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Sample records for loci controls resistance

  1. Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping of Genome Regions Controlling Permethrin Resistance in the Mosquito Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra-Rodriguez, Karla; Strode, Clare; Flores Suarez, Adriana; Fernandez Salas, Ildefonso; Ranson, Hilary; Hemingway, Janet; Black, William C.

    2008-01-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the principal vector of dengue and yellow fever flaviviruses. Permethrin is an insecticide used to suppress Ae. aegypti adult populations but metabolic and target site resistance to pyrethroids has evolved in many locations worldwide. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling permethrin survival in Ae. aegypti were mapped in an F3 advanced intercross line. Parents came from a collection of mosquitoes from Isla Mujeres, México, that had been selected for permethrin resistance for two generations and a reference permethrin-susceptible strain originally from New Orleans. Following a 1-hr permethrin exposure, 439 F3 adult mosquitoes were phenotyped as knockdown resistant, knocked down/recovered, or dead. For QTL mapping, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified at 22 loci with potential antixenobiotic activity including genes encoding cytochrome P450s (CYP), esterases (EST), or glutathione transferases (GST) and at 12 previously mapped loci. Seven antixenobiotic genes mapped to chromosome I, six to chromosome II, and nine to chromosome III. Two QTL of major effect were detected on chromosome III. One corresponds with a SNP previously associated with permethrin resistance in the para sodium channel gene and the second with the CCEunk7o esterase marker. Additional QTL but of relatively minor effect were also found. These included two sex-linked QTL on chromosome I affecting knockdown and recovery and a QTL affecting survival and recovery. On chromosome II, one QTL affecting survival and a second affecting recovery were detected. The patterns confirm that mutations in the para gene cause target-site insensitivity and are the major source of permethrin resistance but that other genes dispersed throughout the genome contribute to recovery and survival of mosquitoes following permethrin exposure. PMID:18723882

  2. QTL meta-analysis provides a comprehensive view of loci controlling partial resistance to Aphanomyces euteiches in four sources of resistance in pea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    More knowledge about diversity of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) controlling polygenic disease resistance in natural genetic variation of crop species is required for durably improving plant genetic resistances to pathogens. Polygenic partial resistance to Aphanomyces root rot, due to Aphanomcyces eu...

  3. Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling resistance to maize chlorotic dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mark W; Redinbaugh, Margaret G; Anderson, Robert J; Louie, R

    2004-12-01

    Ineffective screening methods and low levels of disease resistance have hampered genetic analysis of maize (Zea mays L.) resistance to disease caused by maize chlorotic dwarf virus (MCDV). Progeny from a cross between the highly resistant maize inbred line Oh1VI and the susceptible inbred line Va35 were evaluated for MCDV symptoms after multiple virus inoculations, using the viral vector Graminella nigrifrons. Symptom severity scores from three rating dates were used to calculate area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC) scores for vein banding, leaf twist and tear, and whorl chlorosis. AUDPC scores for the F(2) population indicated that MCDV resistance was quantitatively inherited. Genotypic and phenotypic analyses of 314 F(2) individuals were compared using composite interval mapping (CIM) and analysis of variance. CIM identified two major quantitative trait loci (QTL) on chromosomes 3 and 10 and two minor QTL on chromosomes 4 and 6. Resistance was additive, with alleles from Oh1VI at the loci on chromosomes 3 and 10 contributing equally to resistance.

  4. Genotyping-by-sequencing markers facilitate the identification of quantitative trait loci controlling resistance to Penicillium expansum in Malus sieversii.

    PubMed

    Norelli, John L; Wisniewski, Michael; Fazio, Gennaro; Burchard, Erik; Gutierrez, Benjamin; Levin, Elena; Droby, Samir

    2017-01-01

    Blue mold caused by Penicillium expansum is the most important postharvest disease of apple worldwide and results in significant financial losses. There are no defined sources of resistance to blue mold in domesticated apple. However, resistance has been described in wild Malus sieversii accessions, including plant introduction (PI)613981. The objective of the present study was to identify the genetic loci controlling resistance to blue mold in this accession. We describe the first quantitative trait loci (QTL) reported in the Rosaceae tribe Maleae conditioning resistance to P. expansum on genetic linkage group 3 (qM-Pe3.1) and linkage group 10 (qM-Pe10.1). These loci were identified in a M.× domestica 'Royal Gala' X M. sieversii PI613981 family (GMAL4593) based on blue mold lesion diameter seven days post-inoculation in mature, wounded apple fruit inoculated with P. expansum. Phenotypic analyses were conducted in 169 progeny over a four year period. PI613981 was the source of the resistance allele for qM-Pe3.1, a QTL with a major effect on blue mold resistance, accounting for 27.5% of the experimental variability. The QTL mapped from 67.3 to 74 cM on linkage group 3 of the GMAL4593 genetic linkage map. qM-Pe10.1 mapped from 73.6 to 81.8 cM on linkage group 10. It had less of an effect on resistance, accounting for 14% of the experimental variation. 'Royal Gala' was the primary contributor to the resistance effect of this QTL. However, resistance-associated alleles in both parents appeared to contribute to the least square mean blue mold lesion diameter in an additive manner at qM-Pe10.1. A GMAL4593 genetic linkage map composed of simple sequence repeats and 'Golden Delicious' single nucleotide polymorphism markers was able to detect qM-Pe10.1, but failed to detect qM-Pe3.1. The subsequent addition of genotyping-by-sequencing markers to the linkage map provided better coverage of the PI613981 genome on linkage group 3 and facilitated discovery of qM-Pe3.1. A DNA

  5. Genotyping-by-sequencing markers facilitate the identification of quantitative trait loci controlling resistance to Penicillium expansum in Malus sieversii

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Michael; Fazio, Gennaro; Burchard, Erik; Gutierrez, Benjamin; Levin, Elena; Droby, Samir

    2017-01-01

    Blue mold caused by Penicillium expansum is the most important postharvest disease of apple worldwide and results in significant financial losses. There are no defined sources of resistance to blue mold in domesticated apple. However, resistance has been described in wild Malus sieversii accessions, including plant introduction (PI)613981. The objective of the present study was to identify the genetic loci controlling resistance to blue mold in this accession. We describe the first quantitative trait loci (QTL) reported in the Rosaceae tribe Maleae conditioning resistance to P. expansum on genetic linkage group 3 (qM-Pe3.1) and linkage group 10 (qM-Pe10.1). These loci were identified in a M.× domestica ‘Royal Gala’ X M. sieversii PI613981 family (GMAL4593) based on blue mold lesion diameter seven days post-inoculation in mature, wounded apple fruit inoculated with P. expansum. Phenotypic analyses were conducted in 169 progeny over a four year period. PI613981 was the source of the resistance allele for qM-Pe3.1, a QTL with a major effect on blue mold resistance, accounting for 27.5% of the experimental variability. The QTL mapped from 67.3 to 74 cM on linkage group 3 of the GMAL4593 genetic linkage map. qM-Pe10.1 mapped from 73.6 to 81.8 cM on linkage group 10. It had less of an effect on resistance, accounting for 14% of the experimental variation. ‘Royal Gala’ was the primary contributor to the resistance effect of this QTL. However, resistance-associated alleles in both parents appeared to contribute to the least square mean blue mold lesion diameter in an additive manner at qM-Pe10.1. A GMAL4593 genetic linkage map composed of simple sequence repeats and ‘Golden Delicious’ single nucleotide polymorphism markers was able to detect qM-Pe10.1, but failed to detect qM-Pe3.1. The subsequent addition of genotyping-by-sequencing markers to the linkage map provided better coverage of the PI613981 genome on linkage group 3 and facilitated discovery of q

  6. Comparative analysis of quantitative trait loci controlling glucosinolates, myrosinase and insect resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Kliebenstein, Daniel; Pedersen, Deana; Barker, Bridget; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Evolutionary interactions among insect herbivores and plant chemical defenses have generated systems where plant compounds have opposing fitness consequences for host plants, depending on attack by various insect herbivores. This interplay complicates understanding of fitness costs and benefits of plant chemical defenses. We are studying the role of the glucosinolate-myrosinase chemical defense system in protecting Arabidopsis thaliana from specialist and generalist insect herbivory. We used two Arabidopsis recombinant inbred populations in which we had previously mapped QTL controlling variation in the glucosinolate-myrosinase system. In this study we mapped QTL controlling resistance to specialist (Plutella xylostella) and generalist (Trichoplusia ni) herbivores. We identified a number of QTL that are specific to one herbivore or the other, as well as a single QTL that controls resistance to both insects. Comparison of QTL for herbivory, glucosinolates, and myrosinase showed that T. ni herbivory is strongly deterred by higher glucosinolate levels, faster breakdown rates, and specific chemical structures. In contrast, P. xylostella herbivory is uncorrelated with variation in the glucosinolate-myrosinase system. This agrees with evolutionary theory stating that specialist insects may overcome host plant chemical defenses, whereas generalists will be sensitive to these same defenses. PMID:12019246

  7. Proteomic analysis of resistance mediated by Rcm 2.0 and Rcm 5.1, two loci controlling resistance to bacterial canker of tomato.

    PubMed

    Coaker, Gitta L; Willard, Belinda; Kinter, Michael; Stockinger, Eric J; Francis, David M

    2004-09-01

    Two quantitative trait loci from Lycopersicon hirsutum, Rcm 2.0 and Rcm 5.1, control resistance to Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, the causal agent of bacterial canker of tomato. Lines containing Rcm 2.0 and Rcm 5.1 and a susceptible control line were compared at 72 and 144 h postinoculation, using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis to identify proteins regulated in response to C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis infection. A total of 47 proteins were subjected to tandem mass spectrometry. Database queries with resulting spectra identified tomato genes for 26 proteins. The remaining 21 proteins were either identified in other species or possessed no homology to known proteins. Spectra were interpreted to deduce peptide amino acid sequences that were then used to query publicly available data. This approach identified tomato genes or expressed sequence tags for 44 of the proteins analyzed. Three superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes were differentially regulated among genotypes, and patterns of hydrogen peroxide accumulation were genotype- and tissue-specific, indicating a role for oxidative stress in response to C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. Steady-state mRNA and protein levels for SOD, thioredoxin M-type, S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase, and pathogenesis-related proteins demonstrated similar patterns of differential regulation. Lines containing Rcm 2.0 and Rcm 5.1 accumulate different proteins and steady-state mRNAs in response to inoculation, suggesting that the two loci may confer resistance through distinct mechanisms.

  8. Synteny analysis of loci controlling partial resistance to Aphanomyces euteiches between Pisum sativum and Medicago truncatula

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aphanomyces root rot, due to Aphanomyces euteiches, is one of the most damaging diseases of pea worldwide. Breeding for partial polygenic resistance to Aphanomyces root rot is a major objective for the development of the pea crop in Europe. Our objectives were to study i)- the diversity of resistanc...

  9. QTL meta-analysis provides a comprehensive view of loci controlling partial resistance to Aphanomyces euteiches in four sources of resistance in pea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    the moderately low diversity of loci controlling partial resistance to A. euteiches in four main sources of resistance in pea. Seven highly consistent genomic regions with potential use in marker-assisted-selection were identified. Confidence intervals at several main QTL regions were reduced and co-segregation among resistance and morphological/phenological alleles was identified. Further work will be required to identify the best combinations of QTL for durably increasing partial resistance to A. euteiches. PMID:23497245

  10. Quantitative disease resistance and quantitative resistance Loci in breeding.

    PubMed

    St Clair, Dina A

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative disease resistance (QDR) has been observed within many crop plants but is not as well understood as qualitative (monogenic) disease resistance and has not been used as extensively in breeding. Mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) is a powerful tool for genetic dissection of QDR. DNA markers tightly linked to quantitative resistance loci (QRLs) controlling QDR can be used for marker-assisted selection (MAS) to incorporate these valuable traits. QDR confers a reduction, rather than lack, of disease and has diverse biological and molecular bases as revealed by cloning of QRLs and identification of the candidate gene(s) underlying QRLs. Increasing our biological knowledge of QDR and QRLs will enhance understanding of how QDR differs from qualitative resistance and provide the necessary information to better deploy these resources in breeding. Application of MAS for QRLs in breeding for QDR to diverse pathogens is illustrated by examples from wheat, barley, common bean, tomato, and pepper. Strategies for optimum deployment of QRLs require research to understand effects of QDR on pathogen populations over time.

  11. Identifying permethrin resistance loci in malaria vectors by genetic mapping.

    PubMed

    Witzig, Claudia; Wondji, Charles S; Strode, Clare; Djouaka, Rousseau; Ranson, Hilary

    2013-10-01

    Identification of the major loci responsible for insecticide resistance in malaria vectors would aid the development and implementation of effective resistance management strategies, which are urgently needed to tackle the growing threat posed by resistance to the limited insecticides available for malaria control. Genome-wide association studies in the major malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae, have been hindered by the high degree of within-population structuring and very low levels of linkage disequilibrium hence we revisited the use of quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping to study resistance phenotypes in this vector species. Earlier work, identified two major QTL associated with pyrethroid resistance in A. gambiae s.s. from East Africa using genetic crossing of laboratory-colonized resistant and susceptible strains. In this study, we report the results from genetic mapping of pyrethroid resistance in three isofemale pedigrees established from wild-caught female A. gambiae s.s. mosquitoes from Benin. We identified two QTL on chromosomes 2L and 3R in these field populations, in similar genomic locations to the QTL identified in laboratory strains. The relative merits of two alternative study designs are discussed and suggestions made for future genetic mapping studies of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes.

  12. Multiple Avirulence Loci and Allele-Specific Effector Recognition Control the Pm3 Race-Specific Resistance of Wheat to Powdery Mildew[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Roffler, Stefan; Stirnweis, Daniel; Treier, Georges; Herren, Gerhard; Korol, Abraham B.; Wicker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In cereals, several mildew resistance genes occur as large allelic series; for example, in wheat (Triticum aestivum and Triticum turgidum), 17 functional Pm3 alleles confer agronomically important race-specific resistance to powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis). The molecular basis of race specificity has been characterized in wheat, but little is known about the corresponding avirulence genes in powdery mildew. Here, we dissected the genetics of avirulence for six Pm3 alleles and found that three major Avr loci affect avirulence, with a common locus_1 involved in all AvrPm3-Pm3 interactions. We cloned the effector gene AvrPm3a2/f2 from locus_2, which is recognized by the Pm3a and Pm3f alleles. Induction of a Pm3 allele-dependent hypersensitive response in transient assays in Nicotiana benthamiana and in wheat demonstrated specificity. Gene expression analysis of Bcg1 (encoded by locus_1) and AvrPm3 a2/f2 revealed significant differences between isolates, indicating that in addition to protein polymorphisms, expression levels play a role in avirulence. We propose a model for race specificity involving three components: an allele-specific avirulence effector, a resistance gene allele, and a pathogen-encoded suppressor of avirulence. Thus, whereas a genetically simple allelic series controls specificity in the plant host, recognition on the pathogen side is more complex, allowing flexible evolutionary responses and adaptation to resistance genes. PMID:26452600

  13. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strains expressing nitrate reductase under control of the cabII-1 promoter: isolation of chlorate resistant mutants and identification of new loci for nitrate assimilation.

    PubMed

    Navarro, María Teresa; Mariscal, Vicente; Macías, María Isabel; Fernández, Emilio; Galván, Aurora

    2005-01-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain Tx11-8 is a transgenic alga that bears the nitrate reductase gene (Nia1) under control of the CabII-1 gene promoter (CabII-1-Nia1). Approximately nine copies of the chimeric CabII-1-Nia1 gene were found to be integrated in this strain and to confer a phenotype of chlorate sensitivity in the presence of ammonium. We have used this strain for the isolation of spontaneous chlorate resistant mutants in the presence of ammonium that were found to be defective at loci involved in MoCo metabolism and light-dependent growth in nitrate media. Of a total of 45 mutant strains analyzed first, 44 were affected in the MoCo activity (16 Nit(-), unable to grow in nitrate, and 28 Nit(+), able to grow in nitrate). All the Nit(-) strains lacked MoCo activity. Diploid complementation of Nit(-), MoCo(-) strains with C. reinhardtii MoCo mutants and genetic analysis indicated that some strains were defective at known loci for MoCo biosynthesis, while three strains were defective at two new loci, hereafter named Nit10 and Nit11. The other 28 Nit(+) strains showed almost undetectable MoCo activity or activity was below 20% of the parental strain. Second, only one strain (named 23c(+)) showed MoCo and NR activities comparable to those in the parental strain. Strain 23c(+) seems to be affected in a locus, Nit12, required for growth in nitrate under continuous light. It is proposed that this locus is required for nitrate/chlorate transport activity. In this work, mechanisms of chlorate toxicity are reviewed in the light of our results.

  14. Constructing high-density genetic maps for polyploid sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) and identifying quantitative trait loci controlling brown rust resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is an important economic crop for producing edible sugar and bioethanol. Brown rust had long been a major disease impacting sugarcane production world widely. Resistance resource and markers linked to the resistance are valuable tools for disease resistance improvement. An...

  15. Genotyping-by-sequencing markers facilitate the identification of quantitative trait loci controlling resistance to Penicillium expansum in Malus sieversii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Blue mold caused by Penicillium expansum is the most important postharvest disease of apple worldwide and results in significant financial losses. There are no defined sources of resistance to blue mold in domesticated apple; however, resistance has been described in wild Malus sieversii accessions...

  16. Quantitative trait loci associated with anthracnose resistance in sorghum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With an aim to develop a durable resistance to the fungal disease anthracnose, two unique genetic sources of resistance were selected to create genetic mapping populations to identify regions of the sorghum genome that encode anthracnose resistance. A series of quantitative trait loci were identifi...

  17. The Red Queen lives: Epistasis between linked resistance loci.

    PubMed

    Metzger, César M J A; Luijckx, Pepijn; Bento, Gilberto; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Ebert, Dieter

    2016-02-01

    A popular theory explaining the maintenance of genetic recombination (sex) is the Red Queen Theory. This theory revolves around the idea that time-lagged negative frequency-dependent selection by parasites favors rare host genotypes generated through recombination. Although the Red Queen has been studied for decades, one of its key assumptions has remained unsupported. The signature host-parasite specificity underlying the Red Queen, where infection depends on a match between host and parasite genotypes, relies on epistasis between linked resistance loci for which no empirical evidence exists. We performed 13 genetic crosses and tested over 7000 Daphnia magna genotypes for resistance to two strains of the bacterial pathogen Pasteuria ramosa. Results reveal the presence of strong epistasis between three closely linked resistance loci. One locus masks the expression of the other two, while these two interact to produce a single resistance phenotype. Changing a single allele on one of these interacting loci can reverse resistance against the tested parasites. Such a genetic mechanism is consistent with host and parasite specificity assumed by the Red Queen Theory. These results thus provide evidence for a fundamental assumption of this theory and provide a genetic basis for understanding the Red Queen dynamics in the Daphnia-Pasteuria system.

  18. Temporal and multiple quantitative trait loci analyses of resistance to bacterial wilt in tomato permit the resolution of linked loci.

    PubMed Central

    Mangin, B; Thoquet, P; Olivier, J; Grimsley, N H

    1999-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne bacterium that causes the serious disease known as bacterial wilt in many plant species. In tomato, several QTL controlling resistance have been found, but in different studies, markers spanning a large region of chromosome 6 showed strong association with the resistance. By using two different approaches to analyze the data from a field test F3 population, we show that at least two separate loci approximately 30 cM apart on this chromosome are most likely involved in the resistance. First, a temporal analysis of the progression of symptoms reveals a distal locus early in the development of the disease. As the disease progresses, the maximum LOD peak observed shifts toward the proximal end of the chromosome, obscuring the distal locus. Second, although classical interval mapping could only detect the presence of one locus, a statistical "two-QTL model" test, specifically adapted for the resolution of linked QTL, strongly supported the hypothesis for the presence of two loci. These results are discussed in the context of current molecular knowledge about disease resistance genes on chromosome 6 and observations made by tomato breeders during the production of bacterial wilt-resistant varieties. PMID:10049932

  19. Temporal and multiple quantitative trait loci analyses of resistance to bacterial wilt in tomato permit the resolution of linked loci.

    PubMed

    Mangin, B; Thoquet, P; Olivier, J; Grimsley, N H

    1999-03-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne bacterium that causes the serious disease known as bacterial wilt in many plant species. In tomato, several QTL controlling resistance have been found, but in different studies, markers spanning a large region of chromosome 6 showed strong association with the resistance. By using two different approaches to analyze the data from a field test F3 population, we show that at least two separate loci approximately 30 cM apart on this chromosome are most likely involved in the resistance. First, a temporal analysis of the progression of symptoms reveals a distal locus early in the development of the disease. As the disease progresses, the maximum LOD peak observed shifts toward the proximal end of the chromosome, obscuring the distal locus. Second, although classical interval mapping could only detect the presence of one locus, a statistical "two-QTL model" test, specifically adapted for the resolution of linked QTL, strongly supported the hypothesis for the presence of two loci. These results are discussed in the context of current molecular knowledge about disease resistance genes on chromosome 6 and observations made by tomato breeders during the production of bacterial wilt-resistant varieties.

  20. Identification of Ganoderma Disease Resistance Loci Using Natural Field Infection of an Oil Palm Multiparental Population.

    PubMed

    Tisné, Sébastien; Pomiès, Virginie; Riou, Virginie; Syahputra, Indra; Cochard, Benoît; Denis, Marie

    2017-06-07

    Multi-parental populations are promising tools for identifying quantitative disease resistance loci. Stem rot caused by Ganoderma boninense is a major threat to palm oil production, with yield losses of up to 80% prompting premature replantation of palms. There is evidence of genetic resistance sources, but the genetic architecture of Ganoderma resistance has not yet been investigated. This study aimed to identify Ganoderma resistance loci using an oil palm multi-parental population derived from nine major founders of ongoing breeding programs. A total of 1200 palm trees of the multi-parental population was planted in plots naturally infected by Ganoderma, and their health status was assessed biannually over 25 yr. The data were treated as survival data, and modeled using the Cox regression model, including a spatial effect to take the spatial component in the spread of Ganoderma into account. Based on the genotypes of 757 palm trees out of the 1200 planted, and on pedigree information, resistance loci were identified using a random effect with identity-by-descent kinship matrices as covariance matrices in the Cox model. Four Ganoderma resistance loci were identified, two controlling the occurrence of the first Ganoderma symptoms, and two the death of palm trees, while favorable haplotypes were identified among a major gene pool for ongoing breeding programs. This study implemented an efficient and flexible QTL mapping approach, and generated unique valuable information for the selection of oil palm varieties resistant to Ganoderma disease. Copyright © 2017 Tisné et al.

  1. Identification of Ganoderma Disease Resistance Loci Using Natural Field Infection of an Oil Palm Multiparental Population

    PubMed Central

    Tisné, Sébastien; Pomiès, Virginie; Riou, Virginie; Syahputra, Indra; Cochard, Benoît; Denis, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Multi-parental populations are promising tools for identifying quantitative disease resistance loci. Stem rot caused by Ganoderma boninense is a major threat to palm oil production, with yield losses of up to 80% prompting premature replantation of palms. There is evidence of genetic resistance sources, but the genetic architecture of Ganoderma resistance has not yet been investigated. This study aimed to identify Ganoderma resistance loci using an oil palm multi-parental population derived from nine major founders of ongoing breeding programs. A total of 1200 palm trees of the multi-parental population was planted in plots naturally infected by Ganoderma, and their health status was assessed biannually over 25 yr. The data were treated as survival data, and modeled using the Cox regression model, including a spatial effect to take the spatial component in the spread of Ganoderma into account. Based on the genotypes of 757 palm trees out of the 1200 planted, and on pedigree information, resistance loci were identified using a random effect with identity-by-descent kinship matrices as covariance matrices in the Cox model. Four Ganoderma resistance loci were identified, two controlling the occurrence of the first Ganoderma symptoms, and two the death of palm trees, while favorable haplotypes were identified among a major gene pool for ongoing breeding programs. This study implemented an efficient and flexible QTL mapping approach, and generated unique valuable information for the selection of oil palm varieties resistant to Ganoderma disease. PMID:28592650

  2. Detection of quantitative trait loci associated with leaf rust resistance in bread wheat.

    PubMed

    William, H M; Hoisington, D; Singh, R P; González-de-León, D

    1997-04-01

    Leaf rust, caused by Puccinia recondita Rob. ex Desm., is a common disease in wheat. The objective of this study was to develop molecular markers associated with the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) putatively conferring durable leaf rust resistance in Triticum aestivum L. em. Thell. A population of 77 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) developed from 'Parula' (resistant) and 'Siete Cerros' (moderately susceptible) was used. Bulked segregant analysis was done using random amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs) with DNA enriched for low-copy sequences using hydroxyapatite chromatography. Out of 400 decamer primers screened, 3 RAPD markers were identified between the bulk of the most resistant and the bulk of the most susceptible lines. These were cloned and used as probes on the RILs in Southern hybridizations. Two probes revealed two tightly linked loci. One-way analysis of variance showed that these two loci, and another revealed by the third probe, were linked to QTLs controlling leaf rust resistance based on data taken from 2 years of replicated field trials. Cytogenetic analysis placed the two tightly linked loci on the long arm of chromosome 7B. The third probe detected loci located on the short arms of chromosomes 1B and 1D. It is suggested that the QTL detected on 7BL may well be homoeoallelic to Lr34.

  3. Genetic localization of diuron- and mucidin-resistant mutants relative to a group of loci of the mitochondrial DNA controlling coenzyme QH2-cytochrome c reductase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Colson, A M; Slonimski, P P

    1979-01-02

    Diuron-resistance, DIU (Colson et al., 1977), antimycin-resistance, ANA (Michaelis, 1976; Burger et al., 1976), funiculosin-resistance, FUN (Pratje and Michaelis, 1977; Burger et al., 1977) and mucidin-resistance, MUC (Subik et al., 1977) are each coded by a pair of genetic loci on the mit DNA of S. cerevisiae. In the present paper, these respiratiory-competent, drug-resistant loci are localized relative to respiratory-deficient BOX mutants deficient in coenzyme QH2-cytochrome c reductase (Kotylak and Slonimski, 1976, 1977) using deletion and recombination mapping. Three drug-resistant loci possessing distinct mutated allelic forms are distinguished. DIU1 is allelic or closely linked to ANA2, FUN1 and BOX1; DIU2 is allelic or closely linked to ANA1, MUC1 and BOX4/5; MUC2 is allelic to BOX6. The high recombinant frequencies observed between the three loci (13% on the average for 33 various combinations analyzed) suggest the existence of either three genes coding for three distinct polypeptides or of a single gene coding for a single polypeptide but subdivided into three easily separable segments. The resistance of the respiratory-chain observed in vitro in the drug-resistant mutants and the allelism relationships between respiratory-competent, drug-resistant loci and coQH2-cyt c reductase deficient, BOX, loci strongly suggest that each of the three drug-resistant loci codes for a structural gene-product which is essential for the normal coQH2-cyt c reductase activity and is obviously a good candidate for a gene product of the drug-resistant loci mapped in this paper. Polypeptide length modifications of cytochrome b were observed in mutants deficient in the coQH2-cyt c red and localized at the BOX1, BOX4 and BOX6 genetic loci (Claisse et al., 1977, 1978) which are precisely the loci allelic to drug resistant mutants as shown in the present work. Taken together these two sets of data provide a strong evidence in favor of the idea that there exist three non contiguous

  4. Identification of Drug Resistance Loci in Various Clinical Isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Thomas W.; Warner, Patricia; Zubryzycki, Leonard; Chila, Maria

    1977-01-01

    Extending previous results obtained for three strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, four naturally occurring, multiply resistant isolates were used in transformation studies. Six drug resistance loci corresponding to those found in the previously studied strains were identified. In addition, the mtr and ery-2 loci were found to be allelic. PMID:410364

  5. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies New Loci for Resistance to Leptosphaeria maculans in Canola

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Harsh; Raman, Rosy; Coombes, Neil; Song, Jie; Diffey, Simon; Kilian, Andrzej; Lindbeck, Kurt; Barbulescu, Denise M.; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David; Salisbury, Phil A.; Marcroft, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Key message “We identified both quantitative and quantitative resistance loci to Leptosphaeria maculans, a fungal pathogen, causing blackleg disease in canola. Several genome-wide significant associations were detected at known and new loci for blackleg resistance. We further validated statistically significant associations in four genetic mapping populations, demonstrating that GWAS marker loci are indeed associated with resistance to L. maculans. One of the novel loci identified for the first time, Rlm12, conveys adult plant resistance in canola.” Blackleg, caused by Leptosphaeria maculans, is a significant disease which affects the sustainable production of canola (Brassica napus). This study reports a genome-wide association study based on 18,804 polymorphic SNPs to identify loci associated with qualitative and quantitative resistance to L. maculans. Genomic regions delimited with 694 significant SNP markers, that are associated with resistance evaluated using 12 single spore isolates and pathotypes from four canola stubble were identified. Several significant associations were detected at known disease resistance loci including in the vicinity of recently cloned Rlm2/LepR3 genes, and at new loci on chromosomes A01/C01, A02/C02, A03/C03, A05/C05, A06, A08, and A09. In addition, we validated statistically significant associations on A01, A07, and A10 in four genetic mapping populations, demonstrating that GWAS marker loci are indeed associated with resistance to L. maculans. One of the novel loci identified for the first time, Rlm12, conveys adult plant resistance and mapped within 13.2 kb from Arabidopsis R gene of TIR-NBS class. We showed that resistance loci are located in the vicinity of R genes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus on the sequenced genome of B. napus cv. Darmor-bzh. Significantly associated SNP markers provide a valuable tool to enrich germplasm for favorable alleles in order to improve the level of resistance to L. maculans in

  6. Identification of two cerebral malaria resistance loci using an inbred wild-derived mouse strain

    PubMed Central

    Bagot, Sébastien; Campino, Susana; Penha-Gonçalves, Carlos; Pied, Sylviane; Cazenave, Pierre-André; Holmberg, Dan

    2002-01-01

    Malaria is a complex infectious disease in which the host/parasite interaction is strongly influenced by host genetic factors. The consequences of plasmodial infections range from asymptomatic to severe complications like the neurological syndrome cerebral malaria induced by Plasmodium falciparum in humans and Plasmodium berghei ANKA in rodents. Mice infected with P. berghei ANKA show marked differences in disease manifestation and either die from experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) or from hemolytic anemia caused by hyperparasitemia (HP). A majority of laboratory mouse strains so far investigated are susceptible to ECM; however, a number of wild-derived inbred strains show resistance. To evaluate the genetic basis of this difference, we crossed a uniquely ECM-resistant, wild-derived inbred strain (WLA) with an ECM susceptible laboratory strain (C57BL/6J). All of the (WLA × C57BL/6J) F1 and 97% of the F2 progeny displayed ECM resistance similar to the WLA strain. To screen for loci contributing to ECM resistance, we analyzed a cohort of mice backcrossed to the C57BL/6J parental strain. A genome wide screening of this cohort provided significant linkage of ECM resistance to marker loci in two genetic regions on chromosome 1 (χ2 = 18.98, P = 1.3 × 10−5) and on chromosome 11 (χ2 = 16.51, P = 4.8 × 10−5), being designated Berr1 and Berr2, respectively. These data provide the first evidence of loci associated with resistance to murine cerebral malaria, which may have important implications for the search for genetic factors controlling cerebral malaria in humans. PMID:12114535

  7. Small brown planthopper resistance loci in wild rice (Oryza officinalis).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weilin; Dong, Yan; Yang, Ling; Ma, Bojun; Ma, Rongrong; Huang, Fudeng; Wang, Changchun; Hu, Haitao; Li, Chunshou; Yan, Chengqi; Chen, Jianping

    2014-06-01

    Host-plant resistance is the most practical and economical approach to control the rice planthoppers. However, up to date, few rice germplasm accessions that are resistant to the all three kinds of planthoppers (1) brown planthopper (BPH; Nilaparvata lugens Stål), (2) the small brown planthopper (SBPH; Laodelphax striatellus Fallen), and (3) the whitebacked planthopper (WBPH, Sogatella furcifera Horvath) have been identified; consequently, the genetic basis for host-plant broad spectrum resistance to rice planthoppers in a single variety has been seldom studied. Here, one wild species, Oryza officinalis (Acc. HY018, 2n = 24, CC), was detected showing resistance to the all three kinds of planthoppers. Because resistance to WBPH and BPH in O. officinalis has previously been reported, the study mainly focused on its SBPH resistance. The SBPH resistance gene(s) was (were) introduced into cultivated rice via asymmetric somatic hybridization. Three QTLs for SBPH resistance detected by the SSST method were mapped and confirmed on chromosomes 3, 7, and 12, respectively. The allelic/non-allelic relationship and relative map positions of the three kinds of planthopper resistance genes in O. officinalis show that the SBPH, WBPH, and BPH resistance genes in O. officinalis were governed by multiple genes, but not by any major gene. The data on the genetics of host-plant broad spectrum resistance to planthoppers in a single accession suggested that the most ideally practical and economical approach for rice breeders is to screen the sources of broad spectrum resistance to planthoppers, but not to employ broad spectrum resistance gene for the management of planthoppers. Pyramiding these genes in a variety can be an effective way for the management of planthoppers.

  8. Quantitative trait loci for broomrape (Orobanche cumana Wallr.) resistance in sunflower.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vich, B; Akhtouch, B; Knapp, S J; Leon, A J; Velasco, L; Fernández-Martínez, J M; Berry, S T

    2004-06-01

    Broomrape (Orobanche cumana Wallr.) is a root parasite of sunflower that is regarded as one of the most important constraints of sunflower production in the Mediterranean region. Breeding for resistance is the most effective method of control. P-96 is a sunflower line which shows dominant resistance to broomrape race E and recessive resistance to the very new race F. The objective of this study was to map and characterize quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to race E and to race F of broomrape in P-96. A population from a cross between P-96 and the susceptible line P-21 was phenotyped for broomrape resistance in four experiments, two for race E and two for race F, by measuring different resistance parameters (resistance or susceptibility, number of broomrape per plant, and proportion of resistant plants per F(3) family). This population was also genotyped with microsatellite and RFLP markers. A linkage map comprising 103 marker loci distributed on 17 linkage groups was developed, and composite interval mapping analyses were performed. In total, five QTL ( or1.1, or3.1, or7.1 or13.1 and or13.2) for resistance to race E and six QTL ( or1.1, or4.1, or5.1, or13.1, or13.2 and or16.1) for resistance to race F of broomrape were detected on 7 of the 17 linkage groups. Phenotypic variance for race E resistance was mainly explained by the major QTL or3.1 associated to the resistance or susceptibility character ( R(2)=59%), while race F resistance was explained by QTL with a small to moderate effect ( R(2) from 15.0% to 38.7%), mainly associated with the number of broomrape per plant. Or3.1 was race E-specific, while or1.1, or13.1 and or13.2 of were non-race specific. Or13.1, and or13.2 were stable across the four experiments. Or3.1, and or7.1 were stable over the two race E experiments and or1.1 and or5.1 over the two race F experiments. The results from this study suggest that resistance to broomrape in sunflower is controlled by a combination of qualitative, race

  9. Genome-wide Association Analysis Tracks Bacterial Leaf Blight Resistance Loci In Rice Diverse Germplasm.

    PubMed

    Dilla-Ermita, Christine Jade; Tandayu, Erwin; Juanillas, Venice Margarette; Detras, Jeffrey; Lozada, Dennis Nicuh; Dwiyanti, Maria Stefanie; Vera Cruz, Casiana; Mbanjo, Edwige Gaby Nkouaya; Ardales, Edna; Diaz, Maria Genaleen; Mendioro, Merlyn; Thomson, Michael J; Kretzschmar, Tobias

    2017-12-01

    A range of resistance loci against different races of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the pathogen causing bacterial blight (BB) disease of rice, have been discovered and characterized. Several have been deployed in modern varieties, however, due to rapid evolution of Xoo, a number have already become ineffective. The continuous "arms race" between Xoo and rice makes it imperative to discover new resistance loci to enable durable deployment of multiple resistance genes in modern breeding lines. Rice diversity panels can be exploited as reservoirs of useful genetic variation for bacterial blight (BB) resistance. This study was conducted to identify loci associated to BB resistance, new genetic donors and useful molecular markers for marker-assisted breeding. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of BB resistance using a diverse panel of 285 rice accessions was performed to identify loci that are associated with resistance to nine Xoo strains from the Philippines, representative of eight global races. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with differential resistance were identified in the diverse panel and a subset of 198 indica accessions. Strong associations were found for novel SNPs linked with known bacterial blight resistance Xa genes, from which high utility markers for tracking and selection of resistance genes in breeding programs were designed. Furthermore, significant associations of SNPs in chromosomes 6, 9, 11, and 12 did not overlap with known resistance loci and hence might prove to be novel sources of resistance. Detailed analysis revealed haplotypes that correlated with resistance and analysis of putative resistance alleles identified resistant genotypes as potential donors of new resistance genes. The results of the GWAS validated known genes underlying resistance and identified novel loci that provide useful targets for further investigation. SNP markers and genetic donors identified in this study will help plant breeders in

  10. Confirming and identifying new loci for rice blast disease resistance using magnaporthe oryzae field isolates in the US

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) in rice play important roles in controlling rice blast disease. In the present study, 10 field isolates of the races IA1, IB1, IB17, and IC1 of U.S. rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae collected in 1996 and 2009 were used to identify blast resistance QTL with a recombi...

  11. Low validation rate of quantitative trait loci for Gibberella ear rot resistance in European maize.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Pedro Correa; Melchinger, Albrecht E; Schrag, Tobias A; Utz, H Friedrich; Schipprack, Wolfgang; Kessel, Bettina; Ouzunova, Milena; Miedaner, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Six quantitative trait loci (QTL) for Gibberella ear rot resistance in maize were tested in two different genetic backgrounds; three QTL displayed an effect in few near isogenic line pairs. Few quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping studies for Gibberella ear rot (GER) have been conducted, but no QTL have been verified so far. QTL validation is prudent before their implementation into marker-assisted selection (MAS) programs. Our objectives were to (1) validate six QTL for GER resistance, (2) evaluate the QTL across two genetic backgrounds, (3) investigate the genetic background outside the targeted introgressions. Pairs of near isogenic lines (NILs) segregating for a single QTL (Qger1, Qger2, Qger10, Qger13, Qger16, or Qger21) were developed by recurrent backcross until generation BC3S2. Donor parents (DP) carrying QTL were backcrossed to a susceptible (UH009) and a moderately resistant (UH007) recurrent parent. MAS was performed using five SNP markers covering a region of 40 cM around each QTL. All NILs were genotyped with the MaizeSNP50 assay and phenotyped for GER severity and deoxynivalenol and zearalenone content. Traits were significantly (P < 0.001) intercorrelated. Out of 34 NIL pairs with the UH009 genetic background, three pairs showed significant differences in at least one trait for three QTL (Qger1, Qger2, Qger13). Out of 25 NIL pairs with the UH007 genetic background, five pairs showed significant differences in at least one trait for two QTL (Qger2, Qger21). However, Qger16, Qger10 and Qger13 were most likely false positives. The genetic background possibly affected NIL pairs comparisons due to linkage drag and/or epistasis with residual loci from the DP in non-target regions. In conclusion, validation rates were disappointingly low, which further indicates that GER resistance is controlled by many low-effect QTL.

  12. Genetic mapping revealed two loci for soybean aphid resistance in PI 567301B.

    PubMed

    Jun, Tae-Hwan; Rouf Mian, M A; Michel, Andrew P

    2012-01-01

    The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) is the most damaging insect pest of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] in North America. New soybean aphid biotypes have been evolving quickly and at least three confirmed biotypes have been reported in USA. These biotypes are capable of defeating most known aphid resistant soybean genes indicating the need for identification of new genes. Plant Introduction (PI) 567301B was earlier identified to have antixenosis resistance against biotype 1 and 2 of the soybean aphid. Two hundred and three F(7:9) recombinant inbred lines (RILs) developed from a cross of soybean aphid susceptible cultivar Wyandot and resistant PI 567301B were used for mapping aphid resistance genes using the quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping approach. A subset of 94 RILs and 516 polymorphic SNP makers were used to construct a genome-wide molecular linkage map. Two candidate QTL regions for aphid resistance were identified on this linkage map. Fine mapping of the QTL regions was conducted with SSR markers using all 203 RILs. A major gene on chromosome 13 was mapped near the previously identified Rag2 gene. However, an earlier study revealed that the detached leaves of PI 567301B had no resistance against the soybean aphids while the detached leaves of PI 243540 (source of Rag2) maintained aphid resistance. These results and the earlier finding that PI 243540 showed antibiosis resistance and PI 567301B showed antixenosis type resistance, indicating that the aphid resistances in the two PIs are not controlled by the same gene. Thus, we have mapped a new gene near the Rag2 locus for soybean aphid resistance that should be useful in breeding for new aphid-resistant soybean cultivars. Molecular markers closely linked to this gene are available for marker-assisted breeding. Also, the minor locus found on chromosome 8 represents the first reported soybean aphid-resistant locus on this chromosome.

  13. Quantitative trait loci from the host genetic background modulate the durability of a resistance gene: a rational basis for sustainable resistance breeding in plants

    PubMed Central

    Quenouille, J; Paulhiac, E; Moury, B; Palloix, A

    2014-01-01

    The combination of major resistance genes with quantitative resistance factors is hypothesized as a promising breeding strategy to preserve the durability of resistant cultivar, as recently observed in different pathosystems. Using the pepper (Capsicum annuum)/Potato virus Y (PVY, genus Potyvirus) pathosystem, we aimed at identifying plant genetic factors directly affecting the frequency of virus adaptation to the major resistance gene pvr23 and at comparing them with genetic factors affecting quantitative resistance. The resistance breakdown frequency was a highly heritable trait (h2=0.87). Four loci including additive quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and epistatic interactions explained together 70% of the variance of pvr23 breakdown frequency. Three of the four QTLs controlling pvr23 breakdown frequency were also involved in quantitative resistance, strongly suggesting that QTLs controlling quantitative resistance have a pleiotropic effect on the durability of the major resistance gene. With the first mapping of QTLs directly affecting resistance durability, this study provides a rationale for sustainable resistance breeding. Surprisingly, a genetic trade-off was observed between the durability of PVY resistance controlled by pvr23 and the spectrum of the resistance against different potyviruses. This trade-off seemed to have been resolved by the combination of minor-effect durability QTLs under long-term farmer selection. PMID:24569635

  14. Quantitative trait loci from the host genetic background modulate the durability of a resistance gene: a rational basis for sustainable resistance breeding in plants.

    PubMed

    Quenouille, J; Paulhiac, E; Moury, B; Palloix, A

    2014-06-01

    The combination of major resistance genes with quantitative resistance factors is hypothesized as a promising breeding strategy to preserve the durability of resistant cultivar, as recently observed in different pathosystems. Using the pepper (Capsicum annuum)/Potato virus Y (PVY, genus Potyvirus) pathosystem, we aimed at identifying plant genetic factors directly affecting the frequency of virus adaptation to the major resistance gene pvr2(3) and at comparing them with genetic factors affecting quantitative resistance. The resistance breakdown frequency was a highly heritable trait (h(2)=0.87). Four loci including additive quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and epistatic interactions explained together 70% of the variance of pvr2(3) breakdown frequency. Three of the four QTLs controlling pvr2(3) breakdown frequency were also involved in quantitative resistance, strongly suggesting that QTLs controlling quantitative resistance have a pleiotropic effect on the durability of the major resistance gene. With the first mapping of QTLs directly affecting resistance durability, this study provides a rationale for sustainable resistance breeding. Surprisingly, a genetic trade-off was observed between the durability of PVY resistance controlled by pvr2(3) and the spectrum of the resistance against different potyviruses. This trade-off seemed to have been resolved by the combination of minor-effect durability QTLs under long-term farmer selection.

  15. Reappraisal of known malaria resistance loci in a large multicenter study.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    Many human genetic associations with resistance to malaria have been reported, but few have been reliably replicated. We collected data on 11,890 cases of severe malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum and 17,441 controls from 12 locations in Africa, Asia and Oceania. We tested 55 SNPs in 27 loci previously reported to associate with severe malaria. There was evidence of association at P < 1 × 10(-4) with the HBB, ABO, ATP2B4, G6PD and CD40LG loci, but previously reported associations at 22 other loci did not replicate in the multicenter analysis. The large sample size made it possible to identify authentic genetic effects that are heterogeneous across populations or phenotypes, with a striking example being the main African form of G6PD deficiency, which reduced the risk of cerebral malaria but increased the risk of severe malarial anemia. The finding that G6PD deficiency has opposing effects on different fatal complications of P. falciparum infection indicates that the evolutionary origins of this common human genetic disorder are more complex than previously supposed.

  16. Quantitative trait loci affecting starvation resistance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Harbison, Susan T; Yamamoto, Akihiko H; Fanara, Juan J; Norga, Koenraad K; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2004-01-01

    The ability to withstand periods of scarce food resources is an important fitness trait. Starvation resistance is a quantitative trait controlled by multiple interacting genes and exhibits considerable genetic variation in natural populations. This genetic variation could be maintained in the face of strong selection due to a trade-off in resource allocation between reproductive activity and individual survival. Knowledge of the genes affecting starvation tolerance and the subset of genes that affect variation in starvation resistance in natural populations would enable us to evaluate this hypothesis from a quantitative genetic perspective. We screened 933 co-isogenic P-element insertion lines to identify candidate genes affecting starvation tolerance. A total of 383 P-element insertions induced highly significant and often sex-specific mutational variance in starvation resistance. We also used deficiency complementation mapping followed by complementation to mutations to identify 12 genes contributing to variation in starvation resistance between two wild-type strains. The genes we identified are involved in oogenesis, metabolism, and feeding behaviors, indicating a possible link to reproduction and survival. However, we also found genes with cell fate specification and cell proliferation phenotypes, which implies that resource allocation during development and at the cellular level may also influence the phenotypic response to starvation. PMID:15126400

  17. Genome-wide search of stem rust resistance loci at the seedling stage in durum wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causative agent of stem rust in wheat, is known to rapidly evolve new virulence to resistance genes. While more than 50 stem rust resistance (Sr) loci have been identified in wheat, only a few remain effective, particularly against the highly virulent race Ug99 ...

  18. Lessons from a Phenotyping Center Revealed by the Genome-Guided Mapping of Powdery Mildew Resistance Loci.

    PubMed

    Cadle-Davidson, Lance; Gadoury, David; Fresnedo-Ramírez, Jonathan; Yang, Shanshan; Barba, Paola; Sun, Qi; Demmings, Elizabeth M; Seem, Robert; Schaub, Michelle; Nowogrodzki, Anna; Kasinathan, Hema; Ledbetter, Craig; Reisch, Bruce I

    2016-10-01

    The genomics era brought unprecedented opportunities for genetic analysis of host resistance, but it came with the challenge that accurate and reproducible phenotypes are needed so that genomic results appropriately reflect biology. Phenotyping host resistance by natural infection in the field can produce variable results due to the uncontrolled environment, uneven distribution and genetics of the pathogen, and developmentally regulated resistance among other factors. To address these challenges, we developed highly controlled, standardized methodologies for phenotyping powdery mildew resistance in the context of a phenotyping center, receiving samples of up to 140 grapevine progeny per F1 family. We applied these methodologies to F1 families segregating for REN1- or REN2-mediated resistance and validated that some but not all bioassays identified the REN1 or REN2 locus. A point-intercept method (hyphal transects) to quantify colony density objectively at 8 or 9 days postinoculation proved to be the phenotypic response most reproducibly predicted by these resistance loci. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping with genotyping-by-sequencing maps defined the REN1 and REN2 loci at relatively high resolution. In the reference PN40024 genome under each QTL, nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat candidate resistance genes were identified-one gene for REN1 and two genes for REN2. The methods described here for centralized resistance phenotyping and high-resolution genetic mapping can inform strategies for breeding resistance to powdery mildews and other pathogens on diverse, highly heterozygous hosts.

  19. Genome-wide association study indicates two novel resistance loci for severe malaria.

    PubMed

    Timmann, Christian; Thye, Thorsten; Vens, Maren; Evans, Jennifer; May, Jürgen; Ehmen, Christa; Sievertsen, Jürgen; Muntau, Birgit; Ruge, Gerd; Loag, Wibke; Ansong, Daniel; Antwi, Sampson; Asafo-Adjei, Emanuel; Nguah, Samuel Blay; Kwakye, Kingsley Osei; Akoto, Alex Osei Yaw; Sylverken, Justice; Brendel, Michael; Schuldt, Kathrin; Loley, Christina; Franke, Andre; Meyer, Christian G; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Ziegler, Andreas; Horstmann, Rolf D

    2012-09-20

    Malaria causes approximately one million fatalities per year, mostly among African children. Although highlighted by the strong protective effect of the sickle-cell trait, the full impact of human genetics on resistance to the disease remains largely unexplored. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies are designed to unravel relevant genetic variants comprehensively; however, in malaria, as in other infectious diseases, these studies have been only partly successful. Here we identify two previously unknown loci associated with severe falciparum malaria in patients and controls from Ghana, West Africa. We applied the GWA approach to the diverse clinical syndromes of severe falciparum malaria, thereby targeting human genetic variants influencing any step in the complex pathogenesis of the disease. One of the loci was identified on chromosome 1q32 within the ATP2B4 gene, which encodes the main calcium pump of erythrocytes, the host cells of the pathogenic stage of malaria parasites. The second was indicated by an intergenic single nucleotide polymorphism on chromosome 16q22.2, possibly linked to a neighbouring gene encoding the tight-junction protein MARVELD3. The protein is expressed on endothelial cells and might therefore have a role in microvascular damage caused by endothelial adherence of parasitized erythrocytes. We also confirmed previous reports on protective effects of the sickle-cell trait and blood group O. Our findings underline the potential of the GWA approach to provide candidates for the development of control measures against infectious diseases in humans.

  20. Quantitative trait loci mapping of partial resistance to Diamondback moth in cabbage (Brassica oleracea L).

    PubMed

    Ramchiary, Nirala; Pang, Wenxing; Nguyen, Van Dan; Li, Xiaonan; Choi, Su Ryun; Kumar, Ajay; Kwon, Min; Song, Hye Young; Begum, Shahnaz; Kehie, Mechuselie; Yoon, Moo-Kyoung; Na, Jonghyun; Kim, HyeRan; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2015-06-01

    The resistance to Diamondback moth insect in cabbage is governed by many minor loci in quantitative nature, and at least four genetic loci should be incorporated in marker-assisted breeding program for developing partially resistant DBM cabbage cultivars. The Diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella (L.), is the most destructive insect infesting cruciferous plants worldwide. Earlier studies have reported that the glossy leaves of cabbage are associated with resistance to this insect. However, until now, genetics of DBM resistance has not been studied in detail, and no QTL/gene mapping for this trait has been reported. In this paper, we report quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of DBM-resistant trait using 188 randomly selected segregating F 3 population derived from crossing a partially DBM-resistant glossy leaf cabbage (748) with a susceptible smooth cabbage line (747). Quantitative trait loci mapping using phenotypic data of four consecutive years (2008, 2009, 2010, and 2011) on DBM insect infestation detected a total of eight QTL on five linkage groups suggesting that DBM resistance is a quantitative in nature. Of these QTL, four QTL, i.e., qDbm 1 on LG1, qDbm5 and qDbm6 on LG7, and qDbm8 on LG9, were detected in different tests and years. The QTL, qDbm6 on LG7, was consecutively detected over 3 years. Tightly linked molecular markers have been developed for qDbm8 QTL on LG9 which could be used in marker-assisted breeding program. Our research demonstrated that for desired DBM resistance cultivar breeding, those four genetic loci have to be taken into consideration. Furthermore, the comparative study revealed that DBM resistance QTL is conserved between close relative model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica oleracea genome.

  1. Reappraisal of known malaria resistance loci in a large multi-centre study

    PubMed Central

    Rockett, Kirk A.; Clarke, Geraldine M.; Fitzpatrick, Kathryn; Hubbart, Christina; Jeffreys, Anna E.; Rowlands, Kate; Craik, Rachel; Jallow, Muminatou; Conway, David J.; Bojang, Kalifa A.; Pinder, Margaret; Usen, Stanley; Sisay-Joof, Fatoumatta; Sirugo, Giorgio; Toure, Ousmane; Thera, Mahamadou A.; Konate, Salimata; Sissoko, Sibiry; Niangaly, Amadou; Poudiougou, Belco; Mangano, Valentina D.; Bougouma, Edith C.; Sirima, Sodiomon B.; Modiano, David; Amenga-Etego, Lucas N.; Ghansah, Anita; Koram, Kwadwo A.; Wilson, Michael D.; Enimil, Anthony; Evans, Jennifer; Amodu, Olukemi; Olaniyan, Subulade; Apinjoh, Tobias; Mugri, Regina; Ndi, Andre; Ndila, Carolyne M.; Uyoga, Sophie; Macharia, Alexander; Peshu, Norbert; Williams, Thomas N.; Manjurano, Alphaxard; Riley, Eleanor; Drakeley, Chris; Reyburn, Hugh; Nyirongo, Vysaul; Kachala, David; Molyneux, Malcolm; Dunstan, Sarah J.; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Ngoc Quyen, Nguyen Thi; Thai, Cao Quang; Hien, Tran Tinh; Manning, Laurens; Laman, Moses; Siba, Peter; Karunajeewa, Harin; Allen, Steve; Allen, Angela; Davis, Timothy M. E.; Michon, Pascal; Mueller, Ivo; Green, Angie; Molloy, Sile; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Kerasidou, Angeliki; Cornelius, Victoria; Hart, Lee; Vanderwal, Aaron; SanJoaquin, Miguel; Band, Gavin; Le, Si Quang; Pirinen, Matti; Sepúlveda, Nuno; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Clark, Taane G.; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Achidi, Eric; Doumbo, Ogobara; Farrar, Jeremy; Marsh, Kevin; Taylor, Terrie; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.

    2015-01-01

    Many human genetic associations with resistance to malaria have been reported but few have been reliably replicated. We collected data on 11,890 cases of severe malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum and 17,441 controls from 12 locations in Africa, Asia and Oceania. There was strong evidence of association with the HBB, ABO, ATP2B4, G6PD and CD40LG loci but previously reported associations at 22 other loci did not replicate in the multi-centre analysis. The large sample size made it possible to identify authentic genetic effects that are heterogeneous across populations or phenotypes, a striking example being the main African form of G6PD deficiency, which reduced the risk of cerebral malaria but increased the risk of severe malarial anaemia. The finding that G6PD deficiency has opposing effects on different fatal complications of P. falciparum infection indicates that the evolutionary origins of this common human genetic disorder are more complex than previously supposed. PMID:25261933

  2. Quantitative trait Loci mapping for bacterial blight resistance in rice using bulked segregant analysis.

    PubMed

    Han, Xueying; Yang, Yong; Wang, Xuming; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Wenhao; Yu, Chulang; Cheng, Chen; Cheng, Ye; Yan, Chengqi; Chen, Jianping

    2014-07-03

    Oryza meyeriana is highly resistant to rice bacterial blight (BB) and this resistance trait has been transferred to cultivated rice (O. sativa) using asymmetric somatic hybridization. However, no resistance genes have yet been cloned. In the present study, a progeny of the somatic hybridization with high BB resistance was crossed with a rice cultivar with high BB susceptibility to develop an F2 population. Using bulked segregant analysis (BSA), 17 polymorphic markers that were linked to rice BB resistance were obtained through scanning a total of 186 simple sequence repeats (SSR) and sequence-tagged site (STS) markers, evenly distributed on 12 chromosomes. A genetic linkage map was then constructed based on the 17 linkage markers and the F2 segregating population, which was followed by mapping for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for BB resistance. Three QTLs were identified on chromosomes 1, 3 and 5, respectively, and the alleles of the resistant parent at any of the QTLs increased BB resistance. All of the three QTLs had a strong effect on resistance, explaining about 21.5%, 12.3% and 39.2% of the resistance variance, respectively. These QTLs were different from the loci of the BB resistance genes that have been identified in previous studies. The QTLs mapped in this work will facilitate the isolation of novel BB resistance genes and their utilization in rice resistance breeding.

  3. Quantitative trait Loci for resistance to the congenital nephropathy in tensin 2-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hayato; Sasaki, Nobuya; Nishino, Tomohiro; Nagasaki, Ken-Ichi; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Torigoe, Daisuke; Agui, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The ICR-derived glomerulonephritis (ICGN) mouse is a chronic kidney disease (CKD) model that is characterized histologically by glomerulosclerosis, vascular sclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, and clinically by proteinuria and anemia, which are common symptoms and pathological changes associated with a variety of kidney diseases. Previously, we performed a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis to identify the causative genes for proteinuria in ICGN mice, and found a deletion mutation of the tensin 2 gene (Tns2nph, MGI no: 2447990). Interestingly, the congenic strain carrying the Tns2nph mutation on a C57BL/6J (B6) genetic background exhibited milder phenotypes than did ICGN mice, indicating the presence of several modifier genes controlling the disease phenotype. In this study, to identify the modifier/resistant loci for CKD progression in Tns2-deficient mice, we performed QTL analysis using backcross progenies from susceptible ICGN and resistant B6 mice. We identified a significant locus on chromosome (Chr) 2 (LOD = 5.36; 31 cM) and two suggestive loci on Chrs 10 (LOD = 2.27; 64 cM) and X (LOD = 2.65; 67 cM) with linkage to the severity of tubulointerstitial injury. One significant locus on Chr 13 (LOD = 3.49; approximately 14 cM) and one suggestive locus on Chr 2 (LOD = 2.41; 51 cM) were identified as QTLs for the severity of glomerulosclerosis. Suggestive locus in BUN was also detected in the same Chr 2 region (LOD = 2.34; 51 cM). A locus on Chr 2 (36 cM) was significantly linked with HGB (LOD = 4.47) and HCT (LOD = 3.58). Four novel epistatic loci controlling either HGB or tubulointerstitial injury were discovered. Further genetic analysis should lead to identification of CKD modifier gene(s), aiding early diagnosis and providing novel approaches to the discovery of drugs for the treatment and possible prevention of kidney disease.

  4. A joint analysis to identify loci underlying variation in nematode resistance in three European sheep populations.

    PubMed

    Riggio, V; Pong-Wong, R; Sallé, G; Usai, M G; Casu, S; Moreno, C R; Matika, O; Bishop, S C

    2014-12-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode infections are one of the main health/economic issues in sheep industries, worldwide. Indicator traits for resistance such as faecal egg count (FEC) are commonly used in genomic studies; however, published results are inconsistent among breeds. Meta (or joint)-analysis is a tool for aggregating information from multiple independent studies. The aim of this study was to identify loci underlying variation in FEC, as an indicator of nematode resistance, in a joint analysis using data from three populations (Scottish Blackface, Sarda × Lacaune and Martinik Black-Belly × Romane), genotyped with the ovine 50k SNP chip. The trait analysed was the average animal effect for Strongyles and Nematodirus FEC data. Analyses were performed with regional heritability mapping (RHM), fitting polygenic effects with either the whole genomic relationship matrix or matrices excluding the chromosome being interrogated. Across-population genomic covariances were set to zero. After quality control, 4123 animals and 38 991 SNPs were available for the analysis. RHM identified genome-wide significant regions on OAR4, 12, 14, 19 and 20, with the latter being the most significant. The OAR20 region is close to the major histocompatibility complex, which has often been proposed as a functional candidate for nematode resistance. This region was significant only in the Sarda × Lacaune population. Several other regions, on OAR1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 12, 19, 20 and 24, were significant at the suggestive level.

  5. Quantitative trait loci for aluminum resistance in Chinese wheat landrace FSW.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shibin; Bai, Gui-Hua; Zhang, Dadong

    2008-06-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is a major constraint for wheat production in acid soils worldwide. Chinese landrace FSW demonstrates a high level of Al resistance. A population of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was developed from a cross between FSW and an Al-sensitive Chinese line, ND35, using single seed descent, to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for Al resistance. Wheat reaction to Al stress was measured by net root growth (NRG) in a nutrient solution culture containing Al(3+) and hematoxylin staining score (HSS) of root after Al stress. After 1,437 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were screened using bulk segregant analysis, three QTLs were identified to control Al resistance in FSW. One major QTL (Qalt.pser-4DL) was mapped on chromosome 4DL that co-segregated with Xups4, a marker for the promoter of the Al-activated malate transporter (ALMT1) gene. The other two QTLs (Qalt.pser-3BL, Qalt.pser-2A) were located on chromosomes 3BL and 2A, respectively. Together, the three QTLs accounted for up to 81.9% of the phenotypic variation for HSS and 78.3% of the variation for NRG. The physical positions of flanking markers for Qalt.pser-4DL and Qalt.pser-3BL were determined by analyzing these markers in corresponding nulli-tetrasomic, ditelosomic, and 3BL deletion lines of Chinese Spring. Qalt.pser-3BL is a novel QTL with a major effect on Al resistance discovered in this study. The two major QTLs on 4DL and 3BL demonstrated an additive effect. The SSR markers closely linked to the QTLs have potential to be used for marker-assisted selection (MAS) to improve Al resistance of wheat cultivars in breeding programs.

  6. Evaluation and Quantitative trait loci mapping of resistance to powdery mildew in lettuce

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) is the major leafy vegetable that is susceptible to powdery mildew disease under greenhouse and field conditions. We mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for resistance to powdery mildew under greenhouse conditions in an interspecific population derived from a cross betw...

  7. A consensus map for Ug99 stem rust resistance loci in wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The global effort to identify new sources of resistance to wheat stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici race group Ug99, has resulted in numerous studies reporting both qualitative genes and quantitative trait loci (QTLs). The purpose of our study was to assemble all available informa...

  8. Genetic analysis of durable resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae in the rice accession Gigante Vercelli identified two blast resistance loci.

    PubMed

    Urso, Simona; Desiderio, Francesca; Biselli, Chiara; Bagnaresi, Paolo; Crispino, Laura; Piffanelli, Pietro; Abbruscato, Pamela; Assenza, Federica; Guarnieri, Giada; Cattivelli, Luigi; Valè, Giampiero

    2016-02-01

    Rice cultivars exhibiting durable resistance to blast, the most important rice fungal disease provoking up to 30 % of rice losses, are very rare and searching for sources of such a resistance represents a priority for rice-breeding programs. To this aim we analyzed Gigante Vercelli (GV) and Vialone Nano (VN), two temperate japonica rice cultivars in Italy displaying contrasting response to blast, with GV showing a durable and broad-spectrum resistance, whereas VN being highly susceptible. An SSR-based genetic map developed using a GV × VN population segregating for blast resistance identified two blast resistance loci, localized to the long arm of chromosomes 1 and 4 explaining more than 78 % of the observed phenotypic variation for blast resistance. The pyramiding of two blast resistance QTLs was therefore involved in the observed durable resistance in GV. Mapping data were integrated with information obtained from RNA-seq expression profiling of all classes of resistance protein genes (resistance gene analogs, RGAs) and with the map position of known cloned or mapped blast resistance genes to search candidates for the GV resistant response. A co-localization of RGAs with the LOD peak or the marker interval of the chromosome 1 QTL was highlighted and a valuable tool for selecting the resistance gene during breeding programs was developed. Comparative analysis with known blast resistance genes revealed co-positional relationships between the chromosome 1 QTL with the Pi35/Pish blast resistance alleles and showed that the chromosome 4 QTL represents a newly identified blast resistance gene. The present genetic analysis has therefore allowed the identification of two blast resistance loci in the durable blast-resistant rice cultivar GV and tools for molecular selection of these resistance genes.

  9. Characterization of new loci for Hessian fly resistance in common wheat.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yuanfeng; Cambron, Sue E; Chen, Zhenbang; Wang, Yingying; Bland, Daniel E; Buntin, G David; Johnson, Jerry W

    2013-04-01

    The discovery of several new loci for resistance to Hessian fly was reported here. QHf.uga-6AL, the late HR61 was recognized from wheat cultivar 26R61 on the distal end of 6AL with resistance to both biotypes E and vH13. It is the first gene or QTL found on this particular chromosome. QHf.uga-3DL and QHf.uga-1AL, physically assigned to the deletion bins 3DL2-0.27-0.81 and 1AL1-0.17-0.61, respectively, were detected for resistance to biotype vH13. Both QTL should represent new loci for Hessian fly resistance and the latter was detectable only in the late seedling stage when tolerance was evident. In addition, QHf.uga-6DS-C and QHf.uga-1AS had minor effect and were identified from the susceptible parent AGS 2000 for resistance to biotype E and vH13, respectively. QHf.uga-6DS-C is different from the known gene H13 on 6DS and QHf.uga-1AS is different from H9 gene cluster on 1AS. These loci also might be new components of Hessian fly resistance, although their LOD values were not highly significant. The QTL detections were all conducted on a RIL mapping population of 26R61/AGS 2000 with good genome coverage of molecular markers. The strategy used in the current study will serve as a good starting point for the discovery and mapping of resistance genes including tolerance to the pest and the closely linked markers will certainly be useful in selecting or pyramiding of these loci in breeding programs.

  10. Resisting Mind Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Susan M.; Zimbardo, Philip G.

    1980-01-01

    Provides conceptual analyses of mind control techniques along with practical advice on how to resist these techniques. The authors stress that effective mind control stems more from everyday social relations than from exotic technological gimmicks. Suggestions are given for resisting persuasion, resisting systems, and challenging the system.…

  11. Resisting Mind Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Susan M.; Zimbardo, Philip G.

    1980-01-01

    Provides conceptual analyses of mind control techniques along with practical advice on how to resist these techniques. The authors stress that effective mind control stems more from everyday social relations than from exotic technological gimmicks. Suggestions are given for resisting persuasion, resisting systems, and challenging the system.…

  12. Using Genotyping by Sequencing to Map Two Novel Anthracnose Resistance Loci in Sorghum bicolor.

    PubMed

    J Felderhoff, Terry; M McIntyre, Lauren; Saballos, Ana; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2016-07-07

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance loci present in the highly resistant cultivar 'Bk7', a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing 'Bk7' with the susceptible inbred 'Early Hegari-Sart'. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from 'Bk7'. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. Genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between 'Bk7' and sweet sorghum 'Mer81-4' narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases. Copyright © 2016 Felderhoff et al.

  13. Using Genotyping by Sequencing to Map Two Novel Anthracnose Resistance Loci in Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    J. Felderhoff, Terry; M. McIntyre, Lauren; Saballos, Ana; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance loci present in the highly resistant cultivar ‘Bk7’, a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing ‘Bk7’ with the susceptible inbred ‘Early Hegari-Sart’. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from ‘Bk7’. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. Genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between ‘Bk7’ and sweet sorghum ‘Mer81-4’ narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases. PMID:27194807

  14. Genome-wide association analysis identifies resistance loci for bacterial blight in a diverse collection of indica rice germplasm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Wu, Zhi-Chao; Wang, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Fan; Dingkuhn, Michael; Xu, Jian-Long; Zhou, Yong-Li; Li, Zhi-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial blight, which is caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is one of the most devastating rice diseases worldwide. The development and use of disease-resistant cultivars have been the most effective strategy to control bacterial blight. Identifying the genes mediating bacterial blight resistance is a prerequisite for breeding cultivars with broad-spectrum and durable resistance. We herein describe a genome-wide association study involving 172 diverse Oryza sativa ssp. indica accessions to identify loci influencing the resistance to representative strains of six Xoo races. Twelve resistance loci containing 121 significantly associated signals were identified using 317,894 single nucleotide polymorphisms, which explained 13.3-59.9% of the variability in lesion length caused by Xoo races P1, P6, and P9a. Two hotspot regions (L11 and L12) were located within or nearby two cloned R genes (xa25 and Xa26) and one fine-mapped R gene (Xa4). Our results confirmed the relatively high resolution of genome-wide association studies. Moreover, we detected novel significant associations on chromosomes 2, 3, and 6-10. Haplotype analyses of xa25, the Xa26 paralog (MRKc; LOC_Os11g47290), and a Xa4 candidate gene (LOC_11g46870) revealed differences in bacterial blight resistance among indica subgroups. These differences were responsible for the observed variations in lesion lengths resulting from infections by Xoo races P1 and P9a. Our findings may be relevant for future studies involving bacterial blight resistance gene cloning, and provide insights into the genetic basis for bacterial blight resistance in indica rice, which may be useful for knowledge-based crop improvement.

