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Sample records for locked 270-440 ghz

  1. Synchronized 4 × 12 GHz hybrid harmonically mode-locked semiconductor laser based on AWG.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Lu, D; Zhang, R; Zhao, L; Wang, W; Broeke, R; Ji, C

    2016-05-02

    We report a monolithically integrated synchronized four wavelength channel mode-locked semiconductor laser chip based on arrayed waveguide grating and fabricated in the InP material system. Device fabrication was completed in a multiproject wafer foundry run on the Joint European Platform for Photonic Integration of Components and Circuits. The integrated photonic chip demonstrated 5th harmonic electrical hybrid mode-locking operation with four 400 GHz spacing wavelength channels and synchronized to a 12.7 GHz RF clock, for nearly transform-limited optical pulse trains from a single output waveguide. A low timing jitter of 0.349 ps, and RF frequency locking range of ~50 MHz were also achieved.

  2. 175 GHz, 400-fs-pulse harmonically mode-locked surface emitting semiconductor laser.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Keith G; Quarterman, Adrian H; Apostolopoulos, Vasilis; Beere, Harvey E; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A; Tropper, Anne C

    2012-03-26

    We report a harmonically mode-locked vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) producing 400 fs pulses at a repetition frequency of 175 GHz with an average output power of 300 mW. Harmonic mode-locking was established using a 300 µm thick intracavity single crystal diamond heat spreader in thermal contact with the front surface of the gain sample using liquid capillary bonding. The repetition frequency was set by the diamond microcavity and stable harmonic mode locking was achieved when the laser cavity length was tuned so that the laser operated on the 117th harmonic of the fundamental cavity. When an etalon placed intracavity next to the gain sample, but not in thermal contact was used pulse groups were observed. These contained 300 fs pulses with a spacing of 5.9 ps. We conclude that to achieve stable harmonic mode locking at repetition frequencies in the 100s of GHz range in a VECSEL there is a threshold pulse energy above which harmonic mode locking is achieved and below which groups of pulses are observed.

  3. 11-GHz waveguide Nd:YAG laser CW mode-locked with single-layer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Okhrimchuk, Andrey G.; Obraztsov, Petr A.

    2015-01-01

    We report stable, passive, continuous-wave (CW) mode-locking of a compact diode-pumped waveguide Nd:YAG laser with a single-layer graphene saturable absorber. The depressed cladding waveguide in the Nd:YAG crystal is fabricated with an ultrafast laser inscription method. The saturable absorber is formed by direct deposition of CVD single-layer graphene on the output coupler. The few millimeter-long cavity provides generation of 16-ps pulses with repetition rates in the GHz range (up to 11.3 GHz) and 12 mW average power. Stable CW mode-locking operation is achieved by controlling the group delay dispersion in the laser cavity with a Gires–Tournois interferometer. PMID:26052678

  4. 11-GHz waveguide Nd:YAG laser CW mode-locked with single-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Okhrimchuk, Andrey G; Obraztsov, Petr A

    2015-06-08

    We report stable, passive, continuous-wave (CW) mode-locking of a compact diode-pumped waveguide Nd:YAG laser with a single-layer graphene saturable absorber. The depressed cladding waveguide in the Nd:YAG crystal is fabricated with an ultrafast laser inscription method. The saturable absorber is formed by direct deposition of CVD single-layer graphene on the output coupler. The few millimeter-long cavity provides generation of 16-ps pulses with repetition rates in the GHz range (up to 11.3 GHz) and 12 mW average power. Stable CW mode-locking operation is achieved by controlling the group delay dispersion in the laser cavity with a Gires-Tournois interferometer.

  5. 2.4 GHz CMOS Power Amplifier with Mode-Locking Structure to Enhance Gain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We propose a mode-locking method optimized for the cascode structure of an RF CMOS power amplifier. To maximize the advantage of the typical mode-locking method in the cascode structure, the input of the cross-coupled transistor is modified from that of a typical mode-locking structure. To prove the feasibility of the proposed structure, we designed a 2.4 GHz CMOS power amplifier with a 0.18 μm RFCMOS process for polar transmitter applications. The measured power added efficiency is 34.9%, while the saturated output power is 23.32 dBm. The designed chip size is 1.4 × 0.6 mm2. PMID:25045755

  6. A fully-differential phase-locked loop frequency synthesizer for 60-GHz wireless communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lixue, Kuang; Baoyong, Chi; Lei, Chen; Wen, Jia; Zhihua, Wang

    2014-12-01

    A 40-GHz phase-locked loop (PLL) frequency synthesizer for 60-GHz wireless communication applications is presented. The electrical characteristics of the passive components in the VCO and LO buffers are accurately extracted with an electromagnetic simulator HFSS. A differential tuning technique is utilized in the voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) to achieve higher common-mode noise rejection and better phase noise performance. The VCO and the divider chain are powered by a 1.0 V supply while the phase-frequency detector (PFD) and the charge pump (CP) are powered by a 2.5 V supply to improve the linearity. The measurement results show that the total frequency locking range of the frequency synthesizer is from 37 to 41 GHz, and the phase noise from a 40 GHz carrier is -97.2 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset. Implemented in 65 nm CMOS, the synthesizer consumes a DC power of 62 mW, including all the buffers.

  7. A passively mode-locked fiber laser at 1.54 mum with a fundamental repetition frequency reaching 2 GHz.

    PubMed

    McFerran, J J; Nenadovic, L; Swann, W C; Schlager, J B; Newbury, N R

    2007-10-01

    We demonstrate a fundamentally mode-locked fiber laser with a repetition frequency in excess of 2 GHz at a central wavelength of 1.535 mum. Co-doped ytterbium-erbium fiber provides the gain medium for the laser, affording high gain per unit length, while a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SAM) provides the pulse shaping mechanism in a standing wave cavity. Results are shown confirming cw mode-locking for 1 GHz and 2 GHz repetition frequency systems. The response of the frequency comb output to pump power variations is shown to follow a single pole response. The timing jitter of a 540MHz repetition-rate laser has been suppressed to below 100 fs through phase-lead compensated feedback to the pump power. Alternatively, a single comb line of a 850MHz repetition-rate laser has been phase-locked to a narrow linewidth cw laser with an in-loop phase jitter of 0.06 rad(2). The laser design is compatible with low-noise oscillator applications.

  8. 10 GHz, 1.1 ps optical pulse generation from a regeneratively mode-locked Yb fiber laser in the 1.1 μm band.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Kengo; Yoshida, Masato; Hirooka, Toshihiko; Nakazawa, Masataka

    2011-12-05

    We report a 10 GHz harmonically and regeneratively mode-locked Yb fiber laser with a phase-locked loop (PLL) technique at 1.1 μm. Stable mode locking was achieved by optimizing the average dispersion of the fiber cavity to an anomalous dispersion to operate as a soliton laser. As a result, a 1.1 ps optical pulse with a timing jitter of 140 fs was successfully generated.

  9. 200-GHz and 50-GHz AWG channelized linewidth dependent transmission of weak-resonant-cavity FPLD injection-locked by spectrally sliced ASE.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gong-Ru; Cheng, Tzu-Kang; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Gong-Cheng; Wang, Hai-Lin; Lin, Yi-Hong

    2009-09-28

    In a weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode (WRC-FPLD) based DWDM-PON system with an array-waveguide-grating (AWG) channelized amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source located at remote node, we study the effect of AWG filter bandwidth on the transmission performances of the 1.25-Gbit/s directly modulated WRC-FPLD transmitter under the AWG channelized ASE injection-locking. With AWG filters of two different channel spacings at 50 and 200 GHz, several characteristic parameters such as interfered reflection, relatively intensity noise, crosstalk reduction, side-mode-suppressing ratio and power penalty of BER effect of the WRC-FPLD transmitted data are compared. The 200-GHz AWG filtered ASE injection minimizes the noises of WRC-FPLD based ONU transmitter, improving the power penalty of upstream data by -1.6 dB at BER of 10(-12). In contrast, the 50-GHz AWG channelized ASE injection fails to promote better BER but increases the power penalty by + 1.5 dB under back-to-back transmission. A theoretical modeling elucidates that the BER degradation up to 4 orders of magnitude between two injection cases is mainly attributed to the reduction on ASE injection linewidth, since which concurrently degrades the signal-to-noise and extinction ratios of the transmitted data stream.

  10. Advanced, phase-locked, 100 kW, 1.3 GHz magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, Michael; Ives, R. Lawrence; Bui, Thuc; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Chase, Brian; Walker, Chris; Conant, Jeff

    2017-03-01

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., in collaboration with Fermilab and Communications & Power Industries, LLC, is developing a phase-locked, 100 kW peak, 10 kW average power magnetron-based RF system for driving accelerators. Phase locking will be achieved using an approach originating at Fermilab that includes control of both amplitude and phase on a fast time scale.

  11. Up to 400 GHz burst-mode pulse generation from a hybrid harmonic mode-locked Er-doped fibre laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng-Min; Lai, Yinchieh

    2017-02-01

    By inserting a birefringence filter with FSR  =  100 GHz inside a hybrid mode-locked Er-doped fibre laser, we successfully generate ps to sub-ps optical burst pulses with the intra-burst pulse rate up to 400 GHz. Multiplication of the intra-burst pulse rate is attributed to a new effect analogous to rational harmonic mode-locking, which occurs due to the relative alignment of the cavity harmonic frequencies, the external phase modulation induced frequencies, and the filter-selected frequencies.

  12. 2 GHz passively harmonic mode-locked fiber laser by a microfiber-based topological insulator saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhi-Chao; Liu, Meng; Liu, Hao; Zheng, Xu-Wu; Luo, Ai-Ping; Zhao, Chu-Jun; Zhang, Han; Wen, Shuang-Chun; Xu, Wen-Cheng

    2013-12-15

    We report on the generation of passive harmonic mode locking of a fiber laser using a microfiber-based topological insulator (TI) Bi(2)Te(3) saturable absorber (SA). The optical deposition method was employed to fabricate the microfiber-based TISA. By virtue of the excellent nonlinear optical property of the proposed TISA, the fiber laser could operate at the pulse repetition rate of 2.04 GHz under a pump power of 126 mW, corresponding to the 418th harmonic of fundamental repetition frequency. The results demonstrate that the microfiber-based TI photonic device can operate as both the high nonlinear optical component and the SA in fiber lasers, and could also find other applications in the related fields of photonics.

  13. A low spur, low jitter 10-GHz phase-locked loop in 0.13-μm CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niansong, Mei; Yu, Sun; Bo, Lu; Yaohua, Pan; Yumei, Huang; Zhiliang, Hong

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a 10-GHz low spur and low jitter phase-locked loop (PLL). An improved low phase noise VCO and a dynamic phase frequency detector with a short delay reset time are employed to reduce the noise of the PLL. We also discuss the methodology to optimize the high frequency prescaler's noise and the charge pump's current mismatch. The chip was fabricated in a SMIC 0.13-μm RF CMOS process with a 1.2-V power supply. The measured integrated RMS jitter is 757 fs (1 kHz to 10 MHz); the phase noise is -89 and -118.1 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz and 1 MHz frequency offset, respectively; and the reference frequency spur is below -77 dBc. The chip size is 0.32 mm2 and the power consumption is 30.6 mW.

  14. 320 Gbps to 10 GHz sub-clock recovery using a PPLN-based opto-electronic phase-locked loop.

    PubMed

    Ware, Cédric; Oxenløwe, Leif K; Gómez Agis, Fausto; Mulvad, Hans C; Galili, Michael; Kurimura, Sunao; Nakajima, Hirochika; Ichikawa, Junichiro; Erasme, Didier; Clausen, Anders T; Jeppesen, Palle

    2008-03-31

    We present successful extraction of a 10 GHz clock from single-wavelength 160 and 320 Gbps OTDM data streams, using an opto-electronic phase-locked loop based on three-wave mixing in periodically-poled lithium niobate as a phase comparator.

  15. A low-phase-noise 18 GHz Kerr frequency microcomb phase-locked over 65 THz

    PubMed Central

    Huang, S.-W.; Yang, J.; Lim, J.; Zhou, H.; Yu, M.; Kwong, D.-L.; Wong, C. W.

    2015-01-01

    Laser frequency combs are coherent light sources that simultaneously provide pristine frequency spacings for precision metrology and the fundamental basis for ultrafast and attosecond sciences. Recently, nonlinear parametric conversion in high-Q microresonators has been suggested as an alternative platform for optical frequency combs, though almost all in 100 GHz frequencies or more. Here we report a low-phase-noise on-chip Kerr frequency comb with mode spacing compatible with high-speed silicon optoelectronics. The waveguide cross-section of the silicon nitride spiral resonator is designed to possess small and flattened group velocity dispersion, so that the Kerr frequency comb contains a record-high number of 3,600 phase-locked comb lines. We study the single-sideband phase noise as well as the long-term frequency stability and report the lowest phase noise floor achieved to date with −130 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset for the 18 GHz Kerr comb oscillator, along with feedback stabilization to achieve frequency Allan deviations of 7 × 10−11 in 1 s. The reported system is a promising compact platform for achieving self-referenced Kerr frequency combs and also for high-capacity coherent communication architectures. PMID:26311406

  16. 1.55 μm hydrogen cyanide optical frequency-stabilized and 10 GHz repetition-rate-stabilized mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masato; Yoshida, Kazuki; Kasai, Keisuke; Nakazawa, Masataka

    2016-10-17

    We describe a 1.55 μm hydrogen cyanide (HCN) optical frequency and repetition rate stabilized mode-locked fiber laser, where the optical frequency was locked to the P(10) HCN absorption line and the repetition rate was locked to 9.95328 GHz by using a microwave phase-locked loop. The optical frequency stability of the laser reached 5 x 10-11 with an integration time τ of 1 s. With a bidirectional pumping scheme, the laser output power reached 64.6 mW. To obtain a short pulse train, the average dispersion in the cavity was managed so that it was zero around 1.55 μm, resulting in a 0.95 ps pulse train. In addition, the stabilization of the optical frequency and the repetition rate, meant that the entire spectral profile remained the same for 24 hours.

  17. Laser frequency locking with 46  GHz offset using an electro-optic modulator for magneto-optical trapping of francium atoms.

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Aoki, T; Ezure, S; Kato, K; Hayamizu, T; Kawamura, H; Inoue, T; Arikawa, H; Ishikawa, T; Aoki, T; Uchiyama, A; Sakamoto, K; Ito, S; Itoh, M; Ando, S; Hatakeyama, A; Hatanaka, K; Imai, K; Murakami, T; Nataraj, H S; Shimizu, Y; Sato, T; Wakasa, T; Yoshida, H P; Sakemi, Y

    2016-02-10

    We demonstrate frequency offset locking between two laser sources using a waveguide-type electro-optic modulator (EOM) with 10th-order sidebands for magneto-optical trapping of Fr atoms. The frequency locking error signal was successfully obtained by performing delayed self-homodyne detection of the beat signal between the repumping frequency and the 10th-order sideband component of the trapping light. Sweeping the trapping-light and repumping-light frequencies with keeping its frequency difference of 46 GHz was confirmed over 1 GHz by monitoring the Doppler absorption profile of I₂. This technique enables us to search for a resonance frequency of magneto-optical trapping of Fr.

  18. Laser frequency locking with 46 GHz offset using an electro-optic modulator for magneto-optical trapping of francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, K.; Aoki, T.; Ezure, S.; Kato, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Kawamura, H.; Inoue, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Sakamoto, K.; Ito, S.; Itoh, M.; Ando, S.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Shimizu, Y.; Sato, T.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrated a frequency offset locking between two laser sources using a waveguide-type electro-optic modulator (EOM) with 10th-order sidebands for magneto-optical trapping of Fr atoms. The frequency locking error signal was successfully obtained by performing delayed self-homodyne detection of the beat signal between the repumping frequency and the 10th-order sideband component of the trapping light. Sweeping the trapping-light and repumping-light frequencies with keeping its frequency difference of 46 GHz was confirmed over 1 GHz by monitoring the Doppler absorption profile of I2. This technique enables us to search for a resonance frequency of magneto-optical trapping of Fr.

  19. Tunable GHz pulse repetition rate operation in high-power TEM(00)-mode Nd:YLF lasers at 1047 nm and 1053 nm with self mode locking.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y J; Tzeng, Y S; Tang, C Y; Huang, Y P; Chen, Y F

    2012-07-30

    We report on a high-power diode-pumped self-mode-locked Nd:YLF laser with the pulse repetition rate up to several GHz. A novel tactic is developed to efficiently select the output polarization state for achieving the stable TEM(00)-mode self-mode-locked operations at 1053 nm and 1047 nm, respectively. At an incident pump power of 6.93 W and a pulse repetition rate of 2.717 GHz, output powers as high as 2.15 W and 1.35 W are generated for the σ- and π-polarization, respectively. We experimentally find that decreasing the separation between the gain medium and the input mirror not only brings in the pulse shortening thanks to the enhanced effect of the spatial hole burning, but also effectively introduces the effect of the spectral filtering to lead the Nd:YLF laser to be in a second harmonic mode-locked status. Consequently, pulse durations as short as 8 ps and 8.5 ps are obtained at 1053 nm and 1047 nm with a pulse repetition rate of 5.434 GHz.

  20. C2H2 absolutely optical frequency-stabilized and 40 GHz repetition-rate-stabilized, regeneratively mode-locked picosecond erbium fiber laser at 1.53 microm.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Masataka; Kasai, Keisuke; Yoshida, Masato

    2008-11-15

    We have succeeded in the simultaneous stabilization of the optical frequency and repetition rate of a regeneratively mode-locked picosecond erbium-doped fiber ring laser. The optical frequency was locked to the molecular absorption of C2H2 in the 1.5 microm band, and the repetition rate was stabilized to a 40 GHz synthesizer by using a microwave phase-locked loop. The optical frequency stability of the pulse train reached 2x10(-11) for tau=10-100 s. The key to success is the independent control of the repetition rate without disturbing the optical cavity condition.

  1. Microfiber-based few-layer MoS2 saturable absorber for 2.5 GHz passively harmonic mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Zheng, Xu-Wu; Qi, You-Li; Liu, Hao; Luo, Ai-Ping; Luo, Zhi-Chao; Xu, Wen-Cheng; Zhao, Chu-Jun; Zhang, Han

    2014-09-22

    We reported on the generation of high-order harmonic mode-locking in a fiber laser using a microfiber-based molybdenum disulfide (MoS(2)) saturable absorber (SA). Taking advantage of both the saturable absorption and large third-order nonlinear susceptibilities of the few-layer MoS(2), up to 2.5 GHz repetition rate HML pulse could be obtained at a pump power of 181 mW, corresponding to 369th harmonic of fundamental repetition frequency. The results provide the first demonstration of the simultaneous applications of both highly nonlinear and saturable absorption effects of the MoS(2), indicating that the microfiber-based MoS(2) photonic device could serve as high-performance SA and highly nonlinear optical component for application fields such as ultrafast nonlinear optics.

  2. Phase noise analysis of a 10-GHz optical injection-locked vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser-based optoelectronic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronel, Juan; Varón, Margarita; Rissons, Angélique

    2016-09-01

    The optical injection locking (OIL) technique is proposed to reduce the phase noise of a carrier generated for a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL)-based optoelectronic oscillator. The OIL technique permits the enhancement of the VCSEL direct modulation bandwidth as well as the stabilization of the optical noise of the laser. A 2-km delay line, 10-GHz optical injection-locked VCSEL-based optoelectronic oscillator (OILVBO) was implemented. The internal noise sources of the optoelectronic oscillator components were characterized and analyzed to understand the noise conversion of the system into phase noise in the oscillator carrier. The implemented OILVBO phase noise was -105.7 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz from the carrier; this value agrees well with the performed simulated analysis. From the computed and measured phase noise curves, it is possible to infer the noise processes that take place inside the OILVBO. As a second measurement of the oscillation quality, a time-domain analysis was done through the Allan's standard deviation measurement, reported for first time for an optoelectronic oscillator using the OIL technique.

  3. Towards a beyond 1 GHz solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance: External lock operation in an external current mode for a 500 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masato; Ebisawa, Yusuke; Tennmei, Konosuke; Yanagisawa, Yoshinori; Hosono, Masami; Takasugi, Kenji; Hase, Takashi; Miyazaki, Takayoshi; Fujito, Teruaki; Nakagome, Hideki; Kiyoshi, Tsukasa; Yamazaki, Toshio; Maeda, Hideaki

    2012-10-01

    Achieving a higher magnetic field is important for solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). But a conventional low temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet cannot exceed 1 GHz (23.5 T) due to the critical magnetic field. Thus, we started a project to replace the Nb3Sn innermost coil of an existing 920 MHz NMR (21.6 T) with a Bi-2223 high temperature superconducting (HTS) innermost coil. Unfortunately, the HTS magnet cannot be operated in persistent current mode; an external dc power supply is required to operate the NMR magnet, causing magnetic field fluctuations. These fluctuations can be stabilized by a field-frequency lock system based on an external NMR detection coil. We demonstrate here such a field-frequency lock system in a 500 MHz LTS NMR magnet operated in an external current mode. The system uses a 7Li sample in a microcoil as external NMR detection system. The required field compensation is calculated from the frequency of the FID as measured with a frequency counter. The system detects the FID signal, determining the FID frequency, and calculates the required compensation coil current to stabilize the sample magnetic field. The magnetic field was stabilized at 0.05 ppm/3 h for magnetic field fluctuations of around 10 ppm. This method is especially effective for a magnet with large magnetic field fluctuations. The magnetic field of the compensation coil is relatively inhomogeneous in these cases and the inhomogeneity of the compensation coil can be taken into account.

  4. Femtosecond harmonic mode-locking of a fiber laser at 3.27 GHz using a bulk-like, MoSe2-based saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Koo, Joonhoi; Park, June; Lee, Junsu; Jhon, Young Min; Lee, Ju Han

    2016-05-16

    We experimentally demonstrate the use of a bulk-like, MoSe2-based saturable absorber (SA) as a passive harmonic mode-locker for the production of femtosecond pulses from a fiber laser at a repetition rate of 3.27 GHz. By incorporating a bulk-like, MoSe2/PVA-composite-deposited side-polished fiber as an SA within an erbium-doped-fiber-ring cavity, mode-locked pulses with a temporal width of 737 fs to 798 fs can be readily obtained at various harmonic frequencies. The fundamental resonance frequency and the maximum harmonic-resonance frequency are 15.38 MHz and 3.27 GHz (212th harmonic), respectively. The temporal and spectral characteristics of the output pulses are systematically investigated as a function of the pump power. The output pulses exhibited Gaussian-temporal shapes irrespective of the harmonic order, and even when their spectra possessed hyperbolic-secant shapes. The saturable absorption and harmonic-mode-locking performance of our prepared SA are compared with those of previously demonstrated SAs that are based on other transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). To the best of the authors' knowledge, the repetition rate of 3.27 GHz is the highest frequency that has ever been demonstrated regarding the production of femtosecond pulses from a fiber laser that is based on SA-induced passive harmonic mode-locking.

  5. Integrated optical phase locked loop.

    SciTech Connect

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Kim, Jungwon; Trotter, Douglas Chandler; DeRose, Christopher T.; Kartner, Franz X.; Byun, Hyunil; Nejadmalayeri, Amir H.; Watts, Michael R.; Zortman, William A.

    2010-12-01

    A silicon photonics based integrated optical phase locked loop is utilized to synchronize a 10.2 GHz voltage controlled oscillator with a 509 MHz mode locked laser, achieving 32 fs integrated jitter over 300 kHz bandwidth.

  6. Dual-wavelength passive and hybrid mode-locking of 3, 4.5 and 10 GHz InAs/InP(100) quantum dot lasers.

    PubMed

    Tahvili, M S; Du, L; Heck, M J R; Nötzel, R; Smit, M K; Bente, E A J M

    2012-03-26

    We present an investigation of passive and hybrid mode-locking in Fabry-Pérot type two-section InAs/InP(100) quantum dot lasers that show dual wavelength operation. Over the whole current and voltage range for mode-locking of these lasers, the optical output spectra show two distinct lobes. The two lobes provide a coherent bandwidth and are verified to lead to two synchronized optical pulses. The generated optical pulses are elongated in time due to a chirp which shows opposite signs over the two spectral lobes. Self-induced mode-locking in the single-section laser shows that the dual-wavelength spectra correspond to emission from ground state. In the hybrid mode-locking regime, a map of locking range is presented by measuring the values of timing jitter for several values of power and frequency of the external electrical modulating signal. An overview of the systematic behavior of InAs/InP(100) quantum dot mode-locked lasers is presented as conclusion.

  7. Compact 0.3-to-1.125 GHz self-biased phase-locked loop for system-on-chip clock generation in 0.18 µm CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao; Liu, Liyuan; Feng, Peng; Liu, Jian; Wu, Nanjian

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a compact ring-oscillator-based self-biased phase-locked loop (SBPLL) for system-on-chip (SoC) clock generation. It adopts the proposed triple-well NMOS source degeneration voltage-to-current (V-I) converter instead of the operational amplifier (OPAMP) based V-I converter and a proposed simple start-up circuit with a negligible area to save power and area. The SBPLL is implemented in the 0.18 µm CMOS process, and it occupies 0.048 mm2 active core. The measurement results show the SBPLL can generate output frequency in a wide range from 300 MHz to 1.125 GHz with a constant loop bandwidth that is around 5 MHz and a relatively low jitter performance that is less than 4.9 mUI over the entire covered frequency range. From -20 to 70 °C the rms jitter variation and loop bandwidth variation at 1.125 GHz are 0.2 ps and 350 kHz, respectively. The rms jitter performance variation of all covered frequency points is less than 10% in the supply range from 1.5 to 1.7 V. Such SBPLL shows robustness over environmental variation. The maximum power consumption is 5.6 mW with 1.6 V supply at an output frequency of 1.125 GHz.

  8. Exploring transverse pattern formation in a dual-polarization self-mode-locked monolithic Yb: KGW laser and generating a 25-GHz sub-picosecond vortex beam via gain competition.

    PubMed

    Chang, M T; Liang, H C; Su, K W; Chen, Y F

    2016-04-18

    Formation of transverse modes in a dual-polarization self-mode-locked monolithic Yb: KGW laser under high-power pumping is thoroughly explored. It is experimentally observed that the polarization-resolved transverse patterns are considerably affected by the pump location in the transverse plane of the gain medium. In contrast, the longitudinal self-mode-locking is nearly undisturbed by the pump position, even under the high-power pumping. Under central pumping, a vortex beam of the Laguerre-Gaussian LGp,l mode with p = 1 and l = 1 can be efficiently generated through the process of the gain competition with a sub-picosecond pulse train at 25.3 GHz and the output power can be up to 1.45 W at a pump power of 10.0 W. Under off-center pumping, the symmetry breaking causes the transverse patterns to be dominated by the high-order Hermite-Gaussian modes. Numerical analyses are further performed to manifest the symmetry breaking induced by the off-center pumping.

  9. Widely tunable 11 GHz femtosecond fiber laser based on a nonmode-locked source [Widely tunable 11 GHz femtosecond fiber laser based on a non-modelocked source

    DOE PAGES

    Prantil, Matthew A.; Cormier, Eric; Dawson, Jay W.; ...

    2013-08-19

    An 11 GHz fiber laser built on a modulated CW platform is described and characterized. This compact, vibrationinsensitive, fiber based system can be operated at wavelengths compatible with high energy fiber technology, is driven by an RF signal directly, and is tunable over a wide range of drive frequencies. The demonstration system when operated at 1040 nm is capable of 50 ns bursts of 575 micro-pulses produced at a macro-pulse rate of 83 kHz where the macro-pulse and micro-pulse energies are 1.8 μJ and 3.2 nJ respectively. Micro-pulse durations of 850 fs are demonstrated. Finally, we discuss extensions to shortermore » duration.« less

  10. Widely tunable 11 GHz femtosecond fiber laser based on a nonmode-locked source [Widely tunable 11 GHz femtosecond fiber laser based on a non-modelocked source

    SciTech Connect

    Prantil, Matthew A.; Cormier, Eric; Dawson, Jay W.; Gibson, David J.; Messerly, Michael J.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2013-08-19

    An 11 GHz fiber laser built on a modulated CW platform is described and characterized. This compact, vibrationinsensitive, fiber based system can be operated at wavelengths compatible with high energy fiber technology, is driven by an RF signal directly, and is tunable over a wide range of drive frequencies. The demonstration system when operated at 1040 nm is capable of 50 ns bursts of 575 micro-pulses produced at a macro-pulse rate of 83 kHz where the macro-pulse and micro-pulse energies are 1.8 μJ and 3.2 nJ respectively. Micro-pulse durations of 850 fs are demonstrated. Finally, we discuss extensions to shorter duration.

  11. Locking mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Gary L.; Goin, Jr., Jesse L.; Kirby, Patrick G.; McKenna, John P.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a motorized linkage for operating a door strike. A six volt power source, controlled by a security code, rotates a small electric motor when a proper security code is given. The motor rotates a shaft which engages a coil spring. This moves a locking cam. When a catch on the locking cam separates from the locking lever catch, the latch bolt keeper may be manipulated by a user.

  12. A racetrack mode-locked silicon evanescent laser.

    PubMed

    Fang, Alexander W; Koch, Brian R; Gan, Kian-Giap; Park, Hyundai; Jones, Richard; Cohen, Oded; Paniccia, Mario J; Blumenthal, Daniel J; Bowers, John E

    2008-01-21

    By utilizing a racetrack resonator topography, an on-chip mode locked silicon evanescent laser (ML-SEL) is realized that is independent of facet polishing. This enables integration with other devices on silicon and precise control of the ML-SEL's repetition rate through lithographic definition of the cavity length. Both passive and hybrid mode-locking have been achieved with transform limited, 7 ps pulses emitted at a repetition rate of 30 GHz. Jitter and locking range are measured under hybrid mode locking with a minimum absolute jitter and maximum locking range of 364 fs, and 50 MHz, respectively.

  13. The 30 GHz communications satellite low noise receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffek, L. J.; Smith, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    A Ka-band low noise front end in proof of concept (POC) model form for ultimate spaceborne communications receiver deployment was developed. The low noise receiver consists of a 27.5 to 30.0 GHz image enhanced mixer integrated with a 3.7 to 6.2 GHz FET low noise IF amplifier and driven by a self contained 23.8 GHz phase locked local oscillator source. The measured level of receiver performance over the 27.3 to 30.0 GHz RF/3.7 to 6.2 GHz IF band includes 5.5 to 6.5 dB (typ) SSB noise figure, 20.5 + or - 1.5 dB conversion gain and +23 dBm minimum third order two tone intermodulation output intercept point.

  14. The 30 GHz communications satellite low noise receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffek, L. J.; Smith, D. W.

    1983-10-01

    A Ka-band low noise front end in proof of concept (POC) model form for ultimate spaceborne communications receiver deployment was developed. The low noise receiver consists of a 27.5 to 30.0 GHz image enhanced mixer integrated with a 3.7 to 6.2 GHz FET low noise IF amplifier and driven by a self contained 23.8 GHz phase locked local oscillator source. The measured level of receiver performance over the 27.3 to 30.0 GHz RF/3.7 to 6.2 GHz IF band includes 5.5 to 6.5 dB (typ) SSB noise figure, 20.5 + or - 1.5 dB conversion gain and +23 dBm minimum third order two tone intermodulation output intercept point.

  15. A multi-band fast-locking delay-locked loop with jitter-bounded feature.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chien-Hung; Lai, Hung-Jing; Lin, Meng-Feng

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a fast-locking delay-locked loop (DLL) with jitter-bounded feature is presented. In the proposed fast-locking mechanism, a frequency estimator and a programmable voltage circuit are developed to rapidly switch the control node of voltage-controlled delay line to a voltage level near the final required value. After that, the DLL output will be quickly locked by the following charge pumping on the loop filter. In the jitter-bounded approach, two phase-frequency detectors and a tunable delay are employed to hold the output clock jitter between two reference inputs after the DLL is locked. Furthermore, to enhance the flexibility of the presented DLL, a frequency multiplier with fewer active devices is also developed to provide high-frequency clock output for wideband applications. The presented DLL is implemented in a 0.18-μm 1P6M CMOS technology. The active area without contact pads is 0.34 × 0.41 mm(2). A minimum lock time of six clock cycles is measured from no reference input to locked state. The output frequency ranges of the DLL and the frequency multiplier can be measured from 200 to 400 MHz and from 1 to 2 GHz, respectively. The power dissipation of the presented DLL is 31.5 mW at a 1.8 V supply voltage.

  16. 26. Central compression lock, north span facing north. Compression lock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Central compression lock, north span facing north. Compression lock locks two spans together at highest point. There are three compression locks. - Henry Ford Bridge, Spanning Cerritos Channel, Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 56. LOCK AND DAM NO. 26 (REPLACEMENT). AUXILIARY LOCK AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. LOCK AND DAM NO. 26 (REPLACEMENT). AUXILIARY LOCK AND REMAINDER OF DAM -- CONCRETE MONOLITH PLAN AND WALL ELEVATIONS (WITH LOCK APPURTENANCES). Drawing V-601 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26R, Alton, Madison County, IL

  18. 12. LOCK GATES AT THE SWAMP LOCKS, SEPARATING THE UPPER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. LOCK GATES AT THE SWAMP LOCKS, SEPARATING THE UPPER AND LOWER LOCK CHAMBERS, SHOWING PADDLE VALVES, LOOKING WEST: 1976 - Pawtucket Canal, Swamp Locks, Pawtucket & Merrimack Canals, Lowell, Middlesex County, MA

  19. Self-mode-locked quantum-dot vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser.

    PubMed

    Gaafar, Mahmoud; Nakdali, Dalia Al; Möller, Christoph; Fedorova, Ksenia A; Wichmann, Matthias; Shakfa, Mohammad Khaled; Zhang, Fan; Rahimi-Iman, Arash; Rafailov, Edik U; Koch, Martin

    2014-08-01

    We present the first self-mode-locked optically pumped quantum-dot semiconductor disk laser. Our mode-locked device emits sub-picosecond pulses at a wavelength of 1040 nm and features a record peak power of 460 W at a repetition rate of 1.5 GHz. In this work, we also investigate the temperature dependence of the pulse duration as well as the time-bandwidth product for stable mode locking.

  20. Generation of low-timing-jitter femtosecond pulse trains with 2 GHz repetition rate via external repetition rate multiplication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Sickler, Jason W; Fendel, Peter; Ippen, Erich P; Kärtner, Franz X; Wilken, Tobias; Holzwarth, Ronald; Hänsch, Theodor W

    2008-05-01

    Generation of low-timing-jitter 150 fs pulse trains at 1560 nm with 2 GHz repetition rate is demonstrated by locking a 200 MHz fundamental polarization additive-pulse mode-locked erbium fiber laser to high-finesse external Fabry-Perot cavities. The timing jitter and relative intensity noise of the repetition-rate multiplied pulse train are investigated.

  1. Fast flux locked loop

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-09-10

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  2. Overview of locking systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, K.T.; Scott, S.H.; Wilde, M.G.; Highland, S.E.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this document is to present technical information that should be useful for understanding and applying locking systems for physical protection and control. There are major sections on hardware for locks, vaults, safes, and security containers. Other topics include management of lock systems and safety considerations. This document also contains notes on standards and specifications and a glossary.

  3. Lock For Valve Stem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.; Guirguis, Kamal S.

    1991-01-01

    Simple, cheap device locks valve stem so its setting cannot be changed by unauthorized people. Device covers valve stem; cover locked in place with standard padlock. Valve lock made of PVC pipe and packing band. Shears, drill or punch, and forming rod only tools needed.

  4. Graphene based GHz detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Anthony K.; El Fatimy, Abdel; Barbara, Paola; Nath, Anindya; Campbell, Paul M.; Myers-Ward, Rachael; Daniels, Kevin; Gaskill, D. Kurt

    Graphene demonstrates great promise as a detector over a wide spectral range especially in the GHz range. This is because absorption is enhanced due to the Drude contribution. In the GHz range there are viable detection mechanisms for graphene devices. With this in mind, two types of GHz detectors are fabricated on epitaxial graphene using a lift off resist-based clean lithography process to produce low contact resistance. Both device types use asymmetry for detection, consistent with recent thoughts of the photothermoelectric effect (PTE) mechanism. The first is an antenna coupled device. It utilizes two dissimilar contact metals and the work function difference produces the asymmetry. The other device is a field effect transistor constructed with an asymmetric top gate that creates a PN junction and facilitates tuning the photovoltaic response. The response of both device types, tested from 100GHz to 170GHz, are reported. This work was sponsored by the U.S. Office of Naval Research (Award Number N000141310865).

  5. High-repetition-rate ultrashort pulsed fiber ring laser using hybrid mode locking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang; Hu, Hongyu; Li, Wenbo; Dutta, Niloy K

    2016-10-01

    We propose and demonstrate a hybrid mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser by combining the rational harmonic mode-locking technique and passive mode locking based on nonlinear polarization rotation in a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber. By carefully adjusting the modulation frequency and the polarization controllers in the cavity, a 30 GHz pulse train with improved stability and narrower pulse width is generated. The pulse width at 30 GHz using rational harmonic mode locking alone is 5.8 ps. This hybrid scheme narrows the pulse width to 1.9 ps at the repetition rate of 30 GHz. Numerical simulations are carried out that show good agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Low-power wide-locking-range injection-locked frequency divider for OFDM UWB systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiangwei, Yin; Ning, Li; Renliang, Zheng; Wei, Li; Junyan, Ren

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes a divide-by-two injection-locked frequency divider (ILFD) for frequency synthesizers as used in multiband orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) ultra-wideband (UWB) systems. By means of dual-injection technique and other conventional tuning techniques, such as DCCA and varactor tuning, the divider demonstrates a wide locking range while consuming much less power. The chip was fabricated in the Jazz 0.18 μm RF CMOS process. The measurement results show that the divider achieves a locking range of 4.85 GHz (6.23 to 11.08 GHz) at an input power of 8 dBm. The core circuit without the test buffer consumes only 3.7 mA from a 1.8 V power supply and has a die area of 0.38 × 0.28 mm2. The wide locking range combined with low power consumption makes the ILFD suitable for its application in UWB systems.

  7. 10 GHz fundamental mode fiber laser using a graphene saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Amos; Yamashita, Shinji

    2012-07-01

    All-fiber mode-locked lasers with fundamental repetition rates of several gigahertz are sought after for applications in optical communications and metrology. In this paper, we propose a fiber Fabry-Pérot laser mode-locked by a graphene-based saturable absorber that operates at a fundamental repetition rate of 9.67 GHz. We use this laser as the seed for the generation of supercontinuum with 0.08 nm mode spacing.

