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Sample records for locus genetics meets

  1. Genetic variability at the PARK16 locus

    PubMed Central

    Tucci, Arianna; Nalls, Mike A; Houlden, Henry; Revesz, Tamas; Singleton, Andrew B; Wood, Nicholas W; Hardy, John; Paisán-Ruiz, Coro

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative disease which is clinically heterogeneous and pathologically consists of loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and intracytoplasmic neuronal inclusions containing alpha-synuclein aggregations known as Lewy bodies. Although the majority of PD is idiopathic, pathogenic mutations in several mendelian genes have been successfully identified through linkage analyses. To identify susceptibility loci for idiopathic PD, several genome-wide association studies (GWAS) within different populations have recently been conducted in both idiopathic and familial forms of PD. These analyses have confirmed SNCA and MAPT as loci harboring PD susceptibility. In addition, the GWAS identified several other genetic loci suggestively associated with the risk of PD; among these, only one was replicated by two different studies of European and Asian ancestries. Hence, we investigated this novel locus known as PARK16 for coding mutations in a large series of idiopathic pathologically proven PD cases, and also conducted an association study in a case–control cohort from the United Kingdom. An association between a novel RAB7L1 mutation, c.379-12insT, and disease (P-value=0.0325) was identified. Two novel coding variants present only in the PD cohort were also identified within the RAB7L1 (p.K157R) and SLC41A1 (p.A350V) genes. No copy number variation analyses have yet been performed within this recently identified locus. We concluded that, although both coding variants and risk alleles within the PARK16 locus seem to be rare, further molecular analyses within the PARK16 locus and within different populations are required in order to examine its biochemical role in the disease process. PMID:20683486

  2. Wavelets meet genetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Ping

    2005-08-01

    Genetic image analysis is an interdisciplinary area, which combines microscope image processing techniques with the use of biochemical probes for the detection of genetic aberrations responsible for cancers and genetic diseases. Recent years have witnessed parallel and significant progress in both image processing and genetics. On one hand, revolutionary multiscale wavelet techniques have been developed in signal processing and applied mathematics in the last decade, providing sophisticated tools for genetic image analysis. On the other hand, reaping the fruit of genome sequencing, high resolution genetic probes have been developed to facilitate accurate detection of subtle and cryptic genetic aberrations. In the meantime, however, they bring about computational challenges for image analysis. In this paper, we review the fruitful interaction between wavelets and genetic imaging. We show how wavelets offer a perfect tool to address a variety of chromosome image analysis problems. In fact, the same word "subband" has been used in the nomenclature of cytogenetics to describe the multiresolution banding structure of the chromosome, even before its appearance in the wavelet literature. The application of wavelets to chromosome analysis holds great promise in addressing several computational challenges in genetics. A variety of real world examples such as the chromosome image enhancement, compression, registration and classification will be demonstrated. These examples are drawn from fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and microarray (gene chip) imaging experiments, which indicate the impact of wavelets on the diagnosis, treatments and prognosis of cancers and genetic diseases.

  3. Genetic analysis of the claret locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, W.; Nelson, C.R.; Szauter, P. )

    1989-11-01

    The claret (ca) locus of Drosophila melanogaster comprises two separately mutable domains, one responsible for eye color and one responsible for proper disjunction of chromosomes in meiosis and early cleavage divisions. Previously isolated alleles are of three types: (1) alleles of the claret (ca) type that affect eye color only, (2) alleles of the claret-nondisjunctional (ca{sup nd}) type that affect eye color and chromosome behavior, and (3) a meiotic mutation, non-claret disjunctional (ncd), that affects chromosome behavior only. In order to investigate the genetic structure of the claret locus, the authors have isolated 19 radiation-induced alleles of claret on the basis of the eye color phenotype. Two of these 19 new alleles are of the ca{sup nd} type, while 17 are of the ca type, demonstrating that the two domains do not often act as a single target for mutagenesis. This suggests that the two separately mutable functions are likely to be encoded by separate or overlapping genes rather than by a single gene. One of the new alleles of the ca{sup nd} type is a chromosome rearrangement with a breakpoint at the position of the claret locus. If this breakpoint is the cause of the mutant phenotype and there are no other mutations associated with the rearrangement, the two functions must be encoded by overlapping genes.

  4. Population genetics of the HRAS1 minisatellite locus

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, B.; Risch, N. ); Krontiris, T. New England Medical Center Hospital, Boston, MA )

    1993-12-01

    Several years ago it was reported that rare HRAS1 VNTR alleles occurred more frequently in US Caucasian cancer patients than in unaffected controls. Such an association, in theory, could be caused by undetected population heterogeneity. Also, in a study clearly relevant to this issue, it was recently reported that significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium exist at this locus in a sample of US Caucasians. These considerations motivate population genetic analysis of the HRAS1 locus. From published studies of the HRAS1 VNTR locus, which classified alleles into types, the authors found only small differences in the allele frequency distributions of samples from various European nations, although there were larger differences among ethnic groups (African American, Caucasian, and Oriental). In an analysis of variation of rare-allele frequencies among samples from four European nations, most of the variance was attributable to molecular methodology, and very little of the variance was accounted for by nationality. In addition, the authors showed that mixture of European subpopulations should result in only minor deviations from expected genotype proportions in a Caucasian database and demonstrated that there was no significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the HRAS1 data. 35 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Alpha-locus hexosaminidase genetic compound with juvenile gangliosidosis phenotype: clinical, genetic, and biochemical studies.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, W G; Cohen, C S; Miranda, A F; Waran, S P; Chutorian, A M

    1980-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy developed progressive neurological deterioration in his third year, characterized by dementia, ataxia, myoclonic jerks, and bilateral macular cherry-red spots. Hexosaminidase A (HEX A) was partially decreased in the patient's serum, leukocytes, and cultured skin fibroblasts. Hexosaminidase was studied in serum and leukocytes from family members. Four members of the paternal branch appeared to be carriers of classical infantile Tay-Sachs allele, HEX alpha 2, probably receiving the gene from one great-grandparent of Ashkenazi origin. In the maternal branch, no one was a carrier of classical infantile Tay-Sachs disease, but five individuals were carriers of a milder alpha-locus defect. The patient, therefore, was a genetic compound of two different alpha-locus hexosaminidase mutations. At least 21 families with late-infantile or juvenile GM2 gangliosidosis have been reported, 18 of them with alpha-locus mutations, and three with beta-locus mutations. Genetic compounds of hexosaminidase have been reported in at least seven families, five with alpha-locus mutations and two with beta-locus mutations. The compound had the phenotype of infantile Tay-Sachs disease in one family, infantile Sandhoff disease in another, and the normal phenotype in the rest. PMID:6772023

  6. Two-trait-locus linkage analysis: A powerful strategy for mapping complex genetic traits

    SciTech Connect

    Schork, N.J.; Boehnke, M. ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Nearly all diseases mapped to date follow clear Mendelian, single-locus segregation patterns. In contrast, many common familial diseases such as diabetes, psoriasis, several forms of cancer, and schizophrenia are familial and appear to have a genetic component but do not exhibit simple Mendelian transmission. More complex models are required to explain the genetics of these important diseases. In this paper, the authors explore two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis in which two trait loci are mapped simultaneously to separate genetic markers. The authors compare the utility of this approach to standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis with and without allowance for heterogeneity. The authors also compare the utility of the two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus analysis to two-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis. For common diseases, pedigrees are often bilineal, with disease genes entering via two or more unrelated pedigree members. Since such pedigrees often are avoided in linkage studies, the authors also investigate the relative information content of unilineal and bilineal pedigrees. For the dominant-or-recessive and threshold models that the authors consider, the authors find that two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis can provide substantially more linkage information, as measured by expected maximum lod score, than standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus methods, even allowing for heterogeneity, while, for a dominant-or-dominant generating model, one-locus models that allow for heterogeneity extract essentially as much information as the two-trait-locus methods. For these three models, the authors also find that bilineal pedigrees provide sufficient linkage information to warrant their inclusion in such studies. The authors discuss strategies for assessing the significance of the two linkages assumed in two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus models. 37 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. Genetic locus for streptolysin S production by group A streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Nizet, V; Beall, B; Bast, D J; Datta, V; Kilburn, L; Low, D E; De Azavedo, J C

    2000-07-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is an important human pathogen that causes pharyngitis and invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis. Streptolysin S (SLS) is the cytolytic factor that creates the zone of beta-hemolysis surrounding GAS colonies grown on blood agar. We recently reported the discovery of a potential genetic determinant involved in SLS production, sagA, encoding a small peptide of 53 amino acids (S. D. Betschel, S. M. Borgia, N. L. Barg, D. E. Low, and J. C. De Azavedo, Infect. Immun. 66:1671-1679, 1998). Using transposon mutagenesis, chromosomal walking steps, and data from the GAS genome sequencing project (www.genome.ou.edu/strep. html), we have now identified a contiguous nine-gene locus (sagA to sagI) involved in SLS production. The sag locus is conserved among GAS strains regardless of M protein type. Targeted plasmid integrational mutagenesis of each gene in the sag operon resulted in an SLS-negative phenotype. Targeted integrations (i) upstream of the sagA promoter and (ii) downstream of a terminator sequence after sagI did not affect SLS production, establishing the functional boundaries of the operon. A rho-independent terminator sequence between sagA and sagB appears to regulate the amount of sagA transcript produced versus transcript for the entire operon. Reintroduction of the nine-gene sag locus on a plasmid vector restored SLS activity to the nonhemolytic sagA knockout mutant. Finally, heterologous expression of the intact sag operon conferred the SLS beta-hemolytic phenotype to the nonhemolytic Lactococcus lactis. We conclude that gene products of the GAS sag operon are both necessary and sufficient for SLS production. Sequence homologies of sag operon gene products suggest that SLS is related to the bacteriocin family of microbial toxins.

  8. Genetic Locus for Streptolysin S Production by Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Nizet, Victor; Beall, Bernard; Bast, Darrin J.; Datta, Vivekananda; Kilburn, Laurie; Low, Donald E.; De Azavedo, Joyce C. S.

    2000-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is an important human pathogen that causes pharyngitis and invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis. Streptolysin S (SLS) is the cytolytic factor that creates the zone of beta-hemolysis surrounding GAS colonies grown on blood agar. We recently reported the discovery of a potential genetic determinant involved in SLS production, sagA, encoding a small peptide of 53 amino acids (S. D. Betschel, S. M. Borgia, N. L. Barg, D. E. Low, and J. C. De Azavedo, Infect. Immun. 66:1671–1679, 1998). Using transposon mutagenesis, chromosomal walking steps, and data from the GAS genome sequencing project (www.genome.ou.edu/strep.html), we have now identified a contiguous nine-gene locus (sagA to sagI) involved in SLS production. The sag locus is conserved among GAS strains regardless of M protein type. Targeted plasmid integrational mutagenesis of each gene in the sag operon resulted in an SLS-negative phenotype. Targeted integrations (i) upstream of the sagA promoter and (ii) downstream of a terminator sequence after sagI did not affect SLS production, establishing the functional boundaries of the operon. A rho-independent terminator sequence between sagA and sagB appears to regulate the amount of sagA transcript produced versus transcript for the entire operon. Reintroduction of the nine-gene sag locus on a plasmid vector restored SLS activity to the nonhemolytic sagA knockout mutant. Finally, heterologous expression of the intact sag operon conferred the SLS beta-hemolytic phenotype to the nonhemolytic Lactococcus lactis. We conclude that gene products of the GAS sag operon are both necessary and sufficient for SLS production. Sequence homologies of sag operon gene products suggest that SLS is related to the bacteriocin family of microbial toxins. PMID:10858242

  9. Mapping genetic determinants of viral traits with FST and quantitative trait locus (QTL) approaches.

    PubMed

    Doumayrou, Juliette; Thébaud, Gaël; Vuillaume, Florence; Peterschmitt, Michel; Urbino, Cica

    2015-10-01

    The genetic determinism of viral traits can generally be dissected using either forward or reverse genetics because the clonal reproduction of viruses does not require the use of approaches based on laboratory crosses. Nevertheless, we hypothesized that recombinant viruses could be analyzed as sexually reproducing organisms, using either a quantitative trait loci (QTL) approach or a locus-by-locus fixation index (FST). Locus-by-locus FST analysis, and four different regressions and interval mapping algorithms of QTL analysis were applied to a phenotypic and genotypic dataset previously obtained from 47 artificial recombinant genomes generated between two begomovirus species. Both approaches assigned the determinant of within-host accumulation-previously identified using standard virology approaches-to a region including the 5׳ end of the replication-associated protein (Rep) gene and the upstream intergenic region. This study provides a proof of principle that QTL and population genetics tools can be extended to characterize the genetic determinants of viral traits.

  10. Evidence for genetic heterogeneity in tuberous sclerosis: One locus on chromosome 9 and at least one locus elsewhere

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, H.; Rodriguez, E. Jr. ); Herman, G.E.; Lewis, R.A. ); Kwiatkowski, D.J. ); Roach, E.S. ); Dobyns, W.B. ); Daiger, S.P.; Blanton, S.H. )

    1992-10-01

    Linkage of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), an autosomal dominant disorder, to markers on chromosome 9 was reported first in 1987. This assignment was confirmed by an international collaborative study that suggested more than one locus may be responsible for the phenotype. The authors studied 14 multigenerational TSC families (13 previously unreported) with markers for nine loci in the linked region of chromosome 9q32-q34. Results confirm the previous reports that the genetic locus in one-third to one-half of families maps to chromosome 9. Comparison of clinical findings in the chromosome 9-linked families with those in the chromosome 9-unlinked families reveals only a higher incidence of ungual fibromata in the chromosome 9-linked families. 38 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Molecular genetic analysis of the Phaseolus vulgaris P locus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Common bean market classes are distinguished by their many seed colors, patterns, and size. At least 23 genes, acting independently or in an epistatic manner, affect the seed coat color and pattern. The P locus which is described as the “ground factor” by Emerson, has multiple alleles and controls a...

  12. Rangewide Genetic Variation in Coast Redwood Populations at a Chloroplast Microsatellite Locus

    Treesearch

    Chris Brinegar

    2012-01-01

    Old growth and second growth populations of coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) were sampled at 10 locations throughout its range and analyzed at a highly variable chloroplast microsatellite locus. Very low FST values indicated that there was no significant genetic differentiation between adjacent old growth and second growth populations at each location. Genetic...

  13. [The study of tomato fruit weight quantitative trait locus and its application in genetics teaching].

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyan

    2015-08-01

    The classical research cases, which have greatly promoted the development of genetics in history, can be combined with the content of courses in genetics teaching to train students' ability of scientific thinking and genetic analysis. The localization and clone of gene controlling tomato fruit weight is a pioneer work in quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies and represents a complete process of QTL research in plants. Application of this integrated case in genetics teaching, which showed a wonderful process of scientific discovery and the fascination of genetic research, has inspired students' interest in genetics and achieved a good teaching effect.

  14. Genetic heterogeneity in benign familial neonatal convulsions: Identification of a new locus on chromosome 8q

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.B.; Leach, R.J.; O'Connell, P.; Ryan, S.G. ); Ward, K. )

    1993-09-01

    The syndrome of benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by unprovoked seizures in the first weeks of life. One locus for BFNC has been mapped to chromosome 20 in several pedigrees, but the authors have excluded linkage to chromosome 20 in one large kindred. In order to identify this novel BFNC locus, dinucleotide repeat markers distributed throughout the genome were used to screen this family. Maximum pairwise LOD scores of 4.43 were obtained with markers D8S284 and D8S256 on chromosome 8q. Multipoint analysis placed the BFNC locus in the interval spanned by D8S198-D8S274. This study establishes the presence of a new BFNC locus and confirms genetic heterogeneity of this disorder. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Autosomal dominant ataxia: Genetic evidence for locus heterogeneity from a cuban founder-effect population

    PubMed Central

    Auburger, Georg; Diaz, Guillermo Orozco; Capote, Raul Ferreira; Sanchez, Suzana Gispert; Perez, Marta Paradoa; del Cueto, Marianela Estrada; Meneses, Mirna Garcia; Farrall, Martin; Williamson, Robert; Chamberlain, Susan; Baute, Luis Heredero

    1990-01-01

    The locus for autosomal dominant ataxia with a diagnosis of olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy at autopsy has been previously assigned to chromosome 6p. However, evidence for two alternative locations has been reported. We have recently described a large potential founder-effect population of such patients in the Holguin province of Cuba. With an estimated 1,000 patients available for analysis, this extensive cluster of families provides a unique opportunity for the definitive localization of the genetic mutation. Linkage analysis between the disease locus in this population and markers within and flanking the HLA region on chromosome 6 were undertaken in 12 families comprising over 100 affected individuals. Despite similarity in the clinical phenotype between those families where the disease locus has been reported to be linked to the HLA locus and the Cuban patients, no evidence of linkage to this region could be demonstrated in the latter. The disease locus was excluded from a 96-cM genetic interval of the short arm of chromosome 6, encompassing the F13A1–HLA–GLO1–MUT/D6S4 loci. These data strongly support the existence of genetic heterogeneity for the disease. PMID:1971152

  16. Extensive genetic diversity and low linkage disequilibrium within the COMT locus in maize exotic populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Caffeic acid 3-O-methytransferase (COMT) gene is a prime candidate for cell wall digestibility improvement based on the characterization of brown midrib-3 mutants. We compared the genetic diversity and linkage disequilibrium at COMT locus between populations sampled within the Germplasm Enhance...

  17. Genetic architecture and evolution of the S locus supergene in Primula vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhong; Cocker, Jonathan M; Wright, Jonathan; Webster, Margaret A; McMullan, Mark; Dyer, Sarah; Swarbreck, David; Caccamo, Mario; Oosterhout, Cock van; Gilmartin, Philip M

    2016-12-02

    Darwin's studies on heterostyly in Primula described two floral morphs, pin and thrum, with reciprocal anther and stigma heights that promote insect-mediated cross-pollination. This key innovation evolved independently in several angiosperm families. Subsequent studies on heterostyly in Primula contributed to the foundation of modern genetic theory and the neo-Darwinian synthesis. The established genetic model for Primula heterostyly involves a diallelic S locus comprising several genes, with rare recombination events that result in self-fertile homostyle flowers with anthers and stigma at the same height. Here we reveal the S locus supergene as a tightly linked cluster of thrum-specific genes that are absent in pins. We show that thrums are hemizygous not heterozygous for the S locus, which suggests that homostyles do not arise by recombination between S locus haplotypes as previously proposed. Duplication of a floral homeotic gene 51.7 million years (Myr) ago, followed by its neofunctionalization, created the current S locus assemblage which led to floral heteromorphy in Primula. Our findings provide new insights into the structure, function and evolution of this archetypal supergene.

  18. Genetic and Physical Variability at the Mating Type Locus of the Oomycete, Phytophthora Infestans

    PubMed Central

    Judelson, H. S.

    1996-01-01

    Mating type in the oomyceteous fungus, Phytophthora infestans, is determined by a single locus. In a previous study of a few isolates, the locus segregated in a manner genetically consistent with its linkage to a system of balanced lethal loci. To determine the prevalence of this phenomenon within P. infestans, genetic analyses were performed using isolates representative of the diversity within the species that had been selected by DNA fingerprinting using probes linked to mating type. Non-Mendelian segregation of the mating type locus was observed in crosses performed with each isolate. An unusual group of isolates was identified in which the mating type determinants had been rearranged within the genome; these strains also produced an aberrantly large number of self-fertile progeny. Curiously, in all isolates, markers linked to the mating type locus appeared prone to duplication, transposition, deletion, or other rearrangement. This was not observed for loci unlinked to mating type. Data from the crosses and analyses of marker variation were used to erect models to explain the bases of mating type determination and of the unusual segregation of the chromosomal region containing the mating type locus. PMID:8913745

  19. High Genetic Variability of the agr Locus in Staphylococcus Species

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Philippe; Jarraud, Sophie; Vandenesch, Francois; Greenland, Timothy; Novick, Richard P.; Bes, Michele; Etienne, Jerome; Lina, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    The agr quorum-sensing and signal transduction system was initially described in Staphylococcus aureus, where four distinct allelic variants have been sequenced. Western blotting suggests the presence of homologous loci in many other staphylococci, and this has been confirmed for S. epidermidis and S. lugdunensis. In this study we isolated agr-like loci from a range of staphylococci by using PCR amplification from primers common to the six published agr sequences and bracketing the most variable region, associated with quorum-sensing specificity. Positive amplifications were obtained from 14 of 34 staphylococcal species or subspecies tested. Sequences of the amplicons identified 24 distinct variants which exhibited extensive sequence divergence with only 10% of the nucleotides absolutely conserved on multiple alignment. This variability involved all three open reading frames involved in quorum sensing and signal transduction. However, these variants retained several protein signatures, including the conserved cysteine residue of the autoinducing peptide, with the exception of S. intermedius of pigeon origin, which contained a serine in place of cysteine at this position. We discuss hypotheses on the mode of action and the molecular evolution of the agr locus based on comparisons between the newly determined sequences. PMID:11807079

  20. An acid phosphatase locus expressed in mouse kidney (Apk) and its genetic location on chromosome 10.

    PubMed

    Womack, J E; Auerbach, S B

    1978-04-01

    A genetic locus controlling the electrophoretic mobility of an acid phosphatase in mouse kidney is described. This locus, called acid phosphatase-kidney (Apk), is not expressed in erythrocytes, liver, spleen, heart, lung, brain, skeletal muscle, stomach, or testes. The product of Apk hydrolyzes the substrate naphthol AS-MX phosphoric acid but is not active on alpha-naphthylphosphate or 4-methylumbelliferylphosphate. It is not inactivated by 50 C for 1 hr, nor is its electrophoretic mobility altered by incubation with neuraminidase. The locus is invariant among 31 inbred strains (Apka), with a variant allele (Apkm) observed only in Mus musculus molossinus. Codominant expression was observed in F1 hybrids of M. m. molossinus and inbred strains. Apk was mapped on Chr 10, near the neurological mutant waltzer (v).

  1. An entropy test for single-locus genetic association analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The etiology of complex diseases is due to the combination of genetic and environmental factors, usually many of them, and each with a small effect. The identification of these small-effect contributing factors is still a demanding task. Clearly, there is a need for more powerful tests of genetic association, and especially for the identification of rare effects Results We introduce a new genetic association test based on symbolic dynamics and symbolic entropy. Using a freely available software, we have applied this entropy test, and a conventional test, to simulated and real datasets, to illustrate the method and estimate type I error and power. We have also compared this new entropy test to the Fisher exact test for assessment of association with low-frequency SNPs. The entropy test is generally more powerful than the conventional test, and can be significantly more powerful when the genotypic test is applied to low allele-frequency markers. We have also shown that both the Fisher and Entropy methods are optimal to test for association with low-frequency SNPs (MAF around 1-5%), and both are conservative for very rare SNPs (MAF<1%) Conclusions We have developed a new, simple, consistent and powerful test to detect genetic association of biallelic/SNP markers in case-control data, by using symbolic dynamics and symbolic entropy as a measure of gene dependence. We also provide a standard asymptotic distribution of this test statistic. Given that the test is based on entropy measures, it avoids smoothed nonparametric estimation. The entropy test is generally as good or even more powerful than the conventional and Fisher tests. Furthermore, the entropy test is more computationally efficient than the Fisher's Exact test, especially for large number of markers. Therefore, this entropy-based test has the advantage of being optimal for most SNPs, regardless of their allele frequency (Minor Allele Frequency (MAF) between 1-50%). This property is quite beneficial

  2. Genetic map of the fused locus on mouse Chromosome 17

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, J.M.; Chen, Hsiuchen; Tilghman, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    Fused (Fu) is a dominant mutation in mice resulting in the asymmetry and fusion of tail vertebrae in heterozygotes. Fu/Fu homozygotes are often viable and can exhibit a duplication of the terminal tail vertebrae resulting in bifurcated tails. There are two more severe alleles at Fu, Kinky (Fu{sup Ki}) and Knobbly (Fu{sup Kb)}, which die between 9 and 10 days of gestation as homozygotes, exhibiting a duplication of the embryonic axis, leading to incomplete or complete twinning. To define the precise map position of the Fu{sup Ki} mutation on mouse Chromosome 17, a 983-animal (Fu{sup Ki} if x Mus spretus) F{sub 1} x + tfl + tf interspecific backcross was generated and scored for Fu{sup Ki}, another tightly linked visible marker tufted (tf), and five linked molecular loci, D17MIT18, D17Leh54, D17Aus57, Hba-ps4, and Pim1. The order and genetic distances between the markers were determined to be centromere-D17MIT18-5.79 cM-D17Leh54-0.85 cM-D17Pri6-0.12 cM-D17Pri7-0.12 eM-Hba-ps4-1.20 cM-D17Pri8-0.48 cM-tf-2.05 cM-Pim1. The Fu{sup Ki} gene could not be genetically separated from three molecular markers, D17Pri6, D17Pri7, and Hba-ps4. Yeasts artificial chromosome clones that contain these tightly linked markers have been isolated to form a contig that contains Fu{sup Ki}. Recombination breakpoints generated through the interspecies backcross were mapped onto the contig and demonstrate that recombination in this region is not random.

  3. Genetic Limits of the Xanthine Dehydrogenase Structural Element within the Rosy Locus in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Gelbart, William M.; McCarron, Margaret; Pandey, Janardan; Chovnick, Arthur

    1974-01-01

    Experiments are described that provide an opportunity to estimate the genetic limits of the structural (amino acid coding) portion of the rosy locus (3:52.0) in Drosophila melanogaster, which controls the enzyme, xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). This is accomplished by mapping experiments which localize sites responsible for electrophoretic variation in the enzyme on the known genetic map of null-XDH rosy mutants. Electrophoretic sites are distributed along a large portion of the null mutant map. A cis-trans test involving electrophoretic variants in the left- and right-hand portions of the map leads to the conclusion that the entire region between these variants is also structural. Hence most, if not all, of the null mutant map of the rosy locus contains structural information for the amino acid sequence of the XDH polypeptide. Consideration is given to the significance of the present results for the general problem of gene organization in higher eukaryotes. PMID:4217748

  4. Significant Locus and Metabolic Genetic Correlations Revealed in Genome-Wide Association Study of Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Laramie; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Gaspar, Helena; Walters, Raymond; Goldstein, Jackie; Anttila, Verneri; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Ripke, Stephan; Thornton, Laura; Hinney, Anke; Daly, Mark; Sullivan, Patrick F; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Breen, Gerome; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2017-09-01

    The authors conducted a genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa and calculated genetic correlations with a series of psychiatric, educational, and metabolic phenotypes. Following uniform quality control and imputation procedures using the 1000 Genomes Project (phase 3) in 12 case-control cohorts comprising 3,495 anorexia nervosa cases and 10,982 controls, the authors performed standard association analysis followed by a meta-analysis across cohorts. Linkage disequilibrium score regression was used to calculate genome-wide common variant heritability (single-nucleotide polymorphism [SNP]-based heritability [h(2)SNP]), partitioned heritability, and genetic correlations (rg) between anorexia nervosa and 159 other phenotypes. Results were obtained for 10,641,224 SNPs and insertion-deletion variants with minor allele frequencies >1% and imputation quality scores >0.6. The h(2)SNP of anorexia nervosa was 0.20 (SE=0.02), suggesting that a substantial fraction of the twin-based heritability arises from common genetic variation. The authors identified one genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 12 (rs4622308) in a region harboring a previously reported type 1 diabetes and autoimmune disorder locus. Significant positive genetic correlations were observed between anorexia nervosa and schizophrenia, neuroticism, educational attainment, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and significant negative genetic correlations were observed between anorexia nervosa and body mass index, insulin, glucose, and lipid phenotypes. Anorexia nervosa is a complex heritable phenotype for which this study has uncovered the first genome-wide significant locus. Anorexia nervosa also has large and significant genetic correlations with both psychiatric phenotypes and metabolic traits. The study results encourage a reconceptualization of this frequently lethal disorder as one with both psychiatric and metabolic etiology.

  5. Fixing the broken system of genetic locus symbols: Parkinson disease and dystonia as examples.

    PubMed

    Marras, Connie; Lohmann, Katja; Lang, Anthony; Klein, Christine

    2012-03-27

    Originally, locus symbols (e.g., DYT1) were introduced to specify chromosomal regions that had been linked to a familial disorder with a yet unknown gene. Symbols were systematically assigned in a numerical series to designate mapped loci for a specific phenotype or group of phenotypes. Since the system of designating and using locus symbols was originally established, both our knowledge and our techniques of gene discovery have evolved substantially. The current system has problems that are sources of confusion, perpetuate misinformation, and misrepresent the system as a useful reference tool for a list of inherited disorders of a particular phenotypic class. These include erroneously assigned loci, duplicated loci, missing symbols, missing loci, unconfirmed loci in a consecutively numbered system, combining causative genes and risk factor genes in the same list, and discordance between phenotype and list assignment. In this article, we describe these problems and their impact, and propose solutions. The system could be significantly improved by creating distinct lists for clinical and research purposes, creating more informative locus symbols, distinguishing disease-causing mutations from risk factors, raising the threshold of evidence prior to assigning a locus symbol, paying strict attention to the predominant phenotype when assigning symbols lists, and having a formal system for reviewing and continually revising the list that includes input from both clinical and genetics experts.

  6. Functional and genetic analysis of haplotypic sequence variation at the nicastrin genomic locus

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Gillian; Killick, Richard; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Amouyel, Philippe; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Younkin, Steven G.; Powell, John F.; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Nicastrin (NCSTN) is a component of the γ-secretase complex and therefore potentially a candidate risk gene for Alzheimer's disease. Here, we have developed a novel functional genomics methodology to express common locus haplotypes to assess functional differences. DNA recombination was used to engineer 5 bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) to each express a different haplotype of the NCSTN locus. Each NCSTN-BAC was delivered to knockout nicastrin (Ncstn−/−) cells and clonal NCSTN-BAC+/Ncstn−/− cell lines were created for functional analyses. We showed that all NCSTN-BAC haplotypes expressed nicastrin protein and rescued γ-secretase activity and amyloid beta (Aβ) production in NCSTN-BAC+/Ncstn−/− lines. We then showed that genetic variation at the NCSTN locus affected alternative splicing in human postmortem brain tissue. However, there was no robust functional difference between clonal cell lines rescued by each of the 5 different haplotypes. Finally, there was no statistically significant association of NCSTN with disease risk in the 4 cohorts. We therefore conclude that it is unlikely that common variation at the NCSTN locus is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22405046

  7. Genetic modifier loci of mouse Mfrp(rd6) identified by quantitative trait locus analysis.

    PubMed

    Won, Jungyeon; Charette, Jeremy R; Philip, Vivek M; Stearns, Timothy M; Zhang, Weidong; Naggert, Jürgen K; Krebs, Mark P; Nishina, Patsy M

    2014-01-01

    The identification of genes that modify pathological ocular phenotypes in mouse models may improve our understanding of disease mechanisms and lead to new treatment strategies. Here, we identify modifier loci affecting photoreceptor cell loss in homozygous Mfrp(rd6) mice, which exhibit a slowly progressive photoreceptor degeneration. A cohort of 63 F2 homozygous Mfrp(rd6) mice from a (B6.C3Ga-Mfrp(rd6)/J × CAST/EiJ) F1 intercross exhibited a variable number of cell bodies in the retinal outer nuclear layer at 20 weeks of age. Mice were genotyped with a panel of single nucleotide polymorphism markers, and genotypes were correlated with phenotype by quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis to map modifier loci. A genome-wide scan revealed a statistically significant, protective candidate locus on CAST/EiJ Chromosome 1 and suggestive modifier loci on Chromosomes 6 and 11. Multiple regression analysis of a three-QTL model indicated that the modifier loci on Chromosomes 1 and 6 together account for 26% of the observed phenotypic variation, while the modifier locus on Chromosome 11 explains only an additional 4%. Our findings indicate that the severity of the Mfrp(rd6) retinal degenerative phenotype in mice depends on the strain genetic background and that a significant modifier locus on CAST/EiJ Chromosome 1 protects against Mfrp(rd6)-associated photoreceptor loss.

  8. Functional and genetic analysis of haplotypic sequence variation at the nicastrin genomic locus.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Gillian; Killick, Richard; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Amouyel, Philippe; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Pankratz, V Shane; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Dickson, Dennis W; Petersen, Ronald C; Younkin, Steven G; Powell, John F; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2012-08-01

    Nicastrin (NCSTN) is a component of the γ-secretase complex and therefore potentially a candidate risk gene for Alzheimer's disease. Here, we have developed a novel functional genomics methodology to express common locus haplotypes to assess functional differences. DNA recombination was used to engineer 5 bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) to each express a different haplotype of the NCSTN locus. Each NCSTN-BAC was delivered to knockout nicastrin (Ncstn(-/-)) cells and clonal NCSTN-BAC(+)/Ncstn(-/-) cell lines were created for functional analyses. We showed that all NCSTN-BAC haplotypes expressed nicastrin protein and rescued γ-secretase activity and amyloid beta (Aβ) production in NCSTN-BAC(+)/Ncstn(-/-) lines. We then showed that genetic variation at the NCSTN locus affected alternative splicing in human postmortem brain tissue. However, there was no robust functional difference between clonal cell lines rescued by each of the 5 different haplotypes. Finally, there was no statistically significant association of NCSTN with disease risk in the 4 cohorts. We therefore conclude that it is unlikely that common variation at the NCSTN locus is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Integration of genetic and physical maps of the Primula vulgaris S locus and localization by chromosome in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhong; Webster, Margaret A; Wright, Jonathan; Cocker, Jonathan M; Smith, Matthew C; Badakshi, Farah; Heslop-Harrison, Pat; Gilmartin, Philip M

    2015-10-01

    Heteromorphic flower development in Primula is controlled by the S locus. The S locus genes, which control anther position, pistil length and pollen size in pin and thrum flowers, have not yet been characterized. We have integrated S-linked genes, marker sequences and mutant phenotypes to create a map of the P. vulgaris S locus region that will facilitate the identification of key S locus genes. We have generated, sequenced and annotated BAC sequences spanning the S locus, and identified its chromosomal location. We have employed a combination of classical genetics and three-point crosses with molecular genetic analysis of recombinants to generate the map. We have characterized this region by Illumina sequencing and bioinformatic analysis, together with chromosome in situ hybridization. We present an integrated genetic and physical map across the P. vulgaris S locus flanked by phenotypic and DNA sequence markers. BAC contigs encompass a 1.5-Mb genomic region with 1 Mb of sequence containing 82 S-linked genes anchored to overlapping BACs. The S locus is located close to the centromere of the largest metacentric chromosome pair. These data will facilitate the identification of the genes that orchestrate heterostyly in Primula and enable evolutionary analyses of the S locus.

  10. Genetic variation of polymorphic NOS STR locus in ten Indian population groups.

    PubMed

    Shazia, A; Nithya, P; Seshadri, M

    2009-02-01

    The genotyping of 313 random individuals belonging to ten different population groups from three different states of India was performed for polymorphic pentanucleotide repeat present in the 5'-flanking region of nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS2A) to study the effect of geographical and linguistic affiliations on the genetic affinities among these groups. Likelihood ratio tests showed that all the ten populations for this locus were in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium. Eleven different alleles ranging from 7 repeat to 17 repeats and 46 different genotypes were observed. The observed and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.72-0.94 and 0.84-0.89, respectively. The discriminating power of this locus is > or = 0.86 and the polymorphism information content of this locus in ten population groups ranged from 0.80 to 0.85. High PIC, PD and PE value of this STR showed this marker to be informative and can be used for DNA typing and population studies. The eight populations from Kerala showed a lower GST value of 0.016 compared to the GST of ten populations (G(ST) = 0.019), thereby showing that the populations from the same state showed higher genetic proximity probably due to linguistic and geographical proximity between them.

  11. Genetic variation of the bronze locus (MC1R) in turkeys from Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Corso, Josmael; Hepp, Diego; Ledur, Mônica C; Peixoto, Jane O; Fagundes, Nelson J R; Freitas, Thales R O

    2017-01-01

    Domestic turkeys present several color phenotypes controlled by at least five genetic loci, but only one of these has been identified precisely: the bronze locus, which turned out to be the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene. MC1R variation is important for breeders interested in maintaining or developing different color varieties. In this study, we sequenced most of the MC1R gene from 16 White Holland (the main commercial turkey variety) and 19 pigmented turkeys from southern Brazil with two purposes. The first was to describe the MC1R diversity in White Holland turkeys, which may serve as reservoirs of genetic diversity at this locus. The second was to test whether the traditional color classification used by Brazilian breeders is related to previously known MC1R alleles. White Holland turkeys had four different haplotypes corresponding to the bronze (b+) and black-winged bronze (b1) alleles. Pigmented turkeys also had four haplotypes corresponding to the b+ and b1 alleles, but different haplotypes represent the most common b+ allele in these two groups. The black (B) allele was absent from our samples. Overall, our results suggest that white and pigmented individuals form two different populations, and that the traditional color classification used by Brazilian breeders cannot accurately predict the genotypes at the bronze locus.

  12. Genetic variation of the bronze locus (MC1R) in turkeys from Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Corso, Josmael; Hepp, Diego; Ledur, Mônica C.; Peixoto, Jane O.; Fagundes, Nelson J. R.; Freitas, Thales R. O.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Domestic turkeys present several color phenotypes controlled by at least five genetic loci, but only one of these has been identified precisely: the bronze locus, which turned out to be the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene. MC1R variation is important for breeders interested in maintaining or developing different color varieties. In this study, we sequenced most of the MC1R gene from 16 White Holland (the main commercial turkey variety) and 19 pigmented turkeys from southern Brazil with two purposes. The first was to describe the MC1R diversity in White Holland turkeys, which may serve as reservoirs of genetic diversity at this locus. The second was to test whether the traditional color classification used by Brazilian breeders is related to previously known MC1R alleles. White Holland turkeys had four different haplotypes corresponding to the bronze (b +) and black-winged bronze (b 1) alleles. Pigmented turkeys also had four haplotypes corresponding to the b + and b 1 alleles, but different haplotypes represent the most common b + allele in these two groups. The black (B) allele was absent from our samples. Overall, our results suggest that white and pigmented individuals form two different populations, and that the traditional color classification used by Brazilian breeders cannot accurately predict the genotypes at the bronze locus. PMID:28323301

  13. A 27-locus STR assay to meet all United States and European law enforcement agency standards.

    PubMed

    Schumm, James W; Gutierrez-Mateo, Cristina; Tan, Eugene; Selden, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Different national and international agencies have selected specific STR sets for forensic database use. To enhance database comparison across national and international borders, a 27-locus multiplex system was developed comprising all 15 STR loci of the European standard set, the current 13 STR loci of the CODIS core, the proposed 22 STR loci of the expanded CODIS core, 4 additional commonly used STR loci, and the amelogenin locus. Development required iterative primer design to resolve primer-related artifacts, amplicon sizing, and locus-to-locus balance issues. The 19.5-min assay incorporated newly developed six-dye chemistry analyzed using a novel microfluidic electrophoresis instrument capable of simultaneous detection and discrimination of 8 or more fluorescent dyes. The 27-locus multiplex offers the potential for a new international STR standard permitting laboratories in any jurisdiction to use a single reaction to determine profiles for loci they typically generate plus an expanded common STR profiling set of global interest.

  14. Genetic analysis of absB, a Streptomyces coelicolor locus involved in global antibiotic regulation.

    PubMed

    Adamidis, T; Champness, W

    1992-07-01

    The filamentous soil bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor is known to produce four antibiotics which are genetically and structurally distinct. An extensive search for antibiotic regulatory mutants led to the discovery of absB mutants, which are antibiotic deficient but sporulation proficient. Genetic analysis of the absB mutants has resulted in definition of the absB locus at 5 o'clock on the genetic map. Multiple cloned copies of the actII-ORF4 gene, an activator of synthesis of the antibiotic actinorhodin, restore actinorhodin biosynthetic capability to the absB mutants. These results are interpreted to mean that the failure of absB mutants to produce antibiotics results from decreased expression of the antibiotic genes. The absB gene is proposed to be involved in global regulation of antibiotic synthesis.

  15. Genetic analysis of molecular markers for propamocarb residue in Cucumis sativus using quantitative trait locus mapping.

    PubMed

    Xin, M; Wang, L; Ma, B H; Qin, Z W; Zhou, X Y

    2016-11-03

    The use of pesticides to protect plants against harmful organisms, such as pathogenic microorganisms, is one of the most effective ways to improve agricultural production. However, the continuous use of pesticides might present a risk to human health, animals, and the environment. In this study, two cucumber (Cucumis sativus) varieties containing different levels of pesticide residues, D9320 and D0351, were selected to establish an F2 population. A genetic model and genetic linkage map were constructed. The results showed that the heredity of pesticide residues was dominated by an additive effect and was significantly influenced by non-additive factors in cucumber. QCp1 was detected as a quantitative trait locus (QTL) that might be involved in regulating the levels of pesticide residue in cucumber. Moreover, the cucumber genetic map was compared with the LG6 map, and the results indicated that this QTL was closely related to the level of pesticide residue in cucumber.

  16. Genetic control of natural killing and in vivo tumor elimination by the Chok locus.

    PubMed

    Idris, A H; Iizuka, K; Smith, H R; Scalzo, A A; Yokoyama, W M

    1998-12-21

    The molecular mechanisms underlying target recognition during natural killing are not well understood. One approach to dissect the complexities of natural killer (NK) cell recognition is through exploitation of genetic differences among inbred mouse strains. In this study, we determined that interleukin 2-activated BALB/c-derived NK cells could not lyse Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells as efficiently as C57BL/6-derived NK cells, despite equivalent capacity to kill other targets. This strain-determined difference was also exhibited by freshly isolated NK cells, and was determined to be independent of host major histocompatibility haplotype. Furthermore, CHO killing did not correlate with expression of NK1.1 or 2B4 activation molecules. Genetic mapping studies revealed linkage between the locus influencing CHO killing, termed Chok, and loci encoded within the NK gene complex (NKC), suggesting that Chok encodes an NK cell receptor specific for CHO cells. In vivo assays recapitulated the in vitro data, and both studies determined that Chok regulates an NK perforin-dependent cytotoxic process. These results may have implications for the role of NK cells in xenograft rejection. Our genetic analysis suggests Chok is a single locus that affects NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity similar to other NKC loci that also regulate the complex activity of NK cells.

  17. Statistical epistasis networks reduce the computational complexity of searching three-locus genetic models.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ting; Andrew, Angeline S; Karagas, Margaret R; Moore, Jason H

    2013-01-01

    The rapid development of sequencing technologies makes thousands to millions of genetic attributes available for testing associations with various biological traits. Searching this enormous high-dimensional data space imposes a great computational challenge in genome-wide association studies. We introduce a network-based approach to supervise the search for three-locus models of disease susceptibility. Such statistical epistasis networks (SEN) are built using strong pairwise epistatic interactions and provide a global interaction map to search for higher-order interactions by prioritizing genetic attributes clustered together in the networks. Applying this approach to a population-based bladder cancer dataset, we found a high susceptibility three-way model of genetic variations in DNA repair and immune regulation pathways, which holds great potential for studying the etiology of bladder cancer with further biological validations. We demonstrate that our SEN-supervised search is able to find a small subset of three-locus models with significantly high associations at a substantially reduced computational cost.

  18. A novel genetic locus modulates infarct volume independently of the extent of collateral circulation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Pei-Lun; Keum, Sehoon; Marchuk, Douglas A

    2013-09-03

    In the mouse model of permanent, middle cerebral artery occlusion, infarct volume varies widely across inbred strains but generally is inversely correlated with collateral vessel number. However, we also observed certain mouse strains that share similar collateral vessel anatomy but exhibit significantly different infarct volume. To identify genetic factors determining infarct volume in a collateral vessel-independent manner, we performed quantitative trait locus analysis on a F2 cross between C57BL/6J and C3H/HeJ strains. We mapped four novel loci (Civq4 through Civq7) that modulate infarct volume. Civq4, on chromosome 8, is the strongest locus (logarithm of the odds 9.8) that contributes 21% of the phenotypic variance of infarct volume in the cross. The Civq4 and Civq6 loci represent transgressive B6 alleles that render animals susceptible to larger infarcts. Based on genomic sequence and microarray analyses, we propose candidate genes for the Civq4 locus. By selecting inbred strains with similar collateral vessel anatomy but that vary significantly in infarct volume, we have mapped four loci determining infarct volume in a mouse model of ischemic stroke. Two of the loci appear to modulate infarct volume through a collateral vessel-independent mechanism. Based on strain-specific sequence variants and differences in transcript levels, Msr1 and Mtmr7 appear to be strong candidate genes for Civq4. Identifying the underlying genetic factors of these loci will elucidate the genetic architecture response to cerebral ischemia, shed new light on disease mechanisms of ischemic stroke, and identify potential therapeutic targets for clinical applications.

  19. A novel genetic locus modulates infarct volume independently of the extent of collateral circulation

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Pei-Lun; Keum, Sehoon

    2013-01-01

    In the mouse model of permanent, middle cerebral artery occlusion, infarct volume varies widely across inbred strains but generally is inversely correlated with collateral vessel number. However, we also observed certain mouse strains that share similar collateral vessel anatomy but exhibit significantly different infarct volume. To identify genetic factors determining infarct volume in a collateral vessel-independent manner, we performed quantitative trait locus analysis on a F2 cross between C57BL/6J and C3H/HeJ strains. We mapped four novel loci (Civq4 through Civq7) that modulate infarct volume. Civq4, on chromosome 8, is the strongest locus (logarithm of the odds 9.8) that contributes 21% of the phenotypic variance of infarct volume in the cross. The Civq4 and Civq6 loci represent transgressive B6 alleles that render animals susceptible to larger infarcts. Based on genomic sequence and microarray analyses, we propose candidate genes for the Civq4 locus. By selecting inbred strains with similar collateral vessel anatomy but that vary significantly in infarct volume, we have mapped four loci determining infarct volume in a mouse model of ischemic stroke. Two of the loci appear to modulate infarct volume through a collateral vessel-independent mechanism. Based on strain-specific sequence variants and differences in transcript levels, Msr1 and Mtmr7 appear to be strong candidate genes for Civq4. Identifying the underlying genetic factors of these loci will elucidate the genetic architecture response to cerebral ischemia, shed new light on disease mechanisms of ischemic stroke, and identify potential therapeutic targets for clinical applications. PMID:23800850

  20. A putative regulatory genetic locus modulates virulence in the pathogen Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Eshghi, Azad; Becam, Jérôme; Lambert, Ambroise; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Jagla, Bernd; Wunder, Elsio A; Ko, Albert I; Coppee, Jean-Yves; Goarant, Cyrille; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2014-06-01

    Limited research has been conducted on the role of transcriptional regulators in relation to virulence in Leptospira interrogans, the etiological agent of leptospirosis. Here, we identify an L. interrogans locus that encodes a sensor protein, an anti-sigma factor antagonist, and two genes encoding proteins of unknown function. Transposon insertion into the gene encoding the sensor protein led to dampened transcription of the other 3 genes in this locus. This lb139 insertion mutant (the lb139(-) mutant) displayed attenuated virulence in the hamster model of infection and reduced motility in vitro. Whole-transcriptome analyses using RNA sequencing revealed the downregulation of 115 genes and the upregulation of 28 genes, with an overrepresentation of gene products functioning in motility and signal transduction and numerous gene products with unknown functions, predicted to be localized to the extracellular space. Another significant finding encompassed suppressed expression of the majority of the genes previously demonstrated to be upregulated at physiological osmolarity, including the sphingomyelinase C precursor Sph2 and LigB. We provide insight into a possible requirement for transcriptional regulation as it relates to leptospiral virulence and suggest various biological processes that are affected due to the loss of native expression of this genetic locus.

  1. Fine genetic mapping of the Co locus controlling columnar growth habit in apple.

    PubMed

    Bai, Tuanhui; Zhu, Yuandi; Fernández-Fernández, Felicidad; Keulemans, Johan; Brown, Susan; Xu, Kenong

    2012-05-01

    Tree architecture is an important, complex and dynamic trait affected by diverse genetic, ontogenetic and environmental factors. 'Wijcik McIntosh', a columnar (reduced branching) sport of 'McIntosh' and a valuable genetic resource, has been used intensively in apple-breeding programs for genetic improvement of tree architecture. The columnar growth habit is primarily controlled by the dominant allele of gene Co (columnar) on linkage group-10. But the Co locus is not well mapped and the Co gene remains unknown. To precisely map the Co locus and to identify candidate genes of Co, a sequence-based approach using both peach and apple genomes was used to develop new markers linked more tightly to Co. Five new simple sequence repeats markers were developed (C1753-3520, C18470-25831, C6536-31519, C7223-38004 and C7629-22009). The first four markers were obtained from apple genomic sequences on chromosome-10, whereas the last (C7629-22009) was from an unanchored apple contig that contains an apple expressed sequence tag CV082943, which was identified through synteny analysis between the peach and apple genomes. Genetic mapping of these five markers in four F(1) populations of 528 genotypes and 290 diverse columnar selections/cultivars (818 genotypes in total) delimited the Co locus in a genetic interval with 0.37 % recombination between markers C1753-3520 and C7629-22009. Marker C18470-25831 co-segregates with Co in the 818 genotypes studied. The Co region is estimated to be 193 kb and contains 26 predicted gene in the 'Golden Delicious' genome. Among the 26 genes, three are putative LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES (LOB) DOMAIN (LBD) containing transcription factor genes known of essential roles in plant lateral organ development, and are therefore considered as strong candidates of Co, designated MdLBD1, MdLBD2, and MdLBD3. Although more comprehensive studies are required to confirm the function of MdLBD1-3, the present work represents an important step forward to better

  2. Multilocus patterns of genetic variation across Cryptosporidium species suggest balancing selection at the gp60 locus.

    PubMed

    Abal-Fabeiro, J L; Maside, X; Bello, X; Llovo, J; Bartolomé, C

    2013-09-01

    Cryptosporidium is an apicomplexan protozoan that lives in most vertebrates, including humans. Its gp60 gene is functionally involved in its attachment to host cells, and its high level of genetic variation has made it the reference marker for sample typing in epidemiological studies. To understand the origin of such high diversity and to determine the extent to which this classification applies to the rest of the genome, we analysed the patterns of variation at gp60 and nine other nuclear loci in isolates of three Cryptosporidium species. Most loci showed low genetic polymorphism (πS <1%) and similar levels of between-species divergence. Contrastingly, gp60 exhibited very different characteristics: (i) it was nearly ten times more variable than the other loci; (ii) it displayed a significant excess of polymorphisms relative to between-species differences in a maximum-likelihood Hudson-Kreitman-Aguadé test; (iii) gp60 subtypes turned out to be much older than the species they were found in; and (iv) showed a significant excess of polymorphic variants shared across species from random expectations. These observations suggest that this locus evolves under balancing selection and specifically under negative frequency-dependent selection (FDS). Interestingly, genetic variation at the other loci clusters very well within the groups of isolates defined by gp60 subtypes, which may provide new tools to understand the genome-wide patterns of genetic variation of the parasite in the wild. These results suggest that gp60 plays an active and essential role in the life cycle of the parasite and that genetic variation at this locus might be essential for the parasite's long-term success. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Molecular genetic analysis of the melanoma regulatory locus in Xiphophorus interspecies hybrids.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan; Boswell, Mikki; Boswell, William; Kneitz, Susanne; Hausmann, Michael; Klotz, Barbara; Regneri, Janine; Savage, Markita; Amores, Angel; Postlethwait, John; Warren, Wesley; Schartl, Manfred; Walter, Ronald

    2017-08-01

    Development of spontaneous melanoma in Xiphophorus interspecies backcross hybrid progeny, (X. hellerii × [X. maculatus Jp 163 A × X. hellerii]) is due to Mendelian segregation of a oncogene (xmrk) and a molecularly uncharacterized locus, called R(Diff), on LG5. R(Diff) is thought to suppresses the activity of xmrk in healthy X. maculatus Jp 163 A parental species that rarely develop melanoma. To better understand the molecular genetics of R(Diff), we utilized RNA-Seq to study allele-specific gene expression of spontaneous melanoma tumors and corresponding normal skin samples derived from 15 first generation backcross (BC1 ) hybrids and 13 fifth generation (BC5 ) hybrids. Allele-specific expression was determined for all genes and assigned to parental allele inheritance for each backcross hybrid individual. Results showed that genes residing in a 5.81 Mbp region on LG5 were exclusively expressed from the X. hellerii alleles in tumor-bearing BC1 hybrids. This observation indicates this region is consistently homozygous for X. hellerii alleles in tumor bearing animals, and therefore defines this region to be the R(Diff) locus. The R(Diff) locus harbors 164 gene models and includes the previously characterized R(Diff) candidate, cdkn2x. Twenty-one genes in the R(Diff) region show differential expression in the tumor samples compared to normal skin tissue. These results further characterize the R(Diff) locus and suggest tumor suppression may require a multigenic region rather than a single gene variant. Differences in gene expression between tumor and normal skin tissue in this region may indicate interactions among several genes are required for backcross hybrid melanoma development. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc.

  4. Independent evidence for an association between general cognitive ability and a genetic locus for educational attainment.

