREH-DDX6 locus at 11q23. The associations of several previously reported SSc risk loci were validated and further refined, and the observed peak of association in PXK was related to DNASE1L3. Our study has increased the number of known genetic associations with SSc, provided further insight into the pleiotropic effects of shared autoimmune risk factors, and highlighted the power of dense mapping for detecting previously overlooked susceptibility loci. PMID:24387989

  3. Immunochip analysis identifies multiple susceptibility loci for systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Maureen D; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Gorlova, Olga; Martin, José Ezequiel; Zhou, Xiaodong; Chen, Wei V; Assassi, Shervin; Ying, Jun; Tan, Filemon K; Arnett, Frank C; Reveille, John D; Guerra, Sandra; Teruel, María; Carmona, Francisco David; Gregersen, Peter K; Lee, Annette T; López-Isac, Elena; Ochoa, Eguzkine; Carreira, Patricia; Simeón, Carmen Pilar; Castellví, Iván; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Padyukov, Leonid; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Wijmenga, Cisca; Brown, Matthew; Beretta, Lorenzo; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jörg H W; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Schuerwegh, Annemie J; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Airó, Paolo; Lunardi, Claudio; Shiels, Paul; van Laar, Jacob M; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher; Wigley, Fredrick M; Hummers, Laura K; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique E; Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Pope, Janet E; Furst, Daniel E; Khanna, Dinesh; Phillips, Kristin; Schiopu, Elena; Segal, Barbara M; Molitor, Jerry A; Silver, Richard M; Steen, Virginia D; Simms, Robert W; Lafyatis, Robert A; Fessler, Barri J; Frech, Tracy M; Alkassab, Firas; Docherty, Peter; Kaminska, Elzbieta; Khalidi, Nader; Jones, Henry Niall; Markland, Janet; Robinson, David; Broen, Jasper; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Fonseca, Carmen; Koeleman, Bobby P; Martin, Javier

    2014-01-02

    In this study, 1,833 systemic sclerosis (SSc) cases and 3,466 controls were genotyped with the Immunochip array. Classical alleles, amino acid residues, and SNPs across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region were imputed and tested. These analyses resulted in a model composed of six polymorphic amino acid positions and seven SNPs that explained the observed significant associations in the region. In addition, a replication step comprising 4,017 SSc cases and 5,935 controls was carried out for several selected non-HLA variants, reaching a total of 5,850 cases and 9,401 controls of European ancestry. Following this strategy, we identified and validated three SSc risk loci, including DNASE1L3 at 3p14, the SCHIP1-IL12A locus at 3q25, and ATG5 at 6q21, as well as a suggested association of the TREH-DDX6 locus at 11q23. The associations of several previously reported SSc risk loci were validated and further refined, and the observed peak of association in PXK was related to DNASE1L3. Our study has increased the number of known genetic associations with SSc, provided further insight into the pleiotropic effects of shared autoimmune risk factors, and highlighted the power of dense mapping for detecting previously overlooked susceptibility loci.

  4. Initiation of lymphocyte DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Coffman, F D; Fresa, K L; Cohen, S

    1991-01-01

    The initiation of DNA replication in T lymphocytes appears to be regulated by two distinct activities: one associated with proliferation which mediates initiation, and another associated with quiescence which blocks initiation. Activated lymphocytes and proliferating lymphoid cell lines produce an activity, termed ADR, which can initiate DNA replication in isolated, quiescent nuclei. ADR is heat-labile, has protease activity or interacts closely with a protease, and is distinct from the DNA polymerases. ADR activity is absent in quiescent lymphocytes and appears in mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes after IL-2 binding. The generation of active ADR appears to be mediated by phosphorylation of a precursor which is present in resting cells. Nuclei from mitogen-unresponsive lymphocytes fail to initiate DNA replication in response to ADR, of potential importance in the age-related decline of immunity. Quiescent lymphocytes lack ADR and synthesize an ADR-inhibitory activity. The ADR inhibitor is a heat-stable protein which suppresses the initiation of DNA synthesis, but is ineffective at suppressing elongation once DNA strand replication has begun. Nuclei from several neoplastic cell lines fail to respond to the ADR inhibitor, which may play a role in the continuous proliferation of these cells. At least one of these neoplastic cell lines produces both ADR and an inhibitory factor. These findings suggest that the regulation of proliferation is dependent on the balance between activating and inhibitory pathways.

  5. Overlap of disease susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hinks, Anne; Eyre, Steve; Ke, Xiayi; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Packham, Jon; Worthington, Jane; Thomson, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been extremely successful in the search for susceptibility risk factors for complex genetic autoimmune diseases. As more studies are published, evidence is emerging of considerable overlap of loci between these diseases. In juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), another complex genetic autoimmune disease, the strategy of using information from autoimmune disease GWAS or candidate gene studies to help in the search for novel JIA susceptibility loci has been successful, with confirmed association with two genes, PTPN22 and IL2RA. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that shares similar clinical and pathological features with JIA and, therefore, recently identified confirmed RA susceptibility loci are also excellent JIA candidate loci. Objective To determine the overlap of disease susceptibility loci for RA and JIA. Methods Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at nine RA-associated loci were genotyped in Caucasian patients with JIA (n=1054) and controls (n=3531) and tested for association with JIA. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared between cases and controls using the genetic analysis software, PLINK. Results Two JIA susceptibility loci were identified, one of which was a novel JIA association (STAT4) and the second confirmed previously published associations of the TRAF1/C5 locus with JIA. Weak evidence of association of JIA with three additional loci (Chr6q23, KIF5A and PRKCQ) was also obtained, which warrants further investigation. Conclusion All these loci are good candidates in view of the known pathogenesis of JIA, as genes within these regions (TRAF1, STAT4, TNFAIP3, PRKCQ) are known to be involved in T-cell receptor signalling or activation pathways. PMID:19674979

  6. Microgravity and Cellular Consequences in Lymphocyte Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Sundaresan, Alamelu

    2004-01-01

    Mammalian cells adapt to the environment of low gravity and express a series of responses, some possibly from direct effects on cells and others based on environmental conditions created by microgravity. Human lymphocytes in microgravity culture are functionally diminished in activation and locomotion. Both processes are integral to optimal immune response to fight pathogens. The NASA Rotating-wall vessel (RWV) is a well-accepted analog for microgravity culture on the ground. Gene array experiments and immunoblotting identified upstream events in human lymphocytes adapting to microgravity analog culture. Microgravity induces selective changes, many of which are cell membrane related. Results showed that upstream of PKC in the T cell activation cascade, PLC-gamma and LAT are significantly diminished. ZAP 70 which controls LAT activation is also down regulated in modeled microgravity. Thus events governing cell shape might warrant attention in microgravity conditions. The goal of this study is to delineate response suites that are consequential, direct or indirect effects of the microgravity environment and which of these are essential to lymphocytes

  7. Microgravity and Cellular Consequences in Lymphocyte Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Sundaresan, Alamelu

    2004-01-01

    Mammalian cells adapt to the environment of low gravity and express a series of responses, some possibly from direct effects on cells and others based on environmental conditions created by microgravity. Human lymphocytes in microgravity culture are functionally diminished in activation and locomotion. Both processes are integral to optimal immune response to fight pathogens. The NASA Rotating-wall vessel (RWV) is a well-accepted analog for microgravity culture on the ground. Gene array experiments and immunoblotting identified upstream events in human lymphocytes adapting to microgravity analog culture. Microgravity induces selective changes, many of which are cell membrane related. Results showed that upstream of PKC in the T cell activation cascade, PLC-gamma and LAT are significantly diminished. ZAP 70 which controls LAT activation is also down regulated in modeled microgravity. Thus events governing cell shape might warrant attention in microgravity conditions. The goal of this study is to delineate response suites that are consequential, direct or indirect effects of the microgravity environment and which of these are essential to lymphocytes

  8. Sudden unexpected death associated with lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Vibeke; Drostrup, Dorthe Høj; Thomsen, Jørgen L

    2007-04-01

    A forensic autopsy study comprising 125 cases was carried out retrospectively in order to evaluate pathological changes in the thyroid gland in different groups of death. The five groups selected consecutively were: (i) opiate addicts who died from an overdose, (ii) alcoholics who died as a result of their alcohol abuse, (iii) cases of fatal poisoning other than opiate addicts, (iv) unknown cause of death and (v) controls without prior disease. Tissue samples from the thyroid gland were cut and stained with haematoxylin and eosin and van Gieson. Histology examinations were subsequently performed blind with semiquantitative assessment of the following six parameters: (a) height of the follicular epithelium, (b) the amount of lymphocytes, (c) the presence of plasma cells, (d) hyperplastic follicular changes, (e) oxyphilic changes, and (f) fibrosis. The most striking result was the finding of extensive lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid parenchyma in five of the 124 cases, of which four belonged in the group of 'unknown cause of death'. This discovery leads to reflections regarding lymphocytic thyroiditis as a cause of death, either by itself or in combination with other disorders. Silent (painless) thyroiditis, especially, is easily overlooked at autopsy as there are no macroscopic changes and often no prior symptoms or history of thyroid disease pointing towards this condition. Analyses of thyroid hormones are unreliable in predicting endocrine status in life. Routine microscopy of the thyroid gland is therefore advocated in cases of sudden unexpected death in order to diagnose thyroid disease, in particular silent (painless) thyroiditis.

  9. High density genotyping study identifies four new susceptibility loci for atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ellinghaus, David; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Rodríguez, Elke; Matanovic, Anja; Marenholz, Ingo; Hübner, Norbert; Schaarschmidt, Heidi; Novak, Natalija; Michel, Sven; Maintz, Laura; Werfel, Thomas; Meyer-Hoffert, Ulf; Hotze, Melanie; Prokisch, Holger; Heim, Katharina; Herder, Christian; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Tamari, Mayumi; Kubo, Michiaki; Takahashi, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tsoi, Lam C; Stuart, Philip; Elder, James T; Sun, Liangdan; Zuo, Xianbo; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Xuejun; Hoffmann, Per; Nöthen, Markus M; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Winkelmann, Juliane; Illig, Thomas; Boehm, Bernhard O; Duerr, Richard H; Büning, Carsten; Brand, Stephan; Glas, Jürgen; McAleer, Maeve A; Fahy, Caoimhe M; Kabesch, Michael; Brown, Sara J; McLean, WH Irwin; Irvine, Alan D; Schreiber, Stefan; Lee, Young-Ae; Franke, Andre; Weidinger, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disease with a strong heritable component. Pathogenetic models consider keratinocyte differentiation defects and immune alterations as scaffolds1, and recent data indicate a role for autoreactivity in at least a subgroup of patients2. With filaggrin (FLG) a major locus causing a skin barrier deficiency was identified3. To better define risk variants and identify additional susceptibility loci, we densely genotyped 2,425 German cases and 5,449 controls using the Immunochip array, followed by replication in 7,196 cases and 15,480 controls from Germany, Ireland, Japan and China. We identified 4 new susceptibility loci for atopic dermatitis and replicated previous associations. This brings the number of atopic dermatitis risk loci reported in individuals of European ancestry to 11. We estimate that these susceptibility loci together account for 14.4% of the heritability for atopic dermatitis. PMID:23727859

  10. A comparison of the neutrophil-lymphocyte, platelet-lymphocyte and monocyte-lymphocyte ratios in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients - a retrospective file review.

    PubMed

    Özdin, Selçuk; Sarisoy, Gökhan; Böke, Ömer

    2017-10-01

    Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and monocyte-lymphocyte ratio (MLR) have recently been used as indicators of inflammation. Higher MLR and PLR values have been determined in the euthymic and manic periods in patients with bipolar disorder compared to a control group. High NLR values were determined in the only study investigating this ratio in schizophrenia patients. The purpose of this study was to compare NLR, PLR and MLR values and complete blood count elements in patients receiving treatment and hospitalized due to schizophrenic psychotic episode and bipolar disorder manic episode. All patients meeting the inclusion criteria among subjects receiving treatment and hospitalized due to schizophrenia-psychotic episode and bipolar affective disorder-manic episode at the Ondokuz Mayıs University Medical Faculty Psychiatry Department, Turkey, in 2012-2016 were included in our study. A total of 157 healthy donors were included as a control group. White blood cell (WBC), neutrophil, lymphocyte, platelet and monocyte numbers were noted retrospectively from complete blood counts at time of admission, and NLR, PLR and MLR were calculated from these. NLR, PLR and MLR values and platelet numbers in this study were higher and lymphocyte numbers were lower in bipolar disorder patients compared to the controls. Elevation in NLR, MLR and PLR values and neutrophil numbers and lower lymphocyte numbers were determined in schizophrenia patients compared to the controls. Higher NLR and MLR values were found in schizophrenia patients compared to bipolar disorder. Findings of our study supported the inflammation hypothesis for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

  11. Loci-STREAM Version 0.9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Jeffrey; Thakur, Siddharth

    2006-01-01

    Loci-STREAM is an evolving computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software tool for simulating possibly chemically reacting, possibly unsteady flows in diverse settings, including rocket engines, turbomachines, oil refineries, etc. Loci-STREAM implements a pressure- based flow-solving algorithm that utilizes unstructured grids. (The benefit of low memory usage by pressure-based algorithms is well recognized by experts in the field.) The algorithm is robust for flows at all speeds from zero to hypersonic. The flexibility of arbitrary polyhedral grids enables accurate, efficient simulation of flows in complex geometries, including those of plume-impingement problems. The present version - Loci-STREAM version 0.9 - includes an interface with the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) library for access to enhanced linear-equation-solving programs therein that accelerate convergence toward a solution. The name "Loci" reflects the creation of this software within the Loci computational framework, which was developed at Mississippi State University for the primary purpose of simplifying the writing of complex multidisciplinary application programs to run in distributed-memory computing environments including clusters of personal computers. Loci has been designed to relieve application programmers of the details of programming for distributed-memory computers.

  12. Regulation of lymphocyte progenitor survival by the proapoptotic activities of Bim and Bid.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Malay; Crusio, Kelly M; Meng, Fanyong; Liu, Suqing; Kinsella, Marcus; Clark, Marcus R; Takeuchi, Osamu; Aifantis, Iannis

    2008-12-30

    On their entry into the thymus, developing lymphocyte progenitors depend on signaling from the pre-T cell receptor (pre-TCR), which orchestrates differentiation, cell proliferation, and survival. The exact mechanism of pre-TCR-mediated suppression of T cell death remains unclear and controversial. Here, we identify Bim and Bid, 2 members of the BH3-only group of the BCL2 family, as important regulators of pre-T cell death. Both factors are highly expressed in proapoptotic thymocytes and their expression is suppressed on signaling through the pre-TCR. Their expression is directly regulated by the transcription factors FoxO3a and p53. Bid expression and p53 activity are related to the ongoing rearrangement of the TCR loci and induced DNA damage responses. Bim expression and FoxO3a nuclear translocation are directly controlled by the pre-TCR by means of its downstream kinase Akt/PKB. Interestingly, deletion of either gene on a pre-TCR(-/-) background rescues survival, but fails to induce further progenitor differentiation uncoupling the 2 processes.