  15. Genome-wide association analysis identifies resistance loci for bacterial blight in a diverse collection of indica rice germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Fan; Dingkuhn, Michael; Xu, Jian-Long; Zhou, Yong-Li; Li, Zhi-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial blight, which is caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is one of the most devastating rice diseases worldwide. The development and use of disease-resistant cultivars have been the most effective strategy to control bacterial blight. Identifying the genes mediating bacterial blight resistance is a prerequisite for breeding cultivars with broad-spectrum and durable resistance. We herein describe a genome-wide association study involving 172 diverse Oryza sativa ssp. indica accessions to identify loci influencing the resistance to representative strains of six Xoo races. Twelve resistance loci containing 121 significantly associated signals were identified using 317,894 single nucleotide polymorphisms, which explained 13.3–59.9% of the variability in lesion length caused by Xoo races P1, P6, and P9a. Two hotspot regions (L11 and L12) were located within or nearby two cloned R genes (xa25 and Xa26) and one fine-mapped R gene (Xa4). Our results confirmed the relatively high resolution of genome-wide association studies. Moreover, we detected novel significant associations on chromosomes 2, 3, and 6–10. Haplotype analyses of xa25, the Xa26 paralog (MRKc; LOC_Os11g47290), and a Xa4 candidate gene (LOC_11g46870) revealed differences in bacterial blight resistance among indica subgroups. These differences were responsible for the observed variations in lesion lengths resulting from infections by Xoo races P1 and P9a. Our findings may be relevant for future studies involving bacterial blight resistance gene cloning, and provide insights into the genetic basis for bacterial blight resistance in indica rice, which may be useful for knowledge-based crop improvement. PMID:28355306

  16. Identification of loci Associated with Resistance to Root-Rot Diseases in Autotetraploid Alfalfa using Genome-Wide Sequencing and Association Mapping

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is the world-wide forage crop. Changing trends to multipurpose uses increases demand for alfalfa. However, the production of alfalfa is challenged by endemic and emerging diseases. Identification of genes/loci controlling disease resistance will facilitate breeding for i...

  17. A Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals New Loci for Resistance to Clubroot Disease in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lixia; Luo, Yujie; Chen, Biyun; Xu, Kun; Zhang, Fugui; Li, Hao; Huang, Qian; Xiao, Xin; Zhang, Tianyao; Hu, Jihong; Li, Feng; Wu, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oil crops in the world. However, the yield and quality of rapeseed were largely decreased by clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae Woronin). Therefore, it is of great importance for screening more resistant germplasms or genes and improving the resistance to P. brassicae in rapeseed breeding. In this study, a massive resistant identification for a natural global population was conducted in two environments with race/pathotype 4 of P. brassicae which was the most predominant in China, and a wide range of phenotypic variation was found in the population. In addition, a genome-wide association study of 472 accessions for clubroot resistance (CR) was performed with 60K Brassica Infinium SNP arrays for the first time. In total, nine QTLs were detected, seven of which were novel through integrative analysis. Furthermore, additive effects in genetic control of CR in rapeseed among the above loci were found. By bioinformatic analyses, the candidate genes of these loci were predicted, which indicated that TIR-NBS gene family might play an important role in CR. It is believable that the results presented in our study could provide valuable information for understanding the genetic mechanism and molecular regulation of CR. PMID:27746804

  18. Sequence-based association and selection scans identify drug resistance loci in the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Park, Daniel J.; Lukens, Amanda K.; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Chang, Hsiao-Han; Valim, Clarissa; Ribacke, Ulf; Van Tyne, Daria; Galinsky, Kevin; Galligan, Meghan; Becker, Justin S.; Ndiaye, Daouda; Mboup, Souleymane; Wiegand, Roger C.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Wirth, Dyann F.; Volkman, Sarah K.

    2012-01-01

    Through rapid genetic adaptation and natural selection, the Plasmodium falciparum parasite—the deadliest of those that cause malaria—is able to develop resistance to antimalarial drugs, thwarting present efforts to control it. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide a critical hypothesis-generating tool for understanding how this occurs. However, in P. falciparum, the limited amount of linkage disequilibrium hinders the power of traditional array-based GWAS. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility and power improvements gained by using whole-genome sequencing for association studies. We analyzed data from 45 Senegalese parasites and identified genetic changes associated with the parasites’ in vitro response to 12 different antimalarials. To further increase statistical power, we adapted a common test for natural selection, XP-EHH (cross-population extended haplotype homozygosity), and used it to identify genomic regions associated with resistance to drugs. Using this sequence-based approach and the combination of association and selection-based tests, we detected several loci associated with drug resistance. These loci included the previously known signals at pfcrt, dhfr, and pfmdr1, as well as many genes not previously implicated in drug-resistance roles, including genes in the ubiquitination pathway. Based on the success of the analysis presented in this study, and on the demonstrated shortcomings of array-based approaches, we argue for a complete transition to sequence-based GWAS for small, low linkage-disequilibrium genomes like that of P. falciparum. PMID:22826220

  19. Identification of genetic loci that control mammary tumor susceptibility through the host microenvironment

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Pengju; Lo, Alvin; Huang, Yurong; ...

    2015-03-09

    The interplay between host genetics, tumor microenvironment and environmental exposure in cancer susceptibility remains poorly understood. Here we assessed the genetic control of stromal mediation of mammary tumor susceptibility to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) using backcrossed F1 into BALB/c (F1Bx) between cancer susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (SPRET/EiJ) mouse strains. Tumor formation was evaluated after transplantation of non-irradiated Trp53-/- BALB/c mammary gland fragments into cleared fat pads of F1Bx hosts. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed 2 genetic loci that constitute the baseline susceptibility via host microenvironment. However, once challenged with LDIR, we discovered 13 additional loci that were enriched for genesmore » involved in cytokines, including TGFβ1 signaling. Surprisingly, LDIR-treated F1Bx cohort significantly reduced incidence of mammary tumors from Trp53-/- fragments as well as prolonged tumor latency, compared to sham-treated controls. We demonstrated further that plasma levels of specific cytokines were significantly correlated with tumor latency. Using an ex vivo 3-D assay, we confirmed TGFβ1 as a strong candidate for reduced mammary invasion in SPRET/EiJ, which could explain resistance of this strain to mammary cancer risk following LDIR. Our results open possible new avenues to understand mechanisms of genes operating via the stroma that affect cancer risk from external environmental exposures.« less

  20. Identification of genetic loci that control mammary tumor susceptibility through the host microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengju; Lo, Alvin; Huang, Yurong; Huang, Ge; Liang, Guozhou; Mott, Joni; Karpen, Gary H.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Snijders, Antoine M.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2015-03-09

    The interplay between host genetics, tumor microenvironment and environmental exposure in cancer susceptibility remains poorly understood. Here we assessed the genetic control of stromal mediation of mammary tumor susceptibility to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) using backcrossed F1 into BALB/c (F1Bx) between cancer susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (SPRET/EiJ) mouse strains. Tumor formation was evaluated after transplantation of non-irradiated Trp53-/- BALB/c mammary gland fragments into cleared fat pads of F1Bx hosts. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed 2 genetic loci that constitute the baseline susceptibility via host microenvironment. However, once challenged with LDIR, we discovered 13 additional loci that were enriched for genes involved in cytokines, including TGFβ1 signaling. Surprisingly, LDIR-treated F1Bx cohort significantly reduced incidence of mammary tumors from Trp53-/- fragments as well as prolonged tumor latency, compared to sham-treated controls. We demonstrated further that plasma levels of specific cytokines were significantly correlated with tumor latency. Using an ex vivo 3-D assay, we confirmed TGFβ1 as a strong candidate for reduced mammary invasion in SPRET/EiJ, which could explain resistance of this strain to mammary cancer risk following LDIR. Our results open possible new avenues to understand mechanisms of genes operating via the stroma that affect cancer risk from external environmental exposures.

  1. Association mapping utilizing diverse barley lines reveals net form net blotch seedling resistance/susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jonathan K; Friesen, Timothy L; Brueggeman, Robert S

    2017-05-01

    A diverse collection of barley lines was phenotyped with three North American Pyrenophora teres f. teres isolates and association analyses detected 78 significant marker-trait associations at 16 genomic loci. Pyrenophora teres f. teres is a necrotrophic fungal pathogen and the causal agent of the economically important foliar disease net form net blotch (NFNB) of barley. The deployment of effective and durable resistance against P. teres f. teres has been hindered by the complexity of quantitative resistance and susceptibility. Several bi-parental mapping populations have been used to identify QTL associated with NFNB disease on all seven barley chromosomes. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) to detect marker-trait associations for resistance or susceptibility to P. teres f. teres. Geographically diverse barley genotypes from a world barley core collection (957) were genotyped with the Illumina barley iSelect chip and phenotyped with three P. teres f. teres isolates collected in two geographical regions of the USA (15A, 6A and LDNH04Ptt19). The best of nine regression models tested were identified for each isolate and used for association analysis resulting in the identification of 78 significant marker-trait associations (MTA; -log10p value >3.0). The MTA identified corresponded to 16 unique genomic loci as determined by analysis of local linkage disequilibrium between markers that did not meet a correlation threshold of R (2) ≥ 0.1, indicating that the markers represented distinct loci. Five loci identified represent novel QTL and were designated QRptts-3HL, QRptts-4HS, QRptts-5HL.1, QRptts-5HL.2, and QRptts-7HL.1. In addition, 55 of the barley lines examined exhibited a high level of resistance to all three isolates and the SNP markers identified will provide useful genetic resources for barley breeding programs.

  2. Using genotyping by sequencing to map two novel anthracnose resistance Loci in Sorghum bicolor

    DOE PAGES

    Felderhoff, Terry J.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Saballos, Ana; ...

    2016-05-18

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance locimore » present in the highly resistant cultivar ‘Bk7’, a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing ‘Bk7’ with the susceptible inbred ‘Early Hegari-Sart’. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from ‘Bk7’. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. In addition, genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between ‘Bk7’ and sweet sorghum ‘Mer81-4’ narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases.« less

  3. Two Loci from Lycopersicon hirsutum LA407 Confer Resistance to Strains of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    PubMed

    Kabelka, E; Franchino, B; Francis, D M

    2002-05-01

    ABSTRACT We used molecular markers to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) that contribute to resistance to bacterial canker of tomato caused by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. Resistance was first identified as a marker-trait association in an inbred backcross (IBC) population derived from crossing Lycopersicon hirsutum accession (LA407) with L. esculentum. Single-marker QTL analysis suggested that at least two loci originating from L. hirsutum LA407, Rcm 2.0 on chromosome 2 and Rcm 5.1 on chromosome 5, contribute to resistance in replicated trials. Two segregating F(2) populations were developed by crossing resistant inbred backcross lines (IBLs) to elite L. esculentum lines and used to confirm QTL associations detected in the IBC population. In these populations, realized heritability estimates were higher for selection based on maximal disease than for selection based on disease progression. Realized heritability in the population carrying Rcm 2.0 was 0.63 and 0.14, respectively, for each selection criteria. Realized heritability estimates were 0.85 for selection based on maximal disease and 0.37 for selection based on disease progression in a population carrying Rcm 5.1. The disease response of F(3) families selected for resistance suggested that both Rcm 2.0 and Rcm 5.1 confer resistance to bacterial strains in the repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction DNA fingerprint classes A and C. Markers linked to Rcm 2.0 explained up to 56% of the total phenotypic variation for resistance in one population, and markers linked to Rcm 5.1 explained up to 73% of the total phenotypic variation for resistance in a separate population.

  4. Mapping of loci from Solanum lycopersicoides conferring resistance or susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea in tomato.

    PubMed

    Davis, Joel; Yu, Daozhan; Evans, Wendy; Gokirmak, Tufan; Chetelat, Roger T; Stotz, Henrik U

    2009-07-01

    Cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, syn. Lycopersicon esculentum) is susceptible to the necrotrophic ascomycete and causal agent of gray mold, Botrytis cinerea. Resistance to this fungal pathogen is elevated in wild relatives of tomato, including Solanum lycopersicoides. An introgression line population (IL) containing chromosomal segments of S. lycopersicoides within the background of tomato cv. VF36 was used to screen the genome for foliar resistance and susceptibility to B. cinerea. Based on this screen, putative quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified, five for resistance and two for susceptibility. Four resistance QTL decreased infection frequency while the fifth reduced lesion diameter. One susceptibility QTL increased infection frequency whereas the other increased lesion diameter. Overlapping chromosomal segments provided strong evidence for partial resistance on chromosomes 1 and 9 and for elevated susceptibility on chromosome 11. Segregation analysis confirmed the major resistance QTL on the long arm of chromosome 1 and susceptibility on chromosome 11. Linkage of partial resistance to chromosome 9 could not be confirmed. The usefulness of these data for resistance breeding and for map-based cloning of foliar resistance to B. cinerea is discussed.

  5. Proactive control of proactive interference using the method of loci.

    PubMed

    Bass, Willa S; Oswald, Karl M

    2014-01-01

    Proactive interferencebuilds up with exposure to multiple lists of similar items with a resulting reduction in recall. This study examined the effectiveness of using a proactive strategy of the method of loci to reduce proactive interference in a list recall paradigm of categorically similar words. While all participants reported using some form of strategy to recall list words, this study demonstrated that young adults were able to proactively use the method of loci after 25 min of instruction to reduce proactive interference as compared with other personal spontaneous strategies. The implications of this study are that top-down proactive strategies such as the method of loci can significantly reduce proactive interference, and that the use of image and sequence or location are especially useful in this regard.

  6. Simultaneous estimation of the locations and effects of multiple disease loci in case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Chien, Li-Chu; Chiu, Yen-Feng; Liang, Kung-Yee; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2015-04-01

    The genetic basis of complex diseases often involves multiple causative loci. Under such a disease etiology, assuming one disease locus in linkage disequilibrium mapping is likely to induce bias and lead to efficiency loss in disease locus estimation. An approach is needed for simultaneously localizing multiple functional loci within the same region. However, due to the increasing number of parameters accompanying disease loci, these estimates can be computationally infeasible. To circumvent this problem, we propose to estimate the main and two-adjacent-locus joint effects and a nuisance parameter at the disease loci separately through a linear approximation. Estimates of the genetic effects are entered into a generalized estimating equation to estimate disease loci, and the procedure is conducted iteratively until convergence. The proposed method provides estimates and confidence intervals (CIs) for the disease loci, the genetic main effects, and the joint effects of two adjacent disease loci, with the CIs for the disease loci providing useful regions for further fine-mapping. We apply the proposed approach to a data example of case-control studies. Results of the simulations and data example suggest that the developed method performs well in terms of bias, variance, and coverage probability under scenarios with up to three disease loci.

  7. Mapping and quantitative trait loci analysis of verticillium wilt resistance genes in cotton.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Mei; Lin, Zhong-Xu; Zhang, Xian-Long; Chen, Wei; Guo, Xiao-Ping; Nie, Yi-Chun; Li, Yun-Hai

    2008-02-01

    Verticillium wilt is one of the most serious constraints to cotton production in almost all of the cotton-growing countries. In this study, "XinLuZao1" (XLZ1), a susceptible cultivar Gossypium hirsutum L. and "Hai7124" (H7124), a resistant line G. barbadense, and their F(2:3) families were used to map and study the disease index induced by verticillium wilt. A total of 430 SSR loci were mapped into 41 linkage groups; the map spanned 3,745.9 cM and the average distance between adjacent loci was 8.71 cM. Four and five quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected based on the disease index investigated on July 22 and August 24 in 2004, respectively. These nine QTLs explained 10.63-28.83% of the phenotypic variance, six of them were located on the D sub-genome. Two QTLs located in the same marker intervals may partly explain the significant correlation of the two traits. QTLs explaining large phenotypic variation were identified in this study, which may be quite useful in cotton anti-disease breeding.

  8. Two loci control tuberculin skin test reactivity in an area hyperendemic for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cobat, Aurelie; Gallant, Caroline J; Simkin, Leah; Black, Gillian F; Stanley, Kim; Hughes, Jane; Doherty, T Mark; Hanekom, Willem A; Eley, Brian; Jaïs, Jean-Philippe; Boland-Auge, Anne; van Helden, Paul; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Abel, Laurent; Hoal, Eileen G; Schurr, Erwin; Alcaïs, Alexandre

    2009-11-23

    Approximately 20% of persons living in areas hyperendemic for tuberculosis (TB) display persistent lack of tuberculin skin test (TST) reactivity and appear to be naturally resistant to infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Among those with a positive response, the intensity of TST reactivity varies greatly. The genetic basis of TST reactivity is not known. We report on a genome-wide linkage search for loci that have an impact on TST reactivity, which is defined either as zero versus nonzero (TST-BINa) or as extent of TST in millimeters (TST-quantitative trait locus [QTL]) in a panel of 128 families, including 350 siblings, from an area of South Africa hyperendemic for TB. We detected a major locus (TST1) on chromosomal region 11p14 (P = 1.4 x 10(-5)), which controls TST-BINa, with a lack of responsiveness indicating T cell-independent resistance to M. tuberculosis. We also detected a second major locus (TST2) on chromosomal region 5p15 (P < 10(-5)), which controls TST-QTL or the intensity of T cell-mediated delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) to tuberculin. Fine mapping of this region identified SLC6A3, encoding the dopamine transporter DAT1, as a promising gene for further studies. Our results pave the way for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection in endemic areas (TST1) and for the identification of critical regulators of T cell-dependent DTH to tuberculin (TST2).

  9. Genetic mapping and transcription analyses of resistance gene loci in potato using NBS profiling.

    PubMed

    Brugmans, Bart; Wouters, Doret; van Os, Hans; Hutten, Ronald; van der Linden, Gerard; Visser, Richard G F; van Eck, Herman J; van der Vossen, Edwin A G

    2008-11-01

    NBS profiling is a method for the identification of resistance gene analog (RGA) derived fragments. Here we report the use of NBS profiling for the genome wide mapping of RGA loci in potato. NBS profiling analyses on a minimal set of F1 genotypes of the diploid mapping population previously used to generate the ultra dense (UHD) genetic map of potato, allowed us to efficiently map polymorphic RGA fragments relative to 10,000 existing AFLP markers. In total, 34 RGA loci were mapped, of which only 13 contained RGA sequences homologous to RGAs genetically positioned at approximately similar positions in potato or tomato. The remaining RGA loci mapped either at approximate chromosomal regions previously shown to contain RGAs in potato or tomato without sharing homology to these RGAs, or mapped at positions not yet identified as RGA-containing regions. In addition to markers representing RGAs with unknown functions, segregating markers were detected that were closely linked to four functional R genes that segregate in the UHD mapping population. To explore the potential of NBS profiling in RGA transcription analyses, RNA isolated from different tissues was used as template for NBS profiling. Of all the fragments amplified approximately 15% showed putative intensity or absent/present differences between different tissues suggesting putative tissue specific RGA or R gene transcription. Putative absent/present differences between individuals were also found. In addition to being a powerful tool for generating candidate gene markers linked to R gene loci, NBS profiling, when applied to cDNA, can be instrumental in identifying those members of an R gene cluster that are transcribed, and thus putatively functional.

  10. Quantitative trait loci for resistance to stripe rust of wheat revealed using global field nurseries and opportunities for stacking resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Bokore, Firdissa E; Cuthbert, Richard D; Knox, Ron E; Randhawa, Harpinder S; Hiebert, Colin W; DePauw, Ron M; Singh, Asheesh K; Singh, Arti; Sharpe, Andrew G; N'Diaye, Amidou; Pozniak, Curtis J; McCartney, Curt; Ruan, Yuefeng; Berraies, Samia; Meyer, Brad; Munro, Catherine; Hay, Andy; Ammar, Karim; Huerta-Espino, Julio; Bhavani, Sridhar

    2017-09-14

    Quantitative trait loci controlling stripe rust resistance were identified in adapted Canadian spring wheat cultivars providing opportunity for breeders to stack loci using marker-assisted breeding. Stripe rust or yellow rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici Erikss., is a devastating disease of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in many regions of the world. The objectives of this research were to identify and map quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with stripe rust resistance in adapted Canadian spring wheat cultivars that are effective globally, and investigate opportunities for stacking resistance. Doubled haploid (DH) populations from the crosses Vesper/Lillian, Vesper/Stettler, Carberry/Vesper, Stettler/Red Fife and Carberry/AC Cadillac were phenotyped for stripe rust severity and infection response in field nurseries in Canada (Lethbridge and Swift Current), New Zealand (Lincoln), Mexico (Toluca) and Kenya (Njoro), and genotyped with SNP markers. Six QTL for stripe rust resistance in the population of Vesper/Lillian, five in Vesper/Stettler, seven in Stettler/Red Fife, four in Carberry/Vesper and nine in Carberry/AC Cadillac were identified. Lillian contributed stripe rust resistance QTL on chromosomes 4B, 5A, 6B and 7D, AC Cadillac on 2A, 2B, 3B and 5B, Carberry on 1A, 1B, 4A, 4B, 7A and 7D, Stettler on 1A, 2A, 3D, 4A, 5B and 6A, Red Fife on 2D, 3B and 4B, and Vesper on 1B, 2B and 7A. QTL on 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B, 3B, 4A, 4B, 5B, 7A and 7D were observed in multiple parents. The populations are compelling sources of recombination of many stripe rust resistance QTL for stacking disease resistance. Gene pyramiding should be possible with little chance of linkage drag of detrimental genes as the source parents were mostly adapted cultivars widely grown in Canada.

  11. Identification of genomic loci associated with crown rust resistance in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) divergently selected populations.

    PubMed

    Brazauskas, Gintaras; Xing, Yongzhong; Studer, Bruno; Schejbel, Britt; Frei, Ursula; Berg, Paul Ragnar; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The inheritance of crown rust resistance in perennial ryegrass is complex with both major and minor quantitative trait loci (QTL) being detected on all seven linkage groups. However, QTL mapping populations have only few segregating alleles, limiting the transferability of results to other materials. In this study, a synthetic population was developed from four crown rust resistant and susceptible parents as starting material for a divergent selection experiment of crown rust resistance to be closer to practice in plant breeding programs, and to identify genome regions relevant across a broader range of genotypes. Following three cycles of directional selection, perennial ryegrass populations were produced with a two-fold difference in average rust resistance. Divergently selected populations were genotyped at 7 resistance gene analog-derived expressed sequence tag (RGA-derived EST) as well as 15 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci. A test for selective neutrality (Waples test), which tests the hypothesis of genetic drift versus selection, identified significant differences in allele frequencies for 7 loci (32%). The selection effect was bidirectional with the same loci showing significant response in both positively and negatively selected populations. A region under selection represented by markers LpSSR006 and EST13 on linkage group (LG) 4 was further confirmed by colocation with two separate QTL for crown rust resistance in a VrnA, a two-way pseudo-testcross mapping population. This suggests suitability of alleles identified for introgression into perennial ryegrass germplasm, where quantitative resistance to crown rust is desired.

  12. Blood and Intestine eQTLs from an Anti-TNF-Resistant Crohn's Disease Cohort Inform IBD Genetic Association Loci

    PubMed Central

    Di Narzo, Antonio F; Peters, Lauren A; Argmann, Carmen; Stojmirovic, Aleksandar; Perrigoue, Jacqueline; Li, Katherine; Telesco, Shannon; Kidd, Brian; Walker, Jennifer; Dudley, Joel; Cho, Judy; Schadt, Eric E; Kasarskis, Andrew; Curran, Mark; Dobrin, Radu; Hao, Ke

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified loci reproducibly associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other immune-mediated diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying most of genetic susceptibility remain undefined. Expressional quantitative trait loci (eQTL) of disease-relevant tissue can be employed in order to elucidate the genes and pathways affected by disease-specific genetic variance. METHODS: In this study, we derived eQTLs for human whole blood and intestine tissues of anti-tumor necrosis factor-resistant Crohn's disease (CD) patients. We interpreted these eQTLs in the context of published IBD GWAS hits to inform on the disease process. RESULTS: At 10% false discovery rate, we discovered that 5,174 genes in blood and 2,063 genes in the intestine were controlled by a nearby single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (i.e., cis-eQTL), among which 1,360 were shared between the two tissues. A large fraction of the identified eQTLs were supported by the regulomeDB database, showing that the eQTLs reside in regulatory elements (odds ratio; OR=3.44 and 3.24 for blood and intestine eQTLs, respectively) as opposed to protein-coding regions. Published IBD GWAS hits as a whole were enriched for blood and intestine eQTLs (OR=2.88 and 2.05; and P value=2.51E-9 and 0.013, respectively), thereby linking genetic susceptibility to control of gene expression in these tissues. Through a systematic search, we used eQTL data to inform 109 out of 372 IBD GWAS SNPs documented in National Human Genome Research Institute catalog, and we categorized the genes influenced by eQTLs according to their functions. Many of these genes have experimentally validated roles in specific cell types contributing to intestinal inflammation. CONCLUSIONS: The blood and intestine eQTLs described in this study represent a powerful tool to link GWAS loci to a regulatory function and thus elucidate the mechanisms underlying the genetic loci associated with IBD

  13. Inheritance of partial resistance against Colletotrichum lindemuthianum in Phaseolus vulgaris and co-localization of quantitative trait loci with genes involved in specific resistance.

    PubMed

    Geffroy, V; Sévignac, M; De Oliveira, J C; Fouilloux, G; Skroch, P; Thoquet, P; Gepts, P; Langin, T; Dron, M

    2000-03-01

    Anthracnose, one of the most important diseases of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), is caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. A "candidate gene" approach was used to map anthracnose resistance quantitative trait loci (QTL). Candidate genes included genes for both pathogen recognition (resistance genes and resistance gene analogs [RGAs]) and general plant defense (defense response genes). Two strains of C. lindemuthianum, identified in a world collection of 177 strains, displayed a reproducible and differential aggressiveness toward BAT93 and JaloEEP558, two parental lines of P. vulgaris representing the two major gene pools of this crop. A reliable test was developed to score partial resistance in aerial organs of the plant (stem, leaf, petiole) under controlled growth chamber conditions. BAT93 was more resistant than JaloEEP558 regardless of the organ or strain tested. With a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between these two parental lines, 10 QTL were located on a genetic map harboring 143 markers, including known defense response genes, anthracnose-specific resistance genes, and RGAs. Eight of the QTL displayed isolate specificity. Two were co-localized with known defense genes (phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein) and three with anthracnose-specific resistance genes and/or RGAs. Interestingly, two QTL, with different allelic contribution, mapped on linkage group B4 in a 5.0 cM interval containing Andean and Mesoamerican specific resistance genes against C. lindemuthianum and 11 polymorphic fragments revealed with a RGA probe. The possible relationship between genes underlying specific and partial resistance is discussed.

  14. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) for Resistance to Late Blight in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Panthee, Dilip R; Piotrowski, Ann; Ibrahem, Ragy

    2017-07-22

    Late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans (Montagne, Bary) is a devastating disease of tomato worldwide. There are three known major genes, Ph-1, Ph-2, and Ph-3, conferring resistance to late blight. In addition to these three genes, it is also believed that there are additional factors or quantitative trait loci (QTL) conferring resistance to late blight. Precise molecular mapping of all those major genes and potential QTL is important in the development of suitable molecular markers and hence, marker-assisted selection (MAS). The objective of the present study was to map the genes and QTL associated with late blight resistance in a tomato population derived from intra-specific crosses. To achieve this objective, a population, derived from the crossings of NC 1CELBR × Fla. 7775, consisting of 250 individuals at F2 and F2-derived families, were evaluated in replicated trials. These were conducted at Mountain Horticultural Crops Reseach & Extension Center (MHCREC) at Mills River, NC, and Mountain Research Staion (MRS) at Waynesville, NC in 2011, 2014, and 2015. There were two major QTL associated with late blight resistance located on chromosomes 9 and 10 with likelihood of odd (LOD) scores of more than 42 and 6, explaining 67% and 14% of the total phenotypic variation, respectively. The major QTLs are probably caused by the Ph-2 and Ph-3 genes. Furthermore, there was a minor QTL on chromosomes 12, which has not been reported before. This minor QTL may be novel and may be worth investigating further. Source of resistance to Ph-2, Ph-3, and this minor QTL traces back to line L3707, or Richter's Wild Tomato. The combination of major genes and minor QTL may provide a durable resistance to late blight in tomato.

  15. Quantitative trait loci in pepper control the effective population size of two RNA viruses at inoculation.

    PubMed

    Tamisier, Lucie; Rousseau, Elsa; Barraillé, Sebastien; Nemouchi, Ghislaine; Szadkowski, Marion; Mailleret, Ludovic; Grognard, Frederic; Fabre, Frederic; Moury, Benoit; Palloix, Alain

    2017-07-01

    Infection of plants by viruses is a complex process involving several steps: inoculation into plant cells, replication in inoculated cells and plant colonization. The success of the different steps depends, in part, on the viral effective population size (Ne), defined as the number of individuals passing their genes to the next generation. During infection, the virus population will undergo bottlenecks, leading to drastic reductions in Ne and, potentially, to the loss of the fittest variants. Therefore, it is crucial to better understand how plants affect Ne. We aimed to (i) identify the plant genetic factors controlling Ne during inoculation, (ii) understand the mechanisms used by the plant to control Ne and (iii) compare these genetic factors with the genes controlling plant resistance to viruses. Ne was measured in a doubled-haploid population of Capsicum annuum. Plants were inoculated with either a Potato virus Y (PVY) construct expressing the green fluorescent protein or a necrotic variant of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). Newas assessed by counting the number of primary infection foci on cotyledons for PVY or the number of necrotic local lesions on leaves for CMV. The number of foci and lesions was correlated (r=0.57) and showed a high heritability (h2=0.93 for PVY and h2=0.98 for CMV). The Ne of the two viruses was controlled by both common quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and virus-specific QTLs, indicating the contribution of general and specific mechanisms. The PVY-specific QTL colocalizes with a QTL that reduces PVY accumulation and the capacity to break down a major-effect resistance gene.

  16. Mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling adaptive traits in coastal Douglas fir. III. Quantitative trait loci-by-environment interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Jermstad, Kathleen D; Bassoni, Daniel L; Jech, Keith S; Ritchie, Gary A; Wheeler, Nicholas C; Neale, David B

    2003-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) were mapped in the woody perennial Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) for complex traits controlling the timing of growth initiation and growth cessation. QTL were estimated under controlled environmental conditions to identify QTL interactions with photoperiod, moisture stress, winter chilling, and spring temperatures. A three-generation mapping population of 460 cloned progeny was used for genetic mapping and phenotypic evaluations. An all-marker interval mapping method was used for scanning the genome for the presence of QTL and single-factor ANOVA was used for estimating QTL-by-environment interactions. A modest number of QTL were detected per trait, with individual QTL explaining up to 9.5% of the phenotypic variation. Two QTL-by-treatment interactions were found for growth initiation, whereas several QTL-by-treatment interactions were detected among growth cessation traits. This is the first report of QTL interactions with specific environmental signals in forest trees and will assist in the identification of candidate genes controlling these important adaptive traits in perennial plants. PMID:14668397

  17. Identification of genetic loci associated with fire blight resistance in Malus through combined use of QTL and association mapping.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Awais; Zhao, Youfu Frank; Korban, Schuyler S

    2013-07-01

    Fire blight, incited by the enterobacterium Erwinia amylovora, is a destructive disease of Rosaceae, particularly of apples and pears. There are reports on the molecular mechanisms underlying E. amylovora pathogenesis and how the host activates its resistance mechanism. The host's resistance mechanism is quantitatively controlled, although some major genes might also be involved. Thus far, quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping and differential expression studies have been used to elucidate those genes and/or genomic regions underlying quantitative resistance present in the apple genome. In this study, an effort is undertaken to dissect the genetic basis of fire blight resistance in apple using both QTL and genome-wide association mapping. On the basis of an F1 pedigree of 'Coop 16' × 'Coop 17' and a genome-wide association study (GWAS) mapping population of Malus accessions (species, old and new cultivars and selections), new QTLs and associations have been identified. A total of three QTLs for resistance to fire blight, with above 95% significant logarithm of odds threshold value of 2.5, have been identified on linkage groups (LGs) 02, 06, and 15 of the apple genome with phenotypic variation explained values of 14.7, 20.1 and 17.4, respectively. Although elevated P-values with signals for marker-trait associations are observed for some LGs, these are not found to be significant. However, a total of 34 significant associations, with P-values ≥0.02, have been detected including 8 for lesion length at 7 days following inoculation (PL1), 14 for lesion length at 14 days following inoculation (PL2), and 12 for shoot length. © 2013 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  18. Using early flowering transgenic apple to accelerate the breeding of donor parents with multiple loci for disease resistance (Malus x domestica)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One of the goals of the USDA-NIFA-SCRI RosBREED project is to develop donor parents with multiple loci for disease resistance. Due to the long generation time of tree fruit crops, the accumulation of pyramided resistance loci for multiple diseases by conventional breeding methods could require deca...

  19. Pinpointing genes underlying the quantitative trait loci for root-knot nematode resistance in palaeopolyploid soybean by whole genome resequencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to utilize next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to dissect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for southern root-knot nematode (RKN) resistance into individual genes in soybean. Two-hundred forty-six recombinant inbred lines (RIL) derived from a cross between Mage...

  20. Targeted discovery of quantitative trait loci for resistance to northern leaf blight and other diseases of maize

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To capture diverse alleles at a set of loci associated with disease resistance in maize, heterogeneous inbred family (HIF) analysis was applied for targeted QTL mapping and near-isogenic line (NIL) development. Tropical maize lines CML52 and DK888 were chosen as donors of alleles based on their know...

  1. Mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling adaptive traits in coastal Douglas-fir. III

    Treesearch

    Kathleen D. Jermstad; Daniel L. Bassoni; Keith S. Jech; Gary A. Ritchie; Nicholas C. Wheeler; David B. Neale

    2003-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) were mapped in the woody perennial Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) for complex traits controlling the timing of growth initiation and growth cessation. QTL were estimated under controlled environmental conditions to identify QTL interactions with photoperiod, moisture stress, winter chilling, and spring...

  2. Identifying Loci Contributing to Natural Variation in Xenobiotic Resistance in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Najarro, Michael A.; Hackett, Jennifer L.; Smith, Brittny R.; Highfill, Chad A.; King, Elizabeth G.; Long, Anthony D.; Macdonald, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    Natural populations exhibit a great deal of interindividual genetic variation in the response to toxins, exemplified by the variable clinical efficacy of pharmaceutical drugs in humans, and the evolution of pesticide resistant insects. Such variation can result from several phenomena, including variable metabolic detoxification of the xenobiotic, and differential sensitivity of the molecular target of the toxin. Our goal is to genetically dissect variation in the response to xenobiotics, and characterize naturally-segregating polymorphisms that modulate toxicity. Here, we use the Drosophila Synthetic Population Resource (DSPR), a multiparent advanced intercross panel of recombinant inbred lines, to identify QTL (Quantitative Trait Loci) underlying xenobiotic resistance, and employ caffeine as a model toxic compound. Phenotyping over 1,700 genotypes led to the identification of ten QTL, each explaining 4.5–14.4% of the broad-sense heritability for caffeine resistance. Four QTL harbor members of the cytochrome P450 family of detoxification enzymes, which represent strong a priori candidate genes. The case is especially strong for Cyp12d1, with multiple lines of evidence indicating the gene causally impacts caffeine resistance. Cyp12d1 is implicated by QTL mapped in both panels of DSPR RILs, is significantly upregulated in the presence of caffeine, and RNAi knockdown robustly decreases caffeine tolerance. Furthermore, copy number variation at Cyp12d1 is strongly associated with phenotype in the DSPR, with a trend in the same direction observed in the DGRP (Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel). No additional plausible causative polymorphisms were observed in a full genomewide association study in the DGRP, or in analyses restricted to QTL regions mapped in the DSPR. Just as in human populations, replicating modest-effect, naturally-segregating causative variants in an association study framework in flies will likely require very large sample sizes. PMID:26619284

  3. Identification of quantitative trait loci for resistance against Verticillium longisporum in oilseed rape (Brassica napus).

    PubMed

    Rygulla, W; Snowdon, R J; Friedt, W; Happstadius, I; Cheung, W Y; Chen, D

    2008-02-01

    Verticillium longisporum is one of the major pathogens of oilseed rape (Brassica napus; genome AACC, 2n = 38) in Europe. Current European cultivars possess only a low level of resistance against V. longisporum, meaning that heavy infection can cause major yield losses. The aim of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance against V. longisporum as a starting point for marker-assisted breeding of resistant cultivars. Resistance QTL were localized in a segregating oilseed rape population of 163 doubled haploid (DH) lines derived by microspore culture from the F1 of a cross between two B. napus breeding lines, one of which exhibited V. longisporum resistance derived by pedigree selection from a resynthesized B. napus genotype. A genetic map was constructed comprising 165 restriction fragment length polymorphism, 94 amplified fragment length polymorphism and 45 simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers covering a total of 1,739 cM on 19 linkage groups. Seedlings of the DH lines and parents were inoculated with V. longisporum isolates in four greenhouse experiments performed in Sweden during autumn 1999. In three of the experiments the DH lines were inoculated with a mixture of five isolates, while in the fourth experiment only one of the isolates was used. The intention was to simulate four different environments with variable disease pressure, while still maintaining uniform conditions in each environment to enable reliable disease scoring. The disease index (DI) was calculated by scoring symptoms on a total of 21 inoculated plants per line in comparison to 21 noninoculated plants per line. Using the composite interval mapping procedure a total of four different chromosome regions could be identified that showed significant QTL for resistance in more than one environment. Two major QTL regions were identified on the C-genome linkage groups N14 and N15, respectively; each of these QTL consistently exhibited significant effects on resistance in

  4. Identification of New Resistance Loci to African Stem Rust Race TTKSK in Tetraploid Wheats Based on Linkage and Genome-Wide Association Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Laidò, Giovanni; Panio, Giosuè; Marone, Daniela; Russo, Maria A.; Ficco, Donatella B. M.; Giovanniello, Valentina; Cattivelli, Luigi; Steffenson, Brian; de Vita, Pasquale; Mastrangelo, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis Pers. f. sp. tritici Eriks. and E. Henn. (Pgt), is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat. Races of the pathogen in the “Ug99 lineage” are of international concern due to their virulence for widely used stem rust resistance genes and their spread throughout Africa. Disease resistant cultivars provide one of the best means for controlling stem rust. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) conferring resistance to African stem rust race TTKSK at the seedling stage, we evaluated an association mapping (AM) panel consisting of 230 tetraploid wheat accessions under greenhouse conditions. A high level of phenotypic variation was observed in response to race TTKSK in the AM panel, allowing for genome-wide association mapping of resistance QTL in wild, landrace, and cultivated tetraploid wheats. Thirty-five resistance QTL were identified on all chromosomes, and seventeen are of particular interest as identified by multiple associations. Many of the identified resistance loci were coincident with previously identified rust resistance genes; however, nine on chromosomes 1AL, 2AL, 4AL, 5BL, and 7BS may be novel. To validate AM results, a biparental population of 146 recombinant inbred lines was also considered, which derived from a cross between the resistant cultivar “Cirillo” and susceptible “Neodur.” The stem rust resistance of Cirillo was conferred by a single gene on the distal region of chromosome arm 6AL in an interval map coincident with the resistance gene Sr13, and confirmed one of the resistance loci identified by AM. A search for candidate resistance genes was carried out in the regions where QTL were identified, and many of them corresponded to NBS-LRR genes and protein kinases with LRR domains. The results obtained in the present study are of great interest as a high level of genetic variability for resistance to race TTKSK was described in a germplasm panel comprising most of the tetraploid wheat sub

  5. Location of Vibrio anguillarum resistance-associated trait loci in half-smooth tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis at its microsatellite linkage map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhihong; Guo, Li; Liu, Yang; Shao, Changwei; Chen, Songlin; Yang, Guanpin

    2016-11-01

    A cultured female half-smooth tongue sole ( Cynoglossus semilaevis) was crossed with a wild male, yielding the first filial generation of pseudo-testcrossing from which 200 fish were randomly selected to locate the Vibrio anguillarum resistance trait in half-smooth tongue sole at its microsatellite linkage map. In total, 129 microsatellites were arrayed into 18 linkage groups, ≥4 each. The map reconstructed was 852.85 cM in length with an average spacing of 7.68 cM, covering 72.07% of that expected (1 183.35 cM). The V. anguillarum resistance trait was a composite rather than a unit trait, which was tentatively partitioned into Survival time in Hours After V. anguillarum Infection (SHAVI) and Immunity of V. Anguillarum Infection (IVAI). Above a logarithm of the odds (LOD) threshold of 2.5, 18 loci relative to SHAVI and 3 relative to IVAI were identified. The 3 loci relative to IVAI explained 18.78%, 5.87% and 6.50% of the total phenotypic variation in immunity. The microsatellites bounding the 3 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of IVAI may in future aid to the selection of V. anguillarum-immune half-smooth tongue sole varieties, and facilitate cloning the gene(s) controlling such immunity.

  6. Identification of quantitative trait loci affecting gastrointestinal parasite resistance in an experimental Angus population.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eui-Soo; Sonstegard, Tad S; Silva, Marcos Vinicius G B; Gasbarre, Louis C; Van Tassell, Curtis P

    2014-02-01

    DNA markers associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting host tolerance to gastrointestinal (GI) parasite infection are ideal targets for marker-assisted selection. However, few studies in cattle have attempted to identify this type of QTL due to the difficulty of generating accurate phenotypic data from a resource population with adequate statistical power for detection. For this effort, we amassed fecal egg count (FEC) measures from annual natural field challenges with GI nematodes that spanned 12 different contemporary groups of Angus calves (1992-2000) derived from a closed breeding population. FEC and blood pepsinogen measures were taken weekly over a 26-week period post-weaning, and the FEC data were Box-Cox transformed to normalize the distribution of phenotypes. These 305 test animals and more than 100 founding animals from the extended pedigree were genotyped across 190 microsatellites markers. The genome-wide analyses identified a suggestive genome-wide QTL on bovine chromosome (Chr) 8 (P < 0.002) and nominal QTL on Chr 4, 12 and 17 (P < 0.05). These findings were unique for cattle, and some corresponded to previously identified QTL locations for parasite-related traits in sheep to provide genome locations for further fine mapping of parasite resistance/susceptibility in Angus cattle. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Using genotyping by sequencing to map two novel anthracnose resistance Loci in Sorghum bicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Felderhoff, Terry J.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Saballos, Ana; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2016-05-18

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance loci present in the highly resistant cultivar ‘Bk7’, a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing ‘Bk7’ with the susceptible inbred ‘Early Hegari-Sart’. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from ‘Bk7’. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. In addition, genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between ‘Bk7’ and sweet sorghum ‘Mer81-4’ narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases.

  8. Novel loci control variation in reproductive timing in Arabidopsis thaliana in natural environments.

    PubMed Central

    Weinig, Cynthia; Ungerer, Mark C; Dorn, Lisa A; Kane, Nolan C; Toyonaga, Yuko; Halldorsdottir, Solveig S; Mackay, Trudy F C; Purugganan, Michael D; Schmitt, Johanna

    2002-01-01

    Molecular biologists are rapidly characterizing the genetic basis of flowering in model species such as Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it is not clear how the developmental pathways identified in controlled environments contribute to variation in reproductive timing in natural ecological settings. Here we report the first study of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for date of bolting (the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth) in A. thaliana in natural seasonal field environments and compare the results with those obtained under typical growth-chamber conditions. Two QTL specific to long days in the chamber were expressed only in spring-germinating cohorts in the field, and two loci specific to short days in the chamber were expressed only in fall-germinating cohorts, suggesting differential involvement of the photoperiod pathway in different seasonal environments. However, several other photoperiod-specific QTL with large effects in controlled conditions were undetectable in natural environments, indicating that expression of allelic variation at these loci was overridden by environmental factors specific to the field. Moreover, a substantial number of QTL with major effects on bolting date in one or more field environments were undetectable under controlled environment conditions. These novel loci suggest the involvement of additional genes in the transition to flowering under ecologically relevant conditions. PMID:12524356

  9. Molecular Evolution Perspectives on Intraspecific Lateral DNA Transfer of Topoisomerase and Gyrase Loci in Streptococcus pneumoniae, with Implications for Fluoroquinolone Resistance Development and Spread

    PubMed Central

    Stanhope, Michael J.; Walsh, Stacey L.; Becker, Julie A.; Italia, Michael J.; Ingraham, Karen A.; Gwynn, Michael N.; Mathie, Tom; Poupard, James A.; Miller, Linda A.; Brown, James R.; Amrine-Madsen, Heather

    2005-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are an important class of antibiotics for the treatment of infections arising from the gram-positive respiratory pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although there is evidence supporting interspecific lateral DNA transfer of fluoroquinolone target loci, no studies have specifically been designed to assess the role of intraspecific lateral transfer of these genes in the spread of fluoroquinolone resistance. This study involves a comparative evolutionary perspective, in which the evolutionary history of a diverse set of S. pneumoniae clinical isolates is reconstructed from an expanded multilocus sequence typing data set, with putative recombinants excluded. This control history is then assessed against networks of each of the four fluoroquinolone target loci from the same isolates. The results indicate that although the majority of fluoroquinolone target loci from this set of 60 isolates are consistent with a clonal dissemination hypothesis, 3 to 10% of the sequences are consistent with an intraspecific lateral transfer hypothesis. Also evident were examples of interspecific transfer, with two isolates possessing a parE-parC gene region arising from viridans group streptococci. The Spain 23F-1 clone is the most dominant fluoroquinolone-nonsusceptible clone in this set of isolates, and the analysis suggests that its members act as frequent donors of fluoroquinolone-nonsusceptible loci. Although the majority of fluoroquinolone target gene sequences in this set of isolates can be explained on the basis of clonal dissemination, a significant number are more parsimoniously explained by intraspecific lateral DNA transfer, and in situations of high S. pneumoniae population density, such events could be an important means of resistance spread. PMID:16189113

  10. Detecting Major Genetic Loci Controlling Phenotypic Variability in Experimental Crosses

    PubMed Central

    Rönnegård, Lars; Valdar, William

    2011-01-01

    Traditional methods for detecting genes that affect complex diseases in humans or animal models, milk production in livestock, or other traits of interest, have asked whether variation in genotype produces a change in that trait’s average value. But focusing on differences in the mean ignores differences in variability about that mean. The robustness, or uniformity, of an individual’s character is not only of great practical importance in medical genetics and food production but is also of scientific and evolutionary interest (e.g., blood pressure in animal models of heart disease, litter size in pigs, flowering time in plants). We describe a method for detecting major genes controlling the phenotypic variance, referring to these as vQTL. Our method uses a double generalized linear model with linear predictors based on probabilities of line origin. We evaluate our method on simulated F2 and collaborative cross data, and on a real F2 intercross, demonstrating its accuracy and robustness to the presence of ordinary mean-controlling QTL. We also illustrate the connection between vQTL and QTL involved in epistasis, explaining how these concepts overlap. Our method can be applied to a wide range of commonly used experimental crosses and may be extended to genetic association more generally. PMID:21467569

  11. Induction and expression of mutations at multiple drug-resistance marker loci in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, G.M.; Carver, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    We observed quantitative and qualitative differences in the mutability and mutagen-specificity of various drug-resistance marker loci in Chinese hamster ovary (THO) cells, which suggest that mammalian gene loci may differ in their relative mutability by a given mutagenic agent. We have used the CHO-AT3-2 multiple-marker mutagenesis assay system to examine the dose-dependent induction and kinetics of expression of mutations at four well-characterized, drug-resistance marker loci, after treatment with chemical agents which produce various types of DNA damage. The CHO-AT3-2 subline allows simultaneous quantitation and direct comparison of induced mutation frequencies at the hgprt, oua (Na/sup +//K/sup +/ ATPase), aprt, and tk loci. The agents tested in this study included ethyl methanesulfonate, methyl methanesulfonate, mitomycin C, ICR-191, benzo(a)pyrene, and dimethylnitrosamine. The expression kinetics and optimal expression times for each drug-resistance marker were determined in dose-response experiments in which cells from mutagen-treated populations were plated at 1-2-day intervals over a period of 10 days following mutagenesis. Comparison of induced mutation frequencies for each drug-resistance marker after mutagen treatments yielding equivalent cell survivals (equitoxic doses resulting in relative cell survivals of 0.37) revealed locus-specific differences in the relative mutagenicities of the agents tested. These results indicate that the apparent mutagenicity of a particular agent at a single genetic locus may not necessarily be an accurate indicator of that agent's mutagenic potential for the genome as a whole.

  12. Exotic Scab Resistance Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) Effects on Soft Red Winter Wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium Head Blight (FHB), caused by Fusarium graminearum, of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is a disease that periodically strikes the mid-Atlantic region of the USA. Breeding for resistant wheat varieties is an effective method of disease control. The objective of this study was to evaluate the eff...

  13. Interaction of common bacterial blight bacteria with disease resistance quantitative trait loci in common bean.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Robert W; Singh, Shree P; Gilbertson, Robert L

    2011-04-01

    . fuscans subsp. fuscans genotypes were inoculated onto 28 common bean genotypes having various combinations of known CBB resistance quantitative trait loci (QTL) and associated sequence-characterized amplified region markers. Different levels of virulence were observed for X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains, whereas X. fuscans subsp. fuscans strains were similar in virulence. The typical X. campestris pv. phaseoli strain from Wisconsin was most virulent, whereas X. campestris pv. phaseoli genotypes from East Africa were the least virulent. Host genotypes having the SU91 marker-associated resistance and one or more other QTL (i.e., pyramided resistance), such as the VAX lines, were highly resistant to all genotypes of common blight bacteria tested. This information will help in the development of CBB resistance-breeding strategies for different common bean market classes in different geographical regions, as well as the identification of appropriate pathogen genotypes for screening for resistance.

  14. Effective resist profile control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen-Yu; Wang, Chien-Wei; Huang, Chun-Ching; Chang, Ching-Yu; Ku, Yao-Ching

    2014-03-01

    To meet Moore's law, resist resolution improvement has become more and more important. However, it is difficult to improve resist resolution and keep vertical sidewall profile. For example, a high contrast hole resist may cause trench scum, due to very T-top profile. This paper reports several concepts for resist profile tuning without losing performance for lithographic factor , including mask error enhancement factor (MEEF), depth of focus (DOF), and critical dimension uniformity (CDU). To quantitative analysis the resist profile improvement, we define a new factor, Scum fail ratio (F/R%) for new techniques evaluation. The new techniques, including floatable additive, floatable PAG, and new monomer, are discussed. From X-SEM and CD-SEM data, former three concepts could improve resist sidewall profile quantitatively evaluated by Scum fail F/R% and keep lithographic factors. In addition, another key factor, resist residue defect, is also discussed. The high contrast resist with higher receding contact angle (RCA) easily generates more residue defect after development. With the new monomer composition, RCA of Resist E is decreased from 54 to 48 degree after development. Therefore, the residue defect is improved one order.

  15. Regional heritability mapping and genome-wide association identify loci for complex growth, wood and disease resistance traits in Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Resende, Rafael Tassinari; Resende, Marcos Deon Vilela; Silva, Fabyano Fonseca; Azevedo, Camila Ferreira; Takahashi, Elizabete Keiko; Silva-Junior, Orzenil Bonfim; Grattapaglia, Dario

    2017-02-01

    Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided valuable insights into the decoding of the relationships between sequence variation and complex phenotypes, they have explained little heritability. Regional heritability mapping (RHM) provides heritability estimates for genomic segments containing both common and rare allelic effects that individually contribute too little variance to be detected by GWAS. We carried out GWAS and RHM for seven growth, wood and disease resistance traits in a breeding population of 768 Eucalyptus hybrid trees using EuCHIP60K. Total genomic heritabilities accounted for large proportions (64-89%) of pedigree-based trait heritabilities, providing additional evidence that complex traits in eucalypts are controlled by many sequence variants across the frequency spectrum, each with small contributions to the phenotypic variance. RHM detected 26 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) encompassing 2191 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), whereas GWAS detected 13 single SNP-trait associations. RHM and GWAS QTLs individually explained 5-15% and 4-6% of the genomic heritability, respectively. RHM was superior to GWAS in capturing larger proportions of genomic heritability. Equated to previously mapped QTLs, our results highlighted genomic regions for further examination towards gene discovery. RHM-QTLs bearing a combination of common and rare variants could be useful enhancements to incorporate prior knowledge of the underlying genetic architecture in genomic prediction models.

  16. Method to detect differentially methylated loci with case-control designs using Illumina arrays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang

    2011-11-01

    It is now understood that many human cancer types are the result of the accumulation of both genetic and epigenetic changes. DNA methylation is a molecular modification of DNA that is crucial for normal development. Genes that are rich in CpG dinucleotides are usually not methylated in normal tissues, but are frequently hypermethylated in cancer. With the advent of high-throughput platforms, large-scale structure of genomic methylation patterns is available through genome-wide scans and tremendous amount of DNA methylation data have been recently generated. However, sophisticated statistical methods to handle complex DNA methylation data are very limited. Here, we developed a likelihood based Uniform-Normal-mixture model to select differentially methylated loci between case and control groups using Illumina arrays. The idea is to model the data as three types of methylation loci, one unmethylated, one completely methylated, and one partially methylated. A three-component mixture model with two Uniform distributions and one truncated normal distribution was used to model the three types. The mixture probabilities and the mean of the normal distribution were used to make inference about differentially methylated loci. Through extensive simulation studies, we demonstrated the feasibility and power of the proposed method. An application to a recently published study on ovarian cancer identified several methylation loci that are missed by the existing method.

  17. Quantitative trait loci controlling light and hormone response in two accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Borevitz, Justin O; Maloof, Julin N; Lutes, Jason; Dabi, Tsegaye; Redfern, Joanna L; Trainer, Gabriel T; Werner, Jonathan D; Asami, Tadao; Berry, Charles C; Weigel, Detlef; Chory, Joanne

    2002-01-01

    We have mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for natural variation in light and hormone response between the Cape Verde Islands (Cvi) and Landsberg erecta (Ler) accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana using recombinant inbred lines (RILs). Hypocotyl length was measured in four light environments: white, blue, red, and far-red light and in the dark. In addition, white light plus gibberellin (GA) and dark plus the brassinosteroid biosynthesis inhibitor brassinazole (BRZ) were used to detect hormone effects. Twelve QTL were identified that map to loci not previously known to affect light response, as well as loci where candidate genes have been identified from known mutations. Some QTL act in all environments while others show genotype-by-environment interaction. A global threshold was established to identify a significant epistatic interaction between two loci that have few main effects of their own. LIGHT1, a major QTL, has been confirmed in a near isogenic line (NIL) and maps to a new locus with effects in all light environments. The erecta mutation can explain the effect of the HYP2 QTL in the blue, BRZ, and dark environments, but not in far-red. LIGHT2, also confirmed in an NIL, has effects in white and red light and shows interaction with GA. The phenotype and map position of LIGHT2 suggest the photoreceptor PHYB as a candidate gene. Natural variation in light and hormone response thus defines both new genes and known genes that control light response in wild accessions. PMID:11861571

  18. Kinetically Controlled Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xin E.; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2011-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium brevicompactum produces the immunosuppressive drug mycophenolic acid (MPA), which is a potent inhibitor of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases (IMPDHs). IMPDH catalyzes the conversion of IMP to XMP via a covalent enzyme intermediate, E-XMP*; MPA inhibits by trapping E-XMP*. P. brevicompactum (Pb) contains two MPA-resistant IMPDHs, PbIMPDH-A and PbIMPDH-B, which are 17- and 103-fold more resistant to MPA than typically observed. Surprisingly, the active sites of these resistant enzymes are essentially identical to those of MPA-sensitive enzymes, so the mechanistic basis of resistance is not apparent. Here, we show that, unlike MPA-sensitive IMPDHs, formation of E-XMP* is rate-limiting for both PbIMPDH-A and PbIMPDH-B. Therefore, MPA resistance derives from the failure to accumulate the drug-sensitive intermediate. PMID:21979957

  19. Comparative mapping of Raphanus sativus genome using Brassica markers and quantitative trait loci analysis for the Fusarium wilt resistance trait.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaona; Choi, Su Ryun; Ramchiary, Nirala; Miao, Xinyang; Lee, Su Hee; Sun, Hae Jeong; Kim, Sunggil; Ahn, Chun Hee; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2013-10-01

    Fusarium wilt (FW), caused by the soil-borne fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum is a serious disease in cruciferous plants, including the radish (Raphanus sativus). To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) or gene(s) conferring resistance to FW, we constructed a genetic map of R. sativus using an F2 mapping population derived by crossing the inbred lines '835' (susceptible) and 'B2' (resistant). A total of 220 markers distributed in 9 linkage groups (LGs) were mapped in the Raphanus genome, covering a distance of 1,041.5 cM with an average distance between adjacent markers of 4.7 cM. Comparative analysis of the R. sativus genome with that of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa revealed 21 and 22 conserved syntenic regions, respectively. QTL mapping detected a total of 8 loci conferring FW resistance that were distributed on 4 LGs, namely, 2, 3, 6, and 7 of the Raphanus genome. Of the detected QTL, 3 QTLs (2 on LG 3 and 1 on LG 7) were constitutively detected throughout the 2-year experiment. QTL analysis of LG 3, flanked by ACMP0609 and cnu_mBRPGM0085, showed a comparatively higher logarithm of the odds (LOD) value and percentage of phenotypic variation. Synteny analysis using the linked markers to this QTL showed homology to A. thaliana chromosome 3, which contains disease-resistance gene clusters, suggesting conservation of resistance genes between them.

  20. Quantitative Trait Loci for High-Temperature Adult-Plant Resistance to Stripe Rust (Puccinia Striiformis f. sp. tritici) in a Hard Red Winter Wheat Germplasm IDO444

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High-temperature adult-plant (HTAP) resistance to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) is a durable type of resistance in wheat. The objective of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) conferring the HTAP resistance to stripe rust in a population consisted of 179 F7:8...

  1. Quantitative trait loci detection of Edwardsiella tarda resistance in Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus using bulked segregant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Xu, Wenteng; Liu, Yang; Wang, Lei; Sun, Hejun; Wang, Lei; Chen, Songlin

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, Edwardsiella tarda has become one of the most deadly pathogens of Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus), causing serious annual losses in commercial production. In contrast to the rapid advances in the aquaculture of P. olivaceus, the study of E. tarda resistance-related markers has lagged behind, hindering the development of a disease-resistant strain. Thus, a marker-trait association analysis was initiated, combining bulked segregant analysis (BSA) and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. Based on 180 microsatellite loci across all chromosomes, 106 individuals from the F1333 (♀: F0768 ×♂: F0915) (Nomenclature rule: F+year+family number) were used to detect simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and QTLs associated with E. tarda resistance. After a genomic scan, three markers (Scaffold 404-21589, Scaffold 404-21594 and Scaffold 270-13812) from the same linkage group (LG)-1 exhibited a significant difference between DNA, pooled/bulked from the resistant and susceptible groups (P <0.001). Therefore, 106 individuals were genotyped using all the SSR markers in LG1 by single marker analysis. Two different analytical models were then employed to detect SSR markers with different levels of significance in LG1, where 17 and 18 SSR markers were identified, respectively. Each model found three resistance-related QTLs by composite interval mapping (CIM). These six QTLs, designated qE1-6, explained 16.0%-89.5% of the phenotypic variance. Two of the QTLs, qE-2 and qE-4, were located at the 66.7 cM region, which was considered a major candidate region for E. tarda resistance. This study will provide valuable data for further investigations of E. tarda resistance genes and facilitate the selective breeding of disease-resistant Japanese flounder in the future.

  2. Mapping quantitative trait loci conferring resistance to rice black-streaked virus in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Luan, Junwen; Wang, Fei; Li, Yujie; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Juren

    2012-08-01

    Maize rough dwarf disease (MRDD) is one of the most serious virus diseases of maize worldwide, and it causes great reduction of maize production. In China, the pathogen was shown to be rice black-streaked virus (RBSDV). Currently, MRDD has spread broadly and leads to significant loss in China. However, there has been little research devoted to this disease. Our aims were to identify the markers and loci underlying resistance to this virus disease. In this study, segregation populations were constructed from two maize elite lines '90110', which is highly resistant to MRDD and 'Ye478', which is highly susceptible to MRDD. The F(2) and BC(1) populations were used for bulk sergeant analysis (BSA) to identify resistance-related markers. One hundred and twenty F(7:9) RILs were used for quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping through the experiment of multiple environments over 3 years. Natural occurrence and artificial inoculation were both used and combined to determine the phenotype of plants. Five QTL, qMRD2, qMRD6, qMRD7, qMRD8 and qMRD10 were measured in the experiments. The qMRD8 on chromosome 8 was proved to be one major QTL conferring resistance to RBSDV disease in almost all traits and environments, which explained 12.0-28.9 % of the phenotypic variance for disease severity in this present study.

  3. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Milk Production in Dairy Cattle by Exploiting Progeny Testing

    PubMed Central

    Georges, M.; Nielsen, D.; Mackinnon, M.; Mishra, A.; Okimoto, R.; Pasquino, A. T.; Sargeant, L. S.; Sorensen, A.; Steele, M. R.; Zhao, X.; Womack, J. E.; Hoeschele, I.

    1995-01-01

    We have exploited ``progeny testing'' to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying the genetic variation of milk production in a selected dairy cattle population. A total of 1,518 sires, with progeny tests based on the milking performances of > 150,000 daughters jointly, was genotyped for 159 autosomal microsatellites bracketing 1645 centimorgan or approximately two thirds of the bovine genome. Using a maximum likelihood multilocus linkage analysis accounting for variance heterogeneity of the phenotypes, we identified five chromosomes giving very strong evidence (LOD score >/= 3) for the presence of a QTL controlling milk production: chromosomes 1, 6, 9, 10 and 20. These findings demonstrate that loci with considerable effects on milk production are still segregating in highly selected populations and pave the way toward marker-assisted selection in dairy cattle breeding. PMID:7713441

  4. Mapping quantitative trait loci controlling milk production in dairy cattle by exploiting progeny testing

    SciTech Connect

    Georges, M.; Nielsen, D.; Mackinnon, M.; Mishra, A.; Okimoto, R.; Sargeant, L.S.; Steele, M.R.; Zhao, X.; Pasquino, A.T.

    1995-02-01

    We have exploited {open_quotes}progeny testing{close_quotes} to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying the genetic variation of milk production in a selected dairy cattle population. A total of 1,518 sires, with progeny tests based on the milking performances of >150,000 daughters jointly, was genotyped for 159 autosomal microsatellites bracketing 1645 centimorgan or approximately two thirds of the bovine genome. Using a maximum likelihood multilocus linkage analysis accounting for variance heterogeneity of the phenotypes, we identified five chromosomes giving very strong evidence (LOD score {ge} 3) for the presence of a QTL controlling milk production: chromosomes 1, 6, 9, 10 and 20. These findings demonstrate that loci with considerable effects on milk production are still segregating in highly selected populations and pave the way toward marker-assisted selection in dairy cattle breeding. 44 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Impact of chromosome 2 obesity loci on cardiovascular complications of insulin resistance in LDL receptor-deficient C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Smith, Daria; Collins, Alan R; Wang, Xuping; Crockett, Craig; Castellani, Lawrence; Lusis, Aldons J; Davis, Richard C

    2006-08-01

    Previous characterization of mouse chromosome 2 identified genomic intervals that influence obesity, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. For this, resistant CAST/Ei (CAST) alleles were introgressed onto a susceptible C57BL/6J background to generate congenic strains with CAST alleles encompassing 67-162 Mb (multigenic obesity 6 [MOB6]) and 84-180 Mb (MOB5) from mouse chromosome 2. To examine the effects of each congenic locus on atherosclerosis and glucose disposal, we bred each strain onto a sensitizing LDL receptor-null (LDLR(-/-)) C57BL/6J background to predispose them to hypercholesterolemia and insulin resistance. LDLR(-/-) congenics and controls were characterized for measures of atherogenesis, insulin sensitivity, and obesity. We identified a genomic interval unique to the MOB6 congenic (72-84 Mb) that dramatically decreased atherosclerosis by approximately threefold and decreased insulin resistance. This region also reduced adiposity twofold. Conversely, the congenic region unique to MOB5 (162-180 Mb) increased insulin resistance but had little effect on atherosclerosis and adiposity. The MOB congenic intervals are concordant to human and rat quantitative trait loci influencing diabetes and atherosclerosis traits. Thus, our results define a strategy for studying the poorly understood interactions between diabetes and atherosclerosis and for identifying genes underlying the cardiovascular complications of insulin resistance.

  6. The Utilization during Mitotic Cell Division of Loci Controlling Meiotic Recombination and Disjunction in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Bruce S.; Carpenter, Adelaide T. C.; Ripoll, P.

    1978-01-01

    are in a nondividing (G2) state.—Mitotic recombination is at or above control levels in the presence of each of the recombination-defective meiotic mutants examined, suggesting that meiotic and mitotic recombination are under separate genetic control in Drosophila.—Of the six mutants examined that are defective in processes required for regular meiotic chromosome segregation, four (l(1)TW-6cs, cand, mei-S332, ord) affect mitotic chromosome behavior. At semi-restrictive temperatures, the cold sensitive lethal l(1)TW-6cs causes very frequent somatic spots, a substantial proportion of which are attributable to nondisjunction or loss. Thus, this locus specifies a function essential for chromosome segregation at mitosis as well as at the first meiotic division in females. The patterns of mitotic effects caused by cand, mei-S332, and ord suggest that they may be leaky alleles at essential loci that specify functions common to meiosis and mitosis. Mutants at the two remaining loci (nod, pal) do not affect mitotic chromosome stability. PMID:17248870

  7. Identification and mapping of leaf, stem and stripe rust resistance quantitative trait loci and their interactions in durum wheat.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Pandey, M P; Singh, A K; Knox, R E; Ammar, K; Clarke, J M; Clarke, F R; Singh, R P; Pozniak, C J; Depauw, R M; McCallum, B D; Cuthbert, R D; Randhawa, H S; Fetch, T G

    2013-02-01

    Leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks.), stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. tritici Eriks.) and stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) cause major production losses in durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. var. durum). The objective of this research was to identify and map leaf, stripe and stem rust resistance loci from the French cultivar Sachem and Canadian cultivar Strongfield. A doubled haploid population from Sachem/Strongfield and parents were phenotyped for seedling reaction to leaf rust races BBG/BN and BBG/BP and adult plant response was determined in three field rust nurseries near El Batan, Obregon and Toluca, Mexico. Stripe rust response was recorded in 2009 and 2011 nurseries near Toluca and near Njoro, Kenya in 2010. Response to stem rust was recorded in field nurseries near Njoro, Kenya, in 2010 and 2011. Sachem was resistant to leaf, stripe and stem rust. A major leaf rust quantitative trait locus (QTL) was identified on chromosome 7B at Xgwm146 in Sachem. In the same region on 7B, a stripe rust QTL was identified in Strongfield. Leaf and stripe rust QTL around DArT marker wPt3451 were identified on chromosome 1B. On chromosome 2B, a significant leaf rust QTL was detected conferred by Strongfield, and at the same QTL, a Yr gene derived from Sachem conferred resistance. Significant stem rust resistance QTL were detected on chromosome 4B. Consistent interactions among loci for resistance to each rust type across nurseries were detected, especially for leaf rust QTL on 7B. Sachem and Strongfield offer useful sources of rust resistance genes for durum rust breeding.

  8. Quantitative trait loci for resistance to Haemonchus contortus artificial challenge in Red Maasai and Dorper sheep of East Africa.

    PubMed

    Marshall, K; Mugambi, J M; Nagda, S; Sonstegard, T S; Van Tassell, C P; Baker, R L; Gibson, J P

    2013-06-01

    A genome-wide scan was performed to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to the gastrointestinal nematode Haemonchus contortus in a double backcross population of Red Maasai and Dorper sheep. The mapping population comprised six sire families, with 1026 lambs in total. The lambs were artificially challenged with H. contortus at about 6.5 months of age, and nine phenotypes were measured: fecal egg count, packed cell volume decline, two weight traits and five worm traits. A subset of the population (342 lambs) was selectively genotyped for 172 microsatellite loci covering 25 of the 26 autosomes. QTL mapping was performed for models which assumed that the QTL alleles were either fixed or segregating within each breed, combined with models with only an additive QTL effect fitted or both additive and dominance QTL effects fitted. Overall, QTL significant at the 1% chromosome-wide level were identified for 22 combinations of trait and chromosome. Of particular interest are a region of chromosome 26 with putative QTL for all nine traits and a region of chromosome 2 with putative QTL for three traits. Favorable QTL alleles for disease resistance originated in both the Red Maasai and Dorper breeds, were not always fixed within breed and had significant dominance effects in some cases. We anticipate that this study, in combination with follow-up work and other relevant studies, will help elucidate the biology of disease resistance.

  9. Quantitative trait loci that control the oil content variation of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Congcong; Shi, Jiaqin; Li, Ruiyuan; Long, Yan; Wang, Hao; Li, Dianrong; Zhao, Jianyi; Meng, Jinling

    2014-04-01

    This report describes an integrative analysis of seed-oil-content quantitative trait loci (QTL) in Brassica napus , using a high-density genetic map to align QTL among different populations. Rapeseed (Brassica napus) is an important source of edible oil and sustainable energy. Given the challenge involved in using only a few genes to substantially increase the oil content of rapeseed without affecting the fatty acid composition, exploitation of a greater number of genetic loci that regulate the oil content variation among rapeseed germplasm is of fundamental importance. In this study, we investigated variation in the seed-oil content among two related genetic populations of Brassica napus, the TN double-haploid population and its derivative reconstructed-F2 population. Each population was grown in multiple experiments under different environmental conditions. Mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) identified 41 QTL in the TN populations. Furthermore, of the 20 pairs of epistatic interaction loci detected, approximately one-third were located within the QTL intervals. The use of common markers on different genetic maps and the TN genetic map as a reference enabled us to project QTL from an additional three genetic populations onto the TN genetic map. In summary, we used the TN genetic map of the B. napus genome to identify 46 distinct QTL regions that control seed-oil content on 16 of the 19 linkage groups of B. napus. Of these, 18 were each detected in multiple populations. The present results are of value for ongoing efforts to breed rapeseed with high oil content, and alignment of the QTL makes an important contribution to the development of an integrative system for genetic studies of rapeseed.