    PubMed

    Trampush, Joey W; Lencz, Todd; Knowles, Emma; Davies, Gail; Guha, Saurav; Pe'er, Itsik; Liewald, David C; Starr, John M; Djurovic, Srdjan; Melle, Ingrid; Sundet, Kjetil; Christoforou, Andrea; Reinvang, Ivar; Mukherjee, Semanti; DeRosse, Pamela; Lundervold, Astri; Steen, Vidar M; John, Majnu; Espeseth, Thomas; Räikkönen, Katri; Widen, Elisabeth; Palotie, Aarno; Eriksson, Johan G; Giegling, Ina; Konte, Bettina; Ikeda, Masashi; Roussos, Panos; Giakoumaki, Stella; Burdick, Katherine E; Payton, Antony; Ollier, William; Horan, Mike; Scult, Matthew; Dickinson, Dwight; Straub, Richard E; Donohoe, Gary; Morris, Derek; Corvin, Aiden; Gill, Michael; Hariri, Ahmad; Weinberger, Daniel R; Pendleton, Neil; Iwata, Nakao; Darvasi, Ariel; Bitsios, Panos; Rujescu, Dan; Lahti, Jari; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Keller, Matthew C; Andreassen, Ole A; Deary, Ian J; Glahn, David C; Malhotra, Anil K

    2015-07-01

    Cognitive deficits and reduced educational achievement are common in psychiatric illness; understanding the genetic basis of cognitive and educational deficits may be informative about the etiology of psychiatric disorders. A recent, large genome-wide association study (GWAS) reported a genome-wide significant locus for years of education, which subsequently demonstrated association to general cognitive ability ("g") in overlapping cohorts. The current study was designed to test whether GWAS hits for educational attainment are involved in general cognitive ability in an independent, large-scale collection of cohorts. Using cohorts in the Cognitive Genomics Consortium (COGENT; up to 20,495 healthy individuals), we examined the relationship between g and variants associated with educational attainment. We next conducted meta-analyses with 24,189 individuals with neurocognitive data from the educational attainment studies, and then with 53,188 largely independent individuals from a recent GWAS of cognition. A SNP (rs1906252) located at chromosome 6q16.1, previously associated with years of schooling, was significantly associated with g (P = 1.47 × 10(-4) ) in COGENT. The first joint analysis of 43,381 non-overlapping individuals for this a priori-designated locus was strongly significant (P = 4.94 × 10(-7) ), and the second joint analysis of 68,159 non-overlapping individuals was even more robust (P = 1.65 × 10(-9) ). These results provide independent replication, in a large-scale dataset, of a genetic locus associated with cognitive function and education. As sample sizes grow, cognitive GWAS will identify increasing numbers of associated loci, as has been accomplished in other polygenic quantitative traits, which may be relevant to psychiatric illness.

  5. Independent Evidence for an Association between General Cognitive Ability and a Genetic Locus for Educational Attainment

    PubMed Central

    Trampush, Joey W.; Lencz, Todd; Knowles, Emma; Davies, Gail; Guha, Saurav; Pe’er, Itsik; Liewald, David C.; Starr, John M.; Djurovic, Srdjan; Melle, Ingrid; Sundet, Kjetil; Christoforou, Andrea; Reinvang, Ivar; Mukherjee, Semanti; DeRosse, Pamela; Lundervold, Astri; Steen, Vidar M.; John, Majnu; Espeseth, Thomas; Räikkönen, Katri; Widen, Elisabeth; Palotie, Aarno; Eriksson, Johan G.; Giegling, Ina; Konte, Bettina; Ikeda, Masashi; Roussos, Panos; Giakoumaki, Stella; Burdick, Katherine E.; Payton, Antony; Ollier, William; Horan, Mike; Scult, Matthew; Dickinson, Dwight; Straub, Richard E.; Donohoe, Gary; Morris, Derek; Corvin, Aiden; Gill, Michael; Hariri, Ahmad; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Pendleton, Neil; Iwata, Nakao; Darvasi, Ariel; Bitsios, Panos; Rujescu, Dan; Lahti, Jari; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Keller, Matthew C.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Deary, Ian J.; Glahn, David C.; Malhotra, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive deficits and reduced educational achievement are common in psychiatric illness; understanding the genetic basis of cognitive and educational deficits may be informative about the etiology of psychiatric disorders. A recent, large genomewide association study (GWAS) reported a genome-wide significant locus for years of education, which subsequently demonstrated association to general cognitive ability (“g”) in overlapping cohorts. The current study was designed to test whether GWAS hits for educational attainment are involved in general cognitive ability in an independent, large-scale collection of cohorts. Using cohorts in the Cognitive Genomics Consortium (COGENT; up to 20,495 healthy individuals), we examined the relationship between g and variants associated with educational attainment. We next conducted meta-analyses with 24,189 individuals with neurocognitive data from the educational attainment studies, and then with 53,188 largely independent individuals from a recent GWAS of cognition. A SNP (rs1906252) located at chromosome 6q16.1, previously associated with years of schooling, was significantly associated with g (P = 1.47×10−4) in COGENT. The first joint analysis of 43,381 non-overlapping individuals for this a priori-designated locus was strongly significant (P = 4.94×10−7), and the second joint analysis of 68,159 non-overlapping individuals was even more robust (P = 1.65×10−9). These results provide independent replication, in a large-scale dataset, of a genetic locus associated with cognitive function and education. As sample sizes grow, cognitive GWAS will identify increasing numbers of associated loci, as has been accomplished in other polygenic quantitative traits, which may be relevant to psychiatric illness. PMID:25951819

  6. Genetic overlap between Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease at the MAPT locus

    PubMed Central

    Desikan, Rahul S.; Schork, Andrew J.; Wang, Yunpeng; Witoelar, Aree; Sharma, Manu; McEvoy, Linda K.; Holland, Dominic; Brewer, James B.; Chen, Chi-Hua; Thompson, Wesley K.; Harold, Denise; Williams, Julie; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Mayeux, Richard; Haines, Jonathan L.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Heutink, Peter; Singleton, Andrew B.; Brice, Alexis; Wood, Nicolas W.; Hardy, John; Martinez, Maria; Choi, Seung Hoi; DeStefano, Anita; Ikram, M. Arfan; Bis, Joshua C.; Smith, Albert; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Launer, Lenore; van Duijn, Cornelia; Seshadri, Sudha; Ulstein, Ingun Dina; Aarsland, Dag; Fladby, Tormod; Djurovic, Srdjan; Hyman, Bradley T.; Snaedal, Jon; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari; Gasser, Thomas; Andreassen, Ole A.; Dale, Anders M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated genetic overlap between Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Using summary statistics (p-values) from large recent genomewide association studies (GWAS) (total n = 89,904 individuals), we sought to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associating with both AD and PD. We found and replicated association of both AD and PD with the A allele of rs393152 within the extended MAPT region on chromosome 17 (meta analysis p-value across 5 independent AD cohorts = 1.65 × 10−7). In independent datasets, we found a dose-dependent effect of the A allele of rs393152 on intra-cerebral MAPT transcript levels and volume loss within the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. Our findings identify the tau-associated MAPT locus as a site of genetic overlap between AD and PD and extending prior work, we show that the MAPT region increases risk of Alzheimer’s neurodegeneration. PMID:25687773

  7. Refinement of the Spinal Muscular Atrophy Locus by Genetic and Physical Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C. H.; Kleyn, P. W.; Vitale, E.; Ross, B. M.; Lien, L.; Xu, J.; Carter, T. A.; Brzustowicz, L. M.; Obici, S.; Selig, S.; Pavone, L.; Parano, E.; Penchaszadeh, G. K.; Munsat, T.; Kunkel, L. M.; Gilliam, T. C.

    1995-01-01

    We report the mapping and characterization of 12 microsatellite markers including 11 novel markers. All markers were generated from overlapping YAC clones that span the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) locus. PCR amplification of 32 overlapping YAC clones shows that 9 of the new markers (those set in italics) map to the interval between the two previous closest flanking markers (D5S629 and D5S557): cen - D5S6 - D5S125 - D5S435 - D5S1407-D5S629-D5S1410-D5S1411/D5S1412-D5S1413-D5S1414-D5Z8-D5Z9-CATT1-D5Z10/D5Z6-D5S557-D5S1408-D5S1409-D5S637-D5S351-MAP1B-tel. Four of these new markers detect multiple loci in and out of the SMA gene region. Genetic analysis of recombinant SMA families indicates that D5S1413 is a new proximal flanking locus for the SMA gene. Interestingly, among the 40 physically mapped loci, the 14 multilocus markers map contiguously to a genomic region that overlaps, and perhaps helps define, the minimum genetic region encompassing the SMA gene(s). ImagesFigure 2Figure 5 PMID:7825579

  8. A genetic locus essential for formate-dependent growth of Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C R; Chelm, B K

    1987-01-01

    A genetic locus essential for the formate-dependent growth of Bradyrhizobium japonicum was isolated by complementation of ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutants with a cosmid gene library of B. japonicum DNA. Three related cosmids containing 18.7 kilobase pairs of B. japonicum DNA in common were identified as being able to restore formate-dependent growth capability to mutants lacking either ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase or both ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase activities. To further localize the complementing gene(s), a series of four deletions spanning a total of 16.1 kilobase pairs were introduced into the B. japonicum chromosome. Each resulting deletion mutant lacked formate dehydrogenase activity and lacked ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase activity and immunologically detectable protein. Three of the four also lacked phosphoribulokinase activity. Two other mutants in which the deletion-bearing recombinant plasmid had integrated into the chromosome also lacked ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase activity and protein and phosphoribulokinase activities. The genetic locus defined by these mutants could contain the structural genes for these enzymes or a regulatory gene(s) controlling their expression or both. Images PMID:3036781

  9. Refinement of the spinal muscular atrophy locus by genetic and physical mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.H.; Kleyn, P.W.; Vitale, E.; Ross, B.M.; Xu, J.; Carter, T.A.; Brzustowicz, L.M.; Obici, S.; Lien, L.; Selig, S.

    1995-01-01

    We report the mapping and characterization of 12 microsatellite markers including 11 novel markers. All markers were generated from overlapping YAC clones that span the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) locus. PCR amplification of 32 overlapping YAC clones show that 9 of the new markers (those set in italics) map to the interval between the two previous closest flanking markers (D5S629 and D5S557):cen - D5S6 - D5S125 - D5S435 - D5S1407 - D5S629 - D5S1410 - D5S1411/D5S1412 - D5S1413 - D5S1414 - D5Z8 - D5Z9 - CATT1 - D5Z10/D5Z6 - D5S557 - D5S1408 - D5S1409 - D5S637 - D5S351 - MAP1B - tel. Four of these new markers detect multiple loci in and out of the SMA gene region. Genetic analysis of recombinant SMA families indicates that D5S1413 is a new proximal flanking locus for the SMA gene. Interestingly, among the 40 physically mapped loci, the 14 multilocus markers map contiguously to a genomic region that overlaps, and perhaps helps define, the minimum genetic region encompassing the SMA gene(s). 24 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Philosophy of race meets population genetics.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Quayshawn

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, I respond to four common semantic and metaphysical objections that philosophers of race have launched at scholars who interpret recent human genetic clustering results in population genetics as evidence for biological racial realism. I call these objections 'the discreteness objection', 'the visibility objection', 'the very important objection', and 'the objectively real objection.' After motivating each objection, I show that each one stems from implausible philosophical assumptions about the relevant meaning of 'race' or the nature of biological racial realism. In order to be constructive, I end by offering some advice for how we can productively critique attempts to defend biological racial realism based on recent human genetic clustering results. I also offer a clarification of the relevant human-population genetic research.

  11. Genetics meets pathology - an increasingly important relationship.

    PubMed

    Bonthron, David T; Foulkes, William D

    2017-01-01

    The analytical power of modern methods for DNA analysis has outstripped our capability to interpret and understand the data generated. To make good use of this genomic data in a biomedical setting (whether for research or diagnosis), it is vital that we understand the mechanisms through which mutations affect biochemical pathways and physiological systems. This lies at the centre of what genetics is all about, and it is the reason why genetics and genomics should go hand in hand whenever possible. In this Annual Review Issue of The Journal of Pathology, we have assembled a collection of 16 expert reviews covering a wide range of topics. Through these, we illustrate the power of genetic analysis to improve our understanding of normal physiology and disease pathology, and thereby to think in rational ways about clinical management. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Genetic organization and molecular characterization of secA2 locus in Listeria species.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Krishna K; Mendonca, Marcelo; Aroonnual, Amornrat; Burkholder, Kristin M; Bhunia, Arun K

    2011-12-10

    The translocation of proteins across the bacterial cell wall is carried out by the general secretory (Sec) system. Most bacteria have a single copy of the secA gene, with the exception of a few Gram-positive bacteria, which have an additional copy of secA, designated secA2. secA2 is present in Listeria monocytogenes and is responsible for secretion and translocation of several proteins including virulence factors; however, little is known about the secA2 gene and its genetic organization in nonpathogenic members of the genus Listeria. The goal of this study was to determine the presence of secA2 locus and analyze the genetic relatedness among pathogenic and nonpathogenic Listeria species. Cloning experiments revealed that secA2 is present in all analyzed pathogenic (L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii) and nonpathogenic (L. welshimeri, L. innocua, L. seeligeri, L. grayi and L. marthii) Listeria species except L. rocourtiae. Likewise, SecA2 transcripts were also detected in all species. Sequence analysis further revealed that 2331 nucleotides (776 amino acids) are conserved in L. monocytogenes, L. welshimeri, L. innocua and L. marthii. Three nucleotides are deleted in L. ivanovii and L. seeligeri and six in L. grayi, resulting in amino acid counts of 775, 775 and 774, respectively. secA2 is flanked upstream by iap (encoding p60) and downstream by a putative membrane protein (lmo0583, lmo f2365_0613) in all analyzed Listeria species, demonstrating conserved genetic organization of the secA2 locus in pathogenic and nonpathogenic species. Deletion of secA2 in L. innocua impaired accumulation of SecA2 substrate, N-acetyl muramidase (NamA) in the cell wall, providing evidence for the presence of functional SecA2 in nonpathogenic Listeria.

  13. More than Meets the Eye: the Relationship between Pupil Size and Locus Coerulus Activity

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Vincent D.; Rudebeck, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Using both direct neural recordings and electrical microstimulation, Joshi et al. (2016) show that locus coeruleus (LC) activity closely matches moment-to-moment changes in pupil size. But what causes these two measures to be related is not straightforward. PMID:26748086

  14. Global Genetic Architecture of an Erythroid Quantitative Trait Locus, HMIP-2

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Stephan; Rooks, Helen; Zelenika, Diana; Mtatiro, Siana N; Gnanakulasekaran, Akshala; Drasar, Emma; Cox, Sharon; Liu, Li; Masood, Mariam; Silver, Nicholas; Garner, Chad; Vasavda, Nisha; Howard, Jo; Makani, Julie; Adekile, Adekunle; Pace, Betty; Spector, Tim; Farrall, Martin; Lathrop, Mark; Thein, Swee Lay

    2014-01-01

    HMIP-2 is a human quantitative trait locus affecting peripheral numbers, size and hemoglobin composition of red blood cells, with a marked effect on the persistence of the fetal form of hemoglobin, HbF, in adults. The locus consists of multiple common variants in an enhancer region for MYB (chr 6q23.3), which encodes the hematopoietic transcription factor cMYB. Studying a European population cohort and four African-descended groups of patients with sickle cell anemia, we found that all share a set of two spatially separate HbF-promoting alleles at HMIP-2, termed “A” and “B.” These typically occurred together (“A–B”) on European chromosomes, but existed on separate homologous chromosomes in Africans. Using haplotype signatures for “A” and “B,” we interrogated public population datasets. Haplotypes carrying only “A” or “B” were typical for populations in Sub-Saharan Africa. The “A–B” combination was frequent in European, Asian, and Amerindian populations. Both alleles were infrequent in tropical regions, possibly undergoing negative selection by geographical factors, as has been reported for malaria with other hematological traits. We propose that the ascertainment of worldwide distribution patterns for common, HbF-promoting alleles can aid their further genetic characterization, including the investigation of gene–environment interaction during human migration and adaptation. PMID:25069958

  15. Heterochromatic Position Effect at the Rosy Locus of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER: Cytological, Genetic and Biochemical Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Rushlow, C. A.; Chovnick, A.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes cytological, genetic and biochemical studies designed to characterize two γ-radiation induced, apparent "underproducer" variants of the rosy locus (ry:3-52.0), ryps1149 and ryps11136. The following observations provide a compelling basis for their diagnosis as heterochromatic position effect variants. (1) They are associated with rearrangements that place heterochromatin adjacent to the rosy region of chromosome 3 (87D). (2) The effect of these mutations on rosy locus expression is subject to modification by abnormal Y chromosome content. (3) The rearrangement alters only the expression of the rosy allele on the same chromosome (cis-acting). (4) The Y chromosome modification is only on the position-affected allele's expression. (5) The recessive lethality associated with the rearrangements relate to specific rosy region vital loci, and for ryps 11136, the lethality is not Y chromosome modified. (6) The peptide product of the position-affected allele is qualitatively normal by several criteria. (7) Heterozygous deletion of 87E2-F2 is a suppressor of the rosy position effect. (8) The rosy position effect on XDH production may be assayed in whole larvae and larval fat body tissue as well as in adults. PMID:6437902

  16. Locus-specific genetic differentiation at Rw among warfarin-resistant rat (Rattus norvegicus) populations.

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Michael H; Pelz, Hans-Joachim; Wayne, Robert K

    2003-01-01

    Populations may diverge at fitness-related genes as a result of adaptation to local conditions. The ability to detect this divergence by marker-based genomic scans depends on the relative magnitudes of selection, recombination, and migration. We survey rat (Rattus norvegicus) populations to assess the effect that local selection with anticoagulant rodenticides has had on microsatellite marker variation and differentiation at the warfarin resistance gene (Rw) relative to the effect on the genomic background. Initially, using a small sample of 16 rats, we demonstrate tight linkage of microsatellite D1Rat219 to Rw by association mapping of genotypes expressing an anticoagulant-rodenticide-insensitive vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase (VKOR). Then, using allele frequencies at D1Rat219, we show that predicted and observed resistance levels in 27 populations correspond, suggesting intense and recent selection for resistance. A contrast of F(ST) values between D1Rat219 and the genomic background revealed that rodenticide selection has overwhelmed drift-mediated population structure only at Rw. A case-controlled design distinguished these locus-specific effects of selection at Rw from background levels of differentiation more effectively than a population-controlled approach. Our results support the notion that an analysis of locus-specific population genetic structure may assist the discovery and mapping of novel candidate loci that are the object of selection or may provide supporting evidence for previously identified loci. PMID:12871915

  17. Comprehensive genetic assessment of the ESR1 locus identifies a risk region for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Mara, Tracy A; Glubb, Dylan M; Painter, Jodie N; Cheng, Timothy; Dennis, Joe; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Shah, Mitul; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Lambrechts, Diether; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Annibali, Daniela; Amant, Frederic; Zhao, Hui; Goode, Ellen L; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Salvesen, Helga B; Njølstad, Tormund S; Trovik, Jone; Werner, Henrica M J; Tham, Emma; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Peto, Julian; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F; Thompson, Deborah J; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2015-10-01

    Excessive exposure to estrogen is a well-established risk factor for endometrial cancer (EC), particularly for cancers of endometrioid histology. The physiological function of estrogen is primarily mediated by estrogen receptor alpha, encoded by ESR1. Consequently, several studies have investigated whether variation at the ESR1 locus is associated with risk of EC, with conflicting results. We performed comprehensive fine-mapping analyses of 3633 genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 6607 EC cases and 37 925 controls. There was evidence of an EC risk signal located at a potential alternative promoter of the ESR1 gene (lead SNP rs79575945, P=1.86×10(-5)), which was stronger for cancers of endometrioid subtype (P=3.76×10(-6)). Bioinformatic analysis suggests that this risk signal is in a functionally important region targeting ESR1, and eQTL analysis found that rs79575945 was associated with expression of SYNE1, a neighbouring gene. In summary, we have identified a single EC risk signal located at ESR1, at study-wide significance. Given SNPs located at this locus have been associated with risk for breast cancer, also a hormonally driven cancer, this study adds weight to the rationale for performing informed candidate fine-scale genetic studies across cancer types.

  18. Comprehensive genetic assessment of the ESR1 locus identifies a risk region for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    O’Mara, Tracy A; Glubb, Dylan M; Painter, Jodie N; Cheng, Timothy; Dennis, Joe; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Shah, Mitul; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Lambrechts, Diether; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Annibali, Daniela; Amant, Frederic; Zhao, Hui; Goode, Ellen L; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Salvesen, Helga B; Njølstad, Tormund S; Trovik, Jone; Werner, Henrica MJ; Tham, Emma; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Peto, Julian; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F; Thompson, Deborah J; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2015-01-01

    Excessive exposure to estrogen is a well-established risk factor for endometrial cancer (EC), particularly for cancers of endometrioid histology. The physiological function of estrogen is primarily mediated by estrogen receptor alpha, encoded by ESR1. Consequently, several studies have investigated whether variation at the ESR1 locus is associated with risk of EC, with conflicting results. We performed comprehensive fine-mapping analyses of 3,633 genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 6,607 EC cases and 37,925 controls. There was evidence of an EC risk signal located at a potential alternative promoter of the ESR1 gene (lead SNP rs79575945, P = 1.86 × 10−5), which was stronger for cancers of endometrioid subtype (P = 3.76 × 10−6). Bioinformatic analysis suggests that this risk signal is in a functionally important region targeting ESR1, and eQTL analysis found that rs79575945 was associated with expression of SYNE1, a neighbouring gene. In summary, we have identified a single EC risk signal located at ESR1, at study-wide significance. Given SNPs located at this locus have been associated with risk for breast cancer, also a hormonally driven cancer, this study adds weight to the rationale for performing informed candidate fine-scale genetic studies across cancer types. PMID:26330482

  19. Genetic polymorphisms of the CST2 locus coding for cystatin SA.

    PubMed

    Shintani, M; Minaguchi, K; Isemura, S; Saitoh, E; Sanada, K; Semba, T

    1994-07-01

    A new genetic polymorphism of cystatin SA has been identified in human submandibular-sublingual saliva by means of basic gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting with anti-cystatin S. Two proteins, SA1 and SA2, are given by two alleles of CST2, viz., CST2*1 and CST*2. Inheritance is controlled by two codominant alleles at an autosomal locus. This hypothesis is supported by studies of 16 families 32 children. Gene frequencies for CST2*1 and CST2*2 are 0.935 and 0.065, respectively (n = 341). Eighteen amino acids determined among 20 N-terminal residues of cystatin SA2 are identical with the sequence encoded by CST2. Three forms of cystatin S (mono-phosphorylated cystatin S, di-phosphorylated cystatin S, and non-phosphorylated cystatin S) are present in the 341 saliva samples tested.

  20. Fine-structure genetic map of the cysB locus in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Cheney, R W; Kredich, N M

    1975-01-01

    A genetic map of the cysB region of the Salmonella typhimurium chromosome was constructed using bacteriophage P22-mediated transduction. Strains bearing delta (supX cysB) mutations were employed to divide this regulatory locus into 12 segments containing a total of 39 single-site mutations. Twenty-five of these single-site mutations were further ordered by reciprocal three-point crosses. The results do not support the concept of multiple cistrons at cysB and suggest that the abortive transductants previously observed in crosses between certain cysB mutants were due to intracistronic complementation. The prototrophic cys-1352 mutation, which causes the constitutive expression of the cysteine biosynthetic enzymes, was found to lie within the cysB region itself. It is bracketed by mutations, which lead to an inability to derepress for these enzymes and result in auxotrophy for cysteine. PMID:1104581

  1. The population genetics of the alpha-2 globin locus of orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus).

    PubMed

    Steiper, Michael E; Wolfe, Nathan D; Karesh, William B; Kilbourn, Annelisa M; Bosi, Edwin J; Ruvolo, Maryellen

    2005-03-01

    In this study, the molecular population genetics of the orangutan's alpha-2 globin (HBA2) gene were investigated in order to test for the action of natural selection. Haplotypes from 28 orangutan chromosomes were collected from a 1.46-kilobase region of the alpha-2 globin locus. While many aspects of the data were consistent with neutrality, the observed heterogeneous distribution of polymorphisms was inconsistent with neutral expectations. Furthermore, a single amino acid variant, found in both the Bornean and the Sumatran orangutan subspecies, was associated with different alternative synonymous variants in each subspecies, suggesting that the allele may have spread separately through the two subspecies after two distinct origination events. This variant is not in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). These observations are consistent with neutral models that incorporate population structure and models that invoke selection. The orangutan Plasmodium parasite is a plausible selective agent that may underlie the variation at alpha-2 globin in orangutans.

  2. Genetic instability at the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase locus in mouse L cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tischfield, J.A.; Trill, J.J.; Lee, Y.; Coy, K.; Taylor, M.W.

    1982-03-01

    Resistance to adenine analogs such as 2,6-diaminopurine occurs at a rate of --10/sup -3/ per cell generation in mouse L cells. This resistance is associated with a loss of detectable adenine phosphoribosyltransferase activity. Other genetic loci in L cells have the expected mutation frequency (--10/sup -6/). Transformation of L cell mutants with Chinese hamster ovary cell DNA results in transformants with adenine phosphoribosyltransferase activity characteristic of Chinese hamster ovary cells. No activation of the mouse gene occurs on hybridization with human fibroblasts. That this high frequency event is the result of mutation rather than an epigenetic event is supported by antigenic and reversion studies of the 2,6-diaminopurine-resistant clones. These results are consistent with either a mutational hot-spot, a locus specific mutator gene, or a site of integration of an insertion sequence.

  3. Multiple-locus variable number tandem repeats analysis for genetic fingerprinting of pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lindstedt, Bjørn-Arne

    2005-06-01

    DNA fingerprinting has attracted considerable interest as means for identifying, tracing and preventing the dissemination of infectious agents. Various methods have been developed for typing of pathogenic bacteria, which differ in discriminative power, reproducibility and ease of interpretation. During recent years a typing method, which uses the information provided by whole genome sequencing of bacterial species, has gained increased attention. Short sequence repeat (SSR) motifs are known to undergo frequent variation in the number of repeated units through cellular mechanisms most commonly active during chromosome replication. A class of SSRs, named variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs), has proven to be a suitable target for assessing genetic polymorphisms within bacterial species. This review attempts to give an overview of bacterial agents where VNTR-based typing, or multiple-locus variant-repeat analysis (MLVA) has been developed for typing purposes, together with addressing advantages and drawbacks associated with the use of tandem repeated DNA motifs as targets for bacterial typing and identification.

  4. The genetic instabilities of the mating type locus in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Egel, R

    1976-06-15

    Certain genetic instabilities of the "mating type locus" in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe are interpreted in terms of transposition: Homothallic strains are characterized by two adjacent mating type genes (mat1-mat2+) with sexually complementary functions. One of these genes (mat2+) is able to duplicate itself, and the duplicated copy maps at the position of mat1-. The former function of mat1-is lost (owing to insertion), and only becomes reactivated when the inserted sequence (mat1+) is again excised. Analyses of analogous instabilities expressed by the partially defective mutation mat2+ -B102 have substantiated this transposition scheme. Homothallism is acribed to alternate and mutually exclusive activation of mat1- or mat2+ genes.

  5. A candidate syntenic genetic locus is associated with voluntary exercise levels in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Kostrzewa, E; Brandys, M K; van Lith, H A; Kas, M J H

    2015-01-01

    Individual levels of physical activity, and especially of voluntary physical exercise, highly contribute to the susceptibility for developing metabolic, cardiovascular diseases, and potentially to psychiatric disorders. Here, we applied a cross-species approach to explore a candidate genetic region for voluntary exercise levels. First, a panel of mouse chromosome substitution strains was used to map a genomic region on mouse chromosome 2 that contributes to voluntary wheel running levels - a behavioral readout considered a model of voluntary exercise in humans. Subsequently, we tested the syntenic region (HSA20: 51,212,545-55,212,986) in a human sample (Saint Thomas Twin Register; n=3038) and found a significant association between voluntary exercise levels (categorized into excessive and non-excessive exercise) and an intergenic SNP rs459465 (adjusted P-value of 0.001). Taking under consideration the methodological challenges embedded in this translational approach in the research of complex phenotypes, we wanted to further test the validity of this finding. Therefore, we repeated the analysis in an independent human population (ALSPAC data set; n=2557). We found a significant association of excessive exercise with two SNPs in the same genomic region (rs6022999, adjusted P-value of P=0.011 and rs6092090, adjusted P-value of 0.012). We explored the locus for possible candidate genes by means of literature search and bioinformatics analysis of gene function and of trans-regulatory elements. We propose three potential human candidate genes for voluntary physical exercise levels (MC3R, CYP24A1, and GRM8). To conclude, the identified genetic variance in the human locus 20q13.2 may affect voluntary exercise levels.

  6. The locus of evolution: evo devo and the genetics of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Hopi E; Coyne, Jerry A

    2007-05-01

    An important tenet of evolutionary developmental biology ("evo devo") is that adaptive mutations affecting morphology are more likely to occur in the cis-regulatory regions than in the protein-coding regions of genes. This argument rests on two claims: (1) the modular nature of cis-regulatory elements largely frees them from deleterious pleiotropic effects, and (2) a growing body of empirical evidence appears to support the predominant role of gene regulatory change in adaptation, especially morphological adaptation. Here we discuss and critique these assertions. We first show that there is no theoretical or empirical basis for the evo devo contention that adaptations involving morphology evolve by genetic mechanisms different from those involving physiology and other traits. In addition, some forms of protein evolution can avoid the negative consequences of pleiotropy, most notably via gene duplication. In light of evo devo claims, we then examine the substantial data on the genetic basis of adaptation from both genome-wide surveys and single-locus studies. Genomic studies lend little support to the cis-regulatory theory: many of these have detected adaptation in protein-coding regions, including transcription factors, whereas few have examined regulatory regions. Turning to single-locus studies, we note that the most widely cited examples of adaptive cis-regulatory mutations focus on trait loss rather than gain, and none have yet pinpointed an evolved regulatory site. In contrast, there are many studies that have both identified structural mutations and functionally verified their contribution to adaptation and speciation. Neither the theoretical arguments nor the data from nature, then, support the claim for a predominance of cis-regulatory mutations in evolution. Although this claim may be true, it is at best premature. Adaptation and speciation probably proceed through a combination of cis-regulatory and structural mutations, with a substantial contribution of

  7. Extensive genetic diversity and low linkage disequilibrium within the COMT locus in maize exotic populations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongsheng; Blanco, Michael; Ji, Qing; Frei, Ursula Karoline; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The caffeic acid 3-O-methytransferase (COMT) gene is a prime candidate for cell wall digestibility improvement based on the characterization of brown midrib-3 mutants. We compared the genetic diversity and linkage disequilibrium at this locus between exotic populations sampled within the Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) project and 70 inbred lines. In total, we investigated 55 exotic COMT alleles and discovered more than 400 polymorphisms in a 2.2 kb region with pairwise nucleotide diversity (π) up to 0.017, much higher than reported π values of various genes in inbred lines. The ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous SNPs was 3:1 in exotic populations, and significantly higher than the 1:1 ratio for inbred lines. Selection tests detected selection signature in this gene in both pools, but with different evolution patterns. The linkage disequilibrium decay in exotic populations was at least four times more rapid than for inbred lines with r²>0.1 persisting only up to 100 bp. In conclusion, the alleles sampled in the GEM Project offer a valuable genetic resource to broaden genetic variation for the COMT gene, and likely other genes, in inbred background. Moreover, the low linkage disequilibrium makes this material suitable for high resolution association analyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sex determination: where environment and genetics meet.

    PubMed

    Crews, David

    2003-01-01

    In mammals and birds the genetic constitution established at the time of fertilization determines the type of gonad that develops, whereas in all crocodilians and many turtles it is the temperature experienced during the mid-trimester of embryogenesis that initiates gonadal differentiation. Research with the red-eared slider suggests considerable conservation in the genetic cascades that underlie the sex determination process in vertebrates and, further, that the patterns of expression of these genes appear to reflect phylogenetic relationships, with turtles being more similar to mammals than they are to birds and crocodilians. After the determination and differentiation of an individual's gonadal sex, epigenetic forces shape those morphological, physiological, and behavioral traits that characterize each individual's unique sexuality. Research with the leopard gecko thus relates to the fundamental question of what factors determine individual variability, particularly as it relates to sexually dimorphic behaviors. Taken together, this research illustrates how sexuality depends on sex, but sex should not be confused with sexuality. That is, sex is merely a means of categorizing individuals or gonads, whereas sexuality serves as a descriptor of concordant traits each of which is typically sexually dimorphic in its expression.

  9. The Locus Lookup Tool at MaizeGDB: Identification of Genomic Regions in Maize by Integrating Sequence Information with Physical and Genetic Maps

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methods to automatically integrate sequence information with physical and genetic maps are scarce. The Locus Lookup Tool enables researchers to define windows of genomic sequence likely to contain loci of interest where only genetic or physical mapping associations are reported. Using the Locus Look...

  10. Interacting personalities: behavioural ecology meets quantitative genetics.

    PubMed

    Dingemanse, Niels J; Araya-Ajoy, Yimen G

    2015-02-01

    Behavioural ecologists increasingly study behavioural variation within and among individuals in conjunction, thereby integrating research on phenotypic plasticity and animal personality within a single adaptive framework. Interactions between individuals (cf. social environments) constitute a major causative factor of behavioural variation at both of these hierarchical levels. Social interactions give rise to complex 'interactive phenotypes' and group-level emergent properties. This type of phenotype has intriguing evolutionary implications, warranting a cohesive framework for its study. We detail here how a reaction-norm framework might be applied to usefully integrate social environment theory developed in behavioural ecology and quantitative genetics. The proposed emergent framework facilitates firm integration of social environments in adaptive research on phenotypic characters that vary within and among individuals.

  11. Systematic Evaluation of Genetic Variation at the Androgen Receptor Locus and Risk of Prostate Cancer in a Multiethnic Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Matthew L.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Penney, Kathryn L.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Altshuler, David

    2005-01-01

    Repeat length of the CAG microsatellite polymorphism in exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene has been associated with risk of prostate cancer in humans. This association has been the focus of >20 primary epidemiological publications and multiple review articles, but a consistent and reproducible association has yet to be confirmed. We systematically addressed possible causes of false-negative and false-positive association in >4,000 individuals from a multiethnic, prospective cohort study of prostate cancer, comprehensively studying genetic variation by microsatellite genotyping, direct resequencing of exons in advanced cancer cases, and haplotype analysis across the 180-kb AR genomic locus. These data failed to confirm that common genetic variation in the AR gene locus influences risk of prostate cancer. A systematic approach that assesses both coding and noncoding genetic variation in large and diverse patient samples can help clarify hypotheses about association between genetic variants and disease. PMID:15570555

  12. Genetic Map-Based Location of the Red Clover (Trifolium pratense L.) Gametophytic Self-incompatibility Locus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Red clover is a hermaphadidic allogamous diploid (2n = 2x = 14) with a homomorphic gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) system red clover (Trifolium pratense L.). Red clover GSI has long been studied and it is thought that the genetic control of GSI constitutes a single locus. Although GSI gene...

  13. Extensive genetic diversity and low linkage disequilibrium within the COMT locus in Germplasm Enhancement of Maize populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Caffeic acid 3-O-methytransferase (COMT) gene is a prime candidate for cell wall digestibility improvement based on the characterization of brown midrib-3 mutants. We compared the genetic diversity and linkage disequilibrium at COMT locus between populations sampled within the Germplasm Enhance...

  14. Two pedigrees segregating Duane’s retraction syndrome as a dominant trait map to the DURS2 genetic locus

    PubMed Central

    Engle, Elizabeth C.; Andrews, Caroline; Law, Krystal; Demer, Joseph L.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine the molecular etiologies of Duane’s retraction syndrome (DRS), we are investigating its genetic bases. We have previously identified the transcription factors SALL4 and HOXA1 as the genes mutated in DRS with radial anomalies, and in DRS with deafness, vascular anomalies, and cognitive deficits, respectively. We know less, however, about the genetic etiology of DRS when it occurs in isolation, and only one genetic locus for isolated DRS, the DURS2 locus on chromosome 2, has been mapped to date. Toward the goal of identifying the DURS2 gene, we have ascertained and studied two pedigrees that segregate DRS as a dominant trait. METHODS We enrolled members of two large dominant DRS pedigrees into our ongoing study of the genetic basis of the congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders, and conducted linkage analysis to determine if their DRS phenotype maps to the DURS2 locus. RESULTS By haplotype analysis, the DRS phenotype in each family co-segregates with markers spanning the DURS2 region, and linkage analysis reveals maximum lod scores of >2, establishing that the DRS phenotype in these two pedigrees maps to the DURS2 locus. CONCLUSIONS These two pedigrees double the published pedigrees known to map to the DURS2 locus, and can thus contribute toward the search for the DURS2 gene. The affected members represent a genetically defined population of DURS2-linked DRS individuals, and hence studies of their clinical and structural features can enhance our understanding of the DURS2 phenotype, as described in the companion paper. PMID:17197532

  15. Evidence for weak genetic recombination at the PTP2 locus of Nosema ceranae.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Moracho, Tamara; Bartolomé, Carolina; Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Higes, Mariano; Maside, Xulio

    2015-04-01

    The microsporidian Nosema ceranae is an emergent pathogen that threatens the health of honeybees and other pollinators all over the world. Its recent rapid spread across a wide variety of host species and environments demonstrated an enhanced ability of adaptation, which seems to contradict the lack of evidence for genetic recombination and the absence of a sexual stage in its life cycle. Here we retrieved fresh data of the patterns of genetic variation at the PTP2 locus in naturally infected Apis mellifera colonies, by means of single genome amplification. This technique, designed to prevent the formation of chimeric haplotypes during polymerase chain reaction (PCR), provides more reliable estimates of the diversity levels and haplotype structure than standard PCR-cloning methods. Our results are consistent with low but significant rates of recombination in the history of the haplotypes detected: estimates of the population recombination rate are of the order of 30 and support recent evidence for unexpectedly high levels of variation of the parasites within honeybee colonies. These observations suggest the existence of a diploid stage at some point in the life cycle of this parasite and are relevant for our understanding of the dynamics of its expanding population. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The Salmonella typhimurium mar locus: molecular and genetic analyses and assessment of its role in virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Sulavik, M C; Dazer, M; Miller, P F

    1997-01-01

    The marRAB operon is a regulatory locus that controls multiple drug resistance in Escherichia coli. marA encodes a positive regulator of the antibiotic resistance response, acting by altering the expression of unlinked genes. marR encodes a repressor of marRAB transcription and controls the production of MarA in response to environmental signals. A molecular and genetic study of the homologous operon in Salmonella typhimurium was undertaken, and the role of marA in virulence in a murine model was assessed. Expression of E. coli marA (marAEC) present on a multicopy plasmid in S. typhimurium resulted in a multiple antibiotic resistance (Mar) phenotype, suggesting that a similar regulon exists in this organism. A genomic plasmid library containing S. typhimurium chromosomal sequences was introduced into an E. coli strain that was deleted for the mar locus and contained a single-copy marR'-'lacZ translational fusion. Plasmid clones that contained both S. typhimurium marR (marRSt) and marA (marASt) genes were identified as those that were capable of repressing expression of the fusion and which resulted in a Mar phenotype. The predicted amino acid sequences of MarRSt, MarASt, and MarBSt were 91, 86, and 42% identical, respectively, to the same genes from E. coli, while the operator/promoter region of the operon was 86% identical to the same 98-nucleotide-upstream region in E. coli. The marRAB transcriptional start sites for both organisms were determined by primer extension, and a marRABSt transcript of approximately 1.1 kb was identified by Northern blot analysis. Its accumulation was shown to be inducible by sodium salicylate. Open reading frames flanking the marRAB operon were also conserved. An S. typhimurium marA disruption strain was constructed by an allelic exchange method and compared to the wild-type strain for virulence in a murine BALB/c infection model. No effect on virulence was noted. The endogenous S. typhimurium plasmid that is associated with virulence

  17. Genetic locus for the biosynthesis of the variable portion of Neisseria gonorrhoeae lipooligosaccharide.

    PubMed

    Gotschlich, E C

    1994-12-01

    A locus involved in the biosynthesis of gonococcal lipooligosaccharide (LOS) has been cloned from gonococcal strain F62. The locus contains five open reading frames. The first and second reading frames are homologous, but not identical, to the fourth and fifth reading frames, respectively. Interposed is an additional reading frame which has distant homology to the Escherichia coli rfaI and rfaI genes, both glucosyl transferases involved in lipopolysaccharide core biosynthesis. The second and fifth reading frames show strong homology to the lex-1 or lic2A gene of Haemophilus influenzae, but do not contain the CAAT repeats found in this gene. Deletions of each of these five genes, of combinations of genes, and of the entire locus were constructed and introduced into parental gonococcal strain F62 by transformation. The LOS phenotypes were then analyzed by SDS-PAGE and reactivity with monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of the gonococcal mutants indicates that four of these genes are the glycosyl transferases that add GalNAc beta 1-->3Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc beta 1-->3 Gal beta 1--4 to the substrate Glc beta 1-->4Hep--R of the inner core region. The gene with homology to E. coli rfaI/rfaI is involved with the addition of the alpha-linked galactose residue in the biosynthesis of the alternative LOS structure Gal alpha 1-->4Gal beta 1-->4Glc beta 1-->4Hep-->R. Since these genes encode LOS glycosyl transferases they have been named lgtA, lgtB, lgtC, lgtD, and lgtE. The DNA sequence analysis revealed that lgtA, lgtC, and lgtD contained poly-G tracts, which, in strain F62 were, respectively, 17, 10, and 11 bp. Thus, three of the LOS biosynthetic enzymes are potentially susceptible to premature termination by reading frame changes. It is likely that these structural features are responsible for the high-frequency genetic variation of gonococcal LOS.

  18. Genetic locus for the biosynthesis of the variable portion of Neisseria gonorrhoeae lipooligosaccharide

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    A locus involved in the biosynthesis of gonococcal lipooligosaccharide (LOS) has been cloned from gonococcal strain F62. The locus contains five open reading frames. The first and second reading frames are homologous, but not identical, to the fourth and fifth reading frames, respectively. Interposed is an additional reading frame which has distant homology to the Escherichia coli rfaI and rfaI genes, both glucosyl transferases involved in lipopolysaccharide core biosynthesis. The second and fifth reading frames show strong homology to the lex-1 or lic2A gene of Haemophilus influenzae, but do not contain the CAAT repeats found in this gene. Deletions of each of these five genes, of combinations of genes, and of the entire locus were constructed and introduced into parental gonococcal strain F62 by transformation. The LOS phenotypes were then analyzed by SDS-PAGE and reactivity with monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of the gonococcal mutants indicates that four of these genes are the glycosyl transferases that add GalNAc beta 1-->3Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc beta 1-->3 Gal beta 1--4 to the substrate Glc beta 1-->4Hep--R of the inner core region. The gene with homology to E. coli rfaI/rfaI is involved with the addition of the alpha-linked galactose residue in the biosynthesis of the alternative LOS structure Gal alpha 1-->4Gal beta 1-->4Glc beta 1-->4Hep-->R. Since these genes encode LOS glycosyl transferases they have been named lgtA, lgtB, lgtC, lgtD, and lgtE. The DNA sequence analysis revealed that lgtA, lgtC, and lgtD contained poly-G tracts, which, in strain F62 were, respectively, 17, 10, and 11 bp. Thus, three of the LOS biosynthetic enzymes are potentially susceptible to premature termination by reading frame changes. It is likely that these structural features are responsible for the high-frequency genetic variation of gonococcal LOS. PMID:7964493

  19. PHACTR1 Is a Genetic Susceptibility Locus for Fibromuscular Dysplasia Supporting Its Complex Genetic Pattern of Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Nathan R.; Castro-Vega, Luis-Jaime; Katz, Alexander; D’Escamard, Valentina; Tréard, Cyrielle; Fraher, Daniel; Albuisson, Juliette; Kadian-Dodov, Daniella; Ye, Zi; Austin, Erin; Yang, Min-Lee; Hunker, Kristina; Cusi, Daniele; Galan, Pilar; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Jouven, Xavier; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Bruneval, Patrick; Hyun Kim, Esther Soo; Olin, Jeffrey W.; Azizi, Michel; Plouin, Pierre-François; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Milan, David J.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila

    2016-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic vascular disease leading to stenosis, dissection and aneurysm affecting mainly the renal and cerebrovascular arteries. FMD is often an underdiagnosed cause of hypertension and stroke, has higher prevalence in females (~80%) but its pathophysiology is unclear. We analyzed ~26K common variants (MAF>0.05) generated by exome-chip arrays in 249 FMD patients and 689 controls. We replicated 13 loci (P<10−4) in 402 cases and 2,537 controls and confirmed an association between FMD and a variant in the phosphatase and actin regulator 1 gene (PHACTR1). Three additional case control cohorts including 512 cases and 669 replicated this result and overall reached the genomic level of significance (OR = 1.39, P = 7.4×10−10, 1,154 cases and 3,895 controls). The top variant, rs9349379, is intronic to PHACTR1, a risk locus for coronary artery disease, migraine, and cervical artery dissection. The analyses of geometrical parameters of carotids from ~2,500 healthy volunteers indicate higher intima media thickness (P = 1.97×10−4) and wall to lumen ratio (P = 0.002) in rs9349379-A carriers, suggesting indices of carotid hypertrophy previously described in carotids of FMD patients. Immunohistochemistry detected PHACTR1 in endothelium and smooth muscle cells of FMD and normal human carotids. The expression of PHACTR1 by genotypes in primary human fibroblasts showed higher expression in rs9349379-A carriers (N = 86, P = 0.003). Phactr1 knockdown in zebrafish resulted in dilated vessels indicating subtle impaired vascular development. We report the first susceptibility locus for FMD and provide evidence for a complex genetic pattern of inheritance and indices of shared pathophysiology between FMD and other cardiovascular and neurovascular diseases. PMID:27792790

  20. Genetics of the APM1 locus and its contribution to type 2 diabetes susceptibility in French Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Fernando; Froguel, Philippe

    2004-11-01

    We have carried out a detailed reexamination of the genetics of the APM1 locus and its contribution to the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes susceptibility in the French Caucasian population. The G allele of single nucleotide polymorphism -11426 in the APM1 promoter showed modest association with type 2 diabetes (odds ratio 1.44 [95% CI 1.04-1.98]; P = 0.03), providing corroborative evidence that single nucleotide polymorphisms in the APM1 promoter region contribute to the genetic risk of type 2 diabetes. A "sliding window" analysis identified haplotypes 1-1-1, 1-1-1-1, and 1-1-1-1-1 as being strongly protective against type 2 diabetes (P locus of low linkage disequilibrium, high haplotype diversity, and high recombination. We were unable to obtain data to support the hypothesis that genetic variation in the APM1 gene is a major contributor to the type 2 diabetes linkage result at chromosome 3q27. Finally, in families with early-onset type 2 diabetes, we obtained suggestive evidence of a linkage peak for serum adiponectin levels (logarithm of odds = 2.1) that closely matched the position of the type 2 diabetes linkage peak. This result indicated that the type 2 diabetes susceptibility locus at 3q27 influences both genetic predisposition to type 2 diabetes and serum adiponectin levels in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  1. Genetic control of pungency in C. chinense via the Pun1 locus.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Charles; Mazourek, Michael; Stellari, Giulia M; O'Connell, Mary; Jahn, Molly

    2007-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent principle in hot peppers, acts to deter mammals from consuming pungent pepper pods. Capsaicinoid biosynthesis is restricted to the genus Capsicum and results from the acylation of the aromatic compound, vanillylamine, with a branched-chain fatty acid. The presence of capsaicinoids is controlled by the Pun1 locus, which encodes a putative acyltransferase. In its homozygous recessive state, pun1/pun1, capsaicinoids are not produced by the pepper plant. HPLC analysis confirmed that capsaicinoids are only found in the interlocular septa of pungent pepper fruits. Immunolocalization studies showed that capsaicinoid biosynthesis is uniformly distributed across the epidermal cells of the interlocular septum. Capsaicinoids are secreted from glandular epidermal cells into subcuticular cavities that swell to form blisters along the epidermis. Blister development is positively associated with capsaicinoid accumulation and blisters are not present in non-pungent fruit. A genetic study was used to determine if the absence of blisters in non-pungent fruit acts independently of Pun1 to control pungency. Screening of non-pungent germplasm and genetic complementation tests identified a previously unknown recessive allele of Pun1, named pun1(2). Sequence analysis of pun1(2) revealed that a four base pair deletion results in a frameshift mutation and the predicted production of a truncated protein. Genetic analysis revealed that pun1(2) co-segregated exactly with the absence of blisters, non-pungency, and a reduced transcript accumulation of several genes involved in capsaicinoid biosynthesis. Collectively, these results establish that blister formation requires the Pun1 allele and that pun1(2) is a recessive allele from C. chinense that results in non-pungency.

  2. Identification of the UBP1 Locus as a Critical Blood Pressure Determinant Using a Combination of Mouse and Human Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Koutnikova, Hana; Laakso, Markku; Lu, Lu; Combe, Roy; Paananen, Jussi; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Smith, Ulf; Hanefeld, Markolf; Williams, Robert W.; Auwerx, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is a major health problem of largely unknown genetic origins. To identify new genes responsible for hypertension, genetic analysis of recombinant inbred strains of mice followed by human association studies might prove powerful and was exploited in our current study. Using a set of 27 recombinant BXD strains of mice we identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for blood pressure (BP) on distal chromosome 9. The association analysis of markers encompassing the syntenic region on human chromosome 3 gave in an additive genetic model the strongest association for rs17030583 C/T and rs2291897 G/A, located within the UBP1 locus, with systolic and diastolic BP (rs17030583: 1.3±0.4 mmHg p<0.001, 0.8±0.3 mmHg p = 0.006, respectively and rs2291897: 1.5±0.4 mmHg p<0.001, 0.8±0.3 mmHg p = 0.003, respectively) in three separate studies. Our study, which underscores the marked complementarities of mouse and human genetic approaches, identifies the UBP1 locus as a critical blood pressure determinant. UBP1 plays a role in cholesterol and steroid metabolism via the transcriptional activation of CYP11A, the rate-limiting enzyme in pregnenolone and aldosterone biosynthesis. We suggest that UBP1 and its functional partners are components of a network controlling blood pressure. PMID:19662162

  3. Genetic organization of Streptococcus salivarius 24SMBc blp-like bacteriocin locus.

    PubMed

    Santagati, Maria; Scillato, Marina; Stefani, Stefania

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we describe, for the first time, the genetic organization of the blpU-like cassette in Streptococcus salivarius24SMBc by entire genome sequencing. This strain has recently been found useful and widely applied as an oral probiotic in the prevention of recurrent otitis media. The 24SMBc blpU-like cassette  is 8,023 bp in length, organized in 11 orfs,of which orf8 encodes for the pore-forming peptide bacteriocin, belonging to class IIc, with a double-glycine leader peptide. The first characterization of blplocus was described inStreptococcus pneumoniae, showing a crucial role in interspecies competition within the nasopharynx. The salivarius blpU-like cassette is inserted upstream of the pepX gene in the chromosome. A hypervariable region between pepXand orf1 was found and used as a specific target able to distinguishS. salivarius 24SMBc from all other streptococci. All orfscarried by the blp-like cassette are functionally expressed (qPCR assays). Our results contribute to elucidate the microbial interactions in the nasopharynx, underlining the potential role of  the blp locus in human nasopharyngeal colonization.

  4. Genetic changes at the transferrin locus in the red-backed vole (Clethrionomys gapperi)

    SciTech Connect

    Mihok, S.; Fuller, W.A.; Canham, R.P.; McPhee, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Genetic changes at the transferrin locus in Clethrionomys gapperi were intermittently monitored in a subarctic population from 1966 to 1978. Over this 13-year period, only minor fluctuations in gene frequency were observed. Gene frequency of Tf/sup J/ increased over winter during declines from high nonbreeding density in autumn. This phenomenon may have been responsible for a general negative correlation between the frequency of Tf/sup J/ and population density. Outside of winter, no frequency changes were detected within trappable age-classes of voles from relatively discrete seasonal generations. Excess of Tf/sup M/J/ heterozygotes occurred in three of four samples of young voles that matured in the year of their birth. A similar heterozygote excess occurred in one of six samples of overwintered voles taken in a year characterized by a high rate of population growth. These results suggest that selection may occur during ecologically different conditions of high density or population growth. A heterozygote advantage in early-season cohorts may account for the maintenance of transferrin polymorphism. This hypothesis requires further data on the breeding structure and early life history of voles.

