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Sample records for loci controls resistance

  1. Multiple loci govern the bone marrow-derived immunoregulatory mechanism controlling dominant resistance to autoimmune orchitis.

    PubMed Central

    Meeker, N D; Hickey, W F; Korngold, R; Hansen, W K; Sudweeks, J D; Wardell, B B; Griffith, J S; Teuscher, C

    1995-01-01

    The existence of immunoregulatory genes conferring dominant resistance to autoimmunity is well documented. In an effort to better understand the nature and mechanisms of action of these genes, we utilized the murine model of autoimmune orchitis as a prototype. When the orchitis-resistant strain DBA/2J is crossed with the orchitis-susceptible strain BALB/cByJ, the F1 hybrid is completely resistant to the disease. By using reciprocal radiation bone marrow chimeras, the functional component mediating this resistance was mapped to the bone marrow-derived compartment. Resistance is not a function of either low-dose irradiation- or cyclophosphamide (20 mg/kg)-sensitive immunoregulatory cells, but can be adoptively transferred by primed splenocytes. Genome exclusion mapping identified three loci controlling the resistant phenotype. Orch3 maps to chromosome 11, whereas Orch4 and Orch5 map to the telomeric and centromeric regions of chromosome 1, respectively. All three genes are linked to a number of immunologically relevant candidate loci. Most significant, however, is the linkage of Orch3 to Idd4 and Orch5 to Idd5, two susceptibility genes which play a role in autoimmune insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes mellitus in the nonobese diabetic mouse. PMID:7777570

  2. QTL meta-analysis provides a comprehensive view of loci controlling partial resistance to Aphanomyces euteiches in four sources of resistance in pea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More knowledge about diversity of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) controlling polygenic disease resistance in natural genetic variation of crop species is required for durably improving plant genetic resistances to pathogens. Polygenic partial resistance to Aphanomyces root rot, due to Aphanomcyces eu...

  3. Identification of loci controlling non-host disease resistance in Arabidopsis against the leaf rust pathogen Puccinia triticina.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Reza; Hang, Cui; Kang, Jeong-Gu; Loake, Gary J

    2007-11-01

    SUMMARY Plant immunity against the majority of microbial pathogens is conveyed by a phenomenon termed non-host resistance (NHR). This multifactorial trait provides durable protection against a given pathogen species. We investigated the molecular basis of NHR in Arabidopsis against the wheat leaf rust pathogen, Puccinia triticina (Ptr). Urediospores germinated with high efficiency and grew randomly over the Arabidopsis leaf surface. However, only 12% of urediospores produced a germ tube that successfully located a stoma and just 0.2% of urediospores went on to produce a haustorium within a penetrated mesophyll cell. Attempted Ptr infection induced the production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs), nitric oxide (NO), salicylic acid (SA) and camalexin. The expression of SA, jasmonic acid (JA) and ROI-dependent genes was also detected. A series of well-characterized defence-related mutants were challenged with Ptr, but none of these lines exhibited significantly increased susceptibility to this fungus. Our findings also suggest that attempted Ptr infection triggers transient stomatal closure in Arabidopsis. We assessed the response of a collection of 79 geographically diverse Arabidopsis accessions to Ptr. Wa-1 plants supported a striking increase in Ptr substomatal vesicle frequency relative to all other tested accessions. Furthermore, SA and camalexin levels became elevated in Wa-1 plants relative to the Col reference line, in response to attempted Ptr infection. Additionally, the kinetics of SA-dependent gene expression was expedited in this accession relative to Col plants. To uncover the genetic architecture of NHR against Ptr, we assayed the response of the Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta (Ler) x Columbia (Col) recombinant inbred population to this fungus. Multiple small-to-medium effect quantitative trait loci were identified that govern the expression of NHR in Arabidopsis against Ptr.

  4. Identification of two loci for resistance to clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae Woronin) in Brassica rapa L.

    PubMed

    Suwabe, K; Tsukazaki, H; Iketani, H; Hatakeyama, K; Fujimura, M; Nunome, T; Fukuoka, H; Matsumoto, S; Hirai, M

    2003-10-01

    In an analysis of 114 F(2) individuals from a cross between clubroot-resistant and susceptible lines of Brassica rapa L., 'G004' and 'Hakusai Chukanbohon Nou 7' (A9709), respectively, we identified two loci, Crr1 and Crr2, for clubroot (caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae Woronin) resistance. Each locus segregated independently among the F(2) population, indicating that the loci reside on a different region of chromosomes or on different chromosomes. Genetic analysis showed that each locus had little effect on clubroot resistance by itself, indicating that these two loci are complementary for clubroot resistance. The resistance to clubroot was much stronger when both loci were homozygous for resistant alleles than when they were heterozygous. These results indicate that clubroot resistance in B. rapa is under oligogenic control and at least two loci are necessary for resistance.

  5. Multiple Avirulence Loci and Allele-Specific Effector Recognition Control the Pm3 Race-Specific Resistance of Wheat to Powdery Mildew[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Roffler, Stefan; Stirnweis, Daniel; Treier, Georges; Herren, Gerhard; Korol, Abraham B.; Wicker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In cereals, several mildew resistance genes occur as large allelic series; for example, in wheat (Triticum aestivum and Triticum turgidum), 17 functional Pm3 alleles confer agronomically important race-specific resistance to powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis). The molecular basis of race specificity has been characterized in wheat, but little is known about the corresponding avirulence genes in powdery mildew. Here, we dissected the genetics of avirulence for six Pm3 alleles and found that three major Avr loci affect avirulence, with a common locus_1 involved in all AvrPm3-Pm3 interactions. We cloned the effector gene AvrPm3a2/f2 from locus_2, which is recognized by the Pm3a and Pm3f alleles. Induction of a Pm3 allele-dependent hypersensitive response in transient assays in Nicotiana benthamiana and in wheat demonstrated specificity. Gene expression analysis of Bcg1 (encoded by locus_1) and AvrPm3 a2/f2 revealed significant differences between isolates, indicating that in addition to protein polymorphisms, expression levels play a role in avirulence. We propose a model for race specificity involving three components: an allele-specific avirulence effector, a resistance gene allele, and a pathogen-encoded suppressor of avirulence. Thus, whereas a genetically simple allelic series controls specificity in the plant host, recognition on the pathogen side is more complex, allowing flexible evolutionary responses and adaptation to resistance genes. PMID:26452600

  6. Mapping quantitative trait loci associated with barley net blotch resistance.

    PubMed

    Grewal, T S; Rossnagel, B G; Pozniak, C J; Scoles, G J

    2008-02-01

    Net blotch of barley, caused by Pyrenophora teres Drechs., is an important foliar disease worldwide. Deployment of resistant cultivars is the most economic and eco-friendly control method. This report describes mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with net blotch resistance in a doubled-haploid (DH) barley population using diversity arrays technology (DArT) markers. One hundred and fifty DH lines from the cross CDC Dolly (susceptible)/TR251 (resistant) were screened as seedlings in controlled environments with net-form net blotch (NFNB) isolates WRS858 and WRS1607 and spot-form net blotch (SFNB) isolate WRS857. The population was also screened at the adult-plant stage for NFNB resistance in the field in 2005 and 2006. A high-density genetic linkage map of 90 DH lines was constructed using 457 DArT and 11 SSR markers. A major NFNB seedling resistance QTL, designated QRpt6, was mapped to chromosome 6H for isolates WRS858 and WRS1607. QRpt6 was associated with adult-plant resistance in the 2005 and 2006 field trials. Additional QTL for NFNB seedling resistance to the more virulent isolate WRS858 were identified on chromosomes 2H, 4H, and 5H. A seedling resistance QTL (QRpts4) for the SFNB isolate WRS857 was detected on chromosome 4H as was a significant QTL (QRpt7) on chromosome 7H. Three QTL (QRpt6, QRpts4, QRpt7) were associated with resistance to both net blotch forms and lines with one or more of these demonstrated improved resistance. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers tightly linked to QRpt6 and QRpts4 were identified and validated in an unrelated barley population. The major 6H QTL, QRpt6, may provide adequate NFNB field resistance in western Canada and could be routinely selected for using molecular markers in a practical breeding program. PMID:18071668

  7. Temporal and multiple quantitative trait loci analyses of resistance to bacterial wilt in tomato permit the resolution of linked loci.

    PubMed

    Mangin, B; Thoquet, P; Olivier, J; Grimsley, N H

    1999-03-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne bacterium that causes the serious disease known as bacterial wilt in many plant species. In tomato, several QTL controlling resistance have been found, but in different studies, markers spanning a large region of chromosome 6 showed strong association with the resistance. By using two different approaches to analyze the data from a field test F3 population, we show that at least two separate loci approximately 30 cM apart on this chromosome are most likely involved in the resistance. First, a temporal analysis of the progression of symptoms reveals a distal locus early in the development of the disease. As the disease progresses, the maximum LOD peak observed shifts toward the proximal end of the chromosome, obscuring the distal locus. Second, although classical interval mapping could only detect the presence of one locus, a statistical "two-QTL model" test, specifically adapted for the resolution of linked QTL, strongly supported the hypothesis for the presence of two loci. These results are discussed in the context of current molecular knowledge about disease resistance genes on chromosome 6 and observations made by tomato breeders during the production of bacterial wilt-resistant varieties. PMID:10049932

  8. Temporal and multiple quantitative trait loci analyses of resistance to bacterial wilt in tomato permit the resolution of linked loci.

    PubMed Central

    Mangin, B; Thoquet, P; Olivier, J; Grimsley, N H

    1999-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne bacterium that causes the serious disease known as bacterial wilt in many plant species. In tomato, several QTL controlling resistance have been found, but in different studies, markers spanning a large region of chromosome 6 showed strong association with the resistance. By using two different approaches to analyze the data from a field test F3 population, we show that at least two separate loci approximately 30 cM apart on this chromosome are most likely involved in the resistance. First, a temporal analysis of the progression of symptoms reveals a distal locus early in the development of the disease. As the disease progresses, the maximum LOD peak observed shifts toward the proximal end of the chromosome, obscuring the distal locus. Second, although classical interval mapping could only detect the presence of one locus, a statistical "two-QTL model" test, specifically adapted for the resolution of linked QTL, strongly supported the hypothesis for the presence of two loci. These results are discussed in the context of current molecular knowledge about disease resistance genes on chromosome 6 and observations made by tomato breeders during the production of bacterial wilt-resistant varieties. PMID:10049932

  9. Dynamics of molecular markers linked to the resistance loci in a mosquito-Plasmodium system.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Guiyun; Severson, David W

    2003-01-01

    Models on the evolution of resistance to parasitism generally assume fitness tradeoffs between the costs of being parasitized and the costs associated with resistance. This study tested this assumption using the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti and malaria parasite Plasmodium gallinaceum system. Experimental mosquito populations were created by mixing susceptible and resistant strains in equal proportions, and then the dynamics of markers linked to loci for Plasmodium resistance and other unlinked neutral markers were determined over 12 generations. We found that when the mixed population was maintained under parasite-free conditions, the frequencies of alleles specific to the susceptible strain at markers closely linked to the loci for resistance (QTL markers) as well as other unlinked markers increased significantly in the first generation and then fluctuated around equilibrium frequencies for all six markers. However, when the mixed population was exposed to an infected blood meal every generation, allele frequencies at the QTL markers for resistance were not significantly changed. Small population size caused significant random fluctuations of allele frequencies at all marker loci. Consistent allele frequency changes in the QTL markers and other unlinked markers suggest that the reduced fitness in the resistant population has a genome-wide effect on the genetic makeup of the mixed population. Continuous exposure to parasites promoted the maintenance of alleles from the resistant Moyo-R strain in the mixed population. The results are discussed in relation to the proposed malaria control strategy through genetic disruption of vector competence. PMID:12807772

  10. Analysis of putative resistance gene loci in UK field populations of Haemonchus contortus after 6years of macrocyclic lactone use.

    PubMed

    Laing, Roz; Maitland, Kirsty; Lecová, Lenka; Skuce, Philip J; Tait, Andy; Devaney, Eileen

    2016-09-01

    Sheep farmers in the UK rely on strategic anthelmintic use to treat and control gastrointestinal roundworms in their flocks. However, resistance to these drugs is now widespread and threatens the sustainability of sheep production. The mechanisms underlying resistance to the most commonly used class, the macrocyclic lactones, are not known and sensitive diagnostic tools based on molecular markers are not currently available. This prohibits accurate surveillance of resistance or assessment of strategies aimed at controlling its spread. In this study, we examined four UK field populations of Haemonchus contortus, differing in macrocyclic lactone treatment history, for evidence of selection at 'candidate gene' loci identified as determining macrocyclic lactone resistance in previously published research. Individual worms were genotyped at Hc-lgc-37, Hc-glc-5, Hc-avr-14 and Hc-dyf-7, and four microsatellite loci. High levels of polymorphism were identified at the first three candidate gene loci with remarkably little polymorphism at Hc-dyf-7. While some between-population comparisons of individual farms with and without long-term macrocyclic lactone use identified statistically significant differences in allele frequency and/or fixation index at the Hc-lgc-37, Hc-glc-5 or Hc-avr-14 loci, we found no consistent evidence of selection in other equivalent comparisons. While it is possible that different mechanisms are important in different populations or that resistance may be conferred by small changes at multiple loci, our findings suggest that these are unlikely to be major loci conferring macrocyclic lactone resistance on UK farms or suitable for diagnostic marker development. More powerful approaches, using genome-wide or whole genome sequencing, may be required to define macrocyclic lactone resistance loci in such genetically variable populations. PMID:27179994

  11. Confirming and Identifying New Loci for Rice Blast Disease Resistance using Magnaporthe oryzae Field Isolates in the US

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) in rice play important roles in controlling rice blast disease. In the present study, 10 field isolates of the races IA1, IB1, IB17, and IC1 of U.S. rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae collected in 1996 and 2009 were used to identify blast resistance QTL with a recombi...

  12. Quantitative trait loci from the host genetic background modulate the durability of a resistance gene: a rational basis for sustainable resistance breeding in plants

    PubMed Central

    Quenouille, J; Paulhiac, E; Moury, B; Palloix, A

    2014-01-01

    The combination of major resistance genes with quantitative resistance factors is hypothesized as a promising breeding strategy to preserve the durability of resistant cultivar, as recently observed in different pathosystems. Using the pepper (Capsicum annuum)/Potato virus Y (PVY, genus Potyvirus) pathosystem, we aimed at identifying plant genetic factors directly affecting the frequency of virus adaptation to the major resistance gene pvr23 and at comparing them with genetic factors affecting quantitative resistance. The resistance breakdown frequency was a highly heritable trait (h2=0.87). Four loci including additive quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and epistatic interactions explained together 70% of the variance of pvr23 breakdown frequency. Three of the four QTLs controlling pvr23 breakdown frequency were also involved in quantitative resistance, strongly suggesting that QTLs controlling quantitative resistance have a pleiotropic effect on the durability of the major resistance gene. With the first mapping of QTLs directly affecting resistance durability, this study provides a rationale for sustainable resistance breeding. Surprisingly, a genetic trade-off was observed between the durability of PVY resistance controlled by pvr23 and the spectrum of the resistance against different potyviruses. This trade-off seemed to have been resolved by the combination of minor-effect durability QTLs under long-term farmer selection. PMID:24569635

  13. Genome-wide search of stem rust resistance loci at the seedling stage in durum wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causative agent of stem rust in wheat, is known to rapidly evolve new virulence to resistance genes. While more than 50 stem rust resistance (Sr) loci have been identified in wheat, only a few remain effective, particularly against the highly virulent race Ug99 ...

  14. Reappraisal of known malaria resistance loci in a large multi-centre study

    PubMed Central

    Rockett, Kirk A.; Clarke, Geraldine M.; Fitzpatrick, Kathryn; Hubbart, Christina; Jeffreys, Anna E.; Rowlands, Kate; Craik, Rachel; Jallow, Muminatou; Conway, David J.; Bojang, Kalifa A.; Pinder, Margaret; Usen, Stanley; Sisay-Joof, Fatoumatta; Sirugo, Giorgio; Toure, Ousmane; Thera, Mahamadou A.; Konate, Salimata; Sissoko, Sibiry; Niangaly, Amadou; Poudiougou, Belco; Mangano, Valentina D.; Bougouma, Edith C.; Sirima, Sodiomon B.; Modiano, David; Amenga-Etego, Lucas N.; Ghansah, Anita; Koram, Kwadwo A.; Wilson, Michael D.; Enimil, Anthony; Evans, Jennifer; Amodu, Olukemi; Olaniyan, Subulade; Apinjoh, Tobias; Mugri, Regina; Ndi, Andre; Ndila, Carolyne M.; Uyoga, Sophie; Macharia, Alexander; Peshu, Norbert; Williams, Thomas N.; Manjurano, Alphaxard; Riley, Eleanor; Drakeley, Chris; Reyburn, Hugh; Nyirongo, Vysaul; Kachala, David; Molyneux, Malcolm; Dunstan, Sarah J.; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Ngoc Quyen, Nguyen Thi; Thai, Cao Quang; Hien, Tran Tinh; Manning, Laurens; Laman, Moses; Siba, Peter; Karunajeewa, Harin; Allen, Steve; Allen, Angela; Davis, Timothy M. E.; Michon, Pascal; Mueller, Ivo; Green, Angie; Molloy, Sile; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Kerasidou, Angeliki; Cornelius, Victoria; Hart, Lee; Vanderwal, Aaron; SanJoaquin, Miguel; Band, Gavin; Le, Si Quang; Pirinen, Matti; Sepúlveda, Nuno; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Clark, Taane G.; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Achidi, Eric; Doumbo, Ogobara; Farrar, Jeremy; Marsh, Kevin; Taylor, Terrie; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.

    2015-01-01

    Many human genetic associations with resistance to malaria have been reported but few have been reliably replicated. We collected data on 11,890 cases of severe malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum and 17,441 controls from 12 locations in Africa, Asia and Oceania. There was strong evidence of association with the HBB, ABO, ATP2B4, G6PD and CD40LG loci but previously reported associations at 22 other loci did not replicate in the multi-centre analysis. The large sample size made it possible to identify authentic genetic effects that are heterogeneous across populations or phenotypes, a striking example being the main African form of G6PD deficiency, which reduced the risk of cerebral malaria but increased the risk of severe malarial anaemia. The finding that G6PD deficiency has opposing effects on different fatal complications of P. falciparum infection indicates that the evolutionary origins of this common human genetic disorder are more complex than previously supposed. PMID:25261933

  15. A consensus map for Ug99 stem rust resistance loci in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The global effort to identify new sources of resistance to wheat stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici race group Ug99, has resulted in numerous studies reporting both qualitative genes and quantitative trait loci (QTLs). The purpose of our study was to assemble all available informa...

  16. Evaluation and Quantitative trait loci mapping of resistance to powdery mildew in lettuce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) is the major leafy vegetable that is susceptible to powdery mildew disease under greenhouse and field conditions. We mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for resistance to powdery mildew under greenhouse conditions in an interspecific population derived from a cross betw...

  17. Isolation and manipulation of quantitative trait loci for disease resistance in rice using a candidate gene approach.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ke-Ming; Qiu, De-Yun; Shen, Xiang-Ling; Li, Xiang-Hua; Wang, Shi-Ping

    2008-09-01

    Bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and fungal blast caused by Magnaporthe grisea result in heavy production losses in rice, a main staple food for approximately 50% of the world's population. Application of host resistance to these pathogens is the most economical and environment-friendly approach to solve this problem. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling quantitative resistance are valuable sources for broad-spectrum and durable disease resistance. Although large numbers of QTLs for bacterial blight and blast resistance have been identified, these sources have not been used effectively in rice improvement because of the complex genetic control of quantitative resistance and because the genes underlying resistance QTLs are unknown. To isolate disease resistance QTLs, we established a candidate gene strategy that integrates linkage map, expression profile, and functional complementation analyses. This strategy has proven to be applicable for identifying the genes underlying minor resistance QTLs in rice-Xoo and rice-M. grisea systems and it may also help to shed light on disease resistance QTLs of other cereals. Our results also suggest that a single minor QTL can be used in rice improvement by modulating the expression of the gene underlying the QTL. Pyramiding two or three minor QTL genes, whose expression can be managed and that function in different defense signal transduction pathways, may allow the breeding of rice cultivars that are highly resistant to bacterial blight and blast.

  18. Resisting Mind Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Susan M.; Zimbardo, Philip G.

    1980-01-01

    Provides conceptual analyses of mind control techniques along with practical advice on how to resist these techniques. The authors stress that effective mind control stems more from everyday social relations than from exotic technological gimmicks. Suggestions are given for resisting persuasion, resisting systems, and challenging the system.…

  19. Multi-gene-loci inheritance in resistance modeling.

    PubMed

    Langemann, Dirk; Richter, Otto; Vollrath, Antje

    2013-03-01

    The ability of an organism to degrade harmful substances to less toxic compounds is referred to as metabolic resistance. The biochemical processes result in a shift of dose-response curves associated with the toxic substances. Hence, the development of metabolic resistance may cause great problems of managing pests and diseases by pesticides. We develop a polygenic fitness model capable of simulating the emergence of metabolic resistance. Within the model, polygenic inheritance is described by a new approach based on tensor products of heredity matrices. This is included as genetic submodel into the time-continuous population model for all possible biotypes. Evolution is acting on the parameters of dose-response curves, i.e., on the mortality rates and thus on the ED(50)-value. The resulting system of differential equations is analyzed with respect to polymorphic equilibria. Under a longterm application of only one mode of action the model produces a gradual shift of the mean dose-response curve of the population which is frequently observed in the field. Different scenarios of the development of metabolic resistance are demonstrated in numerical experiments.

  20. Genetic analysis of durable resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae in the rice accession Gigante Vercelli identified two blast resistance loci.

    PubMed

    Urso, Simona; Desiderio, Francesca; Biselli, Chiara; Bagnaresi, Paolo; Crispino, Laura; Piffanelli, Pietro; Abbruscato, Pamela; Assenza, Federica; Guarnieri, Giada; Cattivelli, Luigi; Valè, Giampiero

    2016-02-01

    Rice cultivars exhibiting durable resistance to blast, the most important rice fungal disease provoking up to 30 % of rice losses, are very rare and searching for sources of such a resistance represents a priority for rice-breeding programs. To this aim we analyzed Gigante Vercelli (GV) and Vialone Nano (VN), two temperate japonica rice cultivars in Italy displaying contrasting response to blast, with GV showing a durable and broad-spectrum resistance, whereas VN being highly susceptible. An SSR-based genetic map developed using a GV × VN population segregating for blast resistance identified two blast resistance loci, localized to the long arm of chromosomes 1 and 4 explaining more than 78 % of the observed phenotypic variation for blast resistance. The pyramiding of two blast resistance QTLs was therefore involved in the observed durable resistance in GV. Mapping data were integrated with information obtained from RNA-seq expression profiling of all classes of resistance protein genes (resistance gene analogs, RGAs) and with the map position of known cloned or mapped blast resistance genes to search candidates for the GV resistant response. A co-localization of RGAs with the LOD peak or the marker interval of the chromosome 1 QTL was highlighted and a valuable tool for selecting the resistance gene during breeding programs was developed. Comparative analysis with known blast resistance genes revealed co-positional relationships between the chromosome 1 QTL with the Pi35/Pish blast resistance alleles and showed that the chromosome 4 QTL represents a newly identified blast resistance gene. The present genetic analysis has therefore allowed the identification of two blast resistance loci in the durable blast-resistant rice cultivar GV and tools for molecular selection of these resistance genes.

  1. Mapping loci controlling flowering time in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Camargo, L E; Osborn, T C

    1996-04-01

    The timing of the transition from vegetative to reproductive phase is a major determinant of the morphology and value of Brassica oleracea crops. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling flowering time in B. oleracea were mapped using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) loci and flowering data of F3 families derived from a cabbage by broccoli cross. Plants were grown in the field, and a total of 15 surveys were made throughout the experiment at 5-15 day intervals, in which plants were inspected for the presence of flower buds or open flowers. The flowering traits used for data analysis were the proportion of annual plants (PF) within each F3 family at the end of the experiment, and a flowering-time index (FT) that combined both qualitative (annual/biennial) and quantitative (days to flowering) information. Two QTLs on different linkage groups were found associated with both PF and FT and one additional QTL was found associated only with FT. When combined in a multi-locus model, all three QTLs explained 54.1% of the phenotypic variation in FT. Epistasis was found between two genomic regions associated with FT. Comparisons of map positions of QTLs in B. oleracea with those in B. napus and B. rapa provided no evidence for conservation of genomic regions associated with flowering time between these species.

  2. Separate loci underlie resistance to root infection and leaf scorch during soybean sudden death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kazi, S; Shultz, J; Afzal, J; Johnson, J; Njiti, V N; Lightfoot, D A

    2008-05-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars show differences in their resistance to both the leaf scorch and root rot of sudden death syndrome (SDS). The syndrome is caused by root colonization by Fusarium virguliforme (ex. F. solani f. sp. glycines). Root susceptibility combined with reduced leaf scorch resistance has been associated with resistance to Heterodera glycines HG Type 1.3.6.7 (race 14) of the soybean cyst nematode (SCN). In contrast, the rhg1 locus underlying resistance to Hg Type 0 was found clustered with three loci for resistance to SDS leaf scorch and one for root infection. The aims of this study were to compare the inheritance of resistance to leaf scorch and root infection in a population that segregated for resistance to SCN and to identify the underlying quantitative trait loci (QTL). "Hartwig", a cultivar partially resistant to SDS leaf scorch, F. virguliforme root infection and SCN HG Type 1.3.6.7 was crossed with the partially susceptible cultivar "Flyer". Ninety-two F5-derived recombinant inbred lines and 144 markers were used for map development. Four QTL found in earlier studies were confirmed. One contributed resistance to leaf scorch on linkage group (LG) C2 (Satt277; P = 0.004, R2 = 15%). Two on LG G underlay root infection at R8 (Satt038; P = 0.0001 R2 = 28.1%; Satt115; P = 0.003, R2 = 12.9%). The marker Satt038 was linked to rhg1 underlying resistance to SCN Hg Type 0. The fourth QTL was on LG D2 underlying resistance to root infection at R6 (Satt574; P = 0.001, R2 = 10%). That QTL was in an interval previously associated with resistance to both SDS leaf scorch and SCN Hg Type 1.3.6.7. The QTL showed repulsion linkage with resistance to SCN that may explain the relative susceptibility to SDS of some SCN resistant cultivars. One additional QTL was discovered on LG G underlying resistance to SDS leaf scorch measured by disease index (Satt130; P = 0.003, R2 = 13%). The loci and markers will provide tagged alleles with which to improve

  3. Separate loci underlie resistance to root infection and leaf scorch during soybean sudden death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kazi, S; Shultz, J; Afzal, J; Johnson, J; Njiti, V N; Lightfoot, D A

    2008-05-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars show differences in their resistance to both the leaf scorch and root rot of sudden death syndrome (SDS). The syndrome is caused by root colonization by Fusarium virguliforme (ex. F. solani f. sp. glycines). Root susceptibility combined with reduced leaf scorch resistance has been associated with resistance to Heterodera glycines HG Type 1.3.6.7 (race 14) of the soybean cyst nematode (SCN). In contrast, the rhg1 locus underlying resistance to Hg Type 0 was found clustered with three loci for resistance to SDS leaf scorch and one for root infection. The aims of this study were to compare the inheritance of resistance to leaf scorch and root infection in a population that segregated for resistance to SCN and to identify the underlying quantitative trait loci (QTL). "Hartwig", a cultivar partially resistant to SDS leaf scorch, F. virguliforme root infection and SCN HG Type 1.3.6.7 was crossed with the partially susceptible cultivar "Flyer". Ninety-two F5-derived recombinant inbred lines and 144 markers were used for map development. Four QTL found in earlier studies were confirmed. One contributed resistance to leaf scorch on linkage group (LG) C2 (Satt277; P = 0.004, R2 = 15%). Two on LG G underlay root infection at R8 (Satt038; P = 0.0001 R2 = 28.1%; Satt115; P = 0.003, R2 = 12.9%). The marker Satt038 was linked to rhg1 underlying resistance to SCN Hg Type 0. The fourth QTL was on LG D2 underlying resistance to root infection at R6 (Satt574; P = 0.001, R2 = 10%). That QTL was in an interval previously associated with resistance to both SDS leaf scorch and SCN Hg Type 1.3.6.7. The QTL showed repulsion linkage with resistance to SCN that may explain the relative susceptibility to SDS of some SCN resistant cultivars. One additional QTL was discovered on LG G underlying resistance to SDS leaf scorch measured by disease index (Satt130; P = 0.003, R2 = 13%). The loci and markers will provide tagged alleles with which to improve

  4. Using Genotyping by Sequencing to Map Two Novel Anthracnose Resistance Loci in Sorghum bicolor.

    PubMed

    J Felderhoff, Terry; M McIntyre, Lauren; Saballos, Ana; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance loci present in the highly resistant cultivar 'Bk7', a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing 'Bk7' with the susceptible inbred 'Early Hegari-Sart'. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from 'Bk7'. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. Genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between 'Bk7' and sweet sorghum 'Mer81-4' narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases. PMID:27194807

  5. Using Genotyping by Sequencing to Map Two Novel Anthracnose Resistance Loci in Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    J. Felderhoff, Terry; M. McIntyre, Lauren; Saballos, Ana; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance loci present in the highly resistant cultivar ‘Bk7’, a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing ‘Bk7’ with the susceptible inbred ‘Early Hegari-Sart’. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from ‘Bk7’. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. Genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between ‘Bk7’ and sweet sorghum ‘Mer81-4’ narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases. PMID:27194807

  6. Using Genotyping by Sequencing to Map Two Novel Anthracnose Resistance Loci in Sorghum bicolor.

    PubMed

    J Felderhoff, Terry; M McIntyre, Lauren; Saballos, Ana; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2016-07-07

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance loci present in the highly resistant cultivar 'Bk7', a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing 'Bk7' with the susceptible inbred 'Early Hegari-Sart'. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from 'Bk7'. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. Genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between 'Bk7' and sweet sorghum 'Mer81-4' narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases.

  7. Mapping quantitative trait Loci responsible for resistance to sheath blight in rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Jia, Y; Correa-Victoria, F J; Prado, G A; Yeater, K M; McClung, A; Correll, J C

    2009-09-01

    Rice sheath blight (ShB), caused by the soilborne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, annually causes severe losses in yield and quality in many rice production areas worldwide. Jasmine 85 is an indica cultivar that has proven to have a high level of resistance to this pathogen. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of controlled environment inoculation assays to detect ShB resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in a cross derived from the susceptible cv. Lemont and the resistant cv. Jasmine 85. The disease reactions of 250 F(5) recombinant inbred lines (RILs) were measured on the seedlings inoculated using microchamber and mist-chamber assays under greenhouse conditions. In total, 10 ShB-QTLs were identified on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, and 9 using these two methods. The microchamber method identified four of five new ShB-QTLs, one on each of chromosomes 1, 3, 5, and 6. Both microchamber and mist-chamber methods identified two ShB-QTLs, qShB1 and qShB9-2. Four of the ShB-QTLs or ShB-QTL regions identified on chromosomes 2, 3, and 9 were previously reported in the literature. The major ShB-QTL qShB9-2, which cosegregated with simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker RM245 on chromosome 9, contributed to 24.3 and 27.2% of total phenotypic variation in ShB using microchamber and mistchamber assays, respectively. qShB9-2, a plant-stage-independent QTL, was also verified in nine haplotypes of 10 resistant Lemont/Jasmine 85 RILs using haplotype analysis. These results suggest that multiple ShB-QTLs are involved in ShB resistance and that microchamber and mist-chamber methods are effective for detecting plant-stage-independent QTLs. Furthermore, two SSR markers, RM215 and RM245, are robust markers and can be used in marker-assisted breeding programs to improve ShB resistance.

  8. A Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals New Loci for Resistance to Clubroot Disease in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lixia; Luo, Yujie; Chen, Biyun; Xu, Kun; Zhang, Fugui; Li, Hao; Huang, Qian; Xiao, Xin; Zhang, Tianyao; Hu, Jihong; Li, Feng; Wu, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oil crops in the world. However, the yield and quality of rapeseed were largely decreased by clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae Woronin). Therefore, it is of great importance for screening more resistant germplasms or genes and improving the resistance to P. brassicae in rapeseed breeding. In this study, a massive resistant identification for a natural global population was conducted in two environments with race/pathotype 4 of P. brassicae which was the most predominant in China, and a wide range of phenotypic variation was found in the population. In addition, a genome-wide association study of 472 accessions for clubroot resistance (CR) was performed with 60K Brassica Infinium SNP arrays for the first time. In total, nine QTLs were detected, seven of which were novel through integrative analysis. Furthermore, additive effects in genetic control of CR in rapeseed among the above loci were found. By bioinformatic analyses, the candidate genes of these loci were predicted, which indicated that TIR-NBS gene family might play an important role in CR. It is believable that the results presented in our study could provide valuable information for understanding the genetic mechanism and molecular regulation of CR. PMID:27746804

  9. Sequence-based association and selection scans identify drug resistance loci in the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Park, Daniel J.; Lukens, Amanda K.; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Chang, Hsiao-Han; Valim, Clarissa; Ribacke, Ulf; Van Tyne, Daria; Galinsky, Kevin; Galligan, Meghan; Becker, Justin S.; Ndiaye, Daouda; Mboup, Souleymane; Wiegand, Roger C.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Wirth, Dyann F.; Volkman, Sarah K.

    2012-01-01

    Through rapid genetic adaptation and natural selection, the Plasmodium falciparum parasite—the deadliest of those that cause malaria—is able to develop resistance to antimalarial drugs, thwarting present efforts to control it. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide a critical hypothesis-generating tool for understanding how this occurs. However, in P. falciparum, the limited amount of linkage disequilibrium hinders the power of traditional array-based GWAS. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility and power improvements gained by using whole-genome sequencing for association studies. We analyzed data from 45 Senegalese parasites and identified genetic changes associated with the parasites’ in vitro response to 12 different antimalarials. To further increase statistical power, we adapted a common test for natural selection, XP-EHH (cross-population extended haplotype homozygosity), and used it to identify genomic regions associated with resistance to drugs. Using this sequence-based approach and the combination of association and selection-based tests, we detected several loci associated with drug resistance. These loci included the previously known signals at pfcrt, dhfr, and pfmdr1, as well as many genes not previously implicated in drug-resistance roles, including genes in the ubiquitination pathway. Based on the success of the analysis presented in this study, and on the demonstrated shortcomings of array-based approaches, we argue for a complete transition to sequence-based GWAS for small, low linkage-disequilibrium genomes like that of P. falciparum. PMID:22826220

  10. Identification of genetic loci that control mammary tumor susceptibility through the host microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengju; Lo, Alvin; Huang, Yurong; Huang, Ge; Liang, Guozhou; Mott, Joni; Karpen, Gary H.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Snijders, Antoine M.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2015-03-09

    The interplay between host genetics, tumor microenvironment and environmental exposure in cancer susceptibility remains poorly understood. Here we assessed the genetic control of stromal mediation of mammary tumor susceptibility to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) using backcrossed F1 into BALB/c (F1Bx) between cancer susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (SPRET/EiJ) mouse strains. Tumor formation was evaluated after transplantation of non-irradiated Trp53-/- BALB/c mammary gland fragments into cleared fat pads of F1Bx hosts. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed 2 genetic loci that constitute the baseline susceptibility via host microenvironment. However, once challenged with LDIR, we discovered 13 additional loci that were enriched for genes involved in cytokines, including TGFβ1 signaling. Surprisingly, LDIR-treated F1Bx cohort significantly reduced incidence of mammary tumors from Trp53-/- fragments as well as prolonged tumor latency, compared to sham-treated controls. We demonstrated further that plasma levels of specific cytokines were significantly correlated with tumor latency. Using an ex vivo 3-D assay, we confirmed TGFβ1 as a strong candidate for reduced mammary invasion in SPRET/EiJ, which could explain resistance of this strain to mammary cancer risk following LDIR. Our results open possible new avenues to understand mechanisms of genes operating via the stroma that affect cancer risk from external environmental exposures.

  11. Identification of genetic loci that control mammary tumor susceptibility through the host microenvironment

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Pengju; Lo, Alvin; Huang, Yurong; Huang, Ge; Liang, Guozhou; Mott, Joni; Karpen, Gary H.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; et al

    2015-03-09

    The interplay between host genetics, tumor microenvironment and environmental exposure in cancer susceptibility remains poorly understood. Here we assessed the genetic control of stromal mediation of mammary tumor susceptibility to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) using backcrossed F1 into BALB/c (F1Bx) between cancer susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (SPRET/EiJ) mouse strains. Tumor formation was evaluated after transplantation of non-irradiated Trp53-/- BALB/c mammary gland fragments into cleared fat pads of F1Bx hosts. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed 2 genetic loci that constitute the baseline susceptibility via host microenvironment. However, once challenged with LDIR, we discovered 13 additional loci that were enriched for genesmore » involved in cytokines, including TGFβ1 signaling. Surprisingly, LDIR-treated F1Bx cohort significantly reduced incidence of mammary tumors from Trp53-/- fragments as well as prolonged tumor latency, compared to sham-treated controls. We demonstrated further that plasma levels of specific cytokines were significantly correlated with tumor latency. Using an ex vivo 3-D assay, we confirmed TGFβ1 as a strong candidate for reduced mammary invasion in SPRET/EiJ, which could explain resistance of this strain to mammary cancer risk following LDIR. Our results open possible new avenues to understand mechanisms of genes operating via the stroma that affect cancer risk from external environmental exposures.« less

  12. Mapping loci controlling vernalization requirement in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Teutonico, R A; Osborn, T C

    1995-12-01

    Brassica cultivars are classified as biennial or annual based on their requirement for a period of cold treatment (vernalization) to induce flowering. Genes controlling the vernalization requirement were identified in a Brassica rapa F2 population derived from a cross between an annual and a biennial oilseed cultivar by using an RFLP linkage map and quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of flowering time in F3 lines. Two genomic regions were strongly associated with variation for flowering time of unvernalized plants and alleles from the biennial parent in these regions delayed flowering. These QTLs had no significant effect on flowering time after plants were vernalized for 6 weeks, suggesting that they control flowering time through the requirement for vernalization. The two B. rapa linkage groups containing these QTLs had RFLP loci in common with two B. napus linkage groups that were shown previously to contain QTLs for flowering time. An RFLP locus detected by the cold-induced gene COR6.6 cloned from Arabidopsis thaliana mapped very near to one of the B. rapa QTLs for flowering time.

  13. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies New Loci for Resistance to Sclerotinia Stem Rot in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Zhao, Qing; Liu, Sheng; Shahid, Muhammad; Lan, Lei; Cai, Guangqin; Zhang, Chunyu; Fan, Chuchuan; Wang, Youping; Zhou, Yongming

    2016-01-01

    Sclerotinia stem rot (SSR) caused by the necrotrophic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a major disease in rapeseed (Brassica napus) worldwide. Breeding for SSR resistance in B. napus, as in other crops, relies only on germplasms with quantitative resistance genes. A better understanding of the genetic basis for SSR resistance in B. napus thus holds promise for the genetic improvement of disease resistance. In the present study, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for SSR resistance in B. napus were performed using an association panel of 448 accessions genotyped with the Brassica 60K Infinium® single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. A total of 26 SNPs corresponding to three loci, DSRC4, DSRC6, and DSRC8 were associated with SSR resistance. Haplotype analysis showed that the three favorable alleles for SSR resistance exhibited cumulative effects. After aligning SSR resistance quantitative trait loci (QTL) identified in the present and previous studies to the B. napus reference genome, one locus (DSRC6) was found to be located within the confidence interval of a QTL identified in previous QTL mapping studies and another two loci (DSRC4 and DSRC8) were considered novel loci for SSR resistance. A total of 39 candidate genes were predicted for the three loci based on the GWAS combining with the differentially expressed genes identified in previous transcriptomics analyses. PMID:27703464

  14. In Vitro Recombinants of Antibiotic-Resistant Chlamydia trachomatis Strains Have Statistically More Breakpoints than Clinical Recombinants for the Same Sequenced Loci and Exhibit Selection at Unexpected Loci

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Tara; Bruno, William J.; Wan, Raymond; Yen, Albert; Duong, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) is essential for generating between-strain genomic recombinants of Chlamydia trachomatis to facilitate the organism's evolution. Because there is no reliable laboratory-based gene transfer system for C. trachomatis, in vitro generation of recombinants from antibiotic-resistant strains is being used to study LGT. However, selection pressures imposed on in vitro recombinants likely affect statistical properties of recombination relative to naturally occurring clinical recombinants, including prevalence at particular loci. We examined multiple loci for 16 in vitro-derived recombinants of ofloxacin- and rifampin-resistant L1 and D strains, respectively, grown with both antibiotics, and compared these with the same sequenced loci among 11 clinical recombinants. Breakpoints and recombination frequency were examined using phylogenetics, bioinformatics, and statistics. In vitro and clinical isolates clustered perfectly into two groups, without misclassification, using Ward's minimum variance based on breakpoint data. As expected, gyrA (confers ofloxacin resistance) and rpoB (confers rifampin resistance) had significantly more breakpoints among in vitro recombinants than among clinical recombinants (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.02, respectively, using the Wilcoxon rank sum test). Unexpectedly, trpA also had significantly more breakpoints for in vitro recombinants (P < 0.0001). There was also significant selection at other loci. The strongest bias was for ompA in strain D (P = 3.3 × 10−8). Our results indicate that the in vitro model differs statistically from natural recombination events. Additional genomic studies are needed to determine the factors responsible for the observed selection biases at unexpected loci and whether these are important for LGT to inform approaches for genetically manipulating C. trachomatis. PMID:22123249

  15. Using genotyping by sequencing to map two novel anthracnose resistance Loci in Sorghum bicolor

    DOE PAGES

    Felderhoff, Terry J.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Saballos, Ana; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2016-05-18

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance locimore » present in the highly resistant cultivar ‘Bk7’, a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing ‘Bk7’ with the susceptible inbred ‘Early Hegari-Sart’. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from ‘Bk7’. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. In addition, genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between ‘Bk7’ and sweet sorghum ‘Mer81-4’ narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases.« less

  16. Using genotyping by sequencing to map two novel anthracnose resistance loci in Sorghum bicolor

    DOE PAGES

    Felderhoff, Tery J.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Saballos, Ana; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2016-05-18

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance locimore » present in the highly resistant cultivar ‘Bk7’, a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing ‘Bk7’ with the susceptible inbred ‘Early Hegari-Sart’. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from ‘Bk7’. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. Genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between ‘Bk7’ and sweet sorghum ‘Mer81-4’ narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Lastly, further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases.« less

  17. Resisting religious coercive control.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Shane

    2014-12-01

    Religious coercive control refers to the use of religious beliefs and doctrine as means to coercively control intimate partners. Scholars have shown that some abusive partners use the Christian doctrine of submission as a means of religious coercive control. I explore how victims who experience the doctrine of submission qua religious coercive control actively resist it. I argue that victims' successful resistance of the doctrine is contingent on their religious capital-that is, the knowledge and mastery that people have of a particular religious culture-and interpretive confidence-that is, people's subjective confidence in their interpretations of religious culture-related to the doctrine.

  18. Identification of New Resistance Loci to African Stem Rust Race TTKSK in Tetraploid Wheats Based on Linkage and Genome-Wide Association Mapping.

    PubMed

    Laidò, Giovanni; Panio, Giosuè; Marone, Daniela; Russo, Maria A; Ficco, Donatella B M; Giovanniello, Valentina; Cattivelli, Luigi; Steffenson, Brian; de Vita, Pasquale; Mastrangelo, Anna M

    2015-01-01

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis Pers. f. sp. tritici Eriks. and E. Henn. (Pgt), is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat. Races of the pathogen in the "Ug99 lineage" are of international concern due to their virulence for widely used stem rust resistance genes and their spread throughout Africa. Disease resistant cultivars provide one of the best means for controlling stem rust. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) conferring resistance to African stem rust race TTKSK at the seedling stage, we evaluated an association mapping (AM) panel consisting of 230 tetraploid wheat accessions under greenhouse conditions. A high level of phenotypic variation was observed in response to race TTKSK in the AM panel, allowing for genome-wide association mapping of resistance QTL in wild, landrace, and cultivated tetraploid wheats. Thirty-five resistance QTL were identified on all chromosomes, and seventeen are of particular interest as identified by multiple associations. Many of the identified resistance loci were coincident with previously identified rust resistance genes; however, nine on chromosomes 1AL, 2AL, 4AL, 5BL, and 7BS may be novel. To validate AM results, a biparental population of 146 recombinant inbred lines was also considered, which derived from a cross between the resistant cultivar "Cirillo" and susceptible "Neodur." The stem rust resistance of Cirillo was conferred by a single gene on the distal region of chromosome arm 6AL in an interval map coincident with the resistance gene Sr13, and confirmed one of the resistance loci identified by AM. A search for candidate resistance genes was carried out in the regions where QTL were identified, and many of them corresponded to NBS-LRR genes and protein kinases with LRR domains. The results obtained in the present study are of great interest as a high level of genetic variability for resistance to race TTKSK was described in a germplasm panel comprising most of the tetraploid wheat sub-species.

  19. Selection for quantitative trait loci associated with resistance to Stewart's wilt in sweet corn.

    PubMed

    Pataky, J K; Bohn, M O; Lutz, J D; Richter, P M

    2008-04-01

    The objectives of this research were to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for Stewart's wilt resistance from a mapping population derived from a sweet corn hybrid that is highly resistant to Pantoea stewartii and to determine if marker-based selection for those QTL could substantially improve Stewart's wilt resistance in a population derived from a cross of resistant lines and a highly susceptible sweet corn inbred. Three significant QTL for Stewart's wilt resistance on chromosomes 2 (bin 2.03), 5 (bin 5.03), and 6 (bin 6.06/6.07) explained 31% of the genetic variance in a population of 110 F(3:4) families derived from the sweet corn hybrid Bonus. The three QTL appeared to be additive in their effects on Stewart's wilt ratings. Based on means of families that were either homozygous or heterozygous for marker alleles associated with the resistance QTL, the QTL on chromosomes 2 and 6 appeared to have dominant or partially dominant gene action, while the QTL on chromosome 5 appeared to be recessive. A population of 422 BC(2)S(2) families was derived from crosses of a sweet corn inbred highly susceptible to Stewart's wilt, Green Giant Code 88 (GG88), and plants from two F(3:4) families (12465 and 12467) from the Bonus mapping population that were homozygous for marker alleles associated with Stewart's wilt resistance at the three QTL. Mean Stewart's wilt ratings for BC(2)S(2) families were significantly (P < 0.05) lower for families that were homozygous for the bnlg1902 marker allele (bin 5.03) from resistant lines 12465 or 12467 than for families that were heterozygous at this marker locus or homozygous for the bnlg1902 marker allele from GG88. Resistance associated with this QTL was expressed only if F(3:5) or BC(2)S(2) families were homozygous for marker alleles associated with the resistant inbred parent (P(1)). Marker alleles identified in the F(3:5) mapping population that were in proximity to the resistance QTL on chromosomes 2 and 6 were not polymorphic in

  20. Identification of genomic loci associated with crown rust resistance in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) divergently selected populations.

    PubMed

    Brazauskas, Gintaras; Xing, Yongzhong; Studer, Bruno; Schejbel, Britt; Frei, Ursula; Berg, Paul Ragnar; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The inheritance of crown rust resistance in perennial ryegrass is complex with both major and minor quantitative trait loci (QTL) being detected on all seven linkage groups. However, QTL mapping populations have only few segregating alleles, limiting the transferability of results to other materials. In this study, a synthetic population was developed from four crown rust resistant and susceptible parents as starting material for a divergent selection experiment of crown rust resistance to be closer to practice in plant breeding programs, and to identify genome regions relevant across a broader range of genotypes. Following three cycles of directional selection, perennial ryegrass populations were produced with a two-fold difference in average rust resistance. Divergently selected populations were genotyped at 7 resistance gene analog-derived expressed sequence tag (RGA-derived EST) as well as 15 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci. A test for selective neutrality (Waples test), which tests the hypothesis of genetic drift versus selection, identified significant differences in allele frequencies for 7 loci (32%). The selection effect was bidirectional with the same loci showing significant response in both positively and negatively selected populations. A region under selection represented by markers LpSSR006 and EST13 on linkage group (LG) 4 was further confirmed by colocation with two separate QTL for crown rust resistance in a VrnA, a two-way pseudo-testcross mapping population. This suggests suitability of alleles identified for introgression into perennial ryegrass germplasm, where quantitative resistance to crown rust is desired.

  1. Follower Control of MIMO Temperature Controller for the Same Settling Loci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamane, Hiroto; Hyodo, Yoshikazu; Hayashi, Yoichi; Miyazaki, Kazuyoshi

    This paper presents a system starting strategy for a multi channel temperature control system. Generally, each channel of MIMO temperature system is almost independent and the settling times and loci are different. In this case, energy loss, quality deterioration and product decrease are caused due to the different heat conduction of each channel. This paper developed a novel system starting method “FOLLOWER control", which can be automatic stating to solve the above product problems. Experiments showed that the proposed control system strategy could be successfully and also be easily applied in practice.

  2. Blood and Intestine eQTLs from an Anti-TNF-Resistant Crohn's Disease Cohort Inform IBD Genetic Association Loci

    PubMed Central

    Di Narzo, Antonio F; Peters, Lauren A; Argmann, Carmen; Stojmirovic, Aleksandar; Perrigoue, Jacqueline; Li, Katherine; Telesco, Shannon; Kidd, Brian; Walker, Jennifer; Dudley, Joel; Cho, Judy; Schadt, Eric E; Kasarskis, Andrew; Curran, Mark; Dobrin, Radu; Hao, Ke

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified loci reproducibly associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other immune-mediated diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying most of genetic susceptibility remain undefined. Expressional quantitative trait loci (eQTL) of disease-relevant tissue can be employed in order to elucidate the genes and pathways affected by disease-specific genetic variance. METHODS: In this study, we derived eQTLs for human whole blood and intestine tissues of anti-tumor necrosis factor-resistant Crohn's disease (CD) patients. We interpreted these eQTLs in the context of published IBD GWAS hits to inform on the disease process. RESULTS: At 10% false discovery rate, we discovered that 5,174 genes in blood and 2,063 genes in the intestine were controlled by a nearby single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (i.e., cis-eQTL), among which 1,360 were shared between the two tissues. A large fraction of the identified eQTLs were supported by the regulomeDB database, showing that the eQTLs reside in regulatory elements (odds ratio; OR=3.44 and 3.24 for blood and intestine eQTLs, respectively) as opposed to protein-coding regions. Published IBD GWAS hits as a whole were enriched for blood and intestine eQTLs (OR=2.88 and 2.05; and P value=2.51E-9 and 0.013, respectively), thereby linking genetic susceptibility to control of gene expression in these tissues. Through a systematic search, we used eQTL data to inform 109 out of 372 IBD GWAS SNPs documented in National Human Genome Research Institute catalog, and we categorized the genes influenced by eQTLs according to their functions. Many of these genes have experimentally validated roles in specific cell types contributing to intestinal inflammation. CONCLUSIONS: The blood and intestine eQTLs described in this study represent a powerful tool to link GWAS loci to a regulatory function and thus elucidate the mechanisms underlying the genetic loci associated with IBD

  3. Gold nanoprobes for multi loci assessment of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Pedro; Veigas, Bruno; Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Baptista, Pedro V

    2014-05-01

    Tuberculosis, still one of the leading human infectious diseases, reported 8.7 million new cases in 2011 alone. Also, the increasing rate of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) and its treatment difficulties pose a serious public health threat especially in developing countries. Resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin, first line antibiotics, is commonly associated with point mutations in katG, inhA and rpoB genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). Therefore, the development of cheap, fast and simple molecular methods to assess susceptibility profiles would have a huge impact in the capacity of early diagnosis and treatment of MDRTB. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with thiol-modified oligonucleotides (Au-nanoprobes) have shown the potential to provide a rapid and sensitive detection method for MTBC and single base mutations associated with antibiotic resistance, namely the characterization of the three most relevant codons in rpoB gene associated to rifampicin resistance. Here we extend the Au-nanoprobe approach towards discriminating specific mutations within inhA and rpoB genes in PCR amplified DNA from isolates. Using a multiplex PCR reaction for these two genes, it is possible to assess both loci in parallel, and extend the potential of the Au-nanoprobe method to MDRTB molecular characterization with special application in the most frequent Portuguese genotypes. PMID:24461544

  4. Genetic relationship between soxRS and mar loci in promoting multiple antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, P F; Gambino, L F; Sulavik, M C; Gracheck, S J

    1994-01-01

    Multiple antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli has typically been associated with mutations at the mar locus, located at 34 min on the E. coli chromosome. A new mutant, marC, isolated on the basis of a Mar phenotype but which maps to the soxRS (encoding the regulators of the superoxide stress response) locus located at 92 min, is described here. This mutant shares several features with a known constitutive allele of the soxRS gene, prompting the conclusion that it is a highly active allele of this gene. The marC mutation has thus been given the designation soxR201. This new mutant was used to examine the relationship between the mar and sox loci in promoting antibiotic resistance. The results of these studies indicate that full antibiotic resistance resulting from the soxR201 mutation is partially dependent on an intact mar locus and is associated with an increase in the steady-state level of mar-specific mRNA. In addition, paraquat treatment of wild-type cells is shown to increase the level of antibiotic resistance in a dose-dependent manner that requires an intact soxRS locus. Conversely, overexpression of MarA from a multicopy plasmid results in weak activation of a superoxide stress response target gene. These findings are consistent with a model in which the regulatory factors encoded by the marA and soxS genes control the expression of overlapping sets of target genes, with MarA preferentially acting on targets involved with antibiotic resistance and SoxS directed primarily towards components of the superoxide stress response. Furthermore, compounds frequently used to induce the superoxide stress response, including paraquat, menadione, and phenazine methosulfate, differ with respect to the amount of protection provided against them by the antibiotic resistance response. Images PMID:7986007

  5. Quantitative trait loci for slow-rusting resistance in wheat to leaf rust and stripe rust identified with multi-environment analysis.

    PubMed

    Rosewarne, G M; Singh, R P; Huerta-Espino, J; Rebetzke, G J

    2008-05-01

    Rust diseases are a major cause of yield loss in wheat worldwide, and are often controlled through the incorporation of resistance genes using conventional phenotypic selection methods. Slow-rusting resistance genes are expressed quantitatively and are typically small in genetic effect thereby requiring multiple genes to provide adequate protection against pathogens. These effects are valuable and are generally considered to confer durable resistance. Therefore an understanding of the chromosomal locations of such genes and their biological effects are important in order to ensure they are suitably deployed in elite germplasm. Attila is an important wheat grown throughout the world and is used as a slow-rusting donor in international spring wheat breeding programs. This study identified chromosomal regions associated with leaf rust and stripe rust resistances in a cross between Attila and a susceptible parent, Avocet-S, evaluated over 3 years in the field. Genotypic variation for both rusts was large and repeatable with line-mean heritabilities of 94% for leaf rust resistance and 87% for stripe rust. Three loci, including Lr46/Yr29 on chromosome 1BL, were shown to provide resistance to leaf rust whereas six loci with small effects conferred stripe rust resistance, with a seventh locus having an effect only by epistasis. Disease scoring over three different years enabled inferences to be made relating to stripe rust pathogen strains that predominated in different years.

  6. Molecular mapping of qualitative and quantitative loci for resistance to Leptosphaeria maculans causing blackleg disease in canola (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Raman, Rosy; Taylor, Belinda; Marcroft, Steve; Stiller, Jiri; Eckermann, Paul; Coombes, Neil; Rehman, Ata; Lindbeck, Kurt; Luckett, David; Wratten, Neil; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David; Wang, Xiaowu; Raman, Harsh

    2012-07-01

    Blackleg, caused by Leptosphaeria maculans, is one of the most important diseases of oilseed and vegetable crucifiers worldwide. The present study describes (1) the construction of a genetic linkage map, comprising 255 markers, based upon simple sequence repeats (SSR), sequence-related amplified polymorphism, sequence tagged sites, and EST-SSRs and (2) the localization of qualitative (race-specific) and quantitative (race non-specific) trait loci controlling blackleg resistance in a doubled-haploid population derived from the Australian canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars Skipton and Ag-Spectrum using the whole-genome average interval mapping approach. Marker regression analyses revealed that at least 14 genomic regions with LOD ≥ 2.0 were associated with qualitative and quantitative blackleg resistance, explaining 4.6-88.9 % of genotypic variation. A major qualitative locus, designated RlmSkipton (Rlm4), was mapped on chromosome A7, within 0.8 cM of the SSR marker Xbrms075. Alignment of the molecular markers underlying this QTL region with the genome sequence data of B. rapa L. suggests that RlmSkipton is located approximately 80 kb from the Xbrms075 locus. Molecular marker-RlmSkipton linkage was further validated in an F(2) population from Skipton/Ag-Spectrum. Our results show that SSR markers linked to consistent genomic regions are suitable for enrichment of favourable alleles for blackleg resistance in canola breeding programs.

  7. Identifying quantitative trait loci for resistance to Sclerotinia head rot in two USDA sunflower germplasms.

    PubMed

    Yue, B; Radi, S A; Vick, B A; Cai, X; Tang, S; Knapp, S J; Gulya, T J; Miller, J F; Hu, J

    2008-08-01

    Sclerotinia head rot is a major disease of sunflower in the world, and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping could facilitate understanding of the genetic basis of head rot resistance and breeding in sunflower. One hundred twenty-three F2:3 and F2:4 families from a cross between HA 441 and RHA 439 were studied. The mapping population was evaluated for disease resistance in three field experiments in a randomized complete block design with two replicates. Disease incidence (DI) and disease severity (DS) were assessed. A genetic map with 180 target region amplification polymorphism, 32 simple sequence repeats, 11 insertion-deletion, and 2 morphological markers was constructed. Nine DI and seven DS QTL were identified with each QTL explaining 8.4 to 34.5% of phenotypic variance, suggesting the polygenic basis of the resistance to head rot. Five of these QTL were identified in more than one experiment, and each QTL explained more than 12.9% of phenotypic variance. These QTL could be useful in sunflower breeding. Although a positive correlation existed between the two disease indices, most of the respective QTL were located in different chromosomal regions, suggesting a different genetic basis for the two indices. PMID:18943211

  8. Mapping quantitative trait loci for sheath blight disease resistance in Yangdao 4 rice.

    PubMed

    Wen, Z H; Zeng, Y X; Ji, Z J; Yang, C D

    2015-03-06

    Rice sheath blight (ShB), which is caused by Rhizoctonia solani, has become the most serious rice disease in China. Yangdao 4, a cultivar with partial resistance to ShB, was crossed with Lemont, a susceptible cultivar, to develop mapping populations that were used to analyze quantitative trait loci (QTL) that confer resistance to ShB. QTL analysis were performed in 3 environments (E1-E3) using 2 F2 and 1 F2:3 populations, respectively. Three traits were recorded to evaluate ShB resistance, including disease rating (DR), lesion height (LH), and percentage of lesion height (PLH). Based on field evaluation of ShB resistance and the 2 genetic maps constructed, we identified a total of 8 QTLs for DR (4 in E1, 4 in E2, and 3 in E3), 6 QTLs for LH (1 in E1, 3 in E2, and 2 in E3), and 7 QTLs for PLH (1 in E1, 4 in E2, and 2 in E3). Sixteen of the ShB-QTLs co-localized as 6 clusters on chromosomes 3, 7, 11, and 12. Four of the 6 clusters contained ShB-QTLs that were detected in 2 environments, while the other 2 clusters with ShB-QTLs were detected in 1 environment. Three ShB-QTLs (qSBD-3-2, qSBL-3-1, and qSBPL-3-1) were delimited to a 581-kb region flanked by markers D333B and D334 on chromosome 3. The resistance alleles of Yangdao 4 at the qSBD-3-2 locus decreased DR by 0.68 and 0.79 in E2 and E3, respectively.

  9. Identification of genetic loci associated with fire blight resistance in Malus through combined use of QTL and association mapping.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Awais; Zhao, Youfu Frank; Korban, Schuyler S

    2013-07-01

    Fire blight, incited by the enterobacterium Erwinia amylovora, is a destructive disease of Rosaceae, particularly of apples and pears. There are reports on the molecular mechanisms underlying E. amylovora pathogenesis and how the host activates its resistance mechanism. The host's resistance mechanism is quantitatively controlled, although some major genes might also be involved. Thus far, quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping and differential expression studies have been used to elucidate those genes and/or genomic regions underlying quantitative resistance present in the apple genome. In this study, an effort is undertaken to dissect the genetic basis of fire blight resistance in apple using both QTL and genome-wide association mapping. On the basis of an F1 pedigree of 'Coop 16' × 'Coop 17' and a genome-wide association study (GWAS) mapping population of Malus accessions (species, old and new cultivars and selections), new QTLs and associations have been identified. A total of three QTLs for resistance to fire blight, with above 95% significant logarithm of odds threshold value of 2.5, have been identified on linkage groups (LGs) 02, 06, and 15 of the apple genome with phenotypic variation explained values of 14.7, 20.1 and 17.4, respectively. Although elevated P-values with signals for marker-trait associations are observed for some LGs, these are not found to be significant. However, a total of 34 significant associations, with P-values ≥0.02, have been detected including 8 for lesion length at 7 days following inoculation (PL1), 14 for lesion length at 14 days following inoculation (PL2), and 12 for shoot length. PMID:23627651

  10. Identification of genetic loci associated with fire blight resistance in Malus through combined use of QTL and association mapping.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Awais; Zhao, Youfu Frank; Korban, Schuyler S

    2013-07-01

    Fire blight, incited by the enterobacterium Erwinia amylovora, is a destructive disease of Rosaceae, particularly of apples and pears. There are reports on the molecular mechanisms underlying E. amylovora pathogenesis and how the host activates its resistance mechanism. The host's resistance mechanism is quantitatively controlled, although some major genes might also be involved. Thus far, quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping and differential expression studies have been used to elucidate those genes and/or genomic regions underlying quantitative resistance present in the apple genome. In this study, an effort is undertaken to dissect the genetic basis of fire blight resistance in apple using both QTL and genome-wide association mapping. On the basis of an F1 pedigree of 'Coop 16' × 'Coop 17' and a genome-wide association study (GWAS) mapping population of Malus accessions (species, old and new cultivars and selections), new QTLs and associations have been identified. A total of three QTLs for resistance to fire blight, with above 95% significant logarithm of odds threshold value of 2.5, have been identified on linkage groups (LGs) 02, 06, and 15 of the apple genome with phenotypic variation explained values of 14.7, 20.1 and 17.4, respectively. Although elevated P-values with signals for marker-trait associations are observed for some LGs, these are not found to be significant. However, a total of 34 significant associations, with P-values ≥0.02, have been detected including 8 for lesion length at 7 days following inoculation (PL1), 14 for lesion length at 14 days following inoculation (PL2), and 12 for shoot length.

  11. Pinpointing genes underlying the quantitative trait loci for root-knot nematode resistance in palaeopolyploid soybean by whole genome resequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to utilize next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to dissect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for southern root-knot nematode (RKN) resistance into individual genes in soybean. Two-hundred forty-six recombinant inbred lines (RIL) derived from a cross between Mage...

  12. Using early flowering transgenic apple to accelerate the breeding of donor parents with multiple loci for disease resistance (Malus x domestica)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the goals of the USDA-NIFA-SCRI RosBREED project is to develop donor parents with multiple loci for disease resistance. Due to the long generation time of tree fruit crops, the accumulation of pyramided resistance loci for multiple diseases by conventional breeding methods could require deca...

  13. Quantitative trait loci in Two Soybean Recombinant Inbred Line Populations Segregating for Yield and Disease Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yuan, J.; Njiti, V. N.; Meksem, K.; Iqbal, M. J.; Triwitayakorn, K.; Kassem, My. A.; Davis, G. T.; Schmidt, M. E.; Lightfoot, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    Molecular makers linked to quantitative trait loci (QTL) can assist soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] breeders to combine traits of low heritability, such as yield, with disease resistance. The objective of this study was to identify markers linked to yield QTL in two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations ['Essex' x 'Forrest' (ExF; n = 100) and 'Flyer' x 'Hartwig' (FxH; n = 94)] that also segregate for soybean cyst nematode (SCN) resistance genes (rhg1 and Rhg4). Each population was yield tested in four environments between 1996 and 1999. The resistant parents produced lower yields. Heritability of yield across four environments was 47% for ExF and 57% for FxH. Yield was normally distributed in both populations. High yielding, SCN resistant transgressive segregants were not observed. In the ExF RIL population, 134 microsatellite markers were compared against yield by ANOVA and MAPMAKER QTL. Regions associated with yield were identified by SATT294 on linkage group (LG.) C1 (P = 0.006, R(2) = 10%), SATT440 on LG. I (P = 0.007, R(2) = 10%), and SATT337 on LG. K (P = 0.004, R(2) = 10%). Essex provided the beneficial allele at SATT337. Mean yields among FxH RILs were compared against 33 microsatellite markers from LG. K. In addition 136 markers from randomly selected LGs were compared with extreme phenotypes by bulk segregant analysis. Two regions on LG. K (20 cM apart) associated with yield were identified by SATT326 (P = 0.0004, R(2) = 15%) and SATT539 (P = 0.0008, R(2) = 14%). Flyer provided both beneficial alleles. Both populations revealed a yield QTL in the interval (5 cM) between SATT337 and SATT326. These populations may share a common allele for yield in this region, given that about 40% of Flyer genome derived from Essex.

  14. Identifying Loci Contributing to Natural Variation in Xenobiotic Resistance in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Najarro, Michael A.; Hackett, Jennifer L.; Smith, Brittny R.; Highfill, Chad A.; King, Elizabeth G.; Long, Anthony D.; Macdonald, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    Natural populations exhibit a great deal of interindividual genetic variation in the response to toxins, exemplified by the variable clinical efficacy of pharmaceutical drugs in humans, and the evolution of pesticide resistant insects. Such variation can result from several phenomena, including variable metabolic detoxification of the xenobiotic, and differential sensitivity of the molecular target of the toxin. Our goal is to genetically dissect variation in the response to xenobiotics, and characterize naturally-segregating polymorphisms that modulate toxicity. Here, we use the Drosophila Synthetic Population Resource (DSPR), a multiparent advanced intercross panel of recombinant inbred lines, to identify QTL (Quantitative Trait Loci) underlying xenobiotic resistance, and employ caffeine as a model toxic compound. Phenotyping over 1,700 genotypes led to the identification of ten QTL, each explaining 4.5–14.4% of the broad-sense heritability for caffeine resistance. Four QTL harbor members of the cytochrome P450 family of detoxification enzymes, which represent strong a priori candidate genes. The case is especially strong for Cyp12d1, with multiple lines of evidence indicating the gene causally impacts caffeine resistance. Cyp12d1 is implicated by QTL mapped in both panels of DSPR RILs, is significantly upregulated in the presence of caffeine, and RNAi knockdown robustly decreases caffeine tolerance. Furthermore, copy number variation at Cyp12d1 is strongly associated with phenotype in the DSPR, with a trend in the same direction observed in the DGRP (Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel). No additional plausible causative polymorphisms were observed in a full genomewide association study in the DGRP, or in analyses restricted to QTL regions mapped in the DSPR. Just as in human populations, replicating modest-effect, naturally-segregating causative variants in an association study framework in flies will likely require very large sample sizes. PMID:26619284

  15. A genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting resistance to Trichostrongylus colubriformis in sheep.

    PubMed

    Beh, K J; Hulme, D J; Callaghan, M J; Leish, Z; Lenane, I; Windon, R G; Maddox, J F

    2002-04-01

    A genome linkage scan was carried out using a resource flock of 1029 sheep in six half-sib families. The families were offspring of sires derived by crossing divergent lines of sheep selected for response to challenge with the intestinal parasitic nematode Trichostrongylus colubriformis. All animals in the resource flock were phenotypically assessed for worm resistance soon after weaning using a vaccination/challenge regime. After correcting for fixed effects using a least squares linear model the faecal egg count data obtained following the first challenge and the faecal egg count data obtained after the second challenge were designated Trait 1 and Trait 2, respectively. A total of 472 lambs drawn from the phenotypic extremes of the Trait 2 faecal egg count distribution were genotyped with a panel of 133 microsatellite markers covering all 26 sheep autosomes. Detection of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for each of the faecal egg count traits was determined using interval analysis with the Animap program with recombination rates between markers derived from an existing marker map. No chromosomal regions attained genome-wide significance for QTL influencing either of the traits. However, one region attained chromosome-wide significance and five other regions attained point-wise significance for the presence of QTL affecting parasite resistance.