  8. Theoretical model for frequency locking a diode laser with a Faraday cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninger, P.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    A new method was developed for frequency locking a diode lasers, called 'the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical transmitter (FADOT) laser locking', which is much simpler than other known locking schemes. The FADOT laser locking method uses commercial laser diodes with no antireflection coatings, an atomic Faraday cell with a single polarizer, and an output coupler to form a compound cavity. The FADOT method is vibration insensitive and exhibits minimal thermal expansion effects. The system has a frequency pull in the range of 443.2 GHz (9 A). The method has potential applications in optical communication, remote sensing, and pumping laser excited optical filters.

  9. Use of an Injection Locked Magnetron to Drive a Superconducting RF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Haipeng Wang, Robert Rimmer, G. Davis, Imran Tahir, Amos Dexter, Greame Burt, Richard Carter

    2010-05-01

    The use of an injection locked CW magnetron to drive a 2.45 GHz superconducting RF cavity has been successfully demonstrated. With a locking power less than -27 dB with respect to the output and with a phase control system acting on the locking signal, cavity phase was accurately controlled for hours at a time without loss of lock whilst suppressing microphonics. The phase control accuracy achieved was 0.8 deg. r.m.s. The main contributing disturbance limiting ultimate phase control was power supply ripple from the low specification switch mode power supply used for the experiment.

  10. Locked-in syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cardwell, Michael S

    2013-02-01

    Locked-in syndrome is a rare neuropsychological disorder. Its primary features are quadriplegia and paralysis of the cranial nerves except for those responsible for vertical eye movements. The differential diagnosis includes persistent vegetative state, brain death, minimally conscious states, C3 transection of the spinal cord, and conversion locked-in syndrome. Etiologies of locked-in syndrome include hemorrhagic and thrombotic events, tumors affecting the ventral pons, infectious agents, iatrogenic causes, trauma, metabolic abnormalities, and other miscellaneous causes. The clinical manifestations, differential diagnosis, neuropsychological assessment, rehabilitation, and prognosis of patients with locked-in syndrome are discussed.

  11. Electronic locking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwkoop, E.

    An electronic locking system was developed to remove the disadvantages of conventional mechanical door locks. The electrolock has to replace existing locks. Therefore, the techniques of Surface Mount Technology and Application Specific Integrated Circuit were applied to overcome the space limitations. The key consists of a metal rod with grip equipped with a contactless chip. When the key is inserted in the lock, a magnetic field is generated in the cylinder which induces a voltage in the chip. Therefore a battery is not required. The chip then emits inductively a code which is unique for each key. The electrolock was successfully tested.

  12. West Branch Pennsylvania Canal, Lock No. 34 Lock Keeper's House, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West Branch Pennsylvania Canal, Lock No. 34 Lock Keeper's House, South of State Route 664 along North bank of West Branch of Susquehanna River, 2,000 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA

  13. Lock 1 View north of wall west of lock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 1 - View north of wall west of lock 1. Note the wood pile and plank foundation (believed to be similar under lock 1 walls) - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  14. Reconfigurable quantum dot monolithic multisection passive mode-locked lasers.

    PubMed

    Xin, Y C; Li, Y; Kovanis, Vassilios; Gray, A L; Zhang, L; Lester, L F

    2007-06-11

    We investigate the dynamical response of a quantum dot photonic integrated circuit formed with a combination of eleven passive and active gain cells operating when these cells are appropriately biased as a multi-section quantum dot passively mode-locked laser. When the absorber section is judiciously positioned in the laser cavity then fundamental frequency and harmonic mode-locking at repetition rates from 7.2GHz to 51GHz are recorded. These carefully engineered multi-section configurations that include a passive wave-guide section significantly lower the pulse width up to 34% from 9.7 to 6.4 picoseconds, as well increase by 49% the peak pulsed power from 150 to 224 mW, in comparison to conventional two-section configurations that are formed on the identical device under the same average power. In addition an ultra broad operation range with pulse width below ten picoseconds is obtained with the 3rd-harmonic mode-locking configuration. A record peak power of 234 mW for quantum dot mode-locked lasers operating over 40 GHz is reported for the first time.

  15. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, Joseph E.; Sanderson, Stephen N.

    1984-01-01

    A valve stem and lock include a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  16. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, J.E.; Sanderson, S.N.

    1981-10-27

    A valve stem and lock is disclosed which includes a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  17. Locke on measurement.

    PubMed

    Anstey, Peter R

    2016-12-01

    Like many virtuosi in his day, the English philosopher John Locke maintained an active interest in metrology. Yet for Locke, this was no mere hobby: questions concerning measurement were also implicated in his ongoing philosophical project to develop an account of human understanding. This paper follows Locke's treatment of four problems of measurement from the early Drafts A and B of the Essay concerning Human Understanding to the publication of this famous book and its aftermath. It traces Locke's attempt to develop a natural or universal standard for the measure of length, his attempts to grapple with the measurement of duration, as well as the problems of determining comparative measures for secondary qualities, and the problem of discriminating small differences in the conventional measures of his day. It is argued that the salient context for Locke's treatment of these problems is the new experimental philosophy and its method of experimental natural history.

  18. Dynamics of solid-state lasers pumped by mode-locked lasers.

    PubMed

    Wellmann, Barbara; Spence, David J; Coutts, David W

    2015-02-23

    We analyze the dynamics of mode-locked pumped solid-state lasers focusing on the transition between mode-locked and CW behavior. Where the ratio of the pump and laser cavity lengths is a rational number, 'rational-harmonic mode-locking' is obtained. When the cavity length is detuned away from such resonances, modulated continuous output is generated. The transition from mode-locked to modulated CW operation is explored experimentally for a Ce:LiCAF laser operating at 290 nm and pumped by a 78.75 MHz mode-locked frequency quadrupled Nd:YVO(4) laser. Both CW output and mode-locked output with pulse repetition rates up to 1.1 GHz were achieved. A rate equation model is developed to predict optimum cavity lengths for achieving CW output with minimized modulation.

  19. Phillips SA8016BW 2.5 GHz Synthesizer SEE Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carts, Marty; Ladbury, Ray; Marshall, Paul W.; Mackey, Susan

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Single Event Effects (SEE) testing of the Phillips SA8016BW 2.5 GHz Synthesizer that was chose by the GLAST Program for Frequency Generation. Included in this are diagrams of the phased-locked loop (PLL), the synthesizer, and heater.

  20. All-optical signal processing at 10 GHz using a photonic crystal molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Junay, Alexandra; De Rossi, Alfredo; Malaguti, Stefania; Bellanca, Gaetano; Trillo, Stefano; Ménager, Loic; Peter Reithmaier, Johann

    2013-11-04

    We report on 10 GHz operation of an all-optical gate based on an Indium Phosphide Photonic Crystal Molecule. Wavelength conversion and all-optical mixing of microwave signals are demonstrated using the 2 mW output of a mode locked diode laser. The spectral separation of the optical pump and signal is crucial in suppressing optical cross-talk.

  1. Electronic door locking mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Gary Lin; Kirby, Patrick Gerald

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a motorized linkage for engaging a thumb piece in a door mechanism. The device has an exterior lock assembly with a small battery cell and combination lock. Proper entry by a user of a security code allows the battery to operate a small motor within the exterior lock assembly. The small motor manipulates a cam-plunger which moves an actuator pin into a thumb piece. The user applies a force on to the thumb piece. This force is transmitted by the thumb piece to a latch engagement mechanism by the actuator pin. The latch engagement mechanism operates the door latch.

  2. Electronic door locking mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Williams, G.L.; Kirby, P.G.

    1997-10-21

    The invention is a motorized linkage for engaging a thumb piece in a door mechanism. The device has an exterior lock assembly with a small battery cell and combination lock. Proper entry by a user of a security code allows the battery to operate a small motor within the exterior lock assembly. The small motor manipulates a cam-plunger which moves an actuator pin into a thumb piece. The user applies a force on to the thumb piece. This force is transmitted by the thumb piece to a latch engagement mechanism by the actuator pin. The latch engagement mechanism operates the door latch. 6 figs.

  3. Coal feed lock

    DOEpatents

    Pinkel, I. Irving

    1978-01-01

    A coal feed lock is provided for dispensing coal to a high pressure gas producer with nominal loss of high pressure gas. The coal feed lock comprises a rotor member with a diametral bore therethrough. A hydraulically activated piston is slidably mounted in the bore. With the feed lock in a charging position, coal is delivered to the bore and then the rotor member is rotated to a discharging position so as to communicate with the gas producer. The piston pushes the coal into the gas producer. The rotor member is then rotated to the charging position to receive the next load of coal.

  4. Adjustable high-repetition-rate pulse trains in a passively-mode-locked fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si Fodil, Rachid; Amrani, Foued; Yang, Changxi; Kellou, Abdelhamid; Grelu, Ph.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally investigate multipulse regimes obtained within a passively-mode-locked fiber laser that includes a Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometer. By adjusting the time delay imbalance of the MZ, ultrashort pulse trains at multi-GHz repetition rates are generated. We compare the observed dynamics with high-harmonic mode locking, and show that the multi-GHz pulse trains display an inherent instability, which has been overlooked. By using a recirculation loop containing the MZ, we demonstrate a significant improvement of the pulse train stability.

  5. Double resonance modulation characteristics of optically injection-locked Fabry–Perot lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dorogush, E S; Afonenko, A A

    2015-12-31

    The distributed resonator model is used to show the presence of several resonance responses on the modulation characteristic of optically injection-locked Fabry–Perot lasers. The positions of the resonance peaks on the modulation characteristic are determined by the resonator length and frequency detuning of optical injection. It is shown that an appropriate choice of the resonator length and injection locking conditions allows one to obtain efficient modulation in two ranges near 40 – 60 GHz or to increase the direct modulation bandwidth up to 50 GHz. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  6. An SIS Waveguide heterodyne Reciever for 600 GHz - 635 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salez, Morvan; Febvre, Pascal; McGrath, William R.; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry G.

    1994-01-01

    A waveguide SIS heterodyne receiver using a Nb/A10xNb junction has been built for astronomical observations of molecular tranitions in the frequency range 600GHz - 635GHZ, and has been successfully used at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO).

  7. 180-GHz Interferometric Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Lim, Boon H.; O'Dwyer, Ian J.; Soria, Mary M.; Owen, Heather R.; Gaier, Todd C.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn, H.; Tanner, Alan B.; Ruf, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A 180-GHz interferometric imager uses compact receiver modules, combined high- and low-gain antennas, and ASIC (application specific integrated circuit) correlator technology, enabling continuous, all-weather observations of water vapor with 25-km resolution and 0.3-K noise in 15 minutes of observation for numerical weather forecasting and tropical storm prediction. The GeoSTAR-II prototype instrument is broken down into four major subsystems: the compact, low-noise receivers; sub-array modules; IF signal distribution; and the digitizer/correlator. Instead of the single row of antennas adopted in GeoSTAR, this version has four rows of antennas on a coarser grid. This dramatically improves the sensitivity in the desired field of view. The GeoSTAR-II instrument is a 48-element, synthetic, thinned aperture radiometer operating at 165-183 GHz. The instrument has compact receivers integrated into tiles of 16 elements in a 4x4 arrangement. These tiles become the building block of larger arrays. The tiles contain signal distribution for bias controls, IF signal, and local oscillator signals. The IF signals are digitized and correlated using an ASIC correlator to minimize power consumption. Previous synthetic aperture imagers have used comparatively large multichip modules, whereas this approach uses chip-scale modules mounted on circuit boards, which are in turn mounted on the distribution manifolds. This minimizes the number of connectors and reduces system mass. The use of ASIC technology in the digitizers and correlators leads to a power reduction close to an order of magnitude.

  8. Locked-In Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the body except for those that control eye movement. It may result from traumatic brain injury, diseases ... and paralyzed. Communication may be possible with blinking eye movements × Definition Locked-in syndrome is a rare neurological ...

  9. Experimental quantum data locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Zhu; Wu, Cheng; Fukuda, Daiji; You, Lixing; Zhong, Jiaqiang; Numata, Takayuki; Chen, Sijing; Zhang, Weijun; Shi, Sheng-Cai; Lu, Chao-Yang; Wang, Zhen; Ma, Xiongfeng; Fan, Jingyun; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-08-01

    Classical correlation can be locked via quantum means: quantum data locking. With a short secret key, one can lock an exponentially large amount of information in order to make it inaccessible to unauthorized users without the key. Quantum data locking presents a resource-efficient alternative to one-time pad encryption which requires a key no shorter than the message. We report experimental demonstrations of a quantum data locking scheme originally proposed by D. P. DiVincenzo et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 067902 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.92.067902] and a loss-tolerant scheme developed by O. Fawzi et al. [J. ACM 60, 44 (2013), 10.1145/2518131]. We observe that the unlocked amount of information is larger than the key size in both experiments, exhibiting strong violation of the incremental proportionality property of classical information theory. As an application example, we show the successful transmission of a photo over a lossy channel with quantum data (un)locking and error correction.

  10. Locke and botany.

    PubMed

    Anstey, Peter R; Harris, Stephen A

    2006-06-01

    This paper argues that the English philosopher John Locke, who has normally been thought to have had only an amateurish interest in botany, was far more involved in the botanical science of his day than has previously been known. Through the presentation of new evidence deriving from Locke's own herbarium, his manuscript notes, journal and correspondence, it is established that Locke made a modest contribution to early modern botany. It is shown that Locke had close and ongoing relations with the Bobarts, keepers of the Oxford Botanic Garden, and that Locke distributed seeds and plant parts to other botanists, seeds of which the progeny almost certainly ended up in the most important herbaria of the period. Furthermore, it is claimed that the depth of Locke's interest in and practice of botany has a direct bearing on our understanding of his views on the correct method of natural philosophy and on the interpretation of his well known discussion of the nature of species in Book III of his Essay concerning human understanding.

  11. Self-mode-locked single-section Fabry-Perot semiconductor lasers at 1.56 microm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiguo; Sauer, Nicholas J; Bernasconi, Pietro G; Zhang, Liming

    2007-01-01

    The mode-locking mechanism of a single-section multi-spatial-mode Fabry-Perot semiconductor laser is analyzed by the additive pulse mode-locking (APM) master equation model. Critical parameters of the equivalent saturable absorber as well as the self-phase modulation are estimated. The mode-locking operation regime in terms of pulse chirp and output power is predicted by the APM model and the prediction is shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results of a 40 GHz, 6.7 ps pulse width mode-locked operation at 1.56 microm.

  12. Pressure locking test results

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  13. Precision and Fast Wavelength Tuning of a Dynamically Phase-Locked Widely-Tunable Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Chen, Jeffrey R.; Wu, Stewart T.

    2012-01-01

    We report a precision and fast wavelength tuning technique demonstrated for a digital-supermode distributed Bragg reflector laser. The laser was dynamically offset-locked to a frequency-stabilized master laser using an optical phase-locked loop, enabling precision fast tuning to and from any frequencies within a 40-GHz tuning range. The offset frequency noise was suppressed to the statically offset-locked level in less than 40 s upon each frequency switch, allowing the laser to retain the absolute frequency stability of the master laser. This technique satisfies stringent requirements for gas sensing lidars and enables other applications that require such well-controlled precision fast tuning.

  14. Lock and key colloids.

    PubMed

    Sacanna, S; Irvine, W T M; Chaikin, P M; Pine, D J

    2010-03-25

    New functional materials can in principle be created using colloids that self-assemble into a desired structure by means of a programmable recognition and binding scheme. This idea has been explored by attaching 'programmed' DNA strands to nanometre- and micrometre- sized particles and then using DNA hybridization to direct the placement of the particles in the final assembly. Here we demonstrate an alternative recognition mechanism for directing the assembly of composite structures, based on particles with complementary shapes. Our system, which uses Fischer's lock-and-key principle, employs colloidal spheres as keys and monodisperse colloidal particles with a spherical cavity as locks that bind spontaneously and reversibly via the depletion interaction. The lock-and-key binding is specific because it is controlled by how closely the size of a spherical colloidal key particle matches the radius of the spherical cavity of the lock particle. The strength of the binding can be further tuned by adjusting the solution composition or temperature. The composite assemblies have the unique feature of having flexible bonds, allowing us to produce flexible dimeric, trimeric and tetrameric colloidal molecules as well as more complex colloidal polymers. We expect that this lock-and-key recognition mechanism will find wider use as a means of programming and directing colloidal self-assembly.

  15. Lock 4 View east of lock wall and adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 4 - View east of lock wall and adjacent roadway built atop tow path. The gate pocket can be seen at center. - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  16. Lock 6 (Ogeechee River Lock), Plan, Elevation of North Wall, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 6 (Ogeechee River Lock), Plan, Elevation of North Wall, Cap Stone for Gate Hinge, Brick Patterns - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  17. Lock 1 View northwest of lock entrance. Notch for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 1 - View northwest of lock entrance. Notch for flash boards can be seen near center, gate pocket at left. - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  18. Lock 1 (Savannah River Lock), Elevation of North Wall, Detail ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 1 (Savannah River Lock), Elevation of North Wall, Detail of Wall Foundation, Detail of Gate Pocket - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  19. 30 GHz Commercial Satellite Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Ponchak, George E.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    NASA's research and development work in satellite communications for the past 10 years has included a major technology thrust aimed at opening the Ka frequency band to commercial exploitation. This has included the development and testing of advanced system network architectures, on-board switching and processing, multibeam and phased array antennas, and satellite and ground terminal RF and digital hardware. Development work in system hardware has focused on critical components including power amplifiers, satellite IF switch matrices, low noise receivers, baseband processors, and high data rate bandwidth efficient modems. This paper describes NASA's work in developing and testing 30 GHz low noise satellite receivers for commercial space communications uplink applications. Frequencies allotted for fixed service commercial satellite communications in the Ka band are 27.5 - 30.0 GHz for uplink transmission and 17.7 - 20.2 GHz for downlink transmission. The relatively large 2.5 GHz bandwidth lends itself to wideband, high data rate digital transmission applications.

  20. A 311-GHz Fundamental Oscillator Using InP HBT Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd; Fung, King Man; Samoska, Lorene; Radisic, Vesna; Sawdai, Donald; Scott, Dennis; Deal, W.R.

    2010-01-01

    This oscillator uses a single-emitter 0.3- m InP heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) device with maximum frequency of oscillation (fmax) greater than 500 GHz. Due to high conductor and substrate losses at submillimeterwave frequencies, a primary challenge is to efficiently use the intrinsic device gain. This was done by using a suitable transmission-line media and circuit topology. The passive components of the oscillator are realized in a twometal process with benzocyclobutene (BCB) used as the primary transmission line dielectric. The circuit was designed using microstrip transmission lines. The oscillator is implemented in a common-base topology due to its inherent instability, and the design includes an on-chip resonator, outputmatching circuitry, and an injection-locking port, the port being used to demonstrate the injection-locking prin ciple. A free-running frequency of 311.6 GHz has been measured by down-converting the signal. Ad di tionally, injection locking has been successfully demonstrated with up to 17.8 dB of injection-locking gain. The injection-locking reference signal is generated using a 2 20 GHz frequency synthesizer, followed by a doubler, active tripler, a W-band amplifier, and then a passive tripler. Therefore, the source frequency is multiplied 18 times to obtain a signal above 300 GHz that can be used to injection lock the oscillator. Measurement shows that injection locking has improved the phase noise of the oscillator and can be also used for synchronizing a series of oscillators. A signal conductor is implemented near the BCP -InP interface and the topside of the BCB layer is fully metallized as a signal ground. Because the fields are primarily constrained in the lower permittivity BCB region, this type of transmission line is referred to as an inverted microstrip. In addition, both common-emitter and commonbase circuits were investigated to determine optimum topology for oscillator design. The common -base topology required smaller

  1. Monolithically integrated heterodyne optical phase-lock loop with RF XOR phase detector.

    PubMed

    Steed, Robert J; Pozzi, Francesca; Fice, Martyn J; Renaud, Cyril C; Rogers, David C; Lealman, Ian F; Moodie, David G; Cannard, Paul J; Lynch, Colm; Johnston, Lilianne; Robertson, Michael J; Cronin, Richard; Pavlovic, Leon; Naglic, Luka; Vidmar, Matjaz; Seeds, Alwyn J

    2011-10-10

    We present results for an heterodyne optical phase-lock loop (OPLL), monolithically integrated on InP with external phase detector and loop filter, which phase locks the integrated laser to an external source, for offset frequencies tuneable between 0.6 GHz and 6.1 GHz. The integrated semiconductor laser emits at 1553 nm with 1.1 MHz linewidth, while the external laser has a linewidth less than 150 kHz. To achieve high quality phase locking with lasers of these linewidths, the loop delay has been made less than 1.8 ns. Monolithic integration reduces the optical path delay between the laser and photodiode to less than 20 ps. The electronic part of the OPLL was implemented using a custom-designed feedback circuit with a propagation delay of ~1 ns and an open-loop bandwidth greater than 1 GHz. The heterodyne signal between the locked slave laser and master laser has phase noise below -90 dBc/Hz for frequency offsets greater than 20 kHz and a phase error variance in 10 GHz bandwidth of 0.04 rad2.

  2. Phase-noise characteristics of a 25-GHz-spaced optical frequency comb based on a phase- and intensity-modulated laser.

    PubMed

    Ishizawa, Atsushi; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Mizutori, Akira; Takara, Hidehiko; Takada, Atsushi; Sogawa, Tetsuomi; Koga, Masafumi

    2013-12-02

    We investigated phase-noise characteristics of both a phase/intensity-modulated laser with 25-GHz mode spacing and a mode-locked fiber laser with carrier-envelope-offset (CEO) locking. As the separation from the frequency of the continuous wave (CW) laser diode (LD) for a seed light source increases, the integrated phase noise of each comb mode of both the phase/intensity-modulated laser and supercontinuum light originating from it increases with the same slope as a function of mode number. The dependence of the integrated phase noise on mode number with the phase/intensity-modulated laser is much larger than with the mode-locked fiber laser of the CEO locking. However, the phase noise of the phase/intensity-modulated laser is extremely lower than that of the mode-locked fiber laser with CEO locking in the frequency region around the CW LD. The phase noise of the phase/intensity-modulated laser with 25-GHz mode spacing and that of the mode-locked fiber laser with the CEO locking could be estimated and were found to be almost the same at the wavelengths required in an f-to-2f self-referencing interferometer. Our experimental results indicate the possibility of achieving an offset-frequency-locked frequency comb with the phase/intensity-modulated laser.

  3. Lock for Gantry Trolley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newberg, H. F.

    1982-01-01

    Single operator on ground controls trolley-locking mechanism on portable gantry. Mechanism prevents trolley and load from moving along track when gantry is wheeled from one location to another. A downward pull on chain withdraws brakeshoes from trolley wheels. When operator releases chain, brakeshoes reengage to wheels.

  4. Positioning and locking apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hayward, M.L.; Harper, W.H.

    1987-06-30

    A positioning and locking apparatus are disclosed including a fixture having a rotatable torque ring provided with a plurality of cam segments for automatically guiding a container into a desired location within the fixture. Rotation of the ring turns the container into a final position in pressure sealing relation against a hatch member. 6 figs.

  5. Positioning and locking apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hayward, Milton L.; Harper, William H.

    1987-01-01

    A positioning and locking apparatus including a fixture having a rotatable torque ring provided with a plurality of cam segments for automatically guiding a container into a desired location within the fixture. Rotation of the ring turns the container into a final position in pressure sealing relation against a hatch member.

  6. Positioning and locking apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hayward, M.L.; Harper, W.H.

    1985-06-19

    A positioning and locking apparatus including a fixture having a rotatable torque ring provided with a plurality of cam segments for automatically guiding a container into a desired location within the fixture. Rotation of the ring turns the container into a final position in pressure sealing relation against a hatch member.

  7. Compression of 200 GHz DWDM channelized TDM pulsed carrier from optically modelocking WRC-FPLD fiber ring at 10 GHz.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Chan; Peng, Guo-Hsuan; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2009-03-30

    The compression of 200GHz DWDM channelized optically mode-locking WRC-FPLD fiber ring pulse of at 10 GHz is performed for high-capacity TDM application. To prevent temporal and spectral cross-talk, the duty-cycle of the DWDM channelized WRC-FPLD FL pulse needs to be shortened without broadening its linewidth. With dual-cavity configuration induced DWDM channelization, a shortest single-channel WRC-FPLD FL pulsewidth of 19 ps is generated, which can be linearly compensated to 10 ps and fifth-order soliton compressed to 1.4 ps. Under a maximum pulsewidth compression ratio up to 14 and a +/-100 m tolerance on compressing fiber length, the single-channel pulsewidth remains <2 ps (duty-cycle <2%) with spectral linewidth only broadening from 0.29 nm to 0.8 nm. In comparison, a typical SOAFL without intra-cavity TBF in fiber ring broadens its spectral linewidth from 2.4 to 3.8 nm after compressing its mode-locked pulsewidth from 21 to 2.1 ps. The duty-cycle of the DWDM channelized WRC-FPLD FL pulsed carrier is approaching 1% to satisfy at least 256 optical TDM channels.

  8. Long-term stable microwave signal extraction from mode-locked lasers.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Ludwig, F; Felber, M; Kärtner, F X

    2007-07-09

    Long-term synchronization between two 10.225 GHz microwave signals at +10 dBm power level, locked to a 44.26 MHz repetition rate passively mode-locked fiber laser, is demonstrated using balanced optical-microwave phase detectors. The out-of-loop measurement result shows 12.8 fs relative timing jitter integrated from 10 Hz to 10 MHz. Long-term timing drift measurement shows 48 fs maximum deviation over one hour, mainly limited by drift of the out-of-loop characterization setup itself. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to demonstrate long-term (>1 hour) 3 mrad-level phase stability of a 10.225 GHz microwave signal extracted from a mode-locked laser.

  9. Phase Locking of a 2.7 THz Quantum Cascade Laser to a Microwave Reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khosropanah, P.; Baryshev, A.; Zhang, W.; Jellema, W.; Hovenier, J. N.; Gao, J. R.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Paveliev, D. G.; Williams, B. S.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J. L.; Klein, B.; Hesler, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the phase locking of a 2.7 THz metal-metal waveguide quantum cascade laser (QCL) to an external microwave signal. The reference is the 15th harmonic, generated by a semiconductor superlattice nonlinear device, of a signal at 182 GHz, which itself is generated by a multiplier chain (x 12) from a microwave synthesizer at approx. 15 GHz. Both laser and reference radiations are coupled into a bolometer mixer, resulting in a beat signal, which is fed into a phase-lock loop. The spectral analysis of the beat signal confirms that the QCL is phase locked. This result opens the possibility to extend heterodyne interferometers into the far-infrared range.

  10. Frequency comb generation by CW laser injection into a quantum-dot mode-locked laser.

    PubMed

    Pinkert, T J; Salumbides, E J; Tahvili, M S; Ubachs, W; Bente, E A J M; Eikema, K S E

    2012-09-10

    We report on frequency comb generation at 1.5 μm by injection of a CW laser in a hybridly mode-locked InAs/InP two-section quantum-dot laser (HMLQDL). The generated comb has > 60 modes spaced by ∼ 4.5 GHz and a -20 dBc width of > 100 GHz (23 modes) at > 30 dB signal to background ratio. Comb generation was observed with the CW laser (red) detuned more than 20 nm outside the HMLQDL spectrum, spanning a large part of the gain spectrum of the quantum dot material. It is shown that the generated comb is fully coherent with the injected CW laser and RF frequency used to drive the hybrid mode-locking. This method of comb generation is of interest for the creation of small and robust frequency combs for use in optical frequency metrology, high-frequency (> 100 GHz) RF generation and telecommunication applications.

  11. Scheme for independently stabilizing the repetition rate and optical frequency of a laser using a regenerative mode-locking technique.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Masataka; Yoshida, Masato

    2008-05-15

    We have succeeded in achieving independent control of the repetition rate and optical frequency of a pulse laser by employing a regenerative mode-locking technique. By adopting a voltage-controlled microwave phase shifter or an optical delay line in a regenerative feedback loop we can control the repetition rate of the laser without directly disturbing the optical frequencies. We experimentally show how this independent control can be realized by employing a 40 GHz harmonically and regeneratively mode-locked fiber laser.

  12. CARM and harmonic gyro-amplifier experiments at 17 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Menninger, W.L.; Danly, B.G.; Alberti, S.; Chen, C.; Rullier, J.L.; Temkin, R.J.; Giguet, E. |

    1993-11-01

    Cyclotron resonance maser amplifiers are possible sources for applications such as electron cyclotron resonance heating of fusion plasmas and driving high-gradient rf linear accelerators. For accelerator drivers, amplifiers or phase locked-oscillators are required. A 17 GHz cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) amplifier experiment and a 17 GHz third harmonic gyro-amplifier experiment are presently underway at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center. Using the SRL/MIT SNOMAD II introduction accelerator to provide a 380 kV, 180 A, 30 ns flat top electron beam, the gyro-amplifier experiment has produced 5 MW of rf power with over 50 dB of gain at 17 GHz. The gyro-amplifier operates in the TE{sub 31} mode using a third harmonic interaction. Because of its high power output, the gyro-amplifier will be used as the rf source for a photocathode rf electron gun experiment also taking place at MIT. Preliminary gyro-amplifier results are presented, including measurement of rf power, gain versus interaction length, and the far-field pattern. A CARM experiment designed to operate in the TE{sub 11} mode is also discussed.

  13. Laser-diode pumped self-mode-locked praseodymium visible lasers with multi-gigahertz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxia; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Di Lieto, Alberto; Tonelli, Mauro; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-06-15

    We demonstrate efficient laser-diode pumped multi-gigahertz (GHz) self-mode-locked praseodymium (Pr3+) visible lasers with broadband spectra from green to deep red for the first time to our knowledge. With a Pr3+-doped GdLiF4 crystal, stable self-mode-locked visible pulsed lasers at the wavelengths of 522 nm, 607 nm, 639 nm, and 720 nm have been obtained with the repetition rates of 2.8 GHz, 3.1 GHz, 3.1 GHz, and 3.0 GHz, respectively. The maximum output power was 612 mW with the slope efficiency of 46.9% at 639 nm. The mode-locking mechanism was theoretically analyzed. The stable second-harmonic mode-locking with doubled repetition frequency was also realized based on the Fabry-Perot effect formed in the laser cavity. In addition, we find that the polarization directions were turned with lasing wavelengths. This work may provide a new way for generating efficient ultrafast pulses with high- and changeable-repetition rates in the visible range.

  14. REVIEW ARTICLE: Harmonically mode-locked semiconductor-based lasers as high repetition rate ultralow noise pulse train and optical frequency comb sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinlan, F.; Ozharar, S.; Gee, S.; Delfyett, P. J.

    2009-10-01

    Recent experimental work on semiconductor-based harmonically mode-locked lasers geared toward low noise applications is reviewed. Active, harmonic mode-locking of semiconductor-based lasers has proven to be an excellent way to generate 10 GHz repetition rate pulse trains with pulse-to-pulse timing jitter of only a few femtoseconds without requiring active feedback stabilization. This level of timing jitter is achieved in long fiberized ring cavities and relies upon such factors as low noise rf sources as mode-lockers, high optical power, intracavity dispersion management and intracavity phase modulation. When a high finesse etalon is placed within the optical cavity, semiconductor-based harmonically mode-locked lasers can be used as optical frequency comb sources with 10 GHz mode spacing. When active mode-locking is replaced with regenerative mode-locking, a completely self-contained comb source is created, referenced to the intracavity etalon.

  15. Releasable locking mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Rafiq (Inventor); Wingate, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    In the aerospace field spacecraft components are held together by separation systems until a specific time when they must be separated or deployed. Customarily a threaded joining bolt engages one of the components to be joined, and a threaded nut is placed on that bolt against the other component so they can be drawn together by a releasable locking assembly. The releasable locking assembly herein includes a plunger having one end coupled to one end of a plunger bolt. The other end is flanged to abut and compress a coil spring when the plunger is advanced toward the interface plane between the two components. When the plunger is so advanced toward the interface plane, the end of the plunger bolt can be connected to the joining bolt. Thus during retraction the joining bolt is drawn to one side of the interface plane by the force of the expanding spring.

  16. Code lock with microcircuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobka, A.; May, I.

    1985-01-01

    A code lock with a microcircuit was invented which contains only a very few components. Two DD-triggers control the state of two identical transistors. When both transistors are turned on simultaneously the transistor VS1 is turned on so that the electromagnet YA1 pulls in the bolt and the door opens. This will happen only when a logic 1 appears at the inverted output of the first trigger and at the straight output of the second one. After the door is opened, a button on it resets the contactors to return both triggers to their original state. The electromagnetic is designed to produce the necessary pull force and sufficient power when under rectified 127 V line voltage, with the neutral wire of the lock circuit always connected to the - terminal of the power supply.

  17. An automated 60 GHz open resonator system for precision dielectric measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsar, Mohammed N.; Li, Xiaohui; Chi, Hua

    1990-12-01

    An automated open resonator system was designed and constructed for precision measurement of the loss tangent and dielectric permittivity of low absorbing materials at 60 GHz. The use of a high-Q hemispherical Fabry-Perot cavity together with highly stabilized synthesized phase-locked Gunn oscillator sources and a superheterodyne receiver made it possible to measure loss tangent values as low as 10 microrad. Both cavity length variation and frequency variation techniques were utilized to provide precise data.

  18. Q-Band (37 to 41 GHz) Satellite Beacon Architecture for RF Propagation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the design of a beacon transmitter that will be flown as a hosted payload on a geostationary satellite to enable propagation experiments at Q-band (37 to 41 GHz) frequencies is presented. The beacon uses a phased locked loop stabilized dielectric resonator oscillator and a solid-state power amplifier to achieve the desired output power. The satellite beacon antenna is configured as an offset-fed cutparaboloidal reflector.

  19. Q-Band (37-41 GHz) Satellite Beacon Architecture for RF Propagation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the design of a beacon transmitter that will be flown as a hosted payload on a geostationary satellite to enable propagation experiments at Q-band (37-41 GHz) frequencies is presented. The beacon uses a phased locked loop stabilized dielectric resonator oscillator and a solid-state power amplifier to achieve the desired output power. The satellite beacon antenna is configured as an offset-fed cut-paraboloidal reflector.

  20. Data port security lock

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Joseph D.; Hall, Clarence S.

    2008-06-24

    In a security apparatus for securing an electrical connector, a plug may be fitted for insertion into a connector receptacle compliant with a connector standard. The plug has at least one aperture adapted to engage at least one latch in the connector receptacle. An engagement member is adapted to partially extend through at least one aperture and lock to at least one structure within the connector receptacle.

  1. Clock recovery from 40 Gbps optical signal with optical phase-locked loop based on a terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhon, Young Min; Ki, Ho Jin; Kim, Sun Ho

    2003-05-01

    10 GHz clock recovery from 40 Gbps optical time-division-multiplexed (OTDM) signal pulses is experimentally demonstrated using optical phase lock loop based on a terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer (TOAD) with a local-reference-oscillator-free electronic feedback circuit. The clock pulse that was used as the control pulse had energy of 800 fJ and the SNR of the time-extracted 10 GHz RF signal to the side components was larger than 40 dB.

  2. 4. LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARDS LOCKS. 19TH CENTURY GRAVITY LOCKS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARDS LOCKS. 19TH CENTURY GRAVITY LOCKS ON RIGHT. 20TH CENTURY ELECTRIC LIFT LOCKS ON LEFT. - New York State Barge Canal, Lockport Locks, Richmond Avenue, Lockport, Niagara County, NY

  3. 49 CFR 236.338 - Mechanical locking required in accordance with locking sheet and dog chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... locking sheet and dog chart. 236.338 Section 236.338 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... in accordance with locking sheet and dog chart. Mechanical locking shall be in accordance with locking sheet and dog chart currently in effect....

  4. 49 CFR 236.338 - Mechanical locking required in accordance with locking sheet and dog chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... locking sheet and dog chart. 236.338 Section 236.338 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... in accordance with locking sheet and dog chart. Mechanical locking shall be in accordance with locking sheet and dog chart currently in effect....

  5. 49 CFR 236.338 - Mechanical locking required in accordance with locking sheet and dog chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... locking sheet and dog chart. 236.338 Section 236.338 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... in accordance with locking sheet and dog chart. Mechanical locking shall be in accordance with locking sheet and dog chart currently in effect....

  6. 49 CFR 236.338 - Mechanical locking required in accordance with locking sheet and dog chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... locking sheet and dog chart. 236.338 Section 236.338 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... in accordance with locking sheet and dog chart. Mechanical locking shall be in accordance with locking sheet and dog chart currently in effect....

  7. 49 CFR 236.338 - Mechanical locking required in accordance with locking sheet and dog chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... locking sheet and dog chart. 236.338 Section 236.338 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... in accordance with locking sheet and dog chart. Mechanical locking shall be in accordance with locking sheet and dog chart currently in effect....

  8. High frequency optoelectronic oscillators based on the optical feedback of semiconductor mode-locked laser diodes.

    PubMed

    Haji, Mohsin; Hou, Lianping; Kelly, Anthony E; Akbar, Jehan; Marsh, John H; Arnold, John M; Ironside, Charles N

    2012-01-30

    Optical self seeding feedback techniques can be used to improve the noise characteristics of passively mode-locked laser diodes. External cavities such as fiber optic cables can increase the memory of the phase and subsequently improve the timing jitter. In this work, an improved optical feedback architecture is proposed using an optical fiber loop delay as a cavity extension of the mode-locked laser. We investigate the effect of the noise reduction as a function of the loop length and feedback power. The well known composite cavity technique is also implemented for suppressing supermode noise artifacts presented due to harmonic mode locking effects. Using this method, we achieve a record low radio frequency linewidth of 192 Hz for any high frequency (>1 GHz) passively mode-locked laser to date (to the best of the authors' knowledge), making it promising for the development of high frequency optoelectronic oscillators.