  5. A Genetic and Mosaic Analysis of a Locus Involved in the Anesthesia Response of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mir, B.; Iyer, S.; Ramaswami, M.; Krishnan, K. S.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a genetic and behavioral analysis of several alleles of har38, a mutant with altered sensitivity to the general anesthetic halothane. We obtained a P-element-induced allele of har38 and generated several excision alleles by remobilizing the P element. The mutants narrow abdomen (na) and har85 are confirmed to be allelic to har38. Besides a decreased sensitivity to halothane, all mutant alleles of this locus cause a characteristic walking behavior in the absence of anesthetics. We have quantified this behavior using a geotaxis apparatus. Responses of the mutant alleles to different inhalational anesthetics were tested. The results strongly favor a multipathway model for the onset of anesthesia. Mosaic flies were tested for their response to halothane and checked for their abnormal walking behavior. The analysis suggests that both the behaviors are exhibited only by such mosaics as have the entire head of mutant origin. It is likely that this focus represents an element of a common pathway in the anesthetic response to several inhalational anesthetics but not all. This result is the first demonstration of regional specificity in the CNS of any animal for general anesthetic action. PMID:9335606

  6. Genetic structure of the mating-type locus of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Patrick J; Armbrust, E Virginia; Goodenough, Ursula W

    2002-01-01

    Portions of the cloned mating-type (MT) loci (mt(+) and mt(-)) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, defined as the approximately 1-Mb domains of linkage group VI that are under recombinational suppression, were subjected to Northern analysis to elucidate their coding capacity. The four central rearranged segments of the loci were found to contain both housekeeping genes (expressed during several life-cycle stages) and mating-related genes, while the sequences unique to mt(+) or mt(-) carried genes expressed only in the gametic or zygotic phases of the life cycle. One of these genes, Mtd1, is a candidate participant in gametic cell fusion; two others, Mta1 and Ezy2, are candidate participants in the uniparental inheritance of chloroplast DNA. The identified housekeeping genes include Pdk, encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, and GdcH, encoding glycine decarboxylase complex subunit H. Unusual genetic configurations include three genes whose sequences overlap, one gene that has inserted into the coding region of another, several genes that have been inactivated by rearrangements in the region, and genes that have undergone tandem duplication. This report extends our original conclusion that the MT locus has incurred high levels of mutational change. PMID:11805055

  7. Genetic Control of Pheromones in Drosophila Simulans. I. Ngbo, a Locus on the Second Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Ferveur, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    7-Tricosene and 7-pentacosene are predominant hydrocarbons on the cuticle of both sexes in Drosophila simulans. The pheromonal role of 7-tricosene has been clearly established for conspecific males, while a synergistic effect for 7-pentacosene has been postulated. Interstrain variation for the production of both compounds is very marked, but similar for both sexes. The genetic basis of this polymorphism was investigated. A major role was found for the second chromosome, which controls the 7-tricosene:7-pentacosene ratio. The main locus involved in controlling this variation, Ngbo, was mapped to position 65.3 on the second chromosome. The production of 7-pentacosene is directly related to the Ngbo genotype, which is additively expressed with two known alleles, Seychelles and Cameroon. These alleles act codominantly and are, respectively, hypomorphic and hypermorphic with regard to their effect on 7-pentacosene production. The production of 7-tricosene, which is partially inversely related to that of 7-pentacosene, is also affected by secondary interactions with the second chromosome and with the autosomal background. PMID:2071017

  8. Molecular genetic analysis of the cytochrome P450-debrisoquine hydroxylase locus and association with cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C A; Moss, J E; Gough, A C; Spurr, N K; Wolf, C R

    1992-01-01

    The cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases play a central role in the metabolism of chemical carcinogens. The action of these enzymes can lead to either carcinogen detoxication or activation. Differences in P450 expression in animal models give rise to large differences in susceptibility to chemical carcinogens, so genetic polymorphisms in P450 expression may be expected to be an important factor in individual human susceptibility to cancer. Of particular interest is the genetic polymorphism at the cytochrome P450-debrisoquine/sparteine hydroxylase locus (CYP2D6). Although this is a minor liver P450, its polymorphic expression is associated with the abnormal metabolism of at least 30 therapeutic drugs, including beta-blockers and tricyclic antidepressants. Conflicting reports have been made on the association of this polymorphism with cancer susceptibility. This disagreement may be attributable to limitations of the phenotyping assay used to identify affected individuals (poor metabolizers, PMs). In order to clarify these anomalies, we have developed a simple DNA-based assay with which we can identify the majority of PMs. The assay is centered around the primary gene defect responsible for the polymorphism, a G to A transition at the junction of intron 3/exon 4 which results in a frame-shift in the resultant mRNA. The frequency of this mutation is 70-80% in PMs. We have studied the frequency of mutated alleles in a control population and in a wide range of cancer patients. No association between this polymorphism and lung cancer susceptibility was observed; however, in other populations of cancer patients some very interesting shifts were found in the proportion of PMs and heterozygotes from that in the normal population. PMID:1486838

  9. A multistage association study identifies a breast cancer genetic locus at NCOA7.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Kathryn S P; Breyer, Joan P; Bradley, Kevin M; Schuyler, Peggy A; Plummer, W Dale; Freudenthal, Marcia E; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A; Sanders, Melinda E; Page, David L; Parl, Fritz F; Egan, Kathleen M; Dupont, William D; Smith, Jeffrey R

    2011-06-01

    Estrogen metabolism and growth factor signaling pathway genes play key roles in breast cancer development. We evaluated associations between breast cancer and tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of 107 candidate genes of these pathways using single allele- and haplotype-based tests. We first sought concordance of associations between two study populations: the Nashville Breast Cohort (NBC; 510 cases, 988 controls), and the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) breast cancer study (1,145 cases, 1,142 controls). Findings across the two study populations were concordant at tagging SNPs of six genes, and at previously published SNPs of FGFR2. We sought further replication of results for EGFR, NCOA7, and FGFR2 in the independent Collaborative Breast Cancer Study (CBCS; 1,552 cases, 1,185 controls). Associations at NCOA7 and FGFR2 replicated across all three studies. The association at NCOA7 on 6q22.32, detected by a haplotype spanning the initial protein-coding exon (5'-rs9375411, rs11967627, rs549438, rs529858, rs490361, rs17708107-3'), has not been previously reported. The haplotype had a significant inverse association with breast cancer in each study [OR(Het): 0.69 (NBC), 0.76 (CGEMS), 0.79 (CBCS)], and a meta-analysis OR(Het) of 0.75 (95% CI, 0.65-0.87, P = 1.4 × 10(-4)) in the combined study populations. The haplotype frequency was 0.07 among cases, and 0.09 among controls; homozygotes were infrequent and each OR(Hom) was not significant. NCOA7 encodes a nuclear receptor coactivator that interacts with estrogen receptor α to modulate its activity. These observations provide consistent evidence that genetic variants at the NCOA7 locus may confer a reduced risk of breast cancer.

  10. Genetic variation at the delta-sarcoglycan (SGCD) locus elevates heritable sympathetic nerve activity in human twin pairs.

    PubMed

    Hightower, C Makena; Zhang, Kuixing; Miramontes-González, José P; Rao, Fangwen; Wei, Zhiyun; Schork, Andrew J; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Biswas, Nilima; Mahata, Manjula; Elkelis, Nina; Taupenot, Laurent; Stridsberg, Mats; Ziegler, Michael G; O'Connor, Daniel T

    2013-12-01

    The Syrian Cardiomyopathic Hamster (BIO-14.6/53.58 strains) model of cardiac failure, resulting from naturally occurring deletion at the SGCD (delta-sarcoglycan) locus, displays widespread disturbances in catecholamine metabolism. Rare Mendelian myopathy disorders of human SGCD occur, although common naturally occurring SGCD genetic variation has not been evaluated for effects on human norepinephrine (NE) secretion. This study investigated the effect of SGCD genetic variation on control of NE secretion in healthy twin pairs. Genetic associations profiled SNPs across the SGCD locus. Trait heritability (h(2)) and genetic covariance (pleiotropy; shared h(2)) were evaluated. Sympathochromaffin exocytosis in vivo was probed in plasma by both catecholamines and Chromogranin B (CHGB). Plasma NE is substantially heritable (p = 3.19E-16, at 65.2 ± 5.0% of trait variance), sharing significant (p < 0.05) genetic determination with circulating and urinary catecholamines, CHGB, eGFR, and several cardio-metabolic traits. Participants with higher pNE showed significant (p < 0.05) differences in several traits, including increased BP and hypertension risk factors. Peak SGCD variant rs1835919 predicted elevated systemic vascular compliance, without changes in specifically myocardial traits. We used a chimeric-regulated secretory pathway photoprotein (CHGA-EAP) to evaluate the effect of SGCD on the exocytotic pathway in transfected PC12 cells; in transfected cells, expression of SGCD augmented CHGA trafficking into the exocytotic regulated secretory pathway. Thus, our investigation determined human NE secretion to be a highly heritable trait, influenced by common genetic variation within the SGCD locus. Circulating NE aggregates with BP and hypertension risk factors. In addition, coordinate NE and CHGB elevation by rs1835919 implicates exocytosis as the mechanism of release.

  11. Genetic variation at the delta-sarcoglycan (SGCD) locus elevates heritable sympathetic nerve activity in human twin pairs

    PubMed Central

    Hightower, C. Makena; Zhang, Kuixing; Miramontes-González, José Pablo; Rao, Fangwen; Wei, Zhiyun; Schork, Andrew J.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Biswas, Nilima; Mahata, Manjula; Elkelis, Nina; Taupenot, Laurent; Stridsberg, Mats; Ziegler, Michael G.; O'Connor, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    The Syrian Cardiomyopathic Hamster (BIO-14.6/53.58 strains) model of cardiac failure, resulting from naturally occurring deletion at the SGCD (delta-sarcoglycan) locus, displays widespread disturbances in catecholamine metabolism. Rare Mendelian myopathy disorders of human SGCD occur, though common naturally occurring SGCD genetic variation has not been evaluated for effects on human norepinephrine (NE) secretion. This study investigated the effect of SGCD genetic variation on control of NE secretion in healthy twin pairs. Genetic associations profiled SNPs across the SGCD locus. Trait heritability (h2) and genetic covariance (pleiotropy; shared h2) were evaluated. Sympathochromaffin exocytosis in vivo was probed in plasma by both catecholamines and CHGB. Plasma NE is substantially heritable (P=3.19E-16, at 65.2±5.0% of trait variance), sharing significant (P<0.05) genetic determination with circulating and urinary catecholamines, CHGB, eGFR and several cardio-metabolic traits. Participants with higher pNE showed significant (P<0.05) differences in several traits, including increased BP and hypertension risk factors. Peak SGCD variant rs1835919 predicted elevated systemic vascular compliance, without changes in specifically myocardial traits. We used a chimeric regulated secretory pathway photoprotein (CHGA-EAP) to evaluate the effect of SGCD on the exocytotic pathway in transfected PC12 cells; in transfected cells, expression of SGCD augmented CHGA trafficking into the exocytotic regulated secretory pathway. Thus our investigation determined human NE secretion to be a highly heritable trait, influenced by common genetic variation within the SGCD locus. Circulating NE aggregates with BP and hypertension risk factors. Additionally, coordinate NE and CHGB elevation by rs1835919 implicates exocytosis as the mechanism of release. PMID:23786442

  12. Comparative analysis of the within-population genetic structure in wild cherry (Prunus avium L.) at the self-incompatibility locus and nuclear microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Schueler, Silvio; Tusch, Alexandra; Scholz, Florian

    2006-10-01

    Gametophytic self-incompatibility (SI) systems in plants exhibit high polymorphism at the SI controlling S-locus because individuals with rare alleles have a higher probability to successfully pollinate other plants than individuals with more frequent alleles. This process, referred to as frequency-dependent selection, is expected to shape number, frequency distribution, and spatial distribution of self-incompatibility alleles in natural populations. We investigated the genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure within a Prunus avium population at two contrasting gene loci: nuclear microsatellites and the S-locus. The S-locus revealed a higher diversity (15 alleles) than the eight microsatellites (4-12 alleles). Although the frequency distribution of S-alleles differed significantly from the expected equal distribution, the S-locus showed a higher evenness than the microsatellites (Shannon's evenness index for the S-locus: E = 0.91; for the microsatellites: E = 0.48-0.83). Also, highly significant deviations from neutrality were found for the S-locus whereas only minor deviations were found for two of eight microsatellites. A comparison of the frequency distribution of S-alleles in three age-cohorts revealed no significant differences, suggesting that different levels of selection acting on the S-locus or on S-linked sites might also affect the distribution and dynamics of S-alleles. Autocorrelation analysis revealed a weak but significant spatial genetic structure for the multilocus average of the microsatellites and for the S-locus, but could not ascertain differences in the extent of spatial genetic structure between these locus types. An indirect estimate of gene dispersal, which was obtained to explain this spatial genetic pattern, indicated high levels of gene dispersal within our population (sigma(g) = 106 m). This high gene dispersal, which may be partly due to the self-incompatibility system itself, aids the effective gene flow of the

  13. The X-linked F cell production locus: Genetic mapping and role in fetal hemoglobin production

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.C.; Smith, K.D.; Moore, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    Postnatal fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) production is confined to a subset of erythocytes termed F-cells. There is a 10-20 fold variation in F-cell production in sickle cell disease (SCD) and normal individuals. Most of the variation in F-cell production has been attributed to a diallelic (High, Low) X-linked gene, the F-cell production (FCP) locus that we recently mapped to Xp22.2-22.3 (LOD=4.56, theta=0.04). Using multiple regression analysis in 262 Jamaican SCD patients we determined the relative contribution of the FCP locus and other variables previously associated with variation in Hb F level (gender, age, beta-globin haplotypes, number of alpha-globin genes and the FCP locus phenotypes). When the FCP locus is in the regression model, the FCP locus alone accounts for approximately 40% of the variation in Hb F level while the contribution of age, alpha-globin gene number, and beta-globin haplotypes was insignificant. When individuals with High FCP allele are removed from the analysis, the beta globin haplotype now contribute to >10% of the Hb F variation. We conclude that the X-linked FCP locus is the major determinant of all known variables in Hb F production. Using 4 highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat markers that we identified from cosmids in Xp22.2-22.3, have localized the FCP locus to a 1 Mb minimal candidate region between DXS143 and DXS410.

  14. Identification of a Genetic Locus in Pseudomonas aureofaciens Involved in Fungal Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, F. L.; Conner, A. J.; Mahanty, H. K.

    1994-01-01

    In iron-rich conditions, Pseudomonas aureofaciens PA147-2 produces an antibiotic-like compound that inhibits the growth of a plant fungal pathogen, Aphanomyces euteiches. To contribute to the potential use of PA147-2 as a biocontrol organism, we report the identification of a genetic locus important for antibiotic biosynthesis. Mutants defective for fungal inhibition (Af-) were generated by Tn5 mutagenesis. Southern hybridization of total DNAs from three Af- mutants indicated that loss of fungal inhibition was due to a single Tn5 insertion in each mutant. Restriction mapping of the mutation points showed that in two mutants the Tn5 insertions were in the same 16.0-kb EcoRI fragment and were separated by 2.1 kb. A genomic library of PA147-2 was constructed and screened by using a region of DNA flanking the Tn5 insertion in one mutant (PA109) as a probe to recover complementing cosmids. Three cosmids containing a 16.0-kb EcoRI fragment complementary to the two mutants were recovered. Allele replacement by homologous recombination with putative complementing cosmids restored one mutant to antifungal activity against A. euteiches. Southern analysis of the complemented mutants confirmed that allele replacement had occurred between cosmid DNA and Tn5. The wild-type 16.0-kb EcoRI fragment was cloned from the cosmid and complemented the two mutants to antifungal activity. An antifungal compound was isolated from PA147-2 grown on solid medium. Antifungal activity correlated to a peak on high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis. Under the same growth and extraction conditions, the antifungal activity seen in PA147-2 was absent in two Af- mutants. Furthermore, absence of an antifungal compound in each mutant correlated to the absence of the wild-type “antifungal” peak on high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis. Images PMID:16349166

  15. A discrete genetic locus confers xyloglucan metabolism in select human gut Bacteroidetes

    PubMed Central

    Larsbrink, Johan; Rogers, Theresa E.; Hemsworth, Glyn R.; McKee, Lauren S.; Tauzin, Alexandra S.; Spadiut, Oliver; Klinter, Stefan; Pudlo, Nicholas A.; Urs, Karthik; Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Creagh, A. Louise; Haynes, Charles A.; Kelly, Amelia G.; Cederholm, Stefan Nilsson; Davies, Gideon J.; Martens, Eric C.; Brumer, Harry

    2014-01-01

    A well-balanced human diet includes a significant intake of non-starch polysaccharides, collectively termed “dietary fibre,” from the cell walls of diverse fruits and vegetables.1 Due to a paucity of alimentary enzymes encoded by the human genome,2 our ability to derive energy from dietary fibre depends on saccharification and fermentation of complex carbohydrates by the massive microbial community residing in our distal gut.3,4 The xyloglucans (XyGs), in particular, are a ubiquitous family of highly branched plant cell wall polysaccharides5,6 whose mechanism(s) of degradation in the human gut and consequent importance in nutrition was heretofore unknown.1,7,8 Here, we demonstrate that a single, complex gene locus in Bacteroides ovatus confers xyloglucan catabolism in this common colonic symbiont. Through targeted gene disruption, biochemical analysis of all predicted glycoside hydrolases and carbohydrate-binding proteins, and three-dimensional structural determination of the vanguard endo-xyloglucanase, we reveal the molecular mechanisms through which XyGs are hydrolysed to component monosaccharides for further metabolism. We also observe that orthologous xyloglucan utilization loci (XyGULs) serve as genetic markers of xyloglucan catabolism in Bacteroidetes, that XyGULs are restricted to a limited number of phylogenetically diverse strains, and that XyGULs are ubiquitous in surveyed human metagenomes. Our findings reveal that the metabolism of even highly abundant components of dietary fibre may be mediated by niche species, which has immediate fundamental and practical implications for gut symbiont population ecology in the context of human diet, nutrition and health.9–12 PMID:24463512

  16. A discrete genetic locus confers xyloglucan metabolism in select human gut Bacteroidetes.

    PubMed

    Larsbrink, Johan; Rogers, Theresa E; Hemsworth, Glyn R; McKee, Lauren S; Tauzin, Alexandra S; Spadiut, Oliver; Klinter, Stefan; Pudlo, Nicholas A; Urs, Karthik; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Creagh, A Louise; Haynes, Charles A; Kelly, Amelia G; Cederholm, Stefan Nilsson; Davies, Gideon J; Martens, Eric C; Brumer, Harry

    2014-02-27

    A well-balanced human diet includes a significant intake of non-starch polysaccharides, collectively termed 'dietary fibre', from the cell walls of diverse fruits and vegetables. Owing to the paucity of alimentary enzymes encoded by the human genome, our ability to derive energy from dietary fibre depends on the saccharification and fermentation of complex carbohydrates by the massive microbial community residing in our distal gut. The xyloglucans (XyGs) are a ubiquitous family of highly branched plant cell wall polysaccharides whose mechanism(s) of degradation in the human gut and consequent importance in nutrition have been unclear. Here we demonstrate that a single, complex gene locus in Bacteroides ovatus confers XyG catabolism in this common colonic symbiont. Through targeted gene disruption, biochemical analysis of all predicted glycoside hydrolases and carbohydrate-binding proteins, and three-dimensional structural determination of the vanguard endo-xyloglucanase, we reveal the molecular mechanisms through which XyGs are hydrolysed to component monosaccharides for further metabolism. We also observe that orthologous XyG utilization loci (XyGULs) serve as genetic markers of XyG catabolism in Bacteroidetes, that XyGULs are restricted to a limited number of phylogenetically diverse strains, and that XyGULs are ubiquitous in surveyed human metagenomes. Our findings reveal that the metabolism of even highly abundant components of dietary fibre may be mediated by niche species, which has immediate fundamental and practical implications for gut symbiont population ecology in the context of human diet, nutrition and health.

  17. A genetic test to determine the origin of maternal transmission ratio distortion. Meiotic drive at the mouse Om locus.

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Manuel de Villena, F; de la Casa-Esperon, E; Briscoe, T L; Sapienza, C

    2000-01-01

    We have shown previously that the progeny of crosses between heterozygous females and C57BL/6 males show transmission ratio distortion at the Om locus on mouse chromosome 11. This result has been replicated in several independent experiments. Here we show that the distortion maps to a single locus on chromosome 11, closely linked to Om, and that gene conversion is not implicated in the origin of this phenomenon. To further investigate the origin of the transmission ratio distortion we generated a test using the well-known effect of recombination on maternal meiotic drive. The genetic test presented here discriminates between unequal segregation of alleles during meiosis and lethality, based on the analysis of genotype at both the distorted locus and the centromere of the same chromosome. We used this test to determine the cause of the transmission ratio distortion observed at the Om locus. Our results indicate that transmission ratio distortion at Om is due to unequal segregation of alleles to the polar body at the second meiotic division. Because the presence of segregation distortion at Om also depends on the genotype of the sire, our results confirm that the sperm can influence segregation of maternal chromosomes to the second polar body. PMID:10628992

  18. Cryptopleurine Resistance: Genetic Locus for a 40S Ribosomal Component in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Paul; Sánchez, Lucas; Jiménez, Antonio

    1974-01-01

    Mutants resistant to the phenanthrene alkaloids tylophorine, tylocrebrine, and cryptopleurine have been isolated from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A single recessive nuclear gene was responsible for resistance. This resistance locus, cry, was closely linked to the mating locus (2.2 centimorgans). The resistance was ribosomal and was due to an altered 40S ribosomal subunit. The mode of action of these drugs has been examined, and they appear to inhibit the translocation phase of protein synthesis. PMID:4612014

  19. Simple Sequence Repeat and S-locus Genotyping to Explore Genetic Variability in Polyploid Prunus spinosa and P. insititia.

    PubMed

    Halász, Júlia; Makovics-Zsohár, Noémi; Szőke, Ferenc; Ercisli, Sezai; Hegedűs, Attila

    2017-02-01

    Polyploid Prunus spinosa (2n = 4×) and P. insititia (2n = 6×) represent enormous genetic potential in Central Europe, which can be exploited in breeding programmes. In Hungary, 17 cultivar candidates were selected from wild-growing populations including 10 P. spinosa, 4 P. insititia and three P. spinosa × P. domestica hybrids (2n = 5×). Their taxonomic classification was based on their phenotypic characteristics. Six simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and the multiallelic S-locus genotyping were used to characterize genetic variability and reliable identification of the tested accessions. A total of 98 SSR alleles were identified, which presents 19.5 average allele number per locus, and each of the 17 genotypes could be discriminated based on unique SSR fingerprints. A total of 23 S-RNase alleles were identified. The complete and partial S-genotype was determined for 8 and 9 accessions, respectively. The identification of a cross-incompatible pair of cultivar candidates and several semi-compatible combinations help maximize fruit set in commercial orchards. Our results indicate that the S-allele pools of wild-growing P. spinosa and P. insititia are overlapping in Hungary. A phylogenetic and principal component analysis confirmed the high level of diversity and genetic differentiation present within the analysed genotypes and helped clarify doubtful taxonomic identities. Our data confirm that S-locus genotyping is suitable for diversity studies in polyploid Prunus species. The analysed accessions represent huge genetic potential that can be exploited in commercial cultivation.

  20. Genetic and physical maps around the sex-determining M-locus of the dioecious plant asparagus.

    PubMed

    Telgmann-Rauber, Alexa; Jamsari, Ari; Kinney, Michael S; Pires, J Chris; Jung, Christian

    2007-09-01

    Asparagus officinalis L. is a dioecious plant. A region called the M-locus located on a pair of homomorphic sex chromosomes controls the sexual dimorphism in asparagus. The aim of this work was to clone the region determining sex in asparagus from its position in the genome. The structure of the region encompassing M should be investigated and compared to the sex-determining regions in other dioecious model species. To establish an improved basis for physical mapping, a high-resolution genetic map was enriched with AFLP markers closely linked to the target locus by carrying out a bulked segregant analysis. By screening a BAC library with AFLP- and STS-markers followed by chromosome walking, a physical map with eight contigs could be established. However, the gaps between the contigs could not be closed due to a plethora of repetitive elements. Surprisingly, two of the contigs on one side of the M-locus did not overlap although they have been established with two markers, which mapped in a distance as low as 0.25 cM flanking the sex locus. Thus, the clustering of the markers indicates a reduced recombination frequency within the M-region. On the opposite side of the M-locus, a contig was mapped in a distance of 0.38 cM. Four closely linked BAC clones were partially sequenced and 64 putative ORFs were identified. Interestingly, only 25% of the ORFs showed sequence similarity to known proteins and ESTs. In addition, an accumulation of repetitive sequences and a low gene density was revealed in the sex-determining region of asparagus. Molecular cytogenetic and sequence analysis of BACs flanking the M-locus indicate that the BACs contain highly repetitive sequences that localize to centromeric and pericentromeric locations on all asparagus chromosomes, which hindered the localization of the M-locus to the single pair of sex chromosomes. We speculate that dioecious Silene, papaya and Asparagus species may represent three stages in the evolution of XX, XY sex

  1. Genetic homogeneity of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease: Tight linkage to the proteolipoprotein locus in 16 affected families

    SciTech Connect

    Boespflug-Tanguy, O.; Mimault, C.; Cavagna, A.; Giraud, G.; Dastugue, B.; Melki, J.; Dinh, D.P.; Dautigny, A.

    1994-09-01

    Among the numerous leukodystrophies that have an early onset and no biochemical markers, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is one that can be identified using strict clinical criteria and demonstrating an abnormal formation of myelin that is restricted to the CNS in electrophysiological studies and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In PMD, 12 different base substitutions and one total deletion of the genomic region containing the PLP gene have been reported, but, despite extensive analysis, PLP exon mutations have been found in only 10%-25% of the families analyzed. To test the genetic homogeneity of this disease, the authors have carried out linkage analysis with polymorphic markers of the PLP genomic region in 16 families selected on strict diagnostic criteria of PMD. They observed a tight linkage of the PMD locus with markers of the PLP gene (cDNA PLP, exon IV polymorphism) and of the Xq22 region (DXS17, DXS94, and DXS287), whereas the markers located more proximally (DXYS1X and DXS3) or distally (DXS11) were not linked to the PMD locus. Multipoint analysis gave a maximal location score for the PMD locus (13.98) and the PLP gene (8.32) in the same interval between DXS94 and DXS287, suggesting that in all families PMD is linked to the PLP locus. Mutations of the extraexonic PLP gene sequences or of another unknown close gene could be involved in PMD. In an attempt to identify molecular defects of this genomic region that are responsible for PMD, these results meant that RFLP analysis could be used to improve genetic counseling for the numerous affected families in which a PLP exon mutation could not be demonstrated. 39 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Approaching the self-incompatibility locus Z in rye (Secale cereale L.) via comparative genetics.

    PubMed

    Hackauf, B; Wehling, P

    2005-03-01

    Using barley and wheat expressed sequence tags as well as rice genomic sequence and mapping information, we revisited the genomic region encompassing the self-incompatibility (SI) locus Z on rye chromosome 2RL applying a comparative approach. We were able to arrange 12 novel sequence-tagged site (STS) markers around Z, spanning a genetic distance of 32.3 cM, with the closest flanking markers mapping at a distance of 0.5 cM and 1.0 cM from Z, respectively, and one marker cosegregating with Z, in a testcross population of 204 progeny. Two overlapping rice bacterial artifical chromosomes (BACs), OSJNBa0070O11 and OSJNBa0010D21, were found to carry rice orthologs of the three rye STS markers from the 1.5-cM interval encompassing Z. The STS-marker orthologs on these rice BACs span less than 125,000 bp of the rice genome. The STS marker TC116908 cosegregated with Z in a mapping population and revealed a high degree of polymorphism among a random sample of rye plants of various origin. TC116908 was shown via Southern hybridization to correspond to gene no. 10 (OSJNBa0070O11.10) on rice BAC OSJNBa0070O11. Reverse transcription-PCR with a TC116908-specific primer pair resulted in the amplification of a fragment of the expected size from the rye pistil but not from leaf cDNA. OSJNBa0070O11.10 was found to show a highly significant sequence similarity to AtUBP22, a ubiquitin-specific protease (UBP). TC116908 likely represents a putative UBP gene that is specifically expressed in rye pistils and cosegregates with Z. Given that the ubiquitination of proteins is emerging as a general mechanism involved in different SI systems of plants, TC116908 appears to be a promising target for further investigation with respect to its relation to the SI system of the grasses.

  3. Molecular genetic diversity and evolution at the MHC DQB locus in four species of pinnipeds.

    PubMed

    Hoelzel, A R; Stephens, J C; O'Brien, S J

    1999-05-01

    Variation was investigated at exon 2 (including part of the putative peptide-binding region) of the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) DQB locus for two congeneric phocid seal species and two congeneric otariid seal species. Polymorphism in one phocid species, the southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina), was comparable to that seen in human populations, while the other phocid, the northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris), has been through a severe population bottleneck and exhibited much less variation at this locus. A phylogenetic comparison of the four species was consistent with the trans-specific pattern of evolution described for other taxa at this locus, and relative nonsynonymous and synonymous substitution rates suggest the maintenance of polymorphisms by natural selection. A comparison of sequence patterns also suggested that some variation could have been generated through recombinational events, primarily within genera. These results suggest a pattern of evolution of the immune response in pinnipeds similar to that in terrestrial mammal species.

  4. Multi-locus DNA sequencing of Toxoplasma gondii isolated from Brazilian pigs identifies genetically divergent strains

    PubMed Central

    Frazão-Teixeira, E.; Sundar, N.; Dubey, J. P.; Grigg, M. E.; de Oliveira, F. C. R.

    2010-01-01

    Five Toxoplasma gondii isolates (TgPgBr1–5) were isolated from hearts and brains of pigs freshly purchased at the market of Campos dos Goytacazes, Northern Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Four of the five isolates were highly pathogenic in mice. Four genotypes were identified. Multi-locus PCR-DNA sequencing showed that each strain possessed a unique combination of archetypal and novel alleles not previously described in South America. The data suggest that different strains circulate in pigs destined for human consumption from those previously isolated from cats and chickens in Brazil. Further, multi-locus PCR-RFLP analyses failed to accurately genotype the Brazilian isolates due to the high presence of atypical alleles. This is the first report of multi-locus DNA sequencing of T. gondii isolates in pigs from Brazil. PMID:21051148

  5. A MULTI-LOCUS, MULTI-TAXA PHYLOGEOGRAPHICAL ANALYSIS OF GENETIC DIVERSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In addition to measuring spatial patterns of genetic diversity, population genetic measures of biological resources should include temporal data that indicate whether the observed patterns are the result of historical or contemporary processes. In general, genetic measures focus...

  6. A MULTI-LOCUS, MULTI-TAXA PHYLOGEOGRAPHICAL ANALYSIS OF GENETIC DIVERSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In addition to measuring spatial patterns of genetic diversity, population genetic measures of biological resources should include temporal data that indicate whether the observed patterns are the result of historical or contemporary processes. In general, genetic measures focus...

  7. Genetic determinants of ulcerative colitis include the ECM1 locus and five loci implicated in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Sheila A; Tremelling, Mark; Anderson, Carl A; Gwilliam, Rhian; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Prescott, Natalie J; Nimmo, Elaine R; Massey, Dunecan; Berzuini, Carlo; Johnson, Christopher; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Cummings, Fraser R; Drummond, Hazel; Lees, Charlie W; Onnie, Clive M; Hanson, Catherine E; Blaszczyk, Katarzyna; Inouye, Mike; Ewels, Philip; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Keniry, Andrew; Hunt, Sarah; Carter, Martyn; Watkins, Nick; Ouwehand, Willem; Lewis, Cathryn M; Cardon, Lon; Lobo, Alan; Forbes, Alastair; Sanderson, Jeremy; Jewell, Derek P; Mansfield, John C; Deloukas, Panos; Mathew, Christopher G; Parkes, Miles; Satsangi, Jack

    2008-06-01

    We report results of a nonsynonymous SNP scan for ulcerative colitis and identify a previously unknown susceptibility locus at ECM1. We also show that several risk loci are common to ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease (IL23R, IL12B, HLA, NKX2-3 and MST1), whereas autophagy genes ATG16L1 and IRGM, along with NOD2 (also known as CARD15), are specific for Crohn's disease. These data provide the first detailed illustration of the genetic relationship between these common inflammatory bowel diseases.

  8. Genetic determinants of ulcerative colitis include the ECM1 locus and five loci implicated in Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Sheila A; Tremelling, Mark; Anderson, Carl A; Gwilliam, Rhian; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Prescott, Natalie J; Nimmo, Elaine R; Massey, Dunecan; Berzuini, Carlo; Johnson, Christopher; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Cummings, Fraser R; Drummond, Hazel; Lees, Charlie W; Onnie, Clive M; Hanson, Catherine E; Blaszczyk, Katarzyna; Inouye, Mike; Ewels, Philip; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Keniry, Andrew; Hunt, Sarah; Carter, Martyn; Watkins, Nick; Ouwehand, Willem; Lewis, Cathryn M; Cardon, Lon; Lobo, Alan; Forbes, Alastair; Sanderson, Jeremy; Jewell, Derek P; Mansfield, John C; Deloukas, Panos; Mathew, Christopher G; Parkes, Miles; Satsangi, Jack

    2009-01-01

    We report results of a nonsynonymous SNP scan for ulcerative colitis and identify a previously unknown susceptibility locus at ECM1. We also show that several risk loci are common to ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease (IL23R, IL12B, HLA, NKX2-3 and MST1), whereas autophagy genes ATG16L1 and IRGM, along with NOD2 (also known as CARD15), are specific for Crohn’s disease. These data provide the first detailed illustration of the genetic relationship between these common inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:18438406

  9. Genetic and molecular characterization of the I locus of Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, C Eduardo; Astua-Monge, Gustavo; Jones, Valerie; Plyler, Tammy R; Sakiyama, Ney S; Mackenzie, Sally A

    2006-02-01

    The I locus of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, controls the development of four different phenotypes in response to inoculation with Bean common mosaic virus, Bean common mosaic necrosis virus, several other related potyviruses, and one comovirus. We have generated a high-resolution linkage map around this locus and have aligned it with a physical map constructed with BAC clones. These clones were obtained from a library of the cultivar "Sprite," which carries the dominant allele at the I locus. We have identified a large cluster of TIR-NBS-LRR sequences associated within this locus, which extends over a distance >425 kb. Bean cultivars from the Andean or Mesoamerican gene pool that contain the dominant allele share the same haplotypes as revealed by gel blot hybridizations with a TIR probe. In contrast, beans with a recessive allele display simpler and variable haplotypes. A survey of wild accessions from Argentina to Mexico showed that this multigene family has expanded significantly during evolution and domestication. RNA gel blot analysis indicated that the TIR family of genes plays a role in the response to inoculations with BCMV or BCMNV.

  10. Genetic and Molecular Characterization of the I Locus of Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Vallejos, C. Eduardo; Astua-Monge, Gustavo; Jones, Valerie; Plyler, Tammy R.; Sakiyama, Ney S.; Mackenzie, Sally A.

    2006-01-01

    The I locus of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, controls the development of four different phenotypes in response to inoculation with Bean common mosaic virus, Bean common mosaic necrosis virus, several other related potyviruses, and one comovirus. We have generated a high-resolution linkage map around this locus and have aligned it with a physical map constructed with BAC clones. These clones were obtained from a library of the cultivar “Sprite,” which carries the dominant allele at the I locus. We have identified a large cluster of TIR–NBS–LRR sequences associated within this locus, which extends over a distance >425 kb. Bean cultivars from the Andean or Mesoamerican gene pool that contain the dominant allele share the same haplotypes as revealed by gel blot hybridizations with a TIR probe. In contrast, beans with a recessive allele display simpler and variable haplotypes. A survey of wild accessions from Argentina to Mexico showed that this multigene family has expanded significantly during evolution and domestication. RNA gel blot analysis indicated that the TIR family of genes plays a role in the response to inoculations with BCMV or BCMNV. PMID:16322513

  11. A study on the minimum number of loci required for genetic evaluation using a finite locus model

    PubMed Central

    Totir, Liviu R; Fernando, Rohan L; Dekkers, Jack CM; Fernández, Soledad A

    2004-01-01

    For a finite locus model, Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods can be used to estimate the conditional mean of genotypic values given phenotypes, which is also known as the best predictor (BP). When computationally feasible, this type of genetic prediction provides an elegant solution to the problem of genetic evaluation under non-additive inheritance, especially for crossbred data. Successful application of MCMC methods for genetic evaluation using finite locus models depends, among other factors, on the number of loci assumed in the model. The effect of the assumed number of loci on evaluations obtained by BP was investigated using data simulated with about 100 loci. For several small pedigrees, genetic evaluations obtained by best linear prediction (BLP) were compared to genetic evaluations obtained by BP. For BLP evaluation, used here as the standard of comparison, only the first and second moments of the joint distribution of the genotypic and phenotypic values must be known. These moments were calculated from the gene frequencies and genotypic effects used in the simulation model. BP evaluation requires the complete distribution to be known. For each model used for BP evaluation, the gene frequencies and genotypic effects, which completely specify the required distribution, were derived such that the genotypic mean, the additive variance, and the dominance variance were the same as in the simulation model. For lowly heritable traits, evaluations obtained by BP under models with up to three loci closely matched the evaluations obtained by BLP for both purebred and crossbred data. For highly heritable traits, models with up to six loci were needed to match the evaluations obtained by BLP. PMID:15231231

  12. High-density genetic maps for loci involved in nuclear male sterility (NMS1) and sporophytic self-incompatibility (S-locus) in chicory (Cichorium intybus L., Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Gonthier, Lucy; Blassiau, Christelle; Mörchen, Monika; Cadalen, Thierry; Poiret, Matthieu; Hendriks, Theo; Quillet, Marie-Christine

    2013-08-01

    High-density genetic maps were constructed for loci involved in nuclear male sterility (NMS1-locus) and sporophytic self-incompatibility (S-locus) in chicory (Cichorium intybus L.). The mapping population consisted of 389 F1' individuals derived from a cross between two plants, K28 (male-sterile) and K59 (pollen-fertile), both heterozygous at the S-locus. This F1' mapping population segregated for both male sterility (MS) and strong self-incompatibility (SI) phenotypes. Phenotyping F1' individuals for MS allowed us to map the NMS1-locus to linkage group (LG) 5, while controlled diallel and factorial crosses to identify compatible/incompatible phenotypes mapped the S-locus to LG2. To increase the density of markers around these loci, bulked segregant analysis was used. Bulks and parental plants K28 and K59 were screened using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis, with a complete set of 256 primer combinations of EcoRI-ANN and MseI-CNN. A total of 31,000 fragments were generated, of which 2,350 showed polymorphism between K59 and K28. Thirteen AFLP markers were identified close to the NMS1-locus and six in the vicinity of the S-locus. From these AFLP markers, eight were transformed into sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers and of these five showed co-dominant polymorphism. The chromosomal regions containing the NMS1-locus and the S-locus were each confined to a region of 0.8 cM. In addition, we mapped genes encoding proteins similar to S-receptor kinase, the female determinant of sporophytic SI in the Brasicaceae, and also markers in the vicinity of the putative S-locus of sunflower, but none of these genes or markers mapped close to the chicory S-locus.

  13. Loss of genetic diversity at an MHC locus in the endangered Tokyo bitterling Tanakia tanago (Teleostei: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Kubota, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Katsutoshi

    2013-12-01

    Genetic diversity at a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B gene was examined for two wild and three captive populations of the endangered Tokyo bitterling Tanakia tanago. A specific primer set was first developed to amplify the MHC II B exon 2 locus. Using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and sequencing analysis, 16 DAB3 alleles were detected with 56 nucleotide substitutions in the 276-bp region. In the putative antigen-binding sites of exon 2, the rate of nonsynonymous substitutions was significantly higher than that of synonymous substitutions (dN/dS = 2.79), indicating positive selection on the retention of polymorphism. The population from the Handa Natural Habitat Conservation Area and that from the Tone River system exhibited low variation (one and three alleles, respectively), whereas the captive population that originated from a mix of three distinct populations had the highest amounts of variation (14 alleles). The levels of heterozygosity at the MHC varied considerably among populations and showed significant correlations with those at putative neutral microsatellite markers, suggesting that genetic drift following a bottleneck has affected MHC variability in some populations. Comparisons between endangered and non-endangered fish species in previous reports and the present results indicate that the number of MHC alleles per population is on average 70% lower in endangered species than non-endangered species. Considering the functional consequence of this locus, attention should be paid to captive and wild endangered fish populations in terms of further loss of MHC alleles.

  14. Correlation between genetic features of the mef(A)-msr(D) locus and erythromycin resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Luca Agostino; Di Luca, Maria Chiara; Prenna, Manuela; Petrelli, Dezemona

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the correlation between the genetic variation within mef(A)-msr(D) determinants of efflux-mediated erythromycin resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes and the level of erythromycin resistance. Twenty-eight mef(A)-positive strains were selected according to erythromycin MIC (4-32 μg/mL), and their mef(A)-msr(D) regions were sequenced. Strains were classified according to the bacteriophage carrying mef(A)-msr(D). A new Φm46.1 genetic variant was found in 8 strains out of 28 and named VP_00501.1. Degree of allelic variation was higher in mef(A) than in msr(D). Hotspots for recombination were mapped within the locus that could have shaped the apparent mosaic structure of the region. There was a general correlation between mef(A)-msr(D) sequence and erythromycin resistance level. However, lysogenic conversion of susceptible strains by mef(A)-msr(D)-carrying Φm46.1 indicated that key determinants may not all reside within the mef(A)-msr(D) locus and that horizontal gene transfer could contribute to changes in the level of antibiotic resistance in S. pyogenes.

  15. A two-locus genetic interaction between LPHN3 and 11q predicts ADHD severity and long-term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, M T; Vélez, J I; Bustamante, M L; Balog, J Z; Arcos-Burgos, M; Muenke, M

    2011-01-01

    The severity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms is a major predictor of long-term ADHD outcome. To investigate if two-locus interactions might predict ADHD severity, we studied a sample of 1341 individuals from families clustering ADHD, using the Vanderbilt Assessment Scale for Parents. Latent class cluster analysis was used to construct symptom profiles and classify ADHD severity. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning ADHD-linked chromosomal regions on chromosomes 4, 5, 10, 11, 12 and 17 were genotyped. SNPs associated with ADHD severity were identified and potential two-locus genetic interactions were tested. We found that SNPs within the LPHN3 gene interact with SNPs spanning the 11q region that contains DRD2 and NCAM1 not only to increase the risk of developing ADHD but also to increase ADHD severity. All these genes are identified to have a major role in shaping both brain development and function. These findings demonstrate that genetic interactions may predict the severity of ADHD, which in turn may predict long-term ADHD outcome. PMID:22832519

  16. Genetic variants of the copy number polymorphic beta-defensin locus are associated with sporadic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Huse, Klaus; Taudien, Stefan; Groth, Marco; Rosenstiel, Philip; Szafranski, Karol; Hiller, Michael; Hampe, Jochen; Junker, Kerstin; Schubert, Jorg; Schreiber, Stefan; Birkenmeier, Gerd; Krawczak, Michael; Platzer, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer represents the cancer with the highest worldwide prevalence in men. Chromosome 8p23 has shown suggestive genetic linkage to early-onset familial prostate cancer and is frequently deleted in cancer cells of the urogenital tract. Within this locus some beta-defensin genes (among them DEFB4, DEFB103, DEFB104) are localized, which are arranged in a gene cluster shown to exhibit an extensive copy number variation in the population. This structural variation considerably hampers genetic studies. In a new approach considering both sequence as well as copy number variations we aimed to compare the defensin locus at 8p23 in prostate cancer patients and controls. We apply PCR/cloning-based haplotyping and high-throughput copy number determination methods which allow assessment of both individual haplotypes and gene copy numbers not accessible to conventional SNP-based genotyping. We demonstrate association of four common DEFB104 haplotypes with the risk of prostate cancer in two independent patient cohorts. Moreover, we show that high copy numbers (>9) of the defensin gene cluster are significantly underrepresented in both patient samples. Our findings imply a role of the antibacterial defensins in prostate cancerogenesis qualifying distinct gene variants and copy numbers as potential tumor markers. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Inbreeding depression in self-incompatible North-American Arabidopsis lyrata: disentangling genomic and S-locus-specific genetic load

    PubMed Central

    Stift, M; Hunter, B D; Shaw, B; Adam, A; Hoebe, P N; Mable, B K

    2013-01-01

    Newly formed selfing lineages may express recessive genetic load and suffer inbreeding depression. This can have a genome-wide genetic basis, or be due to loci linked to genes under balancing selection. Understanding the genetic architecture of inbreeding depression is important in the context of the maintenance of self-incompatibility and understanding the evolutionary dynamics of S-alleles. We addressed this using North-American subspecies of Arabidopsis lyrata. This species is normally self-incompatible and outcrossing, but some populations have undergone a transition to selfing. The goals of this study were to: (1) quantify the strength of inbreeding depression in North-American populations of A. lyrata; and (2) disentangle the relative contribution of S-linked genetic load compared with overall inbreeding depression. We enforced selfing in self-incompatible plants with known S-locus genotype by treatment with CO2, and compared the performance of selfed vs outcrossed progeny. We found significant inbreeding depression for germination rate (δ=0.33), survival rate to 4 weeks (δ=0.45) and early growth (δ=0.07), but not for flowering rate. For two out of four S-alleles in our design, we detected significant S-linked load reflected by an under-representation of S-locus homozygotes in selfed progeny. The presence or absence of S-linked load could not be explained by the dominance level of S-alleles. Instead, the random nature of the mutation process may explain differences in the recessive deleterious load among lineages. PMID:22892638

  18. Genetic and epigenetic alterations in the GNAS locus and clinical consequences in Pseudohypoparathyroidism: Italian common healthcare pathways adoption.

    PubMed

    de Sanctis, L; Giachero, F; Mantovani, G; Weber, G; Salerno, M; Baroncelli, G I; Elli, M F; Matarazzo, P; Wasniewska, M; Mazzanti, L; Scirè, G; Tessaris, D

    2016-11-21

    Genetic and epigenetic alterations in the GNAS locus are responsible for the Gsα protein dysfunctions causing Pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) type Ia/c and Ib, respectively. For these heterogeneous diseases characterized by multiple hormone resistances and Albright's Hereditary Osteodystrophy (AHO) the current classification results inadequate because of the clinical overlap between molecular subtypes and a standard clinical approach is still missing. In the present paper several members of the Study Group Endocrine diseases due to altered function of Gsα protein of the Italian Society of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology (ISPED) have reviewed and updated the clinical-molecular data of the largest case series of (epi)/genetically characterized AHO/PHP patients; they then produced a common healthcare pathway for patients with these disorders. The molecular analysis of the GNAS gene and locus identified the causal alteration in 74 subjects (46 genetic and 28 epigenetic mutations). The clinical data at the diagnosis and their evolution during up to 15 years follow-up were collected using two different cards. In patients with genetic mutations the growth impairment worsen during the time, while obesity prevalence decreases; subcutaneous ossifications seem specific for this group. Brachydactyly has been detected in half of the subjects with epigenetic alterations, in which the disease overts later in life, often with symptomatic hypocalcaemia, and also early TSH and GHRH resistances have been recorded. A dedicated healthcare pathway addressing all these aspects in a systematic way would improve the clinical management, allowing an earlier recognition of some PHP features, the optimization of their medical treatment and a better clinical-oriented molecular analysis. Furthermore, standardized follow-up data would provide new insight into less known aspects.

  19. Molecular and genetic analyses of the putative Proteus O antigen gene locus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan; Torzewska, Agnieszka; Ruan, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xiaoting; Rozalski, Antoni; Shao, Zhujun; Guo, Xi; Zhou, Haijian; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2010-08-01

    Proteus species are well-characterized opportunistic pathogens primarily associated with urinary tract infections (UTI) of humans. The Proteus O antigen is one of the most variable constituents of the cell surface, and O antigen heterogeneity is used for serological classification of Proteus isolates. Even though most Proteus O antigen structures have been identified, the O antigen locus has not been well characterized. In this study, we identified the putative Proteus O antigen locus and demonstrated this region's high degree of heterogeneity by comparing sequences of 40 Proteus isolates using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). This analysis identified five putative Proteus O antigen gene clusters, and the probable functions of these O antigen-related genes were proposed, based on their similarity to genes in the available databases. Finally, Proteus-specific genes from these five serogroups were identified by screening 79 strains belonging to the 68 Proteus O antigen serogroups. To our knowledge, this is the first molecular characterization of the putative Proteus O antigen locus, and we describe a novel molecular classification method for the identification of different Proteus serogroups.

  20. Genetic and molecular characterization of the maize rp3 rust resistance locus.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Craig A; Richter, Todd E; Collins, Nicholas C; Nicolas, Marie; Trick, Harold N; Pryor, Tony; Hulbert, Scot H

    2002-01-01

    In maize, the Rp3 gene confers resistance to common rust caused by Puccinia sorghi. Flanking marker analysis of rust-susceptible rp3 variants suggested that most of them arose via unequal crossing over, indicating that rp3 is a complex locus like rp1. The PIC13 probe identifies a nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) gene family that maps to the complex. Rp3 variants show losses of PIC13 family members relative to the resistant parents when probed with PIC13, indicating that the Rp3 gene is a member of this family. Gel blots and sequence analysis suggest that at least 9 family members are at the locus in most Rp3-carrying lines and that at least 5 of these are transcribed in the Rp3-A haplotype. The coding regions of 14 family members, isolated from three different Rp3-carrying haplotypes, had DNA sequence identities from 93 to 99%. Partial sequencing of clones of a BAC contig spanning the rp3 locus in the maize inbred line B73 identified five different PIC13 paralogues in a region of approximately 140 kb. PMID:12242248

  1. The Brisbane Systems Genetics Study: Genetical Genomics Meets Complex Trait Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Joseph E.; Henders, Anjali K.; McRae, Allan F.; Caracella, Anthony; Smith, Sara; Wright, Margaret J.; Whitfield, John B.; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Martin, Nicholas G.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence that genetic risk factors for common disease are caused by hereditary changes of gene regulation acting in complex pathways. Clearly understanding the molecular genetic relationships between genetic control of gene expression and its effect on complex diseases is essential. Here we describe the Brisbane Systems Genetics Study (BSGS), a family-based study that will be used to elucidate the genetic factors affecting gene expression and the role of gene regulation in mediating endophenotypes and complex diseases. BSGS comprises of a total of 962 individuals from 314 families, for which we have high-density genotype, gene expression and phenotypic data. Families consist of combinations of both monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs, their siblings, and, for 72 families, both parents. A significant advantage of the inclusion of parents is improved power to disentangle environmental, additive genetic and non-additive genetic effects of gene expression and measured phenotypes. Furthermore, it allows for the estimation of parent-of-origin effects, something that has not previously been systematically investigated in human genetical genomics studies. Measured phenotypes available within the BSGS include blood phenotypes and biochemical traits measured from components of the tissue sample in which transcription levels are determined, providing an ideal test case for systems genetics approaches. We report results from an expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis using 862 individuals from BSGS to test for associations between expression levels of 17,926 probes and 528,509 SNP genotypes. At a study wide significance level approximately 15,000 associations were observed between expression levels and SNP genotypes. These associations corresponded to a total of 2,081 expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) involving 1,503 probes. The majority of identified eQTL (87%) were located within cis-regions. PMID:22563384

  2. Unravelling the Molecular Epidemiology and Genetic Diversity among Burkholderia pseudomallei Isolates from South India Using Multi-Locus Sequence Typing

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Tushar; KE, Vandana; Kumar, Subodh; Bhat, Vinod; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2016-01-01

    There is a slow but steady rise in the case detection rates of melioidosis from various parts of the Indian sub-continent in the past two decades. However, the epidemiology of the disease in India and the surrounding South Asian countries remains far from well elucidated. Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) is a useful epidemiological tool to study the genetic relatedness of bacterial isolates both with-in and across the countries. With this background, we studied the molecular epidemiology of 32 Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates (31 clinical and 1 soil isolate) obtained during 2006–2015 from various parts of south India using multi-locus sequencing typing and analysis. Of the 32 isolates included in the analysis, 30 (93.7%) had novel allelic profiles that were not reported previously. Sequence type (ST) 1368 (n = 15, 46.8%) with allelic profile (1, 4, 6, 4, 1, 1, 3) was the most common genotype observed. We did not observe a genotypic association of STs with geographical location, type of infection and year of isolation in the present study. Measure of genetic differentiation (FST) between Indian and the rest of world isolates was 0.14413. Occurrence of the same ST across three adjacent states of south India suggest the dispersion of B.pseudomallei across the south western coastal part of India with limited geographical clustering. However, majority of the STs reported from the present study remained as “outliers” on the eBURST “Population snapshot”, suggesting the genetic diversity of Indian isolates from the Australasian and Southeast Asian isolates. PMID:27992477

  3. Population structure and genetic bottleneck in sweet cherry estimated with SSRs and the gametophytic self-incompatibility locus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Domestication and breeding involve the selection of particular phenotypes, limiting the genomic diversity of the population and creating a bottleneck. These effects can be precisely estimated when the location of domestication is established. Few analyses have focused on understanding the genetic consequences of domestication and breeding in fruit trees. In this study, we aimed to analyse genetic structure and changes in the diversity in sweet cherry Prunus avium L. Results Three subgroups were detected in sweet cherry, with one group of landraces genetically very close to the analysed wild cherry population. A limited number of SSR markers displayed deviations from the frequencies expected under neutrality. After the removal of these markers from the analysis, a very limited bottleneck was detected between wild cherries and sweet cherry landraces, with a much more pronounced bottleneck between sweet cherry landraces and modern sweet cherry varieties. The loss of diversity between wild cherries and sweet cherry landraces at the S-locus was more significant than that for microsatellites. Particularly high levels of differentiation were observed for some S-alleles. Conclusions Several domestication events may have happened in sweet cherry or/and intense gene flow from local wild cherry was probably maintained along the evolutionary history of the species. A marked bottleneck due to breeding was detected, with all markers, in the modern sweet cherry gene pool. The microsatellites did not detect the bottleneck due to domestication in the analysed sample. The vegetative propagation specific to some fruit trees may account for the differences in diversity observed at the S-locus. Our study provides insights into domestication events of cherry, however, requires confirmation on a larger sampling scheme for both sweet cherry landraces and wild cherry. PMID:20727153

  4. Identification of a genetic locus controlling bacteria-driven colitis and associated cancer through effects on innate inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Boulard, Olivier; Kirchberger, Stefanie; Royston, Daniel J.; Maloy, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the intestine has been associated with an elevated risk of developing colorectal cancer. Recent association studies have highlighted the role of genetic predisposition in the etiology of colitis and started to unravel its complexity. However, the genetic factors influencing the progression from colon inflammation to tumorigenesis are not known. We report the identification of a genetic interval Hiccs that regulates Helicobacter hepaticus–induced colitis and associated cancer susceptibility in a 129.RAG−/− mouse model. The 1.7-Mb congenic interval on chromosome 3, containing eight genes and five microRNAs, renders susceptible mice resistant to colitis and reduces tumor incidence and multiplicity. Bone marrow chimera experiments showed that resistance is conferred by the hematopoietic compartment. Moreover, the Hiccs locus controls the induction of the innate inflammatory response by regulating cytokine expression and granulocyte recruitment by Thy1+ innate lymphoid cells. Using a tumor-promoting model combining chronic Helicobacter hepaticus infection and the carcinogen azoxymethane, we found that Hiccs also regulates the frequency of colitis-associated neoplasia. Our study highlights the importance of innate immune cells and their genetic configuration in driving progression from inflammation toward cancer and opens the door for analysis of these pathways in human inflammatory disorders and associated cancers. PMID:22734048

  5. Molecular genetics of the brown (b)-locus region of mouse chromosome 4. II. Complementation analyses of lethal brown deletions.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M

    1994-07-01

    Numerous new mutations at the brown (b) locus in mouse chromosome 4 have been recovered over the years in germ-cell mutagenesis experiments performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A large series of radiation- and chemical-induced b mutations known to be chromosomal deletions, and also known to be prenatally lethal when homozygous, were analyzed by pairwise complementation crosses as well as by pseudodominance tests involving flanking loci defined by externally visible phenotypes. These crosses were designed to determine the extent of each deletion on the genetic and phenotype map of the chromosomal region surrounding the b locus; the crosses also provided basic data that assigned deletions to complementation groups and defined four new loci associated with aberrancies in normal development. Specifically, the pseudodominance tests identified deletions that include the proximally mapping whirler (wi) and the distally mapping depilated (dep) genes, thereby bracketing these loci defined by visible developmental abnormalities with landmarks (deletion breakpoints) that are easily identified on the physical map. Furthermore, the complementation crosses, which were supplemented with additional crosses that allowed determination of the gross time of lethality of selected deletions, defined four new loci required for normal development. Homozygous deletion of one of these loci (b-associated fitness, baf) results in a runting syndrome evident during postnatal development; deletion of one locus [l(4)2Rn] causes death in the late gestation/neonatal period; and deletion of either of two loci [l(4)1Rn or l(4)3Rn] results in embryonic death, most likely in pre-, peri- or postimplantation stages. The placement of these new functionally defined loci on the evolving molecular map of the b region should be useful for continuing the analysis of the roles played in development by genes in this segment of chromosome 4.