  13. Regulation of lymphocyte progenitor survival by the proapoptotic activities of Bim and Bid

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Malay; Crusio, Kelly M.; Meng, Fanyong; Liu, Suqing; Kinsella, Marcus; Clark, Marcus R.; Takeuchi, Osamu; Aifantis, Iannis

    2008-01-01

    On their entry into the thymus, developing lymphocyte progenitors depend on signaling from the pre-T cell receptor (pre-TCR), which orchestrates differentiation, cell proliferation, and survival. The exact mechanism of pre-TCR-mediated suppression of T cell death remains unclear and controversial. Here, we identify Bim and Bid, 2 members of the BH3-only group of the BCL2 family, as important regulators of pre-T cell death. Both factors are highly expressed in proapoptotic thymocytes and their expression is suppressed on signaling through the pre-TCR. Their expression is directly regulated by the transcription factors FoxO3a and p53. Bid expression and p53 activity are related to the ongoing rearrangement of the TCR loci and induced DNA damage responses. Bim expression and FoxO3a nuclear translocation are directly controlled by the pre-TCR by means of its downstream kinase Akt/PKB. Interestingly, deletion of either gene on a pre-TCR−/− background rescues survival, but fails to induce further progenitor differentiation uncoupling the 2 processes. PMID:19088189

  14. Seven New Loci Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness in older individuals. To accelerate understanding of AMD biology and help design new therapies, we executed a collaborative genomewide association study, examining >17,100 advanced AMD cases and >60,000 controls of European and Asian ancestry. We identified 19 genomic loci associated with AMD with p<5×10−8 and enriched for genes involved in regulation of complement activity, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. Our results include 7 loci reaching p<5×10−8 for the first time, near the genes COL8A1/FILIP1L, IER3/DDR1, SLC16A8, TGFBR1, RAD51B, ADAMTS9/MIR548A2, and B3GALTL. A genetic risk score combining SNPs from all loci displayed similar good ability to distinguish cases and controls in all samples examined. Our findings provide new directions for biological, genetic and therapeutic studies of AMD. PMID:23455636

  15. New basal cell carcinoma susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Simon N; Helgason, Hannes; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zink, Florian; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Kehr, Birte; Gudmundsson, Julius; Sulem, Patrick; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Corredera, Cristina; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Grasa, Matilde; Planelles, Dolores; Sanmartin, Onofre; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Nexø, Bjørn A; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Jonasson, Jon G; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Kristinsdottir, Anna M; Stefansson, Hreinn; Masson, Gisli; Magnusson, Olafur T; Halldorsson, Bjarni V; Kong, Augustine; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Vogel, Ulla; Kumar, Rajiv; Nagore, Eduardo; Mayordomo, José I; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Olafsson, Jon H; Stefansson, Kari

    2015-04-09

    In an ongoing screen for DNA sequence variants that confer risk of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 24,988,228 SNPs and small indels detected through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders and imputed into 4,572 BCC patients and 266,358 controls. Here we show the discovery of four new BCC susceptibility loci: 2p24 MYCN (rs57244888[C], OR=0.76, P=4.7 × 10(-12)), 2q33 CASP8-ALS2CR12 (rs13014235[C], OR=1.15, P=1.5 × 10(-9)), 8q21 ZFHX4 (rs28727938[G], OR=0.70, P=3.5 × 10(-12)) and 10p14 GATA3 (rs73635312[A], OR=0.74, P=2.4 × 10(-16)). Fine mapping reveals that two variants correlated with rs73635312[A] occur in conserved binding sites for the GATA3 transcription factor. In addition, expression microarrays and RNA-seq show that rs13014235[C] and a related SNP rs700635[C] are associated with expression of CASP8 splice variants in which sequences from intron 8 are retained.

  16. New basal cell carcinoma susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Simon N.; Helgason, Hannes; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zink, Florian; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Kehr, Birte; Gudmundsson, Julius; Sulem, Patrick; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R.; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Corredera, Cristina; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Grasa, Matilde; Planelles, Dolores; Sanmartin, Onofre; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Nexø, Bjørn A.; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Jonasson, Jon G.; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Kristinsdottir, Anna M.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Masson, Gisli; Magnusson, Olafur T.; Halldorsson, Bjarni V.; Kong, Augustine; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Vogel, Ulla; Kumar, Rajiv; Nagore, Eduardo; Mayordomo, José I.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Olafsson, Jon H.; Stefansson, Kari

    2015-01-01

    In an ongoing screen for DNA sequence variants that confer risk of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 24,988,228 SNPs and small indels detected through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders and imputed into 4,572 BCC patients and 266,358 controls. Here we show the discovery of four new BCC susceptibility loci: 2p24 MYCN (rs57244888[C], OR=0.76, P=4.7 × 10−12), 2q33 CASP8-ALS2CR12 (rs13014235[C], OR=1.15, P=1.5 × 10−9), 8q21 ZFHX4 (rs28727938[G], OR=0.70, P=3.5 × 10−12) and 10p14 GATA3 (rs73635312[A], OR=0.74, P=2.4 × 10−16). Fine mapping reveals that two variants correlated with rs73635312[A] occur in conserved binding sites for the GATA3 transcription factor. In addition, expression microarrays and RNA-seq show that rs13014235[C] and a related SNP rs700635[C] are associated with expression of CASP8 splice variants in which sequences from intron 8 are retained. PMID:25855136

  17. [Effects of indium on micronucleus formation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; Hui, Changye; Zhang, Liuzhuo; Wang, Lili; Wang, Dianpeng; Yang, Xueqin; Yang, Xinyue; Li, Zhimin

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the cytotoxicity of indium chloride (InCl₃) and its effects on micro-nucleus formation in primary human lymphocytes cultured in vitro. The CCK-8 assay was used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of 24 h exposure to different concentrations of InCl₃(4, 40, 80, 200, 500, and 1 000 µmol/L) in lymphocytes cultured in vitro. The cytokinesis-block method was used to determine the micronucleus level in lymphocytes exposed to different concentrations of InCl₃and the effects of anti-oxidant vitamin C on micronucleus frequency. Lymphocytes exposed to InCl₃of no less than 500 µmol/L had significantly lower survival rates than those in the control group (P < 0.05). Lymphocytes exposed to 80 µmol/L InCl₃had a significantly higher micronucleus frequency than those in the control group (P < 0.05). However, there was no further increase in micronucleus frequency of lymphocytes exposed to 200 µmol/L InCl₃. Lymphocytes cultured in whole blood and exposed to 500 or 1000 µmol/L InCl₃had a significantly increased micronucleus frequency than those in the control group (P < 0.001). The increase in micronucleus frequency of lymphocytes induced by indium could be partially antagonized by 20 or 100 µmol/L vitamin C. InCl₃can induce an increase in micronucleus frequency of primary human lymphocytes cultured in vitro, which might be associated with DNA damage induced by oxidative stress.

  18. Identification of Susceptibility Loci and Genes for Colorectal Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chenjie; Matsuda, Koichi; Jia, Wei-Hua; Chang, Jiang; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Shin, Aesun; Jee, Sun Ha; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Zhang, Ben; Cai, Qiuyin; Guo, Xingyi; Long, Jirong; Wang, Nan; Courtney, Regina; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Wu, Chen; Takahashi, Atsushi; Shin, Min-Ho; Matsuo, Keitaro; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Gao, Yu-Tang; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Soriul; Jung, Keum Ji; Ahn, Yoon-Ok; Ren, Zefang; Li, Hong-Lan; Wu, Jie; Shi, Jiajun; Wen, Wanqing; Yang, Gong; Li, Bingshan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Brenner, Hermann; Schoen, Robert E.; Küry, Sébastien; Gruber, Stephen B.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Stenzel, Stephanie L.; Casey, Graham; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Kim, Hyeong-Rok; Jeong, Jin-Young; Park, Ji Won; Tajima, Kazuo; Cho, Sang-Hee; Kubo, Michiaki; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lin, Dongxin; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Known Genetic factors explain only a small fraction of genetic variation in colorectal cancer (CRC). We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify risk loci for CRC. Methods This discovery stage included 8027 cases and 22577 controls of East-Asian ancestry. Promising variants were evaluated in studies including as many as 11044 cases and 12047 controls. Tumor-adjacent normal tissues from 188 patients were analyzed to evaluate correlations of risk variants with expression levels of nearby genes. Potential functionality of risk variants were evaluated using public genomic and epigenomic databases. Results We identified 4 loci associated with CRC risk; P values for the most significant variant in each locus ranged from 3.92×10−8 to 1.24×10−12: 6p21.1 (rs4711689), 8q23.3 (rs2450115, rs6469656), 10q24.3 (rs4919687), and 12p13.3 (rs11064437). We also identified 2 risk variants at loci previously associated with CRC: 10q25.2 (rs10506868) and 20q13.3 (rs6061231). These risk variants, conferring an approximate 10%–18% increase in risk per allele, are located either inside or near protein-coding genes that include TFEB (lysosome biogenesis and autophagy), EIF3H (initiation of translation), CYP17A1 (steroidogenesis), SPSB2 (proteasome degradation), and RPS21 (ribosome biogenesis). Gene expression analyses showed a significant association (P <.05) for rs4711689 with TFEB, rs6469656 with EIF3H, rs11064437 with SPSB2, and rs6061231 with RPS21. Conclusions We identified susceptibility loci and genes associated with CRC risk, linking CRC predisposition to steroid hormone, protein synthesis and degradation, and autophagy pathways and providing added insight into the mechanism of CRC pathogenesis. PMID:26965516

  19. Identifying modifier loci in existing genome scan data.

    PubMed

    Daw, E W; Lu, Y; Marian, A J; Shete, S

    2008-09-01

    In many genetic disorders in which a primary disease-causing locus has been identified, evidence exists for additional trait variation due to genetic factors. These findings have led to studies seeking secondary 'modifier' loci. Identification of modifier loci provides insight into disease mechanisms and may provide additional screening and treatment targets. We believe that modifier loci can be identified by re-analysis of genome screen data while controlling for primary locus effects. To test this hypothesis, we simulated multiple replicates of typical genome screening data on to two real family structures from a study of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. With this marker data, we simulated two trait models with characteristics similar to one measure of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Both trait models included 3 genes. In the first, the trait was influenced by a primary gene, a secondary 'modifier' gene, and a third very small effect gene. In the second, we modeled an interaction between the first two genes. We examined power and false positive rates to map the secondary locus while controlling for the effect of the primary locus with two types of analyses. First, we examined Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) simultaneous segregation and linkage analysis as implemented in Loki, for which we calculated two scoring statistics. Second, we calculated LOD scores using an individual-specific liability class based on the quantitative trait value. We found that both methods produced scores that are significant on a genome-wide level in some replicates. We conclude that mapping of modifier loci in existing samples is possible with these methods.

  20. Identifying modifier loci in existing genome scan data

    PubMed Central

    Daw, E. Warwick; Lu, Yue; Marian, Ali J.; Shete, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    In many genetic disorders in which a primary disease-causing locus has been identified, evidence for additional trait variation due to genetic factors exists. These findings have led to studies seeking secondary “modifier” loci. Identification of modifier loci provides insight into disease mechanisms and may provide additional screening and treatment targets. We believe that modifier loci can be identified by re-analysis of genome screen data while controlling for primary locus effects. To test this hypothesis, we simulated multiple replicates of typical genome screening data on to two real family structures from a study of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. With this marker data, we simulated two trait models with characteristics similar to one measure of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Both trait models included 3 genes. In the first, the trait was influenced by a primary gene, a secondary “modifier” gene, and a third very small effect gene. In the second, we modeled an interaction between the first two genes. We examined power and false positive rates to map the secondary locus while controlling for the effect of the primary locus with two types of analyses. First, we examine Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) simultaneous segregation and linkage analysis as implemented in Loki, for which we calculated two scoring statistics. Second, we calculate LOD scores using an individual-specific liability class based on the quantitative trait value. We find that both methods produce scores that are significant on a genome-wide level in some replicates. We conclude that mapping of modifier loci in existing samples is possible with these methods. PMID:18494837

  1. Synergistic Cytotoxicity of Melatonin and New-generation Anticancer Drugs Against Leukemia Lymphocytes But Not Normal Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhelev, Zhivko; Ivanova, Donika; Bakalova, Rumiana; Aoki, Ichio; Higashi, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    The present study demonstrates specific sensitization of leukemia lymphocytes towards anticancer drugs using melatonin and clarifies the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) for induction of apoptosis. The study covers four conventional and 11 new-generation anticancer drugs. Four parameters were analyzed simultaneously in leukemia and normal lymphocytes treated with drug, melatonin, or their combination: cell viability, induction of apoptosis, level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and level of protein-carbonyl products. Almost all investigated combinations of melatonin with new-generation anticancer drugs were characterized by synergistic cytotoxicity towards leukemia lymphocytes, while the combinations with conventional drugs exhibited additive or antagonistic effects on cell viability. In leukemia lymphocytes, the additive cytotoxicity of doxorubicin plus melatonin was accompanied by low levels of ROS and protein-carbonyl products, as well as by suppression of apoptosis. In normal lymphocytes, none of the studied parameters changed significantly compared to cells treated with doxorubicin only. The combinations of everolimus plus melatonin and barasertib plus melatonin exhibited impressive synergistic cytotoxic effects on leukemia lymphocytes but did not affect the viability of normal lymphocytes. In leukemia cells, the synergistic cytotoxicity was accompanied by strong induction of apoptosis but a decrease of ROS to a level below that of the control. In normal lymphocytes, these combinations did not affect the level of ROS nor of protein-carbonyl products, and did not induce apoptosis. The data suggest that melatonin is a promising supplementary component in chemotherapy which allows the therapeutic doses of anticancer drugs to be reduced, minimizing their side-effects.

  2. Phenotype study with monoclonal antibodies of T lymphocyte colonies in normal individuals and in patients with chronic OKT8+ lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Andre, C; Farcet, J P; Oudhriri, N; Gourdin, M F; Bouguet, J; Reyes, F

    1983-01-01

    The lymphocyte colony forming capacity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from normal controls and from two patients with chronic OKT8+ lymphocytic leukaemia was determined in agar culture under PHA stimulation. The number and size of the colonies in patients were reduced compared to normal. The lymphocytic phenotype of colony cells was studied with monoclonal antibodies in colonies harvested from agar culture and in colonies expanded in liquid culture in the presence of TCGF. This study was performed in individual colonies and in pooled colonies. Colonies from normal controls contained a mixture of the OKT4+ and OKT8+ lymphocyte subsets. In contrast, colonies from the two patients contained essentially OKT4+ lymphocytes. The data indicate that, in the patients, progenitors of the OKT8+ subset are unresponsive to normal proliferative and/or differentiative stimuli under the present culture conditions. PMID:6606509

  3. T Lymphocytes Inhibit the Vascular Response to Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, Goran K.; Holm, Jan; Holm, Susanna; Fotev, Zisi; Hedrich, Hans-Jurgen; Fingerle, Jurgen

    1991-12-01

    The proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells is controlled by specific growth factors and cytokines acting in paracrine networks. Macrophage products such as the platelet-derived growth factor and interleukin 1 promote smooth muscle proliferation and are released in the arterial wall during atherosclerosis and repair processes. T lymphocytes are also present in vascular tissue, but their role in vascular growth control in vivo has been unclear. We now demonstrate that rats in which T lymphocytes have been eliminated by a monoclonal antibody develop larger proliferative arterial lesions after balloon-catheter injury. Larger lesions also develop in athymic rnu/rnu rats that lack T lymphocytes, when compared with rnu/+ littermates with normal T-cell levels. Finally, injection of the lymphokine interferon γ inhibits smooth muscle proliferation and results in smaller lesions compared with controls injected with buffer alone. These results indicate that T lymphocytes modulate smooth muscle proliferation during vascular repair. We propose that T lymphocytes may play an important, immunologically nonspecific role in tissue repair processes.

  4. Expression of activated molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongli; Xu, Wenyan; Liu, Hong; Wang, Huaquan; Fu, Rong; Wu, Yuhong; Qu, Wen; Wang, Guojin; Guan, Jing; Song, Jia; Xing, Limin; Shao, Zonghong

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the expression of activation molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA)/Evans patients. The expression of CD80, CD86, and CD69 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was detected using flow cytometry in 30 AIHA/Evans patients, 18 normal controls (NC) and nine chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. CD80 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in untreated patients was higher than that in remission patients (P < 0.05), NC (P < 0.01) and CLL patients (P < 0.01). CD80 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was higher than that on CD5(-)B lymphocytes in untreated patients (P > 0.05), but lower than those of CD5(-)B lymphocytes in remission patients and NC (P < 0.05). CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes of untreated patients was higher than that of remission patients (P < 0.05), NC (P < 0.01). CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes of CLL was higher than that of NC, remission (P < 0.05), and untreated patients (P > 0.05). CD80 and CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was negatively correlated with hemoglobin (HB), C3, C4 (P < 0.05) and positively correlated with reticulocyte (Ret) (P < 0.05). CD69 on CD5(+) and CD5(-)B lymphocytes of CLL was higher than those of AIHA/Evans patients and NC (P < 0.05). The active molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of AIHA/Evans patients differ from those on CD5(-) and clonal CD5(+)B lymphocytes.