  10. Signatures of balancing selection are maintained at disease resistance loci following mating system evolution and a population bottleneck in the genus Capsella

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Population bottlenecks can lead to a loss of variation at disease resistance loci, which could have important consequences for the ability of populations to adapt to pathogen pressure. Alternatively, current or past balancing selection could maintain high diversity, creating a strong heterogeneity in the retention of polymorphism across the genome of bottlenecked populations. We sequenced part of the LRR region of 9 NBS-LRR disease resistance genes in the outcrossing Capsella grandiflora and the recently derived, bottlenecked selfing species Capsella rubella, and compared levels and patterns of nucleotide diversity and divergence with genome-wide reference loci. Results In strong contrast with reference loci, average diversity at resistance loci was comparable between C. rubella and C. grandiflora, primarily due to two loci with highly elevated diversity indicative of past or present balancing selection. Average between-species differentiation was also reduced at the set of R-genes compared with reference loci, which is consistent with the maintenance of ancestral polymorphism. Conclusions Historical or ongoing balancing selection on plant disease resistance genes is a likely contributor to the retention of ancestral polymorphism in some regions of the bottlenecked Capella rubella genome. PMID:22909344

  11. Genome-wide association analysis identifies genetic loci associated with resistance to multiple antimalarials in Plasmodium falciparum from China-Myanmar border

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zenglei; Cabrera, Mynthia; Yang, Jingyun; Yuan, Lili; Gupta, Bhavna; Liang, Xiaoying; Kemirembe, Karen; Shrestha, Sony; Brashear, Awtum; Li, Xiaolian; Porcella, Stephen F.; Miao, Jun; Yang, Zhaoqing; Su, Xin-zhuan; Cui, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance has emerged as one of the greatest challenges facing malaria control. The recent emergence of resistance to artemisinin (ART) and its partner drugs in ART-based combination therapies (ACT) is threatening the efficacy of this front-line regimen for treating Plasmodium falciparum parasites. Thus, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the resistance to ART and the partner drugs has become a high priority for resistance containment and malaria management. Using genome-wide association studies, we investigated the associations of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms with in vitro sensitivities to 10 commonly used antimalarial drugs in 94 P. falciparum isolates from the China-Myanmar border area, a region with the longest history of ART usage. We identified several loci associated with various drugs, including those containing pfcrt and pfdhfr. Of particular interest is a locus on chromosome 10 containing the autophagy-related protein 18 (ATG18) associated with decreased sensitivities to dihydroartemisinin, artemether and piperaquine – an ACT partner drug in this area. ATG18 is a phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate binding protein essential for autophagy and recently identified as a potential ART target. Further investigations on the ATG18 and genes at the chromosome 10 locus may provide an important lead for a connection between ART resistance and autophagy. PMID:27694982

  12. Modular skeletal evolution in sticklebacks is controlled by additive and clustered quantitative trait Loci.

    PubMed

    Miller, Craig T; Glazer, Andrew M; Summers, Brian R; Blackman, Benjamin K; Norman, Andrew R; Shapiro, Michael D; Cole, Bonnie L; Peichel, Catherine L; Schluter, Dolph; Kingsley, David M

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of evolutionary change remains a long-standing goal in biology. In vertebrates, skeletal evolution has contributed greatly to adaptation in body form and function in response to changing ecological variables like diet and predation. Here we use genome-wide linkage mapping in threespine stickleback fish to investigate the genetic architecture of evolved changes in many armor and trophic traits. We identify >100 quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling the pattern of serially repeating skeletal elements, including gill rakers, teeth, branchial bones, jaws, median fin spines, and vertebrae. We use this large collection of QTL to address long-standing questions about the anatomical specificity, genetic dominance, and genomic clustering of loci controlling skeletal differences in evolving populations. We find that most QTL (76%) that influence serially repeating skeletal elements have anatomically regional effects. In addition, most QTL (71%) have at least partially additive effects, regardless of whether the QTL controls evolved loss or gain of skeletal elements. Finally, many QTL with high LOD scores cluster on chromosomes 4, 20, and 21. These results identify a modular system that can control highly specific aspects of skeletal form. Because of the general additivity and genomic clustering of major QTL, concerted changes in both protective armor and trophic traits may occur when sticklebacks inherit either marine or freshwater alleles at linked or possible "supergene" regions of the stickleback genome. Further study of these regions will help identify the molecular basis of both modular and coordinated changes in the vertebrate skeleton.

  13. Modular Skeletal Evolution in Sticklebacks Is Controlled by Additive and Clustered Quantitative Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Craig T.; Glazer, Andrew M.; Summers, Brian R.; Blackman, Benjamin K.; Norman, Andrew R.; Shapiro, Michael D.; Cole, Bonnie L.; Peichel, Catherine L.; Schluter, Dolph; Kingsley, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of evolutionary change remains a long-standing goal in biology. In vertebrates, skeletal evolution has contributed greatly to adaptation in body form and function in response to changing ecological variables like diet and predation. Here we use genome-wide linkage mapping in threespine stickleback fish to investigate the genetic architecture of evolved changes in many armor and trophic traits. We identify >100 quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling the pattern of serially repeating skeletal elements, including gill rakers, teeth, branchial bones, jaws, median fin spines, and vertebrae. We use this large collection of QTL to address long-standing questions about the anatomical specificity, genetic dominance, and genomic clustering of loci controlling skeletal differences in evolving populations. We find that most QTL (76%) that influence serially repeating skeletal elements have anatomically regional effects. In addition, most QTL (71%) have at least partially additive effects, regardless of whether the QTL controls evolved loss or gain of skeletal elements. Finally, many QTL with high LOD scores cluster on chromosomes 4, 20, and 21. These results identify a modular system that can control highly specific aspects of skeletal form. Because of the general additivity and genomic clustering of major QTL, concerted changes in both protective armor and trophic traits may occur when sticklebacks inherit either marine or freshwater alleles at linked or possible “supergene” regions of the stickleback genome. Further study of these regions will help identify the molecular basis of both modular and coordinated changes in the vertebrate skeleton. PMID:24652999

  14. Targeted Sequencing of Lung Function Loci in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Cases and Controls.

    PubMed

    Artigas, María Soler; Wain, Louise V; Shrine, Nick; McKeever, Tricia M; Sayers, Ian; Hall, Ian P; Tobin, Martin D

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death worldwide; smoking is the main risk factor for COPD, but genetic factors are also relevant contributors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of the lung function measures used in the diagnosis of COPD have identified a number of loci, however association signals are often broad and collectively these loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability. In order to examine the association with COPD risk of genetic variants down to low allele frequencies, to aid fine-mapping of association signals and to explain more of the missing heritability, we undertook a targeted sequencing study in 300 COPD cases and 300 smoking controls for 26 loci previously reported to be associated with lung function. We used a pooled sequencing approach, with 12 pools of 25 individuals each, enabling high depth (30x) coverage per sample to be achieved. This pooled design maximised sample size and therefore power, but led to challenges during variant-calling since sequencing error rates and minor allele frequencies for rare variants can be very similar. For this reason we employed a rigorous quality control pipeline for variant detection which included the use of 3 independent calling algorithms. In order to avoid false positive associations we also developed tests to detect variants with potential batch effects and removed them before undertaking association testing. We tested for the effects of single variants and the combined effect of rare variants within a locus. We followed up the top signals with data available (only 67% of collapsing methods signals) in 4,249 COPD cases and 11,916 smoking controls from UK Biobank. We provide suggestive evidence for the combined effect of rare variants on COPD risk in TNXB and in sliding windows within MECOM and upstream of HHIP. These findings can lead to an improved understanding of the molecular pathways involved in the development of COPD.

  15. Targeted Sequencing of Lung Function Loci in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Cases and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Wain, Louise V.; Shrine, Nick; McKeever, Tricia M.; Sayers, Ian; Hall, Ian P.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death worldwide; smoking is the main risk factor for COPD, but genetic factors are also relevant contributors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of the lung function measures used in the diagnosis of COPD have identified a number of loci, however association signals are often broad and collectively these loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability. In order to examine the association with COPD risk of genetic variants down to low allele frequencies, to aid fine-mapping of association signals and to explain more of the missing heritability, we undertook a targeted sequencing study in 300 COPD cases and 300 smoking controls for 26 loci previously reported to be associated with lung function. We used a pooled sequencing approach, with 12 pools of 25 individuals each, enabling high depth (30x) coverage per sample to be achieved. This pooled design maximised sample size and therefore power, but led to challenges during variant-calling since sequencing error rates and minor allele frequencies for rare variants can be very similar. For this reason we employed a rigorous quality control pipeline for variant detection which included the use of 3 independent calling algorithms. In order to avoid false positive associations we also developed tests to detect variants with potential batch effects and removed them before undertaking association testing. We tested for the effects of single variants and the combined effect of rare variants within a locus. We followed up the top signals with data available (only 67% of collapsing methods signals) in 4,249 COPD cases and 11,916 smoking controls from UK Biobank. We provide suggestive evidence for the combined effect of rare variants on COPD risk in TNXB and in sliding windows within MECOM and upstream of HHIP. These findings can lead to an improved understanding of the molecular pathways involved in the development of COPD. PMID:28114305

  16. Grapevine powdery mildew resistance and susceptibility loci identified on a high-resolution SNP map

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Improved efficacy and durability of powdery mildew resistance requires knowledge of the genetics of resistance and susceptibility and high resolution maps to facilitate combining of multiple resistance genes with desirable traits. In the current study, we studied the inheritance of resistance and s...

  17. Identification of RFLP and NBS/PK profiling markers for disease resistance loci in genetic maps of oats.

    PubMed

    Sanz, M J; Loarce, Y; Fominaya, A; Vossen, J H; Ferrer, E

    2013-01-01

    Two of the domains most widely shared among R genes are the nucleotide binding site (NBS) and protein kinase (PK) domains. The present study describes and maps a number of new oat resistance gene analogues (RGAs) with two purposes in mind: (1) to identify genetic regions that contain R genes and (2) to determine whether RGAs can be used as molecular markers for qualitative loci and for QTLs affording resistance to Puccinia coronata. Such genes have been mapped in the diploid A. strigosa × A. wiestii (Asw map) and the hexaploid MN841801-1 × Noble-2 (MN map). Genomic and cDNA NBS-RGA probes from oat, barley and wheat were used to produce RFLPs and to obtain markers by motif-directed profiling based on the NBS (NBS profiling) and PK (PK profiling) domains. The efficiency of primers used in NBS/PK profiling to amplify RGA fragments was assessed by sequencing individual marker bands derived from genomic and cDNA fragments. The positions of 184 markers were identified in the Asw map, while those for 99 were identified in the MN map. Large numbers of NBS and PK profiling markers were found in clusters across different linkage groups, with the PK profiling markers more evenly distributed. The location of markers throughout the genetic maps and the composition of marker clusters indicate that NBS- and PK-based markers cover partly complementary regions of oat genomes. Markers of the different classes obtained were found associated with the two resistance loci, PcA and R-284B-2, mapped on Asw, and with five out of eight QTLs for partial resistance in the MN map. 53 RGA-RFLPs and 187 NBS/PK profiling markers were also mapped on the hexaploid map A. byzantina cv. Kanota × A. sativa cv. Ogle. Significant co-localization was seen between the RGA markers in the KO map and other markers closely linked to resistance loci, such as those for P. coronata and barley yellow dwarf virus (Bydv) that were previously mapped in other segregating populations.

  18. Rapid generation of drug-resistance alleles at endogenous loci using CRISPR-Cas9 indel mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ipsaro, Jonathan J.; Shen, Chen; Arai, Eri; Xu, Yali; Kinney, Justin B.; Joshua-Tor, Leemor; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic alterations conferring resistance to the effects of chemical inhibitors are valuable tools for validating on-target effects in cells. Unfortunately, for many therapeutic targets such alleles are not available. To address this issue, we evaluated whether CRISPR-Cas9-mediated insertion/deletion (indel) mutagenesis can produce drug-resistance alleles at endogenous loci. This method takes advantage of the heterogeneous in-frame alleles produced following Cas9-mediated DNA cleavage, which we show can generate rare alleles that confer resistance to the growth-arrest caused by chemical inhibitors. We used this approach to identify novel resistance alleles of two lysine methyltransferases, DOT1L and EZH2, which are each essential for the growth of MLL-fusion leukemia cells. We biochemically characterized the DOT1L mutation, showing that it is significantly more active than the wild-type enzyme. These findings validate the on-target anti-leukemia activities of existing DOT1L and EZH2 inhibitors and reveal a simple method for deriving drug-resistance alleles for novel targets, which may have utility during early stages of drug development. PMID:28231254

  19. Rapid generation of drug-resistance alleles at endogenous loci using CRISPR-Cas9 indel mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ipsaro, Jonathan J; Shen, Chen; Arai, Eri; Xu, Yali; Kinney, Justin B; Joshua-Tor, Leemor; Vakoc, Christopher R; Shi, Junwei

    2017-01-01

    Genetic alterations conferring resistance to the effects of chemical inhibitors are valuable tools for validating on-target effects in cells. Unfortunately, for many therapeutic targets such alleles are not available. To address this issue, we evaluated whether CRISPR-Cas9-mediated insertion/deletion (indel) mutagenesis can produce drug-resistance alleles at endogenous loci. This method takes advantage of the heterogeneous in-frame alleles produced following Cas9-mediated DNA cleavage, which we show can generate rare alleles that confer resistance to the growth-arrest caused by chemical inhibitors. We used this approach to identify novel resistance alleles of two lysine methyltransferases, DOT1L and EZH2, which are each essential for the growth of MLL-fusion leukemia cells. We biochemically characterized the DOT1L mutation, showing that it is significantly more active than the wild-type enzyme. These findings validate the on-target anti-leukemia activities of existing DOT1L and EZH2 inhibitors and reveal a simple method for deriving drug-resistance alleles for novel targets, which may have utility during early stages of drug development.

  20. Barbarea vulgaris linkage map and quantitative trait loci for saponins, glucosinolates, hairiness and resistance to the herbivore Phyllotreta nemorum.

    PubMed

    Kuzina, Vera; Nielsen, Jens Kvist; Augustin, Jörg Manfred; Torp, Anna Maria; Bak, Søren; Andersen, Sven Bode

    2011-02-01

    Combined genomics and metabolomics approaches were used to unravel molecular mechanisms behind interactions between winter cress (Barbarea vulgaris) and flea beetle (Phyllotreta nemorum). B. vulgaris comprises two morphologically, biochemically and cytologically deviating types, which differ in flea beetle resistance, saponin and glucosinolate profiles, as well as leaf pubescence. An F2 population generated from a cross between the two B. vulgaris types was used to construct a B. vulgaris genetic map based on 100 AFLP and 31 microsatellite markers. The map was divided into eight linkage groups. QTL (quantitative trait loci) analysis revealed a total of 15 QTL affecting eight traits, including nine QTL for four saponins, two QTL for two glucosinolates, two QTL for hairiness, and two QTL for flea beetle resistance. The two QTL for resistance towards flea beetles in B. vulgaris co-localized with QTL for the four saponins associated with resistance. Furthermore, global QTL analysis of B. vulgaris metabolites identified QTL for a number of flavonoid glycosides and additional saponins from both resistant and susceptible types. The transcriptome of the resistant B. vulgaris type was sequenced by pyrosequencing, and sequences containing microsatellites were identified. Microsatellite types in B. vulgaris were similar to Arabidopsis thaliana but different from Oryza sativa. Comparative analysis between B. vulgaris and A. thaliana revealed a remarkable degree of synteny between a large part of linkage groups 1 and 4 of B. vulgaris harboring the two QTL for flea beetle resistance and Arabidopsis chromosomes 3 and 1. Gene candidates that may underlie QTL for resistance and saponin biosynthesis are discussed.

  1. Identification of quantitative trait loci conditioning partial resistance to Phytophthora sojae in soybean PI 407861A

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Improving resistance for Phytophthora root and stem rot is an important goal in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] breeding. Partial resistance can be as effective in managing this disease as single-gene (Rps) mediated resistance and is more durable. The objective of this study was to identify QTL con...

  2. Quantitative trait loci meta-analysis of Plum pox virus resistance in apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.): new insights on the organization and the identification of genomic resistance factors.

    PubMed

    Marandel, Grégoire; Salava, Jaroslav; Abbott, Albert; Candresse, Thierry; Decroocq, Véronique

    2009-05-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) is responsible for sharka disease, one of the most detrimental stone fruit diseases affecting Prunus trees worldwide. Only a few apricot cultivars have been described as resistant, most originating from North American breeding programmes. Several PPV resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs) have been mapped in various progenies, consistently highlighting the contribution to the resistance of the upper part of linkage group 1 (LG1). However, to date, no consensus has been reached on the precise number of QTLs linked to the resistance to PPV in apricot and P. davidiana or on their accurate position on the genetic linkage map. In the present study, the quantitative resistance of cultivar 'Harlayne' was analysed over five growth periods in a large F1 population. Four QTLs were identified, three mapping on LG1, explaining between 5% and 39% of the observed phenotypic variance. In an effort to further this analysis of PPV resistance in apricot, these results were merged in a single QTL meta-analysis with those of five other PPV resistance analyses available in the literature. Three consensus QTL regions were identified on LG1 and a putative fourth region on LG3. QTL meta-analysis also revealed the contribution of each resistant cultivar to metaQTLs, providing interesting comparative data on the resistance factors shared between the resistance sources used in the various studies. Finally, it was shown that one of the metaQTLs co-localizes with the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E, thus providing new hypotheses on the mechanisms of PPV resistance in apricot.

  3. Three combined quantitative trait loci from nonhost Lactuca saligna are sufficient to provide complete resistance of lettuce against Bremia lactucae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ningwen W; Pelgrom, Koen; Niks, Rients E; Visser, Richard G F; Jeuken, Marieke J W

    2009-09-01

    The nonhost resistance of wild lettuce (Lactuca saligna) to downy mildew (Bremia lactucae) is based on at least 15 quantitative trait loci (QTL), each effective at one or more plant developmental stages. We used QTL pyramiding (stacking) to determine how many of these QTL from L. saligna are sufficient to impart complete resistance towards B. lactucae to cultivated lettuce, L. sativa. The alleles of four of the most promising QTL, rbq4, rbq5, rbq6+11, and rbq7 are effective at both the young and adult plant stages. Lines with these four QTL in all possible combinations were generated by crossing the respective backcross inbred lines (BIL). Using the 11 resulting lines (combiBIL), we determined that combinations of three QTL, rbq4, rbq5, and rbq6+11, led to increased levels of resistance; however, one QTL, rbq7, did not add to the resistance level when combined with the other QTL. One line, tripleBIL268, which contains the three QTL rbq4, rbq5, and rbq6+11, was completely resistant to B. lactucae at the young plant stage. This suggests that these three QTL are sufficient to confer the complete resistance of the nonhost L. saligna and any additional QTL in L. saligna are redundant. Histological analysis of B. lactucae infection in L. saligna, the BIL, and the combiBIL 48 h after inoculation revealed different microscopical phenotypes of resistance. The QTL differed with respect to the stage of the infection process with which they interfered.

  4. Comparative analyses of genomic locations and race specificities of loci for quantitative resistance to Pyricularia grisea in rice and barley

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huilan; Wang, Shiping; Xing, Yongzhong; Xu, Caiguo; Hayes, Patrick M.; Zhang, Qifa

    2003-01-01

    Comparative genomic analyses have revealed extensive colinearity in gene orders in distantly related taxa in mammals and grasses, which opened new horizons for evolutionary study. The objective of our study was to assess syntenic relationships of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for disease resistance in cereals by using a model system in which rice and barley were used as the hosts and the blast fungus Pyricularia grisea Sacc. as the pathogen. In total, 12 QTL against three isolates were identified in rice; two had effects on all three isolates, and the other 10 had effects on only one or two of the three isolates. Twelve QTL for blast resistance were identified in barley; one had effect on all three isolates, and the other 11 had effects on only one or two of the three isolates. The observed isolate specificity led to a hypothesis about the durability of quantitative resistance commonly observed in many plant host-pathogen systems. Four pairs of the QTL showed corresponding map positions between rice and barley, two of the four QTL pairs had complete conserved isolate specificity, and another two QTL pairs had partial conserved isolate specificity. Such corresponding locations and conserved specificity suggested a common origin and conserved functionality of the genes underlying the QTL for quantitative resistance and may have utility in gene discovery, understanding the function of the genomes, and identifying the evolutionary forces that structured the organization of the grass genomes. PMID:12601171

  5. Quantitative trait loci linked to PRNP gene controlling health and production traits in INRA 401 sheep

    PubMed Central

    Vitezica, Zulma G; Moreno, Carole R; Lantier, Frederic; Lantier, Isabelle; Schibler, Laurent; Roig, Anne; François, Dominique; Bouix, Jacques; Allain, Daniel; Brunel, Jean-Claude; Barillet, Francis; Elsen, Jean-Michel

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the potential association of PrP genotypes with health and productive traits was investigated. Data were recorded on animals of the INRA 401 breed from the Bourges-La Sapinière INRA experimental farm. The population consisted of 30 rams and 852 ewes, which produced 1310 lambs. The animals were categorized into three PrP genotype classes: ARR homozygous, ARR heterozygous, and animals without any ARR allele. Two analyses differing in the approach considered were carried out. Firstly, the potential association of the PrP genotype with disease (Salmonella resistance) and production (wool and carcass) traits was studied. The data used included 1042, 1043 and 1013 genotyped animals for the Salmonella resistance, wool and carcass traits, respectively. The different traits were analyzed using an animal model, where the PrP genotype effect was included as a fixed effect. Association analyses do not indicate any evidence of an effect of PrP genotypes on traits studied in this breed. Secondly, a quantitative trait loci (QTL) detection approach using the PRNP gene as a marker was applied on ovine chromosome 13. Interval mapping was used. Evidence for one QTL affecting mean fiber diameter was found at 25 cM from the PRNP gene. However, a linkage between PRNP and this QTL does not imply unfavorable linkage disequilibrium for PRNP selection purposes. PMID:17612481

  6. A new statistical approach to detecting differentially methylated loci for case control Illumina array methylation data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongxue; Liu, Qingzhong; Nadarajah, Saralees

    2012-04-15

    As an epigenetic alteration, DNA methylation plays an important role in epigenetic controls of gene transcription. Recent advances in genome-wide scan of DNA methylation provide great opportunities in studying the impact of DNA methylation on many human diseases including various types of cancer. Due to the unique feature of this type of data, applicable statistical methods are limited and new sophisticated approaches are desirable. In this article, we propose a new statistical test to detect differentially methylated loci for case control methylation data generated by Illumina arrays. This new method utilizes the important finding that DNA methylation is highly correlated with age. The proposed method estimates the overall P-value by combining the P-values from independent individual tests each for one age group. Through real data application and simulation study, we show that the proposed test is robust and usually more powerful than other methods.

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of Mutations in Antimicrobial Resistance Loci of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Airways of Cystic Fibrosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Greipel, Leonie; Fischer, Sebastian; Klockgether, Jens; Dorda, Marie; Mielke, Samira; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Cramer, Nina; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2016-11-01

    The chronic airway infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in people with cystic fibrosis (CF) are treated with aerosolized antibiotics, oral fluoroquinolones, and/or intravenous combination therapy with aminoglycosides and β-lactam antibiotics. An international strain collection of 361 P. aeruginosa isolates from 258 CF patients seen at 30 CF clinics was examined for mutations in 17 antimicrobial susceptibility and resistance loci that had been identified as hot spots of mutation by genome sequencing of serial isolates from a single CF clinic. Combinatorial amplicon sequencing of pooled PCR products identified 1,112 sequence variants that were not present in the genomes of representative strains of the 20 most common clones of the global P. aeruginosa population. A high frequency of singular coding variants was seen in spuE, mexA, gyrA, rpoB, fusA1, mexZ, mexY, oprD, ampD, parR, parS, and envZ (amgS), reflecting the pressure upon P. aeruginosa in lungs of CF patients to generate novel protein variants. The proportion of nonneutral amino acid exchanges was high. Of the 17 loci, mexA, mexZ, and pagL were most frequently affected by independent stop mutations. Private and de novo mutations seem to play a pivotal role in the response of P. aeruginosa populations to the antimicrobial load and the individual CF host. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. A meta-analysis of quantitative trait loci for abiotic and biotic stress resistance in tetraploid cotton.

    PubMed

    Abdelraheem, Abdelraheem; Liu, Feng; Song, Mingzhou; Zhang, Jinfa F

    2017-06-24

    The number and location of mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) depend on genetic populations and testing environments. The identification of consistent QTL across genetic backgrounds and environments is a pre-requisite to marker-assisted selection. This study analyzed a total of 661 abiotic and biotic stress resistance QTL based on our previous work and other publications using the meta-analysis software Biomercator. It identified chromosomal regions containing QTL clusters for different resistance traits and hotspots for a particular resistance trait in cotton from 98 QTL for drought tolerance under greenhouse (DT) and 150 QTL in field conditions (FDT), 80 QTL for salt tolerance in the greenhouse conditions (ST), 201 QTL for resistance to Verticillium wilt (VW, Verticillium dahliae), 47 QTL for resistance to Fusarium wilt (FW, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum), and 85 QTL for resistance to root-knot nematodes (RKN, Meloiodogyne incognita) and reniform nematodes (RN, Rotylenchulus reniformis). The traits used in QTL mapping for abiotic stress tolerance included morphological traits-plant height and fresh and dry shoot and root weights, physiological traits-chlorophyll content, osmotic potential, carbon isotope ratio, stomatal conductance, photosynthetic rate, transpiration, canopy temperature, and leaf area index, agronomic traits-seedcotton yield, lint yield, boll weight, and lint percent, and fiber quality traits-fiber length, uniformity, strength, elongation, and micronaire. The results showed that resistance QTL are not uniformly distributed across the cotton genome; some chromosomes carried disproportionally more QTL, QTL clusters, or hotspots. Twenty-three QTL clusters were found on 15 chromosomes (c3, c4, c5, c6, c7, c11, c14, c15, c16, c19, c20, c23, c24, c25, and c26). Moreover, 28 QTL hotshots were associated with different resistance traits including one hotspot on c4 for Verticillium wilt resistance, two QTL hotspots on c24 for chlorophyll

  9. Association mapping utilizing diverse barley lines reveals net form net blotch seedling resistance/susceptibility loci

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pyrenophora teres f. teres is a necrotrophic fungal pathogen and the causal agent of the economically important foliar disease net form net blotch (NFNB) of barley. The deployment of effective and durable resistance against P. teres f. teres has been hindered by the complexity of quantitative resist...

  10. Quantitative trait loci from two genotypes of oat (Avena sativa L.) conditioning resistance to Puccinia coronata

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Developing oat cultivars with partial resistance to crown rust would be beneficial for disease management. Two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations were derived by crossing the susceptible cultivar ‘Provena’ with two partially resistant sources, ‘CDC Boyer’ and breeding line 94197A1-9-2-2-2-5. ...

  11. Novel quantitative trait loci for partial resistance to Phytophthora sojae in soybean PI 398841

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phytophthora root and stem rot caused by Phytophthora sojae Kaufmann and Gerdmann is one of the most severe soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr] diseases in the US. Partial resistance is as effective in managing this disease as single-gene (Rps) mediated resistance and is more durable. The objective of t...

  12. Quantitative trait loci for Fusarium head blight resistance in Huangcandou x 'Jagger' wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a devastating disease in wheat (Triticum aestivum), and growing resistant cultivars is one of the most effective strategies to minimize its damage. Huangcandou (HCD) is a Chinese wheat landrace that shows a high level of resistance to FHB spread within a spike (type II)...

  13. Loci on chromosomes 1A and 2A affect resistance to tan (yellow) spot in wheat populations not segregating for tsn1.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Manisha; Jorgensen, Dorthe; Taylor, Julian; Chalmers, Ken J; Fox, Rebecca; Hollaway, Grant J; Neate, Stephen M; McLean, Mark S; Vassos, Elysia; Golzar, Hossein; Loughman, Robert; Mather, Diane E

    2017-09-14

    QTL for tan spot resistance were mapped on wheat chromosomes 1A and 2A. Lines were developed with resistance alleles at these loci and at the tsn1 locus on chromosome 5B. These lines expressed significantly higher resistance than the parent with tsn1 only. Tan spot (syn. yellow spot and yellow leaf spot) caused by Pyrenophora tritici-repentis is an important foliar disease of wheat in Australia. Few resistance genes have been mapped in Australian germplasm and only one, known as tsn1 located on chromosome 5B, is known in Australian breeding programs. This gene confers insensitivity to the fungal effector ToxA. The main aim of this study was to map novel resistance loci in two populations: Calingiri/Wyalkatchem, which is fixed for the ToxA-insensitivity allele tsn1, and IGW2574/Annuello, which is fixed for the ToxA-sensitivity allele Tsn1. A second aim was to combine new loci with tsn1 to develop lines with improved resistance. Tan spot severity was evaluated at various growth stages and in multiple environments. Symptom severity traits exhibited quantitative variation. The most significant quantitative trait loci (QTL) were detected on chromosomes 2A and 1A. The QTL on 2A explained up to 29.2% of the genotypic variation in the Calingiri/Wyalkatchem population with the resistance allele contributed by Wyalkatchem. The QTL on 1A explained up to 28.1% of the genotypic variation in the IGW2574/Annuello population with the resistance allele contributed by Annuello. The resistance alleles at both QTL were successfully combined with tsn1 to develop lines that express significantly better resistance at both seedling and adult plant stages than Calingiri which has tsn1 only.

  14. New consistent QTL in pea associated with partial resistance to Aphanomyces euteiches in multiple field and controlled environments from France and the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Partial resistances, often controlled by QTL (Quantitative Trait Loci), are considered to be more durable than monogenic resistances. Prior to develop efficient breeding programs for polygenic resistance to pathogens, a higher understanding of genetic diversity and stability of resistance QTL in pla...

  15. Identification of quantitative trait loci for resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Soengas, P; Hand, P; Vicente, J G; Pole, J M; Pink, D A C

    2007-02-01

    Resistance to six known races of black rot in crucifers caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Pammel) Dowson is absent or very rare in Brassica oleracea (C genome). However, race specific and broad-spectrum resistance (to type strains of all six races) does appear to occur frequently in other brassica genomes including B. rapa (A genome). Here, we report the genetics of broad spectrum resistance in the B. rapa Chinese cabbage accession B162, using QTL analysis of resistance to races 1 and 4 of the pathogen. A B. rapa linkage map comprising ten linkage groups (A01-A10) with a total map distance of 664 cM was produced, based on 223 AFLP bands and 23 microsatellites from a F(2) population of 114 plants derived from a cross between the B. rapa susceptible inbred line R-o-18 and B162. Interaction phenotypes of 125 F(2) plants were assessed using two criteria: the percentage of inoculation sites in which symptoms developed, and the severity of symptoms per plant. Resistance to both races was correlated and a cluster of highly significant QTL that explained 24-64% of the phenotypic variance was located on A06. Two additional QTLs for resistance to race 4 were found on A02 and A09. Markers closely linked to these QTL could assist in the transference of the resistance into different B. rapa cultivars or into B. oleracea.

  16. Mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling adaptive traits in coastal Douglas-fir.II. Spring and fall cold-hardiness

    Treesearch

    K.D. Jermstad; D.L. Bassoni; N.C. Wheeler; T.S. Anekonda; S.N. Aitken; W.T. Adams; D.B. Neale

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting fall and spring cold-hardiness were identified in a three-generation outbred pedigree of coastal Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga meniziesii (Mirb.) Franco var. menziesii]. Eleven QTLs controlling fall cold-hardiness were detected on four linkage groups, and 15 QTLs controlling spring cold-hardiness were detected on four...

  17. Linkage and mapping of quantitative trait loci associated with angular leaf spot and powdery mildew resistance in common beans.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Denis; Briñez, Boris; Rosa, Juliana Santa; Oblessuc, Paula Rodrigues; Almeida, Caléo Panhoca de; Nucci, Stella Maris; Silva, Larissa Chariel Domingos da; Chiorato, Alisson Fernando; Vianello, Rosana Pereira; Camargo, Luis Eduardo Aranha; Blair, Matthew Wohlgemuth; Benchimol-Reis, Luciana Lasry

    2017-02-20

    Angular leaf spot (ALS) and powdery mildew (PWM) are two important fungi diseases causing significant yield losses in common beans. In this study, a new genetic linkage map was constructed using single sequence repeats (SSRs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in a segregating population derived from the AND 277 x SEA 5 cross, with 105 recombinant inbred lines. Phenotypic evaluations were performed in the greenhouse to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with resistance by means of the composite interval mapping analysis. Four QTLs were identified for ALS resistance. The QTL ALS11AS, linked on the SNP BAR 5054, mapped on chromosome Pv11, showed the greatest effect (R2 = 26.5%) on ALS phenotypic variance. For PWM resistance, two QTLs were detected, PWM2AS and PWM11AS, on Pv2 and Pv11, explaining 7% and 66% of the phenotypic variation, respectively. Both QTLs on Pv11 were mapped on the same genomic region, suggesting that it is a pleiotropic region. The present study resulted in the identification of new markers closely linked to ALS and PWM QTLs, which can be used for marker-assisted selection, fine mapping and positional cloning.

  18. Two alternative recessive quantitative trait loci influence resistance to spring black stem and leaf spot in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Kamphuis, Lars G; Lichtenzveig, Judith; Oliver, Richard P; Ellwood, Simon R

    2008-01-01

    is tightly linked to a cluster of Toll/Interleukin1 receptor-nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat (TIR-NBS-LRR) genes and disease resistance protein-like genes, while no resistance gene analogues (RGAs) are apparent in the genomic sequence of the reference accession A17 at the rnpm2 locus. Conclusion The induction of defence responses and cell death in the susceptible interaction following infection by P. medicaginis suggested this pathogen is not negatively affected by these responses and may promote them. A QTL for resistance was revealed in each of two populations derived from crosses between a resistant accession and two different susceptible accessions. Both loci are recessive in nature, and the simplest explanation for the existence of two separate QTLs is the occurrence of host genotype-specific susceptibility loci that may interact with undetermined P. medicaginis virulence factors. PMID:18366746

  19. Mechanisms of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli: characterization of nfxB and cfxB, two mutant resistance loci decreasing norfloxacin accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, D C; Wolfson, J S; Souza, K S; Ng, E Y; McHugh, G L; Swartz, M N

    1989-01-01

    Two genetic loci selected for norfloxacin (nfxB) and ciprofloxacin (cfxB) resistance were characterized. Both mutations have previously been shown to confer pleiotropic resistance to quinolones, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline and to decrease expression of porin outer-membrane protein OmpF. nfxB was shown to map at about 19 min and thus to be genetically distinct from ompF (21 min), and cfxB was shown to be very closely linked to marA (34 min). cfxB was dominant over cfxB+ in merodiploids, in contrast to other quinolone resistance mutations. The two loci appear to interact functionally, because nfxB was not expressed in the presence of marA::Tn5. Both nfxB and cfxB decreased the expression of ompF up to 50-fold at the posttranscriptional level as determined in strains containing ompF-lacZ operon and protein fusions. Both mutations also decreased norfloxacin accumulation in intact cells. This decrease in accumulation was abolished by energy inhibitors and by removal of the outer membrane. These findings, in conjunction with those of Cohen et al. (S. P. Cohen, D. C. Hooper, J. S. Wolfson, K. S. Souza, L. M. McMurry, and S. B. Levy, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 32:1187-1191, 1988), suggest a model for quinolone resistance by decreased permeation in which decreased diffusion through porin channels in the outer membrane interacts with a saturable drug efflux system at the inner membrane. PMID:2658782

  20. Mechanisms of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli: characterization of nfxB and cfxB, two mutant resistance loci decreasing norfloxacin accumulation.

    PubMed

    Hooper, D C; Wolfson, J S; Souza, K S; Ng, E Y; McHugh, G L; Swartz, M N

    1989-03-01

    Two genetic loci selected for norfloxacin (nfxB) and ciprofloxacin (cfxB) resistance were characterized. Both mutations have previously been shown to confer pleiotropic resistance to quinolones, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline and to decrease expression of porin outer-membrane protein OmpF. nfxB was shown to map at about 19 min and thus to be genetically distinct from ompF (21 min), and cfxB was shown to be very closely linked to marA (34 min). cfxB was dominant over cfxB+ in merodiploids, in contrast to other quinolone resistance mutations. The two loci appear to interact functionally, because nfxB was not expressed in the presence of marA::Tn5. Both nfxB and cfxB decreased the expression of ompF up to 50-fold at the posttranscriptional level as determined in strains containing ompF-lacZ operon and protein fusions. Both mutations also decreased norfloxacin accumulation in intact cells. This decrease in accumulation was abolished by energy inhibitors and by removal of the outer membrane. These findings, in conjunction with those of Cohen et al. (S. P. Cohen, D. C. Hooper, J. S. Wolfson, K. S. Souza, L. M. McMurry, and S. B. Levy, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 32:1187-1191, 1988), suggest a model for quinolone resistance by decreased permeation in which decreased diffusion through porin channels in the outer membrane interacts with a saturable drug efflux system at the inner membrane.

  1. Putative resistance gene markers associated with quantitative trait loci for fire blight resistance in Malus 'Robusta 5' accessions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Breeding of fire blight resistant scions and rootstocks is a goal of several international apple breeding programs, as options are limited for management of this destructive disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora. A broad, large effect QTL for fire blight resistance has been pre...

  2. A native QTL for Fusarium head blight resistance in North American barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) independent of height, maturity, and spike type loci.

    PubMed

    Yu, G T; Franckowiak, J D; Neate, S M; Zhang, B; Horsley, R D

    2010-02-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), caused by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe (teleomorph Gibberella zeae (Schwein.) Petch), is one of the major diseases of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) in eastern China, the Upper Midwest of the USA, and the eastern Prairie Provinces of Canada. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling FHB resistance, a recombinant inbred line population (F6:7) was developed from the cross Zhenongda 7/PI 643302. The population was phenotyped for resistance to FHB in two experiments in China and four experiments in North Dakota. Accumulation of the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol was determined in one experiment in China and two in North Dakota. Simplified composite interval mapping was performed on the whole genome level using the software MQTL. The QTL FHB-2 from PI 643302 for FHB resistance was found on the distal portion of chromosome 2HL in all six FHB screening environments. This QTL accounted for 14% of phenotypic variation over six environments and was not associated with heading date or plant height. The FHB resistance QTL FHB-2 detected near the end of chromosome 2HL is in a different location from those found previously and is therefore probably unique. Because the QTL was not contributed by the Chinese cultivar Zhenongda 7, it is likely a native QTL present in North American barley. The QTL FHB-2 represents the first reported QTL for native FHB resistance in North American germ plasm and has been given the provisional name Qrgz-2H-14. This QTL should be considered for pyramiding with other FHB QTL previously mapped.

  3. Association mapping of loci controlling genetic and environmental interaction of soybean flowering time under various photo-thermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Mao, Tingting; Li, Jinyu; Wen, Zixiang; Wu, Tingting; Wu, Cunxiang; Sun, Shi; Jiang, Bingjun; Hou, Wensheng; Li, Wenbin; Song, Qijian; Wang, Dechun; Han, Tianfu

    2017-05-26

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) is a short day plant. Its flowering and maturity time are controlled by genetic and environmental factors, as well the interaction between the two factors. Previous studies have shown that both genetic and environmental factors, mainly photoperiod and temperature, control flowering time of soybean. Additionally, these studies have reported gene × gene and gene × environment interactions on flowering time. However, the effects of quantitative trait loci (QTL) in response to photoperiod and temperature have not been well evaluated. The objectives of the current study were to identify the effects of loci associated with flowering time under different photo-thermal conditions and to understand the effects of interaction between loci and environment on soybean flowering. Different photoperiod and temperature combinations were obtained by adjusting sowing dates (spring sowing and summer sowing) or day-length (12 h, 16 h). Association mapping was performed on 91 soybean cultivars from different maturity groups (MG000-VIII) using 172 SSR markers and 5107 SNPs from the Illumina SoySNP6K iSelectBeadChip. The effects of the interaction between QTL and environments on flowering time were also analysed using the QTXNetwork. Large-effect loci were detected on Gm 11, Gm 16 and Gm 20 as in previous reports. Most loci associated with flowering time are sensitive to photo-thermal conditions. Number of loci associated with flowering time was more under the long day (LD) than under the short day (SD) condition. The variation of flowering time among the soybean cultivars mostly resulted from the epistasis × environment and additive × environment interactions. Among the three candidate loci, i.e. Gm04_4497001 (near GmCOL3a), Gm16_30766209 (near GmFT2a and GmFT2b) and Gm19_47514601 (E3 or GmPhyA3), the Gm04_4497001 may be the key locus interacting with other loci for controlling soybean flowering time. The effects of loci associated

  4. Identification of quantitative trait loci affecting resistance to gastro-intestinal parasites in a double backcross population of Red Maasai and Dorper sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A genome-wide scan for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting gastrointestinal (GI) nematode resistance was completed using a double backcross sheep population derived from Red Maasai and Dorper ewes bred to F1 rams. These breeds were chosen, because Red Maasai sheep are known to be more tolerant ...

  5. Quantitative Trait Loci from Two Genotypes of Oat (Avena sativa) Conditioning Resistance to Puccinia coronata.

    PubMed

    Babiker, Ebrahiem M; Gordon, Tyler C; Jackson, Eric W; Chao, Shiaoman; Harrison, Stephen A; Carson, Martin L; Obert, Don E; Bonman, J Michael

    2015-02-01

    Developing oat cultivars with partial resistance to crown rust would be beneficial and cost-effective for disease management. Two recombinant inbred-line populations were generated by crossing the susceptible cultivar Provena with two partially resistant sources, CDC Boyer and breeding line 94197A1-9-2-2-2-5. A third mapping population was generated by crossing the partially resistant sources to validate the quantitative trait locus (QTL) results. The three populations were evaluated for crown rust severity in the field at Louisiana State University (LSU) in 2009 and 2010 and at the Cereal Disease Laboratory (CDL) in St. Paul, MN, in 2009, 2010, and 2011. An iSelect platform assay containing 5,744 oat single nucleotide polymorphisms was used to genotype the populations. From the 2009 CDL test, linkage analyses revealed two QTLs for partial resistance in the Provena/CDC Boyer population on chromosome 19A. One of the 19A QTLs was also detected in the 2009 LSU test. Another QTL was detected on chromosome 12D in the CDL 2009 test. In the Provena/94197A1-9-2-2-2-5 population, only one QTL was detected, on chromosome 13A, in the CDL 2011 test. The 13A QTL from the Provena/94197A1-9-2-2-2-5 population was validated in the CDC Boyer/94197A1-9-2-2-2-5 population in the CDL 2010 and 2011 tests. Comparative analysis of the significant marker sequences with the rice genome database revealed 15 candidate genes for disease resistance on chromosomes 4 and 6 of rice. These genes could be potential targets for cloning from the two resistant parents.

  6. Grapevine powdery mildew resistance and susceptibility loci identified on a high-resolution SNP map.

    PubMed

    Barba, Paola; Cadle-Davidson, Lance; Harriman, James; Glaubitz, Jeffrey C; Brooks, Siraprapa; Hyma, Katie; Reisch, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Improved efficacy and durability of powdery mildew resistance can be enhanced via knowledge of the genetics of resistance and susceptibility coupled with the development of high-resolution maps to facilitate the stacking of multiple resistance genes and other desirable traits. We studied the inheritance of powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator) resistance and susceptibility of wild Vitis rupestris B38 and cultivated V. vinifera 'Chardonnay', finding evidence for quantitative variation. Molecular markers were identified using genotyping-by-sequencing, resulting in 16,833 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) based on alignment to the V. vinifera 'PN40024' reference genome sequence. With an average density of 36 SNPs/Mbp and uniform coverage of the genome, this 17K set was used to identify 11 SNPs on chromosome 7 associated with a resistance locus from V. rupestris B38 and ten SNPs on chromosome 9 associated with a locus for susceptibility from 'Chardonnay' using single marker association and linkage disequilibrium analysis. Linkage maps for V. rupestris B38 (1,146 SNPs) and 'Chardonnay' (1,215 SNPs) were constructed and used to corroborate the 'Chardonnay' locus named Sen1 (Susceptibility to Erysiphe necator 1), providing the first insight into the genetics of susceptibility to powdery mildew from V. vinifera. The identification of markers associated with a susceptibility locus in a V. vinifera background can be used for negative selection among breeding progenies. This work improves our understanding of the nature of powdery mildew resistance in V. rupestris B38 and 'Chardonnay', while applying next-generation sequencing tools to advance grapevine genomics and breeding.

  7. Compact, Controlled Resistance Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulus, David C.; DeWitt, John K.; Reich, Alton J.; Shaw, James E.; Deaconu, Stelu S.

    2011-01-01

    Spaceflight leads to muscle and bone atrophy. Isoinertial (free-weight) exercises provide a sufficient stimulus to elicit increases in both muscle strength and bone mineral density in Earth-based studies. While exercise equipment is in use on the International Space Station for crewmember health maintenance, current devices are too large to place in a transport vehicle or small spacecraft. Therefore, a portable computer controlled resistance exercise device is being developed that is able to simulate the inertial loading experienced when lifting a mass on Earth. This portable device weighs less than 50 lb and can simulate the resistance of lifting and lowering up to 600 lb of free-weights. The objective is to allow crewmembers to perform resistance exercise with loads capable of maintaining muscle and bone health. The device is reconfigurable and allows for the performance of typical Earth-based free-weight exercises. Forces exerted, volume of work, range of motion, time-under-tension, and speed/ acceleration of movement are recorded and can be remotely monitored to track progress and modify individual protocols based on exercise session data. A performance evaluation will be completed and data will be presented that include ground-reaction force comparisons between the device and free-weight dead-lifts over a spectrum of resistance levels. Movement biomechanics will also be presented.

  8. Quantitative trait loci for resistance to pre-harvest sprouting in US hard white winter wheat Rio Blanco.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shubing; Cai, Shibin; Graybosch, Robert; Chen, Cuixia; Bai, Guihua

    2008-09-01

    Pre-harvest sprouting (PHS) of wheat is a major problem that severely limits the end-use quality of flour in many wheat-growing areas worldwide. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for PHS resistance, a population of 171 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was developed from the cross between PHS-resistant white wheat cultivar Rio Blanco and PHS-susceptible white wheat breeding line NW97S186. The population was evaluated for PHS in three greenhouse experiments and one field experiment. After 1,430 pairs of simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers were screened between the two parents and two bulks, 112 polymorphic markers between two bulks were used to screen the RILs. One major QTL, QPhs.pseru-3AS, was identified in the distal region of chromosome 3AS and explained up to 41.0% of the total phenotypic variation in three greenhouse experiments. One minor QTL, QPhs.pseru-2B.1, was detected in the 2005 and 2006 experiments and for the means over the greenhouse experiments, and explained 5.0-6.4% of phenotypic variation. Another minor QTL, QPhs.pseru-2B.2, was detected in only one greenhouse experiment and explained 4.5% of phenotypic variation for PHS resistance. In another RIL population developed from the cross of Rio Blanco/NW97S078, QPhs.pseru-3AS was significant for all three greenhouse experiments and the means over all greenhouse experiments and explained up to 58.0% of phenotypic variation. Because Rio Blanco is a popular parent used in many hard winter wheat breeding programs, SSR markers linked to the QTLs have potential for use in high-throughput marker-assisted selection of wheat cultivars with improved PHS resistance as well as fine mapping and map-based cloning of the major QTL QPhs.pseru-3AS.

  9. Quantitative trait loci associated with resistance to powdery mildew in cornus florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Powdery mildew of flowering dogwood (Cornus florida) caused by Erysiphe pulchra is one of the most destructive diseases in nursery production of flowering dogwood throughout the southeastern U.S. Since the mid-1990s, efforts to breed for resistance to the disease have been undertaken, but to-date on...

  10. Fusarium head blight resistance loci in a stratified population of wheat landraces and varieties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To determine if Chinese and Japanese wheat landraces and varieties have unique sources of Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistance, an association mapping panel of 195 wheat accessions including both commercial varieties and landraces was genotyped with 364 genome-wide simple sequence repeat (SSR) and ...

  11. Confirming QTLs and finding additional Loci responsible for resistance to Sheath Blight in Rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice sheath blight (ShB) caused by the soil borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most destructive diseases of rice around the globe, causing severe losses in rice yield and quality annually. Major genes governing resistance to ShB have not been found in cultivated rice worldwide; however...

  12. Quantitative trait loci for resistance to two fungal pathogens in Quercus robur

    Treesearch

    Cécile Robin; Amira Mougou-Hamdane; Jean-Marc Gion; Antoine Kremer; Marie-Laure. Desprez-Loustau

    2012-01-01

    Powdery mildew, caused by Erysiphe alphitoides (Ascomycete), is the most frequent disease of oaks, which are also known to be host plants for Phytophthora cinnamomi (Oomycete), the causal agent of ink disease. Components of genetic resistance to these two pathogens, infecting either leaves or root and collar, were...

  13. Quantitative trait loci for resistance to common scab and cold-induced sweetening in diploid potato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The development of germplasm with resistance to common scab and cold-induced sweetening is a high priority for the potato industry. A mapping population was developed from mating two individuals from a diploid family generated by crossing the susceptible cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum) clone U...

  14. Yield effecgs of two southern leaf blight resistance loci in maize hybrids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plants need to balance resources between yield and defense. This phenomenon has rarely been investigated in the context of naturally-occurring quantitative resistance alleles in an agricultural production environment. B73-3B and B73-6A are two near-isogenic lines (NILs) in the background of the mai...

  15. Quantitative Trait Loci for Aluminum Resistance in Chinese Wheat Landrace FSW

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is a major constraint for wheat production in acid soils worldwide. Chinese landrace FSW demonstrates a high level of Al resistance. A population of 170 F6 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was developed from a cross between FSW and an Al-sensitive Chinese line, ND35, using sing...

  16. Quantitative Trait Loci for Partial Resistance to Phytophthora Sojaei in Soybean [Glycine Max (L.) Merr.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phytophthora root and stem rot of soybean, caused by the oomycete, Phytophthora sojae, is one of the most destructive diseases to limit soybean production in the US. Although fourteen resistance genes (Rps) to P. sojae have been identified, adaptation of by the pathogen has made many of these ineffe...

  17. Using genotyping by sequencing (GBS) to identify Loci in Colocasiae esculenta linked to Phytophthora colocasiae resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One of the most significant threats to taro production is taro leaf blight (TLB) caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora colocasiae. Therefore, one of the primary selection criteria for the University of Hawaii taro breeding program is TLB resistance. Some cultivars from Palau, Micronesia and o...

  18. Identification of QTL controlling high levels of partial resistance to Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi in pea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium root rot is a common biotic restraint on pea yields worldwide and genetic resistance is the most feasible method for improving pea production. This study was conducted to discover quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling genetic partial resistance to Fusarium root rot caused by Fusarium s...

  19. Mapping the Rust Resistant Loci MXC3 and MER in P. trichocarpa and Assessing the Intermarker Linkage Disequilibrium in MXC3 Region

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Tongming; Difazio, Stephen P.; Gunter, Lee E; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2004-01-01

    In an attempt to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of Melampsora rust resistance in Populus trichocarpa, we have mapped two resistance loci, MXC3 and MER, and intensively characterized the flanking genomic sequence for the MXC3 locus and the level of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in natural populations. We used an interspecific backcross pedigree and a genetic map that was highly saturated with AFLP and SSR markers, and assembled shotgun-sequence data in the region containing markers linked to MXC3. The two loci were mapped to different linkage groups. Linkage disequilibrium for MXC3 was confined to two closely linked regions spanning 34 and 16 kb, respectively. The MXC3 region also contained six disease-resistance candidate genes. The MER and MXC3 loci are clearly distinct, and may have different mechanisms of resistance, as different classes of putative resistance genes were present near each locus. The suppressed recombination previously observed in the MXC3 region was possibly caused by extensive hemizygous rearrangements confined to the original parent tree. The relatively low observed LD may facilitate association studies using candidate genes for rust resistance, but will probably inhibit marker-aided selection.

  20. Genome-Wide Association Study and QTL Mapping Reveal Genomic Loci Associated with Fusarium Ear Rot Resistance in Tropical Maize Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiafa; Shrestha, Rosemary; Ding, Junqiang; Zheng, Hongjian; Mu, Chunhua; Wu, Jianyu; Mahuku, George

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium ear rot (FER) incited by Fusarium verticillioides is a major disease of maize that reduces grain quality globally. Host resistance is the most suitable strategy for managing the disease. We report the results of genome-wide association study (GWAS) to detect alleles associated with increased resistance to FER in a set of 818 tropical maize inbred lines evaluated in three environments. Association tests performed using 43,424 single-nucleotide polymorphic (SNPs) markers identified 45 SNPs and 15 haplotypes that were significantly associated with FER resistance. Each associated SNP locus had relatively small additive effects on disease resistance and accounted for 1–4% of trait variation. These SNPs and haplotypes were located within or adjacent to 38 candidate genes, 21 of which were candidate genes associated with plant tolerance to stresses, including disease resistance. Linkage mapping in four biparental populations to validate GWAS results identified 15 quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with F. verticillioides resistance. Integration of GWAS and QTL to the maize physical map showed eight colocated loci on chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, and 10. QTL on chromosomes 2 and 9 are new. These results reveal that FER resistance is a complex trait that is conditioned by multiple genes with minor effects. The value of selection on identified markers for improving FER resistance is limited; rather, selection to combine small effect resistance alleles combined with genomic selection for polygenic background for both the target and general adaptation traits might be fruitful for increasing FER resistance in maize. PMID:27742723

  1. Mapping quantitative trait loci controlling early growth in a (longleaf pine × slash pine) × slash pine BC1 family

    Treesearch

    C. Weng; Thomas L. Kubisiak; C. Dana. Nelson; M. Stine

    2002-01-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were employed to map the genome and quantitative trait loci controlling the early growth of a pine hybrid F1 tree (Pinus palustris Mill. × P. elliottii Engl.) and a recurrent slash pine tree (P. ellottii Engl.) in a (longleaf pine × slash pine...

  2. Genetic Architecture of Resistance to Alternaria brassicae in Arabidopsis thaliana: QTL Mapping Reveals Two Major Resistance-Conferring Loci

    PubMed Central

    Rajarammohan, Sivasubramanian; Kumar, Amarendra; Gupta, Vibha; Pental, Deepak; Pradhan, Akshay K.; Kaur, Jagreet

    2017-01-01

    Alternaria brassicae, a necrotrophic fungal pathogen, causes Alternaria blight, one of the most important diseases of oleiferous Brassica crops. The current study utilized Arabidopsis as a model to decipher the genetic architecture of defense against A. brassicae. Significant phenotypic variation that was largely genetically determined was observed among Arabidopsis accessions in response to pathogen challenge. Three biparental mapping populations were developed from three resistant accessions viz. CIBC-5, Ei-2, and Cvi-0 and two susceptible accessions – Gre-0 and Zdr-1 (commonly crossed to CIBC-5 and Ei-2). A total of six quantitative trait locus (QTLs) governing resistance to A. brassicae were identified, five of which were population-specific while one QTL was common between all the three mapping populations. Interestingly, the common QTL had varying phenotypic contributions in different populations, which can be attributed to the genetic background of the parental accessions. The presence of both common and population-specific QTLs indicate that resistance to A. brassicae is quantitative, and that different genes may mediate resistance to the pathogen in different accessions. Two of the QTLs had moderate-to-large effects, one of which explained nearly 50% of the variation. The large effect QTLs may therefore contain genes that could play a significant role in conferring resistance even in heterologous hosts. PMID:28286515

  3. Genetic bases of estrogen-induced tumorigenesis in the rat: mapping of loci controlling susceptibility to mammary cancer in a Brown Norway x ACI intercross.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Beverly S; Lachel, Cynthia M; Pennington, Karen L; Murrin, Clare R; Strecker, Tracy E; Tochacek, Martin; Gould, Karen A; Meza, Jane L; McComb, Rodney D; Shull, James D

    2006-08-01

    Exposure to estrogens is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Our laboratory has shown that the ACI rat is uniquely susceptible to 17beta-estradiol (E2)-induced mammary cancer. We previously mapped two loci, Emca1 and Emca2 (estrogen-induced mammary cancer), that act independently to determine susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer in crosses between the susceptible ACI rat strain and the genetically related, but resistant, Copenhagen (COP) rat strain. In this study, we evaluate susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer in a cross between the ACI strain and the unrelated Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. Whereas nearly 100% of the ACI rats developed mammary cancer when treated continuously with E2, BN rats did not develop palpable mammary cancer during the 196-day course of E2 treatment. Susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer segregated as a dominant or incompletely dominant trait in a cross between BN females and ACI males. In a population of 251 female (BN x ACI)F(2) rats, we observed evidence for a total of five genetic determinants of susceptibility. Two loci, Emca4 and Emca5, were identified when mammary cancer status at sacrifice was evaluated as the phenotype, and three additional loci, Emca6, Emca7, and Emca8, were identified when mammary cancer number was evaluated as the phenotype. A total of three genetic interactions were identified. These data indicate that susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer in the BN x ACI cross behaves as a complex trait controlled by at least five loci and multiple gene-gene interactions.

  4. Two independent quantitative trait loci are responsible for novel resistance to beet curly top virus in common bean landrace G122.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Richard C; Kurowski, Chester J; Miklas, Phillip N

    2010-10-01

    Beet curly top virus, often referred to as Curly top virus (CTV), is an important virus disease of common bean in the semiarid regions of the United States, Canada, and Mexico and the only effective control is genetic resistance. Our objective was to determine if dry bean landrace G122, which lacks the Bct gene for resistance to CTV, contains novel resistance to the virus. Two populations, GT-A and GT-B, consisting of 98 F5:7 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) in total were derived from a cross between G122 and the susceptible variety Taylor Horticultural and evaluated for phenotypic response to natural CTV field infection. Genetic analyses revealed random amplified polymorphism DNA (RAPD) markers associated with a major-effect quantitative trait loci (QTL) from G122 which exhibited stable expression across 3 years in both populations. Phenotypic variation explained by the QTL in GT-A (37.6%) was greater than in GT-B (20.4%). RAPD marker Q14.973 was converted to a sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) and designated SQ14.973. The SCAR was used to locate the QTL on linkage group 6 of the Phaseolus core map. A survey of 74 common bean cultivars and breeding lines revealed SQ14.973 would be widely useful for marker-assisted selection of the QTL. An additional minor-effect QTL from G122 was detected on linkage group 7. G122 was determined to possess novel resistance to CTV conditioned by at least two genes, one with major the other minor effect.

  5. Towards Positional Isolation of Three Quantitative Trait Loci Conferring Resistance to Powdery Mildew in Two Spanish Barley Landraces

    PubMed Central

    Silvar, Cristina; Perovic, Dragan; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Spannagl, Manuel; Usadel, Björn; Casas, Ana; Igartua, Ernesto; Ordon, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Three quantitative trait loci (QTL) conferring broad spectrum resistance to powdery mildew, caused by the fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei, were previously identified on chromosomes 7HS, 7HL and 6HL in the Spanish barley landrace-derived lines SBCC097 and SBCC145. In the present work, a genome-wide putative linear gene index of barley (Genome Zipper) and the first draft of the physical, genetic and functional sequence of the barley genome were used to go one step further in the shortening and explicit demarcation on the barley genome of these regions conferring resistance to powdery mildew as well as in the identification of candidate genes. First, a comparative analysis of the target regions to the barley Genome Zippers of chromosomes 7H and 6H allowed the development of 25 new gene-based molecular markers, which slightly better delimit the QTL intervals. These new markers provided the framework for anchoring of genetic and physical maps, figuring out the outline of the barley genome at the target regions in SBCC097 and SBCC145. The outermost flanking markers of QTLs on 7HS, 7HL and 6HL defined a physical area of 4 Mb, 3.7 Mb and 3.2 Mb, respectively. In total, 21, 10 and 16 genes on 7HS, 7HL and 6HL, respectively, could be interpreted as potential candidates to explain the resistance to powdery mildew, as they encode proteins of related functions with respect to the known pathogen defense-related processes. The majority of these were annotated as belonging to the NBS-LRR class or protein kinase family. PMID:23826271

  6. Unique genetic loci identified for emotional behavior in control and chronic stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Carhuatanta, Kimberly A. K.; Shea, Chloe J. A.; Herman, James P.; Jankord, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    An individual's genetic background affects their emotional behavior and response to stress. Although studies have been conducted to identify genetic predictors for emotional behavior or stress response, it remains unknown how prior stress history alters the interaction between an individual's genome and their emotional behavior. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to identify chromosomal regions that affect emotional behavior and are sensitive to stress exposure. We utilized the BXD behavioral genetics mouse model to identify chromosomal regions that predict fear learning and emotional behavior following exposure to a control or chronic stress environment. 62 BXD recombinant inbred strains and C57BL/6 and DBA/2 parental strains underwent behavioral testing including a classical fear conditioning paradigm and the elevated plus maze. Distinct quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were identified for emotional learning, anxiety and locomotion in control and chronic stress populations. Candidate genes, including those with already known functions in learning and stress were found to reside within the identified QTLs. Our data suggest that chronic stress history reveals novel genetic predictors of emotional behavior. PMID:25374516

  7. Multi-ancestry genome-wide association study of 21,000 cases and 95,000 controls identifies new risk loci for atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Waage, Johannes; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Hotze, Melanie; Strachan, David P; Curtin, John A; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Tian, Chao; Takahashi, Atsushi; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Thyssen, Jacob P; den Dekker, Herman T; Ferreira, Manuel A; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Sleiman, Patrick Ma; Xiao, Feng Li; Gonzalez, Juan R; Marenholz, Ingo; Kalb, Birgit; Yanes, Maria Pino; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Venturini, Cristina; Pennell, Craig E; Barton, Sheila J; Levin, Albert M; Curjuric, Ivan; Bustamante, Mariona; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Lockett, Gabrielle A; Bacelis, Jonas; Bunyavanich, Supinda; Myers, Rachel A; Matanovic, Anja; Kumar, Ashish; Tung, Joyce Y; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Kubo, Michiaki; McArdle, Wendy L; Henderson, A J; Kemp, John P; Zheng, Jie; Smith, George Davey; Rüschendorf, Franz; Bauerfeind, Anja; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Schmidt, Carsten O; Mangold, Elisabeth; Cichon, Sven; Keil, Thomas; Rodríguez, Elke; Peters, Annette; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Novak, Natalija; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Horikoshi, Momoko; Pekkanen, Juha; Sebert, Sylvain; Husemoen, Lise L; Grarup, Niels; de Jongste, Johan C; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent Wv; Pasmans, Suzanne Gma; Elbert, Niels J; Uitterlinden, André G; Marks, Guy B; Thompson, Philip J; Matheson, Melanie C; Robertson, Colin F; Ried, Janina S; Li, Jin; Zuo, Xian Bo; Zheng, Xiao Dong; Yin, Xian Yong; Sun, Liang Dan; McAleer, Maeve A; O'Regan, Grainne M; Fahy, Caoimhe Mr; Campbell, Linda E; Macek, Milan; Kurek, Michael; Hu, Donglei; Eng, Celeste; Postma, Dirkje S; Feenstra, Bjarke; Geller, Frank; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Middeldorp, Christel M; Hysi, Pirro; Bataille, Veronique; Spector, Tim; Tiesler, Carla Mt; Thiering, Elisabeth; Pahukasahasram, Badri; Yang, James J; Imboden, Medea; Huntsman, Scott; Vilor-Tejedor, Natàlia; Relton, Caroline L; Myhre, Ronny; Nystad, Wenche; Custovic, Adnan; Weiss, Scott T; Meyers, Deborah A; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Ober, Carole; Raby, Benjamin A; Simpson, Angela; Jacobsson, Bo; Holloway, John W; Bisgaard, Hans; Sunyer, Jordi; Hensch, Nicole M Probst; Williams, L Keoki; Godfrey, Keith M; Wang, Carol A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Melbye, Mads; Koppelman, Gerard H; Jarvis, Deborah; McLean, Wh Irwin; Irvine, Alan D; Zhang, Xue Jun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gieger, Christian; Burchard, Esteban G; Martin, Nicholas G; Duijts, Liesbeth; Linneberg, Allan; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Noethen, Markus M; Lau, Susanne; Hübner, Norbert; Lee, Young-Ae; Tamari, Mayumi; Hinds, David A; Glass, Daniel; Brown, Sara J; Heinrich, Joachim; Evans, David M; Weidinger, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    Genetic association studies have identified 21 loci associated with atopic dermatitis risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify further susceptibility loci for this common, complex skin disease, we performed a meta-analysis of >15 million genetic variants in 21,399 cases and 95,464 controls from populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry, followed by replication in 32,059 cases and 228,628 controls from 18 studies. We identified ten new risk loci, bringing the total number of known atopic dermatitis risk loci to 31 (with new secondary signals at four of these loci). Notably, the new loci include candidate genes with roles in the regulation of innate host defenses and T cell function, underscoring the important contribution of (auto)immune mechanisms to atopic dermatitis pathogenesis.

  8. Genome-wide association study reveals novel quantitative trait Loci associated with resistance to multiple leaf spot diseases of spring wheat.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Suraj; Mamidi, Sujan; Bonman, J Michael; Xiong, Mai; Brown-Guedira, Gina; Adhikari, Tika B

    2014-01-01

    Accelerated wheat development and deployment of high-yielding, climate resilient, and disease resistant cultivars can contribute to enhanced food security and sustainable intensification. To facilitate gene discovery, we assembled an association mapping panel of 528 spring wheat landraces of diverse geographic origin for a genome-wide association study (GWAS). All accessions were genotyped using an Illumina Infinium 9K wheat single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip and 4781 polymorphic SNPs were used for analysis. To identify loci underlying resistance to the major leaf spot diseases and to better understand the genomic patterns, we quantified population structure, allelic diversity, and linkage disequilibrium. Our results showed 32 loci were significantly associated with resistance to the major leaf spot diseases. Further analysis identified QTL effective against major leaf spot diseases of wheat which appeared to be novel and others that were previously identified by association analysis using Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) and bi-parental mapping. In addition, several identified SNPs co-localized with genes that have been implicated in plant disease resistance. Future work could aim to select the putative novel loci and pyramid them in locally adapted wheat cultivars to develop broad-spectrum resistance to multiple leaf spot diseases of wheat via marker-assisted selection (MAS).

  9. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Novel Quantitative Trait Loci Associated with Resistance to Multiple Leaf Spot Diseases of Spring Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Bonman, J. Michael; Xiong, Mai; Brown-Guedira, Gina; Adhikari, Tika B.

    2014-01-01

    Accelerated wheat development and deployment of high-yielding, climate resilient, and disease resistant cultivars can contribute to enhanced food security and sustainable intensification. To facilitate gene discovery, we assembled an association mapping panel of 528 spring wheat landraces of diverse geographic origin for a genome-wide association study (GWAS). All accessions were genotyped using an Illumina Infinium 9K wheat single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip and 4781 polymorphic SNPs were used for analysis. To identify loci underlying resistance to the major leaf spot diseases and to better understand the genomic patterns, we quantified population structure, allelic diversity, and linkage disequilibrium. Our results showed 32 loci were significantly associated with resistance to the major leaf spot diseases. Further analysis identified QTL effective against major leaf spot diseases of wheat which appeared to be novel and others that were previously identified by association analysis using Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) and bi-parental mapping. In addition, several identified SNPs co-localized with genes that have been implicated in plant disease resistance. Future work could aim to select the putative novel loci and pyramid them in locally adapted wheat cultivars to develop broad-spectrum resistance to multiple leaf spot diseases of wheat via marker-assisted selection (MAS). PMID:25268502

  10. The making of a bell pepper-shaped tomato fruit: identification of loci controlling fruit morphology in Yellow Stuffer tomato.