  6. Genetic variation in AKT1, PTEN and the 8q24 locus, and the risk of testicular germ cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, K E; Kristiansen, W; Karlsson, R; Aschim, E L; Dahl, O; Fosså, S D; Adami, H-O; Wiklund, F; Haugen, T B; Grotmol, T

    2013-07-01

    Is there an association between testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) and genetic polymorphisms in AKT1, PTEN and the 8q24 locus? Our findings suggest that genetic variation in PTEN may influence the risk of TGCT. There is strong evidence that genetic variation influences the risk of TGCT. The oncogene, AKT1, the tumor suppressor gene, PTEN and the chromosome 8q24 locus play important roles in cancer development in general. We have conducted a population-based Norwegian-Swedish case-parent study, based on cases diagnosed in 1990-2008, including 831 triads (TGCT case and both parents), 474 dyads (TGCT case and one parent) and 712 singletons (only the TGCT case). In addition we expanded the study to include 3922 unrelated male controls from the TwinGene project. We genotyped 26 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in AKT1, PTEN and the 8q24 locus. First, triads and dyads were included in a likelihood-based association test. To increase the statistical power, case singletons and controls from the TwinGene project were included in a single test for association. We examined if the allelic effect on TGCT risk differed by histological subgroup, country of origin or parent of origin. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated with Bonferroni correction (P bonf) for multiple testing. In the case-parent analyses, none of the 26 SNPs were significantly associated with TGCT. Of the 23 SNPs investigated in the combined study, one SNP in PTEN (rs11202586) remained associated with TGCT risk after adjusting for multiple testing (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.06-1.28, P bonf = 0.040). We found no difference in risk according to histological subgroup, parent of origin or between countries. Our study is strengthened by the population-based design and large sample size, which gives high power to detect risk alleles. The reported association was not highly significant, and although it was based on an a priori hypothesis of this tumor suppressor gene being implicated in

  7. Genetic and Genomic Dissection of the Cochliobolus heterostrophus Tox1 Locus Controlling Biosynthesis of the Polyketide Virulence Factor T-toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Turgeon, Barbara G.; Baker, Scott E.

    2007-04-27

    Fungal pathogenesis to plants is an intricate developmental process requiring biological components found in most fungi, as well as factors that are unique to fungal taxa that participate in particular fungus–plant interactions. The host-selective polyketide toxin known as T-toxin produced by Cochliobolus heterostrophus race T, a highly virulent pathogen of maize, is an intriguing example of the latter type of virulence determinant. The Tox1 locus, which controls biosynthesis of T-toxin, originally defined as a single genetic locus, it is, in fact, two exceedingly complex loci on two chromosomes that are reciprocally translocated with respect to their counterparts in weakly pathogenic race O. Race O lacks the Tox1 locus and does not produce T-toxin. Highly virulent race T was first recognized when it caused an epidemic of Southern Corn Leaf Blight, which devastated the US corn crop in 1970. The evolutionary origin of the Tox1 locus remains unknown.

  8. Assessment of population genetic structure in the arbovirus vector midge, Culicoides brevitarsis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), using multi-locus DNA microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Maria G; Beebe, Nigel W; Gopurenko, David; Bellis, Glenn; Nicholas, Adrian; Ogugo, Moses; Djikeng, Appolinaire; Kemp, Steve; Walker, Peter J; Duchemin, Jean-Bernard

    2015-09-25

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a major pathogen of ruminants that is transmitted by biting midges (Culicoides spp.). Australian BTV serotypes have origins in Asia and are distributed across the continent into two distinct episystems, one in the north and another in the east. Culicoides brevitarsis is the major vector of BTV in Australia and is distributed across the entire geographic range of the virus. Here, we describe the isolation and use of DNA microsatellites and gauge their ability to determine population genetic connectivity of C. brevitarsis within Australia and with countries to the north. Eleven DNA microsatellite markers were isolated using a novel genomic enrichment method and identified as useful for genetic analyses of sampled populations in Australia, northern Papua New Guinea (PNG) and Timor-Leste. Significant (P < 0.05) population genetic subdivision was observed between all paired regions, though the highest levels of genetic sub-division involved pair-wise tests with PNG (PNG vs. Australia (FST = 0.120) and PNG vs. Timor-Leste (FST = 0.095)). Analysis of multi-locus allelic distributions using STRUCTURE identified a most probable two-cluster population model, which separated PNG specimens from a cluster containing specimens from Timor-Leste and Australia. The source of incursions of this species in Australia is more likely to be Timor-Leste than PNG. Future incursions of BTV positive C. brevitarsis into Australia may be genetically identified to their source populations using these microsatellite loci. The vector's panmictic genetic structure within Australia cannot explain the differential geographic distribution of BTV serotypes.

  9. Genetic diversity and evolution of the human leptin locus tetranucleotide repeat.

    PubMed

    Moffett, Susan; Martinson, Jeremy; Shriver, Mark D; Deka, Ranjan; McGarvey, Stephen T; Barrantes, Ramiro; Ferrell, Robert E

    2002-05-01

    To better understand the evolutionary history of the gene region containing the multifunctional adipose tissue hormone leptin, we genotyped 1,957 individuals from 12 world populations for a highly variable tetranucleotide repeat polymorphism located 476 bp 3' of exon 3 of the leptin gene. Common alleles shared among populations, alleles specific to geographically defined populations, and the homologous alleles in the common and pygmy chimpanzee, the gorilla and the orangutan, were sequenced to define the allelic variation at the nucleotide level. These data reveal a common set of alleles shared among world populations, presumed to have arisen from a great ape ancestral allele prior to the divergence of the major geographical subdivisions of the human population, a subset of alleles specific to populations of African ancestry and a second set of alleles that arose by tandem duplication of the core repeat unit following the separation of African and non-African populations. These findings emphasize the complex evolutionary history of this locus and raise cautions about the pooling of alleles at this locus in association studies.

  10. Quantitative Trait Locus and Genetical Genomics Analysis Identifies Putatively Causal Genes for Fecundity and Brooding in the Chicken.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Martin; Jonsson, Kenneth B; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per; Wright, Dominic

    2015-12-04

    Life history traits such as fecundity are important to evolution because they make up components of lifetime fitness. Due to their polygenic architectures, such traits are difficult to investigate with genetic mapping. Therefore, little is known about their molecular basis. One possible way toward finding the underlying genes is to map intermediary molecular phenotypes, such as gene expression traits. We set out to map candidate quantitative trait genes for egg fecundity in the chicken by combining quantitative trait locus mapping in an advanced intercross of wild by domestic chickens with expression quantitative trait locus mapping in the same birds. We measured individual egg fecundity in 232 intercross chickens in two consecutive trials, the second one aimed at measuring brooding. We found 12 loci for different aspects of egg fecundity. We then combined the genomic confidence intervals of these loci with expression quantitative trait loci from bone and hypothalamus in the same intercross. Overlaps between egg loci and expression loci, and trait-gene expression correlations identify 29 candidates from bone and five from hypothalamus. The candidate quantitative trait genes include fibroblast growth factor 1, and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins L42 and L32. In summary, we found putative quantitative trait genes for egg traits in the chicken that may have been affected by regulatory variants under chicken domestication. These represent, to the best of our knowledge, some of the first candidate genes identified by genome-wide mapping for life history traits in an avian species.

  11. Quantitative Trait Locus and Genetical Genomics Analysis Identifies Putatively Causal Genes for Fecundity and Brooding in the Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Johnsson, Martin; Jonsson, Kenneth B.; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per; Wright, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Life history traits such as fecundity are important to evolution because they make up components of lifetime fitness. Due to their polygenic architectures, such traits are difficult to investigate with genetic mapping. Therefore, little is known about their molecular basis. One possible way toward finding the underlying genes is to map intermediary molecular phenotypes, such as gene expression traits. We set out to map candidate quantitative trait genes for egg fecundity in the chicken by combining quantitative trait locus mapping in an advanced intercross of wild by domestic chickens with expression quantitative trait locus mapping in the same birds. We measured individual egg fecundity in 232 intercross chickens in two consecutive trials, the second one aimed at measuring brooding. We found 12 loci for different aspects of egg fecundity. We then combined the genomic confidence intervals of these loci with expression quantitative trait loci from bone and hypothalamus in the same intercross. Overlaps between egg loci and expression loci, and trait–gene expression correlations identify 29 candidates from bone and five from hypothalamus. The candidate quantitative trait genes include fibroblast growth factor 1, and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins L42 and L32. In summary, we found putative quantitative trait genes for egg traits in the chicken that may have been affected by regulatory variants under chicken domestication. These represent, to the best of our knowledge, some of the first candidate genes identified by genome-wide mapping for life history traits in an avian species. PMID:26637433

  12. Next-Generation Sequencing of the HLA locus: Methods and impacts on HLA typing, population genetics and disease association studies.

    PubMed

    Carapito, Raphael; Radosavljevic, Mirjana; Bahram, Seiamak

    2016-11-01

    The human Major Histocompatibility Complex, known as the "Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)", could be defined as a "super locus" (historically called "supergene") governing the adaptive immune system in vertebrates. It also harbors genes involved in innate immunity. HLA is the most gene-dense, polymorphic and disease-associated region of the human genome. It is of critical medical relevance given its involvement in the fate of the transplanted organs/tissues and its association with more than 100 diseases. However, despite these important roles, comprehensive sequence analysis of the 4 megabase HLA locus has been limited due to technological challenges. Thanks to recent improvements in Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies however, one is now able to handle the peculiarities of the MHC notably the tight linkage disequilibrium between genes as well as their high degree of polymorphism (and hence heterozygosity). Increased read lengths, throughput, accuracy, as well as development of new bioinformatics tools now enable to efficiently generate complete and accurate full-length HLA haplotypes without phase ambiguities. The present report reviews current NGS approaches to capture, sequence and analyze HLA genes and loci. The impact of these new methodologies on various applications including HLA typing, population genetics and disease association studies are discussed. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic instability of the lozenge locus in Drosophila melanogaster: Characterization of the lz{sup 75V} allele

    SciTech Connect

    Voloshina, M.A.; Golubovskii, M.D.

    1995-12-01

    Genetic properties of lz{sup 75V}, an unstable allele of the lozenge locus, are described. The lz{sup 75V} allele appeared in progeny of a male from a Far East natural population of Drosophila melanogaster. Mutation of this allele produces a broad spectrum of mutant derivatives with phenotypes varying from normal to extreme. The arising alleles can be stable or unstable. Some lz{sup 75V} derivatives continuously preserve their spontaneous mutability in laboratory conditions, whereas other alleles of the same family show progressive stabilization at the intralocus or intrachromosome level. Instability of the lz{sup 75V}-bearing X chromosome is locus-specific: only the lozenge gene mutates with high frequency, while visible mutations at other loci rarely occur. As shown previously, the lz{sup 75V} allele appears to be caused by a P-element insertion. The appearance of spontaneous instability is discussed with regard to the general problem of transposition regulation in mobile elements. Different systems of hybrid dysgenesis, and, in particular, P elements are assumed to play an important role in induction of unstable mutations in nature. 24 refs., 5 tabs.

  14. Use of genetic and physical mapping to locate the spinal muscular atrophy locus between two new highly polymorphic DNA markers

    SciTech Connect

    Clermont, O.; Burlet, P.; Burglen, L.; Lefebvre, S.; Pascal, F.; McPherson, J.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Cohen, D.; Le Paslier, D.; Weissenbach, J.

    1994-04-01

    The gene for autosomal recessive forms of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has recently been mapped to chromosome 5q13, within a 4-cM region between the blocks D5S465/D5S125 and MAP-1B/D5S112. The authors identified two new highly polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers - namely, AFM265wf5 (D5S629) and AFM281yh9 (D5S637) - which are the closest markers to the SMA locus. Multilocus analysis by the location-score method was used to establish the best estimate of the SMA gene location. The data suggest that the most likely location for SMA is between locus D5S629 and the block D5S637/D5S351/MAP-1B/D5S112/D5S357. Genetic analysis of inbred SMA families, based on homozygosity by descent and physical mapping using meta-YACs, gave additional information for the loci order as follows: cen-D5S6-D5S125/D5S465-D5S435-D5S629-SMA-D5S637-D5S351-MAP-1B/D5S112-D5S357-D5S39-tel. These data give the direction for bidirectional walking in order to clone this interval and isolate the SMA gene. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. The Multi-allelic Genetic Architecture of a Variance-Heterogeneity Locus for Molybdenum Concentration in Leaves Acts as a Source of Unexplained Additive Genetic Variance

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Andreatta, Matthew E.; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Danku, John; Salt, David E.; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) analyses have generally been used to detect individual loci contributing to the phenotypic diversity in a population by the effects of these loci on the trait mean. More rarely, loci have also been detected based on variance differences between genotypes. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the possible genetic mechanisms leading to such variance signals. However, little is known about what causes these signals, or whether this genetic variance-heterogeneity reflects mechanisms of importance in natural populations. Previously, we identified a variance-heterogeneity GWA (vGWA) signal for leaf molybdenum concentrations in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, fine-mapping of this association reveals that the vGWA emerges from the effects of three independent genetic polymorphisms that all are in strong LD with the markers displaying the genetic variance-heterogeneity. By revealing the genetic architecture underlying this vGWA signal, we uncovered the molecular source of a significant amount of hidden additive genetic variation or “missing heritability”. Two of the three polymorphisms underlying the genetic variance-heterogeneity are promoter variants for Molybdate transporter 1 (MOT1), and the third a variant located ~25 kb downstream of this gene. A fourth independent association was also detected ~600 kb upstream of MOT1. Use of a T-DNA knockout allele highlights Copper Transporter 6; COPT6 (AT2G26975) as a strong candidate gene for this association. Our results show that an extended LD across a complex locus including multiple functional alleles can lead to a variance-heterogeneity between genotypes in natural populations. Further, they provide novel insights into the genetic regulation of ion homeostasis in A. thaliana, and empirically confirm that variance-heterogeneity based GWA methods are a valuable tool to detect novel associations of biological importance in natural populations. PMID:26599497

  16. SYSGENET: a meeting report from a new European network for systems genetics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The first scientific meeting of the newly established European SYSGENET network took place at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI) in Braunschweig, April 7-9, 2010. About 50 researchers working in the field of systems genetics using mouse genetic reference populations (GRP) participated in the meeting and exchanged their results, phenotyping approaches, and data analysis tools for studying systems genetics. In addition, the future of GRP resources and phenotyping in Europe was discussed. PMID:20623354

  17. SYSGENET: a meeting report from a new European network for systems genetics.

    PubMed

    Schughart, Klaus

    2010-08-01

    The first scientific meeting of the newly established European SYSGENET network took place at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI) in Braunschweig, April 7-9, 2010. About 50 researchers working in the field of systems genetics using mouse genetic reference populations (GRP) participated in the meeting and exchanged their results, phenotyping approaches, and data analysis tools for studying systems genetics. In addition, the future of GRP resources and phenotyping in Europe was discussed.

  18. Genetic and Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis for Bio-Oil Compounds after Fast Pyrolysis in Maize Cobs.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, Brandon; Kuzhiyil, Najeeb; de Leon, Natalia; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis has been identified as one of the biorenewable conversion platforms that could be a part of an alternative energy future, but it has not yet received the same attention as cellulosic ethanol in the analysis of genetic inheritance within potential feedstocks such as maize. Ten bio-oil compounds were measured via pyrolysis/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py/GC-MS) in maize cobs. 184 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of the intermated B73 x Mo17 (IBM) Syn4 population were analyzed in two environments, using 1339 markers, for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. QTL mapping was performed using composite interval mapping with significance thresholds established by 1000 permutations at α = 0.05. 50 QTL were found in total across those ten traits with R2 values ranging from 1.7 to 5.8%, indicating a complex quantitative inheritance of these traits.

  19. Genetic and Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis for Bio-Oil Compounds after Fast Pyrolysis in Maize Cobs

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey, Brandon; Kuzhiyil, Najeeb; de Leon, Natalia; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis has been identified as one of the biorenewable conversion platforms that could be a part of an alternative energy future, but it has not yet received the same attention as cellulosic ethanol in the analysis of genetic inheritance within potential feedstocks such as maize. Ten bio-oil compounds were measured via pyrolysis/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py/GC-MS) in maize cobs. 184 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of the intermated B73 x Mo17 (IBM) Syn4 population were analyzed in two environments, using 1339 markers, for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. QTL mapping was performed using composite interval mapping with significance thresholds established by 1000 permutations at α = 0.05. 50 QTL were found in total across those ten traits with R2 values ranging from 1.7 to 5.8%, indicating a complex quantitative inheritance of these traits. PMID:26745365

  20. Data on genetic analysis of atherosclerosis identifies a major susceptibility locus in the major histocompatibility complex of mice.

    PubMed

    Grainger, Andrew T; Jones, Michael B; Li, Jing; Chen, Mei-Hua; Manichaikul, Ani; Shi, Weibin

    2016-12-01

    The data presented here are related to the research article, entitled Genetic analysis of atherosclerosis identifies a major susceptibility locus in the major histocompatibility complex of mice, published in Atherosclerosis 2016;254:124 (A.T. Grainger, M.B. Jones, J. Li, M.H. Chen, A. Manichaikul, W. Shi, 2016) [1]. The supporting materials include original genotypic and phenotypic data obtained from 206 female F2 mice derived from an intercross between BALB and SMJ inbred mice. The F2 mice were fed 12 weeks of Western diet, starting at 6 weeks of age. Atherosclerotic lesion size in the aortic root of each mouse is the sum of the top 8 lesion areas. The data is provided in the format required for determining QTLs using two independent programs, J/QTL and PLINK.

  1. Genetic mapping of the spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA2) locus on chromosome 12q23-q24.1

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, A.; Magarino, C.; Gispert, S.

    1995-01-20

    A refined genetic map of the spinocerebellar ataxia 2 locus was constructed through linkage and haplotype analysis of 11 large pedigrees from the Holguin SCA2 family collective. Three-point analysis makes a localization of the SCA2 mutation in the 6-cM interval D12S84-D12S79 likely. This is consistent with haplotype results indicating a crossover event between two branches of the SCA2 family Rs and placing the mutation on the telomeric side of D12S84. The microsatellite D12S105 within this interval shows a peak two-point lod score of Z = 16.14 at {theta} = 0.00 recombination and complete linkage disequilibrium among affected individuals. These data together with the observation of a common disease haplotype among all family ancestors support the notion of an SCA2 founder effect in Holguin province. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Genetic associations of the interleukin locus at 1q32.1 with clinical outcomes of cutaneous melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Rendleman, Justin; Vogelsang, Matjaz; Bapodra, Anuj; Adaniel, Christina; Silva, Ines; Moogk, Duane; Martinez, Carlos N; Fleming, Nathaniel; Shields, Jerry; Shapiro, Richard; Berman, Russell; Pavlick, Anna; Polsky, David; Shao, Yongzhao; Osman, Iman; Krogsgaard, Michelle; Kirchhoff, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to high melanoma immunogenicity, germline genetic variants in immune pathways have been studied for association with melanoma prognosis. However, limited candidate selection, inadequate power, or lack of independent validation have hampered the reproducibility of these prior findings, preventing personalised clinical applicability in melanoma prognostication. Our objective was to assess the prognostic utility of genetic variants in immunomodulatory pathways for prediction of melanoma clinical outcomes. Methods We genotyped 72 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 44 immunomodulatory genes in a population sample of 1022 melanoma patients and performed Cox regression analysis to test the association between SNPs and melanoma recurrence-free (RFS) and overall survival (OS). We have further investigated the most significant associations using a fine mapping strategy and followed with functional analyses in CD4+ T cells in a subset of 75 melanoma patients. Results The most significant associations were found with melanoma OS for rs3024493 in IL10 at chromosome 1q32.1 (heterozygous HR 0.58, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.86; p = 0.0006), a variant previously shown to be linked with autoimmune conditions. Multiple additional SNPs at 1q32.1 were also nominally associated with OS confirming at least two independent association signals in this locus. In addition, we found rs3024493 associated with the downregulation of interleukin 10 (IL10) secretion in CD4+ T cells. Conclusions We discovered novel associations of IL10 with melanoma survival at 1q32.1, suggesting this locus should be considered as a novel melanoma prognostic biomarker with potential for aiding melanoma patient management. Our findings also provide further support for an alternative role of IL10 in stimulation of anti-tumour immune response. PMID:25604082

  3. Sequential genetic change at the TP53 and chemokine receptor CXCR4 locus during transformation of human ovarian surface epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, Kyra M; Kulbe, Hagen; Kwong, Joseph; Chakravarty, Probir; Temple, Jill; Chaplin, Tracy; Flak, Magdalena B; McNeish, Iain A; Deen, Suha; Brenton, James D; Young, Bryan D; Balkwill, Frances

    2011-01-01

    Early genetic events in the development of high-grade serous ovarian cancer, HGSOC, may define the molecular basis of the profound structural and numerical instability of chromosomes in this disease. To discover candidate genetic changes we sequentially passaged cells from a karyotypically normal hTERT immortalised human ovarian surface epithelial line (IOSE25) resulting in the spontaneous formation of colonies in soft agar. Cell lines (TOSE 1 and 4) established from these colonies had an abnormal karyotype and altered morphology but were not tumorigenic in immunodeficient mice. TOSE cells showed loss of heterozygosity at TP53, increased nuclear p53 immunoreactivity and altered expression profile of p53 target genes. The parental IOSE25 cells contained a missense, heterozygous R175H mutation in TP53 whereas TOSE cells had loss of heterozygosity at the TP53 locus with a new R273H mutation at the previous wild-type TP53 allele. Cytogenetic and array CGH analysis of TOSE cells also revealed a focal genomic amplification of CXCR4, a chemokine receptor commonly expressed by HGSOC cells. TOSE cells had increased functional CXCR4 protein and its abrogation reduced epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR, expression, as well as colony size and number. The CXCR4 ligand, CXCL12, was epigenetically silenced in TOSE cells and its forced expression increased TOSE colony size. TOSE cells had other cytogenetic changes typical of those seen in HGSOC ovarian cancer cell lines and biopsies. In addition, enrichment of CXCR4 pathway in expression profiles from HGSOC correlated with enrichment of a mutated TP53 gene expression signature and of EGFR pathway genes. Our data suggest that mutations in TP53 and amplification of the CXCR4 gene locus may be early events in the development of HGSOC, and associated with chromosomal instability. PMID:22266861

  4. Sequential genetic change at the TP53 and chemokine receptor CXCR4 locus during transformation of human ovarian surface epithelium.

    PubMed

    Archibald, K M; Kulbe, H; Kwong, J; Chakravarty, P; Temple, J; Chaplin, T; Flak, M B; McNeish, I A; Deen, S; Brenton, J D; Young, B D; Balkwill, F

    2012-11-29

    Early genetic events in the development of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) may define the molecular basis of the profound structural and numerical instability of chromosomes in this disease. To discover candidate genetic changes we sequentially passaged cells from a karyotypically normal hTERT immortalised human ovarian surface epithelial line (IOSE25) resulting in the spontaneous formation of colonies in soft agar. Cell lines transformed ovarian surface epithelium 1 and 4 (TOSE 1 and 4) established from these colonies had an abnormal karyotype and altered morphology, but were not tumourigenic in immunodeficient mice. TOSE cells showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at TP53, increased nuclear p53 immunoreactivity and altered expression profile of p53 target genes. The parental IOSE25 cells contained a missense, heterozygous R175H mutation in TP53, whereas TOSE cells had LOH at the TP53 locus with a new R273H mutation at the previous wild-type TP53 allele. Cytogenetic and array CGH analysis of TOSE cells also revealed a focal genomic amplification of CXCR4, a chemokine receptor commonly expressed by HGSOC cells. TOSE cells had increased functional CXCR4 protein and its abrogation reduced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression, as well as colony size and number. The CXCR4 ligand, CXCL12, was epigenetically silenced in TOSE cells and its forced expression increased TOSE colony size. TOSE cells had other cytogenetic changes typical of those seen in HGSOC ovarian cancer cell lines and biopsies. In addition, enrichment of CXCR4 pathway in expression profiles from HGSOC correlated with enrichment of a mutated TP53 gene expression signature and of EGFR pathway genes. Our data suggest that mutations in TP53 and amplification of the CXCR4 gene locus may be early events in the development of HGSOC, and associated with chromosomal instability.

  5. Genetic relationship between lodging and lodging components in barley (Hordeum vulgare) based on unconditional and conditional quantitative trait locus analyses.

    PubMed

    Chen, W Y; Liu, Z M; Deng, G B; Pan, Z F; Liang, J J; Zeng, X Q; Tashi, N M; Long, H; Yu, M Q

    2014-03-17

    Lodging (LD) is a major constraint limiting the yield and forage quality of barley. Detailed analyses of LD component (LDC) traits were conducted using 246 F2 plants generated from a cross between cultivars ZQ320 and 1277. Genetic relationships between LD and LDC were evaluated by unconditional and conditional quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping with 117 simple sequence repeat markers. Ultimately, 53 unconditional QTL related to LD were identified on seven barley chromosomes. Up to 15 QTL accounted for over 10% of the phenotypic variation, and up to 20 QTL for culm strength were detected. Six QTL with pleiotropic effects showing significant negative correlations with LD were found between markers Bmag353 and GBM1482 on chromosome 4H. These alleles and alleles of QTL for wall thickness, culm strength, plant height, and plant weight originated from ZQ320. Conditional mapping identified 96 additional QTL for LD. Conditional QTL analysis demonstrated that plant height, plant height center of gravity, and length of the sixth internode had the greatest contribution to LD, whereas culm strength and length of the fourth internode, and culm strength of the second internode were the key factors for LD-resistant. Therefore, lodging resistance in barley can be improved based on selection of alleles affecting culm strength, wall thickness, plant height, and plant weight. The conditional QTL mapping method can be used to evaluate possible genetic relationships between LD and LDC while efficiently and precisely determining counteracting QTL, which will help in understanding the genetic basis of LD in barley.

  6. Quantitative trait locus mapping reveals complex genetic architecture of quantitative virulence in the wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Ethan L; Croll, Daniel; Lendenmann, Mark H; Sanchez-Vallet, Andrea; Hartmann, Fanny E; Palma-Guerrero, Javier; Ma, Xin; McDonald, Bruce A

    2016-11-21

    We conducted a comprehensive analysis of virulence in the fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici using quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. High-throughput phenotyping based on automated image analysis allowed the measurement of pathogen virulence on a scale and with a precision that was not previously possible. Across two mapping populations encompassing more than 520 progeny, 540 710 pycnidia were counted and their sizes and grey values were measured. A significant correlation was found between pycnidia size and both spore size and number. Precise measurements of percentage leaf area covered by lesions provided a quantitative measure of host damage. Combining these large and accurate phenotypic datasets with a dense panel of restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) genetic markers enabled us to genetically dissect pathogen virulence into components related to host damage and those related to pathogen reproduction. We showed that different components of virulence can be under separate genetic control. Large- and small-effect QTLs were identified for all traits, with some QTLs specific to mapping populations, cultivars and traits and other QTLs shared among traits within the same mapping population. We associated the presence of four accessory chromosomes with small, but significant, increases in several virulence traits, providing the first evidence for a meaningful function associated with accessory chromosomes in this organism. A large-effect QTL involved in host specialization was identified on chromosome 7, leading to the identification of candidate genes having a large effect on virulence.

  7. Genetic Control of Pheromones in Drosophila Simulans. II. Kete, a Locus on the X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Ferveur, J. F.; Jallon, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    The production of Drosophila cuticular hydrocarbons, including contact pheromones, is under polygenic control. To investigate X-linked loci, EMS mutations were induced in Drosophila simulans flies. A mutant strain was discovered which in both sexes show a reduction in the biosynthesis of both 7-tricosene (7-T) the species contact pheromone and all other linear hydrocarbons. The locus controlling this effect, kete, is recessive and was localized to I, 18.5. Unlike a previously identified gene on the second chromosome of this species, Ngbo, kete does not affect the ratio of 7-T:7-pentacosene (7-P). Other reproductive characteristics are also affected, including egg-hatching. However, courtship behaviors in both sexes appear normal. PMID:8454203

  8. Genetic diversity of the class II major histocompatibility DRA locus in European, Asiatic and African domestic donkeys.

    PubMed

    Vranova, Marie; Alloggio, Ingrid; Qablan, Moneeb; Vyskocil, Mirko; Baumeisterova, Aneta; Sloboda, Michal; Putnova, Lenka; Vrtkova, Irena; Modry, David; Horin, Petr

    2011-07-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes coding for antigen presenting molecules are the most polymorphic genes in vertebrate genome. The MHC class II DRA gene shows only small variation in many mammalian species, but it exhibits relatively high level of polymorphism in Equidae, especially in donkeys. This extraordinary degree of polymorphism together with signatures of selection in specific amino acids sites makes the donkey DRA gene a suitable model for population diversity studies. The objective of this study was to investigate the DRA gene diversity in three different populations of donkeys under infectious pressure of protozoan parasites, Theileria equi and Babesia caballi. Three populations of domestic donkeys from Italy (N = 68), Jordan (N = 43), and Kenya (N = 78) were studied. A method of the donkey MHC DRA genotyping based on PCR-RFLP and sequencing was designed. In addition to the DRA gene, 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci were genotyped. The presence of Theileria equi and Babesia caballi parasites in peripheral blood was investigated by PCR. Allele and genotype frequencies, observed and expected heterozygosities and F(IS) values were computed as parameters of genetic diversity for all loci genotyped. Genetic distances between the three populations were estimated based on F(ST) values. Statistical associations between parasite infection and genetic polymorphisms were sought. Extensive DRA locus variation characteristic for Equids was found. The results showed differences between populations both in terms of numbers of alleles and their frequencies as well as variation in expected heterozygosity values. Based on comparisons with neutral microsatellite loci, population sub-structure characteristics and association analysis, convincing evidence of pathogen-driven selection at the population level was not provided. It seems that genetic diversity observed in the three populations reflects mostly effects of selective breeding and their different

  9. Analysis of locus D9S1120 and its genetic admixture correlation in seven argentina native american ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Mariela; Corach, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Genetic data have complemented archaeological and linguistic investigations for understanding the peopling of the Americas. Aiming to investigate the Native South American genetic background in Argentina, seven Amerindian and one urban population were selected. The analysis focused on locus D9S1120 due to its potential anthropological information about Native American origins. The sample set included 603 individuals belonging to nine isolated Argentinean aboriginal communities from seven tribes (N = 296), 100 individuals living in Buenos Aires city, and three potentially parental population references samples (N = 207). We computed allele and genotype frequency distributions, genetic distances, and pairwise differences among and within them. Admixture proportion was determined by means of typing 13 autosomal short tandem repeats plus D9S1120 in all populations, and comparing the data with those from three parental groups including Native American, European and Sub Saharan West African. The Native American-specific allele 9RA was found at an average frequency of 0.26 in aboriginal groups. Statistically significant differences were observed among the Native American groups when compared with the Buenos Aires urban population using analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) (Fst = 0.05669; P < 0.0001). Admixture analysis denoted different results between the cohorts of Amerindian samples displaying the specific 9RA allele, compared with those lacking it. A linear correlation was established between positive 9RA and Native American ancestry. Autosomal-based genetic admixture showed that the studied communities have considerable European and Native America contributions. Our results concerning D9S1120 further contribute to a better understanding of the admixture process between Sub Saharan African, Native American, and European individuals that shaped the genetic background of Argentinean extant population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. 75 FR 21295 - Notice of Meeting: Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Notice of Meeting: Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics... the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society (SACGHS), U.S. Public Health... wishing to provide public comment on any issue related to genetics, health and society. Please note that...

  11. 75 FR 21002 - Notice of Meeting: Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... Genetics, Health, and Society Pursuant to Public Law 92-463, notice is hereby given of the twenty-second meeting of the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society (SACGHS), U.S. Public... wishing to provide public comment on any issue related to genetics, health and society. Please note that...

  12. 75 FR 52949 - Notice of Meeting: Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... Genetics, Health, and Society Pursuant to Public Law 92-463, notice is hereby given of the twenty-third meeting of the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society (SACGHS), U.S. Public... cast. The main agenda item will be a review of the revised draft report on genetics education and...

  13. 75 FR 52949 - Notice of Meeting: Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Notice of Meeting: Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics... the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society (SACGHS), U.S. Public Health... cast. The main agenda item will be a review of the revised draft report on genetics education and...

  14. Dynamics of Genetic Variability in Two-Locus Models of Stabilizing Selection

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilets, S.; Hastings, A.

    1994-01-01

    We study a two locus model, with additive contributions to the phenotype, to explore the dynamics of different phenotypic characteristics under stabilizing selection and recombination. We demonstrate that the interaction of selection and recombination results in constraints on the mode of phenotypic evolution. Let V(g) be the genic variance of the trait and C(L) be the contribution of linkage disequilibrium to the genotypic variance. We demonstrate that, independent of the initial conditions, the dynamics of the system on the plane (V(g), C(L)) are typically characterized by a quick approach to a straight line with slow evolution along this line afterward. We analyze how the mode and the rate of phenotypic evolution depend on the strength of selection relative to recombination, on the form of fitness function, and the difference in allelic effect. We argue that if selection is not extremely weak relative to recombination, linkage disequilibrium generated by stabilizing selection influences the dynamics significantly. We demonstrate that under these conditions, which are plausible in nature and certainly the case in artificial stabilizing selection experiments, the model can have a polymorphic equilibrium with positive linkage disequilibrium that is stable simultaneously with monomorphic equilibria. PMID:7828833

  15. Distinguishing the Forces Controlling Genetic Variation at the Xdh Locus in Drosophila Pseudoobscura

    PubMed Central

    Riley, M. A.; Hallas, M. E.; Lewontin, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Fifty-eight isochromosomal lines sampled from two natural populations of Drosophila pseudoobscura in California and one from Bogota, Colombia, were examined using four-cutter restriction mapping. A 4.6-kb region of the xanthine dehydrogenase locus was probed and 66 of 135 restriction sites scored were polymorphic. This predicts that on average every 12th bp would be polymorphic in this region for the genes surveyed if polymorphism occurred randomly along the coding region. In addition, there were 12 insertion/deletion polymorphisms. Forty-nine distinct haplotypes were recognized in the 58 lines examined. The most common haplotype obtained a frequency of only 5%. Measures of base pair heterozygosity (0.0097) and linkage disequilibrium lead to a predicted population size in the range of 1.2-2.4 X 10(6) for the species. High levels of recombination (including gene conversion) can be inferred from the presence of all four gametic types in the data set. PMID:2583480

  16. Genetic map of randomly amplified DNA polymorphisms closely linked to the mating type locus of tetrahymenta thermophila

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, T.J.; Brickner, J.; Orias, E.; Nakano, K.J.

    1995-12-01

    We have used the PCR-based randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method to efficiently identify and map DNA polymorphisms in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. The polymorphisms segregate as Mendelian genetic markers. A targeted screen, using DNA from pooled meiotic segregants, yielded the polymorphisms most closely linked to the mat locus. A total of 10 polymorphisms linked to the mat-Pmr segment of the left arm of micronuclear chromosome 2 have been identified. This constitutes the largest linkage group described in T. thermophila. We also provide here the first crude estimate of the frequency of meiotic recombination in the mat region, 20 kb/cM. This frequency is much higher than that observed in most other eukaryotes. Special features of Tetrahymena genetics enhanced the power of the RAPD method: the ability to obtain in a single step meiotic segregants that are whole-genome homozygotes and the availability of nullisomic strains permitting quick deletion mapping of polymorphisms to micronuclear chromosomes or chromosomes segments. The RAPD method appears to provide a practical and relatively inexpensive approach to the construction of a high-resolution map of the Tetrahymena genome. 39 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Allele variations in the OCA2 gene (pink-eyed-dilution locus) are associated with genetic susceptibility to melanoma.

    PubMed

    Jannot, Anne-Sophie; Meziani, Roubila; Bertrand, Guylene; Gérard, Benedicte; Descamps, Vincent; Archimbaud, Alain; Picard, Catherine; Ollivaud, Laurence; Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Kerob, Delphine; Lanternier, Guy; Lebbe, Celeste; Saiag, P; Crickx, Beatrice; Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise; Grandchamp, Bernard; Soufir, Nadem; Melan-Cohort

    2005-08-01

    The occuloalbinism 2 (OCA2) gene, localized at 15q11, encodes a melanosomal transmembrane protein that is involved in the most common form of human occulo-cutaneous albinism, a human genetic disorder characterized by fair pigmentation and susceptibility to skin cancer. We wondered whether allele variations at this locus could influence susceptibility to malignant melanoma (MM). In all, 10 intragenic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 113 patients with melanomas and in 105 Caucasian control subjects with no personal or family history of skin cancer. By comparing allelic distribution between cases and controls, we show that MM and OCA2 are associated (p value=0.030 after correction for multiple testing). Then, a recently developed strategy, the 'combination test' enabled us to show that a combination formed by two SNPs was most strongly associated to MM, suggesting a possible interaction between intragenic SNPs. In addition, the role of OCA2 on MM risk was also detected using a logistic model taking into account the presence of variants of the melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R, a key pigmentation gene) and all pigmentation characteristics as melanoma risk factors. Our data demonstrate that a second pigmentation gene, in addition to MC1R, is involved in genetic susceptibility to melanoma.

  18. Genetic architecture of growth traits in Populus revealed by integrated quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis and association studies.

    PubMed

    Du, Qingzhang; Gong, Chenrui; Wang, Qingshi; Zhou, Daling; Yang, Haijiao; Pan, Wei; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-02-01

    Deciphering the genetic architecture underlying polygenic traits in perennial species can inform molecular marker-assisted breeding. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing have enabled strategies that integrate linkage-linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping in Populus. We used an integrated method of quantitative trait locus (QTL) dissection with a high-resolution linkage map and multi-gene association mapping to decipher the nature of genetic architecture (additive, dominant, and epistatic effects) of potential QTLs for growth traits in a Populus linkage population (1200 progeny) and a natural population (435 individuals). Seventeen QTLs for tree height, diameter at breast height, and stem volume mapped to 11 linkage groups (logarithm of odds (LOD) ≥ 2.5), and explained 2.7-18.5% of the phenotypic variance. After comparative mapping and transcriptome analysis, 187 expressed genes (10 046 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)) were selected from the segmental homology regions (SHRs) of 13 QTLs. Using multi-gene association models, we observed 202 significant SNPs in 63 promising genes from 10 QTLs (P ≤ 0.0001; FDR ≤ 0.10) that exhibited reproducible associations with additive/dominant effects, and further determined 11 top-ranked genes tightly linked to the QTLs. Epistasis analysis uncovered a uniquely interconnected gene-gene network for each trait. This study opens up opportunities to uncover the causal networks of interacting genes in plants using an integrated linkage-LD mapping approach.

  19. Genetic linkage studies in familial partial epilepsy: Exclusion of the human chromosome regions syntenic to the El-1 mouse locus

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cendes, I.; Mulley, J.C.; Andermann, E.

    1994-09-01

    Recently, six families with a familial form of partial epilepsy were described. All pedigrees showed autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Affected individuals present with predominantly nocturnal seizures with frontal lobe semiology. In 1959, a genetic mouse model for partial epilepsy, the El mouse, was reported. In the El mouse, a major seizure susceptibility gene, El-1, segregates in an autosomal dominant fashion and has been localized to a region distal to the centromere of mouse chromosome 9. Comparative genetic maps between man and mouse have been used for prediction of localization of several human disease genes. Because the region of mouse chromosome 9 that is the most likely to contain the El-1 locus is syntenic to regions on human chromosomes 3q21-p22, 3q21-q23.3, 6q12 and 15q24, we adopted the candidate gene approach as an initial linkage strategy. Twenty-two polymorphic microsatellite markers covering these regions were used for genotyping individuals in the three larger families ascertained, two of which are Australian and one French-Canadian. Negative two-point lod scores were obtained separately for each family. The analysis of all three families combined significantly excludes the candidate regions on chromosomes 3, 6 and 15.

  20. Genetic analysis of a novel plasmid encoded durancin locus in Enterococcus durans 41D

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Enterococcus durans is commonly found in the intestinal tract in humans and animals and several strains are known to produce bacteriocins. Durancin GL, a novel bacteriocin of Enterococcus durans 41D with antilisterial activity was isolated from artisanal cheese samples and its genetic determinants ...

  1. Multi-locus genetic evidence for rapid ecologically based speciation in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Pfrender, M E; Spitze, K; Lehman, N

    2000-11-01

    The process of speciation involves the divergence of two or more subpopulations of a parent species into independent evolutionary trajectories. To study this process in natural populations requires a detailed knowledge of the genetic and ecological characteristics of the parent species and an understanding of how its populations can lose evolutionary cohesion. The cosmopolitan and speciose genus Daphnia provides many of these features by existing in multiple freshwater habitat types, particularly permanent lakes and temporary ponds, each of which presents distinct ecological challenges. We assayed the genetic composition of 20 temporary pond populations of members of the Daphnia pulex species complex in north-western Oregon and compared them to published data on related lake and pond populations. We collected molecular genetic data from 13 allozyme loci, from six microsatellite loci, and from the control region of the mitochondrial DNA. By assaying over 400 individual Daphnia for these data, we were able to compile composite genotypes not only of individual Daphnia but of each pond population as a whole. In these ponds, we discovered two distinct genotypic constellations, one which bears resemblance to the lake-dwelling taxon D. pulicaria, and one which bears resemblance to the pond-dwelling taxon, D. pulex. Using published genetic data from these and other species as a frame of reference, we characterized 13 of these ponds as being 'pond-like', three as being 'lake-like', and four as being 'mixed'. Unlike studies performed elsewhere, however, these ponds do not exhibit high probabilities of interspecific hybridization. Over 95% of all individuals have either a lake-like or a pond-like genotype at all three genetic systems, suggesting the two forms do not represent hybridized vs. nonhybridized genotypes. Because both types can be found in the same ponds at the same time in gametic disequilibrium, we also discount the possibility that they are two extremes of a

  2. Mapping and Genetic Structure Analysis of the Anthracnose Resistance Locus Co-1HY in the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lanfen; Mantri, Nitin; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Zhendong; Wang, Shumin

    2017-01-01

    Anthracnose is a destructive disease of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The Andean cultivar Hongyundou has been demonstrated to possess strong resistance to anthracnose race 81. To study the genetics of this resistance, the Hongyundou cultivar was crossed with a susceptible genotype Jingdou. Segregation of resistance for race 81 was assessed in the F2 population and F2:3 lines under controlled conditions. Results indicate that Hongyundou carries a single dominant gene for anthracnose resistance. An allele test by crossing Hongyundou with another resistant cultivar revealed that the resistance gene is in the Co-1 locus (therefore named Co-1HY). The physical distance between this locus and the two flanking markers was 46 kb, and this region included four candidate genes, namely, Phvul.001G243500, Phvul.001G243600, Phvul.001G243700 and Phvul.001G243800. These candidate genes encoded serine/threonine-protein kinases. Expression analysis of the four candidate genes in the resistant and susceptible cultivars under control condition and inoculated treatment revealed that all the four candidate genes are expressed at significantly higher levels in the resistant genotype than in susceptible genotype. Phvul.001G243600 and Phvul.001G243700 are expressed nearly 15-fold and 90-fold higher in the resistant genotype than in the susceptible parent before inoculation, respectively. Four candidate genes will provide useful information for further research into the resistance mechanism of anthracnose in common bean. The closely linked flanking markers identified here may be useful for transferring the resistance allele Co-1HY from Hongyundou to elite anthracnose susceptible common bean lines. PMID:28076395

  3. Mapping and Genetic Structure Analysis of the Anthracnose Resistance Locus Co-1HY in the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingli; Wu, Jing; Wang, Lanfen; Mantri, Nitin; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Zhendong; Wang, Shumin

    2017-01-01

    Anthracnose is a destructive disease of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The Andean cultivar Hongyundou has been demonstrated to possess strong resistance to anthracnose race 81. To study the genetics of this resistance, the Hongyundou cultivar was crossed with a susceptible genotype Jingdou. Segregation of resistance for race 81 was assessed in the F2 population and F2:3 lines under controlled conditions. Results indicate that Hongyundou carries a single dominant gene for anthracnose resistance. An allele test by crossing Hongyundou with another resistant cultivar revealed that the resistance gene is in the Co-1 locus (therefore named Co-1HY). The physical distance between this locus and the two flanking markers was 46 kb, and this region included four candidate genes, namely, Phvul.001G243500, Phvul.001G243600, Phvul.001G243700 and Phvul.001G243800. These candidate genes encoded serine/threonine-protein kinases. Expression analysis of the four candidate genes in the resistant and susceptible cultivars under control condition and inoculated treatment revealed that all the four candidate genes are expressed at significantly higher levels in the resistant genotype than in susceptible genotype. Phvul.001G243600 and Phvul.001G243700 are expressed nearly 15-fold and 90-fold higher in the resistant genotype than in the susceptible parent before inoculation, respectively. Four candidate genes will provide useful information for further research into the resistance mechanism of anthracnose in common bean. The closely linked flanking markers identified here may be useful for transferring the resistance allele Co-1HY from Hongyundou to elite anthracnose susceptible common bean lines.

  4. The sil Locus in Streptococcus Anginosus Group: Interspecies Competition and a Hotspot of Genetic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Mendonca, Michelle L.; Szamosi, Jake C.; Lacroix, Anne-Marie; Fontes, Michelle E.; Bowdish, Dawn M.; Surette, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    The Streptococcus Invasion Locus (Sil) was first described in Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae, where it has been implicated in virulence. The two-component peptide signaling system consists of the SilA response regulator and SilB histidine kinase along with the SilCR signaling peptide and SilD/E export/processing proteins. The presence of an associated bacteriocin region suggests this system may play a role in competitive interactions with other microbes. Comparative analysis of 42 Streptococcus Anginosus/Milleri Group (SAG) genomes reveals this to be a hot spot for genomic variability. A cluster of bacteriocin/immunity genes is found adjacent to the sil system in most SAG isolates (typically 6–10 per strain). In addition, there were two distinct SilCR peptides identified in this group, denoted here as SilCRSAG-A and SilCRSAG-B, with corresponding alleles in silB. Our analysis of the 42 sil loci showed that SilCRSAG-A is only found in Streptococcus intermedius while all three species can carry SilCRSAG-B. In S. intermedius B196, a putative SilA operator is located upstream of bacteriocin gene clusters, implicating the sil system in regulation of microbe–microbe interactions at mucosal surfaces where the group resides. We demonstrate that S. intermedius B196 responds to its cognate SilCRSAG-A, and, less effectively, to SilCRSAG-B released by other Anginosus group members, to produce putative bacteriocins and inhibit the growth of a sensitive strain of S. constellatus. PMID:28119678

  5. The sil Locus in Streptococcus Anginosus Group: Interspecies Competition and a Hotspot of Genetic Diversity.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Michelle L; Szamosi, Jake C; Lacroix, Anne-Marie; Fontes, Michelle E; Bowdish, Dawn M; Surette, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    The Streptococcus Invasion Locus (Sil) was first described in Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae, where it has been implicated in virulence. The two-component peptide signaling system consists of the SilA response regulator and SilB histidine kinase along with the SilCR signaling peptide and SilD/E export/processing proteins. The presence of an associated bacteriocin region suggests this system may play a role in competitive interactions with other microbes. Comparative analysis of 42 Streptococcus Anginosus/Milleri Group (SAG) genomes reveals this to be a hot spot for genomic variability. A cluster of bacteriocin/immunity genes is found adjacent to the sil system in most SAG isolates (typically 6-10 per strain). In addition, there were two distinct SilCR peptides identified in this group, denoted here as SilCRSAG-A and SilCRSAG-B, with corresponding alleles in silB. Our analysis of the 42 sil loci showed that SilCRSAG-A is only found in Streptococcus intermedius while all three species can carry SilCRSAG-B. In S. intermedius B196, a putative SilA operator is located upstream of bacteriocin gene clusters, implicating the sil system in regulation of microbe-microbe interactions at mucosal surfaces where the group resides. We demonstrate that S. intermedius B196 responds to its cognate SilCRSAG-A, and, less effectively, to SilCRSAG-B released by other Anginosus group members, to produce putative bacteriocins and inhibit the growth of a sensitive strain of S. constellatus.

  6. Genetic mapping reveals that sinefungin resistance in Toxoplasma gondii is controlled by a putative amino acid transporter locus that can be used as a negative selectable marker.

    PubMed

    Behnke, Michael S; Khan, Asis; Sibley, L David

    2015-02-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping studies have been integral in identifying and understanding virulence mechanisms in the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. In this study, we interrogated a different phenotype by mapping sinefungin (SNF) resistance in the genetic cross between type 2 ME49-FUDR(r) and type 10 VAND-SNF(r). The genetic map of this cross was generated by whole-genome sequencing of the progeny and subsequent identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) inherited from the parents. Based on this high-density genetic map, we were able to pinpoint the sinefungin resistance phenotype to one significant locus on chromosome IX. Within this locus, a single nonsynonymous SNP (nsSNP) resulting in an early stop codon in the TGVAND_290860 gene was identified, occurring only in the sinefungin-resistant progeny. Using CRISPR/CAS9, we were able to confirm that targeted disruption of TGVAND_290860 renders parasites sinefungin resistant. Because disruption of the SNR1 gene confers resistance, we also show that it can be used as a negative selectable marker to insert either a positive drug selection cassette or a heterologous reporter. These data demonstrate the power of combining classical genetic mapping, whole-genome sequencing, and CRISPR-mediated gene disruption for combined forward and reverse genetic strategies in T. gondii.

  7. Using multi-locus allelic sequence data to estimate genetic divergence among four Lilium (Liliaceae) cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Shahin, Arwa; Smulders, Marinus J. M.; van Tuyl, Jaap M.; Arens, Paul; Bakker, Freek T.

    2014-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) may enable estimating relationships among genotypes using allelic variation of multiple nuclear genes simultaneously. We explored the potential and caveats of this strategy in four genetically distant Lilium cultivars to estimate their genetic divergence from transcriptome sequences using three approaches: POFAD (Phylogeny of Organisms from Allelic Data, uses allelic information of sequence data), RAxML (Randomized Accelerated Maximum Likelihood, tree building based on concatenated consensus sequences) and Consensus Network (constructing a network summarizing among gene tree conflicts). Twenty six gene contigs were chosen based on the presence of orthologous sequences in all cultivars, seven of which also had an orthologous sequence in Tulipa, used as out-group. The three approaches generated the same topology. Although the resolution offered by these approaches is high, in this case there was no extra benefit in using allelic information. We conclude that these 26 genes can be widely applied to construct a species tree for the genus Lilium. PMID:25368628

  8. Using multi-locus allelic sequence data to estimate genetic divergence among four Lilium (Liliaceae) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Arwa; Smulders, Marinus J M; van Tuyl, Jaap M; Arens, Paul; Bakker, Freek T

    2014-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) may enable estimating relationships among genotypes using allelic variation of multiple nuclear genes simultaneously. We explored the potential and caveats of this strategy in four genetically distant Lilium cultivars to estimate their genetic divergence from transcriptome sequences using three approaches: POFAD (Phylogeny of Organisms from Allelic Data, uses allelic information of sequence data), RAxML (Randomized Accelerated Maximum Likelihood, tree building based on concatenated consensus sequences) and Consensus Network (constructing a network summarizing among gene tree conflicts). Twenty six gene contigs were chosen based on the presence of orthologous sequences in all cultivars, seven of which also had an orthologous sequence in Tulipa, used as out-group. The three approaches generated the same topology. Although the resolution offered by these approaches is high, in this case there was no extra benefit in using allelic information. We conclude that these 26 genes can be widely applied to construct a species tree for the genus Lilium.

  9. Genetic mapping of a mouse chromosomal locus required for mink cell focus-forming virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, C A

    1983-01-01

    Mouse-hamster somatic cell hybrids were used to show that the recombinant mink cell focus-forming murine leukemia viruses and their ecotropic virus progenitors require different mouse chromosomes for replication. Mouse chromosome 1 was shown to carry the genetic information necessary for the replication of six different mink cell focus-forming isolates, and this gene, designated Rmc-1, was tentatively positioned at the distal end of the chromosome. PMID:6310150

  10. Genetic and physical mapping at the limb-girdle muscular dystrophy locus (LGMD2B) on chromosome 2p

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, R.; Keers, S.; Strachan, T.