  5. Vehicle and positive control values from the in vivo rodent comet assay and biomonitoring studies using human lymphocytes: historical database and influence of technical aspects.

    PubMed

    Pant, Kamala; Springer, S; Bruce, S; Lawlor, T; Hewitt, N; Aardema, M J

    2014-10-01

    There is increased interest in the in vivo comet assay in rodents as a follow-up approach for determining the biological relevance of chemicals that are genotoxic in in vitro assays. This is partly because, unlike other assays, DNA damage can be assessed in this assay in virtually any tissue. Since background levels of DNA damage can vary with the species, tissue, and cell processing method, a robust historical control database covering multiple tissues is essential. We describe extensive vehicle and positive control data for multiple tissues from rats and mice. In addition, we report historical data from control and genotoxin-treated human blood. Technical issues impacting comet results are described, including the method of cell preparation and freezing. Cell preparation by scraping (stomach and other GI tract organs) resulted in higher % tail DNA than mincing (liver, spleen, kidney etc) or direct collection (blood or bone marrow). Treatment with the positive control genotoxicant, ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) in rats and methyl methanesulfonate in mice, resulted in statistically significant increases in % tail DNA. Background DNA damage was not markedly increased when cell suspensions were stored frozen prior to preparing slides, and the outcome of the assay was unchanged (EMS was always positive). In conclusion, historical data from our laboratory for the in vivo comet assay for multiple tissues from rats and mice, as well as human blood show very good reproducibility. These data and recommendations provided are aimed at contributing to the design and proper interpretation of results from comet assays.

  6. Pervasive antagonistic interactions among hybrid incompatibility loci.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Rafael F; Muir, Christopher D; Josway, Sarah; Moyle, Leonie C

    2017-06-01

    Species barriers, expressed as hybrid inviability and sterility, are often due to epistatic interactions between divergent loci from two lineages. Theoretical models indicate that the strength, direction, and complexity of these genetic interactions can strongly affect the expression of interspecific reproductive isolation and the rates at which new species evolve. Nonetheless, empirical analyses have not quantified the frequency with which loci are involved in interactions affecting hybrid fitness, and whether these loci predominantly interact synergistically or antagonistically, or preferentially involve loci that have strong individual effects on hybrid fitness. We systematically examined the prevalence of interactions between pairs of short chromosomal regions from one species (Solanum habrochaites) co-introgressed into a heterospecific genetic background (Solanum lycopersicum), using lines containing pairwise combinations of 15 chromosomal segments from S. habrochaites in the background of S. lycopersicum (i.e., 95 double introgression lines). We compared the strength of hybrid incompatibility (either pollen sterility or seed sterility) expressed in each double introgression line to the expected additive effect of its two component single introgressions. We found that epistasis was common among co-introgressed regions. Interactions for hybrid dysfunction were substantially more prevalent in pollen fertility compared to seed fertility phenotypes, and were overwhelmingly antagonistic (i.e., double hybrids were less unfit than expected from additive single introgression effects). This pervasive antagonism is expected to attenuate the rate at which hybrid infertility accumulates among lineages over time (i.e., giving diminishing returns as more reproductive isolation loci accumulate), as well as decouple patterns of accumulation of sterility loci and hybrid incompatibility phenotypes. This decoupling effect might explain observed differences between pollen and

  7. The Role of the T lymphocytes and Remodeling in Asthma.

    PubMed

    Amin, Kawa

    2016-08-01

    In allergic asthma (AA), inflammatory changes in the airway epithelium may contribute to the characteristic pathophysiology and symptoms. The presence of T lymphocytes, eosinophils, mast cells and macrophages, the presence of cytokines, and also structural changes in the airway mucous membrane are characteristic for asthma. Bronchial biopsy specimens were obtained from 33 AA, 25 nonallergic asthma (NAA), and 20 healthy controls (HC). This study used immunohistochemical techniques for identified monoclonal antibodies (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD25, ECP, MBP, tenascin, and laminin) in the bronchi. The highest number of eosinophils and T lymphocyte cells in bronchial biopsies was found in AA, and NAA. The number of T lymphocytes in AA was significantly higher than in NAA and HC. The degree of epithelial damage was higher in the AA group compared to the other groups. The tenascin- and laminin-positive layers in AA were thicker than other groups. In AA, a significant negative correlation was found between epithelial integrity and the count for eosinophils or T lymphocytes. T lymphocytes and eosinophils in AA were found in the area of epithelial and lamina propria damage. This article suggests that T lymphocytes may not only contribute to the chronic airway inflammatory response, airway remodeling, and symptomatology but may also have a central role at the initiation of the allergic immune response. Th-targeted therapy would be of considerable interest in controlling AA. Having more knowledge on the roles of T lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation highlights the contributions of these cells in regulating and may lead to a new therapeutic target-AA.

  8. Surface markers on human lymphocytes: studies of normal subjects and of patients with primary immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Aiuti, F.; Lacava, V.; Garofalo, J. A.; D'Amelio, R.; D'Asero, C.

    1973-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes of twenty normal controls and twelve patients with primary immunodeficiencies were examined for surface membrane Ig and receptors for C3 complement (B cell markers) and for spontaneous rosette formation with sheep erythrocytes (T cell markers). In patients with defects in T cell function no lymphocytes forming spontaneous rosettes were seen. In patients with B cell deficiency they were normal or increased. Lymphocytes with membrane immunoglobulins were normal in patients with T cell defect and absent in patients with severe agammaglobulinaemia. Lymphocytes with receptors for C3 complement were increased in patients with T defect and normal in patients with most other forms of immunodeficiency studied. PMID:4587827

  9. Splenic lymphoma with villous lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ritu; Naseem, Shano; Sukumaran, Shawgi; Kashyap, Rajesh; Kaur, Sukhpreet; Paul, Lily

    2008-01-01

    Splenic lymphoma with villous lymphocytes (SLVL) is a rare disorder that comprises less than 1% of lymphoid neoplasms. It is the leukemic counterpart of splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) and is characterized by splenomegaly, often with no lymphadenopathy, moderate lymphocytosis and villous lymphocytes on peripheral blood smear. Here, we report a case of SLVL in a 56-year-old male with very high leukocyte counts, massive splenomegaly and relatively few leukemic cells with subtle villous projections on the surface. This disorder is often confused with other chronic lymphoproliferative disorders, especially chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and hairy cell leukemia and should be differentiated from them. We are reporting this case to highlight the diagnostic pitfalls associated with this disorder.

  10. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for cutaneous malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Law, Matthew H.; Bishop, D. Timothy; Martin, Nicholas G.; Moses, Eric K.; Song, Fengju; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Kumar, Rajiv; Easton, Douglas F.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Kypreou, Katerina P.; Taylor, John C.; Harland, Mark; Randerson-Moor, Juliette; Akslen, Lars A.; Andresen, Per A.; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Azizi, Esther; Scarrà, Giovanna Bianchi; Brown, Kevin M.; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Duffy, David L.; Elder, David E.; Fang, Shenying; Friedman, Eitan; Galan, Pilar; Ghiorzo, Paola; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Gruis, Nelleke A.; Hansson, Johan; Helsing, Per; Hočevar, Marko; Höiom, Veronica; Ingvar, Christian; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Chen, Wei V.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Lang, Julie; Lathrop, G. Mark; Lubiński, Jan; Mackie, Rona M.; Mann, Graham J.; Molven, Anders; Montgomery, Grant W.; Novaković, Srdjan; Olsson, Håkan; Puig, Susana; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Radford-Smith, Graham L.; van der Stoep, Nienke; van Doorn, Remco; Whiteman, David C.; Craig, Jamie E.; Schadendorf, Dirk; Simms, Lisa A.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Pooley, Karen A.; Orr, Nick; Stratigos, Alexander J.; Cust, Anne E.; Ward, Sarah V.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Han, Jiali; Schulze, Hans-Joachim; Dunning, Alison M.; Bishop, Julia A. Newton; MacGregor, Stuart; Iles, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    Thirteen common susceptibility loci have been reproducibly associated with cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). We report the results of an international 2-stage meta-analysis of CMM genome-wide association studies (GWAS). This meta-analysis combines 11 GWAS (5 previously unpublished) and a further three stage 2 data sets, totaling 15,990 CMM cases and 26,409 controls. Five loci not previously associated with CMM risk reached genome-wide significance (P < 5×10–8), as did two previously-reported but un-replicated loci and all thirteen established loci. Novel SNPs fall within putative melanocyte regulatory elements, and bioinformatic and expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data highlight candidate genes including one involved in telomere biology. PMID:26237428

  11. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new susceptibility loci for migraine.

    PubMed

    Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S; Gormley, Padhraig; Kurth, Tobias; Bettella, Francesco; McMahon, George; Kallela, Mikko; Malik, Rainer; de Vries, Boukje; Terwindt, Gisela; Medland, Sarah E; Todt, Unda; McArdle, Wendy L; Quaye, Lydia; Koiranen, Markku; Ikram, M Arfan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Stam, Anine H; Ligthart, Lannie; Wedenoja, Juho; Dunham, Ian; Neale, Benjamin M; Palta, Priit; Hamalainen, Eija; Schürks, Markus; Rose, Lynda M; Buring, Julie E; Ridker, Paul M; Steinberg, Stacy; Stefansson, Hreinn; Jakobsson, Finnbogi; Lawlor, Debbie A; Evans, David M; Ring, Susan M; Färkkilä, Markus; Artto, Ville; Kaunisto, Mari A; Freilinger, Tobias; Schoenen, Jean; Frants, Rune R; Pelzer, Nadine; Weller, Claudia M; Zielman, Ronald; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Borck, Guntram; Göbel, Hartmut; Heinze, Axel; Heinze-Kuhn, Katja; Williams, Frances M K; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Pouta, Anneli; van den Ende, Joyce; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Amin, Najaf; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Vink, Jacqueline M; Heikkilä, Kauko; Alexander, Michael; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schreiber, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, Heinz Erich; Aromaa, Arpo; Eriksson, Johan G; Traynor, Bryan J; Trabzuni, Daniah; Rossin, Elizabeth; Lage, Kasper; Jacobs, Suzanne B R; Gibbs, J Raphael; Birney, Ewan; Kaprio, Jaakko; Penninx, Brenda W; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia; Raitakari, Olli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Zwart, John-Anker; Cherkas, Lynn; Strachan, David P; Kubisch, Christian; Ferrari, Michel D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Dichgans, Martin; Wessman, Maija; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Daly, Mark J; Nyholt, Dale R; Chasman, Daniel I; Palotie, Aarno

    2013-08-01

    Migraine is the most common brain disorder, affecting approximately 14% of the adult population, but its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We report the results of a meta-analysis across 29 genome-wide association studies, including a total of 23,285 individuals with migraine (cases) and 95,425 population-matched controls. We identified 12 loci associated with migraine susceptibility (P<5×10(-8)). Five loci are new: near AJAP1 at 1p36, near TSPAN2 at 1p13, within FHL5 at 6q16, within C7orf10 at 7p14 and near MMP16 at 8q21. Three of these loci were identified in disease subgroup analyses. Brain tissue expression quantitative trait locus analysis suggests potential functional candidate genes at four loci: APOA1BP, TBC1D7, FUT9, STAT6 and ATP5B.

  12. Identification of multiple risk variants for ankylosing spondylitis through high-density genotyping of immune-related loci.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Adrian; Hadler, Johanna; Pointon, Jenny P; Robinson, Philip C; Karaderi, Tugce; Leo, Paul; Cremin, Katie; Pryce, Karena; Harris, Jessica; Lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Weisman, Michael; Ward, Michael; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Jiang, Lei; Liu, Yu; Wu, Xin; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Kenna, Tony J; Haroon, Nigil; Ferreira, Manuel A; Yang, Jian; Mulero, Juan; Fernandez-Sueiro, Jose Luis; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Deloukas, Panos; Donnelly, Peter; Bowness, Paul; Gafney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Xu, Huji; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Chou, Chung-Tei; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Videm, Vibeke; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Brown, Matthew A

    2013-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a common, highly heritable inflammatory arthritis affecting primarily the spine and pelvis. In addition to HLA-B*27 alleles, 12 loci have previously been identified that are associated with ankylosing spondylitis in populations of European ancestry, and 2 associated loci have been identified in Asians. In this study, we used the Illumina Immunochip microarray to perform a case-control association study involving 10,619 individuals with ankylosing spondylitis (cases) and 15,145 controls. We identified 13 new risk loci and 12 additional ankylosing spondylitis-associated haplotypes at 11 loci. Two ankylosing spondylitis-associated regions have now been identified encoding four aminopeptidases that are involved in peptide processing before major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation. Protective variants at two of these loci are associated both with reduced aminopeptidase function and with MHC class I cell surface expression.

  13. Identification of multiple risk variants for ankylosing spondylitis through high-density genotyping of immune-related loci

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Adrian; Hadler, Johanna; Pointon, Jenny P; Robinson, Philip C; Karaderi, Tugce; Leo, Paul; Cremin, Katie; Pryce, Karena; Harris, Jessica; lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Weisman, Michael; Ward, Michael; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Jiang, Lei; Liu, Yu; Wu, Xin; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Kenna, Tony J; Haroon, Nigil; Ferreira, Manuel A; Yang, Jian; Mulero, Juan; Fernandez-Sueiro, Jose Luis; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Deloukas, Panos; Donnelly, Peter; Bowness, Paul; Gafney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Xu, Huji; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Chou, Chung-Tei; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Videm, Vibeke; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Brown, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a common, highly heritable inflammatory arthritis affecting primarily the spine and pelvis. In addition to HLA-B*27 alleles, 12 loci have previously been identified that are associated with ankylosing spondylitis in populations of European ancestry, and 2 associated loci have been identified in Asians. In this study, we used the Illumina Immunochip microarray to perform a case-control association study involving 10,619 individuals with ankylosing spondylitis (cases) and 15,145 controls. We identified 13 new risk loci and 12 additional ankylosing spondylitis–associated haplotypes at 11 loci. Two ankylosing spondylitis–associated regions have now been identified encoding four aminopeptidases that are involved in peptide processing before major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation. Protective variants at two of these loci are associated both with reduced aminopeptidase function and with MHC class I cell surface expression. PMID:23749187

  14. Formalin-treated bacteria as selective B cell mitogens in the study of lymphocytes from patients with hypogammaglobulinaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Banck, G; Forsgren, A

    1980-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus strain Cowan I, Haemophilus influenzae, and Branhamella catarrhalis that stimulate human B lymphocytes, but not T lymphocytes, were used to study the B lymphocyte function in patients with hypogammaglobulinaemia. Lymphocytes from two patients with no circulating B cells were not stimulated to increased DNA synthesis by these bacterial mitogens. The lymphocytes of six patients with hypogammaglobulinaemia and normal numbers of circulating B cells responded to the bacterial mitogens but in five patients the response was decreased in comparison with healthy controls. PMID:6971196

  15. Novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci implicated in epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Andlauer, Till F. M.; Buck, Dorothea; Antony, Gisela; Bayas, Antonios; Bechmann, Lukas; Berthele, Achim; Chan, Andrew; Gasperi, Christiane; Gold, Ralf; Graetz, Christiane; Haas, Jürgen; Hecker, Michael; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Knop, Matthias; Kümpfel, Tania; Limmroth, Volker; Linker, Ralf A.; Loleit, Verena; Luessi, Felix; Meuth, Sven G.; Mühlau, Mark; Nischwitz, Sandra; Paul, Friedemann; Pütz, Michael; Ruck, Tobias; Salmen, Anke; Stangel, Martin; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Stürner, Klarissa H.; Tackenberg, Björn; Then Bergh, Florian; Tumani, Hayrettin; Warnke, Clemens; Weber, Frank; Wiendl, Heinz; Wildemann, Brigitte; Zettl, Uwe K.; Ziemann, Ulf; Zipp, Frauke; Arloth, Janine; Weber, Peter; Radivojkov-Blagojevic, Milena; Scheinhardt, Markus O.; Dankowski, Theresa; Bettecken, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Czamara, Darina; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Herms, Stefan; Homuth, Georg; Ising, Marcus; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kacprowski, Tim; Kloiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lill, Christina M.; Lucae, Susanne; Meitinger, Thomas; Moebus, Susanne; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nöthen, Markus M.; Petersmann, Astrid; Rawal, Rajesh; Schminke, Ulf; Strauch, Konstantin; Völzke, Henry; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wellmann, Jürgen; Porcu, Eleonora; Mulas, Antonella; Pitzalis, Maristella; Sidore, Carlo; Zara, Ilenia; Cucca, Francesco; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Ziegler, Andreas; Hemmer, Bernhard; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility in German cohorts with 4888 cases and 10,395 controls. In addition to associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, 15 non-MHC loci reached genome-wide significance. Four of these loci are novel MS susceptibility loci. They map to the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, ERG, and SHMT1. The lead variant at SHMT1 was replicated in an independent Sardinian cohort. Products of the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, and ERG play important roles in immune cell regulation. SHMT1 encodes a serine hydroxymethyltransferase catalyzing the transfer of a carbon unit to the folate cycle. This reaction is required for regulation of methylation homeostasis, which is important for establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures. Our GWAS approach in a defined population with limited genetic substructure detected associations not found in larger, more heterogeneous cohorts, thus providing new clues regarding MS pathogenesis. PMID:27386562