  16. Identification of New Resistance Loci to African Stem Rust Race TTKSK in Tetraploid Wheats Based on Linkage and Genome-Wide Association Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Laidò, Giovanni; Panio, Giosuè; Marone, Daniela; Russo, Maria A.; Ficco, Donatella B. M.; Giovanniello, Valentina; Cattivelli, Luigi; Steffenson, Brian; de Vita, Pasquale; Mastrangelo, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis Pers. f. sp. tritici Eriks. and E. Henn. (Pgt), is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat. Races of the pathogen in the “Ug99 lineage” are of international concern due to their virulence for widely used stem rust resistance genes and their spread throughout Africa. Disease resistant cultivars provide one of the best means for controlling stem rust. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) conferring resistance to African stem rust race TTKSK at the seedling stage, we evaluated an association mapping (AM) panel consisting of 230 tetraploid wheat accessions under greenhouse conditions. A high level of phenotypic variation was observed in response to race TTKSK in the AM panel, allowing for genome-wide association mapping of resistance QTL in wild, landrace, and cultivated tetraploid wheats. Thirty-five resistance QTL were identified on all chromosomes, and seventeen are of particular interest as identified by multiple associations. Many of the identified resistance loci were coincident with previously identified rust resistance genes; however, nine on chromosomes 1AL, 2AL, 4AL, 5BL, and 7BS may be novel. To validate AM results, a biparental population of 146 recombinant inbred lines was also considered, which derived from a cross between the resistant cultivar “Cirillo” and susceptible “Neodur.” The stem rust resistance of Cirillo was conferred by a single gene on the distal region of chromosome arm 6AL in an interval map coincident with the resistance gene Sr13, and confirmed one of the resistance loci identified by AM. A search for candidate resistance genes was carried out in the regions where QTL were identified, and many of them corresponded to NBS-LRR genes and protein kinases with LRR domains. The results obtained in the present study are of great interest as a high level of genetic variability for resistance to race TTKSK was described in a germplasm panel comprising most of the tetraploid wheat sub

  17. Location of Vibrio anguillarum resistance-associated trait loci in half-smooth tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis at its microsatellite linkage map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhihong; Guo, Li; Liu, Yang; Shao, Changwei; Chen, Songlin; Yang, Guanpin

    2016-11-01

    A cultured female half-smooth tongue sole ( Cynoglossus semilaevis) was crossed with a wild male, yielding the first filial generation of pseudo-testcrossing from which 200 fish were randomly selected to locate the Vibrio anguillarum resistance trait in half-smooth tongue sole at its microsatellite linkage map. In total, 129 microsatellites were arrayed into 18 linkage groups, ≥4 each. The map reconstructed was 852.85 cM in length with an average spacing of 7.68 cM, covering 72.07% of that expected (1 183.35 cM). The V. anguillarum resistance trait was a composite rather than a unit trait, which was tentatively partitioned into Survival time in Hours After V. anguillarum Infection (SHAVI) and Immunity of V. Anguillarum Infection (IVAI). Above a logarithm of the odds (LOD) threshold of 2.5, 18 loci relative to SHAVI and 3 relative to IVAI were identified. The 3 loci relative to IVAI explained 18.78%, 5.87% and 6.50% of the total phenotypic variation in immunity. The microsatellites bounding the 3 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of IVAI may in future aid to the selection of V. anguillarum-immune half-smooth tongue sole varieties, and facilitate cloning the gene(s) controlling such immunity.

  18. Location of Vibrio anguillarum resistance-associated trait loci in half-smooth tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis at its microsatellite linkage map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhihong; Guo, Li; Liu, Yang; Shao, Changwei; Chen, Songlin; Yang, Guanpin

    2016-03-01

    A cultured female half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) was crossed with a wild male, yielding the first filial generation of pseudo-testcrossing from which 200 fish were randomly selected to locate the Vibrio anguillarum resistance trait in half-smooth tongue sole at its microsatellite linkage map. In total, 129 microsatellites were arrayed into 18 linkage groups, ≥4 each. The map reconstructed was 852.85 cM in length with an average spacing of 7.68 cM, covering 72.07% of that expected (1 183.35 cM). The V. anguillarum resistance trait was a composite rather than a unit trait, which was tentatively partitioned into Survival time in Hours After V. anguillarum Infection (SHAVI) and Immunity of V. Anguillarum Infection (IVAI). Above a logarithm of the odds (LOD) threshold of 2.5, 18 loci relative to SHAVI and 3 relative to IVAI were identified. The 3 loci relative to IVAI explained 18.78%, 5.87% and 6.50% of the total phenotypic variation in immunity. The microsatellites bounding the 3 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of IVAI may in future aid to the selection of V. anguillarum-immune half-smooth tongue sole varieties, and facilitate cloning the gene(s) controlling such immunity.

  19. Fine mapping of quantitative trait loci for mastitis resistance on bovine chromosome 11.

    PubMed

    Schulman, N F; Sahana, G; Iso-Touru, T; Lund, M S; Andersson-Eklund, L; Viitala, S M; Värv, S; Viinalass, H; Vilkki, J H

    2009-08-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting clinical mastitis (CM) and somatic cell score (SCS) were mapped on bovine chromosome 11. The mapping population consisted of 14 grandsire families belonging to three Nordic red cattle breeds: Finnish Ayrshire (FA), Swedish Red and White (SRB) and Danish Red. The families had previously been shown to segregate for udder health QTL. A total of 524 progeny tested bulls were included in the analysis. A linkage map including 33 microsatellite and five SNP markers was constructed. We performed combined linkage disequilibrium and linkage analysis (LDLA) using the whole data set. Further analyses were performed for FA and SRB separately to study the origin of the identified QTL/haplotype and to examine if it was common in both populations. Finally, different two-trait models were fitted. These postulated either a pleiotropic QTL affecting both traits; two linked QTL, each affecting one trait; or one QTL affecting a single trait. A QTL affecting CM was fine-mapped. In FA, a haplotype having a strong association with a high negative effect on mastitis resistance was identified. The mapping precision of an earlier detected SCS-QTL was not improved by the LDLA analysis because of lack of linkage disequilibrium between the markers used and the QTL in the region.

  20. Novel loci control variation in reproductive timing in Arabidopsis thaliana in natural environments.

    PubMed Central

    Weinig, Cynthia; Ungerer, Mark C; Dorn, Lisa A; Kane, Nolan C; Toyonaga, Yuko; Halldorsdottir, Solveig S; Mackay, Trudy F C; Purugganan, Michael D; Schmitt, Johanna

    2002-01-01

    Molecular biologists are rapidly characterizing the genetic basis of flowering in model species such as Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it is not clear how the developmental pathways identified in controlled environments contribute to variation in reproductive timing in natural ecological settings. Here we report the first study of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for date of bolting (the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth) in A. thaliana in natural seasonal field environments and compare the results with those obtained under typical growth-chamber conditions. Two QTL specific to long days in the chamber were expressed only in spring-germinating cohorts in the field, and two loci specific to short days in the chamber were expressed only in fall-germinating cohorts, suggesting differential involvement of the photoperiod pathway in different seasonal environments. However, several other photoperiod-specific QTL with large effects in controlled conditions were undetectable in natural environments, indicating that expression of allelic variation at these loci was overridden by environmental factors specific to the field. Moreover, a substantial number of QTL with major effects on bolting date in one or more field environments were undetectable under controlled environment conditions. These novel loci suggest the involvement of additional genes in the transition to flowering under ecologically relevant conditions. PMID:12524356

  1. Genetic identification of multiple loci that control breast cancer susceptibility in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Shepel, L A; Lan, H; Haag, J D; Brasic, G M; Gheen, M E; Simon, J S; Hoff, P; Newton, M A; Gould, M N

    1998-01-01

    We have used a rat model of induced mammary carcinomas in an effort to identify breast cancer susceptibility genes. Using genetic crosses between the carcinoma-resistant Copenhagen (COP) and carcinoma-sensitive Wistar-Furth rats, we have confirmed the identification of the Mcs1 locus that modulates tumor number. We have now also identified two additional loci, Mcs2 and Mcs3. These three loci map to chromosomes 2, 7, and 1, respectively, and interact additively to suppress mammary carcinoma development in the COP strain. They are responsible for a major portion of the tumor-resistant phenotype of the COP rat. No loss of heterozygosity was observed surrounding the three loci. A fourth COP locus, Mcs4, has also been identified on chromosome 8 and acts in contrast to increase the number of carcinomas. These results show that mammary carcinoma susceptibility in the COP rat is a polygenic trait. Interestingly, a polymorphism in the human genomic region homologous to the rat Mcs4 region is associated with an increased breast cancer risk in African-American women. The isolation of the Mcs genes may help elucidate novel mechanisms of carcinogenesis, provide information important for human breast cancer risk estimation, and also provide unique drug discovery targets for breast cancer prevention. PMID:9584103

  2. Effective resist profile control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen-Yu; Wang, Chien-Wei; Huang, Chun-Ching; Chang, Ching-Yu; Ku, Yao-Ching

    2014-03-01

    To meet Moore's law, resist resolution improvement has become more and more important. However, it is difficult to improve resist resolution and keep vertical sidewall profile. For example, a high contrast hole resist may cause trench scum, due to very T-top profile. This paper reports several concepts for resist profile tuning without losing performance for lithographic factor , including mask error enhancement factor (MEEF), depth of focus (DOF), and critical dimension uniformity (CDU). To quantitative analysis the resist profile improvement, we define a new factor, Scum fail ratio (F/R%) for new techniques evaluation. The new techniques, including floatable additive, floatable PAG, and new monomer, are discussed. From X-SEM and CD-SEM data, former three concepts could improve resist sidewall profile quantitatively evaluated by Scum fail F/R% and keep lithographic factors. In addition, another key factor, resist residue defect, is also discussed. The high contrast resist with higher receding contact angle (RCA) easily generates more residue defect after development. With the new monomer composition, RCA of Resist E is decreased from 54 to 48 degree after development. Therefore, the residue defect is improved one order.

  3. Genetic control of gene expression at novel and established chronic obstructive pulmonary disease loci

    PubMed Central

    Castaldi, Peter J.; Cho, Michael H.; Zhou, Xiaobo; Qiu, Weiliang; Mcgeachie, Michael; Celli, Bartolome; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A.; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Rennard, Stephen; Harshfield, Benjamin; Lange, Christoph; Singh, Dave; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Riley, John H.; Quackenbush, John; Raby, Benjamin A.; Carey, Vincent J.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hersh, Craig P.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic risk loci have been identified for a wide range of diseases through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), but the relevant functional mechanisms have been identified for only a small proportion of these GWAS-identified loci. By integrating results from the largest current GWAS of chronic obstructive disease (COPD) with expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis in whole blood and sputum from 121 subjects with COPD from the ECLIPSE Study, this analysis identifies loci that are simultaneously associated with COPD and the expression of nearby genes (COPD eQTLs). After integrative analysis, 19 COPD eQTLs were identified, including all four previously identified genome-wide significant loci near HHIP, FAM13A, and the 15q25 and 19q13 loci. For each COPD eQTL, fine mapping and colocalization analysis to identify causal shared eQTL and GWAS variants identified a subset of sites with moderate-to-strong evidence of harboring at least one shared variant responsible for both the eQTL and GWAS signals. Transcription factor binding site (TFBS) analysis confirms that multiple COPD eQTL lead SNPs disrupt TFBS, and enhancer enrichment analysis for loci with the strongest colocalization signals showed enrichment for blood-related cell types (CD3 and CD4+ T cells, lymphoblastoid cell lines). In summary, integrative eQTL and GWAS analysis confirms that genetic control of gene expression plays a key role in the genetic architecture of COPD and identifies specific blood-related cell types as likely participants in the functional pathway from GWAS-associated variant to disease phenotype. PMID:25315895

  4. Detecting major genetic loci controlling phenotypic variability in experimental crosses.

    PubMed

    Rönnegård, Lars; Valdar, William

    2011-06-01

    Traditional methods for detecting genes that affect complex diseases in humans or animal models, milk production in livestock, or other traits of interest, have asked whether variation in genotype produces a change in that trait's average value. But focusing on differences in the mean ignores differences in variability about that mean. The robustness, or uniformity, of an individual's character is not only of great practical importance in medical genetics and food production but is also of scientific and evolutionary interest (e.g., blood pressure in animal models of heart disease, litter size in pigs, flowering time in plants). We describe a method for detecting major genes controlling the phenotypic variance, referring to these as vQTL. Our method uses a double generalized linear model with linear predictors based on probabilities of line origin. We evaluate our method on simulated F₂ and collaborative cross data, and on a real F₂ intercross, demonstrating its accuracy and robustness to the presence of ordinary mean-controlling QTL. We also illustrate the connection between vQTL and QTL involved in epistasis, explaining how these concepts overlap. Our method can be applied to a wide range of commonly used experimental crosses and may be extended to genetic association more generally. PMID:21467569

  5. Interaction of common bacterial blight bacteria with disease resistance quantitative trait loci in common bean.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Robert W; Singh, Shree P; Gilbertson, Robert L

    2011-04-01

    . fuscans subsp. fuscans genotypes were inoculated onto 28 common bean genotypes having various combinations of known CBB resistance quantitative trait loci (QTL) and associated sequence-characterized amplified region markers. Different levels of virulence were observed for X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains, whereas X. fuscans subsp. fuscans strains were similar in virulence. The typical X. campestris pv. phaseoli strain from Wisconsin was most virulent, whereas X. campestris pv. phaseoli genotypes from East Africa were the least virulent. Host genotypes having the SU91 marker-associated resistance and one or more other QTL (i.e., pyramided resistance), such as the VAX lines, were highly resistant to all genotypes of common blight bacteria tested. This information will help in the development of CBB resistance-breeding strategies for different common bean market classes in different geographical regions, as well as the identification of appropriate pathogen genotypes for screening for resistance.

  6. Interaction of common bacterial blight bacteria with disease resistance quantitative trait loci in common bean.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Robert W; Singh, Shree P; Gilbertson, Robert L

    2011-04-01

    . fuscans subsp. fuscans genotypes were inoculated onto 28 common bean genotypes having various combinations of known CBB resistance quantitative trait loci (QTL) and associated sequence-characterized amplified region markers. Different levels of virulence were observed for X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains, whereas X. fuscans subsp. fuscans strains were similar in virulence. The typical X. campestris pv. phaseoli strain from Wisconsin was most virulent, whereas X. campestris pv. phaseoli genotypes from East Africa were the least virulent. Host genotypes having the SU91 marker-associated resistance and one or more other QTL (i.e., pyramided resistance), such as the VAX lines, were highly resistant to all genotypes of common blight bacteria tested. This information will help in the development of CBB resistance-breeding strategies for different common bean market classes in different geographical regions, as well as the identification of appropriate pathogen genotypes for screening for resistance. PMID:21391823

  7. Quantitative trait loci for partial resistance to crown rust, Puccinia coronata, in cultivated oat, Avena sativa L.

    PubMed

    Portyanko, V A; Chen, G; Rines, H W; Phillips, R L; Leonard, K J; Ochocki, G E; Stuthman, D D

    2005-07-01

    To facilitate the detection of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for partial resistance to oat crown rust, Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae Eriks., a genetic map was generated in a population of 158 F(6)-derived oat recombinant inbred lines from a cross of a partial resistance line MN841801-1 by a susceptible cultivar selection 'Noble-2'. The map, developed using 230 marker loci, mostly restriction fragment length polymorphism and amplified fragment length polymorphism markers, spanned 1,509 cM (Haldane) arranged into 30 linkage groups of 2-18 markers each. Four consistently detected major QTLs for partial rust resistance, Prq1a, Prq1b, Prq2, and Prq7, and three minor QTLs, Prq3, Prq5, and Prq6, were found in tests involving three field and two greenhouse environments. In addition, two major QTLs for flowering time, Ftq1 and Ftq7, and five weaker QTLs, Ftq2, Ftq3, Ftq4, Ftq5, and Ftq6, were revealed. Overlapping of the map segments of Ftq1 and Prq1 and of Ftq7 and Prq7 suggested either linkage between the flowering time QTLs and resistance QTLs or a pleiotropic effect of the Ftq QTLs on rust resistance. Relatively low heritability estimates (0.30) obtained for partial resistance to crown rust in the field indicate a potential value for marker-assisted selection.

  8. Characterization of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in cultivated rice contributing to field resistance to sheath blight (Rhizoctonia solani).

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Pinson, S R; Marchetti, M A; Stansel, J W; Park, W D

    1995-07-01

    Sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most important diseases of rice. Despite extensive searches of the rice germ plasm, the major gene(s) which give complete resistance to the fungus have not been identified. However, there is much variation in quantitatively inherited resistance to R. solani, and this type of resistance can offer adequate protection against the pathogen under field conditions. Using 255 F4 bulked populations from a cross between the susceptible variety 'Lemont' and the resistant variety 'Teqing', 2 years of field disease evaluation and 113 well-distributed RFLP markers, we identified six quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to resistance to R. solani. These QTLs are located on 6 of the 12 rice chromosomes and collectively explain approximately 60% of the genotypic variation or 47% of the phenotypic variation in the 'Lemont'x'Teqing' cross. One of these resistance QTLs (QSbr4a), which accounted for 6% of the genotypic variation in resistance to R. solani, appeared to be independent of associated morphological traits. The remaining five putative resistance loci (QSbr2a, QSbr3a, QSbr8a, QSbr9a and QSbr12a) all mapped to chromosomal regions also associated with increased plant height, three of which were also associated with QTLs causing later heading. This was consistent with the observation that heading date and plant height accounted for 47% of the genotypic variation in resistance to R. solani in this population. There were also weak associations between resistance to R. solani and leaf width, which were likely due to linkage with a QTL for this trait rather than to a physiological relationship.

  9. Quantitative trait loci controlling light and hormone response in two accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Borevitz, Justin O; Maloof, Julin N; Lutes, Jason; Dabi, Tsegaye; Redfern, Joanna L; Trainer, Gabriel T; Werner, Jonathan D; Asami, Tadao; Berry, Charles C; Weigel, Detlef; Chory, Joanne

    2002-01-01

    We have mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for natural variation in light and hormone response between the Cape Verde Islands (Cvi) and Landsberg erecta (Ler) accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana using recombinant inbred lines (RILs). Hypocotyl length was measured in four light environments: white, blue, red, and far-red light and in the dark. In addition, white light plus gibberellin (GA) and dark plus the brassinosteroid biosynthesis inhibitor brassinazole (BRZ) were used to detect hormone effects. Twelve QTL were identified that map to loci not previously known to affect light response, as well as loci where candidate genes have been identified from known mutations. Some QTL act in all environments while others show genotype-by-environment interaction. A global threshold was established to identify a significant epistatic interaction between two loci that have few main effects of their own. LIGHT1, a major QTL, has been confirmed in a near isogenic line (NIL) and maps to a new locus with effects in all light environments. The erecta mutation can explain the effect of the HYP2 QTL in the blue, BRZ, and dark environments, but not in far-red. LIGHT2, also confirmed in an NIL, has effects in white and red light and shows interaction with GA. The phenotype and map position of LIGHT2 suggest the photoreceptor PHYB as a candidate gene. Natural variation in light and hormone response thus defines both new genes and known genes that control light response in wild accessions. PMID:11861571

  10. Identification of Loci Controlling Restriction of Parasite Growth in Experimental Taenia crassiceps Cysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Anny; Sciutto-Conde, Edda; Fragoso-González, Gladis; Gros, Philippe; Aguilar-Delfin, Irma

    2011-01-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) caused by Taenia solium is a parasitic disease of the central nervous system that is endemic in many developing countries. In this study, a genetic approach using the murine intraperitoneal cysticercosis caused by the related cestode Taenia crassiceps was employed to identify host factors that regulate the establishment and proliferation of the parasite. A/J mice are permissive to T. crassiceps infection while C57BL/6J mice (B6) are comparatively restrictive, with a 10-fold difference in numbers of peritoneal cysticerci recovered 30 days after infection. The genetic basis of this inter-strain difference was explored using 34 AcB/BcA recombinant congenic strains derived from A/J and B6 progenitors, that were phenotyped for T. crassiceps replication. In agreement with their genetic background, most AcB strains (A/J-derived) were found to be permissive to infection while most BcA strains (B6-derived) were restrictive with the exception of a few discordant strains, together suggesting a possible simple genetic control. Initial haplotype association mapping using >1200 informative SNPs pointed to linkages on chromosomes 2 (proximal) and 6 as controlling parasite replication in the AcB/BcA panel. Additional linkage analysis by genome scan in informative [AcB55xDBA/2]F1 and F2 mice (derived from the discordant AcB55 strain), confirmed the effect of chromosome 2 on parasite replication, and further delineated a major locus (LOD = 4.76, p<0.01; peak marker D2Mit295, 29.7 Mb) that we designate Tccr1 (T. crassiceps cysticercosis restrictive locus 1). Resistance alleles at Tccr1 are derived from AcB55 and are inherited in a dominant fashion. Scrutiny of the minimal genetic interval reveals overlap of Tccr1 with other host resistance loci mapped to this region, most notably the defective Hc/C5 allele which segregates both in the AcB/BcA set and in the AcB55xDBA/2 cross. These results strongly suggest that the complement component 5 (C5) plays a

  11. Comparative mapping of Raphanus sativus genome using Brassica markers and quantitative trait loci analysis for the Fusarium wilt resistance trait.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaona; Choi, Su Ryun; Ramchiary, Nirala; Miao, Xinyang; Lee, Su Hee; Sun, Hae Jeong; Kim, Sunggil; Ahn, Chun Hee; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2013-10-01

    Fusarium wilt (FW), caused by the soil-borne fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum is a serious disease in cruciferous plants, including the radish (Raphanus sativus). To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) or gene(s) conferring resistance to FW, we constructed a genetic map of R. sativus using an F2 mapping population derived by crossing the inbred lines '835' (susceptible) and 'B2' (resistant). A total of 220 markers distributed in 9 linkage groups (LGs) were mapped in the Raphanus genome, covering a distance of 1,041.5 cM with an average distance between adjacent markers of 4.7 cM. Comparative analysis of the R. sativus genome with that of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa revealed 21 and 22 conserved syntenic regions, respectively. QTL mapping detected a total of 8 loci conferring FW resistance that were distributed on 4 LGs, namely, 2, 3, 6, and 7 of the Raphanus genome. Of the detected QTL, 3 QTLs (2 on LG 3 and 1 on LG 7) were constitutively detected throughout the 2-year experiment. QTL analysis of LG 3, flanked by ACMP0609 and cnu_mBRPGM0085, showed a comparatively higher logarithm of the odds (LOD) value and percentage of phenotypic variation. Synteny analysis using the linked markers to this QTL showed homology to A. thaliana chromosome 3, which contains disease-resistance gene clusters, suggesting conservation of resistance genes between them.

  12. Comparative mapping of Raphanus sativus genome using Brassica markers and quantitative trait loci analysis for the Fusarium wilt resistance trait.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaona; Choi, Su Ryun; Ramchiary, Nirala; Miao, Xinyang; Lee, Su Hee; Sun, Hae Jeong; Kim, Sunggil; Ahn, Chun Hee; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2013-10-01

    Fusarium wilt (FW), caused by the soil-borne fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum is a serious disease in cruciferous plants, including the radish (Raphanus sativus). To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) or gene(s) conferring resistance to FW, we constructed a genetic map of R. sativus using an F2 mapping population derived by crossing the inbred lines '835' (susceptible) and 'B2' (resistant). A total of 220 markers distributed in 9 linkage groups (LGs) were mapped in the Raphanus genome, covering a distance of 1,041.5 cM with an average distance between adjacent markers of 4.7 cM. Comparative analysis of the R. sativus genome with that of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa revealed 21 and 22 conserved syntenic regions, respectively. QTL mapping detected a total of 8 loci conferring FW resistance that were distributed on 4 LGs, namely, 2, 3, 6, and 7 of the Raphanus genome. Of the detected QTL, 3 QTLs (2 on LG 3 and 1 on LG 7) were constitutively detected throughout the 2-year experiment. QTL analysis of LG 3, flanked by ACMP0609 and cnu_mBRPGM0085, showed a comparatively higher logarithm of the odds (LOD) value and percentage of phenotypic variation. Synteny analysis using the linked markers to this QTL showed homology to A. thaliana chromosome 3, which contains disease-resistance gene clusters, suggesting conservation of resistance genes between them. PMID:23864230

  13. Identification of quantitative trait loci associated with resistance to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus ): a comparison between bacterium, parasite and virus diseases.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ramilo, Silvia T; De La Herrán, Roberto; Ruiz-Rejón, Carmelo; Hermida, Miguel; Fernández, Carlos; Pereiro, Patricia; Figueras, Antonio; Bouza, Carmen; Toro, Miguel A; Martínez, Paulino; Fernández, Jesús

    2014-06-01

    One of the main objectives of genetic breeding programs in turbot industry is to reduce disease-related mortality. In the present study, a genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting resistance and survival to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) was carried out. Three full-sib families with approximately 90 individuals each were genotyped and evaluated by linear regression and maximum likelihood approaches. In addition, a comparison between QTL detected for resistance and survival time to other important bacterial and parasite diseases affecting turbot (furunculosis and scuticociliatosis) was also carried out. Finally, the relationship between QTL affecting resistance/survival time to the virus and growth-related QTL was also evaluated. Several genomic regions controlling resistance and survival time to VHS were detected. Also significant associations between the evaluated traits and genotypes at particular markers were identified, explaining up to 14 % of the phenotypic variance. Several genomic regions controlling general and specific resistance to different diseases in turbot were detected. A preliminary gene mining approach identified candidate genes related to general or specific immunity. This information will be valuable to develop marker-assisted selection programs and to discover candidate genes related to disease resistance to improve turbot production.

  14. Quantitative trait loci detection of Edwardsiella tarda resistance in Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus using bulked segregant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Xu, Wenteng; Liu, Yang; Wang, Lei; Sun, Hejun; Wang, Lei; Chen, Songlin

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, Edwardsiella tarda has become one of the most deadly pathogens of Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus), causing serious annual losses in commercial production. In contrast to the rapid advances in the aquaculture of P. olivaceus, the study of E. tarda resistance-related markers has lagged behind, hindering the development of a disease-resistant strain. Thus, a marker-trait association analysis was initiated, combining bulked segregant analysis (BSA) and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. Based on 180 microsatellite loci across all chromosomes, 106 individuals from the F1333 (♀: F0768 ×♂: F0915) (Nomenclature rule: F+year+family number) were used to detect simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and QTLs associated with E. tarda resistance. After a genomic scan, three markers (Scaffold 404-21589, Scaffold 404-21594 and Scaffold 270-13812) from the same linkage group (LG)-1 exhibited a significant difference between DNA, pooled/bulked from the resistant and susceptible groups (P <0.001). Therefore, 106 individuals were genotyped using all the SSR markers in LG1 by single marker analysis. Two different analytical models were then employed to detect SSR markers with different levels of significance in LG1, where 17 and 18 SSR markers were identified, respectively. Each model found three resistance-related QTLs by composite interval mapping (CIM). These six QTLs, designated qE1-6, explained 16.0%-89.5% of the phenotypic variance. Two of the QTLs, qE-2 and qE-4, were located at the 66.7 cM region, which was considered a major candidate region for E. tarda resistance. This study will provide valuable data for further investigations of E. tarda resistance genes and facilitate the selective breeding of disease-resistant Japanese flounder in the future.

  15. Quantitative trait loci detection of Edwardsiella tarda resistance in Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus using bulked segregant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Xu, Wenteng; Liu, Yang; Wang, Lei; Sun, Hejun; Wang, Lei; Chen, Songlin

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, Edwardsiella tarda has become one of the most deadly pathogens of Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus), causing serious annual losses in commercial production. In contrast to the rapid advances in the aquaculture of P. olivaceus, the study of E. tarda resistance-related markers has lagged behind, hindering the development of a disease-resistant strain. Thus, a marker-trait association analysis was initiated, combining bulked segregant analysis (BSA) and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. Based on 180 microsatellite loci across all chromosomes, 106 individuals from the F1333 (♀: F0768 ×♂: F0915) (Nomenclature rule: F+year+family number) were used to detect simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and QTLs associated with E. tarda resistance. After a genomic scan, three markers (Scaffold 404-21589, Scaffold 404-21594 and Scaffold 270-13812) from the same linkage group (LG)-1 exhibited a significant difference between DNA, pooled/bulked from the resistant and susceptible groups (P <0.001). Therefore, 106 individuals were genotyped using all the SSR markers in LG1 by single marker analysis. Two different analytical models were then employed to detect SSR markers with different levels of significance in LG1, where 17 and 18 SSR markers were identified, respectively. Each model found three resistance-related QTLs by composite interval mapping (CIM). These six QTLs, designated qE1-6, explained 16.0%-89.5% of the phenotypic variance. Two of the QTLs, qE-2 and qE-4, were located at the 66.7 cM region, which was considered a major candidate region for E. tarda resistance. This study will provide valuable data for further investigations of E. tarda resistance genes and facilitate the selective breeding of disease-resistant Japanese flounder in the future.

  16. Identification of Pathotypes of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis in Africa and Detection of Quantitative Trait Loci and Markers for Resistance to Bacterial Blight of Cassava.

    PubMed

    Wydra, K; Zinsou, V; Jorge, V; Verdier, V

    2004-10-01

    ABSTRACT Cassava suffers from bacterial blight attack in all growing regions. Control by resistance is unstable due to high genotype-environment interactions. Identifying genes for resistance to African strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis can support breeding efforts. Five F(1) cassava genotypes deriving from the male parent 'CM2177-2' and the female parent 'TMS30572' were used to produce 111 individuals by backcrossing to the female parent. In all, 16 genotypes among the mapping population were resistant to stem inoculation by four strains of X. axonopodis pv. manihotis from different locations in Africa, and 19 groups with differential reactions to the four strains were identified, suggesting that the strains represent different pathotypes. Four genotypes were resistant to leaf inoculation, and three were resistant to both stem and leaf inoculations. Genotypes with susceptible, moderately resistant, and resistant reactions after leaf and stem inoculation partly differed in their reactions on leaves and stems. Based on the genetic map of cassava, single-markeranalysis of disease severity after stem-puncture inoculation was performed. Eleven markers were identified, explaining between 16 and 33.3% of phenotypic variance of area under disease progress curve. Five markers on three and one linkage groups from the female- and male-derived framework of family CM8820, respectively, seem to be weakly associated with resistance to four strains of X. axonopodis pv. manihotis. Based on the segregation of alleles from the female of family CM8873, one marker was significantly associated with resistance to two X. axonopodis pv. manihotis strains, GSPB2506 and GSPB2511, whereas five markers were not linked to any linkage group. The quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping results also suggest that the four African strains belong to four different pathotypes. The identified pathotypes should be useful for screening for resistance, and the QTL and markers will support

  17. Mapping quantitative trait loci controlling milk production in dairy cattle by exploiting progeny testing

    SciTech Connect

    Georges, M.; Nielsen, D.; Mackinnon, M.; Mishra, A.; Okimoto, R.; Sargeant, L.S.; Steele, M.R.; Zhao, X.; Pasquino, A.T.

    1995-02-01

    We have exploited {open_quotes}progeny testing{close_quotes} to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying the genetic variation of milk production in a selected dairy cattle population. A total of 1,518 sires, with progeny tests based on the milking performances of >150,000 daughters jointly, was genotyped for 159 autosomal microsatellites bracketing 1645 centimorgan or approximately two thirds of the bovine genome. Using a maximum likelihood multilocus linkage analysis accounting for variance heterogeneity of the phenotypes, we identified five chromosomes giving very strong evidence (LOD score {ge} 3) for the presence of a QTL controlling milk production: chromosomes 1, 6, 9, 10 and 20. These findings demonstrate that loci with considerable effects on milk production are still segregating in highly selected populations and pave the way toward marker-assisted selection in dairy cattle breeding. 44 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Identification and mapping of leaf, stem and stripe rust resistance quantitative trait loci and their interactions in durum wheat.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Pandey, M P; Singh, A K; Knox, R E; Ammar, K; Clarke, J M; Clarke, F R; Singh, R P; Pozniak, C J; Depauw, R M; McCallum, B D; Cuthbert, R D; Randhawa, H S; Fetch, T G

    2013-02-01

    Leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks.), stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. tritici Eriks.) and stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) cause major production losses in durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. var. durum). The objective of this research was to identify and map leaf, stripe and stem rust resistance loci from the French cultivar Sachem and Canadian cultivar Strongfield. A doubled haploid population from Sachem/Strongfield and parents were phenotyped for seedling reaction to leaf rust races BBG/BN and BBG/BP and adult plant response was determined in three field rust nurseries near El Batan, Obregon and Toluca, Mexico. Stripe rust response was recorded in 2009 and 2011 nurseries near Toluca and near Njoro, Kenya in 2010. Response to stem rust was recorded in field nurseries near Njoro, Kenya, in 2010 and 2011. Sachem was resistant to leaf, stripe and stem rust. A major leaf rust quantitative trait locus (QTL) was identified on chromosome 7B at Xgwm146 in Sachem. In the same region on 7B, a stripe rust QTL was identified in Strongfield. Leaf and stripe rust QTL around DArT marker wPt3451 were identified on chromosome 1B. On chromosome 2B, a significant leaf rust QTL was detected conferred by Strongfield, and at the same QTL, a Yr gene derived from Sachem conferred resistance. Significant stem rust resistance QTL were detected on chromosome 4B. Consistent interactions among loci for resistance to each rust type across nurseries were detected, especially for leaf rust QTL on 7B. Sachem and Strongfield offer useful sources of rust resistance genes for durum rust breeding.

  19. Genetic control of broad-spectrum resistance to turnip mosaic virus in Brassica rapa (Chinese cabbage).

    PubMed

    Rusholme, Rachel L; Higgins, Erin E; Walsh, John A; Lydiate, Derek J

    2007-11-01

    The Brassica rapa line RLR22 was resistant to eight diverse turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) isolates. A B. rapa genetic map based on 213 marker loci segregating in 120 first back-cross (B(1)) individuals was established and aligned with the B. rapa genome reference map using some of the RFLP probes. B(1) individuals were self-pollinated to produce B(1)S(1) families. The existence of two loci controlling resistance to TuMV isolate CDN 1 was established from contrasting patterns of segregation for resistance and susceptibility in the B(1)S(1) families. The first gene, recessive TuMV resistance 01 (retr01), had a recessive allele for resistance, was located on the upper portion of chromosome R4 and was epistatic to the second gene. The second gene, Conditional TuMV resistance 01 (ConTR01), possessed a dominant allele for resistance and was located on the upper portion of chromosome R8. These genes also controlled resistance to TuMV isolate CZE 1 and might be sufficient to explain the broad-spectrum resistance of RLR22. The dominant resistance gene, ConTR01, was coincident with one of the three eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) loci of B. rapa and possibly one of the loci of eIF(iso)4E. The recessive resistance gene retr01 was apparently coincident with one of the three loci of eIF(iso)4E in the A genome of Brassica napus and therefore, by inference, in the B. rapa genome. This suggested a mode of action for the resistance that is based on denying the viral RNA access to the translation initiation complex of the plant host. The gene retr01 is the first reported example of a recessive resistance gene mapped in a Brassica species.

  20. Quantitative trait loci for resistance to Haemonchus contortus artificial challenge in Red Maasai and Dorper sheep of East Africa.

    PubMed

    Marshall, K; Mugambi, J M; Nagda, S; Sonstegard, T S; Van Tassell, C P; Baker, R L; Gibson, J P

    2013-06-01

    A genome-wide scan was performed to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to the gastrointestinal nematode Haemonchus contortus in a double backcross population of Red Maasai and Dorper sheep. The mapping population comprised six sire families, with 1026 lambs in total. The lambs were artificially challenged with H. contortus at about 6.5 months of age, and nine phenotypes were measured: fecal egg count, packed cell volume decline, two weight traits and five worm traits. A subset of the population (342 lambs) was selectively genotyped for 172 microsatellite loci covering 25 of the 26 autosomes. QTL mapping was performed for models which assumed that the QTL alleles were either fixed or segregating within each breed, combined with models with only an additive QTL effect fitted or both additive and dominance QTL effects fitted. Overall, QTL significant at the 1% chromosome-wide level were identified for 22 combinations of trait and chromosome. Of particular interest are a region of chromosome 26 with putative QTL for all nine traits and a region of chromosome 2 with putative QTL for three traits. Favorable QTL alleles for disease resistance originated in both the Red Maasai and Dorper breeds, were not always fixed within breed and had significant dominance effects in some cases. We anticipate that this study, in combination with follow-up work and other relevant studies, will help elucidate the biology of disease resistance.

  1. Genome-wide association analysis identifies genetic loci associated with resistance to multiple antimalarials in Plasmodium falciparum from China-Myanmar border

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zenglei; Cabrera, Mynthia; Yang, Jingyun; Yuan, Lili; Gupta, Bhavna; Liang, Xiaoying; Kemirembe, Karen; Shrestha, Sony; Brashear, Awtum; Li, Xiaolian; Porcella, Stephen F.; Miao, Jun; Yang, Zhaoqing; Su, Xin-zhuan; Cui, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance has emerged as one of the greatest challenges facing malaria control. The recent emergence of resistance to artemisinin (ART) and its partner drugs in ART-based combination therapies (ACT) is threatening the efficacy of this front-line regimen for treating Plasmodium falciparum parasites. Thus, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the resistance to ART and the partner drugs has become a high priority for resistance containment and malaria management. Using genome-wide association studies, we investigated the associations of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms with in vitro sensitivities to 10 commonly used antimalarial drugs in 94 P. falciparum isolates from the China-Myanmar border area, a region with the longest history of ART usage. We identified several loci associated with various drugs, including those containing pfcrt and pfdhfr. Of particular interest is a locus on chromosome 10 containing the autophagy-related protein 18 (ATG18) associated with decreased sensitivities to dihydroartemisinin, artemether and piperaquine – an ACT partner drug in this area. ATG18 is a phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate binding protein essential for autophagy and recently identified as a potential ART target. Further investigations on the ATG18 and genes at the chromosome 10 locus may provide an important lead for a connection between ART resistance and autophagy. PMID:27694982

  2. Identification of RFLP and NBS/PK profiling markers for disease resistance loci in genetic maps of oats.

    PubMed

    Sanz, M J; Loarce, Y; Fominaya, A; Vossen, J H; Ferrer, E

    2013-01-01

    Two of the domains most widely shared among R genes are the nucleotide binding site (NBS) and protein kinase (PK) domains. The present study describes and maps a number of new oat resistance gene analogues (RGAs) with two purposes in mind: (1) to identify genetic regions that contain R genes and (2) to determine whether RGAs can be used as molecular markers for qualitative loci and for QTLs affording resistance to Puccinia coronata. Such genes have been mapped in the diploid A. strigosa × A. wiestii (Asw map) and the hexaploid MN841801-1 × Noble-2 (MN map). Genomic and cDNA NBS-RGA probes from oat, barley and wheat were used to produce RFLPs and to obtain markers by motif-directed profiling based on the NBS (NBS profiling) and PK (PK profiling) domains. The efficiency of primers used in NBS/PK profiling to amplify RGA fragments was assessed by sequencing individual marker bands derived from genomic and cDNA fragments. The positions of 184 markers were identified in the Asw map, while those for 99 were identified in the MN map. Large numbers of NBS and PK profiling markers were found in clusters across different linkage groups, with the PK profiling markers more evenly distributed. The location of markers throughout the genetic maps and the composition of marker clusters indicate that NBS- and PK-based markers cover partly complementary regions of oat genomes. Markers of the different classes obtained were found associated with the two resistance loci, PcA and R-284B-2, mapped on Asw, and with five out of eight QTLs for partial resistance in the MN map. 53 RGA-RFLPs and 187 NBS/PK profiling markers were also mapped on the hexaploid map A. byzantina cv. Kanota × A. sativa cv. Ogle. Significant co-localization was seen between the RGA markers in the KO map and other markers closely linked to resistance loci, such as those for P. coronata and barley yellow dwarf virus (Bydv) that were previously mapped in other segregating populations.

  3. Identification of quantitative trait loci conditioning partial resistance to Phytophthora sojae in soybean PI 407861A

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving resistance for Phytophthora root and stem rot is an important goal in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] breeding. Partial resistance can be as effective in managing this disease as single-gene (Rps) mediated resistance and is more durable. The objective of this study was to identify QTL con...

  4. Natural Variation Identifies Multiple Loci Controlling Petal Shape and Size in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Mary C.; Metheetrairut, Chanatip; Irish, Vivian F.

    2013-01-01

    Natural variation in organ morphologies can have adaptive significance and contribute to speciation. However, the underlying allelic differences responsible for variation in organ size and shape remain poorly understood. We have utilized natural phenotypic variation in three Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes to examine the genetic basis for quantitative variation in petal length, width, area, and shape. We identified 23 loci responsible for such variation, many of which appear to correspond to genes not previously implicated in controlling organ morphology. These analyses also demonstrated that allelic differences at distinct loci can independently affect petal length, width, area or shape, suggesting that these traits behave as independent modules. We also showed that ERECTA (ER), encoding a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) receptor-like serine-threonine kinase, is a major effect locus determining petal shape. Allelic variation at the ER locus was associated with differences in petal cell proliferation and concomitant effects on petal shape. ER has been previously shown to be required for regulating cell division and expansion in other contexts; the ER receptor-like kinase functioning to also control organ-specific proliferation patterns suggests that allelic variation in common signaling components may nonetheless have been a key factor in morphological diversification. PMID:23418598

  5. Quantitative trait loci meta-analysis of Plum pox virus resistance in apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.): new insights on the organization and the identification of genomic resistance factors.

    PubMed

    Marandel, Grégoire; Salava, Jaroslav; Abbott, Albert; Candresse, Thierry; Decroocq, Véronique

    2009-05-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) is responsible for sharka disease, one of the most detrimental stone fruit diseases affecting Prunus trees worldwide. Only a few apricot cultivars have been described as resistant, most originating from North American breeding programmes. Several PPV resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs) have been mapped in various progenies, consistently highlighting the contribution to the resistance of the upper part of linkage group 1 (LG1). However, to date, no consensus has been reached on the precise number of QTLs linked to the resistance to PPV in apricot and P. davidiana or on their accurate position on the genetic linkage map. In the present study, the quantitative resistance of cultivar 'Harlayne' was analysed over five growth periods in a large F1 population. Four QTLs were identified, three mapping on LG1, explaining between 5% and 39% of the observed phenotypic variance. In an effort to further this analysis of PPV resistance in apricot, these results were merged in a single QTL meta-analysis with those of five other PPV resistance analyses available in the literature. Three consensus QTL regions were identified on LG1 and a putative fourth region on LG3. QTL meta-analysis also revealed the contribution of each resistant cultivar to metaQTLs, providing interesting comparative data on the resistance factors shared between the resistance sources used in the various studies. Finally, it was shown that one of the metaQTLs co-localizes with the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E, thus providing new hypotheses on the mechanisms of PPV resistance in apricot.

  6. Comparative analyses of genomic locations and race specificities of loci for quantitative resistance to Pyricularia grisea in rice and barley.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huilan; Wang, Shiping; Xing, Yongzhong; Xu, Caiguo; Hayes, Patrick M; Zhang, Qifa

    2003-03-01

    Comparative genomic analyses have revealed extensive colinearity in gene orders in distantly related taxa in mammals and grasses, which opened new horizons for evolutionary study. The objective of our study was to assess syntenic relationships of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for disease resistance in cereals by using a model system in which rice and barley were used as the hosts and the blast fungus Pyricularia grisea Sacc. as the pathogen. In total, 12 QTL against three isolates were identified in rice; two had effects on all three isolates, and the other 10 had effects on only one or two of the three isolates. Twelve QTL for blast resistance were identified in barley; one had effect on all three isolates, and the other 11 had effects on only one or two of the three isolates. The observed isolate specificity led to a hypothesis about the durability of quantitative resistance commonly observed in many plant host-pathogen systems. Four pairs of the QTL showed corresponding map positions between rice and barley, two of the four QTL pairs had complete conserved isolate specificity, and another two QTL pairs had partial conserved isolate specificity. Such corresponding locations and conserved specificity suggested a common origin and conserved functionality of the genes underlying the QTL for quantitative resistance and may have utility in gene discovery, understanding the function of the genomes, and identifying the evolutionary forces that structured the organization of the grass genomes.

  7. Quantitative trait loci linked to PRNP gene controlling health and production traits in INRA 401 sheep

    PubMed Central

    Vitezica, Zulma G; Moreno, Carole R; Lantier, Frederic; Lantier, Isabelle; Schibler, Laurent; Roig, Anne; François, Dominique; Bouix, Jacques; Allain, Daniel; Brunel, Jean-Claude; Barillet, Francis; Elsen, Jean-Michel

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the potential association of PrP genotypes with health and productive traits was investigated. Data were recorded on animals of the INRA 401 breed from the Bourges-La Sapinière INRA experimental farm. The population consisted of 30 rams and 852 ewes, which produced 1310 lambs. The animals were categorized into three PrP genotype classes: ARR homozygous, ARR heterozygous, and animals without any ARR allele. Two analyses differing in the approach considered were carried out. Firstly, the potential association of the PrP genotype with disease (Salmonella resistance) and production (wool and carcass) traits was studied. The data used included 1042, 1043 and 1013 genotyped animals for the Salmonella resistance, wool and carcass traits, respectively. The different traits were analyzed using an animal model, where the PrP genotype effect was included as a fixed effect. Association analyses do not indicate any evidence of an effect of PrP genotypes on traits studied in this breed. Secondly, a quantitative trait loci (QTL) detection approach using the PRNP gene as a marker was applied on ovine chromosome 13. Interval mapping was used. Evidence for one QTL affecting mean fiber diameter was found at 25 cM from the PRNP gene. However, a linkage between PRNP and this QTL does not imply unfavorable linkage disequilibrium for PRNP selection purposes. PMID:17612481

  8. Quantitative trait loci from two genotypes of oat (Avena sativa L.) conditioning resistance to Puccinia coronata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Developing oat cultivars with partial resistance to crown rust would be beneficial for disease management. Two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations were derived by crossing the susceptible cultivar ‘Provena’ with two partially resistant sources, ‘CDC Boyer’ and breeding line 94197A1-9-2-2-2-5. ...

  9. Novel quantitative trait loci for partial resistance to Phytophthora sojae in soybean PI 398841

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root and stem rot caused by Phytophthora sojae Kaufmann and Gerdmann is one of the most severe soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr] diseases in the US. Partial resistance is as effective in managing this disease as single-gene (Rps) mediated resistance and is more durable. The objective of t...

  10. Quantitative Trait Loci in Sweet Corn Associated with Partial Resistance to Stewart's Wilt, Northern Corn Leaf Blight, and Common Rust.

    PubMed

    Brown, A F; Juvik, J A; Pataky, J K

    2001-03-01

    ABSTRACT Partial resistance to Stewart's wilt (Erwina stewartii, syn. Pantoea stewartii), northern corn leaf blight (NCLB) (Exserohilum turcicum), and common rust (Puccinia sorghi) was observed in an F(2:3) population developed from a cross between the inbred sweet corn lines IL731a and W6786. The objective of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with partial resistance using restriction fragment length polymorphic markers. Phenotypic data were collected for 2 years for Stewart's wilt, NCLB, and common rust but, due to significant family-environment interaction, analysis was conducted individually on data from each year. In 2 years of evaluation for the three diseases, a total of 33 regions in the maize genome were associated with partial resistance describing from 5.9 to 18% of the total phenotypic variability. Of six regions common in both years, three were associated with partial resistance to Stewart's wilt (chromosomes 4:07, 5:03, and 6:04), one was associated with NCLB (chromosome 9:05), and two were associated with common rust (chromosomes 2:04 and 3:04). The rust QTL on 3S mapped to within 20 cM of the rp3 locus and explained 17.7% of the phenotypic variability. Some of the QTL associated with partial resistance to the three diseases have been reported previously, and some are described here for the first time. Results suggest it may be possible to consolidate QTL from various elite backgrounds in a manner analogous to the pyramiding of major resistance genes. We also report here on two QTL associated with anthocyanin production on chromosomes 10:6 and 5:03 in the general location of the a2 gene. PMID:18943349

  11. Quantitative trait loci for non-race-specific, high-temperature adult-plant resistance to stripe rust in wheat cultivar Express.

    PubMed

    Lin, F; Chen, X M

    2009-02-01

    Wheat cultivar Express has durable, high-temperature adult-plant (HTAP) resistance to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici). To elucidate the genetic basis of the resistance, Express was crossed with 'Avocet Susceptible' (AVS). A mapping population of 146 F(5) recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was developed using single-seed descent. The RILs were evaluated at two sites near Pullman in eastern Washington and one site near Mount Vernon in western Washington in 2005, and were evaluated near Pullman in 2006 under natural stripe rust infection of predominant races virulent on seedlings of Express. Infection type (IT) and disease severity (DS) were recorded three times for each line during each growing season. The DS data were used to calculate relative area under the disease progress curve (rAUDPC) values. Both IT and rAUDPC data showed continuous distributions, indicating that the Express HTAP resistance was controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTL). Resistance gene analog polymorphism (RGAP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) techniques were used to map the HTAP resistance QTL. Three QTL were detected with significant additive effects, explaining 49.5-69.6% of the phenotypic variation for rAUDPC. Two of the QTL explained 30.8-42.7% of the phenotypic variation for IT. The three QTL were mapped to wheat chromosomes 6AS, 3BL and 1BL, and were designated as QYrex.wgp-6AS, QYrex.wgp-3BL and QYrex.wgp-1BL, respectively. QYrex.wgp-6AS and QYrex.wgp-3BL, which had higher effects than QYrex.wgp-1BL, were different from previously reported QTL/genes for adult-plant resistance. Markers Xgwm334-Xwgp56 and Xgwm299-Xwgp66 flanking the two major QTL were highly polymorphic in various wheat genotypes, suggesting that these markers are useful in marker-assisted selection.

  12. Identification of quantitative trait loci for resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Soengas, P; Hand, P; Vicente, J G; Pole, J M; Pink, D A C

    2007-02-01

    Resistance to six known races of black rot in crucifers caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Pammel) Dowson is absent or very rare in Brassica oleracea (C genome). However, race specific and broad-spectrum resistance (to type strains of all six races) does appear to occur frequently in other brassica genomes including B. rapa (A genome). Here, we report the genetics of broad spectrum resistance in the B. rapa Chinese cabbage accession B162, using QTL analysis of resistance to races 1 and 4 of the pathogen. A B. rapa linkage map comprising ten linkage groups (A01-A10) with a total map distance of 664 cM was produced, based on 223 AFLP bands and 23 microsatellites from a F(2) population of 114 plants derived from a cross between the B. rapa susceptible inbred line R-o-18 and B162. Interaction phenotypes of 125 F(2) plants were assessed using two criteria: the percentage of inoculation sites in which symptoms developed, and the severity of symptoms per plant. Resistance to both races was correlated and a cluster of highly significant QTL that explained 24-64% of the phenotypic variance was located on A06. Two additional QTLs for resistance to race 4 were found on A02 and A09. Markers closely linked to these QTL could assist in the transference of the resistance into different B. rapa cultivars or into B. oleracea.

  13. Two alternative recessive quantitative trait loci influence resistance to spring black stem and leaf spot in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Kamphuis, Lars G; Lichtenzveig, Judith; Oliver, Richard P; Ellwood, Simon R

    2008-01-01

    is tightly linked to a cluster of Toll/Interleukin1 receptor-nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat (TIR-NBS-LRR) genes and disease resistance protein-like genes, while no resistance gene analogues (RGAs) are apparent in the genomic sequence of the reference accession A17 at the rnpm2 locus. Conclusion The induction of defence responses and cell death in the susceptible interaction following infection by P. medicaginis suggested this pathogen is not negatively affected by these responses and may promote them. A QTL for resistance was revealed in each of two populations derived from crosses between a resistant accession and two different susceptible accessions. Both loci are recessive in nature, and the simplest explanation for the existence of two separate QTLs is the occurrence of host genotype-specific susceptibility loci that may interact with undetermined P. medicaginis virulence factors. PMID:18366746

  14. Putative resistance gene markers associated with quantitative trait loci for fire blight resistance in Malus 'Robusta 5' accessions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Breeding of fire blight resistant scions and rootstocks is a goal of several international apple breeding programs, as options are limited for management of this destructive disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora. A broad, large effect QTL for fire blight resistance has been pre...

  15. Compact, Controlled Resistance Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulus, David C.; DeWitt, John K.; Reich, Alton J.; Shaw, James E.; Deaconu, Stelu S.

    2011-01-01

    Spaceflight leads to muscle and bone atrophy. Isoinertial (free-weight) exercises provide a sufficient stimulus to elicit increases in both muscle strength and bone mineral density in Earth-based studies. While exercise equipment is in use on the International Space Station for crewmember health maintenance, current devices are too large to place in a transport vehicle or small spacecraft. Therefore, a portable computer controlled resistance exercise device is being developed that is able to simulate the inertial loading experienced when lifting a mass on Earth. This portable device weighs less than 50 lb and can simulate the resistance of lifting and lowering up to 600 lb of free-weights. The objective is to allow crewmembers to perform resistance exercise with loads capable of maintaining muscle and bone health. The device is reconfigurable and allows for the performance of typical Earth-based free-weight exercises. Forces exerted, volume of work, range of motion, time-under-tension, and speed/ acceleration of movement are recorded and can be remotely monitored to track progress and modify individual protocols based on exercise session data. A performance evaluation will be completed and data will be presented that include ground-reaction force comparisons between the device and free-weight dead-lifts over a spectrum of resistance levels. Movement biomechanics will also be presented.

  16. Identification of quantitative trait loci affecting resistance to gastro-intestinal parasites in a double backcross population of Red Maasai and Dorper sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genome-wide scan for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting gastrointestinal (GI) nematode resistance was completed using a double backcross sheep population derived from Red Maasai and Dorper ewes bred to F1 rams. These breeds were chosen, because Red Maasai sheep are known to be more tolerant ...

  17. Grapevine powdery mildew resistance and susceptibility loci identified on a high-resolution SNP map.

    PubMed

    Barba, Paola; Cadle-Davidson, Lance; Harriman, James; Glaubitz, Jeffrey C; Brooks, Siraprapa; Hyma, Katie; Reisch, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Improved efficacy and durability of powdery mildew resistance can be enhanced via knowledge of the genetics of resistance and susceptibility coupled with the development of high-resolution maps to facilitate the stacking of multiple resistance genes and other desirable traits. We studied the inheritance of powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator) resistance and susceptibility of wild Vitis rupestris B38 and cultivated V. vinifera 'Chardonnay', finding evidence for quantitative variation. Molecular markers were identified using genotyping-by-sequencing, resulting in 16,833 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) based on alignment to the V. vinifera 'PN40024' reference genome sequence. With an average density of 36 SNPs/Mbp and uniform coverage of the genome, this 17K set was used to identify 11 SNPs on chromosome 7 associated with a resistance locus from V. rupestris B38 and ten SNPs on chromosome 9 associated with a locus for susceptibility from 'Chardonnay' using single marker association and linkage disequilibrium analysis. Linkage maps for V. rupestris B38 (1,146 SNPs) and 'Chardonnay' (1,215 SNPs) were constructed and used to corroborate the 'Chardonnay' locus named Sen1 (Susceptibility to Erysiphe necator 1), providing the first insight into the genetics of susceptibility to powdery mildew from V. vinifera. The identification of markers associated with a susceptibility locus in a V. vinifera background can be used for negative selection among breeding progenies. This work improves our understanding of the nature of powdery mildew resistance in V. rupestris B38 and 'Chardonnay', while applying next-generation sequencing tools to advance grapevine genomics and breeding.

  18. Quantitative Trait Loci from Two Genotypes of Oat (Avena sativa) Conditioning Resistance to Puccinia coronata.

    PubMed

    Babiker, Ebrahiem M; Gordon, Tyler C; Jackson, Eric W; Chao, Shiaoman; Harrison, Stephen A; Carson, Martin L; Obert, Don E; Bonman, J Michael

    2015-02-01

    Developing oat cultivars with partial resistance to crown rust would be beneficial and cost-effective for disease management. Two recombinant inbred-line populations were generated by crossing the susceptible cultivar Provena with two partially resistant sources, CDC Boyer and breeding line 94197A1-9-2-2-2-5. A third mapping population was generated by crossing the partially resistant sources to validate the quantitative trait locus (QTL) results. The three populations were evaluated for crown rust severity in the field at Louisiana State University (LSU) in 2009 and 2010 and at the Cereal Disease Laboratory (CDL) in St. Paul, MN, in 2009, 2010, and 2011. An iSelect platform assay containing 5,744 oat single nucleotide polymorphisms was used to genotype the populations. From the 2009 CDL test, linkage analyses revealed two QTLs for partial resistance in the Provena/CDC Boyer population on chromosome 19A. One of the 19A QTLs was also detected in the 2009 LSU test. Another QTL was detected on chromosome 12D in the CDL 2009 test. In the Provena/94197A1-9-2-2-2-5 population, only one QTL was detected, on chromosome 13A, in the CDL 2011 test. The 13A QTL from the Provena/94197A1-9-2-2-2-5 population was validated in the CDC Boyer/94197A1-9-2-2-2-5 population in the CDL 2010 and 2011 tests. Comparative analysis of the significant marker sequences with the rice genome database revealed 15 candidate genes for disease resistance on chromosomes 4 and 6 of rice. These genes could be potential targets for cloning from the two resistant parents.

  19. Fusarium head blight resistance loci in a stratified population of wheat landraces and varieties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine if Chinese and Japanese wheat landraces and varieties have unique sources of Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistance, an association mapping panel of 195 wheat accessions including both commercial varieties and landraces was genotyped with 364 genome-wide simple sequence repeat (SSR) and ...

  20. Confirming QTLs and finding additional loci responsible for resistance to rice sheath blight disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice sheath blight disease (Rhizoctonia solani AG1-1AKühn) is one of the most destructive rice diseases worldwide. Utilization of host resistance is the most economical and environmentally sound strategy in managing sheath blight (ShB). Ten ShB-QTLs were previously mapped in a LJRIL population using...

  1. Feedback control of resistive instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Rutherford, P.H.; Furth, H.P.; Park, W.; Chen, L.

    1985-12-01

    Resistive instabilities are responsible for much of the global behavior and the determination of the possible domains of operation of tokamaks. Their successful control could have definite advantages, even making available new regimes of operation. Elimination of sawtoothing might allow operation with higher currents and more peaked current profiles, with q on axis well below unity. In this work different feedback schemes are explored. Simple analytical derivations of the effects of local heating and current drive feedback are presented. Although control of modes with m greater than or equal to 2 is fairly straightforward, the control of the m = 1 mode is more difficult because of its proximity to ideal instability. The most promising scheme utilizes high energy trapped particles. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Identification of QTL controlling high levels of partial resistance to Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi in pea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium root rot is a common biotic restraint on pea yields worldwide and genetic resistance is the most feasible method for improving pea production. This study was conducted to discover quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling genetic partial resistance to Fusarium root rot caused by Fusarium s...

  3. A genome-screen experiment to detect quantitative trait loci affecting resistance to facial eczema disease in sheep.

    PubMed

    Phua, S H; Dodds, K G; Morris, C A; Henry, H M; Beattie, A E; Garmonsway, H G; Towers, N R; Crawford, A M

    2009-02-01

    Facial eczema (FE) is a secondary photosensitization disease arising from liver cirrhosis caused by the mycotoxin sporidesmin. The disease affects sheep, cattle, deer and goats, and costs the New Zealand sheep industry alone an estimated NZ$63M annually. A long-term sustainable solution to this century-old FE problem is to breed for disease-resistant animals by marker-assisted selection. As a step towards finding a diagnostic DNA test for FE sensitivity, we have conducted a genome-scan experiment to screen for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting this trait in Romney sheep. Four F(1) sires, obtained from reciprocal matings of FE resistant and susceptible selection-line animals, were used to generate four outcross families. The resulting half-sib progeny were artificially challenged with sporidesmin to phenotype their FE traits measured in terms of their serum levels of liver-specific enzymes, namely gamma-glutamyl transferase and glutamate dehydrogenase. In a primary screen using selective genotyping on extreme progeny of each family, a total of 244 DNA markers uniformly distributed over all 26 ovine autosomes (with an autosomal genome coverage of 79-91%) were tested for linkage to the FE traits. Data were analysed using Haley-Knott regression. The primary screen detected one significant and one suggestive QTL on chromosomes 3 and 8 respectively. Both the significant and suggestive QTL were followed up in a secondary screen where all progeny were genotyped and analysed; the QTL on chromosome 3 was significant in this analysis.

  4. Mapping the Rust Resistant Loci MXC3 and MER in P. trichocarpa and Assessing the Intermarker Linkage Disequilibrium in MXC3 Region

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Tongming; Difazio, Stephen P.; Gunter, Lee E; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2004-01-01

    In an attempt to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of Melampsora rust resistance in Populus trichocarpa, we have mapped two resistance loci, MXC3 and MER, and intensively characterized the flanking genomic sequence for the MXC3 locus and the level of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in natural populations. We used an interspecific backcross pedigree and a genetic map that was highly saturated with AFLP and SSR markers, and assembled shotgun-sequence data in the region containing markers linked to MXC3. The two loci were mapped to different linkage groups. Linkage disequilibrium for MXC3 was confined to two closely linked regions spanning 34 and 16 kb, respectively. The MXC3 region also contained six disease-resistance candidate genes. The MER and MXC3 loci are clearly distinct, and may have different mechanisms of resistance, as different classes of putative resistance genes were present near each locus. The suppressed recombination previously observed in the MXC3 region was possibly caused by extensive hemizygous rearrangements confined to the original parent tree. The relatively low observed LD may facilitate association studies using candidate genes for rust resistance, but will probably inhibit marker-aided selection.

  5. Sum statistics for the joint detection of multiple disease loci in case-control association studies with SNP markers.

    PubMed

    Wille, Anja; Hoh, Josephine; Ott, Jurg

    2003-12-01

    In complex traits, multiple disease loci presumably interact to produce the disease. For this reason, even with high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker maps, it has been difficult to map susceptibility loci by conventional locus-by-locus methods. Fine mapping strategies are needed that allow for the simultaneous detection of interacting disease loci while handling large numbers of densely spaced markers. For this purpose, sum statistics were recently proposed as a first-stage analysis method for case-control association studies with SNPs. Via sums of single-marker statistics, information over multiple disease-associated markers is combined and, with a global significance value alpha, a small set of "interesting" markers is selected for further analysis. Here, the statistical properties of such approaches are examined by computer simulation. It is shown that sum statistics can often be successfully applied when marker-by-marker approaches fail to detect association. Compared with Bonferroni or False Discovery Rate (FDR) procedures, sum statistics have greater power, and more disease loci can be detected. However, in studies with tightly linked markers, simple sum statistics can be suboptimal, since the intermarker correlation is ignored. A method is presented that takes the correlation structure among marker loci into account when marker statistics are combined.

  6. QTL for spot blotch resistance in bread wheat line Saar co-locate to the biotrophic disease resistance loci Lr34 and Lr46.

    PubMed

    Lillemo, Morten; Joshi, Arun K; Prasad, Ravindra; Chand, Ramesh; Singh, Ravi P

    2013-03-01

    Spot blotch caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana is a major disease of wheat in warm and humid wheat growing regions of the world including south Asian countries such as India, Nepal and Bangladesh. The CIMMYT bread wheat line Saar which carries the leaf tip necrosis (LTN)-associated rust resistance genes Lr34 and Lr46 has exhibited a low level of spot blotch disease in field trials conducted in Asia and South America. One hundred and fourteen recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of Avocet (Susceptible) × Saar, were evaluated along with parents in two dates of sowing in India for 3 years (2007-2008 to 2009-2010) to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with spot blotch resistance, and to determine the potential association of Lr34 and Lr46 with resistance to this disease. Lr34 was found to constitute the main locus for spot blotch resistance, and explained as much as 55 % of the phenotypic variation in the mean disease data across the six environments. Based on the large effect, the spot blotch resistance at this locus has been given the gene designation Sb1. Two further, minor QTL were detected in the sub-population of RILs not containing Lr34. The first of these was located about 40 cM distal to Lr34 on 7DS, and the other corresponded to Lr46 on 1BL. A major implication for wheat breeding is that Lr34 and Lr46, which are widely used in wheat breeding to improve resistance to rust diseases and powdery mildew, also have a beneficial effect on spot blotch.

  7. Towards Positional Isolation of Three Quantitative Trait Loci Conferring Resistance to Powdery Mildew in Two Spanish Barley Landraces

    PubMed Central

    Silvar, Cristina; Perovic, Dragan; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Spannagl, Manuel; Usadel, Björn; Casas, Ana; Igartua, Ernesto; Ordon, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Three quantitative trait loci (QTL) conferring broad spectrum resistance to powdery mildew, caused by the fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei, were previously identified on chromosomes 7HS, 7HL and 6HL in the Spanish barley landrace-derived lines SBCC097 and SBCC145. In the present work, a genome-wide putative linear gene index of barley (Genome Zipper) and the first draft of the physical, genetic and functional sequence of the barley genome were used to go one step further in the shortening and explicit demarcation on the barley genome of these regions conferring resistance to powdery mildew as well as in the identification of candidate genes. First, a comparative analysis of the target regions to the barley Genome Zippers of chromosomes 7H and 6H allowed the development of 25 new gene-based molecular markers, which slightly better delimit the QTL intervals. These new markers provided the framework for anchoring of genetic and physical maps, figuring out the outline of the barley genome at the target regions in SBCC097 and SBCC145. The outermost flanking markers of QTLs on 7HS, 7HL and 6HL defined a physical area of 4 Mb, 3.7 Mb and 3.2 Mb, respectively. In total, 21, 10 and 16 genes on 7HS, 7HL and 6HL, respectively, could be interpreted as potential candidates to explain the resistance to powdery mildew, as they encode proteins of related functions with respect to the known pathogen defense-related processes. The majority of these were annotated as belonging to the NBS-LRR class or protein kinase family. PMID:23826271

  8. Unique genetic loci identified for emotional behavior in control and chronic stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Carhuatanta, Kimberly A. K.; Shea, Chloe J. A.; Herman, James P.; Jankord, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    An individual's genetic background affects their emotional behavior and response to stress. Although studies have been conducted to identify genetic predictors for emotional behavior or stress response, it remains unknown how prior stress history alters the interaction between an individual's genome and their emotional behavior. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to identify chromosomal regions that affect emotional behavior and are sensitive to stress exposure. We utilized the BXD behavioral genetics mouse model to identify chromosomal regions that predict fear learning and emotional behavior following exposure to a control or chronic stress environment. 62 BXD recombinant inbred strains and C57BL/6 and DBA/2 parental strains underwent behavioral testing including a classical fear conditioning paradigm and the elevated plus maze. Distinct quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were identified for emotional learning, anxiety and locomotion in control and chronic stress populations. Candidate genes, including those with already known functions in learning and stress were found to reside within the identified QTLs. Our data suggest that chronic stress history reveals novel genetic predictors of emotional behavior. PMID:25374516

  9. Genome-wide association study reveals novel quantitative trait Loci associated with resistance to multiple leaf spot diseases of spring wheat.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Suraj; Mamidi, Sujan; Bonman, J Michael; Xiong, Mai; Brown-Guedira, Gina; Adhikari, Tika B

    2014-01-01

    Accelerated wheat development and deployment of high-yielding, climate resilient, and disease resistant cultivars can contribute to enhanced food security and sustainable intensification. To facilitate gene discovery, we assembled an association mapping panel of 528 spring wheat landraces of diverse geographic origin for a genome-wide association study (GWAS). All accessions were genotyped using an Illumina Infinium 9K wheat single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip and 4781 polymorphic SNPs were used for analysis. To identify loci underlying resistance to the major leaf spot diseases and to better understand the genomic patterns, we quantified population structure, allelic diversity, and linkage disequilibrium. Our results showed 32 loci were significantly associated with resistance to the major leaf spot diseases. Further analysis identified QTL effective against major leaf spot diseases of wheat which appeared to be novel and others that were previously identified by association analysis using Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) and bi-parental mapping. In addition, several identified SNPs co-localized with genes that have been implicated in plant disease resistance. Future work could aim to select the putative novel loci and pyramid them in locally adapted wheat cultivars to develop broad-spectrum resistance to multiple leaf spot diseases of wheat via marker-assisted selection (MAS). PMID:25268502

  10. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Novel Quantitative Trait Loci Associated with Resistance to Multiple Leaf Spot Diseases of Spring Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Bonman, J. Michael; Xiong, Mai; Brown-Guedira, Gina; Adhikari, Tika B.