    1996-04-01

    The limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, different forms of which have been mapped to at least six distinct genetic loci. We have mapped to at least six distinct genetic loci. We have mapped an autosomal recessive form of LGMD (LGMD2B) to chromosome 2p13. Two other conditions have been shown to map to this region or to the homologous region in mouse: a gene for a form of autosomal recessive distal muscular dystrophy, Miyoshi myopathy, shows linkage to the same markers on chromosome 2p as LGMD2B, and an autosomal recessive mouse mutation mnd2, in which there is rapidly progressive paralysis and muscle atrophy, has been mapped to mouse chromosome 6 to a region showing conserved synteny with human chromosome 2p12-p13. We have assembled a 6-cM YAC contig spanning the LGMD2B locus and have mapped seven genes and 13 anonymous polymorphic microsatellites to it. Using haplotype analysis in the linked families, we have narrowed our region of interest to a 0-cM interval between D2S2113 and D2S145, which does not overlap with the critical region for mnd2 in mouse. Use of these most closely linked markers will help to determine the relationship between LGMD2B and Miyoshi myopathy. YACs selected from our contig will be the starting point for the cloning of the LGMD2B gene and thereby establish the biological basis for this form of muscular dystrophy and its relationship with the other limb-girdle muscular dystrophies. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Leishmania infantum from Southeastern France: Evaluation Using Multi-Locus Microsatellite Typing

    PubMed Central

    Pomares, Christelle; Marty, Pierre; Bañuls, Anne Laure; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Pratlong, Francine; Faucher, Benoît; Jeddi, Fakhri; Moore, Sandy; Michel, Grégory; Aluru, Srikanth; Piarroux, Renaud; Hide, Mallorie

    2016-01-01

    In the south of France, Leishmania infantum is responsible for numerous cases of canine leishmaniasis (CanL), sporadic cases of human visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and rare cases of cutaneous and muco-cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL and MCL, respectively). Several endemic areas have been clearly identified in the south of France including the Pyrénées-Orientales, Cévennes (CE), Provence (P), Alpes-Maritimes (AM) and Corsica (CO). Within these endemic areas, the two cities of Nice (AM) and Marseille (P), which are located 150 km apart, and their surroundings, concentrate the greatest number of French autochthonous leishmaniasis cases. In this study, 270 L. infantum isolates from an extended time period (1978–2011) from four endemic areas, AM, P, CE and CO, were assessed using Multi-Locus Microsatellite Typing (MLMT). MLMT revealed a total of 121 different genotypes with 91 unique genotypes and 30 repeated genotypes. Substantial genetic diversity was found with a strong genetic differentiation between the Leishmania populations from AM and P. However, exchanges were observed between these two endemic areas in which it seems that strains spread from AM to P. The genetic differentiations in these areas suggest strong epidemiological structuring. A model-based analysis using STRUCTURE revealed two main populations: population A (consisting of samples primarily from the P and AM endemic areas with MON-1 and non-MON-1 strains) and population B consisting of only MON-1 strains essentially from the AM endemic area. For four patients, we observed several isolates from different biological samples which provided insight into disease relapse and re-infection. These findings shed light on the transmission dynamics of parasites in humans. However, further data are required to confirm this hypothesis based on a limited sample set. This study represents the most extensive population analysis of L. infantum strains using MLMT conducted in France. PMID:26808522

  12. Multi-Locus Phylogeographic and Population Genetic Analysis of Anolis carolinensis: Historical Demography of a Genomic Model Species

    PubMed Central

    Tollis, Marc; Ausubel, Gavriel; Ghimire, Dhruba; Boissinot, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    The green anole (Anolis carolinensis) has been widely used as an animal model in physiology and neurobiology but has recently emerged as an important genomic model. The recent sequencing of its genome has shed new light on the evolution of vertebrate genomes and on the process that govern species diversification. Surprisingly, the patterns of genetic diversity within natural populations of this widespread and abundant North American lizard remain relatively unknown. In the present study, we use 10 novel nuclear DNA sequence loci (N = 62 to 152) and one mitochondrial locus (N = 226) to delimit green anole populations and infer their historical demography. We uncovered four evolutionarily distinct and geographically restricted lineages of green anoles using phylogenetics, Bayesian clustering, and genetic distance methods. Molecular dating indicates that these lineages last shared a common ancestor ∼2 million years ago. Summary statistics and analysis of the frequency distributions of DNA polymorphisms strongly suggest range-wide expansions in population size. Using Bayesian Skyline Plots, we inferred the timing of population size expansions, which differ across lineages, and found evidence for a relatively recent and rapid westward expansion of green anoles across the Gulf Coastal Plain during the mid-Pleistocene. One surprising result is that the distribution of genetic diversity is not consistent with a latitudinal shift caused by climatic oscillations as is observed for many co-distributed taxa. This suggests that the most recent Pleistocene glacial cycles had a limited impact on the geographic distribution of the green anole at the northern limits of its range. PMID:22685573

  13. Association Between Genetic Variants on Chromosome 15q25 Locus and Objective Measures of Tobacco Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Timofeeva, Maria N.; Morris, Richard W.; Prieto-Merino, David; Sattar, Naveed; Brennan, Paul; Johnstone, Elaine C.; Relton, Caroline; Johnson, Paul C. D.; Walther, Donna; Whincup, Peter H.; Casas, Juan P.; Uhl, George R.; Vineis, Paolo; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Jefferis, Barbara J.; Amuzu, Antoinette; Riboli, Elio; Upton, Mark N.; Aveyard, Paul; Ebrahim, Shah; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Watt, Graham; Palmer, Tom M.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Davey Smith, George

    2012-01-01

    Background Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms, rs1051730 and rs16969968, located within the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene cluster on chromosome 15q25 locus, are associated with heaviness of smoking, risk for lung cancer, and other smoking-related health outcomes. Previous studies have typically relied on self-reported smoking behavior, which may not fully capture interindividual variation in tobacco exposure. Methods We investigated the association of rs1051730 and rs16969968 genotype (referred to as rs1051730–rs16969968, because these are in perfect linkage disequilibrium and interchangeable) with both self-reported daily cigarette consumption and biochemically measured plasma or serum cotinine levels among cigarette smokers. Summary estimates and descriptive statistical data for 12 364 subjects were obtained from six independent studies, and 2932 smokers were included in the analyses. Linear regression was used to calculate the per-allele association of rs1051730–rs16969968 genotype with cigarette consumption and cotinine levels in current smokers for each study. Meta-analysis of per-allele associations was conducted using a random effects method. The likely resulting association between genotype and lung cancer risk was assessed using published data on the association between cotinine levels and lung cancer risk. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Pooled per-allele associations showed that current smokers with one or two copies of the rs1051730–rs16969968 risk allele had increased self-reported cigarette consumption (mean increase in unadjusted number of cigarettes per day per allele = 1.0 cigarette, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.57 to 1.43 cigarettes, P = 5.22 × 10−6) and cotinine levels (mean increase in unadjusted cotinine levels per allele = 138.72 nmol/L, 95% CI = 97.91 to 179.53 nmol/L, P = 2.71 × 10−11). The increase in cotinine levels indicated an increased risk of lung cancer with each additional copy of the rs

  14. What to Expect When Meeting with a Genetic Counselor

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer Testing procedure limitations and accuracy of genetic tests Emotional, psychological, and social consequences of knowing the test results Cancer screening and surveillance options Preventive measures ...

  15. Historical gene flow and profound spatial genetic structure among golden pheasant populations suggested by multi-locus analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Ke; Liu, Hong-Yi; Ge, Yun-Fa; Wu, Shao-Ying; Wan, Qiu-Hong

    2017-05-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a good marker system for geographical genetics since they are functional genes in the immune system that are likely to affect the fitness of the individual, and the survival and evolutionary potential of a population in a changing environment. Golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) is a wild Phasianidae distributed in central and north China. In this study, we used a locus-specific genotyping technique for MHC IIB genes of golden pheasant. Combining with microsatellites (simple sequence repeat, SSR) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop region, we investigated the demographic history and illuminate genetic structure of this bird in detail. SYR (south of Yangtze river) - NYR (north of Yangtze river) lineages, separated by Yangtze River, were defined in genetic structure of MHC IIB. NYR was supposed as refuge during glacial period, suggested by diversity parameters and more ancient alleles in this region. Based on this hypothesis, there was gene flow from NYR to SYR, which was proved by three pieces of evidence: (1) distinct demographic histories of SYR (kept stable) and NYR (experienced expansion); (2) specific affiliation of LC in genetic structure of SSR and MHC genes; (3) significant gene flow from NYR to SYR. Moreover, we also found balancing selection by combination of three Grouping A2's regions (SC, QL and North) into one in Grouping B4 (NYR) and no pattern of isolation by distance (IBD) found in MHC IIB, whereas for SSR we found a relatively strong and significant IBD. Several mechanisms in the evolution of MHC IIB genes, including recombination, historically positive selection, trans-species evolution and concerted evolution, were shown by molecular and phylogenetic analysis. Overall these results suggest the Yangtze River was inferred to be a geological barrier for this avian and NYR might experience population expansion, which invaded into a neighboring region. This study contributes to the understanding of the

  16. Link functions in multi-locus genetic models: implications for testing, prediction, and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Clayton, David

    2012-05-01

    "Complex" diseases are, by definition, influenced by multiple causes, both genetic and environmental, and statistical work on the joint action of multiple risk factors has, for more than 40 years, been dominated by the generalized linear model (GLM). In genetics, models for dichotomous traits have traditionally been approached via the model of an underlying, normally distributed, liability. This corresponds to the GLM with binomial errors and a probit link function. Elsewhere in epidemiology, however, the logistic regression model, a GLM with logit link function, has been the tool of choice, largely because of its convenient properties in case-control studies. The choice of link function has usually been dictated by mathematical convenience, but it has some important implications in (a) the choice of association test statistic in the presence of existing strong risk factors, (b) the ability to predict disease from genotype given its heritability, and (c) the definition, and interpretation of epistasis (or epistacy). These issues are reviewed, and a new association test proposed.

  17. Multi-locus genetic risk score predicts risk for Crohn’s disease in Slovenian population

    PubMed Central

    Zupančič, Katarina; Skok, Kristijan; Repnik, Katja; Weersma, Rinse K; Potočnik, Uroš; Skok, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To develop a risk model for Crohn’s disease (CD) based on homogeneous population. METHODS: In our study were included 160 CD patients and 209 healthy individuals from Slovenia. The association study was performed for 112 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We generated genetic risk scores (GRS) based on the number of risk alleles using weighted additive model. Discriminatory accuracy was measured by area under ROC curve (AUC). For risk evaluation, we divided individuals according to positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR) of a test, with LR > 5 for high risk group and LR < 0.20 for low risk group. RESULTS: The highest accuracy, AUC of 0.78 was achieved with GRS combining 33 SNPs with optimal sensitivity and specificity of 75.0% and 72.7%, respectively. Individuals with the highest risk (GRS > 5.54) showed significantly increased odds of developing CD (OR = 26.65, 95%CI: 11.25-63.15) compared to the individuals with the lowest risk (GRS < 4.57) which is a considerably greater risk captured than in one SNP with the highest effect size (OR = 3.24). When more than 33 SNPs were included in GRS, discriminatory ability was not improved significantly; AUC of all 74 SNPs was 0.76. CONCLUSION: The authors proved the possibility of building accurate genetic risk score based on 33 risk variants on Slovenian CD patients which may serve as a screening tool in the targeted population. PMID:27076762

  18. Multi-locus genetic risk score predicts risk for Crohn's disease in Slovenian population.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Katarina; Skok, Kristijan; Repnik, Katja; Weersma, Rinse K; Potočnik, Uroš; Skok, Pavel

    2016-04-14

    To develop a risk model for Crohn's disease (CD) based on homogeneous population. In our study were included 160 CD patients and 209 healthy individuals from Slovenia. The association study was performed for 112 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We generated genetic risk scores (GRS) based on the number of risk alleles using weighted additive model. Discriminatory accuracy was measured by area under ROC curve (AUC). For risk evaluation, we divided individuals according to positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR) of a test, with LR > 5 for high risk group and LR < 0.20 for low risk group. The highest accuracy, AUC of 0.78 was achieved with GRS combining 33 SNPs with optimal sensitivity and specificity of 75.0% and 72.7%, respectively. Individuals with the highest risk (GRS > 5.54) showed significantly increased odds of developing CD (OR = 26.65, 95%CI: 11.25-63.15) compared to the individuals with the lowest risk (GRS < 4.57) which is a considerably greater risk captured than in one SNP with the highest effect size (OR = 3.24). When more than 33 SNPs were included in GRS, discriminatory ability was not improved significantly; AUC of all 74 SNPs was 0.76. The authors proved the possibility of building accurate genetic risk score based on 33 risk variants on Slovenian CD patients which may serve as a screening tool in the targeted population.

  19. Glossogeny and phylogeny: cultural evolution meets genetic evolution.

    PubMed

    Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2008-08-01

    Evolutionary theorists since Darwin have been interested in the parallels and interactions between biological and cultural evolution. Recent applications of empirical techniques originally developed to analyze molecular genetic data to linguistic data offer new insights into the historical evolution of language, revealing fascinating parallels between language change and biological evolution. This work offers considerable potential toward unified theories of genetic and cultural change.

  20. The genetic basis of Muir-Torre syndrome includes the hMLH1 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Bapat, B.; Xia, L.; Mitri, A.

    1996-09-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS) (McKusick 158320) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the development of sebaceous gland tumors and skin cancers, including keratoacanthomas and basal cell carcinomas. Affected family members may manifest a wide spectrum of internal malignancies, which include colorectal, endometrial, urologic, and upper gastrointestinal neoplasms. Sebaceous gland tumors, which are rare in the general population, are considered to be the hallmark of MTS and may arise prior to the development of other visceral cancers. Despite the high incidence of synchronous and metachronous tumors, prognosis is often favorable. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is one of the most common autosomal dominantly inherited colorectal cancer susceptibility syndromes. In some HNPCC families, extracolonic tumors of the endometrium, ovary, small bowel, and renal and biliary tract occur at an increased frequency. On the basis of similarities in clinical symptoms of MTS and HNPCC, it is proposed that these two syndromes may have a common genetic basis. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Genetic linkage analysis in familial Benign (Hypocalciuric) Hypercalcemia: Evidence for locus heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, H. III; Otterud, B.; Leppert, M.F. ); Jackson, C.E. )

    1993-07-01

    Familial benign hypercalcemia (FBH, or hypocalciuric hypercalcemia) is characterized by inheritance, in an autosomal dominant pattern, of lifelong hypercalcemia without hypercalciuria, which is often mistaken for classical primary hyperparathyroidism. Recently, the FBH trait was linked, in four families, to chromosome 3q. The authors report genetic linkage analysis in 140 persons from five additional families having FBH (65 affected, 67 unaffected, and 8 unclassifiable). In four families, FBH mapped to chromosome 3q, between D3S1215 and D3S20, maximum multipoint lod score 12.9. By contrast, in the fifth kindred FBH mapped to chromosome 19p13.3, tightly linked to the marker loci D19S20 and D19S266 (two-point lod score at recombination fraction = .001 is 3.44 and 3.70, respectively). Thus, the FBH phenotype results from mutations at two separate loci on chromosomes 3q and 19p. 25 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Common genetic variation at the IL1RL1 locus regulates IL-33/ST2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jennifer E; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Ming-Huei; Larson, Martin G; McCabe, Elizabeth L; Cheng, Susan; Ghorbani, Anahita; Coglianese, Erin; Emilsson, Valur; Johnson, Andrew D; Walter, Stefan; Franceschini, Nora; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Dehghan, Abbas; Lu, Chen; Levy, Daniel; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Lin, Honghuang; Felix, Janine F; Schreiter, Eric R; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Januzzi, James L; Lee, Richard T; Wang, Thomas J

    2013-10-01

    The suppression of tumorigenicity 2/IL-33 (ST2/IL-33) pathway has been implicated in several immune and inflammatory diseases. ST2 is produced as 2 isoforms. The membrane-bound isoform (ST2L) induces an immune response when bound to its ligand, IL-33. The other isoform is a soluble protein (sST2) that is thought to be a decoy receptor for IL-33 signaling. Elevated sST2 levels in serum are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. We investigated the determinants of sST2 plasma concentrations in 2,991 Framingham Offspring Cohort participants. While clinical and environmental factors explained some variation in sST2 levels, much of the variation in sST2 production was driven by genetic factors. In a genome-wide association study (GWAS), multiple SNPs within IL1RL1 (the gene encoding ST2) demonstrated associations with sST2 concentrations. Five missense variants of IL1RL1 correlated with higher sST2 levels in the GWAS and mapped to the intracellular domain of ST2, which is absent in sST2. In a cell culture model, IL1RL1 missense variants increased sST2 expression by inducing IL-33 expression and enhancing IL-33 responsiveness (via ST2L). Our data suggest that genetic variation in IL1RL1 can result in increased levels of sST2 and alter immune and inflammatory signaling through the ST2/IL-33 pathway.

  3. Moroccan Leishmania infantum: Genetic Diversity and Population Structure as Revealed by Multi-Locus Microsatellite Typing

    PubMed Central

    Lemrani, Meryem; Mouna, Idrissi; Mohammed, Hida; Mostafa, Sabri; Rhajaoui, Mohamed; Hamarsheh, Omar; Schönian, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Leishmania infantum causes Visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis in northern Morocco. It predominantly affects children under 5 years with incidence of 150 cases/year. Genetic variability and population structure have been investigated for 33 strains isolated from infected dogs and humans in Morocco. A multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT) approach was used in which a MLMtype based on size variation in 14 independent microsatellite markers was compiled for each strain. MLMT profiles of 10 Tunisian, 10 Algerian and 21 European strains which belonged to zymodeme MON-1 and non-MON-1 according to multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) were included for comparison. A Bayesian model-based approach and phylogenetic analysis inferred two L.infantum sub-populations; Sub-population A consists of 13 Moroccan strains grouped with all European strains of MON-1 type; and sub-population B consists of 15 Moroccan strains grouped with the Tunisian and Algerian MON-1 strains. Theses sub-populations were significantly different from each other and from the Tunisian, Algerian and European non MON-1 strains which constructed one separate population. The presence of these two sub-populations co-existing in Moroccan endemics suggests multiple introduction of L. infantum from/to Morocco; (1) Introduction from/to the neighboring North African countries, (2) Introduction from/to the Europe. These scenarios are supported by the presence of sub-population B and sub-population A respectively. Gene flow was noticed between sub-populations A and B. Five strains showed mixed A/B genotypes indicating possible recombination between the two populations. MLMT has proven to be a powerful tool for eco-epidemiological and population genetic investigations of Leishmania. PMID:24147078

  4. Genetic subtyping of Listeria monocytogenes via multiple-locus sequence typing using iap, sigB and actA

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIKAWA, Yuko; OCHIAI, Yoshitsugu; MOCHIZUKI, Mariko; FUJITA, Osamu; TAKANO, Takashi; HONDO, Ryo; UEDA, Fukiko

    2016-01-01

    Pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is widely used for listeriosis surveillance. Although this technique is effective for epidemiology, the data among laboratories are inconsistent. We previously reported a method for Listeria monocytogenes subtyping combined with sequence analysis of partial iap and whole genome restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) using XbaI, ClaI (BanIII) and PstI. However, distinguishing subtypes was challenging, because the output comprised complicated fragment patterns. In this study, we aimed to establish a simple genotyping method that does not depend on visual observation, rather it focuses on multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) using three genes, iap, sigB and actA. Sixty-eight strains of L. monocytogenes including EGD-e as a reference strain were investigated to ensure consistency with previous data on the genetic characterization. All strains were grouped into 29 types by both analyses. Although there are some differences in classification, major clades included the same strains. Simpson’s indices of diversity (SID) by MLST and iap-RFLP-based typing were 0.967 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.955/0.978) and 0.967 (95% CI: 0.955/0.979), respectively. The discriminatory power of both methods can be considered almost identical. Compared with the results of 38 selected strains, the strains within the MLST clusters in this study coincided with those obtained using PFGE. Thus, the MLST strategy could help differentiate among L. monocytogenes isolates during epidemiological studies. PMID:27725353

  5. Genetic locus on chromosome 6p for multicystic renal dysplasia, pelvi-ureteral junction stenosis, and vesicoureteral reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Devriendt, K.; Fryns, J.P.

    1995-11-20

    Robson et al. suggest that renal agenesis, multicystic renal dysplasia (MRD), and uretero-pelvic junction (PUJ) stenosis are pathogenetically related. They proposed a vascular disruption as the cause, with the variable severity of the disorder related to the timing of the abnormal blood supply to the ureteric bud. Alternatively, there exists convincing evidence of a genetic cause transmitted as an autosomal dominant disorder with variable expression, and with a candidate gene localized on chromosome arm 6p. Combinations of these urological malformations occur in the same individual or in different relatives in the same family. In several families with PUJ-stenosis, linkage with the HLA-locus on 6p has been demonstrated. Furthermore, we recently described a patient with a de novo reciprocal translocation involving the same region on 6p in a patient with bilateral multicystic renal dysplasia. Most disease-associated reciprocal translocations appear to have a breakpoint within a candidate gene: therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesize that the breakpoint on 6p in this patient resides within a gene causing MRD. This suggests that mutations in the same gene may lead either to PUJ-stenosis or, when the stenosis is complete, to MRD. A translocation is expected to result in a complete disruption of the gene, and this could explain the severe clinical expression of bilateral MRD. Less severe mutations in the same gene, associated with a partially conserved gene function, could lead to PUJ-stenosis. 11 refs.

  6. Genetic mapping of Eutr1, a locus controlling E2-induced pyometritis in the Brown Norway rat, to RNO5.

    PubMed

    Gould, Karen A; Pandey, Jyotsna; Lachel, Cynthia M; Murrin, Clare R; Flood, Lisa A; Pennington, Karen L; Schaffer, Beverly S; Tochacek, Martin; McComb, Rodney D; Meza, Jane L; Wendell, Douglas L; Shull, James D

    2005-11-01

    In certain rat strains, chronic estrogen administration can lead to pyometritis, an inflammation of the uterus accompanied by infection and the accumulation of intraluminal pus. In this article, we report that the Brown Norway (BN) rat is highly susceptible to pyometritis induced by 17beta-estradiol (E2). The susceptibility of the BN rat to E2-induced pyometritis appears to segregate as a recessive trait in crosses to the resistant August x Copenhagen Irish (ACI) strain. In a (BN x ACI)F(2) population, we find strong evidence for a major genetic determinant of susceptibility to E2-induced pyometritis on rat chromosome 5 (RNO5). Our data are most consistent with a model in which the BN allele of this locus, designated Eutr1 (Estrogen-induced uterine response 1), acts in an incompletely dominant manner to control E2-induced pyometritis. Furthermore, we have confirmed the contribution of Eutr1 to E2-induced uterine pyometritis using an RNO5 congenic rat strain. In addition to Eutr1, we obtained evidence suggestive of linkage for five additional loci on RNO2, 4, 11, 17, and X that control susceptibility to E2-induced pyometritis in the (BN x ACI)F(2) population.

  7. The macromelanophore locus and the melanoma oncogene Xmrk are separate genetic entities in the genome of Xiphophorus.

    PubMed Central

    Weis, S; Schartl, M

    1998-01-01

    Fish of the genus Xiphophorus are polymorphic for black pigmentation patterns. Certain intra- or interspecific hybrids exhibit enhanced expression of these patterns, leading in many cases to malignant melanoma. Because no recombination was ever observed between the pattern information and the genetic predisposition to develop melanoma after hybridization, a "tumor gene" (Tu) was postulated that encodes both phenotypes. A dominant oncogene, ONC-Xmrk, was then found to be necessary and sufficient for the transforming function of Tu. Here we present molecular evidence that ONC-Xmrk and the pigment pattern information are encoded by separate, although intimately linked loci. No ONC-Xmrk gene was present in the 15 Xiphophorus strains investigated which exhibit no black pigmentation pattern. Five different patterns from Xiphophorus maculatus, X. evelynae, X. milleri, X. cortezi, and X. montezumae were associated with ONC-Xmrk and were melanomagenic, while fish of X. helleri, X. variatus, X. nezahualcoyotl, and X. montezumae with five other patterns had no ONC-Xmrk and consequently did not produce hybrid melanoma. These data provide evidence that ONC-Xmrk is sufficient for tumorigenesis in Xiphophorus hybrids, and that a separate, pigment pattern-encoding locus is closely linked to it. PMID:9691046

  8. The macromelanophore locus and the melanoma oncogene Xmrk are separate genetic entities in the genome of Xiphophorus.

    PubMed

    Weis, S; Schartl, M

    1998-08-01

    Fish of the genus Xiphophorus are polymorphic for black pigmentation patterns. Certain intra- or interspecific hybrids exhibit enhanced expression of these patterns, leading in many cases to malignant melanoma. Because no recombination was ever observed between the pattern information and the genetic predisposition to develop melanoma after hybridization, a "tumor gene" (Tu) was postulated that encodes both phenotypes. A dominant oncogene, ONC-Xmrk, was then found to be necessary and sufficient for the transforming function of Tu. Here we present molecular evidence that ONC-Xmrk and the pigment pattern information are encoded by separate, although intimately linked loci. No ONC-Xmrk gene was present in the 15 Xiphophorus strains investigated which exhibit no black pigmentation pattern. Five different patterns from Xiphophorus maculatus, X. evelynae, X. milleri, X. cortezi, and X. montezumae were associated with ONC-Xmrk and were melanomagenic, while fish of X. helleri, X. variatus, X. nezahualcoyotl, and X. montezumae with five other patterns had no ONC-Xmrk and consequently did not produce hybrid melanoma. These data provide evidence that ONC-Xmrk is sufficient for tumorigenesis in Xiphophorus hybrids, and that a separate, pigment pattern-encoding locus is closely linked to it.

  9. Genetic diversity and population genetic analysis of bovine MHC class II DRB3.2 locus in three Bos indicus cattle breeds of Southern India.

    PubMed

    Das, D N; Sri Hari, V G; Hatkar, D N; Rengarajan, K; Saravanan, R; Suryanarayana, V V S; Murthy, L K

    2012-12-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the genetic polymorphism of BoLA-DRB3.2 locus in Malnad Gidda, Hallikar and Ongole South Indian Bos indicus cattle breeds, employing the PCR-RFLP technique. In Malnad Gidda population, 37 BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles were detected, including one novel allele DRB3*2503 (GenBank: HM031389) that was observed in the frequency of 1.87%. In Hallikar and Ongole populations, 29 and 21 BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles were identified, respectively. The frequencies of the most common BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles (with allele frequency > 5%), in Malnad Gidda population, were DRB3.2*15 (10.30%), DRB3*5702 (9.35%), DRB3.2*16 (8.41%), DRB3.2*23 (7.01%) and DRB3.2*09 (5.61%). In Hallikar population, the most common alleles were DRB3.2*11 (13.00%), DRB3.2*44 (11.60%), DRB3.2*31 (10.30%), DRB3.2*28 (5.48%) and DRB3.2*51 (5.48%). The most common alleles in Ongole population were DRB3.2*15 (22.50%), DRB3.2*06 (20.00%), DRB3.2*13 (13.30%), DRB3.2*12 (9.17%) and DRB3.2*23 (7.50%). A high degree of heterozygosity observed in Malnad Gidda (H(O) = 0.934, H(E) = 0.955), Hallikar (H(O) = 0.931, H(E) = 0.943) and Ongole (H(O) = 0.800, H(E) = 0.878) populations, along with F(IS) values close to F(IS) zero (Malnad Gidda: F(IS) = 0.0221, Hallikar: F(IS) = 0.0127 and Ongole: F(IS) = 0.0903), yielded nonsignificant P-values with respect to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium probabilities revealing, no perceptible inbreeding, greater genetic diversity and characteristic population structure being preserved in the three studied cattle populations. The phylogenetic tree constructed based on the frequencies of BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles observed in 10 Bos indicus and Bos taurus cattle breeds revealed distinct clustering of specific Bos indicus cattle breeds, along with unique genetic differentiation observed among them. The results of this study demonstrated that the BoLA-DRB3.2 is a highly polymorphic locus, with significant breed-specific genetic diversities being present amongst the three studied

  10. A genetic locus closely linked to a protease inhibitor gene complex controls the level of multiple RNA transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, R E; Shaw, P H; Barth, R K; Hastie, N D

    1985-01-01

    The two major protease inhibitors in mouse plasma are alpha 1-protease inhibitor (alpha 1-PI), putative inhibitor of neutrophil elastase, and contrapsin, an inhibitor in vitro of trypsinlike proteases. We have shown by nucleotide sequence analysis that these two inhibitors are related (R. E. Hill, P. H. Shaw, P. A. Boyd, H. Baumann, and N. D. Hastie, Nature (London) 311:175-177, 1984). Here, we show that the contrapsin and alpha 1-PI genes are members of two different multigene families, each containing at least three genes in mice and rats. We established the chromosomal locations of these genes by analyzing the segregation of restriction fragment length polymorphisms in recombinant inbred mouse strains. These experiments show that the multiple genes in each family are clustered and that the two gene families are closely linked on chromosome 12. Thus the genes for contrapsin and alpha 1-PI are likely to have evolved by duplication of a common ancestral gene. The contrapsin multigene family codes for multiple mRNA transcripts in the liver. There is a genetic difference among inbred mouse strains in the regulation of two of these transcripts. In some inbred strains the transcripts are synthesized constitutively; in others they are induced by inflammation. We mapped in recombinant inbred strains the regulatory locus responsible for this genetic variation and found it is linked to the contrapsin multigene family, which suggests a cis-acting regulatory element. We also found that the contrapsin and the alpha 1-PI multigene families have acquired very different regulatory responses since the time of the gene duplication event. Images PMID:2427931

  11. Effects of genetic and environmental factors on trait network predictions from quantitative trait locus data.

    PubMed

    Remington, David L

    2009-03-01

    The use of high-throughput genomic techniques to map gene expression quantitative trait loci has spurred the development of path analysis approaches for predicting functional networks linking genes and natural trait variation. The goal of this study was to test whether potentially confounding factors, including effects of common environment and genes not included in path models, affect predictions of cause-effect relationships among traits generated by QTL path analyses. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test simple QTL-trait networks under different regulatory scenarios involving direct and indirect effects. SEM identified the correct models under simple scenarios, but when common-environment effects were simulated in conjunction with direct QTL effects on traits, they were poorly distinguished from indirect effects, leading to false support for indirect models. Application of SEM to loblolly pine QTL data provided support for biologically plausible a priori hypotheses of QTL mechanisms affecting height and diameter growth. However, some biologically implausible models were also well supported. The results emphasize the need to include any available functional information, including predictions for genetic and environmental correlations, to develop plausible models if biologically useful trait network predictions are to be made.

  12. Genetic diversity at the Dhn3 locus in Turkish Hordeum spontaneum populations with comparative structural analyses.

    PubMed

    Uçarlı, Cüneyt; McGuffin, Liam J; Çaputlu, Süleyman; Aravena, Andres; Gürel, Filiz

    2016-02-12

    We analysed Hordeum spontaneum accessions from 21 different locations to understand the genetic diversity of HsDhn3 alleles and effects of single base mutations on the intrinsically disordered structure of the resulting polypeptide (HsDHN3). HsDHN3 was found to be YSK2-type with a low-frequency 6-aa deletion in the beginning of Exon 1. There is relatively high diversity in the intron region of HsDhn3 compared to the two exon regions. We have found subtle differences in K segments led to changes in amino acids chemical properties. Predictions for protein interaction profiles suggest the presence of a protein-binding site in HsDHN3 that coincides with the K1 segment. Comparison of DHN3 to closely related cereals showed that all of them contain a nuclear localization signal sequence flanking to the K1 segment and a novel conserved region located between the S and K1 segments [E(D/T)DGMGGR]. We found that H. vulgare, H. spontaneum, and Triticum urartu DHN3s have a greater number of phosphorylation sites for protein kinase C than other cereal species, which may be related to stress adaptation. Our results show that the nature and extent of mutations in the conserved segments of K1 and K2 are likely to be key factors in protection of cells.

  13. Report of the 1989 Asilomar meeting on education in genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Walker, A P; Scott, J A; Biesecker, B B; Conover, B; Blake, W; Djurdjinovic, L

    1990-06-01

    In September, 1989, 35 individuals representing training programs for genetic counselors and genetic nurse specialists, the Education Committee of the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC), and others with interest and expertise in genetic counselor education met at Asilomar, CA. The purpose of this meeting was to reevaluate training program curricula, both didactic and experiential; to discuss the need for and desirability of advanced graduate education in genetic counseling; and to consider whether alternatives to master's-level training are needed to overcome a growing manpower shortage in the provision of genetics services. This article summarizes recommendations for master's-level training curricula, reviews options and implications for post-master's genetic counselor education, and examines issues related to training for people without a master's degree who also provide patient and community genetics education.

  14. Smooth and Rough Biotypes of Arcanobacterium haemolyticum Can Be Genetically Distinguished at the Arcanolysin Locus

    PubMed Central

    Ruther, Haley S.; Phillips, Kalyn; Ross, Dolores; Crawford, Alyssa; Weidner, M. Payton; Sammra, Osama; Lämmler, Christoph; McGee, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Arcanobacterium haemolyticum is a Gram-positive, β-hemolytic emerging human pathogen that is classified into smooth or rough biotypes. This bacterial species is also a rare pathogen of animals. Smooth biotypes possess smooth colony edges, are moderate to strong in β-hemolysis, and predominately cause wound infections. In contrast, rough biotypes possess rough and irregular colony edges, have weak to no β-hemolytic activity, and predominately cause pharyngitis. Using horse erythrocytes we confirmed that smooth isolates are generally more hemolytic than rough isolates. A hemolysin from A. haemolyticum, arcanolysin (aln/ALN), was recently discovered and is a member of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) family. PCR amplification of aln from all 36 smooth A. haemolyticum isolates yielded the expected 2.0 kb product. While 21 rough isolates yielded the 2.0 kb product, 16 isolates had a 3.2 kb product. The extra 1.2 kb segment was 99% identical to IS911 (insertion sequence) from Corynebacterium diphtheriae. PCR amplification and sequence analysis of the upstream region of aln revealed ~40 nucleotide polymorphisms among 73 clinical isolates from Finland, Denmark, Germany and United States (Nebraska). Remarkably, multi-sequence alignments of the aln upstream region demonstrated that ~90% of the isolates phylogenetically clustered as either smooths or roughs. Differential restriction enzyme analysis of the aln upstream region also demonstrated that the aln upstream region of most (~75%) smooth isolates was cleaved with ClaI while this region in most (~86%) rough isolates was cleaved with XcmI. We conclude that the aln upstream region can be used to genetically distinguish between smooth and rough biotypes of this important emerging pathogen. PMID:26382754

  15. Smooth and Rough Biotypes of Arcanobacterium haemolyticum Can Be Genetically Distinguished at the Arcanolysin Locus.

    PubMed

    Ruther, Haley S; Phillips, Kalyn; Ross, Dolores; Crawford, Alyssa; Weidner, M Payton; Sammra, Osama; Lämmler, Christoph; McGee, David J

    2015-01-01

    Arcanobacterium haemolyticum is a Gram-positive, β-hemolytic emerging human pathogen that is classified into smooth or rough biotypes. This bacterial species is also a rare pathogen of animals. Smooth biotypes possess smooth colony edges, are moderate to strong in β-hemolysis, and predominately cause wound infections. In contrast, rough biotypes possess rough and irregular colony edges, have weak to no β-hemolytic activity, and predominately cause pharyngitis. Using horse erythrocytes we confirmed that smooth isolates are generally more hemolytic than rough isolates. A hemolysin from A. haemolyticum, arcanolysin (aln/ALN), was recently discovered and is a member of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) family. PCR amplification of aln from all 36 smooth A. haemolyticum isolates yielded the expected 2.0 kb product. While 21 rough isolates yielded the 2.0 kb product, 16 isolates had a 3.2 kb product. The extra 1.2 kb segment was 99% identical to IS911 (insertion sequence) from Corynebacterium diphtheriae. PCR amplification and sequence analysis of the upstream region of aln revealed ~40 nucleotide polymorphisms among 73 clinical isolates from Finland, Denmark, Germany and United States (Nebraska). Remarkably, multi-sequence alignments of the aln upstream region demonstrated that ~90% of the isolates phylogenetically clustered as either smooths or roughs. Differential restriction enzyme analysis of the aln upstream region also demonstrated that the aln upstream region of most (~75%) smooth isolates was cleaved with ClaI while this region in most (~86%) rough isolates was cleaved with XcmI. We conclude that the aln upstream region can be used to genetically distinguish between smooth and rough biotypes of this important emerging pathogen.

  16. Genetic studies of mrp, a locus essential for cellular aggregation and sporulation of Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Shi, W

    2001-08-01

    Under starvation conditions, Myxococcus xanthus undergoes a complex developmental process which includes cellular aggregation and sporulation. A transposon insertion mutant (the Tn5-Omega280 mutant) with defects in both aggregation and sporulation was analyzed in this study. The Tn5-Omega280 mutant was found to have a disrupted NtrC-like response regulator designated Myxococcus regulatory protein B (mrpB). Further sequencing analyses revealed a histidine kinase homolog (mrpA) immediately upstream of mrpB and a cyclic AMP receptor protein-like transcriptional regulator (mrpC) downstream of mrpB. In-frame deletion analyses revealed that both the mrpB and mrpC genes were required for cellular aggregation and sporulation but that only mrpA was required for sporulation only. Site-specific mutagenesis of the putative phosphorylation site of MrpB, D58, showed that a D58A mutation caused defects in both aggregation and sporulation but that a D58E mutation resulted in only a sporulation defect. Further genetic and molecular analyses with reporter genes and reverse transcription-PCR indicated that mrpA and mrpB are cotranscribed but that mrpC is transcribed independently and that all of these genes are developmentally regulated. In addition, MrpB is essential for transcription of mrpC and MrpC regulates its own transcription. These data indicate that Mrp proteins are important components required for M. xanthus development. The complicated interaction between Mrp proteins may play an important role in regulating developmental gene expression in M. xanthus.

  17. Coordinated Genetic Regulation of Growth and Lignin Revealed by Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of cDNA Microarray Data in an Interspecific Backcross of Eucalyptus1

    PubMed Central

    Kirst, Matias; Myburg, Alexander A.; De León, José P.G.; Kirst, Mariana E.; Scott, Jay; Sederoff, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Phenotypic, genotypic, and transcript level (microarray) data from an interspecific backcross population of Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus globulus were integrated to dissect the genetic and metabolic network underlying growth variation. Transcript abundance, measured for 2,608 genes in the differentiating xylem of a 91 (E. grandis × E. globulus) × E. grandis backcross progeny was correlated with diameter variation, revealing coordinated down-regulation of genes encoding enzymes of the lignin biosynthesis and associated methylation pathways in fast growing individuals. Lignin analysis of wood samples confirmed the content and quality predicted by the transcript levels measured on the microarrays. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of transcript levels of lignin-related genes showed that their mRNA abundance is regulated by two genetic loci, demonstrating coordinated genetic control over lignin biosynthesis. These two loci colocalize with QTLs for growth, suggesting that the same genomic regions are regulating growth, and lignin content and composition in the progeny. Genetic mapping of the lignin genes revealed that most of the key biosynthetic genes do not colocalize with growth and transcript level QTLs, with the exception of the locus encoding the enzyme S-adenosylmethionine synthase. This study illustrates the power of integrating quantitative analysis of gene expression data and genetic map information to discover genetic and metabolic networks regulating complex biological traits. PMID:15299141

  18. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies GPC5 as a Novel Genetic Locus Protective against Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Post, Wendy; Jui, Jonathan; Hilton, Gina; O'Connor, Ashley; Prineas, Ronald J.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Psaty, Bruce M.; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Rea, Thomas; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Siscovick, David S.; Burke, Gregory L.; Marban, Eduardo; Spooner, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Existing studies indicate a significant genetic component for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide an unbiased approach for identification of novel genes. We performed a GWAS to identify genetic determinants of SCA. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a case-control design within the ongoing Oregon Sudden Unexpected Death Study (Oregon-SUDS). Cases (n = 424) were SCAs with coronary artery disease (CAD) among residents of Portland, OR (2002–07, population ∼1,000,000) and controls (n = 226) were residents with CAD, but no history of SCA. All subjects were of White-European ancestry and GWAS was performed using Affymetrix 500K/5.0 and 6.0 arrays. High signal markers were genotyped in SCA cases (n = 521) identified from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC) and the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) (combined n = 19,611). No SNPs reached genome-wide significance (p<5×10−8). SNPs at 6 loci were prioritized for follow-up primarily based on significance of p<10−4 and proximity to a known gene (CSMD2, GPR37L1, LIN9, B4GALNT3, GPC5, and ZNF592). The minor allele of GPC5 (GLYPICAN 5, rs3864180) was associated with a lower risk of SCA in Oregon-SUDS, an effect that was also observed in ARIC/CHS whites (p<0.05) and blacks (p<0.04). In a combined Cox proportional hazards model analysis that adjusted for race, the minor allele exhibited a hazard ratio of 0.85 (95% CI 0.74 to 0.98; p<0.01). Conclusions/Significance A novel genetic locus for SCA, GPC5, was identified from Oregon-SUDS and successfully validated in the ARIC and CHS cohorts. Three other members of the Glypican family have been previously implicated in human disease, including cardiac conditions. The mechanism of this specific association requires further study. PMID:20360844

  19. Genetics and mapping of a new anthracnose resistance locus in Andean common bean Paloma.

    PubMed

    de Lima Castro, Sandra Aparecida; Gonçalves-Vidigal, Maria Celeste; Gilio, Thiago Alexandre Santana; Lacanallo, Giselly Figueiredo; Valentini, Giseli; da Silva Ramos Martins, Vanusa; Song, Qijian; Galván, Marta Zulema; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P; Pastor-Corrales, Marcial Antonio

    2017-04-18

    The Andean cultivar Paloma is resistant to Mesoamerican and Andean races of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, the fungal pathogen that causes the destructive anthracnose disease in common bean. Remarkably, Paloma is resistant to Mesoamerican races 2047 and 3481, which are among the most virulent races of the anthracnose pathogen. Most genes conferring anthracnose resistance in common bean are overcome by these races. The genetic mapping and the relationship between the resistant Co-Pa gene of Paloma and previously characterized anthracnose resistance genes can be a great contribution for breeding programs. The inheritance of resistance studies for Paloma was performed in F2 population from the cross Paloma (resistant) × Cornell 49-242 (susceptible) inoculated with race 2047, and in F2 and F2:3 generations from the cross Paloma (resistant) × PI 207262 (susceptible) inoculated with race 3481. The results of these studies demonstrated that a single dominant gene confers the resistance in Paloma. Allelism tests performed with multiple races of C. lindemuthianum showed that the resistance gene in Paloma, provisionally named Co-Pa, is independent from the anthracnose resistance genes Co-1, Co-2, Co-3, Co-4, Co-5, Co-6, Co-12, Co-13, Co-14, Co-15 and Co-16. Bulk segregant analysis using the SNP chip BARCBean6K_3 positioned the approximate location of Co-Pa in the lower arm of chromosome Pv01. Further mapping analysis located the Co-Pa gene at a 390 kb region of Pv01 flanked by SNP markers SS82 and SS83 at a distance of 1.3 and 2.1 cM, respectively. The results presented here showed that Paloma cultivar has a new dominant gene conferring resistance to anthracnose, which is independent from those genes previously described. The linkage between the Co-Pa gene and the SS82 and SS83 SNP markers will be extremely important for marker-assisted introgression of the gene into elite cultivars in order to enhance resistance.

  20. Effect of balancing selection on spatial genetic structure within populations: theoretical investigations on the self-incompatibility locus and empirical studies in Arabidopsis halleri

    PubMed Central

    Leducq, J-B; Llaurens, V; Castric, V; Saumitou-Laprade, P; Hardy, O J; Vekemans, X

    2011-01-01

    The effect of selection on patterns of genetic structure within and between populations may be studied by contrasting observed patterns at the genes targeted by selection with those of unlinked neutral marker loci. Local directional selection on target genes will produce stronger population genetic structure than at neutral loci, whereas the reverse is expected for balancing selection. However, theoretical predictions on the intensity of this signal under precise models of balancing selection are still lacking. Using negative frequency-dependent selection acting on self-incompatibility systems in plants as a model of balancing selection, we investigated the effect of such selection on patterns of spatial genetic structure within a continuous population. Using numerical simulations, we tested the effect of the type of self-incompatibility system, the number of alleles at the self-incompatibility locus and the dominance interactions among them, the extent of gene dispersal, and the immigration rate on spatial genetic structure at the selected locus and at unlinked neutral loci. We confirm that frequency-dependent selection is expected to reduce the extent of spatial genetic structure as compared to neutral loci, particularly in situations with low number of alleles at the self-incompatibility locus, high frequency of codominant interactions among alleles, restricted gene dispersal and restricted immigration from outside populations. Hence the signature of selection on spatial genetic structure is expected to vary across species and populations, and we show that empirical data from the literature as well as data reported here on three natural populations of the herb Arabidopsis halleri confirm these theoretical results. PMID:20531450

  1. A paracentric inversion suppresses genetic recombination at the FON3 locus with breakpoints corresponding to sequence gaps on rice chromosome 11L.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Zhang, Wenli; Xia, Zhihui; Jiang, Guanghuai; Qian, Qian; Li, Aili; Cheng, Zhukuan; Zhu, Lihuang; Mao, Long; Zhai, Wenxue

    2007-03-01

    Paracentric inversion is known to inhibit genetic recombination between normal and inverted chromosomal segments in heterozygous arrangements. Insect inversion polymorphisms have been studied to reveal adaptive processes for maintaining genetic variation. We report the first paracentric inversion in rice (Oryza sativa), which was discovered in our effort to clone the floral organ number gene FON3. Recombination at the FON3 locus on the long arm of chromosome 11 was severely suppressed over a distance of more than 36 cM. An extensive screening among 8,242 F(2) progeny failed to detect any recombinants. Cytological analysis revealed a loop-like structure on pachytene chromosomes, whereas FISH analysis showed the migration of a BAC clone from a distal location to a position closer to the centromere. Interestingly, the locations where the genetic recombination suppression began were coincided with the positions of two physical gaps on the chromosome 11, suggesting a correlation between the physical gaps, the inversion breakpoints. Transposons and retrotransposons, and tandemly arranged members of gene families were among the sequences immediately flanking the gaps. Taken together, we propose that the genetic suppression at the FON3 locus was caused by a paracentric inversion. The possible genetic mechanism causing such a spontaneous inversion was proposed.

  2. Genetic Isolation, Cloning, and Analysis of a Mutator-Induced, Dominant Antimorph of the Maize amylose extender1 Locus.

    PubMed Central

    Stinard, PS; Robertson, DS; Schnable, PS

    1993-01-01

    We report the genetic identification, molecular cloning, and characterization of a dominant mutant at the amylose extender1 locus, Ae1-5180. The identities of our clones are corroborated by their ability to reveal DNA polymorphisms between seven wild-type revertants from Ae1-5180 relative to the Ae1-5180 mutant allele and between four of five independently derived, Mutator (Mu)-induced recessive ae1 alleles relative to their respective wild-type progenitor alleles. The Ae1-5180 mutation is associated with two Mu1 insertions flanked by complex rearrangements of ae1-related sequences. One of the Mu1 elements is flanked by inverted repeats of ae1-related DNA of at least 5.0 kb in length. This Mu1 element and at least some of this flanking inverted repeat DNA are absent or hypermethylated in six of seven wild-type revertants of Ae1-5180 that were analyzed. The second Mu1 element is flanked on one side by the 5.0-kb ae1-specific repeat and on the other side by a sequence that does not hybridize to the ae1-related repeat sequence. This second Mu1 element is present in revertants to the wild type and does not, therefore, appear to affect ae1 gene function. A 2.7-kb ae1 transcript can be detected in wild-type and homozygous ae1-Ref endosperms 20 days after pollination. This transcript is absent in endosperms containing one, two, or three doses of Ae1-5180. This result is consistent with a suppression model to explain the dominant gene action of Ae1-5180 and establishes Ae1-5180 as an antimorphic allele. Homozygous wild-type seedlings produce no detectable transcript, indicating some degree of tissue specificity for ae1 expression. Sequence analyses establish that ae1 encodes starch branching enzyme II. PMID:12271046

  3. Genetic architecture of contemporary adaptation to biotic invasions: quantitative trait locus mapping of beak reduction in soapberry bugs.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Andrés, Jose A

    2014-02-19

    Biological invasions can result in new selection pressures driven by the establishment of new biotic interactions. The response of exotic and native species to selection depends critically on the genetic architecture of ecologically relevant traits. In the Florida peninsula, the soapberry bug (Jadera haematoloma) has colonized the recently introduced Chinese flametree, Koelreuteria elegans, as a host plant. Driven by feeding efficiency, the populations associated with this new host have differentiated into a new bug ecomorph characterized by short beaks more appropriate for feeding on the flattened pods of the Chinese flametree. In this study, we have generated a three-generation pedigree from crossing the long-beaked and short-beaked ecomorphs to construct a de novo linkage map and to locate putative quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling beak length and body size in J. haematoloma. Using amplified fragment-length polymorphism markers and a two-way pseudo-testcross design, we have produced two parental maps in six linkage groups, covering the known number of chromosomes. QTL analysis revealed one significant QTL for beak length on a maternal linkage group and the corresponding paternal linkage group. Three QTL were found for body size. Through single marker regression analysis, nine single markers that could not be placed on the map were also found to be significantly associated with one or both of the two traits. Interestingly, the most significant body size QTL co-localized with the beak length QTL, suggesting linkage disequilibrium or pleiotropic effects of related traits. Our results suggest an oligogenic control of beak length.

  4. Genetic Architecture of Contemporary Adaptation to Biotic Invasions: Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping of Beak Reduction in Soapberry Bugs

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Y.; Andrés, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions can result in new selection pressures driven by the establishment of new biotic interactions. The response of exotic and native species to selection depends critically on the genetic architecture of ecologically relevant traits. In the Florida peninsula, the soapberry bug (Jadera haematoloma) has colonized the recently introduced Chinese flametree, Koelreuteria elegans, as a host plant. Driven by feeding efficiency, the populations associated with this new host have differentiated into a new bug ecomorph characterized by short beaks more appropriate for feeding on the flattened pods of the Chinese flametree. In this study, we have generated a three-generation pedigree from crossing the long-beaked and short-beaked ecomorphs to construct a de novo linkage map and to locate putative quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling beak length and body size in J. haematoloma. Using amplified fragment-length polymorphism markers and a two-way pseudo-testcross design, we have produced two parental maps in six linkage groups, covering the known number of chromosomes. QTL analysis revealed one significant QTL for beak length on a maternal linkage group and the corresponding paternal linkage group. Three QTL were found for body size. Through single marker regression analysis, nine single markers that could not be placed on the map were also found to be significantly associated with one or both of the two traits. Interestingly, the most significant body size QTL co-localized with the beak length QTL, suggesting linkage disequilibrium or pleiotropic effects of related traits. Our results suggest an oligogenic control of beak length. PMID:24347624

  5. A genetic locus and gene expression patterns associated with the priming effect on lettuce seed germination at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Schwember, Andrés R; Bradford, Kent J

    2010-05-01

    Seeds of most cultivated varieties of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) fail to germinate at warm temperatures (i.e., above 25-30 degrees C). Seed priming (controlled hydration followed by drying) alleviates this thermoinhibition by increasing the maximum germination temperature. We conducted a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of seed germination responses to priming using a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between L. sativa cv. Salinas and L. serriola accession UC96US23. Priming significantly increased the maximum germination temperature of the RIL population, and a single major QTL was responsible for 47% of the phenotypic variation due to priming. This QTL collocated with Htg6.1, a major QTL from UC96US23 associated with high temperature germination capacity. Seeds of three near-isogenic lines (NILs) carrying an Htg6.1 introgression from UC96US23 in a Salinas genetic background exhibited synergistic increases in maximum germination temperature in response to priming. LsNCED4, a gene encoding a key enzyme (9-cis-epoxycarotinoid dioxygenase) in the abscisic acid biosynthetic pathway, maps precisely with Htg6.1. Expression of LsNCED4 after imbibition for 24 h at high temperature was greater in non-primed seeds of Salinas, of a second cultivar (Titan) and of NILs containing Htg6.1 compared to primed seeds of the same genotypes. In contrast, expression of genes encoding regulated enzymes in the gibberellin and ethylene biosynthetic pathways (LsGA3ox1 and LsACS1, respectively) was enhanced by priming and suppressed by imbibition at elevated temperatures. Developmental and temperature regulation of hormonal biosynthetic pathways is associated with seed priming effects on germination temperature sensitivity.

  6. Association Genetics of Populus trichocarpa or Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Tuskan, Gerry

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Gerry Tuskan of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  7. High-density genetic map construction and gene mapping of pericarp color in wax gourd using specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Biao; Liu, Wenrui; Xie, Dasen; Peng, Qingwu; He, Xiaoming; Lin, Yu'e; Liang, Zhaojun

    2015-12-09

    High-density map is a valuable tool for genetic and genomic analysis. Although wax gourd is a widely distributed vegetable of Cucurbitaceae and has important medicinal and health value, no genetic map has been constructed because of the lack of efficient markers. Specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a newly developed high-throughput strategy for large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and genotyping. In our present study, we constructed a high-density genetic map by using SLAF-seq and identified a locus controlling pericarp color in wax gourd. An F2 population of 140 individuals and their two parents were subjected to SLAF-seq. A total of 143.38 M pair-end reads were generated. The average sequencing depth was 26.51 in the maternal line (B214), 27.01 in the parental line (B227), and 5.11 in each F2 individual. When filtering low-depth SLAF tags, a total of 142,653 high-quality SLAFs were detected, and 22,151 of them were polymorphic, with a polymorphism rate of 15.42 %. And finally, 4,607 of the polymorphic markers were selected for genetic map construction, and 12 linkage groups (LGs) were generated. The map spanned 2,172.86 cM with an average distance between adjacent markers for 0.49 cM. The inheritance of pericarp color was also studied, which showed that the pericarp color was controlled by one single gene. And based on the newly constructed high-density map, a single locus locating on chromosome 5 was identified for controlling the pericarp color of wax gourd. This is the first report of high-density genetic map construction and gene mapping in wax gourd, which will be served as an invaluable tool for gene mapping, marker assisted breeding, map-based gene cloning, comparative mapping and draft genome assembling of wax gourd.