  16. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded genome-wide significant associations with schizophrenia for seven loci, five of which are new (1p21.3, 2q32.3, 8p23.2, 8q21.3 and 10q24.32-q24.33) and two of which have been previously implicated (6p21.32-p22.1 and 18q21.2). The strongest new finding (P = 1.6 × 10−11) was with rs1625579 within an intron of a putative primary transcript for MIR137 (microRNA 137), a known regulator of neuronal development. Four other schizophrenia loci achieving genome-wide significance contain predicted targets of MIR137, suggesting MIR137-mediated dysregulation as a previously unknown etiologic mechanism in schizophrenia. In a joint analysis with a bipolar disorder sample (16,374 affected individuals and 14,044 controls), three loci reached genome-wide significance: CACNA1C (rs4765905, P = 7.0 × 10−9), ANK3 (rs10994359, P = 2.5 × 10−8) and the ITIH3-ITIH4 region (rs2239547, P = 7.8 × 10−9). PMID:21926974

  17. Fatty acids and lymphocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Calder, P C; Yaqoob, P; Thies, F; Wallace, F A; Miles, E A

    2002-01-01

    The immune system acts to protect the host against pathogenic invaders. However, components of the immune system can become dysregulated such that their activities are directed against host tissues, so causing damage. Lymphocytes are involved in both the beneficial and detrimental effects of the immune system. Both the level of fat and the types of fatty acid present in the diet can affect lymphocyte functions. The fatty acid composition of lymphocytes, and other immune cells, is altered according to the fatty acid composition of the diet and this alters the capacity of those cells to produce eicosanoids, such as prostaglandin E2, which are involved in immunoregulation. A high fat diet can impair lymphocyte function. Cell culture and animal feeding studies indicate that oleic, linoleic, conjugated linoleic, gamma-linolenic, dihomo-gamma-linolenic, arachidonic, alpha-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids can all influence lymphocyte proliferation, the production of cytokines by lymphocytes, and natural killer cell activity. High intakes of some of these fatty acids are necessary to induce these effects. Among these fatty acids the long chain n-3 fatty acids, especially eicosapentaenoic acid, appear to be the most potent when included in the human diet. Although not all studies agree, it appears that fish oil, which contains eicosapentaenoic acid, down regulates the T-helper 1-type response which is associated with chronic inflammatory disease. There is evidence for beneficial effects of fish oil in such diseases; this evidence is strongest for rheumatoid arthritis. Since n-3 fatty acids also antagonise the production of inflammatory eicosanoid mediators from arachidonic acid, there is potential for benefit in asthma and related diseases. Recent evidence indicates that fish oil may be of benefit in some asthmatics but not others.

  18. 52 Genetic Loci Influencing Myocardial Mass.

    PubMed

    van der Harst, Pim; van Setten, Jessica; Verweij, Niek; Vogler, Georg; Franke, Lude; Maurano, Matthew T; Wang, Xinchen; Mateo Leach, Irene; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Hayward, Caroline; Sorice, Rossella; Meirelles, Osorio; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Polašek, Ozren; Tanaka, Toshiko; Arking, Dan E; Ulivi, Sheila; Trompet, Stella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Smith, Albert V; Dörr, Marcus; Kerr, Kathleen F; Magnani, Jared W; Del Greco M, Fabiola; Zhang, Weihua; Nolte, Ilja M; Silva, Claudia T; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tragante, Vinicius; Esko, Tõnu; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Adriaens, Michiel E; Andersen, Karl; Barnett, Phil; Bis, Joshua C; Bodmer, Rolf; Buckley, Brendan M; Campbell, Harry; Cannon, Megan V; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chen, Lin Y; Delitala, Alessandro; Devereux, Richard B; Doevendans, Pieter A; Dominiczak, Anna F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Haugen, Eric; Heinig, Matthias; Hernandez, Dena G; Hillege, Hans L; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hubner, Norbert; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Iorio, Annamaria; Kähönen, Mika; Kellis, Manolis; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooner, Ishminder K; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kors, Jan A; Lakatta, Edward G; Lage, Kasper; Launer, Lenore J; Levy, Daniel; Lundby, Alicia; Macfarlane, Peter W; May, Dalit; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Nappo, Stefania; Naitza, Silvia; Neph, Shane; Nord, Alex S; Nutile, Teresa; Okin, Peter M; Olsen, Jesper V; Oostra, Ben A; Penninger, Josef M; Pennacchio, Len A; Pers, Tune H; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Pinto, Yigal M; Pfeufer, Arne; Pilia, Maria Grazia; Pramstaller, Peter P; Prins, Bram P; Raitakari, Olli T; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rice, Ken M; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Rotter, Jerome I; Schafer, Sebastian; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Carsten O; Sehmi, Jobanpreet; Silljé, Herman H W; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Sinner, Moritz F; Slowikowski, Kamil; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Spector, Timothy D; Spiering, Wilko; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Stolk, Ronald P; Strauch, Konstantin; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Tarasov, Kirill V; Trinh, Bosco; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van den Boogaard, Malou; van Duijn, Cornelia M; van Gilst, Wiek H; Viikari, Jorma S; Visscher, Peter M; Vitart, Veronique; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Weichenberger, Christian X; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H; Yang, Jian; Bezzina, Connie R; Munroe, Patricia B; Snieder, Harold; Wright, Alan F; Rudan, Igor; Boyer, Laurie A; Asselbergs, Folkert W; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Stricker, Bruno H; Psaty, Bruce M; Ciullo, Marina; Sanna, Serena; Lehtimäki, Terho; Wilson, James F; Bandinelli, Stefania; Alonso, Alvaro; Gasparini, Paolo; Jukema, J Wouter; Kääb, Stefan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Felix, Stephan B; Heckbert, Susan R; de Boer, Rudolf A; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Hicks, Andrew A; Chambers, John C; Jamshidi, Yalda; Visel, Axel; Christoffels, Vincent M; Isaacs, Aaron; Samani, Nilesh J; de Bakker, Paul I W

    2016-09-27

    Myocardial mass is a key determinant of cardiac muscle function and hypertrophy. Myocardial depolarization leading to cardiac muscle contraction is reflected by the amplitude and duration of the QRS complex on the electrocardiogram (ECG). Abnormal QRS amplitude or duration reflect changes in myocardial mass and conduction, and are associated with increased risk of heart failure and death. This meta-analysis sought to gain insights into the genetic determinants of myocardial mass. We carried out a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 4 QRS traits in up to 73,518 individuals of European ancestry, followed by extensive biological and functional assessment. We identified 52 genomic loci, of which 32 are novel, that are reliably associated with 1 or more QRS phenotypes at p < 1 × 10(-8). These loci are enriched in regions of open chromatin, histone modifications, and transcription factor binding, suggesting that they represent regions of the genome that are actively transcribed in the human heart. Pathway analyses provided evidence that these loci play a role in cardiac hypertrophy. We further highlighted 67 candidate genes at the identified loci that are preferentially expressed in cardiac tissue and associated with cardiac abnormalities in Drosophila melanogaster and Mus musculus. We validated the regulatory function of a novel variant in the SCN5A/SCN10A locus in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our findings provide new insights into genes and biological pathways controlling myocardial mass and may help identify novel therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Glucose, glycolysis and lymphocyte responses.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Raymond P; Finlay, David K

    2015-12-01

    Activated lymphocytes engage in robust growth and rapid proliferation. To achieve this, they tend to adopt a form of glucose metabolism termed aerobic glycolysis. This type of metabolism allows for the use of large amounts of glucose to generate energy, but also to support biosynthetic processes. This review article will discuss how aerobic glycolysis supports the biosynthetic demands of activated T cells, B cells and Natural Killer cells, and the emerging concept that glycolysis is integrally linked to the differentiation and function of these lymphocyte populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thyroid storm and lymphocytic myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ting; Yang, Gee-Gwo; Hsu, Yung-Hsiang

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac failure is the leading cause of mortality in patients with thyroid storm. But the underlying cardiac pathology is unclear. Here, we report a 46-year-old woman who presented with hyperpyrexia and sinus tachycardia subsequent to accidental neck contusion. Her hyperthyroidism was verified by abnormal biochemical changes. Despite vigorous antithyroid treatment including a beta-blocker, glucocorticoid and potassium iodide, the patient eventually succumbed to refractory congestive heart failure in 4 days. Autopsy revealed lymphocytic myocarditis. We propose that lymphocytic myocarditis played a prominent role in her demise.

  1. Natural and Sexual Selection on Many Loci

    PubMed Central

    Barton, N. H.; Turelli, M.

    1991-01-01

    A method is developed that describes the effects on an arbitrary number of autosomal loci of selection on haploid and diploid stages, of nonrandom mating between haploid individuals, and of recombination. We provide exact recursions for the dynamics of allele frequencies and linkage disequilibria (nonrandom associations of alleles across loci). When selection is weak relative to recombination, our recursions provide simple approximations for the linkage disequilibria among arbitrary combinations of loci. We show how previous models of sex-independent natural selection on diploids, assortative mating between haploids, and sexual selection on haploids can be analyzed in this framework. Using our weak-selection approximations, we derive new results concerning the coevolution of male traits and female preferences under natural and sexual selection. In particular, we provide general expressions for the intensity of linkage-disequilibrium induced selection experienced by loci that contribute to female preferences for specific male traits. Our general results support the previous observation that these indirect selection forces are so weak that they are unlikely to dominate the evolution of preference-producing loci. PMID:2016044

  2. Surface markers on lymphocytes of multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, J; Wajgt, A

    1975-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes of twenty-two multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and thirty-five healthy controls were examined for the presence of surface markers characteristic for B lymphocytes (surface immunoglobulin, receptor for C3 (EAC), reporter for Fc (EA) and the spontaneous rosette-forming capacity characteristic of T cells. The results obtained indicate that the number of B and T cells in MS is similar to controls, as evaluated by the presence of surface immunoglobulin and E rosette-forming capacity. However, a statistically significant reduction in the percentage of lymphocytes bearing C3 receptors has been found in MS patients. It might have resulted from a reduction in the lymphocyte population bearing C3 receptor but no surface immunoglobulin. The EA rosette test revealed the greatest difference between the groups. The difference indicated a reduction in the density of the receptor for 7S Fc on lymphocytes from MS patients. The results obtained are consistent with the hypothesis of an immune deficit in multiple sclerosis. PMID:1102165

  3. Effects of racing on lymphocyte proliferation in horses.

    PubMed

    Nesse, Live L; Johansen, Grete Irene; Blom, Anne K

    2002-04-01

    To measure the lymphocyte proliferation response in horses 12 to 16 hours after completion of a race. 8 Thoroughbreds that competed in 14 races and 3 control Thoroughbreds that did not race. Horses participated in races during the late afternoon or evening. Venous blood samples were collected on a morning before a race (1 or 2 days before the race or on the day of the race), on the afternoon of a race (40 to 60 minutes after the race), and on the morning of the day after a race (12 to 16 hours after the race). Lymphocyte proliferation responses and WBC count were measured in samples obtained in the mornings. Plasma cortisol was measured in all samples. Lymphocyte proliferation responses were significantly reduced and WBC counts significantly increased 12 to 16 hours after a race. Plasma cortisol concentrations were significantly increased 40 to 60 minutes after a race. In samples from the control horses, lymphocyte proliferation responses, WBC counts, or plasma cortisol concentrations did not differ significantly among time periods. A decrease in proliferative responses of circulating lymphocytes can be found as late as 12 to 16 hours after a horse participates in a race. Although the clinical consequences of these exercise-related alterations of the immune response are not yet known, managers of horses should take into account that the immune system of a horse may be affected by racing.

  4. The transcriptional control of the perforin locus

    PubMed Central

    Pipkin, Matthew E.; Rao, Anjana; Lichtenheld, Mathias G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) use cytotoxic granules containing perforin and granzymes to lyse infected or malignant host cells and provide immunity to intracellular microbes and tumors. Perforin is essential for cytotoxic granule-mediated killing. Perforin expression is regulated transcriptionally and correlates tightly with the development of cells that can exhibit cytotoxic activity. Although a number of genes transcribed by T cells and NK cells have been studied, the cell-specificity of perforin gene expression makes it an ideal model system in which to clarify the transcriptional mechanisms that guide the development and activation of cytotoxic lymphocytes. In this review, we discuss what is known about perforin expression and its regulation, then elaborate on recent studies that utilized chromosome transfer and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenics to define a comprehensive set of cis-regulatory regions that control transcription of the human PRF1 gene in a near-physiological context. In addition, we compare the human and murine Prf1 loci and discuss how transcription factors known to be important for driving CTL differentiation might also directly regulate the cis-acting domains that control Prf1. Our review emphasizes how studies of PRF1/Prf1 gene transcription can illuminate not only the mechanisms of cytotoxic lymphocyte differentiation but also some basic principles of transcriptional regulation. PMID:20536555

  5. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratios: are they useful for predicting gestational diabetes mellitus during pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Sargın, Mehmet Akif; Yassa, Murat; Taymur, Bilge Dogan; Celik, Ayhan; Ergun, Emrah; Tug, Niyazi

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to investigate whether the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) could be utilized to screen for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Subjects and methods NLR and PLR were assessed by retrospective analysis of 762 healthy and pregnant women with GDM. The patients were stratified into four groups, as follows: GDM (n=144), impaired glucose tolerance (n=76), only screen positive (n=238), and control (n=304). Results The leukocyte, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts were significantly higher in the study groups compared with the control group (P=0.001; P<0.01). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups with respect to the NLR and PLR (P>0.05). Conclusion We do not recommend that blood NLR and PLR can be used to screen for GDM. However, increase in the leukocyte count is an important marker for GDM as it provides evidence of subclinical inflammation. PMID:27217758

  6. GWAS identifies four novel eosinophilic esophagitis loci

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Patrick MA; Wang, Mei-Lun; Cianferoni, Antonella; Aceves, Seema; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Nadeau, Kari; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic disorder characterized by infiltration of the esophagus with eosinophils. We had previously reported association of the TSLP/WDR36 locus with EoE. Here we report genome-wide significant associations at four additional loci; c11orf30 and STAT6, which have been previously associated with both atopic and autoimmune disease, and two EoE-specific loci, ANKRD27 that regulates the trafficking of melanogenic enzymes to epidermal melanocytes and CAPN14, that encodes a calpain whose expression is highly enriched in the esophagus. The identification of five EoE loci, not only expands our etiological understanding of the disease but may also represent new therapeutic targets to treat the most debilitating aspect of EoE, esophageal inflammation and remodeling. PMID:25407941

  7. Radionuclide labeled lymphocytes for therapeutic use

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Fawwaz, Rashid A.; Richards, Powell

    1985-01-01

    Lymphocytes labelled with .beta.-emitting radionuclides are therapeutically useful, particularly for lymphoid ablation. They are prepared by incubation of the lymphocytes with the selected radionuclide-oxine complex.

  8. Radionuclide labeled lymphocytes for therapeutic use

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Richards, P.

    1983-05-03

    Lymphocytes labelled with ..beta..-emitting radionuclides are therapeutically useful, particularly for lymphoid ablation. They are prepared by incubation of the lymphocytes with the selected radionuclide-oxine complex.