    PubMed

    van der Knaap, E; Tanksley, S D

    2003-06-01

    The heirloom tomato cultivar Yellow Stuffer produces fruit that are similar in shape and structure to fruit produced by the bell pepper varieties of garden pepper. To determine the genetic basis of this extreme fruit type in tomato, quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis was performed on an F(2) population derived from a cross between Yellow Stuffer and the related species, Lycopersicon pimpinellifolium, which produces a small, round fruit typical of most wild species. F(2) plants were analyzed for both fruit size and the degree to which their fruit resembled the bell pepper. Three QTL were determined to influence bell pepper shape and seven QTL influenced fruit mass. The map positions of all three bell shape and six out of seven fruit size QTL appear to be allelic to components of fruit morphology analyzed in this population and to major fruit morphology QTL reported previously, adding support to the hypothesis that the majority of fruit size and shape variation in cultivated tomato is attributable to allelic variation at a limited number of loci. However, novel loci controlling components of fruit morphology, such as elongated fruit shape, bumpiness, number of seed per fruit and flowers per inflorescence were identified in this study as well. The three bell shape loci involved are: bell2.1, bell2.2 and bell8.1, and appear to correspond to locule number2.1 ( lcn2.1) and fruit weight 2.2 ( fw2.2) and fruit shape 8.1 ( fs8.1), respectively. The Yellow Stuffer alleles at lcn2.1 and fw2.2 increase locule number and fruit size, respectively, hence contributing to the overall bell pepper shape. The Yellow Stuffer allele at fs8.1 causes convex locule walls, giving the extended, bumpy shape characteristic of bell peppers. In addition, most fruit size QTL correspond to loci controlling number of flowers per inflorescence and/or stem-end blockiness. Comparisons among previously identified fruit morphology loci in tomato, eggplant and pepper suggest that loci affecting

  11. Quantitative trait loci associated with longevity of lettuce seeds under conventional and controlled deterioration storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Schwember, Andrés R; Bradford, Kent J

    2010-10-01

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seeds have poor shelf life and exhibit thermoinhibition (fail to germinate) above ∼25°C. Seed priming (controlled hydration followed by drying) alleviates thermoinhibition by increasing the maximum germination temperature, but reduces lettuce seed longevity. Controlled deterioration (CD) or accelerated ageing storage conditions (i.e. elevated temperature and relative humidity) are used to study seed longevity and to predict potential seed lifetimes under conventional storage conditions. Seeds produced in 2002 and 2006 of a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between L. sativa cv. Salinas×L. serriola accession UC96US23 were utilized to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with seed longevity under CD and conventional storage conditions. Multiple longevity-associated QTLs were identified under both conventional and CD storage conditions for control (non-primed) and primed seeds. However, seed longevity was poorly correlated between the two storage conditions, suggesting that deterioration processes under CD conditions are not predictive of ageing in conventional storage conditions. Additionally, the same QTLs were not identified when RIL populations were grown in different years, indicating that lettuce seed longevity is strongly affected by production environment. Nonetheless, a major QTL on chromosome 4 [Seed longevity 4.1 (Slg4.1)] was responsible for almost 23% of the phenotypic variation in viability of the conventionally stored control seeds of the 2006 RIL population, with improved longevity conferred by the Salinas allele. QTL analyses may enable identification of mechanisms responsible for the sensitivity of primed seeds to CD conditions and breeding for improved seed longevity.

  12. Characterization and Mapping of Leaf Rust and Stripe Rust Resistance Loci in Hexaploid Wheat Lines UC1110 and PI610750 under Mexican Environments.

    PubMed

    Lan, Caixia; Hale, Iago L; Herrera-Foessel, Sybil A; Basnet, Bhoja R; Randhawa, Mandeep S; Huerta-Espino, Julio; Dubcovsky, Jorge; Singh, Ravi P

    2017-01-01

    Growing resistant wheat varieties is a key method of minimizing the extent of yield losses caused by the globally important wheat leaf rust (LR) and stripe rust (YR) diseases. In this study, a population of 186 F8 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross between a synthetic wheat derivative (PI610750) and an adapted common wheat line (cv. "UC1110") were phenotyped for LR and YR response at both seedling and adult plant stages over multiple seasons. Using a genetic linkage map consisting of single sequence repeats and diversity arrays technology markers, in combination with inclusive composite interval mapping analysis, we detected a new LR adult plant resistance (APR) locus, QLr.cim-2DS, contributed by UC1110. One co-located resistance locus to both rusts, QLr.cim-3DC/QYr.cim-3DC, and the known seedling resistance gene Lr26 were also mapped. QLr.cim-2DS and QLr.cim-3DC showed a marginally significant interaction for LR resistance in the adult plant stage. In addition, two previously reported YR APR loci, QYr.ucw-3BS and Yr48, were found to exhibit stable performances in rust environments in both Mexico and the United States and showed a highly significant interaction in the field. Yr48 was also observed to confer intermediate seedling resistance against Mexican YR races, thus suggesting it should be re-classified as an all-stage resistance gene. We also identified 5 and 2 RILs that possessed all detected YR and LR resistance loci, respectively. With the closely linked molecular markers reported here, these RILs could be used as donors for multiple resistance loci to both rusts in wheat breeding programs.

  13. Genetic linkage analysis of the lesser grain borer Rhyzopertha dominica identifies two loci that confer high-level resistance to the fumigant phosphine.

    PubMed Central

    Schlipalius, David I; Cheng, Qiang; Reilly, Paul E B; Collins, Patrick J; Ebert, Paul R

    2002-01-01

    High levels of inheritable resistance to phosphine in Rhyzopertha dominica have recently been detected in Australia and in an effort to isolate the genes responsible for resistance we have used random amplified DNA fingerprinting (RAF) to produce a genetic linkage map of R. dominica. The map consists of 94 dominant DNA markers with an average distance between markers of 4.6 cM and defines nine linkage groups with a total recombination distance of 390.1 cM. We have identified two loci that are responsible for high-level resistance. One provides approximately 50x resistance to phosphine while the other provides 12.5x resistance and in combination, the two genes act synergistically to provide a resistance level 250x greater than that of fully susceptible beetles. The haploid genome size has been determined to be 4.76 x 10(8) bp, resulting in an average physical distance of 1.2 Mbp per map unit. No recombination has been observed between either of the two resistance loci and their adjacent DNA markers in a population of 44 fully resistant F5 individuals, which indicates that the genes are likely to reside within 0.91 cM (1.1 Mbp) of the DNA markers. PMID:12072472

  14. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci of Resistance to Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus and Leaf Spots in a Recombinant Inbred Line Population of Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) from SunOleic 97R and NC94022

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Suping; Qiao, Lixian; Culbreath, Albert K.; Kale, Sandip; Wang, Jianping; Holbrook, C. Corley; Zhuang, Weijian; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Guo, Baozhu

    2016-01-01

    Peanut is vulnerable to a range of diseases, such as Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and leaf spots which will cause significant yield loss. The most sustainable, economical and eco-friendly solution for managing peanut diseases is development of improved cultivars with high level of resistance. We developed a recombinant inbred line population from the cross between SunOleic 97R and NC94022, named as the S-population. An improved genetic linkage map was developed for the S-population with 248 marker loci and a marker density of 5.7 cM/loci. This genetic map was also compared with the physical map of diploid progenitors of tetraploid peanut, resulting in an overall co-linearity of about 60% with the average co-linearity of 68% for the A sub-genome and 47% for the B sub-genome. The analysis using the improved genetic map and multi-season (2010–2013) phenotypic data resulted in the identification of 48 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with phenotypic variance explained (PVE) from 3.88 to 29.14%. Of the 48 QTLs, six QTLs were identified for resistance to TSWV, 22 QTLs for early leaf spot (ELS) and 20 QTLs for late leaf spot (LLS), which included four, six, and six major QTLs (PVE larger than 10%) for each disease, respectively. A total of six major genomic regions (MGR) were found to have QTLs controlling more than one disease resistance. The identified QTLs and resistance gene-rich MGRs will facilitate further discovery of resistance genes and development of molecular markers for these important diseases. PMID:27427980

  15. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci of Resistance to Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus and Leaf Spots in a Recombinant Inbred Line Population of Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) from SunOleic 97R and NC94022.

    PubMed

    Khera, Pawan; Pandey, Manish K; Wang, Hui; Feng, Suping; Qiao, Lixian; Culbreath, Albert K; Kale, Sandip; Wang, Jianping; Holbrook, C Corley; Zhuang, Weijian; Varshney, Rajeev K; Guo, Baozhu

    2016-01-01

    Peanut is vulnerable to a range of diseases, such as Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and leaf spots which will cause significant yield loss. The most sustainable, economical and eco-friendly solution for managing peanut diseases is development of improved cultivars with high level of resistance. We developed a recombinant inbred line population from the cross between SunOleic 97R and NC94022, named as the S-population. An improved genetic linkage map was developed for the S-population with 248 marker loci and a marker density of 5.7 cM/loci. This genetic map was also compared with the physical map of diploid progenitors of tetraploid peanut, resulting in an overall co-linearity of about 60% with the average co-linearity of 68% for the A sub-genome and 47% for the B sub-genome. The analysis using the improved genetic map and multi-season (2010-2013) phenotypic data resulted in the identification of 48 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with phenotypic variance explained (PVE) from 3.88 to 29.14%. Of the 48 QTLs, six QTLs were identified for resistance to TSWV, 22 QTLs for early leaf spot (ELS) and 20 QTLs for late leaf spot (LLS), which included four, six, and six major QTLs (PVE larger than 10%) for each disease, respectively. A total of six major genomic regions (MGR) were found to have QTLs controlling more than one disease resistance. The identified QTLs and resistance gene-rich MGRs will facilitate further discovery of resistance genes and development of molecular markers for these important diseases.

  16. A repressor-antirepressor pair links two loci controlling light-induced carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    López-Rubio, José Juan; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S; Murillo, Francisco José

    2002-03-01

    The light-inducible carB operon encodes all but one of the structural genes for carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus. It is transcriptionally controlled by two proteins expressed from two unlinked genetic loci: CarS from the light-inducible carQRS operon, and CarA from the light-independent carA operon. CarA represses transcription from the carB promoter (P(B)) in the dark, and CarS counteracts this on illumination. The CarA sequence revealed a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif of the type found in bacterial MerR transcriptional factors, whereas CarS contains no known DNA-binding motif. Here, we examine the molecular interplay between CarA and CarS. We demonstrate the following. (i) Whereas CarS exhibits no DNA binding in vitro, CarA binds specifically to a region encompassing P(B) to form at least two distinct complexes. (ii) A palindrome located between positions -46 and -63 relative to the transcription start point is essential but not sufficient for the formation of the two CarA-DNA complexes observed. (iii) CarS abrogates the specific DNA binding of CarA. CarA is therefore a repressor and CarS an antirepressor. (iv) CarS physically interacts with CarA; thus, the functional interaction between them is mediated by protein-protein interactions.

  17. Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling fibre length and lignin content in Arabidopsis thaliana stems.

    PubMed

    Capron, Arnaud; Chang, Xue Feng; Hall, Hardy; Ellis, Brian; Beatson, Rodger P; Berleth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Fibre properties and the biochemical composition of cell walls are important traits in many applications. For example, the lengths of fibres define the strength and quality of paper, and lignin content is a critical parameter for the use of biomass in biofuel production. Identifying genes controlling these traits is comparatively difficult in woody species, because of long generation times and limited amenability to high-resolution genetic mapping. To address this problem, this study mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs) defining fibre length and lignin content in the Arabidopsis recombinant inbred line population Col-4 × Ler-0. Adapting high-throughput phenotyping techniques for both traits for measurements in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems identified significant QTLs for fibre length on chromosomes 2 and 5, as well as one significant QTL affecting lignin content on chromosome 2. For fibre length, total variation within the population was 208% higher than between parental lines and the identified QTLs explained 50.58% of the observed variation. For lignin content, the values were 261 and 26.51%, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis of the associated intervals identified a number of candidate genes for fibre length and lignin content. This study demonstrates that molecular mapping of QTLs pertaining to wood and fibre properties is possible in Arabidopsis, which substantially broadens the use of Arabidopsis as a model species for the functional characterization of plant genes.

  18. Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling fibre length and lignin content in Arabidopsis thaliana stems

    PubMed Central

    Berleth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Fibre properties and the biochemical composition of cell walls are important traits in many applications. For example, the lengths of fibres define the strength and quality of paper, and lignin content is a critical parameter for the use of biomass in biofuel production. Identifying genes controlling these traits is comparatively difficult in woody species, because of long generation times and limited amenability to high-resolution genetic mapping. To address this problem, this study mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs) defining fibre length and lignin content in the Arabidopsis recombinant inbred line population Col-4×Ler-0. Adapting high-throughput phenotyping techniques for both traits for measurements in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems identified significant QTLs for fibre length on chromosomes 2 and 5, as well as one significant QTL affecting lignin content on chromosome 2. For fibre length, total variation within the population was 208% higher than between parental lines and the identified QTLs explained 50.58% of the observed variation. For lignin content, the values were 261 and 26.51%, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis of the associated intervals identified a number of candidate genes for fibre length and lignin content. This study demonstrates that molecular mapping of QTLs pertaining to wood and fibre properties is possible in Arabidopsis, which substantially broadens the use of Arabidopsis as a model species for the functional characterization of plant genes. PMID:23136168

  19. Insecticide resistance and vector control.

    PubMed Central

    Brogdon, W. G.; McAllister, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    Insecticide resistance has been a problem in all insect groups that serve as vectors of emerging diseases. Although mechanisms by which insecticides become less effective are similar across all vector taxa, each resistance problem is potentially unique and may involve a complex pattern of resistance foci. The main defense against resistance is close surveillance of the susceptibility of vector populations. We describe the mechanisms of insecticide resistance, as well as specific instances of resistance emergence worldwide, and discuss prospects for resistance management and priorities for detection and surveillance. PMID:9866736

  20. QTL mapping of genome regions controlling temephos resistance in larvae of the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Solis, Guadalupe Del Carmen; Saavedra-Rodriguez, Karla; Suarez, Adriana Flores; Black, William C

    2014-10-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the principal vector of dengue and yellow fever flaviviruses. Temephos is an organophosphate insecticide used globally to suppress Ae. aegypti larval populations but resistance has evolved in many locations. Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) controlling temephos survival in Ae. aegypti larvae were mapped in a pair of F3 advanced intercross lines arising from temephos resistant parents from Solidaridad, México and temephos susceptible parents from Iquitos, Peru. Two sets of 200 F3 larvae were exposed to a discriminating dose of temephos and then dead larvae were collected and preserved for DNA isolation every two hours up to 16 hours. Larvae surviving longer than 16 hours were considered resistant. For QTL mapping, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified at 23 single copy genes and 26 microsatellite loci of known physical positions in the Ae. aegypti genome. In both reciprocal crosses, Multiple Interval Mapping identified eleven QTL associated with time until death. In the Solidaridad×Iquitos (SLD×Iq) cross twelve were associated with survival but in the reciprocal IqxSLD cross, only six QTL were survival associated. Polymorphisms at acetylcholine esterase (AchE) loci 1 and 2 were not associated with either resistance phenotype suggesting that target site insensitivity is not an organophosphate resistance mechanism in this region of México. Temephos resistance is under the control of many metabolic genes of small effect and dispersed throughout the Ae. aegypti genome.

  1. QTL Mapping of Genome Regions Controlling Temephos Resistance in Larvae of the Mosquito Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Solis, Guadalupe del Carmen; Saavedra-Rodriguez, Karla; Suarez, Adriana Flores; Black, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the principal vector of dengue and yellow fever flaviviruses. Temephos is an organophosphate insecticide used globally to suppress Ae. aegypti larval populations but resistance has evolved in many locations. Methodology/Principal Findings Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) controlling temephos survival in Ae. aegypti larvae were mapped in a pair of F3 advanced intercross lines arising from temephos resistant parents from Solidaridad, México and temephos susceptible parents from Iquitos, Peru. Two sets of 200 F3 larvae were exposed to a discriminating dose of temephos and then dead larvae were collected and preserved for DNA isolation every two hours up to 16 hours. Larvae surviving longer than 16 hours were considered resistant. For QTL mapping, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified at 23 single copy genes and 26 microsatellite loci of known physical positions in the Ae. aegypti genome. In both reciprocal crosses, Multiple Interval Mapping identified eleven QTL associated with time until death. In the Solidaridad×Iquitos (SLD×Iq) cross twelve were associated with survival but in the reciprocal IqxSLD cross, only six QTL were survival associated. Polymorphisms at acetylcholine esterase (AchE) loci 1 and 2 were not associated with either resistance phenotype suggesting that target site insensitivity is not an organophosphate resistance mechanism in this region of México. Conclusions/Significance Temephos resistance is under the control of many metabolic genes of small effect and dispersed throughout the Ae. aegypti genome. PMID:25330200

  2. White mold resistance-associated quantitative trait loci in the Jalo x Small White common bean population.

    PubMed

    Souza, D A; Balestre, M; Pamplona, A K A; Leite, M E; Dias, J A; Santos, J B

    2016-08-26

    We aimed to identify simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers linked to quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with white mold resistance in a segregating population derived from a cross between common bean cultivars Jalo and Small White, in the Southern State of Minas Gerais. Parents were crossed to obtain the F2 generation of 190 plants. From these, F2:3 and F2:4 progenies were obtained for phenotypic evaluation. DNA was extracted from F2 plants and parents for genotyping with SSR primers. For phenotypic assessment by the straw test, we used 190 F2:3 progenies and six lines in a triple-lattice design of 14 x 14 m. Nine trials were conducted for phenotyping by the oxalic acid method to evaluate 177 F2:4 progenies, in addition to the two parents and two common treatments represented by the Jalo and Corujinha lines. The experimental design for the oxalic acid method was completely randomized with three replicates. Adjusted means of evaluations related to F2:3 and F2:4 were used to identify QTLs by using the moving away method from the marker under Bayesian analysis. The markers GATS91, BM197, and X60000 stood out with high heritability and with effects on disease reduction by the straw test; therefore, these markers are promising for selection. The markers BM183, BM189, and SSR-IAC143 were associated with the QTLs identified by oxalic acid, providing greater effects in white mold resistance with high heritability. Based on the oxalic acid and straw test methods, the most prominent marker was PVBR189.

  3. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of resistance to strongyles and coccidia in the free-living Soay sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Beraldi, Dario; McRae, Allan F; Gratten, Jacob; Pilkington, Jill G; Slate, Jon; Visscher, Peter M; Pemberton, Josephine M

    2007-01-01

    A genome-wide scan was performed to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to gastrointestinal parasites and ectoparasitic keds segregating in the free-living Soay sheep population on St. Kilda (UK). The mapping panel consisted of a single pedigree of 882 individuals of which 588 were genotyped. The Soay linkage map used for the scans comprised 251 markers covering the whole genome at average spacing of 15cM. The traits here investigated were the strongyle faecal egg count (FEC), the coccidia faecal oocyst count (FOC) and a count of keds (Melophagus ovinus). QTL mapping was performed by means of variance component analysis so that the genetic parameters of the study traits were also estimated and compared with previous studies in Soay and domestic sheep. Strongyle FEC and coccidia FOC showed moderate heritability (h(2)=0.26 and 0.22, respectively) in lambs but low heritability in adults (h(2)<0.10). Ked count appeared to have very low h(2) in both lambs and adults. Genome scans were performed for the traits with moderate heritability and two genomic regions reached the level of suggestive linkage for coccidia FOC in lambs (logarithm of the odds=2.68 and 2.21 on chromosomes 3 and X, respectively). We believe this is the first study to report a QTL search for parasite resistance in a free-living animal population and therefore may represent a useful reference for similar studies aimed at understanding the genetics of host-parasite co-evolution in the wild.

  4. Increased diuron resistance in the joint expression of mutations located at the DIU2, DIU3 and DIU4 loci of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Meunier, B; Colson, A M

    1989-02-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, diuron blocks the respiratory pathway at the level of the bc1 complex. Two mitochondrially inherited loci, DIU1 and DIU2, located in the cytochrome b gene, and two nuclearly inherited loci, DIU3 and DIU4, have previously been identified. The present work genetically characterizes two double mutants. One mutant, Diu-217, carries two nuclearly inherited mutations, diu3-217a and diu-217b; the second mutant, Diu-783, carries the previously described nuclear mutation diu3-783 and a mitochondrial mutation diu2-783. Each mutation, independent of its location, exhibits a weak diuron resistance. The joint expression of two or three mutations leads to a cumulative or a cooperative enhanced diuron-resistant phenotype.

  5. Multiplex SSR-PCR approaches for semi-automated genotyping and characterization of loci linked to blast disease resistance genes in rice.

    PubMed

    Ashkani, Sadegh; Rafii, Mohd Yusop; Shabanimofrad, Mahmoodreza; Foroughi, Majid; Azizia, Parisa; Akhtar, Mohd Sayeed; Sahebi, Mahbod; Harun, Abd Rahim; Nasehi, Abbas

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, 63 polymorphic microsatellite markers related to rice blast resistance genes were fluorescently labelled at the 5'-end with either 6-FAM or HEX using the G5 dye set and incorporated into a multiplex SSR-PCR for the detection of fragments using an automated system. For rice F3 families obtained from crosses between Pongsu Seribu 2 (Malaysian blast resistant cultivar) and Mahsuri (a susceptible rice cultivar), the genotypes for 13 designated multiplex SSR panels were determined. The genotyping assays were performed using a capillary-based ABIPRISM 3100 genetic analyser. The sizes of the SSRs alleles observed in the range from 79 to 324 bp. The observed marker segregation data were analysed using the Chi(2) test. A genetic linkage map covering ten chromosomes and comprising 63 polymorphic SSR markers was constructed, and the distorted loci were localised to linkage groups. The results indicated that distorted loci are presented on eight chromosomes.

  6. Resistance loci affecting distinct stages of fungal pathogenesis: use of introgression lines for QTL mapping and characterization in the maize - Setosphaeria turcica pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies on host-pathogen interactions in a range of pathosystems have revealed an array of mechanisms by which plants reduce the efficiency of pathogenesis. While R-gene mediated resistance confers highly effective defense responses against pathogen invasion, quantitative resistance is associated with intermediate levels of resistance that reduces disease progress. To test the hypothesis that specific loci affect distinct stages of fungal pathogenesis, a set of maize introgression lines was used for mapping and characterization of quantitative trait loci (QTL) conditioning resistance to Setosphaeria turcica, the causal agent of northern leaf blight (NLB). To better understand the nature of quantitative resistance, the identified QTL were further tested for three secondary hypotheses: (1) that disease QTL differ by host developmental stage; (2) that their performance changes across environments; and (3) that they condition broad-spectrum resistance. Results Among a set of 82 introgression lines, seven lines were confirmed as more resistant or susceptible than B73. Two NLB QTL were validated in BC4F2 segregating populations and advanced introgression lines. These loci, designated qNLB1.02 and qNLB1.06, were investigated in detail by comparing the introgression lines with B73 for a series of macroscopic and microscopic disease components targeting different stages of NLB development. Repeated greenhouse and field trials revealed that qNLB1.06Tx303 (the Tx303 allele at bin 1.06) reduces the efficiency of fungal penetration, while qNLB1.02B73 (the B73 allele at bin 1.02) enhances the accumulation of callose and phenolics surrounding infection sites, reduces hyphal growth into the vascular bundle and impairs the subsequent necrotrophic colonization in the leaves. The QTL were equally effective in both juvenile and adult plants; qNLB1.06Tx303 showed greater effectiveness in the field than in the greenhouse. In addition to NLB resistance, qNLB1.02B73 was

  7. Quantitative trait loci controlling leaf appearance and curd initiation of cauliflower in relation to temperature.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Yaser; Briggs, William; Matschegewski, Claudia; Ordon, Frank; Stützel, Hartmut; Zetzsche, Holger; Groen, Simon; Uptmoor, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    QTL regions on chromosomes C06 and C09 are involved in temperature dependent time to curd induction in cauliflower. Temperature is the main environmental factor influencing curding time of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis). Temperatures above 20-22 °C inhibit development towards curding even in many summer cultivars. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling curding time and its related traits in a wide range of different temperature regimes from 12 to 27 °C, a doubled haploid (DH) mapping population segregating for curding time was developed and days to curd initiation (DCI), leaf appearance rate (LAR), and final leaf number (FLN) were measured. The population was genotyped with 176 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Composite interval mapping (CIM) revealed repeatedly detected QTL for DCI on C06 and C09. The estimated additive effect increased at high temperatures. Significant QTL × environment interactions (Q × E) for FLN and DCI on C06 and C09 suggest that these hotspot regions have major influences on temperature mediated curd induction. 25 % of the DH lines did not induce curds at temperatures higher than 22 °C. Applying a binary model revealed a QTL with LOD >15 on C06. Nearly all lines carrying the allele of the reliable early maturing parental line (PL) on that locus induced curds at high temperatures while only half of the DH lines carrying the allele of the unreliable PL reached the generative phase during the experiment. Large variation in LAR was observed. QTL for LAR were detected repeatedly in several environments on C01, C04 and C06. Negative correlations between LAR and DCI and QTL co-localizations on C04 and C06 suggest that LAR has also effects on development towards curd induction.

  8. Multi-ethnic genome-wide association study of 21,000 cases and 95,000 controls identifies new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Waage, Johannes; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Hotze, Melanie; Strachan, David P; Curtin, John A; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Tian, Chao; Takahashi, Atsushi; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Thyssen, Jacob P; den Dekker, Herman T; Ferreira, Manuel A; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Sleiman, Patrick MA; Xiao, Feng Li; Gonzalez, Juan R; Marenholz, Ingo; Kalb, Birgit; Yanes, Maria Pino; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Venturini, Cristina; Pennell, Craig E; Barton, Sheila J; Levin, Albert M; Curjuric, Ivan; Bustamante, Mariona; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Lockett, Gabrielle A; Bacelis, Jonas; Bunyavanich, Supinda; Myers, Rachel A; Matanovic, Anja; Kumar, Ashish; Tung, Joyce Y; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Kubo, Michiaki; McArdle, Wendy L; Henderson, A J; Kemp, John P; Zheng, Jie; Smith, George Davey; Rüschendorf, Franz; Bauerfeind, Anja; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Schmidt, Carsten O; Mangold, Elisabeth; Cichon, Sven; Keil, Thomas; Rodríguez, Elke; Peters, Annette; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Novak, Natalija; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Horikoshi, Momoko; Pekkanen, Juha; Sebert, Sylvain; Husemoen, Lise L; Grarup, Niels; de Jongste, Johan C; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent WV; Pasmans, Suzanne GMA; Elbert, Niels J; Uitterlinden, André G; Marks, Guy B; Thompson, Philip J; Matheson, Melanie C; Robertson, Colin F; Ried, Janina S; Li, Jin; Zuo, Xian Bo; Zheng, Xiao Dong; Yin, Xian Yong; Sun, Liang Dan; McAleer, Maeve A; O'Regan, Grainne M; Fahy, Caoimhe MR; Campbell, Linda E; Macek, Milan; Kurek, Michael; Hu, Donglei; Eng, Celeste; Postma, Dirkje S; Feenstra, Bjarke; Geller, Frank; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Middeldorp, Christel M; Hysi, Pirro; Bataille, Veronique; Spector, Tim; Tiesler, Carla MT; Thiering, Elisabeth; Pahukasahasram, Badri; Yang, James J; Imboden, Medea; Huntsman, Scott; Vilor-Tejedor, Natàlia; Relton, Caroline L; Myhre, Ronny; Nystad, Wenche; Custovic, Adnan; Weiss, Scott T; Meyers, Deborah A; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Ober, Carole; Raby, Benjamin A; Simpson, Angela; Jacobsson, Bo; Holloway, John W; Bisgaard, Hans; Sunyer, Jordi; Hensch, Nicole M Probst; Williams, L Keoki; Godfrey, Keith M; Wang, Carol A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Melbye, Mads; Koppelman, Gerard H; Jarvis, Deborah; McLean, WH Irwin; Irvine, Alan D; Zhang, Xue Jun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gieger, Christian; Burchard, Esteban G; Martin, Nicholas G; Duijts, Liesbeth; Linneberg, Allan; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Noethen, Markus M; Lau, Susanne; Hübner, Norbert; Lee, Young-Ae; Tamari, Mayumi; Hinds, David A; Glass, Daniel; Brown, Sara J; Heinrich, Joachim; Evans, David M; Weidinger, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Genetic association studies have identified 21 loci associated with atopic dermatitis risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify further susceptibility loci for this common complex skin disease, we performed a meta-analysis of >15 million genetic variants in 21,399 cases and 95,464 controls from populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry, followed by replication in 32,059 cases and 228,628 controls from 18 studies. We identified 10 novel risk loci, bringing the total number of known atopic dermatitis risk loci to 31 (with novel secondary signals at 4 of these). Notably, the new loci include candidate genes with roles in regulation of innate host defenses and T-cell function, underscoring the important contribution of (auto-)immune mechanisms to atopic dermatitis pathogenesis. PMID:26482879

  9. Identification of two novel powdery mildew resistance loci, Ren6 and Ren7, from the wild Chinese grape species Vitis piasezkii.

    PubMed

    Pap, Dániel; Riaz, Summaira; Dry, Ian B; Jermakow, Angelica; Tenscher, Alan C; Cantu, Dario; Oláh, Róbert; Walker, M Andrew

    2016-07-29

    Grapevine powdery mildew Erysiphe necator is a major fungal disease in all grape growing countries worldwide. Breeding for resistance to this disease is crucial to avoid extensive fungicide applications that are costly, labor intensive and may have detrimental effects on the environment. In the past decade, Chinese Vitis species have attracted attention from grape breeders because of their strong resistance to powdery mildew and their lack of negative fruit quality attributes that are often present in resistant North American species. In this study, we investigated powdery mildew resistance in multiple accessions of the Chinese species Vitis piasezkii that were collected during the 1980 Sino-American botanical expedition to the western Hubei province of China. A framework genetic map was developed using simple sequence repeat markers in 277 seedlings of an F1 mapping population arising from a cross of the powdery mildew susceptible Vitis vinifera selection F2-35 and a resistant accession of V. piasezkii DVIT2027. Quantitative trait locus analyses identified two major powdery mildew resistance loci on chromosome 9 (Ren6) and chromosome 19 (Ren7) explaining 74.8 % of the cumulative phenotypic variation. The quantitative trait locus analysis for each locus, in the absence of the other, explained 95.4 % phenotypic variation for Ren6, while Ren7 accounted for 71.9 % of the phenotypic variation. Screening of an additional 259 seedlings of the F1 population and 910 seedlings from four pseudo-backcross populations with SSR markers defined regions of 22 kb and 330 kb for Ren6 and Ren7 in the V. vinifera PN40024 (12X) genome sequence, respectively. Both R loci operate post-penetration through the induction of programmed cell death, but vary significantly in the speed of response and degree of resistance; Ren6 confers complete resistance whereas Ren7 confers partial resistance to the disease with reduced colony size. A comparison of the kinetics of induction of powdery

  10. Analysis techniques for multivariate root loci. [a tool in linear control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, P. M.; Stein, G.; Laub, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis and techniques are developed for the multivariable root locus and the multivariable optimal root locus. The generalized eigenvalue problem is used to compute angles and sensitivities for both types of loci, and an algorithm is presented that determines the asymptotic properties of the optimal root locus.

  11. Two – three loci control scleral ossicle formation via epistasis in the cavefish Astyanax mexicanus

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Anastasia; Powers, Amanda K.; Gross, Joshua B.; O’Quin, Kelly E.

    2017-01-01

    The sclera is the protective outer layer of the eye. In fishes, birds, and reptiles, the sclera may be reinforced with additional bony elements called scleral ossicles. Teleost fish vary in the number and size of scleral ossicles; however, the genetic mechanisms responsible for this variation remain poorly understood. In this study, we examine the inheritance of scleral ossicles in the Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus, which exhibits both a cave morph and a surface fish morph. As these morphs and their hybrids collectively exhibit zero, one, and two scleral ossicles, they represent a microcosm of teleost scleral ossicle diversity. Our previous research in F2 hybrids of cavefish from Pachón cave and surface fish from Texas suggested that three genes likely influence the formation of scleral ossicles in this group through an epistatic threshold model of inheritance, though our sample size was small. In this study, we expand our sample size using additional hybrids of Pachón cavefish and Mexican surface fish to (1) confirm the threshold model of inheritance, (2) refine the number of genes responsible for scleral ossicle formation, and (3) increase our power to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for this trait. To answer these three questions, we scored surface fish and cavefish F2 hybrids for the presence of zero, one, or two scleral ossicles. We then analyzed their distribution among the F2 hybrids using a chi-square (χ2) test, and used a genetic linkage map of over 100 microsatellite markers to identify QTL responsible for scleral ossicle number. We found that inheritance of scleral ossicles follows an epistatic threshold model of inheritance controlled by two genes, which contrasts the three-locus model estimated from our previous study. Finally, the combined analysis of hybrids from both crosses identified two strong QTL for scleral ossicle number on linkage groups 4.2 and 21, and a weaker QTL on linkage group 4.1. Scleral ossification remains a complex

  12. Eggplant Resistance to the Ralstonia solanacearum Species Complex Involves Both Broad-Spectrum and Strain-Specific Quantitative Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    Salgon, Sylvia; Jourda, Cyril; Sauvage, Christopher; Daunay, Marie-Christine; Reynaud, Bernard; Wicker, Emmanuel; Dintinger, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial wilt (BW) is a major disease of solanaceous crops caused by the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex (RSSC). Strains are grouped into five phylotypes (I, IIA, IIB, III, and IV). Varietal resistance is the most sustainable strategy for managing BW. Nevertheless, breeding to improve cultivar resistance has been limited by the pathogen’s extensive genetic diversity. Identifying the genetic bases of specific and non-specific resistance is a prerequisite to breed improvement. A major gene (ERs1) was previously mapped in eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) using an intraspecific population of recombinant inbred lines derived from the cross of susceptible MM738 (S) × resistant AG91-25 (R). ERs1 was originally found to control three strains from phylotype I, while being totally ineffective against a virulent strain from the same phylotype. We tested this population against four additional RSSC strains, representing phylotypes I, IIA, IIB, and III in order to clarify the action spectrum of ERs1. We recorded wilting symptoms and bacterial stem colonization under controlled artificial inoculation. We constructed a high-density genetic map of the population using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) developed from genotyping-by-sequencing and added 168 molecular markers [amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), simple sequence repeats (SSRs), and sequence-related amplified polymorphisms (SRAPs)] developed previously. The new linkage map based on a total of 1,035 markers was anchored on eggplant, tomato, and potato genomes. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping for resistance against a total of eight RSSC strains resulted in the detection of one major phylotype-specific QTL and two broad-spectrum QTLs. The major QTL, which specifically controls three phylotype I strains, was located at the bottom of chromosome 9 and corresponded to the previously identified major gene ERs1. Five candidate R-genes were underlying this QTL, with different alleles between the

  13. Identification of Loci Associated with Drought Resistance Traits in Heterozygous Autotetraploid Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Using Genome-Wide Association Studies with Genotyping by Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tiejun; Yu, Long-Xi; Zheng, Ping; Li, Yajun; Rivera, Martha; Main, Dorrie; Greene, Stephanie L

    2015-01-01

    Drought resistance is an important breeding target for enhancing alfalfa productivity in arid and semi-arid regions. Identification of genes involved in drought tolerance will facilitate breeding for improving drought resistance and water use efficiency in alfalfa. Our objective was to use a diversity panel of alfalfa accessions comprised of 198 cultivars and landraces to identify genes involved in drought tolerance. The panel was selected from the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System alfalfa collection and genotyped using genotyping by sequencing. A greenhouse procedure was used for phenotyping two important traits associated with drought tolerance: drought resistance index (DRI) and relative leaf water content (RWC). Marker-trait association identified nineteen and fifteen loci associated with DRI and RWC, respectively. Alignments of target sequences flanking to the resistance loci against the reference genome of M. truncatula revealed multiple chromosomal locations. Markers associated with DRI are located on all chromosomes while markers associated with RWC are located on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7. Co-localizations of significant markers between DRI and RWC were found on chromosomes 3, 5 and 7. Most loci associated with DRI in this work overlap with the reported QTLs associated with biomass under drought in alfalfa. Additional significant markers were targeted to several contigs with unknown chromosomal locations. BLAST search using their flanking sequences revealed homology to several annotated genes with functions in stress tolerance. With further validation, these markers may be used for marker-assisted breeding new alfalfa varieties with drought resistance and enhanced water use efficiency.

  14. Identification of Loci Associated with Drought Resistance Traits in Heterozygous Autotetraploid Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Using Genome-Wide Association Studies with Genotyping by Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yajun; Rivera, Martha; Main, Dorrie; Greene, Stephanie L.

    2015-01-01

    Drought resistance is an important breeding target for enhancing alfalfa productivity in arid and semi-arid regions. Identification of genes involved in drought tolerance will facilitate breeding for improving drought resistance and water use efficiency in alfalfa. Our objective was to use a diversity panel of alfalfa accessions comprised of 198 cultivars and landraces to identify genes involved in drought tolerance. The panel was selected from the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System alfalfa collection and genotyped using genotyping by sequencing. A greenhouse procedure was used for phenotyping two important traits associated with drought tolerance: drought resistance index (DRI) and relative leaf water content (RWC). Marker-trait association identified nineteen and fifteen loci associated with DRI and RWC, respectively. Alignments of target sequences flanking to the resistance loci against the reference genome of M. truncatula revealed multiple chromosomal locations. Markers associated with DRI are located on all chromosomes while markers associated with RWC are located on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7. Co-localizations of significant markers between DRI and RWC were found on chromosomes 3, 5 and 7. Most loci associated with DRI in this work overlap with the reported QTLs associated with biomass under drought in alfalfa. Additional significant markers were targeted to several contigs with unknown chromosomal locations. BLAST search using their flanking sequences revealed homology to several annotated genes with functions in stress tolerance. With further validation, these markers may be used for marker-assisted breeding new alfalfa varieties with drought resistance and enhanced water use efficiency. PMID:26406473

  15. Rapid genome wide mapping of phosphine resistance loci by a simple regional averaging analysis in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Next-generation sequencing technology is an important tool for the rapid, genome-wide identification of genetic variations. However, it is difficult to resolve the ‘signal’ of variations of interest and the ‘noise’ of stochastic sequencing and bioinformatic errors in the large datasets that are generated. We report a simple approach to identify regional linkage to a trait that requires only two pools of DNA to be sequenced from progeny of a defined genetic cross (i.e. bulk segregant analysis) at low coverage (<10×) and without parentage assignment of individual SNPs. The analysis relies on regional averaging of pooled SNP frequencies to rapidly scan polymorphisms across the genome for differential regional homozygosity, which is then displayed graphically. Results Progeny from defined genetic crosses of Tribolium castaneum (F4 and F19) segregating for the phosphine resistance trait were exposed to phosphine to select for the resistance trait while the remainders were left unexposed. Next generation sequencing was then carried out on the genomic DNA from each pool of selected and unselected insects from each generation. The reads were mapped against the annotated T. castaneum genome from NCBI (v3.0) and analysed for SNP variations. Since it is difficult to accurately call individual SNP frequencies when the depth of sequence coverage is low, variant frequencies were averaged across larger regions. Results from regional SNP frequency averaging identified two loci, tc_rph1 on chromosome 8 and tc_rph2 on chromosome 9, which together are responsible for high level resistance. Identification of the two loci was possible with only 5-7× average coverage of the genome per dataset. These loci were subsequently confirmed by direct SNP marker analysis and fine-scale mapping. Individually, homozygosity of tc_rph1 or tc_rph2 results in only weak resistance to phosphine (estimated at up to 1.5-2.5× and 3-5× respectively), whereas in combination they

  16. Rapid genome wide mapping of phosphine resistance loci by a simple regional averaging analysis in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesan, Rajeswaran; Fotheringham, Amelia; Ebert, Paul R; Schlipalius, David I

    2013-09-24

    Next-generation sequencing technology is an important tool for the rapid, genome-wide identification of genetic variations. However, it is difficult to resolve the 'signal' of variations of interest and the 'noise' of stochastic sequencing and bioinformatic errors in the large datasets that are generated. We report a simple approach to identify regional linkage to a trait that requires only two pools of DNA to be sequenced from progeny of a defined genetic cross (i.e. bulk segregant analysis) at low coverage (<10×) and without parentage assignment of individual SNPs. The analysis relies on regional averaging of pooled SNP frequencies to rapidly scan polymorphisms across the genome for differential regional homozygosity, which is then displayed graphically. Progeny from defined genetic crosses of Tribolium castaneum (F₄ and F₁₉) segregating for the phosphine resistance trait were exposed to phosphine to select for the resistance trait while the remainders were left unexposed. Next generation sequencing was then carried out on the genomic DNA from each pool of selected and unselected insects from each generation. The reads were mapped against the annotated T. castaneum genome from NCBI (v3.0) and analysed for SNP variations. Since it is difficult to accurately call individual SNP frequencies when the depth of sequence coverage is low, variant frequencies were averaged across larger regions. Results from regional SNP frequency averaging identified two loci, tc_rph1 on chromosome 8 and tc_rph2 on chromosome 9, which together are responsible for high level resistance. Identification of the two loci was possible with only 5-7× average coverage of the genome per dataset. These loci were subsequently confirmed by direct SNP marker analysis and fine-scale mapping. Individually, homozygosity of tc_rph1 or tc_rph2 results in only weak resistance to phosphine (estimated at up to 1.5-2.5× and 3-5× respectively), whereas in combination they interact synergistically to

  17. Genome Sequence of the Thermotolerant Foodborne Pathogen Salmonella enterica Serovar Senftenberg ATCC 43845 and Phylogenetic Analysis of Loci Encoding Increased Protein Quality Control Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Scott V.; Harhay, Gregory P.; Bono, James L.; Smith, Timothy P. L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica bacteria are important foodborne pathogens with major economic impact. Some isolates exhibit increased heat tolerance, a concern for food safety. Analysis of a finished-quality genome sequence of an isolate commonly used in heat resistance studies, S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Senftenberg 775W (ATCC 43845), demonstrated an interesting observation that this strain contains not just one, but two horizontally acquired thermotolerance locus homologs. These two loci reside on a large 341.3-kbp plasmid that is similar to the well-studied IncHI2 R478 plasmid but lacks any antibiotic resistance genes found on R478 or other IncHI2 plasmids. As this historical Salmonella isolate has been in use since 1941, comparative analysis of the plasmid and of the thermotolerance loci contained on the plasmid will provide insight into the evolution of heat resistance loci as well as acquisition of resistance determinants in IncHI2 plasmids. IMPORTANCE Thermal interventions are commonly used in the food industry as a means of mitigating pathogen contamination in food products. Concern over heat-resistant food contaminants has recently increased, with the identification of a conserved locus shown to confer heat resistance in disparate lineages of Gram-negative bacteria. Complete sequence analysis of a historical isolate of Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg, used in numerous studies because of its novel heat resistance, revealed that this important strain possesses two distinct copies of this conserved thermotolerance locus, residing on a multireplicon IncHI2/IncHI2A plasmid. Phylogenetic analysis of these loci in comparison with homologs identified in various bacterial genera provides an opportunity to examine the evolution and distribution of loci conferring resistance to environmental stressors, such as heat and desiccation. PMID:28293682

  18. Genome Sequence of the Thermotolerant Foodborne Pathogen Salmonella enterica Serovar Senftenberg ATCC 43845 and Phylogenetic Analysis of Loci Encoding Increased Protein Quality Control Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Scott V; Harhay, Gregory P; Bono, James L; Smith, Timothy P L; Harhay, Dayna M

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica bacteria are important foodborne pathogens with major economic impact. Some isolates exhibit increased heat tolerance, a concern for food safety. Analysis of a finished-quality genome sequence of an isolate commonly used in heat resistance studies, S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Senftenberg 775W (ATCC 43845), demonstrated an interesting observation that this strain contains not just one, but two horizontally acquired thermotolerance locus homologs. These two loci reside on a large 341.3-kbp plasmid that is similar to the well-studied IncHI2 R478 plasmid but lacks any antibiotic resistance genes found on R478 or other IncHI2 plasmids. As this historical Salmonella isolate has been in use since 1941, comparative analysis of the plasmid and of the thermotolerance loci contained on the plasmid will provide insight into the evolution of heat resistance loci as well as acquisition of resistance determinants in IncHI2 plasmids. IMPORTANCE Thermal interventions are commonly used in the food industry as a means of mitigating pathogen contamination in food products. Concern over heat-resistant food contaminants has recently increased, with the identification of a conserved locus shown to confer heat resistance in disparate lineages of Gram-negative bacteria. Complete sequence analysis of a historical isolate of Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg, used in numerous studies because of its novel heat resistance, revealed that this important strain possesses two distinct copies of this conserved thermotolerance locus, residing on a multireplicon IncHI2/IncHI2A plasmid. Phylogenetic analysis of these loci in comparison with homologs identified in various bacterial genera provides an opportunity to examine the evolution and distribution of loci conferring resistance to environmental stressors, such as heat and desiccation.

  19. Unique Genetic Loci Identified for Emotional Behavior in Control and Chronic Stress Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-21

    Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 August 2010 – 21 October 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House Unique genetic loci...unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 88 ABW Cleared 02/26/2014; 88ABW-2014-0757. Report contains color. 14. ABSTRACT An individual’s genetic ...background affects their emotional behavior and response to stress. Although studies have been conducted to identify genetic predictors for emotional

  20. A replication study of genetic risk loci for ischemic stroke in a Dutch population: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hauer, Allard J; Pulit, Sara L; van den Berg, Leonard H; de Bakker, Paul I W; Veldink, Jan H; Ruigrok, Ynte M

    2017-09-22

    We aimed to replicate reported associations of 10 SNPs at eight distinct loci with overall ischemic stroke (IS) and its subtypes in an independent cohort of Dutch IS patients. We included 1,375 IS patients enrolled in a prospective multicenter hospital-based cohort in the Netherlands, and 1,533 population-level controls of Dutch descent. We tested these SNPs for association with overall IS and its subtypes (large artery atherosclerosis, small vessel disease and cardioembolic stroke (CE), as classified by TOAST) using an additive multivariable logistic regression model, adjusting for age and sex. We obtained odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the risk allele of each SNP analyzed and exact p-values by permutation. We confirmed the association at 4q25 (PITX2) (OR 1.43; 95% CI, 1.13-1.81, p = 0.029) and 16q22 (ZFHX3) (OR 1.62; 95% CI, 1.26-2.07, p = 0.001) as risk loci for CE. Locus 16q22 was also associated with overall IS (OR 1.24; 95% CI, 1.08-1.42, p = 0.016). Other loci previously associated with IS and/or its subtypes were not confirmed. In conclusion, we validated two loci (4q25, 16q22) associated with CE. In addition, our study may suggest that the association of locus 16q22 may not be limited to CE, but also includes overall IS.

  1. Mapping of quantitative trait loci for a new source of resistance to bruchids in the wild species Vigna nepalensis Tateishi & Maxted (Vigna subgenus Ceratotropis).

    PubMed

    Somta, Prakit; Kaga, Akito; Tomooka, Norihiko; Isemura, Takehisa; Vaughan, Duncan A; Srinives, Peerasak

    2008-08-01

    Azuki bean breeders have long been interested in producing azuki bean [Vigna angularis (Willd.) Ohwi & Ohashi] varieties with bruchid resistance. A new bruchid (Callosobruchus spp.) resistance source was found in V. nepalensis Tateishi & Maxted, a species that is cross compatible with azuki bean. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) analysis for resistance to C. chinensis (L.) and C. maculatus (F.) was conducted using F2 (V. nepalensisxV. angularis) and BC1F1 [(V. nepalensisxV. angularis)xV. angularis] populations derived from crosses between the bruchid resistant species V. nepalensis and bruchid susceptible species V. angularis. Resistance was measured using two traits, percentage of seeds damaged by bruchids and the time taken for adult bruchids to emerge from seeds. Based on the results from both populations seven QTLs were detected for bruchid resistance; five QTLs for resistance to C. chinensis and two QTLs for resistance to C. maculatus. The different locations found for some resistance QTL to the two bruchid species suggests different resistance mechanisms. QTLs on linkage group (LG) 1 and LG2 for bruchid resistance to C. chinensis co-localized with seed size QTLs suggesting that incremental increase in seed size accompanied susceptibility to C. chinensis. Based on linked markers the QTL on these two linkage groups appear to be the same as previously reported in other Asian Vigna. However, several other QTLs were newly detected including one on LG4 that appears unrelated to seed size. Transfer of these new sources of bruchid resistance from V. nepalensis to azuki bean will be aided by the progress being made in azuki genome mapping.

  2. Mapping of quantitative trait loci associated with partial resistance to phytophthora sojae and flooding tolerance in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phytophthora root rot (PRR) caused by Phytophthora sojae Kaufm. & Gerd. and flooding can limit growth and productivity, of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], especially on poorly drained soils. The primary objective of this research project was to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with f...

  3. Complex Genetics Control Natural Variation in Arabidopsis thaliana Resistance to Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Heather C.; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    The genetic architecture of plant defense against microbial pathogens may be influenced by pathogen lifestyle. While plant interactions with biotrophic pathogens are frequently controlled by the action of large-effect resistance genes that follow classic Mendelian inheritance, our study suggests that plant defense against the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea is primarily quantitative and genetically complex. Few studies of quantitative resistance to necrotrophic pathogens have used large plant mapping populations to dissect the genetic structure of resistance. Using a large structured mapping population of Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified quantitative trait loci influencing plant response to B. cinerea, measured as expansion of necrotic lesions on leaves and accumulation of the antimicrobial compound camalexin. Testing multiple B. cinerea isolates, we identified 23 separate QTL in this population, ranging in isolate-specificity from being identified with a single isolate to controlling resistance against all isolates tested. We identified a set of QTL controlling accumulation of camalexin in response to pathogen infection that largely colocalized with lesion QTL. The identified resistance QTL appear to function in epistatic networks involving three or more loci. Detection of multilocus connections suggests that natural variation in specific signaling or response networks may control A. thaliana–B. cinerea interaction in this population. PMID:18845849

  4. Identification of quantitative trait loci for resistance to Verticillium wilt and yield parameters in hop (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Jakse, Jernej; Cerenak, Andreja; Radisek, Sebastjan; Satovic, Zlatko; Luthar, Zlata; Javornik, Branka

    2013-06-01

    Verticillium wilt (VW) can cause substantial yield loss in hop particularly with the outbreaks of the lethal strain of Verticillium albo-atrum. To elucidate genetic control of VW resistance in hop, an F1 mapping population derived from a cross of cultivar Wye Target, with the predicted genetic basis of resistance, and susceptible male breeding line BL2/1 was developed to assess wilting symptoms and to perform QTL mapping. The genetic linkage map, constructed with 203 markers of various types using a pseudo-testcross strategy, formed ten major linkage groups (LG) of the maternal and paternal maps, covering 552.98 and 441.1 cM, respectively. A significant QTL for VW resistance was detected at LOD 7 on a single chromosomal region on LG03 of both parental maps, accounting for 24.2-26.0 % of the phenotypic variance. QTL analysis for alpha-acid content and yield parameters was also performed on this map. QTLs for these traits were also detected and confirmed our previously detected QTLs in a different pedigree and environment. The work provides the basis for exploration of QTL flanking markers for possible use in marker-assisted selection.

  5. Genetic dissection of milk yield traits and mastitis resistance quantitative trait loci on chromosome 20 in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Naveen K; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Lund, Mogens S; Sahana, Goutam

    2015-12-01

    Intense selection to increase milk yield has had negative consequences for mastitis incidence in dairy cattle. Due to low heritability of mastitis resistance and an unfavorable genetic correlation with milk yield, a reduction in mastitis through traditional breeding has been difficult to achieve. Here, we examined quantitative trait loci (QTL) that segregate for clinical mastitis and milk yield on Bos taurus autosome 20 (BTA20) to determine whether both traits are affected by a single polymorphism (pleiotropy) or by multiple closely linked polymorphisms. In the latter but not the former situation, undesirable genetic correlation could potentially be broken by selecting animals that have favorable variants for both traits. First, we performed a within-breed association study using a haplotype-based method in Danish Holstein cattle (HOL). Next, we analyzed Nordic Red dairy cattle (RDC) and Danish Jersey cattle (JER) with the goal of determining whether these QTL identified in Holsteins were segregating across breeds. Genotypes for 12,566 animals (5,966 HOL, 5,458 RDC, and 1,142 JER) were determined by using the Illumina Bovine SNP50 BeadChip (50K; Illumina, San Diego, CA), which identifies 1,568 single nucleotide polymorphisms on BTA20. Data were combined, phased, and clustered into haplotype states, followed by within- and across-breed haplotype-based association analyses using a linear mixed model. Association signals for both clinical mastitis and milk yield peaked in the 26- to 40-Mb region on BTA20 in HOL. Single-variant association analyses were carried out in the QTL region using whole sequence level variants imputed from references of 2,036 HD genotypes (BovineHD BeadChip; Illumina) and 242 whole-genome sequences. The milk QTL were also segregating in RDC and JER on the BTA20-targeted region; however, an indication of differences in the causal factor(s) was observed across breeds. A previously reported F279Y mutation (rs385640152) within the growth hormone

  6. CD uniformity control for thick resist process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chi-hao; Liu, Yu-Lin; Wang, Weihung; Yang, Mars; Yang, Elvis; Yang, T. H.; Chen, K. C.

    2017-03-01

    In order to meet the increasing storage capacity demand and reduce bit cost of NAND flash memories, 3D stacked flash cell array has been proposed. In constructing 3D NAND flash memories, the higher bit number per area is achieved by increasing the number of stacked layers. Thus the so-called "staircase" patterning to form electrical connection between memory cells and word lines has become one of the primarily critical processes in 3D memory manufacture. To provide controllable critical dimension (CD) with good uniformity involving thick photo-resist has also been of particular concern for staircase patterning. The CD uniformity control has been widely investigated with relatively thinner resist associated with resolution limit dimension but thick resist coupling with wider dimension. This study explores CD uniformity control associated with thick photo-resist processing. Several critical parameters including exposure focus, exposure dose, baking condition, pattern size and development recipe, were found to strongly correlate with the thick photo-resist profile accordingly affecting the CD uniformity control. To minimize the within-wafer CD variation, the slightly tapered resist profile is proposed through well tailoring the exposure focus and dose together with optimal development recipe. Great improvements on DCD (ADI CD) and ECD (AEI CD) uniformity as well as line edge roughness were achieved through the optimization of photo resist profile.

  7. Characterization of disease resistance loci in the USDA soybean germplasm collection using genome-wide association studies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic resistance is a key strategy for soybean disease management. In past decades, soybean germplasm has been phenotyped for resistance to many different pathogens and genes for resistance have been incorporated into elite breeding lines often resulting in commercial cultivars with disease resist...

  8. Mapping loci controlling the concentrations of erucic and linolenic acids in seed oil of Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Thormann, C E; Romero, J; Mantet, J; Osborn, T C

    1996-07-01

    The quality of plant oil is determined by its component fatty acids. Relatively high levels of linolenic acid reduce the oxidative stability of the oil, and high levels of erucic acid in the diet have been associated with health problems. Thus, oilseed Brassica napus cultivars with low linolenic and low erucic acid contents are highly desirable for edible oil production. In order to identify genes controlling the levels of erucic and linolenic acids, we analyzed the oil composition of 99 F1-derived doubled haploid lines from a cross between cv 'Major' (high levels of erucic and linolenic acids) and cv 'Stellar' (low levels of both fatty acids). A molecular marker linkage map of 199 loci for this population was used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling oil composition. We identified two regions that accounted for nearly all of the phenotypic variation in erucic acid concentration and one region that accounted for 47% of the variation in linolenic acid concentration. The QTL associated with linolenic acid concentration mapped near a RFLP locus detected by a cDNA clone encoding an omega-3 desaturase, suggesting that the low linolenic acid content of 'Stellar' may be due to a mutation in this gene.

  9. Flavonoid-deficient mutants in grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.): genetic control, linkage relationships, and mapping with aconitase and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase isozyme loci.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Dibyendu

    2012-01-01

    Two flavonoid-deficient mutants, designated as fldL-1 and fldL-2, were isolated in EMS-mutagenized (0.15%, 10 h) M(2) progeny of grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.). Both the mutants contained total leaf flavonoid content only 20% of their mother varieties. Genetic analysis revealed monogenic recessive inheritance of the trait, controlled by two different nonallelic loci. The two mutants differed significantly in banding patterns of leaf aconitase (ACO) and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) isozymes, possessing unique bands in Aco 1, Aco 2, and Gsnor 2 loci. Isozyme loci inherited monogenically showing codominant expression in F(2) (1:2:1) and backcross (1:1) segregations. Linkage studies and primary trisomic analysis mapped Aco 1 and fld 1 loci on extra chromosome of trisomic-I and Aco 2, fld 2, and Gsnor 2 on extra chromosome of trisomic-IV in linked associations.

  10. Molecular Mapping of Stem Rust Resistance Loci Effective Against the Ug99 Race Group of the Stem Rust Pathogen and Validation of a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Marker Linked to Stem Rust Resistance Gene Sr28.

    PubMed

    Babiker, E M; Gordon, T C; Chao, S; Rouse, M N; Wanyera, R; Acevedo, M; Brown-Guedira, G; Bonman, J M

    2017-02-01

    Wheat landrace PI 177906 has seedling resistance to stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici races TTKSK, TTKST, and BCCBC and field resistance to the Ug99 race group. Parents, 140 recombinant inbred lines, and 138 double haploid (DH) lines were evaluated for seedling resistance to races TTKSK and BCCBC. Parents and the DH population were evaluated for field resistance to Ug99 in Kenya. The 90K wheat single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping platform was used to genotype the parents and populations. Goodness-of-fit tests indicated that two dominant genes in PI 177906 conditioned seedling resistance to TTKSK. Two major loci for seedling resistance were consistently mapped to the chromosome arms 2BL and 6DS. The BCCBC resistance was mapped to the same location on 2BL as the TTKSK resistance. Using field data from the three seasons, two major QTL were consistently detected at the same regions on 2BL and 6DS. Based on the mapping result, race specificity, and the infection type observed in PI 177906, the TTKSK resistance on 2BL is likely due to Sr28. One SNP marker (KASP_IWB1208) was found to be predictive for the presence of the TTKSK resistance locus on 2BL and Sr28.

  11. Urban Graffiti: Crime, Control, and Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrell, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Explores the ways in which producers of contemporary urban graffiti resist the increasing segregation and control of urban environments, and shows how graffiti participants undermine efforts at control. Data come from four years of field work in Denver (Colorado) and research in other cities. (SLD)

  12. Rapid identification of resistance loci effective against Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKSK in 33 spring wheat landraces

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat breeders worldwide are seeking new sources of resistance to Puccinia graminis f. sp tritici race TTKSK. To prioritize field-resistant landraces for follow-up genetic studies to test for the presence of new resistance genes, seedling response to Pgt race TTKSK, molecular markers linked to speci...

  13. Genetic control of resistance to salmonellosis and to Salmonella carrier-state in fowl: a review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Salmonellosis is a frequent disease in poultry stocks, caused by several serotypes of the bacterial species Salmonella enterica and sometimes transmitted to humans through the consumption of contaminated meat or eggs. Symptom-free carriers of the bacteria contribute greatly to the propagation of the disease in poultry stocks. So far, several candidate genes and quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to carrier state or to acute disease have been identified using artificial infection of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis or S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strains in diverse genetic backgrounds, with several different infection procedures and phenotypic assessment protocols. This diversity in experimental conditions has led to a complex sum of results, but allows a more complete description of the disease. Comparisons among studies show that genes controlling resistance to Salmonella differ according to the chicken line studied, the trait assessed and the chicken's age. The loci identified are located on 25 of the 38 chicken autosomal chromosomes. Some of these loci are clustered in several genomic regions, indicating the possibility of a common genetic control for different models. In particular, the genomic regions carrying the candidate genes TLR4 and SLC11A1, the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) and the QTL SAL1 are interesting for more in-depth studies. This article reviews the main Salmonella infection models and chicken lines studied under a historical perspective and then the candidate genes and QTL identified so far. PMID:20429884

  14. Identification of quantitative trait loci associated with resistance to brown planthopper in the indica rice cultivar Col.5 Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lihong; Liu, Yuqiang; Jiang, Ling; Su, Changchao; Wang, Chunming; Zhai, Huqu; Wan, Jianmin

    2007-05-01

    The brown planthopper (BPH) is one of the most serious insect pests of rice throughout Asia. In this study, we constructed a linkage map to determine the locus for BPH resistance gene, using an F(2) population from a cross between a resistant indica cultivar, 'Col.5 Thailand', and a susceptible cultivar '02428'. Insect resistance was evaluated using 147 F(3) families and the genotype of each F(2) plant was inferred from the phenotype of corresponding F(3) families. Two QTLs was detected on chromosome 2 (explains 29.4% phenotypic variation) and 6 (46.2% variation explained) associated with resistance to BPH in the mapping population. Comparison of the chromosomal locations and reactions to BPH biotypes indicated that the gene on chromosome 6 is different from at least 18 of the 19 previously identified BPH resistance genes. These two genes have large effects on BPH resistance and may be a useful BPH resistance resource for rice breeding programs.

  15. Quantitative trait loci and underlying candidate genes controlling agronomical and fruit quality traits in octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa).

    PubMed

    Zorrilla-Fontanesi, Yasmín; Cabeza, Amalia; Domínguez, Pedro; Medina, Juan Jesús; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Denoyes-Rothan, Beatrice; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Amaya, Iraida

    2011-09-01

    Breeding for fruit quality traits in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa, 2n = 8x = 56) is complex due to the polygenic nature of these traits and the octoploid constitution of this species. In order to improve the efficiency of genotype selection, the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and associated molecular markers will constitute a valuable tool for breeding programs. However, the implementation of these markers in breeding programs depends upon the complexity and stability of QTLs across different environments. In this work, the genetic control of 17 agronomical and fruit quality traits was investigated in strawberry using a F(1) population derived from an intraspecific cross between two contrasting selection lines, '232' and '1392'. QTL analyses were performed over three successive years based on the separate parental linkage maps and a pseudo-testcross strategy. The integrated strawberry genetic map consists of 338 molecular markers covering 37 linkage groups, thus exceeding the 28 chromosomes. 33 QTLs were identified for 14 of the 17 studied traits and approximately 37% of them were stable over time. For each trait, 1-5 QTLs were identified with individual effects ranging between 9.2 and 30.5% of the phenotypic variation, indicating that all analysed traits are complex and quantitatively inherited. Many QTLs controlling correlated traits were co-located in homoeology group V, indicating linkage or pleiotropic effects of loci. Candidate genes for several QTLs controlling yield, anthocyanins, firmness and L-ascorbic acid are proposed based on both their co-localization and predicted function. We also report conserved QTLs among strawberry and other Rosaceae based on their syntenic location.

  16. Qualitative and quantitative trait loci conditioning resistance to Puccinia coronata pathotypes NQMG and LGCG in the oat (Avena sativa L.) cultivars Ogle and TAM O-301.

    PubMed

    Jackson, E W; Obert, D E; Menz, M; Hu, G; Bonman, J M

    2008-02-01

    Mapping disease resistance loci relies on the type and precision of phenotypic measurements. For crown rust of oat, disease severity is commonly assessed based on visual ratings of infection types (IT) and/or diseased leaf area (DLA) of infected plants in the greenhouse or field. These data can be affected by several variables including; (i) non-uniform disease development in the field; (ii) atypical symptom development in the greenhouse; (iii) the presence of multiple pathogenic races or pathotypes in the field, and (iv) rating bias. To overcome these limitations, we mapped crown rust resistance to single isolates in the Ogle/TAM O-301 (OT) recombinant inbred line (RIL) population using detailed measurements of IT, uredinia length (UL) and relative fungal DNA (FDNA) estimates determined by q-PCR. Measurements were taken on OT parents and recombinant inbred lines (RIL) inoculated with Puccinia coronata pathotypes NQMG and LGCG in separate greenhouse and field tests. Qualitative mapping identified an allele conferred by TAM O-301 on linkage group (LG) OT-11, which produced a bleached fleck phenotype to both NQMG and LGCG. Quantitative mapping identified two major quantitative trait loci (QTL) originating from TAM O-301 on LGs OT-11 and OT-32 which reduced UL and FDNA of both isolates in all experiments. Additionally, minor QTLs that reduced UL and FDNA were detected on LGs OT-15 and OT-8, originating from TAM O-301, and on LG OT-27, originating from Ogle. Detailed assessments of the OT population using two pathotypes in both the greenhouse and field provided comprehensive information to effectively map the genes responsible for crown rust resistance in Ogle and TAM O-301 to NQMG and LGCG.

  17. Transcriptomic characterization of two major Fusarium resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs), Fhb1 and Qfhs.ifa-5A, identifies novel candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Wolfgang; Steiner, Barbara; Ametz, Christian; Siegwart, Gerald; Wiesenberger, Gerlinde; Berthiller, Franz; Lemmens, Marc; Jia, Haiyan; Adam, Gerhard; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Kreil, David P; Buerstmayr, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium head blight, caused by Fusarium graminearum, is a devastating disease of wheat. We developed near-isogenic lines (NILs) differing in the two strongest known F. graminearum resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs), Qfhs.ndsu-3BS (also known as resistance gene Fhb1) and Qfhs.ifa-5A, which are located on the short arm of chromosome 3B and on chromosome 5A, respectively. These NILs showing different levels of resistance were used to identify transcripts that are changed significantly in a QTL-specific manner in response to the pathogen and between mock-inoculated samples. After inoculation with F. graminearum spores, 16 transcripts showed a significantly different response for Fhb1 and 352 for Qfhs.ifa-5A. Notably, we identified a lipid transfer protein which is constitutively at least 50-fold more abundant in plants carrying the resistant allele of Qfhs.ifa-5A. In addition to this candidate gene associated with Qfhs.ifa-5A, we identified a uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glycosyltransferase gene, designated TaUGT12887, exhibiting a positive difference in response to the pathogen in lines harbouring both QTLs relative to lines carrying only the Qfhs.ifa-5A resistance allele, suggesting Fhb1 dependence of this transcript. Yet, this dependence was observed only in the NIL with already higher basal resistance. The complete cDNA of TaUGT12887 was reconstituted from available wheat genomic sequences, and a synthetic recoded gene was expressed in a toxin-sensitive strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This gene conferred deoxynivalenol resistance, albeit much weaker than that observed with the previously characterized barley HvUGT13248. PMID:23738863

  18. Resistance gene enrichment sequencing (RenSeq) enables reannotation of the NB-LRR gene family from sequenced plant genomes and rapid mapping of resistance loci in segregating populations.

    PubMed

    Jupe, Florian; Witek, Kamil; Verweij, Walter; Sliwka, Jadwiga; Pritchard, Leighton; Etherington, Graham J; Maclean, Dan; Cock, Peter J; Leggett, Richard M; Bryan, Glenn J; Cardle, Linda; Hein, Ingo; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2013-11-01

    RenSeq is a NB-LRR (nucleotide binding-site leucine-rich repeat) gene-targeted, Resistance gene enrichment and sequencing method that enables discovery and annotation of pathogen resistance gene family members in plant genome sequences. We successfully applied RenSeq to the sequenced potato Solanum tuberosum clone DM, and increased the number of identified NB-LRRs from 438 to 755. The majority of these identified R gene loci reside in poorly or previously unannotated regions of the genome. Sequence and positional details on the 12 chromosomes have been established for 704 NB-LRRs and can be accessed through a genome browser that we provide. We compared these NB-LRR genes and the corresponding oligonucleotide baits with the highest sequence similarity and demonstrated that ~80% sequence identity is sufficient for enrichment. Analysis of the sequenced tomato S. lycopersicum 'Heinz 1706' extended the NB-LRR complement to 394 loci. We further describe a methodology that applies RenSeq to rapidly identify molecular markers that co-segregate with a pathogen resistance trait of interest. In two independent segregating populations involving the wild Solanum species S. berthaultii (Rpi-ber2) and S. ruiz-ceballosii (Rpi-rzc1), we were able to apply RenSeq successfully to identify markers that co-segregate with resistance towards the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. These SNP identification workflows were designed as easy-to-adapt Galaxy pipelines.

  19. Additive effects of two quantitative trait loci that confer Rhopalosiphum maidis (corn leaf aphid) resistance in maize inbred line Mo17

    PubMed Central

    Betsiashvili, Mariam; Ahern, Kevin R.; Jander, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Plants show considerable within-species variation in their resistance to insect herbivores. In the case of Zea mays (cultivated maize), Rhopalosiphum maidis (corn leaf aphids) produce approximately twenty times more progeny on inbred line B73 than on inbred line Mo17. Genetic mapping of this difference in maize aphid resistance identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) on chromosomes 4 and 6, with the Mo17 allele reducing aphid reproduction in each case. The chromosome 4 QTL mapping interval includes several genes involved in the biosynthesis of DIMBOA (2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one), a maize defensive metabolite that also is required for callose accumulation in response to aphid feeding. Consistent with the known association of callose with plant defence against aphids, R. maidis reproduction on B73×Mo17 recombinant inbred lines was negatively correlated with both DIMBOA content and callose formation. Further genetic mapping, as well as experiments with near-isogenic lines, confirmed that the Mo17 allele causes increased DIMBOA accumulation relative to the B73 allele. The chromosome 6 aphid resistance QTL functions independently of DIMBOA accumulation and has an effect that is additive to that of the chromosome 4 QTL. Thus, at least two separate defence mechanisms account for the higher level of R. maidis resistance in Mo17 compared with B73. PMID:25249072

  20. Additive effects of two quantitative trait loci that confer Rhopalosiphum maidis (corn leaf aphid) resistance in maize inbred line Mo17.