  9. Offset phase locking of noisy diode lasers aided by frequency division.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, E N; Esnault, F-X; Donley, E A

    2011-08-01

    For heterodyne phase locking, frequency division of the beat note between two oscillators can improve the reliability of the phase lock and the quality of the phase synchronization. Frequency division can also reduce the size, weight, power, and cost of the instrument by excluding the microwave synthesizer from the control loop when the heterodyne offset frequency is large (5 to 10 GHz). We have experimentally tested the use of a frequency divider in an optical phase-lock loop and compared the achieved level of residual phase fluctuations between two diode lasers with that achieved without the use of a frequency divider. The two methods achieve comparable phase stability provided that sufficient loop gain is maintained after frequency division to preserve the required bandwidth. We have also numerically analyzed the noise properties and internal dynamics of phase-locked loops subjected to a high level of phase fluctuations, and our modeling confirms the expected benefits of having an in-loop frequency divider.

  10. A 20-GHz IMPATT transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, J. L.; Sun, C.

    1983-01-01

    The engineering development of a solid state transmitter amplifier operating in the 20 GHz frequency band. The development effort involved a variety of disciplines including IMPATT device development, circulator design, simple and multiple diode circuits designs, and amplifier integration and test.

  11. 49 CFR 236.745 - Face, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Face, locking. 236.745 Section 236.745 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Face, locking. The locking surface of a locking dog, tappet or cross locking of an interlocking machine....

  12. 49 CFR 236.745 - Face, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Face, locking. 236.745 Section 236.745 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Face, locking. The locking surface of a locking dog, tappet or cross locking of an interlocking machine....

  13. 49 CFR 236.745 - Face, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Face, locking. 236.745 Section 236.745 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Face, locking. The locking surface of a locking dog, tappet or cross locking of an interlocking machine....

  14. 49 CFR 236.745 - Face, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Face, locking. 236.745 Section 236.745 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Face, locking. The locking surface of a locking dog, tappet or cross locking of an interlocking machine....

  15. 49 CFR 236.745 - Face, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Face, locking. 236.745 Section 236.745 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Face, locking. The locking surface of a locking dog, tappet or cross locking of an interlocking machine....

  16. Safe-haven locking device

    DOEpatents

    Williams, J.V.

    1984-04-26

    Disclosed is a locking device for eliminating external control of a secured space formed by fixed and movable barriers. The locking device uses externally and internally controlled locksets and a movable strike, operable from the secured side of the movable barrier, to selectively engage either lockset. A disengagement device, for preventing forces from being applied to the lock bolts is also disclosed. In this manner, a secured space can be controlled from the secured side as a safe-haven. 4 figures.

  17. Compact and high repetition rate Kerr-lens mode-locked 532 nm Nd:YVO4 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zuohan; Peng, Jiying; Yuan, Ruixia; Wang, Tongtong; Yao, Jianquan; Zheng, Yi

    2015-11-01

    A compact and feasible CW Kerr-lens-induced mode-locked 532 nm Nd:YVO4 laser system was experimentally demonstrated for the first time with theoretical analysis. Kerr-lens mode locking with intracavity second harmonic generation provides a promising method to generate a high-repetition-rate picosecond green laser. With an incident pump power of 6 W, the average output power of mode locking was 258 mW at a high repetition rate of 1.1 GHz.

  18. 120 Gbit/s injection-locked homodyne coherent transmission of polarization-multiplexed 64 QAM signals over 150 km.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yixin; Kasai, Keisuke; Yoshida, Masato; Nakazawa, Masataka

    2014-12-15

    We describe an injection-locked 64 QAM homodyne coherent transmission, which is the highest QAM multiplicity realized with an injection locking technique. The frequency locking range of the local oscillator (LO) was as wide as 1 GHz. The phase noise was only 0.2 deg, which is 1/3 of that obtained with our previous OVCO-based OPLL (0.6 deg.). As a result, a 120 Gbit/s polarization-multiplexed 64 QAM signal was successfully transmitted over 150 km with a simple receiver configuration and low DSP complexity.

  19. Dynamic Holographic Lock-In Imaging of Ultrasonic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Deason, Vance Albert; Datta, S.K.

    1999-05-01

    A laser imaging approach is presented that utilizes the adaptive property of photorefractive materials to produce a real-time measurement of ultrasonic traveling wave surface displacement and phase in all planar directions simultaneously without scanning. The imaging method performs optical lock-in operation. A single antisymmetric Lamb wave mode image produces direct quantitative determination of the phase velocity in all planar directions showing plate stiffness anisotropy. Excellent agreement was obtained with modeling calculations of the phase velocity in all planar directions for an anisotropic sheet material. The approach functions with diffusely scattering surfaces, subnanometer motions and at frequencies from Hz to GHz.

  20. Design Techniques for Radiation Hardened Phase-Locked Loops

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-23

    Nemmani, M. Vandepas , K. Okk, K. Mayaram, and U. Moon, “Radiation hard PLL design tolerant to noise and process variations,” in CDADIC report, July...2004. [8] M. Vandepas , K. Ok, A. N. Nemmani, M. Brownlee, K. Mayaram, and U.-K. Moon, “Characterization of 1.2GHz phase locked loops and voltage...controlled oscillators in a total dose radiation environment,” in Proceedings of 2005 MAPLD International Conference, Sept. 2005. [9] M. Vandepas , “Design of

  1. Realizing 60 GHz narrow-linewidth photonic microwaves with very low RF driving power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Weiwei; Lin, Peng; Ke, Shanming; Zeng, Xierong

    2016-12-01

    In this letter, we realize tunable (up to 60 GHz) microwave signal generation with low phase noise (-82.7 dBc Hz-1 with an offset of 10 kHz at 60 GHz) and low RF driving power (⩽2.0 dBm). A monolithically integrated semiconductor dual wavelength laser diode is used, where an enhanced  -3 dB bandwidth of up to 30 GHz is realized with a PP resonance effect. By using an RF signal (ƒmod  =  ƒ/2) to directly modulate the distributed feedback laser section, the dual wavelengths of the laser diode can be locked by the generated sidebands (±2nd order), the beating of which generates a stable microwave signal with high purity.

  2. 49 CFR 236.306 - Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement. 236... Interlocking Standards § 236.306 Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement. Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement shall be provided for mechanically operated switch, movable-point frog, or...

  3. 49 CFR 236.306 - Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement. 236... Interlocking Standards § 236.306 Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement. Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement shall be provided for mechanically operated switch, movable-point frog, or...

  4. 49 CFR 236.306 - Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement. 236... Interlocking Standards § 236.306 Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement. Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement shall be provided for mechanically operated switch, movable-point frog, or...

  5. 49 CFR 236.306 - Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement. 236... Interlocking Standards § 236.306 Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement. Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement shall be provided for mechanically operated switch, movable-point frog, or...

  6. 49 CFR 236.306 - Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement. 236... Interlocking Standards § 236.306 Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement. Facing point lock or switch-and-lock movement shall be provided for mechanically operated switch, movable-point frog, or...

  7. Robust Photon Locking

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, T.; Wollenhaupt, M.; Sarpe-Tudoran, C.; Baumert, T.

    2009-01-16

    We experimentally demonstrate a strong-field coherent control mechanism that combines the advantages of photon locking (PL) and rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). Unlike earlier implementations of PL and RAP by pulse sequences or chirped pulses, we use shaped pulses generated by phase modulation of the spectrum of a femtosecond laser pulse with a generalized phase discontinuity. The novel control scenario is characterized by a high degree of robustness achieved via adiabatic preparation of a state of maximum coherence. Subsequent phase control allows for efficient switching among different target states. We investigate both properties by photoelectron spectroscopy on potassium atoms interacting with the intense shaped light field.

  8. Indirect subharmonic optical injection locking of a millimeter-wave IMPATT oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herczfeld, Peter R.; Daryoush, Afshin S.; Rosen, Arye; Sharma, Arvind K.; Contarino, V. M.

    1986-12-01

    Large aperture phased-array antennas operating at millimeter-wave frequencies are designed for space-based communications and imaging. Array elements are composed of active transmit-receive (T/R) modules that are phase and frequency synchronized to a reference signal at the central processing unit by a fiber-optic (FO) distribution network. The implementation of FO links, synchronizing the millimeter-wave local oscillators (LO's) imposes a great challenge. This paper presents results of indirect optical injection locking of a free-running 38-GHz (Ka-band) IMPATT oscillator over the locking range of 2-132 MHz, depending on the injected power level (amplifier gain). In the experiment, the nonlinearity of both the laser diode and the IMPATT oscillator is exploited to achieve 12th subharmonic injection locking. The overall system FM noise degradation of the reference signal is 16 dB at 500-Hz offset. The FM noise degradation is dominated by the theoretical limit of 20log N, where N is the frequency multiplication factor used in subharmonic injection locking. Methods by which optical injection locking may be extended into 60 and 90 GHz are demonstrated.

  9. Phase-locking and Pulse Generation in Multi-Frequency Brillouin Oscillator via Four Wave Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttner, Thomas F. S.; Kabakova, Irina V.; Hudson, Darren D.; Pant, Ravi; Poulton, Christopher G.; Judge, Alexander C.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2014-05-01

    There is an increasing demand for pulsed all-fibre lasers with gigahertz repetition rates for applications in telecommunications and metrology. The repetition rate of conventional passively mode-locked fibre lasers is fundamentally linked to the laser cavity length and is therefore typically ~10-100 MHz, which is orders of magnitude lower than required. Cascading stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in nonlinear resonators, however, enables the formation of Brillouin frequency combs (BFCs) with GHz line spacing, which is determined by the acoustic properties of the medium and is independent of the resonator length. Phase-locking of such combs therefore holds a promise to achieve gigahertz repetition rate lasers. The interplay of SBS and Kerr-nonlinear four-wave mixing (FWM) in nonlinear resonators has been previously investigated, yet the phase relationship of the waves has not been considered. Here, we present for the first time experimental and numerical results that demonstrate phase-locking of BFCs generated in a nonlinear waveguide cavity. Using real-time measurements we demonstrate stable 40 ps pulse trains with 8 GHz repetition rate based on a chalcogenide fibre cavity, without the aid of any additional phase-locking element. Detailed numerical modelling, which is in agreement with the experimental results, highlight the essential role of FWM in phase-locking of the BFC.

  10. Antifungal Lock Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Walraven, Carla J.

    2013-01-01

    The widespread use of intravascular devices, such as central venous and hemodialysis catheters, in the past 2 decades has paralleled the increasing incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs). Candida albicans is the fourth leading cause of hospital-associated BSIs. The propensity of C. albicans to form biofilms on these catheters has made these infections difficult to treat due to multiple factors, including increased resistance to antifungal agents. Thus, curing CR-BSIs caused by Candida species usually requires catheter removal in addition to systemic antifungal therapy. Alternatively, antimicrobial lock therapy has received significant interest and shown promise as a strategy to treat CR-BSIs due to Candida species. The existing in vitro, animal, and patient data for treatment of Candida-related CR-BSIs are reviewed. The most promising antifungal lock therapy (AfLT) strategies include use of amphotericin, ethanol, or echinocandins. Clinical trials are needed to further define the safety and efficacy of AfLT. PMID:23070153

  11. Atomically referenced 1-GHz optical parametric oscillator frequency comb.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Richard A; Balskus, Karolis; Zhang, Zhaowei; Reid, Derryck T

    2015-06-15

    The visible to mid-infrared coverage of femtosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) frequency combs makes them attractive resources for high-resolution spectroscopy and astrophotonic spectrograph calibration. Such applications require absolute traceability and wide comb-tooth spacing, attributes which until now have remained unavailable from any single OPO frequency comb. Here, we report a 1-GHz Ti:sapphire pumped OPO comb whose repetition and offset frequencies are referenced to Rb-stabilised microwave and laser oscillators respectively. This technique simultaneously achieves fully stabilized combs from both the Ti:sapphire laser and the OPO with sub-MHz comb-tooth linewidths, multi-hour locking stability and without the need for super-continuum generation.

  12. 338-GHz Semiconductor Amplifier Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Gaier, Todd C.; Soria, Mary M.; Fung, King Man; Rasisic, Vesna; Deal, William; Leong, Kevin; Mei, Xiao Bing; Yoshida, Wayne; Liu, Po-Hsin; Uyeda, Jansen; Lai, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Research findings were reported from an investigation of new gallium nitride (GaN) monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers (PAs) targeting the highest output power and the highest efficiency for class-A operation in W-band (75-110 GHz). W-band PAs are a major component of many frequency multiplied submillimeter-wave LO signal sources. For spectrometer arrays, substantial W-band power is required due to the passive lossy frequency multipliers.

  13. 32-GHz Wideband Maser Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, J. S.; Neff, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    High-gain, wideband, microwave amplifier based on ruby cooled by liquid helium. Features include low input equivalent noise temperature and 400-MHz bandwidth. Design basically extension of previous reflected-wave masers built for frequency range of 18 to 26 GHz. Maser amplifier includes eight stages connected in reflected-wave configuration. Particularly useful for detection of weak microwave signals in radio astronomy and communications.

  14. Sixty GHz IMPATT diode development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Y. E.; Chen, J.; Benko, E.; Barger, M. J.; Nghiem, H.; Trinh, T. Q.; Kung, J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop 60 GHz GaAs IMPATT Diodes suitable for communications applications. The performance goal of the 60 GHz IMPATT is 1W CW output power with a conversion efficiency of 15 percent and 10 year life time. During the course of the program, double drift (DD) GaAs IMPATT Diodes have been developed resulting in the state of the art performance at V band frequencies. A CW output power of 1.12 W was demonstrated at 51.9 GHz with 9.7 percent efficiency. The best conversion efficiency achieved was 15.3 percent. V band DD GaAs IMPATTs were developed using both small signal and large signal analyses. GaAs wafers of DD flat, DD hybrid, and DD Read profiles using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) were developed with excellent doping profile control. Wafer evaluation was routinely made by the capacitance versus voltage (C-V) measurement. Ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis was also used for more detailed profile evaluation.

  15. Double-Acting, Locking Carabiners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chi-Min; LiDelRosso, Dominic

    2004-01-01

    A proposed design for carabiners (tether hooks used in mountaineering, rock climbing, and rescue) is intended to make it possible to operate these devices even while wearing thick gloves. According to the proposal, the gate of a carabiner would be capable of swinging either toward or away from the hook body, relative to the closed position. The gate would be spring-biased to return to the closed position. An external locking collar would be pinned to an internal locking rod that would be springloaded to slide the collar longitudinally over the gate to lock the gate in the closed position. The gate would be unlocked by sliding the collar axially against the spring load. To reduce the probability of inadvertent unlocking, the rod-and-collar mechanism would include two locking buttons. Optionally, the rod-and-collar mechanism could be replaced with an external locking mechanism based on a longer collar.

  16. Analysis of phase noise in a spin torque oscillator stabilized by phase locked loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaru, Shingo; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yakushiji, Kay; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    This study analyses phase noise in a spin torque oscillator (STO) stabilized by phase locked loop (PLL). Time domain measurement showed that phase error of the 6.996 GHz signal generated by a STO, which exhibited a random-walk type fluctuation under free running, was suppressed within a standard deviation of 0.408 rad by the PLL. Power spectrum under phase locked oscillation indicated that the PLL had a loop bandwidth of approximately 16 MHz, thus effectively suppressing phase error below 10 MHz. However, it was also found that power spectrum of the residual phase error was distributed much higher than the loop bandwidth.

  17. Optical clock division based on dual-wavelength mode-locked semiconductor fiber ring laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Sun, Junqiang; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xingliang; Huang, Dexiu

    2008-07-21

    We have reported the optical clock division utilizing an injected mode-locked fiber ring laser incorporating semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) and a dispersion compensation fiber (DCF). The clock division is mainly caused by the modulation competition between two wavelength components while both of them satisfy the harmonic mode-locking condition at the newly generated frequency. Stable second, third, and fourth clock divisions are obtained by properly adjusting the polarization controllers inside the ring cavity when a 10-GHz clock signal without any sub-harmonic frequency component is injected into the cavity. The radio-frequency spectra show good qualities of the obtained clock division trains.

  18. First demonstration and performance of an injection locked continuous wave magnetron to phase control a superconducting cavity

    SciTech Connect

    A.C. Dexter, G. Burt, R.G. Carter, I. Tahir, H. Wang, K. Davis, R. Rimmer

    2011-03-01

    The applications of magnetrons to high power proton and cw electron linacs are discussed. An experiment is described where a 2.45 GHz magnetron has been used to drive a single cell superconducting cavity. With the magnetron injection locked, a modest phase control accuracy of 0.95° rms has been demonstrated. Factors limiting performance have been identified.

  19. Bidirectional ultradense WDM for metro networks adopting the beat-frequency-locking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Yuep; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Jae-Seung

    2003-10-01

    We present a technique to increase the spectral efficiencies of metro networks by using channel-interleaved bidirectional ultradense wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) within each customer's optical band. As a demonstration, we transmit 12.5-GHz-spaced 8×10 Gbit/s channels achieving spectral efficiency as high as 0.8 bit/s/Hz with a 25-GHz WDM demultiplexer. The beat-frequency-locking method is used to stabilize the channel frequencies within +/-200 MHz, which is far more accurate than with conventional wavelength lockers.

  20. Payload Launch Lock Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ken (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A payload launch lock mechanism includes a base, a preload clamp, a fastener, and a shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator. The preload clamp is configured to releasibly restrain a payload. The fastener extends, along an axis, through the preload clamp and into the base, and supplies a force to the preload clamp sufficient to restrain the payload. The SMA actuator is disposed between the base and the clamp. The SMA actuator is adapted to receive electrical current and is configured, upon receipt of the electrical current, to supply a force that causes the fastener to elongate without fracturing. The preload clamp, in response to the fastener elongation, either rotates or pivots to thereby release the payload.

  1. A magnetorheological fluid locking device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavlicoglu, Barkan; Liu, Yanming

    2011-04-01

    A magnetorheological fluid (MRF) device is designed to provide a static locking force caused by the operation of a controllable MRF valve. The intent is to introduce an MRF device which provides the locking force of a fifth wheel coupler while maintaining the "powerless" locking capability when required. A passive magnetic field supplied by a permanent magnet provides a powerless locking resistance force. The passively closed MRF valve provides sufficient reaction force to eliminate axial displacement to a pre-defined force value. Unlocking of the device is provided by means of an electromagnet which re-routes the magnetic field distribution along the MR valve, and minimizes the resistance. Three dimensional electromagnetic finite element analyses are performed to optimize the MRF lock valve performance. The MRF locking valve is fabricated and tested for installation on a truck fifth wheel application. An experimental setup, resembling actual working conditions, is designed and tests are conducted on vehicle interface schemes. The powerless-locking capacity and the unlocking process with minimal resistance are experimentally demonstrated.

  2. Development of compact and ultra-high-resolution spectrograph with multi-GHz optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Mamoru; Sukegawa, Takashi; Silva, Alissa; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, a calibration method for an astronomical spectrograph using an optical frequency comb (OFC) with a repetition rate of more than ten GHz has been developed successfully [1-5]. But controlling filtering cavities that are used for thinning out longitudinal modes precludes long term stability. The super-mode noise coming from the fundamental repetition rate is an additional problem. We developed a laser-diode pumped Yb:Y2O3 ceramic oscillator, which enabled the generation of 4-GHz (maximum repetition rate of 6.7 GHz) pulse trains directly with a spectrum width of 7 nm (full-width half-maximum, FWHM), and controlled its optical frequency within a MHz level of accuracy using a beat note between the 4-GHz laser and a 246-MHz Yb-fiber OFC. The optical frequency of the Yb-fiber OFC was phase locked to a Rb clock frequency standard. Furthermore we also built a table-top multi-pass spectrograph with a maximum frequency resolution of 600 MHz and a bandwidth of 1 nm using a large-size high-efficiency transmission grating. The resolution could be changed by selecting the number of passes through the grating. This spectrograph could resolve each longitudinal mode of our 4-GHz OFC clearly, and more than 10% throughput was obtained when the resolution was set to 600 MHz. We believe that small and middle scale astronomical observatories could easily implement such an OFC-calibrated spectrograph.

  3. Color-Flavor Locked Strangelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Jes

    2001-10-01

    Finite lumps of color-flavor locked strange-quark matter (CFL strangelets) are significantly more stable than strangelets without color-flavor locking for wide ranges of parameters, increasing the likelihood of strangelet metastability, or even absolute stability beyond some minimum baryon number Amin. Whereas bulk CFL strange-quark matter is electrically neutral, CFL strangelets are positively charged, with Z~0.3A2/3. This is quite different from ``ordinary'' strangelets and may provide a possible test of color-flavor locking if strangelets are detected in upcoming cosmic-ray space experiments.

  4. Highly integrated optical heterodyne phase-locked loop with phase/frequency detection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingzhi; Park, Hyunchul; Bloch, Eli; Sivananthan, Abirami; Bhardwaj, Ashish; Griffith, Zach; Johansson, Leif A; Rodwell, Mark J; Coldren, Larry A

    2012-04-23

    A highly-integrated optical phase-locked loop with a phase/frequency detector and a single-sideband mixer (SSBM) has been proposed and demonstrated for the first time. A photonic integrated circuit (PIC) has been designed, fabricated and tested, together with an electronic IC (EIC). The PIC integrates a widely-tunable sampled-grating distributed-Bragg-reflector laser, an optical 90 degree hybrid and four high-speed photodetectors on the InGaAsP/InP platform. The EIC adds a single-sideband mixer, and a digital phase/frequency detector, to provide single-sideband heterodyne locking from -9 GHz to 7.5 GHz. The loop bandwith is 400 MHz.

  5. Frequency chirped light at large detuning with an injection-locked diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, K.; Disla, M.; Dellatto, J.; Limani, A.; Kaufman, B.; Wright, M. J.

    2015-04-15

    We have developed a laser system to generate frequency-chirped light at rapid modulation speeds (∼100 MHz) with a large frequency offset. Light from an external cavity diode laser with its frequency locked to an atomic resonance is passed through a lithium niobate electro-optical phase modulator. The phase modulator is driven by a ∼6 GHz signal whose frequency is itself modulated with a RF MHz signal (<200 MHz). A second injection locked diode laser is used to filter out all of the light except the frequency-chirped ±1 order by more than 30 dB. Using this system, it is possible to generate a 1 GHz frequency chirp in 5 ns.

  6. Compendium on Waterway Transportation Reliability: Lock Congestion and Lock Queues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    While a microsimulation model for capturing such delays is available (Dai and Schonfeld 89), a significant amount of computer time is required for...development of an approximation to microsimulation that allows for an evaluation of lock delays that incorporate interdependencies. A simulation experiment was... microsimulation model of waterway traffic and lock operations, 3. statistically estimated functions ("metamodels") to approximate the results of the

  7. 49 CFR 236.765 - Locking, mechanical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locking, mechanical. 236.765 Section 236.765... Locking, mechanical. An arrangement of locking bars, dogs, tappets, cross locking and other apparatus by means of which interlocking is effected between the levers of an interlocking machine and...

  8. 49 CFR 236.765 - Locking, mechanical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locking, mechanical. 236.765 Section 236.765... Locking, mechanical. An arrangement of locking bars, dogs, tappets, cross locking and other apparatus by means of which interlocking is effected between the levers of an interlocking machine and...

  9. 49 CFR 236.765 - Locking, mechanical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locking, mechanical. 236.765 Section 236.765 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Locking, mechanical. An arrangement of locking bars, dogs, tappets, cross locking and other apparatus...

  10. 49 CFR 236.765 - Locking, mechanical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Locking, mechanical. 236.765 Section 236.765 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Locking, mechanical. An arrangement of locking bars, dogs, tappets, cross locking and other apparatus...

  11. 49 CFR 236.765 - Locking, mechanical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Locking, mechanical. 236.765 Section 236.765 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Locking, mechanical. An arrangement of locking bars, dogs, tappets, cross locking and other apparatus...

  12. 49 CFR 236.379 - Route locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Route locking. 236.379 Section 236.379 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... and Tests § 236.379 Route locking. Route locking or other type of switch locking shall be tested...

  13. 49 CFR 236.379 - Route locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Route locking. 236.379 Section 236.379 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... and Tests § 236.379 Route locking. Route locking or other type of switch locking shall be tested...

  14. 49 CFR 236.330 - Locking dog of switch-and-lock movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locking dog of switch-and-lock movement. 236.330 Section 236.330 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Rules and Instructions § 236.330 Locking dog of switch-and-lock movement. Locking dog of...

  15. 49 CFR 236.330 - Locking dog of switch-and-lock movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locking dog of switch-and-lock movement. 236.330 Section 236.330 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Rules and Instructions § 236.330 Locking dog of switch-and-lock movement. Locking dog of...

  16. 49 CFR 236.330 - Locking dog of switch-and-lock movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Locking dog of switch-and-lock movement. 236.330 Section 236.330 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Rules and Instructions § 236.330 Locking dog of switch-and-lock movement. Locking dog of...

  17. 49 CFR 236.330 - Locking dog of switch-and-lock movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Locking dog of switch-and-lock movement. 236.330 Section 236.330 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Rules and Instructions § 236.330 Locking dog of switch-and-lock movement. Locking dog of...

  18. 49 CFR 236.337 - Locking faces of mechanical locking; fit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locking faces of mechanical locking; fit. 236.337 Section 236.337 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Rules and Instructions § 236.337 Locking faces of mechanical locking; fit. Locking faces shall...

  19. 49 CFR 236.337 - Locking faces of mechanical locking; fit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Locking faces of mechanical locking; fit. 236.337 Section 236.337 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Rules and Instructions § 236.337 Locking faces of mechanical locking; fit. Locking faces shall...

  20. 49 CFR 236.337 - Locking faces of mechanical locking; fit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locking faces of mechanical locking; fit. 236.337 Section 236.337 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Rules and Instructions § 236.337 Locking faces of mechanical locking; fit. Locking faces shall...

  1. 49 CFR 236.337 - Locking faces of mechanical locking; fit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Locking faces of mechanical locking; fit. 236.337 Section 236.337 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Rules and Instructions § 236.337 Locking faces of mechanical locking; fit. Locking faces shall...

  2. 49 CFR 236.337 - Locking faces of mechanical locking; fit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locking faces of mechanical locking; fit. 236.337 Section 236.337 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Rules and Instructions § 236.337 Locking faces of mechanical locking; fit. Locking faces shall...

  3. 49 CFR 236.330 - Locking dog of switch-and-lock movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locking dog of switch-and-lock movement. 236.330 Section 236.330 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Rules and Instructions § 236.330 Locking dog of switch-and-lock movement. Locking dog of...

  4. Cavity-locked ring down spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Harb, Charles C.; Spence, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Distinct locking and sampling light beams are used in a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system to perform multiple ring-down measurements while the laser and ring-down cavity are continuously locked. The sampling and locking light beams have different frequencies, to ensure that the sampling and locking light are decoupled within the cavity. Preferably, the ring-down cavity is ring-shaped, the sampling light is s-polarized, and the locking light is p-polarized. Transmitted sampling light is used for ring-down measurements, while reflected locking light is used for locking in a Pound-Drever scheme.

  5. High brightness photonic band crystal semiconductor lasers in the passive mode locking regime

    SciTech Connect

    Rosales, R.; Kalosha, V. P.; Miah, M. J.; Bimberg, D.; Posilović, K.; Pohl, J.; Weyers, M.

    2014-10-20

    High brightness photonic band crystal lasers in the passive mode locking regime are presented. Optical pulses with peak power of 3 W and peak brightness of about 180 MW cm{sup −2} sr{sup −1} are obtained on a 5 GHz device exhibiting 15 ps pulses and a very low beam divergence in both the vertical and horizontal directions.

  6. Mechanically actuated downhole locking sub

    SciTech Connect

    Menard, M.

    1986-09-30

    A mechanically actuated locking sub is described for setting and releasing a downhole tool from an oilwell borehole, having landing nipples, without interrupting a production flow therethrough, comprising: an inner tubular member, having a central conduit and a lower end provided with means for attachment to the downhole tool to be set in or released from the oilwell bore; an outer sleeve member circumferentially encompassing at least a part of the inner tubular member, the sleeve having a plurality of apertures therein; locking dog members intermediate the inner tubular member and the outer sleeve member, having an engaging portion extending outwardly through the apertures of the outer sleeve member; slidable sleeve means intermediate the outer sleeve member and the inner tubular member, movable between a first, extended and a second, retracted position with respect to the inner tubular member; and a double acting spring means engaging the locking dogs; adapted to bias the locking dogs towards the inner tubular member.

  7. Locked-in, walked out.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Seamus; McCann, John; Hawkins, Stanley

    2011-09-01

    Locked in syndrome is typically associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We report a patient who had an unusually good recovery from locked in syndrome due to pontine infarction. The good recovery exhibited by our patient may have resulted from resolution of oedema at the site of infarction and brainstem plasticity being augmented by initial supportive measures in the intensive care unit and early, intensive rehabilitation.

  8. John locke on personal identity.

    PubMed

    Nimbalkar, Namita

    2011-01-01

    John Locke speaks of personal identity and survival of consciousness after death. A criterion of personal identity through time is given. Such a criterion specifies, insofar as that is possible, the necessary and sufficient conditions for the survival of persons. John Locke holds that personal identity is a matter of psychological continuity. He considered personal identity (or the self) to be founded on consciousness (viz. memory), and not on the substance of either the soul or the body.

  9. Bandwidth of non-contact vital sign detection with a noise suppression phase locked loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zongyang; Zhang, Ying

    2016-04-01

    In a dual-carrier vital sign detection system, we have designed a noise suppression scheme that uses phase locked loop (PLL) to automatically suppress the noise induced by range correlation and transmission paths. The system uses two microwave carriers at 5.6 and 5.68 GHz generated by two phase locked signal generators to extract the noise and vital sign respectively. The feedback microwave signals are mixed with local 5.68-GHz signal to transfer to the vial sign signal and low frequency intermediate frequency (IF) signal. When the IF signal corresponding to 5.68 GHz microwave signal is locked to a highly stable low noise reference, the noises of IF signal and vital sign signal are suppressed as their corresponding microwave signals are highly correlated. In this system, the noise suppression performance is related to the bandwidth of the PLL, which needs to be carefully designed. Through the theoretical analysis, initial bandwidth is chosen to be 200 Hz. Then the charge pump current is changed to adjust the bandwidth and the corresponding noise suppression performance is evaluated using experiments. The results show the system with a charge pump current 0.625 mA, which corresponds to about 50 Hz bandwidth, exhibits a better noise performance. In addition, at different bandwidth, the vital sign detection system is compared with a design scheme with unlocked PLL and demonstrates superior performance at all bandwidths.

  10. Phase-locking of commercial DFB lasers for distributed optical fiber sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouse, Chris D.; Brown, Anthony W.; Wylie, Michael T. V.; Colpitts, Bruce G.

    2011-05-01

    The design of a phase/frequency detector-based optical phase-locked loop (PFD-OPLL) capable of locking two commercial semiconductor distributed feedback (DFB) lasers for the purpose of making Brillouin Optical Time-Domain Analysis (BOTDA) measurements is presented. Due to the aperiodic nature of the PFD transfer characteristic, the PFDOPLL offers strong acquisition performance without requiring additional acquisition hardware. Design constraints due to laser linewidths are relaxed by choosing a damping factor of 3.5 instead of 0.707. Loop stability is ensured by reducing the loop propagation delay by as much as possible in hardware, and choosing the loop natural frequency such that the loop bandwidth is below the FM phase reversal frequency of the laser. Results show stable lock performance at 11 GHz with a phase noise of -70dBc/Hz at a 100 Hz offset, a capture range of 2.5 GHz and a tuning range of 3.3 GHz. These specifications exceed the performance requirements of a BOTDA system.

  11. MMIC Amplifiers for 90 to 130 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Pukala, David; Peralta, Alejandro; Bryerton, Eric; Morgan, Matt; Boyd, T.; Hu, Ming; Schmitz, Adele

    2007-01-01

    This brief describes two monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) amplifier chips optimized to function in the frequency range of 90 to 130 GHz, covering nearly all of F-band (90 - 140 GHz). These amplifiers were designed specifically for local-oscillator units in astronomical radio telescopes such as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). They could also be readily adapted for use in electronic test equipment, automotive radar systems, and communications systems that operate between 90 and 130 GHz.

  12. Microwave signal extraction from femtosecond mode-locked lasers with attosecond relative timing drift.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungwon; Kärtner, Franz X

    2010-06-15

    We present a feedback-control method for suppression of excess phase noise in the optical-to-electronic conversion process involved in the extraction of microwave signals from femtosecond mode-locked lasers. A delay-locked loop based on drift-free phase detection with a differentially biased Sagnac loop is employed to eliminate low-frequency (e.g., <1 kHz) excess phase noise and drift in the regenerated microwave signals. A 10 GHz microwave signal is extracted from a 200 MHz repetition rate mode-locked laser with a relative rms timing jitter of 2.4 fs (integrated from 1 mHz to 1 MHz) and a relative rms timing drift of 0.84 fs (integrated over 8 h with 1 Hz bandwidth) between the optical pulse train and the extracted microwave signal.

  13. Precision and fast wavelength tuning of a dynamically phase-locked widely-tunable laser.

    PubMed

    Numata, Kenji; Chen, Jeffrey R; Wu, Stewart T

    2012-06-18

    We report a precision and fast wavelength tuning technique demonstrated for a digital-supermode distributed Bragg reflector laser. The laser was dynamically offset-locked to a frequency-stabilized master laser using an optical phase-locked loop, enabling precision fast tuning to and from any frequencies within a ~40-GHz tuning range. The offset frequency noise was suppressed to the statically offset-locked level in less than ~40 μs upon each frequency switch, allowing the laser to retain the absolute frequency stability of the master laser. This technique satisfies stringent requirements for gas sensing lidars and enables other applications that require such well-controlled precision fast tuning.

  14. A 12 GHz satellite video receiver: Low noise, low cost prototype model for TV reception from broadcast satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hreha, M. A.; Baprawski, J. G.; Chamaneria, C. N.; Ferry, S. J.; Keithly, G.; Kuklin, H. S.; Lockyear, W. H.; Schifter, L. H.; Swanberg, N. E.; Swift, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    A 12-channel synchronous phase lock video receiver consisting of an outdoor downconverter unit and an indoor demodulator unit was developed to provide both low noise performance and low cost in production quantities of 1000 units. The prototype receiver can be mass produced at a cost under $1540 without sacrificing system performance. The receiver also has the capability of selecting any of the twelve assigned satellite broadcast channels in the frequency range 11.7 to 12.2 GHz.

  15. Ultrashort pulse generation by semiconductor mode-locked lasers at 760 nm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huolei; Kong, Liang; Forrest, Adam; Bajek, David; Haggett, Stephanie E; Wang, Xiaoling; Cui, Bifeng; Pan, Jiaoqing; Ding, Ying; Cataluna, Maria Ana

    2014-10-20

    We demonstrate the first semiconductor mode-locked lasers for ultrashort pulse generation at the 760 nm waveband. Multi-section laser diodes based on an AlGaAs multi-quantum-well structure were passively mode-locked, resulting in the generation of pulses at around 766 nm, with pulse durations down to ~4 ps, at pulse repetition rates of 19.4 GHz or 23.2 GHz (with different laser cavity lengths of 1.8 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively). The influence of the bias conditions on the mode-locking characteristics was investigated for these new lasers, revealing trends which can be ascribed to the interplay of dynamical processes in the saturable absorber and gain sections. It was also found that the front facet reflectivity played a key role in the stability of mode-locking and the occurrence of self-pulsations. These lasers hold significant promise as light sources for multi-photon biomedical imaging, as well as in other applications such as frequency conversion into the ultraviolet and radio-over-fibre communications.

  16. Picosecond optical vortex converted from multigigahertz self-mode-locked high-order Hermite-Gaussian Nd:GdVO(4) lasers.

    PubMed

    Liang, H C; Huang, Y J; Lin, Y C; Lu, T H; Chen, Y F; Huang, K F

    2009-12-15

    We report on a gigahertz self-mode-locked high-order Hermite-Gaussian (HG) Nd:GdVO(4) laser. With a pump power of 2.2 W, the average output power for the TEM(0,m) modes from m=9 to m=0 are among 350-780 mW at a repetition rate of 3.5 GHz. The mode-locked pulse width is in the range of 20-25 ps for various HG TEM(0,m) modes. With a simple cylindrical-lens converter, the mode-locked HG beams are converted to generate picosecond optical vortex pulses.

  17. Generation of stable high order harmonic noise-like pulses in a passively mode-locked double clad fiber ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Garcia, J. C.; Pottiez, O.; Ibarra-Escamilla, B.; Estudillo-Ayala, J. M.; Rojas-Laguna, R.; Kuzin, E.; Muñoz-Lopez, A.; Filoteo-Razo, J. D.

    2015-03-01

    We study a passively mode-locked double-clad Erbium-Ytterbium fiber ring laser producing noise-like pulse through nonlinear polarization evolution and polarization selection. Single noise-like pulsing is only observed at moderate pump power. As pump power is increased, and through polarization controllers adjustments, harmonic mode-locking of growing order were successively appearing. For pump powers close to the damage threshold of the setup, we reach harmonic orders beyond 1200 and repetition frequencies in excess of a quarter of a GHz. Finally, these experimental results could be useful in the quest for higher pulse energies and higher repetition rates in passively mode-locked fiber lasers.

  18. Pulsed, controlled, frequency-chirped laser light at GHz detunings for atomic physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, B.; Paltoo, T.; Grogan, T.; Pena, T.; John, J. P. St.; Wright, M. J.

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a means to control rapidly frequency-chirped laser light at large detuning, by controlling the input modulation frequency of a ˜7 GHz signal into an electro-optical phase modulator in an injection-locked laser system. We show that we can extend the capabilities of the system to effectively pulse the laser on timescales less than 3 ns by turning the injection lock on/off and create arbitrary frequency-chirp shapes on the laser on the tens of nanosecond time scales. We have been able to use this pulsed frequency-chirped laser to control the excitation of a thermal Rb gas via rapid adiabatic passage.

  19. Ku-band (14GHz) fiber optic communication links for distributed antennas in the Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daryoush, A. S.; Glatz, R.; Herczfeld, P. R.; Baccarini, M. P.

    1987-01-01

    Fiber optic networks are considered as a viable alternative to the conventional coaxial distribution systems for the Space Station. The multiple access communication subsystem provides 450-750 MHz data signal on offset quadrature phase shift keying (OQPSK) format to antenna-mounted electronics. For coherent communication 100 MHz frequency reference signal is transmitted to each module to phase lock a dielectric resonator oscillator at 14.15GHz. Experimental results of phase locked oscillator's spectral purity, synchronized via two commercial fiber-optic links at 1.3 and 0.8 microns are reported. These two fiber-optic links were compared in terms of phase noise degradation. Furthermore, experimental results of fiber-optic link linearity, third-order intermodulation distortion, dynamic range and effect of mixing between data and the frequency reference are reported.