    2014-01-01

    Accelerated wheat development and deployment of high-yielding, climate resilient, and disease resistant cultivars can contribute to enhanced food security and sustainable intensification. To facilitate gene discovery, we assembled an association mapping panel of 528 spring wheat landraces of diverse geographic origin for a genome-wide association study (GWAS). All accessions were genotyped using an Illumina Infinium 9K wheat single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip and 4781 polymorphic SNPs were used for analysis. To identify loci underlying resistance to the major leaf spot diseases and to better understand the genomic patterns, we quantified population structure, allelic diversity, and linkage disequilibrium. Our results showed 32 loci were significantly associated with resistance to the major leaf spot diseases. Further analysis identified QTL effective against major leaf spot diseases of wheat which appeared to be novel and others that were previously identified by association analysis using Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) and bi-parental mapping. In addition, several identified SNPs co-localized with genes that have been implicated in plant disease resistance. Future work could aim to select the putative novel loci and pyramid them in locally adapted wheat cultivars to develop broad-spectrum resistance to multiple leaf spot diseases of wheat via marker-assisted selection (MAS). PMID:25268502

  11. Multi-ancestry genome-wide association study of 21,000 cases and 95,000 controls identifies new risk loci for atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Waage, Johannes; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Hotze, Melanie; Strachan, David P; Curtin, John A; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Tian, Chao; Takahashi, Atsushi; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Thyssen, Jacob P; den Dekker, Herman T; Ferreira, Manuel A; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Sleiman, Patrick M A; Xiao, Feng Li; Gonzalez, Juan R; Marenholz, Ingo; Kalb, Birgit; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Venturini, Cristina; Pennell, Craig E; Barton, Sheila J; Levin, Albert M; Curjuric, Ivan; Bustamante, Mariona; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Lockett, Gabrielle A; Bacelis, Jonas; Bunyavanich, Supinda; Myers, Rachel A; Matanovic, Anja; Kumar, Ashish; Tung, Joyce Y; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Kubo, Michiaki; McArdle, Wendy L; Henderson, A John; Kemp, John P; Zheng, Jie; Smith, George Davey; Rüschendorf, Franz; Bauerfeind, Anja; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Schmidt, Carsten O; Mangold, Elisabeth; Cichon, Sven; Keil, Thomas; Rodríguez, Elke; Peters, Annette; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Novak, Natalija; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Horikoshi, Momoko; Pekkanen, Juha; Sebert, Sylvain; Husemoen, Lise L; Grarup, Niels; de Jongste, Johan C; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Pasmans, Suzanne G M A; Elbert, Niels J; Uitterlinden, André G; Marks, Guy B; Thompson, Philip J; Matheson, Melanie C; Robertson, Colin F; Ried, Janina S; Li, Jin; Zuo, Xian Bo; Zheng, Xiao Dong; Yin, Xian Yong; Sun, Liang Dan; McAleer, Maeve A; O'Regan, Grainne M; Fahy, Caoimhe M R; Campbell, Linda E; Macek, Milan; Kurek, Michael; Hu, Donglei; Eng, Celeste; Postma, Dirkje S; Feenstra, Bjarke; Geller, Frank; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Middeldorp, Christel M; Hysi, Pirro; Bataille, Veronique; Spector, Tim; Tiesler, Carla M T; Thiering, Elisabeth; Pahukasahasram, Badri; Yang, James J; Imboden, Medea; Huntsman, Scott; Vilor-Tejedor, Natàlia; Relton, Caroline L; Myhre, Ronny; Nystad, Wenche; Custovic, Adnan; Weiss, Scott T; Meyers, Deborah A; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Ober, Carole; Raby, Benjamin A; Simpson, Angela; Jacobsson, Bo; Holloway, John W; Bisgaard, Hans; Sunyer, Jordi; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Williams, L Keoki; Godfrey, Keith M; Wang, Carol A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Melbye, Mads; Koppelman, Gerard H; Jarvis, Deborah; McLean, W H Irwin; Irvine, Alan D; Zhang, Xue Jun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gieger, Christian; Burchard, Esteban G; Martin, Nicholas G; Duijts, Liesbeth; Linneberg, Allan; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Nöthen, Markus M; Lau, Susanne; Hübner, Norbert; Lee, Young-Ae; Tamari, Mayumi; Hinds, David A; Glass, Daniel; Brown, Sara J; Heinrich, Joachim; Evans, David M; Weidinger, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    Genetic association studies have identified 21 loci associated with atopic dermatitis risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify further susceptibility loci for this common, complex skin disease, we performed a meta-analysis of >15 million genetic variants in 21,399 cases and 95,464 controls from populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry, followed by replication in 32,059 cases and 228,628 controls from 18 studies. We identified ten new risk loci, bringing the total number of known atopic dermatitis risk loci to 31 (with new secondary signals at four of these loci). Notably, the new loci include candidate genes with roles in the regulation of innate host defenses and T cell function, underscoring the important contribution of (auto)immune mechanisms to atopic dermatitis pathogenesis. PMID:26482879

  12. The making of a bell pepper-shaped tomato fruit: identification of loci controlling fruit morphology in Yellow Stuffer tomato.

    PubMed

    van der Knaap, E; Tanksley, S D

    2003-06-01

    The heirloom tomato cultivar Yellow Stuffer produces fruit that are similar in shape and structure to fruit produced by the bell pepper varieties of garden pepper. To determine the genetic basis of this extreme fruit type in tomato, quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis was performed on an F(2) population derived from a cross between Yellow Stuffer and the related species, Lycopersicon pimpinellifolium, which produces a small, round fruit typical of most wild species. F(2) plants were analyzed for both fruit size and the degree to which their fruit resembled the bell pepper. Three QTL were determined to influence bell pepper shape and seven QTL influenced fruit mass. The map positions of all three bell shape and six out of seven fruit size QTL appear to be allelic to components of fruit morphology analyzed in this population and to major fruit morphology QTL reported previously, adding support to the hypothesis that the majority of fruit size and shape variation in cultivated tomato is attributable to allelic variation at a limited number of loci. However, novel loci controlling components of fruit morphology, such as elongated fruit shape, bumpiness, number of seed per fruit and flowers per inflorescence were identified in this study as well. The three bell shape loci involved are: bell2.1, bell2.2 and bell8.1, and appear to correspond to locule number2.1 ( lcn2.1) and fruit weight 2.2 ( fw2.2) and fruit shape 8.1 ( fs8.1), respectively. The Yellow Stuffer alleles at lcn2.1 and fw2.2 increase locule number and fruit size, respectively, hence contributing to the overall bell pepper shape. The Yellow Stuffer allele at fs8.1 causes convex locule walls, giving the extended, bumpy shape characteristic of bell peppers. In addition, most fruit size QTL correspond to loci controlling number of flowers per inflorescence and/or stem-end blockiness. Comparisons among previously identified fruit morphology loci in tomato, eggplant and pepper suggest that loci affecting

  13. Quantitative trait loci associated with longevity of lettuce seeds under conventional and controlled deterioration storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Schwember, Andrés R; Bradford, Kent J

    2010-10-01

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seeds have poor shelf life and exhibit thermoinhibition (fail to germinate) above ∼25°C. Seed priming (controlled hydration followed by drying) alleviates thermoinhibition by increasing the maximum germination temperature, but reduces lettuce seed longevity. Controlled deterioration (CD) or accelerated ageing storage conditions (i.e. elevated temperature and relative humidity) are used to study seed longevity and to predict potential seed lifetimes under conventional storage conditions. Seeds produced in 2002 and 2006 of a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between L. sativa cv. Salinas×L. serriola accession UC96US23 were utilized to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with seed longevity under CD and conventional storage conditions. Multiple longevity-associated QTLs were identified under both conventional and CD storage conditions for control (non-primed) and primed seeds. However, seed longevity was poorly correlated between the two storage conditions, suggesting that deterioration processes under CD conditions are not predictive of ageing in conventional storage conditions. Additionally, the same QTLs were not identified when RIL populations were grown in different years, indicating that lettuce seed longevity is strongly affected by production environment. Nonetheless, a major QTL on chromosome 4 [Seed longevity 4.1 (Slg4.1)] was responsible for almost 23% of the phenotypic variation in viability of the conventionally stored control seeds of the 2006 RIL population, with improved longevity conferred by the Salinas allele. QTL analyses may enable identification of mechanisms responsible for the sensitivity of primed seeds to CD conditions and breeding for improved seed longevity.

  14. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci of Resistance to Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus and Leaf Spots in a Recombinant Inbred Line Population of Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) from SunOleic 97R and NC94022

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Suping; Qiao, Lixian; Culbreath, Albert K.; Kale, Sandip; Wang, Jianping; Holbrook, C. Corley; Zhuang, Weijian; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Guo, Baozhu

    2016-01-01

    Peanut is vulnerable to a range of diseases, such as Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and leaf spots which will cause significant yield loss. The most sustainable, economical and eco-friendly solution for managing peanut diseases is development of improved cultivars with high level of resistance. We developed a recombinant inbred line population from the cross between SunOleic 97R and NC94022, named as the S-population. An improved genetic linkage map was developed for the S-population with 248 marker loci and a marker density of 5.7 cM/loci. This genetic map was also compared with the physical map of diploid progenitors of tetraploid peanut, resulting in an overall co-linearity of about 60% with the average co-linearity of 68% for the A sub-genome and 47% for the B sub-genome. The analysis using the improved genetic map and multi-season (2010–2013) phenotypic data resulted in the identification of 48 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with phenotypic variance explained (PVE) from 3.88 to 29.14%. Of the 48 QTLs, six QTLs were identified for resistance to TSWV, 22 QTLs for early leaf spot (ELS) and 20 QTLs for late leaf spot (LLS), which included four, six, and six major QTLs (PVE larger than 10%) for each disease, respectively. A total of six major genomic regions (MGR) were found to have QTLs controlling more than one disease resistance. The identified QTLs and resistance gene-rich MGRs will facilitate further discovery of resistance genes and development of molecular markers for these important diseases. PMID:27427980

  15. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci of Resistance to Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus and Leaf Spots in a Recombinant Inbred Line Population of Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) from SunOleic 97R and NC94022.

    PubMed

    Khera, Pawan; Pandey, Manish K; Wang, Hui; Feng, Suping; Qiao, Lixian; Culbreath, Albert K; Kale, Sandip; Wang, Jianping; Holbrook, C Corley; Zhuang, Weijian; Varshney, Rajeev K; Guo, Baozhu

    2016-01-01

    Peanut is vulnerable to a range of diseases, such as Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and leaf spots which will cause significant yield loss. The most sustainable, economical and eco-friendly solution for managing peanut diseases is development of improved cultivars with high level of resistance. We developed a recombinant inbred line population from the cross between SunOleic 97R and NC94022, named as the S-population. An improved genetic linkage map was developed for the S-population with 248 marker loci and a marker density of 5.7 cM/loci. This genetic map was also compared with the physical map of diploid progenitors of tetraploid peanut, resulting in an overall co-linearity of about 60% with the average co-linearity of 68% for the A sub-genome and 47% for the B sub-genome. The analysis using the improved genetic map and multi-season (2010-2013) phenotypic data resulted in the identification of 48 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with phenotypic variance explained (PVE) from 3.88 to 29.14%. Of the 48 QTLs, six QTLs were identified for resistance to TSWV, 22 QTLs for early leaf spot (ELS) and 20 QTLs for late leaf spot (LLS), which included four, six, and six major QTLs (PVE larger than 10%) for each disease, respectively. A total of six major genomic regions (MGR) were found to have QTLs controlling more than one disease resistance. The identified QTLs and resistance gene-rich MGRs will facilitate further discovery of resistance genes and development of molecular markers for these important diseases. PMID:27427980

  16. Polycomb mediates Myc autorepression and its transcriptional control of many loci in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Goodliffe, Julie M.; Wieschaus, Eric; Cole, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Aberrant accumulation of the Myc oncoprotein propels proliferation and induces carcinogenesis. In normal cells, however, an abundance of Myc protein represses transcription at the c-myc locus. Cancer cells often lose this autorepression. We examined the control of myc in Drosophila and show here that the Drosophila ortholog, dmyc, also undergoes autorepression. We find that the developmental repressor Polycomb (Pc) is required for dmyc autorepression, and that this Pc-dMyc-mediated repression spreads across an 875-kb region encompassing the dmyc gene. To further investigate the relationship between Myc and Polycomb, we used microarrays to identify genes regulated by each, and identify a striking relationship between the two: A large set of dMyc activation targets is normally repressed by Pc, and 73% of dMyc repression targets require Pc for this repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed that many dMyc-Pc-repressed loci have an epigenetic mark recognized by Pc. Our results suggest a novel relationship between Myc and Polycomb, wherein Myc enhances Polycomb repression in order to repress targets, and Myc suppresses Polycomb repression in order to activate targets. PMID:16357214

  17. Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling fibre length and lignin content in Arabidopsis thaliana stems

    PubMed Central

    Berleth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Fibre properties and the biochemical composition of cell walls are important traits in many applications. For example, the lengths of fibres define the strength and quality of paper, and lignin content is a critical parameter for the use of biomass in biofuel production. Identifying genes controlling these traits is comparatively difficult in woody species, because of long generation times and limited amenability to high-resolution genetic mapping. To address this problem, this study mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs) defining fibre length and lignin content in the Arabidopsis recombinant inbred line population Col-4×Ler-0. Adapting high-throughput phenotyping techniques for both traits for measurements in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems identified significant QTLs for fibre length on chromosomes 2 and 5, as well as one significant QTL affecting lignin content on chromosome 2. For fibre length, total variation within the population was 208% higher than between parental lines and the identified QTLs explained 50.58% of the observed variation. For lignin content, the values were 261 and 26.51%, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis of the associated intervals identified a number of candidate genes for fibre length and lignin content. This study demonstrates that molecular mapping of QTLs pertaining to wood and fibre properties is possible in Arabidopsis, which substantially broadens the use of Arabidopsis as a model species for the functional characterization of plant genes. PMID:23136168

  18. A repressor-antirepressor pair links two loci controlling light-induced carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    López-Rubio, José Juan; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S; Murillo, Francisco José

    2002-03-01

    The light-inducible carB operon encodes all but one of the structural genes for carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus. It is transcriptionally controlled by two proteins expressed from two unlinked genetic loci: CarS from the light-inducible carQRS operon, and CarA from the light-independent carA operon. CarA represses transcription from the carB promoter (P(B)) in the dark, and CarS counteracts this on illumination. The CarA sequence revealed a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif of the type found in bacterial MerR transcriptional factors, whereas CarS contains no known DNA-binding motif. Here, we examine the molecular interplay between CarA and CarS. We demonstrate the following. (i) Whereas CarS exhibits no DNA binding in vitro, CarA binds specifically to a region encompassing P(B) to form at least two distinct complexes. (ii) A palindrome located between positions -46 and -63 relative to the transcription start point is essential but not sufficient for the formation of the two CarA-DNA complexes observed. (iii) CarS abrogates the specific DNA binding of CarA. CarA is therefore a repressor and CarS an antirepressor. (iv) CarS physically interacts with CarA; thus, the functional interaction between them is mediated by protein-protein interactions.

  19. Quantitative trait loci for rice blast resistance detected in a local rice breeding population by genome-wide association mapping.

    PubMed

    Shinada, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Toshio; Sato, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Eiji; Hori, Kiyosumi; Yonemaru, Junichi; Sato, Takashi; Fujino, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Plant breeding programs aim to develop cultivars with high adaptability to the specific conditions in a local region. As a result, unique genes and gene combinations have been accumulated in local elite breeding populations during the long history of plant breeding. Genetic analyses on such genes and combinations may be useful for developing new cultivars with more-desirable agronomic traits. Here, we attempted to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for rice blast resistance (BR) using a local breeding rice population from Hokkaido, Japan. Using genotyping data on single nucleotide polymorphisms and simple sequence repeat markers distributed throughout the whole genomic region, we detected genetic regions associated with phenotypic variation in BR by a genome-wide association mapping study (GWAS). An additional association analysis using other breeding cultivars verified the effect and inheritance of the associated region. Furthermore, the existence of a gene for BR in the associated region was confirmed by QTL mapping. The results from these studies enabled us to estimate potential of the Hokkaido rice population as a gene pool for improving BR. The results of this study could be useful for developing novel cultivars with vigorous BR in rice breeding programs.

  20. Quantitative trait loci controlling cyanogenic glucoside and dry matter content in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) roots.

    PubMed

    Balyejusa Kizito, Elizabeth; Rönnberg-Wästljung, Ann-Christin; Egwang, Thomas; Gullberg, Urban; Fregene, Martin; Westerbergh, Anna

    2007-09-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a starchy root crop grown in the tropics mainly by small-scale farmers even though agro-industrial processing is rapidly increasing. For this processing market improved varieties with high dry matter root content (DMC) is required. Potentially toxic cyanogenic glucosides are synthesized in the leaves and translocated to the roots. Selection for varieties with low cyanogenic glucoside potential (CNP) and high DMC is among the principal objectives in cassava breeding programs. However, these traits are highly influenced by the environmental conditions and the genetic control of these traits is not well understood. An S(1) population derived from a cross between two bred cassava varieties (MCOL 1684 and Rayong 1) that differ in CNP and DMC was used to study the heritability and genetic basis of these traits. A broad-sense heritability of 0.43 and 0.42 was found for CNP and DMC, respectively. The moderate heritabilities for DMC and CNP indicate that the phenotypic variation of these traits is explained by a genetic component. We found two quantitative trait loci (QTL) on two different linkage groups controlling CNP and six QTL on four different linkage groups controlling DMC. One QTL for CNP and one QTL for DMC mapped near each other, suggesting pleiotrophy and/or linkage of QTL. The two QTL for CNP showed additive effects while the six QTL for DMC showed additive effect, dominance or overdominance. This study is a first step towards developing molecular marker tools for efficient breeding of CNP and DMC in cassava.

  1. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of resistance to strongyles and coccidia in the free-living Soay sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Beraldi, Dario; McRae, Allan F; Gratten, Jacob; Pilkington, Jill G; Slate, Jon; Visscher, Peter M; Pemberton, Josephine M

    2007-01-01

    A genome-wide scan was performed to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to gastrointestinal parasites and ectoparasitic keds segregating in the free-living Soay sheep population on St. Kilda (UK). The mapping panel consisted of a single pedigree of 882 individuals of which 588 were genotyped. The Soay linkage map used for the scans comprised 251 markers covering the whole genome at average spacing of 15cM. The traits here investigated were the strongyle faecal egg count (FEC), the coccidia faecal oocyst count (FOC) and a count of keds (Melophagus ovinus). QTL mapping was performed by means of variance component analysis so that the genetic parameters of the study traits were also estimated and compared with previous studies in Soay and domestic sheep. Strongyle FEC and coccidia FOC showed moderate heritability (h(2)=0.26 and 0.22, respectively) in lambs but low heritability in adults (h(2)<0.10). Ked count appeared to have very low h(2) in both lambs and adults. Genome scans were performed for the traits with moderate heritability and two genomic regions reached the level of suggestive linkage for coccidia FOC in lambs (logarithm of the odds=2.68 and 2.21 on chromosomes 3 and X, respectively). We believe this is the first study to report a QTL search for parasite resistance in a free-living animal population and therefore may represent a useful reference for similar studies aimed at understanding the genetics of host-parasite co-evolution in the wild.

  2. Genetic mapping, synteny, and physical location of two loci for Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. tracheiphilum race 4 resistance in cowpea [Vignaunguiculata (L.) Walp].

    PubMed

    Pottorff, Marti O; Li, Guojing; Ehlers, Jeffery D; Close, Timothy J; Roberts, Philip A

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium wilt is a vascular disease caused by the fungus Fusariumoxysporum f.sp. tracheiphilum (Fot) in cowpea [Vignaunguiculata (L.) Walp]. In this study, we mapped loci conferring resistance to Fot race 4 in three cowpea RIL populations: IT93K-503-1 × CB46, CB27 × 24-125B-1, and CB27 × IT82E-18/Big Buff. Two independent loci which confer resistance to Fot race 4 were identified, Fot4-1 and Fot4-2. Fot4-1 was identified in the IT93K-503-1 (resistant) × CB46 (susceptible) population and was positioned on the cowpea consensus genetic map, spanning 21.57-29.40 cM on linkage group 5. The Fot4-2 locus was validated by identifying it in both the CB27 (resistant) × 24-125B-1 (susceptible) and CB27 (resistant) × IT82E-18/Big Buff (susceptible) populations. Fot4-2 was positioned on the cowpea consensus genetic map on linkage group 3; the minimum distance spanned 71.52-71.75 cM whereas the maximum distance spanned 64.44-80.23 cM. These genomic locations of Fot4-1 and Fot4-2 on the cowpea consensus genetic map, relative to Fot3-1 which was previously identified as the locus conferring resistance to Fot race 3, established that all three loci were independent. The Fot4-1 and Fot4-2 syntenic loci were examined in Glycine max, where several disease-resistance candidate genes were identified for both loci. In addition, Fot4-1 and Fot4-2 were coarsely positioned on the cowpea physical map. Fot4-1 and Fot4-2 will contribute to molecular marker development for future use in marker-assisted selection, thereby expediting introgression of Fot race 4 resistance into future cowpea cultivars.

  3. Multiplex SSR-PCR approaches for semi-automated genotyping and characterization of loci linked to blast disease resistance genes in rice.

    PubMed

    Ashkani, Sadegh; Rafii, Mohd Yusop; Shabanimofrad, Mahmoodreza; Foroughi, Majid; Azizia, Parisa; Akhtar, Mohd Sayeed; Sahebi, Mahbod; Harun, Abd Rahim; Nasehi, Abbas

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, 63 polymorphic microsatellite markers related to rice blast resistance genes were fluorescently labelled at the 5'-end with either 6-FAM or HEX using the G5 dye set and incorporated into a multiplex SSR-PCR for the detection of fragments using an automated system. For rice F3 families obtained from crosses between Pongsu Seribu 2 (Malaysian blast resistant cultivar) and Mahsuri (a susceptible rice cultivar), the genotypes for 13 designated multiplex SSR panels were determined. The genotyping assays were performed using a capillary-based ABIPRISM 3100 genetic analyser. The sizes of the SSRs alleles observed in the range from 79 to 324 bp. The observed marker segregation data were analysed using the Chi(2) test. A genetic linkage map covering ten chromosomes and comprising 63 polymorphic SSR markers was constructed, and the distorted loci were localised to linkage groups. The results indicated that distorted loci are presented on eight chromosomes. PMID:26318048

  4. Multiplex SSR-PCR approaches for semi-automated genotyping and characterization of loci linked to blast disease resistance genes in rice.

    PubMed

    Ashkani, Sadegh; Rafii, Mohd Yusop; Shabanimofrad, Mahmoodreza; Foroughi, Majid; Azizia, Parisa; Akhtar, Mohd Sayeed; Sahebi, Mahbod; Harun, Abd Rahim; Nasehi, Abbas

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, 63 polymorphic microsatellite markers related to rice blast resistance genes were fluorescently labelled at the 5'-end with either 6-FAM or HEX using the G5 dye set and incorporated into a multiplex SSR-PCR for the detection of fragments using an automated system. For rice F3 families obtained from crosses between Pongsu Seribu 2 (Malaysian blast resistant cultivar) and Mahsuri (a susceptible rice cultivar), the genotypes for 13 designated multiplex SSR panels were determined. The genotyping assays were performed using a capillary-based ABIPRISM 3100 genetic analyser. The sizes of the SSRs alleles observed in the range from 79 to 324 bp. The observed marker segregation data were analysed using the Chi(2) test. A genetic linkage map covering ten chromosomes and comprising 63 polymorphic SSR markers was constructed, and the distorted loci were localised to linkage groups. The results indicated that distorted loci are presented on eight chromosomes.

  5. Loci controlling lymphocyte production of interferon c after alloantigen stimulation in vitro and their co-localization with genes controlling lymphocyte infiltration of tumors and tumor susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Lipoldová, Marie; Havelková, Helena; Badalova, Jana; Vojtísková, Jarmila; Quan, Lei; Krulova, Magdaléna; Sohrabi, Yahya; Stassen, Alphons P; Demant, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Low infiltration of lymphocytes into cancers is associated with poor prognosis, but the reasons why some patients exhibit a low and others a high infiltration of tumors are unknown. Previously we mapped four loci (Lynf1–Lynf4) controlling lymphocyte infiltration of mouse lung tumors. These loci do not encode any of the molecules that are involved in traffic of lymphocytes. Here we report a genetic relationship between these loci and the control of production of IFNγ in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC). We found that IFNγ production by lymphocytes of O20/A mice is lower than by lymphocytes of OcB-9/Dem mice (both H2pz) stimulated in MLC by irradiated splenocytes of C57BL/10SnPh (H2b) or BALB/ cHeA (H2d) mice, or by ConA. IFNγ production in MLCs of individual (O20 9 OcB-9)F2mice stimulated by irradiated C57BL/10 splenocytes and genotyped for microsatellite markers revealed four IFNγ-controlling loci (Cypr4-Cypr7), each of which is closely linked with one of the four Lynf loci and with a cluster of susceptibility genes for different tumors. This suggests that inherited differences in certain lymphocyte responses may modify their propensity to infiltrate tumors and their capacity to affect tumor growth.

  6. Susceptibility to ozone-induced inflammation. II. Separate loci control responses to acute and subacute exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Kleeberger, S.R.; Levitt, R.C.; Zhang, L.Y. )

    1993-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that inbred strains of mice are differentially susceptible to acute (3 h) and subacute (48 h) exposures to 2 parts per million (ppm) ozone (O3) and 0.30 ppm O3, respectively. Genetic studies with O3-resistant C3H/HeJ and O3-susceptible C57BL/6J strains have indicated that susceptibility to each of these O3 exposures is under Mendelian (single gene) control. In the present study, we hypothesized that the same gene controls susceptibility to the airway inflammatory responses to 2 ppm and 0.30 ppm O3 exposures. To test this hypothesis, airway inflammation was induced in 10 BXH and 16 BXD recombinant inbred (RI) strains of mice by acute as well as subacute O3 exposures. Airway inflammation was assessed by counting the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) returns obtained immediately after 48-h subacute exposure to 0.30 ppm O3, or 6 h after 3 h acute exposure to 2 ppm O3. Each RI strain was classified as susceptible or resistant to each exposure, based on a comparison of mean numbers of PMNs with those of the respective progenitor strains. For each RI set, a phenotypic strain distribution pattern (SDP) was thus derived for each exposure regimen, and the SDPs were then compared for concordance. Among the BXH RI strains, 4 of 10 responded discordantly to the two exposures: 3 were susceptible to acute exposure and resistant to subacute exposure, whereas 1 was conversely susceptible. Among the BXD RI strains, 4 of 16 were discordant: 1 was susceptible to acute exposure, and resistant to subacute exposure, whereas 3 were conversely susceptible.

  7. Multi-ethnic genome-wide association study of 21,000 cases and 95,000 controls identifies new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Waage, Johannes; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Hotze, Melanie; Strachan, David P; Curtin, John A; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Tian, Chao; Takahashi, Atsushi; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Thyssen, Jacob P; den Dekker, Herman T; Ferreira, Manuel A; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Sleiman, Patrick MA; Xiao, Feng Li; Gonzalez, Juan R; Marenholz, Ingo; Kalb, Birgit; Yanes, Maria Pino; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Venturini, Cristina; Pennell, Craig E; Barton, Sheila J; Levin, Albert M; Curjuric, Ivan; Bustamante, Mariona; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Lockett, Gabrielle A; Bacelis, Jonas; Bunyavanich, Supinda; Myers, Rachel A; Matanovic, Anja; Kumar, Ashish; Tung, Joyce Y; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Kubo, Michiaki; McArdle, Wendy L; Henderson, A J; Kemp, John P; Zheng, Jie; Smith, George Davey; Rüschendorf, Franz; Bauerfeind, Anja; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Schmidt, Carsten O; Mangold, Elisabeth; Cichon, Sven; Keil, Thomas; Rodríguez, Elke; Peters, Annette; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Novak, Natalija; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Horikoshi, Momoko; Pekkanen, Juha; Sebert, Sylvain; Husemoen, Lise L; Grarup, Niels; de Jongste, Johan C; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent WV; Pasmans, Suzanne GMA; Elbert, Niels J; Uitterlinden, André G; Marks, Guy B; Thompson, Philip J; Matheson, Melanie C; Robertson, Colin F; Ried, Janina S; Li, Jin; Zuo, Xian Bo; Zheng, Xiao Dong; Yin, Xian Yong; Sun, Liang Dan; McAleer, Maeve A; O'Regan, Grainne M; Fahy, Caoimhe MR; Campbell, Linda E; Macek, Milan; Kurek, Michael; Hu, Donglei; Eng, Celeste; Postma, Dirkje S; Feenstra, Bjarke; Geller, Frank; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Middeldorp, Christel M; Hysi, Pirro; Bataille, Veronique; Spector, Tim; Tiesler, Carla MT; Thiering, Elisabeth; Pahukasahasram, Badri; Yang, James J; Imboden, Medea; Huntsman, Scott; Vilor-Tejedor, Natàlia; Relton, Caroline L; Myhre, Ronny; Nystad, Wenche; Custovic, Adnan; Weiss, Scott T; Meyers, Deborah A; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Ober, Carole; Raby, Benjamin A; Simpson, Angela; Jacobsson, Bo; Holloway, John W; Bisgaard, Hans; Sunyer, Jordi; Hensch, Nicole M Probst; Williams, L Keoki; Godfrey, Keith M; Wang, Carol A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Melbye, Mads; Koppelman, Gerard H; Jarvis, Deborah; McLean, WH Irwin; Irvine, Alan D; Zhang, Xue Jun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gieger, Christian; Burchard, Esteban G; Martin, Nicholas G; Duijts, Liesbeth; Linneberg, Allan; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Noethen, Markus M; Lau, Susanne; Hübner, Norbert; Lee, Young-Ae; Tamari, Mayumi; Hinds, David A; Glass, Daniel; Brown, Sara J; Heinrich, Joachim; Evans, David M; Weidinger, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Genetic association studies have identified 21 loci associated with atopic dermatitis risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify further susceptibility loci for this common complex skin disease, we performed a meta-analysis of >15 million genetic variants in 21,399 cases and 95,464 controls from populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry, followed by replication in 32,059 cases and 228,628 controls from 18 studies. We identified 10 novel risk loci, bringing the total number of known atopic dermatitis risk loci to 31 (with novel secondary signals at 4 of these). Notably, the new loci include candidate genes with roles in regulation of innate host defenses and T-cell function, underscoring the important contribution of (auto-)immune mechanisms to atopic dermatitis pathogenesis. PMID:26482879

  8. Analysis techniques for multivariate root loci. [a tool in linear control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, P. M.; Stein, G.; Laub, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis and techniques are developed for the multivariable root locus and the multivariable optimal root locus. The generalized eigenvalue problem is used to compute angles and sensitivities for both types of loci, and an algorithm is presented that determines the asymptotic properties of the optimal root locus.

  9. Identification of multiple genetic loci in the mouse controlling immobility time in the tail suspension and forced swimming tests.

    PubMed

    Abou-Elnaga, Ahmed F; Torigoe, Daisuke; Fouda, Mohamed M; Darwish, Ragab A; Abou-Ismail, Usama A; Morimatsu, Masami; Agui, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Depression is one of the most famous psychiatric disorders in humans in all over the countries and considered a complex neurobehavioral trait and difficult to identify causal genes. Tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST) are widely used for assessing depression-like behavior and antidepressant activity in mice. A variety of antidepressant agents are known to reduce immobility time in both TST and FST. To identify genetic determinants of immobility duration in both tests, we analyzed 101 F2 mice from an intercross between C57BL/6 and DBA/2 strains. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping using 106 microsatellite markers revealed three loci (two significant and one suggestive) and five suggestive loci controlling immobility time in the TST and FST, respectively. Results of QTL analysis suggest a broad description of the genetic architecture underlying depression, providing underpinnings for identifying novel molecular targets for antidepressants to clear the complex genetic mechanisms of depressive disorders.

  10. Identification of Loci Associated with Drought Resistance Traits in Heterozygous Autotetraploid Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Using Genome-Wide Association Studies with Genotyping by Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yajun; Rivera, Martha; Main, Dorrie; Greene, Stephanie L.

    2015-01-01

    Drought resistance is an important breeding target for enhancing alfalfa productivity in arid and semi-arid regions. Identification of genes involved in drought tolerance will facilitate breeding for improving drought resistance and water use efficiency in alfalfa. Our objective was to use a diversity panel of alfalfa accessions comprised of 198 cultivars and landraces to identify genes involved in drought tolerance. The panel was selected from the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System alfalfa collection and genotyped using genotyping by sequencing. A greenhouse procedure was used for phenotyping two important traits associated with drought tolerance: drought resistance index (DRI) and relative leaf water content (RWC). Marker-trait association identified nineteen and fifteen loci associated with DRI and RWC, respectively. Alignments of target sequences flanking to the resistance loci against the reference genome of M. truncatula revealed multiple chromosomal locations. Markers associated with DRI are located on all chromosomes while markers associated with RWC are located on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7. Co-localizations of significant markers between DRI and RWC were found on chromosomes 3, 5 and 7. Most loci associated with DRI in this work overlap with the reported QTLs associated with biomass under drought in alfalfa. Additional significant markers were targeted to several contigs with unknown chromosomal locations. BLAST search using their flanking sequences revealed homology to several annotated genes with functions in stress tolerance. With further validation, these markers may be used for marker-assisted breeding new alfalfa varieties with drought resistance and enhanced water use efficiency. PMID:26406473

  11. Genome-wide association study identifies novel loci association with fasting insulin and insulin resistance in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanjie; Bentley, Amy; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Shriner, Daniel; Zhou, Jie; Doumatey, Ayo; Huang, Hanxia; Ramos, Edward; Erdos, Michael; Gerry, Norman; Herbert, Alan; Christman, Michael; Rotimi, Charles

    2012-10-15

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a key determinant of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and other metabolic disorders. This genome-wide association study (GWAS) was designed to shed light on the genetic basis of fasting insulin (FI) and IR in 927 non-diabetic African Americans. 5 396 838 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested for associations with FI or IR with adjustments for age, sex, body mass index, hypertension status and first two principal components. Genotyped SNPs (n = 12) with P < 5 × 10(-6) in African Americans were carried forward for de novo genotyping in 570 non-diabetic West Africans. We replicated SNPs in or near SC4MOL and TCERG1L in West Africans. The meta-analysis of 1497 African Americans and West Africans yielded genome-wide significant associations for SNPs in the SC4MOL gene: rs17046216 (P = 1.7 × 10(-8) and 2.9 × 10(-8) for FI and IR, respectively); and near the TCERG1L gene with rs7077836 as the top scoring (P = 7.5 × 10(-9) and 4.9 × 10(-10) for FI and IR, respectively). In silico replication in the MAGIC study (n = 37 037) showed weak but significant association (adjusted P-value of 0.0097) for rs34602777 in the MYO5A gene. In addition, we replicated previous GWAS findings for IR and FI in Europeans for GCKR, and for variants in four T2D loci (FTO, IRS1, KLF14 and PPARG) which exert their action via IR. In summary, variants in/near SC4MOL, and TCERG1L were associated with FI and IR in this cohort of African Americans and were replicated in West Africans. SC4MOL is under-expressed in an animal model of T2D and plays a key role in lipid biosynthesis, with implications for the regulation of energy metabolism, obesity and dyslipidemia. TCERG1L is associated with plasma adiponectin, a key modulator of obesity, inflammation, IR and diabetes. PMID:22791750

  12. Iso-lines and inbred-lines confirmed loci that underlie resistance from cultivar 'Hartwig' to three soybean cyst nematode populations.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Samreen; Shultz, J; Afzal, J; Hashmi, Rizwan; Jasim, Mohammed; Bond, Jason; Arelli, Prakash R; Lightfoot, David A

    2010-02-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars varied in their resistance to different populations of the soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines, called HG Types. The rhg1 locus on linkage group G was necessary for resistance to all HG types. However, the loci for resistance to H. glycines HG Type 1.3- (race 14) and HG Type 1.2.5- (race 2) of the soybean cyst nematode have varied in their reported locations. The aims were to compare the inheritance of resistance to three nematode HG Types in a population segregating for resistance to SCN and to identify the underlying quantitative trait loci (QTL). 'Hartwig', a soybean cultivar resistant to most SCN HG Types, was crossed with the susceptible cultivar 'Flyer'. A total of 92 F5-derived recombinant inbred lines (RILs; or inbred lines) and 144 molecular markers were used for map development. The rhg1 associated QTL found in earlier studies were confirmed and shown to underlie resistance to all three HG Types in RILs (Satt309; HG Type 0, P = 0.0001 R (2) = 22%; Satt275; HG Type 1.3, P = 0.001, R (2) = 14%) and near isogeneic lines (NILs; or iso-lines; Satt309; HG Type 1.2.5-, P = 0.001 R (2) = 24%). A new QTL underlying resistance to HG Type 1.2.5- was detected on LG D2 (Satt574; P = 0.001, R (2) = 11%) among 14 RILs resistant to the other HG types. The locus was confirmed in a small NIL population consisting of 60 plants of ten genotypes (P = 0.04). This QTL (cqSCN-005) is located in an interval previously associated with resistance to both SDS leaf scorch from 'Pyramid' and 'Ripley' (cqSDS-001) and SCN HG Type 1.3- from Hartwig and Pyramid. The QTL detected will allow marker assisted selection for multigenic resistance to complex nematode populations in combination with sudden death syndrome resistance (SDS) and other agronomic traits.

  13. Iso-lines and inbred-lines confirmed loci that underlie resistance from cultivar 'Hartwig' to three soybean cyst nematode populations.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Samreen; Shultz, J; Afzal, J; Hashmi, Rizwan; Jasim, Mohammed; Bond, Jason; Arelli, Prakash R; Lightfoot, David A

    2010-02-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars varied in their resistance to different populations of the soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines, called HG Types. The rhg1 locus on linkage group G was necessary for resistance to all HG types. However, the loci for resistance to H. glycines HG Type 1.3- (race 14) and HG Type 1.2.5- (race 2) of the soybean cyst nematode have varied in their reported locations. The aims were to compare the inheritance of resistance to three nematode HG Types in a population segregating for resistance to SCN and to identify the underlying quantitative trait loci (QTL). 'Hartwig', a soybean cultivar resistant to most SCN HG Types, was crossed with the susceptible cultivar 'Flyer'. A total of 92 F5-derived recombinant inbred lines (RILs; or inbred lines) and 144 molecular markers were used for map development. The rhg1 associated QTL found in earlier studies were confirmed and shown to underlie resistance to all three HG Types in RILs (Satt309; HG Type 0, P = 0.0001 R (2) = 22%; Satt275; HG Type 1.3, P = 0.001, R (2) = 14%) and near isogeneic lines (NILs; or iso-lines; Satt309; HG Type 1.2.5-, P = 0.001 R (2) = 24%). A new QTL underlying resistance to HG Type 1.2.5- was detected on LG D2 (Satt574; P = 0.001, R (2) = 11%) among 14 RILs resistant to the other HG types. The locus was confirmed in a small NIL population consisting of 60 plants of ten genotypes (P = 0.04). This QTL (cqSCN-005) is located in an interval previously associated with resistance to both SDS leaf scorch from 'Pyramid' and 'Ripley' (cqSDS-001) and SCN HG Type 1.3- from Hartwig and Pyramid. The QTL detected will allow marker assisted selection for multigenic resistance to complex nematode populations in combination with sudden death syndrome resistance (SDS) and other agronomic traits. PMID:19856174

  14. Complex Genetics Control Natural Variation in Arabidopsis thaliana Resistance to Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Heather C.; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    The genetic architecture of plant defense against microbial pathogens may be influenced by pathogen lifestyle. While plant interactions with biotrophic pathogens are frequently controlled by the action of large-effect resistance genes that follow classic Mendelian inheritance, our study suggests that plant defense against the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea is primarily quantitative and genetically complex. Few studies of quantitative resistance to necrotrophic pathogens have used large plant mapping populations to dissect the genetic structure of resistance. Using a large structured mapping population of Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified quantitative trait loci influencing plant response to B. cinerea, measured as expansion of necrotic lesions on leaves and accumulation of the antimicrobial compound camalexin. Testing multiple B. cinerea isolates, we identified 23 separate QTL in this population, ranging in isolate-specificity from being identified with a single isolate to controlling resistance against all isolates tested. We identified a set of QTL controlling accumulation of camalexin in response to pathogen infection that largely colocalized with lesion QTL. The identified resistance QTL appear to function in epistatic networks involving three or more loci. Detection of multilocus connections suggests that natural variation in specific signaling or response networks may control A. thaliana–B. cinerea interaction in this population. PMID:18845849

  15. Mapping of quantitative trait loci associated with partial resistance to phytophthora sojae and flooding tolerance in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root rot (PRR) caused by Phytophthora sojae Kaufm. & Gerd. and flooding can limit growth and productivity, of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], especially on poorly drained soils. The primary objective of this research project was to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with f...

  16. Identification of quantitative trait loci for resistance to Verticillium wilt and yield parameters in hop (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Jakse, Jernej; Cerenak, Andreja; Radisek, Sebastjan; Satovic, Zlatko; Luthar, Zlata; Javornik, Branka

    2013-06-01

    Verticillium wilt (VW) can cause substantial yield loss in hop particularly with the outbreaks of the lethal strain of Verticillium albo-atrum. To elucidate genetic control of VW resistance in hop, an F1 mapping population derived from a cross of cultivar Wye Target, with the predicted genetic basis of resistance, and susceptible male breeding line BL2/1 was developed to assess wilting symptoms and to perform QTL mapping. The genetic linkage map, constructed with 203 markers of various types using a pseudo-testcross strategy, formed ten major linkage groups (LG) of the maternal and paternal maps, covering 552.98 and 441.1 cM, respectively. A significant QTL for VW resistance was detected at LOD 7 on a single chromosomal region on LG03 of both parental maps, accounting for 24.2-26.0 % of the phenotypic variance. QTL analysis for alpha-acid content and yield parameters was also performed on this map. QTLs for these traits were also detected and confirmed our previously detected QTLs in a different pedigree and environment. The work provides the basis for exploration of QTL flanking markers for possible use in marker-assisted selection. PMID:23423654

  17. Genetic dissection of milk yield traits and mastitis resistance quantitative trait loci on chromosome 20 in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Naveen K; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Lund, Mogens S; Sahana, Goutam

    2015-12-01

    Intense selection to increase milk yield has had negative consequences for mastitis incidence in dairy cattle. Due to low heritability of mastitis resistance and an unfavorable genetic correlation with milk yield, a reduction in mastitis through traditional breeding has been difficult to achieve. Here, we examined quantitative trait loci (QTL) that segregate for clinical mastitis and milk yield on Bos taurus autosome 20 (BTA20) to determine whether both traits are affected by a single polymorphism (pleiotropy) or by multiple closely linked polymorphisms. In the latter but not the former situation, undesirable genetic correlation could potentially be broken by selecting animals that have favorable variants for both traits. First, we performed a within-breed association study using a haplotype-based method in Danish Holstein cattle (HOL). Next, we analyzed Nordic Red dairy cattle (RDC) and Danish Jersey cattle (JER) with the goal of determining whether these QTL identified in Holsteins were segregating across breeds. Genotypes for 12,566 animals (5,966 HOL, 5,458 RDC, and 1,142 JER) were determined by using the Illumina Bovine SNP50 BeadChip (50K; Illumina, San Diego, CA), which identifies 1,568 single nucleotide polymorphisms on BTA20. Data were combined, phased, and clustered into haplotype states, followed by within- and across-breed haplotype-based association analyses using a linear mixed model. Association signals for both clinical mastitis and milk yield peaked in the 26- to 40-Mb region on BTA20 in HOL. Single-variant association analyses were carried out in the QTL region using whole sequence level variants imputed from references of 2,036 HD genotypes (BovineHD BeadChip; Illumina) and 242 whole-genome sequences. The milk QTL were also segregating in RDC and JER on the BTA20-targeted region; however, an indication of differences in the causal factor(s) was observed across breeds. A previously reported F279Y mutation (rs385640152) within the growth hormone

  18. Genetic dissection of milk yield traits and mastitis resistance quantitative trait loci on chromosome 20 in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Naveen K; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Lund, Mogens S; Sahana, Goutam

    2015-12-01

    Intense selection to increase milk yield has had negative consequences for mastitis incidence in dairy cattle. Due to low heritability of mastitis resistance and an unfavorable genetic correlation with milk yield, a reduction in mastitis through traditional breeding has been difficult to achieve. Here, we examined quantitative trait loci (QTL) that segregate for clinical mastitis and milk yield on Bos taurus autosome 20 (BTA20) to determine whether both traits are affected by a single polymorphism (pleiotropy) or by multiple closely linked polymorphisms. In the latter but not the former situation, undesirable genetic correlation could potentially be broken by selecting animals that have favorable variants for both traits. First, we performed a within-breed association study using a haplotype-based method in Danish Holstein cattle (HOL). Next, we analyzed Nordic Red dairy cattle (RDC) and Danish Jersey cattle (JER) with the goal of determining whether these QTL identified in Holsteins were segregating across breeds. Genotypes for 12,566 animals (5,966 HOL, 5,458 RDC, and 1,142 JER) were determined by using the Illumina Bovine SNP50 BeadChip (50K; Illumina, San Diego, CA), which identifies 1,568 single nucleotide polymorphisms on BTA20. Data were combined, phased, and clustered into haplotype states, followed by within- and across-breed haplotype-based association analyses using a linear mixed model. Association signals for both clinical mastitis and milk yield peaked in the 26- to 40-Mb region on BTA20 in HOL. Single-variant association analyses were carried out in the QTL region using whole sequence level variants imputed from references of 2,036 HD genotypes (BovineHD BeadChip; Illumina) and 242 whole-genome sequences. The milk QTL were also segregating in RDC and JER on the BTA20-targeted region; however, an indication of differences in the causal factor(s) was observed across breeds. A previously reported F279Y mutation (rs385640152) within the growth hormone

  19. Characterization of disease resistance loci in the USDA soybean germplasm collection using genome-wide association studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic resistance is a key strategy for soybean disease management. In past decades, soybean germplasm has been phenotyped for resistance to many different pathogens and genes for resistance have been incorporated into elite breeding lines often resulting in commercial cultivars with disease resist...

  20. Urban Graffiti: Crime, Control, and Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrell, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Explores the ways in which producers of contemporary urban graffiti resist the increasing segregation and control of urban environments, and shows how graffiti participants undermine efforts at control. Data come from four years of field work in Denver (Colorado) and research in other cities. (SLD)

  1. Rapid identification of resistance loci effective against Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKSK in 33 spring wheat landraces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat breeders worldwide are seeking new sources of resistance to Puccinia graminis f. sp tritici race TTKSK. To prioritize field-resistant landraces for follow-up genetic studies to test for the presence of new resistance genes, seedling response to Pgt race TTKSK, molecular markers linked to speci...

  2. Controlling the type I and type II errors in mapping quantitative trait loci

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, R.C.

    1994-11-01

    Although the interval mapping method is widely used for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs), it is not very well suited for mapping multiple QTLs. The authors present the results of a computer simulation to study the application of exact and approximate models for multiple QTLs. In particular, the authors focus on an automatic two-stage procedure in which in the first stage {open_quotes}important{close_quotes} markers are selected in multiple regression on markers. In the second stage a QTL is moved along the chromosomes by using the preselected markers as cofactors, except for the markers flanking the interval under study. A refined procedure for cases with large numbers of marker cofactors is described. This approach will be called MQM mapping, where MQM is an acronym for {open_quotes}multiple-QTL models{close_quotes} as well as for {open_quotes}marker-QTL-marker{close_quotes}. This simulation work demonstrates the great advantage of MQM mapping compared to interval mapping in reducing the chance of a type I error (i.e., a QTL is indicated at a location where actually no QTL is present) and in reducing the chance of a type II error (i.e., a QTL is not detected). 17 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Quantitative trait loci and underlying candidate genes controlling agronomical and fruit quality traits in octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa).

    PubMed

    Zorrilla-Fontanesi, Yasmín; Cabeza, Amalia; Domínguez, Pedro; Medina, Juan Jesús; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Denoyes-Rothan, Beatrice; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Amaya, Iraida

    2011-09-01

    Breeding for fruit quality traits in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa, 2n = 8x = 56) is complex due to the polygenic nature of these traits and the octoploid constitution of this species. In order to improve the efficiency of genotype selection, the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and associated molecular markers will constitute a valuable tool for breeding programs. However, the implementation of these markers in breeding programs depends upon the complexity and stability of QTLs across different environments. In this work, the genetic control of 17 agronomical and fruit quality traits was investigated in strawberry using a F(1) population derived from an intraspecific cross between two contrasting selection lines, '232' and '1392'. QTL analyses were performed over three successive years based on the separate parental linkage maps and a pseudo-testcross strategy. The integrated strawberry genetic map consists of 338 molecular markers covering 37 linkage groups, thus exceeding the 28 chromosomes. 33 QTLs were identified for 14 of the 17 studied traits and approximately 37% of them were stable over time. For each trait, 1-5 QTLs were identified with individual effects ranging between 9.2 and 30.5% of the phenotypic variation, indicating that all analysed traits are complex and quantitatively inherited. Many QTLs controlling correlated traits were co-located in homoeology group V, indicating linkage or pleiotropic effects of loci. Candidate genes for several QTLs controlling yield, anthocyanins, firmness and L-ascorbic acid are proposed based on both their co-localization and predicted function. We also report conserved QTLs among strawberry and other Rosaceae based on their syntenic location.

  4. Isolation of Polymyxin B-Susceptible Mutants of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Molecular Characterization of Genetic Loci Involved in Polymyxin B Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Burtnick, Mary N.; Woods, Donald E.

    1999-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a gram-negative bacterium that causes the disease known as melioidosis. This pathogen is endemic to Southeast Asia and northern Australia and is particularly problematic in northeastern Thailand. It has been previously reported that B. pseudomallei is resistant to the killing action of cationic antimicrobial peptides, including human neutrophil peptide, protamine sulfate, poly-l-lysine, magainins, and polymyxins. Recently, we have also found that the virulent clinical isolate B. pseudomallei 1026b is capable of replicating in media containing polymyxin B at concentrations of >100 mg/ml. In order to identify genetic loci that are associated with this particular resistance phenotype, we employed a Tn5-OT182 mutagenesis system in coordination with a replica plating screen to isolate polymyxin B-susceptible mutants. Of the 17,000 Tn5-OT182 mutants screened via this approach, five polymyxin B-susceptible mutants were obtained. Three of these mutants harbored Tn5-OT182 insertions within a genetic locus demonstrating strong homology to the lytB gene present in other gram-negative bacteria. Of the remaining two mutants, one contained a transposon insertion in a locus involved in lipopolysaccharide core biosynthesis (waaF), while the other contained an insertion in an open reading frame homologous to UDP-glucose dehydrogenase genes. Isogenic mutants were also constructed via allelic exchange and used in complementation analysis studies to further characterize the relative importance of each of the various genetic loci with respect to the polymyxin B resistance phenotype exhibited by B. pseudomallei 1026b. PMID:10543742

  5. Qualitative and quantitative trait loci conditioning resistance to Puccinia coronata pathotypes NQMG and LGCG in the oat (Avena sativa L.) cultivars Ogle and TAM O-301.

    PubMed

    Jackson, E W; Obert, D E; Menz, M; Hu, G; Bonman, J M

    2008-02-01

    Mapping disease resistance loci relies on the type and precision of phenotypic measurements. For crown rust of oat, disease severity is commonly assessed based on visual ratings of infection types (IT) and/or diseased leaf area (DLA) of infected plants in the greenhouse or field. These data can be affected by several variables including; (i) non-uniform disease development in the field; (ii) atypical symptom development in the greenhouse; (iii) the presence of multiple pathogenic races or pathotypes in the field, and (iv) rating bias. To overcome these limitations, we mapped crown rust resistance to single isolates in the Ogle/TAM O-301 (OT) recombinant inbred line (RIL) population using detailed measurements of IT, uredinia length (UL) and relative fungal DNA (FDNA) estimates determined by q-PCR. Measurements were taken on OT parents and recombinant inbred lines (RIL) inoculated with Puccinia coronata pathotypes NQMG and LGCG in separate greenhouse and field tests. Qualitative mapping identified an allele conferred by TAM O-301 on linkage group (LG) OT-11, which produced a bleached fleck phenotype to both NQMG and LGCG. Quantitative mapping identified two major quantitative trait loci (QTL) originating from TAM O-301 on LGs OT-11 and OT-32 which reduced UL and FDNA of both isolates in all experiments. Additionally, minor QTLs that reduced UL and FDNA were detected on LGs OT-15 and OT-8, originating from TAM O-301, and on LG OT-27, originating from Ogle. Detailed assessments of the OT population using two pathotypes in both the greenhouse and field provided comprehensive information to effectively map the genes responsible for crown rust resistance in Ogle and TAM O-301 to NQMG and LGCG.

  6. Transmission of Two Viruses that Cause Barley Yellow Dwarf is Controlled by Different Loci in the Aphid, Schizaphis graminum

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Stewart M.; Caillaud, Marina C; Burrows, Mary; Smith, Dawn M.

    2007-01-01

    Clonal populations of the aphid, Schizaphis graminum, have been separated into biotypes based on host preference and their ability to overcome resistance genes in wheat. Recently, several biotypes were found to differ in their ability to transmit one or more of the viruses that cause barley yellow dwarf disease in grain crops, and vector competence was linked to host preference. The genetics of host preference has been studied in S. graminum, but how this may relate to the transmission of plant viruses is unknown. Sexual morphs of a vector and nonvector S. graminum genotype were induced from parthenogenetic females and reciprocal crosses made. Eighty-nine hybrids were generated and maintained by parthenogenesis. Each hybrid was evaluated for its ability to transmit Barley yellow dwarf virus-PAV and Cereal yellow dwarf virus-RPV, and for its ability to colonize two wheat genotypes each expressing a different gene that confers resistance to S. graminum. The F1 genotypes were genetically variable for their ability to transmit virus and to colonize the aphid resistant wheat, but these traits were not genetically correlated. Individual F1 genotypes ranged in transmission efficiency from 0–100% for both viruses, although the overall mean transmission efficiency was similar to the transmission competent parent, indicating directional dominance. The direction of the cross did not significantly affect the vector competency for either virus, suggesting that maternally inherited cytoplasmic factors, or bacterial endosymbionts, did not contribute significantly to the inheritance of vector competency in S. graminum. Importantly, there was no genetic correlation between the ability to transmit Barley yellow dwarf virus and Cereal yellow dwarf virus-RPV in the F1 genotypes. These results taken together indicate that multiple loci are involved in the circulative transmission, and that the successful transmission of these closely related viruses is regulated by different sets of

  7. Transcriptomic characterization of two major Fusarium resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs), Fhb1 and Qfhs.ifa-5A, identifies novel candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Wolfgang; Steiner, Barbara; Ametz, Christian; Siegwart, Gerald; Wiesenberger, Gerlinde; Berthiller, Franz; Lemmens, Marc; Jia, Haiyan; Adam, Gerhard; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Kreil, David P; Buerstmayr, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium head blight, caused by Fusarium graminearum, is a devastating disease of wheat. We developed near-isogenic lines (NILs) differing in the two strongest known F. graminearum resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs), Qfhs.ndsu-3BS (also known as resistance gene Fhb1) and Qfhs.ifa-5A, which are located on the short arm of chromosome 3B and on chromosome 5A, respectively. These NILs showing different levels of resistance were used to identify transcripts that are changed significantly in a QTL-specific manner in response to the pathogen and between mock-inoculated samples. After inoculation with F. graminearum spores, 16 transcripts showed a significantly different response for Fhb1 and 352 for Qfhs.ifa-5A. Notably, we identified a lipid transfer protein which is constitutively at least 50-fold more abundant in plants carrying the resistant allele of Qfhs.ifa-5A. In addition to this candidate gene associated with Qfhs.ifa-5A, we identified a uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glycosyltransferase gene, designated TaUGT12887, exhibiting a positive difference in response to the pathogen in lines harbouring both QTLs relative to lines carrying only the Qfhs.ifa-5A resistance allele, suggesting Fhb1 dependence of this transcript. Yet, this dependence was observed only in the NIL with already higher basal resistance. The complete cDNA of TaUGT12887 was reconstituted from available wheat genomic sequences, and a synthetic recoded gene was expressed in a toxin-sensitive strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This gene conferred deoxynivalenol resistance, albeit much weaker than that observed with the previously characterized barley HvUGT13248. PMID:23738863

  8. Genetic diversity of rhg1 and Rhg4 loci in wild soybeans resistant to soybean cyst nematode race 3.

    PubMed

    Yuan, C P; Wang, Y J; Zhao, H K; Zhang, L; Wang, Y M; Liu, X D; Zhong, X F; Dong, Y S

    2016-06-10

    Over-utilization of germplasms that are resistant to the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) in soybean breeding programs can lead to genetic vulnerability in resistant cultivars. Resistant wild soybean (Glycine soja) is considered an invaluable gene source for increasing the genetic diversity of SCN resistance. In this study, we genotyped 23 G. soja accessions that are resistant to SCN race 3 for polymorphisms in the resistance genes, rhg1, Rhg4, and SHMT, and investigated their genetic relationship with eight Glycine max resistant cultivars. We identified 89 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 11 DNA insertion-deletions (InDels), of which 70 SNPs and 8 InDels were found in rhg1, 9 SNPs were found in Rhg4, and 10 SNPs and 3 InDels were found in SHMT. Nucleotide diversity was π = 0.00238 and θ = 0.00235, and haplotype diversity was 1.000. A phylogenetic tree comprising four clusters was constructed using sequence variations of the 23 G. soja and 8 G. max resistant accessions. Five G. soja accessions in subcluster A2, and four G. soja accessions in cluster B were genetically distant from G. max genotypes. Eight resistance-associated SNPs in the three resistance genes formed nine haplotypes in total. G. soja resistant accessions had different haplotypes (H2, H4, H5, H6, H7, and H8) compared with those of G. max (H1, H3, and H9). These results provide vital information on the use of wild soybeans for broadening the genetic base of SCN resistance.

  9. The identification of quantitative trait loci that control the paternal inheritance of a mitochondrial plasmid in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Oshima, Masao; Handa, Hirokazu

    2012-01-01

    Some varieties of Brassica napus (rapeseed) and B. rapa contain a liner mitochondrial plasmid that is unique in that it can be inherited from the male parent through the pollen. We found that two rapeseed cultivars, Norin 16 and Westar, showed different rates of plasmid inheritance from the paternal parent (78.8% and 27.5%, respectively). To identify nuclear genes controlling the inheritance of the plasmid, we carried out quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses using F(2) populations derived from a cross between these two cultivars. The F1 plants transmitted the plasmid from the paternal plant at a frequency of approximately 60%; the transmission rates of the F2 lines varied greatly, from 0 to 100%, with an average of 68.2%. A genetic map was constructed based on the segregation of 175 loci in the 102 F2 plants. A total of 22 linkage groups were obtained, all of which could be assigned to the 19 rapeseed chromosomes. The total map length was 1374.7 cM, with an average distance of 7.9 cM between the markers. We found that three quantitative trait loci for plasmid paternal transfer, qPpt1, qPpt2 and qPpt3, located on chromosomes A5, C2 and C9, respectively, were significantly linked to the transmission frequency, whose the logarithm of odds (LOD) score were 4.97, 3.49 and 3.57, respectively. Their explained phenotypic variances were 25.0%, 22.2% and 37.1%, respectively. These results suggest that the paternal inheritance of the mitochondrial plasmid is controlled by a relatively small number of nuclear genes.

  10. Electrostatic precipitator control for high resistivity particulate

    SciTech Connect

    Bibbo, P.P.; Hankins, F.E.; Jakoplic, R.

    1982-01-19

    A method and apparatus are described for optimizing the operating efficiency of an electrostatic precipitator based on controlling the average input power of the precipitator electrodes in response to control signals derived by sensing changes in specific instantaneous peak voltages associated with the average electrode voltages. The method is particularly well suited for electrostatic precipitators processing high resistivity fly ash and exhibiting an inflection region in its kvmin electrode voltage characteristic. The apparatus is organized to serve as a stand alone control system, or as an adjunct to existing electrostatic precipitator control systems.

  11. Lessons from a phenotyping center revealed by the genome-guided mapping of powdery mildew resistance loci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genomics era brought unprecedented tools for genetic analysis of host resistance, but careful attention is needed on obtaining accurate and reproducible phenotypes so that genomic results appropriately reflect biology. Phenotyping host resistance by natural infection in the field can produce var...

  12. Mapping of iron and zinc quantitative trait loci in soybean for association to iron deficiency chlorosis resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron deficiency chlorosis (IDC) is a nutritional disease of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) which when left unchecked can result in a severe yield penalty or even death in the most extreme cases. In order to curb these effects, resistance to the disease is needed. Breeding for resistance has been ...

  13. Susceptibility of Adult Cat Fleas (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) to Insecticides and Status of Insecticide Resistance Mutations at the Rdl and Knockdown Resistance Loci.

    PubMed

    Rust, Michael K; Vetter, Richard; Denholm, Ian; Blagburn, Byron; Williamson, Martin S; Kopp, Steven; Coleman, Glen; Hostetler, Joe; Davis, Wendell; Mencke, Norbert; Rees, Robert; Foit, Sabrina; Böhm, Claudia; Tetzner, Kathrin

    2015-08-01

    The susceptibility of 12 field-collected isolates and 4 laboratory strains of cat fleas, Ctenocephalides felis was determined by topical application of some of the insecticides used as on-animal therapies to control them. In the tested field-collected flea isolates the LD50 values for fipronil and imidacloprid ranged from 0.09 to 0.35 ng/flea and 0.02 to 0.19 ng/flea, respectively, and were consistent with baseline figures published previously. The extent of variation in response to four pyrethroid insecticides differed between compounds with the LD50 values for deltamethrin ranging from 2.3 to 28.2 ng/flea, etofenprox ranging from 26.7 to 86.7 ng/flea, permethrin ranging from 17.5 to 85.6 ng/flea, and d-phenothrin ranging from 14.5 to 130 ng/flea. A comparison with earlier data for permethrin and deltamethrin implied a level of pyrethroid resistance in all isolates and strains. LD50 values for tetrachlorvinphos ranged from 20.0 to 420.0 ng/flea. The rdl mutation (conferring target-site resistance to cyclodiene insecticides) was present in most field-collected and laboratory strains, but had no discernible effect on responses to fipronil, which acts on the same receptor protein as cyclodienes. The kdr and skdr mutations conferring target-site resistance to pyrethroids but segregated in opposition to one another, precluding the formation of genotypes homozygous for both mutations.

  14. Genome wide scan for quantitative trait loci affecting tick resistance in cattle (Bos taurus × Bos indicus)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In tropical countries, losses caused by bovine tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus infestation have a tremendous economic impact on cattle production systems. Genetic variation between Bos taurus and Bos indicus to tick resistance and molecular biology tools might allow for the identification of molecular markers linked to resistance traits that could be used as an auxiliary tool in selection programs. The objective of this work was to identify QTL associated with tick resistance/susceptibility in a bovine F2 population derived from the Gyr (Bos indicus) × Holstein (Bos taurus) cross. Results Through a whole genome scan with microsatellite markers, we were able to map six genomic regions associated with bovine tick resistance. For most QTL, we have found that depending on the tick evaluation season (dry and rainy) different sets of genes could be involved in the resistance mechanism. We identified dry season specific QTL on BTA 2 and 10, rainy season specific QTL on BTA 5, 11 and 27. We also found a highly significant genome wide QTL for both dry and rainy seasons in the central region of BTA 23. Conclusions The experimental F2 population derived from Gyr × Holstein cross successfully allowed the identification of six highly significant QTL associated with tick resistance in cattle. QTL located on BTA 23 might be related with the bovine histocompatibility complex. Further investigation of these QTL will help to isolate candidate genes involved with tick resistance in cattle. PMID:20433753

  15. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with resistance to a monogenean parasite (Benedenia seriolae) in yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata) through genome wide analysis.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Akiyuki; Yoshida, Kazunori; Fuji, Kanako; Kubota, Satoshi; Kai, Wataru; Aoki, Jun-ya; Kawabata, Yumi; Suzuki, Junpei; Akita, Kazuki; Koyama, Takashi; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Hotta, Takurou; Tsuzaki, Tatsuo; Okamoto, Nobuaki; Araki, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Benedenia infections caused by the monogenean fluke ectoparasite Benedenia seriolae seriously impact marine finfish aquaculture. Genetic variation has been inferred to play a significant role in determining the susceptibility to this parasitic disease. To evaluate the genetic basis of Benedenia disease resistance in yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata), a genome-wide and chromosome-wide linkage analyses were initiated using F1 yellowtail families (n = 90 per family) based on a high-density linkage map with 860 microsatellite and 142 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Two major quantitative trait loci (QTL) regions on linkage groups Squ2 (BDR-1) and Squ20 (BDR-2) were identified. These QTL regions explained 32.9-35.5% of the phenotypic variance. On the other hand, we investigated the relationship between QTL for susceptibility to B. seriolae and QTL for fish body size. The QTL related to growth was found on another linkage group (Squ7). As a result, this is the first genetic evidence that contributes to detailing phenotypic resistance to Benedenia disease, and the results will help resolve the mechanism of resistance to this important parasitic infection of yellowtail. PMID:23750223

  16. Case-control study of allele frequencies of 15 short tandem repeat loci in males with impulsive violent behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun; Ba, Huajie; Gao, Zhiqin; Zhao, Hanqing; Yu, Haiying; Guo, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background Analysis of genetic polymorphisms in short tandem repeats (STRs) is an accepted method for detecting associations between genotype and phenotype but it has not previously been used in the study of the genetics of impulsive violent behavior. Objective Compare the prevalence of different polymorphisms in 15 STR loci (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818 and FGA) between men with a history of impulsive violence and male control subjects without a history of impulsive violence. Methods The distributions of the alleles of the 15 STR loci were compared between 407 cases with impulsive violent behavior and 415 controls using AmpFlSTR® Identifiler™ kits. Results Compared to controls, the average frequencies of the following alleles were significantly lower in individuals with a history of violent behavior: allele 10 of TH01 (OR=0.29, 95%CI=0.16-0.52, p<0.0001,), allele 8 of TPOX (OR=0.71, 95%CI=0.58-0.86, p=0.0005), allele 9 of TPOX (OR=0.65, 95%CI=0.47-0.89, p=0.0072) and allele 14 of CSF1PO (OR=0.27, 95%CI=0.11-0.68, p=0.0035). One allele was significantly higher in cases than controls: allele 11 of TPOX (OR=1.79, 95%CI=1.45-2.22, p<0.0001). Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first behavioral genetic study that clearly demonstrates a close relationship between specific genetic markers and impulsive aggression in non-psychiatric offenders. Further prospective work will be needed to determine whether or not the alleles identified can be considered risk factors for impulsive aggression and, if so, the underlying mechanisms that result in this relationship. PMID:24991178

  17. SIPA1L2, MIR4697, GCH1 and VPS13C loci and risk of Parkinson's diseases in Iranian population: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Safaralizadeh, Tannaz; Jamshidi, Javad; Esmaili Shandiz, Ehsan; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Fazeli, Atena; Emamalizadeh, Babak; Manafi, Navid; Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Tafakhori, Abbas; Darvish, Hossein

    2016-10-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. Prevalence of PD increases steadily with age. A recent meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies has identified six new loci to be linked with PD. Here we investigated the association of four of these new loci, SIPA1L2, MIR4697, GCH1 and VPS13C with PD in an Iranian population. Through a case-control study a total of 1800 subjects comprising 600 PD patients and 1200 unrelated healthy controls were recruited. Rs10797576, rs329648, rs11158026 and rs2414739 related to SIPA1L2, MIR4697, GCH1 and VPS13C loci respectively, were genotyped in all subjects. The difference of genotype and allele frequencies between case and control groups were investigated using chi-square test and logistic regression models with R software. Genotype and allele frequencies were significantly different in PD patients and control group for rs329648, rs11158026 and rs2414739 (p-value=0.018, 0.025, and 0.009 respectively for allele frequency differences). There was no difference in genotype nor allele frequencies between the two groups for rs10797576. We replicated the association of three new loci which are proposed for PD. More studies in other populations and also functional analysis are required to clear the role of these variants in PD. PMID:27653855

  18. Genes and quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling trace element concentrations in perennial grasses grown on phytotoxic soil contaminated with heavy metals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial grasses cover diverse soils throughout the world, including sites contaminated with heavy metals, producing forages that must be safe for livestock and wildlife. Chromosome regions known as quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling forage mineral concentrations were mapped in a populatio...

  19. Resistance of Mice of the 129 Background to Yersinia pestis Maps to Multiple Loci on Chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Tencati, Michael; Tapping, Richard I

    2016-10-01

    Yersinia pestis is a Gram-negative bacterium that is the causative agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague. It is commonly acquired by mammals such as rodents and humans via the bite of an infected flea. We previously reported that multiple substrains of the 129 mouse background are resistant to pigmentation locus-negative (pgm(-)) Yersinia pestis and that this phenotype maps to a 30-centimorgan (cM) region located on chromosome 1. In this study, we have further delineated this plague resistance locus to a region of less than 20 cM through the creation and phenotyping of recombinant offspring arising from novel crossovers in this region. Furthermore, our experiments have revealed that there are at least two alleles in this initial locus, both of which are required for resistance on a susceptible C57BL/6 background. These two alleles work in trans since resistance is restored in offspring possessing one allele contributed by each parent. Our studies also indicated that the Slc11a1 gene (formerly known as Nramp1) located within the chromosome1 locus is not responsible for conferring resistance to 129 mice. PMID:27481241

  20. Mapping of Genomic Regions (Quantitative Trait Loci) Controlling Production and Quality in Industrial Cultures of the Edible Basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Larraya, Luis M.; Alfonso, Mikel; Pisabarro, Antonio G.; Ramírez, Lucía

    2003-01-01

    Industrial production of the edible basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom) is based on a solid fermentation process in which a limited number of selected strains are used. Optimization of industrial mushroom production depends on improving the culture process and breeding new strains with higher yields and productivities. Traditionally, fungal breeding has been carried out by an empirical trial and error process. In this study, we used a different approach by mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling culture production and quality within the framework of the genetic linkage map of P. ostreatus. Ten production traits and four quality traits were studied and mapped. The production QTLs identified explain nearly one-half of the production variation. More interestingly, a single QTL mapping to the highly polymorphic chromosome VII appears to be involved in control of all the productivity traits studied. Quality QTLs appear to be scattered across the genome and to have less effect on the variation of the corresponding traits. Moreover, some of the new hybrid strains constructed in the course of our experiments had production or quality values higher than those of the parents or other commercial strains. This approach opens the possibility of marker-assisted selection and breeding of new industrial strains of this fungus. PMID:12788770

  1. Identification of quantitative trait loci(QTL) controlling important fatty acids in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acids play important role in controlling oil quality of peanut. In addition to the major fatty acids, oleic acid (C18:1) and linoleic acid (C18:2) accounting for about 80%, there are several minor fatty acids accounting for about 20% in peanut oil, such as palmitic acid (PA, C16:0), stearic (S...

  2. Mapping Fusarium solani and Aphanomyces euteiches root rot resistance and root architecture quantitative trait loci in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root rot diseases of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are a constraint to dry and snap bean production. We developed the RR138 RIL mapping population from the cross of OSU5446, a susceptible line that meets current snap bean processing industry standards, and RR6950, a root rot resistant dry bean in th...