  9. Functional inactivation of lymphocytes by methylene blue with visible light.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Cheng, Zhenzhen; Mo, Qin; Wang, Li; Wang, Xun; Wu, Xiaofei; Jia, Yao; Huang, Yuwen

    2015-10-01

    Transfusion of allogeneic white blood cells (WBCs) may cause adverse reactions in immunocompromised recipients, including transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), which is often fatal and incurable. In this study, the in vitro effect of methylene blue with visible light (MB + L) treatment on lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production was measured to investigate whether MB + L can be used to prevent immune reactions that result from transfused lymphocytes. WBCs and 3 μM of MB were mixed and transferred into medical PVC bags, which were then exposed to visible light. Gamma irradiation was conducted as a parallel positive control. The cells without treatment were used as untreated group. All the groups were tested for the ability of cell proliferation and cytokine production upon stimulation. After incubation with mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or plate-bound anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28, the proliferation of MB + L/gamma-irradiation treated lymphocytes was significantly inhibited (P < 0.01) as compared to the untreated ones; the proliferation inhibitive rate of the MB + L group was even higher than that of gamma-irradiated cells (73.77% ± 28.75% vs. 44.72% ± 38.20%). MB + L treated cells incubated up to 7 days with PHA also showed no significant proliferation. The levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-1β present in the supernatant of MB + L treated lymphocytes upon stimulation were significantly lower than those of untreated lymphocytes. These results demonstrated that MB + L treatment functionally and irreversibly inactivated lymphocytes by inhibiting lymphocyte proliferation and the production of cytokines. MB + L treatment might be a promising method for the prevention of adverse immune responses caused by WBCs.

  10. Squamous Tissue Lymphocytes in the Esophagus of Controls and Patients with Reflux Esophagitis and Barrett’s Esophagus Are Characterized by a Non-Inflammatory Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Alexandra; Koenderman, Leo; Kusters, Johannes G.; Siersema, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective Reflux esophagitis (RE) is characterized by inflammation of the squamous epithelium (SQ) of the esophagus and may progress to Barrett’s esophagus (BE) characterized by intestinal metaplasia. The role of inflammation in this transition has been postulated but lacks experimental evidence. Here, the inflammatory responses in the esophagus of these patients were investigated. Patients and Methods Fifty-one esophageal biopsies from with patients BE (n = 19), RE (n = 8) and controls (n = 23) were analyzed. T-cells were analyzed before and after ex vivo expansion (14 days) by multicolor flow cytometric analysis. The following markers were studied: CD3, CD4, CD8 (T-cell markers), Granzyme B (marker of cytotoxicity), CD103 (αE/epithelial integrin) and NKg2a (inhibitory receptor on T-cells and NK-cells). Results Analysis of ex vivo cultures from normal looking SQ from controls, RE patients, and BE patients revealed no significant differences in the number and phenotypes of T-cells. In contrast, tissue from RE was different to normal SQ in four aspects: 1) higher percentages of CD3+CD4+-cells (72±7% vs 48±6%, p = 0.01) and 2) CD8+GranzymeB+ -cells (53±11% vs 26±4%, p<0.05), while 3) lower percentages of CD4+CD103+-cells (45±19% vs 80±3%, p = 0.02) and 4) CD8+NKg2a+- cells (31±12% vs 44±5%). Conclusion Despite the fact that both tissues are exposed to the same reflux associated inflammatory triggers, the immune response observed in RE is clearly distinct from that in SQ of BE. The differences in immune responses in BE tissue might contribute to its susceptibility for transformation into intestinal metaplasia. PMID:25170842

  11. Real-Time Imaging of Resident T Cells in Human Lung and Ovarian Carcinomas Reveals How Different Tumor Microenvironments Control T Lymphocyte Migration.

    PubMed

    Bougherara, Houcine; Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Alifano, Marco; Ngô, Charlotte; Damotte, Diane; Le Frère-Belda, Marie-Aude; Donnadieu, Emmanuel; Peranzoni, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    T cells play a key role in the battle against cancer. To perform their antitumor activities, T cells need to adequately respond to tumor antigens by establishing contacts with either malignant cells or antigen-presenting cells. These latter functions rely on a series of migratory steps that go from entry of T cells into the tumor followed by their locomotion in the tumor stroma. Our knowledge of how T cells migrate within tumors mainly comes from experiments performed in mouse models. Whereas such systems have greatly advanced our understanding, they do not always faithfully recapitulate the disease observed in cancer patients. We previously described a technique based on tissue slices that enables to track with real-time imaging microscopy the motile behavior of fluorescent T cells plated onto fresh sections of human lung tumors. We have now refined this approach to monitor the locomotion of resident tumor-infiltrating CD8 T cells labeled with fluorescently coupled antibodies. Using this approach, our findings reveal that CD8 T cells accumulate in the stroma of ovarian and lung carcinomas but move slowly in this compartment. Conversely, even though less populated, tumors islets were found to be zones of faster migration for resident CD8 T cells. We also confirm the key role played by collagen fibers, which, by their orientation, spacing and density, control the distribution and migration of resident CD8 T cells within the tumor stroma. We have subsequently demonstrated that, under some physical tissue constraints, CD8 T cells exhibited a mode of migration characterized by alternate forward and backward movements. In sum, using an ex vivo assay to track CD8 T cells in fresh human tumor tissues, we have identified the extracellular matrix as a major stromal component in influencing T cell migration, thereby impacting the control of tumor growth. This approach will aid in the development and testing of novel immunotherapy strategies to promote T cell migration in

  12. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? It is important to have frank, honest discussions ... Your Doctor About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  13. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Should You Ask Your Doctor About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia? As you cope with cancer and cancer treatment, ... About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia? More In Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  14. What's New in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia What's New in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? Many ... person's outlook and whether they will need treatment. New drugs for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Dozens of new ...

  15. Variable lymphocyte receptors in hagfish

    PubMed Central

    Pancer, Zeev; Saha, Nil Ratan; Kasamatsu, Jun; Suzuki, Takashi; Amemiya, Chris T.; Kasahara, Masanori; Cooper, Max D.

    2005-01-01

    A previously uncharacterized type of variable lymphocyte receptors (VLR) was identified recently in the Sea lamprey. This jawless vertebrate generates an extensive VLR repertoire through differential insertion of neighboring diverse leucine-rich repeat (LRR) cassettes into an incomplete germ-line VLR gene. We report here VLR homologs from two additional lamprey species and the presence of two types of VLR genes in hagfish, the only other order of contemporary jawless vertebrates. As in the Sea lamprey, the incomplete hagfish germ-line VLR-A and -B genes are modified in lymphocyte-like cells to generate highly diverse repertoires of VLR-A and -B proteins via a presently undetermined mechanism. This jawless-fish mode of VLR diversification starkly contrasts with the rearrangement of Ig V(D)J gene segments used by all jawed vertebrates to produce diverse repertoires of T and B lymphocyte antigen receptors. The development of two very different strategies for receptor diversification at the dawn of vertebrate evolution ≈500 million years ago attests to the fitness value of a lymphocyte-based system of anticipatory immunity. PMID:15964979

  16. Treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; O'Brien, Susan M

    2004-04-01

    Treatment options for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia have changed over the past two decades. This article reviews the experience accumulated with the use of alkylating agents alone and in combination; purine analogues alone and in combination and monoclonal antibodies such as rituximab, and alemtuzumab alone and in combination. The results obtained with different treatment strategies are summarized, compared, and reviewed.

  17. Rapid exacerbation of lymphocytic infundibuloneurohypophysitis

    PubMed Central

    Shibue, Kimitaka; Fujii, Toshihito; Goto, Hisanori; Yamashita, Yui; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Tanji, Masahiro; Yasoda, Akihiro; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Lymphocytic hypophysitis is a relatively rare autoimmune disease defined by lymphocytic infiltration to the pituitary. Its rarity and wide spectrum of clinical manifestations make clarification of the pathology difficult. Here, we describe a case we examined from the primary diagnosis to final discharge, showing the serial progression of lymphocytic infundibuloneurohypophysitis (LINH) to panhypopituitarism with extrapituitary inflammatory invasion in a short period, and responding favorably to high-dose glucocorticoid treatment. Patient concerns: Polyuria, General fatigue and Nausea/Vomiting. Diagnoses: Central diabetes insipidus (CDI), Lymphocytic infundibuloneurohypophysitis (LINH). Interventions: Desmopressin acetate, High-dose glucocorticoid (GC) treatment. Outcomes: He was prescribed desmopressin acetate and subsequently discharged. A month later, he revisited our hospital with general fatigue and nausea/vomiting. A screening test disclosed hypopituitarism with adrenal insufficiency. MRI revealed expanded contrast enhancement to the peripheral extrapituitary lesion. He received high-dose GC treatment and the affected lesion exhibited marked improvement on MRI, along with the recovery of the anterior pituitary function. Lessons: This case demonstrates the potential for classical LINH to develop into panhypopituitarsim. We consider this is the first documentation of approaching the cause of atypical LINH with progressive clinical course from the pathological viewpoint. PMID:28248860

  18. Lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C.G.; Armstrong, G.D. )

    1990-12-01

    We have investigated human T-lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin by affinity isolation and photoaffinity labeling procedures. T lymphocytes were obtained from peripheral human blood, surface iodinated, and solubilized in Triton X-100. The iodinated mixture was then passed through pertussis toxin-agarose, and the fractions were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Autoradiography of the fixed, dried gels revealed several bands in the pertussis toxin-bound fraction that were not observed in fractions obtained from histone or fetuin-agarose. Further investigations employed a photoaffinity labeling reagent, sulfosuccinimidyl 2-(p-azido-salicylamido)-1,3'-dithiopropionate, to identify pertussis toxin receptors in freshly isolated peripheral blood monocytic cells, T lymphocytes, and Jurkat cells. In all three cell systems, the pertussis toxin affinity probe specifically labeled a single protein species with an apparent molecular weight of 70,000 that was not observed when the procedure was performed in the presence of excess unmodified pertussis toxin. A protein comparable in molecular weight to the one detected by the photoaffinity labeling technique was also observed among the species that bound to pertussis toxin-agarose. The results suggest that pertussis toxin may bind to a 70,000-Da receptor in human T lymphocytes.

  19. [Simulated weightlessness inhibits antitumor immunity of T lymphocytes in melanoma-bearing mice].

    PubMed

    Si, Shaoyan; Song, Shujun; Shi, Liang; Liu, Junli; Xu, Bingxin; Yi, Yong; Tan, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the effects of simulated weightlessness on antitumor immunity of T lymphocytes in mice. The malignant melanoma was xenografted by subcutaneous injection of B16 cells into the right hind limb of every mouse. The mice suspended by tail at a -15 degree to 20 degree head-down tilt were used as simulated weightlessness models. The effects of simulated weightlessness on tumor volume and survival time were observed. T the numbers of leucocytes, lymphocytes and T lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood of tumor-bearing mice under simulated weightlessness were monitored by an automatic hemacytometer and a flow cytometer. The effects of simulated weightlessness on the production of IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ in T lymphocytes and the cytotoxicities of tumor-specific CTLs to tumor cells were analyzed by ELISA and LDH release. Compared with control group, the tumors grew faster, the survival times were shorter, the number of lymphocytes, the ratio of lymphocytes, CD3(+);, CD4(+);/CD3(+); and CD8(+);/CD3(+); T lymphocytes in peripheral blood dropped, and the proliferation of splenic T lymphocytes induced by mitogen was reduced (P<0.05 or P<0.01) in the simulated weightlessness group. The production of IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ induced by tumor cells and cytotoxicities of tumor-specific CTLs to tumor cells were inhibited in mice under simulated weightlessness (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Simulated weightlessness inhibits antitumor immunity of T lymphocytes.

  20. Mixed lymphocyte culture stimulatory and responding capacity of lymphocytes from patients with lymphoproliferative diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Rühl, H; Vogt, W; Bochert, G; Schmidt, S; Moelle, R; Schaoua, H

    1975-01-01

    Lymphocyte reactivity in vitro was studied in patients with Hodgkin's disease, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and lymphosarcoma. The responding capacity to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) was markedly depressed and delayed in all three groups of patients compared with the PHA response observed in lymphocyte cultures from normal individuals. In one-way mixed lymphocyte culture experiments a significant decrease in responding capacity of the patients' lymphocytes to lymphocytes from normal donors could be demonstrated. In contrast, the stimulatory capacity of the patients' lymphocytes was found to be intact, or only slightly reduced. PMID:128426

  1. Memory B lymphocytes determine repertoire oligoclonality early after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    OMAZIC, B; LUNDKVIST, I; MATTSSON, J; PERMERT, J; NÄSMAN-BJÖRK, I

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate if oligoclonality of the Ig repertoire post-haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is restricted to memory B lymphocytes or if it is a general property among B lymphocytes. As a measure of B lymphocyte repertoire diversity, we have analysed size distribution of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified Ig H complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) in naive and memory B lymphocytes isolated from patients before HSCT and at 3, 6 and 12 months after HSCT as well as from healthy controls. We demonstrate a limited variation of the IgH CDR3 repertoire in the memory B lymphocyte population compared to the naive B cell population. This difference was significant at 3 and 6 months post-HSCT. Compared to healthy controls there is a significant restriction of the memory B lymphocyte repertoire at 3 months after HSCT, but not of the naive B lymphocyte repertoire. Twelve months after HSCT, the IgH CDR3 repertoire in both memory and naive B lymphocytes are as diverse as in healthy controls. Thus, our findings suggest a role for memory B cells in the restriction of the oligoclonal B cell repertoire observed early after HSCT, which may be of importance when considering reimmunization of transplanted patients. PMID:12974769

  2. GWAS meta-analysis and replication identifies three new susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Ramus, Susan J.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Lawrenson, Kate; Price, Melissa; Fridley, Brooke L.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Shen, Howard; Weber, Rachel; Karevan, Rod; Larson, Melissa C.; Song, Honglin; Tessier, Daniel C.; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie M.; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Aben, Katja K.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Armasu, Sebastian M.; Baglietto, Laura; Bandera, Elisa V.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Birrer, Michael J.; Bloom, Greg; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brenton, James D.; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brown, Robert; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian; Carney, Michael E; Carvalho, Renato S.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Y. Anne; Chen, Zhihua; Chow, Wong-Ho; Cicek, Mine S.; Coetzee, Gerhard; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Despierre, Evelyn; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Dürst, Matthias; Eccles, Diana; Edwards, Robert; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fenstermacher, David; Flanagan, James; Gao, Yu-Tang; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham; Gjyshi, Anxhela; Gore, Martin; Gronwald, Jacek; Guo, Qi; Halle, Mari K; Harter, Philipp; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hillemanns, Peter; Hoatlin, Maureen; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus K.; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Konecny, Gottfried E.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Nathan; Lee, Janet; Leminen, Arto; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lubiński, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Lurie, Galina; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Nakanishi, Toru; Narod, Steven A.; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nickels, Stefan; Noushmehr, Houtan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara; Orlow, Irene; Paul, James; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Qu, Xiaotao; Risch, Harvey A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schwaab, Ira; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hui; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Sieh, Weiva; Southey, Melissa C.; Spellman, Paul; Tajima, Kazuo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Berg, David Van Den; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vitonis, Allison F.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wik, Elisabeth; Winterhoff, Boris; Woo, Yin Ling; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah P.; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Zulkifli, Famida; Goodman, Marc T.; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Pearce, Celeste L; Berchuck, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Iversen, Edwin; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Gayther, Simon A.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Sellers, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified four susceptibility loci for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) with another two loci being close to genome-wide significance. We pooled data from a GWAS conducted in North America with another GWAS from the United Kingdom. We selected the top 24,551 SNPs for inclusion on the iCOGS custom genotyping array. Follow-up genotyping was carried out in 18,174 cases and 26,134 controls from 43 studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. We validated the two loci at 3q25 and 17q21 previously near genome-wide significance and identified three novel loci associated with risk; two loci associated with all EOC subtypes, at 8q21 (rs11782652, P=5.5×10-9) and 10p12 (rs1243180; P=1.8×10-8), and another locus specific to the serous subtype at 17q12 (rs757210; P=8.1×10-10). An integrated molecular analysis of genes and regulatory regions at these loci provided evidence for functional mechanisms underlying susceptibility that implicates CHMP4C in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. PMID:23535730