  20. The healing philosopher: John Locke's medical ethics.

    PubMed

    Short, Bradford William

    2004-01-01

    This article examines a heretofore unexplored facet of John Locke's philosophy. Locke was a medical doctor and he also wrote about medical issues that are controversial today. Despite this, Locke's medical ethics has yet to be studied. An analysis of Locke's education and his teachers and colleagues in the medical profession, of the 17th century Hippocratic Oath, and of the reaction to the last recorded outbreak of the bubonic plague in London, shines some light on the subject of Locke's medical ethics. The study of Locke's medical ethics confirms that he was a deontologist who opposed all suicide and abortion through much of pregnancy.

  1. Medicine in John Locke's philosophy.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Gonzalez, M A

    1990-12-01

    John Locke's philosophy was deeply affected by medicine of his times. It was specially influenced by the medical thought and practice of Thomas Sydenham. Locke was a personal friend of Sydenham, expressed an avid interest in his work and shared his views and methods. The influence of Sydenham's medicine can be seen in the following areas of Locke's philosophy: his "plain historical method"; the emphasis on observation and sensory experience instead of seeking the essence of things; the rejection of hypotheses and principles; the refusal of research into final causes and inner mechanisms; the ideal of irrefutable evidence and skepticism on the possibilities of certainty in science. The science which for Locke held the highest paradigmatic value in his theory of knowledge was precisely medicine. To a great extent, Locke's Essay on Human Understanding can be understood as an attempt to justify, substantiate, and promote Sydenham's medical method. This method, generalized, was then proposed as an instrument for the elaboration of all natural sciences.

  2. 60-GHz integrated-circuit high data rate quadriphase shift keying exciter and modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grote, A.; Chang, K.

    1984-01-01

    An integrated-circuit quadriphase shift keying (QPSK) exciter and modulator have demonstrated excellent performance directly modulating a carrier frequency of 60 GHz with an output phase error of less than 3 degrees and maximum amplitude error of 0.5 dB. The circuit consists of a 60-GHz Gunn VCO phase-locked to a low-frequency reference source, a 4th subharmonic mixer, and a QPSK modlator packaged into a small volume of 1.8 x 2.5 x 0.35 in. The use of microstrip has the advantages of small size, light-weight, and low-cost fabrication. The unit has the potential for multigigabit data rate applications.

  3. Dual-comb coherent Raman spectroscopy with lasers of 1-GHz pulse repetition frequency.

    PubMed

    Mohler, Kathrin J; Bohn, Bernhard J; Yan, Ming; Mélen, Gwénaëlle; Hänsch, Theodor W; Picqué, Nathalie

    2017-01-15

    We extend the technique of multiplex coherent Raman spectroscopy with two femtosecond mode-locked lasers to oscillators of a pulse repetition frequency of 1 GHz. We demonstrate a spectra of liquids, which span 1100  cm-1 of Raman shifts. At a resolution of 6  cm-1, their measurement time may be as short as 5 μs for a refresh rate of 2 kHz. The waiting period between acquisitions is improved 10-fold compared to previous experiments with two lasers of 100-MHz repetition frequencies.

  4. GHz high power Yb-doped picosecond fiber laser and supercontinuum generation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Ge, Tingwu; Li, Wuyi; Kuang, Hongshen; Wang, Zhiyong

    2014-12-20

    We demonstrated a 97 W all-fiber picosecond master oscillator power amplifier seeding by an actively harmonic mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser. The laser seed pulse duration was 7.7 ps at a 1.223 GHz repetition rate with a central wavelength of 1062 nm. In addition, by launching the amplified pulses into a 5 m long photonic crystal fiber, we obtained a 41.8 W supercontinuum covering the wavelength from 600 to 1700 nm with a 10 dB bandwidth of 1040 nm.

  5. Few-cycle near-infrared pulses from a degenerate 1 GHz optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Richard A; Reid, Derryck T

    2015-09-01

    We report the generation of transform-limited 4.3-cycle (23 fs) pulses at 1.6 μm from a degenerate doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by a 1 GHz mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser. A χ(2) nonlinear envelope equation was used to inform the experimental implementation of intracavity group-delay dispersion compensation, resulting in resonant pulses with a 169 nm full width half-maximum spectral bandwidth, close to the bandwidth predicted by theory.

  6. Design and analysis of a K-band low-phase-noise phase-locked loop with subharmonically injection-locked technique.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yen-Liang; Chang, Hong-Yeh

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we present design and analysis of a K-band (18 to 26.5 GHz) low-phase-noise phase-locked loop (PLL) with the subharmonically injection-locked (SIL) technique. The phase noise of the PLL with subharmonic injection is investigated, and a modified phase noise model of the PLL with SIL technique is proposed. The theoretical calculations agree with the experimental results. Moreover, the phase noise of the PLL can be improved with the subharmonic injection. To achieve K-band operation with low dc power consumption, a divide-by-3 injection-locked frequency divider (ILFD) is used as a frequency prescaler. The measured phase noise of the PLL without injection is -110 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset at the operation frequency of 23.08 GHz. With the subharmonic injection, the measured phase noises at 1 MHz offset are -127, -127, and -119 dBc/Hz for the subharmonic injection number NINJ = 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Moreover, the performance of the proposed PLL with and without SIL technique can be compared with the reported advanced CMOS PLLs.

  7. 49 CFR 236.766 - Locking, movable bridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.766 Locking, movable bridge. The rail locks, bridge locks, bolt locks, circuit controllers, and electric...

  8. Locked-wrap fuel rod

    DOEpatents

    Kaplan, Samuel; Chertock, Alan J.; Punches, James R.

    1977-01-01

    A method for spacing fast reactor fuel rods using a wire wrapper improved by orienting the wire-wrapped fuel rods in a unique manner which introduces desirable performance characteristics not attainable by previous wire-wrapped designs. Use of this method in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor results in: (a) improved mechanical performance, (b) improved rod-to-rod contact, (c) reduced steel volume, and (d) improved thermal-hydraulic performance. The method produces a "locked wrap" design which tends to lock the rods together at each of the wire cluster locations.

  9. Automatic locking knee brace joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention is an apparatus for controlling the pivotal movement of a knee brace comprising a tang-and-clevis joint that has been uniquely modified. Both the tang and the clevis have a set of teeth that, when engaged, can lock the tang and the clevis together. In addition, the tang is biased away from the clevis. Consequently, when there is no axial force (i.e., body weight) on the tang, the tang is free to pivot within the clevis. However, when an axial force is exerted on the tang, the tang is pushed into the clevis, both sets of teeth engage, and the tang and the clevis lock together.

  10. Circuit breaker lock out assembly

    DOEpatents

    Gordy, W.T.

    1983-05-18

    A lock out assembly for a circuit breaker which consists of a generally step-shaped unitary base with an aperture in the small portion of the step-shaped base and a roughly S shaped retaining pin which loops through the large portion of the step-shaped base. The lock out assembly is adapted to fit over a circuit breaker with the handle switch projecting through the aperture, and the retaining pin projecting into an opening of the handle switch, preventing removal.

  11. Locking mechanism for orthopedic braces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J. I.; Epps, C. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An orthopedic brace locking mechanism is described which under standing or walking conditions cannot be unlocked, however under sitting conditions the mechanism can be simply unlocked so as to permit bending of the patient's knee. Other features of the device include: (1) the mechanism is rendered operable, and inoperable, dependent upon the relative inclination of the brace with respect to the ground; (2) the mechanism is automatically locked under standing or walking conditions and is manually unlocked under sitting conditions; and (3) the mechanism is light in weight and is relatively small in size.

  12. 49 CFR 236.762 - Locking, indication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.762 Locking, indication. Electric locking which prevents manipulation of levers that would result in an...

  13. 49 CFR 236.769 - Locking, traffic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.769 Locking, traffic. Electric locking which prevents the manipulation of levers or other devices for...

  14. 49 CFR 236.769 - Locking, traffic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.769 Locking, traffic. Electric locking which prevents the manipulation of levers or other devices for...

  15. 49 CFR 236.762 - Locking, indication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.762 Locking, indication. Electric locking which prevents manipulation of levers that would result in an...

  16. 49 CFR 236.762 - Locking, indication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.762 Locking, indication. Electric locking which prevents manipulation of levers that would result in an...

  17. 49 CFR 236.769 - Locking, traffic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.769 Locking, traffic. Electric locking which prevents the manipulation of levers or other devices for...

  18. 49 CFR 236.769 - Locking, traffic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.769 Locking, traffic. Electric locking which prevents the manipulation of levers or other devices for...

  19. 49 CFR 236.767 - Locking, route.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.767 Locking, route. Electric locking, effective when a train passes a signal displaying an aspect for it...

  20. 1.34 µm picosecond self-mode-locked Nd:GdVO4 watt-level laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ming; Peng, Jiying; Li, Zuohan; Cao, Qiuyuan; Yuan, Ruixia

    2017-01-01

    With a simple linear configuration, a diode-pumped, self-mode-locked Nd:GdVO4 laser at 1.34 µm is experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Based on the aberrationless theory of self-focusing and thermal lensing effect, through designing and optimizing the resonator, a pulse width as short as 9.1 ps is generated at a repetition rate of 2.0 GHz and the average output power is 2.51 W. The optical conversion efficiency and the slope efficiency for the stable mode-locked operation are approximately 16.7% and 19.2%, respectively.

  1. Passive mode-locking of fiber ring laser at the 337th harmonic using gigahertz acoustic core resonances.

    PubMed

    Kang, M S; Joly, N Y; Russell, P St J

    2013-02-15

    We report the experimental demonstration of a passively mode-locked Er-doped fiber ring laser operating at the 337th harmonic (1.80 GHz) of the cavity. The laser makes use of highly efficient Raman-like optoacoustic interactions between the guided light and gigahertz acoustic resonances trapped in the micron-sized solid glass core of a photonic crystal fiber. At sufficient pump power levels the laser output locks to a repetition rate corresponding to the acoustic frequency. A stable optical pulse train with a side-mode suppression ratio higher than 45 dB was obtained at low pump powers (~60 mW).

  2. Low repetition rate and broad frequency tuning from a grating-coupled passively mode-locked quantum dot laser

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H. C. Wu, Q. Y.; Pan, C. H.; Lee, C. P.; Lin, G.

    2013-11-18

    Passively mode-locked quantum dot lasers with a grating-coupled external cavity arrangement are investigated. A broad repetition-rate tuning range of fundamental mode-locking from 2 GHz to a record-low frequency of 79.3 MHz is achieved with selecting the wavelength at 1.28 μm. A narrow RF linewidth of ∼25 Hz and an intrinsic linewidth as low as 0.15 Hz are also obtained.

  3. Inter-satellite coherent optical communication locked frequency analysis and method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Haichao; She, Shang; Xiaojun, Li; Song, Dawei

    2014-10-01

    In free space optical homodyne receiver that analyze Residual carrier COSTAS loop, Inter-satellite LEO-GEO laser communication link frequency analysis, result from Doppler frequency shift 10GHz in the maximum range, LEO-GEO inter-satellite laser links between Doppler rate of change in the 20MHz/s. The optical homodyne COSTAS receiver is the application in inter-satellite optical link coherent communication system. The homodyne receiver is the three processes: Scanning frequency, Locked frequency and Locked phase, before the homodyne coherent communication. The processes are validated in lab., and the paper presents the locked frequency data and chart, LO laser frequency with triangle control scanning and receiving optical frequency is mixed less 100MHz intermediate frequency, locked frequency range between 100MHz and 1MHz basically, discriminator method determines mixing intermediate frequency less 1MHz between the signal laser and the LO laser with the low-pass filter due to frequency loop and phase loop noise. When two loops are running, the boundary frequency of laser tuning is fuzzy, so that we must be decoupling internal PID parameters. In the Locked frequency and phase COSTAS loop homodyne receiver gave the eye-diagram with Bit error rate 10E-7.

  4. 46 CFR 154.345 - Air locks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air locks. 154.345 Section 154.345 Shipping COAST GUARD....345 Air locks. (a) An air lock may be used for access from a gas-dangerous zone on the weather deck to a gas-safe space. (b) Each air lock must: (1) Consist of two steel doors, at least 1.5 m (4.9...

  5. The Future RFI Environment Above 30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, Andrew W.

    1995-12-01

    Encompassing 30 - 300 GHz, the millimeter wave (mmW) band offers relief from spectrum crowding at lower frequencies, large available bandwidth, favorable propagation characteristics for certain applications, and relatively high directivity with small antennas. The FCC has recently proposed regulatory changes to foster commercial development of the mmW band. Impending actions include: Designating the 46.7-46.9 GHz and 76-77 GHz bands for unlicensed vehicular radar systems. Potentially tens of millions of vehicles will be equipped with radars to provide ``intelligent cruise control" capability and driver blind-spot warnings. Unwanted emissions from vehicular radar systems may produce harmful interference to passive systems operating in protected bands. Opening the 59-64 GHz band, in which propagation is limited to short distances due to high atmospheric attenuation, to general unlicensed devices. A likely application for this band is wireless local area computer networks. The neighboring bands of 58.2 - 59 and 64 - 65 GHz are allocated to the passive services. Changes still under consideration include: Opening the 116 - 117 GHz band, co-located with an existing passive allocation, for licensed (116 - 116.5 GHz) and general unlicensed (116.5 - 117 GHz) devices. The opening (for licensed and unlicensed services) of nearly 5 GHz of additional spectrum space which neighbors passive allocations and poses a potential interference problem from out-of-band emissions. The status of the FCC's actions concerning the mmW band will be updated. An attempt will be made to predict the RFI environment in the mmW band assuming the likely applications for each of the reallocated bands. Particular emphasis will be placed on the impact of the FCC's actions on current and planned remote sensing and radio astronomy operations.

  6. 49 CFR 236.766 - Locking, movable bridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Locking, movable bridge. 236.766 Section 236.766... Locking, movable bridge. The rail locks, bridge locks, bolt locks, circuit controllers, and electric locks used in providing interlocking protection at a movable bridge....

  7. 49 CFR 236.766 - Locking, movable bridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locking, movable bridge. 236.766 Section 236.766... Locking, movable bridge. The rail locks, bridge locks, bolt locks, circuit controllers, and electric locks used in providing interlocking protection at a movable bridge....

  8. 49 CFR 236.766 - Locking, movable bridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Locking, movable bridge. 236.766 Section 236.766... Locking, movable bridge. The rail locks, bridge locks, bolt locks, circuit controllers, and electric locks used in providing interlocking protection at a movable bridge....

  9. 49 CFR 236.766 - Locking, movable bridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locking, movable bridge. 236.766 Section 236.766... Locking, movable bridge. The rail locks, bridge locks, bolt locks, circuit controllers, and electric locks used in providing interlocking protection at a movable bridge....

  10. 75 FR 2129 - Lock+TM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Lock+ TM Hydro Friends Fund XXX, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit... January 6, 2010. On November 13, 2009, Lock+ TM Hydro Friends Fund XXX, LLC filed an application, pursuant...,018 megawatt-hours. Applicant Contact: Wayne F. Krouse, Lock+ TM Hydro Friends Fund XXX, LLC,...

  11. 49 CFR 236.768 - Locking, time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locking, time. 236.768 Section 236.768... Locking, time. A method of locking, either mechanical or electrical, which, after a signal has been caused to display an aspect to proceed, prevents, until after the expiration of a predetermined...

  12. 49 CFR 236.378 - Time locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Time locking. 236.378 Section 236.378 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... and Tests § 236.378 Time locking. Time locking shall be tested when placed in service and...

  13. 49 CFR 236.378 - Time locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Time locking. 236.378 Section 236.378 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... and Tests § 236.378 Time locking. Time locking shall be tested when placed in service and...

  14. 49 CFR 236.768 - Locking, time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Locking, time. 236.768 Section 236.768... Locking, time. A method of locking, either mechanical or electrical, which, after a signal has been caused to display an aspect to proceed, prevents, until after the expiration of a predetermined...

  15. 49 CFR 236.378 - Time locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Time locking. 236.378 Section 236.378 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... and Tests § 236.378 Time locking. Time locking shall be tested when placed in service and...

  16. Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint locks and unlocks automatically, at any position within range of bend angles, without manual intervention by wearer. Includes tang and clevis, locks whenever wearer transfers weight to knee and unlocks when weight removed. Locking occurs at any angle between 45 degrees knee bend and full extension.

  17. 49 CFR 236.376 - Mechanical locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and Tests § 236.376 Mechanical locking. Mechanical locking in interlocking machine shall be tested... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mechanical locking. 236.376 Section 236.376 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD...

  18. 49 CFR 236.376 - Mechanical locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and Tests § 236.376 Mechanical locking. Mechanical locking in interlocking machine shall be tested... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mechanical locking. 236.376 Section 236.376 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD...

  19. 49 CFR 236.105 - Electric lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electric lock. 236.105 Section 236.105 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION...: All Systems Inspections and Tests; All Systems § 236.105 Electric lock. Electric lock, except...

  20. 49 CFR 236.761 - Locking, electric.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locking, electric. 236.761 Section 236.761 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Locking, electric. The combination of one or more electric locks and controlling circuits by means...

  1. 49 CFR 236.761 - Locking, electric.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Locking, electric. 236.761 Section 236.761 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Locking, electric. The combination of one or more electric locks and controlling circuits by means...

  2. 49 CFR 236.757 - Lock, electric.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lock, electric. 236.757 Section 236.757... Lock, electric. A device to prevent or restrict the movement of a lever, a switch or a movable bridge, unless the locking member is withdrawn by an electrical device, such as an electromagnet, solenoid...

  3. 49 CFR 236.757 - Lock, electric.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lock, electric. 236.757 Section 236.757... Lock, electric. A device to prevent or restrict the movement of a lever, a switch or a movable bridge, unless the locking member is withdrawn by an electrical device, such as an electromagnet, solenoid...

  4. 49 CFR 236.105 - Electric lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electric lock. 236.105 Section 236.105 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION...: All Systems Inspections and Tests; All Systems § 236.105 Electric lock. Electric lock, except...

  5. 49 CFR 236.761 - Locking, electric.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Locking, electric. 236.761 Section 236.761 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Locking, electric. The combination of one or more electric locks and controlling circuits by means...

  6. 49 CFR 236.757 - Lock, electric.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lock, electric. 236.757 Section 236.757... Lock, electric. A device to prevent or restrict the movement of a lever, a switch or a movable bridge, unless the locking member is withdrawn by an electrical device, such as an electromagnet, solenoid...

  7. 49 CFR 236.105 - Electric lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electric lock. 236.105 Section 236.105 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION...: All Systems Inspections and Tests; All Systems § 236.105 Electric lock. Electric lock, except...

  8. 49 CFR 236.105 - Electric lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electric lock. 236.105 Section 236.105 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION...: All Systems Inspections and Tests; All Systems § 236.105 Electric lock. Electric lock, except...

  9. 49 CFR 236.378 - Time locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Time locking. 236.378 Section 236.378 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... and Tests § 236.378 Time locking. Time locking shall be tested when placed in service and...

  10. 49 CFR 236.768 - Locking, time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locking, time. 236.768 Section 236.768... Locking, time. A method of locking, either mechanical or electrical, which, after a signal has been caused to display an aspect to proceed, prevents, until after the expiration of a predetermined...

  11. 49 CFR 236.768 - Locking, time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Locking, time. 236.768 Section 236.768... Locking, time. A method of locking, either mechanical or electrical, which, after a signal has been caused to display an aspect to proceed, prevents, until after the expiration of a predetermined...

  12. 49 CFR 236.378 - Time locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Time locking. 236.378 Section 236.378 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... and Tests § 236.378 Time locking. Time locking shall be tested when placed in service and...

  13. 76 FR 48840 - Lock+TM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Lock+\\TM\\ Hydro Friends Fund XXXV Riverbank Hydro No. 4, LLC; Notice of..., and Competing Applications On April 1, 2011, Lock+\\TM\\ Hydro Friends Fund XXXV (Hydro Friends) and... Corps of Engineers' (Corps) Lock and Dam No. 5, located on the Mississippi River near Minnesota...

  14. 49 CFR 236.376 - Mechanical locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mechanical locking. 236.376 Section 236.376 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... and Tests § 236.376 Mechanical locking. Mechanical locking in interlocking machine shall be...

  15. 49 CFR 236.376 - Mechanical locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mechanical locking. 236.376 Section 236.376 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... and Tests § 236.376 Mechanical locking. Mechanical locking in interlocking machine shall be...

  16. 49 CFR 236.376 - Mechanical locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mechanical locking. 236.376 Section 236.376 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... and Tests § 236.376 Mechanical locking. Mechanical locking in interlocking machine shall be...

  17. 49 CFR 236.381 - Traffic locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Traffic locking. 236.381 Section 236.381 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... and Tests § 236.381 Traffic locking. Traffic locking shall be tested when placed in service...

  18. 49 CFR 236.381 - Traffic locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Traffic locking. 236.381 Section 236.381 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... and Tests § 236.381 Traffic locking. Traffic locking shall be tested when placed in service...

  19. 49 CFR 236.381 - Traffic locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Traffic locking. 236.381 Section 236.381 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... and Tests § 236.381 Traffic locking. Traffic locking shall be tested when placed in service...

  20. 49 CFR 236.381 - Traffic locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Traffic locking. 236.381 Section 236.381 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... and Tests § 236.381 Traffic locking. Traffic locking shall be tested when placed in service...

  1. 49 CFR 236.381 - Traffic locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Traffic locking. 236.381 Section 236.381 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... and Tests § 236.381 Traffic locking. Traffic locking shall be tested when placed in service...

  2. 49 CFR 236.105 - Electric lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electric lock. 236.105 Section 236.105..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems Inspections and Tests; All Systems § 236.105 Electric lock. Electric lock, except...

  3. 46 CFR 108.157 - Locked doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locked doors. 108.157 Section 108.157 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT... may be designed to lock except— (a) A crash door or a door that has a locking device that can...

  4. 46 CFR 108.157 - Locked doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locked doors. 108.157 Section 108.157 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT... may be designed to lock except— (a) A crash door or a door that has a locking device that can...

  5. Simultaneous low noise radio frequency tone and narrow linewidth optical comb generation from a regeneratively mode-locked laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdur, Ibrahim; Ozharar, Sarper; Delfyett, Peter J.

    2014-10-01

    A regeneratively mode-locked laser with simultaneous low noise radio frequency (RF) tone and optical comb generation is presented. The laser does not need any external RF signal and emits a pulse train at ˜10 GHz repetition rate with a 1.5-ps optical pulse width after compression. The generated RF tone has a signal-to-noise ratio of 121 dB/Hz and an RF fluctuation of 10-9 over 0.1 s. The optical frequency comb spacing is also at ˜10 GHz and the optical comb tooth has a linewidth of <1 kHz.

  6. Locking Lasers to RF in an Ultra Fast FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R.; Huang, G.; Doolittle, L.; White, W.; Frisch, J.; Coffee, R.

    2010-01-02

    Using a novel, phase-stabilized RF-over-fiber scheme, they transmit 3GHz over 300m with 27fs RMS error in 250kHz bandwidth over 12 hours, and phase lock a laser to enable ultrafast pump-probe experiments. Free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of producing short-duration (< 10fs), high-energy X-ray pulses for a range of scientific applications. The recently activated Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) FEL facility at SLAC will support experiments which require synchronized light pulses for pump-probe schemes. They developed and operated a fiber optic RF transmission system to synchronize lasers to the emitted X-ray pulses, which was used to enable the first pump-probe experiments at the LCLS.

  7. 75 FR 5068 - Lock + TM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Lock + \\TM\\ Hydro Friends Fund XXXIII, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Competing Applications January 22, 2010. On January 8,...

  8. Photonic generation of phase-stable and wideband chirped microwave signals based on phase-locked dual optical frequency combs.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yitian; Zhou, Qian; Han, Daming; Li, Baiyu; Xie, Weilin; Liu, Zhangweiyi; Qin, Jie; Wang, Xiaocheng; Dong, Yi; Hu, Weisheng

    2016-08-15

    A photonics-based scheme is presented for generating wideband and phase-stable chirped microwave signals based on two phase-locked combs with fixed and agile repetition rates. By tuning the difference of the two combs' repetition rates and extracting different order comb tones, a wideband linearly frequency-chirped microwave signal with flexible carrier frequency and chirped range is obtained. Owing to the scheme of dual-heterodyne phase transfer and phase-locked loop, extrinsic phase drift and noise induced by the separated optical paths is detected and suppressed efficiently. Linearly frequency-chirped microwave signals from 5 to 15 GHz and 237 to 247 GHz with 30 ms duration are achieved, respectively, contributing to the time-bandwidth product of 3×108. And less than 1.3×10-5 linearity errors (RMS) are also obtained.

  9. Near infrared standard sources, generated by electro-optic frequency comb, using injection-locked DFB laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Hun; Suh, Ho Suhng

    2014-02-01

    Stable, near-infrared laser sources were generated by an electro-optic modulator with selected comb-mode seeding. The single comb mode was selected from the fiber laser comb using a Fabry-Pèrot cavity (FPC) of 1.25 GHz spacing, and injection locking technique. An electro-optic frequency comb (EOFC) with spacing of 25 GHz was generated as the side mode of the injection-locked comb mode. Using a single mode of the EOFC, we measured the frequency of the acetylene stabilized laser used as the calibration reference frequency light source for optical communication. The absolute frequency and estimated stability of the acetylene stabilized laser were 194 369 569 384.6 kHz and 2.3×10-12 (average time 1 s), respectively.

  10. Morbus-Locke's early essay on disease.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, J

    2000-01-01

    John Locke engaged in a systematic study of medicine from the late 1650's. In this period he acquainted himself with the three main competing natural philosophical theories of the time -Galenism, Paracelsianism and Mechanism. He was particularly interested in the work of Sennert, Helmont and Doyle. In 1666, just after the publication of Boyle's The Origine of Formes and Qualities, Locke wrote a short paper entitled Morbus. This paper gave Locke's own view of the nature of disease. Locke went out of his way to criticise Boyle's attempts to give mechanical explanations for biological phenomena. He endorsed Helmont's theory that disease was caused by "ferments" and "Archei" and re-introduced Galenic temperaments as factors of susceptibility in seminal diseases. Locke did not endorse a mechanical corpuscularianism at this stage in his career, when his contact with Boyle was most frequent. Consequently, Locke's espousal of the corpuscular philosophy in the Essay cannot be attributed to Locke's association with Boyle at this time.

  11. 1-GHz harmonically pumped femtosecond optical parametric oscillator frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Balskus, K; Leitch, S M; Zhang, Z; McCracken, R A; Reid, D T

    2015-01-26

    We present the first example of a femtosecond optical parametric oscillator frequency comb harmonically-pumped by a 333-MHz Ti:sapphire laser to achieve a stabilized signal comb at 1-GHz mode spacing in the 1.1-1.6-µm wavelength band. Simultaneous locking of the comb carrier-envelope-offset and repetition frequencies is achieved with uncertainties over 1 s of 0.27 Hz and 5 mHz respectively, which are comparable with those of 0.27 Hz and 1.5 mHz achieved for 333-MHz fundamental pumping. The phase-noise power-spectral density of the CEO frequency integrated from 1 Hz-64 kHz was 2.8 rad for the harmonic comb, 1.0 rad greater than for fundamental pumping. The results show that harmonic operation does not substantially compromise the frequency-stability of the comb, which is shown to be limited only by the Rb atomic frequency reference used.

  12. Cryogenic 160-GHz MMIC Heterodyne Receiver Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Soria, Mary M.; Owen, Heather R.; Dawson, Douglas E.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Gaier, Todd C.; Voll, Patricia; Lau, Judy; Sieth, Matt; Church, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    A cryogenic 160-GHz MMIC heterodyne receiver module has demonstrated a system noise temperature of 100 K or less at 166 GHz. This module builds upon work previously described in Development of a 150-GHz MMIC Module Prototype for Large-Scale CMB Radiation (NPO-47664), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 35, No. 8 (August 2011), p. 27. In the original module, the local oscillator signal was saturating the MMIC low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) with power. In order to suppress the local oscillator signal from reaching the MMIC LNAs, the W-band (75 110 GHz) signal had to be filtered out before reaching 140 170 GHz. A bandpass filter was developed to cover 120 170 GHz, using microstrip parallel-coupled lines to achieve the desired filter bandwidth, and ensure that the unwanted W-band local oscillator signal would be sufficiently suppressed. With the new bandpass filter, the entire receiver can work over the 140 180-GHz band, with a minimum system noise temperature of 460 K at 166 GHz. The module was tested cryogenically at 20 K ambient temperature, and it was found that the receiver had a noise temperature of 100 K over an 8-GHz bandwidth. The receiver module now includes a microstrip bandpass filter, which was designed to have a 3-dB bandwidth of approximately 120-170 GHz. The filter was fabricated on a 3-mil-thick alumina substrate. The filter design was based on a W-band filter design made at JPL and used in the QUIET (Q/U Imaging ExperimenT) radiometer modules. The W-band filter was scaled for a new center frequency of 150 GHz, and the microstrip segments were changed accordingly. Also, to decrease the bandwidth of the resulting scaled design, the center gaps between the microstrip lines were increased (by four micrometers in length) compared to the gaps near the edges. The use of the 150-GHz bandpass filter has enabled the receiver module to function well at room temperature. The system noise temperature was measured to be less than 600 K (at room temperature) from 154 to 168 GHz

  13. Deep-red semiconductor monolithic mode-locked lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, L.; Bajek, D.; White, S. E.; Forrest, A. F.; Cataluna, M. A.; Wang, H. L.; Pan, J. Q.; Wang, X. L.; Cui, B. F.; Ding, Y.

    2014-12-01

    A deep-red semiconductor monolithic mode-locked laser is demonstrated. Multi-section laser diodes based on an AlGaAs multi-quantum-well structure were passively mode-locked, enabling the generation of picosecond optical pulses at 752 nm, at pulse repetition rates of 19.37 GHz. An investigation of the dependence of the pulse duration as a function of reverse bias revealed a predominantly exponential decay trend of the pulse duration, varying from 10.5 ps down to 3.5 ps, which can be associated with the concomitant reduction of absorption recovery time with increasing applied field. A 30-MHz-tunability of the pulse repetition rate with bias conditions is also reported. The demonstration of such a compact, efficient and versatile ultrafast laser in this spectral region paves the way for its deployment in a wide range of applications such as biomedical microscopy, pulsed terahertz generation as well as microwave and millimeter-wave generation, with further impact on sensing, imaging and optical communications.

  14. A 16 element quasi-optical FET oscillator power combining array with external injection locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkeland, Joel; Itoh, Tatsuo

    1992-03-01

    The authors present analysis, design and experimental results of a 16 element planar oscillator array for quasi-optical power combining. Each element in the array consists of a single FET oscillator with an input port for injection of the locking signal, and an output port which is connected to a patch radiator. The array is synchronized using a 16-way power dividing network which distributes the locking signal to the oscillating elements. The array is constructed using a two-sided microstrip configuration, with the oscillators and feed network on one side of a ground plane, and the patch radiators on the opposite side. An effective radiated power (ERP) of 28.2 W CW with an isotropic conversion gain of 9.9 dB was measured at 6 GHz. For an injected power of 10.3 dBm, a locking range of 453 MHz at a center frequency of 6.015 GHz was obtained; a bandwidth of 7.5 percent. Because of the simple nature of the individual oscillator elements, this approach is well suited to MMIC implementation.

  15. Dual-wavelength mode-locking of novel chirped multilayer quantum-dot lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chun-Ping; Lin, Gray; Chen, Yu-Chen; Cheng, Hsu-Chieh

    2016-09-01

    Monolithic passively mode-locked lasers are investigated based on chirped multilayer InAs/InGaAs QDs. Three chirped wavelengths, with stacking numbers of 2, 3 and 5 layers, are designed with capped InGaAs thickness of 4, 3 and 1 nm, respectively. The ridge-waveguide devices of 5-μm width and 3-mm length are fabricated to have absorber-to-gain length ratio of 1:9. A curve tracer is used to analyze the hysteresis on the light-current curve. Two kinks in the L-I curve are observed at threshold current near 50 mA and at higher current of about 150 mA. The lasing wavelength just above threshold is centered at 1268 nm and the RF spectrum of mode-locking is peaked at 13.32 GHz. At well above threshold of 200 mA, another RF peak at 13.21 GHz occurs that corresponds to shorter lasing wavelength around 1233 nm. The two lasing wavelengths are originated from ground-state transitions of two groups of InAs/InGaAs QDs. Simultaneous dual-wavelength mode-locking is therefore achieved at rather low forward current and low reverse bias by incorporating this novel design of QD structure.

  16. Optical Injection Locking of Vertical Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers: Digital and Analog Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, Devang

    frequency enhancement was exploited for millimeter-wave radio over fiber communications. Experimental demonstration of 4 Gb/s data transmission over 20 km of fiber and 3 m of wireless transmission at a 60 GHz carrier frequency was achieved. Additionally, optical injection of multi-transverse mode (MM) VCSELs was investigated showing record resonance frequency enhancement of > 54 GHz and 3-dB bandwidth of 38 GHz. Besides these applications, a number of other intriguing applications are also discussed, including an optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) and wavelength-division multiplexed passive optical networks (WDM-PON). Finally, the future of optical injection locking and its direction going forward will be discussed.

  17. Environmental stability of actively mode locked fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Calum H.; Lee, Stephen T.; Reid, Derryck T.; Baili, Ghaya; Davies, John

    2016-10-01

    Lasers developed for defence related applications typically encounter issues with reliability and meeting desired specification when taken from the lab to the product line. In particular the harsh environmental conditions a laser has to endure can lead to difficulties. This paper examines a specific class of laser, namely actively mode-locked fibre lasers (AMLFLs), and discusses the impact of environmental perturbations. Theoretical and experimental results have assisted in developing techniques to improve the stability of a mode-locked pulse train for continuous operation. Many of the lessons learned in this research are applicable to a much broader category of lasers. The AMLFL consists of a fibre ring cavity containing a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), an isolator, an output coupler, a circulator, a bandpass filter and a modulator. The laser produces a train of 6-ps pulses at 800 nm with a repetition rate in the GHz regime and a low-noise profile. This performance is realisable in a laboratory environment. However, even small changes in temperature on the order of 0.1 °C can cause a collapse of mode-locked dynamics such that the required stability cannot be achieved without suitable feedback. Investigations into the root causes of this failure were performed by changing the temperature of components that constitute the laser resonator and observing their properties. Several different feedback mechanisms have been investigated to improve laser stability in an environment with dynamic temperature changes. Active cavity length control will be discussed along with DC bias control of the Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM).

  18. Hybrid wireless-over-fiber transmission system based on multiple injection-locked FP LDs.

    PubMed

    Li, Chung-Yi; Lu, Hai-Han; Chu, Chien-An; Ying, Cheng-Ling; Lu, Ting-Chien; Peng, Peng-Chun

    2015-07-27

    A hybrid wireless-over-fiber (WoF) transmission system based on multiple injection-locked Fabry-Perot laser diodes (FP LDs) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Unlike the traditional hybrid WoF transmission systems that require multiple distributed feedback (DFB) LDs to support different kinds of services, the proposed system employs multiple injection-locked FP LDs to provide different kinds of applications. Such a hybrid WoF transmission system delivers downstream intensity-modulated 20-GHz microwave (MW)/60-GHz millimeter-wave (MMW)/550-MHz cable television (CATV) signals and upstream phase-remodulated 20-GHz MW signal. Excellent bit error rate (BER), carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR), composite second-order (CSO), and composite triple-beat (CTB) are observed over a 40-km single-mode fiber (SMF) and a 4-m radio frequency (RF) wireless transport. Such a hybrid WoF transmission system has practical applications for fiber-wireless convergence to provide broadband integrated services, including telecommunication, data communication, and CATV services.

  19. 80Gb/s clock recovery with phase locked loop based on LiNbO3 modulators.

    PubMed

    Zhu, G; Wang, Q; Dong, H; Sun, H; Dutta, N

    2004-07-26

    In this paper, we present a scheme for extracting a 10GHz clock from the 80Gb/s optical time division multiplexed (OTDM) return to zero (RZ) data stream. The proposed clock recovery is based on the offset locking technique. By using the input data composed of a repeating "10100000" pattern, residue jitter free operation for clock recovery is demonstrated. The method utilizes a LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder (MZ) intensity modulator for cross-correlation detections.

  20. Self-locking threaded fasteners

    DOEpatents

    Glovan, R.J.; Tierney, J.C.; McLean, L.L.; Johnson, L.L.

    1996-01-16

    A threaded fastener with a shape memory alloy (SMA) coatings on its threads is disclosed. The fastener has special usefulness in high temperature applications where high reliability is important. The SMA coated fastener is threaded into or onto a mating threaded part at room temperature to produce a fastened object. The SMA coating is distorted during the assembly. At elevated temperatures the coating tries to recover its original shape and thereby exerts locking forces on the threads. When the fastened object is returned to room temperature the locking forces dissipate. Consequently the threaded fasteners can be readily disassembled at room temperature but remains securely fastened at high temperatures. A spray technique is disclosed as a particularly useful method of coating of threads of a fastener with a shape memory alloy. 13 figs.

  1. Self-locking threaded fasteners

    DOEpatents

    Glovan, Ronald J.; Tierney, John C.; McLean, Leroy L.; Johnson, Lawrence L.

    1996-01-01

    A threaded fastener with a shape memory alloy (SMA) coatings on its threads is disclosed. The fastener has special usefulness in high temperature applications where high reliability is important. The SMA coated fastener is threaded into or onto a mating threaded part at room temperature to produce a fastened object. The SMA coating is distorted during the assembly. At elevated temperatures the coating tries to recover its original shape and thereby exerts locking forces on the threads. When the fastened object is returned to room temperature the locking forces dissipate. Consequently the threaded fasteners can be readily disassembled at room temperature but remains securely fastened at high temperatures. A spray technique is disclosed as a particularly useful method of coating of threads of a fastener with a shape memory alloy.

  2. Locking mechanism for indexing device

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenmeyer, C.W.

    1982-01-25

    Disclosed is a locking mechanism for an indexing spindle. A conventional spur gear having outwardly extending teeth is affixed to the spindle. Also included is a rotatably mounted camshaft whose axis is arranged in skewed relationship with the axis of the spindle. A disk-like wedge having opposing camming surfaces is eccentrically mounted on the camshaft. As the camshaft is rotated, the camming surfaces of the disk are interposed between adjacent gear teeth with a wiping action that wedges the disk between the gear teeth. A zero backlash engagement between disk and gear results, with the engagement having a high mechanical advantage so as to effectively lock the spindle against bi-directional rotation.