    PubMed

    Betsiashvili, Mariam; Ahern, Kevin R; Jander, Georg

    2015-02-01

    Plants show considerable within-species variation in their resistance to insect herbivores. In the case of Zea mays (cultivated maize), Rhopalosiphum maidis (corn leaf aphids) produce approximately twenty times more progeny on inbred line B73 than on inbred line Mo17. Genetic mapping of this difference in maize aphid resistance identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) on chromosomes 4 and 6, with the Mo17 allele reducing aphid reproduction in each case. The chromosome 4 QTL mapping interval includes several genes involved in the biosynthesis of DIMBOA (2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one), a maize defensive metabolite that also is required for callose accumulation in response to aphid feeding. Consistent with the known association of callose with plant defence against aphids, R. maidis reproduction on B73×Mo17 recombinant inbred lines was negatively correlated with both DIMBOA content and callose formation. Further genetic mapping, as well as experiments with near-isogenic lines, confirmed that the Mo17 allele causes increased DIMBOA accumulation relative to the B73 allele. The chromosome 6 aphid resistance QTL functions independently of DIMBOA accumulation and has an effect that is additive to that of the chromosome 4 QTL. Thus, at least two separate defence mechanisms account for the higher level of R. maidis resistance in Mo17 compared with B73. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  1. Using crossover breakpoints in recombinant inbred lines to identify quantitative trait loci controlling the global recombination frequency.

    PubMed

    Esch, Elisabeth; Szymaniak, Jessica M; Yates, Heather; Pawlowski, Wojciech P; Buckler, Edward S

    2007-11-01

    Recombination is a crucial component of evolution and breeding, producing new genetic combinations on which selection can act. Rates of recombination vary tremendously, not only between species but also within species and for specific chromosomal segments. In this study, by examining recombination events captured in recombinant inbred mapping populations previously created for maize, wheat, Arabidopsis, and mouse, we demonstrate that substantial variation exists for genomewide crossover rates in both outcrossed and inbred plant and animal species. We also identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) that control this variation. The method that we developed and employed here holds promise for elucidating factors that regulate meiotic recombination and for creation of hyperrecombinogenic lines, which can help overcome limited recombination that hampers breeding progress.

  2. Isolation and growth characterization of chlorate and/or bromate resistant mutants generated by spontaneous and induced foreword mutations at several gene loci in aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Kanan, Ghassan J M; Al-Najjar, Heyam E

    2010-10-01

    We aimed her mainly to evaluate the contribution of newly employed bromate selection system, in obtaining new Aspergillus niger nitrate/nitrite assimilation defective mutants, through Ultraviolet treatment (UV), 1, 2, 7, 8-Diepoxyoctane (DEO), phenols mixture (Phx)) and spontaneous treatments. The newly employed bromate selection system was able to specify only two putative novel mutant types designated brn (bromate resistant but chlorate sensitive (RS) strain, which may specify nitrite specific transporter) and cbrn mutants (bromate resistant and chlorate resistant strain, which may specify nitrate/nitrite bispecific system). The most relevant and innovative findings of this research work involve the isolation of the RR ( cbrn) mutants (a new type of nitrate assimilation defective mutants), that could be useful for studying the bispecific nitrate /nitrite transporter system. The majority of obtained bromate resistant mutants (93.3% of the total mutants obtained by all treatments) were of the brn type, whereas the remaining percentage (6.76%) was given to cbrn strains. The highest percentages of brn mutant strains (48% and 58.6% of the total RS strains) were obtained with UA after spontaneous and Phx treatment, whereas Trp has generated 29% and 42% of RS strains after UV and DEO treatments, respectively. The obtained ratios of cbrn mutants were higher (i.e. in the range of 8.4%-11.64% of the total bromate mutants) with chemical treatments, especially when U.A or Pro was serving as sole N-sources at 25ºC rather than 37ºC. A 69% mutants` yield of Aspergillus niger mutant strains representing nine gene loci ( niaD, cnx-6 loci , nrt and nirA) were selected on the bases of chlorate (600 mM) toxicity. All chlorate resistant mutants were completely sensitive to bromate (250 mM). The niaD mutants showed the highest percentage (73.97%) of chlorate resistant mutants obtained with all tested treatments. The UV treatment has generated the highest ratio (86.9%) of nia

  3. Genetic diversity of rhg1 and Rhg4 loci in wild soybeans resistant to soybean cyst nematode race 3.

    PubMed

    Yuan, C P; Wang, Y J; Zhao, H K; Zhang, L; Wang, Y M; Liu, X D; Zhong, X F; Dong, Y S

    2016-06-10

    Over-utilization of germplasms that are resistant to the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) in soybean breeding programs can lead to genetic vulnerability in resistant cultivars. Resistant wild soybean (Glycine soja) is considered an invaluable gene source for increasing the genetic diversity of SCN resistance. In this study, we genotyped 23 G. soja accessions that are resistant to SCN race 3 for polymorphisms in the resistance genes, rhg1, Rhg4, and SHMT, and investigated their genetic relationship with eight Glycine max resistant cultivars. We identified 89 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 11 DNA insertion-deletions (InDels), of which 70 SNPs and 8 InDels were found in rhg1, 9 SNPs were found in Rhg4, and 10 SNPs and 3 InDels were found in SHMT. Nucleotide diversity was π = 0.00238 and θ = 0.00235, and haplotype diversity was 1.000. A phylogenetic tree comprising four clusters was constructed using sequence variations of the 23 G. soja and 8 G. max resistant accessions. Five G. soja accessions in subcluster A2, and four G. soja accessions in cluster B were genetically distant from G. max genotypes. Eight resistance-associated SNPs in the three resistance genes formed nine haplotypes in total. G. soja resistant accessions had different haplotypes (H2, H4, H5, H6, H7, and H8) compared with those of G. max (H1, H3, and H9). These results provide vital information on the use of wild soybeans for broadening the genetic base of SCN resistance.

  4. Mapping of iron and zinc quantitative trait loci in soybean for association to iron deficiency chlorosis resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Iron deficiency chlorosis (IDC) is a nutritional disease of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) which when left unchecked can result in a severe yield penalty or even death in the most extreme cases. In order to curb these effects, resistance to the disease is needed. Breeding for resistance has been ...

  5. Identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to Fusarium crown rot (Fusarium pseudograminearum) in two spring wheat populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium crown rot (FCR), caused by F. pseudograminearum and F. culmorum, reduces wheat yields in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of the U.S. by as much as 35%. Currently there is no consistent durable resistance to FCR in PNW wheat cultivars. Significant QTL for crown rot resistance have been documente...

  6. Lessons from a phenotyping center revealed by the genome-guided mapping of powdery mildew resistance loci

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The genomics era brought unprecedented tools for genetic analysis of host resistance, but careful attention is needed on obtaining accurate and reproducible phenotypes so that genomic results appropriately reflect biology. Phenotyping host resistance by natural infection in the field can produce var...

  7. Characterization of insect resistance loci in the USDA soybean germplasm collection using genome-wide association studies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Management of insects that cause economic damage to yields of soybean mainly rely on insecticide application. Sources of resistance in soybean plant introduction (PIs) to different insect pests have been reported, and some of these resistance sources, like for the soybean aphid (SBA) have been used ...

  8. Self-(in)compatibility in apricot germplasm is controlled by two major loci, S and M.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Sanz, Juan Vicente; Zuriaga, Elena; López, Inmaculada; Badenes, María L; Romero, Carlos

    2017-04-26

    Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) exhibits a gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) system and it is mostly considered as a self-incompatible species though numerous self-compatible exceptions occur. These are mainly linked to the mutated S C-haplotype carrying an insertion in the S-locus F-box gene that leads to a truncated protein. However, two S-locus unlinked pollen-part mutations (PPMs) termed m and m' have also been reported to confer self-compatibility (SC) in the apricot cultivars 'Canino' and 'Katy', respectively. This work was aimed to explore whether other additional mutations might explain SC in apricot as well. A set of 67 cultivars/accessions with different geographic origins were analyzed by PCR-screening of the S- and M-loci genotypes, contrasting results with the available phenotype data. Up to 20 S-alleles, including 3 new ones, were detected and sequence analysis revealed interesting synonymies and homonymies in particular with S-alleles found in Chinese cultivars. Haplotype analysis performed by genotyping and determining linkage-phases of 7 SSR markers, showed that the m and m' PPMs are linked to the same m 0-haplotype. Results indicate that m 0-haplotype is tightly associated with SC in apricot germplasm being quite frequent in Europe and North-America. However, its prevalence is lower than that for S C in terms of frequency and geographic distribution. Structures of 34 additional M-haplotypes were inferred and analyzed to depict phylogenetic relationships and M 1-2 was found to be the closest haplotype to m 0. Genotyping results showed that four cultivars classified as self-compatible do not have neither the S C- nor the m 0-haplotype. According to apricot germplasm S-genotyping, a loss of genetic diversity affecting the S-locus has been produced probably due to crop dissemination. Genotyping and phenotyping data support that self-(in)compatibility in apricot relies mainly on the S- but also on the M-locus. Regarding this latter, we have shown

  9. Susceptibility of Adult Cat Fleas (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) to Insecticides and Status of Insecticide Resistance Mutations at the Rdl and Knockdown Resistance Loci.

    PubMed

    Rust, Michael K; Vetter, Richard; Denholm, Ian; Blagburn, Byron; Williamson, Martin S; Kopp, Steven; Coleman, Glen; Hostetler, Joe; Davis, Wendell; Mencke, Norbert; Rees, Robert; Foit, Sabrina; Böhm, Claudia; Tetzner, Kathrin

    2015-08-01

    The susceptibility of 12 field-collected isolates and 4 laboratory strains of cat fleas, Ctenocephalides felis was determined by topical application of some of the insecticides used as on-animal therapies to control them. In the tested field-collected flea isolates the LD50 values for fipronil and imidacloprid ranged from 0.09 to 0.35 ng/flea and 0.02 to 0.19 ng/flea, respectively, and were consistent with baseline figures published previously. The extent of variation in response to four pyrethroid insecticides differed between compounds with the LD50 values for deltamethrin ranging from 2.3 to 28.2 ng/flea, etofenprox ranging from 26.7 to 86.7 ng/flea, permethrin ranging from 17.5 to 85.6 ng/flea, and d-phenothrin ranging from 14.5 to 130 ng/flea. A comparison with earlier data for permethrin and deltamethrin implied a level of pyrethroid resistance in all isolates and strains. LD50 values for tetrachlorvinphos ranged from 20.0 to 420.0 ng/flea. The rdl mutation (conferring target-site resistance to cyclodiene insecticides) was present in most field-collected and laboratory strains, but had no discernible effect on responses to fipronil, which acts on the same receptor protein as cyclodienes. The kdr and skdr mutations conferring target-site resistance to pyrethroids but segregated in opposition to one another, precluding the formation of genotypes homozygous for both mutations.

  10. Characterization of Insect Resistance Loci in the USDA Soybean Germplasm Collection Using Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hao-Xun; Hartman, Glen L.

    2017-01-01

    Management of insects that cause economic damage to yields of soybean mainly rely on insecticide applications. Sources of resistance in soybean plant introductions (PIs) to different insect pests have been reported, and some of these sources, like for the soybean aphid (SBA), have been used to develop resistant soybean cultivars. With the availability of SoySNP50K and the statistical power of genome-wide association studies, we integrated phenotypic data for beet armyworm, Mexican bean beetle (MBB), potato leafhopper (PLH), SBA, soybean looper (SBL), velvetbean caterpillar (VBC), and chewing damage caused by unspecified insects for a comprehensive understanding of insect resistance in the United States Department of Agriculture Soybean Germplasm Collection. We identified significant single nucleotide (SNP) polymorphic markers for MBB, PLH, SBL, and VBC, and we highlighted several leucine-rich repeat-containing genes and myeloblastosis transcription factors within the high linkage disequilibrium region surrounding significant SNP markers. Specifically for soybean resistance to PLH, we found the PLH locus is close but distinct to a locus for soybean pubescence density on chromosome 12. The results provide genetic support that pubescence density may not directly link to PLH resistance. This study offers a novel insight of soybean resistance to four insect pests and reviews resistance mapping studies for major soybean insects. PMID:28555141

  11. Characterization of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Genetic Variation for Preharvest Sprouting in Synthetic Backcross-Derived Wheat Lines

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, Muhammad; Ogbonnaya, Francis C.; Oman, Jason; van Ginkel, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Aegilops tauschii, the wild relative of wheat, has stronger seed dormancy, a major component of preharvest sprouting resistance (PHSR), than bread wheat. A diploid Ae. tauschii accession (AUS18836) and a tetraploid (Triticum turgidum L. ssp. durum var. Altar84) wheat were used to construct a synthetic wheat (Syn37). The genetic architecture of PHS was investigated in 271 BC1F7 synthetic backcross lines (SBLs) derived from Syn37/2*Janz (resistant/susceptible). The SBLs were evaluated in three environments over 2 years and PHS was assessed by way of three measures: the germination index (GI), which measures grain dormancy, the whole spike assay (SI), which takes into account all spike morphology, and counted visually sprouted seeds out of 200 (VI). Grain color was measured using both Chroma Meter- and NaOH-based approaches. QTL for PHSR and grain color were mapped and their additive and epistatic effects as well as their interactions with environment were estimated by a mixed linear-model approach. Single-locus analysis following composite interval mapping revealed four QTL for GI, two QTL for SI, and four QTL for VI on chromosomes 3DL and 4AL. The locus QPhs.dpiv-3D.1 on chromosome 3DL was tightly linked to the red grain color (RGC) at a distance of 5 cM. The other locus on chromosome 3D, “QPhs.dpiv-3D.2” was independent of RGC locus. Two-locus analysis detected nine QTL with main effects and 18 additive × additive interactions for GI, SI, and VI. Two of the nine main effects QTL and two epistatic QTL showed significant interactions with environments. Both additive and epistatic effects contributed to phenotypic variance in PHSR and the identified markers are potential candidates for marker-assisted selection of favorable alleles at multiple loci. SBLs derived from Ae. tauschii proved to be a promising tool to dissect, introgress, and pyramid different PHSR genes into adapted wheat genetic backgrounds. The enhanced expression of PHS resistance in SBLs enabled

  12. Reflections on Speech Motor Control Based on Phonatory and DDK Tasks in Dysarthric Subjects with Lesions in Different Cerebellar Loci

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandana, V. P.

    2007-01-01

    There are very few acoustic studies reflecting on the localization of speech function within the different loci of the cerebellum. Task based performance profile of subjects with lesion in different cerebellar loci is not reported. Also, the findings on nonfocal cerebellar lesions cannot be generalized to lesions restricted to the cerebellum.…

  13. Reflections on Speech Motor Control Based on Phonatory and DDK Tasks in Dysarthric Subjects with Lesions in Different Cerebellar Loci

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandana, V. P.

    2007-01-01

    There are very few acoustic studies reflecting on the localization of speech function within the different loci of the cerebellum. Task based performance profile of subjects with lesion in different cerebellar loci is not reported. Also, the findings on nonfocal cerebellar lesions cannot be generalized to lesions restricted to the cerebellum.…

  14. Adhesion Control between Resist and Photomask Blank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Masaaki; Hatakeyama, Sho; Yoshida, Kouji; Abe, Makoto; Totsukawa, Daisuke; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hoga, Morihisa; Hayashi, Naoya; Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Fujihira, Masamichi

    2009-06-01

    Most problems in photomask fabrication such as pattern collapse, haze, and cleaning damage are related to the behavior of surfaces and interfaces of resists, opaque layers, and quartz substrates. Therefore, it is important to control the corresponding surface and interface energies in photomask fabrication processes. In particular, adhesion analysis in microscopic regions is strongly desirable to optimize material and process designs in photomask fabrication. We applied the direct peeling (DP) method with a scanning probe microscope (SPM) tip and measured the adhesion of resist patterns on Cr and quartz surfaces for photomask process optimization. We also studied the effect of tip shape on the reproducibility of adhesion measurements and the dependence of collapse behavior on the resist profile. We measured lateral forces between the resulting collapsed resist pillar and the Cr or the quartz surface before and after the sliding and related these observed lateral forces to the static and kinetic frictional forces, respectively. We also studied the effect of surface modification of the Cr and quartz surfaces with silanization reagents on adhesion measured with the DP method. Resist adhesion could be controlled by surface modification using silanes. We also discuss the relationship between the adhesion observed with the DP method and the properties of the modified surfaces including water contact angles and local adhesive forces measured from force-distance curves with an SPM.

  15. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci Conditioning the Main Biomass Yield Components and Resistance to Melampsora spp. in Salix viminalis × Salix schwerinii Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Sulima, Paweł; Przyborowski, Jerzy A.; Kuszewska, Anna; Załuski, Dariusz; Jędryczka, Małgorzata; Irzykowski, Witold

    2017-01-01

    The biomass of Salix viminalis is the most highly valued source of green energy, followed by S. schwerinii, S. dasyclados and other species. Significant variability in productivity and leaf rust resistance are noted both within and among willow species, which creates new opportunities for improving willow yield parameters through selection of desirable recombinants supported with molecular markers. The aim of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) linked with biomass yield-related traits and the resistance/susceptibility of Salix mapping population to leaf rust. The experimental material comprised a mapping population developed based on S. viminalis × S. schwerinii hybrids. Phenotyping was performed on plants grown in a field experiment that had a balanced incomplete block design with 10 replications. Based on a genetic map, 11 QTLs were identified for plant height, 9 for shoot diameter, 3 for number of shoots and 11 for resistance/susceptibility to leaf rust. The QTLs identified in our study explained 3%–16% of variability in the analyzed traits. Our findings make significant contributions to the development of willow breeding programs and research into shrubby willow crops grown for energy. PMID:28327519

  16. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci Conditioning the Main Biomass Yield Components and Resistance to Melampsora spp. in Salix viminalis × Salix schwerinii Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Sulima, Paweł; Przyborowski, Jerzy A; Kuszewska, Anna; Załuski, Dariusz; Jędryczka, Małgorzata; Irzykowski, Witold

    2017-03-22

    The biomass of Salix viminalis is the most highly valued source of green energy, followed by S. schwerinii, S. dasyclados and other species. Significant variability in productivity and leaf rust resistance are noted both within and among willow species, which creates new opportunities for improving willow yield parameters through selection of desirable recombinants supported with molecular markers. The aim of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) linked with biomass yield-related traits and the resistance/susceptibility of Salix mapping population to leaf rust. The experimental material comprised a mapping population developed based on S. viminalis × S. schwerinii hybrids. Phenotyping was performed on plants grown in a field experiment that had a balanced incomplete block design with 10 replications. Based on a genetic map, 11 QTLs were identified for plant height, 9 for shoot diameter, 3 for number of shoots and 11 for resistance/susceptibility to leaf rust. The QTLs identified in our study explained 3%-16% of variability in the analyzed traits. Our findings make significant contributions to the development of willow breeding programs and research into shrubby willow crops grown for energy.

  17. Sequence and transcriptional analysis of the Streptomyces glaucescens tcmAR tetracenomycin C resistance and repressor gene loci.

    PubMed Central

    Guilfoile, P G; Hutchinson, C R

    1992-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the tcmA tetracenomycin C resistance gene from Streptomyces glaucescens GLA.O (ETH 22794) identifies one large open reading frame whose deduced product has sequence similarity to the mmr methylenomycin resistance gene from Streptomyces coelicolor, the Streptomyces rimosus tet347 (otrB) tetracycline resistance gene, and the atr1 aminotriazole resistance gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These genes are thought to encode proteins that act as metabolite export pumps powered by transmembrane electrochemical gradients. A divergently transcribed gene, tcmR, is located in the region upstream of tcmA. The deduced product of tcmR resembles the repressor proteins encoded by tetR regulatory genes from Escherichia coli and the actII-orf1 gene from S. coelicolor. Transcriptional analysis of tcmA and tcmR indicates that these genes have back-to-back and overlapping promoter regions. Images PMID:1592819

  18. Case-control study of allele frequencies of 15 short tandem repeat loci in males with impulsive violent behavior.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Ba, Huajie; Gao, Zhiqin; Zhao, Hanqing; Yu, Haiying; Guo, Wei

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of genetic polymorphisms in short tandem repeats (STRs) is an accepted method for detecting associations between genotype and phenotype but it has not previously been used in the study of the genetics of impulsive violent behavior. Compare the prevalence of different polymorphisms in 15 STR loci (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818 and FGA) between men with a history of impulsive violence and male control subjects without a history of impulsive violence. The distributions of the alleles of the 15 STR loci were compared between 407 cases with impulsive violent behavior and 415 controls using AmpFlSTR(®) Identifiler™ kits. COMPARED TO CONTROLS, THE AVERAGE FREQUENCIES OF THE FOLLOWING ALLELES WERE SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER IN INDIVIDUALS WITH A HISTORY OF VIOLENT BEHAVIOR: allele 10 of TH01 (OR=0.29, 95%CI=0.16-0.52, p<0.0001,), allele 8 of TPOX (OR=0.71, 95%CI=0.58-0.86, p=0.0005), allele 9 of TPOX (OR=0.65, 95%CI=0.47-0.89, p=0.0072) and allele 14 of CSF1PO (OR=0.27, 95%CI=0.11-0.68, p=0.0035). One allele was significantly higher in cases than controls: allele 11 of TPOX (OR=1.79, 95%CI=1.45-2.22, p<0.0001). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first behavioral genetic study that clearly demonstrates a close relationship between specific genetic markers and impulsive aggression in non-psychiatric offenders. Further prospective work will be needed to determine whether or not the alleles identified can be considered risk factors for impulsive aggression and, if so, the underlying mechanisms that result in this relationship.

  19. Hypertension: issues in control and resistance.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Marion R; Minor, Deborah S

    2009-10-01

    Hypertension remains uncontrolled in more than 50% of treated patients. Barriers to hypertension control include those that are patient-related, physician-related, and related to the health system. Identification of uncontrolled hypertension, pseudoresistant hyper-tension, and resistant hypertension require thoughtful attention to accurate blood pressure measurement, lifestyle factors, evaluation for secondary causes of hypertension, and proper treatment. Recent guidelines emphasize the importance of aggressive treatment and referral to hypertension specialists for patients with resistant hypertension, defined as blood pressure that remains above goal despite the use of three appropriate anti-hypertensive agents.

  20. Linkage disequilibrium between two distinct loci in chromosomes 5 and 7 of Plasmodium falciparum and in vivo chloroquine resistance in Southwest Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Happi, C T; Gbotosho, G O; Folarin, O A; Sowunmi, A; Bolaji, O M; Fateye, B A; Kyle, D E; Milhous, W; Wirth, D F; Oduola, A M J

    2006-12-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) resistance in Plasmodium falciparum is associated with polymorphisms in loci on pfcrt and pfmdr1 genes. In this study, we determined the association and linkage disequilibrium between in vivo CQ resistance and P. falciparum polymorphisms in pfcrt gene at codon 76 and pfmdr1 gene at codon 86 in isolates obtained from 111 children with acute uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Nigeria. Patients were treated with standard dosage of CQ and followed up for 28 days. Filter paper samples were collected at enrollment and during follow-up for parasites genotypes and identification of pfcrt and pfmdr1 mutations. Association and linkage disequilibrium between mutant pfcrtT76 and pfmdr1Y86 alleles in pretreatment isolates of P. falciparum was determined. Fifty-five out of the 111 patients (49.5%) failed treatment. Single mutant pfcrtT76 or pfmdr1Y86 alleles were found in 55 out of 111 P. falciparum isolates screened at enrollment. Of these 55 isolates, the mutant pfcrtT76 and pfmdr1Y86 alleles were found in 84%. Both mutant pfcrtT76 (p=0.0196) and pfmdr1Y86 (p=0.000042) alleles were associated with in vivo CQ resistance. In addition, the mutant pfcrtT76 (p=0.047) and pfmdr1Y86 (p=0.006) alleles were significantly selected by CQ in patients who failed treatment. Association analysis between paired single alleles at pfcrt and pfmdr1 loci showed a significant association (p=0.0349 and chi(2)=4.45) between the pfcrt T76 allele on chromosome 7 and the pfmdr1Y86 allele on chromosome 5 and that these two mutant alleles were in linkage disequilibrium (p=0.000, D'=0.64, and r(2)=0.28). Considering the high level of CQ resistance and drug use in the study area, the observed linkage disequilibrium between the mutant pfcrtT76 and pfmdr1Y86 alleles is maintained epistatically through directional CQ selective pressure.

  1. SIPA1L2, MIR4697, GCH1 and VPS13C loci and risk of Parkinson's diseases in Iranian population: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Safaralizadeh, Tannaz; Jamshidi, Javad; Esmaili Shandiz, Ehsan; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Fazeli, Atena; Emamalizadeh, Babak; Manafi, Navid; Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Tafakhori, Abbas; Darvish, Hossein

    2016-10-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. Prevalence of PD increases steadily with age. A recent meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies has identified six new loci to be linked with PD. Here we investigated the association of four of these new loci, SIPA1L2, MIR4697, GCH1 and VPS13C with PD in an Iranian population. Through a case-control study a total of 1800 subjects comprising 600 PD patients and 1200 unrelated healthy controls were recruited. Rs10797576, rs329648, rs11158026 and rs2414739 related to SIPA1L2, MIR4697, GCH1 and VPS13C loci respectively, were genotyped in all subjects. The difference of genotype and allele frequencies between case and control groups were investigated using chi-square test and logistic regression models with R software. Genotype and allele frequencies were significantly different in PD patients and control group for rs329648, rs11158026 and rs2414739 (p-value=0.018, 0.025, and 0.009 respectively for allele frequency differences). There was no difference in genotype nor allele frequencies between the two groups for rs10797576. We replicated the association of three new loci which are proposed for PD. More studies in other populations and also functional analysis are required to clear the role of these variants in PD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Genes and quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling trace element concentrations in perennial grasses grown on phytotoxic soil contaminated with heavy metals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Perennial grasses cover diverse soils throughout the world, including sites contaminated with heavy metals, producing forages that must be safe for livestock and wildlife. Chromosome regions known as quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling forage mineral concentrations were mapped in a populatio...

  3. Identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to Fusarium crown rot (Fusarium pseudograminearum) in multiple assay environments in the Pacific Northwestern US.

    PubMed

    Poole, G J; Smiley, R W; Paulitz, T C; Walker, C A; Carter, A H; See, D R; Garland-Campbell, K

    2012-06-01

    Fusarium crown rot (FCR), caused by Fusarium pseudograminearum and F. culmorum, reduces wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) yields in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of the US by as much as 35%. Resistance to FCR has not yet been discovered in currently grown PNW wheat cultivars. Several significant quantitative trait loci (QTL) for FCR resistance have been documented on chromosomes 1A, 1D, 2B, 3B, and 4B in resistant Australian cultivars. Our objective was to identify QTL and tightly linked SSR markers for FCR resistance in the partially resistant Australian spring wheat cultivar Sunco using PNW isolates of F. pseudograminerarum in greenhouse and field based screening nurseries. A second objective was to compare heritabilities of FCR resistance in multiple types of disease assaying environments (seedling, terrace, and field) using multiple disease rating methods. Two recombinant inbred line (RIL) mapping populations were derived from crosses between Sunco and PNW spring wheat cultivars Macon and Otis. The Sunco/Macon population comprised 219 F(6):F(7) lines and the Sunco/Otis population comprised 151 F(5):F(6) lines. Plants were inoculated with a single PNW F. pseudograminearum isolate (006-13) in growth room (seedling), outdoor terrace (adult) and field (adult) assays conducted from 2008 through 2010. Crown and lower stem tissues of seedling and adult plants were rated for disease severity on several different scales, but mainly on a numeric scale from 0 to 10 where 0 = no discoloration and 10 = severe disease. Significant QTL were identified on chromosomes 2B, 3B, 4B, 4D, and 7A with LOD scores ranging from 3 to 22. The most significant and consistent QTL across screening environments was located on chromosome 3BL, inherited from the PNW cultivars Macon and Otis, with maximum LOD scores of 22 and 9 explaining 36 and 23% of the variation, respectively for the Sunco/Macon and Sunco/Otis populations. The SSR markers Xgwm247 and Xgwm299 flank these QTL and are being

  4. Resistance of Mice of the 129 Background to Yersinia pestis Maps to Multiple Loci on Chromosome 1

    PubMed Central

    Tencati, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia pestis is a Gram-negative bacterium that is the causative agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague. It is commonly acquired by mammals such as rodents and humans via the bite of an infected flea. We previously reported that multiple substrains of the 129 mouse background are resistant to pigmentation locus-negative (pgm−) Yersinia pestis and that this phenotype maps to a 30-centimorgan (cM) region located on chromosome 1. In this study, we have further delineated this plague resistance locus to a region of less than 20 cM through the creation and phenotyping of recombinant offspring arising from novel crossovers in this region. Furthermore, our experiments have revealed that there are at least two alleles in this initial locus, both of which are required for resistance on a susceptible C57BL/6 background. These two alleles work in trans since resistance is restored in offspring possessing one allele contributed by each parent. Our studies also indicated that the Slc11a1 gene (formerly known as Nramp1) located within the chromosome1 locus is not responsible for conferring resistance to 129 mice. PMID:27481241

  5. Antibiotic policies and control of resistance.

    PubMed

    Gould, Ian M

    2002-08-01

    The current worldwide pandemic of antibiotic resistance shows no signs of abating. It is clear that it is driven mainly by heavy and often inappropriate antibiotic use. Although control measures are widely practised, it is important that we assess their efficacy critically in order to concentrate expensive control efforts where they will be most effective. The past year has seen much activity in this area, with evidence-based assessments of the literature according to strict guidelines, as well as progress in basic science studies of mechanisms of resistance, and their causes and relations to pathogenicity and adaptability. The present review summarizes current developments in the causes of antibiotic resistance, the classification of antibiotic stewardship and control measures, the evidence base for their efficacy, current problems in hospital practice, the adaptability of bacteria, the content of antibiotic policies and anticipated activities. The conclusions from the published literature are that much of it that pertains to changing prescribing practices does not stand up to modern evidence-based analysis concepts. Nevertheless, we can learn from experience in changing other areas of medical practice. We must be pragmatic and must not expect to change the world, but rather take it step by step, recognizing barriers and measuring outcomes and quality indicators. Studies into the molecular basis of resistance confirm the superb genetic adaptability of micro-organisms. They will always be several steps ahead of us. Nevertheless, we are learning how to modify our prescribing habits to minimize resistance, not only by using antibiotics less frequently but also by altering dosing schedules in various ways.

  6. Emergence of Tetracycline Resistance in Helicobacter pylori: Multiple Mutational Changes in 16S Ribosomal DNA and Other Genetic Loci

    PubMed Central

    Dailidiene, Daiva; Bertoli, M. Teresita; Miciuleviciene, Jolanta; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Dailide, Giedrius; Pascasio, Mario Alberto; Kupcinskas, Limas; Berg, Douglas E.

    2002-01-01

    Tetracycline is useful in combination therapies against the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. We found 6 tetracycline-resistant (Tetr) strains among 159 clinical isolates (from El Salvador, Lithuania, and India) and obtained the following four results: (i) 5 of 6 Tetr isolates contained one or two nucleotide substitutions in one part of the primary tetracycline binding site in 16S rRNA (AGA965-967 [Escherichia coli coordinates] changed to gGA, AGc, guA, or gGc [lowercase letters are used to represent the base changes]), whereas the sixth (isolate Ind75) retained AGA965-967; (ii) PCR products containing mutant 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) alleles transformed recipient strains to Tetr phenotypes, but transformants containing alleles with single substitutions (gGA and AGc) were less resistant than their Tetr parents; (iii) each of 10 Tetr mutants of reference strain 26695 (in which mutations were induced with metronidazole, a mutagenic anti-H. pylori agent) contained the normal AGA965-967 sequence; and (iv) transformant derivatives of Ind75 and of one of the Tetr 26695 mutants that had acquired mutant rDNA alleles were resistant to tetracycline at levels higher than those to which either parent strain was resistant. Thus, tetracycline resistance in H. pylori results from an accumulation of changes that may affect tetracycline-ribosome affinity and/or other functions (perhaps porins or efflux pumps). We suggest that the rarity of tetracycline resistance among clinical isolates reflects this need for multiple mutations and perhaps also the deleterious effects of such mutations on fitness. Formally equivalent mutations with small but additive effects are postulated to contribute importantly to traits such as host specificity and virulence and to H. pylori's great genetic diversity. PMID:12435699

  7. Mapping of genomic regions (quantitative trait loci) controlling production and quality in industrial cultures of the edible basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Larraya, Luis M; Alfonso, Mikel; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Ramírez, Lucía

    2003-06-01

    Industrial production of the edible basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom) is based on a solid fermentation process in which a limited number of selected strains are used. Optimization of industrial mushroom production depends on improving the culture process and breeding new strains with higher yields and productivities. Traditionally, fungal breeding has been carried out by an empirical trial and error process. In this study, we used a different approach by mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling culture production and quality within the framework of the genetic linkage map of P. ostreatus. Ten production traits and four quality traits were studied and mapped. The production QTLs identified explain nearly one-half of the production variation. More interestingly, a single QTL mapping to the highly polymorphic chromosome VII appears to be involved in control of all the productivity traits studied. Quality QTLs appear to be scattered across the genome and to have less effect on the variation of the corresponding traits. Moreover, some of the new hybrid strains constructed in the course of our experiments had production or quality values higher than those of the parents or other commercial strains. This approach opens the possibility of marker-assisted selection and breeding of new industrial strains of this fungus.

  8. Mapping of Genomic Regions (Quantitative Trait Loci) Controlling Production and Quality in Industrial Cultures of the Edible Basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Larraya, Luis M.; Alfonso, Mikel; Pisabarro, Antonio G.; Ramírez, Lucía

    2003-01-01

    Industrial production of the edible basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom) is based on a solid fermentation process in which a limited number of selected strains are used. Optimization of industrial mushroom production depends on improving the culture process and breeding new strains with higher yields and productivities. Traditionally, fungal breeding has been carried out by an empirical trial and error process. In this study, we used a different approach by mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling culture production and quality within the framework of the genetic linkage map of P. ostreatus. Ten production traits and four quality traits were studied and mapped. The production QTLs identified explain nearly one-half of the production variation. More interestingly, a single QTL mapping to the highly polymorphic chromosome VII appears to be involved in control of all the productivity traits studied. Quality QTLs appear to be scattered across the genome and to have less effect on the variation of the corresponding traits. Moreover, some of the new hybrid strains constructed in the course of our experiments had production or quality values higher than those of the parents or other commercial strains. This approach opens the possibility of marker-assisted selection and breeding of new industrial strains of this fungus. PMID:12788770

  9. Identification of quantitative trait loci(QTL) controlling important fatty acids in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fatty acids play important role in controlling oil quality of peanut. In addition to the major fatty acids, oleic acid (C18:1) and linoleic acid (C18:2) accounting for about 80%, there are several minor fatty acids accounting for about 20% in peanut oil, such as palmitic acid (PA, C16:0), stearic (S...

  10. Genome-wide detection of genetic loci associated with soybean aphid resistance in soybean germplasm PI 603712

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) has become one of the major pests of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) in North America since 2000. At least four biotypes of soybean aphid have been confirmed in the United States. Genetic characterization of new sources of soybean aphid resistance will facil...

  11. Genome-wide association studies identify 25 genetic loci associated with resistance to Bacterial Cold Water Disease in rainbow trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant mortality and economic losses in salmonids aquaculture. In previous studies we have identified moderate-large effect QTL for BCWD resistance in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). However, the recent availability of a high density SNP array and...

  12. Association mapping of quantitative trait loci responsible for resistance to Bacterial Leaf Streak and Spot Blotch in spring wheat landraces

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial leaf streak (BLS), caused by Xanthomonas translucens pv. undulosa, and spot blotch (SB), caused by Cochliobolus sativus are two major diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Planting resistant cultivars is the best approach to manage these diseases and identifying new sources of resistan...

  13. Mapping Fusarium solani and Aphanomyces euteiches root rot resistance and root architecture quantitative trait loci in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Root rot diseases of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are a constraint to dry and snap bean production. We developed the RR138 RIL mapping population from the cross of OSU5446, a susceptible line that meets current snap bean processing industry standards, and RR6950, a root rot resistant dry bean in th...

  14. Molecular mapping of greenbug resistance loci Gb6 and Gb2 in 1AL.1RS wheat-rye translocations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani), is an economically important aphid pest of wheat worldwide. The greenbug resistance genes Gb2 and Gb6, derived from the same donor rye line 'Insave', are presented in wheat germplasm lines 'Amigo' and 'GRS1201' respectively as 1AL.1RS wheat-rye transloca...

  15. Turn Up the Heat—Food and Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates Feature Two Transferrable Loci of Heat Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Erik J.; Marti, Roger; Hasman, Henrik; Overballe-Petersen, Søren; Stegger, Marc; Ng, Kim; Knøchel, Susanne; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Hummerjohann, Joerg; Struve, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Heat treatment is a widely used process to reduce bacterial loads in the food industry or to decontaminate surfaces, e.g., in hospital settings. However, there are situations where lower temperatures must be employed, for instance in case of food production such as raw milk cheese or for decontamination of medical devices such as thermo-labile flexible endoscopes. A recently identified locus of heat resistance (LHR) has been shown to be present in and confer heat resistance to a variety of Enterobacteriaceae, including Escherichia coli isolates from food production settings and clinical ESBL-producing E. coli isolates. Here, we describe the presence of two distinct LHR variants within a particularly heat resistant E. coli raw milk cheese isolate. We demonstrate for the first time in this species the presence of one of these LHRs on a plasmid, designated pFAM21805, also encoding type 3 fimbriae and three bacteriocins and corresponding self-immunity proteins. The plasmid was highly transferable to other E. coli strains, including Shiga-toxin-producing strains, and conferred LHR-dependent heat resistance as well as type 3 fimbriae-dependent biofilm formation capabilities. Selection for and acquisition of this “survival” plasmid by pathogenic organisms, e.g., in food production environments, may pose great concern and emphasizes the need to screen for the presence of LHR genes in isolates. PMID:28439262

  16. Mapping Fusarium solani and Aphanomyces euteiches root rot resistance and root architecture quantitative trait loci in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Root rot diseases of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are a constraint to dry and snap bean production. We developed the RR138 RIL mapping population from the cross of OSU5446, a susceptible line that meets current snap bean processing industry standards, and RR6950, a root rot resistant dry bean in th...

  17. Mapping quantitative trait loci for plant adaptation and morphology traits in wheat using single nucleotide polymorphisms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) morphological and adaptation-related traits that are controlled by quantitative traits loci (QTL) define potential growing areas of a wheat cultivar. To dissect the QTL for heading date (HD), lodging resistance (LR), shattering resistance (SR), cold tolerance (CT), plant...

  18. Distribution of antimicrobial resistance determinants, virulence-associated factors and clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats loci in isolates of Enterococcus faecalis from various settings and genetic lineages.

    PubMed

    Gawryszewska, Iwona; Malinowska, Katarzyna; Kuch, Alicja; Chrobak-Chmiel, Dorota; Trokenheim, Lucja Laniewska-; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Sadowy, Ewa

    2017-03-01

    Enterococcus faecalis represents an important factor of hospital-associated infections (HAIs). The knowledge on its evolution from a commensal to an opportunistic pathogen is still limited; thus, we performed a study to characterise distribution of factors that may contribute to this adaptation. Using a collection obtained from various settings (hospitalised patients, community carriers, animals, fresh food, sewage, water), we investigated differences in antimicrobial susceptibility, distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes, virulence-associated determinants and phenotypes, and CRISPR loci in the context of the clonal relatedness of isolates. Bayesian Analysis of Population Structure revealed the presence of three major groups; two subgroups comprised almost exclusively HAI isolates, belonging to previously proposed enterococcal high-risk clonal complexes (HiRECCs) 6 and 28. Isolates of these two subgroups were significantly enriched in antimicrobial resistance genes, presumably produced a polysaccharide capsule and often carried the aggregation substance asa1; distribution of other virulence-associated genes, such as esp and cyl, formation of a biofilm and gelatinase production were more variable. Moreover, both subgroups showed a low prevalence of CRISPR-Cas 1 and 3 and presence of small CRISPR2 variants. Our study confirms the importance of HiRECCs in the population of E. faecalis and their confinement to the hospital settings. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Identification of Novel Loci Associated with Gastrointestinal Parasite Resistance in a Red Maasai x Dorper Backcross Population

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Stephen; Mugambi, John M.; Gibson, John P.; Baker, Robert Leyden; Hanotte, Olivier; Marshall, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) parasitic infection is the main health constraint for small ruminant production, causing loss of weight and/or death. Red Maasai sheep have adapted to a tropical environment where extreme parasite exposure is a constant, especially with highly pathogenic Haemonchus contortus. This breed has been reported to be resistant to gastrointestinal parasite infection, hence it is considered an invaluable resource to study associations between host genetics and resistance. The aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms strongly associated with host resistance in a double backcross population derived from Red Maasai and Dorper sheep using a SNP-based GWAS analysis. The animals that were genotyped represented the most resistant and susceptible individuals based on the tails of phenotypic distribution (10% each) for average faecal egg counts (AVFEC). AVFEC, packed cell volume (AVPCV), and live weight (AVLWT) were adjusted for fixed effects and co-variables, and an association analysis was run using EMMAX. Revised significance levels were calculated using 100,000 permutation tests. The top five significant SNP markers with - log10 p-values >3.794 were observed on five different chromosomes for AVFEC, and BLUPPf90/PostGSf90 results confirmed EMMAX significant regions for this trait. One of these regions included a cluster of significant SNP on chromosome (Chr) 6 not in linkage disequilibrium to each other. This genomic location contains annotated genes involved in cytokine signalling, haemostasis and mucus biosynthesis. Only one association detected on Chr 7 was significant for both AVPCV and AVLWT. The results generated here reveal candidate immune variants for genes involved in differential response to infection and provide additional SNP marker information that has potential to aid selection of resistance to gastrointestinal parasites in sheep of a similar genetic background to the double backcross population. PMID:25867089

  20. Tomato mutants altered in bacterial disease resistance provide evidence for a new locus controlling pathogen recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Salmeron, J M; Barker, S J; Carland, F M; Mehta, A Y; Staskawicz, B J

    1994-01-01

    We have employed a genetic approach to study the resistance of tomato to the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato. Resistance to P. s. tomato depends upon expression of the Pto locus in tomato, which encodes a protein with similarity to serine/threonine protein kinases and recognizes pathogen strains expressing the avirulence gene avrPto. Eleven tomato mutants were isolated with altered resistance to P. s. tomato strains expressing avrPto. We identified mutations both in the Pto resistance locus and in a new locus designated Prf (for Pseudomonas resistance and fenthion sensitivity). The genetic approach allowed us to dissect the roles of these loci in signal transduction in response to pathogen attack. Lines carrying mutations in the Pto locus vary 200-fold in the degree to which they are susceptible to P. s. tomato strains expressing avrPto. The pto mutants retain sensitivity to the organophosphate insecticide fenthion; this trait segregates with Pto in genetic crosses. This result suggested that contrary to previous hypotheses, the Pto locus controls pathogen recognition but not fenthion sensitivity. Interestingly, mutations in the prf locus result in both complete susceptibility to P. s. tomato and insensitivity to fenthion, suggesting that Prf plays a role in tomato signaling in response to both pathogen elicitors and fenthion. Because pto and prf mutations do not alter recognition of Xanthomonas campestris strains expressing avrBsP, an avirulence gene recognized by all tested tomato cultivars, Prf does not play a general role in disease resistance but possibly functions specifically in resistance against P. s. tomato. Genetic analysis of F2 populations from crosses of pto and prf homozygotes indicated that the Pto and Prf loci are tightly linked. PMID:7911348

  1. Bias in effect size of systemic lupus erythematosus susceptibility loci across Europe: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to investigate whether the effect size of the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) risk alleles varies across European subpopulations. Methods European SLE patients (n = 1,742) and ethnically matched healthy controls (n = 2,101) were recruited at 17 centres from 10 different countries. Only individuals with self-reported ancestry from the country of origin were included. In addition, participants were genotyped for top ancestry informative markers and for 25 SLE associated SNPs. The results were used to compare effect sizes between the Central Eureopan and Southern European subgroups. Results Twenty of the 25 SNPs showed independent association with SLE, These SNPs showed a significant bias to larger effect sizes in the Southern subgroup, with 15/20 showing this trend (P = 0.019) and a larger mean odds ratio of the 20 SNPs (1.46 vs. 1.34, P = 0.02) as well as a larger difference in the number of risk alleles (2.06 vs. 1.63, P = 0.027) between SLE patients and controls than for Central Europeans. This bias was reflected in a very significant difference in the cumulative genetic risk score (4.31 vs. 3.48, P = 1.8 × 10-32). Effect size bias was accompanied by a lower number of SLE risk alleles in the Southern subjects, both patients and controls, the difference being more marked between the controls (P = 1.1 × 10-8) than between the Southern and Central European patients (P = 0.016). Seven of these SNPs showed significant allele frequency clines. Conclusion Our findings showed a bias to larger effect sizes of SLE loci in the Southern Europeans relative to the Central Europeans together with clines of SLE risk allele frequencies. These results indicate the need to study risk allele clines and the implications of the polygenic model of inheritance in SLE. PMID:22541939

  2. Increasing insulin resistance accentuates the effect of triglyceride-associated loci on serum triglycerides during 5 years.

    PubMed

    Justesen, Johanne M; Andersson, Ehm A; Allin, Kristine H; Sandholt, Camilla H; Jørgensen, Torben; Linneberg, Allan; Jørgensen, Marit E; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Grarup, Niels

    2016-12-01

    Blood concentrations of triglycerides are influenced by genetic factors as well as a number of environmental factors, including adiposity and glucose homeostasis. The aim was to investigate the association between a serum triglyceride weighted genetic risk score (wGRS) and changes in fasting serum triglyceride level over 5 years and to test whether the effect of the wGRS was modified by 5 year changes of adiposity, insulin resistance, and lifestyle factors. A total of 3,474 nondiabetic individuals from the Danish Inter99 cohort participated in both the baseline and 5 year follow-up physical examinations and had information on the wGRS comprising 39 genetic variants. In a linear regression model adjusted for age, sex, and baseline serum triglyceride, the wGRS was associated with increased serum triglyceride levels over 5 years [per allele effect = 1.3% (1.0-1.6%); P = 1.0 × 10(-17)]. This triglyceride-increasing effect of the wGRS interacted with changes in insulin resistance (Pinteraction = 1.5 × 10(-6)). This interaction indicated that the effect of the wGRS was stronger in individuals who became more insulin resistant over 5 years. In conclusion, our findings suggest that increased genetic risk load is associated with a larger increase in fasting serum triglyceride levels in nondiabetic individuals during 5 years of follow-up. This effect of the wGRS is accentuated by increasing insulin resistance. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Quantitative trait loci that control body weight in DDD/Sgn and C57BL/6J inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Suto, Jun-Ichi; Kojima, Misaki

    2017-02-01

    Inbred DDD/Sgn mice are heavier than inbred C57BL/6J mice. In the present study, we performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping for body weight using R/qtl in reciprocal F2 male populations between the two strains. We identified four significant QTL on Chrs 1, 2, 5, and 17 (proximal region). The DDD/Sgn allele was associated with increased body weight at QTL on Chrs 1 and 5, and the DDD/Sgn allele was associated with decreased body weight at QTL on Chrs 2 and 17. A multiple regression analysis indicated that the detected QTL explain 30.94 % of the body weight variation. Because DDD/Sgn male mice have extremely high levels of circulating testosterone relative to other inbred mouse strains, we performed QTL mapping for plasma testosterone level to examine the effect of testosterone levels on body weight. We identified one suggestive QTL on Chr 5, which overlapped with body weight QTL. The DDD/Sgn allele was associated with increased testosterone level. Thus, we confirmed that there was a genetic basis for the changes in body weight and testosterone levels in male mice. These findings provide insights into the genetic mechanism by which body weight is controlled in male mice.

  4. Major quantitative trait loci control divergence in critical photoperiod for flowering between selfing and outcrossing species of monkeyflower (Mimulus).

    PubMed

    Fishman, Lila; Sweigart, Andrea L; Kenney, Amanda M; Campbell, Samantha

    2014-03-01

    • Divergence in flowering time is a key contributor to reproductive isolation between incipient species, as it enforces habitat specialization and causes assortative mating even in sympatry. Understanding the genetic basis of flowering time divergence illuminates the origins and maintenance of species barriers. • We investigated the genetics of divergence in critical photoperiod for flowering between yellow monkeyflowers Mimulus guttatus (outcrosser, summer flowering) and Mimulus nasutus (selfer, spring flowering). We used quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping of F2 hybrids and fine-mapping in nearly isogenic lines to characterize the genomic regions underlying a > 2 h critical photoperiod difference between allopatric populations, and then tested whether the same QTLs control flowering time in sympatry. • We identified two major QTLs that almost completely explain M. nasutus's ability to flower in early spring; they are shared by allopatric and sympatric population pairs. The smaller QTL is coincident with one that differentiates ecotypes within M. guttatus, but the larger effect QTL appears unique to M. nasutus. • Unlike floral traits associated with mating system divergence, large interspecific differences in flowering phenology depend on only a few loci. Major critical photoperiod QTLs may be 'speciation genes' and also restrict interspecific gene flow in secondary sympatry.

  5. Mapping quantitative trait loci controlling early growth in a (longleaf pine x slash pine) x slash pine BC(1) family.

    PubMed

    Weng, C.; Kubisiak, L.; Nelson, D.; Stine, M.

    2002-04-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were employed to map the genome and quantitative trait loci controlling the early growth of a pine hybrid F(1) tree ( Pinus palustris Mill. x P. elliottii Engl.) and a recurrent slash pine tree ( P. elliottii Engl.) in a (longleaf pine x slash pine) x slash pine BC(1) family consisting of 258 progeny. Of the 150 hybrid F(1) parent-specific RAPD markers, 133 were mapped into 17 linkage groups covering a genetic distance of 1,338.2 cM. Of the 116 slash pine parent-specific RAPD markers, 83 were mapped into 19 linkage groups covering a genetic distance of 994.6 cM. A total of 11 different marker intervals were found to be significantly associated with 13 of the 20 traits on height and diameter growth using MAPMAKER/QTL. Nine of the eleven marker intervals were unique to the hybrid parent 488 genome, and two were unique to the recurrent parent 18-27 genome. The amount of phenotypic variance explained by the putative QTLs ranged from 3.6% to 11.0%. Different QTLs were detected at different ages. Two marker intervals from the hybrid parent 488 were found to have QTL by environment interactions.

  6. Orthogonal control of expression mean and variance by epigenetic features at different genomic loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Siddharth S.; Foley, Jonathan E.; Limsirichai, Prajit; Schaffer, David V.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-05-05

    While gene expression noise has been shown to drive dramatic phenotypic variations, the molecular basis for this variability in mammalian systems is not well understood. Gene expression has been shown to be regulated by promoter architecture and the associated chromatin environment. However, the exact contribution of these two factors in regulating expression noise has not been explored. Using a dual-reporter lentiviral model system, we deconvolved the influence of the promoter sequence to systematically study the contribution of the chromatin environment at different genomic locations in regulating expression noise. By integrating a large-scale analysis to quantify mRNA levels by smFISH and protein levels by flow cytometry in single cells, we found that mean expression and noise are uncorrelated across genomic locations. Furthermore, we showed that this independence could be explained by the orthogonal control of mean expression by the transcript burst size and noise by the burst frequency. Finally, we showed that genomic locations displaying higher expression noise are associated with more repressed chromatin, thereby indicating the contribution of the chromatin environment in regulating expression noise.

  7. Orthogonal control of expression mean and variance by epigenetic features at different genomic loci

    DOE PAGES

    Dey, Siddharth S.; Foley, Jonathan E.; Limsirichai, Prajit; ...

    2015-05-05

    While gene expression noise has been shown to drive dramatic phenotypic variations, the molecular basis for this variability in mammalian systems is not well understood. Gene expression has been shown to be regulated by promoter architecture and the associated chromatin environment. However, the exact contribution of these two factors in regulating expression noise has not been explored. Using a dual-reporter lentiviral model system, we deconvolved the influence of the promoter sequence to systematically study the contribution of the chromatin environment at different genomic locations in regulating expression noise. By integrating a large-scale analysis to quantify mRNA levels by smFISH andmore » protein levels by flow cytometry in single cells, we found that mean expression and noise are uncorrelated across genomic locations. Furthermore, we showed that this independence could be explained by the orthogonal control of mean expression by the transcript burst size and noise by the burst frequency. Finally, we showed that genomic locations displaying higher expression noise are associated with more repressed chromatin, thereby indicating the contribution of the chromatin environment in regulating expression noise.« less

  8. What controls aqueous humour outflow resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The bulk of aqueous humour outflow resistance is generated in or near the inner wall endothelium of Schlemm's canal in normal eyes, and probably also in glaucomatous eyes. Fluid flow through this region is controlled by the location of the giant vacuoles and pores found in cells of the endothelium of Schlemm's canal, but the flow resistance itself is more likely generated either in the extracellular matrix of the juxtacanalicular connective tissue or the basement membrane of Schlemm's canal. Future studies utilizing in vitro perfusion studies of inner wall endothelial cells may give insights into the process by which vacuoles and pores form in this unique endothelium and why inner wall pore density is greatly reduced in glaucoma. PMID:16386733

  9. Two Loci Control Phytoglycogen Production in the Monocellular Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    PubMed Central

    Dauvillée, David; Colleoni, Christophe; Mouille, Gregory; Buléon, Alain; Gallant, Daniel J.; Bouchet, Brigitte; Morell, Matthew K.; d'Hulst, Christophe; Myers, Alan M.; Ball, Steven G.

    2001-01-01

    The STA8 locus of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was identified in a genetic screen as a factor that controls starch biosynthesis. Mutations of STA8 cause a significant reduction in the amount of granular starch produced during nutrient limitation and accumulate phytoglycogen. The granules remaining in sta8 mutants are misshapen, and the abundance of amylose and long chains in amylopectin is altered. Mutations of the STA7 locus, which completely lack isoamylase activity, also cause accumulation of phytoglycogen, although sta8 and sta7 mutants differ in that there is a complete loss of granular starch in the latter. This is the first instance in which mutations of two different genetic elements in one plant species have been shown to cause phytoglycogen accumulation. An analytical procedure that allows assay of isoamylase in total extracts was developed and used to show that sta8 mutations cause a 65% reduction in the level of this activity. All other enzymes known to be involved in starch biosynthesis were shown to be unaffected in sta8 mutants. The same amount of total isoamylase activity (approximately) as that present in sta8 mutants was observed in heterozygous triploids containing two sta7 mutant alleles and one wild-type allele. This strain, however, accumulates normal levels of starch granules and lacks phytoglycogen. The total level of isoamylase activity, therefore, is not the major determinant of whether granule production is reduced and phytoglycogen accumulates. Instead, a qualitative property of the isoamylase that is affected by the sta8 mutation is likely to be the critical factor in phytoglycogen production. PMID:11299352

  10. A search for quantitative trait loci controlling within-individual variation of physical activity traits in mice.

    PubMed

    Leamy, Larry J; Pomp, Daniel; Lightfoot, J Timothy

    2010-09-21

    In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that physical inactivity can predispose individuals to a host of health problems. While many studies have analyzed the effect of various environmental factors on activity, we know much less about the genetic control of physical activity. Some studies in mice have discovered quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing various physical activity traits, but mostly have analyzed inter-individual variation rather than variation in activity within individuals over time. We conducted a genome scan to identify QTLs controlling the distance, duration, and time run by mice over seven consecutive three-day intervals in an F2 population created by crossing two inbred strains (C57L/J and C3H/HeJ) that differed widely (average of nearly 300%) in their activity levels. Our objectives were (a) to see if we would find QTLs not originally discovered in a previous investigation that assessed these traits over the entire 21-day period and (b) to see if some of these QTLs discovered might affect the activity traits only in the early or in the late time intervals. This analysis uncovered 39 different QTLs, over half of which were new. Some QTLs affected the activity traits only in the early time intervals and typically exhibited significant dominance effects whereas others affected activity only in the later age intervals and exhibited less dominance. We also analyzed the regression slopes of the activity traits over the intervals, and found several QTLs affecting these traits that generally mapped to unique genomic locations. It was concluded that the genetic architecture of physical activity in mice is much more complicated than has previously been recognized, and may change considerably depending on the age at which various activity measures are assessed.

  11. Putative resistance gene markers associated with quantitative trait loci for fire blight resistance in Malus ‘Robusta 5’ accessions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breeding of fire blight resistant scions and rootstocks is a goal of several international apple breeding programs, as options are limited for management of this destructive disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora. A broad, large-effect quantitative trait locus (QTL) for fire blight resistance has been reported on linkage group 3 of Malus ‘Robusta 5’. In this study we identified markers derived from putative fire blight resistance genes associated with the QTL by integrating further genetic mapping studies with bioinformatics analysis of transcript profiling data and genome sequence databases. Results When several defined E.amylovora strains were used to inoculate three progenies from international breeding programs, all with ‘Robusta 5’ as a common parent, two distinct QTLs were detected on linkage group 3, where only one had previously been mapped. In the New Zealand ‘Malling 9’ X ‘Robusta 5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora ICMP11176, the proximal QTL co-located with SNP markers derived from a leucine-rich repeat, receptor-like protein ( MxdRLP1) and a closely linked class 3 peroxidase gene. While the QTL detected in the German ‘Idared’ X ‘Robusta 5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea222_JKI or ICMP11176 was approximately 6 cM distal to this, directly below a SNP marker derived from a heat shock 90 family protein gene ( HSP90). In the US ‘Otawa3’ X ‘Robusta5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea273 or E2002a, the position of the LOD score peak on linkage group 3 was dependent upon the pathogen strains used for inoculation. One of the five MxdRLP1 alleles identified in fire blight resistant and susceptible cultivars was genetically associated with resistance and used to develop a high resolution melting PCR marker. A resistance QTL detected on linkage group 7 of the US population co-located with another HSP90 gene-family member and a WRKY transcription factor

  12. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Bolzonella, T.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Menmuir, S.; Ortolani, S.; Rachlew, E.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.

    2005-12-01

    A two-dimensional array of saddle coils at Mc poloidal and Nc toroidal positions is used on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (Brunsell P R et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 1457) to study active control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). Spontaneous growth of several RWMs with poloidal mode number m = 1 and different toroidal mode number n is observed experimentally, in agreement with linear MHD modelling. The measured plasma response to a controlled coil field and the plasma response computed using the linear circular cylinder MHD model are in quantitive agreement. Feedback control introduces a linear coupling of modes with toroidal mode numbers n, n' that fulfil the condition |n - n'| = Nc. Pairs of coupled unstable RWMs are present in feedback experiments with an array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 16 coils. Using intelligent shell feedback, the coupled modes are generally not controlled even though the field is suppressed at the active coils. A better suppression of coupled modes may be achieved in the case of rotating modes by using the mode control feedback scheme with individually set complex gains. In feedback with a larger array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 32 coils, the coupling effect largely disappears, and with this array, the main internal RWMs n = -11, -10, +5, +6 are all simultaneously suppressed throughout the discharge (7 8 wall times). With feedback there is a two-fold extension of the pulse length, compared to discharges without feedback.

  13. Mapping and validation of quantitative trait loci for resistance to Cercospora zeae-maydis infection in tropical maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Pozar, Gilberto; Butruille, David; Silva, Heyder Diniz; McCuddin, Zoe Patterson; Penna, Julio Cesar Viglioni

    2009-02-01

    Breeding for resistance to gray leaf spot, caused by Cercospora zeae-maydis (Cz) is paramount for many maize environments, in particular under warm and humid growing conditions. In this study, we mapped and characterized quantitative trait loci (QTL) involved in the resistance of maize against Cz. We confirmed the impact of the QTL on disease severity using near-isogenic lines (NILs), and estimated their effects on three major agronomic traits using their respective near isogenic hybrids (NIHs), which we obtained by crossing the NILs with an inbred from a complementary heterotic pool. We further validated three of the four QTL that were mapped using the Multiple Interval Mapping approach and showed LOD values>2.5. NILs genotype included all combinations between favorable alleles of the two QTL located in chromosome 1 (Q1 in bin 1.05 and Q2 in bin 1.07), and the allele in chromosome 3 (Q3 in bin 3.07). Each of the three QTL separately significantly reduced the severity of Cz. However, we found an unfavorable epistatic interaction between Q1 and Q2: presence of the favorable allele at one of the QTL allele effectively nullified the effect of the favorable allele at the other. In contrast, the interaction between Q2 and Q3 was additive, promoting the reduction of the severity to a greater extent than the sum of their individual effects. When evaluating the NIH we found significant individual effects for Q1 and Q3 on gray leaf spot severity, for Q2 on stalk lodging and grain yield, and for Q3 on grain moisture and stalk lodging. We detected significant epitasis between Q1 and Q2 for grain moisture and between Q1 and Q3 for stalk lodging. These results suggest that the combination of QTL impacts the effectiveness of marker-assisted selection procedures in commercial product development programs.

  14. Quantitative trait loci associated with constitutive traits control water use in pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br].

    PubMed

    Aparna, K; Nepolean, T; Srivastsava, R K; Kholová, J; Rajaram, V; Kumar, S; Rekha, B; Senthilvel, S; Hash, C T; Vadez, V

    2015-09-01

    There is substantial genetic variation for drought adaption in pearl millet in terms of traits controlling plant water use. It is important to understand genomic regions responsible for these traits. Here, F7 recombinant inbred lines were used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) and allelic interactions for traits affecting plant water use, and their relevance is discussed for crop productivity in water-limited environments. Four QTL contributed to increased transpiration rate under high vapour pressure deficit (VPD) conditions, all with alleles from drought-sensitive parent ICMB 841. Of these four QTL, a major QTL (35.7%) was mapped on linkage group (LG) 6. The alleles for 863B at this QTL decreased transpiration rate and this QTL co-mapped to a previously detected LG 6 QTL, with alleles from 863B for grain weight and panicle harvest index across severe terminal drought stress environments. This provided additional support for a link between water saving from a lower transpiration rate under high VPD and drought tolerance. 863B alleles in this same genomic region also increased shoot weight, leaf area and total transpiration under well-watered conditions. One unexpected outcome was reduced transpiration under high VPD (15%) from the interaction of two alleles for high VPD transpiration (LG 6 (B), 40.7) and specific leaf mass and biomass (LG 7 (A), 35.3), (A, allele from ICMB 841, B, allele from 863B, marker position). The LG 6 QTL appears to combine alleles for growth potential, beneficial for non-stress conditions, and for saving water under high evaporative demand, beneficial under stressful conditions. Mapping QTL for water-use traits, and assessing their interactions offers considerable potential for improving pearl millet adaptation to specific stress conditions through physiology-informed marker-assisted selection. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  15. Use of backcross recurrent selection and QTL mapping to identify loci contributing to southern leaf blight resistance in a highly resistant maize line

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    B73 is a commonly used maize line with excellent yield potential but high susceptibility to the foliar disease southern leaf blight (SLB). NC292 and NC330 are B73 near-isogenic lines (NILs) that are highly resistant to SLB. They were derived by repeated backcrossing an elite source of SLB resistanc...

  16. Evidence from two independent backcross experiments supports genetic linkage of microsatellite Hcms8a20, but not other candidate loci, to a major ivermectin resistance locus in Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Rezansoff, Andrew M; Laing, Roz; Gilleard, John S

    2016-09-01

    Haemonchus contortus is the leading parasitic nematode species used to study anthelmintic drug resistance. A variety of candidate loci have been implicated as being associated with ivermectin resistance in this parasite but definitive evidence of their importance is still lacking. We have previously performed two independent serial backcross experiments to introgress ivermectin resistance loci from two H. contortus ivermectin-resistant strains - MHco4(WRS) and MHco10(CAVR) - into the genetic background of the ivermectin-susceptible genome reference strain MHco3(ISE). We have interrogated a number of candidate ivermectin resistance loci in the resulting backcross populations and assessed the evidence for their genetic linkage to an ivermectin resistance locus. These include the microsatellite marker Hcms8a20 and six candidate genes Hco-glc-5, Hco-avr-14, Hco-lgc-37 (previously designated Hco-hg-1), Hco-pgp-9 (previously designated Hco-pgp-1), Hco-pgp-2 and Hco-dyf-7. We have sampled the haplotype diversity of amplicon markers within, or adjacent to, each of these loci in the parental strains and fourth generation backcross populations to assess the evidence for haplotype introgression from the resistant parental strain into the genomic background of the susceptible parental strain in each backcross. The microsatellite Hcms8a20 locus showed strong evidence of such introgression in both independent backcrosses, suggesting it is linked to an important ivermectin resistance mutation in both the MHco4(WRS) and MHco10(CAVR) strains. In contrast, Hco-glc-5, Hco-avr-14, Hco-pgp-9 and Hco-dyf-7 showed no evidence of introgression in either backcross. Hco-lgc-37 and Hco-pgp-2 showed only weak evidence of introgression in the MHco3/4 backcross but not in the MHco3/10 backcross. Overall, these results suggest that microsatellite marker Hcms8a20, but not the other candidate genes tested, is linked to a major ivermectin resistance locus in the MHco4(WRS) and MHco10(CAVR) strains

  17. Mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling adaptive traits in coastal Douglas-fir. I. Timing of vegetative bud flush.

    Treesearch

    K.D. Jermstad; D.L. Bassoni; K.S. Jech; N.C. Wheeler; D.B. Neale

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Thirty three unique quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting the timing of spring bud flush have been identified in an intraspecific mapping population of coastal Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco var. menziesii]. Both terminal and lateral bud flush were measured over a 4-year period on clonal replicates at two test sites, allowing for the...

  18. Natural resistance to Meningococcal Disease related to CFH loci: Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Martinón-Torres, Federico; Png, Eileen; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Davila, Sonia; Wright, Victoria J; Sim, Kar Seng; Vega, Ana; Fachal, Laura; Inwald, David; Nadel, Simon; Carrol, Enitan D; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Alonso, Sonia Marcos; Carracedo, Angel; Morteruel, Elvira; López-Bayón, Julio; Torre, Andrés Concha; Monge, Cristina Calvo; de Aguilar, Pilar Azcón González; Torné, Elisabeth Esteban; Martínez-Padilla, María Del Carmen; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Levin, Michael; Hibberd, Martin L; Salas, Antonio

    2016-11-02

    Meningococcal disease (MD) remains an important infectious cause of life threatening infection in both industrialized and resource poor countries. Genetic factors influence both occurrence and severity of presentation, but the genes responsible are largely unknown. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) examining 5,440,063 SNPs in 422 Spanish MD patients and 910 controls. We then performed a meta-analysis of the Spanish GWAS with GWAS data from the United Kingdom (combined cohorts: 897 cases and 5,613 controls; 4,898,259 SNPs). The meta-analysis identified strong evidence of association (P-value ≤ 5 × 10(-8)) in 20 variants located at the CFH gene. SNP rs193053835 showed the most significant protective effect (Odds Ratio (OR) = 0.62, 95% confidence interval (C.I.) = 0.52-0.73; P-value = 9.62 × 10(-9)). Five other variants had been previously reported to be associated with susceptibility to MD, including the missense SNP rs1065489 (OR = 0.64, 95% C.I.) = 0.55-0.76, P-value = 3.25 × 10(-8)). Theoretical predictions point to a functional effect of rs1065489, which may be directly responsible for protection against MD. Our study confirms the association of CFH with susceptibility to MD and strengthens the importance of this link in understanding pathogenesis of the disease.