  3. Identification of novel loci associated with gastrointestinal parasite resistance in a Red Maasai x Dorper backcross population.

    PubMed

    Benavides, Magda Vieira; Sonstegard, Tad S; Kemp, Stephen; Mugambi, John M; Gibson, John P; Baker, Robert Leyden; Hanotte, Olivier; Marshall, Karen; Van Tassell, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) parasitic infection is the main health constraint for small ruminant production, causing loss of weight and/or death. Red Maasai sheep have adapted to a tropical environment where extreme parasite exposure is a constant, especially with highly pathogenic Haemonchus contortus. This breed has been reported to be resistant to gastrointestinal parasite infection, hence it is considered an invaluable resource to study associations between host genetics and resistance. The aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms strongly associated with host resistance in a double backcross population derived from Red Maasai and Dorper sheep using a SNP-based GWAS analysis. The animals that were genotyped represented the most resistant and susceptible individuals based on the tails of phenotypic distribution (10% each) for average faecal egg counts (AVFEC). AVFEC, packed cell volume (AVPCV), and live weight (AVLWT) were adjusted for fixed effects and co-variables, and an association analysis was run using EMMAX. Revised significance levels were calculated using 100,000 permutation tests. The top five significant SNP markers with - log10 p-values >3.794 were observed on five different chromosomes for AVFEC, and BLUPPf90/PostGSf90 results confirmed EMMAX significant regions for this trait. One of these regions included a cluster of significant SNP on chromosome (Chr) 6 not in linkage disequilibrium to each other. This genomic location contains annotated genes involved in cytokine signalling, haemostasis and mucus biosynthesis. Only one association detected on Chr 7 was significant for both AVPCV and AVLWT. The results generated here reveal candidate immune variants for genes involved in differential response to infection and provide additional SNP marker information that has potential to aid selection of resistance to gastrointestinal parasites in sheep of a similar genetic background to the double backcross population. PMID:25867089

  4. Identification of quantitative trait loci affecting resistance to gastrointestinal parasites in a double backcross population of Red Maasai and Dorper sheep.

    PubMed

    Silva, M V B; Sonstegard, T S; Hanotte, O; Mugambi, J M; Garcia, J F; Nagda, S; Gibson, J P; Iraqi, F A; McClintock, A E; Kemp, S J; Boettcher, P J; Malek, M; Van Tassell, C P; Baker, R L

    2012-02-01

    A genome-wide scan for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting gastrointestinal nematode resistance in sheep was completed using a double backcross population derived from Red Maasai and Dorper ewes bred to F(1) rams. This design provided an opportunity to map potentially unique genetic variation associated with a parasite-tolerant breed like Red Maasai, a breed developed to survive East African grazing conditions. Parasite indicator phenotypes (blood packed cell volume - PCV and faecal egg count - FEC) were collected on a weekly basis from 1064 lambs during a single 3-month post-weaning grazing challenge on infected pastures. The averages of last measurements for FEC (AVFEC) and PCV (AVPCV), along with decline in PCV from challenge start to end (PCVD), were used to select lambs (N = 371) for genotyping that represented the tails (10% threshold) of the phenotypic distributions. Marker genotypes for 172 microsatellite loci covering 25 of 26 autosomes (1560.7 cm) were scored and corrected by Genoprob prior to qxpak analysis that included Box-Cox transformed AVFEC and arcsine transformed PCV statistics. Significant QTL for AVFEC and AVPCV were detected on four chromosomes, and this included a novel AVFEC QTL on chromosome 6 that would have remained undetected without Box-Cox transformation methods. The most significant P-values for AVFEC, AVPCV and PCVD overlapped the same marker interval on chromosome 22, suggesting the potential for a single causative mutation, which remains unknown. In all cases, the favourable QTL allele was always contributed from Red Maasai, providing support for the idea that future marker-assisted selection for genetic improvement of production in East Africa will rely on markers in linkage disequilibrium with these QTL.

  5. Bias in effect size of systemic lupus erythematosus susceptibility loci across Europe: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to investigate whether the effect size of the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) risk alleles varies across European subpopulations. Methods European SLE patients (n = 1,742) and ethnically matched healthy controls (n = 2,101) were recruited at 17 centres from 10 different countries. Only individuals with self-reported ancestry from the country of origin were included. In addition, participants were genotyped for top ancestry informative markers and for 25 SLE associated SNPs. The results were used to compare effect sizes between the Central Eureopan and Southern European subgroups. Results Twenty of the 25 SNPs showed independent association with SLE, These SNPs showed a significant bias to larger effect sizes in the Southern subgroup, with 15/20 showing this trend (P = 0.019) and a larger mean odds ratio of the 20 SNPs (1.46 vs. 1.34, P = 0.02) as well as a larger difference in the number of risk alleles (2.06 vs. 1.63, P = 0.027) between SLE patients and controls than for Central Europeans. This bias was reflected in a very significant difference in the cumulative genetic risk score (4.31 vs. 3.48, P = 1.8 × 10-32). Effect size bias was accompanied by a lower number of SLE risk alleles in the Southern subjects, both patients and controls, the difference being more marked between the controls (P = 1.1 × 10-8) than between the Southern and Central European patients (P = 0.016). Seven of these SNPs showed significant allele frequency clines. Conclusion Our findings showed a bias to larger effect sizes of SLE loci in the Southern Europeans relative to the Central Europeans together with clines of SLE risk allele frequencies. These results indicate the need to study risk allele clines and the implications of the polygenic model of inheritance in SLE. PMID:22541939

  6. Mapping quantitative trait loci for plant adaptation and morphology traits in wheat using single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) morphological and adaptation-related traits that are controlled by quantitative traits loci (QTL) define potential growing areas of a wheat cultivar. To dissect the QTL for heading date (HD), lodging resistance (LR), shattering resistance (SR), cold tolerance (CT), plant...

  7. Orthogonal control of expression mean and variance by epigenetic features at different genomic loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Siddharth S.; Foley, Jonathan E.; Limsirichai, Prajit; Schaffer, David V.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-05-05

    While gene expression noise has been shown to drive dramatic phenotypic variations, the molecular basis for this variability in mammalian systems is not well understood. Gene expression has been shown to be regulated by promoter architecture and the associated chromatin environment. However, the exact contribution of these two factors in regulating expression noise has not been explored. Using a dual-reporter lentiviral model system, we deconvolved the influence of the promoter sequence to systematically study the contribution of the chromatin environment at different genomic locations in regulating expression noise. By integrating a large-scale analysis to quantify mRNA levels by smFISH and protein levels by flow cytometry in single cells, we found that mean expression and noise are uncorrelated across genomic locations. Furthermore, we showed that this independence could be explained by the orthogonal control of mean expression by the transcript burst size and noise by the burst frequency. Finally, we showed that genomic locations displaying higher expression noise are associated with more repressed chromatin, thereby indicating the contribution of the chromatin environment in regulating expression noise.

  8. Orthogonal control of expression mean and variance by epigenetic features at different genomic loci

    DOE PAGES

    Dey, Siddharth S.; Foley, Jonathan E.; Limsirichai, Prajit; Schaffer, David V.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-05-05

    While gene expression noise has been shown to drive dramatic phenotypic variations, the molecular basis for this variability in mammalian systems is not well understood. Gene expression has been shown to be regulated by promoter architecture and the associated chromatin environment. However, the exact contribution of these two factors in regulating expression noise has not been explored. Using a dual-reporter lentiviral model system, we deconvolved the influence of the promoter sequence to systematically study the contribution of the chromatin environment at different genomic locations in regulating expression noise. By integrating a large-scale analysis to quantify mRNA levels by smFISH andmore » protein levels by flow cytometry in single cells, we found that mean expression and noise are uncorrelated across genomic locations. Furthermore, we showed that this independence could be explained by the orthogonal control of mean expression by the transcript burst size and noise by the burst frequency. Finally, we showed that genomic locations displaying higher expression noise are associated with more repressed chromatin, thereby indicating the contribution of the chromatin environment in regulating expression noise.« less

  9. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Bolzonella, T.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Menmuir, S.; Ortolani, S.; Rachlew, E.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.

    2005-12-01

    A two-dimensional array of saddle coils at Mc poloidal and Nc toroidal positions is used on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (Brunsell P R et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 1457) to study active control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). Spontaneous growth of several RWMs with poloidal mode number m = 1 and different toroidal mode number n is observed experimentally, in agreement with linear MHD modelling. The measured plasma response to a controlled coil field and the plasma response computed using the linear circular cylinder MHD model are in quantitive agreement. Feedback control introduces a linear coupling of modes with toroidal mode numbers n, n' that fulfil the condition |n - n'| = Nc. Pairs of coupled unstable RWMs are present in feedback experiments with an array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 16 coils. Using intelligent shell feedback, the coupled modes are generally not controlled even though the field is suppressed at the active coils. A better suppression of coupled modes may be achieved in the case of rotating modes by using the mode control feedback scheme with individually set complex gains. In feedback with a larger array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 32 coils, the coupling effect largely disappears, and with this array, the main internal RWMs n = -11, -10, +5, +6 are all simultaneously suppressed throughout the discharge (7 8 wall times). With feedback there is a two-fold extension of the pulse length, compared to discharges without feedback.

  10. Multiple loci affect genetic predisposition to hepatocarcinogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Manenti, G.; Gariboldi, M.; Canzian, F.

    1994-09-01

    The C3H/He mouse represents a good experimental model of genetic predispositoin to hepatocellular tumor development. We analyzed an interspecific test-cross population of 106 urethane-treated male (C3H/He x Mus spretus) x C57BL/6J mice, typed with 222 genetic markers to locate precisely the hepatocellular tumor susceptibility (Hcs) loci. Three regions, on chromosomes 2, 5, and 19, showed a significant linkage with hepatocellular tumor development, as indicated by different quantitative indexes estimating liver tumor size. Liver tumor frequency was not genetically controlled. These loci are different from three other Hcs loci that we have previously mapped in an F2 progeny of the C3H/He mouse crossed with the resistant laboratory strain A/J. The present result indicates a multigenic model of inheritance for hepatocellular tumor susceptibility.

  11. Identifying quantitative trait loci and determining closely related stalk traits for rind penetrometer resistance in a high-oil maize population.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haixiao; Meng, Yujie; Wang, Hongwu; Liu, Hai; Chen, Shaojiang

    2012-05-01

    Stalk lodging in maize causes annual yield losses between 5 and 20% worldwide. Many studies have indicated that maize stalk strength significantly negatively correlates with lodging observed in the field. Rind penetrometer resistance (RPR) measurements can be used to effectively evaluate maize stalk strength, but little is known about the genetic basis of this parameter. The objective of this study was to explore a genetic model and detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) of RPR and determine relationships between RPR and other stalk traits, especially cell wall chemical components. RPR is quantitative trait in nature, and both additive and non-additive effects may be important to consider for the improvement of RPR. Nine additive-effect QTLs covering nine chromosomes, except chromosome 5, and one pair of epistatic QTLs were detected for RPR. CeSA11 involved in cellulose synthesis and colorless2 involved in lignin synthesis were identified as possible candidate genes for RPR. Internode diameter (InD), fresh weight of internode (FreW), dry weight of internode (DryW), fresh weight and dry weight as well as cell wall components per unit volume significantly positively correlated with RPR. The internode water content (InW) significantly negatively correlated with RPR. Notably, these traits significantly correlated with RPR, and the QTLs of these traits co-localized with those of RPR. The corresponding results obtained from correlation analysis and QTL mapping suggested the presence of pleitropism or linkage between genes and indicated that these different approaches may be used for cross authentication of relationships between different traits. PMID:22314785

  12. Species-specific differences in tissue-specific expression of alcohol dehydrogenase are under the control of complex cis-acting loci: Evidence from Drosophila hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ranganayakulu, G.; Reddy, A.R. ); Kirkpatrick, R.B.; Martin, P.F. )

    1991-12-01

    Differences in the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase in the hindgut and testis of adult Drosophila virilis, D. texana, D. novamexicana and D. borealis flies were observed. These heritable differences do not arise due to chromosomal rearrangements, since the polytene chromosome banding patterns did not reveal any such gross chromosomal rearrangements near the Adh locus in any of the tested species. Analysis of the interspecific hybrids revealed that these differences are controlled by complex cis-acting genetic loci. Further, the cis-acting locus controlling the expression of ADH in testis was found to be separable by crossing-over.

  13. Epigenomic analysis of the HOX gene loci reveals mechanisms that may control canonical expression patterns in AML and normal hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D H; Young, M A; Lamprecht, T L; Helton, N M; Fulton, R; O'Laughlin, M; Fronick, C; Magrini, V; Demeter, R T; Miller, C A; Klco, J M; Wilson, R K; Ley, T J

    2015-06-01

    HOX genes are highly expressed in many acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples, but the patterns of expression and associated regulatory mechanisms are not clearly understood. We analyzed RNA sequencing data from 179 primary AML samples and normal hematopoietic cells to understand the range of expression patterns in normal versus leukemic cells. HOX expression in AML was restricted to specific genes in the HOXA or HOXB loci, and was highly correlated with recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities. However, the majority of samples expressed a canonical set of HOXA and HOXB genes that was nearly identical to the expression signature of normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Transcriptional profiles at the HOX loci were similar between normal cells and AML samples, and involved bidirectional transcription at the center of each gene cluster. Epigenetic analysis of a subset of AML samples also identified common regions of chromatin accessibility in AML samples and normal CD34(+) cells that displayed differences in methylation depending on HOX expression patterns. These data provide an integrated epigenetic view of the HOX gene loci in primary AML samples, and suggest that HOX expression in most AML samples represents a normal stem cell program that is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms at specific regulatory elements.

  14. Epigenomic analysis of the HOX gene loci reveals mechanisms that may control canonical expression patterns in AML and normal hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, David H.; Young, Margaret A.; Lamprecht, Tamara L.; Helton, Nichole M.; Fulton, Robert; O’Laughlin, Michelle; Fronick, Catrina; Magrini, Vincent; Demeter, Ryan T.; Miller, Christopher A.; Klco, Jeffery M.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    HOX genes are highly expressed in many acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples, but the patterns of expression and associated regulatory mechanisms are not clearly understood. We analyzed RNA sequencing data from 179 primary AML samples and normal hematopoietic cells to understand the range of expression patterns in normal versus leukemic cells. HOX expression in AML was restricted to specific genes in the HOXA or HOXB loci, and was highly correlated with recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities. However, the majority of samples expressed a canonical set of HOXA and HOXB genes that was nearly identical to the expression signature of normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). Transcriptional profiles at the HOX loci were similar between normal cells and AML samples, and involved bidirectional transcription at the center of each gene cluster. Epigenetic analysis of a subset of AML samples also identified common regions of chromatin accessibility in AML samples and normal CD34+ cells that displayed differences in methylation depending on HOX expression patterns. These data provide an integrated epigenetic view of the HOX gene loci in primary AML samples, and suggest that HOX expression in most AML samples represents a normal stem cell program that is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms at specific regulatory elements. PMID:25600023

  15. Genome-Wide Interaction with Insulin Secretion Loci Reveals Novel Loci for Type 2 Diabetes in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Keaton, Jacob M.; Hellwege, Jacklyn N.; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Pankow, James S.; Fornage, Myriam; Wilson, James G.; Correa, Adolfo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Taylor, Kent D.; Rich, Stephen S.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Freedman, Barry I.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the result of metabolic defects in insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, yet most T2D loci identified to date influence insulin secretion. We hypothesized that T2D loci, particularly those affecting insulin sensitivity, can be identified through interaction with insulin secretion loci. To test this hypothesis, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg), a dynamic measure of first-phase insulin secretion, were identified in African Americans from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRASFS; n = 492 subjects). These SNPs were tested for interaction, individually and jointly as a genetic risk score (GRS), using genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from five cohorts (ARIC, CARDIA, JHS, MESA, WFSM; n = 2,725 cases, 4,167 controls) with T2D as the outcome. In single variant analyses, suggestively significant (Pinteraction<5×10−6) interactions were observed at several loci including LYPLAL1 (rs10746381), CHN2 (rs7796525), and EXOC1 (rs4289500). Notable AIRg GRS interactions were observed with SAMD4A (rs11627203) and UTRN (rs17074194). These data support the hypothesis that additional genetic factors contributing to T2D risk can be identified by interactions with insulin secretion loci. PMID:27448167

  16. Genome-Wide Interaction with Insulin Secretion Loci Reveals Novel Loci for Type 2 Diabetes in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Keaton, Jacob M; Hellwege, Jacklyn N; Ng, Maggie C Y; Palmer, Nicholette D; Pankow, James S; Fornage, Myriam; Wilson, James G; Correa, Adolfo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Rotter, Jerome I; Chen, Yii-Der I; Taylor, Kent D; Rich, Stephen S; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Freedman, Barry I; Bowden, Donald W

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the result of metabolic defects in insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, yet most T2D loci identified to date influence insulin secretion. We hypothesized that T2D loci, particularly those affecting insulin sensitivity, can be identified through interaction with insulin secretion loci. To test this hypothesis, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg), a dynamic measure of first-phase insulin secretion, were identified in African Americans from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRASFS; n = 492 subjects). These SNPs were tested for interaction, individually and jointly as a genetic risk score (GRS), using genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from five cohorts (ARIC, CARDIA, JHS, MESA, WFSM; n = 2,725 cases, 4,167 controls) with T2D as the outcome. In single variant analyses, suggestively significant (Pinteraction<5×10-6) interactions were observed at several loci including LYPLAL1 (rs10746381), CHN2 (rs7796525), and EXOC1 (rs4289500). Notable AIRg GRS interactions were observed with SAMD4A (rs11627203) and UTRN (rs17074194). These data support the hypothesis that additional genetic factors contributing to T2D risk can be identified by interactions with insulin secretion loci. PMID:27448167

  17. Directionality of Fission Yeast Mating-Type Interconversion Is Controlled by the Location of the Donor Loci

    PubMed Central

    Thon, G.; Klar, AJS.

    1993-01-01

    Cells of homothallic strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe efficiently switch between two mating types called P and M. The phenotypic switches are due to conversion of the expressed mating-type locus (mat1) by two closely linked silent loci, mat2-P and mat3-M, that contain unexpressed information for the P and M mating types, respectively. In this process, switching-competent cells switch to the opposite mating type in 72-90% of the cell divisions. Hence, mat2-P is a preferred donor of information to mat1 in M cells, whereas mat3-M is a preferred donor in P cells. We investigated the reason for the donor preference by constructing a strain in which the genetic contents of the donor loci were swapped. We found that switching to the opposite mating type was very inefficient in that strain. This shows that the location of the silent cassettes in the chromosome, rather than their content, is the deciding factor for recognition of the donor for each cell type. We propose a model in which switching is achieved by regulating accessibility of the donor loci, perhaps by changing the chromatin structure in the mating-type region, thus promoting an intrachromosomal folding of mat2 or mat3 onto mat1 in a cell type-specific fashion. We also present evidence for the involvement of the Swi6 and Swi6-mod trans-acting factors in the donor-choice mechanism. We suggest that these factors participate in forming the proposed folded structure. PMID:8375648

  18. Epidemiological control of drug resistance and compensatory mutation under resistance testing and second-line therapy.

    PubMed

    Saddler, Clare A; Wu, Yue; Valckenborgh, Frank; Tanaka, Mark M

    2013-12-01

    The fitness cost of antibiotic resistance in the absence of treatment raises the possibility that prudent use of drugs may slow or reverse the rise of resistance. Unfortunately, compensatory mutations that lower this cost may lead to entrenched resistance. Here, we develop a mathematical model of resistance evolution and compensatory mutation to determine whether reversion to sensitivity can occur, and how disease control might be facilitated by a second-line therapy. When only a single antibiotic is available, sensitive bacteria reach fixation only under treatment rates so low that hardly any cases are treated. We model a scenario in which drug sensitivity can be accurately tested so that a second-line therapy is administered to resistant cases. Before the rise of resistance to the second drug, disease eradication is possible if resistance testing and second-line treatment are conducted at a high enough rate. However, if double drug resistance arises, the possibility of disease eradication is greatly reduced and compensated resistance prevails in most of the parameter space. The boundary separating eradication from fixation of compensated resistance is strongly influenced by the underlying basic reproductive number of the pathogen and drug efficacy in sensitive cases, but depends less on the resistance cost and compensation. When double resistance is possible, the boundary is affected by the relative strengths of resistance against the two drugs in the double-resistant-compensated strain.

  19. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tönu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-01-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have raised the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional follow-up of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

  20. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways.

    PubMed

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tõnu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-09-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have increased the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin concentration showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional analysis of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

  1. Integrated resistant pigweed control in the Southeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation agriculture has been highly effective in reducing soil erosion, increasing water holding capacity, and minimizing surface water contamination. The adoption of herbicide resistant crops facilitated successful implementation of conservation agriculture practices throughout the Southeast d...

  2. Linkage mapping of genes controlling resistance to white rust (Albugo candida) in Brassica rapa (syn. campestris) and comparative mapping to Brassica napus and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kole, C; Williams, P H; Rimmer, S R; Osborn, T C

    2002-02-01

    Genes for resistance to white rust (Albugo candida) in oilseed Brassica rapa were mapped using a recombinant inbred (RI) population and a genetic linkage map consisting of 144 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers and 3 phenotypic markers. Young seedlings were evaluated by inoculating cotyledons with A. candida race 2 (AC2) and race 7 (AC7) and scoring the interaction phenotype (IP) on a 0-9 scale. The IP of each line was nearly identical for the two races and the population showed bimodal distributions, suggesting that a single major gene (or tightly linked genes) controlled resistance to the two races. The IP scores were converted to categorical resistant and susceptible scores, and these data were used to map a single Mendelian gene controlling resistance to both races on linkage group 4 where resistance to race 2 had been mapped previously. A quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping approach using the IP scores detected the same major resistance locus for both races, plus a second minor QTL effect for AC2 on linkage group 2. These results indicate that either a dominant allele at a single locus (Acal) or two tightly linked loci control seedling resistance to both races of white rust in the biennial turnip rape cultivar Per. The map positions of white rust resistance genes in B. rapa and Brassica napus were compared and the results indicate where additional loci that have not been mapped may be located. Alignment of these maps to the physical map of the Arabidopsis genome identified regions to target for comparative fine mapping using this model organism.

  3. Occurrence, genetic control and evolution of non-target-site based resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate synthase (ALS) in the dicot weed Papaver rhoeas.

    PubMed

    Scarabel, Laura; Pernin, Fanny; Délye, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    Non-target-site resistance (NTSR) to herbicides is a major issue for the chemical control of weeds. Whilst predominant in grass weeds, NTSR remains largely uninvestigated in dicot weeds. We investigated the occurrence, inheritance and genetic control of NTSR to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors in Papaver rhoeas (corn poppy) using progenies from plants with potential NTSR to the imidazolinone herbicide imazamox. NTSR to imazamox was inherited from parents over two successive generations. NTSR to tritosulfuron (a sulfonylurea) was observed in F1 generations and inherited in F2 generations. NTSR to florasulam (a triazolopyrimidine) emerged in F2 generations. Our findings suggest NTSR was polygenic and gradually built-up by accumulation over generations of loci with moderate individual effects in single plants. We also demonstrated that ALS alleles conferring herbicide resistance can co-exist with NTSR loci in P. rhoeas plants. Previous research focussed on TSR in P. rhoeas, which most likely caused underestimation of NTSR significance in this species. This may also apply to other dicot species. From our data, resistance to ALS inhibitors in P. rhoeas appears complex, and involves well-known mutant ALS alleles and a set of unknown NTSR loci that confer resistance to ALS inhibitors from different chemical families. PMID:26259184

  4. Occurrence, genetic control and evolution of non-target-site based resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate synthase (ALS) in the dicot weed Papaver rhoeas.

    PubMed

    Scarabel, Laura; Pernin, Fanny; Délye, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    Non-target-site resistance (NTSR) to herbicides is a major issue for the chemical control of weeds. Whilst predominant in grass weeds, NTSR remains largely uninvestigated in dicot weeds. We investigated the occurrence, inheritance and genetic control of NTSR to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors in Papaver rhoeas (corn poppy) using progenies from plants with potential NTSR to the imidazolinone herbicide imazamox. NTSR to imazamox was inherited from parents over two successive generations. NTSR to tritosulfuron (a sulfonylurea) was observed in F1 generations and inherited in F2 generations. NTSR to florasulam (a triazolopyrimidine) emerged in F2 generations. Our findings suggest NTSR was polygenic and gradually built-up by accumulation over generations of loci with moderate individual effects in single plants. We also demonstrated that ALS alleles conferring herbicide resistance can co-exist with NTSR loci in P. rhoeas plants. Previous research focussed on TSR in P. rhoeas, which most likely caused underestimation of NTSR significance in this species. This may also apply to other dicot species. From our data, resistance to ALS inhibitors in P. rhoeas appears complex, and involves well-known mutant ALS alleles and a set of unknown NTSR loci that confer resistance to ALS inhibitors from different chemical families.

  5. Genome-wide association and regional heritability mapping to identify loci underlying variation in nematode resistance and body weight in Scottish Blackface lambs.

    PubMed

    Riggio, V; Matika, O; Pong-Wong, R; Stear, M J; Bishop, S C

    2013-05-01

    The genetic architecture underlying nematode resistance and body weight in Blackface lambs was evaluated comparing genome-wide association (GWA) and regional heritability mapping (RHM) approaches. The traits analysed were faecal egg count (FEC) and immunoglobulin A activity against third-stage larvae from Teladorsagia circumcincta, as indicators of nematode resistance, and body weight in a population of 752 Scottish Blackface lambs, genotyped with the 50k single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip. FEC for both Nematodirus and Strongyles nematodes (excluding Nematodirus), as well as body weight were collected at approximately 16, 20 and 24 weeks of age. In addition, a weighted average animal effect was estimated for both FEC and body weight traits. After quality control, 44 388 SNPs were available for the GWA analysis and 42 841 for the RHM, which utilises only mapped SNPs. The same fixed effects were used in both analyses: sex, year, management group, litter size and age of dam, with day of birth as covariate. Some genomic regions of interest for both nematode resistance and body weight traits were identified, using both GWA and RHM approaches. For both methods, strong evidence for association was found on chromosome 14 for Nematodirus average animal effect, chromosome 6 for Strongyles FEC at 16 weeks and chromosome 6 for body weight at 16 weeks. Across the entire data set, RHM identified more regions reaching the suggestive level than GWA, suggesting that RHM is capable of capturing some of the variation not detected by GWA analyses.

  6. Genome-wide association analysis of self-reported events in 6135 individuals and 252 827 controls identifies 8 loci associated with thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hinds, David A; Buil, Alfonso; Ziemek, Daniel; Martinez-Perez, Angel; Malik, Rainer; Folkersen, Lasse; Germain, Marine; Mälarstig, Anders; Brown, Andrew; Soria, Jose Manuel; Dichgans, Martin; Bing, Nan; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Souto, Juan Carlos; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Hamsten, Anders; Worrall, Bradford B; Tung, Joyce Y; Sabater-Lleal, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Thrombotic diseases are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. To add insights into the genetic regulation of thrombotic disease, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 6135 self-reported blood clots events and 252 827 controls of European ancestry belonging to the 23andMe cohort of research participants. Eight loci exceeded genome-wide significance. Among the genome-wide significant results, our study replicated previously known venous thromboembolism (VTE) loci near the F5, FGA-FGG, F11, F2, PROCR and ABO genes, and the more recently discovered locus near SLC44A2 In addition, our study reports for the first time a genome-wide significant association between rs114209171, located upstream of the F8 structural gene, and thrombosis risk. Analyses of expression profiles and expression quantitative trait loci across different tissues suggested SLC44A2, ILF3 and AP1M2 as the three most plausible candidate genes for the chromosome 19 locus, our only genome-wide significant thrombosis-related locus that does not harbor likely coagulation-related genes. In addition, we present data showing that this locus also acts as a novel risk factor for stroke and coronary artery disease (CAD). In conclusion, our study reveals novel common genetic risk factors for VTE, stroke and CAD and provides evidence that self-reported data on blood clots used in a GWAS yield results that are comparable with those obtained using clinically diagnosed VTE. This observation opens up the potential for larger meta-analyses, which will enable elucidation of the genetics of thrombotic diseases, and serves as an example for the genetic study of other diseases. PMID:26908601

  7. Rehabilitation device with variable resistance and intelligent control

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, J.Q.; Rudolph, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been widely reported to have positive rehabilitation effects for patients with neuromuscular and orthopaedic conditions. This paper presents an optimal design of magneto-rheological fluid dampers for variable resistance exercise device in the form of a knee brace. An intelligent supervisory control for regulating the resistive force or torque of the knee brace has also been studied. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training for the knee. PMID:15694609

  8. Major Quantitative Trait Loci and Putative Candidate Genes for Powdery Mildew Resistance and Fruit-Related Traits Revealed by an Intraspecific Genetic Map for Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang-Hwan; Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Han, Dong-Yeup; Park, Minkyu; Kim, Seungill; Choi, Doil; Kim, Yongjae; Lee, Gung Pyo; Kim, Sun-Tae; Park, Young-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    An intraspecific genetic map for watermelon was constructed using an F2 population derived from ‘Arka Manik’ × ‘TS34’ and transcript sequence variants and quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to powdery mildew (PMR), seed size (SS), and fruit shape (FS) were analyzed. The map consists of 14 linkage groups (LGs) defined by 174 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences (CAPS), 2 derived-cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers, 20 sequence-characterized amplified regions, and 8 expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat markers spanning 1,404.3 cM, with a mean marker interval of 6.9 cM and an average of 14.6 markers per LG. Genetic inheritance and QTL analyses indicated that each of the PMR, SS, and FS traits is controlled by an incompletely dominant effect of major QTLs designated as pmr2.1, ss2.1, and fsi3.1, respectively. The pmr2.1, detected on chromosome 2 (Chr02), explained 80.0% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 30.76). This QTL was flanked by two CAPS markers, wsb2-24 (4.00 cM) and wsb2-39 (13.97 cM). The ss2.1, located close to pmr2.1 and CAPS marker wsb2-13 (1.00 cM) on Chr02, explained 92.3% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 68.78). The fsi3.1, detected on Chr03, explained 79.7% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 31.37) and was flanked by two CAPS, wsb3-24 (1.91 cM) and wsb3-9 (7.00 cM). Candidate gene-based CAPS markers were developed from the disease resistance and fruit shape gene homologs located on Chr.02 and Chr03 and were mapped on the intraspecific map. Colocalization of these markers with the major QTLs indicated that watermelon orthologs of a nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat class gene containing an RPW8 domain and a member of SUN containing the IQ67 domain are candidate genes for pmr2.1 and fsi3.1, respectively. The results presented herein provide useful information for marker-assisted breeding and gene cloning for PMR and fruit-related traits. PMID:26700647

  9. Major Quantitative Trait Loci and Putative Candidate Genes for Powdery Mildew Resistance and Fruit-Related Traits Revealed by an Intraspecific Genetic Map for Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus).

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Hwan; Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Han, Dong-Yeup; Park, Minkyu; Kim, Seungill; Choi, Doil; Kim, Yongjae; Lee, Gung Pyo; Kim, Sun-Tae; Park, Young-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    An intraspecific genetic map for watermelon was constructed using an F2 population derived from 'Arka Manik' × 'TS34' and transcript sequence variants and quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to powdery mildew (PMR), seed size (SS), and fruit shape (FS) were analyzed. The map consists of 14 linkage groups (LGs) defined by 174 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences (CAPS), 2 derived-cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers, 20 sequence-characterized amplified regions, and 8 expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat markers spanning 1,404.3 cM, with a mean marker interval of 6.9 cM and an average of 14.6 markers per LG. Genetic inheritance and QTL analyses indicated that each of the PMR, SS, and FS traits is controlled by an incompletely dominant effect of major QTLs designated as pmr2.1, ss2.1, and fsi3.1, respectively. The pmr2.1, detected on chromosome 2 (Chr02), explained 80.0% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 30.76). This QTL was flanked by two CAPS markers, wsb2-24 (4.00 cM) and wsb2-39 (13.97 cM). The ss2.1, located close to pmr2.1 and CAPS marker wsb2-13 (1.00 cM) on Chr02, explained 92.3% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 68.78). The fsi3.1, detected on Chr03, explained 79.7% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 31.37) and was flanked by two CAPS, wsb3-24 (1.91 cM) and wsb3-9 (7.00 cM). Candidate gene-based CAPS markers were developed from the disease resistance and fruit shape gene homologs located on Chr.02 and Chr03 and were mapped on the intraspecific map. Colocalization of these markers with the major QTLs indicated that watermelon orthologs of a nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat class gene containing an RPW8 domain and a member of SUN containing the IQ67 domain are candidate genes for pmr2.1 and fsi3.1, respectively. The results presented herein provide useful information for marker-assisted breeding and gene cloning for PMR and fruit-related traits.

  10. Major Quantitative Trait Loci and Putative Candidate Genes for Powdery Mildew Resistance and Fruit-Related Traits Revealed by an Intraspecific Genetic Map for Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus).

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Hwan; Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Han, Dong-Yeup; Park, Minkyu; Kim, Seungill; Choi, Doil; Kim, Yongjae; Lee, Gung Pyo; Kim, Sun-Tae; Park, Young-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    An intraspecific genetic map for watermelon was constructed using an F2 population derived from 'Arka Manik' × 'TS34' and transcript sequence variants and quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to powdery mildew (PMR), seed size (SS), and fruit shape (FS) were analyzed. The map consists of 14 linkage groups (LGs) defined by 174 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences (CAPS), 2 derived-cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers, 20 sequence-characterized amplified regions, and 8 expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat markers spanning 1,404.3 cM, with a mean marker interval of 6.9 cM and an average of 14.6 markers per LG. Genetic inheritance and QTL analyses indicated that each of the PMR, SS, and FS traits is controlled by an incompletely dominant effect of major QTLs designated as pmr2.1, ss2.1, and fsi3.1, respectively. The pmr2.1, detected on chromosome 2 (Chr02), explained 80.0% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 30.76). This QTL was flanked by two CAPS markers, wsb2-24 (4.00 cM) and wsb2-39 (13.97 cM). The ss2.1, located close to pmr2.1 and CAPS marker wsb2-13 (1.00 cM) on Chr02, explained 92.3% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 68.78). The fsi3.1, detected on Chr03, explained 79.7% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 31.37) and was flanked by two CAPS, wsb3-24 (1.91 cM) and wsb3-9 (7.00 cM). Candidate gene-based CAPS markers were developed from the disease resistance and fruit shape gene homologs located on Chr.02 and Chr03 and were mapped on the intraspecific map. Colocalization of these markers with the major QTLs indicated that watermelon orthologs of a nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat class gene containing an RPW8 domain and a member of SUN containing the IQ67 domain are candidate genes for pmr2.1 and fsi3.1, respectively. The results presented herein provide useful information for marker-assisted breeding and gene cloning for PMR and fruit-related traits. PMID:26700647

  11. Identification of genes for controlling swine adipose deposition by integrating transcriptome, whole-genome resequencing, and quantitative trait loci data.

    PubMed

    Xing, Kai; Zhu, Feng; Zhai, LiWei; Chen, ShaoKang; Tan, Zhen; Sun, YangYang; Hou, ZhuoCheng; Wang, ChuDuan

    2016-01-01

    Backfat thickness is strongly associated with meat quality, fattening efficiency, reproductive performance, and immunity in pigs. Fat storage and fatty acid synthesis mainly occur in adipose tissue. Therefore, we used a high-throughput massively parallel sequencing approach to identify transcriptomes in adipose tissue, and whole-genome differences from three full-sibling pairs of pigs with opposite (high and low) backfat thickness phenotypes. We obtained an average of 38.69 million reads for six samples, 78.68% of which were annotated in the reference genome. Eighty-nine overlapping differentially expressed genes were identified among the three pair comparisons. Whole-genome resequencing also detected multiple genetic variations between the pools of DNA from the two groups. Compared with the animal quantitative trait loci (QTL) database, 20 differentially expressed genes were matched to the QTLs associated with fatness in pigs. Our technique of integrating transcriptome, whole-genome resequencing, and QTL database information provided a rich source of important differentially expressed genes and variations. Associate analysis between selected SNPs and backfat thickness revealed that two SNPs and one haplotype of ME1 significantly affected fat deposition in pigs. Moreover, genetic analysis confirmed that variations in the differentially expressed genes may affect fat deposition. PMID:26996612

  12. Identification of genes for controlling swine adipose deposition by integrating transcriptome, whole-genome resequencing, and quantitative trait loci data

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Kai; Zhu, Feng; Zhai, LiWei; Chen, ShaoKang; Tan, Zhen; Sun, YangYang; Hou, ZhuoCheng; Wang, ChuDuan

    2016-01-01

    Backfat thickness is strongly associated with meat quality, fattening efficiency, reproductive performance, and immunity in pigs. Fat storage and fatty acid synthesis mainly occur in adipose tissue. Therefore, we used a high-throughput massively parallel sequencing approach to identify transcriptomes in adipose tissue, and whole-genome differences from three full-sibling pairs of pigs with opposite (high and low) backfat thickness phenotypes. We obtained an average of 38.69 million reads for six samples, 78.68% of which were annotated in the reference genome. Eighty-nine overlapping differentially expressed genes were identified among the three pair comparisons. Whole-genome resequencing also detected multiple genetic variations between the pools of DNA from the two groups. Compared with the animal quantitative trait loci (QTL) database, 20 differentially expressed genes were matched to the QTLs associated with fatness in pigs. Our technique of integrating transcriptome, whole-genome resequencing, and QTL database information provided a rich source of important differentially expressed genes and variations. Associate analysis between selected SNPs and backfat thickness revealed that two SNPs and one haplotype of ME1 significantly affected fat deposition in pigs. Moreover, genetic analysis confirmed that variations in the differentially expressed genes may affect fat deposition. PMID:26996612

  13. Surveillance and Control of Antibiotic Resistance in the Mediterranean Region.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Walter; Giubbini, Gabriele; Laurenti, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is one of the most relevant problems in the healthcare: the growth of resistant microorganisms in healthcare settings is a worrisome threat, raising length to stay (LOS), morbidity and mortality in those patients. The importance of the antibiotic resistance and its spread around the world, gave rise to the activation of several surveillance systems, based especially on the collection of laboratory data to local or national level. The objective of this work is to carry out a review of the scientific literature existing on the topic and scientific activities related to surveillance of antibiotic resistance in the countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. Recent Data from European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (November 2015) show, for different combinations bacterium-drug, an increase of resistance from North to South and from West to East of Europe. It is of particular concern the phenomenon of resistance carried out by some gram-negative, specifically Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli to third-generation cephalosporin, often combined in opposition to fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides. Is particularly high the incidence of resistance to carbapenems by strains of Enterobacteriaceae (Klebsiella included). The resistance exerted by MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) continues to be relevant, albeit showing some decline in recent years. The incidence of resistance carried on by Streptococcus pneumoniae is stable and is mainly relevant to macrolides. Finally, a significant increase in recording relatively exercised by Enterococcus faecium to Vancomycin. Detecting, preventing, and controlling antibiotic resistance requires strategic, coordinated, and sustained efforts. It also depends on the engagement of governments, academia, industry, healthcare providers, the general public, and the agricultural community, as well as international partners. Committing to combating antibiotic-resistant microbes does support

  14. Surveillance and Control of Antibiotic Resistance in the Mediterranean Region

    PubMed Central

    Ricciardi, Walter; Giubbini, Gabriele; Laurenti, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is one of the most relevant problems in the healthcare: the growth of resistant microorganisms in healthcare settings is a worrisome threat, raising length to stay (LOS), morbidity and mortality in those patients. The importance of the antibiotic resistance and its spread around the world, gave rise to the activation of several surveillance systems, based especially on the collection of laboratory data to local or national level. The objective of this work is to carry out a review of the scientific literature existing on the topic and scientific activities related to surveillance of antibiotic resistance in the countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. Recent Data from European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (November 2015) show, for different combinations bacterium-drug, an increase of resistance from North to South and from West to East of Europe. It is of particular concern the phenomenon of resistance carried out by some gram-negative, specifically Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli to third-generation cephalosporin, often combined in opposition to fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides. Is particularly high the incidence of resistance to carbapenems by strains of Enterobacteriaceae (Klebsiella included). The resistance exerted by MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) continues to be relevant, albeit showing some decline in recent years. The incidence of resistance carried on by Streptococcus pneumoniae is stable and is mainly relevant to macrolides. Finally, a significant increase in recording relatively exercised by Enterococcus faecium to Vancomycin. Detecting, preventing, and controlling antibiotic resistance requires strategic, coordinated, and sustained efforts. It also depends on the engagement of governments, academia, industry, healthcare providers, the general public, and the agricultural community, as well as international partners. Committing to combating antibiotic-resistant microbes does support

  15. Impact of pyrethroid resistance on operational malaria control in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Wondji, Charles S.; Coleman, Michael; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Mzilahowa, Themba; Irving, Helen; Ndula, Miranda; Rehman, Andrea; Morgan, John; Barnes, Kayla G.; Hemingway, Janet

    2012-01-01

    The impact of insecticide resistance on insect-borne disease programs is difficult to quantify. The possibility of eliminating malaria in high-transmission settings is heavily dependent on effective vector control reducing disease transmission rates. Pyrethroids are the dominant insecticides used for malaria control, with few options for their replacement. Their failure will adversely affect our ability to control malaria. Pyrethroid resistance has been selected in Malawi over the last 3 y in the two major malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus, with a higher frequency of resistance in the latter. The resistance in An. funestus is metabolically based and involves the up-regulation of two duplicated P450s. The same genes confer resistance in Mozambican An. funestus, although the levels of up-regulation differ. The selection of resistance over 3 y has not increased malaria transmission, as judged by annual point prevalence surveys in 1- to 4-y-old children. This is true in areas with long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLINs) alone or LLINs plus pyrethroid-based insecticide residual spraying (IRS). However, in districts where IRS was scaled up, it did not produce the expected decrease in malaria prevalence. As resistance increases in frequency from this low initial level, there is the potential for vector population numbers to increase with a concomitant negative impact on control efficacy. This should be monitored carefully as part of the operational activities in country. PMID:23118337

  16. Fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes during wastewater chlorination: implication for antibiotic resistance control.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L). The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L). By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L). However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination.

  17. Fate of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Genes during Wastewater Chlorination: Implication for Antibiotic Resistance Control

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L). The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L). By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L). However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination. PMID:25738838

  18. Insecticide resistance in the horn fly: alternative control strategies.

    PubMed

    Oyarzún, M P; Quiroz, A; Birkett, M A

    2008-09-01

    The horn fly, Haematobia irritans (Linnaeus 1758) (Diptera: Muscidae) is one of the most widespread and economically important pests of cattle. Although insecticides have been used for fly control, success has been limited because of the development of insecticide resistance in all countries where the horn fly is found. This problem, along with public pressure for insecticide-free food and the prohibitive cost of developing new classes of compounds, has driven the investigation of alternative control methods that minimize or avoid the use of insecticides. This review provides details of the economic impact of horn flies, existing insecticides used for horn fly control and resistance mechanisms. Current research on new methods of horn fly control based on resistant cattle selection, semiochemicals, biological control and vaccines is also discussed.

  19. Novel Genetic Loci Control Calcium Absorption and Femur Bone Mass as Well as Their Response to Low Calcium Intake in Male BXD Recombinant Inbred Mice.

    PubMed

    Reyes Fernandez, Perla C; Replogle, Rebecca A; Wang, Libo; Zhang, Min; Fleet, James C

    2016-05-01

    Low dietary calcium (Ca) intake during growth limits peak bone mass but physiological adaptation can prevent this adverse effect. To assess the genetic control on the physiologic response to dietary Ca restriction (RCR), we conducted a study in 51 BXD lines fed either 0.5% (basal) or 0.25% (low) Ca diets from ages 4 to 12 weeks (n = 8/line/diet). Ca absorption (CaAbs), femur bone mineral density (BMD), and bone mineral content (BMC) were examined. ANCOVA with body size as covariate was used to detect significant line and diet main effects, and line-by-diet interactions. Body size-corrected residuals were used for linkage mapping and to estimate heritability (h(2) ). Loci controlling the phenotypes were identified using composite interval mapping on each diet and for the RCR. h(2) of basal phenotypes (0.37-0.43) and their RCR (0.32-0.38) was moderate. For each phenotype, we identified multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL) on each diet and for the RCR. Several loci affected multiple traits: Chr 1 (88.3-90.6 cM, CaAbs, BMC), Chr 4 (45.8-49.2 cM, CaAbs, BMD, BMC), Chr 8 (28.6-31.6 cM, CaAbs, BMD, RCR), and Chr 15 (13.6-24 cM, BMD, BMC; 32.3-36 cM, CaAbs RCR, BMD). This suggests that gene clusters may regulate interdependent bone-related phenotypes. Using in silico expression QTL (eQTL) mapping and bioinformatic tools, we identified novel candidates for the regulation of bone under Ca stress (Ext1, Deptor), and for the first time, we report genes modulating Ca absorption (Inadl, Sc4mol, Sh3rf1, and Dennd3), and both Ca and bone metabolism (Tceanc2, Tll1, and Aadat). Our data reveal gene-by-diet interactions and the existence of novel relationships between bone and Ca metabolism during growth. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  20. Resisting Erosion: Quantifying Controls on Soil Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byersdorfer, J. P.; Burke, B. C.; Heimsath, A.; Dade, B.

    2005-12-01

    Soil production from a bedrock surface is influenced by climate, mineralogy, seismic activity, and glacial history. This study examines the relationships between chemical weathering, soil production rates, and new observations of physical strength and, microscopic weathering textures of saprolite in granitic terrain. Our study areas are soil-mantled hillslopes on two well-studied geographically disparate sites: Points Reyes National Seashore, CA and Nunnock River, Australia. Soil production rates at both sites were determined with in situ produced cosmogenic nuclides and decrease exponentially with increasing soil thickness. We hypothesize that saprolite strength should i) constrain soil production rates, and ii) diminish with degree of alumino-silicate weathering. Until now, these ideas have not been systematically tested. To measure the physical competency of the saprolite we use conventional shear vane and dynamic cone penetrometers tests. We find that soil production rates and resistance to penetration each exhibit maximal values at the hillcrest and diminish with increasing soil cover and distance downslope as the soil thickness increases. Conversely, saprolite shear strength increases under thicker soil profiles that accompany lower soil production rates and decreasing values of Kr ratio (SiO2/Al2O3 + Fe2O3). We speculate that the contrasting decrease in penetration resistance and increasing shear strength of saprolite is due to accumulation of clays with increasing residence time at the base of the soil column. The mechanistic significance of saprolite strength as a constraint on soil production depends on whether the soil producing processes are dominated by penetration (e.g. tree roots) or shearing forces (e.g. burrowing mammals).

  1. Genetic evidence that two independent S-loci control RNase-based self-incompatibility in diploid strawberry.

    PubMed

    Bosković, Radovan I; Sargent, Daniel J; Tobutt, Kenneth R

    2010-03-01

    The self-incompatibility mechanism that reduces inbreeding in many plants of the Rosaceae is attributed to a multi-allelic S locus which, in the Prunoideae and Maloideae subfamilies, comprises two complementary genes, a stylar-expressed S-RNase and a pollen-expressed SFB. To elucidate incompatibility in the subfamily Rosoideae, stylar-specific RNases and self-(in)compatibility status were analysed in various diploid strawberries, especially Fragaria nubicola and F. viridis, both self-incompatible, and F. vesca, self-compatible, and in various progenies derived from them. Unexpectedly, two unlinked RNase loci, S and T, were found, encoding peptides distinct from Prunoideae and Maloideae S-RNases; the presence of a single active allele at either is sufficient to confer self-incompatibility. By contrast, in diploid Maloideae and Prunoideae a single locus encodes S-RNases that share several conserved regions and two active alleles are required for self-incompatibility. Our evidence implicates the S locus in unilateral inter-specific incompatibility and shows that S and T RNases can, remarkably, confer not only allele-specific rejection of cognate pollen but also unspecific rejection of Sn Tn pollen, where n indicates a null allele, consistent with the the presence of the pollen component, SFB, activating the cognitive function of these RNases. Comparison of relevant linkage groups between Fragaria and Prunus suggests that Prunus S-RNases, unique in having two introns, may have resulted from gene conversion in an ancestor of Prunus. In addition, it is shown that there is a non-S locus that is essential for self-incompatibility in diploid Fragaria.

  2. Automatic control and detector for three-terminal resistance measurement

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1976-10-26

    A device is provided for automatic control and detection in a three-terminal resistance measuring instrument. The invention is useful for the rapid measurement of the resistivity of various bulk material with a three-terminal electrode system. The device maintains the current through the sample at a fixed level while measuring the voltage across the sample to detect the sample resistance. The three-electrode system contacts the bulk material and the current through the sample is held constant by means of a control circuit connected to a first of the three electrodes and works in conjunction with a feedback controlled amplifier to null the voltage between the first electrode and a second electrode connected to the controlled amplifier output. An A.C. oscillator provides a source of sinusoidal reference voltage of the frequency at which the measurement is to be executed. Synchronous reference pulses for synchronous detectors in the control circuit and an output detector circuit are provided by a synchronous pulse generator. The output of the controlled amplifier circuit is sampled by an output detector circuit to develop at an output terminal thereof a D.C. voltage which is proportional to the sample resistance R. The sample resistance is that segment of the sample between the area of the first electrode and the third electrode, which is connected to ground potential.

  3. Absence of genetic divergence between western corn rootworms (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) resistant and susceptible to control by crop rotation.

    PubMed

    Miller, N J; Kim, K S; Ratcliffe, S T; Estoup, A; Bourguet, D; Guillemaud, T

    2006-06-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is a major pest of corn, Zea mays L., in North America that has recently invaded Europe. A loss of ovipositional fidelity to cornfields has allowed the species to circumvent crop rotation as a means of control in part of its range in the United States. Analyses of variation at eight microsatellite loci provided no evidence for general genetic differentiation between samples of western corn rootworm collected in soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., fields and those collected in cornfields both inside and outside the rotation-resistance problem area. This result suggests that few or no barriers to gene flow exist between rotation-resistant and -susceptible rootworm populations. The implications of this result for the management of western corn rootworm in North America and Europe are discussed.

  4. Salmonella and Campylobacter: Antimicrobial resistance and bacteriophage control in poultry.

    PubMed

    Grant, Ar'Quette; Hashem, Fawzy; Parveen, Salina

    2016-02-01

    Salmonella and Campylobacter are major causes of foodborne related illness and are traditionally associated with consuming undercooked poultry and/or consuming products that have been cross contaminated with raw poultry. Many of the isolated Salmonella and Campylobacter that can cause disease have displayed antimicrobial resistance phenotypes. Although poultry producers have reduced on-the-farm overuse of antimicrobials, antimicrobial resistant Salmonella and Campylobacter strains still persist. One method of bio-control, that is producing promising results, is the use of lytic bacteriophages. This review will highlight the current emergence and persistence of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella and Campylobacter recovered from poultry as well as bacteriophage research interventions and limitations.

  5. Mixture for Controlling Insecticide-Resistant Malaria Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Carlo; Corbel, Vincent; Licciardi, Séverine; Dabiré, Roch K.; Lapied, Bruno; Chandre, Fabrice; Hougard, Jean-Marc

    2008-01-01

    The spread of resistance to pyrethroids in the major Afrotropical malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae s.s. necessitates the development of new strategies to control resistant mosquito populations. To test the efficacy of nets treated with repellent and insecticide against susceptible and insecticide-resistant An. gambiae mosquito populations, we impregnated mosquito bed nets with an insect repellent mixed with a low dose of organophosphorous insecticide and tested them in a rice-growing area near Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso. During the first 2 weeks posttreatment, the mixture was as effective as deltamethrin alone and was more effective at killing An. gambiae that carried knockdown resistance (kdr) or insensitive acetylcholinesterase resistance (Ace1R) genes. The mixture seemed to not kill more susceptible genotypes for the kdr or Ace1R alleles. Mixing repellents and organophosphates on bed nets could be used to control insecticide-resistant malaria vectors if residual activity of the mixture is extended and safety is verified. PMID:18976553

  6. Iso-lines and Inbred-lines Confirmed Loci that Underlie Resistance from Cultivar 'Hartwig' to Three Soybean Cyst Nematode Populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars vary in their resistance to different populations of the soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines. Populations are classified into groups called HG Types. The rhg1 locus on linkage group G underlying resistance to HG Type 0 was necessary for resista...

  7. Precise mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci for Resistance to Southern Leaf Blight, caused by Cochliobolus heterostrophus race O, using an Advanced Intercross Maize Population.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The IBM population, an advanced intercross recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross between the maize lines Mo17 (resistant) and B73 (susceptible), was evaluated in four environments for resistance to southern leaf blight (SLB) disease caused by Cochliobolus heterostrophus race O. ...

  8. Averting a malaria disaster: will insecticide resistance derail malaria control?

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Janet; Ranson, Hilary; Magill, Alan; Kolaczinski, Jan; Fornadel, Christen; Gimnig, John; Coetzee, Maureen; Simard, Frederic; Roch, Dabiré K; Hinzoumbe, Clément Kerah; Pickett, John; Schellenberg, David; Gething, Peter; Hoppé, Mark; Hamon, Nicholas

    2016-04-23

    World Malaria Day 2015 highlighted the progress made in the development of new methods of prevention (vaccines and insecticides) and treatment (single dose drugs) of the disease. However, increasing drug and insecticide resistance threatens the successes made with existing methods. Insecticide resistance has decreased the efficacy of the most commonly used insecticide class of pyrethroids. This decreased efficacy has increased mosquito survival, which is a prelude to rising incidence of malaria and fatalities. Despite intensive research efforts, new insecticides will not reach the market for at least 5 years. Elimination of malaria is not possible without effective mosquito control. Therefore, to combat the threat of resistance, key stakeholders need to rapidly embrace a multifaceted approach including a reduction in the cost of bringing new resistance management methods to market and the streamlining of associated development, policy, and implementation pathways to counter this looming public health catastrophe. PMID:26880124

  9. Averting a malaria disaster: will insecticide resistance derail malaria control?

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Janet; Ranson, Hilary; Magill, Alan; Kolaczinski, Jan; Fornadel, Christen; Gimnig, John; Coetzee, Maureen; Simard, Frederic; Roch, Dabiré K; Hinzoumbe, Clément Kerah; Pickett, John; Schellenberg, David; Gething, Peter; Hoppé, Mark; Hamon, Nicholas

    2016-04-23

    World Malaria Day 2015 highlighted the progress made in the development of new methods of prevention (vaccines and insecticides) and treatment (single dose drugs) of the disease. However, increasing drug and insecticide resistance threatens the successes made with existing methods. Insecticide resistance has decreased the efficacy of the most commonly used insecticide class of pyrethroids. This decreased efficacy has increased mosquito survival, which is a prelude to rising incidence of malaria and fatalities. Despite intensive research efforts, new insecticides will not reach the market for at least 5 years. Elimination of malaria is not possible without effective mosquito control. Therefore, to combat the threat of resistance, key stakeholders need to rapidly embrace a multifaceted approach including a reduction in the cost of bringing new resistance management methods to market and the streamlining of associated development, policy, and implementation pathways to counter this looming public health catastrophe.

  10. Relationship of Antimicrobial Control Policies and Hospital and Infection Control Characteristics to Antimicrobial Resistance Rates

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Elaine L.; Quiros, Dave; Giblin, Tara; Lin, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Background Antibiotic misuse and noncompliance with infection control precautions have contributed to increasing levels of antimicrobial resistance in hospitals. Objectives To assess the extent to which resistance is monitored in infection control programs and to correlate resistance rates with characteristics of antimicrobial control policies, provider attitudes and practices, and systems-level indicators of implementation of the hand hygiene guideline of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Methods An on-site survey of intensive care unit staff and infection control directors of 33 hospitals in the United States was conducted. The following data were collected: antimicrobial control policies; rates during the previous 12 months of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and ceftazidime-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae; an implementation score of systems-level efforts to implement the guideline; staff attitudes toward practice guidelines; and observations of staff hand hygiene. Variables associated with resistance rates were examined for independent effects by using logistic regression. Results Resistance rates for S aureus, enterococci, and K pneumoniae were 52.5%, 18.2%, and 16.0%, respectively. Ten (30.3%) hospitals had an antibiotic control policy. No statistically significant correlation was observed between staff attitudes toward practice guidelines, observed hand hygiene behavior, or having an antibiotic use policy and resistance rates. In logistic regression analysis, higher scores on measures of systems-level efforts to implement the guideline were associated with lower rates of resistant S aureus and enterococci (P=.046). Conclusions Organizational-level factors independent of the practices of individual clinicians may be associated with rates of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:17322010

  11. Unlinked genetic loci control the reduced transcription of aminopeptidase N 1 and 3 in the European corn borer and determine tolerance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crystalline (Cry) toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) control insect feeding damage on crop plants via foliar applications or by expression within transgenic plants, but continued Bt use is threatened by the buildup of insect resistance traits. Aminopeptidase N (apn) gene family members encode m...

  12. Quality evaluation of resistivity-controlled silicon crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jong Hoe

    2006-01-01

    The segregation phenomenon of dopants causes a low production yield of silicon crystal that meets the resistivity tolerance required by device manufacturers. In order to control the macroscopic axial resistivity distribution in bulk crystal growth, numerous studies including continuous Czochralski method and double crucible technique have been studied. The simple B-P codoping method for improving the productivity of p-type silicon single-crystal growth by controlling axial specific resistivity distribution was proposed by Wang [Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 43 (2004) 4079]. In this work, the quality of Czochralski-grown silicon single crystals with a diameter 200 mm using B-P codoping method was studied from the chemical and structural points of view. It was found that the characteristics of B-P codoped wafers including the oxygen precipitation behavior and the grown-in defects are same as that of conventional B-doped Czochralski crystals.

  13. Genetic Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Growth and Wood Quality Traits in Eucalyptus Grandis Using a Maternal Half-Sib Family and Rapd Markers

    PubMed Central

    Grattapaglia, D.; Bertolucci, FLG.; Penchel, R.; Sederoff, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of forest productivity traits was performed using an open pollinated half-sib family of Eucalyptus grandis. For volume growth, a sequential QTL mapping approach was applied using bulk segregant analysis (BSA), selective genotyping (SG) and cosegregation analysis (CSA). Despite the low heritability of this trait and the heterogeneous genetic background employed for mapping. BSA detected one putative QTL and SG two out of the three later found by CSA. The three putative QTL for volume growth were found to control 13.7% of the phenotypic variation, corresponding to an estimated 43.7% of the genetic variation. For wood specific gravity five QTL were identified controlling 24.7% of the phenotypic variation corresponding to 49% of the genetic variation. Overlapping QTL for CBH, WSG and percentage dry weight of bark were observed. A significant case of digenic epistasis was found, involving unlinked QTL for volume. Our results demonstrate the applicability of the within half-sib design for QTL mapping in forest trees and indicate the existence of major genes involved in the expression of economically important traits related to forest productivity in Eucalyptus grandis. These findings have important implications for marker-assisted tree breeding. PMID:8913761

  14. Detection of quantitative trait loci for mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) resistance in mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) in India and Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Kitsanachandee, Ratanakorn; Somta, Prakit; Chatchawankanphanich, Orawan; Akhtar, Khalid P.; Shah, Tariq Mahmud; Nair, Ramakrishnan M.; Bains, Tejinderjit S.; Sirari, Asmita; Kaur, Livinder; Srinives, Peerasak

    2013-01-01

    Yellow mosaic disease (YMD) is one of the major diseases affecting mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek). In this study, we report the mapping of the quantitative trait locus (QTL) for mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) resistance in mungbean. An F8 recombinant inbred line (RIL) mapping population was generated in Thailand from a cross between NM10-12-1 (MYMIV resistance) and KPS2 (MYMIV susceptible). One hundred and twenty-two RILs and their parents were evaluated for MYMIV resistance in infested fields in India and Pakistan. A genetic linkage map was developed for the RIL population using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Composite interval mapping identified five QTLs for MYMIV resistance: three QTLs for India (qYMIV1, qYMIV2 and qYMIV3) and two QTLs for Pakistan (qYMIV4 and qYMIV5). qYMIV1, qYMIV2, qYMIV3, qYMIV4 and qYMIV5 explained 9.33%, 10.61%, 12.55%, 21.93% and 6.24% of variation in disease responses, respectively. qYMIV1 and qYMIV4 appeared to be the same locus and were common to a major QTL for MYMIV resistance in India identified previously using a different resistant mungbean. PMID:24399908

  15. Control of volume resistivity in inorganic organic separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Manzo, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Control of resistivity in NASA inorganic-organic separators is achieved by incorporating small percentages of high surface area, fine particle silica with other ingredients in the separator coating. The volume resistivity is predictable from the surface area of filler particles in the coating. The approach is applied to two polymer- plasticizer -filler coating systems, where the filler content of each is below the generally acknowledged critical pigment volume concentration of the coating. Application of these coating systems to 0.0254 cm thick (10-mil) fuel cell grade asbestos sheet produces inexpensive, flexible, microporous separators that perform as well as the original inorganic-organic concept, the Astropower separator.

  16. Control of resistance plug welding using quantitative feedback theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, A.E.; Horowitz, I. ||; Chait, Y.; Rodrigues, J.

    1996-12-01

    Resistance welding is used extensively throughout the manufacturing industry. Variations in weld quality often result in costly post-weld inspections. Applications of feed-back control to such processes have been limited by the lack of accurate models describing the nonlinear dynamics of this process. A new system based on electrode displacement feedback is developed that greatly improves quality control of the resistance plug welding process. The system is capable of producing repeatable welds of consistent displacement (and thus consistent quality), with wide variations in weld parameters. This paper describes the feedback design of a robust controller using Quantitative Feedback Theory for this highly complex process, and the experimental results of the applied system.

  17. Deciphering the conserved genetic loci implicated in plant disease control through comparative genomics of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad J; Ran, Chao; Liu, Ke; Ryu, Choong-Min; Rasmussen-Ivey, Cody R; Williams, Malachi A; Hassan, Mohammad K; Choi, Soo-Keun; Jeong, Haeyoung; Newman, Molli; Kloepper, Joseph W; Liles, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    To understand the growth-promoting and disease-inhibiting activities of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strains, the genomes of 12 Bacillus subtilis group strains with PGPR activity were sequenced and analyzed. These B. subtilis strains exhibited high genomic diversity, whereas the genomes of B. amyloliquefaciens strains (a member of the B. subtilis group) are highly conserved. A pairwise BLASTp matrix revealed that gene family similarity among Bacillus genomes ranges from 32 to 90%, with 2839 genes within the core genome of B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum. Comparative genomic analyses of B. amyloliquefaciens strains identified genes that are linked with biological control and colonization of roots and/or leaves, including 73 genes uniquely associated with subsp. plantarum strains that have predicted functions related to signaling, transportation, secondary metabolite production, and carbon source utilization. Although B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strains contain gene clusters that encode many different secondary metabolites, only polyketide biosynthetic clusters that encode difficidin and macrolactin are conserved within this subspecies. To evaluate their role in plant pathogen biocontrol, genes involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis were deleted in a B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strain, revealing that difficidin expression is critical in reducing the severity of disease, caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria in tomato plants. This study defines genomic features of PGPR strains and links them with biocontrol activity and with host colonization. PMID:26347755

  18. Deciphering the conserved genetic loci implicated in plant disease control through comparative genomics of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad J.; Ran, Chao; Liu, Ke; Ryu, Choong-Min; Rasmussen-Ivey, Cody R.; Williams, Malachi A.; Hassan, Mohammad K.; Choi, Soo-Keun; Jeong, Haeyoung; Newman, Molli; Kloepper, Joseph W.; Liles, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    To understand the growth-promoting and disease-inhibiting activities of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strains, the genomes of 12 Bacillus subtilis group strains with PGPR activity were sequenced and analyzed. These B. subtilis strains exhibited high genomic diversity, whereas the genomes of B. amyloliquefaciens strains (a member of the B. subtilis group) are highly conserved. A pairwise BLASTp matrix revealed that gene family similarity among Bacillus genomes ranges from 32 to 90%, with 2839 genes within the core genome of B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum. Comparative genomic analyses of B. amyloliquefaciens strains identified genes that are linked with biological control and colonization of roots and/or leaves, including 73 genes uniquely associated with subsp. plantarum strains that have predicted functions related to signaling, transportation, secondary metabolite production, and carbon source utilization. Although B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strains contain gene clusters that encode many different secondary metabolites, only polyketide biosynthetic clusters that encode difficidin and macrolactin are conserved within this subspecies. To evaluate their role in plant pathogen biocontrol, genes involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis were deleted in a B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strain, revealing that difficidin expression is critical in reducing the severity of disease, caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria in tomato plants. This study defines genomic features of PGPR strains and links them with biocontrol activity and with host colonization. PMID:26347755

  19. Use of an Advanced Intercross Line Population for Precise Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci for Gray Leaf Spot Resistance in Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grey leaf spot (GLS) (caused by Cercospora zeae-maydis) of maize (Zea mays L.)is an important fungal disease of maize in the U.S. and worldwide. The IBM population, an advanced intercross recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross between the maize lines Mo17 (resistant) and B73 (sus...

  20. Association mapping of North American spring wheat breeding germplasm reveals loci conferring resistance to Ug99 and other African stem rust races

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recently identified Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) race TTKSK (Ug99) poses a severe threat to global wheat production because of its broad virulence on several widely deployed resistance genes. Additional concerning virulences have been detected in the Ug99 group of races, and spread of ...

  1. Construction of two BAC libraries from the wild Mexican diploid potato, Solanum pinnatisectum, and the identification of clones near the late blight and Colorado potato beetle resistance loci.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q; Sun, S; Ye, Q; McCuine, S; Huff, E; Zhang, H-B

    2004-04-01

    To facilitate isolation and characterization of disease and insect resistance genes important to potato, two bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries were constructed from genomic DNA of the Mexican wild diploid species, Solanum pinnatisectum, which carries high levels of resistance to the most important potato pathogen and pest, the late blight and the Colorado potato beetle (CPB). One of the libraries was constructed from the DNA, partially digested with BamHI, and it consists of 40328 clones with an average insert size of 125 kb. The other library was constructed from the DNA partially digested with EcoRI, and it consists of 17280 clones with an average insert size of 135 kb. The two libraries, together, represent approximately six equivalents of the wild potato haploid genome. Both libraries were evaluated for contamination with organellar DNA sequences and were shown to have a very low percentage (0.65-0.91%) of clones derived from the chloroplast genome. High-density filters, prepared from the two libraries, were screened with ten restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers linked to the resistance genes for late blight, CPB, Verticillium wilt and potato cyst nematodes, and the gene Sr1 for the self-incompatibility S-locus. Thirty nine positive clones were identified and at least two positive BAC clones were detected for each RFLP marker. Four markers that are linked to the late blight resistance gene Rpi1 hybridized to 14 BAC clones. Fifteen BAC clones were shown to harbor the PPO (polyphenol oxidase) locus for the CPB resistance by three RFLP probes. Two RFLP markers detected five BAC clones that were linked to the Sr1 gene for self-incompatibility. These results agree with the library's predicted extent of coverage of the potato genome, and indicated that the libraries are useful resources for the molecular isolation of disease and insect resistance genes, as well as other economically important genes in the wild potato species. The

  2. Controlled-expansion superalloy resists oxidation at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wanner, E.A.; DeAntonio, D.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Controlled-thermal-expansion superalloys are vital materials for aircraft gas turbine engines, where their dimensional stability over a wide temperature range permits small clearances between rotating and stationary components. However, they must be coated for service at temperatures above 540 C (1,000 F) because they lack oxidation resistance. In Carpenter's new Thermo-Span superalloy, chromium is added to the composition, providing oxidation resistance without the need for a protective coating. Although its composition is otherwise similar to conventional controlled-expansion superalloys, the Co/Ni ratio in the matrix was rebalanced, and other small changes were made. As a result, the physical and mechanical properties of Thermo-Span alloy differ slightly from those of conventional alloys such as Carpenter's CTX-909 alloy.

  3. Impurity control and corrosion resistance of magnesium-aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M.; Song, GuangLing

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is very sensitive to the contents of impurity elements such as iron. In this study, a series of diecast AXJ530 magnesium alloy samples were prepared with additions of Mn and Fe. Through a comprehensive phase diagram calculation and corrosion evaluation, the mechanisms for the tolerance limit of Fe in magnesium alloy are discussed. This adds a new dimension to control the alloying impurity in terms of alloying composition design and casting conditions.