  3. Locking mechanism for indexing device

    SciTech Connect

    Lindemeyer, C.W.

    1984-08-14

    Disclosed is a locking mechanism for an indexing spindle. A conventional spur gear having outwardly extending teeth is affixed to the spindle. Also included is a rotatably mounted camshaft whose axis is arranged in skewed relationship with the axis of the spindle. A disk-like wedge having opposing camming surfaces is eccentrically mounted on the camshaft. As the camshaft is rotated, the camming surfaces of the disc-like member are interposed between adjacent gear teeth with a wiping action that wedges the disc-like member between the gear teeth. A zero backlash engagement between disc-like member and gear results, with the engagement having a high mechanical advantage so as to effectively lock the spindle against bidirectional rotation.

  4. Locking mechanism for indexing device

    DOEpatents

    Lindemeyer, Carl W.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a locking mechanism for an indexing spindle. A conventional r gear having outwardly extending teeth is affixed to the spindle. Also included is a rotatably mounted camshaft whose axis is arranged in skewed relationship with the axis of the spindle. A disk-like wedge having opposing camming surfaces is eccentrically mounted on the camshaft. As the camshaft is rotated, the camming surfaces of the disc-like member are interposed between adjacent gear teeth with a wiping action that wedges the disc-like member between the gear teeth. A zero backlash engagement between disc-like member and gear results, with the engagement having a high mechanical advantage so as to effectively lock the spindle against bidirectional rotation.

  5. Digital phase-lock loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Jr., Jess B. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved digital phase lock loop incorporates several distinctive features that attain better performance at high loop gain and better phase accuracy. These features include: phase feedback to a number-controlled oscillator in addition to phase rate; analytical tracking of phase (both integer and fractional cycles); an amplitude-insensitive phase extractor; a more accurate method for extracting measured phase; a method for changing loop gain during a track without loss of lock; and a method for avoiding loss of sampled data during computation delay, while maintaining excellent tracking performance. The advantages of using phase and phase-rate feedback are demonstrated by comparing performance with that of rate-only feedback. Extraction of phase by the method of modeling provides accurate phase measurements even when the number-controlled oscillator phase is discontinuously updated.

  6. 47 CFR 15.251 - Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz. 15.251 Section 15.251 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  7. 47 CFR 15.251 - Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz. 15.251 Section 15.251 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  8. 47 CFR 15.251 - Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz. 15.251 Section 15.251 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  9. 47 CFR 15.251 - Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz. 15.251 Section 15.251 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  10. 47 CFR 15.251 - Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz. 15.251 Section 15.251 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  11. Hydraulic Modeling of Lock Approaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    cation was that the guidewall design changed from a solid wall to one on pilings in which water was allowed to flow through and/or under the wall ...develops innovative solutions in civil and military engineering, geospatial sciences, water resources, and environmental sciences for the Army, the...magnitudes and directions at lock approaches for open river conditions. The meshes were developed using the Surface- water Modeling System. The two

  12. Subharmonic Fourier domain mode locking.

    PubMed

    Eigenwillig, Christoph M; Wieser, Wolfgang; Biedermann, Benjamin R; Huber, Robert

    2009-03-15

    We demonstrate a subharmonically Fourier domain mode-locked wavelength-swept laser source with a substantially reduced cavity fiber length. In contrast to a standard Fourier domain mode-locked configuration, light is recirculated repetitively in the delay line with the optical bandpass filter used as switch. The laser has a fundamental optical round trip frequency of 285 kHz and can be operated at integer fractions thereof (subharmonics). Sweep ranges up to 95 nm full width centred at 1317 nm are achieved at the 1/5th subharmonic. A maximum sensitivity of 116 dB and an axial resolution of 12 microm in air are measured at an average sweep power of 12 mW. A sensitivity roll-off of 11 dB over 4 mm and 25 dB over 10 mm is observed and optical coherence tomography imaging is demonstrated. Besides the advantage of a reduced fiber length, subharmonic Fourier domain mode locking (shFDML) enables simple scaling of the sweep speed by extracting light from the delay part of the resonator. A sweep rate of 570 kHz is achieved. Characteristic features of shFDML operation, such as power leakage during fly-back and cw breakthrough, are investigated.

  13. Millimeter wave absorption in the nonhuman primate eye at 35 GHz and 94 GHz.

    PubMed

    Chalfin, Steven; D'Andrea, John A; Comeau, Paul D; Belt, Michael E; Hatcher, Donald J

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate anterior segment bioeffects of pulsed 35 GHz and 94 GHz microwave exposure in the nonhuman primate eye. Five juvenile rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) underwent baseline anterior segment ocular assessment consisting of slit lamp examination, corneal topography, specular microscopy, and pachymetry. These studies were repeated after exposure of one eye to pulsed 35 GHz or 94 GHz microwaves at varied fluences, with the other eye serving as a control. The mean fluence required to produce a threshold corneal lesion (faint epithelial edema and fluorescein staining) was 7.5 J cm(-2) at 35 GHz and 5 J cm(-2) at 94 GHz. Transient changes in corneal topography and pachymetry were noted at these fluences. Endothelial cell counts remained unchanged. Threshold corneal injury from 35 GHz and 94 GHz microwave exposure is produced at fluences below those previously reported for CO2 laser radiation. These data may help elucidate the mechanism of thermal injury to the cornea, and resolve discrepancies between IEEE C95.1 (1999), NCRP (1986), and ICNIRP (1998) safety standards for exposure to non-ionizing radiation at millimeter wavelengths.

  14. Contactless Investigations of Yeast Cell Cultivation in the 7 GHz and 240 GHz Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, J.; Schmalz, K.; Gastrock, G.; Cahill, B. P.; Meliani, C.

    2013-04-01

    Using a microfluidic system based on PTFE tubes, experimental results of contactless and label-free characterization techniques of yeast cell cultivation are presented. The PTFE tube has an inner diameter of 0.5 mm resulting in a sample volume of 2 μ1 for 1 cm sample length. Two approaches (at frequencies around 7 GHz and 240 GHz) are presented and compared in terms of sensitivity and applicability. These frequency bands are particularly interesting to gain information on the permittivity of yeast cells in Glucose solution. Measurements from 240 GHz to 300 GHz were conducted with a continuous wave spectrometer from Toptica. At 7 GHz band, measurements have been performed using a rat-race based characterizing system realized on a printed circuit board. The conducted experiments demonstrate that by selecting the phase as characterization parameter, the presented contactless and label-free techniques are suitable for cell cultivation monitoring in a PTFE pipe based microfluidic system.

  15. Use of optical speckle patterns for compressive sensing of RF signals in the GHz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, George C.; Sefler, George A.; Shaw, T. Justin

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that speckle patterns at the output of multimode optical waveguides can be used for a compressive sensing (CS) measurement matrix (MM) to measure sparse RF signals in the GHz band (1-100 GHz). In our system mode-locked femtosecond laser pulses are stretched to a width on the order of the interpulse time, modulated by the RF, and injected into a multimode waveguide. The speckle pattern out of the guide is imaged onto an array of photodiodes whose output is digitized by a bank of ADCs. We have measured the CS MM for multimode fibers and used these MMs to demonstrate that sparse RF signals (sparsity K) modulated on a chirped optical carrier can be recovered from M measurements (the number of photodiodes) consistent with the CS relation M ~ K log(N/K) (N is the number of samples needed for Nyquist rate sampling). We demonstrate experimentally that speckle sampling gives comparable results to the photonic WDM sampling system used previously for periodic undersampling (multi-coset sampling) of RF chirp pulses. We have also calculated MMs for both multimode fibers and planar waveguides using their respective mode solutions to determine optimal waveguide parameters for a CS system. Our results suggest a path to a CS system for GHz band RF signals that can be completely constructed using photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technology.

  16. Improvements in Speed and Functionality of a 670-GHz Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dengler, Robert J.; Cooper, Ken B.; Mehdi, Imran; Siegel, Peter H.; Tarsala, Jan A.; Bryllert, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Significant improvements have been made in the instrument originally described in a prior NASA Tech Briefs article: Improved Speed and Functionality of a 580-GHz Imaging Radar (NPO-45156), Vol. 34, No. 7 (July 2010), p. 51. First, the wideband YIG oscillator has been replaced with a JPL-designed and built phase-locked, low-noise chirp source. Second, further refinements to the data acquisition and signal processing software have been performed by moving critical code sections to C code, and compiling those sections to Windows DLLs, which are then invoked from the main LabVIEW executive. This system is an active, single-pixel scanned imager operating at 670 GHz. The actual chirp signals for the RF and LO chains were generated by a pair of MITEQ 2.5 3.3 GHz chirp sources. Agilent benchtop synthesizers operating at fixed frequencies around 13 GHz were then used to up-convert the chirp sources to 15.5 16.3 GHz. The resulting signals were then multiplied 36 times by a combination of off-the-shelf millimeter- wave components, and JPL-built 200- GHz doublers and 300- and 600-GHz triplers. The power required to drive the submillimeter-wave multipliers was provided by JPL-built W-band amplifiers. The receive and transmit signal paths were combined using a thin, high-resistivity silicon wafer as a beam splitter. While the results at present are encouraging, the system still lacks sufficient speed to be usable for practical applications in a contraband detection. Ideally, an image acquisition speed of ten seconds, or a factor of 30 improvement, is desired. However, the system improvements to date have resulted in a factor of five increase in signal acquisition speed, as well as enhanced signal processing algorithms, permitting clearer imaging of contraband objects hidden underneath clothing. In particular, advances in three distinct areas have enabled these performance enhancements: base source phase noise reduction, chirp rate, and signal processing. Additionally, a second

  17. Is one hair lock really representative?

    PubMed

    Dussy, Franz; Carson, Nicholas; Hangartner, Sarah; Briellmann, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    When investigating someone's hair a single lock is cut, washed, extracted and analysed. The forensic institutes in Switzerland agreed to retain a second lock for a possible reassessment. We were interested in the reproducibility of the concentrations of analytes in hair locks taken from different areas of the head of the same person covering the same time period. Therefore we analysed ethyl glucuronide and caffeine as model substances in 10 hair locks from three individuals categorised as social drinkers. The individual coefficients of variation varied between 14% and 28% for ethyl glucuronide and between 13% and 62% for caffeine corresponding to factors of 1.6 to 4.2 for the highest to the lowest concentrations between the hair locks. This finding has a significant importance both when the second hair lock has to be analysed in a forensic case and if the interpretation of the result is depending on a cut-off value.

  18. A 30 GHz monolithic receive module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondal, J.; Contolatis, T.; Geddes, J.; Bauhahn, P.; Sokolov, V.

    1990-01-01

    The technical achievements and deliveries made during the duration of the program to develop a 30 GHz monolithic receive module for communication feed array applications and to deliver submodules and 30 GHz monolithic receive modules for experimental evaluation are discussed. Key requirements include an overall receive module noise figure of 5 dB, a 30 dB RF-to-RF gain with six levels of intermediate gain control, a five bit phase shifter, and a maximum power consumption of 250 mW. In addition, the monolithic receive module design addresses a cost goal of less than one thousand dollars (1980 dollars) per module in unit buys of 5,000 or more, and a mechanical configuration that is applicable to a spaceborne phase array system. An additional task for the development and delivery of 32 GHz phase shifter integrated circuit (IC) for deep space communication is also described.

  19. 140-GHz pulsed Fourier transform microwave spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbe, W. F.; Leskovar, B.

    1985-01-01

    A pulsed microwave spectrometer operating in the vicinity of 140 GHz for the detection of rotational transitions in gaseous molecules is described. The spectrometer incorporates a tunable Fabry-Perot cavity and a subharmonically pumped superheterodyne receiver for the detection of the molecular emission signals. A 70-GHz source supplying a high-efficiency frequency doubler which is pulse modulated at 30 MHz produces sidebands of sufficient power at 140 GHz to excite the molecules. The cavity is tuned to one of the modulation sidebands. The operation of the spectrometer is illustrated by the detection of emission signals from the 6(2, 4)-6(1, 5) transition of SO2 gas. The generation of the electric dipole analog of nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) ``spin-echo'' signals by a π/2-π pulse sequence is also described.

  20. A 12 GHz broadband latching circulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoh, Y.; Konishi, H.; Sakamoto, K.

    The two kinds of latching circulators, external return path and internal return path, are defined, noting the advantages (faster switching speed, lower switching energy, less complicated fabrication) offered by the internal configuration. It is noted, however, that this kind of circulator is difficult to make broadband because the return paths do not seem to act as part of the ferrite junction. The development of a 12-GHz broadband, internal return path circulator with impedance matching transformer and in-phase adjustment screws designed using eigenvalue measurement is described. In describing the operating characteristics, it is noted that more than 25 dB isolation over 11 GHz to 13.5 GHz and 0.25 dB insertion loss is obtained.

  1. Two-photon dichroic atomic vapor laser lock using electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Becerra, F. E.; Willis, R. T.; Rolston, S. L.; Orozco, L. A.

    2009-07-15

    We demonstrate a technique to lock the frequency of a laser to a transition between two excited states in Rb vapor using a two-photon process in the presence of a weak magnetic field. We use a ladder configuration from specific hyperfine sublevels of the 5S{sub 1/2}, 5P{sub 3/2}, and 5D{sub 5/2} levels. This atomic configuration can show electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption processes. The error signal comes from the difference in the transparency or absorption felt by the two orthogonal polarizations of the probe beam. A simplified model is in good quantitative agreement with the observed signals for the experimental parameters. We have used this technique to lock the frequency of the laser up to 1.5 GHz off atomic resonance.

  2. Extremely Coherent Microwave Emission from Spin Torque Oscillator Stabilized by Phase Locked Loop.

    PubMed

    Tamaru, Shingo; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yakushiji, Kay; Yuasa, Shinji; Fukushima, Akio

    2015-12-11

    Spin torque oscillator (STO) has been attracting a great deal of attention as a candidate for the next generation microwave signal sources for various modern electronics systems since its advent. However, the phase noise of STOs under free running oscillation is still too large to be used in practical microwave applications, thus an industrially viable means to stabilize its oscillation has been strongly sought. Here we demonstrate implementation of a phase locked loop using a STO as a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) that generates a 7.344 GHz microwave signal stabilized by a 153 MHz reference signal. Spectrum measurement showed successful phase locking of the microwave signal to the reference signal, characterized by an extremely narrow oscillation peak with a linewidth of less than the measurement limit of 1 Hz. This demonstration should be a major breakthrough toward various practical applications of STOs.

  3. Extremely Coherent Microwave Emission from Spin Torque Oscillator Stabilized by Phase Locked Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaru, Shingo; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yakushiji, Kay; Yuasa, Shinji; Fukushima, Akio

    2015-12-01

    Spin torque oscillator (STO) has been attracting a great deal of attention as a candidate for the next generation microwave signal sources for various modern electronics systems since its advent. However, the phase noise of STOs under free running oscillation is still too large to be used in practical microwave applications, thus an industrially viable means to stabilize its oscillation has been strongly sought. Here we demonstrate implementation of a phase locked loop using a STO as a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) that generates a 7.344 GHz microwave signal stabilized by a 153 MHz reference signal. Spectrum measurement showed successful phase locking of the microwave signal to the reference signal, characterized by an extremely narrow oscillation peak with a linewidth of less than the measurement limit of 1 Hz. This demonstration should be a major breakthrough toward various practical applications of STOs.

  4. Extremely Coherent Microwave Emission from Spin Torque Oscillator Stabilized by Phase Locked Loop

    PubMed Central

    Tamaru, Shingo; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yakushiji, Kay; Yuasa, Shinji; Fukushima, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Spin torque oscillator (STO) has been attracting a great deal of attention as a candidate for the next generation microwave signal sources for various modern electronics systems since its advent. However, the phase noise of STOs under free running oscillation is still too large to be used in practical microwave applications, thus an industrially viable means to stabilize its oscillation has been strongly sought. Here we demonstrate implementation of a phase locked loop using a STO as a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) that generates a 7.344 GHz microwave signal stabilized by a 153 MHz reference signal. Spectrum measurement showed successful phase locking of the microwave signal to the reference signal, characterized by an extremely narrow oscillation peak with a linewidth of less than the measurement limit of 1 Hz. This demonstration should be a major breakthrough toward various practical applications of STOs. PMID:26658880

  5. Ultrafast pulse generation in a mode-locked Erbium chip waveguide laser.

    PubMed

    Khurmi, Champak; Hébert, Nicolas Bourbeau; Zhang, Wen Qi; Afshar V, Shahraam; Chen, George; Genest, Jérôme; Monro, Tanya M; Lancaster, David G

    2016-11-28

    We report mode-locked ~1550 nm output of transform-limited ~180 fs pulses from a large mode-area (diameter ~50 μm) guided-wave erbium fluorozirconate glass laser. The passively mode-locked oscillator generates pulses with 25 nm bandwidth at 156 MHz repetition rate and peak-power of 260 W. Scalability to higher repetition rate is demonstrated by transform-limited 410 fs pulse output at 1.3 GHz. To understand the origins of the broad spectral output, the laser cavity is simulated by using a numerical solution to the Ginzburg-Landau equation. This paper reports the widest bandwidth and shortest pulses achieved from an ultra-fast laser inscribed waveguide laser.

  6. Actively mode-locked fiber ring laser by intermodal acousto-optic modulation.

    PubMed

    Bello-Jiménez, M; Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Sáez-Rodríguez, D; Diez, A; Cruz, J L; Andrés, M V

    2010-11-15

    We report an actively mode-locked fiber ring laser. A simple and low-insertion-loss acousto-optic modulator driven by standing flexural waves, which couples core-to-cladding modes in a standard single-mode optical fiber, is used as an active mechanism for mode locking. Among the remarkable features of the modulator, we mention its high modulation depth (72%), broad bandwidth (187 GHz), easy tunability in the optical wavelength, and low insertion losses (0.7 dB). The narrowest optical pulses obtained were of 95 ps time width, 21 mW peak power, repetition rate of 4.758 MHz, and 110 mW of pump power.

  7. Hybrid mode-locked fiber ring laser using graphene and charcoal nanoparticles as saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hongyu; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Wenbo; Dutta, Niloy K.

    2016-05-01

    A fiber ring laser which implements hybrid mode locking technique has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated to generate pulse train at 20 GHz repetition rate with ultrashort pulse width. Graphene and charcoal nano-particles acting as passive mode lockers are inserted into a rational harmonic mode-locked fiber laser to improve the performance. With graphene saturable absorbers, the pulse duration is shortened from 5.3 ps to 2.8 ps, and with charcoal nano-particles, it is shortened to 3.2 ps. The RF spectra show that supermode noise can be removed in the presence of the saturable absorbers. Numerical simulation of the pulse transmission has also been carried out, which shows good agreement with the experimental results.

  8. VIEW LOOKING WEST THROUGH LOCK 70. NOTE THE EXTANT HARDWARE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING WEST THROUGH LOCK 70. NOTE THE EXTANT HARDWARE EMBEDED IN THE TOP OF THE LOCK WALLS, THE RECESSES IN THE LOCK WALLS, AND THE LATER-ERA CONCRETE WEIR APPROXIMATELY WHERE THE LOCK GATE SHOULD BE. - New York State Barge Canal, Lockport Locks, Richmond Avenue, Lockport, Niagara County, NY

  9. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST, LOCK 35 IS ON THE RIGHT. CANAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST, LOCK 35 IS ON THE RIGHT. CANAL WORKERS ARE CLEANING TRASH GRATES TO LOCK 35 WATER INLET. ENTRANCE TO OLD LOCK 71 ON LEFT. NOTE THE SEDIMENT BUILD UP IN THE ENTRANCE CHANNEL TO OLD LOCK 71. - New York State Barge Canal, Lockport Locks, Richmond Avenue, Lockport, Niagara County, NY

  10. Towards chip-scale optical frequency synthesis based on optical heterodyne phase-locked loop.

    PubMed

    Arafin, Shamsul; Simsek, Arda; Kim, Seong-Kyun; Dwivedi, Sarvagya; Liang, Wei; Eliyahu, Danny; Klamkin, Jonathan; Matsko, Andrey; Johansson, Leif; Maleki, Lute; Rodwell, Mark; Coldren, Larry

    2017-01-23

    An integrated heterodyne optical phase-locked loop was designed and demonstrated with an indium phosphide based photonic integrated circuit and commercial off-the-shelf electronic components. As an input reference, a stable microresonator-based optical frequency comb with a 50-dB span of 25 nm (~3 THz) around 1550 nm, having a spacing of ~26 GHz, was used. A widely-tunable on-chip sampled-grating distributed-Bragg-reflector laser is offset locked across multiple comb lines. An arbitrary frequency synthesis between the comb lines is demonstrated by tuning the RF offset source, and better than 100Hz tuning resolution with ± 5 Hz accuracy is obtained. Frequency switching of the on-chip laser to a point more than two dozen comb lines away (~5.6 nm) and simultaneous locking to the corresponding nearest comb line is also achieved in a time ~200 ns. A low residual phase noise of the optical phase-locking system is successfully achieved, as experimentally verified by the value of -80 dBc/Hz at an offset of as low as 200 Hz.

  11. An Auto-Lock Laser System for Long Term Frequency Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthiaume, Robert; Vorozcovs, Andrew; Kumarakrishnan, A.

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a compact, digitally controlled system to automatically stabilize the frequency of an external cavity diode laser to an atomic resonance. The key component of the system is a low-cost single-board computer with A/D and D/A capability that acts as a specialized lock-in amplifier. The system performs pattern matching between Doppler-free peaks obtained by scanning the laser frequency and reference peaks stored in the processor's memory. The incoming spectral signals are compared with the reference waveforms using a sliding correlation algorithm, which determines the control voltage required for adjusting the laser frequency to the desired lock point. The system has a scan amplitude of less than 1MHz when locked and it can re-lock for frequency drifts up to 10 GHz without human intervention. The dependence of laser frequency stability on ambient temperature, humidity, and pressure has been investigated. The performance of the system is suitable for experiments in atom trapping and atom interferometry that require long-term laser frequency stabilization.

  12. Phase-locking and coherent power combining of broadband linearly chirped optical waves.

    PubMed

    Satyan, Naresh; Vasilyev, Arseny; Rakuljic, George; White, Jeffrey O; Yariv, Amnon

    2012-11-05

    We propose, analyze and demonstrate the optoelectronic phase-locking of optical waves whose frequencies are chirped continuously and rapidly with time. The optical waves are derived from a common optoelectronic swept-frequency laser based on a semiconductor laser in a negative feedback loop, with a precisely linear frequency chirp of 400 GHz in 2 ms. In contrast to monochromatic waves, a differential delay between two linearly chirped optical waves results in a mutual frequency difference, and an acoustooptic frequency shifter is therefore used to phase-lock the two waves. We demonstrate and characterize homodyne and heterodyne optical phase-locked loops with rapidly chirped waves, and show the ability to precisely control the phase of the chirped optical waveform using a digital electronic oscillator. A loop bandwidth of ~ 60 kHz, and a residual phase error variance of < 0.01 rad(2) between the chirped waves is obtained. Further, we demonstrate the simultaneous phase-locking of two optical paths to a common master waveform, and the ability to electronically control the resultant two-element optical phased array. The results of this work enable coherent power combining of high-power fiber amplifiers-where a rapidly chirping seed laser reduces stimulated Brillouin scattering-and electronic beam steering of chirped optical waves.

  13. Harmonically mode-locked Ti:Er:LiNbO{sub 3} waveguide laser

    SciTech Connect

    Suche, H.; Wessel, R.; Westenhoefer, S.; Sohler, W.; Bosso, S.; Carmannini, C.; Corsini, R.

    1995-03-15

    Active mode locking of an Er-diffusion-doped Ti:LiNbO{sub 3} waveguide laser by intracavity phase modulation to as high as the fourth harmonic (5.12 GHz) of the axial-mode frequency spacing is reported. The diode-pumped, pigtailed, and fully packaged laser with a monolithically integrated intracavity phase modulator has a threshold of 9 mW (incident pump power {ital E}{sub {ital p}}{vert_bar}{vert_bar}{ital c}) and emits transform-limited pulses of {ge}3.8-ps width and {le}5.6-pJ pulse energy (gain-switched mode locking) at 1602-nm wavelength ({ital E}{sub {ital s}}{vert_bar}{vert_bar}{ital c}). The relative change of the mode-locking frequency with the temperature is 3.65{times}10{sup {minus}5}/{degree}C. The mode-locking acceptance bandwidth is {plus_minus}75 kHz near the axial-mode frequency spacing at approximately five times the threshold pump power.

  14. Bandwidth controller for phase-locked-loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockman, Milton H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A phase locked loop utilizing digital techniques to control the closed loop bandwidth of the RF carrier phase locked loop in a receiver provides high sensitivity and a wide dynamic range for signal reception. After analog to digital conversion, a digital phase locked loop bandwidth controller provides phase error detection with automatic RF carrier closed loop tracking bandwidth control to accommodate several modes of transmission.

  15. Spring-Loaded-Bolt Locking Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calco, Frank S.

    1990-01-01

    Locking device designed to clamp small objects temporarily onto object or vehicle that accelerates. Intended to be used in place of toggle clamp, which can snap out of lock during excessive shock or vibration or because of accidental contact of person or object with toggle locking handle. Device looks and operates somewhat like spring-loaded door bolt. Moderate vibrations do not cause accidental unlocking.

  16. Hydraulic Design of Lock Culvert Valves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Engineering and Design HYDRAULIC DESIGN OF LOCK CULVERT VALVES Distribution Restriction Statement Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited...Report Documentation Page Report Date 10 Jul 1989 Report Type N/A Dates Covered (from... to) - Title and Subtitle Hydraulic Design of Lock...from experience and research that may be useful to Corps of Engineers hydraulic designers concerned with the design of control valves for navigation lock

  17. 17 GHz High Gradient Accelerator Research

    SciTech Connect

    Temkin, Richard J.; Shapiro, Michael A.

    2013-07-10

    This is a report on the MIT High Gradient Accelerator Research program which has included: Operation of the 17 GHz, 25 MeV MIT/Haimson Research Corp. electron accelerator at MIT, the highest frequency, stand-alone accelerator in the world; collaboration with members of the US High Gradient Collaboration, including the design and test of novel structures at SLAC at 11.4 GHz; the design, construction and testing of photonic bandgap structures, including metallic and dielectric structures; the investigation of the wakefields in novel structures; and the training of the next generation of graduate students and postdoctoral associates in accelerator physics.

  18. The 60 GHz solid state power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclymonds, J.

    1991-01-01

    A new amplifier architecture was developed during this contract that is superior to any other solid state approach. The amplifier produced 6 watts with 4 percent efficiency over a 2 GHz band at 61.5 GHz. The unit was 7 x 9 x 3 inches in size, 5.5 pounds in weight, and the conduction cooling through the baseplate is suitable for use in space. The amplifier used high efficiency GaAs IMPATT diodes which were mounted in 1-diode circuits, called modules. Eighteen modules were used in the design, and power combining was accomplished with a proprietary passive component called a combiner plate.

  19. 95 GHz gyrotron with ferroelectric cathode.

    PubMed

    Einat, M; Pilossof, M; Ben-Moshe, R; Hirshbein, H; Borodin, D

    2012-11-02

    Ferroelectric cathodes were reported as a feasible electron source for microwave tubes. However, due to the surface plasma emission characterizing this cathode, operation of millimeter wave tubes based on it remains questionable. Nevertheless, the interest in compact high power sources of millimeter waves and specifically 95 GHz is continually growing. In this experiment, a ferroelectric cathode is used as an electron source for a gyrotron with the output frequency extended up to 95 GHz. Power above a 5 kW peak and ~0.5 μs pulses are reported; a duty cycle of 10% is estimated to be achievable.

  20. Biomechanical comparison of volar locked plate constructs using smooth and threaded locking pegs.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jeffrey; Park, Min Jung; Patel, Chirag S

    2014-02-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether there is any biomechanical difference in terms of construct strength with axial loading between volar fixed-angle locking plates with threaded locking vs smooth locking pegs. The control group comprised 7 cadaveric specimens with threaded locking pegs, and the test group comprised 7 cadaveric specimens from the same donor with smooth locking pegs. The DVR plate (Biomet, Warsaw, Indiana) was applied to the volar surface. A 15-mm dorsal wedge osteotomy was created near the level of Lister's tubercle. The radii were potted in polymethylmethacrylate for biomechanical testing. The loading protocol consisted of 3 parts: ramp loading, cyclic loading, and failure loading. The outcome measures of stiffness and failure were used to test the plates fixed with threaded and smooth locking pegs. When comparing each cycle, the difference in mean stiffness between threaded and smooth locking pegs was as follows: 122 N/mm, -9.09 N/mm, -14.7 N/mm, 49.4 N/mm, 57.4 N/mm, 71.9 N/mm, 52.3 N/mm, 35.8 N/mm. The difference in mean failure load between the threaded and smooth locking pegs was -11.3 N. There was no difference in stiffness throughout all cycles. Failure analysis showed no significant difference between the smooth (962 N) and threaded (951 N) locking pegs. The difference in stiffness between the 2 constructs (smooth minus threaded locking pegs) in ramp loading ranged from -122 to 15 N/mm. The results of this study showed no significant differences in stiffness and failure load between constructs consisting of threaded locking pegs or smooth locking pegs in the distal rows of the DVR distal radius volar locking plate. Based on the results of this study, there may be no benefit to using threaded locking pegs vs smooth locking pegs when treating distal radius fractures with a volar locking plate.

  1. Interchangeable breech lock for glove boxes

    DOEpatents

    Lemonds, David Preston

    2015-11-24

    A breech lock for a glove box is provided that may be used to transfer one or more items into the glove box. The breech lock can be interchangeably installed in place of a plug, glove, or other device in a port or opening of a glove box. Features are provided to aid the removal of items from the breech lock by a gloved operator. The breech lock can be reused or, if needed, can be replaced with a plug, glove, or other device at the port or opening of the glove box.

  2. Microcontroller-based locking in optics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K.; Le Jeannic, H.; Ruaudel, J.; Morin, O.; Laurat, J.

    2014-12-15

    Optics experiments critically require the stable and accurate locking of relative phases between light beams or the stabilization of Fabry-Perot cavity lengths. Here, we present a simple and inexpensive technique based on a stand-alone microcontroller unit to perform such tasks. Easily programmed in C language, this reconfigurable digital locking system also enables automatic relocking and sequential functioning. Different algorithms are detailed and applied to fringe locking and to low- and high-finesse optical cavity stabilization, without the need of external modulations or error signals. This technique can readily replace a number of analog locking systems advantageously in a variety of optical experiments.

  3. Microcontroller-based locking in optics experiments.

    PubMed

    Huang, K; Le Jeannic, H; Ruaudel, J; Morin, O; Laurat, J

    2014-12-01

    Optics experiments critically require the stable and accurate locking of relative phases between light beams or the stabilization of Fabry-Perot cavity lengths. Here, we present a simple and inexpensive technique based on a stand-alone microcontroller unit to perform such tasks. Easily programmed in C language, this reconfigurable digital locking system also enables automatic relocking and sequential functioning. Different algorithms are detailed and applied to fringe locking and to low- and high-finesse optical cavity stabilization, without the need of external modulations or error signals. This technique can readily replace a number of analog locking systems advantageously in a variety of optical experiments.

  4. Robust quantum data locking from phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, Cosmo; Wilde, Mark M.; Lloyd, Seth

    2014-08-01

    Quantum data locking is a uniquely quantum phenomenon that allows a relatively short key of constant size to (un)lock an arbitrarily long message encoded in a quantum state, in such a way that an eavesdropper who measures the state but does not know the key has essentially no information about the message. The application of quantum data locking in cryptography would allow one to overcome the limitations of the one-time pad encryption, which requires the key to have the same length as the message. However, it is known that the strength of quantum data locking is also its Achilles heel, as the leakage of a few bits of the key or the message may in principle allow the eavesdropper to unlock a disproportionate amount of information. In this paper we show that there exist quantum data locking schemes that can be made robust against information leakage by increasing the length of the key by a proportionate amount. This implies that a constant size key can still lock an arbitrarily long message as long as a fraction of it remains secret to the eavesdropper. Moreover, we greatly simplify the structure of the protocol by proving that phase modulation suffices to generate strong locking schemes, paving the way to optical experimental realizations. Also, we show that successful data locking protocols can be constructed using random code words, which very well could be helpful in discovering random codes for data locking over noisy quantum channels.

  5. Peer-to-Peer Magnetron Locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Edward Jeffrey

    The viability of coherent power combination of multiple high-efficiency, moderate power magnetrons requires a thorough understanding of frequency and phase control. Injection locking of conventional magnetrons, and other types of oscillators, employing a master-to-slave configuration has been studied theoretically and experimentally. This dissertation focuses on the peer-to-peer locking, where each oscillator acts as a master of and slave to all others, between two conventional magnetrons, where the general condition for locking was recently derived. The experiments performed on peer-to-peer locking of two 1-kW magnetrons verify the recently developed theory on the condition under which the two nonlinear oscillators may be locked to a common frequency and relative phase. This condition reduces to Adler's classical locking condition (master-slave) if the coupling is one way. Dependent on the degree of coupling, the frequency of oscillation when locking occurs was found to not necessarily lie between the two magnetrons' free running frequencies. Likewise, when the locking condition was violated, the beat of the spectrum was not necessarily found to be equal to the difference between the free running frequencies. The frequency of oscillation and relative phase between the two magnetrons when locking did occur were found to correspond to one of two solution modes given by the recent theory. The accessibility of the two possible modes is yet to be determined. This work was supported by ONR, AFRL, AFOSR, L-3 Communications Electron Devices Division and Northrop-Grumman Corporation.

  6. A multiple-pass ring oscillator based dual-loop phase-locked loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danfeng, Chen; Junyan, Ren; Jingjing, Deng; Wei, Li; Ning, Li

    2009-10-01

    A dual-loop phase-locked loop (PLL) for wideband operation is proposed. The dual-loop architecture combines a coarse-tuning loop with a fine-tuning one, enabling a wide tuning range and low voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) gain without poisoning phase noise and reference spur suppression performance. An analysis of the phase noise and reference spur of the dual-loop PLL is emphasized. A novel multiple-pass ring VCO is designed for the dual-loop application. It utilizes both voltage-control and current-control simultaneously in the delay cell. The PLL is fabricated in Jazz 0.18-μm RF CMOS technology. The measured tuning range is from 4.2 to 5.9 GHz. It achieves a low phase noise of -99 dBc/Hz @ 1 MHz offset from a 5.5 GHz carrier.

  7. Simulation Study Using an Injection Phase-locked Magnetron as an Alternative Source for SRF Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haipeng; Plawski, Tomasz E.; Rimmer, Robert A.

    2015-09-01

    As a drop-in replacement for the CEBAF CW klystron system, a 1497 MHz, CW-type high-efficiency magnetron using injection phase lock and amplitude variation is attractive. Amplitude control using magnetic field trimming and anode voltage modulation has been studied using analytical models and MATLAB/Simulink simulations. Since the 1497 MHz magnetron has not been built yet, previously measured characteristics of a 2.45GHz cooker magnetron are used as reference. The results of linear responses to the amplitude and phase control of a superconducting RF (SRF) cavity, and the expected overall benefit for the current CEBAF and future MEIC RF systems are presented in this paper.

  8. Phase drift cancellation of remote radio frequency transfer using an optoelectronic delay-locked loop.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lumin; Chang, Le; Dong, Yi; Xie, Weilin; He, Hao; Hu, Weisheng

    2011-03-15

    In this Letter, we propose a phase drift cancellation method for remote radio frequency transfer. Phase fluctuation along the transmission fiber, which is induced by temperature and pressure changes, is measured and compensated by a heterodyne optoelectronic delay-locked loop. The control loop consists of a heterodyne optoelectronic phase detector, a microwave delay module, and the loop filter. We demonstrate the concept by transmitting a 10 GHz microwave frequency over 50 km single-mode fiber, with subpicosecond jitters measured at the remote end.

  9. Digital phase-locked loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, R. A. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An digital phase-locked loop is provided for deriving a loop output signal from an accumulator output terminal. A phase detecting exclusive OR gate is fed by the loop digital input and output signals. The output of the phase detector is a bi-level digital signal having a duty cycle indicative of the relative phase of the input and output signals. The accumulator is incremented at a first rate in response to a first output level of the phase detector and at a second rate in response to a second output level of the phase detector.

  10. 60 GHz Tapered Transmission Line Resonators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-15

    DARPA TEAM program (contract no. DAAB07-02-1- L428 ), Motorola, and the UC-Micro program. 60 GHz Tapered Transmission Line Resonators by...0403427, wafer fabrication donation by STMicroelectronics, DARPA TEAM program (con- tract no. DAAB07-02-1- L428 ), Motorola, and the UC-Micro program. 1

  11. A 20 GHz Active Receive Slot Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulintseff, A. N.; Lee, K.; Sukamto, L.; Chew, W.

    1994-01-01

    A 20 GHz active receive slot array has been developed for operation in the downlink frequency band of NASA's Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) for the ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) project. The AMT is to demonstrate voice and data communication between a mobile terminal in Los Angeles, California, and a fixed terminal in Cleveland, Ohio, via the ACTS satellite.

  12. Propagation handbook, frequencies above 10 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, Louis J.

    1988-01-01

    The progress and accomplishments in the developmet of the Fourth Edition of the NASA Propagation Effects Handbook for Satellite Systems Design, for frequencies 10 to 100 GHz, NASA Reference Publication 1082(04), dated May 1988, prepared by Westighouse Electric Corporation for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are discussed.

  13. 44/20 GHz Ground Terminal.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    contract was awarded to Andrew Antenna Co., Whitby , Ontario to design and construct the (44/20) GHz feed system. The design (Fig. 1) also included the...Receive 1.5 max. Power Rating (10 - 100) watts Axial ratios VSWR, and primary patterns (Appendix A) were measured at the Whitby Plant and supplied

  14. 49 CFR 236.764 - Locking, lever operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Locking, lever operated. 236.764 Section 236.764... Locking, lever operated. The mechanical locking of an interlocking machine which is actuated by means of the lever....

  15. 49 CFR 236.764 - Locking, lever operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locking, lever operated. 236.764 Section 236.764... Locking, lever operated. The mechanical locking of an interlocking machine which is actuated by means of the lever....