  19. Natural resistance to Meningococcal Disease related to CFH loci: Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Martinón-Torres, Federico; Png, Eileen; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Davila, Sonia; Wright, Victoria J.; Sim, Kar Seng; Vega, Ana; Fachal, Laura; Inwald, David; Nadel, Simon; Carrol, Enitan D.; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Alonso, Sonia Marcos; Carracedo, Angel; Morteruel, Elvira; López-Bayón, Julio; Torre, Andrés Concha; Monge, Cristina Calvo; de Aguilar, Pilar Azcón González; Torné, Elisabeth Esteban; Martínez-Padilla, María del Carmen; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Levin, Michael; Hibberd, Martin L.; Salas, Antonio; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Cebey, Miriam; Sánchez, Natalia García; Calle, Irene Rivero; Grande, Antonio Justicia; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Barral-Arca, Ruth; Pischedda, Sara; Currás-Tuala, María-José; Rodriguez-Tenreiro, Carmen; Redondo-Collazo, Lorenzo; Sánchez, Fernanda Pardo; de la Cruz Moreno, Jesús; Millán Miralles, Mª. Leticia; García Rodríguez, José Luis; García, Susana Rey; Doce, Ana Hurtado; Barba, Ángela Ferrer; Pallares, Manuel Ortiz; Romero, Alfredo Reparaz; Muñoz Bonet, Juan Ignacio; Cancela, Manuel Silveira; Bergara, Eider Oñate; Arriortua, Amaya Bustinza; Navarro Gómez, María Luisa; Fernández, Mario Sánchez; Martínez, Xavier Allué; Ortega, Álvaro Castellanos; Rosso, Servando Pantoja; Caballero Macarrón, César Pérez; Menchón, Natalia Molini; Sánchez, Francisco Giménez; Garzón, Manuel González-Ripoll; García, María del Mar Ballesteros; Sánchez Granados, José Manuel; Ayestarán, Olga Serrano; Payo, Roman; Palazón, Sonia Cañadas; León León, Maria Cruz; Dominguez, Susana Reyes; Villanueba, David Arjona; Alonso Martín, J. Antonio; Orayen, Concepción Goñi; Iturbe, Enrique Bernaola; Alonso Salas, María Teresa; Fernández, Isabel Quintela; Booy, Robert; Coin, Lachlan J. M.; Eleftherohorinou, Hariklia; Faust, Saul; Galassini, Rachel; Habibi, Parviz; Haralambous, Elene; Kroll, Simon; Langford, Paul; Pathan, Nazima; Pollard, Andrew J.; Abdulla, Farhana; Agapow, Paul; Bellos, Evangelos; Hamilton, Shea; Herberg, Jethro A.; Hoggart, Clive; Kaforou, Myrsini; Mashbat, Meg; Mustafa, Sobia; Sancho-Shimizu, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Meningococcal disease (MD) remains an important infectious cause of life threatening infection in both industrialized and resource poor countries. Genetic factors influence both occurrence and severity of presentation, but the genes responsible are largely unknown. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) examining 5,440,063 SNPs in 422 Spanish MD patients and 910 controls. We then performed a meta-analysis of the Spanish GWAS with GWAS data from the United Kingdom (combined cohorts: 897 cases and 5,613 controls; 4,898,259 SNPs). The meta-analysis identified strong evidence of association (P-value ≤ 5 × 10−8) in 20 variants located at the CFH gene. SNP rs193053835 showed the most significant protective effect (Odds Ratio (OR) = 0.62, 95% confidence interval (C.I.) = 0.52–0.73; P-value = 9.62 × 10−9). Five other variants had been previously reported to be associated with susceptibility to MD, including the missense SNP rs1065489 (OR = 0.64, 95% C.I.) = 0.55–0.76, P-value = 3.25 × 10−8). Theoretical predictions point to a functional effect of rs1065489, which may be directly responsible for protection against MD. Our study confirms the association of CFH with susceptibility to MD and strengthens the importance of this link in understanding pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:27805046

  20. Species-specific differences in tissue-specific expression of alcohol dehydrogenase are under the control of complex cis-acting loci: Evidence from Drosophila hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ranganayakulu, G.; Reddy, A.R. ); Kirkpatrick, R.B.; Martin, P.F. )

    1991-12-01

    Differences in the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase in the hindgut and testis of adult Drosophila virilis, D. texana, D. novamexicana and D. borealis flies were observed. These heritable differences do not arise due to chromosomal rearrangements, since the polytene chromosome banding patterns did not reveal any such gross chromosomal rearrangements near the Adh locus in any of the tested species. Analysis of the interspecific hybrids revealed that these differences are controlled by complex cis-acting genetic loci. Further, the cis-acting locus controlling the expression of ADH in testis was found to be separable by crossing-over.

  1. Epigenomic analysis of the HOX gene loci reveals mechanisms that may control canonical expression patterns in AML and normal hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D H; Young, M A; Lamprecht, T L; Helton, N M; Fulton, R; O'Laughlin, M; Fronick, C; Magrini, V; Demeter, R T; Miller, C A; Klco, J M; Wilson, R K; Ley, T J

    2015-06-01

    HOX genes are highly expressed in many acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples, but the patterns of expression and associated regulatory mechanisms are not clearly understood. We analyzed RNA sequencing data from 179 primary AML samples and normal hematopoietic cells to understand the range of expression patterns in normal versus leukemic cells. HOX expression in AML was restricted to specific genes in the HOXA or HOXB loci, and was highly correlated with recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities. However, the majority of samples expressed a canonical set of HOXA and HOXB genes that was nearly identical to the expression signature of normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Transcriptional profiles at the HOX loci were similar between normal cells and AML samples, and involved bidirectional transcription at the center of each gene cluster. Epigenetic analysis of a subset of AML samples also identified common regions of chromatin accessibility in AML samples and normal CD34(+) cells that displayed differences in methylation depending on HOX expression patterns. These data provide an integrated epigenetic view of the HOX gene loci in primary AML samples, and suggest that HOX expression in most AML samples represents a normal stem cell program that is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms at specific regulatory elements.

  2. Genome-Wide Interaction with Insulin Secretion Loci Reveals Novel Loci for Type 2 Diabetes in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Keaton, Jacob M.; Hellwege, Jacklyn N.; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Pankow, James S.; Fornage, Myriam; Wilson, James G.; Correa, Adolfo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Taylor, Kent D.; Rich, Stephen S.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Freedman, Barry I.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the result of metabolic defects in insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, yet most T2D loci identified to date influence insulin secretion. We hypothesized that T2D loci, particularly those affecting insulin sensitivity, can be identified through interaction with insulin secretion loci. To test this hypothesis, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg), a dynamic measure of first-phase insulin secretion, were identified in African Americans from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRASFS; n = 492 subjects). These SNPs were tested for interaction, individually and jointly as a genetic risk score (GRS), using genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from five cohorts (ARIC, CARDIA, JHS, MESA, WFSM; n = 2,725 cases, 4,167 controls) with T2D as the outcome. In single variant analyses, suggestively significant (Pinteraction<5×10−6) interactions were observed at several loci including LYPLAL1 (rs10746381), CHN2 (rs7796525), and EXOC1 (rs4289500). Notable AIRg GRS interactions were observed with SAMD4A (rs11627203) and UTRN (rs17074194). These data support the hypothesis that additional genetic factors contributing to T2D risk can be identified by interactions with insulin secretion loci. PMID:27448167

  3. Chloroplast-coded atrazine resistance in Solanum nigrum: psbA loci from susceptible and resistant biotypes are isogenic except for a single codon change.

    PubMed Central

    Goloubinoff, P; Edelman, M; Hallick, R B

    1984-01-01

    The 32-kDa photosystem II protein of the chloroplast is thought to be a target molecule for the herbicide atrazine. The psbA gene coding for this protein was cloned from Solanum nigrum atrazine-susceptible ('S') and atrazine-resistant ('R') biotypes. The 'S' and 'R' genes are identical in nucleotide sequence except for an A to G transition, predicting a Ser to Gly change at codon 264. The same predicted amino acid change in psbA was previously shown for an Amaranthus hybridus 'S' and 'R' biotypes which had, in addition, two silent nucleotide changes between the genes (Hirschberg, J. and McIntosh, L., Science 222, 1346-1349, 1983). Occurrence of the identical, non-silent change in psbA in different 'S' and 'R' weed biotype pairs suggests a functional, herbicide-related role for this codon position. Images PMID:6514581

  4. The role of self-control in resistance to persuasion.

    PubMed

    Burkley, Edward

    2008-03-01

    Four studies investigated a self-control theory of resistance to persuasion. This theory asserts that resistance to persuasion requires and consumes self-control resources. Study 1 showed that resistance to a persuasive message reduced the ability to engage in a subsequent self-control task. Studies 2 and 3 showed that self-control depletion leads to increased persuasion. Study 4 showed that self-control depletion increased persuasion, particularly under effortful resistance (i.e., strong arguments). Together, these findings suggest that self-control plays a vital role in the process of resistance to persuasion. People must have self-control resources to fend off persuasive appeals; without them, they become susceptible to influence.

  5. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tönu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-01-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have raised the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional follow-up of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

  6. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways.

    PubMed

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tõnu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-09-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have increased the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin concentration showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional analysis of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control.

  7. Directionality of Fission Yeast Mating-Type Interconversion Is Controlled by the Location of the Donor Loci

    PubMed Central

    Thon, G.; Klar, AJS.

    1993-01-01

    Cells of homothallic strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe efficiently switch between two mating types called P and M. The phenotypic switches are due to conversion of the expressed mating-type locus (mat1) by two closely linked silent loci, mat2-P and mat3-M, that contain unexpressed information for the P and M mating types, respectively. In this process, switching-competent cells switch to the opposite mating type in 72-90% of the cell divisions. Hence, mat2-P is a preferred donor of information to mat1 in M cells, whereas mat3-M is a preferred donor in P cells. We investigated the reason for the donor preference by constructing a strain in which the genetic contents of the donor loci were swapped. We found that switching to the opposite mating type was very inefficient in that strain. This shows that the location of the silent cassettes in the chromosome, rather than their content, is the deciding factor for recognition of the donor for each cell type. We propose a model in which switching is achieved by regulating accessibility of the donor loci, perhaps by changing the chromatin structure in the mating-type region, thus promoting an intrachromosomal folding of mat2 or mat3 onto mat1 in a cell type-specific fashion. We also present evidence for the involvement of the Swi6 and Swi6-mod trans-acting factors in the donor-choice mechanism. We suggest that these factors participate in forming the proposed folded structure. PMID:8375648

  8. Directionality of fission yeast mating-type interconversion is controlled by the location of the donor loci.

    PubMed

    Thon, G; Klar, A J

    1993-08-01

    Cells of homothallic strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe efficiently switch between two mating types called P and M. The phenotypic switches are due to conversion of the expressed mating-type locus (mat1) by two closely linked silent loci, mat2-P and mat3-M, that contain unexpressed information for the P and M mating types, respectively. In this process, switching-competent cells switch to the opposite mating type in 72-90% of the cell divisions. Hence, mat2-P is a preferred donor of information to mat1 in M cells, whereas mat3-M is a preferred donor in P cells. We investigated the reason for the donor preference by constructing a strain in which the genetic contents of the donor loci were swapped. We found that switching to the opposite mating type was very inefficient in that strain. This shows that the location of the silent cassettes in the chromosome, rather than their content, is the deciding factor for recognition of the donor for each cell type. We propose a model in which switching is achieved by regulating accessibility of the donor loci, perhaps by changing the chromatin structure in the mating-type region, thus promoting an intrachromosomal folding of mat2 or mat3 onto mat1 in a cell type-specific fashion. We also present evidence for the involvement of the Swi6 and Swi6-mod trans-acting factors in the donor-choice mechanism. We suggest that these factors participate in forming the proposed folded structure.

  9. Epidemiological control of drug resistance and compensatory mutation under resistance testing and second-line therapy.

    PubMed

    Saddler, Clare A; Wu, Yue; Valckenborgh, Frank; Tanaka, Mark M

    2013-12-01

    The fitness cost of antibiotic resistance in the absence of treatment raises the possibility that prudent use of drugs may slow or reverse the rise of resistance. Unfortunately, compensatory mutations that lower this cost may lead to entrenched resistance. Here, we develop a mathematical model of resistance evolution and compensatory mutation to determine whether reversion to sensitivity can occur, and how disease control might be facilitated by a second-line therapy. When only a single antibiotic is available, sensitive bacteria reach fixation only under treatment rates so low that hardly any cases are treated. We model a scenario in which drug sensitivity can be accurately tested so that a second-line therapy is administered to resistant cases. Before the rise of resistance to the second drug, disease eradication is possible if resistance testing and second-line treatment are conducted at a high enough rate. However, if double drug resistance arises, the possibility of disease eradication is greatly reduced and compensated resistance prevails in most of the parameter space. The boundary separating eradication from fixation of compensated resistance is strongly influenced by the underlying basic reproductive number of the pathogen and drug efficacy in sensitive cases, but depends less on the resistance cost and compensation. When double resistance is possible, the boundary is affected by the relative strengths of resistance against the two drugs in the double-resistant-compensated strain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Occurrence, genetic control and evolution of non-target-site based resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate synthase (ALS) in the dicot weed Papaver rhoeas.

    PubMed

    Scarabel, Laura; Pernin, Fanny; Délye, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    Non-target-site resistance (NTSR) to herbicides is a major issue for the chemical control of weeds. Whilst predominant in grass weeds, NTSR remains largely uninvestigated in dicot weeds. We investigated the occurrence, inheritance and genetic control of NTSR to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors in Papaver rhoeas (corn poppy) using progenies from plants with potential NTSR to the imidazolinone herbicide imazamox. NTSR to imazamox was inherited from parents over two successive generations. NTSR to tritosulfuron (a sulfonylurea) was observed in F1 generations and inherited in F2 generations. NTSR to florasulam (a triazolopyrimidine) emerged in F2 generations. Our findings suggest NTSR was polygenic and gradually built-up by accumulation over generations of loci with moderate individual effects in single plants. We also demonstrated that ALS alleles conferring herbicide resistance can co-exist with NTSR loci in P. rhoeas plants. Previous research focussed on TSR in P. rhoeas, which most likely caused underestimation of NTSR significance in this species. This may also apply to other dicot species. From our data, resistance to ALS inhibitors in P. rhoeas appears complex, and involves well-known mutant ALS alleles and a set of unknown NTSR loci that confer resistance to ALS inhibitors from different chemical families. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Integrated resistant pigweed control in the Southeast

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conservation agriculture has been highly effective in reducing soil erosion, increasing water holding capacity, and minimizing surface water contamination. The adoption of herbicide resistant crops facilitated successful implementation of conservation agriculture practices throughout the Southeast d...

  12. Vanadate-resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae show alterations in protein phosphorylation and growth control.

    PubMed Central

    Kanik-Ennulat, C; Neff, N

    1990-01-01

    This work describes two spontaneous vanadate-resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with constitutive alterations in protein phosphorylation, growth control, and sporulation. Vanadate has been shown by a number of studies to be an efficient competitor of phosphate in biochemical reactions, especially those that involve phosphoproteins as intermediates or substrates. Resistance to toxic concentrations of vanadate can arise in S. cerevisiae by both recessive and dominant spontaneous mutations in a large number of loci. Mutations in two of the recessive loci, van1-18 and van2-93, resulted in alterations in the phosphorylation of a number of proteins. The mutant van1-18 gene also showed an increase in plasma membrane ATPase activity in vitro and a lowered basal phosphatase activity under alkaline conditions. Cells containing the van2-93 mutant allele had normal levels of plasma membrane ATPase activity, but this activity was not inhibited by vanadate. Both of these mutants failed to enter stationary phase, were heat shock sensitive, showed lowered long-term viability, and sporulated on rich medium in the presence of 2% glucose. The wild-type VAN1 gene was isolated and sequenced. The open reading frame predicts a protein of 522 amino acids, with no significant homology to any genes that have been identified. Diploid cells that contained two mutant alleles of this gene demonstrated defects in spore viability. These data suggest that the VAN1 gene product is involved in regulation of the phosphorylation of a number of proteins, some of which appear to be important in cell growth control. Images PMID:2137555

  13. A journey from a SSR-based low density map to a SNP-based high density map for identification of disease resistance quantitative trait loci in peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mapping and identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) are important for efficient marker-assisted breeding. Diseases such as leaf spots and Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) cause significant loses to peanut growers. The U.S. Peanut Genome Initiative (PGI) was launched in 2004, and expanded to...

  14. Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli: Infection Control Implications.

    PubMed

    Adler, Amos; Friedman, N Deborah; Marchaim, Dror

    2016-12-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a common iatrogenic complication of both modern life and medical care. Certain multidrug resistant and extensively drug resistant Gram-negative organisms pose the biggest challenges to health care today, predominantly owing to a lack of therapeutic options. Containing the spread of these organisms is challenging, and in reality, the application of multiple control measures during an evolving outbreak makes it difficult to measure the relative impact of each measure. This article reviews the usefulness of various infection control measures in containing the spread of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of sex-specific quantitative trait loci controlling alcohol preference in C57BL/ 6 mice.

    PubMed

    Melo, J A; Shendure, J; Pociask, K; Silver, L M

    1996-06-01

    Mice from various inbred strains consume alcoholic beverages at highly reproducible and strain-specific levels. While most mice consume alcohol in moderate amounts, C57BL/6J animals exhibit sustained oral ingestion of high levels of alcohol in the presence of competing water and food. We now report a genetic investigation of this phenotype as one potential model for alcoholism. An intercross-backcross breeding protocol was used to identify two recessive alcohol preference quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that are both sex-restricted in expression. A comparison of our results with those of an earlier morphine preference study argues against the hypothesis of a single unified phenotype defined by a preference for all euphoria-producing drugs.

  16. Genome-wide association and regional heritability mapping to identify loci underlying variation in nematode resistance and body weight in Scottish Blackface lambs.

    PubMed

    Riggio, V; Matika, O; Pong-Wong, R; Stear, M J; Bishop, S C

    2013-05-01

    The genetic architecture underlying nematode resistance and body weight in Blackface lambs was evaluated comparing genome-wide association (GWA) and regional heritability mapping (RHM) approaches. The traits analysed were faecal egg count (FEC) and immunoglobulin A activity against third-stage larvae from Teladorsagia circumcincta, as indicators of nematode resistance, and body weight in a population of 752 Scottish Blackface lambs, genotyped with the 50k single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip. FEC for both Nematodirus and Strongyles nematodes (excluding Nematodirus), as well as body weight were collected at approximately 16, 20 and 24 weeks of age. In addition, a weighted average animal effect was estimated for both FEC and body weight traits. After quality control, 44 388 SNPs were available for the GWA analysis and 42 841 for the RHM, which utilises only mapped SNPs. The same fixed effects were used in both analyses: sex, year, management group, litter size and age of dam, with day of birth as covariate. Some genomic regions of interest for both nematode resistance and body weight traits were identified, using both GWA and RHM approaches. For both methods, strong evidence for association was found on chromosome 14 for Nematodirus average animal effect, chromosome 6 for Strongyles FEC at 16 weeks and chromosome 6 for body weight at 16 weeks. Across the entire data set, RHM identified more regions reaching the suggestive level than GWA, suggesting that RHM is capable of capturing some of the variation not detected by GWA analyses.

  17. Genome-wide association and regional heritability mapping to identify loci underlying variation in nematode resistance and body weight in Scottish Blackface lambs

    PubMed Central

    Riggio, V; Matika, O; Pong-Wong, R; Stear, M J; Bishop, S C

    2013-01-01

    The genetic architecture underlying nematode resistance and body weight in Blackface lambs was evaluated comparing genome-wide association (GWA) and regional heritability mapping (RHM) approaches. The traits analysed were faecal egg count (FEC) and immunoglobulin A activity against third-stage larvae from Teladorsagia circumcincta, as indicators of nematode resistance, and body weight in a population of 752 Scottish Blackface lambs, genotyped with the 50k single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip. FEC for both Nematodirus and Strongyles nematodes (excluding Nematodirus), as well as body weight were collected at approximately 16, 20 and 24 weeks of age. In addition, a weighted average animal effect was estimated for both FEC and body weight traits. After quality control, 44 388 SNPs were available for the GWA analysis and 42 841 for the RHM, which utilises only mapped SNPs. The same fixed effects were used in both analyses: sex, year, management group, litter size and age of dam, with day of birth as covariate. Some genomic regions of interest for both nematode resistance and body weight traits were identified, using both GWA and RHM approaches. For both methods, strong evidence for association was found on chromosome 14 for Nematodirus average animal effect, chromosome 6 for Strongyles FEC at 16 weeks and chromosome 6 for body weight at 16 weeks. Across the entire data set, RHM identified more regions reaching the suggestive level than GWA, suggesting that RHM is capable of capturing some of the variation not detected by GWA analyses. PMID:23512009

  18. An Image-Based Genetic Assay Identifies Genes in T1D Susceptibility Loci Controlling Cellular Antiviral Immunity in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Juan; Jijon, Humberto B.; Kim, Ira R.; Goel, Gautam; Doan, Aivi; Sokol, Harry; Bauer, Hermann; Herrmann, Bernhard G.; Lassen, Kara G.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of complex diseases, such as type 1 diabetes (T1D), derives from interactions between host genetics and environmental factors. Previous studies have suggested that viral infection plays a significant role in initiation of T1D in genetically predisposed individuals. T1D susceptibility loci may therefore be enriched in previously uncharacterized genes functioning in antiviral defense pathways. To identify genes involved in antiviral immunity, we performed an image-based high-throughput genetic screen using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) against 161 genes within T1D susceptibility loci. RAW 264.7 cells transduced with shRNAs were infected with GFP-expressing herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and fluorescent microscopy was performed to assess the viral infectivity by fluorescence reporter activity. Of the 14 candidates identified with high confidence, two candidates were selected for further investigation, Il27 and Tagap. Administration of recombinant IL-27 during viral infection was found to act synergistically with interferon gamma (IFN-γ) to activate expression of type I IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines, and to enhance the activities of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). Consistent with a role in antiviral immunity, Tagap-deficient macrophages demonstrated increased viral replication, reduced expression of proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, and decreased production of IFN-β. Taken together, our unbiased loss-of-function genetic screen identifies genes that play a role in host antiviral immunity and delineates roles for IL-27 and Tagap in the production of antiviral cytokines. PMID:25268627

  19. Genetic control of pear rootstock-induced dwarfing and precocity is linked to a chromosomal region syntenic to the apple Dw1 loci.

    PubMed

    Knäbel, Mareike; Friend, Adam P; Palmer, John W; Diack, Robert; Wiedow, Claudia; Alspach, Peter; Deng, Cecilia; Gardiner, Susan E; Tustin, D Stuart; Schaffer, Robert; Foster, Toshi; Chagné, David

    2015-09-22

    The vigour and precocity of trees highly influences their efficiency in commercial production. In apple, dwarfing rootstocks allow high-density plantings while their precocious flowering enables earlier fruit production. Currently, there is a lack of pear (Pyrus communis L.) rootstocks that are equivalent to the high yielding apple rootstock 'M9'. For the efficient breeding of new Pyrus rootstocks it is crucial to understand the genetic determinants of vigour control and precocity. In this study we used quantitative trait loci (QTLs) analysis to identify genetic loci associated with the desired traits, using a segregating population of 405 F1 P. communis seedlings from a cross between 'Old Home' and 'Louise Bonne de Jersey' (OHxLBJ). The seedlings were grafted as rootstocks with 'Doyenne du Comice' scions and comprehensively phenotyped over four growing seasons for traits related to tree architecture and flowering, in order to describe the growth of the scions. A high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genetic map comprising 597 polymorphic pear and 113 apple markers enabled the detection of QTLs influencing expression of scion vigour and precocity located on linkage groups (LG)5 and LG6 of 'Old Home'. The LG5 QTL maps to a position that is syntenic to the apple 'Malling 9' ('M9') Dw1 locus at the upper end of LG5. An allele of a simple sequence repeat (SSR) associated with apple Dw1 segregated with dwarfing and precocity in pear and was identified in other pear germplasm accessions. The orthology of the vigour-controlling LG5 QTL between apple and pear raises the possibility that the dwarfing locus Dw1 arose before the divergence of apple and pear, and might therefore be present in other Rosaceae species. We report the first QTLs associated with vigour control and flowering traits in pear rootstocks. Orthologous loci were found to control scion growth and precocity in apple and pear rootstocks. The application of our results may assist in the

  20. Control of Acid Resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Castanie-Cornet, Marie-Pierre; Penfound, Thomas A.; Smith, Dean; Elliott, John F.; Foster, John W.

    1999-01-01

    Acid resistance (AR) in Escherichia coli is defined as the ability to withstand an acid challenge of pH 2.5 or less and is a trait generally restricted to stationary-phase cells. Earlier reports described three AR systems in E. coli. In the present study, the genetics and control of these three systems have been more clearly defined. Expression of the first AR system (designated the oxidative or glucose-repressed AR system) was previously shown to require the alternative sigma factor RpoS. Consistent with glucose repression, this system also proved to be dependent in many situations on the cyclic AMP receptor protein. The second AR system required the addition of arginine during pH 2.5 acid challenge, the structural gene for arginine decarboxylase (adiA), and the regulator cysB, confirming earlier reports. The third AR system required glutamate for protection at pH 2.5, one of two genes encoding glutamate decarboxylase (gadA or gadB), and the gene encoding the putative glutamate:γ-aminobutyric acid antiporter (gadC). Only one of the two glutamate decarboxylases was needed for protection at pH 2.5. However, survival at pH 2 required both glutamate decarboxylase isozymes. Stationary phase and acid pH regulation of the gad genes proved separable. Stationary-phase induction of gadA and gadB required the alternative sigma factor ςS encoded by rpoS. However, acid induction of these enzymes, which was demonstrated to occur in exponential- and stationary-phase cells, proved to be ςS independent. Neither gad gene required the presence of volatile fatty acids for induction. The data also indicate that AR via the amino acid decarboxylase systems requires more than an inducible decarboxylase and antiporter. Another surprising finding was that the ςS-dependent oxidative system, originally thought to be acid induced, actually proved to be induced following entry into stationary phase regardless of the pH. However, an inhibitor produced at pH 8 somehow interferes with the

  1. Wrist Resistance Training Improves Motor Control And Strength.

    PubMed

    Chu, Edward; Kim, You-Sin; Hill, Genevieve; Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Kim, Chang Kook; Shim, Jae Kun

    2017-07-28

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a 6-week direction specific resistance training program on isometric torque control and isokinetic torque strength of the wrist joint. Nineteen subjects were randomly assigned to either the wrist training group (n=9) or the control group (n=10). The training group performed wrist exercises in six directions (flexion, extension, pronation, supination, radial deviation, and ulnar deviation) while the control group did not. Data were collected on the isometric torque control, one-repetition maximum (1-RM) strength, and isokinetic maximum torque (angular velocity of 60°/s wrist movements) before and after six weeks of resistance training and at two-week intervals during training. The training group showed significant decreases in isometric torque control error in all six directions after 2 weeks of resistance training, while the control group did not show significant increase or decrease. After 4 weeks of training, the training group showed significant increases in maximum strength in all six directions as assessed by 1-RM strength and isokinetic strength tests, while the control group did not show any statistically significant changes. This study shows that motor control significantly improves within the first two weeks of resistance training, while the wrist strength significantly improves within the first four weeks of resistance training. Based on the findings of this study, coaches and trainers should consider wrist resistance training to improve athletes' muscular strength and control of the wrist muscles.

  2. Rehabilitation device with variable resistance and intelligent control

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, J.Q.; Rudolph, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been widely reported to have positive rehabilitation effects for patients with neuromuscular and orthopaedic conditions. This paper presents an optimal design of magneto-rheological fluid dampers for variable resistance exercise device in the form of a knee brace. An intelligent supervisory control for regulating the resistive force or torque of the knee brace has also been studied. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training for the knee. PMID:15694609

  3. Additional rabbit IgA allotypes, f69, f70, g76,g77: control by the C alphaf and C alphag loci.

    PubMed

    Lammert, J M; Dray, S; Knight, K L; Hanly, W C

    1977-04-01

    Genetic and immunochemical studies have led to the identification of four additional rabbit IgA allotypes controlled by the Calphaf and Calphag loci. The folowing linkage combinations of the VHa and the 'new' alleles were observed among the populations of rabbits studied: a1f70g76, a1f69g77, and a2f69g77. Cross-reactions among g74, g76, and g77 molecules with various anti-g anti-allotype antisera indicate that the IgA-g allotypic specificities are comprised of multiple antigenic determinants. These studies provide a basis for further understanding of the evolution and gnetic control of the immunoglobulin heavy chain chromosomal region.

  4. Major Quantitative Trait Loci and Putative Candidate Genes for Powdery Mildew Resistance and Fruit-Related Traits Revealed by an Intraspecific Genetic Map for Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus).

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Hwan; Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Han, Dong-Yeup; Park, Minkyu; Kim, Seungill; Choi, Doil; Kim, Yongjae; Lee, Gung Pyo; Kim, Sun-Tae; Park, Young-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    An intraspecific genetic map for watermelon was constructed using an F2 population derived from 'Arka Manik' × 'TS34' and transcript sequence variants and quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to powdery mildew (PMR), seed size (SS), and fruit shape (FS) were analyzed. The map consists of 14 linkage groups (LGs) defined by 174 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences (CAPS), 2 derived-cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers, 20 sequence-characterized amplified regions, and 8 expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat markers spanning 1,404.3 cM, with a mean marker interval of 6.9 cM and an average of 14.6 markers per LG. Genetic inheritance and QTL analyses indicated that each of the PMR, SS, and FS traits is controlled by an incompletely dominant effect of major QTLs designated as pmr2.1, ss2.1, and fsi3.1, respectively. The pmr2.1, detected on chromosome 2 (Chr02), explained 80.0% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 30.76). This QTL was flanked by two CAPS markers, wsb2-24 (4.00 cM) and wsb2-39 (13.97 cM). The ss2.1, located close to pmr2.1 and CAPS marker wsb2-13 (1.00 cM) on Chr02, explained 92.3% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 68.78). The fsi3.1, detected on Chr03, explained 79.7% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 31.37) and was flanked by two CAPS, wsb3-24 (1.91 cM) and wsb3-9 (7.00 cM). Candidate gene-based CAPS markers were developed from the disease resistance and fruit shape gene homologs located on Chr.02 and Chr03 and were mapped on the intraspecific map. Colocalization of these markers with the major QTLs indicated that watermelon orthologs of a nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat class gene containing an RPW8 domain and a member of SUN containing the IQ67 domain are candidate genes for pmr2.1 and fsi3.1, respectively. The results presented herein provide useful information for marker-assisted breeding and gene cloning for PMR and fruit-related traits.

  5. Major Quantitative Trait Loci and Putative Candidate Genes for Powdery Mildew Resistance and Fruit-Related Traits Revealed by an Intraspecific Genetic Map for Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang-Hwan; Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Han, Dong-Yeup; Park, Minkyu; Kim, Seungill; Choi, Doil; Kim, Yongjae; Lee, Gung Pyo; Kim, Sun-Tae; Park, Young-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    An intraspecific genetic map for watermelon was constructed using an F2 population derived from ‘Arka Manik’ × ‘TS34’ and transcript sequence variants and quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to powdery mildew (PMR), seed size (SS), and fruit shape (FS) were analyzed. The map consists of 14 linkage groups (LGs) defined by 174 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences (CAPS), 2 derived-cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers, 20 sequence-characterized amplified regions, and 8 expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat markers spanning 1,404.3 cM, with a mean marker interval of 6.9 cM and an average of 14.6 markers per LG. Genetic inheritance and QTL analyses indicated that each of the PMR, SS, and FS traits is controlled by an incompletely dominant effect of major QTLs designated as pmr2.1, ss2.1, and fsi3.1, respectively. The pmr2.1, detected on chromosome 2 (Chr02), explained 80.0% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 30.76). This QTL was flanked by two CAPS markers, wsb2-24 (4.00 cM) and wsb2-39 (13.97 cM). The ss2.1, located close to pmr2.1 and CAPS marker wsb2-13 (1.00 cM) on Chr02, explained 92.3% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 68.78). The fsi3.1, detected on Chr03, explained 79.7% of the phenotypic variation (LOD = 31.37) and was flanked by two CAPS, wsb3-24 (1.91 cM) and wsb3-9 (7.00 cM). Candidate gene-based CAPS markers were developed from the disease resistance and fruit shape gene homologs located on Chr.02 and Chr03 and were mapped on the intraspecific map. Colocalization of these markers with the major QTLs indicated that watermelon orthologs of a nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat class gene containing an RPW8 domain and a member of SUN containing the IQ67 domain are candidate genes for pmr2.1 and fsi3.1, respectively. The results presented herein provide useful information for marker-assisted breeding and gene cloning for PMR and fruit-related traits. PMID:26700647

  6. Identification of genes for controlling swine adipose deposition by integrating transcriptome, whole-genome resequencing, and quantitative trait loci data

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Kai; Zhu, Feng; Zhai, LiWei; Chen, ShaoKang; Tan, Zhen; Sun, YangYang; Hou, ZhuoCheng; Wang, ChuDuan

    2016-01-01

    Backfat thickness is strongly associated with meat quality, fattening efficiency, reproductive performance, and immunity in pigs. Fat storage and fatty acid synthesis mainly occur in adipose tissue. Therefore, we used a high-throughput massively parallel sequencing approach to identify transcriptomes in adipose tissue, and whole-genome differences from three full-sibling pairs of pigs with opposite (high and low) backfat thickness phenotypes. We obtained an average of 38.69 million reads for six samples, 78.68% of which were annotated in the reference genome. Eighty-nine overlapping differentially expressed genes were identified among the three pair comparisons. Whole-genome resequencing also detected multiple genetic variations between the pools of DNA from the two groups. Compared with the animal quantitative trait loci (QTL) database, 20 differentially expressed genes were matched to the QTLs associated with fatness in pigs. Our technique of integrating transcriptome, whole-genome resequencing, and QTL database information provided a rich source of important differentially expressed genes and variations. Associate analysis between selected SNPs and backfat thickness revealed that two SNPs and one haplotype of ME1 significantly affected fat deposition in pigs. Moreover, genetic analysis confirmed that variations in the differentially expressed genes may affect fat deposition. PMID:26996612

  7. Surveillance and Control of Antibiotic Resistance in the Mediterranean Region

    PubMed Central

    Ricciardi, Walter; Giubbini, Gabriele; Laurenti, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is one of the most relevant problems in the healthcare: the growth of resistant microorganisms in healthcare settings is a worrisome threat, raising length to stay (LOS), morbidity and mortality in those patients. The importance of the antibiotic resistance and its spread around the world, gave rise to the activation of several surveillance systems, based especially on the collection of laboratory data to local or national level. The objective of this work is to carry out a review of the scientific literature existing on the topic and scientific activities related to surveillance of antibiotic resistance in the countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. Recent Data from European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (November 2015) show, for different combinations bacterium-drug, an increase of resistance from North to South and from West to East of Europe. It is of particular concern the phenomenon of resistance carried out by some gram-negative, specifically Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli to third-generation cephalosporin, often combined in opposition to fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides. Is particularly high the incidence of resistance to carbapenems by strains of Enterobacteriaceae (Klebsiella included). The resistance exerted by MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) continues to be relevant, albeit showing some decline in recent years. The incidence of resistance carried on by Streptococcus pneumoniae is stable and is mainly relevant to macrolides. Finally, a significant increase in recording relatively exercised by Enterococcus faecium to Vancomycin. Detecting, preventing, and controlling antibiotic resistance requires strategic, coordinated, and sustained efforts. It also depends on the engagement of governments, academia, industry, healthcare providers, the general public, and the agricultural community, as well as international partners. Committing to combating antibiotic-resistant microbes does support

  8. Genetic control of T cell responsiveness to the Friend murine leukemia virus envelope antigen. Identification of class II loci of the H-2 as immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    T cells primed specifically for the envelope glycoprotein of Friend murine leukemia helper virus (F-MuLV) were prepared by immunizing mice with a recombinant vaccinia virus that expressed the entire env gene of F-MuLV. Significant proliferative responses of F-MuLV envelope- specific, H-2a/b T cells were observed when the T cells were stimulated with antigen-pulsed peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) having the b allele at the K, A beta, A alpha, and E beta loci of the H-2. On the other hand, PEC having only the kappa allele at these loci did not induce the envelope-specific T cell proliferation, even when the PEC had the b allele at the E alpha, S, or D loci. F-MuLV envelope-specific proliferation of H-2a/b T cells under the stimulation of antigen- pulsed, H-2a/b PEC was specifically blocked with anti-I-Ab and anti-I- Ek mAbs but not with anti-Kb, anti-Kk, or anti-I-Ak mAbs. Moreover, (B10.MBR x A/WySn)F1 mice that have the b allele only at the K locus but not in I-A subregion were nonresponders to the envelope glycoprotein, and the bm12 mutation at the A beta locus completely abolished the T cell responsiveness to this antigen. These results indicate that proliferative T cells recognize a limited number of epitopes on F-MuLV envelope protein in the context of I-Ab, hybrid I- Ak/b, and/or hybrid I-Ek/b class II MHC molecules but fail to recognize the same envelope protein in the context of I-Ak or I-Ek molecules. This influence of the H-2I region on T cell recognition of the envelope glycoprotein appeared to control in vivo induction of protective immunity against Friend virus complex after immunization with the vaccinia-F-MuLV env vaccine. Thus, these results provide, for the first time, direct evidence for Ir gene-controlled responder/nonresponder phenotypes influencing the immune response to a pathogenic virus of mice. PMID:3141552

  9. Impact of pyrethroid resistance on operational malaria control in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Wondji, Charles S; Coleman, Michael; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Mzilahowa, Themba; Irving, Helen; Ndula, Miranda; Rehman, Andrea; Morgan, John; Barnes, Kayla G; Hemingway, Janet

    2012-11-20

    The impact of insecticide resistance on insect-borne disease programs is difficult to quantify. The possibility of eliminating malaria in high-transmission settings is heavily dependent on effective vector control reducing disease transmission rates. Pyrethroids are the dominant insecticides used for malaria control, with few options for their replacement. Their failure will adversely affect our ability to control malaria. Pyrethroid resistance has been selected in Malawi over the last 3 y in the two major malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus, with a higher frequency of resistance in the latter. The resistance in An. funestus is metabolically based and involves the up-regulation of two duplicated P450s. The same genes confer resistance in Mozambican An. funestus, although the levels of up-regulation differ. The selection of resistance over 3 y has not increased malaria transmission, as judged by annual point prevalence surveys in 1- to 4-y-old children. This is true in areas with long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLINs) alone or LLINs plus pyrethroid-based insecticide residual spraying (IRS). However, in districts where IRS was scaled up, it did not produce the expected decrease in malaria prevalence. As resistance increases in frequency from this low initial level, there is the potential for vector population numbers to increase with a concomitant negative impact on control efficacy. This should be monitored carefully as part of the operational activities in country.

  10. Impact of pyrethroid resistance on operational malaria control in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Wondji, Charles S.; Coleman, Michael; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Mzilahowa, Themba; Irving, Helen; Ndula, Miranda; Rehman, Andrea; Morgan, John; Barnes, Kayla G.; Hemingway, Janet

    2012-01-01

    The impact of insecticide resistance on insect-borne disease programs is difficult to quantify. The possibility of eliminating malaria in high-transmission settings is heavily dependent on effective vector control reducing disease transmission rates. Pyrethroids are the dominant insecticides used for malaria control, with few options for their replacement. Their failure will adversely affect our ability to control malaria. Pyrethroid resistance has been selected in Malawi over the last 3 y in the two major malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus, with a higher frequency of resistance in the latter. The resistance in An. funestus is metabolically based and involves the up-regulation of two duplicated P450s. The same genes confer resistance in Mozambican An. funestus, although the levels of up-regulation differ. The selection of resistance over 3 y has not increased malaria transmission, as judged by annual point prevalence surveys in 1- to 4-y-old children. This is true in areas with long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLINs) alone or LLINs plus pyrethroid-based insecticide residual spraying (IRS). However, in districts where IRS was scaled up, it did not produce the expected decrease in malaria prevalence. As resistance increases in frequency from this low initial level, there is the potential for vector population numbers to increase with a concomitant negative impact on control efficacy. This should be monitored carefully as part of the operational activities in country. PMID:23118337

  11. Fate of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Genes during Wastewater Chlorination: Implication for Antibiotic Resistance Control

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L). The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L). By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L). However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination. PMID:25738838

  12. Fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes during wastewater chlorination: implication for antibiotic resistance control.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L). The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L). By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L). However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination.

  13. Genetic evidence that two independent S-loci control RNase-based self-incompatibility in diploid strawberry

    PubMed Central

    Bošković, Radovan I.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Tobutt, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    The self-incompatibility mechanism that reduces inbreeding in many plants of the Rosaceae is attributed to a multi-allelic S locus which, in the Prunoideae and Maloideae subfamilies, comprises two complementary genes, a stylar-expressed S-RNase and a pollen-expressed SFB. To elucidate incompatibility in the subfamily Rosoideae, stylar-specific RNases and self-(in)compatibility status were analysed in various diploid strawberries, especially Fragaria nubicola and F. viridis, both self-incompatible, and F. vesca, self-compatible, and in various progenies derived from them. Unexpectedly, two unlinked RNase loci, S and T, were found, encoding peptides distinct from Prunoideae and Maloideae S-RNases; the presence of a single active allele at either is sufficient to confer self-incompatibility. By contrast, in diploid Maloideae and Prunoideae a single locus encodes S-RNases that share several conserved regions and two active alleles are required for self-incompatibility. Our evidence implicates the S locus in unilateral inter-specific incompatibility and shows that S and T RNases can, remarkably, confer not only allele-specific rejection of cognate pollen but also unspecific rejection of Sn Tn pollen, where n indicates a null allele, consistent with the the presence of the pollen component, SFB, activating the cognitive function of these RNases. Comparison of relevant linkage groups between Fragaria and Prunus suggests that Prunus S-RNases, unique in having two introns, may have resulted from gene conversion in an ancestor of Prunus. In addition, it is shown that there is a non-S locus that is essential for self-incompatibility in diploid Fragaria. PMID:20008462

  14. Mapping four quantitative trait loci associated with type I Fusarium head blight resistance in winter wheat ‘INW0412’

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) has become one of the most damaging wheat diseases in humid and semi-humid regions around the world. Breeding efforts have focused on resistance mechanisms that limit the spread once a spike is infected, or type II resistance. But resistance to initial infection, type I re...

  15. Insecticide resistance in the horn fly: alternative control strategies.

    PubMed

    Oyarzún, M P; Quiroz, A; Birkett, M A

    2008-09-01

    The horn fly, Haematobia irritans (Linnaeus 1758) (Diptera: Muscidae) is one of the most widespread and economically important pests of cattle. Although insecticides have been used for fly control, success has been limited because of the development of insecticide resistance in all countries where the horn fly is found. This problem, along with public pressure for insecticide-free food and the prohibitive cost of developing new classes of compounds, has driven the investigation of alternative control methods that minimize or avoid the use of insecticides. This review provides details of the economic impact of horn flies, existing insecticides used for horn fly control and resistance mechanisms. Current research on new methods of horn fly control based on resistant cattle selection, semiochemicals, biological control and vaccines is also discussed.

  16. Controlling changes in vocal tract resistance.

    PubMed

    Warren, D W; Rochet, A P; Dalston, R M; Mayo, R

    1992-05-01

    There is some evidence that speech aerodynamics follows the rules of a regulating system. The purpose of the present study was to assess how the speech system manages perturbations that produce "errors" within the system. Three experimental approaches were used to evaluate the physiological responses to an imposed change in airway resistance. The first involved subjects with varying degrees of velopharyngeal inadequacy. The second and third approaches involved noncleft subjects whose airway was perturbed by bleed valves and bite blocks during consonant productions. The pressure-flow technique was used to measure aerodynamic variables associated with the production of test consonants. The results of this study provide additional evidence that the speech system actively responds to perturbations in ways that tend to minimize a change in consonant speech pressures. The degree of success in stabilizing pressures appears to reflect the capability of the system to use whatever articulatory and respiratory responses are available.

  17. Resisting Erosion: Quantifying Controls on Soil Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byersdorfer, J. P.; Burke, B. C.; Heimsath, A.; Dade, B.

    2005-12-01

    Soil production from a bedrock surface is influenced by climate, mineralogy, seismic activity, and glacial history. This study examines the relationships between chemical weathering, soil production rates, and new observations of physical strength and, microscopic weathering textures of saprolite in granitic terrain. Our study areas are soil-mantled hillslopes on two well-studied geographically disparate sites: Points Reyes National Seashore, CA and Nunnock River, Australia. Soil production rates at both sites were determined with in situ produced cosmogenic nuclides and decrease exponentially with increasing soil thickness. We hypothesize that saprolite strength should i) constrain soil production rates, and ii) diminish with degree of alumino-silicate weathering. Until now, these ideas have not been systematically tested. To measure the physical competency of the saprolite we use conventional shear vane and dynamic cone penetrometers tests. We find that soil production rates and resistance to penetration each exhibit maximal values at the hillcrest and diminish with increasing soil cover and distance downslope as the soil thickness increases. Conversely, saprolite shear strength increases under thicker soil profiles that accompany lower soil production rates and decreasing values of Kr ratio (SiO2/Al2O3 + Fe2O3). We speculate that the contrasting decrease in penetration resistance and increasing shear strength of saprolite is due to accumulation of clays with increasing residence time at the base of the soil column. The mechanistic significance of saprolite strength as a constraint on soil production depends on whether the soil producing processes are dominated by penetration (e.g. tree roots) or shearing forces (e.g. burrowing mammals).

  18. Automatic control and detector for three-terminal resistance measurement

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1976-10-26

    A device is provided for automatic control and detection in a three-terminal resistance measuring instrument. The invention is useful for the rapid measurement of the resistivity of various bulk material with a three-terminal electrode system. The device maintains the current through the sample at a fixed level while measuring the voltage across the sample to detect the sample resistance. The three-electrode system contacts the bulk material and the current through the sample is held constant by means of a control circuit connected to a first of the three electrodes and works in conjunction with a feedback controlled amplifier to null the voltage between the first electrode and a second electrode connected to the controlled amplifier output. An A.C. oscillator provides a source of sinusoidal reference voltage of the frequency at which the measurement is to be executed. Synchronous reference pulses for synchronous detectors in the control circuit and an output detector circuit are provided by a synchronous pulse generator. The output of the controlled amplifier circuit is sampled by an output detector circuit to develop at an output terminal thereof a D.C. voltage which is proportional to the sample resistance R. The sample resistance is that segment of the sample between the area of the first electrode and the third electrode, which is connected to ground potential.

  19. Dual Cry2Ab and Vip3A resistant strains of Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa punctigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae); testing linkage between loci and monitoring of allele frequencies.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T K; Downes, S J; Gascoyne, J; James, W; Parker, T; Armstrong, J; Mahon, R J

    2014-08-01

    Considerable attention has been given to delaying the evolution of insect resistance to toxins produced by transgenic crops. The major pests of cotton in Australia are the Lepidoptera Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner, 1805) and Helicoverpa punctigera (Wallengren), and the toxins deployed in current and imminent transgenic cotton varieties are Cry1Ac, Cry2Ab and Vip3A from Bacillus thuringiensis. In this study, lines that carry alleles conferring resistance to Cry2Ab and Vip3A were isolated using F2 tests. Extensive work on the Cry2Ab resistant lines, and preliminary work on the Vip3A resistant lines, suggested a single common resistance to each toxin in both species thereby justifying the use of more efficient F1 tests as the primary means for monitoring changes over time. A potential further efficiency could be gained by developing a single resistant line that carries both types of Bt resistance. Herein we report on work with both H. armigera and H. punctigera that tests whether dual Cry2Ab-Vip3A resistant lines can be developed and, if so, whether they can be used to effectively monitor resistance frequencies. Furthermore, the creation of dual resistant lines allowed linkage between the Cry2Ab and Vip3A resistances to be investigated for H. punctigera. We show that dual resistant lines can be used to increase the efficiency of the F1 screen for recessive alleles, and that in H. punctigera there is no linkage between Cry2Ab and Vip3A resistance.

  20. A design of tamper resistant prescription RFID access control system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Yi; Huang, Der-Chen; Tsai, Meng-Lin; Jan, Jinn-Ke

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a tamper resistant prescription RFID access control protocol for different authorized readers. Not only the authentication mechanism but also the access right authorization mechanism is designed in our scheme. Only the specific doctor, usually the patient's doctor, can access the tag. Moreover, some related information of patient's prescription is attached to a RFID tag for tamper resistance. The patients' rights will be guaranteed.

  1. Association mapping of loci controlling genetic and environmental interaction of soybean flowering time under various photo-thermal conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean (Glycine max) is a short day plant. Its flowering and maturity time are controlled by genetic and environmental factors, as well as their interaction. Previous studies have shown that both genetic and environmental factors, mainly photoperiod and temperature control flowering time of soybean...

  2. Resistance to tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus in melon is controlled by a major QTL located in chromosome 11.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Cristina; Esteras, Cristina; Martínez, Cecilia; Ferriol, María; Dhillon, Narinder P S; López, Carmelo; Picó, Belén

    2017-07-14

    Identification of three genomic regions and underlying candidate genes controlling the high level of resistance to ToLCNDV derived from a wild melon. SNP markers appropriated for MAS management of resistance. Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) is a bipartite begomovirus that severely affects melon crop (Cucumis melo) in the main production areas of Spain since 2012. In this work, we evaluated the degree of resistance of four accessions (two belonging to the subsp. agrestis var. momordica and two to the wild agrestis group) and their corresponding hybrids with a susceptible commercial melon belonging to the subsp. melo (Piel de Sapo, PS). The analysis using quantitative PCR (qPCR) allowed us to select one wild agrestis genotype (WM-7) with a high level of resistance and use it to construct segregating populations (F 2 and backcrosses). These populations were phenotyped for symptom severity and virus content using qPCR, and genotyped with different sets of SNP markers. Phenotyping and genotyping results in the F 2 and BC1s populations derived from the WM-7 × PS cross were used for QTL analysis. Three genomic regions controlling resistance to ToLCNDV were found, one major locus in chromosome 11 and two additional regions in chromosomes 12 and 2. The highest level of resistance (no or mild symptoms and very low viral titer) was obtained with the homozygous WM-7WM-7 genotype at the major QTL in chromosome 11, even with PSPS genotypes at the other two loci. The resistance derived from WM-7 is useful to develop new melon cultivars and the linked SNPs selected in this paper will be highly useful in marker-assisted breeding for ToLCNDV resistance in melon.

  3. Control of ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic modes in reversed field pinches with a resistive wall

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, A. S.; Finn, J. M.; Delzanno, G. L.

    2010-11-15

    Numerical studies of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities with feedback control in reversed field pinches (RFPs) are presented. Specifically, investigations are performed of the stability of m=1 modes in RFPs with control based on sensing the normal and tangential magnetic fields at the resistive wall and applying two-parameter feedback proportional to these fields. The control scheme is based on that of [J. M. Finn, Phys. Plasmas 13, 082504 (2006)], which is here modified to use a more realistic plasma model. The plasma model now uses full resistive MHD rather than reduced MHD, and it uses three realistic classes of equilibrium parallel current density profiles appropriate to RFPs. Results with these modifications are in qualitative agreement with [J. M. Finn, Phys. Plasmas 13, 082504 (2006)]: the feedback can stabilize tearing modes (with resistive or ideal-wall) and resistive wall ideal modes. The limit for stabilization is again found to be near the threshold for ideal modes with an ideal-wall. In addition to confirming these predictions, the nature of the instabilities limiting the range of feedback stabilization near the ideal-wall ideal-plasma threshold are studied, and the effects of viscosity, resistive wall time, and plasma resistivity are reported.

  4. A GBS-SNP-based linkage map and quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum race 2 identified in Citrullus lanatus var. citroides.

    PubMed

    Branham, Sandra E; Levi, Amnon; Farnham, Mark W; Patrick Wechter, W

    2017-02-01

    A major QTL for resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum race 2 was mapped to a narrow 1.2 Mb interval using a high-density GBS-SNP linkage map, the first map of Citrullus lanatus var. citroides. Fusarium wilt, a fungal disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (Fon), devastates watermelon crop production worldwide. Several races, which are differentiated by host range, of the pathogen exist. Resistance to Fon race 2, a particularly virulent strain prevalent in the United States, does not exist in edible cultivars of the sweet cultivated watermelon Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus (Cll) and has been well described in a few plant introductions of the wild subspecies of watermelon, C. lanatus var. citroides (Clc). Clc provides a vital source of genetic diversity, as well as resistance to numerous diseases. Unfortunately, both genetic diversity and disease resistance are lacking in Cll due to the narrow genetic base. Despite the importance of Clc to continued watermelon improvement, intra-variety genetic studies are lacking. Here, we present the first Clc genetic linkage map, generated with 2495 single nucleotide polymorphisms developed through genotyping-by-sequencing, and use it to identify quantitative trait loci associated with Fon race 2 resistance. Multiple QTL mapping in a Clc F2:3 population (N = 173) identified one major and four minor QTL. The major QTL explained 43% of the variation in Fon race 2 resistance and was delimited to a 1.2-Mb interval on chromosome 9, a region spanning 44 genes.

  5. Identification of loci associated with drought resistance traits in heterozygous autotetraploid alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) using genome-wide association studies with genotyping by sequencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Developing molecular markers associated with drought resistance would be helpful for improving the accuracy in selecting resistant alfalfa, and accelerating the breeding process. A panel of accessions comprised of 200 alfalfa cultivars and landraces with potential drought tolerance were selected fro...

  6. A genomic island harboring arsenic resistance genes varies in gene content and is located in different chromosomal loci among Listeria monocytogenes strains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, arsenic resistance has been often encountered among certain clonal groups of serotype 4b and was earlier found to be strongly associated with an arsenic resistance gene cluster within a 35 kb chromosomal region, designated Listeria genomic island 2 (...

  7. Iso-lines and Inbred-lines Confirmed Loci that Underlie Resistance from Cultivar 'Hartwig' to Three Soybean Cyst Nematode Populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars vary in their resistance to different populations of the soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines. Populations are classified into groups called HG Types. The rhg1 locus on linkage group G underlying resistance to HG Type 0 was necessary for resista...

  8. Unlinked genetic loci control the reduced transcription of aminopeptidase N 1 and 3 in the European corn borer and determine tolerance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crystalline (Cry) toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) control insect feeding damage on crop plants via foliar applications or by expression within transgenic plants, but continued Bt use is threatened by the buildup of insect resistance traits. Aminopeptidase N (apn) gene family members encode m...

  9. Genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling growth and wood quality traits in Eucalyptus grandis using a maternal half-sib family and RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Grattapaglia, D; Bertolucci, F L; Penchel, R; Sederoff, R R

    1996-11-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of forest productivity traits was performed using an open pollinated half-sib family of Eucalyptus grandis. For volume growth, a sequential QTL mapping approach was applied using bulk segregant analysis (BSA), selective genotyping (SG) and cosegregation analysis (CSA). Despite the low heritability of this trait and the heterogeneous genetic background employed for mapping, BSA detected one putative QTL and SG two out of the three later found by CSA. The three putative QTL for volume growth were found to control 13.7% of the phenotypic variation, corresponding to an estimated 43.7% of the genetic variation. For wood specific gravity five QTL were identified controlling 24.7% of the phenotypic variation corresponding to 49% of the genetic variation. Overlapping QTL for CBH, WSG and percentage dry weight of bark were observed. A significant case of digenic epistasis was found, involving unlinked QTL for volume. Our results demonstrate the applicability of the within half-sib design for QTL mapping in forest trees and indicate the existence of major genes involved in the expression of economically important traits related to forest productivity in Eucalyptus grandis. These findings have important implications for marker-assisted tree breeding.

  10. Genetic Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Growth and Wood Quality Traits in Eucalyptus Grandis Using a Maternal Half-Sib Family and Rapd Markers

    PubMed Central

    Grattapaglia, D.; Bertolucci, FLG.; Penchel, R.; Sederoff, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of forest productivity traits was performed using an open pollinated half-sib family of Eucalyptus grandis. For volume growth, a sequential QTL mapping approach was applied using bulk segregant analysis (BSA), selective genotyping (SG) and cosegregation analysis (CSA). Despite the low heritability of this trait and the heterogeneous genetic background employed for mapping. BSA detected one putative QTL and SG two out of the three later found by CSA. The three putative QTL for volume growth were found to control 13.7% of the phenotypic variation, corresponding to an estimated 43.7% of the genetic variation. For wood specific gravity five QTL were identified controlling 24.7% of the phenotypic variation corresponding to 49% of the genetic variation. Overlapping QTL for CBH, WSG and percentage dry weight of bark were observed. A significant case of digenic epistasis was found, involving unlinked QTL for volume. Our results demonstrate the applicability of the within half-sib design for QTL mapping in forest trees and indicate the existence of major genes involved in the expression of economically important traits related to forest productivity in Eucalyptus grandis. These findings have important implications for marker-assisted tree breeding. PMID:8913761

  11. A genetic map of cucumber composed of RAPDs, RFLPs, AFLPs, and loci conditioning resistance to papaya ringspot and zucchini yellow mosaic viruses.

    PubMed

    Park, Y H; Sensoy, S; Wye, C; Antonise, R; Peleman, J; Havey, M J

    2000-12-01

    The watermelon strain of papaya ringspot virus (PRSV-W) and zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) are potyviruses that cause significant disease losses in cucumber. Resistances have been identified primarily in exotic germplasm that require transfer to elite cultivated backgrounds. To select more efficiently for virus resistances, we identified molecular markers tightly linked to PRSV-W and ZYMV resistances in cucumber. We generated F6 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from a cross between Cucumis sativus L. 'Straight 8' and a line from 'Taichung Mou Gua', TMG1 (susceptible and resistant, respectively, to both viruses), and studied the segregations of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers, randomly amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs), restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), and resistances to PRSV-W and ZYMV. A 353-point map of cucumber was generated, delineating 12 linkage groups at LOD 3.5. Linkage arrangements among RFLPs were consistent with previously published maps; however linkages among RAPDs in our map did not agree with a previously published map. Resistances to PRSV-W and ZYMV were tightly linked (2.2 cM) and mapped to the end of one linkage group. One AFLP cosegregated with resistance to ZYMV.

  12. Antibiotic control of antibiotic resistance in hospitals: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Haber, Michael; Levin, Bruce R; Kramarz, Piotr

    2010-08-25

    Using mathematical deterministic models of the epidemiology of hospital-acquired infections and antibiotic resistance, it has been shown that the rates of hospital-acquired bacterial infection and frequency of antibiotic infections can be reduced by (i) restricting the admission of patients colonized with resistant bacteria, (ii) increasing the rate of turnover of patients, (iii) reducing transmission by infection control measures, and (iv) the use of second-line drugs for which there is no resistance. In an effort to explore the generality and robustness of the predictions of these deterministic models to the real world of hospitals, where there is variation in all of the factors contributing to the incidence of infection, we developed and used a stochastic model of the epidemiology of hospital-acquired infections and resistance. In our analysis of the properties of this model we give particular consideration different regimes of using second-line drugs in this process. We developed a simple model that describes the transmission of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant bacteria in a small hospital. Colonized patients may be treated with a standard drug, for which there is some resistance, and with a second-line drug, for which there is no resistance. We then ran deterministic and stochastic simulation programs, based on this model, to predict the effectiveness of various treatment strategies. The results of the analysis using our stochastic model support the predictions of the deterministic models; not only will the implementation of any of the above listed measures substantially reduce the incidences of hospital-acquired infections and the frequency of resistance, the effects of their implementation should be seen in months rather than the years or decades anticipated to control resistance in open communities. How effectively and how rapidly the application of second-line drugs will contribute to the decline in the frequency of resistance to the first-line drugs

  13. Averting a malaria disaster: will insecticide resistance derail malaria control?

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Janet; Ranson, Hilary; Magill, Alan; Kolaczinski, Jan; Fornadel, Christen; Gimnig, John; Coetzee, Maureen; Simard, Frederic; Roch, Dabiré K; Hinzoumbe, Clément Kerah; Pickett, John; Schellenberg, David; Gething, Peter; Hoppé, Mark; Hamon, Nicholas

    2016-04-23

    World Malaria Day 2015 highlighted the progress made in the development of new methods of prevention (vaccines and insecticides) and treatment (single dose drugs) of the disease. However, increasing drug and insecticide resistance threatens the successes made with existing methods. Insecticide resistance has decreased the efficacy of the most commonly used insecticide class of pyrethroids. This decreased efficacy has increased mosquito survival, which is a prelude to rising incidence of malaria and fatalities. Despite intensive research efforts, new insecticides will not reach the market for at least 5 years. Elimination of malaria is not possible without effective mosquito control. Therefore, to combat the threat of resistance, key stakeholders need to rapidly embrace a multifaceted approach including a reduction in the cost of bringing new resistance management methods to market and the streamlining of associated development, policy, and implementation pathways to counter this looming public health catastrophe. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Selection of multiple-antibiotic-resistant (mar) mutants of Escherichia coli by using the disinfectant pine oil: roles of the mar and acrAB loci.

    PubMed Central

    Moken, M C; McMurry, L M; Levy, S B

    1997-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli selected for resistance to the disinfectant pine oil or to a household product containing pine oil also showed resistance to multiple antibiotics (tetracycline, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and nalidixic acid) and overexpressed the marA gene. Likewise, antibiotic-selected Mar mutants, which also overexpress marA, were resistant to pine oil. Deletion of the mar or acrAB locus, the latter encoding a multidrug efflux pump positively regulated in part by MarA, increased the susceptibility of wild-type and mutant strains to pine oil. PMID:9420057

  15. Relationship of Antimicrobial Control Policies and Hospital and Infection Control Characteristics to Antimicrobial Resistance Rates

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Elaine L.; Quiros, Dave; Giblin, Tara; Lin, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Background Antibiotic misuse and noncompliance with infection control precautions have contributed to increasing levels of antimicrobial resistance in hospitals. Objectives To assess the extent to which resistance is monitored in infection control programs and to correlate resistance rates with characteristics of antimicrobial control policies, provider attitudes and practices, and systems-level indicators of implementation of the hand hygiene guideline of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Methods An on-site survey of intensive care unit staff and infection control directors of 33 hospitals in the United States was conducted. The following data were collected: antimicrobial control policies; rates during the previous 12 months of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and ceftazidime-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae; an implementation score of systems-level efforts to implement the guideline; staff attitudes toward practice guidelines; and observations of staff hand hygiene. Variables associated with resistance rates were examined for independent effects by using logistic regression. Results Resistance rates for S aureus, enterococci, and K pneumoniae were 52.5%, 18.2%, and 16.0%, respectively. Ten (30.3%) hospitals had an antibiotic control policy. No statistically significant correlation was observed between staff attitudes toward practice guidelines, observed hand hygiene behavior, or having an antibiotic use policy and resistance rates. In logistic regression analysis, higher scores on measures of systems-level efforts to implement the guideline were associated with lower rates of resistant S aureus and enterococci (P=.046). Conclusions Organizational-level factors independent of the practices of individual clinicians may be associated with rates of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:17322010

  16. Detection of quantitative trait loci for mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) resistance in mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) in India and Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Kitsanachandee, Ratanakorn; Somta, Prakit; Chatchawankanphanich, Orawan; Akhtar, Khalid P.; Shah, Tariq Mahmud; Nair, Ramakrishnan M.; Bains, Tejinderjit S.; Sirari, Asmita; Kaur, Livinder; Srinives, Peerasak

    2013-01-01

    Yellow mosaic disease (YMD) is one of the major diseases affecting mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek). In this study, we report the mapping of the quantitative trait locus (QTL) for mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) resistance in mungbean. An F8 recombinant inbred line (RIL) mapping population was generated in Thailand from a cross between NM10-12-1 (MYMIV resistance) and KPS2 (MYMIV susceptible). One hundred and twenty-two RILs and their parents were evaluated for MYMIV resistance in infested fields in India and Pakistan. A genetic linkage map was developed for the RIL population using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Composite interval mapping identified five QTLs for MYMIV resistance: three QTLs for India (qYMIV1, qYMIV2 and qYMIV3) and two QTLs for Pakistan (qYMIV4 and qYMIV5). qYMIV1, qYMIV2, qYMIV3, qYMIV4 and qYMIV5 explained 9.33%, 10.61%, 12.55%, 21.93% and 6.24% of variation in disease responses, respectively. qYMIV1 and qYMIV4 appeared to be the same locus and were common to a major QTL for MYMIV resistance in India identified previously using a different resistant mungbean. PMID:24399908

  17. A Cluster of Nucleotide-Binding Site-Leucine-Rich Repeat Genes Resides in a Barley Powdery Mildew Resistance Quantitative Trait Loci on 7HL.

    PubMed

    Cantalapiedra, Carlos P; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Silvar, Cristina; Perovic, Dragan; Ordon, Frank; Gracia, María Pilar; Igartua, Ernesto; Casas, Ana M

    2016-07-01

    Powdery mildew causes severe yield losses in barley production worldwide. Although many resistance genes have been described, only a few have already been cloned. A strong QTL (quantitative trait locus) conferring resistance to a wide array of powdery mildew isolates was identified in a Spanish barley landrace on the long arm of chromosome 7H. Previous studies narrowed down the QTL position, but were unable to identify candidate genes or physically locate the resistance. In this study, the exome of three recombinant lines from a high-resolution mapping population was sequenced and analyzed, narrowing the position of the resistance down to a single physical contig. Closer inspection of the region revealed a cluster of closely related NBS-LRR (nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat containing protein) genes. Large differences were found between the resistant lines and the reference genome of cultivar Morex, in the form of PAV (presence-absence variation) in the composition of the NBS-LRR cluster. Finally, a template-guided assembly was performed and subsequent expression analysis revealed that one of the new assembled candidate genes is transcribed. In summary, the results suggest that NBS-LRR genes, absent from the reference and the susceptible genotypes, could be functional and responsible for the powdery mildew resistance. The procedure followed is an example of the use of NGS (next-generation sequencing) tools to tackle the challenges of gene cloning when the target gene is absent from the reference genome.

  18. Known glioma risk loci are associated with glioma with a family history of brain tumours -- a case-control gene association study.

    PubMed

    Melin, Beatrice; Dahlin, Anna M; Andersson, Ulrika; Wang, Zhaoming; Henriksson, Roger; Hallmans, Göran; Bondy, Melissa L; Johansen, Christoffer; Feychting, Maria; Ahlbom, Anders; Kitahara, Cari M; Wang, Sophia S; Ruder, Avima M; Carreón, Tania; Butler, Mary Ann; Inskip, Peter D; Purdue, Mark; Hsing, Ann W; Mechanic, Leah; Gillanders, Elizabeth; Yeager, Meredith; Linet, Martha; Chanock, Stephen J; Hartge, Patricia; Rajaraman, Preetha

    2013-05-15

    Familial cancer can be used to leverage genetic association studies. Recent genome-wide association studies have reported independent associations between seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of glioma. The aim of this study was to investigate whether glioma cases with a positive family history of brain tumours, defined as having at least one first- or second-degree relative with a history of brain tumour, are associated with known glioma risk loci. One thousand four hundred and thirty-one glioma cases and 2,868 cancer-free controls were identified from four case-control studies and two prospective cohorts from USA, Sweden and Denmark and genotyped for seven SNPs previously reported to be associated with glioma risk in case-control designed studies. Odds ratios were calculated by unconditional logistic regression. In analyses including glioma cases with a family history of brain tumours (n = 104) and control subjects free of glioma at baseline, three of seven SNPs were associated with glioma risk: rs2736100 (5p15.33, TERT), rs4977756 (9p21.3, CDKN2A-CDKN2B) and rs6010620 (20q13.33, RTEL1). After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, only one marker was statistically significantly associated with glioma risk, rs6010620 (ORtrend for the minor (A) allele, 0.39; 95% CI: 0.25-0.61; Bonferroni adjusted ptrend , 1.7 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, as previously shown for glioma regardless of family history of brain tumours, rs6010620 (RTEL1) was associated with an increased risk of glioma when restricting to cases with family history of brain tumours. These findings require confirmation in further studies with a larger number of glioma cases with a family history of brain tumours. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  19. Known glioma risk loci are associated with glioma with a family history of brain tumours - a case-control gene association study

    PubMed Central

    Melin, Beatrice; Dahlin, Anna M.; Andersson, Ulrika; Wang, Zhaoming; Henriksson, Roger; Hallmans, Göran; Bondy, Melissa L.; Johansen, Christoffer; Feychting, Maria; Ahlbom, Anders; Kitahara, Cari M.; Wang, Sophia S.; Ruder, Avima M.; Carreón, Tania; Butler, Mary Ann; Inskip, Peter D.; Purdue, Mark; Hsing, Ann W.; Mechanic, Leah; Gillanders, Elizabeth; Yeager, Meredith; Linet, Martha; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hartge, Patricia; Rajaraman, Preetha

    2012-01-01

    Familial cancer can be used to leverage genetic association studies. Recent genome-wide association studies have reported independent associations between seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of glioma. The aim of this study was to investigate whether glioma cases with a positive family history of brain tumours, defined as having at least one first or second degree relative with a history of brain tumour, are associated with known glioma risk loci. 1431 glioma cases and 2868 cancer-free controls were identified from four case-control studies and two prospective cohorts from USA, Sweden, and Denmark and genotyped for seven SNPs previously reported to be associated with glioma risk in case-control designed studies. Odds ratios were calculated by unconditional logistic regression. In analyses including glioma cases with a family history of brain tumours (n=104) and control subjects free of glioma at baseline, three out of seven SNPs were associated with glioma risk; rs2736100 (5p15.33, TERT), rs4977756 (9p21.3, CDKN2A-CDKN2B), and rs6010620 (20q13.33, RTEL1). After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, only one marker was statistically significantly associated with glioma risk, rs6010620 (ORtrend for the minor (A) allele, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.25–0.61; Bonferroni adjusted ptrend, 1.7×10−4). In conclusion, as previously shown for glioma regardless of family history of brain tumours, rs6010620 (RTEL1) was associated with an increased risk of glioma when restricting to cases with family history of brain tumours. These findings require confirmation in further studies with a larger number of glioma cases with a family history of brain tumours. PMID:23115063

  20. Aod1 controlling day 3 thymectomy-induced autoimmune ovarian dysgenesis in mice encompasses two linked quantitative trait loci with opposing allelic effects on disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Roper, Randall J; McAllister, Ryan D; Biggins, Julia E; Michael, Sandra D; Min, Soo Hong; Tung, Kenneth S K; Call, Stanford B; Gao, Jianfeng; Teuscher, Cory

    2003-06-15

    Day 3 thymectomy (D3Tx) leads to a paucity of CD4(+)CD25(+) suppressor T cells, a loss of peripheral tolerance, and the development of organ-specific autoimmune disease in adult mice. Importantly, D3Tx does not lead to autoimmune disease in all mouse strains, indicating that this process is genetically controlled. Previously, we reported linkage of D3Tx-induced autoimmune ovarian dysgenesis (AOD) and its intermediate phenotypes, antiovarian autoantibody responsiveness, oophoritis, and atrophy, to five quantitative trait loci (QTL), designated Aod1 through Aod5. We also showed interaction between these QTL and H2 as well as Gasa2, a QTL controlling susceptibility to D3Tx-induced autoimmune gastritis. To physically map Aod1, interval-specific bidirectional recombinant congenic strains of mice were generated and studied for susceptibility to D3Tx-induced AOD. Congenic mapping studies revealed that Aod1 controls susceptibility to oophoritis and comprises two linked QTL with opposing allelic effects. Aod1a resides between D16Mit211 (23.3 cM) and D16Mit51 (66.75 cM) on chromosome 16. Aod1b maps proximal of Aod1a between D16Mit89 (20.9 cM) and D16Mit211 (23.3 cM) and includes the candidate genes stefin A1, A2, and A3 (Stfa1-Stfa3), inhibitors of cathepsin S, a cysteine protease required for autoantigen presentation, and the development of autoimmune disease of the salivary and lacrimal glands following D3Tx. cDNA sequencing revealed the existence of structural polymorphisms for both Stfa1 and Stfa2. Given the roles of cathepsins in Ag processing and presentation, Stfa1 and Stfa2 alleles have the potential to control susceptibility to autoimmune disease at the level of both CD4(+)CD25(+) suppressor and CD4(+)CD25(-) effector T cells.