  4. Insecticide Resistance and the Future of Malaria Control in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Chanda, Emmanuel; Hemingway, Janet; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Rehman, Andrea M.; Ramdeen, Varsha; Phiri, Faustina N.; Coetzer, Sarel; Mthembu, David; Shinondo, Cecilia J.; Chizema-Kawesha, Elizabeth; Kamuliwo, Mulakwa; Mukonka, Victor; Baboo, Kumar S.; Coleman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background In line with the Global trend to improve malaria control efforts a major campaign of insecticide treated net distribution was initiated in 1999 and indoor residual spraying with DDT or pyrethroids was reintroduced in 2000 in Zambia. In 2006, these efforts were strengthened by the President's Malaria Initiative. This manuscript reports on the monitoring and evaluation of these activities and the potential impact of emerging insecticide resistance on disease transmission. Methods Mosquitoes were captured daily through a series of 108 window exit traps located at 18 sentinel sites. Specimens were identified to species and analyzed for sporozoites. Adult Anopheles mosquitoes were collected resting indoors and larva collected in breeding sites were reared to F1 and F0 generations in the lab and tested for insecticide resistance following the standard WHO susceptibility assay protocol. Annual cross sectional household parasite surveys were carried out to monitor the impact of the control programme on prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum in children aged 1 to 14 years. Results A total of 619 Anopheles gambiae s.l. and 228 Anopheles funestus s.l. were captured from window exit traps throughout the period, of which 203 were An. gambiae malaria vectors and 14 An. funestus s.s.. In 2010 resistance to DDT and the pyrethroids deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin was detected in both An. gambiae s.s. and An. funestus s.s.. No sporozoites were detected in either species. Prevalence of P. falciparum in the sentinel sites remained below 10% throughout the study period. Conclusion Both An. gambiae s.s. and An. funestus s.s. were controlled effectively with the ITN and IRS programme in Zambia, maintaining a reduced disease transmission and burden. However, the discovery of DDT and pyrethroid resistance in the country threatens the sustainability of the vector control programme. PMID:21915314

  5. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Root and Shoot Traits Associated with Drought Tolerance in a Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) Recombinant Inbred Line Population

    PubMed Central

    Idrissi, Omar; Udupa, Sripada M.; De Keyser, Ellen; McGee, Rebecca J.; Coyne, Clarice J.; Saha, Gopesh C.; Muehlbauer, Fred J.; Van Damme, Patrick; De Riek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Drought is one of the major abiotic stresses limiting lentil productivity in rainfed production systems. Specific rooting patterns can be associated with drought avoidance mechanisms that can be used in lentil breeding programs. In all, 252 co-dominant and dominant markers were used for Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) analysis on 132 lentil recombinant inbred lines based on greenhouse experiments for root and shoot traits during two seasons under progressive drought-stressed conditions. Eighteen QTLs controlling a total of 14 root and shoot traits were identified. A QTL-hotspot genomic region related to a number of root and shoot characteristics associated with drought tolerance such as dry root biomass, root surface area, lateral root number, dry shoot biomass and shoot length was identified. Interestingly, a QTL (QRSratioIX-2.30) related to root-shoot ratio, an important trait for drought avoidance, explaining the highest phenotypic variance of 27.6 and 28.9% for the two consecutive seasons, respectively, was detected. This QTL was closed to the co-dominant SNP marker TP6337 and also flanked by the two SNP TP518 and TP1280. An important QTL (QLRNIII-98.64) related to lateral root number was found close to TP3371 and flanked by TP5093 and TP6072 SNP markers. Also, a QTL (QSRLIV-61.63) associated with specific root length was identified close to TP1873 and flanked by F7XEM6b SRAP marker and TP1035 SNP marker. These two QTLs were detected in both seasons. Our results could be used for marker-assisted selection in lentil breeding programs targeting root and shoot characteristics conferring drought avoidance as an efficient alternative to slow and labor-intensive conventional breeding methods. PMID:27602034

  6. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Root and Shoot Traits Associated with Drought Tolerance in a Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) Recombinant Inbred Line Population

    PubMed Central

    Idrissi, Omar; Udupa, Sripada M.; De Keyser, Ellen; McGee, Rebecca J.; Coyne, Clarice J.; Saha, Gopesh C.; Muehlbauer, Fred J.; Van Damme, Patrick; De Riek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Drought is one of the major abiotic stresses limiting lentil productivity in rainfed production systems. Specific rooting patterns can be associated with drought avoidance mechanisms that can be used in lentil breeding programs. In all, 252 co-dominant and dominant markers were used for Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) analysis on 132 lentil recombinant inbred lines based on greenhouse experiments for root and shoot traits during two seasons under progressive drought-stressed conditions. Eighteen QTLs controlling a total of 14 root and shoot traits were identified. A QTL-hotspot genomic region related to a number of root and shoot characteristics associated with drought tolerance such as dry root biomass, root surface area, lateral root number, dry shoot biomass and shoot length was identified. Interestingly, a QTL (QRSratioIX-2.30) related to root-shoot ratio, an important trait for drought avoidance, explaining the highest phenotypic variance of 27.6 and 28.9% for the two consecutive seasons, respectively, was detected. This QTL was closed to the co-dominant SNP marker TP6337 and also flanked by the two SNP TP518 and TP1280. An important QTL (QLRNIII-98.64) related to lateral root number was found close to TP3371 and flanked by TP5093 and TP6072 SNP markers. Also, a QTL (QSRLIV-61.63) associated with specific root length was identified close to TP1873 and flanked by F7XEM6b SRAP marker and TP1035 SNP marker. These two QTLs were detected in both seasons. Our results could be used for marker-assisted selection in lentil breeding programs targeting root and shoot characteristics conferring drought avoidance as an efficient alternative to slow and labor-intensive conventional breeding methods.

  7. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Root and Shoot Traits Associated with Drought Tolerance in a Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) Recombinant Inbred Line Population.

    PubMed

    Idrissi, Omar; Udupa, Sripada M; De Keyser, Ellen; McGee, Rebecca J; Coyne, Clarice J; Saha, Gopesh C; Muehlbauer, Fred J; Van Damme, Patrick; De Riek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Drought is one of the major abiotic stresses limiting lentil productivity in rainfed production systems. Specific rooting patterns can be associated with drought avoidance mechanisms that can be used in lentil breeding programs. In all, 252 co-dominant and dominant markers were used for Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) analysis on 132 lentil recombinant inbred lines based on greenhouse experiments for root and shoot traits during two seasons under progressive drought-stressed conditions. Eighteen QTLs controlling a total of 14 root and shoot traits were identified. A QTL-hotspot genomic region related to a number of root and shoot characteristics associated with drought tolerance such as dry root biomass, root surface area, lateral root number, dry shoot biomass and shoot length was identified. Interestingly, a QTL (QRSratioIX-2.30) related to root-shoot ratio, an important trait for drought avoidance, explaining the highest phenotypic variance of 27.6 and 28.9% for the two consecutive seasons, respectively, was detected. This QTL was closed to the co-dominant SNP marker TP6337 and also flanked by the two SNP TP518 and TP1280. An important QTL (QLRNIII-98.64) related to lateral root number was found close to TP3371 and flanked by TP5093 and TP6072 SNP markers. Also, a QTL (QSRLIV-61.63) associated with specific root length was identified close to TP1873 and flanked by F7XEM6b SRAP marker and TP1035 SNP marker. These two QTLs were detected in both seasons. Our results could be used for marker-assisted selection in lentil breeding programs targeting root and shoot characteristics conferring drought avoidance as an efficient alternative to slow and labor-intensive conventional breeding methods. PMID:27602034

  8. Strategies for controlling methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Boyce, J M

    1995-07-01

    In areas where the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is very low, aggressive strategies, which appear to have been effective, such as those used in the Netherlands and western Australia, may be feasible. In hospitals where MRSA is epidemic or highly endemic, less rigorous strategies are appropriate. However, which isolation techniques and barrier precautions are optimal is controversial. In addition, there is no consensus regarding the epidemiological importance of environmental contamination. Rapid detection of MRSA, prompt implementation of barrier precautions and prospective surveillance are essential components of a successful control programme. Eradicating nasal carriage of MRSA among patients and personnel can be useful during epidemics, but the cost-effectiveness of using this approach in hospitals where the prevalence of MRSA is low is unknown. Additional studies of this issue need to include surveillance for mupirocin-resistant strains.

  9. Control of an outbreak of an epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus also resistant to mupirocin.

    PubMed

    Irish, D; Eltringham, I; Teall, A; Pickett, H; Farelly, H; Reith, S; Woodford, N; Cookson, B

    1998-05-01

    An epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphlococcus aureus (EMRSA-3) appeared in a District hospital in June 1989 as part of a regional outbreak. The dynamics of the outbreak were complex and involved patient transfer between hospitals and wards. Control measures followed UK guidelines and included the use of nasal mupirocin. During these efforts a mupirocin-resistant MRSA [MuMRSA: mupirocin minimum inhibitor concentration (MIC) > 256 mg/L] emerged, probably in a patient who had been given eight mupirocin courses over nine months. The MuMRSA had a narrower phage-typing pattern than EMRSA-3, but was indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of SmaI chromosomal restriction enzyme digests and its susceptibility pattern to other antibiotics. The results of in vitro curing and gene probing indicated that mupirocin resistance was encoded on a 48 Md plasmid. MuMRSA spread occurred in 12 patients and 11 staff. The affected patients were nursed on the same ward. The strain was eradicated from patients with oral ciprofloxacin and rifampicin, triclosan skin treatment and nasal fusidic acid and bacitracin cream. The control of the outbreak had significant medical, social and financial implications. Fortunately, there were alternative topical agents to mupirocin, an agent which has played such a key role in MRSA eradication in recent years.

  10. Validity and reliability of a controlled pneumatic resistance exercise device.

    PubMed

    Paulus, David C; Reynolds, Michael C; Schilling, Brian K

    2008-01-01

    During the concentric portion of the free-weight squat exercise, accelerating the mass from rest results in a fluctuation in ground reaction force. It is characterized by an initial period of force greater than the load while accelerating from rest followed by a period of force lower than the external load during negative acceleration. During the deceleration phase, less force is exerted and muscles are loaded sub-optimally. Thus, using a reduced inertia form of resistance such as pneumatics has the capability to minimize these inertial effects as well as control the force in real time to maximize the force exerted over the exercise cycle. To improve the system response of a preliminary design, a squat device was designed with a reduced mass barbell and two smaller pneumatic cylinders. The resistance was controlled by regulating cylinder pressure such that it is capable of adjusting force within a repetition to maximize force exerted during the lift. The resistance force production of the machine was statically validated with the input voltage and output force R2 =0.9997 for at four increments of the range of motion, and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) between trials at the different heights equaled 0.999. The slew rate at three forces was 749.3 N/s +/- 252.3. Dynamic human subject testing showed the desired input force correlated with average and peak ground reaction force with R2 = 0.9981 and R2 = 0.9315, respectively. The ICC between desired force and average and peak ground reaction force was 0.963. Thus, the system is able to deliver constant levels of static and dynamic force with validity and reliability. Future work will be required to develop the control strategy required for real-time control, and performance testing is required to determine its efficacy.

  11. Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling sucrose content based on an enriched genetic linkage map of sugarcane (saccharum spp. hybrids) cultivar ‘LCP 85-384’

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose content is the most important trait in sugarcane breeding. Since sugarcane cultivars possess 100 to 130 chromosomes and are genetically complex polyploids and aneuploids, identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with sucrose content is considered the best option to improve...

  12. Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling sugar content based on an enriched genetic linkage map of sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) cultivar ‘LCP 85-384’

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since sugarcane cultivars possess >100 chromosomes (2n = 100-130) and are genetically complex polyploid and aneuploids, identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with sugar content is considered the best option to improve sugar content through molecular breeding. Also, improving su...

  13. Resistance controllability and variability improvement in a TaO{sub x}-based resistive memory for multilevel storage application

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, A. E-mail: amit.knp02@gmail.com Song, J.; Hwang, H. E-mail: amit.knp02@gmail.com; Deleruyelle, D.; Bocquet, M.

    2015-06-08

    In order to obtain reliable multilevel cell (MLC) characteristics, resistance controllability between the different resistance levels is required especially in resistive random access memory (RRAM), which is prone to resistance variability mainly due to its intrinsic random nature of defect generation and filament formation. In this study, we have thoroughly investigated the multilevel resistance variability in a TaO{sub x}-based nanoscale (<30 nm) RRAM operated in MLC mode. It is found that the resistance variability not only depends on the conductive filament size but also is a strong function of oxygen vacancy concentration in it. Based on the gained insights through experimental observations and simulation, it is suggested that forming thinner but denser conductive filament may greatly improve the temporal resistance variability even at low operation current despite the inherent stochastic nature of resistance switching process.

  14. Ambient-controlled scanning spreading resistance microscopy measurement and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shu; Suo, Zhiyong; Fillmore, David; Lu, Shifeng; Jeff Hu, Y.; McTeer, Allen

    2013-12-01

    An ambient-controlled scanning spreading resistance microscopy (AC-SSRM) apparatus is utilized for one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional doping profiling measurement. 1D SSRM profiling on a blanket (vertical) B-doped Si wafer is conducted to obtain a spreading resistance profile SR(x). Modeling is used to convert SR(x) to carrier profile n(x). Replacing the average mobility (μ) with a calibration using μ(x), the carrier (hole) profile n(x) is more accurate. This is especially pronounced near the surface and junction depth (xj) and is consistent with the continuous anodic oxidation technique/differential Hall effect (CAOT/DHE) measured carrier profiles. The model based on AC-SSRM data obtained xj = 103.4 nm, which was consistent to secondary ion mass spectrometry results of xj = 104.0 nm. Calibrated hole dose using μ(x) is 9.6 × 1014/cm2 and is relatively closer to DHE hole dose 1.4 × 1015/cm2. In addition, a fairly good consistency of sheet resistance (RS) values among 4 point probe (4PP), CAOT/DHE, and AC-SSRM methods has been demonstrated.

  15. Ethanol-resistant polymeric film coatings for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Rosiaux, Y; Muschert, S; Chokshi, R; Leclercq, B; Siepmann, F; Siepmann, J

    2013-07-10

    The sensitivity of controlled release dosage forms to the presence of ethanol in the gastro intestinal tract is critical, if the incorporated drug is potent and exhibits severe side effects. This is for instance the case for most opioid drugs. The co-ingestion of alcoholic beverages can lead to dose dumping and potentially fatal consequences. For these reasons the marketing of hydromorphone HCl extended release capsules (Palladone) was suspended. The aim of this study was to develop a novel type of controlled release film coatings, which are ethanol-resistant: even the presence of high ethanol concentrations in the surrounding bulk fluid (e.g., up to 40%) should not affect the resulting drug release kinetics. Interestingly, blends of ethylcellulose and medium or high viscosity guar gums provide such ethanol resistance. Theophylline release from pellets coated with the aqueous ethylcellulose dispersion Aquacoat® ECD 30 containing 10 or 15% medium and high viscosity guar gum was virtually unaffected by the addition of 40% ethanol to the release medium. Furthermore, drug release was shown to be long term stable from this type of dosage forms under ambient and stress conditions (without packaging material), upon appropriate curing.

  16. Malaria Distribution, Prevalence, Drug Resistance and Control in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Elyazar, Iqbal R.F.; Hay, Simon I.; Baird, J. Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 230 million people live in Indonesia. The country is also home to over 20 anopheline vectors of malaria which transmit all four of the species of Plasmodium that routinely infect humans. A complex mosaic of risk of infection across this 5000-km-long archipelago of thousands of islands and distinctive habitats seriously challenges efforts to control malaria. Social, economic and political dimensions contribute to these complexities. This chapter examines malaria and its control in Indonesia, from the earliest efforts by malariologists of the colonial Netherlands East Indies, through the Global Malaria Eradication Campaign of the 1950s, the tumult following the coup d’état of 1965, the global resurgence of malaria through the 1980s and 1990s and finally through to the decentralization of government authority following the fall of the authoritarian Soeharto regime in 1998. We detail important methods of control and their impact in the context of the political systems that supported them. We examine prospects for malaria control in contemporary decentralized and democratized Indonesia with multidrug-resistant malaria and greatly diminished capacities for integrated malaria control management programs. PMID:21295677

  17. Malaria distribution, prevalence, drug resistance and control in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Elyazar, Iqbal R F; Hay, Simon I; Baird, J Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 230 million people live in Indonesia. The country is also home to over 20 anopheline vectors of malaria which transmit all four of the species of Plasmodium that routinely infect humans. A complex mosaic of risk of infection across this 5000-km-long archipelago of thousands of islands and distinctive habitats seriously challenges efforts to control malaria. Social, economic and political dimensions contribute to these complexities. This chapter examines malaria and its control in Indonesia, from the earliest efforts by malariologists of the colonial Netherlands East Indies, through the Global Malaria Eradication Campaign of the 1950s, the tumult following the coup d'état of 1965, the global resurgence of malaria through the 1980s and 1990s and finally through to the decentralization of government authority following the fall of the authoritarian Soeharto regime in 1998. We detail important methods of control and their impact in the context of the political systems that supported them. We examine prospects for malaria control in contemporary decentralized and democratized Indonesia with multidrug-resistant malaria and greatly diminished capacities for integrated malaria control management programs. PMID:21295677

  18. Complexities of chromosome landing in a highly duplicated genome: toward map-based cloning of a gene controlling blackleg resistance in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Reinhold; Wilde, Kris; Mayerhofer, Marion; Lydiate, Derek; Bansal, Vipan K; Good, Allen G; Parkin, Isobel A P

    2005-12-01

    The LmR1 locus, which controls seedling resistance to the blackleg fungus Leptosphaeria maculans in the Brassica napus cultivar Shiralee, was positioned on linkage group N7. Fine genetic mapping in a population of 2500 backcross lines identified three molecular markers that cosegregated with LmR1. Additional linkage mapping in a second population colocalized a seedling resistance gene, ClmR1, from the cultivar Cresor to the same genetic interval on N7 as LmR1. Both genes were located in a region that showed extensive inter- and intragenomic duplications as well as intrachromosomal tandem duplications. The tandem duplications seem to have occurred in the Brassica lineage before the divergence of B. rapa and B. oleracea but after the separation of Brassica and Arabidopsis from a common ancestor. Microsynteny was found between the region on N7 carrying the resistance gene and the end of Arabidopsis chromosome 1, interrupted by a single inversion close to the resistance locus. The collinear region in Arabidopsis was assayed for the presence of possible candidate genes for blackleg resistance. These data provided novel insights into the genomic structure and evolution of plant resistance loci and an evaluation of the candidate gene approach using comparative mapping with a model organism.

  19. Resistive wall mode active control physics design for KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bak, J. G.; Bialek, J. M.; Berkery, J. W.; Lee, S. G.; Oh, Y. K.

    2014-01-01

    As KSTAR H-mode operation approaches the region where the resistive wall mode (RWM) can be unstable, an important issue for future long pulse, high beta plasma operation is to evaluate RWM active feedback control performance using a planned active/passive RWM stabilization system on the device. In particular, an optimal design of feedback sensors allows mode stabilization up to the highest achievable βN close to the ideal with-wall limit, βNwall, with reduced control power requirements. The computed ideal n = 1 mode structure from the DCON code has been input to the VALEN-3D code to calculate the projected performance of an active RWM control system in the KSTAR three-dimensional conducting structure device geometry. Control performance with the midplane locked mode detection sensors, off-midplane saddle loops, and magnetic pickup coils is examined. The midplane sensors measuring the radial component of the mode perturbation is found to be strongly affected by the wall eddy current. The off-axis saddle loops with proper compensation of the prompt applied field are computed to provide stabilization at βN up to 86% of βNwall but the low RWM amplitude computed in the off-axis regions near the sensors can produce a low signal-to-noise ratio. The required control power and bandwidth are also estimated with varied noise levels in the feedback sensors. Further improvements have been explored by examining a new RWM sensor design motivated by the off-midplane poloidal magnetic field sensors in NSTX. The new sensors mounted off of the copper passive stabilizer plates near the device midplane show a clear advantage in control performance corresponding to achieving 99% of βNwall without the need of compensation of the prompt field. The result shows a significant improvement of RWM feedback stabilization using the new sensor set which motivates a future feedback sensor upgrade.

  20. Major Loci on Chromosomes 8q and 3q Control Interferon γ Production Triggered by Bacillus Calmette-Guerin and 6-kDa Early Secretory Antigen Target, Respectively, in Various Populations

    PubMed Central

    Jabot-Hanin, Fabienne; Cobat, Aurélie; Feinberg, Jacqueline; Grange, Ghislain; Remus, Natascha; Poirier, Christine; Boland-Auge, Anne; Besse, Céline; Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Schurr, Erwin; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Hoal, Eileen G.; Delacourt, Christophe; Abel, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Background. Interferon γ (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) provide an in vitro measurement of antimycobacterial immunity that is widely used as a test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. IGRA outcomes are highly heritable in various populations, but the nature of the involved genetic factors remains unknown. Methods. We conducted a genome-wide linkage analysis of IGRA phenotypes in families from a tuberculosis household contact study in France and a replication study in families from South Africa to confirm the loci identified. Results. We identified a major locus on chromosome 8q controlling IFN-γ production in response to stimulation with live bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG; LOD score, 3.81; P = 1.40 × 10−5). We also detected a second locus, on chromosome 3q, that controlled IFN-γ levels in response to stimulation with 6-kDa early secretory antigen target, when accounting for the IFN-γ production shared with that induced by BCG (LOD score, 3.72; P = 1.8 × 10−5). Both loci were replicated in South African families, where tuberculosis is hyperendemic. These loci differ from those previously identified as controlling the response to the tuberculin skin test (TST1 and TST2) and the production of TNF-α (TNF1). Conclusions. The identification of 2 new linkage signals in populations of various ethnic origins living in different M. tuberculosis exposure settings provides new clues about the genetic control of human antimycobacterial immunity. PMID:26690346

  1. Altered baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance during simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Vernikos, J.

    1994-01-01

    Reflex peripheral vasoconstriction induced by activation of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors in response to reduced central venous pressure (CVP) is a basic mechanism for elevating systemic vascular resistance and defending arterial blood pressure during orthostatically-induced reductions in cardiac filling and output. The sensitivity of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex response [defined as the slope of the relationship between changes in forearm vascular resistance (FVR) and CVP] and the resultant vasoconstriction are closely and inversely associated with the amount of circulating blood volume. Thus, a high-gain FVR response will be elicited by a hypovolemic state. Exposure to microgravity during spaceflight results in reduced plasma volume. It is therefore reasonable to expect that the FVR response to cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading would be accentuated following adaptation to microgravity. Such data could provide better insight about the physiological mechanisms underlying alterations in blood pressure control following spaceflight. We therefore exposed eleven men to 6 degrees head-down bedrest for 7 days and measured specific hemodynamic responses to low levels of the lower body negative pressure to determine if there are alterations in cardiopulmonary baroreceptor stimulus-FVR reflex response relationship during prolonged exposure to an analog of microgravity.

  2. Emergence of resistance and resistance management in field populations of tropical Culex quinquefasciatus to the microbial control agent Bacillus sphaericus.

    PubMed

    Mulla, Mir S; Thavara, Usavadee; Tawatsin, Apiwat; Chomposri, Jakkrawarn; Su, Tianyun

    2003-03-01

    In recent years, highly potent mosquitocidal strains of the microbial agent Bacillus sphaericus (Bsph) have been isolated and developed for the control of mosquito larvae around the world. Laboratory selection experiments with the most active strains and their use in large-scale operational mosquito control programs resulted in the emergence of resistance in larvae of the Culex pipiens complex. This generated great concern among vector control agencies around the world, who feared reduced efficacy of this highly active larvicidal agent. To address this issue, the current studies were started to find practical strategies for controlling resistant mosquitoes and more importantly to develop resistance management strategies that would prevent or delay development of resistance. We initiated field studies in 3 low-income communities in Nonthaburi Province, Thailand. In 1 of the communities, larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus that were highly resistant (>125,000-fold) to Bsph strain 2362 were successfully controlled with applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) alone or in combination with Bsph. To prevent or delay resistance to Bsph, 2 other sites were selected, 1 treated with Bsph 2362 alone and the other treated with a mixture of Bsph 2362 and Bti. Mosquitoes treated with Bsph 2362 alone showed some resistance by the 9th treatment and almost complete failure of control occurred by the 17th treatment. After 9 treatments with the mixture over a 9-month period at another site, no noticeable change in susceptibility to Bsph was detected. During this period, the site treated with Bsph alone required 19 treatments, whereas the site treated with mixtures took only 9 treatments because of slower resurgence of larvae at the site treated with the mixture than at the site treated with Bsph alone. This is the 1st field evidence for delay or prevention of resistance to microbial agents in larval Cx. quinquefasciatus by using mixtures of Bti and Bsph. Further

  3. Macrocyclic lactone resistance in Dirofilaria immitis: Failure of heartworm preventives and investigation of genetic markers for resistance.

    PubMed

    Bourguinat, Catherine; Lee, Alice C Y; Lizundia, Regina; Blagburn, Byron L; Liotta, Janice L; Kraus, Marc S; Keller, Kathy; Epe, Christian; Letourneau, Louis; Kleinman, Claudia L; Paterson, Tara; Gomez, Elena Carreton; Montoya-Alonso, José Alberto; Smith, Hubert; Bhan, Aron; Peregrine, Andrew S; Carmichael, James; Drake, Jason; Schenker, Rudolf; Kaminsky, Ronald; Bowman, Dwight D; Geary, Timothy G; Prichard, Roger K

    2015-06-15

    Macrocyclic lactone (ML) endectocides are used as chemoprophylaxis for heartworm infection (Dirofilaria immitis) in dogs and cats. Claims of loss of efficacy (LOE) of ML heartworm preventives have become common in some locations in the USA. We directly tested whether resistance to MLs exists in LOE isolates of D. immitis and identified genetic markers that are correlated with, and therefore can predict ML resistance. ML controlled studies showed that LOE strains of D. immitis established infections in dogs despite chemoprophylaxis with oral ivermectin or injectable moxidectin. A whole genome approach was used to search for loci associated with the resistance phenotype. Many loci showed highly significant differences between pools of susceptible and LOE D. immitis. Based on 186 potential marker loci, Sequenom(®) SNP frequency analyses were conducted on 663 individual parasites (adult worms and microfilariae) which were phenotypically characterized as susceptible (SUS), confirmed ML treatment survivors/resistant (RES), or suspected resistant/loss of efficacy (LOE) parasites. There was a subset of SNP loci which appears to be promising markers for predicting ML resistance, including SNPs in some genes that have been associated with ML resistance in other parasites. These data provide unequivocal proof of ML resistance in D. immitis and identify genetic markers that could be used to monitor for ML resistance in heartworms.

  4. Initial manufacturing performance of an actively controlled PBS resist development process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novembre, Anthony E.; Tarascon, Regine G.; Thompson, Larry F.; Tang, Wallace T.; Tange, C. O.; Bostic, R. A.; Ahn, D. H.

    1993-03-01

    An improvement in the method used to fabricate 5 X 5 in2 -1 and 5x biased and unbiased optical masks is achieved by actively controlling the resist development step of the mask fabrication process. This method has been initially applied to a photomask process which utilizes poly(1-butene-co-sulfur dioxide)(PBS) resist as the pattern delineation material. Real-time targeting of resist feature dimensions is performed using a Laserlith Resist Thickness and Endpoint Controller which has been adapted to an Applied Process TechnologyR/Convac Model 915 resist processor. The controller monitors in real-time the one-step resist development process for a time period based on the measured development rate of the resist, the geometry and size of the targeted feature. After the resist is developed, the controller instructs the resist processor to continue onto the remaining steps in the processing cycle. The targeted resist features of initial product produced using this system have an average variation from targeted size of 0.04 micrometers and an average resist linewidth uniformity (3(sigma) ) of 0.04 micrometers . These results indicate that active control of this critical development step enables the resist feature dimensions to be within +/- 0.05 micrometers of their targeted size after completion of the post-development bake step.

  5. Resistive wall mode active control physics design for KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y. S. Sabbagh, S. A.; Bialek, J. M.; Berkery, J. W.; Bak, J. G.; Lee, S. G.; Oh, Y. K.

    2014-01-15

    As KSTAR H-mode operation approaches the region where the resistive wall mode (RWM) can be unstable, an important issue for future long pulse, high beta plasma operation is to evaluate RWM active feedback control performance using a planned active/passive RWM stabilization system on the device. In particular, an optimal design of feedback sensors allows mode stabilization up to the highest achievable β{sub N} close to the ideal with-wall limit, β{sub N}{sup wall}, with reduced control power requirements. The computed ideal n = 1 mode structure from the DCON code has been input to the VALEN-3D code to calculate the projected performance of an active RWM control system in the KSTAR three-dimensional conducting structure device geometry. Control performance with the midplane locked mode detection sensors, off-midplane saddle loops, and magnetic pickup coils is examined. The midplane sensors measuring the radial component of the mode perturbation is found to be strongly affected by the wall eddy current. The off-axis saddle loops with proper compensation of the prompt applied field are computed to provide stabilization at β{sub N} up to 86% of β{sub N}{sup wall} but the low RWM amplitude computed in the off-axis regions near the sensors can produce a low signal-to-noise ratio. The required control power and bandwidth are also estimated with varied noise levels in the feedback sensors. Further improvements have been explored by examining a new RWM sensor design motivated by the off-midplane poloidal magnetic field sensors in NSTX. The new sensors mounted off of the copper passive stabilizer plates near the device midplane show a clear advantage in control performance corresponding to achieving 99% of β{sub N}{sup wall} without the need of compensation of the prompt field. The result shows a significant improvement of RWM feedback stabilization using the new sensor set which motivates a future feedback sensor upgrade.

  6. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  7. Remote Symbolic Computation of Loci

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abanades, Miguel A.; Escribano, Jesus; Botana, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a web-based tool designed to compute certified equations and graphs of geometric loci specified using standard Dynamic Geometry Systems (DGS). Complementing the graphing abilities of the considered DGS, the equations of the loci produced by the application are remotely computed using symbolic algebraic techniques from the…

  8. Identification of QTLs that control clubroot resistance in Brassica oleracea and comparative analysis of clubroot resistance genes between B. rapa and B. oleracea.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, T; Doullah, M A U; Matsumoto, S; Kawasaki, S; Ishikawa, T; Hori, H; Okazaki, K

    2010-05-01

    To perform comparative studies of CR (clubroot resistance) loci in Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa and to develop marker-assisted selection in B. oleracea, we constructed a B. oleracea map, including specific markers linked to CR genes of B. rapa. We also analyzed CR-QTLs using the mean phenotypes of F(3) progenies from the cross of a resistant double-haploid line (Anju) with a susceptible double-haploid line (GC). In the nine linkage groups obtained (O1-O9), the major QTL, pb-Bo(Anju)1, was derived from Anju with a maximum LOD score (13.7) in O2. The QTL (LOD 5.1) located in O5, pb-Bo(GC)1, was derived from the susceptible GC. Other QTLs with smaller effects were found in O2, O3, and O7. Based on common markers, it was possible to compare our finding CR-QTLs with the B. oleracea CR loci reported by previous authors; pb-Bo(GC)1 may be identical to the CR-QTL reported previously or a different member contained in the same CR gene cluster. In total, the markers linked to seven B. rapa CR genes were mapped on the B. oleracea map. Based on the mapping position and markers of the CR genes, informative comparative studies of CR loci between B. oleracea and B. rapa were performed. Our map discloses specific primer sequences linked to CR genes and includes public SSR markers that will promote pyramiding CR genes in intra- and inter-specific crosses in Brassica crops. Five genes involved in glucosinolates biosynthesis were also mapped, and GSL-BoELONG and GSL-BoPro were found to be linked to the pb-Bo(Anju)1 and Bo(GC)1 loci, respectively. The linkage drag associated with the CR-QTLs is briefly discussed.

  9. Diminished Baroreflex Control of Forearm Vascular Resistance Following Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, G. W.; Thompson, C. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Nadel, E. R.; Convertino, V. A.

    1991-01-01

    The stimulus-response characteristics of cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR units in mm Hg x min x I00 ml/ml) were studied in 14 volunteers before and after 10 wk of endurance training. We assessed the relationship betaleen reflex stimulus (changes in central venous pressure, CVP) and response (FVR) during unloading of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors with lower body negative pressure (LBNP, 0 to - 2O mm Hg). Changes in CVP during LBNP were estimated from pressure changes in a large peripheral vein in the dependent arm of the subject in the right lateral decubitus position. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO(sub 2max)) and total blood volume increased with endurance training from 37.8 +/- 1.4 ml/min x kg and 63.6 +/- 2.1 ml/kg to 45.3 +/- 1.4 ml/ min x kg and 69.3 +/- 2.8 ml/kg respectively (P less than 0.05). Reflex forearm vasoconstriction occurred in response to a reduction in estimated CVP, and the absolute change in FVR per unit of CVP was reduced from -5.96 +/- 0.79 to -4.06 +/- 0.52 units x mm/ Hg (P less than 0.05) following exercise training but was unchanged from -6.10 to 0.57 to -6.22 +/- 0.94 units x mm/ Hg for the time control group (N = 7). Resting values for FVR were similar before and after exercise training; however, resting estimated CVP was elevated from 9.5 +/- 0.5 mm x Hg before training to 11.3 +/- 0.6 mm x Hg after training. The reduction in sensitivity of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of FVR was linearly related to the increase in blood volume (r = 0.65, P less than 0.05). suggesting that diminished cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of FVR in physically fit individuals is related, in part, to a training-induced blood volume expansion.

  10. Diminished baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance following training.

    PubMed

    Mack, G W; Thompson, C A; Doerr, D F; Nadel, E R; Convertino, V A

    1991-12-01

    The stimulus-response characteristics of cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR units in mm Hg.min.100 ml.ml-1) were studied in 14 volunteers before and after 10 wk of endurance training. We assessed the relationship between reflex stimulus (changes in central venous pressure, CVP) and response (FVR) during unloading of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors with lower body negative pressure (LBNP, 0 to -20 mm Hg). Changes in CVP during LBNP were estimated from pressure changes in a large peripheral vein in the dependent arm of the subject in the right lateral decubitus position. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and total blood volume increased with endurance training from 37.8 +/- 1.4 ml.min-1.kg-1 and 63.6 +/- 2.1 ml.kg-1 to 45.3 +/- 1.4 ml.min-1.kg-1 and 69.3 +/- 2.8 ml.kg-1, respectively (P less than 0.05). Reflex forearm vasoconstriction occurred in response to a reduction in estimated CVP, and the absolute change in FVR per unit of CVP was reduced from -5.96 +/- 0.79 to -4.06 +/- 0.52 units.mm Hg-1 (P less than 0.05) following exercise training but was unchanged from -6.10 to 0.57 to -6.22 +/- 0.94 units.mm Hg-1 for the time control group (N = 7). Resting values for FVR were similar before and after exercise training; however, resting estimated CVP was elevated from 9.5 +/- 0.5 mm Hg before training to 11.3 +/- 0.6 mm Hg after training.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1798379

  11. Insecticide Resistance and Malaria Vector Control: The Importance of Fitness Cost Mechanisms in Determining Economically Optimal Control Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Zachary S.; Dickinson, Katherine L.; Kramer, Randall A.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of insecticide resistance in harmful arthropods has economic implications, not only for the control of agricultural pests (as has been well studied), but also for the control of disease vectors, such as malaria-transmitting Anopheles mosquitoes. Previous economic work on insecticide resistance illustrates the policy relevance of knowing whether insecticide resistance mutations involve fitness costs. Using a theoretical model, this article investigates economically optimal strategies for controlling malaria-transmitting mosquitoes when there is the potential for mosquitoes to evolve resistance to insecticides. Consistent with previous literature, we find that fitness costs are a key element in the computation of economically optimal resistance management strategies. Additionally, our models indicate that different biological mechanisms underlying these fitness costs (e.g., increased adult mortality and/or decreased fecundity) can significantly alter economically optimal resistance management strategies. PMID:23448053

  12. Analyses of genetic variations at microsatellite loci present in-and-around the Pfcrt gene in Indian Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Kshipra; Pande, Veena; Das, Aparup

    2013-12-01

    Evolution and spread of chloroquine resistant (CQR) malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum have posed great threat in malaria intervention across the globe. The occurrence of K76T mutation in the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) gene has been widely attributed to CQR with four neighboring mutations providing compensatory fitness benefit to the parasite survival. Understanding evolutionary patterns of the pfcrt gene is of great relevance not only for devising new malaria control measures but also could serve as a model to understand evolution and spread of other human drug-resistant pathogens. Several studies, mainly based on differential patterns of diversities of the microsatellite loci placed in-and-around the pfcrt gene have indicated the role of positive natural selection under the 'hitchhiking' model of molecular evolution. However, the studies were restricted to limited number of microsatellite loci present inside the pfcrt gene. Moreover, comparatively higher level of diversities in microsatellite loci present inside the pfcrt gene than the loci flanking the pfcrt gene are hallmarks of Indian P. falciparum, presenting contrasting evolutionary models to global isolates. With a view to infer evolutionary patterns of the pfcrt gene in Indian P. falciparum, we have adopted a unique sampling scheme of two types of populations (cultured and field collected) and utilized 20 polymorphic microsatellite loci (16 located inside the pfcrt gene and four in the two flanking regions) to disentangle between genetic drift (inbred cultured isolates) and natural selection (field isolates). Data analyses employing different population genetic tests could not straightforwardly explain either the model invoking 'genetic hitchhiking' or 'genetic drift'. However, complex evolutionary models influenced by both demography and natural selection or an alternative model of natural selection (e.g. diversifying/balancing selection) might better explain the observed

  13. Control of linear modes in cylindrical resistive magnetohydrodynamics with a resistive wall, plasma rotation, and complex gain

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, D. P.; Finn, J. M.

    2014-10-15

    Feedback stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in a tokamak is studied in a cylindrical model with a resistive wall, plasma resistivity, viscosity, and toroidal rotation. The control is based on a linear combination of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field just inside the resistive wall. The feedback includes complex gain, for both the normal and for the tangential components, and it is known that the imaginary part of the feedback for the former is equivalent to plasma rotation [J. M. Finn and L. Chacon, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1866 (2004)]. The work includes (1) analysis with a reduced resistive MHD model for a tokamak with finite β and with stepfunction current density and pressure profiles, and (2) computations with a full compressible visco-resistive MHD model with smooth decreasing profiles of current density and pressure. The equilibria are stable for β = 0 and the marginal stability values β{sub rp,rw} < β{sub rp,iw} < β{sub ip,rw} < β{sub ip,iw} (resistive plasma, resistive wall; resistive plasma, ideal wall; ideal plasma, resistive wall; and ideal plasma, ideal wall) are computed for both models. The main results are: (a) imaginary gain with normal sensors or plasma rotation stabilizes below β{sub rp,iw} because rotation suppresses the diffusion of flux from the plasma out through the wall and, more surprisingly, (b) rotation or imaginary gain with normal sensors destabilizes above β{sub rp,iw} because it prevents the feedback flux from entering the plasma through the resistive wall to form a virtual wall. A method of using complex gain G{sub i} to optimize in the presence of rotation in this regime with β > β{sub rp,iw} is presented. The effect of imaginary gain with tangential sensors is more complicated but essentially destabilizes above and below β{sub rp,iw}.

  14. Microstructure -- the critical variable controlling the SSC resistance of low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, M.; Ayer, R.

    1995-09-01

    The effects of microstructure on the sulfide-stress-cracking resistance (SSC) of AISI 4130 steel are illustrated using NACE test method TM0177. SSC resistance was a function of the amount of martensite that formed on quenching, with the best resistance obtained for material that possessed 100 percent martensite. Samples with lesser amounts of martensite exhibited significantly poorer SSC resistance. These data emphasize the need to control microstructure as a means to achieve significant improvements in the SSC resistance of steels, and show that traditional controls on hardness are unreliable and do not uniquely define nor guarantee good SSC resistance. Specifying threshold stress is the most reliable method to ensure a specific or an adequate amount of SSC resistance.

  15. Genetic mapping of two QTL from the wild tomato Solanum pimpinellifolium L. controlling resistance against two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae Koch).

    PubMed

    Salinas, María; Capel, Carmen; Alba, Juan Manuel; Mora, Blanca; Cuartero, Jesús; Fernández-Muñoz, Rafael; Lozano, Rafael; Capel, Juan

    2013-01-01

    A novel source of resistance to two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae Koch) was found in Solanum pimpinellifolium L. accession TO-937 and thereby a potential source of desirable traits that could be introduced into new tomato varieties. This resistance was found to be controlled by a major locus modulated by minor loci of unknown location in the genome of this wild tomato. We first applied a bulked segregant analysis (BSA) approach in an F(4) population as a method for rapidly identifying a genomic region of 17 cM on chromosome 2, flanked by two simple sequence repeat markers, harboring Rtu2.1, one of the major QTL involved in the spider mite resistance. A population of 169 recombinant inbred lines was also evaluated for spider mite infestation and a highly saturated genetic map was developed from this population. QTL mapping corroborated that chromosome 2 harbored the Rtu2.1 QTL in the same region that our previous BSA findings pointed out, but an even more robust QTL was found in the telomeric region of this chromosome. This QTL, we termed Rtu2.2, had a LOD score of 15.43 and accounted for more than 30% of the variance of two-spotted spider mite resistance. Several candidate genes involved in trichome formation, synthesis of trichomes exudates and plant defense signaling have been sequenced. However, either the lack of polymorphisms between the parental lines or their map position, away from the QTL, led to their rejection as candidate genes responsible for the two-spotted spider mite resistance. The Rtu2 QTL not only serve as a valuable target for marker-assisted selection of new spider mite-resistant tomato varieties, but also as a starting point for a better understanding of the molecular genetic functions underlying the resistance to this pest.

  16. Precise estimation of genomic regions controlling lodging resistance using a set of reciprocal chromosome segment substitution lines in rice

    PubMed Central

    Ookawa, Taiichiro; Aoba, Ryo; Yamamoto, Toshio; Ueda, Tadamasa; Takai, Toshiyuki; Fukuoka, Shuichi; Ando, Tsuyu; Adachi, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Makoto; Ebitani, Takeshi; Kato, Yoichiro; Mulsanti, Indria Wahyu; Kishii, Masahiro; Reynolds, Matthew; Piñera, Francisco; Kotake, Toshihisa; Kawasaki, Shinji; Motobayashi, Takashi; Hirasawa, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Severe lodging has occurred in many improved rice varieties after the recent strong typhoons in East and Southeast Asian countries. The indica variety Takanari possesses strong culm characteristics due to its large section modulus, which indicates culm thickness, whereas the japonica variety Koshihikari is subject to substantial bending stress due to its thick cortical fibre tissue. To detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for lodging resistance and to eliminate the effects of genetic background, we used reciprocal chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) derived from a cross between Koshihikari and Takanari. The oppositional effects of QTLs for section modulus were confirmed in both genetic backgrounds on chromosomes 1, 5 and 6, suggesting that these QTLs are not affected by the genetic background and are controlled independently by a single factor. The candidate region of a QTL for section modulus included SD1. The section modulus of NIL-sd1 was lower than that of Koshihikari, whereas the section modulus of NIL-SD1 was higher than that of Takanari. This result indicated that those regions regulate the culm thickness. The reciprocal effects of the QTLs for cortical fibre tissue thickness were confirmed in both genetic backgrounds on chromosome 9 using CSSLs. PMID:27465821

  17. Precise estimation of genomic regions controlling lodging resistance using a set of reciprocal chromosome segment substitution lines in rice.

    PubMed

    Ookawa, Taiichiro; Aoba, Ryo; Yamamoto, Toshio; Ueda, Tadamasa; Takai, Toshiyuki; Fukuoka, Shuichi; Ando, Tsuyu; Adachi, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Makoto; Ebitani, Takeshi; Kato, Yoichiro; Mulsanti, Indria Wahyu; Kishii, Masahiro; Reynolds, Matthew; Piñera, Francisco; Kotake, Toshihisa; Kawasaki, Shinji; Motobayashi, Takashi; Hirasawa, Tadashi

    2016-07-28

    Severe lodging has occurred in many improved rice varieties after the recent strong typhoons in East and Southeast Asian countries. The indica variety Takanari possesses strong culm characteristics due to its large section modulus, which indicates culm thickness, whereas the japonica variety Koshihikari is subject to substantial bending stress due to its thick cortical fibre tissue. To detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for lodging resistance and to eliminate the effects of genetic background, we used reciprocal chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) derived from a cross between Koshihikari and Takanari. The oppositional effects of QTLs for section modulus were confirmed in both genetic backgrounds on chromosomes 1, 5 and 6, suggesting that these QTLs are not affected by the genetic background and are controlled independently by a single factor. The candidate region of a QTL for section modulus included SD1. The section modulus of NIL-sd1 was lower than that of Koshihikari, whereas the section modulus of NIL-SD1 was higher than that of Takanari. This result indicated that those regions regulate the culm thickness. The reciprocal effects of the QTLs for cortical fibre tissue thickness were confirmed in both genetic backgrounds on chromosome 9 using CSSLs.

  18. Controlled ferrite content improves weldability of corrosion-resistant steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, C. O.

    1967-01-01

    Corrosion-resistant steel that adds restrictions on chemical composition to ensure sufficient ferrite content decreases the tendency of CRES to develop cracks during welding. The equations restricting composition are based on the Schaeffler constitution diagram.

  19. Characterization of metabolite quantitative trait loci and metabolic networks that control glucosinolate concentration in the seeds and leaves of Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ji; Long, Yan; Shi, Lei; Shi, Jiaqin; Barker, Guy; Meng, Jinling

    2012-01-01

    • Glucosinolates are a major class of secondary metabolites found in the Brassicaceae, whose degradation products are proving to be increasingly important for human health and in crop protection. • The genetic and metabolic basis of glucosinolate accumulation was dissected through analysis of total glucosinolate concentration and its individual components in both leaves and seeds of a doubled-haploid (DH) mapping population of oilseed rape/canola (Brassica napus). • The quantitative trait loci (QTL) that had an effect on glucosinolate concentration in either or both of the organs were integrated, resulting in 105 metabolite QTL (mQTL). Pairwise correlations between individual glucosinolates and prior knowledge of the metabolic pathways involved in the biosynthesis of different glucosinolates allowed us to predict the function of genes underlying the mQTL. Moreover, this information allowed us to construct an advanced metabolic network and associated epistatic interactions responsible for the glucosinolate composition in both leaves and seeds of B. napus. • A number of previously unknown potential regulatory relationships involved in glucosinolate synthesis were identified and this study illustrates how genetic variation can affect a biochemical pathway.

  20. Temephos Resistance in Aedes aegypti in Colombia Compromises Dengue Vector Control

    PubMed Central

    Grisales, Nelson; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Gomez, Santiago; Fonseca-Gonzalez, Idalyd; Ranson, Hilary; Lenhart, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    Background Control and prevention of dengue relies heavily on the application of insecticides to control dengue vector mosquitoes. In Colombia, application of the larvicide temephos to the aquatic breeding sites of Aedes aegypti is a key part of the dengue control strategy. Resistance to temephos was recently detected in the dengue-endemic city of Cucuta, leading to questions about its efficacy as a control tool. Here, we characterize the underlying mechanisms and estimate the operational impact of this resistance. Methodology/Principal Findings Larval bioassays of Ae. aegypti larvae from Cucuta determined the temephos LC50 to be 0.066 ppm (95% CI 0.06–0.074), approximately 15× higher than the value obtained from a susceptible laboratory colony. The efficacy of the field dose of temephos at killing this resistant Cucuta population was greatly reduced, with mortality rates <80% two weeks after application and <50% after 4 weeks. Neither biochemical assays nor partial sequencing of the ace-1 gene implicated target site resistance as the primary resistance mechanism. Synergism assays and microarray analysis suggested that metabolic mechanisms were most likely responsible for the temephos resistance. Interestingly, although the greatest synergism was observed with the carboxylesterase inhibitor, DEF, the primary candidate genes from the microarray analysis, and confirmed by quantitative PCR, were cytochrome P450 oxidases, notably CYP6N12, CYP6F3 and CYP6M11. Conclusions/Significance In Colombia, resistance to temephos in Ae. aegypti compromises the duration of its effect as a vector control tool. Several candidate genes potentially responsible for metabolic resistance to temephos were identified. Given the limited number of insecticides that are approved for vector control, future chemical-based control strategies should take into account the mechanisms underlying the resistance to discern which insecticides would likely lead to the greatest control efficacy while

  1. Quantitative trait loci that control plasma lipid levels in an F2 intercross between C57BL/6J and DDD.Cg-A(y) inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Suto, Jun-ichi

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize plasma lipid phenotypes and dissect the genetic basis of plasma lipid levels in an obese DDD.Cg-A(y) mouse strain. Plasma triglyceride (TG) levels were significantly higher in the DDD.Cg-A(y) strain than in the B6.Cg-A(y) strain. In contrast, plasma total-cholesterol (CHO) levels did not substantially differ between the two strains. As a rule, the A(y) allele significantly increased TG levels, but did not increase CHO levels. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses for plasma TG and CHO levels were performed in two types of F(2) female mice [F(2)A(y) (F(2) mice carrying the A(y) allele) and F(2) non- A(y) mice (F(2) mice without the A(y) allele)] produced by crossing C57BL/6J females and DDD.Cg-A(y) males. Single QTL scan identified one significant QTL for TG levels on chromosome 1, and two significant QTLs for CHO levels on chromosomes 1 and 8. When the marker nearest to the QTL on chromosome 1 was used as covariates, four additional significant QTLs for CHO levels were identified on chromosomes 5, 6, and 17 (two loci). In contrast, consideration of the agouti locus genotype as covariates did not detect additional QTLs. DDD.Cg-A(y) showed a low CHO level, although it had Apoa2(b), which was a CHO-increasing allele at the Apoa2 locus. This may have been partly due to the presence of multiple QTLs, which were associated with decreased CHO levels, on chromosome 8.

  2. Quantitative trait loci that control body weight and obesity in an F2 intercross between C57BL/6J and DDD.Cg-Ay mice.

    PubMed

    Suto, Jun-ichi

    2011-07-01

    I have developed a congenic mouse strain for the A(y) allele at the agouti locus in an inbred DDD/Sgn strain, DDD.Cg-A(y). DDD.Cg-A(y) females are extremely obese and significantly heavier than B6.Cg-A(y) females. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic basis of obesity in DDD.Cg-A(y) mice, and to determine whether or not their high body weight was due to the presence of DDD background-specific modifiers. I performed quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses for body weight and body mass index in two types of F(2) mice [F2 A(y) (F(2) mice carrying the A(y) allele) and F(2) non-A(y) (F2 mice without the A(y) allele)] produced by crossing C57BL/6J females and DDD.Cg-A(y) males. The results of the QTL analysis of F(2) A(y) mice were very similar to those obtained for F(2) non-A(y) mice. It was unlikely that the high body weight of DDD.Cg-A(y) mice was due to the presence of specific modifiers. When both F(2) datasets were merged and analyzed, four significant body weight QTLs were identified on chromosomes 6, 9, and 17 (2 loci) and four significant obesity QTLs were identified on chromosomes 1, 6, 9, and 17. Although the presence of DDD background-specific modifiers was not confirmed, a multifactorial basis of obesity in DDD.Cg-A(y) females was thus revealed.

  3. Quantitative-Trait Loci on Chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 11, 12, and 18 Control Variation in Levels of T and B Lymphocyte Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Hall, M. A.; Norman, P. J.; Thiel, B.; Tiwari, H.; Peiffer, A.; Vaughan, R. W.; Prescott, S.; Leppert, M.; Schork, N. J.; Lanchbury, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Lymphocyte subpopulation levels are used for prognosis and monitoring of a variety of human diseases, especially those with an infectious etiology. As a primary step to defining the major gene variation underlying these phenotypes, we conducted the first whole-genome screen for quantitative variation in lymphocyte count, CD4 T cell, CD8 T cell, B cell, and natural killer cell numbers, as well as CD4:CD8 ratio. The screen was performed in 15 of the CEPH families that form the main human genome genetic project mapping resource. Quantitative-trait loci (QTLs) that account for significant proportions of the phenotypic variance of lymphocyte subpopulations were detected on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 11, 12, and 18. The most significant QTL found was for CD4 levels on chromosome 8 (empirical P=.00005). Two regions of chromosome 4 showed significant linkage to CD4:CD8 ratio (empirical P=.00007 and P=.003). A QTL for the highly correlated measures of CD4 and CD19 levels colocalized at 18q21 (both P=.003). Similarly, a shared region of chromosome 1 was linked to CD8 and CD19 levels (P=.0001 and P=.002, respectively). Several of the identified chromosome regions are likely to harbor polymorphic candidate genes responsible for these important human phenotypes. Their discovery has important implications for understanding the generation of the immune repertoire and understanding immune-system homeostasis. More generally, these data show the power of an integrated human gene–mapping approach for heritable molecular phenotypes, using large pedigrees that have been extensively genotyped. PMID:11951176

  4. Multigenic Control of Pod Shattering Resistance in Chinese Rapeseed Germplasm Revealed by Genome-Wide Association and Linkage Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hui; Wang, Wenxiang; Zhou, Rijin; Mei, Desheng; Cheng, Hongtao; Yang, Juan; Raman, Harsh; Hu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    The majority of rapeseed cultivars shatter seeds upon maturity especially under hot-dry and windy conditions, reducing yield and gross margin return to growers. Here, we identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to pod shatter in an unstructured diverse panel of 143 rapeseed accessions, and two structured populations derived from bi-parental doubled haploid (DH) and inter-mated (IF2) crosses derived from R1 (resistant to pod shattering) and R2 (prone to pod shattering) accessions. Genome-wide association analysis identified six significant QTL for resistance to pod shatter located on chromosomes A01, A06, A07, A09, C02, and C05. Two of the QTL, qSRI.A09 delimited with the SNP marker Bn-A09-p30171993 (A09) and qSRI.A06 delimited with the SNP marker Bn-A06-p115948 (A06) could be repeatedly detected across environments in a diversity panel, DH and IF2 populations, suggesting that at least two loci on chromosomes A06 and A09 were the main contributors to pod shatter resistance in Chinese germplasm. Significant SNP markers identified in this study especially those that appeared repeatedly across environments provide a cost-effective and an efficient method for introgression and pyramiding of favorable alleles for pod shatter resistance via marker-assisted selection in rapeseed improvement programs. PMID:27493651

  5. Multigenic Control of Pod Shattering Resistance in Chinese Rapeseed Germplasm Revealed by Genome-Wide Association and Linkage Analyses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hui; Wang, Wenxiang; Zhou, Rijin; Mei, Desheng; Cheng, Hongtao; Yang, Juan; Raman, Harsh; Hu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    The majority of rapeseed cultivars shatter seeds upon maturity especially under hot-dry and windy conditions, reducing yield and gross margin return to growers. Here, we identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to pod shatter in an unstructured diverse panel of 143 rapeseed accessions, and two structured populations derived from bi-parental doubled haploid (DH) and inter-mated (IF2) crosses derived from R1 (resistant to pod shattering) and R2 (prone to pod shattering) accessions. Genome-wide association analysis identified six significant QTL for resistance to pod shatter located on chromosomes A01, A06, A07, A09, C02, and C05. Two of the QTL, qSRI.A09 delimited with the SNP marker Bn-A09-p30171993 (A09) and qSRI.A06 delimited with the SNP marker Bn-A06-p115948 (A06) could be repeatedly detected across environments in a diversity panel, DH and IF2 populations, suggesting that at least two loci on chromosomes A06 and A09 were the main contributors to pod shatter resistance in Chinese germplasm. Significant SNP markers identified in this study especially those that appeared repeatedly across environments provide a cost-effective and an efficient method for introgression and pyramiding of favorable alleles for pod shatter resistance via marker-assisted selection in rapeseed improvement programs. PMID:27493651

  6. Multigenic Control of Pod Shattering Resistance in Chinese Rapeseed Germplasm Revealed by Genome-Wide Association and Linkage Analyses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hui; Wang, Wenxiang; Zhou, Rijin; Mei, Desheng; Cheng, Hongtao; Yang, Juan; Raman, Harsh; Hu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    The majority of rapeseed cultivars shatter seeds upon maturity especially under hot-dry and windy conditions, reducing yield and gross margin return to growers. Here, we identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to pod shatter in an unstructured diverse panel of 143 rapeseed accessions, and two structured populations derived from bi-parental doubled haploid (DH) and inter-mated (IF2) crosses derived from R1 (resistant to pod shattering) and R2 (prone to pod shattering) accessions. Genome-wide association analysis identified six significant QTL for resistance to pod shatter located on chromosomes A01, A06, A07, A09, C02, and C05. Two of the QTL, qSRI.A09 delimited with the SNP marker Bn-A09-p30171993 (A09) and qSRI.A06 delimited with the SNP marker Bn-A06-p115948 (A06) could be repeatedly detected across environments in a diversity panel, DH and IF2 populations, suggesting that at least two loci on chromosomes A06 and A09 were the main contributors to pod shatter resistance in Chinese germplasm. Significant SNP markers identified in this study especially those that appeared repeatedly across environments provide a cost-effective and an efficient method for introgression and pyramiding of favorable alleles for pod shatter resistance via marker-assisted selection in rapeseed improvement programs.

  7. Control of fluoroquinolone resistance through successful regulation, Australia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Allen C; Turnidge, John; Collignon, Peter; Looke, David; Barton, Mary; Gottlieb, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Fluoroquinolone antimicrobial drugs are highly bioavailable, broad-spectrum agents with activity against gram-negative pathogens, especially those resistant to other classes of antimicrobial drugs. Australia has restricted the use of quinolones in humans through its national pharmaceutical subsidy scheme; and, through regulation, has not permitted the use of quinolones in food-producing animals. As a consequence, resistance to fluoroquinolones in the community has been slow to emerge and has remained at low levels in key pathogens, such as Escherichia coli. In contrast to policies in most other countries, this policy has successfully preserved the utility of this class of antimicrobial drugs for treatment of most infections. PMID:22932272

  8. A review of control methods and resistance mechanisms in stored-product insects.

    PubMed

    Boyer, S; Zhang, H; Lempérière, G

    2012-04-01

    This review describes the major stored-product insect species and their resistance to insecticides. The economic importance of the control of those pests is highlighted with a loss of more than one billion US dollars per year worldwide. A detailed common description of species resistance throughout the world has been developed, and we observed 28 recurrent studied species involved in resistance cases disseminated on the five continents. The different mechanisms, including behavioral resistance, were studied particularly on Oryzaephilus surinamensis. The role of detoxifying enzymes and studies on the genetic resistance, involving the kdr mutation mechanisms and the transmission of the genes of resistance, are also described. A chapter clarifying definitions on cross and multiple resistance is enclosed.

  9. A review of control methods and resistance mechanisms in stored-product insects.

    PubMed

    Boyer, S; Zhang, H; Lempérière, G

    2012-04-01

    This review describes the major stored-product insect species and their resistance to insecticides. The economic importance of the control of those pests is highlighted with a loss of more than one billion US dollars per year worldwide. A detailed common description of species resistance throughout the world has been developed, and we observed 28 recurrent studied species involved in resistance cases disseminated on the five continents. The different mechanisms, including behavioral resistance, were studied particularly on Oryzaephilus surinamensis. The role of detoxifying enzymes and studies on the genetic resistance, involving the kdr mutation mechanisms and the transmission of the genes of resistance, are also described. A chapter clarifying definitions on cross and multiple resistance is enclosed. PMID:22126937

  10. Nested Case-Control Study of the Emergence of Tigecycline Resistance in Multidrug-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Nigo, Masayuki; Cevallos, Catalina Salinas; Woods, Krystina; Flores, Vicente Maco; Francis, Gweneth; Perlman, David C.; Revuelta, Manuel; Mildvan, Donna; Waldron, Mary; Gomez, Tessa; Koshy, Sanjana; Jodlowski, Tomasz; Riley, William

    2013-01-01

    We performed a nested case-control study (ratio of 1:4) on the emergence of tigecycline-resistant multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (TR-MDRKP) isolates among patients who initially presented with a tigecycline-susceptible MDRKP isolate. Out of 260 patients, 24 (9%) had a subsequent clinical culture positive for a TR-MDRKP isolate within the 90-day follow-up period. On logistic regression analyses, receipt of tigecycline (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 5.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.80 to 14.23; P = 0.002) was the only independent predictor of subsequent isolation of a TR strain. PMID:23979745

  11. Colonic Macrophages "Remote Control" Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Subhra K; Bonecchi, Raffaella

    2016-08-01

    The early events linking diet-induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance remain poorly understood. In this issue of Cell Metabolism, Kawano et al. (2016) show that infiltration of colonic pro-inflammatory macrophages orchestrated by the intestinal CCL2/CCR2 axis kick-starts this process during high-fat-diet feeding. PMID:27508866

  12. Footing, Resistance and Control: Negotiating a Traffic Citation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Wendy B.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the micro-interactional processes by which powerful and powerless identities are locally reconstructed. The article specifically examines the interplay between consent and resistance to law-breaking identities. Data consist of transcripts of 45 incidents in which highway patrol officers issue traffic…

  13. Strategies for the management of resistance in mosquitoes to the microbial control agent Bacillus sphaericus.

    PubMed

    Zahiri, Nayer S; Su, Tianyun; Mulla, Mir S

    2002-05-01

    Bacillus sphaericus (B.spi) strain 2362 has been recognized as a promising mosquito larvicide, and various preparations of this strain have been tested and used in mosquito control programs worldwide. This control agent has advantages of high efficacy, specificity, persistence, and environmental safety. However, resistance in Culex pipiens complex mosquitoes to Bsph has occurred in both laboratory and field populations, necessitating development of resistance management strategies. Studies were initiated aiming at reversing previously established Bsph resistance in a laboratory colony of Culex quinque fasciatus Say by selections with Bti alone, Bti and Bsph in rotation, or mixture. Partial restoration of susceptibility to Bsph was achieved by selection of resistant colony for 10 generations with Bti alone at LC80). After this colony was switched back to Bsph selection for 20 generations, resistance to Bsph partially increased to a stable level. Selections of Basph-resistant colonies with Bti and Bsph in rotation or mixture resulted in steady decline of resistance over 30 generations, with rapid decline in resistance noted in the initial 10-15 generations. It is interesting to note that selections with Bti and Bsph in rotation increased susceptibility to Bti in Bsph-resistant colony. It is promising that selection with Bti alone, Bsph and Bti in rotation, or mixture have a potential for developing practical strategies to overcome acquired resistance to Bsph in Cx. quinquefasciatus populations.

  14. [Initial drug resistance as a threat for tuberculosis control: the case of Buenaventura, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Moreira, César A; Hernández, Héctor L; Arias, Nhora L; Castaño, Martha C; Ferro, Beatriz E; Jaramillos, Ernesto

    2004-06-01

    In 2001, Buenaventura, Colombia, the rate of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis was of 66 per 100,000 inhabitants. The poor control of the tuberculosis in this city during the last 10 years and the inadequate use of first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs was an opportune situation for the development of high resistance to these drugs. Two surveys of initial resistance to first-line antituberculosis drugs were conducted in new cases of pulmonary TB, in the city of Buenaventura--the first from August 1, of 1997 to January 31 of 1998 and the second from November 15, of 2000 to November 15, 2001. The method of multiple proportions was used to determine drug susceptibility. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated in 93% and 55% of the new cases of lung TB during each respective period. The initial resistance to at least one drug was 25% (9/36) and 32% (23/72), respectively. The initial multi-drug resistance (defined as resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampicin) was 6% for both surveys. This demonstrates the dissemination of multidrug-resistant bacilli and shows the need for surveillance of resistance to antituberculosis drugs in control of the disease, particularly in those areas where the TB control program has been erratically applied. In areas where multi-drug resistant TB occurs, the control strategy should be enhanced with the careful introduction of second-line drugs.

  15. Weed control and yield comparisons of glyphosate- and glufosinate-resistant corn grown in rotation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 6-yr field study was conducted from 2004 to 2009 at Stoneville, MS to examine the effects of rotating glyphosate-resistant and glufosinate-resistant corn (Zea mays L.) under reduced tillage conditions on weed control, soil weed seedbank, and yield. The four rotation systems were glyphosate-resista...

  16. GPU-Based Optimal Control Techniques for Resistive Wall Mode Control on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, M.; Navratil, G. A.; Hanson, J. M.; Strait, E. J.

    2014-10-01

    The DIII-D tokamak can excite strong, locked or nearly locked kink modes whose rotation frequencies do not evolve quickly and are slow compared to their growth rates. To control such modes, DIII-D plans to implement a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) based feedback control system in a low-latency architecture based on system developed on the HBT-EP tokamak. Up to 128 local magnetic sensors will be used to extrapolate the state of the rotating kink mode, which will be used by the feedback algorithm to calculate the required currents for the internal and/or external control coils. Offline techniques for resolving the mode structure of the resistive wall mode (RWM) will be presented and compared along with the proposed GPU implementation scheme and potential real-time estimation algorithms for RWM feedback. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FG02-07ER54917, DE-FG02-04ER54761, and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  17. Controlled formation and resistivity scaling of nickel silicide nanolines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Luo, Zhiquan; Shi, Li; Zhou, Ji Ping; Rabenberg, Lew; Ho, Paul S.; Allen, Richard A.; Cresswell, Michael W.

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate a top-down method for fabricating nickel mono-silicide (NiSi) nanolines (also referred to as nanowires) with smooth sidewalls and line widths down to 15 nm. Four-probe electrical measurements reveal that the room temperature electrical resistivity of the NiSi nanolines remains constant as the line widths are reduced to 23 nm. The resistivity at cryogenic temperatures is found to increase with decreasing line width. This finding can be attributed to electron scattering at the sidewalls and is used to deduce an electron mean free path of 6.3 nm for NiSi at room temperature. The results suggest that NiSi nanolines with smooth sidewalls are able to meet the requirements for implementation at the 22 nm technology node without degradation of device performance.

  18. A Novel Route Controlling Begomovirus Resistance by the Messenger RNA Surveillance Factor Pelota.

    PubMed

    Lapidot, Moshe; Karniel, Uri; Gelbart, Dana; Fogel, Doron; Evenor, Dalia; Kutsher, Yaarit; Makhbash, Zion; Nahon, Sahadia; Shlomo, Haviva; Chen, Lea; Reuveni, Moshe; Levin, Ilan

    2015-10-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a devastating disease of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) that can be effectively controlled by the deployment of resistant cultivars. The TYLCV-resistant line TY172 carries a major recessive locus for TYLCV resistance, designated ty-5, on chromosome 4. In this study, the association between 27 polymorphic DNA markers, spanning the ty-5 locus, and the resistance characteristics of individual plants inoculated with TYLCV in 51 segregating recombinant populations were analyzed. These analyses localized ty-5 into a 425 bp region containing two transversions: one in the first exon of a gene encoding the tomato homolog of the messenger RNA surveillance factor Pelota (Pelo), and a second in its proximal promoter. Analyses of susceptible and resistant lines revealed that the relative transcript level of the gene remained unchanged, regardless of whether the plants were infected with TYLCV or not. This suggests that the polymorphism discovered in the coding region of the gene controls the resistance. Silencing of Pelo in a susceptible line rendered the transgenic plants highly resistant, while in the resistant line TY172 had no effect on symptom development. In addition, over-expression of the susceptible allele of the gene in the resistant TY172 line rendered it susceptible, while over-expression of the resistant allele in susceptible plants had no effect. These results confirm that Pelo is the gene controlling resistance at the ty-5 locus. Pelo, implicated in the ribosome recycling-phase of protein synthesis, offers an alternative route to promote resistance to TYLCV and other viruses. PMID:26448569

  19. A Novel Route Controlling Begomovirus Resistance by the Messenger RNA Surveillance Factor Pelota

    PubMed Central

    Lapidot, Moshe; Karniel, Uri; Gelbart, Dana; Fogel, Doron; Evenor, Dalia; Kutsher, Yaarit; Makhbash, Zion; Nahon, Sahadia; Shlomo, Haviva; Chen, Lea; Reuveni, Moshe; Levin, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a devastating disease of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) that can be effectively controlled by the deployment of resistant cultivars. The TYLCV-resistant line TY172 carries a major recessive locus for TYLCV resistance, designated ty-5, on chromosome 4. In this study, the association between 27 polymorphic DNA markers, spanning the ty-5 locus, and the resistance characteristics of individual plants inoculated with TYLCV in 51 segregating recombinant populations were analyzed. These analyses localized ty-5 into a 425 bp region containing two transversions: one in the first exon of a gene encoding the tomato homolog of the messenger RNA surveillance factor Pelota (Pelo), and a second in its proximal promoter. Analyses of susceptible and resistant lines revealed that the relative transcript level of the gene remained unchanged, regardless of whether the plants were infected with TYLCV or not. This suggests that the polymorphism discovered in the coding region of the gene controls the resistance. Silencing of Pelo in a susceptible line rendered the transgenic plants highly resistant, while in the resistant line TY172 had no effect on symptom development. In addition, over-expression of the susceptible allele of the gene in the resistant TY172 line rendered it susceptible, while over-expression of the resistant allele in susceptible plants had no effect. These results confirm that Pelo is the gene controlling resistance at the ty-5 locus. Pelo, implicated in the ribosome recycling-phase of protein synthesis, offers an alternative route to promote resistance to TYLCV and other viruses. PMID:26448569

  20. Improving resistance uniformity and endurance of resistive switching memory by accurately controlling the stress time of pulse program operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoming; Long, Shibing; Yu, Zhaoan; Zhang, Meiyun; Ye, Tianchun; Li, Yang; Xu, Dinglin; Lv, Hangbing; Liu, Qi; Wang, Ming; Xu, Xiaoxin; Liu, Hongtao; Yang, Baohe; Suñé, Jordi; Liu, Ming

    2015-03-01

    In this letter, the impact of stress time of pulse program operation on the resistance uniformity and endurance of resistive random access memory (RRAM) is investigated. A width-adjusting pulse operation (WAPO) method which can accurately setup and measure switching time is proposed for improving the uniformity and endurance of RRAM. Different from the traditional single pulse operation (TSPO) method in which only one wide pulse is applied in each switching cycle, WAPO method utilizes a series of pulses with the width increased gradually until a set or reset switching process is completely finished and no excessive stress is produced. Our program/erase (P/E) method can exactly control the switching time and the final resistance and can significantly improve the uniformity, stability, and endurance of RRAM device. Improving resistance uniformity by WAPO compared with TSPO method is explained through the interdependence between resistance state and switching time. The endurance improvement by WAPO operation stems from the effective avoidance of the overstress-induced progressive-breakdown and even hard-breakdown to the conductive soft-breakdown path.