  3. Evaluation of Genome Wide Association Study Associated Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility Loci in Sub Saharan Africans

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemo, Adebowale A.; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Doumatey, Ayo P.; Bentley, Amy R.; Chen, Guanjie; Huang, Hanxia; Zhou, Jie; Shriner, Daniel; Fasanmade, Olufemi; Okafor, Godfrey; Eghan, Benjamin; Agyenim-Boateng, Kofi; Adeleye, Jokotade; Balogun, Williams; Elkahloun, Abdel; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Owusu, Samuel; Amoah, Albert; Acheampong, Joseph; Johnson, Thomas; Oli, Johnnie; Adebamowo, Clement; Collins, Francis; Dunston, Georgia; Rotimi, Charles N.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) for type 2 diabetes (T2D) undertaken in European and Asian ancestry populations have yielded dozens of robustly associated loci. However, the genomics of T2D remains largely understudied in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where rates of T2D are increasing dramatically and where the environmental background is quite different than in these previous studies. Here, we evaluate 106 reported T2D GWAS loci in continental Africans. We tested each of these SNPs, and SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with these index SNPs, for an association with T2D in order to assess transferability and to fine map the loci leveraging the generally reduced LD of African genomes. The study included 1775 unrelated Africans (1035 T2D cases, 740 controls; mean age 54 years; 59% female) enrolled in Nigeria, Ghana, and Kenya as part of the Africa America Diabetes Mellitus (AADM) study. All samples were genotyped on the Affymetrix Axiom PanAFR SNP array. Forty-one of the tested loci showed transferability to this African sample (p < 0.05, same direction of effect), 11 at the exact reported SNP and 30 others at SNPs in LD with the reported SNP (after adjustment for the number of tested SNPs). TCF7L2 SNP rs7903146 was the most significant locus in this study (p = 1.61 × 10−8). Most of the loci that showed transferability were successfully fine-mapped, i.e., localized to smaller haplotypes than in the original reports. The findings indicate that the genetic architecture of T2D in SSA is characterized by several risk loci shared with non-African ancestral populations and that data from African populations may facilitate fine mapping of risk loci. The study provides an important resource for meta-analysis of African ancestry populations and transferability of novel loci. PMID:26635871

  4. Sodium fluoride induces apoptosis in cultured splenic lymphocytes from mice

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hengmin; Chen, Lian; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Wang, Xun; Zhao, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Though fluorine has been shown to induce apoptosis in immune organs in vivo, there has no report on fluoride-induced apoptosis in the cultured lymphocytes. Therefore, this study was conducted with objective of investigating apoptosis induced by sodium fluoride (NaF) and the mechanism behind that in the cultured splenic lymphocytes by flow cytometry, western blot and Hoechst 33258 staining. The splenic lymphocytes were isolated from 3 weeks old male ICR mice and exposed to NaF (0, 100, 200, and 400 μmol/L) in vitro for 24 and 48 h. When compared to control group, flow cytometry assay and Hoechst 33258 staining showed that NaF induced lymphocytes apoptosis, which was promoted by decrease of mitochondria transmembrane potential, up-regulation of Bax, Bak, Fas, FasL, caspase 9, caspase 8, caspase 7, caspase 6 and caspase 3 protein expression (P < 0.05 or P <0.01), and down-regulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL protein expression (P <0.05 or P <0.01). The above-mentioned data suggested that NaF-induced apoptosis in splenic lymphocytes could be mediated by mitochondrial and death receptor pathways. PMID:27655720

  5. Chemokine receptor patterns in lymphocytes mirror metastatic spreading in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Jacquelot, Nicolas; Enot, David P.; Flament, Caroline; Vimond, Nadège; Blattner, Carolin; Pitt, Jonathan M.; Roberti, María Paula; Daillère, Romain; Vétizou, Marie; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Semeraro, Michaëla; Caignard, Anne; Slingluff, Craig L.; Sallusto, Federica; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Weide, Benjamin; Marabelle, Aurélien; Kohrt, Holbrook; Dalle, Stéphane; Cavalcanti, Andréa; Kroemer, Guido; Di Giacomo, Anna Maria; Maio, Michele; Wong, Phillip; Yuan, Jianda; Wolchok, Jedd; Umansky, Viktor; Eggermont, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma prognosis is dictated by tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, the migratory and functional behavior of which is guided by chemokine or cytokine gradients. Here, we retrospectively analyzed the expression patterns of 9 homing receptors (CCR/CXCR) in naive and memory CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in 57 patients with metastatic melanoma (MMel) with various sites of metastases to evaluate whether T cell CCR/CXCR expression correlates with intratumoral accumulation, metastatic progression, and/or overall survival (OS). Homing receptor expression on lymphocytes strongly correlated with MMel dissemination. Loss of CCR6 or CXCR3, but not cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA), on circulating T cell subsets was associated with skin or lymph node metastases, loss of CXCR4, CXCR5, and CCR9 corresponded with lung involvement, and a rise in CCR10 or CD103 was associated with widespread dissemination. High frequencies of CD8+CCR9+ naive T cells correlated with prolonged OS, while neutralizing the CCR9/CCL25 axis in mice stimulated tumor progression. The expansion of CLA-expressing effector memory CD8+ T cells in response to a single administration of CTLA4 blockade predicted disease control at 3 months in 47 patients with MMel. Thus, specific CCR/CXCR expression patterns on circulating T lymphocytes may guide potential diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:26854930

  6. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tönu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-01-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have raised the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional follow-up of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

  7. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways.

    PubMed

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tõnu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-09-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have increased the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin concentration showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional analysis of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control.

  8. Platelet inhibition of human lymphocyte PHA-induced blastoid transformation.

    PubMed

    Cress, D C; Metcalf, W K

    1975-01-01

    The reduced PHA responsiveness of human lymphocytes obtained from heparinized as compared to defibrinated blood has been shown to be due to platelet contamination in the former. Inhibition of blastoid transformation and lymphocyte death is directly related to the number of platelets added to a culture. Divalent ions partially reduce this platelet inhibitor phenomenon but do not block if completely. The "toxic" platelet components appear to be localized in the membranes and particulate matter after homogenization and hard centrifugation. Comparative studies of PHA transformation must control platelet contamination of the cultures in order to avoid severe difficulties of interpretation.

  9. Lymphocyte migration in the adoptive transfer of EAU

    SciTech Connect

    Palestine, A.G.; Mc Allister, C.; Carter, C.; Keenan, A.M.; Vistica, B.; Gery, I.; Davey, R.; Nussenblatt, R.

    1986-04-01

    Experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) was transferred into naive male Lewis rats using 1 X 10(8) indium-111 labeled lymphocytes from syngeneic donors immunized with S-antigen. The migration of the lymphocytes was monitored by gamma camera imaging and by determining the accumulation of radioactivity in selected organs. The majority of the cells leave the peritoneal cavity within 24 hr and migrate to the liver, spleen, and thymus. Only a small fraction of the labeled cells reach the eye. However, there were significantly more labeled cells present in eyes that developed EAU as compared with controls using lymphocytes sensitized against bovine serum albumin. These results indicate the adoptive transfer of EAU is a complex process in which only a small number of transferred cells actually reach the eye to induce uveoretinitis.

  10. Antigen-specific lymphocyte transformation in patients with recent yersiniosis.

    PubMed

    Vuento, R

    1983-04-01

    Lymphocyte transformation in patients with recent yersiniosis was studied. A micromethod using washed blood cells and Yersinia enterocolitica antigen was employed. The washed blood cells were incubated in the presence of various dilutions of heat-treated whole bacteria; these proved as antigen superior to gentamicin- or formalin-treated bacteria. Patients with recent yersiniosis had a significantly higher response against Yersinia antigen as compared to 20 healthy controls, who had either no response or a low response. No difference could be observed in responses against PPD or streptokinase-streptodornase, or in the mitogen responses between these two groups. A marked cross-reaction was observed between Yersinia and Escherichia coli antigen. The results show that patients with recent yersiniosis develop lymphocyte transformation response against Yersinia. Lymphocyte transformation test can be used in the study of host responses against infecting Yersinia in patients with different clinical pictures of yersiniosis.

  11. Cell cycle RNA regulons coordinating early lymphocyte development.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Alison; Turner, Martin

    2017-09-01

    Lymphocytes undergo dynamic changes in gene expression as they develop from progenitor cells lacking antigen receptors, to mature cells that are prepared to mount immune responses. While transcription factors have established roles in lymphocyte development, they act in concert with post-transcriptional and post-translational regulators to determine the proteome. Furthermore, the post-transcriptional regulation of RNA regulons consisting of mRNAs whose protein products act cooperatively allows RNA binding proteins to exert their effects at multiple points in a pathway. Here, we review recent evidence demonstrating the importance of RNA binding proteins that control the cell cycle in lymphocyte development and discuss the implications for tumorigenesis. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1419. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1419 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 The Authors. WIREs RNA published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Cholinergic regulatory lymphocytes reestablish neuromodulation of innate immune responses in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Geber; Cai, Bolin; Ramos, Laura; Vida, Gergely; Deitch, Edwin A.; Ulloa, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Many anti-inflammatory strategies successful in healthy animals fail in clinical trials for sepsis, in part, because sepsis normally involves immunocompromised patients, and massive lymphocyte apoptosis prevents immunomodulation. Here we report a new set of regulatory lymphocytes able to reestablish the cholinergic anti-inflammatory modulation and to provide therapeutic advantages in sepsis. Vagus nerve controls inflammation in healthy, but not in septic mice. Likewise, vagus nerve and cholinergic agonists fail to control inflammation in splenectomized and nude animals. Unlike typical suppressor CD25+ cells, CD4+CD25− lymphocytes reestablish the anti-inflammatory potential of the vagus nerve and cholinergic agonists in immunocompromised and septic animals. These cholinergic lymphocytes reestablish splenic protection and the potential of cholinergic agonists to rescue immunocompromised animals from established sepsis. These results reveal these new regulatory lymphocytes as the first known physiological target for neuromodulation of the innate immune responses, and a potential therapeutic target for sepsis. PMID:21666060

  13. Fludarabine Phosphate, Radiation Therapy, and Rituximab in Treating Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Rituximab for High-Risk Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  14. High-density genotyping of immune-related loci identifies new SLE risk variants in individuals with Asian ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E.; Looger, Loren L.; Zhou, Xu-jie; Kim, Kwangwoo; Okada, Yukinori; Ma, Jianyang; Qi, Yuan-yuan; Kim-Howard, Xana; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Bhattarai, Krishna; Adler, Adam; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Kochi, Yuta; Suzuki, Akari; Kubo, Michiaki; Sumida, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Young Jin; Han, Bok-Ghee; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Wren, Jonathan D.; Harley, John B.; Shen, Nan; Chua, Kek Heng; Zhang, Hong; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Nath, Swapan K.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a strong but incompletely understood genetic architecture. We conducted an association study with replication in 4,492 SLE cases and 12,675 controls from six East-Asian cohorts, to identify novel and better localize known SLE susceptibility loci. We identified 10 novel loci as well as 20 known loci with genome-wide significance. Among the novel loci, the most significant was GTF2IRD1-GTF2I at 7q11.23 (rs73366469, Pmeta=3.75×10−117, OR=2.38), followed by DEF6, IL12B, TCF7, TERT, CD226, PCNXL3, RASGRP1, SYNGR1 and SIGLEC6. We localized the most likely functional variants for each locus by analyzing epigenetic marks and gene regulation data. Ten putative variants are known to alter cis- or trans-gene expression. Enrichment analysis highlights the importance of these loci in B- and T-cell biology. Together with previously known loci, the explained heritability of SLE increases to 24%. Novel loci share functional and ontological characteristics with previously reported loci, and are possible drug targets for SLE therapeutics. PMID:26808113

  15. Multiple Loci are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in Irish wolfhounds.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Ute; Vollmar, Andrea; Häggström, Jens; Thomas, Anne; Distl, Ottmar

    2012-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a highly prevalent and often lethal disease in Irish wolfhounds. Complex segregation analysis indicated different loci involved in pathogenesis. Linear fixed and mixed models were used for the genome-wide association study. Using 106 DCM cases and 84 controls we identified one SNP significantly associated with DCM on CFA37 and five SNPs suggestively associated with DCM on CFA1, 10, 15, 21 and 17. On CFA37 MOGAT1 and ACSL3 two enzymes of the lipid metabolism were located near the identified SNP.

  16. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-18

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  17. Genome-wide association study identifies 12 new susceptibility loci for primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Mells, George F; Floyd, James A B; Morley, Katherine I; Cordell, Heather J; Franklin, Christopher S; Shin, So-Youn; Heneghan, Michael A; Neuberger, James M; Donaldson, Peter T; Day, Darren B; Ducker, Samantha J; Muriithi, Agnes W; Wheater, Elizabeth F; Hammond, Christopher J; Dawwas, Muhammad F; Jones, David E; Peltonen, Leena; Alexander, Graeme J; Sandford, Richard N; Anderson, Carl A

    2011-03-13

    In addition to the HLA locus, six genetic risk factors for primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) have been identified in recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS). To identify additional loci, we carried out a GWAS using 1,840 cases from the UK PBC Consortium and 5,163 UK population controls as part of the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). We followed up 28 loci in an additional UK cohort of 620 PBC cases and 2,514 population controls. We identified 12 new susceptibility loci (at a genome-wide significance level of P < 5 × 10⁻⁸) and replicated all previously associated loci. We identified three further new loci in a meta-analysis of data from our study and previously published GWAS results. New candidate genes include STAT4, DENND1B, CD80, IL7R, CXCR5, TNFRSF1A, CLEC16A and NFKB1. This study has considerably expanded our knowledge of the genetic architecture of PBC.

  18. Changes in lymphocyte subsets after short-term pharmacotherapy in patients with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youl-Ri; Park, Quehn; Yu, Bum-Hee

    2004-09-30

    Panic disorder is associated with a high frequency of comorbid immunological diseases, such as allergies and asthma, although the psychoneuroimmunology of panic disorder is relatively unexplored. The objective of this study was to determine whether panic patients have different immunological findings compared with normal healthy subjects and whether changes in immune function are associated with short-term pharmacotherapy. We also examined whether immunological variables were associated with clinical severity and serum catecholamine levels. Patients with panic disorder (n=26) and healthy control subjects (n=26) were recruited for this study. All patients were treated with paroxetine for 3 months. We measured the lymphocyte subsets, psychopathological characteristics and serum catecholamine (norepinephrine and epinephrine) levels. Panic patients did not differ initially from control subjects in peripheral lymphocyte phenotypic markers. After drug therapy, however, percentages of circulating CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes were significantly increased, while the percentage of CD19+ B lymphocytes was significantly decreased in the patients. The difference in the percentage of CD8+ T lymphocytes before and after treatment was negatively correlated with pretreatment Global Clinical Impression scores. The lymphocyte subsets were not significantly associated with serum catecholamine levels in panic patients. In conclusion, panic patients showed increased CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte proportions and a decreased B lymphocyte proportion after 3 months of drug therapy. This finding suggests that pharmacological treatment may affect immune function in panic patients.