  1. Asymptotic unbounded root loci - Formulas and computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, S. S.; Desoer, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    A new geometric way of computing the asymptotic behavior of unbounded root loci of a strictly proper linear time-invariant control system as loop gain goes to infinity is presented. Properties of certain restricted linear maps and nested restrictions of linear maps are developed, and formulas are obtained for the leading coefficient of the asymptotic values of the unbounded multivariable root loci are obtained in terms of eigenvalues of those maps. Published results and a certain simple null structure assumption are used to relate these asymptotic values to the structure at infinity of the Smith-McMillan form of the open loop transfer function. Explicit matrix formulas for the more abstract derived formulas are given and additional geometric insights are developed with orthogonal projections and singular value decomposition. Formulas for the pivots of the unbounded root loci are calculated and shown to have the same form as the coefficients of the unbounded asymptotic root loci.

  2. Asymptotic unbounded root loci - Formulas and computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, S. S.; Desoer, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    A new geometric way of computing the asymptotic behavior of unbounded root loci of a strictly proper linear time-invariant control system as loop gain goes to infinity is presented. Properties of certain restricted linear maps and nested restrictions of linear maps are developed, and formulas are obtained for the leading coefficient of the asymptotic values of the unbounded multivariable root loci are obtained in terms of eigenvalues of those maps. Published results and a certain simple null structure assumption are used to relate these asymptotic values to the structure at infinity of the Smith-McMillan form of the open loop transfer function. Explicit matrix formulas for the more abstract derived formulas are given and additional geometric insights are developed with orthogonal projections and singular value decomposition. Formulas for the pivots of the unbounded root loci are calculated and shown to have the same form as the coefficients of the unbounded asymptotic root loci.

  3. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci and a candidate locus for freezing tolerance in controlled and outdoor environments in the overwintering crucifer Boechera stricta

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jae-Yun; Feng, Dongsheng; Niu, Xiaomu; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; van Tienderen, Peter H.; Tomes, Dwight; Schranz, M. Eric

    2015-01-01

    Development of chilling and freezing tolerance is complex and can be affected by photoperiod, temperature and photosynthetic performance; however, there has been limited research on the interaction of these three factors. We evaluated 108 recombinant inbred lines of Boechera stricta, derived from a cross between lines originating from Idaho and Colorado, under controlled Long-Day (LD), Short-Day (SD) and in an Outdoor Environment (OE). We measured maximum quantum yield of photosystem II, lethal temperature for 50% survival and electrolyte leakage of leaves. Our results revealed significant variation for chilling and freezing tolerance and photosynthetic performance in different environments. Using both single and multi-trait analyses, three main-effect Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) were identified. QTL on LG3 were SD-specific, whereas QTL on LG4 were found under both LD and SD. Under all conditions, QTL on LG7 were identified, but were particularly predictive for the Outdoor Experiment. The co-localization of photosynthetic performance and freezing tolerance effects supports these traits being co-regulated. Finally, the major QTL on LG7 is syntenic to the Arabidopsis CBF locus, known regulators of chilling and freezing responses in A. thaliana and other species. PMID:24811132

  4. Resistance to genetic insect control: Modelling the effects of space.

    PubMed

    Watkinson-Powell, Benjamin; Alphey, Nina

    2017-01-21

    Genetic insect control, such as self-limiting RIDL(2) (Release of Insects Carrying a Dominant Lethal) technology, is a development of the sterile insect technique which is proposed to suppress wild populations of a number of major agricultural and public health insect pests. This is achieved by mass rearing and releasing male insects that are homozygous for a repressible dominant lethal genetic construct, which causes death in progeny when inherited. The released genetically engineered ('GE') insects compete for mates with wild individuals, resulting in population suppression. A previous study modelled the evolution of a hypothetical resistance to the lethal construct using a frequency-dependent population genetic and population dynamic approach. This found that proliferation of resistance is possible but can be diluted by the introgression of susceptible alleles from the released homozygous-susceptible GE males. We develop this approach within a spatial context by modelling the spread of a lethal construct and resistance trait, and the effect on population control, in a two deme metapopulation, with GE release in one deme. Results show that spatial effects can drive an increased or decreased evolution of resistance in both the target and non-target demes, depending on the effectiveness and associated costs of the resistant trait, and on the rate of dispersal. A recurrent theme is the potential for the non-target deme to act as a source of resistant or susceptible alleles for the target deme through dispersal. This can in turn have a major impact on the effectiveness of insect population control.

  5. Control of volume resistivity in inorganic organic separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Manzo, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Control of resistivity in NASA inorganic-organic separators is achieved by incorporating small percentages of high surface area, fine particle silica with other ingredients in the separator coating. The volume resistivity is predictable from the surface area of filler particles in the coating. The approach is applied to two polymer- plasticizer -filler coating systems, where the filler content of each is below the generally acknowledged critical pigment volume concentration of the coating. Application of these coating systems to 0.0254 cm thick (10-mil) fuel cell grade asbestos sheet produces inexpensive, flexible, microporous separators that perform as well as the original inorganic-organic concept, the Astropower separator.

  6. Deciphering the conserved genetic loci implicated in plant disease control through comparative genomics of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad J.; Ran, Chao; Liu, Ke; Ryu, Choong-Min; Rasmussen-Ivey, Cody R.; Williams, Malachi A.; Hassan, Mohammad K.; Choi, Soo-Keun; Jeong, Haeyoung; Newman, Molli; Kloepper, Joseph W.; Liles, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    To understand the growth-promoting and disease-inhibiting activities of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strains, the genomes of 12 Bacillus subtilis group strains with PGPR activity were sequenced and analyzed. These B. subtilis strains exhibited high genomic diversity, whereas the genomes of B. amyloliquefaciens strains (a member of the B. subtilis group) are highly conserved. A pairwise BLASTp matrix revealed that gene family similarity among Bacillus genomes ranges from 32 to 90%, with 2839 genes within the core genome of B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum. Comparative genomic analyses of B. amyloliquefaciens strains identified genes that are linked with biological control and colonization of roots and/or leaves, including 73 genes uniquely associated with subsp. plantarum strains that have predicted functions related to signaling, transportation, secondary metabolite production, and carbon source utilization. Although B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strains contain gene clusters that encode many different secondary metabolites, only polyketide biosynthetic clusters that encode difficidin and macrolactin are conserved within this subspecies. To evaluate their role in plant pathogen biocontrol, genes involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis were deleted in a B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strain, revealing that difficidin expression is critical in reducing the severity of disease, caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria in tomato plants. This study defines genomic features of PGPR strains and links them with biocontrol activity and with host colonization. PMID:26347755

  7. Multicentre search for genetic susceptibility loci in sporadic epilepsy syndrome and seizure types: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Weale, Michael E; Shianna, Kevin V; Singh, Rinki; Lynch, John M; Grinton, Bronwyn; Szoeke, Cassandra; Murphy, Kevin; Kinirons, Peter; O'Rourke, Deirdre; Ge, Dongliang; Depondt, Chantal; Claeys, Kristl G; Pandolfo, Massimo; Gumbs, Curtis; Walley, Nicole; McNamara, James; Mulley, John C; Linney, Kristen N; Sheffield, Leslie J; Radtke, Rodney A; Tate, Sarah K; Chissoe, Stephanie L; Gibson, Rachel A; Hosford, David; Stanton, Alice; Graves, Tracey D; Hanna, Michael G; Eriksson, Kai; Kantanen, Anne-Mari; Kalviainen, Reetta; O'Brien, Terence J; Sander, Josemir W; Duncan, John S; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel F; Wood, Nicholas W; Doherty, Colin P; Delanty, Norman; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Goldstein, David B

    2007-11-01

    The Epilepsy Genetics (EPIGEN) Consortium was established to undertake genetic mapping analyses with augmented statistical power to detect variants that influence the development and treatment of common forms of epilepsy. We examined common variations across 279 prime candidate genes in 2717 case and 1118 control samples collected at four independent research centres (in the UK, Ireland, Finland, and Australia). Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and combined set-association analyses were used to examine the contribution of genetic variation in the candidate genes to various forms of epilepsy. We did not identify clear, indisputable common genetic risk factors that contribute to selected epilepsy subphenotypes across multiple populations. Nor did we identify risk factors for the general all-epilepsy phenotype. However, set-association analysis on the most significant p values, assessed under permutation, suggested the contribution of numerous SNPs to disease predisposition in an apparent population-specific manner. Variations in the genes KCNAB1, GABRR2, KCNMB4, SYN2, and ALDH5A1 were most notable. The underlying genetic component to sporadic epilepsy is clearly complex. Results suggest that many SNPs contribute to disease predisposition in an apparently population-specific manner. However, subtle differences in phenotyping across cohorts, combined with a poor understanding of how the underlying genetic component to epilepsy aligns with current phenotypic classifications, might also account for apparent population-specific genetic risk factors. Variations across five genes warrant further study in independent cohorts to clarify the tentative association.

  8. Control of resistance plug welding using quantitative feedback theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, A.E.; Horowitz, I. ||; Chait, Y.; Rodrigues, J.

    1996-12-01

    Resistance welding is used extensively throughout the manufacturing industry. Variations in weld quality often result in costly post-weld inspections. Applications of feed-back control to such processes have been limited by the lack of accurate models describing the nonlinear dynamics of this process. A new system based on electrode displacement feedback is developed that greatly improves quality control of the resistance plug welding process. The system is capable of producing repeatable welds of consistent displacement (and thus consistent quality), with wide variations in weld parameters. This paper describes the feedback design of a robust controller using Quantitative Feedback Theory for this highly complex process, and the experimental results of the applied system.

  9. Intensified agriculture favors evolved resistance to biological control.

    PubMed

    Tomasetto, Federico; Tylianakis, Jason M; Reale, Marco; Wratten, Steve; Goldson, Stephen L

    2017-03-13

    Increased regulation of chemical pesticides and rapid evolution of pesticide resistance have increased calls for sustainable pest management. Biological control offers sustainable pest suppression, partly because evolution of resistance to predators and parasitoids is prevented by several factors (e.g., spatial or temporal refuges from attacks, reciprocal evolution by control agents, and contrasting selection pressures from other enemy species). However, evolution of resistance may become more probable as agricultural intensification reduces the availability of refuges and diversity of enemy species, or if control agents have genetic barriers to evolution. Here we use 21 y of field data from 196 sites across New Zealand to show that parasitism of a key pasture pest (Listronotus bonariensis; Argentine stem weevil) by an introduced parasitoid (Microctonus hyperodae) was initially nationally successful but then declined by 44% (leading to pasture damage of c. 160 million New Zealand dollars per annum). This decline was not attributable to parasitoid numbers released, elevation, or local climatic variables at sample locations. Rather, in all locations the decline began 7 y (14 host generations) following parasitoid introduction, despite releases being staggered across locations in different years. Finally, we demonstrate experimentally that declining parasitism rates occurred in ryegrass Lolium perenne, which is grown nationwide in high-intensity was significantly less than in adjacent plots of a less-common pasture grass (Lolium multiflorum), indicating that resistance to parasitism is host plant-dependent. We conclude that low plant and enemy biodiversity in intensive large-scale agriculture may facilitate the evolution of host resistance by pests and threaten the long-term viability of biological control.

  10. Association mapping of North American spring wheat breeding germplasm reveals loci conferring resistance to Ug99 and other African stem rust races

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The recently identified Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) race TTKSK (Ug99) poses a severe threat to global wheat production because of its broad virulence on several widely deployed resistance genes. Additional concerning virulences have been detected in the Ug99 group of races, and spread of ...

  11. Use of an Advanced Intercross Line Population for Precise Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci for Gray Leaf Spot Resistance in Maize

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Grey leaf spot (GLS) (caused by Cercospora zeae-maydis) of maize (Zea mays L.)is an important fungal disease of maize in the U.S. and worldwide. The IBM population, an advanced intercross recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross between the maize lines Mo17 (resistant) and B73 (sus...

  12. Quantitative Trait Loci for Resistance to Aspergillus Ear Rot: Analysis by Linkage Mapping, Characterization of Near-Isogenic Lines and Meta-Analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High levels of aflatoxin contamination of maize can be deadly for exposed human populations. Resistance to aflatoxin accumulation in maize has been reported in multiple studies and acts at multiple steps where there is fungal-plant interaction. In this study, we report the identification and mapping...

  13. Identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) responsible for sheath blight resistance in rice using recombinant inbred line population of Lemont X Jasmine 85

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice sheath blight (RSB) caused by the soil borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most destructive diseases of rice, causing severe losses in rice yield and quality annually. The major gene (s) governing the resistance to RSB have not been found in cultivated rice worldwide. However, ri...

  14. Identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to Fusarium crown rot (Fusarium pseudograminearum) in multiple assay environments in the Pacific Northwestern US

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium crown rot (FCR), caused by F. pseudograminearum and F. culmorum, reduces wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) yields in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of the U.S. by as much as 35%. Resistance to FCR has not yet been discovered in currently grown PNW wheat cultivars. Several significant quantitative t...

  15. Loci associated with resistance to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) in a core collection of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum)

    PubMed Central

    Bulli, Peter; Rynearson, Sheri; Chen, Xianming; Pumphrey, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici Erikss. (Pst) remains one of the most significant diseases of wheat worldwide. We investigated stripe rust resistance by genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) in 959 spring wheat accessions from the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service National Small Grains Collection, representing major global production environments. The panel was characterized for field resistance in multi-environment field trials and seedling resistance under greenhouse conditions. A genome-wide set of 5,619 informative SNP markers were used to examine the population structure, linkage disequilibrium and marker-trait associations in the germplasm panel. Based on model-based analysis of population structure and hierarchical Ward clustering algorithm, the accessions were clustered into two major subgroups. These subgroups were largely separated according to geographic origin and improvement status of the accessions. A significant correlation was observed between the population sub-clusters and response to stripe rust infection. We identified 11 and 7 genomic regions with significant associations with stripe rust resistance at adult plant and seedling stages, respectively, based on a false discovery rate multiple correction method. The regions harboring all, except three, of the QTL identified from the field and greenhouse studies overlap with positions of previously reported QTL. Further work should aim at validating the identified QTL using proper germplasm and populations to enhance their utility in marker assisted breeding. PMID:28591221

  16. Quantitative trait loci mapping of resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum race 2 in Citrullus lanatus var. citroides using genotyping-by-sequencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One of the most devastating watermelon diseases worldwide, Fusarium wilt, is caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (Fon). Spread of the particularly virulent Fon race 2 in the United States, coupled with the lack of resistance in edible cultivars of the sweet cultivated watermelon Citrullus lan...

  17. Loci associated with resistance to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) in a core collection of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici Erikss. (Pst) remains one of the most significant diseases of wheat worldwide. We investigated stripe rust resistance by genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) in 959 spring wheat accessions from the Unites States Department of Agr...

  18. Mapping of two loci conferring resistance to wheat stem rust pathogen races TTKSK (Ug99) and TRTTF in the elite hard red spring wheat line SD4279

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since its identification in the late 1990's, the stem rust pathogen (Puccinia graminis. f. sp. tritici (Pgt)) strain Ug99 (race TTKSK) has represented a worldwide wheat production threat due to its ability to overcome most of the resistance genes present in commercial cultivars. In order to address ...

  19. Salmonella and Campylobacter: Antimicrobial resistance and bacteriophage control in poultry.

    PubMed

    Grant, Ar'Quette; Hashem, Fawzy; Parveen, Salina

    2016-02-01

    Salmonella and Campylobacter are major causes of foodborne related illness and are traditionally associated with consuming undercooked poultry and/or consuming products that have been cross contaminated with raw poultry. Many of the isolated Salmonella and Campylobacter that can cause disease have displayed antimicrobial resistance phenotypes. Although poultry producers have reduced on-the-farm overuse of antimicrobials, antimicrobial resistant Salmonella and Campylobacter strains still persist. One method of bio-control, that is producing promising results, is the use of lytic bacteriophages. This review will highlight the current emergence and persistence of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella and Campylobacter recovered from poultry as well as bacteriophage research interventions and limitations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis: epidemiology and control.

    PubMed

    Matteelli, Alberto; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Cirillo, Daniela; Centis, Rosella; Girard, Enrico; Raviglion, Mario

    2007-10-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB and, more recently, of extensively drug-resistant (XDR)-TB is a real threat to achieve TB control and elimination. Over 400,000 new cases of MDR-TB occur each year and, although their number is currently unknown, XDR cases are recognized in every setting where there has been the capacity to detect them. The long-term vision for the full control of MDR-TB requires the scaling-up of culture and drug-susceptibility testing capacity, which is very limited in disease-endemic countries, and the expanded use of high-technology assays for rapid determination of resistance. MDR cases are treatable and well designed regimens, largely based on second-line anti-TB drugs, can considerably improve cure rates. However, treatment regimens need to be markedly improved through the introduction of less toxic and more powerful drugs, thus reducing duration of treatment and tolerability. This is of utmost importance for XDR-TB cases. The prevalence of MDR-TB and XDR-TB are inversely correlated with the quality of TB control and the proper use of second-line anti-TB drugs. Adherence to proper standards of care and control is imperative and a top priority of all TB control efforts. However, the risk of an uncontrollable epidemic of MDR- and XDR-TB is real considering current levels of financing and commitment to care.

  1. QTL for several metabolic traits map to loci controlling growth and body composition in an F2 intercross between high- and low-growth chicken lines.

    PubMed

    Nadaf, Javad; Pitel, Frédérique; Gilbert, Hélène; Duclos, Michel J; Vignoles, Florence; Beaumont, Catherine; Vignal, Alain; Porter, Tom E; Cogburn, Larry A; Aggrey, Samuel E; Simon, Jean; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth

    2009-08-07

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) for metabolic and body composition traits were mapped at 7 and 9 wk, respectively, in an F(2) intercross between high-growth and low-growth chicken lines. These lines also diverged for abdominal fat percentage (AFP) and plasma insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), insulin, and glucose levels. Genotypings were performed with 129 microsatellite markers covering 21 chromosomes. A total of 21 QTL with genomewide level of significance were detected by single-trait analyses for body weight (BW), breast muscle weight (BMW) and percentage (BMP), AF weight (AFW) and percentage (AFP), shank length (ShL) and diameter (ShD), fasting plasma glucose level (Gluc), and body temperature (T(b)). Other suggestive QTL were identified for these parameters and for plasma IGF-I and nonesterified fatty acid levels. QTL controlling adiposity and Gluc were colocalized on GGA3 and GGA5 and QTL for BW, ShL and ShD, adiposity, and T(b) on GGA4. Multitrait analyses revealed two QTL controlling Gluc and AFP on GGA5 and Gluc and T(b) on GGA26. Significant effects of the reciprocal cross were observed on BW, ShD, BMW, and Gluc, which may result from mtDNA and/or maternal effects. Most QTL regions for Gluc and adiposity harbor genes for which alleles have been associated with increased susceptibility to diabetes and/or obesity in humans. Identification of genes responsible for these metabolic QTL will increase our understanding of the constitutive "hyperglycemia" found in chickens. Furthermore, a comparative approach could provide new information on the genetic causes of diabetes and obesity in humans.

  2. Infection control implications of heterogeneous resistance mechanisms in carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE).

    PubMed

    Goodman, K E; Simner, P J; Tamma, P D; Milstone, A M

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) based upon a phenotypic demonstration of carbapenem resistance. However, considerable heterogeneity exists within this definitional umbrella. CRE may mechanistically differ by whether they do or do not produce carbapenemases. Moreover, patients can acquire CRE through multiple pathways: endogenously through antibiotic selective pressure on intestinal microbiota, exogenously through horizontal transmission or through a combination of these factors. Some evidence suggests that non-carbapenemase-producing CRE may be more frequently acquired by antibiotic exposure and carbapenemase-producing CRE via horizontal transmission, but definitive data are lacking. This review examines types of CRE resistance mechanisms, antibiotic exposure and horizontal transmission pathways of CRE acquisition, and the implications of these heterogeneities to the development of evidence-based CRE healthcare epidemiology policies. In our Expert Commentary & Five-Year View, we outline specific nosocomial CRE knowledge gaps and potential methodological approaches for their resolution.

  3. Impurity control and corrosion resistance of magnesium-aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M.; Song, GuangLing

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is very sensitive to the contents of impurity elements such as iron. In this study, a series of diecast AXJ530 magnesium alloy samples were prepared with additions of Mn and Fe. Through a comprehensive phase diagram calculation and corrosion evaluation, the mechanisms for the tolerance limit of Fe in magnesium alloy are discussed. This adds a new dimension to control the alloying impurity in terms of alloying composition design and casting conditions.

  4. Insecticide Resistance and the Future of Malaria Control in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Chanda, Emmanuel; Hemingway, Janet; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Rehman, Andrea M.; Ramdeen, Varsha; Phiri, Faustina N.; Coetzer, Sarel; Mthembu, David; Shinondo, Cecilia J.; Chizema-Kawesha, Elizabeth; Kamuliwo, Mulakwa; Mukonka, Victor; Baboo, Kumar S.; Coleman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background In line with the Global trend to improve malaria control efforts a major campaign of insecticide treated net distribution was initiated in 1999 and indoor residual spraying with DDT or pyrethroids was reintroduced in 2000 in Zambia. In 2006, these efforts were strengthened by the President's Malaria Initiative. This manuscript reports on the monitoring and evaluation of these activities and the potential impact of emerging insecticide resistance on disease transmission. Methods Mosquitoes were captured daily through a series of 108 window exit traps located at 18 sentinel sites. Specimens were identified to species and analyzed for sporozoites. Adult Anopheles mosquitoes were collected resting indoors and larva collected in breeding sites were reared to F1 and F0 generations in the lab and tested for insecticide resistance following the standard WHO susceptibility assay protocol. Annual cross sectional household parasite surveys were carried out to monitor the impact of the control programme on prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum in children aged 1 to 14 years. Results A total of 619 Anopheles gambiae s.l. and 228 Anopheles funestus s.l. were captured from window exit traps throughout the period, of which 203 were An. gambiae malaria vectors and 14 An. funestus s.s.. In 2010 resistance to DDT and the pyrethroids deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin was detected in both An. gambiae s.s. and An. funestus s.s.. No sporozoites were detected in either species. Prevalence of P. falciparum in the sentinel sites remained below 10% throughout the study period. Conclusion Both An. gambiae s.s. and An. funestus s.s. were controlled effectively with the ITN and IRS programme in Zambia, maintaining a reduced disease transmission and burden. However, the discovery of DDT and pyrethroid resistance in the country threatens the sustainability of the vector control programme. PMID:21915314

  5. Strain-specific and recessive QTLs involved in the control of partial resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis race 1.2 in a recombinant inbred line population of melon.

    PubMed

    Perchepied, L; Dogimont, C; Pitrat, M

    2005-06-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis (FOM) causes serious economic losses in melon (Cucumis melo L.). Two dominant resistance genes have been identified, Fom-1 and Fom-2, which provide resistance to races 0 and 2 and races 0 and 1, respectively, however FOM race 1.2 overcomes these resistance genes. A partial resistance to FOM race 1.2 that has been found in some Far East accessions is under polygenic control. A genetic map of melon was constructed to tag FOM race 1.2 resistance with DNA markers on a recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross between resistant (Isabelle) and susceptible (cv. Védrantais) lines. Artificial root inoculations on plantlets of this population using two strains, one that causes wilting (FOM 1.2w) and one that causes yellowing (FOM 1.2y), resulted in phenotypic and genotypic data that enabled the identification of nine quantitative trait loci (QTLs). These QTLs were detected on five linkage groups by composite interval mapping and explained between 41.9% and 66.4% of the total variation. Four digenic epistatic interactions involving seven loci were detected and increased the total phenotypic variation that was explained. Co-localizations between QTLs and resistance gene homologs or resistance genes, such as Fom-2 and Vat, were observed. A strain-specific QTL was detected, and some QTLs appeared to be recessive.

  6. Quantitative Trait Loci for CD4:CD8 Lymphocyte Ratio Are Associated with Risk of Type 1 Diabetes and HIV-1 Immune Control

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Manuel A.R.; Mangino, Massimo; Brumme, Chanson J.; Zhao, Zhen Zhen; Medland, Sarah E.; Wright, Margaret J.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Gordon, Scott; Campbell, Megan; McEvoy, Brian P.; Henders, Anjali; Evans, David M.; Lanchbury, Jerry S.; Pereyra, Florencia; Walker, Bruce D.; Haas, David W.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Frazer, Ian H.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal expansion or depletion of particular lymphocyte subsets is associated with clinical manifestations such as HIV progression to AIDS and autoimmune disease. We sought to identify genetic predictors of lymphocyte levels and reasoned that these may play a role in immune-related diseases. We tested 2.3 million variants for association with five lymphocyte subsets, measured in 2538 individuals from the general population, including CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells, and the derived measure CD4:CD8 ratio. We identified two regions of strong association. The first was located in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), with multiple SNPs strongly associated with CD4:CD8 ratio (rs2524054, p = 2.1 × 10−28). The second region was centered within a cluster of genes from the Schlafen family and was associated with NK cell levels (rs1838149, p = 6.1 × 10−14). The MHC association with CD4:CD8 replicated convincingly (p = 1.4 × 10−9) in an independent panel of 988 individuals. Conditional analyses indicate that there are two major independent quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the MHC region that regulate CD4:CD8 ratio: one is located in the class I cluster and influences CD8 levels, whereas the second is located in the class II cluster and regulates CD4 levels. Jointly, both QTL explained 8% of the variance in CD4:CD8 ratio. The class I variants are also strongly associated with durable host control of HIV, and class II variants are associated with type-1 diabetes, suggesting that genetic variation at the MHC may predispose one to immune-related diseases partly through disregulation of T cell homeostasis. PMID:20045101

  7. Quantitative trait loci for CD4:CD8 lymphocyte ratio are associated with risk of type 1 diabetes and HIV-1 immune control.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Manuel A R; Mangino, Massimo; Brumme, Chanson J; Zhao, Zhen Zhen; Medland, Sarah E; Wright, Margaret J; Nyholt, Dale R; Gordon, Scott; Campbell, Megan; McEvoy, Brian P; Henders, Anjali; Evans, David M; Lanchbury, Jerry S; Pereyra, Florencia; Walker, Bruce D; Haas, David W; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D; de Bakker, Paul I W; Frazer, Ian H; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal expansion or depletion of particular lymphocyte subsets is associated with clinical manifestations such as HIV progression to AIDS and autoimmune disease. We sought to identify genetic predictors of lymphocyte levels and reasoned that these may play a role in immune-related diseases. We tested 2.3 million variants for association with five lymphocyte subsets, measured in 2538 individuals from the general population, including CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells, and the derived measure CD4:CD8 ratio. We identified two regions of strong association. The first was located in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), with multiple SNPs strongly associated with CD4:CD8 ratio (rs2524054, p = 2.1 x 10(-28)). The second region was centered within a cluster of genes from the Schlafen family and was associated with NK cell levels (rs1838149, p = 6.1 x 10(-14)). The MHC association with CD4:CD8 replicated convincingly (p = 1.4 x 10(-9)) in an independent panel of 988 individuals. Conditional analyses indicate that there are two major independent quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the MHC region that regulate CD4:CD8 ratio: one is located in the class I cluster and influences CD8 levels, whereas the second is located in the class II cluster and regulates CD4 levels. Jointly, both QTL explained 8% of the variance in CD4:CD8 ratio. The class I variants are also strongly associated with durable host control of HIV, and class II variants are associated with type-1 diabetes, suggesting that genetic variation at the MHC may predispose one to immune-related diseases partly through disregulation of T cell homeostasis.

  8. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Root and Shoot Traits Associated with Drought Tolerance in a Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) Recombinant Inbred Line Population

    PubMed Central

    Idrissi, Omar; Udupa, Sripada M.; De Keyser, Ellen; McGee, Rebecca J.; Coyne, Clarice J.; Saha, Gopesh C.; Muehlbauer, Fred J.; Van Damme, Patrick; De Riek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Drought is one of the major abiotic stresses limiting lentil productivity in rainfed production systems. Specific rooting patterns can be associated with drought avoidance mechanisms that can be used in lentil breeding programs. In all, 252 co-dominant and dominant markers were used for Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) analysis on 132 lentil recombinant inbred lines based on greenhouse experiments for root and shoot traits during two seasons under progressive drought-stressed conditions. Eighteen QTLs controlling a total of 14 root and shoot traits were identified. A QTL-hotspot genomic region related to a number of root and shoot characteristics associated with drought tolerance such as dry root biomass, root surface area, lateral root number, dry shoot biomass and shoot length was identified. Interestingly, a QTL (QRSratioIX-2.30) related to root-shoot ratio, an important trait for drought avoidance, explaining the highest phenotypic variance of 27.6 and 28.9% for the two consecutive seasons, respectively, was detected. This QTL was closed to the co-dominant SNP marker TP6337 and also flanked by the two SNP TP518 and TP1280. An important QTL (QLRNIII-98.64) related to lateral root number was found close to TP3371 and flanked by TP5093 and TP6072 SNP markers. Also, a QTL (QSRLIV-61.63) associated with specific root length was identified close to TP1873 and flanked by F7XEM6b SRAP marker and TP1035 SNP marker. These two QTLs were detected in both seasons. Our results could be used for marker-assisted selection in lentil breeding programs targeting root and shoot characteristics conferring drought avoidance as an efficient alternative to slow and labor-intensive conventional breeding methods. PMID:27602034

  9. Molecular topology: A new strategy for antimicrobial resistance control.

    PubMed

    Zanni, Riccardo; Galvez-Llompart, Maria; Machuca, Jesus; Garcia-Domenech, Ramon; Recacha, Esther; Pascual, Alvaro; Rodriguez-Martinez, Jose Manuel; Galvez, Jorge

    2017-09-08

    The control of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) seems to have come to an impasse. The use and abuse of antibacterial drugs has had major consequences on the genetic mutability of both pathogenic and nonpathogenic microorganisms, leading to the development of new highly resistant strains. Because of the complexity of this situation, an in silico strategy based on QSAR molecular topology was devised to identify synthetic molecules as antimicrobial agents not susceptible to one or several mechanisms of resistance such as: biofilms formation (BF), ionophore (IA) activity, epimerase (EI) activity or SOS system (RecA inhibition). After selecting a group of 19 compounds, five of them showed significant antimicrobial activity against several strains of Staphylococcus (2 S. aureus, including 1 methicillin resistant, and 1 S. epidermidis), with MIC values between 16 and 32 mg/L. Among the compounds active on RecA, one showed a marked activity in decreasing RecA gene expression in Escherichia coli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci: Epidemiology, Infection Prevention, and Control.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Katherine; Bardossy, Ana Cecilia; Zervos, Marcus

    2016-12-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) infections have acquired prominence as a leading cause of health care-associated infections. Understanding VRE epidemiology, transmission modes in health care settings, risk factors for colonization, and infection is essential to prevention and control of VRE infections. Infection control strategies are pivotal in management of VRE infections and should be based on patient characteristics, hospital needs, and available resources. Hand hygiene is basic to decrease acquisition of VRE. The effectiveness of surveillance and contact precautions is variable and controversial in endemic settings, but important during VRE outbreak investigations and control. Environmental cleaning, chlorhexidine bathing, and antimicrobial stewardship are vital in VRE prevention and control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling sucrose content based on an enriched genetic linkage map of sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) cultivar ‘LCP 85-384’

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since sugarcane cultivars possess >100 chromosomes (2n = 100-130) and are genetically complex polyploid and aneuploids, identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with sugar content is considered the best option to improve sugar content through molecular breeding. Also, improving su...

  12. Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling sucrose content based on an enriched genetic linkage map of sugarcane (saccharum spp. hybrids) cultivar ‘LCP 85-384’

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sucrose content is the most important trait in sugarcane breeding. Since sugarcane cultivars possess 100 to 130 chromosomes and are genetically complex polyploids and aneuploids, identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with sucrose content is considered the best option to improve...

  13. Genes controlling vaccine responses and disease resistance to respiratory viral pathogens in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Elizabeth J.; Baxter, Rebecca; Leach, Richard J.; Jann, Oliver C.

    2012-01-01

    Farm animals remain at risk of endemic, exotic and newly emerging viruses. Vaccination is often promoted as the best possible solution, and yet for many pathogens, either there are no appropriate vaccines or those that are available are far from ideal. A complementary approach to disease control may be to identify genes and chromosomal regions that underlie genetic variation in disease resistance and response to vaccination. However, identification of the causal polymorphisms is not straightforward as it generally requires large numbers of animals with linked phenotypes and genotypes. Investigation of genes underlying complex traits such as resistance or response to viral pathogens requires several genetic approaches including candidate genes deduced from knowledge about the cellular pathways leading to protection or pathology, or unbiased whole genome scans using markers spread across the genome. Evidence for host genetic variation exists for a number of viral diseases in cattle including bovine respiratory disease and anecdotally, foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV). We immunised and vaccinated a cattle cross herd with a 40-mer peptide derived from FMDV and a vaccine against bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). Genetic variation has been quantified. A candidate gene approach has grouped high and low antibody and T cell responders by common motifs in the peptide binding pockets of the bovine major histocompatibility complex (BoLA) DRB3 gene. This suggests that vaccines with a minimal number of epitopes that are recognised by most cattle could be designed. Whole genome scans using microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers has revealed many novel quantitative trait loci (QTL) and SNP markers controlling both humoral and cell-mediated immunity, some of which are in genes of known immunological relevance including the toll-like receptors (TLRs). The sequencing, assembly and annotation of livestock genomes and is continuing apace. In

  14. Linkage between prostate cancer occurrence and Y-chromosomal DYS loci in Malaysian subjects.

    PubMed

    Nargesi, Mirsaed Miri; Ismail, Patimah; Razack, Azad Hassan Abdul; Pasalar, Parvin; Nazemi, Ali; Oshkoor, Sima Attaollahi; Amini, Peyman

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer differs markedly in incidence across ethnic groups. Since this disease is influenced by complex genetics, it is many genetic factors may affect the level of susceptibility to development of the disease. In this study, four Y-linked short tandem repeats (STRs), DYS388, DYS435, DYS437, and DYS439, were genotyped to compare Malaysian prostate cancer patients and normal control males. A total of 175 subjects comprising 84 patients and 91 healthy individuals were recruited. Multiplex PCR was optimized to co-amplify DYS388, DYS435, DYS437, and DYS439 loci. All samples were genotyped for alleles of four DYS loci using a Genetic Analysis System. Of all DYS loci, allele 10 (A) of DYS388 had a significantly lower incidence of disease in compare with other alleles of this locus, while a higher incidence of disease was found among males who had either allele 12 (C) of DYS388 or allele 14 (E) of DYS439. Moreover, a total of 47 different haplotypes comprising different alleles of four DYS loci were found among the whole study samples, of which haplotypes AABC and CAAA showed a lower and higher frequency among cases than controls, respectively. It is likely that Malaysian males who belong to Y-lineages with either allele 12 of DYS388, allele 14 of DYS439, or haplotype CAAA are more susceptible to develop prostate cancer, while those belonging to lineages with allele 10 of DYS388 or haplotype AABC are more resistant to the disease.

  15. Resistance controllability and variability improvement in a TaO{sub x}-based resistive memory for multilevel storage application

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, A. E-mail: amit.knp02@gmail.com Song, J.; Hwang, H. E-mail: amit.knp02@gmail.com; Deleruyelle, D.; Bocquet, M.

    2015-06-08

    In order to obtain reliable multilevel cell (MLC) characteristics, resistance controllability between the different resistance levels is required especially in resistive random access memory (RRAM), which is prone to resistance variability mainly due to its intrinsic random nature of defect generation and filament formation. In this study, we have thoroughly investigated the multilevel resistance variability in a TaO{sub x}-based nanoscale (<30 nm) RRAM operated in MLC mode. It is found that the resistance variability not only depends on the conductive filament size but also is a strong function of oxygen vacancy concentration in it. Based on the gained insights through experimental observations and simulation, it is suggested that forming thinner but denser conductive filament may greatly improve the temporal resistance variability even at low operation current despite the inherent stochastic nature of resistance switching process.

  16. Genetic loci conditioning adult plant resistance to the Ug99 race group and seedling resistance to races TRTTF and TTTTF of the stem rust pathogen in wheat landrace CItr 15026

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat landrace CItr 15026 previously showed adult plant resistance (APR) to the Ug99 stem rust race group in Kenya and seedling resistance to Puccinia graminis f. sp tritici (Pgt) races QFCSC, TTTTF, and TRTTF. CItr 15026 was crossed to susceptible accessions LMPG-6 and Red Bobs, and 180 DH lines an...

  17. Molecular mapping of stem rust resistance loci effective against the Ug99 race group of the stem rust pathogen and identification of SNP marker linked to stem rust resistance gene Sr28

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat landrace PI 177906 has field resistance to the Ug99 race group and seedling resistance to stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) races TTKSK, TTKST, and BCCBC. Two populations were developed from a cross between PI 177906 and LMPG-6, 138 double haploid (DH) lines and 140 re...

  18. Prevention and control of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, H; Grundmann, H; Skov, R; Lucet, J-C; Cauda, R

    2009-02-01

    Recent efforts to combat infections have focused on pharmaceutical interventions. However, the global spread of antimicrobial resistance calls for the reappraisal of personal and institutional hygiene. Hygiene embodies behavioural and procedural rules that prevent bacterial transmission. Consequently, the chance of spreading bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is significantly reduced. Hygiene is part of the primacy and totality of patient care, ensuring that no harm is done. Any prevention and control strategy must be underpinned by changes in attitude, embraced by all. The major components of preventing and controlling MRSA include hand and environmental hygiene (as part of standard precautions), patient isolation, and patient/staff decolonization. Improving hand hygiene practice is especially important where the risk of infection is highest, e.g. in intensive care. Physical isolation has two advantages: the physical barrier interrupts transmission, and this barrier emphasizes that precautions are required. With limited isolation facilities, risk assessment should be conducted to indicate which patients should be isolated. Environmental hygiene, although important, has a lower priority than standard precautions. When a patient is ready for discharge (home) or transfer (to another healthcare facility), the overall interests of the patient should take priority. All patients should be informed of their MRSA-positive status as soon as possible. Because of increased mupirocin resistance, a selective approach to decolonization should be taken. When MRSA-positive staff are identified, restricting their professional activity will depend on the nature of their work. Finally, politicians and others need to commit to providing the necessary resources to maximize MRSA prevention and control.

  19. Quantitative Resistance: More Than Just Perception of a Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Corwin, Jason A; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2017-04-01

    Molecular plant pathology has focused on studying large-effect qualitative resistance loci that predominantly function in detecting pathogens and/or transmitting signals resulting from pathogen detection. By contrast, less is known about quantitative resistance loci, particularly the molecular mechanisms controlling variation in quantitative resistance. Recent studies have provided insight into these mechanisms, showing that genetic variation at hundreds of causal genes may underpin quantitative resistance. Loci controlling quantitative resistance contain some of the same causal genes that mediate qualitative resistance, but the predominant mechanisms of quantitative resistance extend beyond pathogen recognition. Indeed, most causal genes for quantitative resistance encode specific defense-related outputs such as strengthening of the cell wall or defense compound biosynthesis. Extending previous work on qualitative resistance to focus on the mechanisms of quantitative resistance, such as the link between perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns and growth, has shown that the mechanisms underlying these defense outputs are also highly polygenic. Studies that include genetic variation in the pathogen have begun to highlight a potential need to rethink how the field considers broad-spectrum resistance and how it is affected by genetic variation within pathogen species and between pathogen species. These studies are broadening our understanding of quantitative resistance and highlighting the potentially vast scale of the genetic basis of quantitative resistance. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  20. [Discriminatory power of variable number on tandem repeats loci for genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in China].

    PubMed

    Chen, H X; Cai, C; Liu, J Y; Zhang, Z G; Yuan, M; Jia, J N; Sun, Z G; Huang, H R; Gao, J M; Li, W M

    2017-06-10

    Objective: Using the standard genotype method, variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR), we constructed a VNTR database to cover all provinces and proposed a set of optimized VNTR loci combinations for each province, in order to improve the preventive and control programs on tuberculosis, in China. Methods: A total of 15 loci VNTR was used to analyze 4 116 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, isolated from national survey of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis, in 2007. Hunter-Gaston Index (HGI) was also used to analyze the discriminatory power of each VNTR site. A set combination of 12-VNTR, 10-VNTR, 8-VNTR and 5-VNTR was respectively constructed for each province, based on 1) epidemic characteristics of M. tuberculosis lineages in China, with high discriminatory power and genetic stability. Results: Through the completed 15 loci VNTR patterns of 3 966 strains under 96.36% (3 966/4 116) coverage, we found seven high HGI loci (including QUB11b and MIRU26) as well as low stable loci (including QUB26, MIRU16, Mtub21 and QUB11b) in several areas. In all the 31 provinces, we found an optimization VNTR combination as 10-VNTR loci in Inner Mongolia, Chongqing and Heilongjiang, but with 8-VNTR combination shared in other provinces. Conclusions: It is necessary to not only use the VNTR database for tracing the source of infection and cluster of M. tuberculosis in the nation but also using the set of optimized VNTR combinations in monitoring those local epidemics and M. tuberculosis (genetics in local) population.

  1. Multiple genetic loci modify susceptibility to plasmacytoma-related morbidity in Eμ-v-abl transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Symons, R. C. Andrew; Daly, Mark J.; Fridlyand, Jane; Speed, Terence P.; Cook, Wendy D.; Gerondakis, Steven; Harris, Alan W.; Foote, Simon J.

    2002-01-01

    There is a great difference in susceptibility to v-abl transgene-induced plasmacytoma between the BALB/cAn and the relatively resistant C57BL/6J mouse strains. We have used the Mapmaker/SURVIVOR algorithm to analyze genome-wide scans on over 800 transgenic F2 hybrid mice, and have mapped at least six loci on chromosomes 2, 4, 11, 17, and 18 that modify tumor-related morbidity. As in human multiple myeloma, males were found to be more prone to plasmacytomagenesis. Different loci influence tumor susceptibility in male and female mice. Survival in females may be largely controlled by a pair of interacting loci on chromosomes 2 and 17. PMID:12149518

  2. The impact of coronary artery disease risk loci on ischemic heart failure severity and prognosis: association analysis in the COntrolled ROsuvastatin multiNAtional trial in heart failure (CORONA).

    PubMed

    Haver, Vincent G; Verweij, Niek; Kjekshus, John; Fox, Jayne C; Wedel, Hans; Wikstrand, John; van Gilst, Wiek H; de Boer, Rudolf A; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; van der Harst, Pim

    2014-12-21

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified multiple loci that are associated with an increased risk of developing coronary artery disease (CAD). The impact of these loci on the disease severity and prognosis of ischemic heart failure due to CAD is currently unknown. We undertook association analysis of 7 single nucleotide polymorphism (rs599839, rs17465637, rs2972147, rs6922269, rs1333049, rs501120, and rs17228212) at 7 well established CAD risk loci (1p13.3, 1q41, 2q36.3, 6q25.1, 9p21.3, 10q11.21, and 15q22.33, respectively) in 3,320 subjects diagnosed with systolic heart failure of ischemic aetiology and participating in the COntrolled ROsuvastatin multiNAtional Trial in Heart Failure (CORONA) trial. The primary outcome was the composite of time to first event of cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction and non-fatal stroke, secondary outcomes included mortality and hospitalization due to worsening heart failure. None of the 7 loci were significantly associated with the primary composite endpoint of the CORONA trial (death from cardiovascular cases, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and nonfatal stroke). However, the 1p13.3 locus (rs599839) showed evidence for association with all-cause mortality (after adjustment for covariates; HR 0.74, 95%CI [0.61 to 0.90]; P = 0.0025) and we confirmed the 1p13.3 locus (rs599839) to be associated with lipid parameters (total cholesterol (P = 1.1x10(-4)), low-density lipoprotein levels (P = 3.5 × 10(-7)) and apolipoprotein B (P = 2.2 × 10(-10))). Genetic variants strongly associated with CAD risk are not associated with the severity and outcome of ischemic heart failure. The observed association of the 1p13.3 locus with all-cause mortality requires confirmation in further studies.

  3. Sensors for feedback controls in solid state resistance welding operations

    SciTech Connect

    Tarpley, J.

    1997-10-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has a 40-plus year history of producing and processing tritium primarily for use in nuclear weapons. This gas is stored at high pressures in reservoirs that are manufactured and sealed through the use of special resistance welding processes. There is an interest in maintaining the quality and consistency of these welds to avoid leaks in the reservoirs. The reasons for this are the limited supply and high cost of producing tritium, the necessity of assuring nuclear safety and to promote weapon system reliability. Precisely machined 304-L and 316 stainless steel components are the materials used in the fabrication of the reservoir. This presentation will include a survey of sensors for use in resistance welding processes. The results of the application of the analog laser position sensor will be presented along with data indicating how the displacement parameter defines the weld process. Opportunities to close the control loop by taking sensor data into the weld controller will be discussed.

  4. Malaria Distribution, Prevalence, Drug Resistance and Control in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Elyazar, Iqbal R.F.; Hay, Simon I.; Baird, J. Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 230 million people live in Indonesia. The country is also home to over 20 anopheline vectors of malaria which transmit all four of the species of Plasmodium that routinely infect humans. A complex mosaic of risk of infection across this 5000-km-long archipelago of thousands of islands and distinctive habitats seriously challenges efforts to control malaria. Social, economic and political dimensions contribute to these complexities. This chapter examines malaria and its control in Indonesia, from the earliest efforts by malariologists of the colonial Netherlands East Indies, through the Global Malaria Eradication Campaign of the 1950s, the tumult following the coup d’état of 1965, the global resurgence of malaria through the 1980s and 1990s and finally through to the decentralization of government authority following the fall of the authoritarian Soeharto regime in 1998. We detail important methods of control and their impact in the context of the political systems that supported them. We examine prospects for malaria control in contemporary decentralized and democratized Indonesia with multidrug-resistant malaria and greatly diminished capacities for integrated malaria control management programs. PMID:21295677

  5. Malaria distribution, prevalence, drug resistance and control in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Elyazar, Iqbal R F; Hay, Simon I; Baird, J Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 230 million people live in Indonesia. The country is also home to over 20 anopheline vectors of malaria which transmit all four of the species of Plasmodium that routinely infect humans. A complex mosaic of risk of infection across this 5000-km-long archipelago of thousands of islands and distinctive habitats seriously challenges efforts to control malaria. Social, economic and political dimensions contribute to these complexities. This chapter examines malaria and its control in Indonesia, from the earliest efforts by malariologists of the colonial Netherlands East Indies, through the Global Malaria Eradication Campaign of the 1950s, the tumult following the coup d'état of 1965, the global resurgence of malaria through the 1980s and 1990s and finally through to the decentralization of government authority following the fall of the authoritarian Soeharto regime in 1998. We detail important methods of control and their impact in the context of the political systems that supported them. We examine prospects for malaria control in contemporary decentralized and democratized Indonesia with multidrug-resistant malaria and greatly diminished capacities for integrated malaria control management programs.

  6. Drug-resistant tuberculosis control in China: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Long, Qian; Qu, Yan; Lucas, Henry

    2016-01-29

    China has the second highest caseload of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in the world. In 2009, the Chinese government agreed to draw up a plan for MDR-TB prevention and control in the context of a comprehensive health system reform launched in the same year. China is facing high prevalence rates of drug-resistant TB and MDR-TB. MDR-TB disproportionally affects the poor rural population and the highest rates are in less developed regions largely due to interrupted and/or inappropriate TB treatment. Most households with an affected member suffer a heavy financial burden because of a combination of treatment and other related costs. The influential Global Fund programme for MDR-TB control in China provides technical and financial support for MDR-TB diagnosis and treatment. However, this programme has a fixed timeline and cannot provide a long term solution. In 2009, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, in cooperation with the National Health and Family Planning Commission of China, started to develop innovative approaches to TB/MDR-TB management and case-based payment mechanisms for treatment, alongside increased health insurance benefits for patients, in order to contain medical costs and reduce financial barriers to treatment. Although these efforts appear to be in the right direction, they may not be sufficient unless (a) domestic sources are mobilized to raise funding for TB/MDR-TB prevention and control and (b) appropriate incentives are given to both health facilities and their care providers. Along with the on-going Chinese health system reform, sustained government financing and social health protection schemes will be critical to ensure universal access to appropriate TB treatment in order to reduce risk of developing MDR-TB and systematic MDR-TB treatment and management.

  7. Altered baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance during simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Vernikos, J.

    1994-01-01

    Reflex peripheral vasoconstriction induced by activation of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors in response to reduced central venous pressure (CVP) is a basic mechanism for elevating systemic vascular resistance and defending arterial blood pressure during orthostatically-induced reductions in cardiac filling and output. The sensitivity of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex response [defined as the slope of the relationship between changes in forearm vascular resistance (FVR) and CVP] and the resultant vasoconstriction are closely and inversely associated with the amount of circulating blood volume. Thus, a high-gain FVR response will be elicited by a hypovolemic state. Exposure to microgravity during spaceflight results in reduced plasma volume. It is therefore reasonable to expect that the FVR response to cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading would be accentuated following adaptation to microgravity. Such data could provide better insight about the physiological mechanisms underlying alterations in blood pressure control following spaceflight. We therefore exposed eleven men to 6 degrees head-down bedrest for 7 days and measured specific hemodynamic responses to low levels of the lower body negative pressure to determine if there are alterations in cardiopulmonary baroreceptor stimulus-FVR reflex response relationship during prolonged exposure to an analog of microgravity.

  8. Mechanisms controlling theophylline release from ethanol-resistant coated pellets.

    PubMed

    Rosiaux, Y; Velghe, C; Muschert, S; Chokshi, R; Leclercq, B; Siepmann, F; Siepmann, J

    2014-03-01

    To elucidate the mass transport mechanisms controlling drug release from recently proposed, ethanol-resistant, polymeric film coatings. Theophylline matrix pellets were coated with ethylcellulose: guar gum blends. Drug release from single pellets and ensembles of pellets was measured in various release media. Changes in the systems' morphology, composition and mechanical properties were monitored using SEM, gravimetrical analysis and a texture analyzer. Based on the obtained experimental results a mechanistically realistic mathematical model was identified and used to quantitatively predict drug release from coated pellets in ethanol-free and ethanol-containing bulk fluids. Drug diffusion though the intact polymeric film coatings is likely to be the dominant mass transport mechanism in the investigated systems, irrespective of the ethanol content in the surrounding environment. An appropriate solution of Fick's law could be used to quantitatively predict theophylline release from pellets coated with different ethylcellulose:guar gum blends at different coating levels. Importantly, independent experiments confirmed the theoretical predictions. In silico simulations can help facilitating the optimization of the novel ethanol-resistant polymeric film coatings, avoiding time-consuming and cost-intensive series of trial-and-error experiments. The presence/absence of ethanol does not affect the underlying drug release mechanisms.

  9. Altered baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance during simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Vernikos, J.

    1994-01-01

    Reflex peripheral vasoconstriction induced by activation of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors in response to reduced central venous pressure (CVP) is a basic mechanism for elevating systemic vascular resistance and defending arterial blood pressure during orthostatically-induced reductions in cardiac filling and output. The sensitivity of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex response [defined as the slope of the relationship between changes in forearm vascular resistance (FVR) and CVP] and the resultant vasoconstriction are closely and inversely associated with the amount of circulating blood volume. Thus, a high-gain FVR response will be elicited by a hypovolemic state. Exposure to microgravity during spaceflight results in reduced plasma volume. It is therefore reasonable to expect that the FVR response to cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading would be accentuated following adaptation to microgravity. Such data could provide better insight about the physiological mechanisms underlying alterations in blood pressure control following spaceflight. We therefore exposed eleven men to 6 degrees head-down bedrest for 7 days and measured specific hemodynamic responses to low levels of the lower body negative pressure to determine if there are alterations in cardiopulmonary baroreceptor stimulus-FVR reflex response relationship during prolonged exposure to an analog of microgravity.

  10. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE): transmission and control.

    PubMed

    Tacconelli, Evelina; Cataldo, Maria A

    2008-02-01

    Transmission of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) can occur through direct contact with colonised or infected patients or through indirect contact via the hands of health-care workers (HCWs), or via contaminated patient care equipment or environmental surfaces. Antibiotic exposure plays an important role in the transmission dynamic of VRE. Until now, the control measures aimed at reducing the incidence of VRE colonisation and infection in hospitals have included: education of HCWs with implementation of hand-washing practices and compliance; wide and targeted surveillance cultures; isolation of VRE-positive patients; pre-emptive isolation of high-risk patients; and restriction of antibiotic use. However, despite these, VRE is still endemic in many hospitals. The causes of this could be non-compliance with infection control interventions, overuse of antibiotics, and insensitive microbiological methods for detecting VRE in stool. A scoring system using point values has been demonstrated to be useful in reducing rates of nosocomial VRE colonisation. Future prospective comparative studies of infection control approaches in different epidemiological situations might be useful.

  11. Emergence of resistance and resistance management in field populations of tropical Culex quinquefasciatus to the microbial control agent Bacillus sphaericus.

    PubMed

    Mulla, Mir S; Thavara, Usavadee; Tawatsin, Apiwat; Chomposri, Jakkrawarn; Su, Tianyun

    2003-03-01

    In recent years, highly potent mosquitocidal strains of the microbial agent Bacillus sphaericus (Bsph) have been isolated and developed for the control of mosquito larvae around the world. Laboratory selection experiments with the most active strains and their use in large-scale operational mosquito control programs resulted in the emergence of resistance in larvae of the Culex pipiens complex. This generated great concern among vector control agencies around the world, who feared reduced efficacy of this highly active larvicidal agent. To address this issue, the current studies were started to find practical strategies for controlling resistant mosquitoes and more importantly to develop resistance management strategies that would prevent or delay development of resistance. We initiated field studies in 3 low-income communities in Nonthaburi Province, Thailand. In 1 of the communities, larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus that were highly resistant (>125,000-fold) to Bsph strain 2362 were successfully controlled with applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) alone or in combination with Bsph. To prevent or delay resistance to Bsph, 2 other sites were selected, 1 treated with Bsph 2362 alone and the other treated with a mixture of Bsph 2362 and Bti. Mosquitoes treated with Bsph 2362 alone showed some resistance by the 9th treatment and almost complete failure of control occurred by the 17th treatment. After 9 treatments with the mixture over a 9-month period at another site, no noticeable change in susceptibility to Bsph was detected. During this period, the site treated with Bsph alone required 19 treatments, whereas the site treated with mixtures took only 9 treatments because of slower resurgence of larvae at the site treated with the mixture than at the site treated with Bsph alone. This is the 1st field evidence for delay or prevention of resistance to microbial agents in larval Cx. quinquefasciatus by using mixtures of Bti and Bsph. Further

  12. Control of antibiotic-resistant bacteria: Memorandum from a WHO Meeting*

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Control of the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is essential for the appropriate use of antibiotics for prophylaxis and treatment of infections. Hospitals are regarded as the place where antibiotic-resistant bacteria might often develop. Control of antibiotic use in hospitals is therefore one of the most important measures for effective control of antibiotic resistance. Another effective means to control antibiotic resistance is to develop a surveillance programme on a national, and international scale. This would be of great assistance, especially for forecasting future changes in the resistance of bacteria. The prevention of disease by measures other than the use of antibiotics could also reduce antibiotic resistance. This Memorandum of the WHO Scientific Working Group on Antibiotic Resistance describes the measures for controlling the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria by (a) the surveillance of antibiotic resistance, including surveillance of resistance in human pathogens and resistance determinants in the general population, and (b) control of antibiotic use in hospitals, the essential elements of which are the establishment of appropriate hospital antibiotic policy, elaboration of general strategy, and the monitoring of antibiotic use. Further research needs are also described and a number of areas are indicated where research might lead to improvements in antibiotic use and in methods for the containment of resistance. Guidelines for the appropriate use of antibiotics are presented in an Annex. PMID:6603916

  13. Genome Sequencing Reveals Loci under Artificial Selection that Underlie Disease Phenotypes in the Laboratory Rat

    PubMed Central

    Atanur, Santosh S.; Diaz, Ana Garcia; Maratou, Klio; Sarkis, Allison; Rotival, Maxime; Game, Laurence; Tschannen, Michael R.; Kaisaki, Pamela J.; Otto, Georg W.; Ma, Man Chun John; Keane, Thomas M.; Hummel, Oliver; Saar, Kathrin; Chen, Wei; Guryev, Victor; Gopalakrishnan, Kathirvel; Garrett, Michael R.; Joe, Bina; Citterio, Lorena; Bianchi, Giuseppe; McBride, Martin; Dominiczak, Anna; Adams, David J.; Serikawa, Tadao; Flicek, Paul; Cuppen, Edwin; Hubner, Norbert; Petretto, Enrico; Gauguier, Dominique; Kwitek, Anne; Jacob, Howard; Aitman, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Large numbers of inbred laboratory rat strains have been developed for a range of complex disease phenotypes. To gain insights into the evolutionary pressures underlying selection for these phenotypes, we sequenced the genomes of 27 rat strains, including 11 models of hypertension, diabetes, and insulin resistance, along with their respective control strains. Altogether, we identified more than 13 million single-nucleotide variants, indels, and structural variants across these rat strains. Analysis of strain-specific selective sweeps and gene clusters implicated genes and pathways involved in cation transport, angiotensin production, and regulators of oxidative stress in the development of cardiovascular disease phenotypes in rats. Many of the rat loci that we identified overlap with previously mapped loci for related traits in humans, indicating the presence of shared pathways underlying these phenotypes in rats and humans. These data represent a step change in resources available for evolutionary analysis of complex traits in disease models. PaperClip PMID:23890820

  14. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  15. Remote Symbolic Computation of Loci

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abanades, Miguel A.; Escribano, Jesus; Botana, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a web-based tool designed to compute certified equations and graphs of geometric loci specified using standard Dynamic Geometry Systems (DGS). Complementing the graphing abilities of the considered DGS, the equations of the loci produced by the application are remotely computed using symbolic algebraic techniques from the…

  16. Resistance to aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides in Amazon sprangletop: Confirmation, control, and molecular basis of resistance.

    PubMed

    Tehranchian, Parsa; Norsworthy, Jason K; Korres, Nicholas E; McElroy, Scott; Chen, Shu; Scott, Robert C

    2016-10-01

    Amazon sprangletop is problematic weed of rice in the midsouthern USA. Two biotypes of this species from rice fields approximately 100km apart in Louisiana were unaffected when sprayed with the labeled field rate of cyhalofop-butyl (314g ai ha(-1)) in 2008. Dose response studies were conducted to confirm the level of resistance to cyhalofop-butyl over a range of doses. Cross-resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase)-inhibiting herbicides from two different chemical families and multiple herbicide resistance to other mechanisms of action were evaluated. Sequencing using the Illumina Hiseq platform and ACCase gene sequencing revealed two different amino acid substitutions, Trp2027-to-Cys in the first resistant biotype and Asp2078-to-Gly in the second resistant biotype, within the CT domain of the ACCase gene. Two known amino acid substitutions confirmed resistance to cyhalofop-butyl and fenoxaprop-P-ethyl in resistant Amazon sprangletop biotypes. Asp2078-to-Gly amino acid substitution that was detected in one of the resistant biotypes did not result in cross-resistance to clethodim, an ACCase-inhibiting cyclohexandione herbicide which has endowed clethodim resistance in other weed species. Based on this research, both resistant Amazon sprangletop biotypes have evolved target-site resistance to the APP herbicides; yet, alternative herbicides are still active on these plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Genotyping-by-sequencing-based genome-wide association studies on Verticillium wilt resistance in autotetraploid alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Yu, Long-Xi; Zheng, Ping; Zhang, Tiejun; Rodringuez, Jonas; Main, Dorrie

    2017-02-01

    Verticillium wilt (VW) is a fungal disease that causes severe yield losses in alfalfa. The most effective method to control the disease is through the development and use of resistant varieties. The identification of marker loci linked to VW resistance can facilitate breeding for disease-resistant alfalfa. In the present investigation, we applied an integrated framework of genome-wide association with genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) to identify VW resistance loci in a panel of elite alfalfa breeding lines. Phenotyping was performed by manual inoculation of the pathogen to healthy seedlings, and scoring for disease resistance was carried out according to the standard test of the North America Alfalfa Improvement Conference (NAAIC). Marker-trait association by linkage disequilibrium identified 10 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers significantly associated with VW resistance. Alignment of the SNP marker sequences to the M. truncatula genome revealed multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Three, two, one and five markers were located on chromosomes 5, 6, 7 and 8, respectively. Resistance loci found on chromosomes 7 and 8 in the present study co-localized with the QTLs reported previously. A pairwise alignment (blastn) using the flanking sequences of the resistance loci against the M. truncatula genome identified potential candidate genes with putative disease resistance function. With further investigation, these markers may be implemented into breeding programmes using marker-assisted selection, ultimately leading to improved VW resistance in alfalfa.

  18. 52 Genetic Loci Influencing Myocardial Mass

    PubMed Central

    van der Harst, Pim; van Setten, Jessica; Verweij, Niek; Vogler, Georg; Franke, Lude; Maurano, Matthew T.; Wang, Xinchen; Leach, Irene Mateo; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Hayward, Caroline; Sorice, Rossella; Meirelles, Osorio; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Polašek, Ozren; Tanaka, Toshiko; Arking, Dan E.; Ulivi, Sheila; Trompet, Stella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Smith, Albert V.; Dörr, Marcus; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Magnani, Jared W.; Fabiola Del Greco, M.; Zhang, Weihua; Nolte, Ilja M.; Silva, Claudia T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tragante, Vinicius; Esko, Tõnu; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Adriaens, Michiel E.; Andersen, Karl; Barnett, Phil; Bis, Joshua C.; Bodmer, Rolf; Buckley, Brendan M.; Campbell, Harry; Cannon, Megan V.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chen, Lin Y.; Delitala, Alessandro; Devereux, Richard B.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B.; Haugen, Eric; Heinig, Matthias; Hernandez, Dena G.; Hillege, Hans L.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Hubner, Norbert; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Iorio, Annamaria; Kähönen, Mika; Kellis, Manolis; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooner, Ishminder K.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kors, Jan A.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Lage, Kasper; Launer, Lenore J.; Levy, Daniel; Lundby, Alicia; Macfarlane, Peter W.; May, Dalit; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Nappo, Stefania; Naitza, Silvia; Neph, Shane; Nord, Alex S.; Nutile, Teresa; Okin, Peter M.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Oostra, Ben A.; Penninger, Josef M.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Pers, Tune H.; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Pinto, Yigal M.; Pfeufer, Arne; Pilia, Maria Grazia; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Prins, Bram P.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rice, Ken M.; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Schafer, Sebastian; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Sehmi, Jobanpreet; Silljé, Herman H.W.; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Sinner, Moritz F.; Slowikowski, Kamil; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Spector, Timothy D.; Spiering, Wilko; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Strauch, Konstantin; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Trinh, Bosco; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van den Boogaard, Malou; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Visscher, Peter M.; Vitart, Veronique; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Weichenberger, Christian X.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.; Yang, Jian; Bezzina, Connie R.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Snieder, Harold; Wright, Alan F.; Rudan, Igor; Boyer, Laurie A.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Ciullo, Marina; Sanna, Serena; Lehtimäki, Terho; Wilson, James F.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Alonso, Alvaro; Gasparini, Paolo; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kääb, Stefan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Felix, Stephan B.; Heckbert, Susan R.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Hicks, Andrew A.; Chambers, John C.; Jamshidi, Yalda; Visel, Axel; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Isaacs, Aaron; Samani, Nilesh J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Myocardial mass is a key determinant of cardiac muscle function and hypertrophy. Myocardial depolarization leading to cardiac muscle contraction is reflected by the amplitude and duration of the QRS complex on the electrocardiogram (ECG). Abnormal QRS amplitude or duration reflect changes in myocardial mass and conduction, and are associated with increased risk of heart failure and death. OBJECTIVES This meta-analysis sought to gain insights into the genetic determinants of myocardial mass. METHODS We carried out a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 4 QRS traits in up to 73,518 individuals of European ancestry, followed by extensive biological and functional assessment. RESULTS We identified 52 genomic loci, of which 32 are novel, that are reliably associated with 1 or more QRS phenotypes at p < 1 × 10−8. These loci are enriched in regions of open chromatin, histone modifications, and transcription factor binding, suggesting that they represent regions of the genome that are actively transcribed in the human heart. Pathway analyses provided evidence that these loci play a role in cardiac hypertrophy. We further highlighted 67 candidate genes at the identified loci that are preferentially expressed in cardiac tissue and associated with cardiac abnormalities in Drosophila melanogaster and Mus musculus. We validated the regulatory function of a novel variant in the SCN5A/SCN10A locus in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS Taken together, our findings provide new insights into genes and biological pathways controlling myocardial mass and may help identify novel therapeutic targets. PMID:27659466

  19. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A continuing infection control challenge.

    PubMed

    Molinari, John A

    2012-04-01

    The ability of MRSA and other staphylococci to colonize, persist, and adapt to multiple environmental and tissue conditions has allowed for these bacteria to be virtually ubiquitous in their distribution. The effectiveness of commonly used antibiotics, such as penicillin, has continued to decline against infections caused by MRSA and increasingly resistant strains. The challenge for both dental and medical health professionals is to routinely apply proven, evidence-based infection control precautions. As mentioned earlier in this discussion, when compliance with effective aseptic technique practices improves, the patients and environments. Ensure that reusable equipment is not used for the care of another patient until it has been appropriately cleaned and reprocessed and that single-use items are properly discarded. Clean and disinfect clinical contact surfaces that are not barrier-protected by using an environmental protection agency-registered hospital disinfectant with a low- (ie, HIV and HBV label claims) to intermediate-level (ie, tuberculocidal claim) activity after each patient. When the surface is visibly contaminated with blood, an intermediate-incidence of detectable infections can be reduced. Microorganisms will continue to evolve and adapt in order to survive and thrive, sometimes at the expense of susceptible human hosts. The struggle is to constantly remain aware of impending infectious threats which may challenge current precautions, and maintain and improve the quality of infection control to minimize the potential for disease.

  20. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: source control and surveillance organization.