  8. Layered genetic control of DNA methylation and gene expression: a locus of multiple sclerosis in healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jean; Bourdon, Celine; Bernard, Manon; Wilson, Michael D.; Reischl, Eva; Waldenberger, Melanie; Ruggeri, Barbara; Schumann, Gunter; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Leemans, Alexander; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Leonard, Gabriel; Richer, Louis; Bouchard, Luigi; Gaudet, Daniel; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation may contribute to the etiology of complex genetic disorders through its impact on genome integrity and gene expression; it is modulated by DNA-sequence variants, named methylation quantitative trait loci (meQTLs). Most meQTLs influence methylation of a few CpG dinucleotides within short genomic regions (<3 kb). Here, we identified a layered genetic control of DNA methylation at numerous CpGs across a long 300 kb genomic region. This control involved a single long-range meQTL and multiple local meQTLs. The long-range meQTL explained up to 75% of variance in methylation of CpGs located over extended areas of the 300 kb region. The meQTL was identified in four samples (P = 2.8 × 10−17, 3.1 × 10−31, 4.0 × 10−71 and 5.2 × 10−199), comprising a total of 2796 individuals. The long-range meQTL was strongly associated not only with DNA methylation but also with mRNA expression of several genes within the 300 kb region (P = 7.1 × 10−18–1.0 × 10−123). The associations of the meQTL with gene expression became attenuated when adjusted for DNA methylation (causal inference test: P = 2.4 × 10−13–7.1 × 10−20), indicating coordinated regulation of DNA methylation and gene expression. Further, the long-range meQTL was found to be in linkage disequilibrium with the most replicated locus of multiple sclerosis, a disease affecting primarily the brain white matter. In middle-aged adults free of the disease, we observed that the risk allele was associated with subtle structural properties of the brain white matter found in multiple sclerosis (P = 0.02). In summary, we identified a long-range meQTL that controls methylation and expression of several genes and may be involved in increasing brain vulnerability to multiple sclerosis. PMID:26220975

  9. The genetic locus for free sialic acid storage disease maps to the long arm of chromosome 6.

    PubMed Central

    Haataja, L.; Schleutker, J.; Laine, A. P.; Renlund, M.; Savontaus, M. L.; Dib, C.; Weissenbach, J.; Peltonen, L.; Aula, P.

    1994-01-01

    Salla disease (SD), or adult-type free sialic acid storage disease, is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by impaired transport of free sialic acid across the lysosomal membrane and severe psychomotor retardation. Random linkage analysis of a sample of 27 Finnish families allowed us to localize the SD locus to the long arm of chromosome 6. The highest lod score of 8.95 was obtained with a microsatellite marker of locus D6S286 at theta = .00. Evidence for linkage disequilibrium was observed between the SD locus and the alleles of three closely linked markers, suggesting that the length of the critical region for the SD locus is in the order of 190 kb. PMID:8198127

  10. Mapping of Trichodermin Resistance in SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE : A Genetic Locus for a Component of the 60s Ribsomal Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Paul G.; Schindler, Daniel; Davies, Julian E.

    1976-01-01

    Resistance to the protein synthesis inhibitor trichodermin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been studied. A single recessive nuclear gene was responsible for resistance. The resistance locus, tcm1 was found to be closely linked (1 centimorgan) to the locus pet 17 on the right arm of chromosome XV. The mutation to trichodermin resistance conferred resistance to other 12,13-epoxytrichothecenes and to the structurally unrelated antibiotic anisomycin. PMID:786781

  11. Genetic control of the immune response to staphylococcal nuclease. IX. Recombination between genes determining BALB/c antinuclease idiotypes and the heavy chain allotype locus.

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, D S; Riordan, S E; Sachs, D H

    1979-03-01

    The genetic linkage relationship of two antinuclease idiotypes produced by the BALB/c strain was investigated in the backcross (BALB/c x CB.20) X CB.20. These two idiotypes were detected by Lewis rat anti-idiotypic antisera prepared against affinity-purified A/J and SJL antinuclease antibodies, termed the A/J and SJL idiotypes, respectively. Both idiotypes were found to be linked to the IgCHa immunoglobulin heavy chain allotype locus. There was, however, a high frequency of recombination observed between both markers and the IgCHa locus, with eight of 83 backcross animals recombinant for the A/J idiotype and five of 83 recombinant for the SJL idiotype. All such recombinant animals were IgCHb/b homozygotes that had gained one or both idiotypes. These results are consistent with a genetic map of VHr region genes in the BALB/c strain in which genes determining the SJL idiotype are closer to the IgCHa allotype locus than are genes determining the A/J idiotype. This high frequency of recombination may indicate that the chromosome segment containing VH region genes is very large or that it has structural features that promote recombination.

  12. Genetic variation at the MHC DRB1 locus is similar across Gunnison's prairie dog (Cynomys gunnisoni) colonies regardless of plague history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobble, Kacy R.; Califf, Katy J.; Stone, Nathan E.; Shuey, Megan M.; Birdsell, Dawn; Colman, Rebecca E.; Schupp, James M.; Aziz, Maliha; Van Andel, Roger; Rocke, Tonie E.; Wagner, David M.; Busch, Joseph D.

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia pestis was introduced to North America around 1900 and leads to nearly 100% mortality in prairie dog (Cynomys spp.) colonies during epizootic events, which suggests this pathogen may exert a strong selective force. We characterized genetic diversity at an MHC class II locus (DRB1) in Gunnison's prairie dog (C. gunnisoni) and quantified population genetic structure at the DRB1versus 12 microsatellite loci in three large Arizona colonies. Two colonies, Seligman (SE) and Espee Ranch (ES), have experienced multiple plague-related die-offs in recent years, whereas plague has never been documented at Aubrey Valley (AV). We found fairly low allelic diversity at the DRB1 locus, with one allele (DRB1*01) at high frequency (0.67–0.87) in all colonies. Two otherDRB1 alleles appear to be trans-species polymorphisms shared with the black-tailed prairie dog (C. ludovicianus), indicating that these alleles have been maintained across evolutionary time frames. Estimates of genetic differentiation were generally lower at the MHC locus (FST = 0.033) than at microsatellite markers (FST = 0.098). The reduced differentiation at DRB1 may indicate that selection has been important for shaping variation at MHC loci, regardless of the presence or absence of plague in recent decades. However, genetic drift has probably also influenced theDRB1 locus because its level of differentiation was not different from that of microsatellites in anFST outlier analysis. We then compared specific MHC alleles to plague survivorship in 60C. gunnisoni that had been experimentally infected with Y. pestis. We found that survival was greater in individuals that carried at least one copy of the most common allele (DRB1*01) compared to those that did not (60% vs. 20%). Although the sample sizes of these two groups were unbalanced, this result suggests the possibility that this MHC class II locus, or a nearby linked gene, could play a role in plague survival.

  13. Genetic variation at the MHC DRB1 locus is similar across Gunnison's prairie dog (Cynomys gunnisoni) colonies regardless of plague history.

    PubMed

    Cobble, Kacy R; Califf, Katy J; Stone, Nathan E; Shuey, Megan M; Birdsell, Dawn N; Colman, Rebecca E; Schupp, James M; Aziz, Maliha; Van Andel, Roger; Rocke, Tonie E; Wagner, David M; Busch, Joseph D

    2016-04-01

    Yersinia pestis was introduced to North America around 1900 and leads to nearly 100% mortality in prairie dog (Cynomys spp.) colonies during epizootic events, which suggests this pathogen may exert a strong selective force. We characterized genetic diversity at an MHC class II locus (DRB1) in Gunnison's prairie dog (C. gunnisoni) and quantified population genetic structure at the DRB1 versus 12 microsatellite loci in three large Arizona colonies. Two colonies, Seligman (SE) and Espee Ranch (ES), have experienced multiple plague-related die-offs in recent years, whereas plague has never been documented at Aubrey Valley (AV). We found fairly low allelic diversity at the DRB1 locus, with one allele (DRB1*01) at high frequency (0.67-0.87) in all colonies. Two other DRB1 alleles appear to be trans-species polymorphisms shared with the black-tailed prairie dog (C. ludovicianus), indicating that these alleles have been maintained across evolutionary time frames. Estimates of genetic differentiation were generally lower at the MHC locus (F ST = 0.033) than at microsatellite markers (F ST = 0.098). The reduced differentiation at DRB1 may indicate that selection has been important for shaping variation at MHC loci, regardless of the presence or absence of plague in recent decades. However, genetic drift has probably also influenced the DRB1 locus because its level of differentiation was not different from that of microsatellites in an F ST outlier analysis. We then compared specific MHC alleles to plague survivorship in 60 C. gunnisoni that had been experimentally infected with Y. pestis. We found that survival was greater in individuals that carried at least one copy of the most common allele (DRB1*01) compared to those that did not (60% vs. 20%). Although the sample sizes of these two groups were unbalanced, this result suggests the possibility that this MHC class II locus, or a nearby linked gene, could play a role in plague survival.

  14. Molecular population genetics of human CYP3A locus: signatures of positive selection and implications for evolutionary environmental medicine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoping; Wang, Haijian; Zhou, Gangqiao; Zhang, Xiumei; Dong, Xiaojia; Zhi, Lianteng; Jin, Li; He, Fuchu

    2009-10-01

    The human CYP3A gene cluster codes for cytochrome P450 (CYP) subfamily enzymes that catalyze the metabolism of various exogenous and endogenous chemicals and is an obvious candidate for evolutionary and environmental genomic study. Functional variants in the CYP3A locus may have undergone a selective sweep in response to various environmental conditions. The goal of this study was to profile the allelic structure across the human CYP3A locus and investigate natural selection on that locus. From the CYP3A locus spanning 231 kb, we resequenced 54 genomic DNA fragments (a total of 43,675 bases) spanning four genes (CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP3A7, and CYP3A43) and two pseudogenes (CYP3AP1 and CYP3AP2), and randomly selected intergenic regions at the CYP3A locus in Africans (24 individuals), Caucasians (24 individuals), and Chinese (29 individuals). We comprehensively investigated the nucleotide diversity and haplotype structure and examined the possible role of natural selection in shaping the sequence variation throughout the gene cluster. Neutrality tests with Tajima's D, Fu and Li's D* and F*, and Fay and Wu's H indicated possible roles of positive selection on the entire CYP3A locus in non-Africans. Sliding-window analyses of nucleotide diversity and frequency spectrum, as well as haplotype diversity and phylogenetically inferred haplotype structure, revealed that CYP3A4 and CYP3A7 had recently undergone or were undergoing a selective sweep in all three populations, whereas CYP3A43 and CYP3A5 were undergoing a selective sweep in non-Africans and Caucasians, respectively. The refined allelic architecture and selection spectrum for the human CYP3A locus highlight that evolutionary dynamics of molecular adaptation may underlie the phenotypic variation of the xenobiotic disposition system and varied predisposition to complex disorders in which xenobiotics play a role.

  15. Linkage disequilibrium utilized to establish a refined genetic position of the Salla disease locus on 6q14-q15

    SciTech Connect

    Schleutker, J.; Laine, A.P.; Haataja, L. |

    1995-05-20

    Salla disease (SD), an inherited free sialic acid storage disorder, is caused by impaired transport of free sialic acid across the lyosomal membrane. Clinical characteristics of the disease include severe psychomotor retardation and some neurological abnormalities. The authors report detailed linkage analyses of 50 Finnish SD families that localize the SD disease gene to a refined chromosomal area on 6q14-q15. The highest lod score of 17.30 was obtained with a microsatellite marker of locus D6S280. When linkage disequilibrium was adopted in the linkage analyses, they could further assign the SD locus to the immediate vicinity of marker locus D6S406. Linkage disequilibrium facilitated further restriction of the critical chromosomal region to approximately 80 kb, well within the limits of positional cloning techniques. 31 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. LMNA cardiomyopathy: cell biology and genetics meet clinical medicine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jonathan T; Muchir, Antoine; Nagy, Peter L; Worman, Howard J

    2011-09-01

    Mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes A-type nuclear lamins (intermediate filament proteins expressed in most differentiated somatic cells), cause a diverse range of diseases, called laminopathies, that selectively affect different tissues and organ systems. The most prevalent laminopathy is cardiomyopathy with or without different types of skeletal muscular dystrophy. LMNA cardiomyopathy has an aggressive clinical course with higher rates of deadly arrhythmias and heart failure than most other heart diseases. As awareness among physicians increases, and advances in DNA sequencing methods make the genetic diagnosis of LMNA cardiomyopathy more common, cardiologists are being faced with difficult questions regarding patient management. These questions concern the optimal use of intracardiac cardioverter defibrillators to prevent sudden death from arrhythmias, and medical interventions to prevent heart damage and ameliorate heart failure symptoms. Data from a mouse model of LMNA cardiomyopathy suggest that inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways are beneficial in preventing and treating cardiac dysfunction; this basic research discovery needs to be translated to human patients.

  17. Breast and ovarian cancer referrals to the ACT Genetic Service: are we meeting guidelines?

    PubMed

    Aitken, Lucy; Warwick, Linda; Davis, Alison

    2017-03-01

    The ACT Genetic Service at The Canberra Hospital evaluates the genetic risk of individuals for inherited diseases, and provides counselling and genetic testing where appropriate. To evaluate the current referral practice for patients with a personal and/or family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer, and to assess whether these referrals are made according to eviQ cancer referral guidelines. A retrospective clinical audit of patients seen by the ACT Genetic Service for evaluation of genetic risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer between 1 January 2013 and 30 June 2015. Statistical analysis included Chi-squared and Poisson distribution tests. Of the 711 patients referred during the 30-month period, 671 were seen by the service. The number of patients seen increased steadily over the time period, as did waiting times. The majority of referrals were made by general practitioners (403/711; 57%) and oncologists (172/711; 24%). Of note, 300 of 711 (42%) of all referrals made to the service during this time period did not meet eviQ referral guidelines. Patients who met guidelines for referral were more likely both to be offered genetic testing and to have a positive result. Demand on the ACT Genetic Service increased over the time period assessed. As a significant proportion of patients did not meet eviQ cancer referral guidelines, it is worth reviewing the referral process in order to optimise utility of this limited resource. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  18. Admixture mapping of white cell count: genetic locus responsible for lower white blood cell count in the Health ABC and Jackson Heart studies.

    PubMed

    Nalls, Michael A; Wilson, James G; Patterson, Nick J; Tandon, Arti; Zmuda, Joseph M; Huntsman, Scott; Garcia, Melissa; Hu, Donglei; Li, Rongling; Beamer, Brock A; Patel, Kushang V; Akylbekova, Ermeg L; Files, Joe C; Hardy, Cheryl L; Buxbaum, Sarah G; Taylor, Herman A; Reich, David; Harris, Tamara B; Ziv, Elad

    2008-01-01

    White blood cell count (WBC) is an important clinical marker that varies among different ethnic groups. African Americans are known to have a lower WBC than European Americans. We surveyed the entire genome for loci underlying this difference in WBC by using admixture mapping. We analyzed data from African American participants in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study and the Jackson Heart Study. Participants of both studies were genotyped across >or= 1322 single nucleotide polymorphisms that were pre-selected to be informative for African versus European ancestry and span the entire genome. We used these markers to estimate genetic ancestry in each chromosomal region and then tested the association between WBC and genetic ancestry at each locus. We found a locus on chromosome 1q strongly associated with WBC (p < 10(-12)). The strongest association was with a marker known to affect the expression of the Duffy blood group antigen. Participants who had both copies of the common West African allele had a mean WBC of 4.9 (SD 1.3); participants who had both common European alleles had a mean WBC of 7.1 (SD 1.3). This variant explained approximately 20% of population variation in WBC. We used admixture mapping, a novel method for conducting genetic-association studies, to find a region that was significantly associated with WBC on chromosome 1q. Additional studies are needed to determine the biological mechanism for this effect and its clinical implications.

  19. Evidence for the control of phytolith formation in Cucurbita fruits by the hard rind (Hr) genetic locus: Archaeological and ecological implications.

    PubMed

    Piperno, Dolores R; Holst, Irene; Wessel-Beaver, Linda; Andres, Thomas C

    2002-08-06

    Many angiosperms, both monocotyledons and dicotyledons, heavily impregnate their vegetative and reproductive organs with solid particles of silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) known as opaline phytoliths. The underlying mechanisms accounting for the formation of phytoliths in plants are poorly understood, however. Using wild and domesticated species in the genus Cucurbita along with their F(1) and F(2) progeny, we have demonstrated that the production of large diagnostic phytoliths in fruit rinds exhibits a one-to-one correspondence to the lignification of these structures. We propose that phytolith formation in Cucurbita fruits is primarily determined by a dominant genetic locus, called hard rind (Hr), previously shown to code for lignin deposition. If true, this evidence represents a demonstration of genetic control over phytolith production in a dicotyledon and provides considerable support to hypotheses that silica phytoliths constitute another important system of mechanical defense in plants. Our research also identifies Hr as another single locus controlling more than one important phenotypic difference between wild and domesticated plants, and establishes rind tissue cell structure and hardness under the effects of Hr as an important determinant of phytolith morphology. When recovered from pre-Columbian archaeological sites, Cucurbita phytoliths represent genetically controlled fossil markers of exploitation and domestication in this important economic genus.

  20. Evidence for the control of phytolith formation in Cucurbita fruits by the hard rind (Hr) genetic locus: Archaeological and ecological implications

    PubMed Central

    Piperno, Dolores R.; Holst, Irene; Wessel-Beaver, Linda; Andres, Thomas C.

    2002-01-01

    Many angiosperms, both monocotyledons and dicotyledons, heavily impregnate their vegetative and reproductive organs with solid particles of silicon dioxide (SiO2) known as opaline phytoliths. The underlying mechanisms accounting for the formation of phytoliths in plants are poorly understood, however. Using wild and domesticated species in the genus Cucurbita along with their F1 and F2 progeny, we have demonstrated that the production of large diagnostic phytoliths in fruit rinds exhibits a one-to-one correspondence to the lignification of these structures. We propose that phytolith formation in Cucurbita fruits is primarily determined by a dominant genetic locus, called hard rind (Hr), previously shown to code for lignin deposition. If true, this evidence represents a demonstration of genetic control over phytolith production in a dicotyledon and provides considerable support to hypotheses that silica phytoliths constitute another important system of mechanical defense in plants. Our research also identifies Hr as another single locus controlling more than one important phenotypic difference between wild and domesticated plants, and establishes rind tissue cell structure and hardness under the effects of Hr as an important determinant of phytolith morphology. When recovered from pre-Columbian archaeological sites, Cucurbita phytoliths represent genetically controlled fossil markers of exploitation and domestication in this important economic genus. PMID:12149443

  1. Genetic modification stimulated by the induction of a site-specific break distant from the locus of correction in haploid and diploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, Samantha; Storici, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Generation of a site-specific break at a genomic locus to stimulate homologous recombination (HR) is used in many organisms to efficiently target genes for various types of genetic modification. Additionally, a site-specific chromosomal break can be used to trigger HR at genomic regions distant from the break, thereby largely expanding the region available for introducing desired mutations. In contrast to the former approach, the latter presents an alternative way in which genes can be efficiently modified also when it is not possible or desirable to introduce a break in the vicinity of the targeting locus. This type of in vivo site-directed mutagenesis distant from a break can be accomplished in the yeast model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae because the generation of a double-strand break (DSB) in yeast chromosomal DNA activates HR at long regions upstream and downstream from the break site. Here we provide a protocol for efficiently altering a yeast chromosomal locus following the induction of a DSB several kilobase pairs distant from the site of gene correction. The techniques described can be used in both diploid and haploid yeast strains, and we provide examples of the gene correction assays.

  2. CATCH 22 syndrome: report of 7 infants with follow-up data and review of the recent advancements in the genetic knowledge of the locus 22q11.

    PubMed

    Sergi, C; Serpi, M; Müller-Navia, J; Schnabel, P A; Hagl, S; Otto, H F; Ulmer, H E

    1999-06-01

    CATCH 22 is a medical acronym for Cardiac defects, Abnormal facies, Thymic hypoplasia, Cleft palate, and Hypocalcemia, and a variable deletion on chromosome 22. The deletion within the chromosome region of 22q11 may occur in patients with three well-described dysmorphologic+ cardiological syndromes: DiGeorge syndrome (DGS), velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), and conotruncal anomaly face syndrome (CTAFS). We report in detail seven infants with a deletion of the locus 22q11 showing overlapping clinical features of DGS and CTAFS with complex congenital heart defects (double outlet right ventricle, atresia or stenosis of the pulmonary valve, atrial and ventricular septal defects, patent ductus arteriosus, tetralogy of Fallot, major aortopulmonary collateral arteries, arcus aortae dexter, and persistence of the left superior vena cava). A homograft was implanted between the right ventricle and the main stem of the pulmonary artery in 2 patients, while a balloon valvuloplastic of the pulmonary valve was performed in one patient only. Pulmonary hemorrhage, acute hypoxia, and Aspergillus pneumonia were the complications. Death occurred in three out of seven patients. Recent advancements in the genetic knowledge of the locus 22q11 are described. Since the locus 22q11 is highly heterogeneous, the CATCH 22 acronym should be used and temporarily the old eponyms should be abandoned waiting for the identification of the different genes.

  3. Positional cloning of the nude locus: Genetic, physical, and transcription maps of the region and mutations in the mouse and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Segre, J.A.; Lander, E.S. |; Taylor, B.A.

    1995-08-10

    Mutations in the nude locus in mice and rats produce the pleiotropic phenotype of hairlessness and athymia, resulting in severely compromised immune system. To identify the causative gene, we utilized modern tools and techniques of positional cloning. Specifically, spanning the region in which the nude locus resides, we constructed a genetic map of polymorphic markers, a physical map of yeast artificial chromosomes and bacteriophage P1 clones, and a transcription map of genes obtained by direct cDNA selection and exon trapping. We identified seven novel transcripts with similarity to genes from Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, rat or human and three previously identified mouse genes. Based on our transcription mapping results, we present a novel approach to estimate that the nude locus resides in a region approximately threefold enriched for genes. We confirm a recently published report that the nude phenotype is caused by mutations in a gene encoding a novel winged helix or fork head domain transcription factor, whn. We report as well as the mutations in the rat rnu allele and the complete coding sequence of the rat whn mRNA. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Molecular genetics of the brown (b)-locus region of mouse chromosome 4. I. Origin and molecular mapping of radiation- and chemical-induced lethal brown deletions.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M; Bell, J A; Hunsicker, P R; Friedman, J M; Jackson, I J; Russell, L B

    1994-07-01

    Over a period of many years, germ-cell mutagenesis experiments using the mouse specific-locus test have generated numerous radiation- and chemical-induced alleles of the brown (b; Tyrp 1) locus in mouse chromosome 4. We describe here the origin, maintenance and initial molecular characterization of 28 b mutations that are prenatally lethal when homozygous. Each of these mutations is deleted for Tyrp 1 sequences, and each of 25 mutations tested further is deleted for at least one other locus defined by molecular clones previously found to be closely linked to b by interspecific backcross analysis. A panel of DNAs from mice carrying a lethal b mutation and a Mus spretus chromosome 4 was used in the fine structure mapping of these molecularly defined loci. The deletional nature of each of these prenatally lethal mutations is consistent with the hypothesis that the null phenotype at b has an effect only on the quality (color) of eumelanin produced in melanocytes. The resulting deletion map provides a framework on which to build future molecular-genetic and biological analyses of this region of mouse chromosome 4.

  5. Postprandial Triglyceride Metabolism is Modified by the Presence of Genetic Variation at the Perilipin (PLIN) Locus in Two Caucasian Populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Several perilipin (PLIN) polymorphic sites have 1 been studied for their potential use as markers for obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Objective: to examine whether the presence of several polymorphisms at the perilipin (PLIN) locus (PLIN1: 6209T>C, PLIN4:11482G>A, PLIN5: 13041A>G, an...

  6. Genetic variation at the PCSK9 locus, low density lipoproteins, response to pravastatin and coronary heart disease: results from PROSPER

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Caucasian carriers of the T allele at R46L in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) locus have been reported to have 15% lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (C) levels and 47% lower coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Our objective was to examine two PCSK9 single nucle...

  7. Locus BoLA-DRB3 is just an ordinary site of the polygene when explaining genetic variance of somatic cell count and milk yield.

    PubMed

    Oprzadek, Jolanta; Sender, Grazyna; Pawlik, Adrianna; Lukaszewicz, Marek

    2015-11-01

    The study aimed at clarifying the problem of the hitherto contradictory results regarding usefulness of BoLA-DRB3 locus as a marker in selection against mastitis and for milk yield. Treating the BoLA-DRB3 locus effect as random was proposed in place of considering it fixed. Somatic cell counts and milk yields recorded monthly on a test day (22,424) of 619 Polish Holstein cows genotyped for BoLA-DRB3 were analysed with an animal model including a random effect for genotype at this locus. The BoLA-DRB3 alleles were defined as restriction patterns obtained with three endonucleases. Two alternative BoLA-DRB3 additive genotype (co)variance structures were constructed for 161 genotypes recorded. One was based on the allelic similarity of the genotypes resulting in element values of 0 (no common allele), 0.5 (one allele in common), and 1 (diagonal). The other considered restriction site similarity (up to 3 in 1 allele) giving element values of 0 (no common restriction sites) and then increasingly in steps of 1/6 up to 6/6 (diagonal), where the numerator represents the number of common sites between genotypes. The DRB3 variance component for the natural logarithm of somatic cell count did not exceed 0.006 of the polygenic additive component or 0.003 for milk yield. Hence, unless we fail to detect the causative site or to properly define traits being the projection of a site, the effect of the genotype at the BoLA-DRB3 locus does not explain variation in somatic cell count and milk yield at a degree expected of a genetic marker.

  8. Virus-induced autoimmune diabetes in the LEW.1WR1 rat requires Iddm14 and a genetic locus proximal to the major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P; Cort, Laura; Greiner, Dale L; Guberski, Dennis L; Mordes, John P

    2009-12-01

    To identify genes that confer susceptibility to autoimmune diabetes following viral infection in the LEW.1WR1 rat. About 2% of LEW.1WR1 rats develop spontaneous autoimmune diabetes. Immunological perturbants including viral infection increase both the frequency and tempo of diabetes onset. To identify diabetes susceptibility genes (LEW.1WR1 x WF), F2 rats were infected with Kilham rat virus following brief pretreatment with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid. This treatment induces diabetes in 100% of parental LEW.1WR1 rats and 0% of parental WF rats. Linkage to diabetes was analyzed by genome-wide scanning. Among 182 F2 rats, 57 (31%) developed autoimmune diabetes after a mean latency of 16 days. All diabetic animals and approximately 20% of nondiabetic animals exhibited pancreatic insulitis. Genome-wide scanning revealed a requirement for the Iddm14 locus, long known to be required for diabetes in the BB rat. In addition, a new locus near the RT1 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) was found to be a major determinant of disease susceptibility. Interestingly, one gene linked to autoimmune diabetes in mouse and human, UBD, lies within this region. The Iddm14 diabetes locus in the rat is a powerful determinant of disease penetrance in the LEW.1WR1 rat following viral infection. In addition, a locus near the MHC (Iddm37) conditions diabetes susceptibility in these animals. Other, as-yet-unidentified genes are required to convert latent susceptibility to overt diabetes. These data provide insight into the polygenic nature of autoimmune diabetes in the rat and the interplay of genetic and environmental factors underlying disease expression.

  9. Genetic mapping of the labile (lab) gene: a recessive locus causing irregular spikelet fertility in labile-barley (Hordeum vulgare convar. labile).

    PubMed

    Youssef, Helmy M; Koppolu, Ravi; Rutten, Twan; Korzun, Viktor; Schweizer, Patrick; Schnurbusch, Thorsten

    2014-05-01

    The recessive labile locus mapped on chromosome 5HL causes irregular spikelet fertility and controls floret development as well as row-type in barley. The labile-barley displays a variable number of fertile spikelets at each rachis internode (0-3 fertile spikelets/rachis internode) which is intermediate between that observed in two- or six-rowed types. Previous re-sequencing of Vrs1 in 219 labile-barley (Hordeum vulgare L. convar. labile) accessions showed that all carried a six-rowed specific allele. We therefore hypothesized that this seemingly random reduction in spikelet fertility is most likely caused by the labile (lab) locus, which we aimed to phenotypically and genetically define. Here, we report a detailed phenotypic analysis of spikelet fertility in labile-barleys in comparison to two- and six-rowed genotypes using scanning electron microscopy analysis. We found that the first visible morphological deviation occurred during the stamen primordium stage, when we regularly observed the appearance of arrested central floral primordia in labile but not in two- or six-rowed barleys. At late stamen and early awn primordium stages, lateral florets in two-rowed and only some in labile-barley showed retarded development and reduction in size compared with fully fertile lateral florets in six-rowed barley. We used two F2 mapping populations to generate whole genome genetic linkage maps and ultimately locate the lab locus as a recessive Mendelian trait to a 4.5-5.8 cM interval at approximately 80 cM on chromosome 5HL. Our results will help identifying the role of the lab gene in relation to other spikelet fertility factors in barley.

  10. Identification of Genetic Loci Affecting the Severity of Symptoms of Hirschsprung Disease in Rats Carrying Ednrbsl Mutations by Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Torigoe, Daisuke; Lei, Chuzhao; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong; Sasaki, Nobuya; Wang, Jinxi; Agui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR) is a congenital disease in neonates characterized by the absence of the enteric ganglia in a variable length of the distal colon. This disease results from multiple genetic interactions that modulate the ability of enteric neural crest cells to populate developing gut. We previously reported that three rat strains with different backgrounds (susceptible AGH-Ednrbsl/sl, resistant F344-Ednrbsl/sl, and LEH-Ednrbsl/sl) but the same null mutation of Ednrb show varying severity degrees of aganglionosis. This finding suggests that strain-specific genetic factors affect the severity of HSCR. Consistent with this finding, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for the severity of HSCR on chromosome (Chr) 2 was identified using an F2 intercross between AGH and F344 strains. In the present study, we performed QTL analysis using an F2 intercross between the susceptible AGH and resistant LEH strains to identify the modifier/resistant loci for HSCR in Ednrb-deficient rats. A significant locus affecting the severity of HSCR was also detected within the Chr 2 region. These findings strongly suggest that a modifier gene of aganglionosis exists on Chr 2. In addition, two potentially causative SNPs (or mutations) were detected upstream of a known HSCR susceptibility gene, Gdnf. These SNPs were possibly responsible for the varied length of gut affected by aganglionosis. PMID:25790447

  11. Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map Based on Large-Scale Marker Development in Mango Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq)

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chun; Shu, Bo; Yao, Quangsheng; Wu, Hongxia; Xu, Wentian; Wang, Songbiao

    2016-01-01

    Genetic maps are particularly important and valuable tools for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping and marker assisted selection (MAS) of plant with desirable traits. In this study, 173 F1 plants from a cross between Mangifera indica L. “Jin-Hwang” and M. indica L. “Irwin” and their parent plants were subjected to high-throughput sequencing and specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) library construction. After preprocessing, 66.02 Gb of raw data containing 330.64 M reads were obtained. A total of 318,414 SLAFs were detected, of which 156,368 were polymorphic. Finally, 6594 SLAFs were organized into a linkage map consisting of 20 linkage groups (LGs). The total length of the map was 3148.28 cM and the average distance between adjacent markers was 0.48 cM. This map could be considered, to our knowledge, the first high-density genetic map of mango, and might form the basis for fine QTL mapping and MAS of mango. PMID:27625670

  12. Genetic analysis of the genes involved in synthesis of the lipopolysaccharide core in Escherichia coli K-12: three operons in the rfa locus.

    PubMed Central

    Roncero, C; Casadaban, M J

    1992-01-01

    The region of the Escherichia coli K-12 chromosome encoding the enzymes responsible for the synthesis of responsible for the synthesis of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core has been cloned in vivo by using a mini-Mu vector. This region, formerly known as the rfa locus, comprises 18 kb of DNA between the markers tdh and rpmBG. Results of in vitro mutagenesis of this region with MudII1734 indicate the presence of at least 17 open reading frames or genes, a number considerably higher than expected on the basis of genetic and biochemical studies. Specific insertions in different genes have been recombined into the chromosome, and the mutations have been phenotypically characterized. Complementation analysis indicates that these genes are arranged in three different operons transcribed in opposite directions. A detailed physical map of this region has been constructed on the basis of complementation analysis, fusion protein data, and phenotypic characterizations. Additionally, the role of some genes in the synthesis of LPS has been defined by complementation analysis with known Salmonella typhimurium LPS mutants. The genetic organization of this locus seems to be identical in E. coli K-12 and S. typhimurium. Images PMID:1577693

  13. Genome-Wide Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Discovery and High-Density Genetic Map Construction in Cauliflower Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhenqing; Gu, Honghui; Sheng, Xiaoguang; Yu, Huifang; Wang, Jiansheng; Huang, Long; Wang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers and genetic maps play an important role in plant genomics and breeding studies. Cauliflower is an important and distinctive vegetable; however, very few molecular resources have been reported for this species. In this study, a novel, specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing strategy was employed for large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and high-density genetic map construction in a double-haploid, segregating population of cauliflower. A total of 12.47 Gb raw data containing 77.92 M pair-end reads were obtained after processing and 6815 polymorphic SLAFs between the two parents were detected. The average sequencing depths reached 52.66-fold for the female parent and 49.35-fold for the male parent. Subsequently, these polymorphic SLAFs were used to genotype the population and further filtered based on several criteria to construct a genetic linkage map of cauliflower. Finally, 1776 high-quality SLAF markers, including 2741 SNPs, constituted the linkage map with average data integrity of 95.68%. The final map spanned a total genetic length of 890.01 cM with an average marker interval of 0.50 cM, and covered 364.9 Mb of the reference genome. The markers and genetic map developed in this study could provide an important foundation not only for comparative genomics studies within Brassica oleracea species but also for quantitative trait loci identification and molecular breeding of cauliflower. PMID:27047515

  14. Genome-Wide Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Discovery and High-Density Genetic Map Construction in Cauliflower Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenqing; Gu, Honghui; Sheng, Xiaoguang; Yu, Huifang; Wang, Jiansheng; Huang, Long; Wang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers and genetic maps play an important role in plant genomics and breeding studies. Cauliflower is an important and distinctive vegetable; however, very few molecular resources have been reported for this species. In this study, a novel, specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing strategy was employed for large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and high-density genetic map construction in a double-haploid, segregating population of cauliflower. A total of 12.47 Gb raw data containing 77.92 M pair-end reads were obtained after processing and 6815 polymorphic SLAFs between the two parents were detected. The average sequencing depths reached 52.66-fold for the female parent and 49.35-fold for the male parent. Subsequently, these polymorphic SLAFs were used to genotype the population and further filtered based on several criteria to construct a genetic linkage map of cauliflower. Finally, 1776 high-quality SLAF markers, including 2741 SNPs, constituted the linkage map with average data integrity of 95.68%. The final map spanned a total genetic length of 890.01 cM with an average marker interval of 0.50 cM, and covered 364.9 Mb of the reference genome. The markers and genetic map developed in this study could provide an important foundation not only for comparative genomics studies within Brassica oleracea species but also for quantitative trait loci identification and molecular breeding of cauliflower.

  15. Movable Genetic Elements: Detection of Changes in Maize DNA at the Shrunken Locus Due to the Intervention of Ds Elements

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Burr, B.; Burr, F.A.

    1980-05-28

    This report describes our initial attempts at the molecular characterization of a maize controlling element. We have prepared a cDNA probe and used it to detect changes at a locus where Ds elements are found. Evidence of their presence are indicated by changes in the restriction patterns, but there is as yet no information on the physical nature of the controlling elements nor on the kinds of rearrangements they cause.

  16. Movable genetic elements: detection of changes in maize DNA at the Shrunken locus due to the intervention of Ds elements

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, B.; Burr, F.A.

    1980-05-28

    This report describes our initial attempts at the molecular characterization of a maize controlling element. We have prepared a cDNA probe and used it to detect changes at a locus where Ds elements are found. Evidence of their presence are indicated by changes in the restriction patterns, but there is as yet no information on the physical nature of the controlling elements nor on the kinds of rearrangements they cause.

  17. High-resolution genetic mapping of the sucrose octaacetate taste aversion (Soa) locus on mouse Chromosome 6.

    PubMed

    Bachmanov, A A; Li, X; Li, S; Neira, M; Beauchamp, G K; Azen, E A

    2001-09-01

    An acetylated sugar, sucrose octaacetate (SOA), tastes bitter to humans and has an aversive taste to at least some mice and other animals. In mice, taste aversion to SOA depends on allelic variation of a single locus, Soa. Three Soa alleles determine 'taster' (Soa(a)), 'nontaster' (Soa(b)), and 'demitaster' (Soa(c)) phenotypes of taste sensitivity to SOA. Although Soa has been mapped to distal Chromosome (Chr) 6, the limits of the Soa region have not been defined. In this study, mice from congenic strains SW.B6-Soa(b), B6.SW-Soa(a), and C3.SW-Soa(a/c) and from an outbred CFW strain were genotyped with polymorphic markers on Chr 6. In the congenic strains, the limits of introgressed donor fragments were determined. In the outbred mice, linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analyses were conducted. Positions of the markers were further resolved by using radiation hybrid mapping. The results show that the Soa locus is contained in an approximately 1-cM (3.3-4.9 Mb) region including the Prp locus.

  18. A Phenomic Scan of the Norfolk Island Genetic Isolate Identifies a Major Pleiotropic Effect Locus Associated with Metabolic and Renal Disorder Markers

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Miles C.; Lea, Rodney A.; Macartney-Coxson, Donia; Hanna, Michelle; Eccles, David A.; Carless, Melanie A.; Chambers, Geoffrey K.; Bellis, Claire; Goring, Harald H.; Curran, Joanne E.; Harper, Jacquie L.; Gibson, Gregory; Blangero, John; Griffiths, Lyn R.

    2015-01-01

    Multiphenotype genome-wide association studies (GWAS) may reveal pleiotropic genes, which would remain undetected using single phenotype analyses. Analysis of large pedigrees offers the added advantage of more accurately assessing trait heritability, which can help prioritise genetically influenced phenotypes for GWAS analysis. In this study we performed a principal component analysis (PCA), heritability (h2) estimation and pedigree-based GWAS of 37 cardiovascular disease -related phenotypes in 330 related individuals forming a large pedigree from the Norfolk Island genetic isolate. PCA revealed 13 components explaining >75% of the total variance. Nine components yielded statistically significant h2 values ranging from 0.22 to 0.54 (P<0.05). The most heritable component was loaded with 7 phenotypic measures reflecting metabolic and renal dysfunction. A GWAS of this composite phenotype revealed statistically significant associations for 3 adjacent SNPs on chromosome 1p22.2 (P<1x10-8). These SNPs form a 42kb haplotype block and explain 11% of the genetic variance for this renal function phenotype. Replication analysis of the tagging SNP (rs1396315) in an independent US cohort supports the association (P = 0.000011). Blood transcript analysis showed 35 genes were associated with rs1396315 (P<0.05). Gene set enrichment analysis of these genes revealed the most enriched pathway was purine metabolism (P = 0.0015). Overall, our findings provide convincing evidence for a major pleiotropic effect locus on chromosome 1p22.2 influencing risk of renal dysfunction via purine metabolism pathways in the Norfolk Island population. Further studies are now warranted to interrogate the functional relevance of this locus in terms of renal pathology and cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:26474483

  19. Genetic linkage mapping for a susceptibility locus to bipolar illness: Chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, 10p, 11p, 22, and Xpter

    SciTech Connect

    Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Hseih, W.T.; Goldin, L.R.

    1994-09-15

    We are conducting a genome search for a predisposing locus to bipolar (manic-depressive) illness by genotyping 21 moderate-sized pedigrees. We report linkage data derived from screening marker loci on chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, 10p, 11p, 22, and the pseudoautosomal region at Xpter. To analyze for linkage, two-point marker to illness lod scores were calculated under a dominant model with either 85% or 50% maximum penetrance and a recessive model with 85% maximum penetrance, and two affection status models. Under the dominant high penetrance model the cumulative lod scores in the pedigree series were less than -2 at {theta} = 0.01 in 134 of 142 loci examined, indicating that if the disease is genetically homogeneous, linkage could be excluded in these marker regions. Similar results were obtained using the other genetic models. Heterogeneity analysis was conducted when indicated, but no evidence for linkage was found. In the course of mapping we found a positive total lod score greater than +3 at the D7S78 locus at {theta} = 0.01 under a dominant, 50% penetrance model. The lod scores for additional markers within the D7S78 region failed to support the initial finding, implying that this was a spurious positive. Analysis with affected pedigree member method for COL1A2 and D7S78 showed no significance for linkage, but for PLANH1, at the weighting functions f(p)=1 and f(p)=1/sqrt(p), borderline P values of 0.036 and 0.047 were obtained. We also detected new polymorphisms at the mineralo-corticoid receptor (MLR) and calmodulin II (CALMII) genes. These genes were genetically mapped and under affection status model 2 and a dominant, high penetrance mode of transmission the lod scores of {le}2 at {theta} = 0.01 were found. 39 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Characterization of genetic polymorphism of the bovine lymphocyte antigen DRB3.2 locus in Kankrej cattle (Bos indicus).

    PubMed

    Behl, J D; Verma, N K; Behl, R; Mukesh, M; Ahlawat, S P S

    2007-06-01

    Bovine lymphocyte antigen DRB 3.2 (BoLA-DRB3.2) gene encodes for the beta chain of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule in cattle, which is a glycoprotein present on the surface of antigen-presenting cells. This locus shows extensive polymorphism in it. The objective of the present study was to genotype the BoLA-DRB3.2 locus in Kankrej cattle (n = 50) by PCR-RFLP. Bovine DNA was isolated from aliquots of whole blood. Primers specific for exon 2 of the bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA)-DRB3 gene were used to amplify the region. The 304-bp amplified product of the DRB3 gene was separately digested with restriction endonucleases RsaI, BstYI, and Hae III. Twenty-four BoLA-DRB 3.2 alleles were identified with frequencies ranging from 1 to 22.0%. Twenty-one alleles of the total 24 alleles were similar to those reported earlier; 3 alleles were new and had not been reported previously. The allele BoLA-DRB3.2*34 occurred at the highest frequency of 22% (approx.) in the Kankrej animals studied. Six alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2 *34, *15, *06, *20, *37, and *20) accounted for almost 71% of the total alleles observed to be present in the Kankrej animals. All the new alleles observed were present at frequencies of 1%. The results obtained in the present study demonstrated that the BoLA DRB3.2 locus is highly polymorphic in the Kankrej cattle.

  1. [Genetic variation at the pantophysin (PanI) locus in North-East Arctic cod Gadus morhua L. (Gadiformes: Gadidae) population in the Barents Sea and adjacent waters].

    PubMed

    Makeenko, G A; Volkov, A A; Mugue, N S; Zelenina, D A

    2014-12-01

    We investigated polymorphisms in the pantophysin gene (Pan I locus) in a population of North-East Arctic cod, Gadus morhua L., throughout its foraging area in the Barents Sea and adjacent waters. Correlations between the frequencies of Pan I alleles and habitat conditions, such as depth and temperature, were explored. This study was based on a large number of specimens (2210 individuals) of different age and wide geographic sampling coverage. The frequency of the Pan I(A) allele, a known genetic marker of coastal cod, varied from zero to 0.47. Allele frequencies correlated with depth at the sampling location but not with bottom water temperatures. We observed variations in Pan I(A) frequencies among different age cohorts from the same area. The most prominent shift in Pan I polymorphism was detected at the early stages of the fish life cycle, between pelagic juveniles and benthic cod. We found that the Pan I(A) allele frequency in pelagic yearling cod was essentially same throughout the studied areas in the Barents Sea. In turn, juveniles settling at the northern and deep water locations showed a significant decrease in the allele frequency. In contrast, the frequency of the Pan I(A) allele remained constant in juveniles settling in shallow waters when compared to the pelagic stage. These results confirm the selective nature of the cod Pan I locus and indicate that selection process acting on individuals with different genotypes at the Pan I locus leads to the formation of a stable spatial distribution of allele frequencies observed in adult cod.

  2. Intra-and inter-population genetic diversity at the HLA-DQA1 locus and their implications for parentage analysis and human identification

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas, F. |; Cerda-Flores, R. |; Zhong, Y.

    1994-09-01

    HLA-DQA1 locus, studied by PCR-based sequence specific oligonucleotide probes, is highly polymorphic in all populations thus far studied. From the literature we compiled genotype and allele frequency data at this locus for 87 populations to examine the pattern of intra- and inter- population genetic diversity. In general, allele frequency variations in populations are consistent with their ethno-history, although small isolated populations (e.g. Pacific Islanders) exhibit somewhat disparate variations of allele frequencies. A nested gene diversity analysis of 41 populations, classified into 5 ethnic groups (African, n = 3; Caucasian, n = 18; American Native, n = 3; Asian, n = 8; Pacific Islanders, n = 9) showed that the total gene diversity (80.4%) is largely (95%) due to intra-population variation. Only 3% of the gene diversity is due to inter-population within ethnic group variation, with the remaining 2% due to between ethnic group variation. In terms of average heterozygosity, probability of paternity exlusion, and probability of individual identification, the inter-ethnic group variation is larger than that between poulation samples within the ethnic groups. No significant departure from Hardy-Weinberg expectations of genotype frequencies was observed in any population. With an average heterozygosity of 77% around the world, this locus provides a 57% chance of exclusion of a falsely accused person from paternity, and is able to exclude 91% of individuals for identification purposes. In terms of allele fequencies, the geometric positions of the admixed populations (e.g. African-Americans and American-Hispanics) are consistent with their admixture estimates in their gene pool.

  3. Genetic and physical mapping of the Treacher Collins syndrome locus with respect to loci in the chromosome 5q3 region

    SciTech Connect

    Jabs, E.W.; Li, Xiang; Coss, C.; Taylor, E. ); Lovett, M. ); Yamaoka, L.H.; Speer, M.C. ); Cadle, R.; Hall, B. ); Brown, K. )

    1993-10-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant, craniofacial developmental disorder, and its locus (TCOF1) has been mapped to chromosome 5q3. To refine the location of the gene within this region, linkage analysis was performed among the TCOF1 locus and 12 loci (IL9, FGFA, GRL, D5S207, D5S210, D5S376, CSF1R, SPARC, D5S119, D5S209, D5S527, FGFR4) in 13 Treacher Collins syndrome families. The highest maximum lod score was obtained between loci TCOF1 and D5S210 (Z = 10.52; [theta] = 0.02 [+-] 0.07). The best order, IL9-GRL-D5S207/D5S210-CSF1R-SPARC-D5S119, and genetic distances among these loci were determined in the 40 CEPH families by multipoint linkage analysis. YAC clones were used to establish the order of loci, centromere-5[prime]GRL3[prime]-D5S207-D5S210-D5S376-CSF1R-SPARC-D5S119-telomere. By combining known physical mapping data with ours, the order of chromosome 5q3 markers is centomere-IL9-FGFA-5[prime]GRL3[prime]-D5s207-D5S210-D5S376-CSF1R-SPARC-D5S119-D5S209-FGFR4-telomere. Based on this order, haplotype analysis suggests that the TCOF1 locus resides distal CSF1R and proximal to SPARC within a region less than 1 Mb in size. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Genetic mapping of human heart-skeletal muscle adenine nucleotide translocator and its relationship to the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Haraguchi, Y.; Chung, A.B.; Torroni, A.; Stepien, G.; Shoffner, J.M.; Costigan, D.A.; Polak, M.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Altherr, M.R.; Winokur, S.T.

    1993-05-01

    The mitochondrial heart-skeletal muscle adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT1) was regionally mapped to 4q35-qter using somatic cell hybrids containing deleted chromosome 4. The regional location was further refined through family studies using ANT1 intron and promoter nucleotide polymorphisms recognized by the restriction endonucleases MboII, NdeI, and HaeIII. Two alleles were found, each at a frequency of 0.5. The ANT1 locus was found to be closely linked to D4S139, D4S171, and the dominant skeletal muscle disease locus facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). A crossover that separated D4S171 and ANT1 from D4S139 was found. Since previous studies have established the chromosome 4 map order as centromere-D4S171-D4S139-FSHD, it was concluded that ANT1 is located on the side of D4S139, that is opposite from FSHD. This conclusion was confirmed by sequencing the exons and analyzing the transcripts of ANT1 from several FSHD patients and finding no evidence of aberration. 35 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Quantitative trait locus mapping with background control in genetic populations of clonal F1 and double cross.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luyan; Li, Huihui; Ding, Junqiang; Wu, Jianyu; Wang, Jiankang

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we considered five categories of molecular markers in clonal F1 and double cross populations, based on the number of distinguishable alleles and the number of distinguishable genotypes at the marker locus. Using the completed linkage maps, incomplete and missing markers were imputed as fully informative markers in order to simplify the linkage mapping approaches of quantitative trait genes. Under the condition of fully informative markers, we demonstrated that dominance effect between the female and male parents in clonal F1 and double cross populations can cause the interactions between markers. We then developed an inclusive linear model that includes marker variables and marker interactions so as to completely control additive effects of the female and male parents, as well as the dominance effect between the female and male parents. The linear model was finally used for background control in inclusive composite interval mapping (ICIM) of quantitative trait locus (QTL). The efficiency of ICIM was demonstrated by extensive simulations and by comparisons with simple interval mapping, multiple-QTL models and composite interval mapping. Finally, ICIM was applied in one actual double cross population to identify QTL on days to silking in maize.

  6. Quantitative trait locus mapping with background control in genetic populations of clonal F1 and double cross

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luyan; Li, Huihui; Ding, Junqiang; Wu, Jianyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we considered five categories of molecular markers in clonal F1 and double cross populations, based on the number of distinguishable alleles and the number of distinguishable genotypes at the marker locus. Using the completed linkage maps, incomplete and missing markers were imputed as fully informative markers in order to simplify the linkage mapping approaches of quantitative trait genes. Under the condition of fully informative markers, we demonstrated that dominance effect between the female and male parents in clonal F1 and double cross populations can cause the interactions between markers. We then developed an inclusive linear model that includes marker variables and marker interactions so as to completely control additive effects of the female and male parents, as well as the dominance effect between the female and male parents. The linear model was finally used for background control in inclusive composite interval mapping (ICIM) of quantitative trait locus (QTL). The efficiency of ICIM was demonstrated by extensive simulations and by comparisons with simple interval mapping, multiple‐QTL models and composite interval mapping. Finally, ICIM was applied in one actual double cross population to identify QTL on days to silking in maize. PMID:25881980

  7. Genetic Interactions at the Fla10 Locus: Suppressors and Synthetic Phenotypes That Affect the Cell Cycle and Flagellar Function in Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Lux-III, F. G.; Dutcher, S. K.

    1991-01-01

    Through the isolation of suppressors of temperature-sensitive flagellar assembly mutations at the FLA10 locus of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we have identified six other genes involved in flagellar assembly. Mutations at these suppressor loci, termed SUF1-SUF6, display allele specificity with respect to which fla10(-) mutant alleles they suppress. An additional mutation, apm1-122, which confers resistance to the plant herbicides amiprophos-methyl and oryzalin, was also found to interact with mutations at the FLA10 locus. The apm1-122 mutation in combination with three fla10(-) mutant alleles results in synthetic cold-sensitive cell division defects, and in combination with an additional pseudo-wild-type fla10(-) allele yields a synthetic temperature-sensitive flagellar motility phenotype. Based upon the genetic interactions of these loci, we propose that the FLA10 gene product interacts with multiple components of the flagellar apparatus and plays a role both in flagellar assembly and in the cell cycle. PMID:1874415

  8. Genetic Control of Schistosome Infections by the SM1 Locus of the 5q31-q33 Region Is Linked to Differentiation of Type 2 Helper T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Virmondes; Piper, Karen; Couissinier-Paris, Patricia; Bacelar, Olivia; Dessein, Hélia; Dessein, Alain J.

    1999-01-01

    Human susceptibility to Schistosoma mansoni infections is controlled by the SM1 locus on chromosome 5 in q31-q33. This genetic region encodes cytokines which regulate the development of helper T lymphocytes. In the present work, a clonal analysis of CD4+ T lymphocytes of homozygous resistant and homozygous susceptible subjects was undertaken to evaluate whether SM1 controls helper T-cell differentiation. Of 121 CD4+ T-cell clones (TCC) from three susceptible (S) and three resistant (R) subjects, 68 proliferated when stimulated by parasite antigens. Parasite-specific TCC derived from susceptible subjects (33 STCC) produced 10- to 1,000-fold less interleukin-4 and -5 than TCC from resistant subjects (25 RTCC). Clones from both patient groups produced, however, the same amount of gamma interferon. Parasite-specific STCC were type 1 helper (Th1) or Th0/1, whereas RTCC were either Th2 or Th0/2. These results, together with the localization of SM1 in 5q31-q33, indicate that the SM1 locus controls the differentiation of Th2 lymphocytes. PMID:10456917

  9. Localization of a locus for juvenile myoclonic epilepsy on chromosome 6p11-21.2 and evidence for genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.W.; Delgado-Escueta, A.V. |; Alonso, V.M.E.