  19. Variant of TYR and Autoimmunity Susceptibility Loci in Generalized Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ying; Birlea, Stanca A.; Fain, Pamela R.; Gowan, Katherine; Riccardi, Sheri L.; Holland, Paulene J.; Mailloux, Christina M.; Sufit, Alexandra J.D.; Hutton, Saunie M.; Amadi-Myers, Anita; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Wallace, Margaret R.; McCormack, Wayne T.; Kemp, E. Helen; Gawkrodger, David J.; Weetman, Anthony P.; Picardo, Mauro; Leone, Giovanni; Taïeb, Alain; Jouary, Thomas; Ezzedine, Khaled; van Geel, Nanny; Lambert, Jo; Overbeck, Andreas; Spritz, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Generalized vitiligo is an autoimmune disease characterized by melanocyte loss, which results in patchy depigmentation of skin and hair, and is associated with an elevated risk of other autoimmune diseases. METHODS To identify generalized vitiligo susceptibility loci, we conducted a genomewide association study. We genotyped 579,146 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1514 patients with generalized vitiligo who were of European-derived white (CEU) ancestry and compared the genotypes with publicly available control genotypes from 2813 CEU persons. We then tested 50 SNPs in two replication sets, one comprising 677 independent CEU patients and 1106 CEU controls and the other comprising 183 CEU simplex trios with generalized vitiligo and 332 CEU multiplex families. RESULTS We detected significant associations between generalized vitiligo and SNPs at several loci previously associated with other autoimmune diseases. These included genes encoding major-histocompatibility-complex class I molecules (P = 9.05×10−23) and class II molecules (P = 4.50×10−34), PTPN22 (P = 1.31×10−7), LPP (P = 1.01×10−11), IL2RA (P = 2.78×10−9), UBASH3A (P = 1.26×10−9), and C1QTNF6 (P = 2.21×10−16). We also detected associations between generalized vitiligo and SNPs in two additional immune-related loci, RERE (P = 7.07×10−15) and GZMB (P = 3.44×10−8), and in a locus containing TYR (P = 1.60×10−18), encoding tyrosinase. CONCLUSIONS We observed associations between generalized vitiligo and markers implicating multiple genes, some associated with other autoimmune diseases and one (TYR) that may mediate target-cell specificity and indicate a mutually exclusive relationship between susceptibility to vitiligo and susceptibility to melanoma. PMID:20410501

  20. [B lymphocyte ontogeny].

    PubMed

    Balandrán, Juan Carlos; Pelayo, Rosana

    2016-01-01

    The B cell development from hematopoietic stem cells is a continuous and highly regulated process where multiple differentiation potentials are gradually lost while acquiring lineage specialized functions. At 50 years of the B cell discovery, the current knowledge of its early differentiation largely derive from the isolation and characterization of bone marrow early progenitor cells initiating the lymphoid program, and from the definition of transcriptional activity patterns that control cell fate decisions. Of particular relevance has been the intercommunication between B cell precursors and key components of the hematopoietic microenvironment, both for generation of novel models integrating all regulatory elements of this complex process, and for the understanding of this branch of the adaptive immune system in disease settings. This review provides an overview of the complex process of lymphoid differentiation: from the hierarchical organization and biological characteristics of primitive cells involved in its earliest stages, to the principles governing its interdependence with the hematopoietic microenvironment.

  1. Investigation of Crohn’s Disease Risk Loci in Ulcerative Colitis Further Defines Their Molecular Relationship

    PubMed Central

    ANDERSON, CARL A.; MASSEY, DUNECAN C. O.; BARRETT, JEFFREY C.; PRESCOTT, NATALIE J.; TREMELLING, MARK; FISHER, SHEILA A.; GWILLIAM, RHIAN; JACOB, JEMIMA; NIMMO, ELAINE R.; DRUMMOND, HAZEL; LEES, CHARLIE W.; ONNIE, CLIVE M.; HANSON, CATHERINE; BLASZCZYK, KATARZYNA; RAVINDRARAJAH, RADHI; HUNT, SARAH; VARMA, DHIRAJ; HAMMOND, NAOMI; LEWIS, GREGORY; ATTLESEY, HEATHER; WATKINS, NICK; OUWEHAND, WILLEM; STRACHAN, DAVID; MCARDLE, WENDY; LEWIS, CATHRYN M.; LOBO, ALAN; SANDERSON, JEREMY; JEWELL, DEREK P.; DELOUKAS, PANOS; MANSFIELD, JOHN C.; MATHEW, CHRISTOPHER G.; SATSANGI, JACK; PARKES, MILES

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Identifying shared and disease-specific susceptibility loci for Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) would help define the biologic relationship between the inflammatory bowel diseases. More than 30 CD susceptibility loci have been identified. These represent important candidate susceptibility loci for UC. Loci discovered by the index genome scans in CD have previously been tested for association with UC, but those identified in the recent meta-analysis await such investigation. Furthermore, the recently identified UC locus at ECM1 requires formal testing for association with CD. Methods We analyzed 45 single nucleotide polymorphisms, tagging 29 of the loci recently associated with CD in 2527 UC cases and 4070 population controls. We also genotyped the UC-associated ECM1 variant rs11205387 in 1560 CD patients and 3028 controls. Results Nine regions showed association with UC at a threshold corrected for the 29 loci tested (P < .0017). The strongest association (P = 4.13 × 10-8; odds ratio = 1.27) was identified with a 170-kilobase region on chromosome 1q32 that contains 3 genes. We also found association with JAK2 and replicated a recently reported association with STAT3, further implicating the role of this signaling pathway in inflammatory bowel disease. Additional novel UC susceptibility genes were LYRM4 and CDKAL1. Twenty of the loci were not associated with UC, and several appear to be specific to CD. ECM1 variation was not associated with CD. Conclusions Collectively, these data help define the genetic relationship between CD and UC and characterize common, as well as disease-specific mechanisms of pathogenesis. PMID:19068216

  2. Lymphocytic hypophysitis in a man.

    PubMed

    Guay, A T; Agnello, V; Tronic, B C; Gresham, D G; Freidberg, S R

    1987-03-01

    Fewer than 20 patients with lymphocytic adenohypophysitis have been reported, all of them women, and it usually occurs during pregnancy or the postpartum period. We report the recognition of lymphocytic adenohypophysitis in a man. The patient presented with anterior hypopituitarism and an intrasellar mass on computed tomography. Antipituitary antibodies, found in only one of the previous patients, were not present in this man, although low titer antinuclear antibodies were found. The implications of this latter finding are unclear. The patient's histocompatibility antigen (HLA) types were A2, B8, Bw58, DR1, and DR5. The degree of pituitary failure seemed out of proportion to the size of the mass seen on computed tomographic scan.

  3. [Polymorphism of the cultivated barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) of South Arabia at hordein-coding loci].

    PubMed

    Pomortsev, A A; Lialina, E V

    2007-05-01

    Electrophoresis in starch gel was used to study the polymorphism of hordeins controlled by loci Hrd A, Hrd B, and Hrd F in 89 samples of the local barleys from South Arabia (Yemen). Overall, 36 alleles were detected for locus Hrd A; 48 alleles, for Hrd B; and 5 alleles, for Hrd F. The existence of the blocks of hordein components controlled by loci Hrd A and Hrd B was demonstrated. Calculation of genetic distances allows us to conclude that the barley populations from Yemen and Ethiopia are more similar compared with the populations from Egypt. This confirms the hypothesis of Bakhteev on the origin of Ethiopian barleys.

  4. Lymphocytic enteritis in a filly.

    PubMed

    Clark, E S; Morris, D D; Allen, D; Tyler, D E

    1988-11-15

    A yearling Hanoverian filly had intermittent colic for 6 weeks, chylous peritoneal effusion, and a firm mass palpable per rectum. Exploratory laparotomy revealed mesenteric lymphadenopathy, adhesion of the mesenteric root to the duodenum and jejunum, distention of the mesenteric veins and lymphatic vessels, and increased jejunal venous pressure. Lesions in the duodenum, jejunum, and colon included infiltration of lymphocytes and plasma cells in the lamina propria.

  5. Characterization of microsatellite loci for the littorine snail Bembicium vittatum.

    PubMed

    Kennington, W J; Lukehurst, S S; Johnson, M S

    2008-11-01

    We describe the isolation and development of 17 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the intertidal snail Bembicium vittatum (Gastropoda: Littorinidae). The loci were tested in 46 individuals from a single population situated near the centre of the species distribution. No evidence of linkage disequilibrium was detected between any pair of loci. However, two loci showed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg expectations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 15. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Generation and Repair of AID-initiated DNA Lesions in B Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhangguo; Wang, Jing H.

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates the secondary antibody diversification process in B lymphocytes. In mammalian B cells, this process includes somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR), both of which require AID. AID induces U:G mismatch lesions in DNA that are subsequently converted into point mutations or DNA double stranded breaks during SHM/CSR. In a physiological context, AID targets immunoglobulin (Ig) loci to mediate SHM/CSR. However, recent studies reveal genome-wide access of AID to numerous non-Ig loci. Thus, AID poses a threat to the genome of B cells if AID-initiated DNA lesions cannot be properly repaired. In this review, we focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate the specificity of AID targeting and the repair pathways responsible for processing AID-initiated DNA lesions. PMID:24748462

  7. Quality control of CD4+ T-lymphocyte enumeration: results from the last 9 years of the United Kingdom National External Quality Assessment Scheme for Immune Monitoring (1993-2001).

    PubMed

    Whitby, Liam; Granger, Viv; Storie, Ian; Goodfellow, Karen; Sawle, Alex; Reilly, John T; Barnett, David

    2002-04-15

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) global epidemic has necessitated the routine enumeration of T-lymphocyte subsets, which has created a need for external quality assurance (EQA). The United Kingdom National External Quality Assessment Scheme (UK NEQAS) for Immune Monitoring provides EQA for 296 laboratories in 40 countries. In 1993, UK NEQAS developed and incorporated into its program stabilized whole blood that enables the accurate monitoring of laboratory performance. Overall, the mean interlaboratory coefficient of variation (CV) for percentage CD4(+) T-lymphocyte subset enumeration has fallen from 15% to less than 5%, as a direct result of the increased use of CD45/ side scatter (SSC) gating. Laboratories using alternative gating strategies (i.e., CD45/CD14 or forward scatter [FSC]/SSC) were about 7.4 times more likely to fail an EQA exercise. Furthermore, the adoption of single-platform technology resulted in a reduction of the overall mean interlaboratory CV for absolute CD4(+) T lymphocytes from 56% (prior to the widespread use of single-platform technology) to 9.7%. Individual laboratory deficiencies were also identified using a performance monitoring system and, through re-education by collaboration with the coordinating center, satisfactorily resolved. In conclusion, during the last 9 years, the UK NEQAS for Immune Monitoring program has highlighted the significant technological advances made by laboratories worldwide that undertake lymphocyte subset enumeration.

  8. New Predictive Parameters of Bell's Palsy: Neutrophil to Lymphocyte Ratio and Platelet to Lymphocyte Ratio.

    PubMed

    Atan, Doğan; İkincioğulları, Aykut; Köseoğlu, Sabri; Özcan, Kürşat Murat; Çetin, Mehmet Ali; Ensari, Serdar; Dere, Hüseyin

    2015-04-01

    Bell's palsy is the most frequent cause of unilateral facial paralysis. Inflammation is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Bell's palsy. Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR) are simple and inexpensive tests which are indicative of inflammation and can be calculated by all physicians. The aim of this study was to reveal correlations of Bell's palsy and degree of paralysis with NLR and PLR. Case-control study. The retrospective study was performed January 2010 and December 2013. Ninety-nine patients diagnosed as Bell's palsy were included in the Bell's palsy group and ninety-nine healthy individuals with the same demographic characteristics as the Bell's palsy group were included in the control group. As a result of analyses, NLR and PLR were calculated. The mean NLR was 4.37 in the Bell's palsy group and 1.89 in the control group with a statistically significant difference (p<0.001). The mean PLR was 137.5 in the Bell's palsy group and 113.75 in the control group with a statistically significant difference (p=0.008). No statistically significant relation was detected between the degree of facial paralysis and NLR and PLR. The NLR and the PLR were significantly higher in patients with Bell's palsy. This is the first study to reveal a relation between Bell's palsy and PLR. NLR and PLR can be used as auxiliary parameters in the diagnosis of Bell's palsy.

  9. Lymphocyte subpopulations in Chinese women with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hongye; Wang, Dandan; Zhu, Haiyan; Li, Jie; Hu, Yali; Hou, Yayi

    2012-03-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is associated with deficiency of cellular and humoral immunity. However, the characteristics of lymphocyte subpopulations in Chinese women with TS have not been reported. In this study, the percentage of lymphocyte subpopulations and the mRNA expression of some transcription factors were determined in patients with TS. The effect of the hormone substitution on lymphocyte subpopulations was also analyzed. Thirteen Chinese TS women and eight age and sex-matched healthy volunteers were studied. The percentage and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of lymphocyte subpopulations including CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+, CD19-CD138+, CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ and CD4+CD8-IL17A+ cells were determined by flow cytometry. The mRNA expression of some transcription factors were detected by RT-PCR. Compared to control, the percentage of CD3+CD4+ cells was significantly reduced (p < 0.05), while the percentage of CD19-CD138+, CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ and CD4+CD8-IL17A+ cells was significantly increased in TS patients. No difference was observed in the percentage of CD3+CD8+, CD19+ B cells between TS patients and healthy volunteers, with the similar changes in the mean fluorescence intensity of these cells. The mRNA expression of some transcription factors slightly enhanced in TS patients. Estrogen therapy did not affect the percentage of lymphocyte subpopulations. These findings suggested that Turner syndrome might be associated with changes of lymphocyte subpopulations.

  10. Large-scale association analysis identifies new lung cancer susceptibility loci and heterogeneity in genetic susceptibility across histological subtypes.

    PubMed

    McKay, James D; Hung, Rayjean J; Han, Younghun; Zong, Xuchen; Carreras-Torres, Robert; Christiani, David C; Caporaso, Neil E; Johansson, Mattias; Xiao, Xiangjun; Li, Yafang; Byun, Jinyoung; Dunning, Alison; Pooley, Karen A; Qian, David C; Ji, Xuemei; Liu, Geoffrey; Timofeeva, Maria N; Bojesen, Stig E; Wu, Xifeng; Le Marchand, Loic; Albanes, Demetrios; Bickeböller, Heike; Aldrich, Melinda C; Bush, William S; Tardon, Adonina; Rennert, Gad; Teare, M Dawn; Field, John K; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Lazarus, Philip; Haugen, Aage; Lam, Stephen; Schabath, Matthew B; Andrew, Angeline S; Shen, Hongbing; Hong, Yun-Chul; Yuan, Jian-Min; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Pesatori, Angela C; Ye, Yuanqing; Diao, Nancy; Su, Li; Zhang, Ruyang; Brhane, Yonathan; Leighl, Natasha; Johansen, Jakob S; Mellemgaard, Anders; Saliba, Walid; Haiman, Christopher A; Wilkens, Lynne R; Fernandez-Somoano, Ana; Fernandez-Tardon, Guillermo; van der Heijden, Henricus F M; Kim, Jin Hee; Dai, Juncheng; Hu, Zhibin; Davies, Michael P A; Marcus, Michael W; Brunnström, Hans; Manjer, Jonas; Melander, Olle; Muller, David C; Overvad, Kim; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Tumino, Rosario; Doherty, Jennifer A; Barnett, Matt P; Chen, Chu; Goodman, Gary E; Cox, Angela; Taylor, Fiona; Woll, Penella; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, H-Erich; Manz, Judith; Muley, Thomas R; Risch, Angela; Rosenberger, Albert; Grankvist, Kjell; Johansson, Mikael; Shepherd, Frances A; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Arnold, Susanne M; Haura, Eric B; Bolca, Ciprian; Holcatova, Ivana; Janout, Vladimir; Kontic, Milica; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mukeria, Anush; Ognjanovic, Simona; Orlowski, Tadeusz M; Scelo, Ghislaine; Swiatkowska, Beata; Zaridze, David; Bakke, Per; Skaug, Vidar; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Duell, Eric J; Butler, Lesley M; Koh, Woon-Puay; Gao, Yu-Tang; Houlston, Richard S; McLaughlin, John; Stevens, Victoria L; Joubert, Philippe; Lamontagne, Maxime; Nickle, David C; Obeidat, Ma'en; Timens, Wim; Zhu, Bin; Song, Lei; Kachuri, Linda; Artigas, María Soler; Tobin, Martin D; Wain, Louise V; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir E; Reginsson, Gunnar W; Stefansson, Kari; Hancock, Dana B; Bierut, Laura J; Spitz, Margaret R; Gaddis, Nathan C; Lutz, Sharon M; Gu, Fangyi; Johnson, Eric O; Kamal, Ahsan; Pikielny, Claudio; Zhu, Dakai; Lindströem, Sara; Jiang, Xia; Tyndale, Rachel F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Bossé, Yohan; Chanock, Stephen; Brennan, Paul; Landi, Maria Teresa; Amos, Christopher I

    2017-07-01

    Although several lung cancer susceptibility loci have been identified, much of the heritability for lung cancer remains unexplained. Here 14,803 cases and 12,262 controls of European descent were genotyped on the OncoArray and combined with existing data for an aggregated genome-wide association study (GWAS) analysis of lung cancer in 29,266 cases and 56,450 controls. We identified 18 susceptibility loci achieving genome-wide significance, including 10 new loci. The new loci highlight the striking heterogeneity in genetic susceptibility across the histological subtypes of lung cancer, with four loci associated with lung cancer overall and six loci associated with lung adenocarcinoma. Gene expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis in 1,425 normal lung tissue samples highlights RNASET2, SECISBP2L and NRG1 as candidate genes. Other loci include genes such as a cholinergic nicotinic receptor, CHRNA2, and the telomere-related genes OFBC1 and RTEL1. Further exploration of the target genes will continue to provide new insights into the etiology of lung cancer.