  1. Mapping quantitative trait loci of resistance to Tomato spotted wilt virus and leaf spots in a recombinant inbred line population of peanut (Arachis hypogae L.) from SunOleic 97R and NC94022

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut is vulnerable to a range of diseases, such as Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and leaf spots. The most sustainable and economical solution for managing peanut diseases is development of resistance cultivars. The new breeding line NC94022, high resistance to TSWV and moderate resistance to le...

  2. A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF RESISTANCE EXERCISE TRAINING TO IMPROVE GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN OLDER ADULTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE-To determine the efficacy of high-intensity progressive resistance training (PRT) on glycemic control in older adults with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-We performed a 16-week randomized controlled trial in 62 Latino older adults (40 women and 22 men; mean +/- SE age 66 +/...

  3. Tailoring resistive switching in Pt/SrTiO3 junctions by stoichiometry control

    PubMed Central

    Mikheev, Evgeny; Hwang, Jinwoo; Kajdos, Adam P.; Hauser, Adam J.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Resistive switching effects in transition metal oxide-based devices offer new opportunities for information storage and computing technologies. Although it is known that resistive switching is a defect-driven phenomenon, the precise mechanisms are still poorly understood owing to the difficulty of systematically controlling specific point defects. As a result, obtaining reliable and reproducible devices remains a major challenge for this technology. Here, we demonstrate control of resistive switching based on intentional manipulation of native point defects. Oxide molecular beam epitaxy is used to systematically investigate the effect of Ti/Sr stoichiometry on resistive switching in high-quality Pt/SrTiO3 junctions. We demonstrate resistive switching with improved state retention through the introduction of Ti- and Sr-excess into the near-interface region. More broadly, the results demonstrate the utility of high quality metal/oxide interfaces and explicit control over structural defects to improve control, uniformity, and reproducibility of resistive switching processes. Unintentional interfacial contamination layers, which are present if Schottky contacts are processed at low temperature, can easily dominate the resistive switching characteristics and complicate the interpretation if nonstoichiometry is also present. PMID:26056783

  4. Control-system techniques for improved departure/spin resistance for fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L. T.; Gilbert, W. P.; Ogburn, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Some fundamental information on control system effects on controllability of highly maneuverable aircraft at high angles of attack are summarized as well as techniques for enhancing fighter aircraft departure/spin resistance using control system design. The discussion includes: (1) a brief review of pertinent high angle of attack phenomena including aerodynamics, inertia coupling, and kinematic coupling; (2) effects of conventional stability augmentation systems at high angles of attack; (3) high angle of attack control system concepts designed to enhance departure/spin resistance; and (4) the outlook for applications of these concepts to future fighters, particularly those designs which incorporate relaxed static stability.

  5. Manipulated transformation of filamentary and homogeneous resistive switching on ZnO thin film memristor with controllable multistate.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Hsin; Huang, Jian-Shiou; Lai, Chih-Chung; Huang, Hsin-Wei; Lin, Su-Jien; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2013-07-10

    A bias polarity-manipulated transformation from filamentary to homogeneous resistive switching was demonstrated on a Pt/ZnO thin film/Pt device. Two types of switching behaviors, exhibiting different resistive switching characteristics and memory performances were investigated in detail. The detailed transformation mechanisms are systematically proposed. By controlling different compliance currents and RESET-stop voltages, controllable multistate resistances in low resistance states and a high resistance states in the ZnO thin film metal-insulator-metal structure under the homogeneous resistive switching were demonstrated. We believe that findings would open up opportunities to explore the resistive switching mechanisms and performance memristor with multistate storage.

  6. Resistance to potato leaf roll virus multiplication in potato is under major gene control.

    PubMed

    Barker, H; Solomon-Blackburn, R M; McNicol, J W; Bradshaw, J E

    1994-08-01

    The concentration of potato leaf roll virus (PLRV), as measured by a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, in the foliage of potato plants (Solanum tuberosum) of cv 'Maris Piper' with secondary infection was 2900 ng/g leaf, whereas in clones G7445(1) and G7032(5) it was 180 ng/g leaf and 120 ng/g leaf, respectively. To examine the genetic control of resistance to PLRV multiplication, reciprocal crosses were made between the susceptible cultivar 'Maris Piper' and the two resistant clones, and the three parents were selfed. Seedling progenies of these families were grown to generate tubers of individual genotypes (clones). Clonally propagated plants were graft-inoculated, and their daughter tubers were collected and used to grow plants with secondary infection in which PLRV concentration was estimated. The expression of resistance to PLRV multiplication had a bimodal distribution in progenies from crosses between 'Maris Piper' and either resistant clone, and also in progeny from selfing the resistant parents, with genotypes segregating into high and low virus titre groups. Only the progeny obtained from selfing 'Maris Piper' did not segregate, all genotypes being susceptible to PLRV multiplication. The pattern of segregation obtained from these progenies fits more closely with the genetical hypothesis that resistance to PLRV multiplication is controlled by two unlinked dominant complementary genes, both of which are required for resistance, than with the simpler hypothesis that resistance is conferred by a single dominant gene, as published previously.

  7. Pyrethroid Resistance in Anopheles gambiae, in Bomi County, Liberia, Compromises Malaria Vector Control

    PubMed Central

    Temu, Emmanuel A.; Maxwell, Caroline; Munyekenye, Godwil; Howard, Annabel F. V.; Munga, Stephen; Avicor, Silas W.; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Jones, Joel J.; Allan, Richard; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Ranson, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    Background Long Lasting Insecticidal Nets (LLIN) and Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS) have both proven to be effective malaria vector control strategies in Africa and the new technology of insecticide treated durable wall lining (DL) is being evaluated. Sustaining these interventions at high coverage levels is logistically challenging and, furthermore, the increase in insecticide resistance in African malaria vectors may reduce the efficacy of these chemical based interventions. Monitoring of vector populations and evaluation of the efficacy of insecticide based control approaches should be integral components of malaria control programmes. This study reports on entomological survey conducted in 2011 in Bomi County, Liberia. Methods Anopheles gambiae larvae were collected from four sites in Bomi, Liberia, and reared in a field insectary. Two to five days old female adult An gambiae s.l. were tested using WHO tube (n = 2027) and cone (n = 580) bioassays in houses treated with DL or IRS. A sample of mosquitoes (n = 169) were identified to species/molecular form and screened for the presence of knock down resistance (kdr) alleles associated with pyrethroid resistance. Results Anopheles gambiae s.l tested were resistant to deltamethrin but fully susceptible to bendiocarb and fenithrothion. The corrected mortality of local mosquitoes exposed to houses treated with deltamethrin either via IRS or DL was 12% and 59% respectively, suggesting that resistance may affect the efficacy of these interventions. The presence of pyrethroid resistance was associated with a high frequency of the 1014F kdr allele (90.5%) although this mutation alone cannot explain the resistance levels observed. Conclusion High prevalence of resistance to deltamethrin in Bomi County may reduce the efficacy of malaria strategies relying on this class of insecticide. The findings highlight the urgent need to expand and sustain monitoring of insecticide resistance in Liberian malaria vectors

  8. Insecticide Control of Vector-Borne Diseases: When Is Insecticide Resistance a Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, Ana; Vézilier, Julien; Weill, Mylène; Read, Andrew F.; Gandon, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    Many of the most dangerous human diseases are transmitted by insect vectors. After decades of repeated insecticide use, all of these vector species have demonstrated the capacity to evolve resistance to insecticides. Insecticide resistance is generally considered to undermine control of vector-transmitted diseases because it increases the number of vectors that survive the insecticide treatment. Disease control failure, however, need not follow from vector control failure. Here, we review evidence that insecticide resistance may have an impact on the quality of vectors and, specifically, on three key determinants of parasite transmission: vector longevity, competence, and behaviour. We argue that, in some instances, insecticide resistance is likely to result in a decrease in vector longevity, a decrease in infectiousness, or in a change in behaviour, all of which will reduce the vectorial capacity of the insect. If this effect is sufficiently large, the impact of insecticide resistance on disease management may not be as detrimental as previously thought. In other instances, however, insecticide resistance may have the opposite effect, increasing the insect's vectorial capacity, which may lead to a dramatic increase in the transmission of the disease and even to a higher prevalence than in the absence of insecticides. Either way—and there may be no simple generality—the consequence of the evolution of insecticide resistance for disease ecology deserves additional attention. PMID:20700451

  9. The association between medication adherence and treatment intensification with blood pressure control in resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, Stacie L; Powers, J David; Magid, David J; Masoudi, Frederick A; Margolis, Karen L; O'Connor, Patrick J; Schmittdiel, Julie A; Ho, P Michael

    2012-08-01

    Patients with resistant hypertension are at risk for poor outcomes. Medication adherence and intensification improve blood pressure (BP) control; however, little is known about these processes or their association with outcomes in resistant hypertension. This retrospective study included patients from 2002 to 2006 with incident hypertension from 2 health systems who developed resistant hypertension or uncontrolled BP despite adherence to ≥3 antihypertensive medications. Patterns of hypertension treatment, medication adherence (percentage of days covered), and treatment intensification (increase in medication class or dose) were described in the year after resistant hypertension identification. Then, the association between medication adherence and intensification with 1-year BP control was assessed controlling for patient characteristics. Of the 3550 patients with resistant hypertension, 49% were male, and mean age was 60 years. One year after resistance hypertension determination, fewer patients were taking diuretics (77.7% versus 92.2%; P<0.01), β-blockers (71.2% versus 79.4%; P<0.01), and angiotensinogen-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker (64.8% versus 70.1%; P<0.01) compared with baseline. Rates of BP control improved over 1 year (22% versus 55%; P<0.01). During this year, adherence was not associated with 1-year BP control (adjusted odds ratio, 1.18 [95% CI: 0.94-1.47]). Treatment was intensified in 21.6% of visits with elevated BP. Increasing treatment intensity was associated with 1-year BP control (adjusted odds ratio, 1.64 [95% CI, 1.58-1.71]). In this cohort of patients with resistant hypertension, treatment intensification but not medication adherence was significantly associated with 1-year BP control. These findings highlight the need to investigate why patients with uncontrolled BP do not receive treatment intensification.

  10. Intracellular pH and the Control of Multidrug Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford; Roy, Deborshi; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-02-01

    Many anticancer drugs are classified as either weak bases or molecules whose binding to cellular structures is pH dependent. Accumulation of these drugs within tumor cells should be affected by transmembrane pH gradients. Indeed, development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells has been correlated with an alkaline shift of cytosolic pH. To examine the role of pH in drug partitioning, the distribution of two drugs, doxorubicin and daunomycin, was monitored in fibroblasts and myeloma cells. In both cell types the drugs rapidly accumulated within the cells. The highest concentrations were measured in the most acidic compartments-e.g., lysosomes. Modifying the cellular pH in drug-sensitive cells to mimic reported shifts in MDR caused an immediate change in the cellular drug concentration. Drug accumulation was enhanced by acidic shifts and reversed by alkaline shifts. All of these effects were rapid and reversible. These results demonstrate that the alkaline shift observed in MDR is sufficient to prevent the accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs independent of active drug efflux.

  11. Antibiotic Adjuvants: Diverse Strategies for Controlling Drug-Resistant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Erin E; Franco, Octavio L; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-01-01

    The growing number of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to numerous antibiotics is a cause for concern around the globe. There have been no new broad-spectrum antibiotics developed in the last 40 years, and the drugs we have currently are quickly becoming ineffective. In this article, we explore a range of therapeutic strategies that could be employed in conjunction with antibiotics and may help to prolong the life span of these life-saving drugs. Discussed topics include antiresistance drugs, which are administered to potentiate the effects of current antimicrobials in bacteria where they are no longer (or never were) effective; antivirulence drugs, which are directed against bacterial virulence factors; host-directed therapies, which modulate the host's immune system to facilitate infection clearance; and alternative treatments, which include such therapies as oral rehydration for diarrhea, phage therapy, and probiotics. All of these avenues show promise for the treatment of bacterial infections and should be further investigated to explore their full potential in the face of a postantibiotic era. PMID:25393203

  12. Controlling the resistive hose instability in relativistic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Fernsler, R.F.; Slinker, S.P.; Lampe, M.; Hubbard, R.F.

    1995-11-01

    The resistive hose instability has long been recognized as the major impediment to the propagation of intense, relativistic electrons beams in dense gas. However, hose is a convective instability, and therefore its growth is limited by the length of the beam pulse, the local growth rate, and the speed at which the instability convects through the pulse. The convective speed and the growth rate depend on the beam and plasma parameters, and these vary strongly from beam head to tail. In this paper, hose theory is reformulated to incorporate these variations, and the reformulated model is then used to compute the maximum hose growth possible in a given beam pulse. In air, the model predicts that hose grows by many orders of magnitude when the beam current is less than 10 kA or has a rise time more than a few nanoseconds long. But the growth is predicted to be less than a factor of 20 if the current is 50 kA or more, the rise time is subnanosecond, and the beam radius is properly tapered from head to tail. The model is supported by extensive numerical simulations and is in general agreement with available experimental data. Many of the issues discussed here may have application to other instabilities as well. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  13. MODELING A RESISTIVE WALL MODE CONTROL SYSTEM OF THE BANG-BANG TYPE

    SciTech Connect

    JENSEN,TH

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 Feedback stabilization of the resistive wall mode is usually accomplished by using linear amplifiers. In this paper a study is made of a possibility of controlling resistive wall modes using switches instead of linear amplifiers, i.e., using bang-bang control. The motivation is that bang-bang control systems may be cheaper than conventional feedback systems. A distinct disadvantage of the bang-bang system is complexity due to its inherent nonlinearity. Further studies, particularly of engineering issues, are needed to determine the attractiveness of a bang-bang system.

  14. Are Herbicide Resistant Crops The Answer To Controlling Cascuta?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide tolerant crop technology could provide new management strategies for the control of parasitic plants. Three herbicide-tolerant oilseed rape genotypes were used to examine the response of attached C. campestris to glyphosate, imazamox and glufosinate. C. campestris was allowed to establi...

  15. ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY VARIATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH CONTROLLED GASOLINE SPILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of geophysical surveys were conducted over two controlled releases of about 100 gallons each of gasoline. In order to clearly identify the responses associated with the gasoline plume, measurements were made before, during and after the injection. The two experiments we...

  16. [A mathematical model for the chemical control of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) having acquired chemical resistance].

    PubMed

    Restrepo-Alape, Leonardo D; Toro-Zapata, Hernán D; Muñoz-Loaiza, Aníbal

    2010-12-01

    Dengue fever is a common vector-borne disease in tropical and subtropical areas. It is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected female Aedes mosquito. Since no vaccines are currently available which can protect against infection, disease control relies on controlling the mosquito population. This work was aimed at modelling such mosquito's population dynamics regarding chemical control of the adult population and its acquired resistance to chemicals. The model was analysed by using classical dynamic system theory techniques and mosquito growth threshold was determined as this establishes when a particular population may prosper in the environment or when it is likely to disappear. A suitable chemical control strategy was developed from such threshold. Simulations were made in control and non-control scenarios; this determined the degree of control application effectiveness against different levels of acquired resistance.

  17. [A mathematical model for the chemical control of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) having acquired chemical resistance].

    PubMed

    Restrepo-Alape, Leonardo D; Toro-Zapata, Hernán D; Muñoz-Loaiza, Aníbal

    2010-12-01

    Dengue fever is a common vector-borne disease in tropical and subtropical areas. It is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected female Aedes mosquito. Since no vaccines are currently available which can protect against infection, disease control relies on controlling the mosquito population. This work was aimed at modelling such mosquito's population dynamics regarding chemical control of the adult population and its acquired resistance to chemicals. The model was analysed by using classical dynamic system theory techniques and mosquito growth threshold was determined as this establishes when a particular population may prosper in the environment or when it is likely to disappear. A suitable chemical control strategy was developed from such threshold. Simulations were made in control and non-control scenarios; this determined the degree of control application effectiveness against different levels of acquired resistance. PMID:22030690

  18. A prototype rehabilitation device with variable resistance and joint motion control

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, J.Q.; Rudolph, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been widely reported to have positive rehabilitation effects for patients with neuromuscular and orthopaedic conditions. This paper presents the design of a versatile rehabilitation device in the form of a rotating joint arm mounted on the adjustable seat that provides passive resistance during strength training for muscles. The resistance is supplied by a magnetorheological damper. Intelligent controls are developed to produce resistance force based on the prescription of the therapist. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training and is reconfigurable for several human joints. Special consideration has been given to the human–machine interaction in the adaptive control algorithms that can modify the behavior of the device to account for strength gains or muscle fatigue. PMID:16112598

  19. A prototype rehabilitation device with variable resistance and joint motion control.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, J Q; Rudolph, Katherine

    2006-05-01

    Resistance exercise has been widely reported to have positive rehabilitation effects for patients with neuromuscular and orthopaedic conditions. This paper presents the design of a versatile rehabilitation device in the form of a rotating joint arm mounted on the adjustable seat that provides passive resistance during strength training for muscles. The resistance is supplied by a magnetorheological damper. Intelligent controls are developed to produce resistance force based on the prescription of the therapist. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training and is reconfigurable for several human joints. Special consideration has been given to the human-machine interaction in the adaptive control algorithms that can modify the behavior of the device to account for strength gains or muscle fatigue. PMID:16112598

  20. Post-Traumatic, Drug-Resistant Epilepsy and Review of Seizure Control Outcomes from Blinded, Randomized Controlled Trials of Brain Stimulation Treatments for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, R. Michael; Szuflita, Nicholas S; Severson, Meryl A; Levine, Zachary T

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) patients become resistant to medications. Nervous stimulation as a treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) is an active area of clinical investigation. Objective: To summarize methods, reported seizure control outcome measures, and adverse events from blinded, randomized control trials (RCTs) for selected invasive brain stimulation (IBS) and non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) treatment options in patients with DRE. Methods: PubMed was searched for articles from 1995-2014, using search terms related to the topics of interest. Available relevant articles reporting the outcomes of interest were identified and data was extracted. Articles in the reference lists of relevant articles and clinicaltrials.gov were also referenced. Results: Eleven articles were analyzed with a total of 795 patients identified. Studies showed that select nervous stimulation treatments significantly reduced seizure frequency in patients with DRE.  PMID:27672534

  1. Post-Traumatic, Drug-Resistant Epilepsy and Review of Seizure Control Outcomes from Blinded, Randomized Controlled Trials of Brain Stimulation Treatments for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, R. Michael; Szuflita, Nicholas S; Severson, Meryl A; Levine, Zachary T

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) patients become resistant to medications. Nervous stimulation as a treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) is an active area of clinical investigation. Objective: To summarize methods, reported seizure control outcome measures, and adverse events from blinded, randomized control trials (RCTs) for selected invasive brain stimulation (IBS) and non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) treatment options in patients with DRE. Methods: PubMed was searched for articles from 1995-2014, using search terms related to the topics of interest. Available relevant articles reporting the outcomes of interest were identified and data was extracted. Articles in the reference lists of relevant articles and clinicaltrials.gov were also referenced. Results: Eleven articles were analyzed with a total of 795 patients identified. Studies showed that select nervous stimulation treatments significantly reduced seizure frequency in patients with DRE. 

  2. High-Density Genotyping of Immune Loci in Koreans and Europeans Identifies Eight New Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Loci

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jun, Jae-Bum; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Kang, Young Mo; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Suh, Chang-Hee; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Jisoo; Chung, Won Tae; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Lee, Jong-Young; Han, Bok-Ghee; Nath, Swapan K.; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Pappas, Dimitrios A.; Kremer, Joel M.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Okada, Yukinori; Diogo, Dorothée; Liao, Katherine P.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Martin, Javier; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Plenge, Robert M.; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Objective A highly polygenic etiology and high degree of allele-sharing between ancestries have been well-elucidated in genetic studies of rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, the high-density genotyping array Immunochip for immune disease loci identified 14 new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci among individuals of European ancestry. Here, we aimed to identify new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci using Korean-specific Immunochip data. Methods We analyzed Korean rheumatoid arthritis case-control samples using the Immunochip and GWAS array to search for new risk alleles of rheumatoid arthritis with anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies. To increase power, we performed a meta-analysis of Korean data with previously published European Immunochip and GWAS data, for a total sample size of 9,299 Korean and 45,790 European case-control samples. Results We identified 8 new rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci (TNFSF4, LBH, EOMES, ETS1–FLI1, COG6, RAD51B, UBASH3A and SYNGR1) that passed a genome-wide significance threshold (p<5×10−8), with evidence for three independent risk alleles at 1q25/TNFSF4. The risk alleles from the 7 new loci except for the TNFSF4 locus (monomorphic in Koreans), together with risk alleles from previously established RA risk loci, exhibited a high correlation of effect sizes between ancestries. Further, we refined the number of SNPs that represent potentially causal variants through a trans-ethnic comparison of densely genotyped SNPs. Conclusion This study demonstrates the advantage of dense-mapping and trans-ancestral analysis for identification of potentially causal SNPs. In addition, our findings support the importance of T cells in the pathogenesis and the fact of frequent overlap of risk loci among diverse autoimmune diseases. PMID:24532676

  3. Resistance training alters the sensorimotor control of vasti muscles.

    PubMed

    Wong, Y M; Ng, Gabriel

    2010-02-01

    The present study examined and compared two modes of weight training (bodybuilding and power-lifting) on the surface EMG of vasti muscles, knee joint position sense and isometric knee extension force in 48 able-bodied subjects. Subjects were randomly allocated into either a moderate loading and repetitions (bodybuilding) training or a high loading and low repetitions (power-lifting) training, or a no training control group. Training was conducted on alternate days with individual supervision. After 8 weeks of training, subjects from both training groups showed significantly earlier EMG onset timing and higher amplitude of vastus medialis obliquus relative to vastus lateralis (p=0.005 or <0.001), and improved knee joint position sense (p<0.001), but no such changes were found in the control group. However, the changes were not significantly different (p>0.05) between the two training groups. The findings suggested that the neuromotor control of the vasti muscles could be altered by regular weight training.

  4. Fourier models and the loci of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Makous, W L

    1997-09-01

    First measures of sensitivity and the need for a model to interpret them are addressed. Then modeling in the Fourier domain is promoted by a demonstration of how much an approach explains spatial sensitization and its dependence on luminance. Then the retinal illuminance and receptor absorptions produced by various stimuli are derived to foster interpretation of the neural mechanisms underlying various psychophysical phenomena. Finally, the sequence and the anatomical loci of the processes controlling visual sensitivity are addressed. It is concluded that multiplicative adaptation often has effects identical to response compression followed by subtractive adaptation and that, perhaps as a consequence, there is no evidence of retinal gain changes in human cone vision until light levels are well above those available in natural scenes and in most contemporary psychophysical experiments; that contrast gain control fine tunes sensitivity to patterns at all luminances; and that response compression, modulated by subtractive adaptation, predominates in the control of sensitivity in human cone vision.

  5. The impact of insecticide-resistance on control of vectors and vector-borne diseases

    PubMed Central

    Busvine, J. R.; Pal, R.

    1969-01-01

    A questionnaire inquiring into the nature of schemes for the insecticidal control of disease vectors, the development of resistance in these vectors, and the effect of any such resistance on their control and on the extent of disease was sent to more than 100 health authorities throughout the world. The replies to the questionnaire are summarized in this paper. Until recently, the use of insecticides in public health has been largely based on three organochlorine compounds—DDT, HCH and dieldrin. However, in some countries resistance to these has now severely affected control both of many insect species and of the diseases they transmit (e.g., malaria, yellow fever, filariasis, typhus, plague). Certain other public health problems (onchocerciasis, Chagas' disease, trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis) have not so far been greatly affected by resistance, but it is difficult to be sure of the continued reliability of the organochlorines. Research in the past 5 years, much of it sponsored by WHO, has shown the value of various organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides as replacements for the organochlorines, although resistance to them, too, can occur. Attention must therefore be focused on all facets of the use of these newer compounds and particular scrutiny made of possible instances of resistance to them. PMID:5307234

  6. Genome-Wide Scan and Test of Candidate Genes in the Snail Biomphalaria glabrata Reveal New Locus Influencing Resistance to Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Tennessen, Jacob A.; Bonner, Kaitlin M.; Bollmann, Stephanie R.; Johnstun, Joel A.; Yeh, Jan-Ying; Marine, Melanie; Tavalire, Hannah F.; Bayne, Christopher J.; Blouin, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Background New strategies to combat the global scourge of schistosomiasis may be revealed by increased understanding of the mechanisms by which the obligate snail host can resist the schistosome parasite. However, few molecular markers linked to resistance have been identified and characterized in snails. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we test six independent genetic loci for their influence on resistance to Schistosoma mansoni strain PR1 in the 13-16-R1 strain of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata. We first identify a genomic region, RADres, showing the highest differentiation between susceptible and resistant inbred lines among 1611 informative restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) markers, and show that it significantly influences resistance in an independent set of 439 outbred snails. The additive effect of each RADres resistance allele is 2-fold, similar to that of the previously identified resistance gene sod1. The data fit a model in which both loci contribute independently and additively to resistance, such that the odds of infection in homozygotes for the resistance alleles at both loci (13% infected) is 16-fold lower than the odds of infection in snails without any resistance alleles (70% infected). Genome-wide linkage disequilibrium is high, with both sod1 and RADres residing on haplotype blocks >2Mb, and with other markers in each block also showing significant effects on resistance; thus the causal genes within these blocks remain to be demonstrated. Other candidate loci had no effect on resistance, including the Guadeloupe Resistance Complex and three genes (aif, infPhox, and prx1) with immunological roles and expression patterns tied to resistance, which must therefore be trans-regulated. Conclusions/Significance The loci RADres and sod1 both have strong effects on resistance to S. mansoni. Future approaches to control schistosomiasis may benefit from further efforts to characterize and harness this natural genetic variation. PMID:26372103

  7. Characterisation of a novel panel of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, using a next generation sequencing approach☆

    PubMed Central

    Cwiklinski, Krystyna; Allen, Katherine; LaCourse, James; Williams, Diana J.; Paterson, Steve; Hodgkinson, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    The liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica is an economically important pathogen of sheep and cattle and has been described by the WHO as a re-emerging zoonosis. Control is heavily reliant on the use of drugs, particularly triclabendazole and as a result resistance has now emerged. The population structure of F. hepatica is not well known, yet it can impact on host–parasite interactions and parasite control with drugs, particularly regarding the spread of triclabendazole resistance. We have identified 2448 potential microsatellites from 83 Mb of F. hepatica genome sequence using msatfinder. Thirty-five loci were developed and optimised for microsatellite PCR, resulting in a panel of 15 polymorphic loci, with a range of three to 15 alleles. This panel was validated on genomic DNA from 46 adult F. hepatica; 38 liver flukes sourced from a Northwest abattoir, UK and 8 liver flukes from an established isolate (Shrewsbury; Ridgeway Research). Evidence for null alleles was found at four loci (Fh_1, Fh_8, Fh_13 and Fh_14), which showed markedly higher levels of homozygosity than the remaining 11 loci. Of the 38 liver flukes isolated from cattle livers (n = 10) at the abattoir, 37 genotypes were identified. Using a multiplex approach all 15 loci could be amplified from several life cycle stages that typically yield low amounts of DNA, including metacercariae, the infective life cycle stage present on pasture, highlighting the utility of this multiplex microsatellite panel. This study reports the largest panel of microsatellite markers available to date for population studies of F. hepatica and the first multiplex panel of microsatellite markers that can be used for several life cycle stages. PMID:25796359

  8. Characterisation of a novel panel of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, using a next generation sequencing approach.

    PubMed

    Cwiklinski, Krystyna; Allen, Katherine; LaCourse, James; Williams, Diana J; Paterson, Steve; Hodgkinson, Jane E

    2015-06-01

    The liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica is an economically important pathogen of sheep and cattle and has been described by the WHO as a re-emerging zoonosis. Control is heavily reliant on the use of drugs, particularly triclabendazole and as a result resistance has now emerged. The population structure of F. hepatica is not well known, yet it can impact on host-parasite interactions and parasite control with drugs, particularly regarding the spread of triclabendazole resistance. We have identified 2448 potential microsatellites from 83 Mb of F. hepatica genome sequence using msatfinder. Thirty-five loci were developed and optimised for microsatellite PCR, resulting in a panel of 15 polymorphic loci, with a range of three to 15 alleles. This panel was validated on genomic DNA from 46 adult F. hepatica; 38 liver flukes sourced from a Northwest abattoir, UK and 8 liver flukes from an established isolate (Shrewsbury; Ridgeway Research). Evidence for null alleles was found at four loci (Fh_1, Fh_8, Fh_13 and Fh_14), which showed markedly higher levels of homozygosity than the remaining 11 loci. Of the 38 liver flukes isolated from cattle livers (n=10) at the abattoir, 37 genotypes were identified. Using a multiplex approach all 15 loci could be amplified from several life cycle stages that typically yield low amounts of DNA, including metacercariae, the infective life cycle stage present on pasture, highlighting the utility of this multiplex microsatellite panel. This study reports the largest panel of microsatellite markers available to date for population studies of F. hepatica and the first multiplex panel of microsatellite markers that can be used for several life cycle stages.

  9. Alzheimer disease (AD) specific transcription, DNA methylation and splicing in twenty AD associated loci.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Crystal; Kohli, Martin A; Whitehead, Patrice; Mash, Deborah C; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Gilbert, John

    2015-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified twenty loci associated with late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD). We examined each of the twenty loci, specifically the ±50kb region surrounding the most strongly associated variant, for changes in gene(s) transcription specific to LOAD. Post-mortem human brain samples were examined for expression, methylation, and splicing differences. LOAD specific differences were detected by comparing LOAD to normal and "disease" controls. Eight loci, prominently ABCA7, contain LOAD specific differences. Significant changes in the CELF1 and ZCWPW1 loci occurred in genes not located nearest the associated variant, suggesting that these genes should be investigated further as LOAD candidates.

  10. Comparative risk of renal, cardiovascular, and mortality outcomes in controlled, uncontrolled resistant, and non-resistant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sim, John J.; Bhandari, Simran K.; Shi, Jiaxiao; Reynolds, Kristi; Calhoun, David A.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Jacobsen, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    We sought to compare the risk of end stage renal disease (ESRD), ischemic heart event (IHE), congestive heart failure (CHF), cerebrovascular accident (CVA), and all-cause mortality among 470,386 individuals with resistant and nonresistant hypertension (non-RH). Resistant hypertension (60,327 individuals) was sub-categorized into 2 groups; 23,104 patients with cRH (controlled on 4 or more medicines) and 37,223 patients with uRH (uncontrolled on 3 or more medicines) in a 5 year retrospective cohort study. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to estimate hazard ratios adjusting for age, gender, race, body mass index, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and co-morbidities. Resistant hypertension (cRH and uRH) compared to non-RH, had multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of 1.32 (1.27–1.37), 1.24 (1.20–1.28), 1.46 (1.40–1.52), 1.14 (1.10–1.19), and 1.06 (1.03–1.08) for ESRD, IHE, CHF, CVA, and mortality, respectively. Comparison of uRH to cRH had hazard ratios of 1.25 (1.18–1.33), 1.04 (0.99–1.10), 0.94 (0.89–1.01), 1.23 (1.14–1.31), and 1.01 (0.97–1.05) for ESRD, IHE, CHF, CVA, and mortality, respectively. Males and Hispanics had greater risk for ESRD within all 3 cohorts. Resistant hypertension had greater risk for ESRD, IHE, CHF, CVA, and mortality. The risk of ESRD and CVA and were 25% and 23% greater, respectively, in uRH compared to cRH supporting the linkage between blood pressure and both outcomes. PMID:25945406

  11. Triple insecticide resistance in Anopheles culicifacies: a practical impediment for malaria control in Odisha State, India

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, S.S.; Gunasekaran, K.; Vijayakumar, T.; Jambulingam, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: In Odisha State, the control of malaria vectors has become dependent on synthetic pyrethroids, which are used for treatment of all approved long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs). The vast use of just one class of insecticide has led to the problem of resistance to insecticides in malaria vectors. One of the major malaria vectors in Odisha State is Anopheles culicifacies Giles. The aim of this study was to determine the resistance status of An. culicifacies to deltamethrin, a synthetic pyrethroid and other common insecticides used by the National Vector Borne Diseases Control Programme (NVBDCP) for indoor residual spraying in Odisha State. Methods: Mosquitoes were collected during April 2014 - June 2014 from 15 randomly selected villages in five Plasmodium falciparum endemic southern districts of Odisha State. The blood-fed wild caught females were exposed to the diagnostic dosage of DDT (4.0%), malathion (5.0%) and deltamethrin (0.05%) for one hour. Mortality was recorded at 24 h after the exposure. Results: Results indicated that An. culicifacies was resistant to all the three insecticides used in the malaria control programme in the five districts of Odisha State. Interpretation & conclusions: Resistance management strategy by appropriate rotation of different groups of insecticides including carbamates and incorporating a synergist with synthetic pyrethroids for treating mosquito nets should be considered for the control of malaria vectors in the area, especially where An. culicifacies is predominant. Periodical monitoring of susceptibility/resistance status of An. culicifacies to different insecticides is warranted. PMID:26905243

  12. Two major quantitative trait loci controlling the number of seminal roots in maize co-map with the root developmental genes rtcs and rum1.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Silvio; Giuliani, Silvia; Ricciolini, Claudia; Carraro, Nicola; Maccaferri, Marco; Presterl, Thomas; Ouzunova, Milena; Tuberosa, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    The genetic dissection of root architecture and functions allows for a more effective and informed design of novel root ideotypes and paves the way to evaluate their effects on crop resilience to a number of abiotic stresses. In maize, limited attention has been devoted to the genetic analysis of root architecture diversity at the early stage. The difference in embryonic (including seminal and primary) root architecture between the maize reference line B73 (which mostly develops three seminal roots) and the landrace Gaspé Flint (with virtually no seminal roots) was genetically dissected using a collection of introgression lines grown in paper rolls and pots. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis identified three QTLs controlling seminal root number (SRN) on chromosome bins 1.02, 3.07, and 8.04-8.05, which collectively explained 66% of the phenotypic variation. In all three cases, Gaspé Flint contributed the allele for lower SRN. Primary root dry weight was negatively correlated with SRN (r= -0.52), and QTLs for primary root size co-mapped with SRN QTLs, suggesting a pleiotropic effect of SRN QTLs on the primary root, most probably caused by competition for seed resources. Interestingly, two out of three SRN QTLs co-mapped with the only two known maize genes (rtcs and rum1) affecting the number of seminal roots. The strong additive effect of the three QTLs and the development of near isogenic lines for each QTL in the elite B73 background provide unique opportunities to characterize functionally the genes involved in root development and to evaluate how root architecture affects seedling establishment, early development, and eventually yield in maize.

  13. Two major quantitative trait loci controlling the number of seminal roots in maize co-map with the root developmental genes rtcs and rum1

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Silvio; Giuliani, Silvia; Ricciolini, Claudia; Carraro, Nicola; Maccaferri, Marco; Presterl, Thomas; Ouzunova, Milena; Tuberosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The genetic dissection of root architecture and functions allows for a more effective and informed design of novel root ideotypes and paves the way to evaluate their effects on crop resilience to a number of abiotic stresses. In maize, limited attention has been devoted to the genetic analysis of root architecture diversity at the early stage. The difference in embryonic (including seminal and primary) root architecture between the maize reference line B73 (which mostly develops three seminal roots) and the landrace Gaspé Flint (with virtually no seminal roots) was genetically dissected using a collection of introgression lines grown in paper rolls and pots. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis identified three QTLs controlling seminal root number (SRN) on chromosome bins 1.02, 3.07, and 8.04–8.05, which collectively explained 66% of the phenotypic variation. In all three cases, Gaspé Flint contributed the allele for lower SRN. Primary root dry weight was negatively correlated with SRN (r= −0.52), and QTLs for primary root size co-mapped with SRN QTLs, suggesting a pleiotropic effect of SRN QTLs on the primary root, most probably caused by competition for seed resources. Interestingly, two out of three SRN QTLs co-mapped with the only two known maize genes (rtcs and rum1) affecting the number of seminal roots. The strong additive effect of the three QTLs and the development of near isogenic lines for each QTL in the elite B73 background provide unique opportunities to characterize functionally the genes involved in root development and to evaluate how root architecture affects seedling establishment, early development, and eventually yield in maize. PMID:26880748

  14. The compatibility of a nucleopolyhedrosis virus control with resistance management for Bacillus thuringiensis: co-infection and cross-resistance studies with the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella.

    PubMed

    Raymond, B; Sayyed, A H; Wright, D J

    2006-10-01

    The use of genetically modified crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins can lead to the reduction in application of broad-spectrum pesticides and an increased opportunity for supplementary biological control. Bt microbial sprays are also used by organic growers or as part of integrated pest management programs that rely on the use of natural enemies. In both applications the evolution of resistance to Bt toxins is a potential problem. Natural enemies (pathogens or insects) acting in combination with toxins can accelerate or decelerate the evolution of resistance to Bt. In the present study we investigated whether the use of a nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) could potentially affect the evolution of resistance to the Bt toxin Cry1Ac in Plutella xylostella. At low toxin doses there was evidence for antagonistic interactions between AcMNPV and Cry1Ac resistant and susceptible insects. However, this antagonism was much stronger and more widespread for susceptible larvae; interactions were generally not distinguishable from additive for resistant larvae. Selection for resistance to Cry1Ac in two populations of P. xylostella with differing resistance mechanisms did not produce any correlated changes in resistance to AcMNPV. Stronger antagonistic interactions between Bt and AcMNPV on susceptible rather than resistant larvae can decrease the relative fitness between Bt-resistant and susceptible larvae. These interactions and the lack of cross-resistance between virus and toxin suggest that the use of NPV is compatible with resistance management to Bt products.

  15. Mathematical Modeling of the Transmission and Control of Foodborne Pathogens and Antimicrobial Resistance at Preharvest

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhao; Gröhn, Yrjo T.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Foodborne diseases are a significant health-care and economic burden. Most foodborne pathogens are enteric pathogens harbored in the gastrointestinal tract of farm animals. Understanding the transmission of foodborne pathogens and the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance at the farm level is necessary to design effective control strategies at preharvest. Mathematical models improve our understanding of pathogen dynamics by providing a theoretical framework in which factors affecting transmission and control of the pathogens can be explicitly considered. In this review, we aim to present the principles underlying the mathematical modeling of foodborne pathogens and antimicrobial resistance at the farm level to a broader audience. PMID:21043837

  16. An error-resistant linguistic protocol for air traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cushing, Steven

    1989-01-01

    The research results described here are intended to enhance the effectiveness of the DATALINK interface that is scheduled by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to be deployed during the 1990's to improve the safety of various aspects of aviation. While voice has a natural appeal as the preferred means of communication both among humans themselves and between humans and machines as the form of communication that people find most convenient, the complexity and flexibility of natural language are problematic, because of the confusions and misunderstandings that can arise as a result of ambiguity, unclear reference, intonation peculiarities, implicit inference, and presupposition. The DATALINK interface will avoid many of these problems by replacing voice with vision and speech with written instructions. This report describes results achieved to date on an on-going research effort to refine the protocol of the DATALINK system so as to avoid many of the linguistic problems that still remain in the visual mode. In particular, a working prototype DATALINK simulator system has been developed consisting of an unambiguous, context-free grammar and parser, based on the current air-traffic-control language and incorporated into a visual display involving simulated touch-screen buttons and three levels of menu screens. The system is written in the C programming language and runs on the Macintosh II computer. After reviewing work already done on the project, new tasks for further development are described.

  17. Breeding strategies for tick resistance in tropical cattle: a sustainable approach for tick control.

    PubMed

    Shyma, K P; Gupta, Jay Prakash; Singh, Veer

    2015-03-01

    About 80 % of world cattle population is under the risk of ticks and tick borne diseases (TTBDs). Losses caused by bovine tick burdens in tropical countries have a tremendous economic impact on production systems. Chemical control of disease has been found to be ineffective and also involving large cost. To reduce our reliance on these chemical products, it is necessary to embark on programs that include habitat management, genetic selection of hosts, and development of a strain capable of inducing host resistance to ticks. Selection for disease resistance provide alternate method for sustainable control of TTBDs. Domestic livestock manifests tick-resistance by skin thickness, coat type, coat color, hair density and skin secretions etc. Zebu cattle have, on average, greater tick resistance than either European cattle or African cattle. Heritability for tick burden in cattle has been shown to range about 0.30, which is sufficient to result in the success of some programs of selection for tick resistance in cattle. To select animals at younger age, to reduce generation interval and to increase genetic gain, marker assisted selection is an important tool. There are also various MHC molecules which are associated with resistance to TTBDs. PMID:25698850

  18. Model-based Adaptive Control of Resistive Wall Modes in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, F.; Schuster, E.; Humphreys, D. A.; Walker, M. L.

    2009-11-01

    One of the major non-axisymmetric instabilities under study in the DIII-D tokamak is the resistive wall mode (RWM), a form of plasma kink instability whose growth rate is moderated by the influence of a resistive wall. The General Atomics/FARTECH DIII-D/RWM dynamic model represents the plasma surface as a toroidal current sheet and the wall using an eigenmode approach. We report first on the experimental validation and reconciliation of the proposed dynamic model, which is a required step previous to the potential implementation in the Plasma Control System (PCS) of any model-based controller. The dynamic model is then used to synthesize an adaptive control law for the stabilization of the RWM under time-varying β conditions. Simulation results are presented comparing the performance of the model-based adaptive controller and present non-model-based PD controllers.

  19. Research on temperature control with numerical regulators in electric resistance furnaces with indirect heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniş, C. M.; Popa, G. N.; Iagăr, A.

    2016-02-01

    The paper is an analysis of two-positions (hysteresis) regulators, self-tuned PID controller and PID controller for temperature control used for indirect heat resistance furnaces. For PID controller was used three methods of tuning: Ziegler-Nichols step response model, Cohen-Coon tuning rules and Ziegler-Nichols tuning rules. In experiments it used an electric furnace with indirect heating with active power of resistance of 1 kW/230V AC and a numerical temperature regulator AT-503 type (ANLY). It got a much better temperature control when using the Cohen-Coon tuning rules method than those of Ziegler-Nichols step response method and Ziegler-Nichols tuning rules method.

  20. Controllable resistive switching in Au/Nb:SrTiO3 microscopic Schottky junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhang; Shi, Xiaolan; Zhao, Kehan; Xie, Guanlin; Huang, Siyu; Zhang, Liuwan

    2016-02-01

    The reversible resistive switching effect at oxide interface shows promising applications in information storage and artificial intelligence. However, the microscopic switching mechanism is still elusive due to the difficulty of direct observation of the electrical and chemical behavior at the buried interface, which becomes a major barrier to design reliable, scalable, and reproducible devices. Here we used a gold-coated AFM tip as a removable electrode to investigate the resistive switching effect in a microscopic Au/Nb:SrTiO3 Schottky junction. We found that unlike the inhomogeneous random resistive switching in the macroscopic Schottky junctions, the high and low resistance states can be reversibly switched in a controllable way on the Nb-doped SrTiO3 surface by the conductive tip. The switching between the high and low resistance states in vacuum is accompanied by the reversible shift of the surface Fermi level. We indicate that the transfer of the interface oxygen ion in a double-well potential is responsible for the resistive switching in both macroscopic and microscopic Schottky junctions. Our findings provide a guide to optimize the key performance parameters of a resistive switching device such as operation voltage, switching speed, on/off ratio, and state retention time by proper electrode selection and fabrication strategy.

  1. Plasmodium genetic loci linked to host cytokine and chemokine responses

    PubMed Central

    Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Li, Jian; Wu, Jian; Qi, Yanwei; Eastman, Richard T.; Zilversmit, Martine; Nair, Sethu C.; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Quinones, Mariam; Jiang, Hongying; Li, Na; Zhu, Jun; Zhao, Keji; Kaneko, Osamu; Long, Carole A.; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2014-01-01

    Both host and parasite factors contribute to disease severity of malaria infection; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the disease and the host-parasite interactions involved remain largely unresolved. To investigate effects of parasite factors on host immune responses and pathogenesis, we measured levels of plasma cytokines/chemokines (CC) and growth rates in mice infected with two Plasmodium yoelii strains having different virulence phenotypes and in progeny from a genetic cross of the two parasites. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis linked levels of many CCs, particularly IL-1β, IP-10, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and MIG, and early parasite growth rate to loci on multiple parasite chromosomes, including chromosomes 7, 9, 10, 12, and 13. Comparison of the genome sequences spanning the mapped loci revealed various candidate genes. The loci on chromosome 7 and 13 had significant (p < 0.005) additive effects on IL-1β, IL-5, and IP-10 responses, and the chromosome 9 and 12 loci had significant (p = 0.017) interaction. Infection of knockout mice showed critical roles of MCP-1 and IL-10 in parasitemia control and host mortality. These results provide important information for better understanding of malaria pathogenesis and can be used to examine the role of these factors in human malaria infection. PMID:24452266

  2. A digitally controlled system for effecting and presenting a selected electrical resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Ross, Walter L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A digitally controlled resistance generator is described, in which resistors having values selected according to an expression 2(sup N-1)(R), where N is equal to the number of terms in the expression, and R is equal to the lowest value of resistance, are electrically inserted into a resistive circuit in accordance with a parallel binary signal provided by an analog-to-digital converter or a programmable computer. This binary signal is coupled via optical isolators which, when activated by a logical 1, provides a negative potential to some or all of the gate inputs of the normally on field effect transistors which, when on, shorts out the associated resistor. This applied negative potential turns the field effect transistors off and electrically inserts the resistor coupled between the source terminal and the drain terminal of that field effect transistor into the resistive circuit between the terminals.

  3. Mycoplasmas and Their Antibiotic Resistance: The Problems and Prospects in Controlling Infections.

    PubMed

    Chernova, O A; Medvedeva, E S; Mouzykantov, A A; Baranova, N B; Chernov, V M

    2016-01-01

    The present review discusses the problem of controlling mycoplasmas (class Mollicutes), the smallest of self-replicating prokaryotes, parasites of higher eukaryotes, and main contaminants of cell cultures and vaccines. Possible mechanisms for the rapid development of resistance to antimicrobial drugs in mycoplasmas have been analyzed. Omics technologies provide new opportunities for investigating the molecular basis of bacterial adaptation to stress factors and identifying resistomes, the total of all genes and their products contributing to antibiotic resistance in microbes. The data obtained using an integrated approach with post-genomics methods show that antibiotic resistance may be caused by more complex processes than has been believed heretofore. The development of antibiotic resistance in mycoplasmas is associated with essential changes in the genome, proteome, and secretome profiles, which involve many genes and proteins related to fundamental cellular processes and virulence.

  4. Mycoplasmas and Their Antibiotic Resistance: The Problems and Prospects in Controlling Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chernova, O.A.; Medvedeva, E.S.; Mouzykantov, A.A.; Baranova, N.B.; Chernov, V.M.

    2016-01-01

    The present review discusses the problem of controlling mycoplasmas (class Mollicutes), the smallest of self-replicating prokaryotes, parasites of higher eukaryotes, and main contaminants of cell cultures and vaccines. Possible mechanisms for the rapid development of resistance to antimicrobial drugs in mycoplasmas have been analyzed. Omics technologies provide new opportunities for investigating the molecular basis of bacterial adaptation to stress factors and identifying resistomes, the total of all genes and their products contributing to antibiotic resistance in microbes. The data obtained using an integrated approach with post-genomics methods show that antibiotic resistance may be caused by more complex processes than has been believed heretofore. The development of antibiotic resistance in mycoplasmas is associated with essential changes in the genome, proteome, and secretome profiles, which involve many genes and proteins related to fundamental cellular processes and virulence. PMID:27437137

  5. Novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci implicated in epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Andlauer, Till F M; Buck, Dorothea; Antony, Gisela; Bayas, Antonios; Bechmann, Lukas; Berthele, Achim; Chan, Andrew; Gasperi, Christiane; Gold, Ralf; Graetz, Christiane; Haas, Jürgen; Hecker, Michael; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Knop, Matthias; Kümpfel, Tania; Limmroth, Volker; Linker, Ralf A; Loleit, Verena; Luessi, Felix; Meuth, Sven G; Mühlau, Mark; Nischwitz, Sandra; Paul, Friedemann; Pütz, Michael; Ruck, Tobias; Salmen, Anke; Stangel, Martin; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Stürner, Klarissa H; Tackenberg, Björn; Then Bergh, Florian; Tumani, Hayrettin; Warnke, Clemens; Weber, Frank; Wiendl, Heinz; Wildemann, Brigitte; Zettl, Uwe K; Ziemann, Ulf; Zipp, Frauke; Arloth, Janine; Weber, Peter; Radivojkov-Blagojevic, Milena; Scheinhardt, Markus O; Dankowski, Theresa; Bettecken, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Czamara, Darina; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Binder, Elisabeth B; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Herms, Stefan; Homuth, Georg; Ising, Marcus; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kacprowski, Tim; Kloiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lill, Christina M; Lucae, Susanne; Meitinger, Thomas; Moebus, Susanne; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nöthen, Markus M; Petersmann, Astrid; Rawal, Rajesh; Schminke, Ulf; Strauch, Konstantin; Völzke, Henry; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wellmann, Jürgen; Porcu, Eleonora; Mulas, Antonella; Pitzalis, Maristella; Sidore, Carlo; Zara, Ilenia; Cucca, Francesco; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Ziegler, Andreas; Hemmer, Bernhard; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility in German cohorts with 4888 cases and 10,395 controls. In addition to associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, 15 non-MHC loci reached genome-wide significance. Four of these loci are novel MS susceptibility loci. They map to the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, ERG, and SHMT1. The lead variant at SHMT1 was replicated in an independent Sardinian cohort. Products of the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, and ERG play important roles in immune cell regulation. SHMT1 encodes a serine hydroxymethyltransferase catalyzing the transfer of a carbon unit to the folate cycle. This reaction is required for regulation of methylation homeostasis, which is important for establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures. Our GWAS approach in a defined population with limited genetic substructure detected associations not found in larger, more heterogeneous cohorts, thus providing new clues regarding MS pathogenesis.

  6. Beverton-Holt discrete pest management models with pulsed chemical control and evolution of pesticide resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Juhua; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A.

    2016-07-01

    Pest resistance to pesticides is usually managed by switching between different types of pesticides. The optimal switching time, which depends on the dynamics of the pest population and on the evolution of the pesticide resistance, is critical. Here we address how the dynamic complexity of the pest population, the development of resistance and the spraying frequency of pulsed chemical control affect optimal switching strategies given different control aims. To do this, we developed novel discrete pest population growth models with both impulsive chemical control and the evolution of pesticide resistance. Strong and weak threshold conditions which guarantee the extinction of the pest population, based on the threshold values of the analytical formula for the optimal switching time, were derived. Further, we addressed switching strategies in the light of chosen economic injury levels. Moreover, the effects of the complex dynamical behaviour of the pest population on the pesticide switching times were also studied. The pesticide application period, the evolution of pesticide resistance and the dynamic complexity of the pest population may result in complex outbreak patterns, with consequent effects on the pesticide switching strategies.

  7. [Should we screen for colonization to control the spread of multidrug resistant bacteria?].

    PubMed

    Lepelletier, D; Perron, S; Huguenin, H; Picard, M; Bemer, P; Caillon, J; Juvin, M-E; Drugeon, H

    2003-10-01

    Should we screen for colonization to control the spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria? A multidrug-resistant bacteria surveillance program was performed in 1999 at Laënnec Hospital (Nantes, France). After a 3-year period, the results permit us to determine the strategy to strengthen their spread. In 2001, Staphylococcus aureus resistant to methicillin represented 45% of the 202 multidrug-resistant bacteria isolated. The global incidence rate per 100 admissions remained stable between 1999 and 2001 (0.42%), but those of infections acquired in our institution decreased significantly from 0.27% in 1999 to 0.18% in 2001 (P < 0.05), particularly in medical care units (P < 0.04). In spite of this surveillance program and hygiene trainings, the global incidence remained stable during the study period, even if our action contributed to decrease the incidence of S. aureus resistant to methicillin acquired in our institution. Isolation precautions and screening for colonization policy in intensive care units are not sufficient to control the spread of MRB at hospital level. They should be strengthened by procedures for the transfer of infected or colonized patients and by antibiotic use control. PMID:14568591

  8. Evidence of selection at insulin receptor substrate-1 gene loci.

    PubMed

    Yoshiuchi, Issei

    2013-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex disease characterized by insulin resistance and defect of insulin secretion. The worldwide prevalence of T2DM is steadily increasing. T2DM is also significantly associated with obesity, coronary artery disease (CAD), and metabolic syndrome. There is a clear difference in the prevalence of T2DM among populations, and T2DM is highly heritable. Human adaptations to environmental changes in food supply, lifestyle, and geography may have pressured the selection of genes associated with the metabolism of glucose, lipids, carbohydrates, and energy. The insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) gene is considered a major T2DM gene, and common genetic variations near the IRS1 gene were found to be associated with T2DM, insulin resistance, adiposity, and CAD. Here, we aimed to find evidence of selection at the IRS1 gene loci using the HapMap population data. We investigated a 3-step test procedure-Wright's F statistics (Fst), the long-range haplotype (LRH) test, and the integrated haplotype score (iHS) test-to detect selection at the IRS1 gene loci using the HapMap population data. We observed that 1 CAD-associated SNP (rs2943634) and 1 adiposity- and insulin resistance-associated SNP (rs2943650) exhibited high Fst values. We also found selection at the IRS1 gene loci by the LRH test and the iHS test. These findings suggest evidence of selection at the IRS1 gene loci and that further studies should examine the adaptive evolution of T2DM genes. PMID:22797928

  9. Control of electro-rheological fluid based resistive torque elements for use in active rehabilitation devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitczuk, Jason; Weinberg, Brian; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2007-04-01

    In this paper we present control algorithms for novel electro-rheological fluid based resistive torque generation elements that will be used to drive the joint of a new type of portable and controllable active knee rehabilitation orthotic device (AKROD) for iso-inertial, isokinetic, and isometric exercising as well as gait retraining. The AKROD is composed of straps and rigid components for attachment to the leg, with a central hinge mechanism where a gear system is connected. The key features of AKROD include: a compact, lightweight design with highly tunable torque capabilities through a variable damper component, full portability with on-board power, control circuitry, and sensors (encoder and torque), and real-time capabilities for closed loop computer control for optimizing gait retraining. The variable damper component is achieved through an electro-rheological fluid (ERF) element that connects to the output of the gear system. Using the electrically controlled rheological properties of ERFs, compact brakes capable of supplying high resistive and controllable torques are developed. In this project, a prototype for the AKROD has been developed and tested. The AKROD's ERF resistive actuator was tested in laboratory experiments using a custom-made ERF testing apparatus (ETA). ETA provides a computer-controlled environment to test ERF brakes and actuators in various conditions and scenarios including emulating the interaction between human muscles involved with the knee and the AKROD's ERF actuators/brakes. The AKROD's ERF resistive actuator was tested in closed loop torque control experiments. A hybrid (non-linear, adaptive) proportional-integral (PI) torque controller was implemented to achieve this goal.

  10. Is anthelmintic resistance a concern for the control of human soil-transmitted helminths?

    PubMed Central

    Vercruysse, Jozef; Albonico, Marco; Behnke, Jerzy M.; Kotze, Andrew C.; Prichard, Roger K.; McCarthy, James S.; Montresor, Antonio; Levecke, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    The major human soil-transmitted helminths (STH), Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworms (Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale) and Trichuris trichiura have a marked impact on human health in many parts of the world. Current efforts to control these parasites rely predominantly on periodic mass administration of anthelmintic drugs to school age children and other at-risk groups. After many years of use of these same drugs for controlling roundworms in livestock, high levels of resistance have developed, threatening the sustainability of these livestock industries in some locations. Hence, the question arises as to whether this is likely to also occur in the human STH, thereby threatening our ability to control these parasites. This is particularly important because of the recent increase in mass control programmes, relying almost exclusively on benzimidazole anthelmintics. It will be important to ensure that resistance is detected as it emerges in order to allow the implementation of mitigation strategies, such as use of drug combinations, to ensure that the effectiveness of the few existing anthelmintic drugs is preserved. In this review we address these issues by firstly examining the efficacy of anthelmintics against the human STH, and assessing whether there are any indications to date that resistance has emerged. We then consider the factors that influence the effect of current drug-use patterns in selecting for resistant parasite populations. We describe the tools currently available for resistance monitoring (field-based coprological methods), and those under development (in vitro bioassays and molecular tests), and highlight confounding factors that need to be taken into account when interpreting such resistance-monitoring data. We then highlight means to ensure that the currently available tools are used correctly, particularly with regard to study design, and we set appropriate drug-efficacy thresholds. Finally, we make recommendations for monitoring

  11. Controlling antimicrobial resistance in hospitals: infection control and use of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, R A

    2001-01-01

    Antimicrobial-drug resistance in hospitals is driven by failures of hospital hygiene, selective pressures created by overuse of antibiotics, and mobile genetic elements that can encode bacterial resistance mechanisms. Attention to hand hygiene is constrained by the time it takes to wash hands and by the adverse effects of repeated handwashing on the skin. Alcohol-based hand rubs can overcome the time problem and actually improve skin condition. Universal glove use could close gaps left by incomplete adherence to hand hygiene. Various interventions have been described to improve antibiotic use. The most effective have been programs restricting use of antibiotics and computer-based order forms for health providers.

  12. Neural Network-Based Resistance Spot Welding Control and Quality Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.D., Jr.; Ivezic, N.D.; Zacharia, T.

    1999-07-10

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of neural network-based systems for industrial resistance spot welding process control and weld quality assessment. The developed systems utilize recurrent neural networks for process control and both recurrent networks and static networks for quality prediction. The first section describes a system capable of both welding process control and real-time weld quality assessment, The second describes the development and evaluation of a static neural network-based weld quality assessment system that relied on experimental design to limit the influence of environmental variability. Relevant data analysis methods are also discussed. The weld classifier resulting from the analysis successfldly balances predictive power and simplicity of interpretation. The results presented for both systems demonstrate clearly that neural networks can be employed to address two significant problems common to the resistance spot welding industry, control of the process itself, and non-destructive determination of resulting weld quality.

  13. A role for Lon protease in the control of the acid resistance genes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Heuveling, Johanna; Possling, Alexandra; Hengge, Regine

    2008-07-01

    Lon protease is a major protease in cellular protein quality control, but also plays an important regulatory role by degrading various naturally unstable regulators. Here, we traced additional such regulators by identifying regulons with co-ordinately altered expression in a lon mutant by genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Besides many members of the RcsA regulon (which validates our approach as RcsA is a known Lon substrate), many genes of the sigmaS-dependent general stress response were upregulated in the lon mutant. However, the lon mutation did not affect sigmaS levels nor sigmaS activity in general, suggesting specific effects of Lon on secondary regulators involved in the control of subsets of sigmaS-controlled genes. Lon-affected genes also included the major acid resistance genes (gadA, gadBC, gadE, hdeAB and hdeD), which led to the discovery that the essential acid resistance regulator GadE (whose expression is sigmaS-controlled) is degraded in vivo in a Lon-dependent manner. GadE proteolysis is constitutive as it was observed even under conditions that induce the system (i.e. at low pH or during entry into stationary phase). GadE degradation was found to rapidly terminate the acid resistance response upon shift back to neutral pH and to avoid overexpression of acid resistance genes in stationary phase.

  14. Glyphosate-resistant horseweed (conyza canadensis) control with dicamba in Alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Widespread horseweed resistance to glyphosate has resulted in the use of dicamba as an alternative treatment. Horseweed populations in Cherokee and DeKalb counties in northern Alabama were not well controlled following glyphosate and dicamba treatments. This research evaluates horseweed populations ...

  15. Genome-Wide Delineation of Natural Variation for Pod Shatter Resistance in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Harsh; Raman, Rosy; Kilian, Andrzej; Detering, Frank; Carling, Jason; Coombes, Neil; Diffey, Simon; Kadkol, Gururaj; Edwards, David; McCully, Margaret; Ruperao, Pradeep; Parkin, Isobel A. P.; Batley, Jacqueline; Luckett, David J.; Wratten, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to pod shattering (shatter resistance) is a target trait for global rapeseed (canola, Brassica napus L.), improvement programs to minimise grain loss in the mature standing crop, and during windrowing and mechanical harvest. We describe the genetic basis of natural variation for shatter resistance in B. napus and show that several quantitative trait loci (QTL) control this trait. To identify loci underlying shatter resistance, we used a novel genotyping-by-sequencing approach DArT-Seq. QTL analysis detected a total of 12 significant QTL on chromosomes A03, A07, A09, C03, C04, C06, and C08; which jointly account for approximately 57% of the genotypic variation in shatter resistance. Through Genome-Wide Association Studies, we show that a large number of loci, including those that are involved in shattering in Arabidopsis, account for variation in shatter resistance in diverse B. napus germplasm. Our results indicate that genetic diversity for shatter resistance genes in B. napus is limited; many of the genes that might control this trait were not included during the natural creation of this species, or were not retained during the domestication and selection process. We speculate that valuable diversity for this trait was lost during the natural creation of B. napus. To improve shatter resistance, breeders will need to target the introduction of useful alleles especially from genotypes of other related species of Brassica, such as those that we have identified. PMID:25006804

  16. Human subject evaluation of the controlled resistance exercise device (C-red) for spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Paulus, David C; DeWitt, John

    2015-01-01

    Resistance exercise is an effective countermeasure to the muscle and bone atrophy associated with the unloading experienced during spaceflight. Long duration spaceflight will require compact exercise devices that are capable of delivering sufficient loading to prevent physiological losses while meeting strict mass and volume requirements. Accordingly, a controlled resistance exercise device (C-RED), developed as an advanced exercise concept for NASA, uses an electric motor for resistance and is programmed to simulate inertial loading based on barbell acceleration and desired resistance mass. The barbell acts as a movable pulley increasing efficiency by doubling the created load. Human subject testing of the functionality of the device was conducted in a laboratory at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. Subjects performed ten resistance exercises typically used by astronauts at three freely chosen load levels. The results indicate that subjects were able to perform all exercises with resistance loads that were typical to those used in the gymnasium with loads ranges of 4-1600 N, and bilateral symmetry of ground reaction force was quantified for the deadlift. A survey also was given to each subject to allow the users to express their opinions regarding the device. The subject questionnaire showed that the dumbbell attachment exercises were preferred to the barbell exercises. The positive preliminary results indicate promise for the device. PMID:25996698

  17. Riboswitch control of induction of aminoglycoside resistance acetyl and adenyl-transferases

    PubMed Central

    He, Weizhi; Zhang, Xuhui; Zhang, Jun; Jia, Xu; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Wenxia; Jiang, Hengyi; Chen, Dongrong; Murchie, Alastair IH

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by human pathogens poses a significant threat to public health. The mechanisms that control the proliferation and expression of antibiotic resistance genes are not yet completely understood. The aminoglycosides are a historically important class of antibiotics that were introduced in the 1940s. Aminoglycoside resistance is conferred most commonly through enzymatic modification of the drug or enzymatic modification of the target rRNA through methylation or through the overexpression of efflux pumps. In our recent paper, we reported that expression of the aminoglycoside resistance genes encoding the aminoglycoside acetyl transferase (AAC) and aminoglycoside adenyl transferase (AAD) enzymes was controlled by an aminoglycoside-sensing riboswitch RNA. This riboswitch is embedded in the leader RNA of the aac/aad genes and is associated with the integron cassette system. The leader RNA can sense and bind specific aminoglycosides such that the binding causes a structural transition in the leader RNA, which leads to the induction of aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance. Specific aminoglycosides induce reporter gene expression mediated by the leader RNA. Aminoglycoside RNA binding was measured directly and, aminoglycoside-induced changes in RNA structure monitored by chemical probing. UV cross-linking and mutational analysis identified potential aminoglycoside binding sites on the RNA. PMID:23880830

  18. A genotype-by-sequencing-single nucleotide polymorphism based linkage map and quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum race 2 identified in Citrullus lanatus var. citroides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium wilt, a fungal disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (Fon), devastates watermelon crop production worldwide. Several races, which are differentiated by host range, of the pathogen exist. Resistance to Fon race 2, a particularly virulent strain prevalent in the United States, do...

  19. Strategic measures for the control of surging antimicrobial resistance in Hong Kong and mainland of China

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Vincent CC; Wong, Sally CY; Ho, Pak-Leung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria are either highly prevalent or increasing rapidly in Hong Kong and China. Treatment options for these bacteria are generally limited, less effective and more expensive. The emergence and dynamics of antimicrobial resistance genes in bacteria circulating between animals, the environment and humans are not entirely known. Nonetheless, selective pressure by antibiotics on the microbiomes of animal and human, and their associated environments (especially farms and healthcare institutions), sewage systems and soil are likely to confer survival advantages upon bacteria with antimicrobial-resistance genes, which may be further disseminated through plasmids or transposons with integrons. Therefore, antibiotic use must be tightly regulated to eliminate such selective pressure, including the illegalization of antibiotics as growth promoters in animal feed and regulation of antibiotic use in veterinary practice and human medicine. Heightened awareness of infection control measures to reduce the risk of acquiring resistant bacteria is essential, especially during antimicrobial use or institutionalization in healthcare facilities. The transmission cycle must be interrupted by proper hand hygiene, environmental cleaning, avoidance of undercooked or raw food and compliance with infection control measures by healthcare workers, visitors and patients, especially during treatment with antibiotics. In addition to these routine measures, proactive microbiological screening of hospitalized patients with risk factors for carrying resistant bacteria, including history of travel to endemic countries, transfer from other hospitals, and prolonged hospitalization; directly observed hand hygiene before oral intake of drugs, food and drinks; and targeted disinfection of high-touch or mutual-touch items, such as bed rails and bed curtains, are important. Transparency of surveillance data from each institute for public scrutiny provides an incentive for

  20. Strategic measures for the control of surging antimicrobial resistance in Hong Kong and mainland of China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Vincent C C; Wong, Sally C Y; Ho, Pak-Leung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-02-01

    Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria are either highly prevalent or increasing rapidly in Hong Kong and China. Treatment options for these bacteria are generally limited, less effective and more expensive. The emergence and dynamics of antimicrobial resistance genes in bacteria circulating between animals, the environment and humans are not entirely known. Nonetheless, selective pressure by antibiotics on the microbiomes of animal and human, and their associated environments (especially farms and healthcare institutions), sewage systems and soil are likely to confer survival advantages upon bacteria with antimicrobial-resistance genes, which may be further disseminated through plasmids or transposons with integrons. Therefore, antibiotic use must be tightly regulated to eliminate such selective pressure, including the illegalization of antibiotics as growth promoters in animal feed and regulation of antibiotic use in veterinary practice and human medicine. Heightened awareness of infection control measures to reduce the risk of acquiring resistant bacteria is essential, especially during antimicrobial use or institutionalization in healthcare facilities. The transmission cycle must be interrupted by proper hand hygiene, environmental cleaning, avoidance of undercooked or raw food and compliance with infection control measures by healthcare workers, visitors and patients, especially during treatment with antibiotics. In addition to these routine measures, proactive microbiological screening of hospitalized patients with risk factors for carrying resistant bacteria, including history of travel to endemic countries, transfer from other hospitals, and prolonged hospitalization; directly observed hand hygiene before oral intake of drugs, food and drinks; and targeted disinfection of high-touch or mutual-touch items, such as bed rails and bed curtains, are important. Transparency of surveillance data from each institute for public scrutiny provides an incentive for

  1. Strategic measures for the control of surging antimicrobial resistance in Hong Kong and mainland of China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Vincent C C; Wong, Sally C Y; Ho, Pak-Leung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-02-01

    Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria are either highly prevalent or increasing rapidly in Hong Kong and China. Treatment options for these bacteria are generally limited, less effective and more expensive. The emergence and dynamics of antimicrobial resistance genes in bacteria circulating between animals, the environment and humans are not entirely known. Nonetheless, selective pressure by antibiotics on the microbiomes of animal and human, and their associated environments (especially farms and healthcare institutions), sewage systems and soil are likely to confer survival advantages upon bacteria with antimicrobial-resistance genes, which may be further disseminated through plasmids or transposons with integrons. Therefore, antibiotic use must be tightly regulated to eliminate such selective pressure, including the illegalization of antibiotics as growth promoters in animal feed and regulation of antibiotic use in veterinary practice and human medicine. Heightened awareness of infection control measures to reduce the risk of acquiring resistant bacteria is essential, especially during antimicrobial use or institutionalization in healthcare facilities. The transmission cycle must be interrupted by proper hand hygiene, environmental cleaning, avoidance of undercooked or raw food and compliance with infection control measures by healthcare workers, visitors and patients, especially during treatment with antibiotics. In addition to these routine measures, proactive microbiological screening of hospitalized patients with risk factors for carrying resistant bacteria, including history of travel to endemic countries, transfer from other hospitals, and prolonged hospitalization; directly observed hand hygiene before oral intake of drugs, food and drinks; and targeted disinfection of high-touch or mutual-touch items, such as bed rails and bed curtains, are important. Transparency of surveillance data from each institute for public scrutiny provides an incentive for

  2. Resistive Wall Mode feedback on DIII-D using Linear Quadratic Gaussian control and a GPU powered control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, M. D.; Navratil, G. A.; Hanson, J. M.; Bialek, J.; Piglowski, D. A.; Penaflor, B. G.