    PubMed

    Tacconelli, E

    2009-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been a common nosocomial pathogen since the 1960s, and has become a major problem in hospitals worldwide. Patients and the public are increasingly seeing MRSA and rates of MRSA infections as indicators of the quality of patient care. The control measures aimed at reducing the spread of MRSA among hospitals and communities include the following: education of healthcare workers, with implementation and adherence to hand-washing practices; restriction of antibiotic use; active surveillance cultures (ASCs); contact isolation of MRSA-positive patients; and pre-emptive isolation of high-risk patients. However, despite these interventions, MRSA is still endemic in many hospitals worldwide. In particular, the role of ASCs is still under debate. International guidelines suggest that extensive ASCs should only be used in intensive-care units (ICUs), and routine screening of all hospital admissions is not usually advocated. Local decisions can be made on the basis of types of risk factor of non-ICU patients. Before starting ASCs, laboratories should be prepared for the workload, and the turn-around time for screening tests should be reduced and arrangements made to monitor the effectiveness of this intervention. Most recently, rapid methods for molecular detection of MRSA colonization have been developed. Published studies differ in their settings (ICU, medical wards, surgical wards), choice of patient population, severity of illness, hospital infection control measures, and study design. The existing evidence does not support the wide application of rapid molecular screening for MRSA.

  1. Inspiratory resistive loading improves cycling capacity: a placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gething, A; Williams, M; Davies, B

    2004-01-01

    Background: Respiratory muscle training has been shown to improve both its strength and endurance. The effect of these improvements on whole-body exercise performance remains controversial. Objective: To assess the effect of a 10 week inspiratory resistive loading (IRL) intervention on respiratory muscle performance and whole-body exercise endurance. Methods: Fifteen apparently healthy subjects (10 men, 5 women) were randomly allocated to one of three groups. One group underwent IRL set at 80% of maximum inspiratory pressure with ever decreasing work/rest ratios until task failure, for three days a week for 10 weeks (IRL group). A second placebo group performed the same training procedure but with a minimal resistance (PLA group). IRL and placebo training were performed at rest. The remaining five control subjects performed no IRL during the 10 week study period (CON group). Cycling endurance capacity at 75% V·O2peak was measured before and after the intervention. Results: After the 10 week IRL intervention, respiratory muscle strength (maximum inspiratory pressure) and endurance (sum of sustained maximum inspiratory pressure) had significantly improved (by 34% and 38% respectively). An increase in diaphragm thickness was also observed. These improvements translated into a 36% increase in cycling time to exhaustion at 75% V·O2peak. During cycling trials, heart rate, ventilation, and rating of perceived exertion were attenuated in the IRL group. No changes were observed for the PLA or CON group either in the time to exhaustion or cardiorespiratory response to the same intensity of exercise. Conclusion: Ten weeks of IRL attenuated the heart rate, ventilatory, and perceptual response to constant workload exercise, and improved the cycling time to exhaustion. Familiarisation was not a factor and the placebo effect was minimal. PMID:15562168

  2. Global transcription of CRISPR loci in the human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Lum, Andrew G; Ly, Melissa; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Naidu, Mayuri; Boehm, Tobias K; Pride, David T

    2015-05-21

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) are active in acquired resistance against bacteriophage and plasmids in a number of environments. In the human mouth, CRISPR loci evolve to counteract oral phage, but the expression of these CRISPR loci has not previously been investigated. We sequenced cDNA from CRISPR loci found in numerous different oral bacteria and compared with oral phage communities to determine whether the transcription of CRISPR loci is specifically targeted towards highly abundant phage present in the oral environment. We found that of the 529,027 CRISPR spacer groups studied, 88 % could be identified in transcripts, indicating that the vast majority of CRISPR loci in the oral cavity were transcribed. There were no strong associations between CRISPR spacer repertoires and oral health status or nucleic acid type. We also compared CRISPR repertoires with oral bacteriophage communities, and found that there was no significant association between CRISPR transcripts and oral phage, regardless of the CRISPR type being evaluated. We characterized highly expressed CRISPR spacers and found that they were no more likely than other spacers to match oral phage. By reassembling the CRISPR-bearing reads into longer CRISPR loci, we found that the majority of the loci did not have spacers matching viruses found in the oral cavities of the subjects studied. For some CRISPR types, loci containing spacers matching oral phage were significantly more likely to have multiple spacers rather than a single spacer matching oral phage. These data suggest that the transcription of oral CRISPR loci is relatively ubiquitous and that highly expressed CRISPR spacers do not necessarily target the most abundant oral phage.

  3. Genotyping-by-sequencing based genome-wide association studies on Verticillium wilt resistance in heterozygous autotetraploid alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Verticillium wilt (VW) is a fungal disease which causes severe yield loss in alfalfa. The most effective method to control the disease is through the development and use of resistant varieties. Identification of gene loci linked to VW resistance will facilitate breeding for the disease-resistant al...

  4. Antibiotic combinations for controlling colistin-resistant Enterobacter cloacae.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thais Bergamin; Silva, Osmar Nascimento; de Almeida, Keyla Caroline; Ribeiro, Suzana Meira; Motta, Dielle de Oliveira; Maria-Neto, Simone; Lara, Michelle Brizolla; Filho, Carlos Roberto Souza; Ombredane, Alicia Simalie; de Faria Junior, Celio; Parachin, Nadia Skorupa; Magalhães, Beatriz Simas; Franco, Octávio Luiz

    2017-02-01

    Enterobacter cloacae is a Gram-negative bacterium associated with high morbidity and mortality in intensive care patients due to its resistance to multiple antibiotics. Currently, therapy against multi-resistant bacteria consists of using colistin, in spite of its toxic effects at higher concentrations. In this context, colistin-resistant E. cloacae strains were challenged with lower levels of colistin combined with other antibiotics to reduce colistin-associated side effects. Colistin-resistant E. cloacae (ATCC 49141) strains were generated by serial propagation in subinhibitory colistin concentrations. After this, three colistin-resistant and three nonresistant replicates were isolated. The identity of all the strains was confirmed by MALDI-TOF MS, VITEK 2 and MicroScan analysis. Furthermore, cross-resistance to other antibiotics was checked by disk diffusion and automated systems. The synergistic effects of the combined use of colistin and chloramphenicol were observed via the broth microdilution checkerboard method. First, data here reported showed that all strains presented intrinsic resistance to penicillin, cephalosporin (except fourth generation), monobactam, and some associations of penicillin and β-lactamase inhibitors. Moreover, a chloramphenicol and colistin combination was capable of inhibiting the induced colistin-resistant strains as well as two colistin-resistant clinical strains. Furthermore, no cytotoxic effect was observed by using such concentrations. In summary, the data reported here showed for the first time the possible therapeutic use of colistin-chloramphenicol for infections caused by colistin-resistant E. cloacae.

  5. Genetic architecture of cyst nematode resistance revealed by genome-wide association study in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bi-parental mapping populations have been commonly utilized to identify and characterize quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling resistance to soybean cyst nematode (SCN, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe). Although this approach successfully mapped a large number of SCN resistance QTL, it captures onl...

  6. Genome-wide nested association mapping of quantitative resistance to northern leaf blight in maize

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Quantitative resistance to plant pathogens, controlled by multiple loci of small effect, is important for food production, food security, and food safety but is poorly understood. To gain insights into the genetic architecture of quantitative resistance in maize, we evaluated a 5,000 inbred-line ne...

  7. Impact of Azithromycin Administration for Trachoma Control on the Carriage of Antibiotic-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Batt, Sarah L.; Charalambous, Bambos M.; Solomon, Anthony W.; Knirsch, Charles; Massae, Patrick A.; Safari, Salesia; Sam, Noel E.; Everett, Dean; Mabey, David C. W.; Gillespie, Stephen H.

    2003-01-01

    Community distribution of azithromycin has an important role to play in trachoma control. Previous studies have suggested that this may increase the prevalence of macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. S. pneumoniae was isolated from children under 7 years of age in Rombo District, northern Tanzania, before and 2 and 6 months after community-wide administration of azithromycin. Overall carriage rates were 11, 12, and 7%, respectively. Only one macrolide-resistant isolate carrying the mef gene was obtained 6 months after azithromycin administration. This contrasted with cotrimoxazole and penicillin resistance, both of which were common (cotrimoxazole resistance, 42, 43, and 47%, and penicillin resistance, 21, 17, and 16% at baseline, 2 months, and 6 months, respectively). There was a significant association between cotrimoxazole and penicillin resistance (P < 0.0001, Fisher's exact). These data suggest that in communities where macrolide resistance is rare, azithromycin distribution for trachoma control is unlikely to increase the prevalence of resistant organisms. PMID:12936971

  8. Pyrethroid resistance in African anopheline mosquitoes: what are the implications for malaria control?

    PubMed

    Ranson, Hilary; N'guessan, Raphael; Lines, Jonathan; Moiroux, Nicolas; Nkuni, Zinga; Corbel, Vincent

    2011-02-01

    The use of pyrethroid insecticides in malaria vector control has increased dramatically in the past decade through the scale up of insecticide treated net distribution programmes and indoor residual spraying campaigns. Inevitably, the major malaria vectors have developed resistance to these insecticides and the resistance alleles are spreading at an exceptionally rapid rate throughout Africa. Although substantial progress has been made on understanding the causes of pyrethroid resistance, remarkably few studies have focused on the epidemiological impact of resistance on current malaria control activities. As we move into the malaria eradication era, it is vital that the implications of insecticide resistance are understood and strategies to mitigate these effects are implemented.

  9. Insecticide Resistance and Malaria Vector Control: The Importance of Fitness Cost Mechanisms in Determining Economically Optimal Control Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Zachary S.; Dickinson, Katherine L.; Kramer, Randall A.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of insecticide resistance in harmful arthropods has economic implications, not only for the control of agricultural pests (as has been well studied), but also for the control of disease vectors, such as malaria-transmitting Anopheles mosquitoes. Previous economic work on insecticide resistance illustrates the policy relevance of knowing whether insecticide resistance mutations involve fitness costs. Using a theoretical model, this article investigates economically optimal strategies for controlling malaria-transmitting mosquitoes when there is the potential for mosquitoes to evolve resistance to insecticides. Consistent with previous literature, we find that fitness costs are a key element in the computation of economically optimal resistance management strategies. Additionally, our models indicate that different biological mechanisms underlying these fitness costs (e.g., increased adult mortality and/or decreased fecundity) can significantly alter economically optimal resistance management strategies. PMID:23448053

  10. Diminished Baroreflex Control of Forearm Vascular Resistance Following Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, G. W.; Thompson, C. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Nadel, E. R.; Convertino, V. A.

    1991-01-01

    The stimulus-response characteristics of cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR units in mm Hg x min x I00 ml/ml) were studied in 14 volunteers before and after 10 wk of endurance training. We assessed the relationship betaleen reflex stimulus (changes in central venous pressure, CVP) and response (FVR) during unloading of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors with lower body negative pressure (LBNP, 0 to - 2O mm Hg). Changes in CVP during LBNP were estimated from pressure changes in a large peripheral vein in the dependent arm of the subject in the right lateral decubitus position. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO(sub 2max)) and total blood volume increased with endurance training from 37.8 +/- 1.4 ml/min x kg and 63.6 +/- 2.1 ml/kg to 45.3 +/- 1.4 ml/ min x kg and 69.3 +/- 2.8 ml/kg respectively (P less than 0.05). Reflex forearm vasoconstriction occurred in response to a reduction in estimated CVP, and the absolute change in FVR per unit of CVP was reduced from -5.96 +/- 0.79 to -4.06 +/- 0.52 units x mm/ Hg (P less than 0.05) following exercise training but was unchanged from -6.10 to 0.57 to -6.22 +/- 0.94 units x mm/ Hg for the time control group (N = 7). Resting values for FVR were similar before and after exercise training; however, resting estimated CVP was elevated from 9.5 +/- 0.5 mm x Hg before training to 11.3 +/- 0.6 mm x Hg after training. The reduction in sensitivity of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of FVR was linearly related to the increase in blood volume (r = 0.65, P less than 0.05). suggesting that diminished cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of FVR in physically fit individuals is related, in part, to a training-induced blood volume expansion.

  11. Diminished Baroreflex Control of Forearm Vascular Resistance Following Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, G. W.; Thompson, C. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Nadel, E. R.; Convertino, V. A.

    1991-01-01

    The stimulus-response characteristics of cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR units in mm Hg x min x I00 ml/ml) were studied in 14 volunteers before and after 10 wk of endurance training. We assessed the relationship betaleen reflex stimulus (changes in central venous pressure, CVP) and response (FVR) during unloading of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors with lower body negative pressure (LBNP, 0 to - 2O mm Hg). Changes in CVP during LBNP were estimated from pressure changes in a large peripheral vein in the dependent arm of the subject in the right lateral decubitus position. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO(sub 2max)) and total blood volume increased with endurance training from 37.8 +/- 1.4 ml/min x kg and 63.6 +/- 2.1 ml/kg to 45.3 +/- 1.4 ml/ min x kg and 69.3 +/- 2.8 ml/kg respectively (P less than 0.05). Reflex forearm vasoconstriction occurred in response to a reduction in estimated CVP, and the absolute change in FVR per unit of CVP was reduced from -5.96 +/- 0.79 to -4.06 +/- 0.52 units x mm/ Hg (P less than 0.05) following exercise training but was unchanged from -6.10 to 0.57 to -6.22 +/- 0.94 units x mm/ Hg for the time control group (N = 7). Resting values for FVR were similar before and after exercise training; however, resting estimated CVP was elevated from 9.5 +/- 0.5 mm x Hg before training to 11.3 +/- 0.6 mm x Hg after training. The reduction in sensitivity of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of FVR was linearly related to the increase in blood volume (r = 0.65, P less than 0.05). suggesting that diminished cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of FVR in physically fit individuals is related, in part, to a training-induced blood volume expansion.

  12. Confirmation of five novel susceptibility loci for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and integrated network analysis of 82 SLE susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Molineros, Julio E; Yang, Wanling; Zhou, Xu-Jie; Sun, Celi; Okada, Yukinori; Zhang, Huoru; Heng Chua, Kek; Lau, Yu-Lung; Kochi, Yuta; Suzuki, Akari; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Ma, Jianyang; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Kwangwoo; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Zhang, Hong; Shen, Nan; Looger, Loren L; Nath, Swapan K

    2017-03-15

    We recently identified ten novel SLE susceptibility loci in Asians and uncovered several additional suggestive loci requiring further validation. This study aimed to replicate five of these suggestive loci in a Han Chinese cohort from Hong Kong, followed by meta-analysis (11,656 cases and 23,968 controls) on previously reported Asian and European populations, and to perform bioinformatic analyses on all 82 reported SLE loci to identify shared regulatory signatures. We performed a battery of analyses for these five loci, as well as joint analyses on all 82 SLE loci. All five loci passed genome-wide significance: MYNN (rs10936599, Pmeta = 1.92 × 10-13, OR = 1.14), ATG16L2 (rs11235604, Pmeta = 8.87 × 10 -12, OR = 0.78), CCL22 (rs223881, Pmeta = 5.87 × 10-16, OR = 0.87), ANKS1A (rs2762340, Pmeta = 4.93 × 10-15, OR = 0.87) and RNASEH2C (rs1308020, Pmeta = 2.96 × 10-19, OR = 0.84) and co-located with annotated gene regulatory elements. The novel loci share genetic signatures with other reported SLE loci, including effects on gene expression, transcription factor binding, and epigenetic characteristics. Most (56%) of the correlated (r2 > 0.8) SNPs from the 82 SLE loci were implicated in differential expression (9.81 × 10-198 < P < 5 × 10-3) of cis-genes. Transcription factor binding sites for p53, MEF2A and E2F1 were significantly (P < 0.05) over-represented in SLE loci, consistent with apoptosis playing a critical role in SLE. Enrichment analysis revealed common pathways, gene ontology, protein domains, and cell type-specific expression. In summary, we provide evidence of five novel SLE susceptibility loci. Integrated bioinformatics using all 82 loci revealed that SLE susceptibility loci share many gene regulatory features, suggestive of conserved mechanisms of SLE etiopathogenesis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  13. Natural Variation in Partial Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae Is Controlled by Two Major QTLs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Perchepied, Laure; Kroj, Thomas; Tronchet, Maurice; Loudet, Olivier; Roby, Dominique

    2006-01-01

    Background Low-level, partial resistance is pre-eminent in natural populations, however, the mechanisms underlying this form of resistance are still poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, we used the model pathosystem Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst) - Arabidopsis thaliana to study the genetic basis of this form of resistance. Phenotypic analysis of a set of Arabidopsis accessions, based on evaluation of in planta pathogen growth revealed extensive quantitative variation for partial resistance to Pst. It allowed choosing a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between the accessions Bayreuth and Shahdara for quantitative genetic analysis. Experiments performed under two different environmental conditions led to the detection of two major and two minor quantitative trait loci (QTLs) governing partial resistance to Pst and called PRP-Ps1 to PRP-Ps4. The two major QTLs, PRP-Ps1 and PRP-Ps2, were confirmed in near isogenic lines (NILs), following the heterogeneous inbred families (HIFs) strategy. Analysis of marker gene expression using these HIFs indicated a negative correlation between the induced amount of transcripts of SA-dependent genes PR1, ICS and PR5, and the in planta bacterial growth in the HIF segregating at PRP-Ps2 locus, suggesting an implication of PRP-Ps2 in the activation of SA dependent responses. Conclusions/Significance These results show that variation in partial resistance to Pst in Arabidopsis is governed by relatively few loci, and the validation of two major loci opens the way for their fine mapping and their cloning, which will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying partial resistance. PMID:17205127

  14. The role of healthcare strategies in controlling antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Ann-Marie

    In an interview in March 2013, the Chief Medical Officer described antibiotic resistance as a 'ticking time bomb' and ranked it along with terrorism on a list of threats to the nation. Her report Infections and the Rise of Antimicrobial Resistance (Department of Health, 2011) highlighted that, while a new infectious disease has been discovered nearly every year over the past three decades, there have been very few new antibiotics developed, leaving our armoury nearly empty. Antibiotic resistance is a universal problem that needs to be tackled by a wide variety of strategies and players. Our approach to tackling resistance to antibiotic agents must therefore also be dynamic. As well as reducing environmental use, we also need to lower antibiotic use in the healthcare setting. Healthcare workers have a huge role to play in combating antibiotic resistance. This article focuses on several issues related to antibiotic resistance, including antibiotic modes of action and the properties that confer resistance on bacteria. It includes information on antibiotic usage and describes current healthcare strategies we can adopt to help reduce the development of resistance.

  15. Kinetically controlled drug resistance: how Penicillium brevicompactum survives mycophenolic acid.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin E; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2011-11-25

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium brevicompactum produces the immunosuppressive drug mycophenolic acid (MPA), which is a potent inhibitor of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases (IMPDHs). IMPDH catalyzes the conversion of IMP to XMP via a covalent enzyme intermediate, E-XMP*; MPA inhibits by trapping E-XMP*. P. brevicompactum (Pb) contains two MPA-resistant IMPDHs, PbIMPDH-A and PbIMPDH-B, which are 17- and 10(3)-fold more resistant to MPA than typically observed. Surprisingly, the active sites of these resistant enzymes are essentially identical to those of MPA-sensitive enzymes, so the mechanistic basis of resistance is not apparent. Here, we show that, unlike MPA-sensitive IMPDHs, formation of E-XMP* is rate-limiting for both PbIMPDH-A and PbIMPDH-B. Therefore, MPA resistance derives from the failure to accumulate the drug-sensitive intermediate.

  16. Control of linear modes in cylindrical resistive magnetohydrodynamics with a resistive wall, plasma rotation, and complex gain

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, D. P.; Finn, J. M.

    2014-10-15

    Feedback stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in a tokamak is studied in a cylindrical model with a resistive wall, plasma resistivity, viscosity, and toroidal rotation. The control is based on a linear combination of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field just inside the resistive wall. The feedback includes complex gain, for both the normal and for the tangential components, and it is known that the imaginary part of the feedback for the former is equivalent to plasma rotation [J. M. Finn and L. Chacon, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1866 (2004)]. The work includes (1) analysis with a reduced resistive MHD model for a tokamak with finite β and with stepfunction current density and pressure profiles, and (2) computations with a full compressible visco-resistive MHD model with smooth decreasing profiles of current density and pressure. The equilibria are stable for β = 0 and the marginal stability values β{sub rp,rw} < β{sub rp,iw} < β{sub ip,rw} < β{sub ip,iw} (resistive plasma, resistive wall; resistive plasma, ideal wall; ideal plasma, resistive wall; and ideal plasma, ideal wall) are computed for both models. The main results are: (a) imaginary gain with normal sensors or plasma rotation stabilizes below β{sub rp,iw} because rotation suppresses the diffusion of flux from the plasma out through the wall and, more surprisingly, (b) rotation or imaginary gain with normal sensors destabilizes above β{sub rp,iw} because it prevents the feedback flux from entering the plasma through the resistive wall to form a virtual wall. A method of using complex gain G{sub i} to optimize in the presence of rotation in this regime with β > β{sub rp,iw} is presented. The effect of imaginary gain with tangential sensors is more complicated but essentially destabilizes above and below β{sub rp,iw}.

  17. Controlling herbicide resistant annual bluegrass (Poa annua L.) phenotypes with methiozolin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methiozolin is an isoxazoline herbicide being investigated for selective POST annual bluegrass control in managed turfgrass. Research was conducted to evaluate methiozolin efficacy for controlling two annual bluegrass phenotypes with target site resistance to photosystem II (PSII) or enolpyruvylshik...

  18. Light-controlled resistive switching memory of multiferroic BiMnO3 nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bai; Li, Chang Ming

    2015-03-14

    A multiferroic BiMnO3 nanowire array was prepared using a hydrothermal process and its resistive switching memory behaviors were further investigated. The prominent ferroelectricity can be well controlled by white-light illumination, thus offering an excellent light-controlled resistive switching memory device using a Ag/BiMnO3/Ti structure at room temperature.

  19. [Chloroquine resistance and malaria control in Ivory Coast].

    PubMed

    Henry, M C; Koné, M; Guillet, P; Mouchet, J

    1998-01-01

    We present here data from the Ivory Coast on the susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine, obtained since the first chloroquine-resistant strains were discovered in 1987. Susceptibility was assessed using the WHO 7-day field test. Almost all the tests were carried out in the capital, Adidjan, and in the southern forest zone. The frequency of chloroquine resistance was below 30% in most cases, the actual frequency differing between regions. The frequency of R3 chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum was very low. Such resistant parasites were found only on an oil-palm plantation and in the south west of the country, probably due to the free medical care available at both locations. In general, access to health care is limited. Fevers attributed to malaria are generally treated at home using plants or incomplete courses of chloroquine. Our data suggest that R3 chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum strains are selected by repeated high doses of chloroquine, rather than by low doses. Thus, symptomatic treatment of uncomplicated malaria and treatment at home with the "correct" medication may be more effective than systematic medication, for limiting the level of chloroquine resistance in the parasite. Pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae s.l. is present in West Africa and this may reduce the short-term effectiveness of impregnated mosquito nets. In the absence of R3 chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum, self-medication at home may be a practical and realistic way to treat malaria. However, more knowledge about the effectiveness of anti-malaria drugs, their use in various social, cultural and economic environments and the geographical distribution of insecticide-resistant vectors is required before effective strategies can be designed. However, it would certainly be of value to consistently check the quality of anti-malaria drugs and to try to improve the effectiveness of self-medication at home.

  20. Characterization of metabolite quantitative trait loci and metabolic networks that control glucosinolate concentration in the seeds and leaves of Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ji; Long, Yan; Shi, Lei; Shi, Jiaqin; Barker, Guy; Meng, Jinling

    2012-01-01

    • Glucosinolates are a major class of secondary metabolites found in the Brassicaceae, whose degradation products are proving to be increasingly important for human health and in crop protection. • The genetic and metabolic basis of glucosinolate accumulation was dissected through analysis of total glucosinolate concentration and its individual components in both leaves and seeds of a doubled-haploid (DH) mapping population of oilseed rape/canola (Brassica napus). • The quantitative trait loci (QTL) that had an effect on glucosinolate concentration in either or both of the organs were integrated, resulting in 105 metabolite QTL (mQTL). Pairwise correlations between individual glucosinolates and prior knowledge of the metabolic pathways involved in the biosynthesis of different glucosinolates allowed us to predict the function of genes underlying the mQTL. Moreover, this information allowed us to construct an advanced metabolic network and associated epistatic interactions responsible for the glucosinolate composition in both leaves and seeds of B. napus. • A number of previously unknown potential regulatory relationships involved in glucosinolate synthesis were identified and this study illustrates how genetic variation can affect a biochemical pathway. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Genetic control of autoantibody expression in autoimmune myasthenia gravis: role of the self-antigen and of HLA-linked loci.

    PubMed

    Giraud, M; Beaurain, G; Eymard, B; Tranchant, C; Gajdos, P; Garchon, H-J

    2004-08-01

    Autoantibodies against the muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) play an essential role in the pathophysiology of autoimmune myasthenia gravis (MG). Their serum titers, however, vary considerably among patients. Our aim was to investigate whether their variation might be explained by genetic factors. Using different methods, we have obtained strong evidence for a three-locus association influencing autoantibody titers in MG patients with thymus hyperplasia or with a normal thymus. Two of the loci, one encoding the AChR alpha-subunit, the other encoding the alpha-chain of the class II antigen-presentation molecule, HLA-DQ, demonstrated interaction to determine high autoantibody titers. The third locus was associated with the 8.1 ancestral HLA haplotype. It exerted an additive effect and it is postulated to have a nonantigen specific immunoregulatory function. Our study demonstrates for the first time that polymorphism of an autoantigen gene may quantitatively modify the immune response against it. Altogether, the data lend support to a three-gene model to explain autoantibody expression in a subset of MG patients.

  2. Precise estimation of genomic regions controlling lodging resistance using a set of reciprocal chromosome segment substitution lines in rice

    PubMed Central

    Ookawa, Taiichiro; Aoba, Ryo; Yamamoto, Toshio; Ueda, Tadamasa; Takai, Toshiyuki; Fukuoka, Shuichi; Ando, Tsuyu; Adachi, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Makoto; Ebitani, Takeshi; Kato, Yoichiro; Mulsanti, Indria Wahyu; Kishii, Masahiro; Reynolds, Matthew; Piñera, Francisco; Kotake, Toshihisa; Kawasaki, Shinji; Motobayashi, Takashi; Hirasawa, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Severe lodging has occurred in many improved rice varieties after the recent strong typhoons in East and Southeast Asian countries. The indica variety Takanari possesses strong culm characteristics due to its large section modulus, which indicates culm thickness, whereas the japonica variety Koshihikari is subject to substantial bending stress due to its thick cortical fibre tissue. To detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for lodging resistance and to eliminate the effects of genetic background, we used reciprocal chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) derived from a cross between Koshihikari and Takanari. The oppositional effects of QTLs for section modulus were confirmed in both genetic backgrounds on chromosomes 1, 5 and 6, suggesting that these QTLs are not affected by the genetic background and are controlled independently by a single factor. The candidate region of a QTL for section modulus included SD1. The section modulus of NIL-sd1 was lower than that of Koshihikari, whereas the section modulus of NIL-SD1 was higher than that of Takanari. This result indicated that those regions regulate the culm thickness. The reciprocal effects of the QTLs for cortical fibre tissue thickness were confirmed in both genetic backgrounds on chromosome 9 using CSSLs. PMID:27465821

  3. Nonequivalent Loci and the distribution of mutant effects.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, J J; Waxman, D

    2002-01-01

    It has been observed repeatedly that the distribution of new mutations of a quantitative trait has a kurtosis (a statistical measure of the distribution's shape) that is systematically larger than that of a normal distribution. Here we suggest that rather than being a property of individual loci that control the trait, the enhanced kurtosis is highly likely to be an emergent property that arises directly from the loci being mutationally nonequivalent. We present a method of incorporating nonequivalent loci into quantitative genetic modeling and give an approximate relation between the kurtosis of the mutant distribution and the degree of mutational nonequivalence of loci. We go on to ask whether incorporating the experimentally observed kurtosis through nonequivalent loci, rather than at locus level, affects any biologically important conclusions of quantitative genetic modeling. Concentrating on the maintenance of quantitative genetic variation by mutation-selection balance, we conclude that typically nonequivalent loci yield a genetic variance that is of order 10% smaller than that obtained from the previous approaches. For large populations, when the kurtosis is large, the genetic variance may be <50% of the result of equivalent loci, with Gaussian distributions of mutant effects. PMID:12072483

  4. Type 1 diabetes risk for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR3 haplotypes depends on genotypic context: association of DPB1 and HLA class I loci among DR3- and DR4-matched Italian patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Noble, Janelle A; Martin, Adelle; Valdes, Ana M; Lane, Julie A; Galgani, Andrea; Petrone, Antonio; Lorini, Renata; Pozzilli, Paolo; Buzzetti, Raffaella; Erlich, Henry A

    2008-01-01

    Patients with high-risk human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR-DQ genotypes for type 1 diabetes (T1D) were compared with HLA-matched controls to evaluate T1D risk for other HLA loci, including HLA-A, -B, -Cw, and DPB1. Patients (n = 133) with high-risk genotypes (DR3/DR3, DR3/DR4, DR4/DR4) were selected from the Lazio (Rome) region of Italy. Screening of more than 9000 patients from the Lazio region and northern Italy yielded 162 controls with high-T1D-risk haplotypes. Although the overall distributions did not differ significantly, allele frequency differences were discovered between the controls from Lazio and controls from northern Italy for some alleles previously determined to affect T1D risk, such as A*3002, DPB1*0301, and DPB1*0402. Therefore, Lazio patient data were compared both with the Lazio subset of controls (n = 53) and with the entire group of controls for association analyses. Significant allele frequency differences between patients and DR-DQ-matched controls existed for specific alleles at all loci. Data for the DR3/DR3 subset of patients and controls demonstrated an increase of Cw*0702 in patients. Compared with controls, reduced patient frequencies were seen for several alleles, including A*0101, B*0801, and Cw*0701, all on the highly conserved, extended DR3 haplotype known as 8.1 in DR3/DR3, but not DR3/DR4, subgroup. DPB1*0101, often reported on 8.1 haplotypes, was also less frequent in DR3/DR3 patients than controls. Analysis of family-based data from the HBDI repository was consistent with the observed results from the Italian patients, indicating the presence of a T1D-protective locus at or near A*0101 and a second T1D-protective locus at or near DPB1*0101. These data indicate that T1D risk conferred by the 8.1 haplotype is genotype dependent.

  5. Modification of the spectral properties of cytochrome b in mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistant to 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea. Mapping at two distinct genetic loci of the split mitochondrial gene of cytochrome b.

    PubMed

    Briquet, M; Goffeau, A

    1981-07-01

    The effects of five inhibitors of the cytochrome bc1 complex: 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (diuron), 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HpHOQnO), antimycin A, funiculosin and mucidin were measured in submitochondrial particles of strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae belonging to two classes of diuron-resistant mutants Diu 1 and Diu 2 which are modified in different exons of the split mitochondrial gene of cytochrome b. 1. The oxidation of NADH and of cytochrome b-561 exhibits a similar resistance to diuron and HpHOQnO in Diu 1 and Diu 2 mutants. 2. No extra reduction of cytochrome b-561 and cytochrome b-565 is observed in the presence of diuron and HpHOQnO. 3. Both Diu 1 and Diu 2 mutants exhibit the red shift of cytochrome b-561 induced by concentrations of HpHOQno 2 -- 3-times higher than those required in the parental strains. 4. The spectral and respiratory effects of antimycin A, funiculosin and mucidin and generally similar in the diuron-resistant mutants and in their parental strains. However a cross-resistance between diuron and antimycin A is indicated in one Diu 2 mutant. 5. From the combined genetic and biochemical data it is concluded that the interaction of diuron and HpHOQnO with cytochrome b is mediated by at least two specific amino acids located apart in the central region of the apocytochrome b peptide coded by mitochondrial DNA. These two amino acids control tightly the extra reduction of cytochromes b-565 and b-561 as well as the flow of electrons through the bc1 complex. However the binding of HpHOQnO required for the expression of the red shift of cytochrome b-561 is only slightly affected by the diu-1 and diu-2 mutations.

  6. Controlled ferrite content improves weldability of corrosion-resistant steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, C. O.

    1967-01-01

    Corrosion-resistant steel that adds restrictions on chemical composition to ensure sufficient ferrite content decreases the tendency of CRES to develop cracks during welding. The equations restricting composition are based on the Schaeffler constitution diagram.

  7. Genome sequence of the thermotolerant foodborne pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg ATCC 43845 and phylogenetic analysis of Loci encoding increased protein quality control mechanisms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica bacteria are important foodborne pathogens with major economic impact. Some isolates exhibit increased heat tolerance, a concern for food safety. Analysis of a finished-quality genome sequence of an isolate commonly used in heat resistance studies, S. enterica sub...

  8. Quantitative trait loci that control plasma lipid levels in an F2 intercross between C57BL/6J and DDD.Cg-A(y) inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Suto, Jun-ichi

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize plasma lipid phenotypes and dissect the genetic basis of plasma lipid levels in an obese DDD.Cg-A(y) mouse strain. Plasma triglyceride (TG) levels were significantly higher in the DDD.Cg-A(y) strain than in the B6.Cg-A(y) strain. In contrast, plasma total-cholesterol (CHO) levels did not substantially differ between the two strains. As a rule, the A(y) allele significantly increased TG levels, but did not increase CHO levels. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses for plasma TG and CHO levels were performed in two types of F(2) female mice [F(2)A(y) (F(2) mice carrying the A(y) allele) and F(2) non- A(y) mice (F(2) mice without the A(y) allele)] produced by crossing C57BL/6J females and DDD.Cg-A(y) males. Single QTL scan identified one significant QTL for TG levels on chromosome 1, and two significant QTLs for CHO levels on chromosomes 1 and 8. When the marker nearest to the QTL on chromosome 1 was used as covariates, four additional significant QTLs for CHO levels were identified on chromosomes 5, 6, and 17 (two loci). In contrast, consideration of the agouti locus genotype as covariates did not detect additional QTLs. DDD.Cg-A(y) showed a low CHO level, although it had Apoa2(b), which was a CHO-increasing allele at the Apoa2 locus. This may have been partly due to the presence of multiple QTLs, which were associated with decreased CHO levels, on chromosome 8.

  9. Quantitative trait loci that control body weight and obesity in an F2 intercross between C57BL/6J and DDD.Cg-Ay mice.

    PubMed

    Suto, Jun-ichi

    2011-07-01

    I have developed a congenic mouse strain for the A(y) allele at the agouti locus in an inbred DDD/Sgn strain, DDD.Cg-A(y). DDD.Cg-A(y) females are extremely obese and significantly heavier than B6.Cg-A(y) females. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic basis of obesity in DDD.Cg-A(y) mice, and to determine whether or not their high body weight was due to the presence of DDD background-specific modifiers. I performed quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses for body weight and body mass index in two types of F(2) mice [F2 A(y) (F(2) mice carrying the A(y) allele) and F(2) non-A(y) (F2 mice without the A(y) allele)] produced by crossing C57BL/6J females and DDD.Cg-A(y) males. The results of the QTL analysis of F(2) A(y) mice were very similar to those obtained for F(2) non-A(y) mice. It was unlikely that the high body weight of DDD.Cg-A(y) mice was due to the presence of specific modifiers. When both F(2) datasets were merged and analyzed, four significant body weight QTLs were identified on chromosomes 6, 9, and 17 (2 loci) and four significant obesity QTLs were identified on chromosomes 1, 6, 9, and 17. Although the presence of DDD background-specific modifiers was not confirmed, a multifactorial basis of obesity in DDD.Cg-A(y) females was thus revealed.

  10. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling High Iron and Zinc Content in Self and Open Pollinated Grains of Pearl Millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sushil; Hash, Charles T.; Thirunavukkarasu, Nepolean; Singh, Govind; Rajaram, Vengaldas; Rathore, Abhishek; Senapathy, Senthilvel; Mahendrakar, Mahesh D.; Yadav, Rattan S.; Srivastava, Rakesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Pearl millet is a multipurpose grain/fodder crop of the semi-arid tropics, feeding many of the world’s poorest and most undernourished people. Genetic variation among adapted pearl millet inbreds and hybrids suggests it will be possible to improve grain micronutrient concentrations by selective breeding. Using 305 loci, a linkage map was constructed to map QTLs for grain iron [Fe] and zinc [Zn] using replicated samples of 106 pearl millet RILs (F6) derived from ICMB 841-P3 × 863B-P2. The grains of the RIL population were evaluated for Fe and Zn content using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Grain mineral concentrations ranged from 28.4 to 124.0 ppm for Fe and 28.7 to 119.8 ppm for Zn. Similarly, grain Fe and Zn in open pollinated seeds ranged between 22.4–77.4 and 21.9–73.7 ppm, respectively. Mapping with 305 (96 SSRs; 208 DArT) markers detected seven linkage groups covering 1749 cM (Haldane) with an average intermarker distance of 5.73 cM. On the basis of two environment phenotypic data, two co-localized QTLs for Fe and Zn content on linkage group (LG) 3 were identified by composite interval mapping (CIM). Fe QTL explained 19% phenotypic variation, whereas the Zn QTL explained 36% phenotypic variation. Likewise for open pollinated seeds, the QTL analysis led to the identification of two QTLs for grain Fe content on LG3 and 5, and two QTLs for grain Zn content on LG3 and 7. The total phenotypic variance for Fe and Zn QTLs in open pollinated seeds was 16 and 42%, respectively. Analysis of QTL × QTL and QTL × QTL × environment interactions indicated no major epistasis. PMID:27933068

  11. Multigenic Control of Pod Shattering Resistance in Chinese Rapeseed Germplasm Revealed by Genome-Wide Association and Linkage Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hui; Wang, Wenxiang; Zhou, Rijin; Mei, Desheng; Cheng, Hongtao; Yang, Juan; Raman, Harsh; Hu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    The majority of rapeseed cultivars shatter seeds upon maturity especially under hot-dry and windy conditions, reducing yield and gross margin return to growers. Here, we identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to pod shatter in an unstructured diverse panel of 143 rapeseed accessions, and two structured populations derived from bi-parental doubled haploid (DH) and inter-mated (IF2) crosses derived from R1 (resistant to pod shattering) and R2 (prone to pod shattering) accessions. Genome-wide association analysis identified six significant QTL for resistance to pod shatter located on chromosomes A01, A06, A07, A09, C02, and C05. Two of the QTL, qSRI.A09 delimited with the SNP marker Bn-A09-p30171993 (A09) and qSRI.A06 delimited with the SNP marker Bn-A06-p115948 (A06) could be repeatedly detected across environments in a diversity panel, DH and IF2 populations, suggesting that at least two loci on chromosomes A06 and A09 were the main contributors to pod shatter resistance in Chinese germplasm. Significant SNP markers identified in this study especially those that appeared repeatedly across environments provide a cost-effective and an efficient method for introgression and pyramiding of favorable alleles for pod shatter resistance via marker-assisted selection in rapeseed improvement programs. PMID:27493651

  12. Control failure likelihood and spatial dependence of insecticide resistance in the tomato pinworm, Tuta absoluta.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gerson A; Picanço, Marcelo C; Bacci, Leandro; Crespo, André Luiz B; Rosado, Jander F; Guedes, Raul Narciso C

    2011-08-01

    Insecticide resistance is a likely cause of field control failures of Tuta absoluta, but the subject has been little studied. Therefore, resistance to ten insecticides was surveyed in seven representative field populations of this species. The likelihood of control failures was assessed, as well as weather influence and the spatial dependence of insecticide resistance. No resistance or only low resistance levels were observed for pyrethroids (bifenthrin and permethrin), abamectin, spinosad, Bacillus thuringiensis and the mixture deltamethrin + triazophos (<12.5-fold). In contrast, indoxacarb exhibited moderate levels of resistance (up to 27.5-fold), and chitin synthesis inhibitors exhibited moderate to high levels of resistance (up to 222.3-fold). Evidence of control failures was obtained for bifenthrin, permethrin, diflubenzuron, teflubenzuron, triflumuron and B. thuringiensis. Weather conditions favour resistance to some insecticides, and spatial dependence was observed only for bifenthrin and permethrin. Insecticide resistance in field populations of the tomato pinworm prevails for the insecticides nowadays most frequently used against them-the chitin synthesis inhibitors (diflubenzuron, triflumuron and teflubenzuron). Local selection favoured by weather conditions and dispersal seem important for pyrethroid resistance evolution among Brazilian populations of T. absoluta and should be considered in designing pest management programmes. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Antifungal Resistance and New Strategies to Control Fungal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Vandeputte, Patrick; Ferrari, Selene; Coste, Alix T.

    2012-01-01

    Despite improvement of antifungal therapies over the last 30 years, the phenomenon of antifungal resistance is still of major concern in clinical practice. In the last 10 years the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon were extensively unraveled. In this paper, after a brief overview of currently available antifungals, molecular mechanisms of antifungal resistance will be detailed. It appears that major mechanisms of resistance are essential due to the deregulation of antifungal resistance effector genes. This deregulation is a consequence of point mutations occurring in transcriptional regulators of these effector genes. Resistance can also follow the emergence of point mutations directly in the genes coding antifungal targets. In addition we further describe new strategies currently undertaken to discover alternative therapy targets and antifungals. Identification of new antifungals is essentially achieved by the screening of natural or synthetic chemical compound collections. Discovery of new putative antifungal targets is performed through genome-wide approaches for a better understanding of the human pathogenic fungi biology. PMID:22187560

  14. Temephos Resistance in Aedes aegypti in Colombia Compromises Dengue Vector Control

    PubMed Central

    Grisales, Nelson; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Gomez, Santiago; Fonseca-Gonzalez, Idalyd; Ranson, Hilary; Lenhart, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    Background Control and prevention of dengue relies heavily on the application of insecticides to control dengue vector mosquitoes. In Colombia, application of the larvicide temephos to the aquatic breeding sites of Aedes aegypti is a key part of the dengue control strategy. Resistance to temephos was recently detected in the dengue-endemic city of Cucuta, leading to questions about its efficacy as a control tool. Here, we characterize the underlying mechanisms and estimate the operational impact of this resistance. Methodology/Principal Findings Larval bioassays of Ae. aegypti larvae from Cucuta determined the temephos LC50 to be 0.066 ppm (95% CI 0.06–0.074), approximately 15× higher than the value obtained from a susceptible laboratory colony. The efficacy of the field dose of temephos at killing this resistant Cucuta population was greatly reduced, with mortality rates <80% two weeks after application and <50% after 4 weeks. Neither biochemical assays nor partial sequencing of the ace-1 gene implicated target site resistance as the primary resistance mechanism. Synergism assays and microarray analysis suggested that metabolic mechanisms were most likely responsible for the temephos resistance. Interestingly, although the greatest synergism was observed with the carboxylesterase inhibitor, DEF, the primary candidate genes from the microarray analysis, and confirmed by quantitative PCR, were cytochrome P450 oxidases, notably CYP6N12, CYP6F3 and CYP6M11. Conclusions/Significance In Colombia, resistance to temephos in Ae. aegypti compromises the duration of its effect as a vector control tool. Several candidate genes potentially responsible for metabolic resistance to temephos were identified. Given the limited number of insecticides that are approved for vector control, future chemical-based control strategies should take into account the mechanisms underlying the resistance to discern which insecticides would likely lead to the greatest control efficacy while

  15. GLANET: genomic loci annotation and enrichment tool.

    PubMed

    Otlu, Burçak; Firtina, Can; Keles, Sündüz; Tastan, Oznur

    2017-09-15

    Genomic studies identify genomic loci representing genetic variations, transcription factor (TF) occupancy, or histone modification through next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Interpreting these loci requires evaluating them with known genomic and epigenomic annotations. We present GLANET as a comprehensive annotation and enrichment analysis tool which implements a sampling-based enrichment test that accounts for GC content and/or mappability biases, jointly or separately. GLANET annotates and performs enrichment analysis on these loci with a rich library. We introduce and perform novel data-driven computational experiments for assessing the power and Type-I error of its enrichment procedure which show that GLANET has attained high statistical power and well-controlled Type-I error rate. As a key feature, users can easily extend its library with new gene sets and genomic intervals. Other key features include assessment of impact of single nucleotide variants (SNPs) on TF binding sites and regulation based pathway enrichment analysis. GLANET can be run using its GUI or on command line. GLANET's source code is available at https://github.com/burcakotlu/GLANET . Tutorials are provided at https://glanet.readthedocs.org . burcak@ceng.metu.edu.tr or oznur.tastan@cs.bilkent.edu.tr. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  16. Hydrogel control of xylem hydraulic resistance in plants.

    PubMed

    Zwieniecki, M A; Melcher, P J; Michele Holbrook, N M

    2001-02-09

    Increasing concentrations of ions flowing through the xylem of plants produce rapid, substantial, and reversible decreases in hydraulic resistance. Changes in hydraulic resistance in response to solution ion concentration, pH, and nonpolar solvents are consistent with this process being mediated by hydrogels. The effect is localized to intervessel bordered pits, suggesting that microchannels in the pit membranes are altered by the swelling and deswelling of pectins, which are known hydrogels. The existence of an ion-mediated response breaks the long-held paradigm of the xylem as a system of inert pipes and suggests a mechanism by which plants may regulate their internal flow regime.

  17. Control of fluoroquinolone resistance through successful regulation, Australia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Allen C; Turnidge, John; Collignon, Peter; Looke, David; Barton, Mary; Gottlieb, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Fluoroquinolone antimicrobial drugs are highly bioavailable, broad-spectrum agents with activity against gram-negative pathogens, especially those resistant to other classes of antimicrobial drugs. Australia has restricted the use of quinolones in humans through its national pharmaceutical subsidy scheme; and, through regulation, has not permitted the use of quinolones in food-producing animals. As a consequence, resistance to fluoroquinolones in the community has been slow to emerge and has remained at low levels in key pathogens, such as Escherichia coli. In contrast to policies in most other countries, this policy has successfully preserved the utility of this class of antimicrobial drugs for treatment of most infections.

  18. A review of control methods and resistance mechanisms in stored-product insects.

    PubMed

    Boyer, S; Zhang, H; Lempérière, G

    2012-04-01

    This review describes the major stored-product insect species and their resistance to insecticides. The economic importance of the control of those pests is highlighted with a loss of more than one billion US dollars per year worldwide. A detailed common description of species resistance throughout the world has been developed, and we observed 28 recurrent studied species involved in resistance cases disseminated on the five continents. The different mechanisms, including behavioral resistance, were studied particularly on Oryzaephilus surinamensis. The role of detoxifying enzymes and studies on the genetic resistance, involving the kdr mutation mechanisms and the transmission of the genes of resistance, are also described. A chapter clarifying definitions on cross and multiple resistance is enclosed.

  19. Round fruit shape in WI7239 cucumber is controlled by two interacting quantitative trait loci with one putatively encoding a tomato SUN homolog.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yupeng; Liang, Xinjing; Gao, Meiling; Liu, Hanqiang; Meng, Huanwen; Weng, Yiqun; Cheng, Zhihui

    2017-03-01

    QTL analysis revealed two interacting loci, FS1.2 and FS2.1, underlying round fruit shape in WI7239 cucumber; CsSUN , a homolog of tomato fruit shape gene SUN , was a candidate for FS1.2. Fruit size is an important quality and yield trait in cucumber, but its genetic basis remains poorly understood. Here we reported QTL mapping results on fruit size with segregating populations derived from the cross between WI7238 (long fruit) and WI7239 (round fruit) inbred cucumber lines. Phenotypic data of fruit length and diameter were collected at anthesis, immature and mature fruit stages in four environments. Ten major-effect QTL were detected for six traits; synthesis of information from these QTL supported two genes, FS1.2 and FS2.1, underlying fruit size variation in the examined populations. Under the two-gene model, deviation from expected segregation ratio in fruit length and diameter among segregating populations was observed, which could be explained mainly by the interactions between FS1.2 and FS2.1, and segregation distortion in the FS2.1 region. Genome-wide candidate gene search identified CsSUN, a homolog of the tomato fruit shape gene SUN, as the candidate for FS1.2. The round-fruited WI7239 had a 161-bp deletion in the first exon of CsSUN, and its expression in WI7239 was significantly lower than that in WI7238. A marker derived from this deletion was mapped at the peak location of FS1.2 in QTL analysis. Comparative analysis suggested the melon gene CmSUN-14, a homolog of CsSUN as a candidate of the fl2/fd2/fw2 QTL in melon. This study revealed the unique genetic architecture of round fruit shape in WI7239 cucumber. It also highlights the power of QTL analysis for traits with a simple genetic basis but their expression is complicated by other factors.

  20. Footing, Resistance and Control: Negotiating a Traffic Citation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Wendy B.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the micro-interactional processes by which powerful and powerless identities are locally reconstructed. The article specifically examines the interplay between consent and resistance to law-breaking identities. Data consist of transcripts of 45 incidents in which highway patrol officers issue traffic…

  1. Footing, Resistance and Control: Negotiating a Traffic Citation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Wendy B.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the micro-interactional processes by which powerful and powerless identities are locally reconstructed. The article specifically examines the interplay between consent and resistance to law-breaking identities. Data consist of transcripts of 45 incidents in which highway patrol officers issue traffic…

  2. Panic disorder, anxiety and depression in resistant hypertension--a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Davies, S J; Ghahramani, P; Jackson, P R; Hippisley-Cox, J; Yeo, W W; Ramsay, L E

    1997-10-01

    It has been suggested that panic disorder can cause or contribute to hypertension or resistance to antihypertensive drugs. To compare the prevalences of panic disorder, panic attacks, anxiety and depression between patients with resistant hypertension and age- and sex-matched patients with non-resistant hypertension. A case-control study of patients attending the Sheffield Hypertension Clinic, using self-completed postal questionnaires to assess panic disorder, anxiety and depression. PATIENTS CASES: With resistant hypertension were defined as patients who presently or previously had systolic blood pressure above 160 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure above 90 mmHg despite the use of three or more antihypertensive agents at full dose. For each of 136 cases, one control with non-resistant hypertension, defined as controlled to < or = 160/90 mmHg by one or two antihypertensive agents, was identified by a bias-free method. Cases and controls were matched for age and sex. Lifetime and current prevalence of panic attacks, the prevalences of panic disorder, anxiety and depression by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, and the severity and frequency of panic attacks. Of the resistant hypertensive patients, 33% had experienced a panic attack compared with 39% of the control non-resistant hypertensives (resistant-non-resistant -6%, 95% confidence interval -19 to +7%). Twelve per cent of the resistant patients and 14% of controls fulfilled the criteria for a current or previous diagnosis of panic disorder (resistant-non-resistant -2%, 95% confidence interval -11% to +7%). There were also no significant differences between the groups in the prevalences of current panic attacks, panic attacks rated as moderate or worse, spontaneous panic attacks and in the frequency of panic attacks. There remained no significant difference between the groups for panic attacks and panic disorder when the analysis was limited to those patients who had idiopathic hypertension. The two

  3. A PQL (protein quantity loci) analysis of mature pea seed proteins identifies loci determining seed protein composition.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Michael; Jacquin, Françoise; Cassecuelle, Florence; Savois, Vincent; Belghazi, Maya; Aubert, Grégoire; Quillien, Laurence; Huart, Myriam; Marget, Pascal; Burstin, Judith

    2011-05-01

    Legume seeds are a major source of dietary proteins for humans and animals. Deciphering the genetic control of their accumulation is thus of primary significance towards their improvement. At first, we analysed the genetic variability of the pea seed proteome of three genotypes over 3 years of cultivation. This revealed that seed protein composition variability was under predominant genetic control, with as much as 60% of the spots varying quantitatively among the three genotypes. Then, by combining proteomic and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping approaches, we uncovered the genetic architecture of seed proteome variability. Protein quantity loci (PQL) were searched for 525 spots detected on 2-D gels obtained for 157 recombinant inbred lines. Most protein quantity loci mapped in clusters, suggesting that the accumulation of the major storage protein families was under the control of a limited number of loci. While convicilin accumulation was mainly under the control of cis-regulatory regions, vicilins and legumins were controlled by both cis- and trans-regulatory regions. Some loci controlled both seed protein composition and protein content and a locus on LGIIa appears to be a major regulator of protein composition and of protein in vitro digestibility. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Genetic loci associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap with loci for lung function and pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Brian D; de Jong, Kim; Lamontagne, Maxime; Bossé, Yohan; Shrine, Nick; Artigas, María Soler; Wain, Louise V; Hall, Ian P; Jackson, Victoria E; Wyss, Annah B; London, Stephanie J; North, Kari E; Franceschini, Nora; Strachan, David P; Beaty, Terri H; Hokanson, John E; Crapo, James D; Castaldi, Peter J; Chase, Robert P; Bartz, Traci M; Heckbert, Susan R; Psaty, Bruce M; Gharib, Sina A; Zanen, Pieter; Lammers, Jan W; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Groen, H J; Locantore, Nicholas; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Rennard, Stephen I; Vestbo, Jørgen; Timens, Wim; Paré, Peter D; Latourelle, Jeanne C; Dupuis, Josée; O'Connor, George T; Wilk, Jemma B; Kim, Woo Jin; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Vonk, Judith M; de Koning, Harry J; Leng, Shuguang; Belinsky, Steven A; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Rich, Stephen S; Barr, R Graham; Sparrow, David; Litonjua, Augusto A; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Lahousse, Lies; Brusselle, Guy G; Stricker, Bruno H; Uitterlinden, André G; Ampleford, Elizabeth J; Bleecker, Eugene R; Woodruff, Prescott G; Meyers, Deborah A; Qiao, Dandi; Lomas, David A; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Hawrylkiewicz, Iwona; Sliwinski, Pawel; Hardin, Megan; Fingerlin, Tasha E; Schwartz, David A; Postma, Dirkje S; MacNee, William; Tobin, Martin D; Silverman, Edwin K; Boezen, H Marike; Cho, Michael H

    2017-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. We performed a genetic association study in 15,256 cases and 47,936 controls, with replication of select top results (P < 5 × 10(-6)) in 9,498 cases and 9,748 controls. In the combined meta-analysis, we identified 22 loci associated at genome-wide significance, including 13 new associations with COPD. Nine of these 13 loci have been associated with lung function in general population samples, while 4 (EEFSEC, DSP, MTCL1, and SFTPD) are new. We noted two loci shared with pulmonary fibrosis (FAM13A and DSP) but that had opposite risk alleles for COPD. None of our loci overlapped with genome-wide associations for asthma, although one locus has been implicated in joint susceptibility to asthma and obesity. We also identified genetic correlation between COPD and asthma. Our findings highlight new loci associated with COPD, demonstrate the importance of specific loci associated with lung function to COPD, and identify potential regions of genetic overlap between COPD and other respiratory diseases.

  5. Weed control and yield comparisons of glyphosate- and glufosinate-resistant corn grown in rotation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A 6-yr field study was conducted from 2004 to 2009 at Stoneville, MS to examine the effects of rotating glyphosate-resistant and glufosinate-resistant corn (Zea mays L.) under reduced tillage conditions on weed control, soil weed seedbank, and yield. The four rotation systems were glyphosate-resista...

  6. Multiple resistance of horseweed to glyphosate and paraquat and its control with paraquat and metribuzin combinations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Greenhouse and field studies were conducted in 2007 and 2008 to investigate possible multiple-resistance of horseweed to paraquat and glyphosate, and to evaluate the effect of the addition of metribuzin to paraquat on control of paraquat-resistant horseweed. Results indicated that the GR50 (herbicid...

  7. Fitness Costs of Drug Resistance Mutations in Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Household-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Phillip P; Becerra, Mercedes C; Abel zur Wiesch, Pia; Hinkley, Trevor; Kaur, Devinder; Sloutsky, Alexander; Cohen, Ted

    2016-01-01

    The projected long-term prevalence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis depends upon the relative fitness of MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, compared with non-MDR strains. While many experimental models have tested the in vitro or in vivo fitness costs of various drug resistance mutations, fewer epidemiologic studies have attempted to validate these experimental findings. We performed a case-control study comparing drug resistance-associated mutations from MDR M. tuberculosis strains causing multiple cases in a household to matched MDR strains without evidence of secondary household cases. Eighty-eight multiple-case and 88 single-case household MDR strains were analyzed for 10 specific drug resistance-associated polymorphisms previously associated with fitness effects. We found that the isoniazid-resistant katG Ser315Thr mutation occurred more than twice as frequently in multiple-case households than in single-case households (odds ratio [OR], 2.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21-4.70), corroborating previous experimental findings. However, strains carrying both the katG Ser315Thr mutation and the rpsL Lys43Arg mutation were less likely to be found in multiple-case households (OR, 0.09; 95% CI, .01-.73), suggesting a negative epistatic interaction which contrasts previous findings. The case-control design presents a useful approach for assessing in vivo fitness effects of drug resistance mutations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. A Novel Route Controlling Begomovirus Resistance by the Messenger RNA Surveillance Factor Pelota

    PubMed Central

    Lapidot, Moshe; Karniel, Uri; Gelbart, Dana; Fogel, Doron; Evenor, Dalia; Kutsher, Yaarit; Makhbash, Zion; Nahon, Sahadia; Shlomo, Haviva; Chen, Lea; Reuveni, Moshe; Levin, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a devastating disease of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) that can be effectively controlled by the deployment of resistant cultivars. The TYLCV-resistant line TY172 carries a major recessive locus for TYLCV resistance, designated ty-5, on chromosome 4. In this study, the association between 27 polymorphic DNA markers, spanning the ty-5 locus, and the resistance characteristics of individual plants inoculated with TYLCV in 51 segregating recombinant populations were analyzed. These analyses localized ty-5 into a 425 bp region containing two transversions: one in the first exon of a gene encoding the tomato homolog of the messenger RNA surveillance factor Pelota (Pelo), and a second in its proximal promoter. Analyses of susceptible and resistant lines revealed that the relative transcript level of the gene remained unchanged, regardless of whether the plants were infected with TYLCV or not. This suggests that the polymorphism discovered in the coding region of the gene controls the resistance. Silencing of Pelo in a susceptible line rendered the transgenic plants highly resistant, while in the resistant line TY172 had no effect on symptom development. In addition, over-expression of the susceptible allele of the gene in the resistant TY172 line rendered it susceptible, while over-expression of the resistant allele in susceptible plants had no effect. These results confirm that Pelo is the gene controlling resistance at the ty-5 locus. Pelo, implicated in the ribosome recycling-phase of protein synthesis, offers an alternative route to promote resistance to TYLCV and other viruses. PMID:26448569

  9. Controlled formation and resistivity scaling of nickel silicide nanolines.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Luo, Zhiquan; Shi, Li; Zhou, JiPing; Rabenberg, Lew; Ho, Paul S; Allen, Richard A; Cresswell, Michael W

    2009-02-25

    We demonstrate a top-down method for fabricating nickel mono-silicide (NiSi) nanolines (also referred to as nanowires) with smooth sidewalls and line widths down to 15 nm. Four-probe electrical measurements reveal that the room temperature electrical resistivity of the NiSi nanolines remains constant as the line widths are reduced to 23 nm. The resistivity at cryogenic temperatures is found to increase with decreasing line width. This finding can be attributed to electron scattering at the sidewalls and is used to deduce an electron mean free path of 6.3 nm for NiSi at room temperature. The results suggest that NiSi nanolines with smooth sidewalls are able to meet the requirements for implementation at the 22 nm technology node without degradation of device performance.

  10. Temperature control during regeneration of activated carbon fiber cloth with resistance-feedback.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, David L; Rood, Mark J

    2012-10-16

    Electrothermal swing adsorption (ESA) of organic compounds from gas streams with activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) reduces emissions to the atmosphere and recovers feedstock for reuse. Local temperature measurement (e.g., with a thermocouple) is typically used to monitor/control adsorbent regeneration cycles. Remote electrical resistance measurement is evaluated here as an alternative to local temperature measurement. ACFC resistance that was modeled based on its physical properties was within 10.5% of the measured resistance values during electrothermal heating. Resistance control was developed based on this measured relationship and used to control temperature to within 2.3% of regeneration set-point temperatures. Isobutane-laden adsorbent was then heated with resistance control. After 2 min of heating, the temperature of the adsorbent with isobutane was 13% less than the adsorbent without isobutane. This difference decreased to 2.1% after 9 min of heating, showing desorption of isobutane. An ACFC cartridge was also heated to 175 °C for 900 cycles with its resistance and adsorption capacity values remaining within 3% and 2%, respectively. This new method to control regeneration power application based on rapid sensing of the adsorbent's resistance removes the need for direct-contact temperature sensors providing a simple, cost-efficient, and long-term regeneration technique for ESA systems.

  11. Mapping quantitative trait loci of resistance to Tomato spotted wilt virus and leaf spots in a recombinant inbred line population of peanut (Arachis hypogae L.) from SunOleic 97R and NC94022

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut is vulnerable to a range of diseases, such as Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and leaf spots. The most sustainable and economical solution for managing peanut diseases is development of resistance cultivars. The new breeding line NC94022, high resistance to TSWV and moderate resistance to le...

  12. Interruption of chemical mosquito control and evolution of insecticide resistance genes in Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Eritja, R; Chevillon, C

    1999-01-01

    Within the Llobregat Delta (Barcelona, Spain), Culex pipiens L. has been the target of organophosphate insecticide (OP) control for 10 yr (1982-1992). Between 1991 and 1992, OPs were replaced by Bacillus-based toxins in all the mosquito control programs within > 150 km of this area. The distribution of several OP-resistance genes was surveyed within the Llobregat Delta and neighboring populations (< 25 km) during the 2 yr following this regional pesticide change to investigate how the change in selection pressure affected the dynamics of OP-resistance genes. The immigration failure of the A2-B2 resistant esterases and the observed difference in OP-resistance dynamics between isolated and nonisolated populations may indicate fitness disadvantages associated with OP-resistance genes, hence a tendency for a decrease in OP-resistance. In contrast, one OP-resistance gene further increased in frequency, whereas the frequencies of some others were maintained. These unexpected results question the importance of pesticides from sources other than mosquito control, and the variability of pleiotropic fitness costs among pesticide resistance genes.

  13. Identification of genomic region controlling resistance to aflatoxin contamination in a peanut recombinant inbred line population (Tifrunner x GT-C20)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aflatoxin contamination of peanut is a significant threat to global food safety. In this study we performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis to identify peanut genomic regions contributing to aflatoxin contamination resistance in a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from the Tifr...

  14. Blood pressure control in resistant hypertension: new therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Guido; Quarti-Trevano, Fosca; Brambilla, Gianmaria; Seravalle, Gino

    2010-11-01

    Resistant hypertension, namely the hypertensive state characterized by the inability of multiple antihypertensive drug interventions to lower blood pressure to goal levels, represents a condition frequently detected in clinical practice. Its main features are represented by its heterogeneous etiology as well as its very high cardiovascular risk. This latter peculiarity has implemented the research for new approaches to the treatment of the disease. This article will focus on two of them, namely carotid baroreceptor electric stimulation and the renal denervation procedure. Clinical studies and large-scale clinical trials are presently ongoing with the aim of defining the long-term efficacy and safety profile of the two interventions.

  15. Tailoring resistive switching in Pt/SrTiO3 junctions by stoichiometry control

    PubMed Central

    Mikheev, Evgeny; Hwang, Jinwoo; Kajdos, Adam P.; Hauser, Adam J.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Resistive switching effects in transition metal oxide-based devices offer new opportunities for information storage and computing technologies. Although it is known that resistive switching is a defect-driven phenomenon, the precise mechanisms are still poorly understood owing to the difficulty of systematically controlling specific point defects. As a result, obtaining reliable and reproducible devices remains a major challenge for this technology. Here, we demonstrate control of resistive switching based on intentional manipulation of native point defects. Oxide molecular beam epitaxy is used to systematically investigate the effect of Ti/Sr stoichiometry on resistive switching in high-quality Pt/SrTiO3 junctions. We demonstrate resistive switching with improved state retention through the introduction of Ti- and Sr-excess into the near-interface region. More broadly, the results demonstrate the utility of high quality metal/oxide interfaces and explicit control over structural defects to improve control, uniformity, and reproducibility of resistive switching processes. Unintentional interfacial contamination layers, which are present if Schottky contacts are processed at low temperature, can easily dominate the resistive switching characteristics and complicate the interpretation if nonstoichiometry is also present. PMID:26056783

  16. Control of Glyphosate-Resistant Common Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.) in Glufosinate-Resistant Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Ethann R.; Knezevic, Stevan Z.; Sikkema, Peter H.; Lindquist, John L.; Jhala, Amit J.

    2017-01-01

    Common ragweed emerges early in the season in Nebraska, USA and is competitive with soybean; therefore, preplant herbicides are important for effective control. Glyphosate has been used as a preplant control option; however, confirmation of glyphosate-resistant (GR) common ragweed in Nebraska necessitates evaluating other herbicide options. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate the efficacy of preplant (PP) herbicides followed by (fb) glufosinate alone or in tank-mixture with imazethapyr, acetochlor, or S-metolachlor applied post-emergence (POST) for control of GR common ragweed in glufosinate-resistant soybean; (2) their effect on common ragweed density, biomass, and soybean yield; and (3) the partial economics of herbicide programs. A field experiment was conducted in a grower's field infested with GR common ragweed in Gage County, Nebraska, USA in 2015 and 2016. Preplant herbicide programs containing glufosinate, paraquat, 2,4-D, dimethenamid-P, cloransulam-methyl, or high rates of flumioxazin plus chlorimuron-ethyl provided 90–99% control of common ragweed at 21 d after treatment (DAT). The aforementioned PP herbicides fb a POST application of glufosinate alone or in tank-mixture with imazethapyr, acetochlor, or S-metolachlor controlled GR common ragweed 84–98% at soybean harvest, reduced common ragweed density (≤20 plants m−2) and biomass by ≥93%, and secured soybean yield 1,819–2,158 kg ha−1. The PP fb POST herbicide programs resulted in the highest gross profit margins (US$373–US$506) compared to PP alone (US$91) or PRE fb POST programs (US$158). The results of this study conclude that effective and economical control of GR common ragweed in glufosinate-resistant soybean is achievable with PP fb POST herbicide programs. PMID:28868065

  17. Control of Glyphosate-Resistant Common Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.) in Glufosinate-Resistant Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr].

    PubMed

    Barnes, Ethann R; Knezevic, Stevan Z; Sikkema, Peter H; Lindquist, John L; Jhala, Amit J

    2017-01-01

    Common ragweed emerges early in the season in Nebraska, USA and is competitive with soybean; therefore, preplant herbicides are important for effective control. Glyphosate has been used as a preplant control option; however, confirmation of glyphosate-resistant (GR) common ragweed in Nebraska necessitates evaluating other herbicide options. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate the efficacy of preplant (PP) herbicides followed by (fb) glufosinate alone or in tank-mixture with imazethapyr, acetochlor, or S-metolachlor applied post-emergence (POST) for control of GR common ragweed in glufosinate-resistant soybean; (2) their effect on common ragweed density, biomass, and soybean yield; and (3) the partial economics of herbicide programs. A field experiment was conducted in a grower's field infested with GR common ragweed in Gage County, Nebraska, USA in 2015 and 2016. Preplant herbicide programs containing glufosinate, paraquat, 2,4-D, dimethenamid-P, cloransulam-methyl, or high rates of flumioxazin plus chlorimuron-ethyl provided 90-99% control of common ragweed at 21 d after treatment (DAT). The aforementioned PP herbicides fb a POST application of glufosinate alone or in tank-mixture with imazethapyr, acetochlor, or S-metolachlor controlled GR common ragweed 84-98% at soybean harvest, reduced common ragweed density (≤20 plants m(-2)) and biomass by ≥93%, and secured soybean yield 1,819-2,158 kg ha(-1). The PP fb POST herbicide programs resulted in the highest gross profit margins (US$373-US$506) compared to PP alone (US$91) or PRE fb POST programs (US$158). The results of this study conclude that effective and economical control of GR common ragweed in glufosinate-resistant soybean is achievable with PP fb POST herbicide programs.

  18. Glycogen controls Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan and resistance to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Gusarov, Ivan; Pani, Bibhusita; Gautier, Laurent; Smolentseva, Olga; Eremina, Svetlana; Shamovsky, Ilya; Katkova-Zhukotskaya, Olga; Mironov, Alexander; Nudler, Evgeny

    2017-01-01

    A high-sugar diet has been associated with reduced lifespan in organisms ranging from worms to mammals. However, the mechanisms underlying the harmful effects of glucose are poorly understood. Here we establish a causative relationship between endogenous glucose storage in the form of glycogen, resistance to oxidative stress and organismal aging in Caenorhabditis elegans. We find that glycogen accumulated on high dietary glucose limits C. elegans longevity. Glucose released from glycogen and used for NADPH/glutathione reduction renders nematodes and human hepatocytes more resistant against oxidative stress. Exposure to low levels of oxidants or genetic inhibition of glycogen synthase depletes glycogen stores and extends the lifespan of animals fed a high glucose diet in an AMPK-dependent manner. Moreover, glycogen interferes with low insulin signalling and accelerates aging of long-lived daf-2 worms fed a high glucose diet. Considering its extensive evolutionary conservation, our results suggest that glycogen metabolism might also have a role in mammalian aging. PMID:28627510

  19. An optimal control strategy to reduce the spread of malaria resistance.

    PubMed

    Fatmawati; Tasman, Hengki

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model of malaria transmission considering the resistance of malaria parasites to the anti-malarial drugs. The model also incorporates mass treatment and insecticide as control