  16. 49 CFR 236.764 - Locking, lever operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Locking, lever operated. 236.764 Section 236.764... Locking, lever operated. The mechanical locking of an interlocking machine which is actuated by means of the lever....

  17. 49 CFR 236.764 - Locking, lever operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locking, lever operated. 236.764 Section 236.764... Locking, lever operated. The mechanical locking of an interlocking machine which is actuated by means of the lever....

  18. 49 CFR 236.764 - Locking, lever operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locking, lever operated. 236.764 Section 236.764... Locking, lever operated. The mechanical locking of an interlocking machine which is actuated by means of the lever....

  19. UPSTREAM LOCK GATE DETAIL AND DOG HOUSE. NOTE ARM AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    UPSTREAM LOCK GATE DETAIL AND DOG HOUSE. NOTE ARM AND GEARING FOR CONTROLLING LOCK GATE. LOOKING WEST SOUTHWEST. - Illinois Waterway, Brandon Road Lock and Dam , 1100 Brandon Road, Joliet, Will County, IL

  20. DOWNSTREAM LOCK GATE DETAIL VIEW WITH DOG HOUSE. NOTE CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DOWNSTREAM LOCK GATE DETAIL VIEW WITH DOG HOUSE. NOTE CONTROL ARM AND GEAR FOR GATE. LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Illinois Waterway, Dresden Island Lock and Dam , 7521 North Lock Road, Channahon, Will County, IL

  1. 10. Detail of bridge underside showing gears for locking mechanism ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Detail of bridge underside showing gears for locking mechanism at south end of bridge. View to east. - Locke Avenue Bridge, Locke Avenue (County Route 671) Spanning Raccoon Creek, Swedesboro, Gloucester County, NJ

  2. 89. LOCK 13 EAST. WOODEN TIMBERS (FOREGROUND LEFT AND RIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    89. LOCK 13 EAST. WOODEN TIMBERS (FOREGROUND LEFT AND RIGHT OF LOCK ENTRANCE) ARE BEING USED AS BUMPERS TO HELP GUIDE SHIP INTO LOCK WHILE AVOIDING CONTACT WITH WALLS. - Morris Canal, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  3. 170. VIEW OF UNIDENTIFIED LOCK SHOWING DOORS PARTIALLY OPEN. IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    170. VIEW OF UNIDENTIFIED LOCK SHOWING DOORS PARTIALLY OPEN. IRON RODS STICKING UP FROM GATES OPERATE PADDLES THAT ALLOWS WATER IN LOCK TO EQUALIZE WITH WATER IN CANAL DURING THE LOCKING PROCEDURE. - Morris Canal, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  4. Critical behavior of a passively mode-locked laser: rational harmonic mode locking.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Li; Gu, Zhaochang; Zhang, Jianwen; Xia, Yuxing

    2007-08-15

    The critical behavior of passive mode locking has been demonstrated in a figure-eight fiber laser that performs rational harmonic mode locking (RHML). On both the repetition rate and the pulse amplitude distribution, the observed pulse trains near the threshold exhibit the same regulations as the rational harmonic mode-locked ones. The theory also shows that there should be a middle status of RHML before achieving normal mode locking. It is important to note that the results provide what we believe to be the first confirmed attempt to address a fundamental question: how does a laser become mode locking with an increase of pump power?

  5. Photonic subsampling analog-to-digital conversion of microwave signals at 40-GHz with higher than 7-ENOB resolution.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungwon; Park, Matthew J; Perrott, Michael H; Kärtner, Franz X

    2008-10-13

    Conversion of analog signals into digital signals is one of the most important functionalities in modern signal processing systems. As the signal frequency increases beyond 10 GHz, the timing jitter from electronic clocks, currently limited at approximately 100 fs, compromises the achievable resolution of analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). Owing to their ultralow timing jitter, the use of optical pulse trains from passively mode-locked lasers has been considered to be a promising way for sampling electronic signals. In this paper, based on sub-10 fs jitter optical sampling pulse trains, we demonstrate a photonic subsampling ADC that downconverts and digitizes a narrowband microwave signal at 40 GHz carrier frequency with higher than 7 effective-number-of-bit (ENOB) resolution.

  6. Bidirectional 60-GHz radio-over-fiber systems with downstream OFDMA and wavelength reuse upstream SC-FDMA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Duan, Jun; Li, Juhao; Hu, Weiwei; Li, Hongbin; Wu, Hequan; Chen, Zhangyuan

    2010-08-30

    We have proposed and experimentally demonstrated a 60-GHz bidirectional radio-over-fiber system with downstream orthogonal frequency division multiplexing address (OFDMA) and wavelength reuse upstream single-carrier frequency division multiple address (SC-FDMA). In the downstream, a 3-dB optical coupler is used for two-carrier injection-locking a distributed feedback (DFB) laser in order to realize the single-sideband modulation. In the upstream, the weakly modulated one of the two downstream carriers is filtered out for wavelength reuse. Transmission of 9.65-Gb/s 16-QAM downstream OFDMA on 60-GHz carrier and 5-Gb/s QPSK upstream SC-FDMA (2.5 Gb/s for each user) are both successfully demonstrated over 53-km standard single mode fiber without chromatic dispersion compensation. The crosstalk between the downstream OFDMA and the upstream SC-FDMA can be neglected.

  7. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM THE PINE STREET BRIDGE. THE LOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM THE PINE STREET BRIDGE. THE LOCK ACCESS ROAD (FORMER TOW PATH) IS AT THE EXTREME LEFT, AND LOCKS 69 THROUGH 67 ARE IN THE CENTER LEFT, THE LOCK MACHINE SHOP IS IN THE MID-GROUND CENTER, AND THE ERIE CANAL MUSEUM (FORMER LOCK POWER PLANT) IN THE BACKGROUND CENTER. THE BARGE CANAL LOCK 34 IS AT THE EXTREME RIGHT. - New York State Barge Canal, Lockport Locks, Richmond Avenue, Lockport, Niagara County, NY

  8. 1.5 GHz picosecond pulse generation from a monolithic waveguide laser with a graphene-film saturable output coupler.

    PubMed

    Mary, Rose; Brown, Graeme; Beecher, Stephen J; Torrisi, Felice; Milana, Silvia; Popa, Daniel; Hasan, Tawfique; Sun, Zhipei; Lidorikis, Elefterios; Ohara, Seiki; Ferrari, Andrea C; Kar, Ajoy K

    2013-04-08

    We fabricate a saturable absorber mirror by coating a graphene- film on an output coupler mirror. This is then used to obtain Q-switched mode-locking from a diode-pumped linear cavity channel waveguide laser inscribed in Ytterbium-doped Bismuthate Glass. The laser produces 1.06 ps pulses at ~1039 nm, with a 1.5 GHz repetition rate, 48% slope efficiency and 202 mW average output power. This performance is due to the combination of the graphene saturable absorber and the high quality optical waveguides in the laser glass.

  9. A Wide Spaced Femtosecond Ti:Sapphire Frequency Comb at 15 GHz by a Fabry—Pérot Filter Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lei; Han, Hai-Nian; Zhang, Jin-Wei; Li, De-Hua; Wei, Zhi-Yi

    2013-10-01

    We realize a wide spaced frequency comb by using an external low-fineness Fabry—Pérot (F-P) cavity to filter few-cycle laser pulses from a Kerr-lens mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser at the fundamental repetition rate of 350MHz. Mode spacing as wide as 15 GHz with spectrum covered from 690 nm to 710 nm is demonstrated, corresponding to a filter multiple of about 43. The scanning transmission peaks after the F-P cavity with cavity lengths are also simulated numerically, and the results are in agreement with the experiment.

  10. Beat note stabilization of a 10-60 GHz dual-polarization microlaser through optical down conversion.

    PubMed

    Rolland, A; Brunel, M; Loas, G; Frein, L; Vallet, M; Alouini, M

    2011-02-28

    Down-conversion of a high-frequency beat note to an intermediate frequency is realized by a Mach-Zehnder intensity modulator. Optically-carried microwave signals in the 10-60 GHz range are synthesized by using a two-frequency solid-state microchip laser as a voltage-controlled oscillator inside a digital phase-locked loop. We report an in-loop relative frequency stability better than 2.5×10⁻¹¹. The principle is applicable to beat notes in the millimeter-wave range.

  11. Self-Injection Locking Of Diode Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1991-01-01

    Simple optical coupling scheme locks array of gain-guided diode lasers into oscillation in single mode and with single-lobed output beam. Selective feedback from thin etalon self-injection-locks array into desired mode. One application of new scheme for pumping of neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet lasers with diode-laser arrays.

  12. Wideband Phase-Locked Angle Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Lim

    1991-01-01

    Modified configuration for phase-locked angle modulator circuit makes possible to design filters in modulating portion of circuit independently of filter in phase-locked-loop portion. Bandwidth of phase- or frequency-modulated output not limited by low-pass nature of loop filter.

  13. 49 CFR 236.329 - Bolt lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 236.329 Bolt lock. Bolt lock shall be so maintained that signal governing movements over switch or... while derail is in derailing position, or when switch point is open one-half inch or more....

  14. 49 CFR 236.329 - Bolt lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 236.329 Bolt lock. Bolt lock shall be so maintained that signal governing movements over switch or... while derail is in derailing position, or when switch point is open one-half inch or more....

  15. 49 CFR 236.757 - Lock, electric.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lock, electric. 236.757 Section 236.757 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Lock, electric. A device to prevent or restrict the movement of a lever, a switch or a movable...

  16. 49 CFR 236.757 - Lock, electric.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lock, electric. 236.757 Section 236.757 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Lock, electric. A device to prevent or restrict the movement of a lever, a switch or a movable...

  17. 49 CFR 236.769 - Locking, traffic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.769 Locking, traffic. Electric locking which prevents the manipulation of levers or other devices for changing the direction of traffic on a section of track while that section is occupied or while a...

  18. 49 CFR 236.760 - Locking, approach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.760 Locking, approach. Electric locking effective while a train is approaching, within a specified distance, a signal displaying an aspect to proceed, and which prevents, until after the expiration of a...

  19. Past, Present, Future Erosion at Locke Island

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2006-08-08

    This report describes and documents the erosion that has occurred along the northeast side of Locke Island over the last 10 to 20 years. The principal cause of this erosion is the massive Locke Island landslide complex opposite the Columbia River along the White Bluffs, which constricts the flow of the river and deflects the river's thalweg southward against the island.

  20. An automatic mode-locked system for passively mode-locked fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sha; Xu, Jun; Chen, Guoliang; Mei, Li; Yi, Bo

    2013-12-01

    This paper designs and implements one kind of automatic mode-locked system. It can adjust a passively mode-locked fiber laser to keep steady mode-locked states automatically. So the unsteadiness of traditional passively mode-locked fiber laser can be avoided. The system transforms optical signals into electrical pulse signals and sends them into MCU after processing. MCU calculates the frequency of the signals and judges the state of the output based on a quick judgment algorithm. A high-speed comparator is used to check the signals and the comparison voltage can be adjusted to improve the measuring accuracy. Then by controlling two polarization controllers at an angle of 45degrees to each other, MCU extrudes the optical fibers to change the polarization until it gets proper mode-locked output. So the system can continuously monitor the output signal and get it back to mode-locked states quickly and automatically. States of the system can be displayed on the LCD and PC. The parameters of the steady mode-locked states can be stored into an EEPROM so that the system will get into mode-locked states immediately next time. Actual experiments showed that, for a 6.238MHz passively mode-locked fiber lasers, the system can get into steady mode-locked states automatically in less than 90s after starting the system. The expected lock time can be reduced to less than 20s after follow up improvements.

  1. New high-performance complementary bipolar technology featuring 45-GHz NPN and 20-GHz PNP devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Martin C.; Osborne, Peter H.; Thomas, Simon; Cook, Trevor

    1999-09-01

    A new high performance silicon complementary bipolar technology is introduced. In addition a novel process 'enhancement' technique based on a local oxidation is described and demonstrated and NPN devices with cut-off frequencies up to 45GHz and PNP devices of 20GHz have been fabricate. We propose that the technique we have used will allow specific transistors within a circuit to be optimized, as required.

  2. A 10 GHz bandwidth, single transient, digitized oscilloscope with 20 GHz capability

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, C.L.; Kocimski, S.M.; Spector, J.; Thomas, J.B.; Woodstra, R.R.

    1993-12-31

    EG&G/EM has developed an oscilloscope with a {minus}3 dB bandwidth greater than 10 GHz. Its rolloff characteristics are such that single-transient data greater than 20 GHz may be captured. A demountable CCD camera records the oscilloscope trace and is provided with PC-compatible capture and data processing software. The capabilities of the oscilloscope, camera, and its processing software are described and examples of the system`s performance is shown.

  3. Commonwealth Edison Company pressure locking test report

    SciTech Connect

    Bunte, B.D.; Kelly, J.F.

    1996-12-01

    Pressure Locking is a phenomena which can cause the unseating thrust for a gate valve to increase dramatically from its typical static unseating thrust. This can result in the valve actuator having insufficient capability to open the valve. In addition, this can result in valve damage in cases where the actuator capability exceeds the valve structural limits. For these reasons, a proper understanding of the conditions which may cause pressure locking and thermal binding, as well as a methodology for predicting the unseating thrust for a pressure locked or thermally bound valve, are necessary. This report discusses the primary mechanisms which cause pressure locking. These include sudden depressurization of piping adjacent to the valve and pressurization of fluid trapped in the valve bonnet due to heat transfer. This report provides a methodology for calculating the unseating thrust for a valve which is pressure locked. This report provides test data which demonstrates the accuracy of the calculation methodology.

  4. A widely tunable 10-μm quantum cascade laser phase-locked to a state-of-the-art mid-infrared reference for precision molecular spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sow, P. L. T.; Mejri, S.; Tokunaga, S. K.; Lopez, O.; Argence, B.; Chardonnet, C.; Darquié, B.; Goncharov, A.; Amy-Klein, A.; Daussy, C.

    2014-06-30

    We report the coherent phase-locking of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) at 10-μm to the secondary frequency standard of this spectral region, a CO{sub 2} laser stabilized on a saturated absorption line of OsO{sub 4}. The stability and accuracy of the standard are transferred to the QCL resulting in a line width of the order of 10 Hz, and leading to the narrowest QCL to date. The locked QCL is then used to perform absorption spectroscopy spanning 6 GHz of NH{sub 3} and methyltrioxorhenium, two species of interest for applications in precision measurements.

  5. Suppressing the relaxation oscillation noise of injection-locked WRC-FPLD for directly modulated OFDM transmission.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Min-Chi; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Li, Yi-Cheng; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2014-06-30

    By up-shifting the relaxation oscillation peak and suppressing its relative intensity noise in a weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode (WRC-FPLD) under intense injection-locking, the directly modulated transmission of optical 16 quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) data-stream is demonstrated. The total bit rate of up to 20 Gbit/s within 5-GHz bandwidth is achieved by using the OFDM subcarrier pre-leveling technique. With increasing the injection-locking power from -12 to -3 dBm, the effective reduction on threshold current of the WRC-FPLD significantly shifts its relaxation oscillation frequency from 5 to 7.5 GHz. This concurrently induces an up-shift of the peak relative intensity noise (RIN) of the WRC-FPLD, and effectively suppresses the background RIN level to -104 dBc/Hz within the OFDM band between 3 and 6 GHz. The enhanced signal-to-noise ratio from 16 to 20 dB leads to a significant reduction of bit-error-rate (BER) of the back-to-back transmitted 16-QAM-OFDM data from 1.3 × 10(-3) to 5 × 10(-5), which slightly degrades to 1.1 × 10(-4) after 25-km single-mode fiber (SMF) transmission. However, the enlarged injection-locking power from -12 to -3 dBm inevitably declines the modulation throughput and increases its negative throughput slope from -0.8 to -1.9 dBm/GHz. After pre-leveling the peak amplitude of the OFDM subcarriers to compensate the throughput degradation of the directly modulated WRC-FPLD, the BER under 25-km SMF transmission can be further improved to 3 × 10(-5) under a receiving power of -3 dBm.

  6. Selective lock for anchoring well tools

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, W.F.; Hopmann, M.E.

    1984-03-20

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for effecting the locking of a well tool in any selected one of a plurality of identical nipples provided in spaced relationship along a well tubing string. Each nipple is provided with an annular recess to receive expandable locking dogs carried by the locking mechanism and an upwardly facing no-go shoulder which is of no lesser diameter than the bore of the tubular string. The locking mechanism is shearably mounted on a running tool and incorporates an expansible C-ring which has a downwardly facing shoulder engagable, when expanded, with the no-go shoulder of the selected locking nipple. The expansible C-ring is held in a retracted position by a collet having spring arms which pass freely downwardly through any or all of the nipples but, when moved upwardly through a selected nipple, engage a surface on the nipple and pull the collet out of its retaining position with respect to the expansible C-ring. The C-ring expands into engagement with the upwardly facing no-go shoulder, thus permitting the application of a downward force to the locking mechanism which effects the shearing of shear pins holding a camming mandrel in an inoperative position with respect to the locking dogs. The camming mandrel is then moved downwardly by the running tool to expand the locking dogs into engagement with the locking recess, following which, the running tool may be removed from the locking mechanism by an upward pull which shears a second shear pin.

  7. 164-GHz MMIC HEMT Frequency Doubler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Radisic, Vesna; Micovic, Miro; Hu, Ming; Janke, Paul; Ngo, Catherine; Nguyen, Loi; Morgan, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    A monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) that includes a high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) has been developed as a prototype of improved frequency doublers for generating signals at frequencies greater than 100 GHz. Signal sources that operate in this frequency range are needed for a variety of applications, notably including general radiometry and, more specifically, radiometric remote sensing of the atmosphere. Heretofore, it has been common practice to use passive (diode-based) frequency multipliers to obtain frequencies greater than 100 GHz. Unfortunately, diode-based frequency multipliers are plagued by high DC power consumption and low conversion efficiency. Moreover, multiplier diodes are not easily integrated with such other multiplier-circuit components as amplifiers and oscillators. The goals of developing the present MMIC HEMT frequency doubler were (1) to utilize the HEMT as an amplifier to increase conversion efficiency (more precisely, to reduce conversion loss), thereby increasing the output power for a given DC power consumption or, equivalently, reducing the DC power consumption for a given output power; and (2) to provide for the integration of amplifier and oscillator components on the same chip. The MMIC frequency doubler (see Figure 1) contains an AlInAs/GaInAs/InP HEMT biased at pinch-off to make it function as a class-B amplifier (meaning that it conducts in half-cycle pulses). Grounded coplanar waveguides (GCPWs) are used as impedance-matching transmission lines. Air bridges are placed at discontinuities to suppress undesired slot electromagnetic modes. Another combination of GCPWs also serves both as a low-pass filter to suppress undesired oscillations at frequencies below 60 GHz and as a DC blocker. Large decoupling capacitors and epitaxial resistors are added in the drain and gate lines to suppress bias oscillations. At the output terminal, the fundamental frequency is suppressed by a quarter-wave open stub, which presents

  8. Traveling-Wave Maser for 32 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, James; Clauss, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The figure depicts a traveling-wave ruby maser that has been designed (though not yet implemented in hardware) to serve as a low-noise amplifier for reception of weak radio signals in the frequency band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The design offers significant improvements over previous designs of 32-GHz traveling-wave masers. In addition, relative to prior designs of 32-GHz amplifiers based on high-electron-mobility transistors, this design affords higher immunity to radio-frequency interference and lower equivalent input noise temperature. In addition to the basic frequency-band and low-noise requirements, the initial design problem included a requirement for capability of operation in a closed-cycle helium refrigerator at a temperature .4 K and a requirement that the design be mechanically simplified, relative to prior designs, in order to minimize the cost of fabrication and assembly. Previous attempts to build 32- GHz traveling-wave masers involved the use of metallic slow-wave structures comprising coupled transverse electromagnetic (TEM)-mode resonators that were subject to very tight tolerances and, hence, were expensive to fabricate and assemble. Impedance matching for coupling signals into and out of these earlier masers was very difficult. A key feature of the design is a slow-wave structure, the metallic portions of which would be mechanically relatively simple in that, unlike in prior slow-wave structures, there would be no internal metal steps, irises, or posts. The metallic portions of the slow-wave structure would consist only of two rectangular metal waveguide arms. The arms would contain sections filled with the active material (ruby) alternating with evanescent-wave sections. This structure would be transparent in both the signal-frequency band (the aforementioned range of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz) and the pump-frequency band (65.75 to 66.75 GHz), and would impose large slowing factors in both frequency bands. Resonant ferrite isolators would be placed in the

  9. Loss of catheter locking solution caused by fluid density.

    PubMed

    Polaschegg, Hans-Dietrich

    2005-01-01

    The avoidance of clotting in catheter lumina between treatments usually entails locking with an anticoagulant solution such as heparin. In a previous work, it was shown that approximately 20% of locking solution flows from the catheter during instillation of the lock equal in volume to the lumen volume. Furthermore, the locking solution may spill into the blood stream under the influence of gravity. This work investigates the influence of density and viscosity of the locking solution on the volume and speed of locking solution loss from the catheter lumen. A large fraction of the catheter locking solution spills under the influence of gravity if the locking solution's density is higher than the fluid it spills to (blood). Locking solution lost is replaced by blood. Viscosity delays this process, but at 90 minutes after injection, the loss is completed even when highly viscous lock solutions are used. Slow administration of the lock has negligible influence upon the dynamics of the loss.

  10. Bandwidth enhancement in an injection-locked quantum dot laser operating at 1.31-μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, N. A.; Pochet, M.; Kovanis, V.; Lester, L. F.

    2010-02-01

    The high-speed modulation characteristics of an injection-locked quantum dot Fabry-Perot (FP) semiconductor laser operating at 1310-nm under strong injection are investigated experimentally with a focus on the enhancement of the modulation bandwidth. The coupled system consists of a directly-modulated Quantum Dot (QD) slave injected-locked by a distributed feedback (DFB) laser as the master. At particular injection strengths and zero detuning cases, a unique modulation response is observed that differs from the typical modulation response observed in injection-locked systems. This unique response is characterized by a rapid low-frequency rise along with a slow high-frequency roll-off that enhances the 3-dB bandwidth of the injection-locked system at the expense of losing modulation efficiency of about 20 dB at frequencies below 1 GHz. Such behavior has been previously observed both experimentally and theoretically in the high-frequency response characteristic of an injection-locked system using an externally-modulated master; however, the results shown here differ in that the slave laser is directly-modulated. The benefit of the observed response is that it takes advantage of the enhancement of the resonance frequency achieved through injection-locking without experiencing the low frequency dip that significantly limits the useful bandwidth in the conventional injection-locked response. The second benefit of this unique response is the improvement in the high frequency roll-off that extends the bandwidth. Finally a 3-dB bandwidth improvement of greater than 8 times compared to the free-running slave laser has been achieved.

  11. 47 CFR 101.525 - 24 GHz system operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 24 GHz system operations. 101.525 Section 101.525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.525 24 GHz...

  12. 47 CFR 101.525 - 24 GHz system operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 24 GHz system operations. 101.525 Section 101.525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.525 24 GHz...

  13. 47 CFR 101.525 - 24 GHz system operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false 24 GHz system operations. 101.525 Section 101.525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.525 24 GHz...

  14. 47 CFR 101.525 - 24 GHz system operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false 24 GHz system operations. 101.525 Section 101.525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.525 24 GHz...

  15. 47 CFR 101.525 - 24 GHz system operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 24 GHz system operations. 101.525 Section 101.525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.525 24 GHz...

  16. Delay locked loop integrated circuit.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2007-10-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Delay Locked Loop (DLL) integrated circuit (IC). The DLL was developed and tested as a stand-alone IC test chip to be integrated into a larger application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), the Quadrature Digital Waveform Synthesizer (QDWS). The purpose of the DLL is to provide a digitally programmable delay to enable synchronization between an internal system clock and external peripherals with unknown clock skew. The DLL was designed and fabricated in the IBM 8RF process, a 0.13 {micro}m CMOS process. It was designed to operate with a 300MHz clock and has been tested up to 500MHz.

  17. Locking apparatus for gate valves

    DOEpatents

    Fabyan, Joseph; Williams, Carl W.

    1988-01-01

    A locking apparatus for fluid operated valves having a piston connected to the valve actuator which moves in response to applied pressure within a cylinder housing having a cylinder head, a catch block is secured to the piston, and the cylinder head incorporates a catch pin. Pressure applied to the cylinder to open the valve moves the piston adjacent to the cylinder head where the catch pin automatically engages the catch block preventing futher movement of the piston or premature closure of the valve. Application of pressure to the cylinder to close the valve, retracts the catch pin, allowing the valve to close. Included are one or more selector valves, for selecting pressure application to other apparatus depending on the gate valve position, open or closed, protecting such apparatus from damage due to premature closing caused by pressure loss or operational error.

  18. Locking apparatus for gate valves

    DOEpatents

    Fabyan, J.; Williams, C.W.

    A locking apparatus for fluid operated valves having a piston connected to the valve actuator which moves in response to applied pressure within a cylinder housing having a cylinder head, a catch block is secured to the piston, and the cylinder head incorporates a catch pin. Pressure applied to the cylinder to open the valve moves the piston adjacent to the cylinder head where the catch pin automatically engages the catch block preventing further movement of the piston or premature closure of the valve. Application of pressure to the cylinder to close the valve, retracts the catch pin, allowing the valve to close. Included are one or more selector valves, for selecting pressure application to other apparatus depending on the gate valve position, open or closed, protecting such apparatus from damage due to premature closing caused by pressure loss or operational error.

  19. Multiple teleportation via partially entangled GHZ state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Pei-Ying; Yu, Xu-Tao; Zhan, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Zai-Chen

    2016-08-01

    Quantum teleportation is important for quantum communication. We propose a protocol that uses a partially entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state for single hop teleportation. Quantum teleportation will succeed if the sender makes a Bell state measurement, and the receiver performs the Hadamard gate operation, applies appropriate Pauli operators, introduces an auxiliary particle, and applies the corresponding unitary matrix to recover the transmitted state.We also present a protocol to realize multiple teleportation of partially entangled GHZ state without an auxiliary particle. We show that the success probability of the teleportation is always 0 when the number of teleportations is odd. In order to improve the success probability of a multihop, we introduce the method used in our single hop teleportation, thus proposing a multiple teleportation protocol using auxiliary particles and a unitary matrix. The final success probability is shown to be improved significantly for the method without auxiliary particles for both an odd or even number of teleportations.

  20. SEVENTH HARMONIC 20 GHz CO-GENERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L

    2014-04-08

    To satisfy the need for multi-MW rf sources in frequency ranges where commercial sources do not exist, a study was undertaken on a class of devices based on gyro-harmonic frequency multiplication. This mechanism relies upon adding energy in gyrating motion to a linear electron beam that traverses a rotating-mode TE111-mode drive cavity in a dc magnetic field. The beam then drifts along the magnetic field into a second cavity, operating in the TEn11-mode tuned to the nth harmonic of the drive cavity. Studies of this configuration have been carried out for 2 < n < 7. Results are given for multi-MW, efficient operation of a 7th harmonic device operating at 20 GHz, and a 2nd harmonic device operating at 22.4 GHz.

  1. Integrated 222-GHz corner-reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gearhart, Steven S.; Ling, Curtis C.; Rebeiz, Gabriel M.

    1991-01-01

    A high-gain monolithic millimeter-wave antenna has been designed, fabricated, and tested at 222 GHz. The structure consists of a traveling-wave antenna integrated on a 1.2-micron dielectric membrane and suspended in a longitudinal cavity etched in a silicon wafer. A new traveling-wave antenna design yields a wideband input impedance and a low cross-polarization component in the E- and quasi-H-plane patterns. A directivity of 17.7 dB and a main-beam efficiency of 88.5 percent are calculated from the 222-GHz pattern measurements. The integrated corner-reflector antenna is well suited for millimeter- and submillimeter-wave imaging applications in large f-number systems.

  2. Tree attenuation at 20 GHz: Foliage effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Wolfhard J.; Goldhirsh, Julius

    1993-01-01

    Static tree attenuation measurements at 20 GHz (K-Band) on a 30 deg slant path through a mature Pecan tree with and without leaves showed median fades exceeding approximately 23 dB and 7 dB, respectively. The corresponding 1% probability fades were 43 dB and 25 dB. Previous 1.6 GHz (L-Band) measurements for the bare tree case showed fades larger than those at K-Band by 3.4 dB for the median and smaller by approximately 7 dB at the 1% probability. While the presence of foliage had only a small effect on fading at L-Band (approximately 1 dB additional for the median to 1% probability range), the attenuation increase was significant at K-Band, where it increased by about 17 dB over the same probability range.

  3. Tree attenuation at 20 GHz: Foliage effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Wolfhard J.; Goldhirsh, Julius

    1993-08-01

    Static tree attenuation measurements at 20 GHz (K-Band) on a 30 deg slant path through a mature Pecan tree with and without leaves showed median fades exceeding approximately 23 dB and 7 dB, respectively. The corresponding 1% probability fades were 43 dB and 25 dB. Previous 1.6 GHz (L-Band) measurements for the bare tree case showed fades larger than those at K-Band by 3.4 dB for the median and smaller by approximately 7 dB at the 1% probability. While the presence of foliage had only a small effect on fading at L-Band (approximately 1 dB additional for the median to 1% probability range), the attenuation increase was significant at K-Band, where it increased by about 17 dB over the same probability range.

  4. Australia 31-GHz brightness temperature exceedance statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, B. L.

    1988-01-01

    Water vapor radiometer measurements were made at DSS 43 during an 18 month period. Brightness temperatures at 31 GHz were subjected to a statistical analysis which included correction for the effects of occasional water on the radiometer radome. An exceedance plot was constructed, and the 1 percent exceedance statistics occurs at 120 K. The 5 percent exceedance statistics occurs at 70 K, compared with 75 K in Spain. These values are valid for all of the three month groupings that were studied.

  5. VLBI survey at 2. 29 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.A.; Morabito, D.D.; Williams, J.G.; Faulkner, J.; Jauncey, D.L.

    1985-09-01

    VLBI observations at 2.29 GHz with fringe spacings of about 3 milliarcsec have been performed on 1398 radio sources spread over the entire sky. 917 sources were detected, including 93 percent of the identified BL Lacertae objects, 86 percent of the quasars, and 36 percent of the galaxies. The resulting catalog of compact radio sources is useful for various astrophysical studies and in the formation of VLBI celestial reference frames. 252 references.

  6. Phase locked backward wave oscillator pulsed beam spectrometer in the submillimeter wave range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewen, F.; Gendriesch, R.; Pak, I.; Paveliev, D. G.; Hepp, M.; Schieder, R.; Winnewisser, G.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a new submillimeter wave pulsed molecular beam spectrometer with phase stabilized backward wave oscillators (BWOs). In the frequency ranges of 260-380 and 440-630 GHz, the BWOs output power varies between 3 and 60 mW. Part of the radiation was coupled to a novel designed harmonic mixer for submillimeter wavelength operation, which consists of an advanced whiskerless Schottky diode driven by a harmonic of the reference synthesizer and the BWO radiation. The resulting intermediate frequency of 350 MHz passed a low noise high electron mobility transistor amplifier, feeding the phase lock loop (PLL) circuit. The loop parameters of the PLL have been carefully adjusted for low phase noise. The half power bandwidth of the BWO radiation at 330 GHz was determined to be as small as 80 MHz, impressively demonstrating the low phase noise operation of a phase locked BWO. A double modulation technique was employed by combining an 80 Hz pulsed jet modulation and a 10-20 kHz source modulation of the BWO and reaching a minimum detectable fractional absorption of 2×10-7. For the first time, a number of pure rotational (Ka=3←2, Ka=4←3) and rovibrational transitions in the van der Waals bending and stretching bands of the Ar-CO complex were recorded.

  7. Opto-mechanical door locking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Saurabh S.; Rodrigues, Vanessa M.; Patil, Ajeetkumar; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2015-09-01

    We present an Opto-mechanical Door Locking System which is an optical system that combines a simple combination of a coherent light source (Laser) and a photodiode based sensor with focus toward security applications. The basic construct of the KEY comprises a Laser source in a cylindrical enclosure that slides perfectly into the LOCK. The Laser is pulsed at a fixed encrypted frequency unique to that locking system. Transistor-transistor logic (TTL) circuitry is used to achieve encryption. The casing of the key is designed in such a way that it will power the pulsing laser only when the key is inserted in the slot provided for it. The Lock includes a photo-sensor that will convert the detected light intensity to a corresponding electrical signal by decrypting the frequency. The lock also consists of a circuit with a feedback system that will carry the digital information regarding the encryption frequency code. The information received from the sensor is matched with the stored code; if found a perfect match, a signal will be sent to the servo to unlock the mechanical lock or to carry out any other operation. This technique can be incorporated in security systems for residences and safe houses, and can easily replace all conventional locks which formerly used fixed patterns to unlock. The major advantage of this proposed optomechanical system over conventional ones is that it no longer relies on a solid/imprinted pattern to perform its task and hence makes it almost impossible to tamper with.

  8. The 60 GHz IMPATT diode development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dat, Rovindra; Ayyagari, Murthy; Hoag, David; Sloat, David; Anand, Yogi; Whitely, Stan

    1986-01-01

    The objective is to develop 60 GHz IMPATT diodes suitable for communications applications. The performance goals of the 60 GHz IMPATT is 1W CW output power with a conversion efficiency of 15 percent and 10-year lifetime. The final design of the 60 GHz IMPATT structure evolved from computer simulations performed at the University of Michigan. The initial doping profile, involving a hybrid double-drift (HDD) design, was derived from a drift-diffusion model that used the static velocity-field characteristics for GaAs. Unfortunately, the model did not consider the effects of velocity undershoot and delay of the avalanche process due to energy relaxation. Consequently, the initial devices were oscillating at a much lower frequency than anticipated. With a revised simulation program that included the two effects given above, a second HDD profile was generated and was used as a basis for fabrication efforts. In the area of device fabrication, significant progress was made in epitaxial growth and characterization, wafer processing, and die assembly. The organo-metallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) was used. Starting with a baseline X-Band IMPATT technology, appropriate processing steps were modified to satisfy the device requirements at V-Band. In terms of efficiency and reliability, the device requirements dictate a reduction in its series resistance and thermal resistance values. Qualitatively, researchers were able to reduce the diodes' series resistance by reducing the thickness of the N+ GaAs substrate used in its fabrication.

  9. The 30-GHz monolithic receive module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolov, V.; Geddes, J.; Bauhahn, P.

    1983-01-01

    Key requirements for a 30 GHz GaAs monolithic receive module for spaceborne communication antenna feed array applications include an overall receive module noise figure of 5 dB, a 30 dB RF to IF gain with six levels of intermediate gain control, a five-bit phase shifter, and a maximum power consumption of 250 mW. The RF designs for each of the four submodules (low noise amplifier, some gain control, phase shifter, and RF to IF sub-module) are presented. Except for the phase shifter, high frequency, low noise FETs with sub-half micron gate lengths are employed in the submodules. For the gain control, a two stage dual gate FET amplifier is used. The phase shifter is of the passive switched line type and consists of 5-bits. It uses relatively large gate width FETs (with zero drain to source bias) as the switching elements. A 20 GHz local oscillator buffer amplifier, a FET compatible balanced mixer, and a 5-8 GHz IF amplifier constitute the RF/IF sub-module. Phase shifter fabrication using ion implantation and a self-aligned gate technique is described. Preliminary RF results obtained on such phase shifters are included.

  10. Novel 140 GHz Gyro-TWT Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W.; Kreischer, K. E.; Shapiro, M.; Temkin, R. J.

    1996-11-01

    We have designed and are currently building a novel gyro-twt amplifier to operate at 100 kW and a frequency of 95 GHz. However, due to equipment availability in our laboratory, the amplifier will actually be operated a frequency of 140 GHz. The electron beam will be provided by an existing MIG electron gun which has been previously used in gyrotron oscillator research at the 100 kW power level at 140 GHz. The gun operates at 65 kV and up to 8A with equal to 1.5. The novel wave circuit consists of two facing mirrors with confocal profiles in the transverse direction and flat profiles in the longitudinal direction. The mode is Gaussian-like in the transverse direction. This design effectively reduces the mode competition problem in conventional amplifiers from two dimensional to one dimensional. Another advantage of this circuit is the relatively large cavity size, which improves power capacity. Preliminary calculations indicate that the linear gain is about 2.7dB/cm with an efficiency exceeding 20preliminary experiment using an oscillator configuration has also been designed.

  11. Collet lock joint for space station truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A lock joint for a Space Station has a series of struts joined together in a predetermined configuration by node point fittings. The fittings have removeable inserts. The lock joint has an elongated housing connected at one end to a strut. A split-fingered collet is mounted within the housing to insure reciprocal movement. A handle on the housing is connected to the collet for moving the collet into the insert where the fingers of the collet expand to lock the joint to the fitting.

  12. Parallel Digital Phase-Locked Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadr, Ramin; Shah, Biren N.; Hinedi, Sami M.

    1995-01-01

    Wide-band microwave receivers of proposed type include digital phase-locked loops in which band-pass filtering and down-conversion of input signals implemented by banks of multirate digital filters operating in parallel. Called "parallel digital phase-locked loops" to distinguish them from other digital phase-locked loops. Systems conceived as cost-effective solution to problem of filtering signals at high sampling rates needed to accommodate wide input frequency bands. Each of M filters process 1/M of spectrum of signal.

  13. Phase-locked loops and their application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, W. C. (Editor); Simon, M. K.

    1978-01-01

    A collection of papers is presented on the characteristics and capabilities of phase-locked loops (PLLs), along with some applications of interest. The discussion covers basic theory (linear and nonlinear); acquisition; threshold; stability; frequency demodulation and detection; tracking; cycle slipping and loss of lock; phase-locked oscillators; operation and performance in the presence of noise; AGC, AFC, and APC circuits and systems; digital PLL; and applications and miscellaneous. With the rapid development of IC technology, PLLs are expected to be used widely in consumer electronics.

  14. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH EAST INTO THE LOCK, SHOWING THE GATES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING SOUTH EAST INTO THE LOCK, SHOWING THE GATES TO THE LOCK, NOTE THE SCALE OF THE BOAT RELATIVE TO THE SCALE OF THE LOCK. - Wilson Dam & Hydroelectric Plant, Navigation Lock, Spanning Tennessee River at Wilson Dam Road (Route 133), Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  15. 49 CFR 236.339 - Mechanical locking, maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... prevented: (a) Mechanical machine—(1) Latch-operated locking. Raising lever latch block so that bottom... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mechanical locking, maintenance requirements. 236... Interlocking Rules and Instructions § 236.339 Mechanical locking, maintenance requirements. Locking...