    2015-11-01

    A Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) based control system has been installed on the DIII-D tokamak for Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) control similar to one implemented at the HBT-EP tokamak. DIII-D can excite RWMs, which are strong, locked or nearly locked kink modes whose rotation frequencies do not evolve quickly and are slow compared to their growth rates. Simulations have predicted that modern control techniques like Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control will perform better than classical control techniques when using control coils external to the vacuum vessel. An LQG control algorithm based on the VALEN model for the RWM has been developed and tested on this system. Early tests have shown the algorithm is able to track and suppress with external control coils the plasma response of an n=1 perturbation driven by internal control coils. An overview of the control hardware, VALEN model, control algorithm and initial results will be presented. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-04ER54761 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  3. Simulation and design of feedback control on resistive wall modes in Keda Torus eXperiment

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chenguang; Liu, Wandong; Li, Hong

    2014-12-15

    The feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) in Keda Torus eXperiment (KTX) (Liu et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 56, 094009 (2014)) is investigated by simulation. A linear model is built to describe the growth of the unstable modes in the absence of feedback and the resulting mode suppression due to feedback, given the typical reversed field pinch plasma equilibrium. The layout of KTX with two shell structures (the vacuum vessel and the stabilizing shell) is taken into account. The feedback performance is explored both in the scheme of “clean mode control” (Zanca et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, 1425 (2007)) and “raw mode control.” The discrete time control model with specific characteristic times will mimic the real feedback control action and lead to the favored control cycle. Moreover, the conceptual design of feedback control system is also presented, targeting on both RWMs and tearing modes.

  4. Oxide stoichiometry-controlled TaOx-based resistive switching behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Gwang Ho; Lee, Ah Rahm; Kim, Tae Yoon; Im, Hyun Sik; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2016-10-01

    We examine the influence of variable oxygen concentration in TaOx active layers on the forming process and bipolar resistive switching (BRS) features of TaOx-based resistive switching cells. TaOx active layers prepared using various rf sputtering powers were systematically analyzed to identify the relation between initial compositions and BRS behavior. Proper control of oxygen vacancy concentration was clearly identified as a basic factor in ensuring typical BRS features without affecting the structural properties. We describe the possible origins of both conduction and switching based on the variation of oxygen concentrations initially provided by the growth conditions.

  5. Achievement of controlled resistive response of nanogapped palladium film to hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, M.; Wong, M. H.; Ong, C. W.

    2015-07-20

    Palladium (Pd) film containing nanogaps of well controlled dimension was fabricated on a Si wafer having a high-aspect-ratio micropillar. The Pd film was arranged to experience hydrogen (H{sub 2})-induced volume expansion. (i) If the nanogap is kept open, its width is narrowed down. A discharge current was generated to give a strong, fast, and repeatable on-off type resistive switching response. (ii) If the nanogap is closed, the cross section of the conduction path varies to give continuous H{sub 2}-concentration dependent resistive response. The influence of stresses and related physical mechanisms are discussed.

  6. Public health measures to control the spread of antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Xiridou, M; Soetens, L C; Koedijk, F D H; VAN DER Sande, M A B; Wallinga, J

    2015-06-01

    Gonorrhoea is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections. The control of gonorrhoea is extremely challenging because of the repeated development of resistance to the antibiotics used for its treatment. We explored different strategies to control the spread of antimicrobial resistance and prevent increases in gonorrhoea prevalence. We used a mathematical model that describes gonorrhoea transmission among men who have sex with men and distinguishes gonorrhoea strains sensitive or resistant to three antibiotics. We investigated the impact of combination therapy, switching first-line antibiotics according to resistance thresholds, and other control efforts (reduced sexual risk behaviour, increased treatment rate). Combination therapy can delay the spread of resistance better than using the 5% resistance threshold. Increased treatment rates, expected to enhance gonorrhoea control, may reduce gonorrhoea prevalence only in the short term, but could lead to more resistance and higher prevalence in the long term. Re-treatment of resistant cases with alternative antibiotics can substantially delay the spread of resistance. In conclusion, combination therapy and re-treatment of resistant cases with alternative antibiotics could be the most effective strategies to prevent increases in gonorrhoea prevalence due to antimicrobial resistance.

  7. Multiple Disease Resistance in Plants.

    PubMed

    Wiesner-Hanks, Tyr; Nelson, Rebecca

    2016-08-01

    Many plants, both in nature and in agriculture, are resistant to multiple diseases. Although much of the plant innate immunity system provides highly specific resistance, there is emerging evidence to support the hypothesis that some components of plant defense are relatively nonspecific, providing multiple disease resistance (MDR). Understanding MDR is of fundamental and practical interest to plant biologists, pathologists, and breeders. This review takes stock of the available evidence related to the MDR hypothesis. Questions about MDR are considered primarily through the lens of forward genetics, starting at the organismal level and proceeding to the locus level and, finally, to the gene level. At the organismal level, MDR may be controlled by clusters of R genes that evolve under diversifying selection, by dispersed, pathogen-specific genes, and/or by individual genes providing MDR. Based on the few MDR loci that are well-understood, MDR is conditioned by diverse mechanisms at the locus and gene levels. PMID:27296142

  8. Control of Dynamic Limb Motion Using Fatigue-Resistant Asynchronous Intrafascicular Multi-Electrode Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Mitchell A.; Mathews, V John; Clark, Gregory A.; Normann, Richard A.; Meek, Sanford G.

    2016-01-01

    Asynchronous intrafascicular multi-electrode stimulation (aIFMS) of small independent populations of peripheral nerve motor axons can evoke selective, fatigue-resistant muscle forces. We previously developed a real-time proportional closed-loop control method for aIFMS generation of isometric muscle force and the present work extends and adapts this closed-loop controller to the more demanding task of dynamically controlling joint position in the presence of opposing joint torque. A proportional-integral-velocity controller, with integrator anti-windup strategies, was experimentally validated as a means to evoke motion about the hind-limb ankle joint of an anesthetized feline via aIFMS stimulation of fast-twitch plantar-flexor muscles. The controller was successful in evoking steps in joint position with 2.4% overshoot, 2.3-s rise time, 4.5-s settling time, and near-zero steady-state error. Controlled step responses were consistent across changes in step size, stable against external disturbances, and reliable over time. The controller was able to evoke smooth eccentric motion at joint velocities up to 8 deg./s, as well as sinusoidal trajectories with frequencies up to 0.1 Hz, with time delays less than 1.5 s. These experiments provide important insights toward creating a robust closed-loop aIFMS controller that can evoke precise fatigue-resistant motion in paralyzed individuals, despite the complexities introduced by aIFMS. PMID:27679557

  9. Control of Dynamic Limb Motion Using Fatigue-Resistant Asynchronous Intrafascicular Multi-Electrode Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Mitchell A.; Mathews, V John; Clark, Gregory A.; Normann, Richard A.; Meek, Sanford G.

    2016-01-01

    Asynchronous intrafascicular multi-electrode stimulation (aIFMS) of small independent populations of peripheral nerve motor axons can evoke selective, fatigue-resistant muscle forces. We previously developed a real-time proportional closed-loop control method for aIFMS generation of isometric muscle force and the present work extends and adapts this closed-loop controller to the more demanding task of dynamically controlling joint position in the presence of opposing joint torque. A proportional-integral-velocity controller, with integrator anti-windup strategies, was experimentally validated as a means to evoke motion about the hind-limb ankle joint of an anesthetized feline via aIFMS stimulation of fast-twitch plantar-flexor muscles. The controller was successful in evoking steps in joint position with 2.4% overshoot, 2.3-s rise time, 4.5-s settling time, and near-zero steady-state error. Controlled step responses were consistent across changes in step size, stable against external disturbances, and reliable over time. The controller was able to evoke smooth eccentric motion at joint velocities up to 8 deg./s, as well as sinusoidal trajectories with frequencies up to 0.1 Hz, with time delays less than 1.5 s. These experiments provide important insights toward creating a robust closed-loop aIFMS controller that can evoke precise fatigue-resistant motion in paralyzed individuals, despite the complexities introduced by aIFMS.

  10. Control of Dynamic Limb Motion Using Fatigue-Resistant Asynchronous Intrafascicular Multi-Electrode Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Mitchell A; Mathews, V John; Clark, Gregory A; Normann, Richard A; Meek, Sanford G

    2016-01-01

    Asynchronous intrafascicular multi-electrode stimulation (aIFMS) of small independent populations of peripheral nerve motor axons can evoke selective, fatigue-resistant muscle forces. We previously developed a real-time proportional closed-loop control method for aIFMS generation of isometric muscle force and the present work extends and adapts this closed-loop controller to the more demanding task of dynamically controlling joint position in the presence of opposing joint torque. A proportional-integral-velocity controller, with integrator anti-windup strategies, was experimentally validated as a means to evoke motion about the hind-limb ankle joint of an anesthetized feline via aIFMS stimulation of fast-twitch plantar-flexor muscles. The controller was successful in evoking steps in joint position with 2.4% overshoot, 2.3-s rise time, 4.5-s settling time, and near-zero steady-state error. Controlled step responses were consistent across changes in step size, stable against external disturbances, and reliable over time. The controller was able to evoke smooth eccentric motion at joint velocities up to 8 deg./s, as well as sinusoidal trajectories with frequencies up to 0.1 Hz, with time delays less than 1.5 s. These experiments provide important insights toward creating a robust closed-loop aIFMS controller that can evoke precise fatigue-resistant motion in paralyzed individuals, despite the complexities introduced by aIFMS.

  11. Control of Dynamic Limb Motion Using Fatigue-Resistant Asynchronous Intrafascicular Multi-Electrode Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Mitchell A; Mathews, V John; Clark, Gregory A; Normann, Richard A; Meek, Sanford G

    2016-01-01

    Asynchronous intrafascicular multi-electrode stimulation (aIFMS) of small independent populations of peripheral nerve motor axons can evoke selective, fatigue-resistant muscle forces. We previously developed a real-time proportional closed-loop control method for aIFMS generation of isometric muscle force and the present work extends and adapts this closed-loop controller to the more demanding task of dynamically controlling joint position in the presence of opposing joint torque. A proportional-integral-velocity controller, with integrator anti-windup strategies, was experimentally validated as a means to evoke motion about the hind-limb ankle joint of an anesthetized feline via aIFMS stimulation of fast-twitch plantar-flexor muscles. The controller was successful in evoking steps in joint position with 2.4% overshoot, 2.3-s rise time, 4.5-s settling time, and near-zero steady-state error. Controlled step responses were consistent across changes in step size, stable against external disturbances, and reliable over time. The controller was able to evoke smooth eccentric motion at joint velocities up to 8 deg./s, as well as sinusoidal trajectories with frequencies up to 0.1 Hz, with time delays less than 1.5 s. These experiments provide important insights toward creating a robust closed-loop aIFMS controller that can evoke precise fatigue-resistant motion in paralyzed individuals, despite the complexities introduced by aIFMS. PMID:27679557

  12. Undesirable Consequences of Insecticide Resistance following Aedes aegypti Control Activities Due to a Dengue Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Maciel-de-Freitas, Rafael; Avendanho, Fernando Campos; Santos, Rosangela; Sylvestre, Gabriel; Araújo, Simone Costa; Lima, José Bento Pereira; Martins, Ademir Jesus; Coelho, Giovanini Evelim; Valle, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Background During a dengue outbreak with co-circulation of DENV-1 and -2 in the city of Boa Vista, one patient was diagnosed with DENV-4, a serotype supposed absent from Brazil for almost 30 years. The re-emergence of DENV-4 triggered the intensification of mechanical and chemical Aedes aegypti control activities in order to reduce vector density and avoid DENV-4 dissemination throughout the country. Methods/Principal Findings Vector control activities consisted of (a) source reduction, (b) application of diflubenzuron against larvae and (c) vehicle-mounted space spraying of 2% deltamethrin to eliminate adults. Control activity efficacy was monitored by comparing the infestation levels and the number of eggs collected in ovitraps before and after interventions, performed in 22 Boa Vista districts, covering an area of ∼80% of the city and encompassing 56,837 dwellings. A total of 94,325 containers were eliminated or treated with diflubenzuron. The most frequently positive containers were small miscellaneous receptacles, which corresponded to 59% of all positive breeding sites. Insecticide resistance to deltamethrin was assessed before, during and after interventions by dose-response bioassays adopting WHO-based protocols. The intense use of the pyrethroid increased fourfold the resistance ratio of the local Ae. aegypti population only six months after the beginning of vector control. Curiously, this trend was also observed in the districts in which no deltamethrin was applied by the public health services. On the other hand, changes in the resistance ratio to the organophosphate temephos seemed less influenced by insecticide in Boa Vista. Conclusions Despite the intense effort, mosquito infestation levels were only slightly reduced. Besides, the median number of eggs in ovitraps remained unaltered after control activity intensification. The great and rapid increase in pyrethroid resistance levels of natural Ae. aegypti populations is discussed in the context of

  13. Quantitative trait loci for glucosinolate accumulation in Brassica rapa leaves.

    PubMed

    Lou, Ping; Zhao, Jianjun; He, Hongju; Hanhart, Corrie; Del Carpio, Dunia Pino; Verkerk, Ruud; Custers, Jan; Koornneef, Maarten; Bonnema, Guusje

    2008-01-01

    Glucosinolates and their breakdown products have been recognized for their effects on plant defense, human health, flavor and taste of cruciferous vegetables. Despite this importance, little is known about the regulation of the biosynthesis and degradation in Brassica rapa. Here, the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for glucosinolate accumulation in B. rapa leaves in two novel segregating double haploid (DH) populations is reported: DH38, derived from a cross between yellow sarson R500 and pak choi variety HK Naibaicai; and DH30, from a cross between yellow sarson R500 and Kairyou Hakata, a Japanese vegetable turnip variety. An integrated map of 1068 cM with 10 linkage groups, assigned to the international agreed nomenclature, is developed based on the two individual DH maps with the common parent using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and single sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Eight different glucosinolate compounds were detected in parents and F(1)s of the DH populations and found to segregate quantitatively in the DH populations. QTL analysis identified 16 loci controlling aliphatic glucosinolate accumulation, three loci controlling total indolic glucosinolate concentration and three loci regulating aromatic glucosinolate concentrations. Both comparative genomic analyses based on Arabidopsis-Brassica rapa synteny and mapping of candidate orthologous genes in B. rapa allowed the selection of genes involved in the glucosinolate biosynthesis pathway that may account for the identified QTL.

  14. Mapping of two suppressors of OVATE (sov) loci in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, G R; Kim, H J; van der Knaap, E

    2013-01-01

    Tomato fruit shape varies significantly in the cultivated germplasm. To a large extent, this variation can be explained by four genes including OVATE. While most varieties with the OVATE mutation bear elongated fruits, some accessions carry round fruit, suggesting the existence of suppressors of OVATE in the germplasm. We developed three intraspecific F2 populations with parents that carried the OVATE mutation but differed in fruit shape. We used a bulk segregant analysis approach and genotyped the extreme classes using a high-throughput genotyping platform, the SolCAP Infinium Assay. The analyses revealed segregation at two quantitative trait loci (QTLs), sov1 and sov2. These loci were confirmed by genotyping and QTL analyses of the entire population. More precise location of those loci using progeny testing confirmed that sov1 on chromosome 10 controlled obovoid and elongated shape, whereas sov2 on chromosome 11 controlled mainly elongated fruit shape. Both loci were located in intervals of <2.4 Mb on their respective chromosomes. PMID:23673388

  15. [Controlling infection and spread of carbapenems-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae among burn patients].

    PubMed

    Huan, Jingning

    2015-02-01

    The emergence and spread of carbapenems-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) in burn ward is an important threat to burn management. CRKP isolates are resistant to almost all available antibiotics and are susceptible only to polymyxins and tigecycline. The mechanism of the drug resistance of CRKP is associated with the plasmid-encoded carbapenemase Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC), a carbapenem-hydrolyzing β-lactamase. Antibiotics which can currently be used to treat CRKP infection include polymyxins, tigecycline, and some aminoglycosides. The efficacy of using antibiotics in combination is better than that of single-agent therapy for the treatment of CRKP infection in bloodstream. In order to control CRKP infection in burn patients, strategies for preventing CRKP dissemination in burn ward are strongly advocated.

  16. Passive microfluidic control of two merging streams by capillarity and relative flow resistance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Lim, Yong Taik; Yang, Haesik; Shin, Yong Beom; Kim, Kyuwon; Lee, Dae-Sik; Park, Se Ho; Kim, Youn Tae

    2005-10-01

    In the progress of microfluidic devices, a simple and precise control of multiple streams has been essential for complex microfluidic networks. Consequently, microfluidic devices, which have a simple structure, typically use external energy sources to control the multiple streams. Here, we propose a pure passive scheme that uses capillarity without using external force or external regulation to control the merging of two streams and even to regulate their volumetric flow rate (VFR). We accomplish this process by controlling the geometry of two inlets and a junction, and by regulating the hydrophilicity of a substrate. Additionally, we use the relative flow resistance to control the VFR ratio of the merged two streams. Our results will significantly simplify the control of multiple streams without sacrificing precision.

  17. Modeling and Simulation of Resistive Wall Mode Control In DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, M. L.; Humphreys, D. A.; Jensen, T. H.; Leuer, J. A.; Nerem, A.; Strait, E. J.; Garofalo, A. M.

    2001-10-01

    Detailed dynamic response models have been developed for all relevant subsystems comprising the DIII-D resistive wall mode (RWM) closed loop control system. These include the switching power amplifiers (SPA), digital plasma control system (PCS), acquisition and control circuitry, and a fully toroidal model of plasma/vessel dynamics based on specification of the marginal wall position from stability codes such as GATO and DCON. These models have been validated with experimental data, including open-loop excitation of the SPA, PCS, and vacuum vessel dynamic responses, and measurement of the growth rate and mode structure of the unstable plasma. These models are incorporated into a closed-loop control simulation to investigate the control limitations which are due to realistic power supply responses. Consequences of and approaches to the intrinsically multivariable RWM control problem are also investigated.

  18. Control of Pyrethroid-Resistant Chagas Disease Vectors with Entomopathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini, Nicolás; Mijailovsky, Sergio J.; Girotti, Juan R.; Stariolo, Raúl; Cardozo, Rubén M.; Gentile, Alberto; Juárez, M. Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Background Triatoma infestans-mediated transmission of Tripanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, remains as a major health issue in southern South America. Key factors of T. infestans prevalence in specific areas of the geographic Gran Chaco region—which extends through northern Argentina, Bolivia, and Paraguay—are both recurrent reinfestations after insecticide spraying and emerging pyrethroid-resistance over the past ten years. Among alternative control tools, the pathogenicity of entomopathogenic fungi against triatomines is already known; furthermore, these fungi have the ability to fully degrade hydrocarbons from T. infestans cuticle and to utilize them as fuel and for incorporation into cellular components. Methodology and Findings Here we provide evidence of resistance-related cuticle differences; capillary gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry analyses revealed that pyrethroid-resistant bugs have significantly larger amounts of surface hydrocarbons, peaking 56.2±6.4% higher than susceptible specimens. Also, a thicker cuticle was detected by scanning electron microscopy (32.1±5.9 µm and 17.8±5.4 µm for pyrethroid-resistant and pyrethroid-susceptible, respectively). In laboratory bioassays, we showed that the virulence of the entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana against T. infestans was significantly enhanced after fungal adaptation to grow on a medium containing insect-like hydrocarbons as the carbon source, regardless of bug susceptibility to pyrethroids. We designed an attraction-infection trap based on manipulating T. infestans behavior in order to facilitate close contact with B. bassiana. Field assays performed in rural village houses infested with pyrethroid-resistant insects showed 52.4% bug mortality. Using available mathematical models, we predicted that further fungal applications could eventually halt infection transmission. Conclusions This low cost, low tech, ecologically friendly methodology could help in

  19. A small RNA controls a protein regulator involved in antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Eyraud, Alex; Tattevin, Pierre; Chabelskaya, Svetlana; Felden, Brice

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of Staphylococcus aureus strains that are resistant to glycopeptides has led to alarming scenarios where serious staphylococcal infections cannot be treated. The bacterium expresses many small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that have unknown biological functions for the most part. Here we show that an S. aureus sRNA, SprX (alias RsaOR), shapes bacterial resistance to glycopeptides, the invaluable treatments for Methicillin-resistant staphylococcal infections. Modifying SprX expression levels influences Vancomycin and Teicoplanin glycopeptide resistance. Comparative proteomic studies have identified that SprX specifically downregulates stage V sporulation protein G, SpoVG. SpoVG is produced from the yabJ-spoVG operon and contributes to S. aureus glycopeptide resistance. SprX negatively regulates SpoVG expression by direct antisense pairings at the internal translation initiation signals of the second operon gene, without modifying bicistronic mRNA expression levels or affecting YabJ translation. The SprX and yabJ-spoVG mRNA domains involved in the interaction have been identified, highlighting the importance of a CU-rich loop of SprX in the control of SpoVG expression. We have shown that SpoVG might not be the unique SprX target involved in the glycopeptide resistance and demonstrated that the regulation of glycopeptide sensitivity involves the CU-rich domain of SprX. Here we report the case of a sRNA influencing antibiotic resistance of a major human pathogen. PMID:24557948

  20. Allelic analysis of sheath blight resistance with association mapping in rice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Limeng; Yan, Wengui; Zhu, Chengsong; Agrama, Hesham A; Jackson, Aaron; Yeater, Kathleen; Li, Xiaobai; Huang, Bihu; Hu, Biaolin; McClung, Anna; Wu, Dianxing

    2012-01-01

    Sheath blight (ShB) caused by the soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most devastating diseases in rice world-wide. Global attention has focused on examining individual mapping populations for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for ShB resistance, but to date no study has taken advantage of association mapping to examine hundreds of lines for potentially novel QTLs. Our objective was to identify ShB QTLs via association mapping in rice using 217 sub-core entries from the USDA rice core collection, which were phenotyped with a micro-chamber screening method and genotyped with 155 genome-wide markers. Structure analysis divided the mapping panel into five groups, and model comparison revealed that PCA5 with genomic control was the best model for association mapping of ShB. Ten marker loci on seven chromosomes were significantly associated with response to the ShB pathogen. Among multiple alleles in each identified loci, the allele contributing the greatest effect to ShB resistance was named the putative resistant allele. Among 217 entries, entry GSOR 310389 contained the most putative resistant alleles, eight out of ten. The number of putative resistant alleles presented in an entry was highly and significantly correlated with the decrease of ShB rating (r = -0.535) or the increase of ShB resistance. Majority of the resistant entries that contained a large number of the putative resistant alleles belonged to indica, which is consistent with a general observation that most ShB resistant accessions are of indica origin. These findings demonstrate the potential to improve breeding efficiency by using marker-assisted selection to pyramid putative resistant alleles from various loci in a cultivar for enhanced ShB resistance in rice.

  1. Superior Inhibitory Control and Resistance to Mental Fatigue in Professional Road Cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Menaspà, Paolo; Hennessey, Tom; Marcora, Samuele; Keegan, Richard; Thompson, Kevin G.; Martin, David; Halson, Shona; Rattray, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Given the important role of the brain in regulating endurance performance, this comparative study sought to determine whether professional road cyclists have superior inhibitory control and resistance to mental fatigue compared to recreational road cyclists. Methods After preliminary testing and familiarization, eleven professional and nine recreational road cyclists visited the lab on two occasions to complete a modified incongruent colour-word Stroop task (a cognitive task requiring inhibitory control) for 30 min (mental exertion condition), or an easy cognitive task for 10 min (control condition) in a randomized, counterbalanced cross-over order. After each cognitive task, participants completed a 20-min time trial on a cycle ergometer. During the time trial, heart rate, blood lactate concentration, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded. Results The professional cyclists completed more correct responses during the Stroop task than the recreational cyclists (705±68 vs 576±74, p = 0.001). During the time trial, the recreational cyclists produced a lower mean power output in the mental exertion condition compared to the control condition (216±33 vs 226±25 W, p = 0.014). There was no difference between conditions for the professional cyclists (323±42 vs 326±35 W, p = 0.502). Heart rate, blood lactate concentration, and RPE were not significantly different between the mental exertion and control conditions in both groups. Conclusion The professional cyclists exhibited superior performance during the Stroop task which is indicative of stronger inhibitory control than the recreational cyclists. The professional cyclists also displayed a greater resistance to the negative effects of mental fatigue as demonstrated by no significant differences in perception of effort and time trial performance between the mental exertion and control conditions. These findings suggest that inhibitory control and resistance to mental fatigue may contribute to

  2. Major QTLs control resistance to rice hoja blanca virus and its vector Tagosodes orizicolus.

    PubMed

    Romero, Luz E; Lozano, Ivan; Garavito, Andrea; Carabali, Silvio J; Triana, Monica; Villareal, Natalia; Reyes, Luis; Duque, Myriam C; Martinez, César P; Calvert, Lee; Lorieux, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Rice hoja blanca (white leaf) disease can cause severe yield losses in rice in the Americas. The disease is caused by the rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV), which is transmitted by the planthopper vector Tagosodes orizicolus. Because classical breeding schemes for this disease rely on expensive, time-consuming screenings, there is a need for alternatives such as marker-aided selection. The varieties Fedearroz 2000 and Fedearroz 50, which are resistant to RHBV and to the feeding damage caused by T. orizicolus, were crossed with the susceptible line WC366 to produce segregating F2:3 populations. The F3 families were scored for their resistance level to RHBV and T. orizicolus. The F2:3 lines of both crosses were genotyped using microsatellite markers. One major QTL on the short arm of chromosome 4 was identified for resistance to RHBV in the two populations. Two major QTL on chromosomes 5 and 7 were identified for resistance to T. orizicolus in the Fd2000 × WC366 and Fd50 × WC366 crosses, respectively. This comparative study using two distinct rice populations allowed for a better understanding of how the resistance to RHBV and its vector are controlled genetically. Simple marker-aided breeding schemes based on QTL information can be designed to improve rice germplasm to reduce losses caused by this important disease. PMID:24240781

  3. Major QTLs Control Resistance to Rice Hoja Blanca Virus and Its Vector Tagosodes orizicolus

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Luz E.; Lozano, Ivan; Garavito, Andrea; Carabali, Silvio J.; Triana, Monica; Villareal, Natalia; Reyes, Luis; Duque, Myriam C.; Martinez, César P.; Calvert, Lee; Lorieux, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Rice hoja blanca (white leaf) disease can cause severe yield losses in rice in the Americas. The disease is caused by the rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV), which is transmitted by the planthopper vector Tagosodes orizicolus. Because classical breeding schemes for this disease rely on expensive, time-consuming screenings, there is a need for alternatives such as marker-aided selection. The varieties Fedearroz 2000 and Fedearroz 50, which are resistant to RHBV and to the feeding damage caused by T. orizicolus, were crossed with the susceptible line WC366 to produce segregating F2:3 populations. The F3 families were scored for their resistance level to RHBV and T. orizicolus. The F2:3 lines of both crosses were genotyped using microsatellite markers. One major QTL on the short arm of chromosome 4 was identified for resistance to RHBV in the two populations. Two major QTL on chromosomes 5 and 7 were identified for resistance to T. orizicolus in the Fd2000 × WC366 and Fd50 × WC366 crosses, respectively. This comparative study using two distinct rice populations allowed for a better understanding of how the resistance to RHBV and its vector are controlled genetically. Simple marker-aided breeding schemes based on QTL information can be designed to improve rice germplasm to reduce losses caused by this important disease. PMID:24240781

  4. Induced Resistance as a Mechanism of Biological Control by Lysobacter enzymogenes Strain C3.

    PubMed

    Kilic-Ekici, Ozlem; Yuen, Gary Y

    2003-09-01

    ABSTRACT Induced resistance was found to be a mechanism for biological control of leaf spot, caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana, in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) using the bacterium Lysobacter enzymogenes strain C3. Resistance elicited by C3 suppressed germination of B. sorokiniana conidia on the phylloplane in addition to reducing the severity of leaf spot. The pathogen-inhibitory effect could be separated from antibiosis by using heat-inactivated cells of C3 that retained no antifungal activity. Application of live or heat-killed cells to tall fescue leaves resulted only in localized resistance confined to the treated leaf, whereas treatment of roots resulted in systemic resistance expressed in the foliage. The effects of foliar and root applications of C3 were long lasting, as evidenced by suppression of conidial germination and leaf spot development even when pathogen inoculation was delayed 15 days after bacterial treatment. When C3 population levels and germination of pathogen conidia was examined on leaf segments, germination percentage was reduced on all segments from C3-treated leaves compared with segments from non-treated leaves, but no dose-response relationship typical of antagonism was found. Induced resistance by C3 was not host or pathogen specific; foliar application of heat-killed C3 cells controlled B. sorokiniana on wheat and also was effective in reducing the severity of brown patch, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, on tall fescue. Treatments of tall fescue foliage or roots with C3 resulted in significantly elevated peroxidase activity compared with the control.

  5. Genetic loci for retinal arteriolar microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Sim, Xueling; Jensen, Richard A; Ikram, M Kamran; Cotch, Mary Frances; Li, Xiaohui; MacGregor, Stuart; Xie, Jing; Smith, Albert Vernon; Boerwinkle, Eric; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Glazer, Nicole L; Lumley, Thomas; McKnight, Barbara; Psaty, Bruce M; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Harris, Tamara B; Jonasson, Fridbert; Launer, Lenore J; Attia, John; Baird, Paul N; Harrap, Stephen; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Inouye, Michael; Rochtchina, Elena; Scott, Rodney J; Viswanathan, Ananth; Li, Guo; Smith, Nicholas L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Kuo, Jane Z; Taylor, Kent D; Hewitt, Alex W; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Sun, Cong; Young, Terri L; Mackey, David A; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Doney, Alex S F; Palmer, Colin N A; Morris, Andrew D; Rotter, Jerome I; Tai, E Shyong; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Vingerling, Johannes R; Siscovick, David S; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Y

    2013-01-01

    Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene) was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10(-8). This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10(-12) in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts). In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined.

  6. Genetic loci for retinal arteriolar microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Sim, Xueling; Jensen, Richard A; Ikram, M Kamran; Cotch, Mary Frances; Li, Xiaohui; MacGregor, Stuart; Xie, Jing; Smith, Albert Vernon; Boerwinkle, Eric; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Glazer, Nicole L; Lumley, Thomas; McKnight, Barbara; Psaty, Bruce M; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Harris, Tamara B; Jonasson, Fridbert; Launer, Lenore J; Attia, John; Baird, Paul N; Harrap, Stephen; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Inouye, Michael; Rochtchina, Elena; Scott, Rodney J; Viswanathan, Ananth; Li, Guo; Smith, Nicholas L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Kuo, Jane Z; Taylor, Kent D; Hewitt, Alex W; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Sun, Cong; Young, Terri L; Mackey, David A; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Doney, Alex S F; Palmer, Colin N A; Morris, Andrew D; Rotter, Jerome I; Tai, E Shyong; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Vingerling, Johannes R; Siscovick, David S; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Y

    2013-01-01

    Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene) was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10(-8). This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10(-12) in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts). In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined. PMID:23776548

  7. Sunflower Resistance to Broomrape (Orobanche cumana) Is Controlled by Specific QTLs for Different Parasitism Stages.

    PubMed

    Louarn, Johann; Boniface, Marie-Claude; Pouilly, Nicolas; Velasco, Leonardo; Pérez-Vich, Begoña; Vincourt, Patrick; Muños, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Orobanche cumana (sunflower broomrape) is an obligatory and non-photosynthetic root parasitic plant that specifically infects the sunflower. It is located in Europe and in Asia, where it can cause yield losses of over 80%. More aggressive races have evolved, mainly around the Black Sea, and broomrape can rapidly spread to new areas. Breeding for resistance seems to be the most efficient and sustainable approach to control broomrape infestation. In our study, we used a population of 101 recombinant inbred lines (RILs), derived from a cross between the two lines HA89 and LR1 (a line derived from an interspecific cross with Helianthus debilis). Rhizotrons, pots and field experiments were used to characterize all RILs for their resistance to O. cumana race F parasitism at three post vascular connection life stages: (i) early attachment of the parasite to the sunflower roots, (ii) young tubercle and (iii) shoot emergence. In addition, RIL resistance to race G at young tubercle development stage was evaluated in pots. The entire population was genotyped, and QTLs were mapped. Different QTLs were identified for each race (F from Spain and G from Turkey) and for the three stages of broomrape development. The results indicate that there are several quantitative resistance mechanisms controlling the infection by O. cumana that can be used in sunflower breeding. PMID:27242810

  8. Alkali- and Sulfur-Resistant Tungsten-Based Catalysts for NOx Emissions Control.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiwei; Li, Hao; Gao, Jiayi; Gu, Xiao; Zheng, Li; Hu, Pingping; Xin, Ying; Chen, Junxiao; Chen, Yaxin; Zhang, Zhaoliang; Chen, Jianmin; Tang, Xingfu

    2015-12-15

    The development of catalysts with simultaneous resistance to alkalis and sulfur poisoning is of great importance for efficiently controlling NOx emissions using the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3 (SCR), because the conventional V2O5/WO3-TiO2 catalysts often suffer severe deactivation by alkalis. Here, we support V2O5 on a hexagonal WO3 (HWO) to develop a V2O5/HWO catalyst, which has exceptional resistance to alkali and sulfur poisoning in the SCR reactions. A 350 μmol g(-1) K(+) loading and the presence of 1,300 mg m(-3) SO2 do not almost influence the SCR activity of the V2O5/HWO catalyst, and under the same conditions, the conventional V2O5/WO3-TiO2 catalysts completely lost the SCR activity within 4 h. The strong resistance to alkali and sulfur poisoning of the V2O5/HWO catalysts mainly originates from the hexagonal structure of the HWO. The HWO allows the V2O5 to be highly dispersed on the external surfaces for catalyzing the SCR reactions and has the relatively smooth surfaces and the size-suitable tunnels specifically for alkalis' diffusion and trapping. This work provides a useful strategy to develop SCR catalysts with exceptional resistance to alkali and sulfur poisoning for controlling NOx emissions from the stationary source and the mobile source.

  9. Sunflower Resistance to Broomrape (Orobanche cumana) Is Controlled by Specific QTLs for Different Parasitism Stages

    PubMed Central

    Louarn, Johann; Boniface, Marie-Claude; Pouilly, Nicolas; Velasco, Leonardo; Pérez-Vich, Begoña; Vincourt, Patrick; Muños, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Orobanche cumana (sunflower broomrape) is an obligatory and non-photosynthetic root parasitic plant that specifically infects the sunflower. It is located in Europe and in Asia, where it can cause yield losses of over 80%. More aggressive races have evolved, mainly around the Black Sea, and broomrape can rapidly spread to new areas. Breeding for resistance seems to be the most efficient and sustainable approach to control broomrape infestation. In our study, we used a population of 101 recombinant inbred lines (RILs), derived from a cross between the two lines HA89 and LR1 (a line derived from an interspecific cross with Helianthus debilis). Rhizotrons, pots and field experiments were used to characterize all RILs for their resistance to O. cumana race F parasitism at three post vascular connection life stages: (i) early attachment of the parasite to the sunflower roots, (ii) young tubercle and (iii) shoot emergence. In addition, RIL resistance to race G at young tubercle development stage was evaluated in pots. The entire population was genotyped, and QTLs were mapped. Different QTLs were identified for each race (F from Spain and G from Turkey) and for the three stages of broomrape development. The results indicate that there are several quantitative resistance mechanisms controlling the infection by O. cumana that can be used in sunflower breeding. PMID:27242810

  10. Sunflower Resistance to Broomrape (Orobanche cumana) Is Controlled by Specific QTLs for Different Parasitism Stages.

    PubMed

    Louarn, Johann; Boniface, Marie-Claude; Pouilly, Nicolas; Velasco, Leonardo; Pérez-Vich, Begoña; Vincourt, Patrick; Muños, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Orobanche cumana (sunflower broomrape) is an obligatory and non-photosynthetic root parasitic plant that specifically infects the sunflower. It is located in Europe and in Asia, where it can cause yield losses of over 80%. More aggressive races have evolved, mainly around the Black Sea, and broomrape can rapidly spread to new areas. Breeding for resistance seems to be the most efficient and sustainable approach to control broomrape infestation. In our study, we used a population of 101 recombinant inbred lines (RILs), derived from a cross between the two lines HA89 and LR1 (a line derived from an interspecific cross with Helianthus debilis). Rhizotrons, pots and field experiments were used to characterize all RILs for their resistance to O. cumana race F parasitism at three post vascular connection life stages: (i) early attachment of the parasite to the sunflower roots, (ii) young tubercle and (iii) shoot emergence. In addition, RIL resistance to race G at young tubercle development stage was evaluated in pots. The entire population was genotyped, and QTLs were mapped. Different QTLs were identified for each race (F from Spain and G from Turkey) and for the three stages of broomrape development. The results indicate that there are several quantitative resistance mechanisms controlling the infection by O. cumana that can be used in sunflower breeding.

  11. Reduced efficacy of pyrethroid space sprays for dengue control in an area of Martinique with pyrethroid resistance.

    PubMed

    Marcombe, Sébastien; Carron, Alexandre; Darriet, Frédéric; Etienne, Manuel; Agnew, Philip; Tolosa, Michel; Yp-Tcha, Marie Michèle; Lagneau, Christophe; Yébakima, André; Corbel, Vincent

    2009-05-01

    In the Caribbean, insecticide resistance is widely developed in Aedes aegypti and represents a serious obstacle for dengue vector control. The efficacy of pyrethroid and organophosphate ultra-low volume space sprays was investigated in Martinique where Ae. aegypti has been shown to be resistant to conventional insecticides. In the laboratory, a wild-field caught population showed high levels of resistance to deltamethrin, organophosphate (naled), and pyrethrum. Simulated-field trials showed that this resistance can strongly reduce the knock-down effect and mortality of deltamethrin and synergized pyrethrins when applied by thermal-fogging. Conversely, the efficacy of naled was high against insecticide-resistant mosquitoes. Chemical analyses of nettings exposed to the treatments showed a decrease in residues over distance from release for the pyrethroids, and naled was not detected. This finding has important implications for dengue vector control and emphasizes the need to develop innovative strategies to maintain effective control of resistant Ae. aegypti populations. PMID:19407118

  12. Gate controllable resistive random access memory devices using reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Preetam; Resmi, A. N.; Jinesh, K. B.

    2016-04-01

    The biggest challenge in the resistive random access memory (ReRAM) technology is that the basic operational parameters, such as the set and reset voltages, the current on-off ratios (hence the power), and their operational speeds, strongly depend on the active and electrode materials and their processing methods. Therefore, for its actual technological implementations, the unification of the operational parameters of the ReRAM devices appears to be a difficult task. In this letter, we show that by fabricating a resistive memory device in a thin film transistor configuration and thus applying an external gate bias, we can control the switching voltage very accurately. Taking partially reduced graphene oxide, the gate controllable switching is demonstrated, and the possible mechanisms are discussed.

  13. Control of a Multi-Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Outbreak after Orthopedics Department Relocation

    PubMed Central

    Gogou, Vasiliki; Meletis, Georgios; Tsitouras, Dimosthenis

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates have the ability to survive in the hospital niche for prolonged time periods and to develop resistance against multiple antimicrobial agents. Therefore, A. baumannii has emerged as an important cause of nosocomial outbreaks worldwide, especially in critical-care environments such as intensive care units. In the present communication, we report a multi-drug-resistant A. baumannii outbreak that occurred in an orthopedics department in Greece after the admission of a patient previously hospitalized in the intensive care unit of a Greek tertiary care hospital. Despite the implementation of infection control measures, 29 patients were infected, significantly raising their hospitalization periods and treatment costs. Interestingly, the outbreak was put under control after the department’s previously programmed relocation.

  14. Ten microsatellite loci from Zamia integrifolia (Zamiaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten microsatellite loci isolated from Zamia integrifolia are described. All 10 are polymorphic, with three to ten alleles across 36 members of a single population from South Florida. Heterozygosity ranged from 0.067 to 1. Two loci depart significantly from Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium, and exhibit het...

  15. Adaptive optimal stochastic state feedback control of resistive wall modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Z.; Sen, A.K.; Longman, R.W.

    2006-01-15

    An adaptive optimal stochastic state feedback control is developed to stabilize the resistive wall mode (RWM) instability in tokamaks. The extended least-square method with exponential forgetting factor and covariance resetting is used to identify (experimentally determine) the time-varying stochastic system model. A Kalman filter is used to estimate the system states. The estimated system states are passed on to an optimal state feedback controller to construct control inputs. The Kalman filter and the optimal state feedback controller are periodically redesigned online based on the identified system model. This adaptive controller can stabilize the time-dependent RWM in a slowly evolving tokamak discharge. This is accomplished within a time delay of roughly four times the inverse of the growth rate for the time-invariant model used.

  16. Joint QTL analyses for partial resistance to Phytophthora sojae using six nested inbred populations with heterogeneous conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Partial resistance to Phytophthora sojae in soybean is controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL). With traditional QTL mapping approaches, power to detect these QTL, frequently of small effect, can be limited by population size. Joint linkage QTL analysis of nested recombinant inbred li...

  17. Control of foliar pathogens of spring barley using a combination of resistance elicitors

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Dale R.; Havis, Neil D.; Paterson, Linda; Taylor, Jeanette; Walsh, David J.; Sablou, Cecile

    2014-01-01

    The ability of the resistance elicitors acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM), β-aminobutyric acid (BABA), cis-jasmone (CJ), and a combination of the three products, to control infection of spring barley by Rhynchosporium commune was examined under glasshouse conditions. Significant control of R. commune was provided by ASM and CJ, but the largest reduction in infection was obtained with the combination of the three elicitors. This elicitor combination was found to up-regulate the expression of PR-1b, which is used as a molecular marker for systemic acquired resistance (SAR). However, the elicitor combination also down-regulated the expression of LOX2, a gene involved in the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA). In field experiments over 3 consecutive years, the effects of the elicitor combination were influenced greatly by crop variety and by year. For example, the elicitor combination applied on its own provided significant control of powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei) and R. commune in 2009, whereas no control on either variety was observed in 2007. In contrast, treatments involving both the elicitor combination and fungicides provided disease control and yield increases which were equal to, and in some cases better than that provided by the best fungicide-only treatment. The prospects for the use of elicitor plus fungicide treatments to control foliar pathogens of spring barley in practice are discussed. PMID:24904629

  18. Preschoolers' motor and verbal self-control strategies during a resistance-to-temptation task.

    PubMed

    Manfra, Louis; Davis, Kelly D; Ducenne, Lesley; Winsler, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Although prior research has shown that young children exhibit enhanced self-control when they use verbal strategies provided through adult instructions, little work has examined the role of children's spontaneous verbalizations or motor behavior as strategies for enhancing self-control. The present study examined the usefulness of spontaneous verbal and motor strategies for 39 3- and 4-year-old children's ability to exercise self-control during a resistance-to-temptation task. After a 2-min play period, participants were asked by an experimenter not to touch an attractive train set while he was out of the room. Children were videotaped during the 3-min waiting period and videos were coded for frequency and duration of touches, motor movements, and verbalizations. Results indicated that self-control was improved by using both motor and verbal strategies. Children who were unable to resist touching the forbidden toy used limited motor or verbal strategies. These findings add to the growing literature demonstrating the positive role of verbalizations on cognitive control and draw attention to motor behaviors as additional strategies used by young children to exercise self-control.

  19. Analysis of the features of 45 identified CRISPR loci in 32 Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Siyu; Liu, Jing; Shao, Fuye; Wang, Pengfei; Duan, Guangcai; Yang, Haiyan

    2015-08-28

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a common pathogen that can cause serious infections, even death. Because of the horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of antibiotic resistance genes, the drug resistant condition is becoming increasingly prevalent. Recently, an adaptive immunity system, named clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), was discovered and demonstrated to confer a defense against foreign invading elements that may carry the antibiotic resistance genes. In this study, we reveal the features of 45 identified CRISPR loci and the CRISPR associated gene (Cas) in 32 S. aureus strains from CRISPR database. Five spacers of S. aureus 08BA02176 and MSHR1132 were homologous with foreign genetic sequences from phages or plasmids, even containing a spacer sequence identical to part of some phages' genomes containing lukPV gene that encodes the PVL toxin. Many S. aureus strains with the same CRISPR type shared the same MLST type. CRISPR loci that had 3 or more similar protein loci mostly belonged to the same CRISPR type. We came to the conclusion that the CRISPR/Cas of strains 08BA02176 and MSHR1132 were inherited from a common ancestor or recombined from Staphylococcus lugdunensis. CRISPR loci can be mobilized and can transfer among different but closely related species, and the same types of MLST strains exhibit a higher affinity to the same types of CRISPR loci. Bacteriophages may be the predominant challenge facing S. aureus. The CRISPR/Cas structure may limit the transmission of bacterial virulence among S. aureus.

  20. Exercise-induced stress resistance is independent of exercise controllability and the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Benjamin N; Spence, Katie G; Crevling, Danielle M; Clark, Peter J; Craig, Wendy C; Fleshner, Monika

    2013-02-01

    Exercise increases resistance against stress-related disorders such as anxiety and depression. Similarly, the perception of control is a powerful predictor of neurochemical and behavioral responses to stress, but whether the experience of choosing to exercise, and exerting control over that exercise, is a critical factor in producing exercise-induced stress resistance is unknown. The current studies investigated whether the protective effects of exercise against the anxiety- and depression-like consequences of stress are dependent on exercise controllability and a brain region implicated in the protective effects of controllable experiences, the medial prefrontal cortex. Adult male Fischer 344 rats remained sedentary, were forced to run on treadmills or motorised running wheels, or had voluntary access to wheels for 6 weeks. Three weeks after exercise onset, rats received sham surgery or excitotoxic lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex. Rats were exposed to home cage or uncontrollable tail shock treatment three weeks later. Shock-elicited fear conditioning and shuttle box escape testing occurred the next day. Both forced and voluntary wheel running, but not treadmill training, prevented the exaggerated fear conditioning and interference with escape learning produced by uncontrollable stress. Lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex failed to eliminate the protective effects of forced or voluntary wheel running. These data suggest that exercise controllability and the medial prefrontal cortex are not critical factors in conferring the protective effects of exercise against the affective consequences of stressor exposure, and imply that exercise perceived as forced may still benefit affect and mental health.

  1. Multidrug-resistant organisms in refugees: prevalences and impact on infection control in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Heudorf, Ursel; Albert-Braun, Sabine; Hunfeld, Klaus-Peter; Birne, Franz-Ulrich; Schulze, Jörg; Strobel, Klaus; Petscheleit, Knut; Kempf, Volkhard A. J.; Brandt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The refugee crisis is a great challenge to the social and healthcare system in European countries, especially in Germany. An abundance of data has been published on the refugees’ health problems (infections as well as physical diseases and psychiatric problems) and their prevention (i.e., sanitary and vaccination programs). However, data on prevalences of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) in refugees are scarce, although it is known that most refugees are from or travelled through countries with high prevalences of MDRO. This paper presents current data on MDRO colonization of refugees admitted to hospitals, and the impact of screening upon admission and infection control in hospitals is discussed. Methods: Anonymous data obtained by screening upon hospital admission were reported by hospitals in the Rhine-Main region of Germany to the local public health department. Screening and microbiological analyses were performed from December 2015 to March 2016 according to standardized and validated methods. Results: 9.8% of the refugees screened (32/325) exhibited colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and 23.3% of the refugees (67/290) were colonized with Gram-negative bacteria with extended spectrum beta-lactamases, and/or enterobacteria with resistance against 3 or 4 groups of antibacterials, so-called 3MRGN (multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria with resistance against penicillins, cephalosporins and quinolones) and 4MRGN (with additional resistance against carbapenems). Carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (CRGN) were detected in 2.1% (6/290) of the refugees. Conclusion: The data confirms the studies published between 2014 and 2016, encompassing refugees tested in Germany, the Netherlands and Israel, with prevalences of MRSA and CRGN up to 13.5% and 5.6%. The MDRO prevalences are higher than those of “risk groups” for MRSA, such as hemodialysis patients and patients depending on outpatient home

  2. Identification and mapping in spring wheat of genetic factors controlling stem rust resistance and the study of their epistatic interactions across multiple environments.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Knox, R E; DePauw, R M; Singh, A K; Cuthbert, R D; Campbell, H L; Singh, D; Bhavani, S; Fetch, T; Clarke, F

    2013-08-01

    Stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) is responsible for major production losses in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) around the world. The spread of stem rust race Ug99 and variants is a threat to worldwide wheat production and efforts are ongoing to identify and incorporate resistance. The objectives of this research were to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) and to study their epistatic interactions for stem rust resistance in a population derived from the Canadian wheat cultivars AC Cadillac and Carberry. A doubled haploid (DH) population was developed and genotyped with DArT(®) and SSR markers. The parents and DH lines were phenotyped for stem rust severity and infection response to Ug99 and variant races in 2009, 2010 and 2011 in field rust nurseries near Njoro, Kenya, and to North American races in 2011 and 2012 near Swift Current, SK, Canada. Seedling infection type to race TTKSK was assessed in a bio-containment facility in 2009 and 2012 near Morden, MB. Eight QTL for stem rust resistance and three QTL for pseudo-black chaff on nine wheat chromosomes were identified. The phenotypic variance (PV) explained by the stem rust resistance QTL ranged from 2.4 to 48.8 %. AC Cadillac contributed stem rust resistance QTL on chromosomes 2B, 3B, 5B, 6D, 7B and 7D. Carberry contributed resistance QTL on 4B and 5A. Epistatic interactions were observed between loci on 4B and 5B, 4B and 7B, 6D and 3B, 6D and 5B, and 6D and 7B. The stem rust resistance locus on 6D interacted synergistically with 5B to improve the disease resistance through both crossover and non-crossover interactions depending on the environment. Results from this study will assist in planning breeding for stem rust resistance by maximizing QTL main effects and epistatic interactions.

  3. Transgenic Resistance Confers Effective Field Level Control of Bacterial Spot Disease in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Diana M.; Stall, Robert E.; Jones, Jeffrey B.; Pauly, Michael H.; Vallad, Gary E.; Dahlbeck, Doug; Staskawicz, Brian J.; Scott, John W.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether lines of transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) expressing the Bs2 resistance gene from pepper, a close relative of tomato, demonstrate improved resistance to bacterial spot disease caused by Xanthomonas species in replicated multi-year field trials under commercial type growing conditions. We report that the presence of the Bs2 gene in the highly susceptible VF 36 background reduced disease to extremely low levels, and VF 36-Bs2 plants displayed the lowest disease severity amongst all tomato varieties tested, including commercial and breeding lines with host resistance. Yields of marketable fruit from transgenic lines were typically 2.5 times that of the non-transformed parent line, but varied between 1.5 and 11.5 fold depending on weather conditions and disease pressure. Trials were conducted without application of any copper-based bactericides, presently in wide use despite negative impacts on the environment. This is the first demonstration of effective field resistance in a transgenic genotype based on a plant R gene and provides an opportunity for control of a devastating pathogen while eliminating ineffective copper pesticides. PMID:22870280

  4. Seven newly identified loci for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jason D; Simmonds, Matthew J; Walker, Neil M; Burren, Oliver; Brand, Oliver J; Guo, Hui; Wallace, Chris; Stevens, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), is one of the most common of the immune-mediated diseases. To further investigate the genetic determinants of AITD, we conducted an association study using a custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, the ImmunoChip. The SNP array contains all known and genotype-able SNPs across 186 distinct susceptibility loci associated with one or more immune-mediated diseases. After stringent quality control, we analysed 103 875 common SNPs (minor allele frequency >0.05) in 2285 GD and 462 HT patients and 9364 controls. We found evidence for seven new AITD risk loci (P < 1.12 × 10(-6); a permutation test derived significance threshold), five at locations previously associated and two at locations awaiting confirmation, with other immune-mediated diseases. PMID:22922229

  5. Seven newly identified loci for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jason D; Simmonds, Matthew J; Walker, Neil M; Burren, Oliver; Brand, Oliver J; Guo, Hui; Wallace, Chris; Stevens, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), is one of the most common of the immune-mediated diseases. To further investigate the genetic determinants of AITD, we conducted an association study using a custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, the ImmunoChip. The SNP array contains all known and genotype-able SNPs across 186 distinct susceptibility loci associated with one or more immune-mediated diseases. After stringent quality control, we analysed 103 875 common SNPs (minor allele frequency >0.05) in 2285 GD and 462 HT patients and 9364 controls. We found evidence for seven new AITD risk loci (P < 1.12 × 10(-6); a permutation test derived significance threshold), five at locations previously associated and two at locations awaiting confirmation, with other immune-mediated diseases.

  6. Isolate Dependency of Brassica rapa Resistance QTLs to Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Kwon, Soon-Tae; Chen, Fang; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Generalist necrotrophic pathogens including Botrytis cinerea cause significant yield and financial losses on Brassica crops. However, there is little knowledge about the mechanisms underlying the complex interactions encoded by both host and pathogen genomes in this interaction. This potentially includes multiple layers of plant defense and pathogen virulence mechanisms that could complicate in breeding broad spectrum resistance within Brassica species. Glucosinolates (GSLs) are a diverse group of defense metabolites that play a key role in interaction between Brassica and biotic attackers. In this study, we utilized a collection of diverse B. cinerea isolates to investigate resistance within the Brassica rapa R500 × IMB211 recombinant inbred line population. We tested variation on lesion development and glucosinolate accumulation in parental lines and all population lines. We then mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) for both resistances to B. cinerea and defense metabolites in this population. Phenotypic analysis and QTL mapping demonstrate that the genetic basis of resistance to B. cinerea in B. rapa is isolate specific and polygenic with transgressive segregation that both parents contribute resistance alleles. QTLs controlling defensive GSLs are highly dependent on pathogen infection. An overlap of two QTLs identified between resistance to B. cinerea and defense metabolites also showed isolate specific effects. This work suggests that directly searching for resistance loci may not be the best approach at improving resistance in B. rapa to necrotrophic pathogen. PMID:26925079

  7. Isolate Dependency of Brassica rapa Resistance QTLs to Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Kwon, Soon-Tae; Chen, Fang; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Generalist necrotrophic pathogens including Botrytis cinerea cause significant yield and financial losses on Brassica crops. However, there is little knowledge about the mechanisms underlying the complex interactions encoded by both host and pathogen genomes in this interaction. This potentially includes multiple layers of plant defense and pathogen virulence mechanisms that could complicate in breeding broad spectrum resistance within Brassica species. Glucosinolates (GSLs) are a diverse group of defense metabolites that play a key role in interaction between Brassica and biotic attackers. In this study, we utilized a collection of diverse B. cinerea isolates to investigate resistance within the Brassica rapa R500 × IMB211 recombinant inbred line population. We tested variation on lesion development and glucosinolate accumulation in parental lines and all population lines. We then mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) for both resistances to B. cinerea and defense metabolites in this population. Phenotypic analysis and QTL mapping demonstrate that the genetic basis of resistance to B. cinerea in B. rapa is isolate specific and polygenic with transgressive segregation that both parents contribute resistance alleles. QTLs controlling defensive GSLs are highly dependent on pathogen infection. An overlap of two QTLs identified between resistance to B. cinerea and defense metabolites also showed isolate specific effects. This work suggests that directly searching for resistance loci may not be the best approach at improving resistance in B. rapa to necrotrophic pathogen.

  8. Isolate Dependency of Brassica rapa Resistance QTLs to Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Kwon, Soon-Tae; Chen, Fang; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Generalist necrotrophic pathogens including Botrytis cinerea cause significant yield and financial losses on Brassica crops. However, there is little knowledge about the mechanisms underlying the complex interactions encoded by both host and pathogen genomes in this interaction. This potentially includes multiple layers of plant defense and pathogen virulence mechanisms that could complicate in breeding broad spectrum resistance within Brassica species. Glucosinolates (GSLs) are a diverse group of defense metabolites that play a key role in interaction between Brassica and biotic attackers. In this study, we utilized a collection of diverse B. cinerea isolates to investigate resistance within the Brassica rapa R500 × IMB211 recombinant inbred line population. We tested variation on lesion development and glucosinolate accumulation in parental lines and all population lines. We then mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) for both resistances to B. cinerea and defense metabolites in this population. Phenotypic analysis and QTL mapping demonstrate that the genetic basis of resistance to B. cinerea in B. rapa is isolate specific and polygenic with transgressive segregation that both parents contribute resistance alleles. QTLs controlling defensive GSLs are highly dependent on pathogen infection. An overlap of two QTLs identified between resistance to B. cinerea and defense metabolites also showed isolate specific effects. This work suggests that directly searching for resistance loci may not be the best approach at improving resistance in B. rapa to necrotrophic pathogen. PMID:26925079

  9. High-density genotyping of immune-related loci identifies new SLE risk variants in individuals with Asian ancestry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E; Looger, Loren L; Zhou, Xu-Jie; Kim, Kwangwoo; Okada, Yukinori; Ma, Jianyang; Qi, Yuan-Yuan; Kim-Howard, Xana; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Bhattarai, Krishna; Adler, Adam; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Kochi, Yuta; Suzuki, Akari; Kubo, Michiaki; Sumida, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Young Jin; Han, Bok-Ghee; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Wren, Jonathan D; Harley, John B; Shen, Nan; Chua, Kek Heng; Zhang, Hong; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Nath, Swapan K

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a strong but incompletely understood genetic architecture. We conducted an association study with replication in 4,478 SLE cases and 12,656 controls from six East Asian cohorts to identify new SLE susceptibility loci and better localize known loci. We identified ten new loci and confirmed 20 known loci with genome-wide significance. Among the new loci, the most significant locus was GTF2IRD1-GTF2I at 7q11.23 (rs73366469, Pmeta = 3.75 × 10(-117), odds ratio (OR) = 2.38), followed by DEF6, IL12B, TCF7, TERT, CD226, PCNXL3, RASGRP1, SYNGR1 and SIGLEC6. We identified the most likely functional variants at each locus by analyzing epigenetic marks and gene expression data. Ten candidate variants are known to alter gene expression in cis or in trans. Enrichment analysis highlights the importance of these loci in B cell and T cell biology. The new loci, together with previously known loci, increase the explained heritability of SLE to 24%. The new loci share functional and ontological characteristics with previously reported loci and are possible drug targets for SLE therapeutics.

  10. Genomewide meta-analysis identifies novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To perform a one-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility and explore functional consequences of new susceptibility loci. Methods We synthesized 7 MS GWAS. Each dataset was imputed using HapMap phase II and a per-SNP meta-analysis was performed across the 7 datasets. We explored RNA expression data using a quantitative trait analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 228 subjects with demyelinating disease. Results We meta-analyzed 2,529,394 unique SNPs in 5,545 cases and 12,153 controls. We identified three novel susceptibility alleles: rs170934T at 3p24.1 (OR=1.17, P = 1.6 × 10−8) near EOMES, rs2150702G in the second intron of MLANA on chromosome 9p24.1 (OR = 1.16, P = 3.3 × 10−8), and rs6718520A in an intergenic region on chromosome 2p21, with THADA as the nearest flanking gene (OR = 1.17, P = 3.4 × 10−8). The three new loci do not have a strong “cis” effect on RNA expression in PBMCs. Ten other susceptibility loci had a suggestive P<1×10−6, some of which have evidence of association in other inflammatory diseases, i.e. IL12B, TAGAP, PLEK, and ZMIZ1. Interpretation We have performed a meta-analysis of GWAS in MS that more than doubles the size of previous gene discovery efforts and highlights three novel MS susceptibility loci. These and additional loci with suggestive evidence of association are excellent candidates for further investigations to refine and validate their role in the genetic architecture of MS. PMID:22190364

  11. [Grupo Colaborativo de Resistencia Bacteriana, Chile: recommendations 2014 towards the control of bacteria resistance].

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Marcela; Silva, Francisco; Arancibia, J Miguel; Rosales, Ruth; Ajenjo, M Cristina; Riedel, Gisela; Camponovo, Rossana; Labarca, Jaime

    2015-06-01

    Five issues were reviewed in depth at the 2014 annual meeting of Colaborative Group Against Bacterial Resistance and the antecedents and conclusions are detailed in this document. I.- News in CLSI 2014: the difficulties and implications on its implementation at the local level were reviewed and recommendations were set. II.- Criteria for determining the incidence of multi-resistant microorganism in critical care units where indicators and monitoring methodology for better quantification of microorganisms were defined. III.- Quality requirements were established to be considered by the professionals involved in the selection of antimicrobials in the hospital. IV.- Transfer policies, screening and contact precautions for the control of transmission of multiresistant bacteria. V.- Recommendations for health facilities when a carbapenemase producing enterobacteriacea is detected, in a checklist format for rapid deployment in hospitals without endemia of these agents. These are suggestions that arise from the joint work of specialists from many hospitals that do not represent consensus or recommendation, but may help to control the resistance level of each health facility in the country.

  12. Local silencing controls the oxidative stress response and the multidrug resistance in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Orta-Zavalza, Emmanuel; Guerrero-Serrano, Gehenna; Gutiérrez-Escobedo, Guadalupe; Cañas-Villamar, Israel; Juárez-Cepeda, Jacqueline; Castaño, Irene; De Las Peñas, Alejandro

    2013-06-01

    In Candida glabrata, the sirtuins Sir2 and Hst1 control the expression of a wide number of genes including adhesins required for host colonization and niacin transporters needed for growth. Given that these sirtuins can be inactivated during infection, we asked if their inhibition could modify the response of C. glabrata to other stressful conditions. Here, we found that deletion of HST1 decreases susceptibility of C. glabrata to fluconazole and hydrogen peroxide. The transcription factor Pdr1 and the ABC transporter Cdr1 mediated the fluconazole resistance phenotype of the hst1Δ cells, whereas the transcriptional activator Msn4 and the catalase Cta1 are necessary to provide oxidative stress resistance. We show that the transcription factor Sum1 interacts with Hst1 and participate in the regulation of these genes. Interestingly, even though C. glabrata and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are closely related phylogenetically, deletion of HST1 decreased susceptibility to fluconazole and hydrogen peroxide only in C. glabrata but not in S. cerevisiae, indicating a different transcriptional control by two similar sirtuins. Our findings suggest that Hst1 acts as a regulator of stress resistance associated-genes. PMID:23651300

  13. High-density genetic mapping identifies new susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Diogo, Dorothée; Lee, Annette; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli; Viatte, Sebastien; McAllister, Kate; Amos, Christopher I; Padyukov, Leonid; Toes, Rene E M; Huizinga, Tom W J; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hu, Xinli; Sandor, Cynthia; de Bakker, Paul I W; Davila, Sonia; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heng, Khai Koon; Andrews, Robert; Edkins, Sarah; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Symmons, Deborah; Concannon, Pat; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S; Deloukas, Panos; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlsetig, Lisbeth; Martin, Javier; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Plenge, Robert M; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane

    2012-12-01

    Using the Immunochip custom SNP array, which was designed for dense genotyping of 186 loci identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we analyzed 11,475 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (cases) of European ancestry and 15,870 controls for 129,464 markers. We combined these data in a meta-analysis with GWAS data from additional independent cases (n = 2,363) and controls (n = 17,872). We identified 14 new susceptibility loci, 9 of which were associated with rheumatoid arthritis overall and five of which were specifically associated with disease that was positive for anticitrullinated peptide antibodies, bringing the number of confirmed rheumatoid arthritis risk loci in individuals of European ancestry to 46. We refined the peak of association to a single gene for 19 loci, identified secondary independent effects at 6 loci and identified association to low-frequency variants at 4 loci. Bioinformatic analyses generated strong hypotheses for the causal SNP at seven loci. This study illustrates the advantages of dense SNP mapping analysis to inform subsequent functional investigations.

  14. High-density genetic mapping identifies new susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Diogo, Dorothée; Lee, Annette; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli; Viatte, Sebastien; McAllister, Kate; Amos, Christopher I; Padyukov, Leonid; Toes, Rene E M; Huizinga, Tom W J; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hu, Xinli; Sandor, Cynthia; de Bakker, Paul I W; Davila, Sonia; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heng, Khai Koon; Andrews, Robert; Edkins, Sarah; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Symmons, Deborah; Concannon, Pat; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S; Deloukas, Panos; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlsetig, Lisbeth; Martin, Javier; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Plenge, Robert M; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane

    2012-12-01

    Using the Immunochip custom SNP array, which was designed for dense genotyping of 186 loci identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we analyzed 11,475 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (cases) of European ancestry and 15,870 controls for 129,464 markers. We combined these data in a meta-analysis with GWAS data from additional independent cases (n = 2,363) and controls (n = 17,872). We identified 14 new susceptibility loci, 9 of which were associated with rheumatoid arthritis overall and five of which were specifically associated with disease that was positive for anticitrullinated peptide antibodies, bringing the number of confirmed rheumatoid arthritis risk loci in individuals of European ancestry to 46. We refined the peak of association to a single gene for 19 loci, identified secondary independent effects at 6 loci and identified association to low-frequency variants at 4 loci. Bioinformatic analyses generated strong hypotheses for the causal SNP at seven loci. This study illustrates the advantages of dense SNP mapping analysis to inform subsequent functional investigations. PMID:23143596

  15. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A.; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K.; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V.; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S.; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chung, Wendy K.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C.; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M.; Eccles, Diana M.; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B.; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gayther, Simon A.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G.; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Goldgar, David E.; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H.; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E.; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hopper, John L.; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J.; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y.; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Knight, Julia A.; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L.; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E.; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W. M.; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L.; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M.; Muranen, Taru A.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K.; Peeters, Petra H.; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B.; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E.; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Monteiro, Alvaro A. N.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10−8) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. PMID:27117709

  16. Allele imbalance at tumour suppressor loci during the indolent phase of follicle centre cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Randerson, J; Cawkwell, L; Jack, A S; Child, A J; Shiach, C R; Lewis, F; Johnson, P; Evans, P; Barrans, S; Morgan, G J

    1996-06-01

    We have examined 41 cases of follicle centre cell lymphoma with fluorescent PCR of microsatellite repeats closely linked to or within six tumour suppressor gene loci (APC, DCC, P53, RB1, WT1 and NM23). These probes are highly informative with heterozygousity rates in the range of 57%-90%. In addition we have used four loci from chromosome 6 (D6S260, TNFa, D6S281 and D6S262) as control loci which are unlikely to be involved in the pathogenesis of lymphoma. Of 369 informative PCR reactions allele imbalance was identified in 38 (10%) and this was seen in 23 of the 41 cases. Looking at individual loci allele imbalance was seen in APC(1) 11%, APC(2) 12%, P53(1) 5%, P53 (2) 7%, WT1 5%, RB1 13%, DCC 18% and NM23 0%. This frequency of change was no different from that seen at the control loci D6S260 16%, TNFa 20%, D6S281 4% and D6S262 9%. In the indolent phase of germinal centre cell lymphoma there is therefore quite a high rate of allele imbalance at all loci but this is no higher in those loci linked to tumour suppressor genes. PMID:8724537

  17. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-04-27

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction.

  18. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. PMID:27117709

  19. High density genetic mapping identifies new susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Diogo, Dorothée; Lee, Annette; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli; Viatte, Sebastien; McAllister, Kate; Amos, Christopher I.; Padyukov, Leonid; Toes, Rene E.M.; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hu, Xinli; Sandor, Cynthia; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Davila, Sonia; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heng, Khai Koon; Andrews, Robert; Edkins, Sarah; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Symmons, Deborah; Concannon, Pat; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S; Deloukas, Panos; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlsetig, Lisbeth; Martin, Javier; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Plenge, Robert; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Summary Using the Immunochip custom single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, designed for dense genotyping of 186 genome wide association study (GWAS) confirmed loci we analysed 11,475 rheumatoid arthritis cases of European ancestry and 15,870 controls for 129,464 markers. The data were combined in meta-analysis with GWAS data from additional independent cases (n=2,363) and controls (n=17,872). We identified fourteen novel loci; nine were associated with rheumatoid arthritis overall and 5 specifically in anti-citrillunated peptide antibody positive disease, bringing the number of confirmed European ancestry rheumatoid arthritis loci to 46. We refined the peak of association to a single gene for 19 loci, identified secondary independent effects at six loci and association to low frequency variants (minor allele frequency <0.05) at 4 loci. Bioinformatic analysis of the data generated strong hypotheses for the causal SNP at seven loci. This study illustrates the advantages of dense SNP mapping analysis to inform subsequent functional investigations. PMID:23143596

  20. Development of myoelectric control type speaking valve with low flow resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooe, Katsutoshi; Sakurai, Kohei; Mimaki, Shinya

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to develop welfare devices for patients with phonation disorder. One of these devices is the electrical controltype speaking valve system. The conventional speaking valves have one-way valve architecture, they open when the user breathes in, and they close when user breathes out and produce voices. This type is very simple and tough, but some users feel closeness in case of exhalation without phonation. This problem is caused by its mechanism what can not be controlled by user's will. Therefore, we proposed an electrical control-type speaking valve system to resolve this problem. This valve is controlled by neck myoelectric signal of sternohyoid muscle. From our previous report, it was clarified that this valve had better performance about easy-to-breath. Furthermore, we proposed the compact myoelectric control-type speaking valve system. The new-type speaking valve was enough small to attach the human body, and its opening area is larger than that of conventional one. Additionally, we described the improvement of flow channel shape by using of FEM analysis. According to the result of the analysis, it was clarified that the shape-improved speaking valve gets the low flow resistance channel in case of inspiration. In this report, we tried to make the flow resistance lower by the shape of current plates, in case of both inspiration and exhalation. From the result of FEM analysis, our speaking valve could get better flow channel than older one.