    1994-09-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a common form of primary idiopathic generalized epilepsy characterized by myoclonias, tonic-clonic or clonic tonic-clonic convulsions and absences. Ictal electroencephalograms (EEGs) show high amplitude multispikes folowed by slow waves and interictal EEGs manifest 3.5-6 Hz diffuse multispike wave complexes. JME affected about 7-10% of patients with epilepsies and its onset peaks between 13-15 years of age. We recently mapped a JME locus on chromosome 6p21.1-6p11 by linkage analysis of one relatively large JME family from Los Angeles and Belize. Assuming autosomal dominant inheritance with 70% penetrance, pairwise analyses tightly linked JME to D6S257 (Z = 3.67), D6S428 (Z = 3.08) and D6S272 (Z = 3.56) at {theta} = 0, m = f. Recombination and multipoints linkage analysis also suggested a locus is between markers D6S257 and D6S272. We then screened three relatively larger Mexican JME pedigrees with D6S257, D6S272, D6S282, TNF, D6S276, D6S273, D6S105 and F13A1 on chromosome 6p. Assuming autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance, linkage to chromosome 6p DNA markers are excluded. Our findings underline the genetic heterogeneity of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

  10. Genetic characterization of a complex locus necessary for the transport and catabolism of erythritol, adonitol and L-arabitol in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Barney A; Oresnik, Ivan J

    2012-08-01

    The Sinorhizobium meliloti locus necessary for the utilization of erythritol as a sole carbon source, contains 17 genes, including genes that encode an ABC transporter necessary for the transport of erythritol, as well as the genes encoding EryA, EryB, EryC, TpiB and the regulators EryD and EryR (SMc01615). Construction of defined deletions and complementation experiments show that the other genes at this locus encode products that are necessary for the catabolism of adonitol (ribitol) and l-arabitol, but not d-arabitol. These analyses show that aside from one gene that is specific for the catabolism of l-arabitol (SMc01619, lalA), the rest of the catabolic genes are necessary for both polyols (SMc01617, rbtC; SMc01618, rbtB; SMc01622, rbtA). Genetic and biochemical data show that in addition to utilizing erythritol as a substrate, EryA is also capable of utilizing adonitol and l-arabitol. Similarly, transport experiments using labelled erythritol show that adonitol, l-arabitol and erythritol share a common transporter (MptABCDE). Quantitative RT-PCR experiments show that transcripts containing genes necessary for adonitol and l-arabitol utilization are induced by these sugars in an eryA-dependent manner.

  11. Genetic mapping identifies a major locus spanning P450 clusters associated with pyrethroid resistance in kdr-free Anopheles arabiensis from Chad.

    PubMed

    Witzig, C; Parry, M; Morgan, J C; Irving, H; Steven, A; Cuamba, N; Kerah-Hinzoumbé, C; Ranson, H; Wondji, C S

    2013-04-01

    Prevention of malaria transmission throughout much of Africa is dependent on bednets that are impregnated with pyrethroid insecticides. Anopheles arabiensis is the major malaria vector in Chad and efforts to control this vector are threatened by the emergence of pyrethroid resistance. WHO bioassays revealed that An. arabiensis from Ndjamena is resistant to pyrethroids and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) but fully susceptible to carbamates and organophosphates. No 1014F or 1014S kdr alleles were detected in this population. To determine the mechanisms that are responsible for resistance, genetic crosses were established between the Ndja strain and an insecticide susceptible population from Mozambique. Resistance was inherited as an autosomal trait and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping identified a single major locus on chromosome 2R, which explained 24.4% of the variance in resistance. This QTL is enriched in P450 genes including 25 cytochrome P450s in total. One of these, Cyp6p4 is 22-fold upregulated in the Ndja strain compared with the susceptible. Piperonyl butoxide (PBO) synergist and biochemical assays further support a role for P450s in conferring pyrethroid resistance in this population.

  12. Next-Generation Genetics in Plants: Evolutionary Trade-off, Immunity and Speciation (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Wiegel, Detlef

    2016-07-12

    Detlef Wiegel from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology on "Next-generation genetics in plants: Evolutionary tradeoffs, immunity and speciation" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  13. Next-Generation Genetics in Plants: Evolutionary Trade-off, Immunity and Speciation (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegel, Detlef

    2010-03-25

    Detlef Wiegel from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology on "Next-generation genetics in plants: Evolutionary tradeoffs, immunity and speciation" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  14. Next Generation Genetic Mapping of the Ligon-lintless-2 (Li2) Locus in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Next generation sequencing offers new ways to identify the genetic mechanisms that underlie mutant phenotypes. The release of a reference diploid Gossypium raimondii (D5) genome and bioinformatics tools to sort tetraploid reads into subgenomes has brought cotton genetic mapping into the genomics er...

  15. Plasmodium falciparum genetic diversity can be characterised using the polymorphic merozoite surface antigen 2 (MSA-2) gene as a single locus marker.

    PubMed

    Prescott, N; Stowers, A W; Cheng, Q; Bobogare, A; Rzepczyk, C M; Saul, A

    1994-02-01

    The genetic diversity of Solomon Island Plasmodium falciparum isolates was examined using MSA-2 as a single locus marker. Amplification of MSA-2 gene fragments showed size polymorphism and the presence of mixed infections. Sequence analysis indicated a global representation of MSA-2 alleles with representatives of 3D7/CAMP allelic subfamilies and the FCQ-27 allelic family being identified. A simplified method of characterisation, utilising PCR-RFLPs of MSA-2 gene fragments, was developed. The RFLPs allowed identification of allelic families and further distinction within the 3D7/CAMP family. The amplification of MSA-2 gene fragments from culture derived lines revealed a loss of diversity for a number of Solomon Island isolates. Genomic diversity was confirmed for Solomon Island lines, along with Papua New Guinean and Thai lines, by the generation of 7H8/6 fingerprints. All lines were distinct and band sharing frequencies and Wagner tree construction failed to identify any geographic clustering.

  16. Genetic Analysis of Natural Variation in Antirrhinum Scent Profiles Identifies BENZOIC ACID CARBOXYMETHYL TRANSFERASE As the Major Locus Controlling Methyl Benzoate Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Hernández, Victoria; Hermans, Benjamin; Weiss, Julia; Egea-Cortines, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    The Antirrhinum genus has a considerable complexity in the scent profiles produced by different species. We have analyzed the genetic differences between A. majus and A. linkianum, two species divergent in the emission of methyl benzoate, methyl cinnamate, acetophenone, and ocimene. The genetic analysis showed that all compounds segregated in a Mendelian fashion attributable to one or two loci with simple or epistatic interactions. Several lines lacked methyl benzoate, a major Volatile Organic Compound emitted by A. majus but missing in A. linkianum. Using a candidate gene approach, we found that the BENZOIC ACID CARBOXYMETHYL TRANSFERASE from A. linkianum appeared to be a null allele as we could not detect mRNA expression. The coding region did not show significant differences that could explain the loss of expression. The intron-exon boundaries was also conserved indicating that there is no alternative splicing in A. linkianum as compared to A. majus. However, it showed multiple polymorphisms in the 5' promoter region including two insertions, one harboring an IDLE MITE transposon with additional sequences with high homology to the PLENA locus and a second one with somewhat lower homology to the regulatory region of the VENOSA locus. It also had a 778 bp deletion as compared to the A. majus BAMT promoter region. Our results show that the differences in scent emission between A. majus and A. linkianum may be traced back to single genes involved in discrete biosynthetic reactions such as benzoic acid methylation. Thus, natural variation of this complex trait maybe the result of combinations of wild type, and loss of function alleles in different genes involved in discrete VOCs biosynthesis. Furthermore, the presence of active transposable elements in the genus may account for rapid evolution and instability, raising the possibility of adaptation to local pollinators.

  17. Association between genetic variants in the tumour necrosis factor/lymphotoxin α/lymphotoxin β locus and primary Sjogren's syndrome in Scandinavian samples.

    PubMed

    Bolstad, Anne Isine; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Kristjansdottir, Gudlaug; Vasaitis, Lilian; Kvarnström, Marika; Sjöwall, Christopher; Johnsen, Svein Joar Auglænd; Eriksson, Per; Omdal, Roald; Brun, Johan G; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Theander, Elke; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Rönnblom, Lars; Nordmark, Gunnel; Jonsson, Roland

    2012-06-01

    Lymphotoxin β (LTB) has been found to be upregulated in salivary glands of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). An animal model of pSS also showed ablation of the lymphoid organisation and a marked improvement in salivary gland function on blocking the LTB receptor pathway. This study aimed to investigate whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the lymphotoxin α (LTA)/LTB/tumour necrosis factor (TNF) gene clusters are associated with pSS. 527 pSS patients and 532 controls participated in the study, all of Caucasian origin from Sweden and Norway. 14 SNP markers were genotyped and after quality control filtering, 12 SNP were analysed for their association with pSS using single marker and haplotype tests, and corrected by permutation testing. Nine markers showed significant association with pSS at the p=0.05 level. Markers rs1800629 and rs909253 showed the strongest genotype association (p=1.64E-11 and p=4.42E-08, respectively, after correcting for sex and country of origin). When the analysis was conditioned for the effect of rs1800629, only the association with rs909253 remained nominally significant (p=0.027). In haplotype analyses the strongest effect was observed for the haplotype rs909253G_rs1800629A (p=9.14E-17). The associations were mainly due to anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibody-positive pSS. A strong association was found between several SNP in the LTA/LTB/TNFα locus and pSS, some of which led to amino acid changes. These data suggest a role for this locus in the development of pSS. Further studies are needed to examine if the genetic effect described here is independent of the known genetic association between HLA and pSS.

  18. Genetic Analysis of Natural Variation in Antirrhinum Scent Profiles Identifies BENZOIC ACID CARBOXYMETHYL TRANSFERASE As the Major Locus Controlling Methyl Benzoate Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Hernández, Victoria; Hermans, Benjamin; Weiss, Julia; Egea-Cortines, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    The Antirrhinum genus has a considerable complexity in the scent profiles produced by different species. We have analyzed the genetic differences between A. majus and A. linkianum, two species divergent in the emission of methyl benzoate, methyl cinnamate, acetophenone, and ocimene. The genetic analysis showed that all compounds segregated in a Mendelian fashion attributable to one or two loci with simple or epistatic interactions. Several lines lacked methyl benzoate, a major Volatile Organic Compound emitted by A. majus but missing in A. linkianum. Using a candidate gene approach, we found that the BENZOIC ACID CARBOXYMETHYL TRANSFERASE from A. linkianum appeared to be a null allele as we could not detect mRNA expression. The coding region did not show significant differences that could explain the loss of expression. The intron-exon boundaries was also conserved indicating that there is no alternative splicing in A. linkianum as compared to A. majus. However, it showed multiple polymorphisms in the 5′ promoter region including two insertions, one harboring an IDLE MITE transposon with additional sequences with high homology to the PLENA locus and a second one with somewhat lower homology to the regulatory region of the VENOSA locus. It also had a 778 bp deletion as compared to the A. majus BAMT promoter region. Our results show that the differences in scent emission between A. majus and A. linkianum may be traced back to single genes involved in discrete biosynthetic reactions such as benzoic acid methylation. Thus, natural variation of this complex trait maybe the result of combinations of wild type, and loss of function alleles in different genes involved in discrete VOCs biosynthesis. Furthermore, the presence of active transposable elements in the genus may account for rapid evolution and instability, raising the possibility of adaptation to local pollinators. PMID:28154577

  19. Genetics meets epigenetics: Genetic variants that modulate noncoding RNA in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Calore, Martina; De Windt, Leon J; Rampazzo, Alessandra

    2015-12-01

    After the recent description of the human genome by the ENCODE and the FANTOM consortia, major attention has been addressed to the so-called "genomic noise", which mainly consists of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Among them, microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs have been demonstrated to modulate gene expression and to be involved in several human diseases. Since ncRNAs and their targets are encoded in the genome, genetic principles apply. Common variants are supposed to influence the expression level and the functionality of ncRNAs, with subsequent differential regulation of their target genes. Moreover, several reports showed that polymorphisms in ncRNA or their target genes play a role in the development of cardiovascular adverse phenotype. Here, we provide an overview of the effects of these variations in cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Genetic studies of the Fv-1 locus of mice: linkage with Gpd-1 in recombinant inbred lines.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, B A; Bedigian, H G; Meier, H

    1977-01-01

    Multiple recombinant inbred lines, derived from crosses between strains permissive to N-tropic murine leukemia viruses (Fv-1n) and strains permissive to B-tropic murine leukemia viruses (Fv-1b), have been characterized as to Fv-1 genotype and other chromosome 4 markers, including the closely linked hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase isozyme locus (Gpd-1). Only one recombinant between Fv-1 and Gpd-1 was found among 45 lines tested. On this basis, the distance between Fv-1 and Gpd-1 is estimated to be 0.6 centimorgans. None of the lines was either resistant or susceptible to both N- and B-tropic viruses. Nineteen other inbred strains, previously untested, were characterized as either Fv-1n or Fv-1b. PMID:196096

  1. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences. (ERB)

  2. An omnibus permutation test on ensembles of two-locus analyses can detect pure epistasis and genetic heterogeneity in genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Setsirichok, Damrongrit; Tienboon, Phuwadej; Jaroonruang, Nattapong; Kittichaijaroen, Somkit; Wongseree, Waranyu; Piroonratana, Theera; Usavanarong, Touchpong; Limwongse, Chanin; Aporntewan, Chatchawit; Phadoongsidhi, Marong; Chaiyaratana, Nachol

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the ability of an omnibus permutation test on ensembles of two-locus analyses (2LOmb) to detect pure epistasis in the presence of genetic heterogeneity. The performance of 2LOmb is evaluated in various simulation scenarios covering two independent causes of complex disease where each cause is governed by a purely epistatic interaction. Different scenarios are set up by varying the number of available single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in data, number of causative SNPs and ratio of case samples from two affected groups. The simulation results indicate that 2LOmb outperforms multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) and random forest (RF) techniques in terms of a low number of output SNPs and a high number of correctly-identified causative SNPs. Moreover, 2LOmb is capable of identifying the number of independent interactions in tractable computational time and can be used in genome-wide association studies. 2LOmb is subsequently applied to a type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) data set, which is collected from a UK population by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC). After screening for SNPs that locate within or near genes and exhibit no marginal single-locus effects, the T1D data set is reduced to 95,991 SNPs from 12,146 genes. The 2LOmb search in the reduced T1D data set reveals that 12 SNPs, which can be divided into two independent sets, are associated with the disease. The first SNP set consists of three SNPs from MUC21 (mucin 21, cell surface associated), three SNPs from MUC22 (mucin 22), two SNPs from PSORS1C1 (psoriasis susceptibility 1 candidate 1) and one SNP from TCF19 (transcription factor 19). A four-locus interaction between these four genes is also detected. The second SNP set consists of three SNPs from ATAD1 (ATPase family, AAA domain containing 1). Overall, the findings indicate the detection of pure epistasis in the presence of genetic heterogeneity and provide an alternative explanation for the aetiology of T1D

  3. Family-Based Analysis Using a Dense Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism–Based Map Defines Genetic Variation at PSORS1, the Major Psoriasis-Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Veal, Colin D.; Capon, Francesca; Allen, Michael H.; Heath, Emma K.; Evans, Julie C.; Jones, Andrew; Patel, Shanta; Burden, David; Tillman, David; Barker, Jonathan N. W. N.; Trembath, Richard C.

    2002-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common skin disorder of multifactorial origin. Genomewide scans for disease susceptibility have repeatedly demonstrated the existence of a major locus, PSORS1 (psoriasis susceptibility 1), contained within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), on chromosome 6p21. Subsequent refinement studies have highlighted linkage disequilibrium (LD) with psoriasis, along a 150-kb segment that includes at least three candidate genes (encoding human leukocyte antigen–C [HLA-C], α-helix–coiled-coil–rod homologue, and corneodesmosin), each of which has been shown to harbor disease-associated alleles. However, the boundaries of the minimal PSORS1 region remain poorly defined. Moreover, interpretations of allelic association with psoriasis are compounded by limited insight of LD conservation within MHC class I interval. To address these issues, we have pursued a high-resolution genetic characterization of the PSORS1 locus. We resequenced genomic segments along a 220-kb region at chromosome 6p21 and identified a total of 119 high-frequency SNPs. Using 59 SNPs (18 coding and 41 noncoding SNPs) whose position was representative of the overall marker distribution, we genotyped a data set of 171 independently ascertained parent–affected offspring trios. Family-based association analysis of this cohort highlighted two SNPs (n.7 and n.9) respectively lying 7 and 4 kb proximal to HLA-C. These markers generated highly significant evidence of disease association (P<10-9), several orders of magnitude greater than the observed significance displayed by any other SNP that has previously been associated with disease susceptibility. This observation was replicated in a Gujarati Indian case/control data set. Haplotype-based analysis detected overtransmission of a cluster of chromosomes, which probably originated by ancestral mutation of a common disease-bearing haplotype. The only markers exclusive to the overtransmitted chromosomes are SNPs n.7 and n.9, which define a

  4. Genetically modified crops for the bioeconomy: meeting public and regulatory expectations.

    PubMed

    Chapotin, Saharah Moon; Wolt, Jeffrey D

    2007-12-01

    As the United States moves toward a plant-based bioeconomy, a large research and development effort is focused on creating new feedstocks to meet biomass demand for biofuels, bioenergy, and specialized bioproducts, such as industrial compounds and biomaterial precursors. Most bioeconomy projections assume the widespread deployment of novel feedstocks developed through the use of modern molecular breeding techniques, but rarely consider the challenges involved with the use of genetically modified crops, which can include hurdles due to regulatory approvals, market adoption, and public acceptance. In this paper we consider the implications of various transgenic crops and traits under development for the bioeconomy that highlight these challenges. We believe that an awareness of the issues in crop and trait selection will allow developers to design crops with maximum stakeholder appeal and with the greatest potential for widespread adoption, while avoiding applications unlikely to meet regulatory approval or gain market and public acceptance.

  5. 76 FR 6623 - Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel...

  6. The society for craniofacial genetics and developmental biology 39th annual meeting.

    PubMed

    Fish, Jennifer L; Albertson, Craig; Harris, Matthew P; Lozanoff, Scott; Marcucio, Ralph S; Richtsmeier, Joan T; Trainor, Paul A

    2017-04-01

    The Society for Craniofacial Genetics and Developmental Biology (SCGDB) aims to promote education, research, and communication, about normal and abnormal development of the tissues and organs of the head. Membership of the SCGDB is broad and diverse-including clinicians, orthodontists, scientists, and academics-but with all members sharing an interest in craniofacial biology. Each year, the SCGDB hosts a meeting where members can share their latest research, exchange ideas and resources, and build on or establish new collaborations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The Imaging and Cognition Genetics Conference 2011, ICG 2011: A Meeting of Minds

    PubMed Central

    Le Hellard, Stéphanie; Hanson, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    In June 2011, 70 researchers from the disciplines of cognitive science, genetics, psychology, psychiatry, neurobiology, and computer science gathered in Os, Norway, for the first Imaging and Cognition Genetics meeting. The aim of the conference was to discuss progress, enhance collaboration, and maximize the sharing of resources within this new field. In this Perspective, we summarize the major themes that emerged from ICG 2011. The first is the importance of defining cognitive and imaging phenotypes and endophenotypes suitable for genetic analysis. These can come from differential psychology, cognitive science, structural MRI, tractography, and functional imaging. The second theme is the emergence of new methods for the analysis of complex traits. These include advanced computational and statistical techniques for analyzing complex datasets, and new ways of interpreting data from genome-wide association studies, such as jointly evaluating the contribution of SNPs in specific genes and pathways rather than considering single SNPs in isolation. The final theme is the importance of establishing functional correlates of newly identified genetic variants. PMID:22654732

  8. The Imaging and Cognition Genetics Conference 2011, ICG 2011: A Meeting of Minds.

    PubMed

    Le Hellard, Stéphanie; Hanson, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    In June 2011, 70 researchers from the disciplines of cognitive science, genetics, psychology, psychiatry, neurobiology, and computer science gathered in Os, Norway, for the first Imaging and Cognition Genetics meeting. The aim of the conference was to discuss progress, enhance collaboration, and maximize the sharing of resources within this new field. In this Perspective, we summarize the major themes that emerged from ICG 2011. The first is the importance of defining cognitive and imaging phenotypes and endophenotypes suitable for genetic analysis. These can come from differential psychology, cognitive science, structural MRI, tractography, and functional imaging. The second theme is the emergence of new methods for the analysis of complex traits. These include advanced computational and statistical techniques for analyzing complex datasets, and new ways of interpreting data from genome-wide association studies, such as jointly evaluating the contribution of SNPs in specific genes and pathways rather than considering single SNPs in isolation. The final theme is the importance of establishing functional correlates of newly identified genetic variants.

  9. Association of genetic variation in the tachykinin receptor 3 locus with hot flashes and night sweats in the Women's Health Initiative Study.

    PubMed

    Crandall, Carolyn J; Manson, JoAnn E; Hohensee, Chancellor; Horvath, Steve; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; LeBlanc, Erin S; Vitolins, Mara Z; Nassir, Rami; Sinsheimer, Janet S

    2017-03-01

    Vasomotor symptoms (VMS, ie, hot flashes or night sweats) are reported by many, but not all, women. The extent to which VMS are genetically determined is unknown. We evaluated the relationship of genetic variation and VMS. In this observational study, we accessed data from three genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (SNP Health Association Resource cohort [SHARe], WHI Memory Study cohort [WHIMS+], and Genome-Wide Association Studies of Treatment Response in Randomized Clinical Trials [GARNET] studies, total n = 17,695) of European American, African American, and Hispanic American postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79 years at baseline in the Women's Health Initiative Study. We examined genetic variation in relation to VMS (yes/no) in each study and using trans-ethnic inverse variance fixed-effects meta-analysis. A total of 11,078,977 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) met the quality criteria. After adjustment for covariates and population structure, three SNPs (on chromosomes 3 and 11) were associated with VMS at the genome-wide threshold of 5 × 10 in the African American SHARe GWAS, but were not associated in the other cohorts. In the meta-analysis, 14 SNPs, all located on chromosome 4 in the tachykinin receptor 3 (TACR3) locus, however, had P < 5 × 10. These SNPs' effect sizes were similar across studies/participants' ancestry (odds ratio ∼1.5). Genetic variation in TACR3 may contribute to the risk of VMS. To our knowledge, this is the first GWAS to examine SNPs associated with VMS. These results support the biological hypothesis of a role for TACR3 in VMS, which was previously hypothesized from animal and human studies. Further study of these variants may lead to new insights into the biological pathways involved in VMS, which are poorly understood.

  10. Multi-Locus Sequence Analysis Reveals Profound Genetic Diversity among Isolates of the Human Pathogen Bartonella bacilliformis

    PubMed Central

    Chaloner, Gemma L.; Palmira Ventosilla; Birtles, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Bartonella bacilliformis is the aetiological agent of human bartonellosis, a potentially life threatening infection of significant public health concern in the Andean region of South America. Human bartonellosis has long been recognised in the region but a recent upsurge in the number of cases of the disease and an apparent expansion of its geographical distribution have re-emphasized its contemporary medical importance. Here, we describe the development of a multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for B. bacilliformis and its application to an archive of 43 isolates collected from patients across Peru. MLST identified eight sequence types among these isolates and the delineation of these was generally congruent with those of the previously described typing scheme. Phylogenetic analysis based on concatenated sequence data derived from MLST loci revealed that seven of the eight sequence types were closely related to one another; however, one sequence type, ST8, exhibited profound evolutionary divergence from the others. The extent of this divergence was akin to that observed between other members of the Bartonella genus, suggesting that ST8 strains may be better considered as members of a novel Bartonella genospecies. PMID:21811647

  11. Genetic mapping of the cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) locus on chromosome band 6p21 to include a microdeletion

    SciTech Connect

    Gelb, B.D.; Desnick, R.J.; Shevell, M.

    1995-08-28

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a generalized skeletal dysplasia with autosomal dominant inheritance. Recently, the CCD disease locus was localized to 23 and 17 cM regions of chromosome band 6p21 by linkage studies of seven affected families. Of note, the 23 cM region contained a microdeletion detected in one family at D6S459, an interval that was excluded in the 17 cM overlapping region. Here, linkage of CCD to 6p21 was independently confirmed with a maximal two-point LOD score of Z=5.12 with marker D6S452 at {theta}=0.00. Recombinant events in two affected individuals defined a CCD region of 7 cM from D6S465 to D6S282, which overlapped with the CCD region containing the microdeletion but did not overlap with the 17 cM critical region from D6S282 to D6S291. These results suggest the refined localization of the CCD region to 6 cM spanning markers D6S438 to D6S282, thereby reviving the possibility that the CCD gene lies within the microdeletion at D6S459. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Genetic defects at the UGT1 locus associated with Crigler-Najjar type I disease, including a prenatal diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ciotti, M.; Obaray, R.; Owens, I.S.; Martin, M.G.

    1997-01-20

    Characterization of the UGT1 gene complex locus encoding both multiple bilirubin and phenol UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (transferases) has been critical in identifying mutations in the bilirubin isoforms. This study utilizes this information to identify the bases of deficient bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activity encoded by the UGT1A gene for the major bilirubin isozyme, HUG-Br1, in 3 Crigler-Najjar type I individuals and the genotype of an at-risk unborn sibling of one patient. A homozygous and heterozygous two-base mutation (CCC to CGT) created the HUG-Br1P387R mutant of the major bilirubin transferase in 2 different Crigler-Najjar type I patients, B.G. and G.D., respectively. Both parents of B.G. and his unborn sibling, J.G., were determined to be carriers of the P387R mutation. G.D. also contains the CAA to TAA nonsense mutation (G1n357st). Y.A. has a homozygous CT deletion in codons 40/41. The HUG-Br1P387R mutant protein was totally inactive at the major pH optimum, but retained 26% normal activity at the minor pH optimum (7.6), which was 5.4% of the combined activities measured at the two pH values. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Genetic analysis of lipopolysaccharide core biosynthesis by Escherichia coli K-12: insertion mutagenesis of the rfa locus.

    PubMed Central

    Austin, E A; Graves, J F; Hite, L A; Parker, C T; Schnaitman, C A

    1990-01-01

    Tn10 insertions were selected on the basis of resistance to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-specific bacteriophage U3. The majority of these were located in a 2-kilobase region within the rfa locus, a gene cluster of about 18 kb that contains genes for LPS core biosynthesis. The rfa::Tn10 insertions all exhibited a deep rough phenotype that included hypersensitivity to hydrophobic antibiotics, a reduction in major outer membrane proteins, and production of truncated LPS. These mutations were complemented by a Clarke-Carbon plasmid known to complement rfa mutations of Salmonella typhimurium, and analysis of the insert from this plasmid showed that it contained genes for at least six polypeptides which appear to be arranged in the form of a complex operon. Defects in two of these genes were specifically implicated as the cause of the deep rough phenotype. One of these appeared to be rfaG, which encodes a function required for attachment of the first glucose residue to the heptose region of the core. The other gene did not appear to be directly involved in determination of the sugar composition of the core. We speculate that the product of this gene is involved in the attachment of phosphate or phosphorylethanolamine to the core and that it is the lack of one of these substituents which results in the deep rough phenotype. Images PMID:2168379

  14. Genetic diversity at a single locus under viability selection and facultative apomixis: equilibrium structure and deviations from Hardy-Weinberg frequencies.

    PubMed Central

    Overath, R D; Asmussen, M A

    1998-01-01

    We extensively analyze the maintenance of genetic variation and deviations from Hardy-Weinberg frequencies at a diallelic locus under mixed mating with apomixis and constant viability selection. Analytical proofs show that: (1) at most one polymorphic equilibrium exists, (2) polymorphism requires overdominant or underdominant selection, and (3) a simple, modified overdominance condition is sufficient to maintain genetic variation. In numerical analyses, only overdominant polymorphic equilibria are stable, and these are stable whenever they exist, which happens for approximately 78% of random fitness and mating parameters. The potential for maintaining both alleles increases with increasing apomixis or outcrossing and decreasing selfing. Simulations also indicate that equilibrium levels of heterozygosity will often be statistically indistinguishable from Hardy-Weinberg frequencies and that adults, not seeds, should usually be censused to maximize detecting deviations. Furthermore, although both censuses more often have an excess rather than a deficit of heterozygotes, analytical sign analyses of the fixation indices prove that, overall, adults are more likely to have an excess and seeds a deficit at equilibrium. PMID:9560415

  15. A reference genetic map of Muscadinia rotundifolia and identification of Ren5, a new major locus for resistance to grapevine powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Sophie; Wiedemann-Merdinoglu, Sabine; Dumas, Vincent; Mestre, Pere; Merdinoglu, Didier

    2012-12-01

    Muscadinia rotundifolia, a species closely related to cultivated grapevine Vitis vinifera, is a major source of resistance to grapevine downy and powdery mildew, two major threats to cultivated traditional cultivars of V. vinifera respectively caused by the oomycete Plasmopara viticola and the ascomycete Erisyphe necator. The aim of the present work was to develop a reference genetic linkage map based on simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers for M. rotundifolia. This map was created using S1 M. rotundifolia cv. Regale progeny, and covers 948 cM on 20 linkage groups, which corresponds to the expected chromosome number for muscadine. The comparison of the genetic maps of V. vinifera and M. rotundifolia revealed a high macrosynteny between the genomes of both species. The S1 progeny was used to assess the general level of resistance of M. rotundifolia to P. viticola and E. necator, by scoring different parameters of pathogen development. A quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis allowed us to highlight a major QTL on linkage group 14 controlling resistance to powdery mildew, which explained up to 58 % of the total phenotypic variance. This QTL was named 'Resistance to Erysiphe Necator 5' (Ren5). A microscopic evaluation E. necator mycelium development on resistant and susceptible genotypes of the S1 progeny showed that Ren5 exerts its action after the formation of the first appressorium, and acts by delaying, and then stopping, mycelium development.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF EPIC GENETIC MARKERS AND THE UTILITY OF A MULTI-LOCUS, MULTI-TAXA PHYLOGEOGRAPHICAL APPROACH TO EXAMINING PATTERNS OF GENETIC DIVERSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of population genetic measures for assessing the structure of natural populations and the condition of biological resources has increased steadily since the 1970's. Traditionally, genetic diversity within and among geographic areas is assessed based on a one-time sampling of...

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF EPIC GENETIC MARKERS AND THE UTILITY OF A MULTI-LOCUS, MULTI-TAXA PHYLOGEOGRAPHICAL APPROACH TO EXAMINING PATTERNS OF GENETIC DIVERSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of population genetic measures for assessing the structure of natural populations and the condition of biological resources has increased steadily since the 1970's. Traditionally, genetic diversity within and among geographic areas is assessed based on a one-time sampling of...

  18. High-Density Genetic Linkage Map Construction and Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping for Hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida Bunge).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuhui; Su, Kai; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Liping; Zhang, Jijun; Li, Junpeng; Guo, Yinshan

    2017-07-14

    Genetic linkage maps are an important tool in genetic and genomic research. In this study, two hawthorn cultivars, Qiujinxing and Damianqiu, and 107 progenies from a cross between them were used for constructing a high-density genetic linkage map using the 2b-restriction site-associated DNA (2b-RAD) sequencing method, as well as for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) for flavonoid content. In total, 206,411,693 single-end reads were obtained, with an average sequencing depth of 57× in the parents and 23× in the progeny. After quality trimming, 117,896 high-quality 2b-RAD tags were retained, of which 42,279 were polymorphic; of these, 12,951 markers were used for constructing the genetic linkage map. The map contained 17 linkage groups and 3,894 markers, with a total map length of 1,551.97 cM and an average marker interval of 0.40 cM. QTL mapping identified 21 QTLs associated with flavonoid content in 10 linkage groups, which explained 16.30-59.00% of the variance. This is the first high-density linkage map for hawthorn, which will serve as a basis for fine-scale QTL mapping and marker-assisted selection of important traits in hawthorn germplasm and will facilitate chromosome assignment for hawthorn whole-genome assemblies in the future.

  19. Sex-Based Genetic Association Study Identifies CELSR1 as a Possible Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Risk Locus among Women.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Megan; Cho, Michael H; Sharma, Sunita; Glass, Kimberly; Castaldi, Peter J; McDonald, Merry-Lynn; Aschard, Hugues; Senter-Sylvia, Jody; Tantisira, Kelan; Weiss, Scott T; Hersh, Craig P; Morrow, Jarrett D; Lomas, David; Agusti, Alvar; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; O'Connor, George T; Dupuis, Josée; Hokanson, John; Crapo, James D; Beaty, Terri H; Laird, Nan; Silverman, Edwin K; DeMeo, Dawn L

    2017-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex disease with strong environmental and genetic influences and sexually dimorphic features. Although genetic risk factors for COPD have been identified, much of the heritability remains unexplained. Sex-based genetic association studies may uncover additional COPD genetic risk factors. We studied current and former smokers from COPD case-control cohorts (COPDGene non-Hispanic whites and African Americans, Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate End-Points, and Genetics of Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease). COPD was defined as post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity less than 0.70 and forced expiratory volume in 1 second percent predicted less than 80. Testing was performed across all cohorts and combined in a meta-analysis adjusted for age, pack-years, and genetic ancestry. We first performed genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-by-sex interaction testing on the outcome of COPD affection status. We performed sex-stratified association testing for SNPs with interaction P less than 10(-6). We examined over 8 million SNPs in four populations, including 6,260 subjects with COPD (40.6% female) and 5,269 smoking control subjects (47.3% female). The SNP rs9615358 in the cadherin gene CELSR1 approached genome-wide significance for an interaction with sex (P = 1.24 × 10(-7)). In the sex-stratified meta-analysis, this SNP was associated with COPD among females (odds ratio, 1.37 [95% confidence interval, 1.25-1.49]; P = 3.32 × 10(-7)) but not males (odds ratio, 0.90 [95% confidence interval, 0.79-1.01]; P = 0.06). CELSR1 is involved in fetal lung development. In a human fetal lung tissue dataset, we observed greater CELSR1 expression in female compared with male samples. This SNP-by-sex genome-wide association analysis identified the fetal lung development gene, CELSR1, as a potential sex-specific risk factor for COPD

  20. Role of a genetic variant on the 15q25.1 lung cancer susceptibility locus in smoking-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xuemei; Zhang, Weidong; Gui, Jiang; Fan, Xia; Zhang, Weiwei; Li, Yafang; An, Guangyu; Zhu, Dakai; Hu, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    The 15q25.1 lung cancer susceptibility locus, containing CHRNA5, could modify lung cancer susceptibility and multiple smoking related phenotypes. However, no studies have investigated the association between CHRNA5 rs3841324, which has been proven to have the highest association with CHRNA5 mRNA expression, and the risk of other smoking-associated cancers, except lung cancer. In the current study we examined the association between rs3841324 and susceptibility to smoking-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In this case-control study we genotyped the CHRNA5 rs3841324 polymorphism with 400 NPC cases and 491 healthy controls who were Han Chinese and frequency-matched by age (±5 years), gender, and alcohol consumption. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). We found that individuals with CHRNA5 rs3841324 combined variant genotypes (ins/del+del/del) had a >1.5-fold elevated risk for NPC than those with the ins/ins genotype (adjusted OR = 1.52; 95% CI, 1.16-2.00), especially among ever smokers (adjusted OR = 2.07; 95% CI, 1.23-3.48). The combined variant genotypes acted jointly with cigarette smoking to contribute to a 4.35-fold increased NPC risk (adjusted OR = 4.35; 95% CI, 2.57-7.38). There was a dose-response relationship between deletion alleles and NPC susceptibility (trend test, P = 0.011). Our results suggest that genetic variants on the 15q25.1 lung cancer susceptibility locus may influence susceptibility to NPC, particularly for smoking-associated NPC. Such work may be helpful to facilitate an understanding of the etiology of smoking-associated cancers and improve prevention efforts.

  1. MicroRNA-22 and promoter motif polymorphisms at the Chga locus in genetic hypertension: functional and therapeutic implications for gene expression and the pathogenesis of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Friese, Ryan S.; Altshuler, Angelina E.; Zhang, Kuixing; Miramontes-Gonzalez, Jose Pablo; Hightower, C. Makena; Jirout, Martin L.; Salem, Rany M.; Gayen, Jiaur R.; Mahapatra, Nitish R.; Biswas, Nilima; Cale, Mo; Vaingankar, Sucheta M.; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Courel, Maïté; Taupenot, Laurent; Ziegler, Michael G.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Pravenec, Michal; Mahata, Sushil K.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.; O'Connor, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is a common hereditary syndrome with unclear pathogenesis. Chromogranin A (Chga), which catalyzes formation and cargo storage of regulated secretory granules in neuroendocrine cells, contributes to blood pressure homeostasis centrally and peripherally. Elevated Chga occurs in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) adrenal glands and plasma, but central expression is unexplored. In this report, we measured SHR and Wistar–Kyoto rat (control) Chga expression in central and peripheral nervous systems, and found Chga protein to be decreased in the SHR brainstem, yet increased in the adrenal and the plasma. By re-sequencing, we systematically identified five promoter, two coding and one 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) polymorphism at the SHR (versus WKY or BN) Chga locus. Using HXB/BXH recombinant inbred (RI) strain linkage and correlations, we demonstrated genetic determination of Chga expression in SHR, including a cis-quantitative trait loci (QTLs) (i.e. at the Chga locus), and such expression influenced biochemical determinants of blood pressure, including a cascade of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes, catecholamines themselves and steroids. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that the 3′-UTR polymorphism (which disrupts a microRNA miR-22 motif) and promoter polymorphisms altered gene expression consistent with the decline in SHR central Chga expression. Coding region polymorphisms did not account for changes in Chga expression or function. Thus, we hypothesized that the 3′-UTR and promoter mutations lead to dysregulation (diminution) of Chga in brainstem cardiovascular control nuclei, ultimately contributing to the pathogenesis of hypertension in SHR. Accordingly, we demonstrated that in vivo administration of miR-22 antagomir to SHR causes substantial (∼18 mmHg) reductions in blood pressure, opening a novel therapeutic avenue for hypertension. PMID:23674521

  2. Genomewide scan for real-word reading subphenotypes of dyslexia: Novel chromosome 13 locus and genetic complexity

    PubMed Central

    Igo, Robert P.; Chapman, Nicola H.; Berninger, Virginia W.; Matsushita, Mark; Brkanac, Zoran; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Holzman, Ted; Nielsen, Kathleen; Raskind, Wendy H.; Wijsman, Ellen M.

    2008-01-01

    Dyslexia is a common learning disability exhibited as a delay in acquiring reading skills despite adequate intelligence and instruction. Reading single real words (real-word reading, RWR) is especially impaired in many dyslexics. We performed a genome scan, using variance-components (VC) linkage analysis and Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) joint segregation and linkage analysis, for three quantitative measures of RWR in 108 multigenerational families, with followup of the strongest signals with parametric LOD score analyses. We used single-word reading efficiency (SWE) to assess speed and accuracy of RWR, and word identification (WID) to assess accuracy alone. Adjusting SWE for WID provided a third measure of RWR efficiency. All three methods of analysis identified a strong linkage signal for SWE on chromosome 13q. Based on multipoint analysis with 13 markers we obtained a MCMC intensity ratio of 53.2 (chromosome-wide p < 0.004), a VC LOD score of 2.29, and a parametric LOD score of 2.94, based on a quantitative-trait model from MCMC segregation analysis. A weaker signal for SWE on chromosome 2q occurred in the same location as a significant linkage peak seen previously in a scan for phonological decoding. MCMC oligogenic segregation analysis identified three models of transmission for WID, which could be assigned to two distinct linkage peaks on chromosomes 12 and 15. Taken together, these results indicate a locus for efficiency and accuracy of RWR on chromosome 13, and a complex model for inheritance of RWR accuracy with loci on chromosomes 12 and 15. PMID:16331673

  3. Assessment of genetic diversity of zoonotic Brucella spp. recovered from livestock in Egypt using multiple locus VNTR analysis.

    PubMed

    Menshawy, Ahmed M S; Perez-Sancho, Marta; Garcia-Seco, Teresa; Hosein, Hosein I; García, Nerea; Martinez, Irene; Sayour, Ashraf E; Goyache, Joaquín; Azzam, Ragab A A; Dominguez, Lucas; Alvarez, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Brucellosis is endemic in most parts of Egypt, where it is caused mainly by Brucella melitensis biovar 3, and affects cattle and small ruminants in spite of ongoing efforts devoted to its control. Knowledge of the predominant Brucella species/strains circulating in a region is a prerequisite of a brucellosis control strategy. For this reason a study aiming at the evaluation of the phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of a panel of 17 Brucella spp. isolates recovered from domestic ruminants (cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat) from four governorates during a period of five years (2002-2007) was carried out using microbiological tests and molecular biology techniques (PCR, MLVA-15, and sequencing). Thirteen strains were identified as B. melitensis biovar 3 while all phenotypic and genetic techniques classified the remaining isolates as B. abortus (n = 2) and B. suis biovar 1 (n = 2). MLVA-15 yielded a high discriminatory power (h = 0.801), indicating a high genetic diversity among the B. melitensis strains circulating among domestic ruminants in Egypt. This is the first report of the isolation of B. suis from cattle in Egypt which, coupled with the finding of B. abortus, suggests a potential role of livestock as reservoirs of several zoonotic Brucella species in the region.

  4. Development of a 10,000 Locus Genetic Map of the Sunflower Genome Based on Multiple Crosses

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, John E.; Bachlava, Eleni; Brunick, Robert L.; Rieseberg, Loren H.; Knapp, Steven J.; Burke, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps have the potential to facilitate the genetic dissection of complex traits and comparative analyses of genome structure, as well as molecular breeding efforts in species of agronomic importance. Until recently, the majority of such maps was based on relatively low-throughput marker technologies, which limited marker density across the genome. The availability of high-throughput genotyping technologies has, however, made possible the efficient development of high-density genetic maps. Here, we describe the analysis and integration of genotypic data from four sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) mapping populations to produce a consensus linkage map of the sunflower genome. Although the individual maps (which contained 3500–5500 loci each) were highly colinear, we observed localized variation in recombination rates in several genomic regions. We also observed several gaps up to 26 cM in length that completely lacked mappable markers in individual crosses, presumably due to regions of identity by descent in the mapping parents. Because these regions differed by cross, the consensus map of 10,080 loci contained no such gaps, clearly illustrating the value of simultaneously analyzing multiple mapping populations. PMID:22870395

  5. Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map and Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping in the Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Meilin; Li, Yangping; Jing, Jing; Mu, Chuang; Du, Huixia; Dou, Jinzhuang; Mao, Junxia; Li, Xue; Jiao, Wenqian; Wang, Yangfan; Hu, Xiaoli; Wang, Shi; Wang, Ruijia; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps are critical and indispensable tools in a wide range of genetic and genomic research. With the advancement of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) methods, the construction of a high-density and high-resolution linkage maps has become achievable in marine organisms lacking sufficient genomic resources, such as echinoderms. In this study, high-density, high-resolution genetic map was constructed for a sea cucumber species, Apostichopus japonicus, utilizing the 2b-restriction site-associated DNA (2b-RAD) method. A total of 7839 markers were anchored to the linkage map with the map coverage of 99.57%, to our knowledge, this is the highest marker density among echinoderm species. QTL mapping and association analysis consistently captured one growth-related QTL located in a 5 cM region of linkage group (LG) 5. An annotated candidate gene, retinoblastoma-binding protein 5 (RbBP5), which has been reported to be an important regulator of cell proliferation, was recognized in the QTL region. This linkage map represents a powerful tool for research involving both fine-scale QTL mapping and marker assisted selection (MAS), and will facilitate chromosome assignment and improve the whole-genome assembly of sea cucumber in the future. PMID:26439740

  6. Development of a 10,000 locus genetic map of the sunflower genome based on multiple crosses.

    PubMed

    Bowers, John E; Bachlava, Eleni; Brunick, Robert L; Rieseberg, Loren H; Knapp, Steven J; Burke, John M

    2012-07-01

    Genetic linkage maps have the potential to facilitate the genetic dissection of complex traits and comparative analyses of genome structure, as well as molecular breeding efforts in species of agronomic importance. Until recently, the majority of such maps was based on relatively low-throughput marker technologies, which limited marker density across the genome. The availability of high-throughput genotyping technologies has, however, made possible the efficient development of high-density genetic maps. Here, we describe the analysis and integration of genotypic data from four sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) mapping populations to produce a consensus linkage map of the sunflower genome. Although the individual maps (which contained 3500-5500 loci each) were highly colinear, we observed localized variation in recombination rates in several genomic regions. We also observed several gaps up to 26 cM in length that completely lacked mappable markers in individual crosses, presumably due to regions of identity by descent in the mapping parents. Because these regions differed by cross, the consensus map of 10,080 loci contained no such gaps, clearly illustrating the value of simultaneously analyzing multiple mapping populations.

  7. Genetic dissection of the pre-eclampsia susceptibility locus on chromosome 2q22 reveals shared novel risk factors for cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew P.; Brennecke, Shaun P.; East, Christine E.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Roten, Linda T.; Proffitt, J. Michael; Melton, Phillip E.; Fenstad, Mona H.; Aalto-Viljakainen, Tia; Mäkikallio, Kaarin; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kere, Juha; Laivuori, Hannele; Austgulen, Rigmor; Blangero, John; Moses, Eric K.; Pouta, Anneli; Kivinen, Katja; Ekholm, Eeva; Hietala, Reija; Sainio, Susanna; Saisto, Terhi; Uotila, Jukka; Klemetti, Miira; Inkeri Lokki, Anna; Georgiadis, Leena; Huovari, Elina; Kortelainen, Eija; Leminen, Satu; Lähdesmäki, Aija; Mehtälä, Susanna; Salmen, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is an idiopathic pregnancy disorder promoting morbidity and mortality to both mother and child. Delivery of the fetus is the only means to resolve severe symptoms. Women with pre-eclamptic pregnancies demonstrate increased risk for later life cardiovascular disease (CVD) and good evidence suggests these two syndromes share several risk factors and pathophysiological mechanisms. To elucidate the genetic architecture of pre-eclampsia we have dissected our chromosome 2q22 susceptibility locus in an extended Australian and New Zealand familial cohort. Positional candidate genes were prioritized for exon-centric sequencing using bioinformatics, SNPing, transcriptional profiling and QTL-walking. In total, we interrogated 1598 variants from 52 genes. Four independent SNP associations satisfied our gene-centric multiple testing correction criteria: a missense LCT SNP (rs2322659, P = 0.0027), a synonymous LRP1B SNP (rs35821928, P = 0.0001), an UTR-3 RND3 SNP (rs115015150, P = 0.0024) and a missense GCA SNP (rs17783344, P = 0.0020). We replicated the LCT SNP association (P = 0.02) and observed a borderline association for the GCA SNP (P = 0.07) in an independent Australian case–control population. The LRP1B and RND3 SNP associations were not replicated in this same Australian singleton cohort. Moreover, these four SNP associations could not be replicated in two additional case–control populations from Norway and Finland. These four SNPs, however, exhibit pleiotropic effects with several quantitative CVD-related traits. Our results underscore the genetic complexity of pre-eclampsia and present novel empirical evidence of possible shared genetic mechanisms underlying both pre-eclampsia and other CVD-related risk factors. PMID:23420841

  8. High-resolution genetic linkage mapping, high-temperature tolerance and growth-related quantitative trait locus (QTL) identification in Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xia; Luan, Sheng; Hu, Long Yang; Mao, Yong; Tao, Ye; Zhong, Sheng Ping; Kong, Jie

    2016-06-01

    The Kuruma prawn, Marsupenaeus japonicus, is one of the most promising marine invertebrates in the industry in Asia, Europe and Australia. However, the increasing global temperatures result in considerable economic losses in M. japonicus farming. In the present study, to select genetically improved animals for the sustainable development of the Kuruma prawn industry, a high-resolution genetic linkage map and quantitative trait locus (QTL) identification were performed using the RAD technology. The maternal map contained 5849 SNP markers and spanned 3127.23 cM, with an average marker interval of 0.535 cM. Instead, the paternal map contained 3927 SNP markers and spanned 3326.19 cM, with an average marker interval of 0.847 cM. The consensus map contained 9289 SNP markers and spanned 3610.90 cM, with an average marker interval of 0.388 cM and coverage of 99.06 % of the genome. The markers were grouped into 41 linkage groups in the maps. Significantly, negative correlation was detected between high-temperature tolerance (UTT) and body weight (BW). The QTL mapping revealed 129 significant QTL loci for UTT and four significant QTL loci for BW at the genome-wide significance threshold. Among these QTLs, 129 overlapped with linked SNPs, and the remaining four were located in regions between contiguous SNPs. They explained the total phenotypic variance ranging from 8.9 to 12.4 %. Because of a significantly negative correlation between growth and high-temperature tolerance, we demonstrate that this high-resolution linkage map and QTLs would be useful for further marker-assisted selection in the genetic improvement of M. japonicus.

  9. Congenic mice provide in vivo evidence for a genetic locus that modulates intrinsic transforming growth factor β1-mediated signaling and bone acquisition.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Aditi; Larson, Emily A; Carlos, Amy S; Belknap, John K; Rotwein, Peter; Klein, Robert F

    2012-06-01

    Osteoporosis, the most common skeletal disorder, is characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and an increased risk of fragility fractures. BMD is the best clinical predictor of future osteoporotic fracture risk, but is a complex trait controlled by multiple environmental and genetic determinants with individually modest effects. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping is a powerful method for identifying chromosomal regions encompassing genes involved in shaping complex phenotypes, such as BMD. Here we have applied QTL analysis to male and female genetically-heterogeneous F(2) mice derived from a cross between C57BL/6 and DBA/2 strains, and have identified 11 loci contributing to femoral BMD. Further analysis of a QTL on mouse chromosome 7 following the generation of reciprocal congenic strains has allowed us to determine that the high BMD trait, which tracks with the DBA/2 chromosome and exerts equivalent effects on male and female mice, is manifested by enhanced osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro and by increased growth of metatarsal bones in short-term primary culture. An insertion/deletion DNA polymorphism in Ltbp4 exon 12 that causes the in-frame removal of 12 codons in the DBA/2-derived gene maps within 0.6 Mb of the marker most tightly linked to the QTL. LTBP4, one of four paralogous mouse proteins that modify the bioavailability of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family of growth factors, is expressed in differentiating MSC-derived osteoblasts and in long bones, and reduced responsiveness to TGF-β1 is observed in MSCs of mice homozygous for the DBA/2 chromosome 7. Taken together, our results identify a potential genetic and biochemical relationship between decreased TGF-β1-mediated signaling and enhanced femoral BMD that may be regulated by a variant LTBP4 molecule. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  10. Meeting Report: International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History II.

    PubMed

    Artan, Murat; Hwang, Ara B; Lee, Seung V; Nam, Hong Gil

    2015-06-01

    The second International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History was held at the campus of Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu, South Korea, from May 14 to 16, 2014. Many leading scientists in the field of aging research from all over the world contributed to the symposium by attending and presenting their recent work and thoughts. The aim of the symposium was to stimulate international collaborations and interactions among scientists who work on the biology of aging. In the symposium, the most recent and exciting work on aging research was presented, covering a wide range of topics, including the genetics of aging, age-associated diseases, and cellular senescence. The work was conducted in various organisms, includingC. elegans, mice, plants, and humans. Topics covered in the symposium stimulated discussion of novel directions for future research on aging. The meeting ended with a commitment for the third International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History, which will be held in 2016.

  11. Meeting Report: International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History II

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung‐Jae V.; Nam, Hong Gil

    2015-01-01

    The second International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History was held at the campus of Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu, South Korea, from May 14 to 16, 2014. Many leading scientists in the field of aging research from all over the world contributed to the symposium by attending and presenting their recent work and thoughts. The aim of the symposium was to stimulate international collaborations and interactions among scientists who work on the biology of aging. In the symposium, the most recent and exciting work on aging research was presented, covering a wide range of topics, including the genetics of aging, age‐associated diseases, and cellular senescence. The work was conducted in various organisms, including C. elegans, mice, plants, and humans. Topics covered in the symposium stimulated discussion of novel directions for future research on aging. The meeting ended with a commitment for the third International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History, which will be held in 2016. PMID:26115541

  12. High-Resolution Mapping of a Genetic Locus Regulating Preferential Carbohydrate Intake, Total Kilocalories, and Food Volume on Mouse Chromosome 17

    PubMed Central

    Gularte-Mérida, Rodrigo; DiCarlo, Lisa M.; Robertson, Ginger; Simon, Jacob; Johnson, William D.; Kappen, Claudia; Medrano, Juan F.; Richards, Brenda K.