  11. Large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association data identifies six new risk loci for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nalls, Mike A; Pankratz, Nathan; Lill, Christina M; Do, Chuong B; Hernandez, Dena G; Saad, Mohamad; DeStefano, Anita L; Kara, Eleanna; Bras, Jose; Sharma, Manu; Schulte, Claudia; Keller, Margaux F; Arepalli, Sampath; Letson, Christopher; Edsall, Connor; Stefansson, Hreinn; Liu, Xinmin; Pliner, Hannah; Lee, Joseph H; Cheng, Rong; Ikram, M Arfan; Ioannidis, John P A; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Bis, Joshua C; Martinez, Maria; Perlmutter, Joel S; Goate, Alison; Marder, Karen; Fiske, Brian; Sutherland, Margaret; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Myers, Richard H; Clark, Lorraine N; Stefansson, Kari; Hardy, John A; Heutink, Peter; Chen, Honglei; Wood, Nicholas W; Houlden, Henry; Payami, Haydeh; Brice, Alexis; Scott, William K; Gasser, Thomas; Bertram, Lars; Eriksson, Nicholas; Foroud, Tatiana; Singleton, Andrew B

    2014-09-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of Parkinson's disease genome-wide association studies using a common set of 7,893,274 variants across 13,708 cases and 95,282 controls. Twenty-six loci were identified as having genome-wide significant association; these and 6 additional previously reported loci were then tested in an independent set of 5,353 cases and 5,551 controls. Of the 32 tested SNPs, 24 replicated, including 6 newly identified loci. Conditional analyses within loci showed that four loci, including GBA, GAK-DGKQ, SNCA and the HLA region, contain a secondary independent risk variant. In total, we identified and replicated 28 independent risk variants for Parkinson's disease across 24 loci. Although the effect of each individual locus was small, risk profile analysis showed substantial cumulative risk in a comparison of the highest and lowest quintiles of genetic risk (odds ratio (OR) = 3.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.55-4.30; P = 2 × 10(-16)). We also show six risk loci associated with proximal gene expression or DNA methylation.

  12. Identification of Susceptibility Loci and Genes for Colorectal Cancer Risk.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chenjie; Matsuda, Koichi; Jia, Wei-Hua; Chang, Jiang; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Shin, Aesun; Jee, Sun Ha; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Zhang, Ben; Cai, Qiuyin; Guo, Xingyi; Long, Jirong; Wang, Nan; Courtney, Regina; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Wu, Chen; Takahashi, Atsushi; Shin, Min-Ho; Matsuo, Keitaro; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Gao, Yu-Tang; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Soriul; Jung, Keum Ji; Ahn, Yoon-Ok; Ren, Zefang; Li, Hong-Lan; Wu, Jie; Shi, Jiajun; Wen, Wanqing; Yang, Gong; Li, Bingshan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Brenner, Hermann; Schoen, Robert E; Küry, Sébastien; Gruber, Stephen B; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Stenzel, Stephanie L; Casey, Graham; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Kim, Hyeong-Rok; Jeong, Jin-Young; Park, Ji Won; Tajima, Kazuo; Cho, Sang-Hee; Kubo, Michiaki; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lin, Dongxin; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Zheng, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Known genetic factors explain only a small fraction of genetic variation in colorectal cancer (CRC). We conducted a genome-wide association study to identify risk loci for CRC. This discovery stage included 8027 cases and 22,577 controls of East-Asian ancestry. Promising variants were evaluated in studies including as many as 11,044 cases and 12,047 controls. Tumor-adjacent normal tissues from 188 patients were analyzed to evaluate correlations of risk variants with expression levels of nearby genes. Potential functionality of risk variants were evaluated using public genomic and epigenomic databases. We identified 4 loci associated with CRC risk; P values for the most significant variant in each locus ranged from 3.92 × 10(-8) to 1.24 × 10(-12): 6p21.1 (rs4711689), 8q23.3 (rs2450115, rs6469656), 10q24.3 (rs4919687), and 12p13.3 (rs11064437). We also identified 2 risk variants at loci previously associated with CRC: 10q25.2 (rs10506868) and 20q13.3 (rs6061231). These risk variants, conferring an approximate 10%-18% increase in risk per allele, are located either inside or near protein-coding genes that include transcription factor EB (lysosome biogenesis and autophagy), eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3, subunit H (initiation of translation), cytochrome P450, family 17, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 (steroidogenesis), splA/ryanodine receptor domain and SOCS box containing 2 (proteasome degradation), and ribosomal protein S2 (ribosome biogenesis). Gene expression analyses showed a significant association (P < .05) for rs4711689 with transcription factor EB, rs6469656 with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3, subunit H, rs11064437 with splA/ryanodine receptor domain and SOCS box containing 2, and rs6061231 with ribosomal protein S2. We identified susceptibility loci and genes associated with CRC risk, linking CRC predisposition to steroid hormone, protein synthesis and degradation, and autophagy pathways and providing added insight into the

  13. Genome scan for nonadditive heterotic trait loci reveals mainly underdominant effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Laiba, Efrat; Glikaite, Ilana; Levy, Yael; Pasternak, Zohar; Fridman, Eyal

    2016-04-01

    The overdominant model of heterosis explains the superior phenotype of hybrids by synergistic allelic interaction within heterozygous loci. To map such genetic variation in yeast, we used a population doubling time dataset of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 16 × 16 diallel and searched for major contributing heterotic trait loci (HTL). Heterosis was observed for the majority of hybrids, as they surpassed their best parent growth rate. However, most of the local heterozygous loci identified by genome scan were surprisingly underdominant, i.e., reduced growth. We speculated that in these loci adverse effects on growth resulted from incompatible allelic interactions. To test this assumption, we eliminated these allelic interactions by creating hybrids with local hemizygosity for the underdominant HTLs, as well as for control random loci. Growth of hybrids was indeed elevated for most hemizygous to HTL genes but not for control genes, hence validating the results of our genome scan. Assessing the consequences of local heterozygosity by reciprocal hemizygosity and allele replacement assays revealed the influence of genetic background on the underdominant effects of HTLs. Overall, this genome-wide study on a multi-parental hybrid population provides a strong argument against single gene overdominance as a major contributor to heterosis, and favors the dominance complementation model.

  14. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of subcutaneous versus intravenous rituximab plus chemotherapy as treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (SAWYER): a phase 1b, open-label, randomised controlled non-inferiority trial.

    PubMed

    Assouline, Sarit; Buccheri, Valeria; Delmer, Alain; Gaidano, Gianluca; Trneny, Marek; Berthillon, Natalia; Brewster, Michael; Catalani, Olivier; Li, Sai; McIntyre, Christine; Sayyed, Pakeeza; Badoux, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Part one of the two-part SAWYER study predicted that subcutaneous rituximab 1600 mg would achieve trough serum concentrations that were non-inferior to those achieved with intravenous rituximab 500 mg/m(2) in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. In part two of the study, we aimed to confirm the pharmacokinetic non-inferiority of subcutaneous rituximab, and investigate its safety and efficacy. We did this phase 1b, open-label, randomised controlled non-inferiority study at 68 centres in 19 countries in Europe, North America, South America, and Australasia. Patients aged 18 years or older with untreated chronic lymphocytic leukaemia were randomly assigned, via an interactive voice-response system with a permuted block randomisation scheme (block size of ten), to receive subcutaneous rituximab 1600 mg or intravenous rituximab 500 mg/m(2) plus fludarabine and cyclophosphamide every 4 weeks for up to six cycles. In cycle one, all patients received intravenous rituximab 375 mg/m(2). Randomisation was stratified by Binet stage and fludarabine and cyclophosphamide administration route (oral vs intravenous). Study investigators and patients were not masked to group allocation, but allocation was concealed from the statistician, clinical scientist, and clinical pharmacologist. The primary endpoint was trough serum concentration at cycle five, with a non-inferiority margin of 0·8 for the adjusted geometric mean ratio of the subcutaneous to the intravenous dose. We did the primary analysis in patients in the intention-to-treat population with complete pharmacokinetic data (pharmacokinetic population). This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01292603, and is ongoing, although the treatment stage is now complete. Between Aug 20, 2012, and June 17, 2013, we randomly assigned 176 patients to receive subcutaneous rituximab (n=88) or intravenous rituximab (n=88); 134 (76%) patients comprised the pharmacokinetic population. As of May 7, 2014, median

  15. Lymphocyte subpopulations in the blood of sheep persistently infected with border disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Burrells, C; Nettleton, P F; Reid, H W; Miller, H R; Hopkins, J; McConnell, I; Gorrell, M D; Brandon, M R

    1989-01-01

    The surface phenotypes of peripheral blood lymphocytes in groups of lambs and adult sheep persistently infected with Border disease virus (P-I BD) were compared with those of healthy controls. The proportion and number of lymphocytes bearing surface immunoglobulin (sIg+) and expressing class II MHC antigen (B cells) were significantly increased. A significant increase in CD1+ lymphocytes was also evident. Conversely, the proportion of T lymphocytes in P-I BD lambs was reduced. A marked reduction in the proportion of circulating lymphocytes expressing class I MHC antigen was also observed. These findings were not affected by differences in the strain of the virus responsible for the persistent infection. PMID:2787717

  16. Antibodies Against Membrane Interleukin 1α Activate Accessory Cells to Stimulate Proliferation of T Lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugui, Elsie M.; Almquist, Susan J.

    1990-02-01

    Some monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against interleukin (IL) 1α have been found to activate antigen-presenting cells (APC, human peripheral blood monocytes and B lymphocytes), so that unstimulated T lymphocytes cultured with them are induced to proliferate and secrete IL-2. Control mAbs of the same isotypes and mAbs against IL-11β do not activate APC. In the absence of APC, mAbs against IL-1α do not induce proliferation of T lymphocytes. Mitomycin C-treated activated APC still induce T-cell proliferation. Proliferation of T lymphocytes cannot be induced by culture supernatants and requires contact with APC activated by mAbs against IL-1α. The observations imply that surface membrane IL-1α can function as a triggering molecule on APC, which could play an important role in the initiation of immune responses by T lymphocytes.

  17. T-cell receptor gamma--delta lymphocytes and Eimeria vermiformis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, M E; Hesketh, P; Rothwell, L; Gramzinski, R A

    1996-01-01

    The role of T-cell receptor gamma--delta T lymphocytes in coccidiosis was examined by determining the course of infection with Eimeria vermiformis in BALB/c mice depleted of gamma--delta lymphocytes by treatment with GL3 monoclonal antibody. The replication of the parasite in primary infections was not greatly, or consistently, affected by this treatment, and there was no correlation between the extent of depletion of small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and the number of oocysts produced. The resistance of immunized mice to challenge was not compromised by depletion of intraintestinal epithelial lymphocytes when their depletion was effected at the time of primary infection and/or administration of the challenge inoculum. Thus, T-cell receptor gamma--delta T lymphocytes do not appear to be crucial to the establishment, or the control, of primary infection with E. vermiformis and are not principal mediators of the solid immunity to challenge that this infection induces. PMID:8890252

  18. Reduced lymphocyte activation in space: Role of cell-substratum interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gmuender, Felix K.; Kiess, M.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Lee, J.; Cogoli, Augusto

    1990-01-01

    The effect of substratum adhesiveness on lymphocyte responsiveness was investigated by reducing and blocking cell adhesion with poly-HEMA (poly (2-Hydroxyethyl Methacrylate)) in a simple on ground system. Cells grown on medium thick and thick poly-HEMA films were rounded in shape and displayed no signs of spreading. By contrast, on tissue culture plastic and very thin poly-HEMA films, they showed clear signs of spreading. The mitogenic response of lymphocytes grown on thick poly-HEMA films was reduced by up to 68 percent of the control (tissue culture plastic). Interferon gamma production was virtually nil when the cells were grown on the least adhesive substratum. These results show that activated lymphocytes need to anchor and spread prior to achieving an optimal proliferation response. It is concluded that decreased lymphocyte adhesion could contribute to the depressed in vitro lymphocyte responsiveness found in the microgravity conditions of space flight.

  19. Reduced lymphocyte activation in space - Role of cell-substratum interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gmuender, F. K.; Kiess, M.; Lee, J.; Cogoli, A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of substratum adhesiveness on lymphocyte responsiveness was investigated by reducing and blocking cell adhesion with poly-HEMA in a simple on ground system. Cells grown on medium thick and thick poly-HEMA films were rounded in shape and displayed no signs of spreading. By contrast, on tissue culture plastic and very thin poly-HEMA films, they showed clear signs of spreading. The mitogenic response of lymphocytes grown on thick poly-HEMA films was reduced by up to 68 percent of the control (tissue culture plastic). Interferon gamma production was virtually nil when the cells were grown on the least adhesive substratum. These results show that activated lymphocytes need to anchor and spread prior to achieving an optimal proliferation response. It is concluded that decreased lymphocyte adhesion could contribute to the depressed in vitro lymphocyte responsiveness found in the microgravity conditions of space flight.

  20. Two Susceptibility Loci Identified for Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Sonja I.; Wang, Zhaoming; Yeager, Meredith; Alavanja, Michael C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Amundadottir, Laufey; Andriole, Gerald; Freeman, Laura Beane; Campa, Daniele; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cornu, Jean-Nicolas; Cussenot, Olivier; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Grönberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian; Hutchinson, Amy; Hunter, David J.; Key, Timothy J.; Kolb, Suzanne; Koutros, Stella; Kraft, Peter; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindström, Sara; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Riboli, Elio; Schumacher, Fred; Siddiq, Afshan; Stanford, Janet L.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Travis, Ruth C.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Wilkund, Fredrik; Xu, Jianfeng; Zheng, S. Lilly; Yu, Kai; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Han; Sampson, Joshua; Black, Amanda; Jacobs, Kevin; Hoover, Robert N; Tucker, Margaret; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Most men diagnosed with prostate cancer will experience indolent disease; hence discovering genetic variants that distinguish aggressive from non-aggressive prostate cancer is of critical clinical importance for disease prevention and treatment. In a multistage, case-only genome-wide association study of 12,518 prostate cancer cases, we identify two loci associated with Gleason score, a pathological measure of disease aggressiveness: rs35148638 at 5q14.3 (RASA1, P=6.49×10-9) and rs78943174 at 3q26.31 (NAALADL2, P=4.18×10-8). In a stratified case-control analysis, the SNP at 5q14.3 appears specific for aggressive prostate cancer (P=8.85×10-5) with no association for non-aggressive prostate cancer compared to controls (P=0.57). The proximity of these loci to genes involved in vascular disease suggests potential biological mechanisms worthy of further investigation. PMID:25939597

  1. Modified expression of peripheral blood lymphocyte muscarinic cholinergic receptors in asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Cherubini, Emanuela; Tabbì, Luca; Scozzi, Davide; Mariotta, Salvatore; Galli, Elena; Carello, Rossella; Avitabile, Simona; Tayebati, Seyed Koshrow; Amenta, Francesco; De Vitis, Claudia; Mancini, Rita; Ricci, Alberto

    2015-07-15

    Lymphocytes possess an independent cholinergic system. We assessed the expression of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in lymphocytes from 49 asthmatic children and 10 age matched controls using Western blot. We demonstrated that CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressed M2 and M4 muscarinic receptors which density were significantly increased in asthmatic children in comparison with