  1. Association mapping of spot blotch resistance in wild barley

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Joy K.; Smith, Kevin P.; Muehlbauer, Gary J.; Chao, Shiaoman; Close, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Spot blotch, caused by Cochliobolus sativus, is an important foliar disease of barley. The disease has been controlled for over 40 years through the deployment of cultivars with durable resistance derived from the line NDB112. Pathotypes of C. sativus with virulence for the NDB112 resistance have been detected in Canada; thus, many commercial cultivars are vulnerable to spot blotch epidemics. To increase the diversity of spot blotch resistance in cultivated barley, we evaluated 318 diverse wild barley accessions comprising the Wild Barley Diversity Collection (WBDC) for reaction to C. sativus at the seedling stage and utilized an association mapping (AM) approach to identify and map resistance loci. A high frequency of resistance was found in the WBDC as 95% (302/318) of the accessions exhibited low infection responses. The WBDC was genotyped with 558 Diversity Array Technology (DArT®) and 2,878 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and subjected to structure analysis before running the AM procedure. Thirteen QTL for spot blotch resistance were identified with DArT and SNP markers. These QTL were found on chromosomes 1H, 2H, 3H, 5H, and 7H and explained from 2.3 to 3.9% of the phenotypic variance. Nearly half of the identified QTL mapped to chromosome bins where spot blotch resistance loci were previously reported, offering some validation for the AM approach. The other QTL mapped to unique genomic regions and may represent new spot blotch resistance loci. This study demonstrates that AM is an effective technique for identifying and mapping QTL for disease resistance in a wild crop progenitor. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11032-010-9402-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20694035

  2. Dissection of the genetic architecture of rice resistance to the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Kang, Houxiang; Wang, Yue; Peng, Shasha; Zhang, Yanli; Xiao, Yinghui; Wang, Dan; Qu, Shaohong; Li, Zhiqiang; Yan, Shuangyong; Wang, Zhilong; Liu, Wende; Ning, Yuese; Korniliev, Pavel; Leung, Hei; Mezey, Jason; McCouch, Susan R; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2016-08-01

    Resistance in rice cultivars to the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is complex and is controlled by both major genes and quantitative trait loci (QTLs). We undertook a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using the rice diversity panel 1 (RDP1) that was genotyped using a high-density (700 000 single nucleotide polymorphisms) array and inoculated with five diverse M. oryzae isolates. We identified 97 loci associated with blast resistance (LABRs). Among them, 82 were new regions and 15 co-localized with known blast resistance loci. The top 72 LABRs explained up to 98% of the phenotypic variation. The candidate genes in the LABRs encode nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) resistance proteins, receptor-like protein kinases, transcription factors and defence-related proteins. Among them, LABR_64 was strongly associated with resistance to all five isolates. We analysed the function of candidate genes underlying LABR_64 using RNA interference (RNAi) technology and identified two new resistance alleles at the Pi5 locus. We demonstrate an efficient strategy for rapid allele discovery using the power of GWAS, coupled with RNAi technology, for the dissection of complex blast resistance in rice.

  3. Current-Controlled Negative Differential Resistance Due to Joule Heating In Tio2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratkovsky, A. M.; Alexandrov, A. S.; Savel'Ev, S. E.; Strukov, D. B.; Williams, R. S.

    2012-02-01

    We show that Joule heating causes current-controlled negative differential resistance (CC-NDR) in TiO2 memristive systems by constructing an analytical model of the current-voltage characteristics based on polaronic transport for Ohm's law and Newton's law of cooling and fitting this model to experimental data. This threshold switching is he ``soft breakdown'' observed during electroforming in TiO2 and other transition-metal oxide based memristors, as well as a precursor to ``ON'' or ``SET'' switching of unipolar memristors from their high to their low resistance states. The shape of the V-I curves is a sensitive indicator of the nature of the polaronic conduction, which apparently follows an adiabatic regime [1]. [4pt] [1] A.S. Alexandrov, A.M.Bratkovsky, B.Bridle, S.E.Savel'ev, D. Strukov, and R.S.Williams, Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, xxx (2011).

  4. Current-controlled negative differential resistance due to Joule heating in TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A. S.; Bratkovsky, A. M.; Bridle, B.; Savel'ev, S. E.; Strukov, D. B.; Stanley Williams, R.

    2011-11-01

    We show that Joule heating causes current-controlled negative differential resistance (CC-NDR) in TiO2 by constructing an analytical model of the voltage-current V(I) characteristic based on polaronic transport for Ohm's Law and Newton's Law of Cooling and fitting this model to experimental data. This threshold switching is the "soft breakdown" observed during electroforming of TiO2 and other transition-metal-oxide based memristors, as well as a precursor to "ON" or "SET" switching of unipolar memristors from their high to their low resistance states. The shape of the V(I) curve is a sensitive indicator of the nature of the polaronic conduction.

  5. A major gene controlling warfarin-resistance in the house mouse.

    PubMed

    Wallace, M E; MacSwiney, F J

    1976-04-01

    The spread of a "cream" mutant in a wild population of house mice is reported. The hypothesis that the gene responsible for the colour, extreme chinchilla, ce, has spread because of linkage with a major gene for warfarin-resistance, is tested by a linkage backcross. The results prove that a major gene does exist, that it is very closely linked with frizzy, fr, in chromosome 7, which in turn is linked with ce, that it is fully dominant in females at 4 months of age, and that its partial dominance in males is under the control of modifiers. The symbol War is proposed for the gene. Its position in chromosome 7 is analagous with the position of the resistant gene, Rw2, in the rat in the analagous chromosome. The adaptive significance of the finding is discussed, as also are reports of certain other mutants in wild populations of mice. PMID:1063212

  6. Control of volume resistivity in inorganic-organic separators. [for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Manzo, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    Control of resistivity in NASA inorganic-organic separators is achieved by incorporating small percentages of high surface area, fine-particle silica with other ingredients in the separator coating. The volume resistivity appears to be predictable from coating composition, that is, from the surface area of filler particles in the coating. The approach has been applied to two polymer-'plasticizer'-filler coating systems, where the filler content of each is below the generally acknowledged critical pigment volume concentration of the coating. Application of these coating systems to 0.0254 cm thick (10 mil) fuel-cell grade asbestos sheet produces inexpensive, flexible, microporous separators that perform at least as well as the original inorganic-organic concept, the Astropower separator.

  7. The Importance of Movement Velocity as a Measure to Control Resistance Training Intensity

    PubMed Central

    González-Badillo, Juan J.; Marques, Mário C.; Sánchez-Medina, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Configuration of the exercise stimulus in resitance training has been traditionally associated with a combination of the so-called ‘acute resistance exercise variables’ (exercise type and order, loading, number of repetitions and sets, rests duration and movement velocity). During typical resistance exercise in isoinertial conditions, and assuming every repetition is performed with maximal voluntary effort, velocity unintentionally declines as fatigue develops. However, few studies analyzing the response to different resitance training schemes have described changes in repetition velocity or power. It thus seems necessary to conduct more research using models of fatigue that analyze the reduction in mechanical variables such as force, velocity and power output over repeated dynamic contractions in actual training or competition settings. Thus, the aim of this paper was to discuss the importance of movement velocity concerning control training intensity. PMID:23487504

  8. Linezolid-resistant staphylococcal bacteraemia: A multicentre case-case-control study in Italy.

    PubMed

    Russo, Alessandro; Campanile, Floriana; Falcone, Marco; Tascini, Carlo; Bassetti, Matteo; Goldoni, Paola; Trancassini, Maria; Della Siega, Paola; Menichetti, Francesco; Stefani, Stefania; Venditti, Mario

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this multicentre study was to analyse the characteristics of patients with bloodstream infections due to staphylococcal strains resistant to linezolid. This was a retrospective case-case-control study of patients hospitalised in three large teaching hospitals in Italy. A linezolid-resistant (LIN-R) Staphylococcus spp. group and a linezolid-susceptible (LIN-S) Staphylococcus spp. group were compared with control patients to determine the clinical features and factors associated with isolation of LIN-R strains. All LIN-R Staphylococcus spp. strains underwent molecular typing. Compared with the LIN-S group, central venous catheters were the main source of infection in the LIN-R group. The LIN-R and LIN-S groups showed a similar incidence of severe sepsis or septic shock, and both showed a higher incidence of these compared with the control group. Overall, patients in the LIN-R group had a higher 30-day mortality rate. Multivariate analysis found previous linezolid therapy, linezolid therapy >14 days, antibiotic therapy in the previous 30 days, antibiotic therapy >14 days, previous use of at least two antibiotics and hospitalisation in the previous 90 days as independent risk factors associated with isolation of a LIN-R strain. The G2576T mutation in domain V of 23S rRNA was the principal mechanism of resistance; only one strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis carried the cfr methylase gene (A2503), together with L4 insertion (71GGR72) and L3 substitution (H146Q). LIN-R strains are associated with severe impairment of clinical conditions and unfavourable patient outcomes. Reinforcement of infection control measures may have an important role in preventing these infections. PMID:25600893

  9. Immunochip analysis identifies multiple susceptibility loci for systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Maureen D; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Gorlova, Olga; Martin, José Ezequiel; Zhou, Xiaodong; Chen, Wei V; Assassi, Shervin; Ying, Jun; Tan, Filemon K; Arnett, Frank C; Reveille, John D; Guerra, Sandra; Teruel, María; Carmona, Francisco David; Gregersen, Peter K; Lee, Annette T; López-Isac, Elena; Ochoa, Eguzkine; Carreira, Patricia; Simeón, Carmen Pilar; Castellví, Iván; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Padyukov, Leonid; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Wijmenga, Cisca; Brown, Matthew; Beretta, Lorenzo; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jörg H W; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Schuerwegh, Annemie J; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Airó, Paolo; Lunardi, Claudio; Shiels, Paul; van Laar, Jacob M; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher; Wigley, Fredrick M; Hummers, Laura K; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique E; Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Pope, Janet E; Furst, Daniel E; Khanna, Dinesh; Phillips, Kristin; Schiopu, Elena; Segal, Barbara M; Molitor, Jerry A; Silver, Richard M; Steen, Virginia D; Simms, Robert W; Lafyatis, Robert A; Fessler, Barri J; Frech, Tracy M; Alkassab, Firas; Docherty, Peter; Kaminska, Elzbieta; Khalidi, Nader; Jones, Henry Niall; Markland, Janet; Robinson, David; Broen, Jasper; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Fonseca, Carmen; Koeleman, Bobby P; Martin, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 1,833 systemic sclerosis (SSc) cases and 3,466 controls were genotyped with the Immunochip array. Classical alleles, amino acid residues, and SNPs across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region were imputed and tested. These analyses resulted in a model composed of six polymorphic amino acid positions and seven SNPs that explained the observed significant associations in the region. In addition, a replication step comprising 4,017 SSc cases and 5,935 controls was carried out for several selected non-HLA variants, reaching a total of 5,850 cases and 9,401 controls of European ancestry. Following this strategy, we identified and validated three SSc risk loci, including DNASE1L3 at 3p14, the SCHIP1-IL12A locus at 3q25, and ATG5 at 6q21, as well as a suggested association of the TREH-DDX6 locus at 11q23. The associations of several previously reported SSc risk loci were validated and further refined, and the observed peak of association in PXK was related to DNASE1L3. Our study has increased the number of known genetic associations with SSc, provided further insight into the pleiotropic effects of shared autoimmune risk factors, and highlighted the power of dense mapping for detecting previously overlooked susceptibility loci.

  10. Immunochip Analysis Identifies Multiple Susceptibility Loci for Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, Maureen D.; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Gorlova, Olga; Martin, José Ezequiel; Zhou, Xiaodong; Chen, Wei V.; Assassi, Shervin; Ying, Jun; Tan, Filemon K.; Arnett, Frank C.; Reveille, John D.; Guerra, Sandra; Teruel, María; Carmona, Francisco David; Gregersen, Peter K.; Lee, Annette T.; López-Isac, Elena; Ochoa, Eguzkine; Carreira, Patricia; Simeón, Carmen Pilar; Castellví, Iván; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Ríos, Raquel; Callejas, José Luis; Navarrete, Nuria; García Portales, Rosa; Camps, María Teresa; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; González-Escribano, María F.; Sánchez-Román, Julio; García-Hernández, Francisco José; Castillo, María Jesús; Aguirre, María Ángeles; Gómez-Gracia, Inmaculada; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Vicente, Esther; Andreu, José Luis; Fernández de Castro, Mónica; García de la Peña, Paloma; López-Longo, Francisco Javier; Martínez, Lina; Fonollosa, Vicente; Espinosa, Gerard; Tolosa, Carlos; Pros, Anna; Rodríguez Carballeira, Mónica; Narváez, Francisco Javier; Rubio Rivas, Manel; Ortiz Santamaría, Vera; Díaz, Bernardino; Trapiella, Luis; Freire, María del Carmen; Sousa, Adrián; Egurbide, María Victoria; Fanlo Mateo, Patricia; Sáez-Comet, Luis; Díaz, Federico; Hernández, Vanesa; Beltrán, Emma; Román-Ivorra, José Andrés; Grau, Elena; Alegre Sancho, Juan José; Blanco García, Francisco J.; Oreiro, Natividad; Fernández Sueiro, Luis; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Padyukov, Leonid; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Wijmenga, Cisca; Brown, Matthew; Beretta, Lorenzo; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jörg H.W.; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Schuerwegh, Annemie J.; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Airó, Paolo; Lunardi, Claudio; Shiels, Paul; van Laar, Jacob M.; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Hummers, Laura K.; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique E.; Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Pope, Janet E.; Furst, Daniel E.; Khanna, Dinesh; Phillips, Kristin; Schiopu, Elena; Segal, Barbara M.; Molitor, Jerry A.; Silver, Richard M.; Steen, Virginia D.; Simms, Robert W.; Lafyatis, Robert A.; Fessler, Barri J.; Frech, Tracy M.; AlKassab, Firas; Docherty, Peter; Kaminska, Elzbieta; Khalidi, Nader; Jones, Henry Niall; Markland, Janet; Robinson, David; Broen, Jasper; Radstake, Timothy R.D.J.; Fonseca, Carmen; Koeleman, Bobby P.; Martin, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 1,833 systemic sclerosis (SSc) cases and 3,466 controls were genotyped with the Immunochip array. Classical alleles, amino acid residues, and SNPs across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region were imputed and tested. These analyses resulted in a model composed of six polymorphic amino acid positions and seven SNPs that explained the observed significant associations in the region. In addition, a replication step comprising 4,017 SSc cases and 5,935 controls was carried out for several selected non-HLA variants, reaching a total of 5,850 cases and 9,401 controls of European ancestry. Following this strategy, we identified and validated three SSc risk loci, including DNASE1L3 at 3p14, the SCHIP1-IL12A locus at 3q25, and ATG5 at 6q21, as well as a suggested association of the TREH-DDX6 locus at 11q23. The associations of several previously reported SSc risk loci were validated and further refined, and the observed peak of association in PXK was related to DNASE1L3. Our study has increased the number of known genetic associations with SSc, provided further insight into the pleiotropic effects of shared autoimmune risk factors, and highlighted the power of dense mapping for detecting previously overlooked susceptibility loci. PMID:24387989

  11. Defect density control on "satellite spots" or chemical stains for deep-UV resist process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Luke K. C.; Lim, Hui Kow

    2002-07-01

    Satellite spots defects of size less than 1um are being experienced with UV series positive deep-UV photo resists at Chartered and it is believed to be formed as a result of the insoluble resist residue remaining on the BARC after the developing process. Though these defects reported are by far cosmetic defects that are not transferred after etch, we expect the results presented here to be significant and applicable to smaller geometries and to 12-inch wafer fabs. Figure 1 shows a typical satellite spots defect found in the open area where there are no resist patterns after the developing process. The spinning cycle of the developing process is thought to make the aqueous resist-developer dissolution adhere to the surface of the BARC in a satellite-like formation. In a small geometry on a patterned wafer under microgravity environment, the Marangoni convection occurs in the thin resist-developer dissolution during developing causing the micro dry spots in the dissolution under the spreading developer. The high surface tension of the deep-UV resists is believed to make it more difficult to remove after the hard bake process. The probabilistic model for the mechanism of resist-developer dissolution provides a theoretical backing to the resolution of satellite spots defect and it adequately accounts for the dissolution behavior of poly (hydroxystyrene) (PHS). Different developing recipes ranging from DI-water pre-wet, developer pre-wet, to high spin speed during DIW rinse were being investigated to find out the effectiveness in removing satellite spots. The combination of extended DIW rinse time, without resorting to high spin speed or high acceleration, and double developer puddling programs produce the lowest counts with the TMAH developer. Considerable defect density improvement after the developing process can be realized using the above control methodology. Although no significant yield improvement can be achieved at the present 0.25micrometers technology in

  12. Multiple loci on 8q24 associated with prostate cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Giles, Graham G; Guy, Michelle; Morrison, Jonathan; Severi, Gianluca; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Jhavar, Sameer; Saunders, Ed; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Muir, Kenneth R; English, Dallas R; Dearnaley, David P; Ardern-Jones, Audrey T; Hall, Amanda L; O'Brien, Lynne T; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Sawyer, Emma; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A; Khoo, Vincent S; Parker, Christopher C; Woodhouse, Christopher J; Thompson, Alan; Christmas, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Cooper, Colin; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Neal, David E; Eeles, Rosalind A; Easton, Douglas F

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies have identified multiple loci on 8q24 associated with prostate cancer risk. We performed a comprehensive analysis of SNP associations across 8q24 by genotyping tag SNPs in 5,504 prostate cancer cases and 5,834 controls. We confirmed associations at three previously reported loci and identified additional loci in two other linkage disequilibrium blocks (rs1006908: per-allele OR = 0.87, P = 7.9 x 10(-8); rs620861: OR = 0.90, P = 4.8 x 10(-8)). Eight SNPs in five linkage disequilibrium blocks were independently associated with prostate cancer susceptibility. PMID:19767752

  13. Multiple loci on 8q24 associated with prostate cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Giles, Graham G; Guy, Michelle; Morrison, Jonathan; Severi, Gianluca; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Jhavar, Sameer; Saunders, Ed; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Muir, Kenneth R; English, Dallas R; Dearnaley, David P; Ardern-Jones, Audrey T; Hall, Amanda L; O'Brien, Lynne T; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Sawyer, Emma; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A; Khoo, Vincent S; Parker, Christopher C; Woodhouse, Christopher J; Thompson, Alan; Christmas, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Cooper, Colin; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Neal, David E; Eeles, Rosalind A; Easton, Douglas F

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies have identified multiple loci on 8q24 associated with prostate cancer risk. We performed a comprehensive analysis of SNP associations across 8q24 by genotyping tag SNPs in 5,504 prostate cancer cases and 5,834 controls. We confirmed associations at three previously reported loci and identified additional loci in two other linkage disequilibrium blocks (rs1006908: per-allele OR = 0.87, P = 7.9 x 10(-8); rs620861: OR = 0.90, P = 4.8 x 10(-8)). Eight SNPs in five linkage disequilibrium blocks were independently associated with prostate cancer susceptibility.

  14. Molecular genomics resource for the parasitic nematode Spirocerca lupi: Identification of 149 microsatellite loci using FIASCO and next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Reid, Kerry; Mitha, Janishtha R; Greeff, Jaco M; de Waal, Pamela J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding genetic diversity and movement patterns in parasitic organisms is paramount to establish control and management strategies. In this study we developed a microsatellite resource as well as a diagnostic multiplex for the cosmopolitan parasitic nematode Spirocerca lupi, known to cause spirocercosis in canids. A combination of microsatellite enrichment and 454 sequencing was used to identify 149 unique microsatellite loci in S. lupi. Twenty loci were characterized further in two sampling sites in South Africa, with 10 loci identified as polymorphic (allele ranges from 4 to 17). These loci were designed into a single diagnostic multiplex suitable for species identification and population genetics studies. The markers were also successful in cross-species amplification in Cylicospirura felineus, Philonema oncorhynchi and Gongylonema pulchrum. Our resource provides a large set of candidate loci for a number of nematode studies as well as loci suitable for diversity and population genetics studies of S. lupi within the South African context as well as globally.

  15. Optimization of Feedback Control Coils for Resistive Wall Mode Stabilization in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialek, J.; Boozer, A. H.; Garofalo, A. M.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Turnbull, A. D.

    1999-11-01

    Recent experiments in DIII--D on Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) stabilization with active feedback have been very promising. We investigated extensions to the sensor and control coil set that would further improve RWM stabilization. The VALEN computer code models the RWM as an equivalent current distribution on the unperturbed plasma boundary which duplicates the plasma external magnetic field of the mode, as calculated by GATO. This surface current determines the plasma interaction with all conducting structures. In three dimensions the VALEN code models the unstable plasma, passive structure, proposed sensors, and proposed control coils together with the control logic. The problem may be examined as a transient simulation, or for a linear power supply model, as an eigenvalue calculation. A summary of the configurations examined and their predicted effectiveness will be presented.

  16. Simple evaporation controller for thin-film deposition from a resistively heated boat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scofield, John H.; Bajuk, Lou; Mohler, William

    1990-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive circuit is described for switching the current through a resistively heated evaporation boat during thin-film deposition. The circuit uses a silicon-controlled rectifier (SCR) to switch the 0-15-A current in the primary of a 2-kV A step-down transformer that supplies the 0-200-A current to an evaporation boat. The circuit is controlled by a 0-10 V-dc signal similar to that furnished by an Inficon XTC deposition-rate controller. This circuit may be assembled from a handful of parts for a cost of about $400, nearly one-tenth the cost of similar commercial units. Minimum construction is required, since the circuit is built around an off-the-shelf, self-contained SCR unit.

  17. Simple evaporation controller for thin-film deposition from a resistively heated boat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scofield, John H.; Bajuk, Lou; Mohler, William

    1990-07-01

    A simple, inexpensive circuit is described for switching the current through a resistively heated evaporation boat during thin-film deposition. The circuit uses a silicon-controlled rectifier (SCR) to switch the 0-15-A current in the primary of a 2-kV A step-down transformer that supplies the 0-200-A current to an evaporation boat. The circuit is controlled by a 0-10 V-dc signal similar to that furnished by an Inficon XTC deposition-rate controller. This circuit may be assembled from a handful of parts for a cost of about $400, nearly one-tenth the cost of similar commercial units. Minimum construction is required, since the circuit is built around an off-the-shelf, self-contained SCR unit.

  18. Implementation of model predictive control for resistive wall mode stabilization on EXTRAP T2R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiadi, A. C.; Brunsell, P. R.; Frassinetti, L.

    2015-10-01

    A model predictive control (MPC) method for stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM) in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch is presented. The system identification technique is used to obtain a linearized empirical model of EXTRAP T2R. MPC employs the model for prediction and computes optimal control inputs that satisfy performance criterion. The use of a linearized form of the model allows for compact formulation of MPC, implemented on a millisecond timescale, that can be used for real-time control. The design allows the user to arbitrarily suppress any selected Fourier mode. The experimental results from EXTRAP T2R show that the designed and implemented MPC successfully stabilizes the RWM.

  19. Diversity of genetic backgrounds modulating the durability of a major resistance gene. Analysis of a core collection of pepper landraces resistant to Potato virus Y.

    PubMed

    Quenouille, Julie; Saint-Felix, Ludovic; Moury, Benoit; Palloix, Alain

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of resistance-breaking capacity in pathogen populations has been shown to depend on the plant genetic background surrounding the resistance genes. We evaluated a core collection of pepper (Capsicum annuum) landraces, representing the worldwide genetic diversity, for its ability to modulate the breakdown frequency by Potato virus Y of major resistance alleles at the pvr2 locus encoding the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). Depending on the pepper landrace, the breakdown frequency of a given resistance allele varied from 0% to 52.5%, attesting to their diversity and the availability of genetic backgrounds favourable to resistance durability in the plant germplasm. The mutations in the virus genome involved in resistance breakdown also differed between plant genotypes, indicating differential selection effects exerted on the virus population by the different genetic backgrounds. The breakdown frequency was positively correlated with the level of virus accumulation, confirming the impact of quantitative resistance loci on resistance durability. Among these loci, pvr6, encoding an isoform of eIF4E, was associated with a major effect on virus accumulation and on the breakdown frequency of the pvr2-mediated resistance. This exploration of plant genetic diversity delivered new resources for the control of pathogen evolution and the increase in resistance durability.

  20. Diversity of genetic backgrounds modulating the durability of a major resistance gene. Analysis of a core collection of pepper landraces resistant to Potato virus Y.

    PubMed

    Quenouille, Julie; Saint-Felix, Ludovic; Moury, Benoit; Palloix, Alain

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of resistance-breaking capacity in pathogen populations has been shown to depend on the plant genetic background surrounding the resistance genes. We evaluated a core collection of pepper (Capsicum annuum) landraces, representing the worldwide genetic diversity, for its ability to modulate the breakdown frequency by Potato virus Y of major resistance alleles at the pvr2 locus encoding the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). Depending on the pepper landrace, the breakdown frequency of a given resistance allele varied from 0% to 52.5%, attesting to their diversity and the availability of genetic backgrounds favourable to resistance durability in the plant germplasm. The mutations in the virus genome involved in resistance breakdown also differed between plant genotypes, indicating differential selection effects exerted on the virus population by the different genetic backgrounds. The breakdown frequency was positively correlated with the level of virus accumulation, confirming the impact of quantitative resistance loci on resistance durability. Among these loci, pvr6, encoding an isoform of eIF4E, was associated with a major effect on virus accumulation and on the breakdown frequency of the pvr2-mediated resistance. This exploration of plant genetic diversity delivered new resources for the control of pathogen evolution and the increase in resistance durability. PMID:25967744

  1. Alternative disease control agents induce resistance to blue mold in harvested 'red delicious' apple fruit.

    PubMed

    de Capdeville, Guy; Wilson, Charles L; Beer, Steven V; Aist, James R

    2002-08-01

    ABSTRACT Alternative control agents, including UV-type C (254 nm) irradiation, yeasts antagonistic to fungal growth, chitosan and harpin, were evaluated for their ability to induce resistance in cv. Red Delicious apple fruit against postharvest blue mold caused by Penicillium expansum. Freshly harvested and controlled atmosphere (CA)-stored fruit were treated with these agents at different doses and concentrations or with paired combinations of the agents. Treated fruit were inoculated with P. expansum 24, 48, or 96 h following treatment, and stored at 24 degrees C in the dark. The fruit were evaluated for development of disease every 2 days for 14 days by measuring the diameter of lesions that formed. The area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC) was calculated and analyzed statistically. All treatments were effective in reducing the AUDPC; UV-C was most effective, followed by harpin, chitosan, and the yeasts, respectively. Regardless of treatment, fresh fruit were more responsive to treatments than CA-stored fruit. There was a clear time-dependent response of the fruit to the treatments, in which treatments applied 96 h before inoculation provided the best results. In a few situations, the combinations of agents did provide an additive effect, but no synergistic effects were detected. Moreover, disease severity in fruit treated by any combination was markedly better than that in the controls. Although the combinations of treatments was overall less effective than the single treatments, they did provide significant reductions of the progress of disease in comparison with the controls. Because the fungus did not come into contact with any of the control agents, this study showed conclusively that the agents studied were able to induce resistance in the fruit rather than merely inhibit the pathogen directly. It also showed, for the first time, that harpin is able to induce resistance in harvested apple fruit. The use of these control agents may minimize the

  2. Overlap of disease susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hinks, Anne; Eyre, Steve; Ke, Xiayi; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Packham, Jon; Worthington, Jane; Thomson, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been extremely successful in the search for susceptibility risk factors for complex genetic autoimmune diseases. As more studies are published, evidence is emerging of considerable overlap of loci between these diseases. In juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), another complex genetic autoimmune disease, the strategy of using information from autoimmune disease GWAS or candidate gene studies to help in the search for novel JIA susceptibility loci has been successful, with confirmed association with two genes, PTPN22 and IL2RA. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that shares similar clinical and pathological features with JIA and, therefore, recently identified confirmed RA susceptibility loci are also excellent JIA candidate loci. Objective To determine the overlap of disease susceptibility loci for RA and JIA. Methods Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at nine RA-associated loci were genotyped in Caucasian patients with JIA (n=1054) and controls (n=3531) and tested for association with JIA. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared between cases and controls using the genetic analysis software, PLINK. Results Two JIA susceptibility loci were identified, one of which was a novel JIA association (STAT4) and the second confirmed previously published associations of the TRAF1/C5 locus with JIA. Weak evidence of association of JIA with three additional loci (Chr6q23, KIF5A and PRKCQ) was also obtained, which warrants further investigation. Conclusion All these loci are good candidates in view of the known pathogenesis of JIA, as genes within these regions (TRAF1, STAT4, TNFAIP3, PRKCQ) are known to be involved in T-cell receptor signalling or activation pathways. PMID:19674979

  3. Investigation of single nucleotide polymorphism loci susceptible to degradation by ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Machida, Mitsuyo; Taki, Takashi; Shimada, Ryo; Kibayashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-10-01

    DNA in biological fluids is often degraded by environmental factors. Given that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses require shorter amplicons than short tandem repeat (STR) analyses do, their use in human identification using degraded samples has recently attracted attention. Although various SNP loci are used to analyze degraded samples, it is unclear which ones are more appropriate. To characterize and identify SNP loci that are susceptible or resistant to degradation, we artificially degraded DNA, obtained from buccal swabs from 11 volunteers, by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light for different durations (254 nm for 5, 15, 30, 60, or 120 min) and analyzed the resulting SNP loci. DNA degradation was assessed using gel electrophoresis, STR, and SNP profiling. DNA fragmentation occurred within 5 min of UV irradiation, and successful STR and SNP profiling decreased with increasing duration. However, 73% of SNP loci were still detected correctly in DNA samples irradiated for 120 min, a dose that rendered STR loci undetectable. The unsuccessful SNP typing and the base call failure of nucleotides neighboring the SNPs were traced to rs1031825, and we found that this SNP was susceptible to UV light. When comparing the detection efficiencies of STR and SNP loci, SNP typing was more successful than STR typing, making it effective when using degraded DNA. However, it is important to use rs1031825 with caution when interpreting SNP analyses of degraded DNA.

  4. Investigation of single nucleotide polymorphism loci susceptible to degradation by ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Machida, Mitsuyo; Taki, Takashi; Shimada, Ryo; Kibayashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-10-01

    DNA in biological fluids is often degraded by environmental factors. Given that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses require shorter amplicons than short tandem repeat (STR) analyses do, their use in human identification using degraded samples has recently attracted attention. Although various SNP loci are used to analyze degraded samples, it is unclear which ones are more appropriate. To characterize and identify SNP loci that are susceptible or resistant to degradation, we artificially degraded DNA, obtained from buccal swabs from 11 volunteers, by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light for different durations (254 nm for 5, 15, 30, 60, or 120 min) and analyzed the resulting SNP loci. DNA degradation was assessed using gel electrophoresis, STR, and SNP profiling. DNA fragmentation occurred within 5 min of UV irradiation, and successful STR and SNP profiling decreased with increasing duration. However, 73% of SNP loci were still detected correctly in DNA samples irradiated for 120 min, a dose that rendered STR loci undetectable. The unsuccessful SNP typing and the base call failure of nucleotides neighboring the SNPs were traced to rs1031825, and we found that this SNP was susceptible to UV light. When comparing the detection efficiencies of STR and SNP loci, SNP typing was more successful than STR typing, making it effective when using degraded DNA. However, it is important to use rs1031825 with caution when interpreting SNP analyses of degraded DNA. PMID:27570235

  5. Quantifying Missing Heritability at Known GWAS Loci

    PubMed Central

    Gusev, Alexander; Bhatia, Gaurav; Zaitlen, Noah; Vilhjalmsson, Bjarni J.; Diogo, Dorothée; Stahl, Eli A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Klareskog, Lars; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Plenge, Robert M.; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Price, Alkes L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has shown that much of the missing heritability of complex traits can be resolved by estimates of heritability explained by all genotyped SNPs. However, it is currently unknown how much heritability is missing due to poor tagging or additional causal variants at known GWAS loci. Here, we use variance components to quantify the heritability explained by all SNPs at known GWAS loci in nine diseases from WTCCC1 and WTCCC2. After accounting for expectation, we observed all SNPs at known GWAS loci to explain more heritability than GWAS-associated SNPs on average (). For some diseases, this increase was individually significant: for Multiple Sclerosis (MS) () and for Crohn's Disease (CD) (); all analyses of autoimmune diseases excluded the well-studied MHC region. Additionally, we found that GWAS loci from other related traits also explained significant heritability. The union of all autoimmune disease loci explained more MS heritability than known MS SNPs () and more CD heritability than known CD SNPs (), with an analogous increase for all autoimmune diseases analyzed. We also observed significant increases in an analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) samples typed on ImmunoChip, with more heritability from all SNPs at GWAS loci () and more heritability from all autoimmune disease loci () compared to known RA SNPs (including those identified in this cohort). Our methods adjust for LD between SNPs, which can bias standard estimates of heritability from SNPs even if all causal variants are typed. By comparing adjusted estimates, we hypothesize that the genome-wide distribution of causal variants is enriched for low-frequency alleles, but that causal variants at known GWAS loci are skewed towards common alleles. These findings have important ramifications for fine-mapping study design and our understanding of complex disease architecture. PMID:24385918

  6. Unstable pyrethroid resistance in sheep body lice Bovicola ovis (Schrank), (Phthiraptera: Trichodectidae) and its implications for lice control on sheep.

    PubMed

    Levot, Garry

    2012-04-30

    A retrospective study in which the 18 years treatment history of a mob of sheep hosting a pyrethroid resistant strain of sheep body lice was compared with the coincidental changes in that strain's response to cypermethrin, provided a unique opportunity to investigate the stability of pyrethroid resistance in this species. Resistance levels remained very high (resistance factors (RF)=75-145) for at least five years following the cessation of pyrethroid treatments but within ten years had dropped to only 5, a level similar to many normal field strains and certainly not indicative of high-level resistance. Resumption of pyrethroid treatment of sheep infested with these lice caused a coincidental increase in resistance to an extreme level (RF=321) within two years. Wool producers considering a return to pyrethroid use to control louse infestations should be aware that such a strategy may not be sustainable in the long term and that in Australia effective registered alternative treatments are available.

  7. Gastrointestinal nematodes of dairy goats, anthelmintic resistance and practices of parasite control in Northern Italy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) are one of the main constraints to ruminant production worldwide. Anthelmintic resistance (AR) has been reported in goats throughout Europe, yet little is known about the AR status in Italy. The aims of the study were: i) determine the frequency of AR in GINs in goat flocks in Northern Italy, Italy, ii) survey goat farmers on the current practices of parasite control, iii) update the species composition of the gastrointestinal helminthofauna. Thirty three flocks were enrolled and 1288 individual fecal samples were collected. Based on the egg per gram (EPG), 15 flocks were selected to evaluate the presence of AR in GINs with the Fecal Egg Count Reduction Test (FECRT). A questionnaire surveyed 110 dairy goat farmers to acquire information about farm management and drenching practices against GINs. Further, the gastrointestinal tracts of 42 goats were analyzed. Results The FECRs indicated that five of the 15 flocks had problems of AR, which was identified in all two of the anthelmintic classes tested. Resistance and suspected resistance was found in 40% of the flocks selected for AR testing that were treated with benzimidazoles while 20% of the flocks treated with eprinomectin had resistant GINs. Teladorsagia/Trichostrongylus L3 were isolated from the post-treatment coprocultures of all flocks with resistance but not from the flock with suspected oxfendazole resistance. Treatments against helminths were performed once annually in 73.63% of the flocks, but 20.00% of farmers declared not regularly treating their goats every year. Annual treatments usually occurred in autumn or winter at dose rate for sheep. Te. circumcincta, H. contortus, Tr. colubriformis, Skrjabinema caprae and Oesophagostomum venulosum were the most abundant and prevalent species of the gastrointestinal tract. Conclusions Strategies to prevent the development of AR should be widely adopted in Northern Italy. Further, farmers and practitioners should be

  8. Hybridization of an invasive shrub affects tolerance and resistance to defoliation by a biological control agent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Wyatt I.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Gaskin, John F.; Norton, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Evolution has contributed to the successful invasion of exotic plant species in their introduced ranges, but how evolution affects particular control strategies is still under evaluation. For instance, classical biological control, a common strategy involving the utilization of highly specific natural enemies to control exotic pests, may be negatively affected by host hybridization because of shifts in plant traits, such as root allocation or chemical constituents. We investigated introgression between two parent species of the invasive shrub tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) in the western United States, and how differences in plant traits affect interactions with a biological control agent. Introgression varied strongly with latitude of origin and was highly correlated with plant performance. Increased levels of T. ramosissima introgression resulted in both higher investment in roots and tolerance to defoliation and less resistance to insect attack. Because tamarisk hybridization occurs predictably on the western U.S. landscape, managers may be able to exploit this information to maximize control efforts. Genetic differentiation in plant traits in this system underpins the importance of plant hybridization and may explain why some biological control releases are more successful than others.

  9. Hybridization of an invasive shrub affects tolerance and resistance to defoliation by a biological control agent

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Wyatt I; Friedman, Jonathan M; Gaskin, John F; Norton, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    Evolution has contributed to the successful invasion of exotic plant species in their introduced ranges, but how evolution affects particular control strategies is still under evaluation. For instance, classical biological control, a common strategy involving the utilization of highly specific natural enemies to control exotic pests, may be negatively affected by host hybridization because of shifts in plant traits, such as root allocation or chemical constituents. We investigated introgression between two parent species of the invasive shrub tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) in the western United States, and how differences in plant traits affect interactions with a biological control agent. Introgression varied strongly with latitude of origin and was highly correlated with plant performance. Increased levels of T. ramosissima introgression resulted in both higher investment in roots and tolerance to defoliation and less resistance to insect attack. Because tamarisk hybridization occurs predictably on the western U.S. landscape, managers may be able to exploit this information to maximize control efforts. Genetic differentiation in plant traits in this system underpins the importance of plant hybridization and may explain why some biological control releases are more successful than others. PMID:24665340

  10. Identification and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci in the red-crowned crane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Zhang, Z H; Shen, F J; Hou, R; Zhang, W P; Liu, Y L; Tu, K Y; Yang, A L

    2015-01-01

    We isolated and characterized microsatellite loci for the red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis) from a microsatellite-enriched database, which was obtained using high-throughput sequencing technology. We designed primer sets for 445 microsatellite loci and after initial screening, 34 loci were genotyped in 31 red-crowned cranes. The number of observed alleles ranged from 3 to 10. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.197 to 0.935 and 0.453 to 0.887, respectively; the mean polymorphic information content was 0.663. Loci Lia10943, Lia60455, Lia48514, Lia62171, Lia1059, and Lia5286 deviated from expectation of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium; however, significant linkage disequilibrium was not observed among the 34 loci. Using these 34 markers, we successfully completed parental identification for 19 cranes. The probability of exclusion for 7 selected loci (Lia271333, Lia3745, Lia11091, Lia45761, Lia16468, Lia21909, and Lia22355) was >0.9977 and analyses with more loci increased the combination efficiency. These 34 markers were also proven to be efficient for individual identification. We recommend that this marker system be used in the systematic control of pedigree management and future genetic variation studies of red-crowned cranes.

  11. Identification and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci in the red-crowned crane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Zhang, Z H; Shen, F J; Hou, R; Zhang, W P; Liu, Y L; Tu, K Y; Yang, A L

    2015-01-01

    We isolated and characterized microsatellite loci for the red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis) from a microsatellite-enriched database, which was obtained using high-throughput sequencing technology. We designed primer sets for 445 microsatellite loci and after initial screening, 34 loci were genotyped in 31 red-crowned cranes. The number of observed alleles ranged from 3 to 10. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.197 to 0.935 and 0.453 to 0.887, respectively; the mean polymorphic information content was 0.663. Loci Lia10943, Lia60455, Lia48514, Lia62171, Lia1059, and Lia5286 deviated from expectation of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium; however, significant linkage disequilibrium was not observed among the 34 loci. Using these 34 markers, we successfully completed parental identification for 19 cranes. The probability of exclusion for 7 selected loci (Lia271333, Lia3745, Lia11091, Lia45761, Lia16468, Lia21909, and Lia22355) was >0.9977 and analyses with more loci increased the combination efficiency. These 34 markers were also proven to be efficient for individual identification. We recommend that this marker system be used in the systematic control of pedigree management and future genetic variation studies of red-crowned cranes. PMID:26634480

  12. Seven New Loci Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness in older individuals. To accelerate understanding of AMD biology and help design new therapies, we executed a collaborative genomewide association study, examining >17,100 advanced AMD cases and >60,000 controls of European and Asian ancestry. We identified 19 genomic loci associated with AMD with p<5×10−8 and enriched for genes involved in regulation of complement activity, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. Our results include 7 loci reaching p<5×10−8 for the first time, near the genes COL8A1/FILIP1L, IER3/DDR1, SLC16A8, TGFBR1, RAD51B, ADAMTS9/MIR548A2, and B3GALTL. A genetic risk score combining SNPs from all loci displayed similar good ability to distinguish cases and controls in all samples examined. Our findings provide new directions for biological, genetic and therapeutic studies of AMD. PMID:23455636

  13. Four loci explain 83% of size variation in the horse.

    PubMed

    Makvandi-Nejad, Shokouh; Hoffman, Gabriel E; Allen, Jeremy J; Chu, Erin; Gu, Esther; Chandler, Alyssa M; Loredo, Ariel I; Bellone, Rebecca R; Mezey, Jason G; Brooks, Samantha A; Sutter, Nathan B

    2012-01-01

    Horse body size varies greatly due to intense selection within each breed. American Miniatures are less than one meter tall at the withers while Shires and Percherons can exceed two meters. The genetic basis for this variation is not known. We hypothesize that the breed population structure of the horse should simplify efforts to identify genes controlling size. In support of this, here we show with genome-wide association scans (GWAS) that genetic variation at just four loci can explain the great majority of horse size variation. Unlike humans, which are naturally reproducing and possess many genetic variants with weak effects on size, we show that horses, like other domestic mammals, carry just a small number of size loci with alleles of large effect. Furthermore, three of our horse size loci contain the LCORL, HMGA2 and ZFAT genes that have previously been found to control human height. The LCORL/NCAPG locus is also implicated in cattle growth and HMGA2 is associated with dog size. Extreme size diversification is a hallmark of domestication. Our results in the horse, complemented by the prior work in cattle and dog, serve to pinpoint those very few genes that have played major roles in the rapid evolution of size during domestication.

  14. Multiple newly identified loci associated with prostate cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Eeles, Rosalind A; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Giles, Graham G; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Guy, Michelle; Jugurnauth, Sarah K; Mulholland, Shani; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Edwards, Stephen M; Morrison, Jonathan; Field, Helen I; Southey, Melissa C; Severi, Gianluca; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Dearnaley, David P; Muir, Kenneth R; Smith, Charmaine; Bagnato, Melisa; Ardern-Jones, Audrey T; Hall, Amanda L; O'Brien, Lynne T; Gehr-Swain, Beatrice N; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Cox, Angie; Lewis, Sarah; Brown, Paul M; Jhavar, Sameer G; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Bryant, Sarah L; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A; Khoo, Vincent S; Parker, Christopher C; Woodhouse, Christopher J; Thompson, Alan; Christmas, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Fisher, Cyril; Jamieson, Charles; Cooper, Colin S; English, Dallas R; Hopper, John L; Neal, David E; Easton, Douglas F

    2008-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer affecting males in developed countries. It shows consistent evidence of familial aggregation, but the causes of this aggregation are mostly unknown. To identify common alleles associated with prostate cancer risk, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using blood DNA samples from 1,854 individuals with clinically detected prostate cancer diagnosed at controls with a low prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration (<0.5 ng/ml). We analyzed these samples for 541,129 SNPs using the Illumina Infinium platform. Initial putative associations were confirmed using a further 3,268 cases and 3,366 controls. We identified seven loci associated with prostate cancer on chromosomes 3, 6, 7, 10, 11, 19 and X (P = 2.7 x 10(-8) to P = 8.7 x 10(-29)). We confirmed previous reports of common loci associated with prostate cancer at 8q24 and 17q. Moreover, we found that three of the newly identified loci contain candidate susceptibility genes: MSMB, LMTK2 and KLK3.

  15. New basal cell carcinoma susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Simon N.; Helgason, Hannes; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zink, Florian; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Kehr, Birte; Gudmundsson, Julius; Sulem, Patrick; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R.; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Corredera, Cristina; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Grasa, Matilde; Planelles, Dolores; Sanmartin, Onofre; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Nexø, Bjørn A.; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Jonasson, Jon G.; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Kristinsdottir, Anna M.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Masson, Gisli; Magnusson, Olafur T.; Halldorsson, Bjarni V.; Kong, Augustine; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Vogel, Ulla; Kumar, Rajiv; Nagore, Eduardo; Mayordomo, José I.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Olafsson, Jon H.; Stefansson, Kari

    2015-01-01

    In an ongoing screen for DNA sequence variants that confer risk of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 24,988,228 SNPs and small indels detected through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders and imputed into 4,572 BCC patients and 266,358 controls. Here we show the discovery of four new BCC susceptibility loci: 2p24 MYCN (rs57244888[C], OR=0.76, P=4.7 × 10−12), 2q33 CASP8-ALS2CR12 (rs13014235[C], OR=1.15, P=1.5 × 10−9), 8q21 ZFHX4 (rs28727938[G], OR=0.70, P=3.5 × 10−12) and 10p14 GATA3 (rs73635312[A], OR=0.74, P=2.4 × 10−16). Fine mapping reveals that two variants correlated with rs73635312[A] occur in conserved binding sites for the GATA3 transcription factor. In addition, expression microarrays and RNA-seq show that rs13014235[C] and a related SNP rs700635[C] are associated with expression of CASP8 splice variants in which sequences from intron 8 are retained. PMID:25855136

  16. Genetic analysis and molecular mapping of QTLs for resistance to rice black-streaked dwarf disease in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tong; Du, Linlin; Wang, Lijiao; Wang, Ying; Gao, Cunyi; Lan, Ying; Sun, Feng; Fan, Yongjian; Wang, Guoliang; Zhou, Yijun

    2015-07-22

    Rice black-streaked dwarf disease, caused by rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), is transmitted by small brown planthoppers (Laodelphax striatellus Fallén, SBPH) and causes severe yield loss in epidemic years in China and other East Asian countries. Breeding for resistance to RBSDV is a promising strategy to control the disease. We identified Tetep that showed resistance to RBSDV using a field test and artificial inoculation test. An evaluation of the resistance mechanism revealed that Tetep was resistant to RBSDV but not to SBPH. Genetic analysis showed that the resistance of Tetep to RBSDV was controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Three new QTLs for RBSDV resistance were identified in this study, i.e., qRBSDV-3, qRBSDV-10 and qRBSDV-11. The LOD scores of qRBSDV-3, qRBSDV-10 and qRBSDV-11 were 4.07, 2.24 and 2.21, accounting for 17.5%, 0.3% and 12.4% of the total phenotypic variation, respectively. All the resistance loci identified in this study were associated with virus resistance genes. The alleles for enhancing resistance on chromosomes 3 and 11 originated from Tetep, whereas the other allele on chromosome 10 originated from a susceptible parent. The identified new resistance QTLs in this study are useful resources for efficiently breeding resistant rice cultivars to RBSDV.

  17. Genetic analysis and molecular mapping of QTLs for resistance to rice black-streaked dwarf disease in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tong; Du, Linlin; Wang, Lijiao; Wang, Ying; Gao, Cunyi; Lan, Ying; Sun, Feng; Fan, Yongjian; Wang, Guoliang; Zhou, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    Rice black-streaked dwarf disease, caused by rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), is transmitted by small brown planthoppers (Laodelphax striatellus Fallén, SBPH) and causes severe yield loss in epidemic years in China and other East Asian countries. Breeding for resistance to RBSDV is a promising strategy to control the disease. We identified Tetep that showed resistance to RBSDV using a field test and artificial inoculation test. An evaluation of the resistance mechanism revealed that Tetep was resistant to RBSDV but not to SBPH. Genetic analysis showed that the resistance of Tetep to RBSDV was controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Three new QTLs for RBSDV resistance were identified in this study, i.e., qRBSDV-3, qRBSDV-10 and qRBSDV-11. The LOD scores of qRBSDV-3, qRBSDV-10 and qRBSDV-11 were 4.07, 2.24 and 2.21, accounting for 17.5%, 0.3% and 12.4% of the total phenotypic variation, respectively. All the resistance loci identified in this study were associated with virus resistance genes. The alleles for enhancing resistance on chromosomes 3 and 11 originated from Tetep, whereas the other allele on chromosome 10 originated from a susceptible parent. The identified new resistance QTLs in this study are useful resources for efficiently breeding resistant rice cultivars to RBSDV. PMID:26198760

  18. Genetic analysis and molecular mapping of QTLs for resistance to rice black-streaked dwarf disease in rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tong; Du, Linlin; Wang, Lijiao; Wang, Ying; Gao, Cunyi; Lan, Ying; Sun, Feng; Fan, Yongjian; Wang, Guoliang; Zhou, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    Rice black-streaked dwarf disease, caused by rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), is transmitted by small brown planthoppers (Laodelphax striatellus Fallén, SBPH) and causes severe yield loss in epidemic years in China and other East Asian countries. Breeding for resistance to RBSDV is a promising strategy to control the disease. We identified Tetep that showed resistance to RBSDV using a field test and artificial inoculation test. An evaluation of the resistance mechanism revealed that Tetep was resistant to RBSDV but not to SBPH. Genetic analysis showed that the resistance of Tetep to RBSDV was controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Three new QTLs for RBSDV resistance were identified in this study, i.e., qRBSDV-3, qRBSDV-10 and qRBSDV-11. The LOD scores of qRBSDV-3, qRBSDV-10 and qRBSDV-11 were 4.07, 2.24 and 2.21, accounting for 17.5%, 0.3% and 12.4% of the total phenotypic variation, respectively. All the resistance loci identified in this study were associated with virus resistance genes. The alleles for enhancing resistance on chromosomes 3 and 11 originated from Tetep, whereas the other allele on chromosome 10 originated from a susceptible parent. The identified new resistance QTLs in this study are useful resources for efficiently breeding resistant rice cultivars to RBSDV. PMID:26198760

  19. Controlling endemic multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Intensive Care Units using antimicrobial stewardship and infection control

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Shinhye; Kim, Mi-Ja; Yun, Seon-Jin; Moon, Jae Young; Kim, Yeon-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Nosocomial infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii have become public-health problem. However, few studies have evaluated the control of endemic MDR A. baumannii in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Therefore, we investigated the effectiveness of antimicrobial stewardship and comprehensive intensified infection control measures for controlling endemic MDR A. baumannii in ICUs at a tertiary care center. Methods: Carbapenem use was strictly restricted through antimicrobial stewardship. Environmental cleaning and disinfection was performed at least 3 times per day in addition to basic infection control measures. Isolation using plastic curtains and contact precautions were applied to patients who were colonized or infected with MDR A. baumannii. The outcome was measured as the incidence density rate of hospital-onset MDR A. baumannii among patients in the ICUs. Results: The incidence density rate of hospital-onset MDR A. baumannii decreased from 22.82 cases per 1,000 patient-days to 2.68 cases per 1,000 patient-days after the interventions were implemented (odds ratio, 0.12; 95% confidence interval, 0.03 to 0.4; p < 0.001). The mean monthly use of carbapenems also decreased from 134.99 ± 82.26 defined daily doses per 1,000 patient-days to 94.85 ± 50.98 defined daily doses per 1,000 patient-days (p = 0.016). Conclusions: Concomitant implementation of strict antimicrobial stewardship and comprehensive infection control measures effectively controlled endemic MDR A. baumannii in our ICUs within 1 year. PMID:26874513

  20. The study of develop optimization to control various resist defect in Photomask fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, JongHoon; Kim, ByungJu; Son, JaeSik; Park, EuiSang; Kim, SangPyo; Yim, DongGyu

    2015-07-01

    To reduce the pattern size in photomask is an inevitable trend because of the minimization of chip size. So it makes a big challenge to control defects in photomask industry. Defects below a certain size that had not been any problem in previous technology node are becoming an issue as the patterns are smaller. Therefore, the acceptable tolerance levels for current defect size and quantity are dramatically reduced. Because these defects on photomask can be the sources of the repeating defects on wafer, small size defects smaller than 200nm should not be ignored any more. Generally, almost defects are generated during develop process and etch process. Especially it is difficult to find the root cause of defects formed during the develop process because of their various types and very small size. In this paper, we studied how these small defects can be eliminated by analyzing the defects and tuning the develop process. There are 3 types of resist defects which are named as follows. The first type is `Popcorn' defect which is mainly occurred in negative resist and exists on the dark features. The second type is `Frog eggs' defect which is occurred in 2nd process of HTPSM and exists on the wide space area. The last type is `Spot' defect which also exists on the wide space area. These defects are generally appeared on the entire area of a plate and the number of these defects is about several hundred. It is thought that the original source is the surface's hydrophilic state before develop process or the incongruity between resist and developer. This study shows that the optimizing the develop process can be a good solution for some resist defects.

  1. Stabilization of the External Kink and Control of the Resistive Wall Mode in Tokamaks*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalo, A. M.

    1998-11-01

    Tokamak based approaches to fusion which depend on significant bootstrap current for steady-state operation will necessarily operate at high normalized beta, well beyond the conventional Troyon beta limit. One promising method of maintaining stability is the use of a conducting wall close to the plasma to stabilize low-n ideal MHD instabilities, combined with an active control system to stabilize the more slowly growing resistive wall modes (RWMs). Experiments in the DIII--D, PBX-M, and HBT-EP tokamaks(E.J. Strait et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 74 (1995) 2483; M. Okabayashi et al., Nucl. Fusion 36 (1996) 1167; T.H. Ivers et al., Phys. Plasmas 3 (1996) 1926. have demonstrated that plasmas with a nearby conducting wall can remain stable above the beta limit predicted with the wall at infinity. More recently, detailed, reproducible observations of the n=1 RWM have been possible in DIII--D plasmas above the no wall beta limit. Comparisons with ideal and resistive MHD predictions are helping to distinguish the relative importance for wall stabilization of proposed dissipation mechanisms, such as resonant absorption, viscosity, and resistivity. The DIII--D measurements confirm other characteristics common to several RWM theories. The mode is destabilized as the plasma rotation at the q=3 surface decreases below a critical frequency of 1 to 4 kHz ( ~1% of the toroidal Alfvén frequency). The measured mode growth times of 3 to 5 ms agree with measurements and numerical calculations of the dominant DIII--D vessel eigenmode time constants, τ_ω. From its onset, the RWM has little or no toroidal rotation (ω_mode<=τ_w-1<<ω_plasma), and rapidly reduces the plasma rotation to zero. Both DIII--D and HBT-EP have adopted the ``smart shell''(C.M. Bishop, Plasma Phys. and Contr. Fusion 31) (1989) 1179. concept as an initial approach to control of these slowly growing RWMs: external coils are controlled by a feedback loop designed to make the resistive wall appear perfectly conducting

  2. Combined aerobic and resistance training in breast cancer survivors: A randomized, controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Herrero, F; San Juan, A F; Fleck, S J; Balmer, J; Pérez, M; Cañete, S; Earnest, C P; Foster, C; Lucía, A

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effects of a combined cardiorespiratory and resistance exercise training program of short duration on the cardiorespiratory fitness, strength endurance, task specific functional muscle capacity, body composition and quality of life (QOL) in women breast cancer survivors. Sixteen subjects were randomly assigned to either a training (n = 8; age: 50 +/- 5 yrs) or control non-exercising group (n = 8; age: 51 +/- 10 yrs). The training group followed an 8-week exercise program consisting of 3 weekly sessions of 90-min duration, supervised by an experienced investigator and divided into resistance exercises and aerobic training. Before and after the intervention period, all of the subjects performed a cardiorespiratory test to measure peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), a dynamic strength endurance test (maximum number of repetitions for chest and leg press exercise at 30 - 35 % and 100 - 110 % of body mass, respectively) and a sit-stand test. Quality of life was assessed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 (EORTC-C30) questionnaire. In response to training, QOL, VO2peak (mean 3.9 ml/kg/min; 95 % CI, 0.93, 6.90) performance in leg press (17.9 kg; 95 % CI, 12.8, 22.4) and sit-stand test (- 0.67 s; 95 % CI, - 0.52, - 1.2) improved (p < or = 0.05). We observed no significant changes in the control group. Combined cardiorespiratory and resistance training, even of very brief duration, improves the QOL and the overall physical fitness of women breast cancer survivors.

  3. Non-Hebbian Learning Implementation in Light-Controlled Resistive Memory Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ungureanu, Mariana; Stoliar, Pablo; Llopis, Roger; Casanova, Fèlix; Hueso, Luis E.

    2012-01-01

    Non-Hebbian learning is often encountered in different bio-organisms. In these processes, the strength of a synapse connecting two neurons is controlled not only by the signals exchanged between the neurons, but also by an additional factor external to the synaptic structure. Here we show the implementation of non-Hebbian learning in a single solid-state resistive memory device. The output of our device is controlled not only by the applied voltages, but also by the illumination conditions under which it operates. We demonstrate that our metal/oxide/semiconductor device learns more efficiently at higher applied voltages but also when light, an external parameter, is present during the information writing steps. Conversely, memory erasing is more efficiently at higher applied voltages and in the dark. Translating neuronal activity into simple solid-state devices could provide a deeper understanding of complex brain processes and give insight into non-binary computing possibilities. PMID:23251679

  4. [Importance of quality control for the detection of β-lactam antibiotic resistance in Enterobacteriaceae].

    PubMed

    Rivera, Alba; Larrosa, Nieves; Mirelis, Beatriz; Navarro, Ferran

    2014-02-01

    β-lactam antimicrobial agents are frequently used to treat infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae. The main mechanism of resistance to these antibiotics is the production of certain enzymes, collectively named β-lactamases. Due to their substrate profile and their epidemiological implications, the most clinically important β-lactamases are extended-spectrum β-lactamases, class C β-lactamases and carbapenemases. Phenotypic detection of these enzymes may be complicated and is based on the use of specific inhibitors of each β-lactamase and on the loss of activity on some β-lactam indicators. Various international committees postulate that it is no longer necessary to interpret the susceptibility results or determine the mechanism of resistance. Several critics disagree, however, and consider that susceptibility results should be interpreted until more data are available on the clinical efficacy of treatment with β-lactams. Given these methodological difficulties and constant changes in the interpretation criteria, we consider that training and external quality controls are essential to keep updated in this field. For learning purposes, these external quality controls should always be accompanied by a review of the results and methodology used, and the analysis of errors. In this paper we review and contextualize all the aspects related to the detection and interpretation of these β-lactamases.

  5. Self-assembled oxide films with tailored nanoscale ionic and electronic channels for controlled resistive switching.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seungho; Yun, Chao; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Kursumovic, Ahmed; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lu, Ping; Jia, Quanxi; Fan, Meng; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Hofmann, Stephan; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L

    2016-01-01

    Resistive switches are non-volatile memory cells based on nano-ionic redox processes that offer energy efficient device architectures and open pathways to neuromorphics and cognitive computing. However, channel formation typically requires an irreversible, not well controlled electroforming process, giving difficulty to independently control ionic and electronic properties. The device performance is also limited by the incomplete understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Here, we report a novel memristive model material system based on self-assembled Sm-doped CeO2 and SrTiO3 films that allow the separate tailoring of nanoscale ionic and electronic channels at high density (∼10(12) inch(-2)). We systematically show that these devices allow precise engineering of the resistance states, thus enabling large on-off ratios and high reproducibility. The tunable structure presents an ideal platform to explore ionic and electronic mechanisms and we expect a wide potential impact also on other nascent technologies, ranging from ionic gating to micro-solid oxide fuel cells and neuromorphics. PMID:27491392

  6. Self-assembled oxide films with tailored nanoscale ionic and electronic channels for controlled resistive switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seungho; Yun, Chao; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Kursumovic, Ahmed; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lu, Ping; Jia, Quanxi; Fan, Meng; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Hofmann, Stephan; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.

    2016-08-01

    Resistive switches are non-volatile memory cells based on nano-ionic redox processes that offer energy efficient device architectures and open pathways to neuromorphics and cognitive computing. However, channel formation typically requires an irreversible, not well controlled electroforming process, giving difficulty to independently control ionic and electronic properties. The device performance is also limited by the incomplete understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Here, we report a novel memristive model material system based on self-assembled Sm-doped CeO2 and SrTiO3 films that allow the separate tailoring of nanoscale ionic and electronic channels at high density (~1012 inch-2). We systematically show that these devices allow precise engineering of the resistance states, thus enabling large on-off ratios and high reproducibility. The tunable structure presents an ideal platform to explore ionic and electronic mechanisms and we expect a wide potential impact also on other nascent technologies, ranging from ionic gating to micro-solid oxide fuel cells and neuromorphics.

  7. Self-assembled oxide films with tailored nanoscale ionic and electronic channels for controlled resistive switching.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seungho; Yun, Chao; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Kursumovic, Ahmed; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lu, Ping; Jia, Quanxi; Fan, Meng; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Hofmann, Stephan; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L

    2016-08-05

    Resistive switches are non-volatile memory cells based on nano-ionic redox processes that offer energy efficient device architectures and open pathways to neuromorphics and cognitive computing. However, channel formation typically requires an irreversible, not well controlled electroforming process, giving difficulty to independently control ionic and electronic properties. The device performance is also limited by the incomplete understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Here, we report a novel memristive model material system based on self-assembled Sm-doped CeO2 and SrTiO3 films that allow the separate tailoring of nanoscale ionic and electronic channels at high density (∼10(12) inch(-2)). We systematically show that these devices allow precise engineering of the resistance states, thus enabling large on-off ratios and high reproducibility. The tunable structure presents an ideal platform to explore ionic and electronic mechanisms and we expect a wide potential impact also on other nascent technologies, ranging from ionic gating to micro-solid oxide fuel cells and neuromorphics.

  8. Self-assembled oxide films with tailored nanoscale ionic and electronic channels for controlled resistive switching

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seungho; Yun, Chao; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Kursumovic, Ahmed; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lu, Ping; Jia, Quanxi; Fan, Meng; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Hofmann, Stephan; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.

    2016-01-01

    Resistive switches are non-volatile memory cells based on nano-ionic redox processes that offer energy efficient device architectures and open pathways to neuromorphics and cognitive computing. However, channel formation typically requires an irreversible, not well controlled electroforming process, giving difficulty to independently control ionic and electronic properties. The device performance is also limited by the incomplete understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Here, we report a novel memristive model material system based on self-assembled Sm-doped CeO2 and SrTiO3 films that allow the separate tailoring of nanoscale ionic and electronic channels at high density (∼1012 inch−2). We systematically show that these devices allow precise engineering of the resistance states, thus enabling large on–off ratios and high reproducibility. The tunable structure presents an ideal platform to explore ionic and electronic mechanisms and we expect a wide potential impact also on other nascent technologies, ranging from ionic gating to micro-solid oxide fuel cells and neuromorphics. PMID:27491392

  9. By passing microbial resistance: xylitol controls microorganisms growth by means of its anti-adherence property.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Aline S; Silva-Paes-Leme, Annelisa F; Raposo, Nádia R B; da Silva, Sílvio S

    2015-01-01

    Xylitol is an important polyalcohol suitable for use in odontological, medical and pharmaceutical products and as an additive in food. The first studies on the efficacy of xylitol in the control and treatment of infections started in the late 1970s and it is still applied for this purpose, with safety and very little contribution to resistance. Xylitol seems to act against microorganisms exerting an anti-adherence effect. Some research studies have demonstrated its action against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts. However, a clear explanation of how xylitol is effective has not been completely established yet. Some evidence shows that xylitol acts on gene expression, down-regulating the ones which are involved in the microorganisms' virulence, such as capsule formation. Another possible clarification is that xylitol blocks lectin-like receptors. The most important aspect is that, over time, xylitol bypasses microbial resistance and succeeds in controlling infection, either alone or combined with another compound. In this review, the effect of xylitol in inhibiting the growth of a different microorganism is described, focusing on studies in which such an anti-adherent property was highlighted. This is the first mini-review to describe xylitol as an anti-adherent compound and take into consideration how it exerts such action.

  10. Surveillance, insecticide resistance and control of an invasive Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) population in California.

    PubMed

    Cornel, Anthony J; Holeman, Jodi; Nieman, Catelyn C; Lee, Yoosook; Smith, Charles; Amorino, Mark; Brisco, Katherine K; Barrera, Roberto; Lanzaro, Gregory C; Mulligan Iii, F Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The invasion and subsequent establishment in California of Aedes aegypti in 2013 has created new challenges for local mosquito abatement and vector control districts. Studies were undertaken to identify effective and economical strategies to monitor the abundance and spread of this mosquito species as well as for its control. Overall, BG Sentinel (BGS) traps were found to be the most sensitive trap type to measure abundance and spread into new locations. Autocidal-Gravid-Ovitraps (AGO-B), when placed at a site for a week, performed equally to BGS in detecting the presence of female Ae. aegypti. Considering operational cost and our findings, we recommend use of BGS traps for surveillance in response to service requests especially in locations outside the known infestation area. We recommend AGO-Bs be placed at fixed sites, cleared and processed once a week to monitor mosquito abundance within a known infestation area. Long-term high density placements of AGO-Bs were found to show promise as an environmentally friendly trap-kill control strategy. California Ae. aegypti were found to be homozygous for the V1016I mutation in the voltage gated sodium channel gene, which is implicated to be involved in insecticide resistance. This strain originating from Clovis, California was resistant to some pyrethroids but not to deltamethrin in bottle bio-assays. Sentinel cage ultra-low-volume (ULV) trials using a new formulation of deltamethrin (DeltaGard®) demonstrated that it provided some control (average of 56% death in sentinel cages in a 91.4 m spray swath) after a single truck mounted aerial ULV application in residential areas. PMID:27158450

  11. Surveillance, insecticide resistance and control of an invasive Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) population in California.

    PubMed

    Cornel, Anthony J; Holeman, Jodi; Nieman, Catelyn C; Lee, Yoosook; Smith, Charles; Amorino, Mark; Brisco, Katherine K; Barrera, Roberto; Lanzaro, Gregory C; Mulligan Iii, F Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The invasion and subsequent establishment in California of Aedes aegypti in 2013 has created new challenges for local mosquito abatement and vector control districts. Studies were undertaken to identify effective and economical strategies to monitor the abundance and spread of this mosquito species as well as for its control. Overall, BG Sentinel (BGS) traps were found to be the most sensitive trap type to measure abundance and spread into new locations. Autocidal-Gravid-Ovitraps (AGO-B), when placed at a site for a week, performed equally to BGS in detecting the presence of female Ae. aegypti. Considering operational cost and our findings, we recommend use of BGS traps for surveillance in response to service requests especially in locations outside the known infestation area. We recommend AGO-Bs be placed at fixed sites, cleared and processed once a week to monitor mosquito abundance within a known infestation area. Long-term high density placements of AGO-Bs were found to show promise as an environmentally friendly trap-kill control strategy. California Ae. aegypti were found to be homozygous for the V1016I mutation in the voltage gated sodium channel gene, which is implicated to be involved in insecticide resistance. This strain originating from Clovis, California was resistant to some pyrethroids but not to deltamethrin in bottle bio-assays. Sentinel cage ultra-low-volume (ULV) trials using a new formulation of deltamethrin (DeltaGard®) demonstrated that it provided some control (average of 56% death in sentinel cages in a 91.4 m spray swath) after a single truck mounted aerial ULV application in residential areas.

  12. Controlling multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and access to expensive drugs: a rational framework.

    PubMed Central

    Pablos-Mendez, Ariel; Gowda, Deepthiman K.; Frieden, Thomas R.

    2002-01-01

    The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), i.e. involving resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampicin, could threaten the control of TB globally. Controversy has emerged about the best way of confronting MDR-TB in settings with very limited resources. In 1999, the World Health Organization (WHO) created a working group on DOTS-Plus, an initiative exploring the programmatic feasibility and cost-effectiveness of treating MDR-TB in low-income and middle-income countries, in order to consider the management of MDR-TB under programme conditions. The challenges of implementation have proved more daunting than those of access to second-line drugs, the prices of which are dropping. Using data from the WHO/International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease surveillance project, we have grouped countries according to the proportion of TB patients completing treatment successfully and the level of MDR-TB among previously untreated patients. The resulting matrix provides a reasonable framework for deciding whether to use second-line drugs in a national programme. Countries in which the treatment success rate, i.e. the proportion of new patients who complete the scheduled treatment, irrespective of whether bacteriological cure is documented, is below 70% should give the highest priority to introducing or improving DOTS, the five-point TB control strategy recommended by WHO and the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. A poorly functioning programme can create MDR-TB much faster than it can be treated, even if unlimited resources are available. There is no single prescription for controlling MDR-TB but the various tools available should be applied wisely. Firstly, good DOTS and infection control; then appropriate use of second-line drug treatment. The interval between the two depends on the local context and resources. As funds are allocated to treat MDR-TB, human and financial resources should be increased to expand

  13. Surveillance, insecticide resistance and control of an invasive Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) population in California

    PubMed Central

    Cornel, Anthony J.; Holeman, Jodi; Nieman, Catelyn C.; Lee, Yoosook; Smith, Charles; Amorino, Mark; Brisco, Katherine K.; Barrera, Roberto; Lanzaro, Gregory C.; Mulligan III, F. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The invasion and subsequent establishment in California of Aedes aegypti in 2013 has created new challenges for local mosquito abatement and vector control districts. Studies were undertaken to identify effective and economical strategies to monitor the abundance and spread of this mosquito species as well as for its control. Overall, BG Sentinel (BGS) traps were found to be the most sensitive trap type to measure abundance and spread into new locations. Autocidal-Gravid-Ovitraps (AGO-B), when placed at a site for a week, performed equally to BGS in detecting the presence of female Ae. aegypti. Considering operational cost and our findings, we recommend use of BGS traps for surveillance in response to service requests especially in locations outside the known infestation area. We recommend AGO-Bs be placed at fixed sites, cleared and proc