  16. 49 CFR 236.339 - Mechanical locking, maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... prevented: (a) Mechanical machine—(1) Latch-operated locking. Raising lever latch block so that bottom... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mechanical locking, maintenance requirements. 236... Interlocking Rules and Instructions § 236.339 Mechanical locking, maintenance requirements. Locking...

  17. 1. VIEW SOUTH ACROSS SUSQUEHANNA RIVER, LOCK SETTING (Opening of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW SOUTH ACROSS SUSQUEHANNA RIVER, LOCK SETTING (Opening of lock on bank by shrubs, near center of photograph) - Bald Eagle Cross-Cut Canal Lock, North of Water Street along West Branch of Susquehanna River South bank, 500 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA

  18. 49 CFR 236.758 - Lock, electric, forced drop.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lock, electric, forced drop. 236.758 Section 236.758 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 236.758 Lock, electric, forced drop. An electric lock in which the locking member is...

  19. 49 CFR 236.758 - Lock, electric, forced drop.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lock, electric, forced drop. 236.758 Section 236.758 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 236.758 Lock, electric, forced drop. An electric lock in which the locking member is...

  20. 49 CFR 236.758 - Lock, electric, forced drop.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lock, electric, forced drop. 236.758 Section 236.758 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 236.758 Lock, electric, forced drop. An electric lock in which the locking member is...

  1. 27 CFR 19.282 - Breaking Government locks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breaking Government locks... Breaking Government locks. Where affixed, Government locks shall not be removed without the authorization... obtain authorization from an appropriate TTB officer, Government locks may be removed, by the...

  2. 49 CFR 236.339 - Mechanical locking, maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mechanical locking, maintenance requirements. 236... Interlocking Rules and Instructions § 236.339 Mechanical locking, maintenance requirements. Locking and... prevented: (a) Mechanical machine—(1) Latch-operated locking. Raising lever latch block so that...

  3. 49 CFR 236.339 - Mechanical locking, maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mechanical locking, maintenance requirements. 236... Interlocking Rules and Instructions § 236.339 Mechanical locking, maintenance requirements. Locking and... prevented: (a) Mechanical machine—(1) Latch-operated locking. Raising lever latch block so that...

  4. 49 CFR 236.339 - Mechanical locking, maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mechanical locking, maintenance requirements. 236... Interlocking Rules and Instructions § 236.339 Mechanical locking, maintenance requirements. Locking and... prevented: (a) Mechanical machine—(1) Latch-operated locking. Raising lever latch block so that...

  5. 49 CFR 236.759 - Lock, facing point.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Lock, facing point. A mechanical lock for a switch, derail, or movable-point frog, comprising a plunger stand and a plunger which engages a lock rod attached to the switch point to lock the operated unit....

  6. 49 CFR 236.759 - Lock, facing point.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Lock, facing point. A mechanical lock for a switch, derail, or movable-point frog, comprising a plunger stand and a plunger which engages a lock rod attached to the switch point to lock the operated unit....

  7. 49 CFR 236.758 - Lock, electric, forced drop.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lock, electric, forced drop. 236.758 Section 236..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.758 Lock, electric, forced drop. An electric lock in which the locking member is...

  8. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST INTO LOCK 71. NOTE THE SEDIMENT BUILD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST INTO LOCK 71. NOTE THE SEDIMENT BUILD UP. THIS IS BY DESIGN, NOT ONLY ARE THE OLDER LOCKS USED AS AN OVERFLOW SPILLWAY FOR THE CURRENT LOCKS, THEY ARE ALSO USED FOR SEDIMENT AND DEBRIS CONTROL. - New York State Barge Canal, Lockport Locks, Richmond Avenue, Lockport, Niagara County, NY

  9. A stabilized laser continuously tunable over a range of 1.5 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, B. L.; Xiong, W.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, L. J.

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate a method to stabilize laser frequency which can be continuously tuned over a range of 1.5 GHz. It is based on saturated absorption spectroscopy (SAS) generated by an external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) which is modulated by an electro-optic amplitude modulator (EO-AM). The spectra consist of not only the original peaks corresponding to resonant and crossover lines of 133Cs D2 line, but also signals introduced by sidebands from an EO-AM. Thus, the laser frequency can be locked to any point within the range of the spectra. Furthermore, the tuning range of the laser can be doubled compared to the coverage of common SAS by fixing the frequency of the pumping laser. The best stability of the locked laser induced by the EO-AM is 1.27 × 10-11 over an integrating time of 125 s. This method may be applied for more precise and flexible manipulation of atoms and molecules.

  10. Prescaled phase-locked loop using phase modulation and spectral filtering and its application to clock extraction from 160-Gbit/s optical-time-division multiplexed signal.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Koji; Katoh, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2006-05-01

    We propose a prescaled phase-locked loop (PLL) using a simple optoelectronic phase comparator based on phase modulation and spectral filtering. Our phase comparator has a high dynamic range of over 9 dB and a high sensitivity comparable to that using an electrical mixer. A PLL composed of our phase comparator enables to extract a low-noise 10-GHz clock from a 160-Gbit/s optical-time-division multiplexed (OTDM) signal.

  11. 1.61 μm high-order passive harmonic mode locking in a fiber laser based on graphene saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yichang; Niang, Alioune; Guesmi, Khmaies; Salhi, Mohamed; Sanchez, Francois

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate a passive mode-locked Er:Yb doped double-clad ring fiber laser based on graphene saturable absorber. By adjusting the polarization controller and minimizing the cavity loss, the laser can operate at hundreds of harmonics of the fundamental repetition frequency of the resonator with the central wavelength of 1.61 μm. Up to 683rd harmonic (which corresponds to 5.882 GHz) of the fundamental repetition frequency was achieved.

  12. A 75-116-Ghz LNA with 23-K Noise Temperature at 108 Ghz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varonen, Mikko; Reeves, Rodrigo; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Samoska, Lorene; Cleary, Kieran; Gawande, Rohit; Fung, Andy; Gaier, Todd; Weinreb, Sander; Readhead, Anthony C. S.; Sarkozy, Stephen; Lai, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the design and measurement results, both on-wafer and in package, of an ultra-low-noise and wideband monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifier in the frequency range of 75 to 116 GHz. The three-stage amplifier packaged in a WR10 waveguide housing and fabricated using a 35-nm InP HEMT technology achieves a record noise temperature of 23 K at 108 GHz when cryogenically cooled to 27 K. The measured gain is 22 to 27 dB for frequency range of 75 to 116 GHz. Furthermore, the amplifier utilizes four finger devices with total gate width of 60 um resulting for improved linearity.

  13. High power coherent polarization locked laser diode.

    PubMed

    Purnawirman; Phua, P B

    2011-03-14

    We have coherently combined a broad area laser diode array to obtain high power single-lobed output by using coherent polarization locking. The single-lobed coherent beam is achieved by spatially combining four diode emitters using walk-off crystals and waveplates while their phases are passively locked via polarization discrimination. While our previous work focused on coherent polarization locking of diode in Gaussian beams, we demonstrate in this paper, the feasibility of the same polarization discrimination for locking multimode beams from broad area diode lasers. The resonator is designed to mitigate the loss from smile effect by using retro-reflection feedback in the cavity. In a 980 nm diode array, we produced 7.2 W coherent output with M2 of 1.5x11.5. The brightness of the diode is improved by more than an order of magnitude.

  14. Validation of Modeling Flow Approaching Navigation Locks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    instrumentation, direction vernier . ........................................................................ 8  Figure 11. Plan A lock approach, upstream approach...13-9 8 Figure 9. Tools and instrumentation, bracket attached to rail. Figure 10. Tools and instrumentation, direction vernier . Numerical model

  15. 49 CFR 236.756 - Lock, bolt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... mechanical lock so arranged that if a switch, derail or movable-point frog is not in the proper position for... will prevent a movement of the switch, derail or movable-point frog unless the signal displays its...

  16. 49 CFR 236.756 - Lock, bolt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... mechanical lock so arranged that if a switch, derail or movable-point frog is not in the proper position for... will prevent a movement of the switch, derail or movable-point frog unless the signal displays its...

  17. 49 CFR 236.756 - Lock, bolt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... mechanical lock so arranged that if a switch, derail or movable-point frog is not in the proper position for... will prevent a movement of the switch, derail or movable-point frog unless the signal displays its...

  18. Equivalent-circuit modeling of a MEMS phase detector for phase-locked loop applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Juzheng; Liao, Xiaoping

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an equivalent-circuit model of a MEMS phase detector and deals with its application in phase-locked loops (PLLs). Due to the dc voltage output of the MEMS phase detector, the low-pass filter which is essential in a conventional PLL can be omitted. Thus, the layout area can be miniaturized and the consumed power can be saved. The signal transmission inside the phase detector is realized in circuit model by waveguide modules while the electric-thermal-electric conversion is illustrated in circuit term based on analogies between thermal and electrical variables. Losses are taken into consideration in the modeling. Measurement verifications for the phase detector model are conducted at different input powers 11, 14 and 17 dBm at 10 GHz. The maximum discrepancies between the simulated and measured results are 0.14, 0.42 and 1.13 mV, respectively. A new structure of PLL is constructed by connecting the presented model directly to a VCO module in the simulation platform. It allows to model the transient behaviors of the PLL at both locked and out of lock conditions. The VCO output frequency is revealed to be synchronized with the reference frequency within the hold range. All the modeling and simulation are performed in Advanced Design System (ADS) software.

  19. Multi-gigahertz repetition rate ultrafast waveguide lasers mode-locked with graphene saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obraztsov, P. A.; Okhrimchuk, A. G.; Rybin, M. G.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Garnov, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    We report the development of an approach to build compact waveguide lasers that operate in the stable fundamental mode-locking regime with multigigahertz repetition rates. The approach is based on the use of depressed cladding multi- or single-mode waveguides fabricated directly in the active laser crystal using the femtosecond laser inscription method and a graphene saturable absorber. Using this approach we achieve the stable self-starting mode-locking operation of a diode-pumped waveguide Nd:YAG laser that delivers picosecond pulses at a repetition rate of up to 11.5 GHz with an average power of 12 mW at a central wavelength of 1064 nm. The saturable absorbers are formed through the chemical vapor deposition of single-layer graphene on the output coupler mirror or directly on the end facet of the laser crystal. The stable self-starting mode-locking operation is achieved by controlling the group delay dispersion in the laser cavity with an intracavity interferometer. The method developed for the creation of compact ultrashort pulse laser generators with gigahertz repetition rates can be extended further and applied for the development of compact high-repetition rate lasers that operate at a wide range of IR wavelengths.

  20. An etalon stabilized 10-GHz comb source using a slab coupled waveguide amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila-Rodriguez, Josue; Ozdur, Ibrahim T.; Mandridis, Dimitrios; Williams, Charles; Delfyett, Peter J.; Plant, Jason J.; Juodawlkis, Paul W.

    2011-06-01

    An optical comb source based on a slab-coupled optical waveguide amplifier (SCOWA) is presented. The laser is harmonically mode-locked at 10.287 GHz repetition rate and stabilized to an intra-cavity Fabry-Pérot etalon via Pound- Drever-Hall locking. The Fabry-Pérot etalon serves as a reference for the optical frequency of the comb-lines and suppresses the fiber cavity modes to allow only a single longitudinal mode-set to oscillate, generating a frequency comb spaced by the repetition rate. The pulse-to-pulse timing jitter and energy fluctuations are < 2 fs and < 0.03%, respectively (integrated from 1Hz to 100 MHz). Fundamental to this result is the incorporation of the SCOW amplifier as the gain medium and the use of an ultra-low noise sapphire-loaded cavity oscillator to mode-lock the laser. The SCOWA has higher saturation power than commercially available gain media, permitting higher intra-cavity power as well as available power at the output, increasing the power of the photodetected RF tones which increases their signal-to-noise ratio. A high visibility optical frequency comb is observed spanning ~3 nm (at -10 dB), with optical SNR > 60 dB for a cavity with no dispersion compensation. Initial results of a dispersion compensated cavity are presented. A spectral width of ~7.6 nm (-10 dB) was obtained for this case and the pulses can be compressed to near the transform limit at ~930 fs.

  1. 60-GHz Millimeter-wave Over Fiber with Directly Modulated Dual-mode Laser Diode.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Lin, Chi-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Ting; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2016-06-14

    A directly modulated dual-mode laser diode (DMLD) with third-order intermodulation distortion (IMD3) suppression is proposed for a 60-GHz millimeter-wave over fiber (MMWoF) architecture, enabling new fiber-wireless communication access to cover 4-km single-mode-fiber (SMF) and 3-m wireless 16-QAM OFDM transmissions. By dual-mode injection-locking, the throughput degradation of the DMLD is mitigated with saturation effect to reduce its threshold, IMD3 power and relative intensity noise to 7.7 mA, -85 dBm and -110.4 dBc/Hz, respectively, providing huge spurious-free dynamic range of 85.8 dB/Hz(2/3). This operation suppresses the noise floor of the DMLD carried QPSK-OFDM spectrum by 5 dB. The optical receiving power is optimized to restrict the power fading effect for improving the bit error rate to 1.9 × 10(-3 )and the receiving power penalty to 1.1 dB. Such DMLD based hybrid architecture for 60-GHz MMW fiber-wireless access can directly cover the current optical and wireless networks for next-generation indoor and short-reach mobile communications.

  2. 60-GHz Millimeter-wave Over Fiber with Directly Modulated Dual-mode Laser Diode

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Lin, Chi-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Ting; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2016-01-01

    A directly modulated dual-mode laser diode (DMLD) with third-order intermodulation distortion (IMD3) suppression is proposed for a 60-GHz millimeter-wave over fiber (MMWoF) architecture, enabling new fiber-wireless communication access to cover 4-km single-mode-fiber (SMF) and 3-m wireless 16-QAM OFDM transmissions. By dual-mode injection-locking, the throughput degradation of the DMLD is mitigated with saturation effect to reduce its threshold, IMD3 power and relative intensity noise to 7.7 mA, −85 dBm and −110.4 dBc/Hz, respectively, providing huge spurious-free dynamic range of 85.8 dB/Hz2/3. This operation suppresses the noise floor of the DMLD carried QPSK-OFDM spectrum by 5 dB. The optical receiving power is optimized to restrict the power fading effect for improving the bit error rate to 1.9 × 10−3 and the receiving power penalty to 1.1 dB. Such DMLD based hybrid architecture for 60-GHz MMW fiber-wireless access can directly cover the current optical and wireless networks for next-generation indoor and short-reach mobile communications. PMID:27297267

  3. 60-GHz Millimeter-wave Over Fiber with Directly Modulated Dual-mode Laser Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Lin, Chi-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Ting; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2016-06-01

    A directly modulated dual-mode laser diode (DMLD) with third-order intermodulation distortion (IMD3) suppression is proposed for a 60-GHz millimeter-wave over fiber (MMWoF) architecture, enabling new fiber-wireless communication access to cover 4-km single-mode-fiber (SMF) and 3-m wireless 16-QAM OFDM transmissions. By dual-mode injection-locking, the throughput degradation of the DMLD is mitigated with saturation effect to reduce its threshold, IMD3 power and relative intensity noise to 7.7 mA, ‑85 dBm and ‑110.4 dBc/Hz, respectively, providing huge spurious-free dynamic range of 85.8 dB/Hz2/3. This operation suppresses the noise floor of the DMLD carried QPSK-OFDM spectrum by 5 dB. The optical receiving power is optimized to restrict the power fading effect for improving the bit error rate to 1.9 × 10‑3 and the receiving power penalty to 1.1 dB. Such DMLD based hybrid architecture for 60-GHz MMW fiber-wireless access can directly cover the current optical and wireless networks for next-generation indoor and short-reach mobile communications.

  4. On-Wafer Measurement of a Silicon-Based CMOS VCO at 324 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Man Fung, King; Gaier, Todd; Huang, Daquan; Larocca, Tim; Chang, M. F.; Campbell, Richard; Andrews, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The world s first silicon-based complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated-circuit voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) operating in a frequency range around 324 GHz has been built and tested. Concomitantly, equipment for measuring the performance of this oscillator has been built and tested. These accomplishments are intermediate steps in a continuing effort to develop low-power-consumption, low-phase-noise, electronically tunable signal generators as local oscillators for heterodyne receivers in submillimeter-wavelength (frequency > 300 GHz) scientific instruments and imaging systems. Submillimeter-wavelength imaging systems are of special interest for military and law-enforcement use because they could, potentially, be used to detect weapons hidden behind clothing and other opaque dielectric materials. In comparison with prior submillimeter- wavelength signal generators, CMOS VCOs offer significant potential advantages, including great reductions in power consumption, mass, size, and complexity. In addition, there is potential for on-chip integration of CMOS VCOs with other CMOS integrated circuitry, including phase-lock loops, analog- to-digital converters, and advanced microprocessors.

  5. Optimum design of hybrid phase locked loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, P.; Yan, T.

    1981-01-01

    The design procedure of phase locked loops is described in which the analog loop filter is replaced by a digital computer. Specific design curves are given for the step and ramp input changes in phase. It is shown that the designed digital filter depends explicitly on the product of the sampling time and the noise bandwidth of the phase locked loop. This technique of optimization can be applied to the design of digital analog loops for other applications.

  6. Self-mode-locking semiconductor disk laser.

    PubMed

    Gaafar, Mahmoud; Richter, Philipp; Keskin, Hakan; Möller, Christoph; Wichmann, Matthias; Stolz, Wolfgang; Rahimi-Iman, Arash; Koch, Martin

    2014-11-17

    The development of mode-locked semiconductor disk lasers received striking attention in the last 14 years and there is still a vast potential of such pulsed lasers to be explored and exploited. While for more than one decade pulsed operation was strongly linked to the employment of a saturable absorber, self-mode-locking emerged recently as an effective and novel technique in this field - giving prospect to a reduced complexity and improved cost-efficiency of such lasers. In this work, we highlight recent achievements regarding self-mode-locked semiconductor devices. It is worth to note, that although nonlinear effects in the active medium are expected to give rise to self-mode-locking, this has to be investigated with care in future experiments. However, there is a controversy whether results presented with respect to self-mode-locking truly show mode-locking. Such concerns are addressed in this work and we provide a clear evidence of mode-locking in a saturable-absorber-free device. By using a BBO crystal outside the cavity, green light originating from second-harmonic generation using the out-coupled laser beam is demonstrated. In addition, long-time-span pulse trains as well as radiofrequency-spectra measurements are presented for our sub-ps pulses at 500 MHz repetition rate which indicate the stable pulse operation of our device. Furthermore, a long-time-span autocorrelation trace is introduced which clearly shows absence of a pedestal or double pulses. Eventually, a beam-profile measurement reveals the excellent beam quality of our device with an M-square factor of less than 1.1 for both axes, showing that self-mode-locking can be achieved for the fundamental transverse mode.

  7. SAR measurements of mines and minefields at 35 GHz and 94 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimpf, Hartmuf; Puehl, M.; Biegel, Gregor

    1997-07-01

    Different types of anti-tank surface mines were measured on a turntable in a n anechoic chamber, and modelled with the German SIMPRASS model. In addition, several flights over a realistic minefield were performed with a 35 GHz and a 94 GHz radar operated in parallel in a SAR configuration. It is found that typical RCS values of AT mines at mmW frequencies are in the region between -18dBsm and -30dBsm. Therefore, they are detectable by airborne mmW radar only for a resolution cell size comparable to the physical size of the mine itself depending on the background clutter type.

  8. The 30-GHz monolithic receive module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauhahn, P.; Geddes, J.; Sokolov, V.; Contolatis, T.

    1988-01-01

    The fourth year progress is described on a program to develop a 27.5 to 30 GHz GaAs monolithic receive module for spaceborne-communication antenna feed array applications, and to deliver submodules for experimental evaluation. Program goals include an overall receive module noise figure of 5 dB, a 30 dB RF to IF gain with six levels of intermediate gain control, a five bit phase shifter, and a maximum power consumption of 250 mW. Submicron gate length single and dual gate FETs are described and applied in the development of monolithic gain control amplifiers and low noise amplifiers. A two-stage monolithic gain control amplifier based on ion implanted dual gate MESFETs was designed and fabricated. The gain control amplifier has a gain of 12 dB at 29 GHz with a gain control range of over 13 dB. A two-stage monolithic low noise amplifier based on ion implanted MESFETs which provides 7 dB gain with 6.2 dB noise figure at 29 GHz was also developed. An interconnected receive module containing LNA, gain control, and phase shifter submodules was built using the LNA and gain control ICs as well as a monolithic phase shifter developed previously under this program. The design, fabrication, and evaluation of this interconnected receiver is presented. Progress in the development of an RF/IF submodule containing a unique ion implanted diode mixer diode and a broadband balanced mixer monolithic IC with on-chip IF amplifier and the initial design of circuits for the RF portion of a two submodule receiver are also discussed.

  9. Automatic locking orthotic knee device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An articulated tang in clevis joint for incorporation in newly manufactured conventional strap-on orthotic knee devices or for replacing such joints in conventional strap-on orthotic knee devices is discussed. The instant tang in clevis joint allows the user the freedom to extend and bend the knee normally when no load (weight) is applied to the knee and to automatically lock the knee when the user transfers weight to the knee, thus preventing a damaged knee from bending uncontrollably when weight is applied to the knee. The tang in clevis joint of the present invention includes first and second clevis plates, a tang assembly and a spacer plate secured between the clevis plates. Each clevis plate includes a bevelled serrated upper section. A bevelled shoe is secured to the tank in close proximity to the bevelled serrated upper section of the clevis plates. A coiled spring mounted within an oblong bore of the tang normally urges the shoes secured to the tang out of engagement with the serrated upper section of each clevic plate to allow rotation of the tang relative to the clevis plate. When weight is applied to the joint, the load compresses the coiled spring, the serrations on each clevis plate dig into the bevelled shoes secured to the tang to prevent relative movement between the tang and clevis plates. A shoulder is provided on the tang and the spacer plate to prevent overextension of the joint.

  10. An LTCC 94 GHz Antenna Array

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, J; Pao, H; Lin, H; Garland, P; O'Neill, D; Horton, K

    2007-12-21

    An antenna array is designed in low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) Ferro A6M{trademark} for a mm-wave application. The antenna is designed to operate at 94 GHz with a few percent bandwidth. A key manufacturing technology is the use of 3 mil diameter vias on a 6 mil pitch to construct the laminated waveguides that form the beamforming network and radiating elements. Measurements for loss in the laminated waveguide are presented. The slot-fed cavity-radiating element is designed to account for extremely tight mutual coupling between elements. The array incorporates a slot-fed multi-layer beamforming network.

  11. A wideband 12 GHz down converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, B. A.; Rosenbaum, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and evaluation of a single ended 12 GHz down-converter suitable for use in a low cost satellite ground terminal is described. The mixer uses waveguide, coaxial and MIC (microwave integrated circuit) transmission line components. Theoretical and experimental analyses of several microstrip circuit elements are presented including the traveling wave-directional filter, quarter wave-length proximity directional coupler, low pass filter and the quarterwave band stop filter. The optimum performance achieved for the mixer using a packaged diode was 9.4 db conversion loss and a bandwidth of 275 MHz.

  12. 600-GHz Electronically Tunable Vector Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dengler, Robert; Maiwald, Frank; Siegel, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A compact, high-dynamic-range, electronically tunable vector measurement system that operates in the frequency range from approximately 560 to approximately 635 GHz has been developed as a prototype of vector measurement systems that would be suitable for use in nearly-real-time active submillimeter-wave imaging. As used here, 'vector measurement system" signifies an instrumentation system that applies a radio-frequency (RF) excitation to an object of interest and measures the resulting amplitude and phase response, relative to either the applied excitatory signal or another reference signal related in a known way to applied excitatory signal.

  13. Astrometry at 24 and 43 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, Gabor E.; Boboltz, D.; Charlot, P.; Fey, A.; Fomalont, E.; Gordon, D.; Jacobs, C. S.; Ma, C. - C.; Naudet, C. J.; Sovers, O. J.; Zhang, L. D.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the goals and initial results of a collaboration formed to survey extragalactic objects at radio frequencies of 24 and 43 GHz This survey is for extending the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) that is the current coordinate system for astrometry and wh ich is the angular inertial frame of deep space navigation. In princ iple, the extension should lead to a more stable reference frame. We report upon our initial three 24-hour observing sessions involving about 100 radio sources at the VLBA.

  14. The 53 GHz DMR sky map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The 53 GHz DMR sky map (top) prior to dipole subtraction, (middle) after dipole subtraction, and (bottom) after subtraction of a model of the Galactic emission, based on data gathered over the entire 4-year mission. The Galactic emission model is based on DIRBE far-infrared and Haslam et al. (1982) 408 MHz radio continuum observations (see Bennett et al. 1996, ApJ, 464, L1). Bennett et al. excluded an area around the Galactic plane referred to as the 'custom cut' region when they conducted their analysis. See slide 19 caption for information about map smoothing and projection.

  15. The 8-18 GHz radar spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, T. F.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1973-01-01

    The design, construction, testing, and accuracy of an 8-18 GHz radar spectrometer, an FM-CW system which employs a dual antenna system, is described. The antennas, transmitter, and a portion of the receiver are mounted at the top of a 26 meter hydraulic boom which is in turn mounted on a truck for system mobility. HH and VV polarized measurements are possible at incidence angles ranging from 0 deg. to 80 deg. Calibration is accomplished by referencing the measurements against a Luneberg lens of known radar cross section.

  16. High-order harmonic noise-like pulsing of a passively mode-locked double-clad Er/Yb fibre ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottiez, O.; Hernández-García, J. C.; Ibarra-Escamilla, B.; Kuzin, E. A.; Durán-Sánchez, M.; González-García, A.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we study noise-like pulse generation in a km-long fibre ring laser including a double-clad erbium-ytterbium fibre and passively mode-locked through nonlinear polarization evolution. Although single noise-like pulsing is only observed at moderate pump power, pulse energies as high as 120 nJ are reached in this regime. For higher pump power, the pulse splits into several noise-like pulses, which then rearrange into a stable and periodic pulse train. Harmonic mode locking from the 2nd to the 48th orders is readily obtained. At pump powers close to the damage threshold of the setup, much denser noise-like pulse trains are demonstrated, reaching harmonic orders beyond 1200 and repetition frequencies in excess of a quarter of a GHz. The mechanisms leading to noise-like pulse breaking and stable high-order harmonic mode locking are discussed.

  17. Passive mode locking of a GaSb-based quantum well diode laser emitting at 2.1 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Merghem, K.; Aubin, G.; Ramdane, A.; Teissier, R.; Baranov, A. N.; Monakhov, A. M.

    2015-09-14

    We demonstrate passive mode locking of a GaSb-based diode laser emitting at 2.1 μm. The active region of the studied device consists in two 10-nm-thick GaInSbAs/GaAlSbAs quantum wells. Passive mode locking has been achieved in a two-section laser with one of the sections used as a saturable absorber. A microwave signal at 20.6 GHz, measured in the electrical circuit of the absorber, corresponds to the fundamental photon round-trip frequency in the laser resonator. The linewidth of this signal as low as ∼10 kHz has been observed at certain operating conditions, indicating low phase noise mode-locked operation.

  18. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-11-01

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2-4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be -23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is -105 dB rad2/Hz at 1 kHz offset and -150 dB rad2/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10-9 at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10-11 τ-1/2 up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  19. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-11-15

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10{sup −9} at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10{sup −11} τ{sup −1/2} up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  20. A 17 GHz molecular rectifier

    PubMed Central

    Trasobares, J.; Vuillaume, D.; Théron, D.; Clément, N.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular electronics originally proposed that small molecules sandwiched between electrodes would accomplish electronic functions and enable ultimate scaling to be reached. However, so far, functional molecular devices have only been demonstrated at low frequency. Here, we demonstrate molecular diodes operating up to 17.8 GHz. Direct current and radio frequency (RF) properties were simultaneously measured on a large array of molecular junctions composed of gold nanocrystal electrodes, ferrocenyl undecanethiol molecules and the tip of an interferometric scanning microwave microscope. The present nanometre-scale molecular diodes offer a current density increase by several orders of magnitude compared with that of micrometre-scale molecular diodes, allowing RF operation. The measured S11 parameters show a diode rectification ratio of 12 dB which is linked to the rectification behaviour of the direct current conductance. From the RF measurements, we extrapolate a cut-off frequency of 520 GHz. A comparison with the silicon RF-Schottky diodes, architecture suggests that the RF-molecular diodes are extremely attractive for scaling and high-frequency operation. PMID:27694833

  1. Recent progress of RIKEN 18 GHz ECRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Takahide; Yoshitoshi, Miyazawa; Masatake, Hemmi; Masayuki, Kase; Tadashi, Kageyama; Osamu, Kamigaito; Toshiya, Chiba; Naohito, Inabe; Akira, Goto; Yasushige, Yano; Juha, Ärje

    1997-05-01

    We have constructed and tested a new ECRIS in RIKEN. This source has a higher magnetic field(1.4 T) and higher operational RF frequency(18 GHz). For gaseous elements, we obtained the 190 eμA of Ar^11+ and 5 eμA of Ar^16+. For the production of metallic ions, we use a special technique, the so called "MIVOC method". Using this method 140 eμA of Fe^10+ and 80 eμA of Fe^13+ were obtained. We also tested the pulsed mode operation. The beam intensity has strongly enhanced (e.g., 200 eμA of Fe^10+) compared to CW mode operation. We determined the ion confinement time in the ECRIS under the pulsed mode operation for various kinds of ions. In this contribution, we will present not only the results of production of ions (O, Ar, Kr, Cr, Fe, Ni, Ru, Mo, W, Ta etc) but also basic characteristics of the 18 GHz ECRIS including the ion confinement time.

  2. Electronic sideband locking of a broadly tunable 318.6 nm ultraviolet laser to an ultra-stable optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jiandong; Wang, Jieying; He, Jun; Wang, Junmin

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate frequency stabilization of a tunable 318.6 nm ultraviolet (UV) laser system using electronic sideband locking. By indirectly changing the frequency of a broadband electro-optic phase modulator, the laser can be continuously tuned over 4 GHz, while a 637.2 nm laser is directly stabilized to a high-finesse ultra-stable optical cavity. The doubling cavity also remains locked to the 637.2 nm light. We show that the tuning range depends mainly on the gain-flattening region of the modulator and the piezo-tunable range of the seed laser. The frequency-stabilized tunable UV laser system is able to compensate for the offset between reference and target frequencies, and has potential applications in precision spectroscopy of cold atoms.

  3. Diode-pumped passively mode-locked Nd:YAG laser at 1338 nm with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Xu, Jin-Long; He, Jing-Liang; Yang, Xiu-Qin; Zhang, Bing-Yuan; Yang, He; Liu, Shan-De; Zhang, Bai-Tao

    2011-12-20

    We demonstrate a diode-end-pumped passively mode-locked 1338 nm Nd:YAG laser with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror. At the absorbed pump power of 8.89 W, an average output power of 1.12 W was obtained with a slope efficiency of 14%. The pulse width was 22.4 ps with a repetition rate of 63.9 MHz, corresponding to a peak power of 782 W. In addition, the bandwidth of the mode-locking spectrum is as narrow as 20.44 GHz, which shows the potential application in long-distance ranging and fiber information transmission because of the low dispersion of these ultrashort pulses.

  4. Passive mode locking at harmonics of the free spectral range of the intracavity filter in a fiber ring laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shumin; Lu, Fuyun; Dong, Xinyong; Shum, Ping; Yang, Xiufeng; Zhou, Xiaoqun; Gong, Yandong; Lu, Chao

    2005-11-01

    We report the passive mode-locking at harmonics of the free spectral range (FSR) of the intracavity multi-channel filter in a fiber ring laser. The laser uses a sampled fiber Bragg grating (SFBG) with a free spectral range (FSR) of 0.8 nm, or 99 GHz at 1555 nm, and a length of highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber with low and flat dispersion. Stable picosecond soliton pulse trains with twofold to sevenfold enhancement in the repetition rate, relative to the FSR of the SFBG, have been achieved. The passive mode-locking mechanism that is at play in this laser relies on a dissipative four-wave mixing process and switching of repetition rate is realized simply by adjustment of the intracavity polarization controllers.

  5. The characteristics of Kerr-lens mode-locked self-Raman Nd:YVO4 1176 nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zuohan; Peng, Jiying; Yao, Jianquan; Han, Ming

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we report on a compact and feasible dual-concave cavity CW Kerr-lens mode-locked self-Raman Nd:YVO4 laser. A self-starting diode-pumped picosecond Nd:YVO4 1176 nm laser is demonstrated without any additional components, where the stimulated Stokes Raman scattering and Kerr-lens-induced mode locking are operated in the same crystal. With an incident pump power of 12 W, the average output power at 1176 nm is up to 643 mW. Meanwhile, the repetition rate and the pulse width of the fundamental laser are measured to be 1.53 GHz and 8.6 ps, respectively. In addition, the yellow laser output at 588 nm is realized by frequency doubling with a LiB3O5 crystal.

  6. Rational harmonic mode-locked laser using a bismuth-oxide-based highly nonlinear erbium-doped fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuchi, Yutaka; Hirata, Kouji; Muraguchi, Masahiro; Maeda, Joji

    2017-01-01

    We report a rational harmonic mode-locked fiber laser employing a bismuth-oxide-based highly nonlinear erbium-doped fiber (Bi-HNL-EDF) with a length of 1.5 m. The Bi-HNL-EDF is used as a broadband gain medium and as a noise suppressor based on self-phase modulation. The amplitude of the rational harmonic mode-locked pulses can be regulated by properly tuning the modulation parameters of the intracavity modulator. The cavity length as short as 6 m enables generation of stable and clean short pulses with a repetition frequency up to 40 GHz over the wavelength range covering both the conventional and the longer bands.

  7. Output Power Limitations and Improvements in Passively Mode Locked GaAs/AlGaAs Quantum Well Lasers.

    PubMed

    Tandoi, Giuseppe; Ironside, Charles N; Marsh, John H; Bryce, A Catrina

    2012-03-01

    We report a novel approach for increasing the output power in passively mode locked semiconductor lasers. Our approach uses epitaxial structures with an optical trap in the bottom cladding that enlarges the vertical mode size to scale the pulse saturation energy. With this approach we demonstrate a very high peak power of 9.8 W per facet, at a repetition rate of 6.8 GHz and with pulse duration of 0.71 ps. In particular, we compare two GaAs/AlGaAs epilayer designs, a double quantum well design operating at 830 nm and a single quantum well design operating at 795 nm, with vertical mode sizes of 0.5 and 0.75 μm, respectively. We show that a larger mode size not only shifts the mode locking regime of operation towards higher powers, but also produces other improvements in respect of two main failure mechanisms that limit the output power: the catastrophic optical mirror damage and the catastrophic optical saturable absorber damage. For the 830 nm material structure, we also investigate the effect of non-absorbing mirrors on output power and mode locked operation of colliding pulse mode locked lasers.

  8. Output Power Limitations and Improvements in Passively Mode Locked GaAs/AlGaAs Quantum Well Lasers

    PubMed Central

    Tandoi, Giuseppe; Ironside, Charles N.; Marsh, John H.; Bryce, A. Catrina

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel approach for increasing the output power in passively mode locked semiconductor lasers. Our approach uses epitaxial structures with an optical trap in the bottom cladding that enlarges the vertical mode size to scale the pulse saturation energy. With this approach we demonstrate a very high peak power of 9.8 W per facet, at a repetition rate of 6.8 GHz and with pulse duration of 0.71 ps. In particular, we compare two GaAs/AlGaAs epilayer designs, a double quantum well design operating at 830 nm and a single quantum well design operating at 795 nm, with vertical mode sizes of 0.5 and 0.75 μm, respectively. We show that a larger mode size not only shifts the mode locking regime of operation towards higher powers, but also produces other improvements in respect of two main failure mechanisms that limit the output power: the catastrophic optical mirror damage and the catastrophic optical saturable absorber damage. For the 830 nm material structure, we also investigate the effect of non-absorbing mirrors on output power and mode locked operation of colliding pulse mode locked lasers. PMID:23843678

  9. A wide range ultra-low power Phase-Locked Loop with automatic frequency setting in 130 nm CMOS technology for data serialisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firlej, M.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Moroń, J.; Świentek, K.

    2015-12-01

    The design and measurements results of a wide frequency range ultra-low power Phase-Locked Loop (PLL) for applications in readout systems of particle physics detectors are presented. The PLL was fabricated in a 130 nm CMOS technology. To allow the implementation of different data serialisation schemes multiple division factors (6, 8, 10, 16) were implemented in the PLL feedback loop. The main PLL block—VCO works in 16 frequency ranges/modes, switched either manually or automatically. A dedicated automatic frequency mode switching circuit was developed to allow simple frequency tuning. Although the PLL was designed and simulated for a frequency range of 30 MHz-3 GHz, due to the SLVS interface limits, the measurements were done only up to 1.3 GHz. The full PLL functionality was experimentally verified, confirming a very low and frequency scalable power consumption (0.7 mW at 1 GHz).

  10. High-accuracy photoreceiver frequency response measurements at 1.55 µm by use of a heterodyne phase-locked loop.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Tasshi; Hale, Paul D

    2011-10-10

    We demonstrate a high-accuracy heterodyne measurement system for characterizing the magnitude of the frequency response of high-speed 1.55 µm photoreceivers from 2 MHz to greater than 50 GHz. At measurement frequencies below 2 GHz, we employ a phase-locked loop with a double-heterodyne detection scheme, which enables precise tuning of the heterodyne beat frequency with an RF synthesizer. At frequencies above 2 GHz the system is operated in free-run mode with thermal tuning of the laser beat frequency. We estimate the measurement uncertainties for the low frequency range and compare the measured high-frequency response of a photoreceiver to a measurement using electro-optic sampling.

  11. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5–10 GHz frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; Spoddig, Detlef; Ollefs, Katharina; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A.; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-10

    In this study, we present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme in order to study high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes of the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combination of the developed excitation mechanism with a single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. The required mechanical stability is achieved by a compact design of the microscope. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with 35 nm resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a –6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ~0.1° amplitude at –9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  12. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5–10 GHz frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Bonetti, Stefano Chen, Zhao; Kukreja, Roopali; Spoddig, Detlef; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ollefs, Katharina; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A.; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-15

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ∼6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ∼0.1° amplitude at ∼9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  13. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5-10 GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; Spoddig, Detlef; Ollefs, Katharina; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A.; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ˜6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ˜0.1° amplitude at ˜9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  14. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5–10 GHz frequency range

    DOE PAGES

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; ...

    2015-09-10

    In this study, we present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme in order to study high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes of the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combination of the developed excitation mechanism with a single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. The required mechanical stability is achieved by a compact design of the microscope. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range,more » with 35 nm resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a –6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ~0.1° amplitude at –9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.« less

  15. Preliminary Bremstrahlung Measurements on VENUS at 18 and 28 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.M.; Leitner, D.

    2005-03-15

    The bremstrahlung produced by the VENUS ECR ion source at 18 GHz and 28 GHz in the axial direction has been measured with a germanium detector. The bremstrahlung spectrum goes out beyond 1 MeV at 28 GHz and this complicates analysis of the data and the design of the collimators and detection system. Preliminary spectra and the geometry of the detection system will be described.

  16. Radiometric Measurements of Powerline Cables at 94 GHz

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-02-01

    ARMY RESEARCH LABORATORY Radiometric Measurements of Powerline Cables at 94 GHz David A. Wikner and Thomas J. Pizzillo ARL-TR-837 February 2001...MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-837 February 2001 Radiometric Measurements of Powerline Cables at 94 GHz David A. Wikner and Thomas J. Pizzillo Sensors and...collision avoidance system," Proc. SPIE 3088 (April 1997), pp 57-63. 5. D. Wikner and T. Pizzillo, "Measurement of nadir and near-nadir 94-GHz

  17. Development of a 233 GHz High Gain Traveling Wave Amplifier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-22

    USA 2Beam Wave Research, Inc., Bethesda, MD 20814 USA Abstract: We present development plans for a 233 GHz, serpentine waveguide vacuum electron...NRL G-band serpentine waveguide amplifier [2, 3] was the first demonstrated amplifier to use a UV-LIGA fabricated circuit. The small- signal gain...using the same techniques for 231.5 GHz to 235 GHz, an FCC Radiolocation band. Amplifier Design The compound, hybrid serpentine waveguide (SWG

  18. A highly stable mm-wave synthesizer realized by mixing two lasers locked to an optical frequency comb generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musha, Mitsuru; Ueda, Akitoshi; Horikoshi, Munekazu; Nakagawa, Ken'ichi; Ishiguro, Masato; Ueda, Ken-ichi; Ito, Hiroshi

    2004-10-01

    Millimeter signal generation with high spectral purity and low phase fluctuations up to 100 GHz were demonstrated with an optical method in which two external-cavity laser diodes were phase-locked to an electro-optic modulator (EOM)-based optical frequency comb generator (OFCG). The additional phase noise caused from the cavity fluctuation in OFCG was completely canceled, and the phase noise of the heterodyne beat note of two LDs was determined only by that of the signal generator below offset frequency of 10 kHz. The detailed investigation of such a high frequency signal had never been done before, and the measured frequency of 100 GHz was limited only by the bandwidth of the phase noise detection system, and can be expanded up to more than 1 THz.

  19. Integration of FTTH and GI-POF in-house networks based on injection locking and direct-detection techniques.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hsiao-Chun; Lu, Hai-Han; Li, Chung-Yi; Su, Heng-Sheng; Hsu, Chin-Tai

    2011-03-28

    An integration of fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) and graded-index plastic optical fiber (GI-POF) in-house networks based on injection-locked vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) and direct-detection technique is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Sufficient low bit error rate (BER) values were obtained over a combination of 20-km single-mode fiber (SMF) and 50-m GI-POF links. Signal qualities satisfy the worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) requirement with data signals of 20 Mbps/5.8 GHz and 70 Mbps/10 GHz, respectively. Since our proposed network does not use sophisticated and expensive RF devices in premises, it reveals a prominent one with simpler and more economic advantages. Our proposed architecture is suitable for the SMF-based primary and GI-POF-based in-house networks.

  20. Record bandwidth and sub-picosecond pulses from a monolithically integrated mode-locked quantum well ring laser.

    PubMed

    Moskalenko, Valentina; Latkowski, Sylwester; Tahvili, Saeed; de Vries, Tjibbe; Smit, Meint; Bente, Erwin

    2014-11-17

    In this paper, we present the detailed characterization of a semiconductor ring passively mode-locked laser with a 20 GHz repetition rate that was realized as an indium phosphide based photonic integrated circuit (PIC). Various dynamical regimes as a function of operating conditions were explored in the spectral and time domain. A record bandwidth of the optical coherent comb from a quantum well based device of 11.5 nm at 3 dB and sub-picosecond pulse generation is demonstrated.

  1. Gigahertz repetition rate mode-locked Yb:KYW laser using self-assembled quantum dot saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiser, Niels; Seger, Kai; Pasiskevicius, Valdas; Jang, Hoon; Rafailov, Edik; Krestnikov, Igor

    2013-03-01

    Fundamental mode-locking is achieved in a 1.036 GHz cavity using a semiconductor quantum dot saturable absorber mirror with a fast relaxation time component of down to 550 fs. The dispersive cavity delivers 1.7 ps wide pulses with spectra supporting sub-picosecond pulse durations and an M² of 1.3. An average output power of up to 339 mW at wavelengths around 1,032 nm is achieved and the saturable absorber's damage threshold is identified as a limitation for further power scaling.

  2. Mode coherence measurements across a 1.5 THz spectral bandwidth of a passively mode-locked quantum dash laser.

    PubMed

    Watts, Regan; Rosales, Ricardo; Lelarge, Francois; Ramdane, Abderrahim; Barry, Liam

    2012-05-01

    The mode coherence of adjacent and non-adjacent spectral modes of a passively mode locked quantum dash (QDash) semiconductor laser are deduced through radio frequency beat-tone linewidth measurements. A wavelength conversion scheme that uses degenerate four wave mixing in a semiconductor optical amplifier is proposed which considerably extends the mode spacing beyond the limit imposed by conventional fast-photodetection and electrical spectrum analysis of around 100 GHz. Using this scheme, the mode coherence of the QDash laser was measured out to the thirty-first harmonic, or a mode separation of 1.5 THz.

  3. Characterization of gigahertz (GHz) bandwidth photomultipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Rowe, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    The average impulse response, root-mean-square times jitter as a function of signal level, single photoelectron distribution, and multiphotoelectron dark-count distribution have been measured for two static crossed-field and five electrostatic photomultipliers. The optical signal source for the first three of these tests was a 30 picosecond mode-locked laser pulse at 0.53 micron. The static crossed-field detectors had 2-photoelectron resolution, less than 200 ps rise times, and rms time jitters of 30 ps at the single photoelectron level. The electrostatic photomultipliers had rise times from 1 to 2.5 nanoseconds, and rms time jitters from 160 to 650 ps at the same signal level. The two static crossed-field photomultipliers had ion-feedback-generated dark pulses to the 50-photoelectron level, whereas one electrostatic photomultiplier had dark pulses to the 30-photoelectron level.

  4. Synchrotron Spectral Curvature from 22 MHZ to 23 GHZ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    We combine surveys of the radio sky at frequencies 22 MHz to 1.4 GHz with data from the ARCADE-2 instrument at frequencies 3 GHz to 10 GHz to characterize the frequency spectrum of diffuse synchrotron emission in the Galaxy. The radio spectrum steepens with frequency from 22 MHz to 10 GHz. The projected spectral index at 23 GHz derived from the low-frequency data agrees well with independent measurements using only data at frequencies 23 GHz and above. Comparing the spectral index at 23 GHz to the value from previously published analyses allows extension of the model to higher frequencies. The combined data are consistent with a power-law index beta = -2.64 +/-= 0.03 at 0.31 GHz, steepening by an amount of Delta-beta = 0.07 every octave in frequency. Comparison of the radio data to models including the cosmic-ray energy spectrum suggests that any break in the synchrotron spectrum must occur at frequencies above 23 GHz.

  5. A 94/183 GHz multichannel radiometer for Convair flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliano, J. A.; Stratigos, J. A.; Forsythe, R. E.; Schuchardt, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    A multichannel 94/183 GHz radiometer was designed, built, and installed on the NASA Convair 990 research aircraft to take data for hurricane penetration flights, SEASAT-A underflights for measuring rain and water vapor, and Nimbus-G underflights for new sea ice signatures and sea surface temperature data (94 GHz only). The radiometer utilized IF frequencies of 1, 5, and 8.75 GHz about the peak of the atmospheric water vapor absorption line, centered at 183.3 GHz, to gather data needed to determine the shape of the water molecule line. Another portion of the radiometer operated at 94 GHz and obtained data on the sea brightness temperature, sea ice signatures, and on areas of rain near the ocean surface. The radiometer used a multiple lens antenna/temperature calibration technique using 3 lenses and corrugated feed horns at 94 GHz and 183 GHz. Alignment of the feed beams at 94 GHz and 183 GHz was accomplished using a 45 deg oriented reflecting surface which permitted simultaneous viewing of the feeds on alternate cycles of the chopping intervals.

  6. 12. VIEW OF TYPICAL CELL LOCKING MECHANISM, BUILDING 220 CELL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF TYPICAL CELL LOCKING MECHANISM, BUILDING 220 CELL BLOCK 'A'. THE FACE PLATE OF THE CELL LOCK IS SHOWN REMOVED, EXPOSING THE ELECTROMAGNETIC LOCKING MECHANISM COMPRISING OF 2 MICROSWITCHES FOR LOCK POSITION INDICATION (FRONT LEFT CENTER AND REAR RIGHT CENTER OF PANEL); KEY SLOT MECHANICAL LOCK; LOCK SPRING (UPPER RIGHT OF PANEL); ELECTRIC SOLENOID (BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER OF PANEL); AND MISCELLANEOUS MECHANICAL LINKAGES. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Brig, Neville Way near Ninth Street at Marine Barracks, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Universal spin-momentum locked optical forces

    SciTech Connect

    Kalhor, Farid; Thundat, Thomas; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-02-08

    Evanescent electromagnetic waves possess spin-momentum locking, where the direction of propagation (momentum) is locked to the inherent polarization of the wave (transverse spin). We study the optical forces arising from this universal phenomenon and show that the fundamental origin of recently reported non-trivial optical chiral forces is spin-momentum locking. For evanescent waves, we show that the direction of energy flow, the direction of decay, and the direction of spin follow a right hand rule for three different cases of total internal reflection, surface plasmon polaritons, and HE{sub 11} mode of an optical fiber. Furthermore, we explain how the recently reported phenomena of lateral optical force on chiral and achiral particles are caused by the transverse spin of the evanescent field and the spin-momentum locking phenomenon. Finally, we propose an experiment to identify the unique lateral forces arising from the transverse spin in the optical fiber and point to fundamental differences of the spin density from the well-known orbital angular momentum of light. Our work presents a unified view on spin-momentum locking and how it affects optical forces on chiral and achiral particles.

  8. 30 GHz High Power Production for CLIC

    SciTech Connect

    Syratchev, I.

    2006-01-03

    The CLIC Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) is a passive microwave device in which bunches of the drive beam interact with the impedance of the periodically loaded waveguide and excite preferentially the synchronous TM01 mode at 30 GHz. The RF power produced (several hundred MW) is collected at the downstream end of the structure by means of the Power Extractor and conveyed to the main linac structure. The PETS geometry is a result of multiple compromises between beam stability along single decelerator (600 m) and active length of the structure given by main linac RF power needs and layout. Surface electric and magnetic fields, power extraction method, HOM damping, ON/OFF capability and fabrication technology were all evaluated to provide reliable design.

  9. Contact gating at GHz frequency in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Wilmart, Q.; Inhofer, A.; Boukhicha, M.; Yang, W.; Rosticher, M.; Morfin, P.; Garroum, N.; Fève, G.; Berroir, J.-M.; Plaçais, B.

    2016-01-01

    The paradigm of graphene transistors is based on the gate modulation of the channel carrier density by means of a local channel gate. This standard architecture is subject to the scaling limit of the channel length and further restrictions due to access and contact resistances impeding the device performance. We propose a novel design, overcoming these issues by implementing additional local gates underneath the contact region which allow a full control of the Klein barrier taking place at the contact edge. In particular, our work demonstrates the GHz operation of transistors driven by independent contact gates. We benchmark the standard channel and novel contact gating and report for the later dynamical transconductance levels at the state of the art. Our finding may find applications in electronics and optoelectronics whenever there is need to control independently the Fermi level and the electrostatic potential of electronic sources or to get rid of cumbersome local channel gates. PMID:26879709

  10. The 94 GHz MMW imaging radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alon, Yair; Ulmer, Lon

    1993-01-01

    The 94 GHz MMW airborne radar system that provides a runway image in adverse weather conditions is now undergoing tests at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB). This system, which consists of a solid state FMCW transceiver, antenna, and digital signal processor, has an update rate of 10 times per second, 0.35x azimuth resolution and up to 3.5 meter range resolution. The radar B scope (range versus azimuth) image, once converted to C scope (elevation versus azimuth), is compatible with the standard TV presentation and can be displayed on the Head Up Display (HUD) or Head Down Display (HDD) to aid the pilot during landing and takeoff in limited visibility conditions.

  11. Advanced system characterizes antennas to 65 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Michael H.; Kremer, Douglas P.; Repjar, Andrew G.

    1990-03-01

    The antenna measurement service offered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology provides radiation-pattern, on-axis gain, and polarization measurements to 65 GHz using planar near-field and extrapolation techniques. It is pointed out that measurements of millimeter-wave antennas are both difficult and costly to make and that such measurements require low-noise, high-power signal sources and exceptionally stable and repeatable connections. The process of the three-antenna extrapolation technique and subsequent measurements of dual-port circularly polarized antennas and swept-frequency gain measurements are analyzed, and antenna standards are noted. Insertion-loss measurements and attenuator calibration are discussed, and measurement uncertainties and far-field patterns are analyzed.

  12. Operation of the SUPARAMP at 33GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, R. Y.; Parrish, P. T.

    1975-01-01

    A 9mm degenerate parametric amplifier was constructed using a linear, series array of unbiased Josephson junctions as the active, nonlinear element. A balanced diode mixer was used as a synchronous detector, with a single source serving both as the pump and as the mixer local oscillator. A stable, net gain of 15 dB in an instantaneous bandwith (FWHM) of 3.4 GHz was achieved. A system noise temperature of 220 K + or - 5 K (DSB) was measured with a SUPARAMP contribution of only 20 K x or - 10 K. Output saturation was observed and complicates the interpretation of the noise temperature measurements and may render them upper limits. A comparison was made with the results of an earlier 3 cm suparamp. The data is in substantial agreement with theoretical predictions.

  13. Development of 20 GHz monolithic transmit modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The history of the development of a transmit module for the band 17.7 to 20.2 GHz is presented. The module was to monolithically combine, on one chip, five bits of phase shift, a buffer amplifier and a power amplifier to produce 200 mW to the antenna element. The approach taken was MESFET ion implanted device technology. A common pinch-off voltage was decided upon for each application. The beginning of the total integration phases revealed hitherto unencountered hazards of large microwave circuit integration which were successfully overcome. Yield and customer considerations finally led to two separate chips, one containing the power amplifiers and the other containing the complete five bit phase shifter.

  14. Quantum limited quasiparticle mixers at 100 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, C.A; Hu, Qing; Richards, P.L. ); Worsham, A.H.; Prober, D.E. . Dept. of Applied Physics); Raeisaenen, A.V. . Radio Lab.)

    1990-09-01

    We have made accurate measurements of the noise and gain of superconducting-insulating-superconducting (SIS) mixers employing small area (1{mu}m{sup 2}) Ta/Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Pb{sub 0.9}Bi{sub 0.1} tunnel junctions. We have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 +/{minus} 0.31 quanta at 95.0 GHz, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit of 0.5 quanta. We have carried out a detailed comparison between theoretical predictions of the quantum theory of mixing and experimentally measured noise and gain. We used the shapes of I-V curves pumped at the upper and lower sideband frequencies to deduce values of the embedding admittances at these frequencies. Using these admittances, the mixer noise and gain predicted by quantum theory are in excellent agreement with experiment. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  15. Analysis of locked and unlocked dynamics of a passively mode-locked laser diode under external periodic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrutin, Evgenii A.; Arnold, John M.; Marsh, John H.

    1996-04-01

    A distributed time-domain model is used for a numerical analysis of the dynamics of a passively mode locked laser diode under external modulation at a frequency close to the round-trip frequency of the laser. The possible dynamical regimes of the laser are identified as synchronization locking, frequency mixing and chaotic dynamics, including a special case of quasi-locking. For the locked regime, steady-state parameters are defined, the crucial role of group-velocity dispersion in achieving locking demonstrated and stages of the locking dynamics and corresponding time constants identified.

  16. Double reference pulsed phase locked loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A double reference pulse phase locked loop is described which measures the phase shift between tone burst signals initially derived from the same periodic signal source (voltage controlled oscillator) and delayed by different amounts because of two different paths. A first path is from the transducer to the surface of a sample and back. A second path is from the transducer to the opposite surface and back. A first pulse phase locked loop including a phase detector and a phase shifter forces the tone burst signal delayed by the second path in phase quadrature with the periodic signal source. A second pulse phase locked loop including a second phase detector forces the tone burst signals delayed by the first path into phase quadrature with the phase shifted periodic signal source.

  17. Entropy driven key-lock assembly.

    PubMed

    Odriozola, G; Jiménez-Angeles, F; Lozada-Cassou, M

    2008-09-21

    The effective interaction between a sphere with an open cavity (lock) and a spherical macroparticle (key), both immersed in a hard sphere fluid, is studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations. As a result, a two-dimensional map of the key-lock effective interaction potential is constructed, which leads to the proposal of a self-assembling mechanism: There exists trajectories through which the key-lock pair could assemble avoiding trespassing potential barriers. Hence, solely the entropic contribution can induce their self-assembling even in the absence of attractive forces. This study points out the solvent contribution within the underlying mechanisms of substrate-protein assemblydisassembly processes, which are important steps of the enzyme catalysis and protein mediated transport.

  18. Knee Brace Would Lock And Unlock Automatically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Neill; Forbes, John; Shadoan, Mike; Baker, Kevin

    1995-01-01

    Proposed knee brace designed to aid rehabilitation of person who suffered some muscle damage in leg. Not limited to locking in straight-leg position and, instead, locks at any bend angle. Does not prevent knee from bearing weight. Instead, knee brace allows knee to bear weight and locks only when foot and lower leg bear weight. Thus, brace prevents flexion that wearer desired to prevent but could not prevent because of weakened muscles. Knee bends freely to exercise knee-related muscles. Knee brace strapped at upper end to leg above knee, and anchored at lower end by stirrup under foot. Joint mechanism (identical mechanisms used in left and right assemblies) allows knee joint to flex freely except when weight applied to heel.

  19. Injection Locking Techniques for Spectrum Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gathma, Timothy D.; Buckwalter, James F.

    2011-04-01

    Wideband spectrum analysis supports future communication systems that reconfigure and adapt to the capacity of the spectral environment. While test equipment manufacturers offer wideband spectrum analyzers with excellent sensitivity and resolution, these spectrum analyzers typically cannot offer acceptable size, weight, and power (SWAP). CMOS integrated circuits offer the potential to fully integrate spectrum analysis capability with analog front-end circuitry and digital signal processing on a single chip. Unfortunately, CMOS lacks high-Q passives and wideband resonator tunability that is necessary for heterodyne implementations of spectrum analyzers. As an alternative to the heterodyne receiver architectures, two nonlinear methods for performing wideband, low-power spectrum analysis are presented. The first method involves injecting the spectrum of interest into an array of injection-locked oscillators. The second method employs the closed loop dynamics of both injection locking and phase locking to independently estimate the injected frequency and power.

  20. Injection Locking Techniques for Spectrum Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gathma, Timothy D.; Buckwalter, James F.

    2011-04-19

    Wideband spectrum analysis supports future communication systems that reconfigure and adapt to the capacity of the spectral environment. While test equipment manufacturers offer wideband spectrum analyzers with excellent sensitivity and resolution, these spectrum analyzers typically cannot offer acceptable size, weight, and power (SWAP). CMOS integrated circuits offer the potential to fully integrate spectrum analysis capability with analog front-end circuitry and digital signal processing on a single chip. Unfortunately, CMOS lacks high-Q passives and wideband resonator tunability that is necessary for heterodyne implementations of spectrum analyzers. As an alternative to the heterodyne receiver architectures, two nonlinear methods for performing wideband, low-power spectrum analysis are presented. The first method involves injecting the spectrum of interest into an array of injection-locked oscillators. The second method employs the closed loop dynamics of both injection locking and phase locking to independently estimate the injected frequency and power.

  1. Wideband phase-locked angular modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L.

    1989-01-01

    A phase-locked loop (PLL) angular modulator scheme has been proposed which has the characteristics of wideband modulation frequency response. The modulator design is independent of the PLL closed-loop transfer function H(s), thereby allowing independent optimization of the loop's parameters as well as the modulator's parameters. A phase modulator implementing the proposed scheme was built to phase modulate a low-noise phase-locked signal source at the output frequency of 2290 MHz. The measurement results validated the analysis by demonstrating that the resulting baseband modulation bandwidth exceeded that of the phase-locked loop by over an order of magnitude. However, it is expected to be able to achieve much wider response still.

  2. A 250 GHz Gyrotron with a 3 GHz Tuning Bandwidth for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Nanni, Emilio A.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a novel tunable 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator with >10 W output power over most of a 3 GHz band and >35 W peak power. The tuning bandwidth and power are sufficient to generate a >1 MHz nutation frequency across the entire nitroxide EPR lineshape for cross effect DNP, as well as to excite solid effect transitions utilizing other radicals, without the need for sweeping the NMR magnetic field. Substantially improved tunability is achieved by implementing a long (23 mm) interaction cavity that can excite higher order axial modes by changing either the magnetic field of the gyrotron or the cathode potential. This interaction cavity excites the rotating TE5,2,q mode, and an internal mode converter outputs a high-quality microwave beam with >94% Gaussian content. The gyrotron was integrated into a DNP spectrometer, resulting in a measured DNP enhancement of 54 on the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. PMID:22743211

  3. A 250 GHz gyrotron with a 3 GHz tuning bandwidth for dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Alexander B; Nanni, Emilio A; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2012-08-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a novel tunable 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator with >10 W output power over most of a 3 GHz band and >35 W peak power. The tuning bandwidth and power are sufficient to generate a >1 MHz nutation frequency across the entire nitroxide EPR lineshape for cross effect DNP, as well as to excite solid effect transitions utilizing other radicals, without the need for sweeping the NMR magnetic field. Substantially improved tunability is achieved by implementing a long (23 mm) interaction cavity that can excite higher order axial modes by changing either the magnetic field of the gyrotron or the cathode potential. This interaction cavity excites the rotating TE(₅,₂,q) mode, and an internal mode converter outputs a high-quality microwave beam with >94% Gaussian content. The gyrotron was integrated into a DNP spectrometer, resulting in a measured DNP enhancement of 54 on the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin.

  4. A 250 GHz gyrotron with a 3 GHz tuning bandwidth for dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Nanni, Emilio A.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2012-08-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a novel tunable 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator with >10 W output power over most of a 3 GHz band and >35 W peak power. The tuning bandwidth and power are sufficient to generate a >1 MHz nutation frequency across the entire nitroxide EPR lineshape for cross effect DNP, as well as to excite solid effect transitions utilizing other radicals, without the need for sweeping the NMR magnetic field. Substantially improved tunability is achieved by implementing a long (23 mm) interaction cavity that can excite higher order axial modes by changing either the magnetic field of the gyrotron or the cathode potential. This interaction cavity excites the rotating TE5,2,q mode, and an internal mode converter outputs a high-quality microwave beam with >94% Gaussian content. The gyrotron was integrated into a DNP spectrometer, resulting in a measured DNP enhancement of 54 on the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin.

  5. A Study of Dielectric Properties of Proteinuria between 0.2 GHz and 50 GHz

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Peck Shen; Ting, Hua Nong; Ong, Teng Aik; Wong, Chew Ming; Ng, Kwan Hong; Chong, Yip Boon

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the dielectric properties of urine in normal subjects and subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD) at microwave frequency of between 0.2 GHz and 50 GHz. The measurements were conducted using an open-ended coaxial probe at room temperature (25°C), at 30°C and at human body temperature (37°C). There were statistically significant differences in the dielectric properties of the CKD subjects compared to those of the normal subjects. Statistically significant differences in dielectric properties were observed across the temperatures for normal subjects and CKD subjects. Pearson correlation test showed the significant correlation between proteinuria and dielectric properties. The experimental data closely matched the single-pole Debye model. The relaxation dispersion and relaxation time increased with the proteinuria level, while decreasing with the temperature. As for static conductivity, it increased with proteinuria level and temperature. PMID:26066351

  6. Integrated injection-locked semiconductor diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Hadley, G. Ronald; Hohimer, John P.; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1991-01-01

    A continuous wave integrated injection-locked high-power diode laser array is provided with an on-chip independently-controlled master laser. The integrated injection locked high-power diode laser array is capable of continuous wave lasing in a single near-diffraction limited output beam at single-facet power levels up to 125 mW (250 mW total). Electronic steering of the array emission over an angle of 0.5 degrees is obtained by varying current to the master laser. The master laser injects a laser beam into the slave array by reflection of a rear facet.

  7. Frequency spectrum analyzer with phase-lock

    DOEpatents

    Boland, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    A frequency-spectrum analyzer with phase-lock for analyzing the frequency and amplitude of an input signal is comprised of a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) which is driven by a ramp generator, and a phase error detector circuit. The phase error detector circuit measures the difference in phase between the VCO and the input signal, and drives the VCO locking it in phase momentarily with the input signal. The input signal and the output of the VCO are fed into a correlator which transfers the input signal to a frequency domain, while providing an accurate absolute amplitude measurement of each frequency component of the input signal.

  8. Hydrodynamic Phase Locking in Mouse Node Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Atsuko; Shinohara, Kyosuke; Ishikawa, Takuji; Hamada, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    Rotational movement of mouse node cilia generates leftward fluid flow in the node cavity, playing an important role in left-right determination in the embryo. Although rotation of numerous cilia was believed necessary to trigger the determination, recent reports indicate the action of two cilia to be sufficient. We examine cooperative cilia movement via hydrodynamic interaction. Results show cilia to be cooperative, having phases locked in a certain relation; a system with a pair of nonidentical cilia can achieve phase-locked states more easily than one with a pair of identical cilia.

  9. SESAM mode-locked red praseodymium laser.

    PubMed

    Gaponenko, Maxim; Metz, Philip Werner; Härkönen, Antti; Heuer, Alexander; Leinonen, Tomi; Guina, Mircea; Südmeyer, Thomas; Huber, Günter; Kränkel, Christian

    2014-12-15

    We present the first semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) mode-locked praseodymium solid-state laser. The laser is based on a Pr(3+):LiYF(4) crystal as gain medium and a GaInP-quantum well-based SESAM. Self-starting continuous-wave mode-locked laser operation with an average output power of 16 mW is achieved at a center wavelength of 639.5 nm. The laser operates at a repetition rate of ∼85.55  MHz and emits pulses with a duration of ∼18  ps.

  10. Spacer grid assembly and locking mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Jr., Harold J.; Veca, Anthony R.; Donck, Harry A.

    1982-01-01

    A spacer grid assembly is disclosed for retaining a plurality of fuel rods in substantially parallel spaced relation, the spacer grids being formed with rhombic openings defining contact means for engaging from one to four fuel rods arranged in each opening, the spacer grids being of symmetric configuration with their rhombic openings being asymmetrically offset to permit inversion and relative rotation of the similar spacer grids for improved support of the fuel rods. An improved locking mechanism includes tie bars having chordal surfaces to facilitate their installation in slotted circular openings of the spacer grids, the tie rods being rotatable into locking engagement with the slotted openings.

  11. Integrated injection-locked semiconductor diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Hadley, G.R.; Hohimer, J.P.; Owyoung, A.

    1991-02-19

    A continuous wave integrated injection-locked high-power diode laser array is provided with an on-chip independently-controlled master laser. The integrated injection locked high-power diode laser array is capable of continuous wave lasing in a single near-diffraction limited output beam at single-facet power levels up to 125 mW (250 mW total). Electronic steering of the array emission over an angle of 0.5 degrees is obtained by varying current to the master laser. The master laser injects a laser beam into the slave array by reflection of a rear facet. 18 figures.

  12. Implementation of Digital Lock-in Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sabyasachi; Nasir Ahmed, Ragib; Bijoy Purkayastha, Basab; Bhattacharyya, Kaustubh

    2016-10-01

    The recovery of signal under the presence of noise is utmost essential for proper communication. The signals corrupted due to noise can be recovered using various techniques. However the weak signals are more prone to noise and hence they can be easily degraded due to noise. In such cases, a digital lock-in amplifier becomes an essential device for recovery of such weak signals. Keeping the cost, speed and other considerations, we will present the implementation of digital lock-in amplifier and how it recovers the weak signal under extreme noisy conditions.

  13. PT-symmetric mode-locking.

    PubMed

    Longhi, S

    2016-10-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetry is one of the most important accomplishments in optics over the past decade. Here the concept of PT mode-locking (ML) of a laser is introduced, in which active phase-locking of cavity axial modes is realized by asymmetric mode coupling in a complex time crystal. PT ML shows a transition from single- to double-pulse emission as the PT symmetry breaking point is crossed. The transition can show a turbulent behavior, depending on a dimensionless modulation parameter that plays the same role as the Reynolds number in hydrodynamic flows.

  14. Lock-in by molecular multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Dieter; Libchaber, Albert

    2003-12-01

    A lock-in amplifier is physically realized at the level of fluorescent dye molecules. It is based on the general property that the emission of a fluorescent dye is the product of quantum efficiency and illumination intensity. For each pixel of a microscopic image, we measure in amplitude and phase an environment property of the dye, such as conformation, membrane voltage, or temperature. This lock-in implementation is highly parallel and reaches the ultimate photon shot noise limit. Using fast temperature oscillations, we apply it to measure the opening/closing kinetics of a molecular beacon (DNA hairpin) at 5 μs resolution.

  15. 50. LOCK AND DAM NO. 26 (REPLACEMENT). FIRST STAGE DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. LOCK AND DAM NO. 26 (REPLACEMENT). FIRST STAGE DAM -- DAM CONCRETE -- GENERAL ARRANGEMENT -- SECTION AND ELEVATIONS. M-L 26(R) 40/3 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26R, Alton, Madison County, IL

  16. 49. LOCK AND DAM NO. 26 (REPLACEMENT). FIRST STAGE DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. LOCK AND DAM NO. 26 (REPLACEMENT). FIRST STAGE DAM -- DAM CONCRETE -- TYPICAL PIER ISOMETRIC. M-L 26(R) 40/1 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26R, Alton, Madison County, IL

  17. 6. DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF LOWER MITER GATES WITH FULL LOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF LOWER MITER GATES WITH FULL LOCK CHAMBER, VISITORS, AND LOCKMASTER'S HOUSE IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  18. 8. EMPTY LOCK CHAMBER FROM DOWNSTREAM (WEST) END, WITH VISITORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. EMPTY LOCK CHAMBER FROM DOWNSTREAM (WEST) END, WITH VISITORS CENTER (LEFT) AND LOCKMASTER'S HOUSE ON NORTH BANK. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  19. Lock 6 Detail of hinge stone with iron straps ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 6 - Detail of hinge stone with iron straps and carved completion date (1830) located on ground at southeast corner of lock - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  20. 10. LOCK CONSTRUCTION PHOTO SHOWING CONCRETE MONOLITHS FOR WALLS, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. LOCK CONSTRUCTION PHOTO SHOWING CONCRETE MONOLITHS FOR WALLS, LOOKING NORTH. August 1934 - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 16, Upper Mississippi River, Muscatine, Muscatine County, IA

  1. view downstream of inside of lower lock gates closed with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    view downstream of inside of lower lock gates closed with southeast machinery house, SF 109, on right, view towards northeast - St. Lucie Canal, St. Lucie Lock No. 1, St. Lucie, Cross State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Stuart, Martin County, FL

  2. Interior view of almost closed lower lock gates and northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of almost closed lower lock gates and northeast machinery house, SF 107 on left, view towards north - St. Lucie Canal, St. Lucie Lock No. 1, St. Lucie, Cross State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Stuart, Martin County, FL

  3. DOG HOUSE AT UPSTREAM LOCK GATE. ALSO SEEN AT LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DOG HOUSE AT UPSTREAM LOCK GATE. ALSO SEEN AT LEFT IN PHOTO NO. IL-164-A-23. - Illinois Waterway, La Grange Lock and Dam, 3/4 mile south of Country 795N at Illinois River, Versailles, Brown County, IL

  4. 16. DETAIL VIEW OF AUXILIARY LOCK MITER GATE OPERATING MACHINERY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL VIEW OF AUXILIARY LOCK MITER GATE OPERATING MACHINERY LOCATED IN INTERMEDIATE WALL, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 27, Granite City, Madison County, IL

  5. 15. DETAIL VIEW OF MAIN LOCK MITER GATE IN PARTIALLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAIL VIEW OF MAIN LOCK MITER GATE IN PARTIALLY OPENED POSITION, LOOKING NORTHWEST (UPSTREAM). COMPRESSOR BUILDING VISIBLE TO REAR ON INTERMEDIATE WALL - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 27, Granite City, Madison County, IL

  6. "Thoughts Concerning Education": John Locke On Teaching Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, John E.

    1971-01-01

    Locke's suggestions for more effective speech instruction have gone largely unnoticed. Consequently, it is the purpose of this article to consider John Locke's criticisms, theory and specific methods of speech education. (Author)

  7. 44. LOCK, ELECTRICAL SYSTEM, HAULAGE ENGINES, ELECTRICAL DETAILS AND LOCATION. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. LOCK, ELECTRICAL SYSTEM, HAULAGE ENGINES, ELECTRICAL DETAILS AND LOCATION. February 1938 - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 17, Upper Mississippi River, New Boston, Mercer County, IL

  8. 31. INTERIOR VIEW OF MAIN LOCK, WITH CENTRAL CONTROL STATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. INTERIOR VIEW OF MAIN LOCK, WITH CENTRAL CONTROL STATION IN RIGHT BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTHEAST, UPSTREAM - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  9. 40. VIEW OF MAIN LOCK WINCH, WITH REPLACEMENT WINCH AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. VIEW OF MAIN LOCK WINCH, WITH REPLACEMENT WINCH AND MITER GATE CONTROL STATION IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  10. 49 CFR 236.780 - Plunger, facing point lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plunger, facing point lock. 236.780 Section 236.780 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... plunger stand when the switch is locked....

  11. 49 CFR 236.780 - Plunger, facing point lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plunger, facing point lock. 236.780 Section 236.780 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... plunger stand when the switch is locked....

  12. Robust tilt and lock mechanism for hopping actuator

    DOEpatents

    Salton, Jonathan R.; Buerger, Stephen; Dullea, Kevin J.; Marron, Lisa C.; Salisbury, Curt Michael; Spletzer, Barry Louis

    2017-02-07

    A tilt and lock apparatus that includes a tilt servomechanism, a spiral torsion spring, a lock wheel, and a lock hook is described herein. The spiral torsion spring is mechanically coupled to the tilt servomechanism and the lock wheel (which includes an opening). When a shaft is positioned through the opening, rotation of the lock wheel is in unison with rotation of the shaft. An external surface of the lock wheel includes one or more grooves. The lock hook includes a head that engages and disengages the grooves. The lock wheel is stationary when the head engages one of the grooves and is rotatable when the head disengages the grooves. The head and the grooves are geometrically aligned when engaged to prevent creation of a force that acts to disengage the head responsive to an applied force acting on the shaft.

  13. 24. DETAIL VIEW OF TILE GAUGE IN INTERMEDIATE LOCK WALL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. DETAIL VIEW OF TILE GAUGE IN INTERMEDIATE LOCK WALL, LOOKING NORTHEAST. NOTE STEEL WALL ARMOR EMBEDDED IN CONCRETE. - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26, Alton, Madison County, IL

  14. VIEW LOOKING EAST AT PLEASURE CRAFTS ENTERING THE NAVIGATION LOCK. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING EAST AT PLEASURE CRAFTS ENTERING THE NAVIGATION LOCK. - Wilson Dam & Hydroelectric Plant, Navigation Lock, Spanning Tennessee River at Wilson Dam Road (Route 133), Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  15. 3. Down river view of lock and dam to southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Down river view of lock and dam to southwest - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  16. 2. Distant view of lock and dam to northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Distant view of lock and dam to northwest - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  17. 1. Distant view of lock and dam to northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Distant view of lock and dam to northeast - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  18. 20. LOCK GATES, 3 FOOT WALKWAY, ADJUSTMENT AT GUDGEON PIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. LOCK GATES, 3 FOOT WALKWAY, ADJUSTMENT AT GUDGEON PIN AND QUOIN SHOE. May 1933 - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 17, Upper Mississippi River, New Boston, Mercer County, IL

  19. Rectenna Technology Program: Ultra light 2.45 GHz rectenna 20 GHz rectenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, William C.

    1987-01-01

    The program had two general objectives. The first objective was to develop the two plane rectenna format for space application at 2.45 GHz. The resultant foreplane was a thin-film, etched-circuit format fabricated from a laminate composed of 2 mil Kapton F sandwiched between sheets of 1 oz copper. The thin-film foreplane contains half wave dipoles, filter circuits, rectifying Schottky diode, and dc bussing lead. It weighs 160 grams per square meter. Efficiency and dc power output density were measured at 85% and 1 kw/sq m, respectively. Special testing techniques to measure temperature of circuit and diode without perturbing microwave operation using the fluoroptic thermometer were developed. A second objective was to investigate rectenna technology for use at 20 GHz and higher frequencies. Several fabrication formats including the thin-film scaled from 2.45 GHz, ceramic substrate and silk-screening, and monolithic were investigated, with the conclusion that the monolithic approach was the best. A preliminary design of the monolithic rectenna structure and the integrated Schottky diode were made.

  20. Spain 31-GHz observations of sky brightness temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, B. L.

    1988-01-01

    A water vapor radiometer was deployed at DSS 63 for 3 months of sky brightness temperature measurements at 31 GHz. An exceedance plot was derived from this data showing the fraction of time that 31 GHz 30 degree elevation angle brightness temperature exceeds specified values. The 5 percent exceedance statistics occurs at 75 K, compared with 70 K in Australia.