    2014-01-01

    The specific genes regulating the quantitative variation in macronutrient preference and food intake are virtually unknown. We fine mapped a previously identified mouse chromosome 17 region harboring quantitative trait loci (QTL) with large effects on preferential macronutrient intake-carbohydrate (Mnic1), total kilcalories (Kcal2), and total food volume (Tfv1) using interval-specific strains. These loci were isolated in the [C57BL/6J.CAST/EiJ-17.1-(D17Mit19-D17Mit50); B6.CAST-17.1] strain, possessing a ∼40.1 Mb region of CAST DNA on the B6 genome. In a macronutrient selection paradigm, the B6.CAST-17.1 subcongenic mice eat 30% more calories from the carbohydrate-rich diet, ∼10% more total calories, and ∼9% more total food volume per body weight. In the current study, a cross between carbohydrate-preferring B6.CAST-17.1 and fat-preferring, inbred B6 mice was used to generate a subcongenic-derived F2 mapping population; genotypes were determined using a high-density, custom SNP panel. Genetic linkage analysis substantially reduced the 95% confidence interval for Mnic1 (encompassing Kcal2 and Tfv1) from 40.1 to 29.5 Mb and more precisely established its boundaries. Notably, no genetic linkage for self-selected fat intake was detected, underscoring the carbohydrate-specific effect of this locus. A second key finding was the separation of two energy balance QTLs: Mnic1/Kcal2/Tfv1 for food intake and a newly discovered locus regulating short term body weight gain. The Mnic1/Kcal2/Tfv1 QTL was further de-limited to 19.0 Mb, based on the absence of nutrient intake phenotypes in subcongenic HQ17IIa mice. Analyses of available sequence data and gene ontologies, along with comprehensive expression profiling in the hypothalamus of non-recombinant, cast/cast and b6/b6 F2 controls, focused our attention on candidates within the QTL interval. Zfp811, Zfp870, and Btnl6 showed differential expression and also contain stop codons, but have no known biology related to food

  13. The First High-Density Genetic Map Construction in Tree Peony (Paeonia Sect. Moutan) using Genotyping by Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Changfu; Cheng, Fang-Yun; Wu, Jing; Zhong, Yuan; Liu, Gaixiu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps, permitting the elucidation of genome structure, are one of most powerful genomic tools to accelerate marker-assisted breeding. However, due to a lack of sufficient user-friendly molecular markers, no genetic linkage map has been developed for tree peonies (Paeonia Sect. Moutan), a group of important horticultural plants worldwide. Specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a recent molecular marker development technology that enable the large-scale discovery and genotyping of sequence-based marker in genome-wide. In this study, we performed SLAF sequencing of an F1 population, derived from the cross P. ostti ‘FenDanBai’ × P. × suffruticosa ‘HongQiao’, to identify sufficient high-quality markers for the construction of high-density genetic linkage map in tree peonies. After SLAF sequencing, a total of 78 Gb sequencing data and 285,403,225 pair-end reads were generated. We detected 309,198 high-quality SLAFs from these data, of which 85,124 (27.5%) were polymorphic. Subsequently, 3518 of the polymorphic markers, which were successfully encoded in to Mendelian segregation types, and were in conformity with the criteria of high-quality markers, were defined as effective markers and used for genetic linkage mapping. Finally, we constructed an integrated genetic map, which comprised 1189 markers on the five linkage groups, and spanned 920.699 centiMorgans (cM) with an average inter-marker distance of 0.774 cM. There were 1115 ‘SNP-only’ markers, 18 ‘InDel-only’ markers, and 56 ‘SNP&InDel’ markers on the map. Among these markers, 450 (37.85%) showed significant segregation distortion (P < 0.05). In conclusion, this investigation reported the first large-scale marker development and high-density linkage map construction for tree peony. The results of this study will serve as a solid foundation not only for marker-assisted breeding, but also for genome sequence assembly for tree peony. PMID:26010095

  14. The First High-Density Genetic Map Construction in Tree Peony (Paeonia Sect. Moutan) using Genotyping by Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Cai, Changfu; Cheng, Fang-Yun; Wu, Jing; Zhong, Yuan; Liu, Gaixiu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps, permitting the elucidation of genome structure, are one of most powerful genomic tools to accelerate marker-assisted breeding. However, due to a lack of sufficient user-friendly molecular markers, no genetic linkage map has been developed for tree peonies (Paeonia Sect. Moutan), a group of important horticultural plants worldwide. Specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a recent molecular marker development technology that enable the large-scale discovery and genotyping of sequence-based marker in genome-wide. In this study, we performed SLAF sequencing of an F1 population, derived from the cross P. ostti 'FenDanBai' × P. × suffruticosa 'HongQiao', to identify sufficient high-quality markers for the construction of high-density genetic linkage map in tree peonies. After SLAF sequencing, a total of 78 Gb sequencing data and 285,403,225 pair-end reads were generated. We detected 309,198 high-quality SLAFs from these data, of which 85,124 (27.5%) were polymorphic. Subsequently, 3518 of the polymorphic markers, which were successfully encoded in to Mendelian segregation types, and were in conformity with the criteria of high-quality markers, were defined as effective markers and used for genetic linkage mapping. Finally, we constructed an integrated genetic map, which comprised 1189 markers on the five linkage groups, and spanned 920.699 centiMorgans (cM) with an average inter-marker distance of 0.774 cM. There were 1115 'SNP-only' markers, 18 'InDel-only' markers, and 56 'SNP&InDel' markers on the map. Among these markers, 450 (37.85%) showed significant segregation distortion (P < 0.05). In conclusion, this investigation reported the first large-scale marker development and high-density linkage map construction for tree peony. The results of this study will serve as a solid foundation not only for marker-assisted breeding, but also for genome sequence assembly for tree peony.

  15. Dissecting the genetic components of a quantitative trait locus for blood pressure and renal pathology on rat chromosome 3

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Tan, H.H. Caline; Dashti, Mohammed; Wang, Ting; Beattie, Wendy; Mcclure, John; Young, Barbara; Dominiczak, Anna F.; McBride, Martin W.; Graham, Delyth

    2017-01-01

    Background: We have previously confirmed the importance of rat chromosome 3 (RNO3) genetic loci on blood pressure elevation, pulse pressure (PP) variability and renal pathology during salt challenge in the stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive (SHRSP) rat. The aims of this study were to generate a panel of RNO3 congenic sub-strains to genetically dissect the implicated loci and identify positional candidate genes by microarray expression profiling and analysis of next-generation sequencing data. Method and results: A panel of congenic sub-strains were generated containing Wistar–Kyoto (WKY)-introgressed segments of varying size on the SHRSP genetic background, focused within the first 50 Mbp of RNO3. Haemodynamic profiling during salt challenge demonstrated significantly reduced systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and PP variability in SP.WKYGla3a, SP.WKYGla3c, SP.WKYGla3d and SP.WKYGla3e sub-strains. Only SBP and DBP were significantly reduced during salt challenge in SP.WKYGla3b and SP.WKYGla3f sub-strains, whereas SP.WKYGla3g rats did not differ in haemodynamic response to SHRSP. Those sub-strains demonstrating significantly reduced PP variability during salt challenge also demonstrated significantly reduced renal pathology and proteinuria. Microarray expression profiling prioritized two candidate genes for blood pressure regulation (Dnm1, Tor1b), localized within the common congenic interval shared by SP.WKYGla3d and SP.WKYGla3f strains, and one candidate gene for salt-induced PP variability and renal pathology (Rabgap1), located within the region unique to the SP.WKYGla3d strain. Comparison of next-generation sequencing data identified variants within additional positional genes that are likely to affect protein function. Conclusion: This study has identified distinct intervals on RNO3-containing genes that may be important for blood pressure regulation and renal pathology during salt challenge. PMID:27755386

  16. Genetic variation at the 8q24.21 renal cancer susceptibility locus affects HIF binding to a MYC enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Grampp, Steffen; Platt, James L.; Lauer, Victoria; Salama, Rafik; Kranz, Franziska; Neumann, Viviana K.; Wach, Sven; Stöhr, Christine; Hartmann, Arndt; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Mole, David R.; Schödel, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by loss of function of the von Hippel–Lindau tumour suppressor (VHL) and unrestrained activation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). Genetic and epigenetic determinants have an impact on HIF pathways. A recent genome-wide association study on renal cancer susceptibility identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in an intergenic region located between the oncogenes MYC and PVT1. Here using assays of chromatin conformation, allele-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome editing, we show that HIF binding to this regulatory element is necessary to trans-activate MYC and PVT1 expression specifically in cells of renal tubular origins. Moreover, we demonstrate that the risk-associated polymorphisms increase chromatin accessibility and activity as well as HIF binding to the enhancer. These findings provide further evidence that genetic variation at HIF-binding sites modulates the oncogenic transcriptional output of the VHL–HIF axis and provide a functional explanation for the disease-associated effects of SNPs in ccRCC. PMID:27774982

  17. The translocation-associated tox1 locus of Cochliobolus heterostrophus is two genetic elements on two different chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, M; Rose, M S; Yang, G; Yun, S H; Yoder, O C; Turgeon, B G

    1999-01-01

    Previously, Tox1 was defined as a single genetic element controlling the difference between races of Cochliobolus heterostrophus: race T is highly virulent on T-cytoplasm corn and produces the polyketide T-toxin; race O is weakly virulent and does not produce T-toxin. Here we report that Tox1 is two loci, Tox1A and Tox1B, on two different chromosomes. Evidence for two loci derives from: (1) the appearance of 25% Tox+ progeny in crosses between induced Tox1(-) mutants, one defective at Tox1A, the other at Tox1B; (2) the ability of Tox1A- + Tox1B- heterokaryons to complement for T-toxin production; and (3) electrophoretic karyotypes proving that Tox1(-) mutations are physically located on two different chromosomes. Data showing Tox1 as a single genetic element are reconciled with those proving it is two loci by the fact that Tox1 is inseparably linked to the breakpoints of a reciprocal translocation; the translocation results in a four-armed linkage group. In crosses where the translocation is heterozygous (i.e., race T by race O), all markers linked to the four-armed intersection appear linked to each other; in crosses between induced Tox1(-) mutants, complications due to the translocation are eliminated and the two loci segregate independently. PMID:9927453

  18. Genetic diversity patterns in the SR-BI/II locus can be explained by a recent selective sweep.

    PubMed

    Le Jossec, Mireille; Wambach, Tina; Labuda, Damian; Sinnett, Daniel; Levy, Emile

    2004-04-01

    The human scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI and splice variant SR-BII) plays a central role in HDL cholesterol metabolism and represents a candidate gene for a number of related diseases. We examined the genetic diversity of its coding and flanking regions in a sample of 178 chromosomes from individuals of European, African, East Asian (including Southeast Asian), Middle-Eastern as well as Amerindian descent. Nine of the 14 polymorphisms observed are new. Four of the five variants causing amino acid replacements, G2S, S229G, R484W, and G499R, are likely to affect protein structure and function. SR-BI/BII diversity is partitioned among 19 haplotypes; all but one interconnected by single mutation or a recombination event. Such tight haplotype network and the unusual geographic partitioning of this diversity, high not only in Africa but in East Asia as well, suggests its recent origin and possible effect of selection. Coalescent analysis infers a relatively short time to the most recent common ancestor and points to population expansion in Africa and East Asia. These two continents differ significantly in pairwise F(ST) values, differing as well from a single cluster formed by Europe, Middle East and America. In the context of findings for similarly analyzed other loci, we propose that a selective sweep at the origin of modern human populations could explain the low level of ancestral SR-BI/II diversity. The unusually deep split between Africa and Asia, well beyond the Upper Paleolithic when inferred under neutrality, is consistent with subsequent geographical and demographic expansion favoring the accumulation of new variants, especially in groups characterized by large effective population sizes, such as Asians and Africans. The relevance of such partitioning of SR-BI/II diversity remains to be investigated in genetic epidemiological studies which can be guided by the present findings.

  19. Genetic and Molecular Characterization of Submergence Response Identifies Subtol6 as a Major Submergence Tolerance Locus in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Malachy T.; Proctor, Christopher A.; Dou, Yongchao; Schmitz, Aaron J.; Phansak, Piyaporn; Kruger, Greg R.; Zhang, Chi; Walia, Harkamal

    2015-01-01

    Maize is highly sensitive to short term flooding and submergence. Early season flooding reduces germination, survival and growth rate of maize seedlings. We aimed to discover genetic variation for submergence tolerance in maize and elucidate the genetic basis of submergence tolerance through transcriptional profiling and linkage analysis of contrasting genotypes. A diverse set of maize nested association mapping (NAM) founder lines were screened, and two highly tolerant (Mo18W and M162W) and sensitive (B97 and B73) genotypes were identified. Tolerant lines exhibited delayed senescence and lower oxidative stress levels compared to sensitive lines. Transcriptome analysis was performed on these inbreds to provide genome level insights into the molecular responses to submergence. Tolerant lines had higher transcript abundance of several fermentation-related genes and an unannotated Pyrophosphate-Dependent Fructose-6-Phosphate 1-Phosphotransferase gene during submergence. A coexpression network enriched for CBF (C-REPEAT/DRE BINDING FACTOR: C-REPEAT/DRE BINDING FACTOR) genes, was induced by submergence in all four inbreds, but was more activated in the tolerant Mo18W. A recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from Mo18W and B73 was screened for submergence tolerance. A major QTL named Subtol6 was mapped to chromosome 6 that explains 22% of the phenotypic variation within the RIL population. We identified two candidate genes (HEMOGLOBIN2 and RAV1) underlying Subtol6 based on contrasting expression patterns observed in B73 and Mo18W. Sources of tolerance identified in this study (Subtol6) can be useful to increase survival rate during flooding events that are predicted to increase in frequency with climate change. PMID:25806518

  20. Amplification of a single-locus variable-number direct repeats with restriction fragment length polymorphism (DR-PCR/RFLP) for genetic typing of Acinetobacter baumannii strains.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Zaleska, Alicja; Krawczyk, Beata; Kotłowski, Roman; Mikucka, Agnieszka; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2008-01-01

    In search of an effective DNA typing technique for Acinetobacter baumannii strains for hospital epidemiology use, the performance and convenience of a new target sequence was evaluated. Using known genomic sequences of Acinetobacter baumannii strains AR 319754 and ATCC 17978, we developed single-locus variable-number direct-repeat analysis using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (DR-PCR/RFLP) method. A total of 90 Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from patients of the Clinical Hospital in Bydgoszcz, Poland, were examined. Initially, all strains were typed using macrorestriction analysis of the chromosomal DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (REA-PFGE). Digestion of the chromosomal DNA with the ApaI endonuclease and separation of the fragments by PFGE revealed 21 unique types. Application of DR-PCR/RFLP resulted in recognition of 12 clusters. The results showed that the DR-PCR/RFLP method is less discriminatory than REA-PFGE, however, the novel genotyping method can be used as an alternative technique for generating DNA profiles in epidemiological studies of intra-species genetic relatedness of Acinetobacter baumannii strains.

  1. A High-Density Genetic Map with Array-Based Markers Facilitates Structural and Quantitative Trait Locus Analyses of the Common Wheat Genome

    PubMed Central

    Iehisa, Julio Cesar Masaru; Ohno, Ryoko; Kimura, Tatsuro; Enoki, Hiroyuki; Nishimura, Satoru; Okamoto, Yuki; Nasuda, Shuhei; Takumi, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    The large genome and allohexaploidy of common wheat have complicated construction of a high-density genetic map. Although improvements in the throughput of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have made it possible to obtain a large amount of genotyping data for an entire mapping population by direct sequencing, including hexaploid wheat, a significant number of missing data points are often apparent due to the low coverage of sequencing. In the present study, a microarray-based polymorphism detection system was developed using NGS data obtained from complexity-reduced genomic DNA of two common wheat cultivars, Chinese Spring (CS) and Mironovskaya 808. After design and selection of polymorphic probes, 13,056 new markers were added to the linkage map of a recombinant inbred mapping population between CS and Mironovskaya 808. On average, 2.49 missing data points per marker were observed in the 201 recombinant inbred lines, with a maximum of 42. Around 40% of the new markers were derived from genic regions and 11% from repetitive regions. The low number of retroelements indicated that the new polymorphic markers were mainly derived from the less repetitive region of the wheat genome. Around 25% of the mapped sequences were useful for alignment with the physical map of barley. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses of 14 agronomically important traits related to flowering, spikes, and seeds demonstrated that the new high-density map showed improved QTL detection, resolution, and accuracy over the original simple sequence repeat map. PMID:24972598

  2. Quantitative genetic bases of anthocyanin variation in grape (Vitis vinifera L. ssp. sativa) berry: a quantitative trait locus to quantitative trait nucleotide integrated study.

    PubMed

    Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Le Cunff, Loïc; Gomez, Camila; Doligez, Agnès; Ageorges, Agnès; Roux, Catherine; Bertrand, Yves; Souquet, Jean-Marc; Cheynier, Véronique; This, Patrice

    2009-11-01

    The combination of QTL mapping studies of synthetic lines and association mapping studies of natural diversity represents an opportunity to throw light on the genetically based variation of quantitative traits. With the positional information provided through quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, which often leads to wide intervals encompassing numerous genes, it is now feasible to directly target candidate genes that are likely to be responsible for the observed variation in completely sequenced genomes and to test their effects through association genetics. This approach was performed in grape, a newly sequenced genome, to decipher the genetic architecture of anthocyanin content. Grapes may be either white or colored, ranging from the lightest pink to the darkest purple tones according to the amount of anthocyanin accumulated in the berry skin, which is a crucial trait for both wine quality and human nutrition. Although the determinism of the white phenotype has been fully identified, the genetic bases of the quantitative variation of anthocyanin content in berry skin remain unclear. A single QTL responsible for up to 62% of the variation in the anthocyanin content was mapped on a Syrah x Grenache F(1) pseudo-testcross. Among the 68 unigenes identified in the grape genome within the QTL interval, a cluster of four Myb-type genes was selected on the basis of physiological evidence (VvMybA1, VvMybA2, VvMybA3, and VvMybA4). From a core collection of natural resources (141 individuals), 32 polymorphisms revealed significant association, and extended linkage disequilibrium was observed. Using a multivariate regression method, we demonstrated that five polymorphisms in VvMybA genes except VvMybA4 (one retrotransposon, three single nucleotide polymorphisms and one 2-bp insertion/deletion) accounted for 84% of the observed variation. All these polymorphisms led to either structural changes in the MYB proteins or differences in the VvMybAs promoters. We concluded that

  3. Genetic basis for the psychostimulant effects of nicotine: a quantitative trait locus analysis in AcB/BcA recombinant congenic mice.

    PubMed

    Gill, K J; Boyle, A E

    2005-10-01

    Genetic differences in sensitivity to nicotine have been reported in both animals and humans. The present study utilized a novel methodology to map genes involved in regulating both the psychostimulant and depressant effects of nicotine in the AcB/BcA recombinant congenic strains (RCS) of mice. Locomotor activity was measured in a computerized open-field apparatus following subcutaneous administration of saline (days 1 and 2) or nicotine on day 3. The phenotypic measures obtained from this experimental design included total basal locomotor activity, as well as total nicotine activity, nicotine difference scores, nicotine percent change and nicotine regression residual scores. The results indicated that the C57BL/6J (B6) were insensitive to nicotine over the entire dose-response curve (0.1, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg). However, the 0.8-mg/kg dose of nicotine produced a significant decrease in the locomotor activity in the A/J strain and a wide and continuous range of both locomotor excitation and depression among the AcB/BcA RCS. Single-locus association analysis in the AcB RCS identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) for the psychostimulant effects of nicotine on chromosomes 11, 12, 13, 14 and 17 and one QTL for nicotine-induced depression on chromosome 11. In the BcA RCS, nicotine-induced locomotor activation was associated with seven putative regions on chromosomes 2, 7, 8, 13, 14, 16 and 17. There were no overlapping QTL and no genetic correlations between saline- and nicotine-related phenotypes in the AcB/BcA RCS. A number of putative candidate genes were in proximity to regions identified with nicotine sensitivity, including the alpha2 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and the dopamine D3 receptor.

  4. Genetic variants of FOXP2 and KIAA0319/TTRAP/THEM2 locus are associated with altered brain activation in distinct language-related regions.

    PubMed

    Pinel, Philippe; Fauchereau, Fabien; Moreno, Antonio; Barbot, Alexis; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Le Bihan, Denis; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Bourgeron, Thomas; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2012-01-18

    Recent advances have been made in the genetics of two human communication skills: speaking and reading. Mutations of the FOXP2 gene cause a severe form of language impairment and orofacial dyspraxia, while single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located within a KIAA0319/TTRAP/THEM2 gene cluster and affecting the KIAA0319 gene expression are associated with reading disability. Neuroimaging studies of clinical populations point to partially distinct cerebral bases for language and reading impairments. However, alteration of FOXP2 and KIAA0319/TTRAP/THEM2 polymorphisms on typically developed language networks has never been explored. Here, we genotyped and scanned 94 healthy subjects using fMRI during a reading task. We studied the correlation of genetic polymorphisms with interindividual variability in brain activation and functional asymmetry in frontal and temporal cortices. In FOXP2, SNPs rs6980093 and rs7799109 were associated with variations of activation in the left frontal cortex. In the KIAA0319/TTRAP/THEM2 locus, rs17243157 was associated with asymmetry in functional activation of the superior temporal sulcus (STS). Interestingly, healthy subjects bearing the KIAA0319/TTRAP/THEM2 variants previously identified as enhancing the risk of dyslexia showed a reduced left-hemispheric asymmetry of the STS. Our results confirm that both FOXP2 and KIAA0319/TTRAP/THEM2 genes play an important role in human language development, but probably through different cerebral pathways. The observed cortical effects mirror previous fMRI results in developmental language and reading disorders, and suggest that a continuum may exist between these pathologies and normal interindividual variability.

  5. Multi-locus genotypes of Enterocytozoon bieneusi in captive Asiatic black bears in southwestern China: High genetic diversity, broad host range, and zoonotic potential.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lei; Li, Wei; Zhong, Zhijun; Gong, Chao; Cao, Xuefeng; Song, Yuan; Wang, Wuyou; Huang, Xiangming; Liu, Xuehan; Hu, Yanchun; Fu, Hualin; He, Min; Wang, Ya; Zhang, Yue; Wu, Kongju; Peng, Guangneng

    2017-01-01

    Enterocytozoon bieneusi is an obligate eukaryotic intracellular parasite that infects a wide variety of vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. Although considerable research has been conducted on this organism, relatively little information is available on the occurrence of E. bieneusi in captive Asiatic black bears. The present study was performed to determine the prevalence, genetic diversity, and zoonotic potential of E. bieneusi in captive Asiatic black bears in zoos in southwestern China. Fecal specimens from Asiatic black bears in four zoos, located in four different cities, were collected and analyzed for the prevalence of E. bieneusi. The average prevalence of E. bieneusi was 27.4% (29/106), with the highest prevalence in Guiyang Zoo (36.4%, 16/44). Altogether, five genotypes of E. bieneusi were identified among the 29 E. bieneusi-positive samples, including three known genotypes (CHB1, SC02, and horse2) and two novel genotypes named ABB1 and ABB2. Multi-locus sequence typing using three microsatellites (MS1, MS3, and MS7) and one minisatellite (MS4) revealed V, III, V, and IV genotypes at these four loci, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the genotypes SC02 and ABB2 were clustered into group 1 of zoonotic potential, the genotypes CHB1 and ABB1 were clustered into a new group, and the genotype horse2 was clustered into group 6 of unclear zoonotic potential. In conclusion, this study identified two novel E. bieneusi genotypes in captive Asiatic black bears, and used microsatellite and minisatellite markers to reveal E. bieneusi genetic diversity. Moreover, our findings show that genotypes SC02 (identified in humans) and ABB2 belong to group 1 with zoonotic potential, suggesting the risk of transmission of E. bieneusi from Asiatic black bears to humans and other animals.

  6. Multi-locus genotypes of Enterocytozoon bieneusi in captive Asiatic black bears in southwestern China: High genetic diversity, broad host range, and zoonotic potential

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xuefeng; Song, Yuan; Wang, Wuyou; Huang, Xiangming; Liu, Xuehan; Hu, Yanchun; Fu, Hualin; He, Min; Wang, Ya; Zhang, Yue; Wu, Kongju; Peng, Guangneng

    2017-01-01

    Enterocytozoon bieneusi is an obligate eukaryotic intracellular parasite that infects a wide variety of vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. Although considerable research has been conducted on this organism, relatively little information is available on the occurrence of E. bieneusi in captive Asiatic black bears. The present study was performed to determine the prevalence, genetic diversity, and zoonotic potential of E. bieneusi in captive Asiatic black bears in zoos in southwestern China. Fecal specimens from Asiatic black bears in four zoos, located in four different cities, were collected and analyzed for the prevalence of E. bieneusi. The average prevalence of E. bieneusi was 27.4% (29/106), with the highest prevalence in Guiyang Zoo (36.4%, 16/44). Altogether, five genotypes of E. bieneusi were identified among the 29 E. bieneusi-positive samples, including three known genotypes (CHB1, SC02, and horse2) and two novel genotypes named ABB1 and ABB2. Multi-locus sequence typing using three microsatellites (MS1, MS3, and MS7) and one minisatellite (MS4) revealed V, III, V, and IV genotypes at these four loci, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the genotypes SC02 and ABB2 were clustered into group 1 of zoonotic potential, the genotypes CHB1 and ABB1 were clustered into a new group, and the genotype horse2 was clustered into group 6 of unclear zoonotic potential. In conclusion, this study identified two novel E. bieneusi genotypes in captive Asiatic black bears, and used microsatellite and minisatellite markers to reveal E. bieneusi genetic diversity. Moreover, our findings show that genotypes SC02 (identified in humans) and ABB2 belong to group 1 with zoonotic potential, suggesting the risk of transmission of E. bieneusi from Asiatic black bears to humans and other animals. PMID:28182656

  7. Genetic stability of Brucella abortus isolates from an outbreak by multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA16)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Brucellosis caused by Brucella abortus is one of the most important zoonoses in the world. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA16) has been shown be a useful tool to epidemiological traceback studies in B. abortus infection. Thus, the present study aimed (i) to evaluate the genetic diversity of B. abortus isolates from a brucellosis outbreak, and (ii) to investigate the in vivo stability of the MLVA16 markers. Results Three-hundred and seventy-five clinical samples, including 275 vaginal swabs and 100 milk samples, were cultured from a brucellosis outbreak in a cattle herd, which adopted RB51 vaccination and test-and-slaughter policies. Thirty-seven B. abortus isolates were obtained, eight from milk and twenty-nine from post-partum/abortion vaginal swabs, which were submitted to biotyping and genotyping by MLVA16. Twelve B. abortus isolates obtained from vaginal swabs were identified as RB51. Twenty four isolates, seven obtained from milk samples and seventeen from vaginal swabs, were identified as B. abortus biovar 3, while one isolate from vaginal swabs was identified as B. abortus biovar 1. Three distinct genotypes were observed during the brucellosis outbreak: RB observed in all isolates identified as RB51; W observed in all B. abortus biovar 3 isolates; and Z observed in the single B. abortus biovar 1 isolate. Epidemiological and molecular data show that the B. abortus biovar 1 genotype Z strain is not related to the B. abortus biovar 3 genotype W isolates, and represents a new introduction B. abortus during the outbreak. Conclusions The results of the present study on typing of multiple clinical B. abortus isolates from the same outbreak over a sixteen month period indicate the in vivo stability of MLVA16 markers, a low genetic diversity among B. abortus isolates and the usefulness of MLVA16 for epidemiological studies of bovine brucellosis. PMID:25015840

  8. Genetic analysis of the recG locus of Escherichia coli K-12 and of its role in recombination and DNA repair.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, R G; Buckman, C

    1991-01-01

    We describe a transposon insertion that reduces the efficiency of homologous recombination and DNA repair in Escherichia coli. The insertion, rec-258, was located between pyrE and dgo at min 82.1 on the current linkage map. On the basis of linkage to pyrE and complementation studies with the cloned rec+ gene, rec-258 was identified as an allele of the recG locus first reported by Storm et al. (P. K. Storm, W. P. M. Hoekstra, P. G. De Haan, and C. Verhoef, Mutat. Res. 13:9-17, 1971). The recG258 mutation confers sensitivity to mitomycin C and UV light and a 3- to 10-fold deficiency in conjugational recombination in wild-type, recB recC sbcA, and recB recC sbcB sbcC genetic backgrounds. It does not appear to affect plasmid recombination in the wild-type. A recG258 single mutant is also sensitive to ionizing radiation. The SOS response is induced normally, although the basal level of expression is elevated two- to threefold. Further genetic studies revealed that recB recG and recG recJ double mutants are much more sensitive to UV light than the respective single mutants in each case. However, no synergistic interactions were discovered between recG258 and mutations in recF, recN, or recQ. It is concluded that recG does not fall within any of the accepted groups of genes that affect recombination and DNA repair. PMID:1846849

  9. A genetic network of flowering-time genes in wheat leaves, in which an APETALA1/FRUITFULL-like gene, VRN1, is upstream of FLOWERING LOCUS T.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Sanae; Ogawa, Taiichi; Kitagawa, Satoshi; Suzuki, Takayuki; Ikari, Chihiro; Shitsukawa, Naoki; Abe, Tomoko; Kawahigashi, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Rie; Handa, Hirokazu; Murai, Koji

    2009-05-01

    To elucidate the genetic mechanism of flowering in wheat, we performed expression, mutant and transgenic studies of flowering-time genes. A diurnal expression analysis revealed that a flowering activator VRN1, an APETALA1/FRUITFULL homolog in wheat, was expressed in a rhythmic manner in leaves under both long-day (LD) and short-day (SD) conditions. Under LD conditions, the upregulation of VRN1 during the light period was followed by the accumulation of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) transcripts. Furthermore, FT was not expressed in a maintained vegetative phase (mvp) mutant of einkorn wheat (Triticum monococcum), which has null alleles of VRN1, and never transits from the vegetative to the reproductive phase. These results suggest that VRN1 is upstream of FT and upregulates the FT expression under LD conditions. The overexpression of FT in a transgenic bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) caused extremely early heading with the upregulation of VRN1 and the downregulation of VRN2, a putative repressor gene of VRN1. These results suggest that in the transgenic plant, FT suppresses VRN2 expression, leading to an increase in VRN1 expression. Based on these results, we present a model for a genetic network of flowering-time genes in wheat leaves, in which VRN1 is upstream of FT with a positive feedback loop through VRN2. The mvp mutant has a null allele of VRN2, as well as of VRN1, because it was obtained from a spring einkorn wheat strain lacking VRN2. The fact that FT is not expressed in the mvp mutant supports the present model.

  10. A genetic network of flowering-time genes in wheat leaves, in which an APETALA1/FRUITFULL-like gene, VRN1, is upstream of FLOWERING LOCUS T

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Sanae; Ogawa, Taiichi; Kitagawa, Satoshi; Suzuki, Takayuki; Ikari, Chihiro; Shitsukawa, Naoki; Abe, Tomoko; Kawahigashi, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Rie; Handa, Hirokazu; Murai, Koji

    2009-01-01

    To elucidate the genetic mechanism of flowering in wheat, we performed expression, mutant and transgenic studies of flowering-time genes. A diurnal expression analysis revealed that a flowering activator VRN1, an APETALA1/FRUITFULL homolog in wheat, was expressed in a rhythmic manner in leaves under both long-day (LD) and short-day (SD) conditions. Under LD conditions, the upregulation of VRN1 during the light period was followed by the accumulation of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) transcripts. Furthermore, FT was not expressed in a maintained vegetative phase (mvp) mutant of einkorn wheat (Triticum monococcum), which has null alleles of VRN1, and never transits from the vegetative to the reproductive phase. These results suggest that VRN1 is upstream of FT and upregulates the FT expression under LD conditions. The overexpression of FT in a transgenic bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) caused extremely early heading with the upregulation of VRN1 and the downregulation of VRN2, a putative repressor gene of VRN1. These results suggest that in the transgenic plant, FT suppresses VRN2 expression, leading to an increase in VRN1 expression. Based on these results, we present a model for a genetic network of flowering-time genes in wheat leaves, in which VRN1 is upstream of FT with a positive feedback loop through VRN2. The mvp mutant has a null allele of VRN2, as well as of VRN1, because it was obtained from a spring einkorn wheat strain lacking VRN2. The fact that FT is not expressed in the mvp mutant supports the present model. PMID:19175767

  11. Post-Zygotic and Inter-Individual Structural Genetic Variation in a Presumptive Enhancer Element of the Locus between the IL10Rβ and IFNAR1 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Kancherla Reddy; Przerada, Szymon; Paprocka, Hanna; Zywicka, Anna; Westerman, Maxwell P.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; O'Hanlon, Terrance P.; Rider, Lisa G.; Miller, Frederick W.; Srutek, Ewa; Jankowski, Michal; Zegarski, Wojciech; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Absher, Devin; Dumanski, Jan P.

    2013-01-01

    Although historically considered as junk-DNA, tandemly repeated sequence motifs can affect human phenotype. For example, variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) with embedded enhancers have been shown to regulate gene transcription. The post-zygotic variation is the presence of genetically distinct populations of cells in an individual derived from a single zygote, and this is an understudied aspect of genome biology. We report somatically variable VNTR with sequence properties of an enhancer, located upstream of IFNAR1. Initially, SNP genotyping of 63 monozygotic twin pairs and multiple tissues from 21 breast cancer patients suggested a frequent post-zygotic mosaicism. The VNTR displayed a repeated 32 bp core motif in the center of the repeat, which was flanked by similar variable motifs. A total of 14 alleles were characterized based on combinations of segments, which showed post-zygotic and inter-individual variation, with up to 6 alleles in a single subject. Somatic variation occurred in ∼24% of cases. In this hypervariable region, we found a clustering of transcription factor binding sites with strongest sequence similarity to mouse Foxg1 transcription factor binding motif. This study describes a VNTR with sequence properties of an enhancer that displays post-zygotic and inter-individual genetic variation. This element is within a locus containing four related cytokine receptors: IFNAR2, IL10Rβ, IFNAR1 and IFNGR2, and we hypothesize that it might function in transcriptional regulation of several genes in this cluster. Our findings add another level of complexity to the variation among VNTR-based enhancers. Further work may unveil the normal function of this VNTR in transcriptional control and its possible involvement in diseases connected with these receptors, such as autoimmune conditions and cancer. PMID:24023707

  12. Evolution of a unique predatory feeding apparatus: functional anatomy, development and a genetic locus for jaw laterality in Lake Tanganyika scale-eating cichlids

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While bilaterality is a defining characteristic of triploblastic animals, several assemblages have managed to break this symmetry in order to exploit the adaptive peaks garnered through the lateralization of behaviour or morphology. One striking example of an evolved asymmetry in vertebrates comes from a group of scale-eating cichlid fishes from Lake Tanganyika. Members of the Perissodini tribe of cichlid fishes have evolved dental and craniofacial asymmetries in order to more effectively remove scales from the left or right flanks of prey. Here we examine the evolution and development of craniofacial morphology and laterality among Lake Tanganyika scale-eating cichlids. Results Using both geometric and traditional morphometric methods we found that the craniofacial evolution in the Perissodini involved discrete shifts in skeletal anatomy that reflect differences in habitat preference and predation strategies. Further, we show that the evolutionary history of the Perissodini is characterized by an accentuation of craniofacial laterality such that certain taxa show elaborate sided differences in craniofacial shape consistent with the sub-partitioning of function between sides of the head during attacks. Craniofacial laterality in the scale-eating specialist Perissodus microlepis was found to be evident early in development and exhibited a unimodal distribution, which is contrary to the adult condition where jaw laterality has been described as a discrete, bimodal antisymmetry. Finally, using linkage and association analyses we identified a conserved locus for jaw handedness that segregates among East African cichlids. Conclusions We suggest that, during the evolution of the Perissodini, selection has accentuated a latent, genetically determined handedness of the craniofacial skeleton, enabling the evolution of jaw asymmetries in order to increase predation success. Continued work on the developmental genetic basis of laterality in the Perissodini will

  13. Fine scale genetic and physical mapping using interstitial deletion mutants of Lr34 /Yr18: a disease resistance locus effective against multiple pathogens in wheat.

    PubMed

    Spielmeyer, W; Singh, R P; McFadden, H; Wellings, C R; Huerta-Espino, J; Kong, X; Appels, R; Lagudah, E S

    2008-02-01

    The Lr34/Yr18 locus has contributed to durable, non-race specific resistance against leaf rust (Puccinia triticina) and stripe rust (P. striiformis f. sp. tritici) in wheat (Triticum aestivum). Lr34/Yr18 also cosegregates with resistance to powdery mildew (Pm38) and a leaf tip necrosis phenotype (Ltn1). Using a high resolution mapping family from a cross between near-isogenic lines in the "Thatcher" background we demonstrated that Lr34/Yr18 also cosegregated with stem rust resistance in the field. Lr34/Yr18 probably interacts with unlinked genes to provide enhanced stem rust resistance in "Thatcher". In view of the relatively low levels of DNA polymorphism reported in the Lr34/Yr18 region, gamma irradiation of the single chromosome substitution line, Lalbahadur(Parula7D) that carries Lr34/Yr18 was used to generate several mutant lines. Characterisation of the mutants revealed a range of highly informative genotypes, which included variable size deletions and an overlapping set of interstitial deletions. The mutants enabled a large number of wheat EST derived markers to be mapped and define a relatively small physical region on chromosome 7DS that carried Lr34/Yr18. Fine scale genetic mapping confirmed the physical mapping and identified a genetic interval of less than 0.5 cM, which contained Lr34/Yr18. Both rice and Brachypodium genome sequences provided useful information for fine mapping of ESTs in wheat. Gene order was more conserved between wheat and Brachypodium than with rice but these smaller grass genomes did not reveal sequence information that could be used to identify a candidate gene for rust resistance in wheat. We predict that Lr34/Yr18 is located within a large insertion in wheat not found at syntenic positions in Brachypodium and rice.

  14. Genetic Susceptible Locus in NOTCH2 Interacts with Arsenic in Drinking Water on Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wen-Chi; Kile, Molly L.; Seow, Wei Jie; Lin, Xihong; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Mahiuddin, Golam; Mostofa, Golam; Lu, Quan; Christiani, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) but the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Objectives This study evaluated the interaction between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes associated with diabetes and arsenic exposure in drinking water on the risk of developing T2DM. Methods In 2009–2011, we conducted a follow up study of 957 Bangladeshi adults who participated in a case-control study of arsenic-induced skin lesions in 2001–2003. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between 38 SNPs in 18 genes and risk of T2DM measured at follow up. T2DM was defined as having a blood hemoglobin A1C level greater than or equal to 6.5% at follow-up. Arsenic exposure was characterized by drinking water samples collected from participants' tubewells. False discovery rates were applied in the analysis to control for multiple comparisons. Results Median arsenic levels in 2001–2003 were higher among diabetic participants compared with non-diabetic ones (71.6 µg/L vs. 12.5 µg/L, p-value <0.001). Three SNPs in ADAMTS9 were nominally associated with increased risk of T2DM (rs17070905, Odds Ratio (OR)  = 2.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17–4.50; rs17070967, OR = 2.02, 95%CI 1.00–4.06; rs6766801, OR = 2.33, 95%CI 1.18–4.60), but these associations did not reach the statistical significance after adjusting for multiple comparisons. A significant interaction between arsenic and NOTCH2 (rs699780) was observed which significantly increased the risk of T2DM (p for interaction = 0.003; q-value = 0.021). Further restricted analysis among participants exposed to water arsenic of less than 148 µg/L showed consistent results for interaction between the NOTCH2 variant and arsenic exposure on T2DM (p for interaction  = 0.048; q-value = 0.004). Conclusions These findings suggest that genetic variation in NOTCH2 increased

  15. Genetic susceptible locus in NOTCH2 interacts with arsenic in drinking water on risk of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wen-Chi; Kile, Molly L; Seow, Wei Jie; Lin, Xihong; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Mahiuddin, Golam; Mostofa, Golam; Lu, Quan; Christiani, David C

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) but the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. This study evaluated the interaction between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes associated with diabetes and arsenic exposure in drinking water on the risk of developing T2DM. In 2009-2011, we conducted a follow up study of 957 Bangladeshi adults who participated in a case-control study of arsenic-induced skin lesions in 2001-2003. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between 38 SNPs in 18 genes and risk of T2DM measured at follow up. T2DM was defined as having a blood hemoglobin A1C level greater than or equal to 6.5% at follow-up. Arsenic exposure was characterized by drinking water samples collected from participants' tubewells. False discovery rates were applied in the analysis to control for multiple comparisons. Median arsenic levels in 2001-2003 were higher among diabetic participants compared with non-diabetic ones (71.6 µg/L vs. 12.5 µg/L, p-value <0.001). Three SNPs in ADAMTS9 were nominally associated with increased risk of T2DM (rs17070905, Odds Ratio (OR)  = 2.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17-4.50; rs17070967, OR = 2.02, 95%CI 1.00-4.06; rs6766801, OR = 2.33, 95%CI 1.18-4.60), but these associations did not reach the statistical significance after adjusting for multiple comparisons. A significant interaction between arsenic and NOTCH2 (rs699780) was observed which significantly increased the risk of T2DM (p for interaction = 0.003; q-value = 0.021). Further restricted analysis among participants exposed to water arsenic of less than 148 µg/L showed consistent results for interaction between the NOTCH2 variant and arsenic exposure on T2DM (p for interaction  = 0.048; q-value = 0.004). These findings suggest that genetic variation in NOTCH2 increased susceptibility to T2DM among people exposed to inorganic

  16. Hybrid Incompatibility in Arabidopsis Is Determined by a Multiple-Locus Genetic Network1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Burkart-Waco, Diana; Josefsson, Caroline; Dilkes, Brian; Kozloff, Nora; Torjek, Otto; Meyer, Rhonda; Altmann, Thomas; Comai, Luca

    2012-01-01

    The cross between Arabidopsis thaliana and the closely related species Arabidopsis arenosa results in postzygotic hybrid incompatibility, manifested as seed death. Ecotypes of A. thaliana were tested for their ability to produce live seed when crossed to A. arenosa. The identified genetic variation was used to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) encoded by the A. thaliana genome that affect the frequency of postzygotic lethality and the phenotypes of surviving seeds. Seven QTLs affecting the A. thaliana component of this hybrid incompatibility were identified by crossing a Columbia × C24 recombinant inbred line population to diploid A. arenosa pollen donors. Additional epistatic loci were identified based on their pairwise interaction with one or several of these QTLs. Epistatic interactions were detected for all seven QTLs. The two largest additive QTLs were subjected to fine-mapping, indicating the action of at least two genes in each. The topology of this network reveals a large set of minor-effect loci from the maternal genome controlling hybrid growth and viability at different developmental stages. Our study establishes a framework that will enable the identification and characterization of genes and pathways in A. thaliana responsible for hybrid lethality in the A. thaliana × A. arenosa interspecific cross. PMID:22135429

  17. Genetic alterations within the retinoblastoma locus in colorectal carcinomas. Relation to DNA ploidy pattern studied by flow cytometric analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Meling, G. I.; Lothe, R. A.; Børresen, A. L.; Hauge, S.; Graue, C.; Clausen, O. P.; Rognum, T. O.

    1991-01-01

    Alterations within the retinoblastoma (Rb) gene, as detected by the VNTR probe p68RS2.0, and flow cytometric DNA pattern have been analysed in 255 colorectal carcinomas. A total of 35.3% of the tumours had alterations within the Rb gene. Amplification of one allele was demonstrated in 29.5% of the tumours, and loss of heterozygosity was found in 11.5%. No association was found between amplification within the Rb gene and clinicopathological characteristics of the patients. The high frequency of alterations demonstrated within the Rb gene, suggests that this gene is involved in colorectal carcinogenesis with amplification as by far the most abundant genetic alteration. This may imply that the Rb gene has an oncogene-like function in colorectal carcinomas, rather than acting as a tumour suppressor gene. Sixty-three per cent of the carcinomas were DNA aneuploid, and a significant association was demonstrated between amplification within the Rb gene and DNA aneuploidy (P less than 0.01). Two other chromosome loci were analysed, on chromosome 1p (probe pYNZ2) and on chromosome 2p (probe pYNH24), respectively. On chromosome 1p, heterozygous loss was found in 22.2% of the tumours, indicating an involvement of this chromosome in a subset of colorectal carcinomas. Images Figure 1 PMID:1911187

  18. Linkage of the murine steroid sulfatase locus, Sts, to sex reversed, Sxr: a genetic and molecular analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Nagamine, C M; Michot, J L; Roberts, C; Guénet, J L; Bishop, C E

    1987-01-01

    We present genetic and molecular data demonstrating linkage of the gene for steroid sulfatase (Sts) to the mutation sex reversed (Sxr) definitively showing the existance of a functional allele for Sts mapping to the pseudoautosomal region of the mouse Y chromosome. Thus, in mouse, functional Sts genes are present in the pseudoautosomal region of both the X and Y chromosomes. This is in contrast to man where Sts has been mapped to the short arm of the X just centromeric to the pseudoautosomal region. Only a single recombinant separating Sts and Sxr was found out of 103 male meioses analyzed; double recombinants were not found between sex (Tdy), Sts and Sxr. If the rate of recombination in the pseudoautosomal region in male mice is equivalent to that in man and thus 7-10X higher than normal, then our data suggest that the distance between Sts and Sxr (or the telomere of the Y) is approximately 100-200 kb in length. Our data is in contrast to a recent report of a recombination frequency separating Sts and Sxr of as high as 6.2-9.8%. Images PMID:3479751

  19. The effects of locus number, genetic divergence, and genotyping error on the utility of dominant markers for hybrid identification

    PubMed Central

    Sovic, Michael G; Kubatko, Laura S; Fuerst, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    In surveys of hybrid zones, dominant genetic markers are often used to identify individuals of hybrid origin and assign these individuals to one of several potential hybrid classes. Quantitative analyses that address the statistical power of dominant markers in such inference are scarce. In this study, dominant genotype data were simulated to evaluate the effects of, first, the number of loci analyzed, second, the magnitude of differentiation between the markers scored in the groups that are hybridizing, and third, the level of genotyping error associated with the data when assigning individuals to various parental and hybrid categories. The overall performance of the assignment methods was relatively modest at the lowest level of divergence examined (Fst ˜ 0.4), but improved substantially at higher levels of differentiation (Fst ˜ 0.67 or 0.8). The effect of genotyping error was dependent on the level of divergence between parental taxa, with larger divergences tempering the effects of genotyping error. These results highlight the importance of considering the effects of each of the variables when assigning individuals to various parental and hybrid categories, and can help guide decisions regarding the number of loci employed in future hybridization studies to achieve the power and level of resolution desired. PMID:24634730

  20. Genetic variation at the CELF1 (CUGBP, elav-like family member 1 gene) locus is genome-wide associated with Alzheimer's disease and obesity.

    PubMed

    Hinney, Anke; Albayrak, Ozgür; Antel, Jochen; Volckmar, Anna-Lena; Sims, Rebecca; Chapman, Jade; Harold, Denise; Gerrish, Amy; Heid, Iris M; Winkler, Thomas W; Scherag, André; Wiltfang, Jens; Williams, Julie; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Deviations from normal body weight are observed prior to and after the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Midlife obesity confers increased AD risk in later life, whereas late-life obesity is associated with decreased AD risk. The role of underweight and weight loss for AD risk is controversial. Based on the hypothesis of shared genetic variants for both obesity and AD, we analyzed the variants identified for AD or obesity from genome-wide association meta-analyses of the GERAD (AD, cases = 6,688, controls = 13,685) and GIANT (body mass index [BMI] as measure of obesity, n = 123,865) consortia. Our cross-disorder analysis of genome-wide significant 39 obesity SNPs and 23 AD SNPs in these two large data sets revealed that: (1) The AD SNP rs10838725 (pAD  = 1.1 × 10(-08)) at the locus CELF1 is also genome-wide significant for obesity (pBMI  = 7.35 × 10(-09) ). (2) Four additional AD risk SNPs were nominally associated with obesity (rs17125944 at FERMT2, pBMI  = 4.03 × 10(-05), pBMI corr  = 2.50 × 10(-03) ; rs3851179 at PICALM; pBMI  = 0.002, rs2075650 at TOMM40/APOE, pBMI  = 0.024, rs3865444 at CD33, pBMI  = 0.024). (3) SNPs at two of the obesity risk loci (rs4836133 downstream of ZNF608; pAD  = 0.002 and at rs713586 downstream of RBJ/DNAJC27; pAD  = 0.018) were nominally associated with AD risk. Additionally, among the SNPs used for confirmation in both studies the AD risk allele of rs1858973, with an AD association just below genome-wide significance (pAD  = 7.20 × 10(-07)), was also associated with obesity (SNP at IQCK/GPRC5B; pBMI  = 5.21 × 10(-06) ; pcorr  = 3.24 × 10(-04)). Our first GWAS based cross-disorder analysis for AD and obesity suggests that rs10838725 at the locus CELF1 might be relevant for both disorders.

  1. Assignment of a locus (GLC3A) for primary congenital glaucoma (Buphthalmos) to 2p21 and evidence for genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfarazi, M.; Akarsu, A.N.; Hossain, A.

    1995-11-20

    Primary congenital glaucoma (GLC3) is an inherited eye disorder that accounts for 0.01-0.04% of total blindness. Although a large number of chromosomal abnormalities have already been reported in patients with congenital glaucoma, the precise location and pathogenesis of this condition remain elusive. By using a group of 17 GLC3 families and a combination of both candidate regional and general positional mapping strategies, we have mapped a locus for GLC3 to the short arm of chromosome 2. Eleven families showed no recombination with 3 tightly linked markers of D2S177 (Z = 9.40), D2S1346 (Z = 8.83), and D2S1348 (Z = 8.90) with a combined haplotype lod score of 11.50. Haplotype and multipoint linkage analyses of 14 DNA markers from 2p indicated that the disease gene is located in the 2p21 region and is flanked by DNA markers D2S1788/D2S1325 ({theta} = 0.03; Z = 5.42) and D2S1356 ({theta} = 0.05; Z = 4.69). Inspection of haplotype and heterogeneity analysis confirmed that 6 families are not linked to the 2p21 region, thus providing the first proof of genetic heterogeneity for this phenotype. We therefore designated the locus on 2p21 GLC3A and positioned it in the overall linkage map of Tel-D2S405-D2S367-(D2S1788/D2S1325)-[(GLC 3A,D2S177)/(D2S1346/D2S1348)]-D2S1356-D2S119-D2S1761-D2S1248-D2S1352-D2S406-D2S441-Cen. Of the seven genes mapping to the 2p21 region, CAD, CALM2, and LHCGR are centromeric to D2S119 and can be excluded as a candidate for GLC3A, but mutations in PRK-R, TIK, SOS1, or SPTBN1 may still be accountable for this phenotype. As human 2p21 shows homology with mouse chromosomes 11 and 17, the homolog of GLC3A is expected to reside on one of these two chromosomes. 36 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Genetic variation at the IRF7/PHRF1 locus is associated with autoantibody profile and serum interferon-alpha activity in lupus patients.

    PubMed

    Salloum, Rafah; Franek, Beverly S; Kariuki, Silvia N; Rhee, Lesley; Mikolaitis, Rachel A; Jolly, Meenakshi; Utset, Tammy O; Niewold, Timothy B

    2010-02-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) is a heritable risk factor for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Genetic variation near IRF7 is implicated in SLE susceptibility. SLE-associated autoantibodies can stimulate IFNalpha production through the Toll-like receptor/IRF7 pathway. This study was undertaken to determine whether variants of IRF7 act as risk factors for SLE by increasing IFNalpha production and whether autoantibodies are important to this phenomenon. We studied 492 patients with SLE (236 African American, 162 European American, and 94 Hispanic American subjects). Serum levels of IFNalpha were measured using a reporter cell assay, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IRF7/PHRF1 locus were genotyped. In a joint analysis of European American and Hispanic American subjects, the rs702966 C allele was associated with the presence of anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibodies (odds ratio [OR] 1.83, P = 0.0069). The rs702966 CC genotype was only associated with higher serum levels of IFNalpha in European American and Hispanic American patients with anti-dsDNA antibodies (joint analysis P = 4.1 x 10(-5) in anti-dsDNA-positive patients and P = 0.99 in anti-dsDNA-negative patients). In African American subjects, anti-Sm antibodies were associated with the rs4963128 SNP near IRF7 (OR 1.95, P = 0.0017). The rs4963128 CT and TT genotypes were associated with higher serum levels of IFNalpha only in African American patients with anti-Sm antibodies (P = 0.0012). In African American patients lacking anti-Sm antibodies, an effect of anti-dsDNA-rs702966 C allele interaction on serum levels of IFNalpha was observed, similar to the other patient groups (overall joint analysis P = 1.0 x 10(-6)). In European American and Hispanic American patients, the IRF5 SLE risk haplotype showed an additive effect with the rs702966 C allele on IFNalpha level in anti-dsDNA-positive patients. Our findings indicate that IRF7/PHRF1 variants in combination with SLE

  3. Population genetic and phylogenetic evidence for positive selection on regulatory mutations at the factor VII locus in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Matthew W; Rockman, Matthew V; Soranzo, Nicole; Goldstein, David B; Wray, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    The abundance of cis-regulatory polymorphisms in humans suggests that many may have been important in human evolution, but evidence for their role is relatively rare. Four common polymorphisms in the 5' promoter region of factor VII (F7), a coagulation factor, have been shown to affect its transcription and protein abundance both in vitro and in vivo. Three of these polymorphisms have low-frequency alleles that decrease expression of F7 and may provide protection against myocardial infarction (heart attacks). The fourth polymorphism has a minor allele that increases the level of transcription. To look for evidence of natural selection on the cis-regulatory variants flanking F7, we genotyped three of the polymorphisms in six Old World populations for which we also have data from a group of putatively neutral SNPs. Our population genetic analysis shows evidence for selection within humans; surprisingly, the strongest evidence is due to a large increase in frequency of the high-expression variant in Singaporean Chinese. Further characterization of a Japanese population shows that at least part of the increase in frequency of the high-expression allele is found in other East Asian populations. In addition, to examine interspecific patterns of selection we sequenced the homologous 5' noncoding region in chimpanzees, bonobos, a gorilla, an orangutan, and a baboon. Analysis of these data reveals an excess of fixed differences within transcription factor binding sites along the human lineage. Our results thus further support the hypothesis that regulatory mutations have been important in human evolution. PMID:15238535

  4. Identification and characterization of a NaCl-responsive genetic locus involved in survival during desiccation in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Vriezen, Jan A C; de Bruijn, Frans J; Nüsslein, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    The Rhizobiaceae are a bacterial family of enormous agricultural importance due to the ability of its members to fix atmospheric nitrogen in an intimate relationship with plants. Their survival as naturally occurring soil bacteria in agricultural soils as well as popular seed inocula is affected directly by drought and salinity. Survival after desiccation in the presence of NaCl is enabled by underlying genetic mechanisms in the model organism Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. Since salt stress parallels a loss in water activity, the identification of NaCl-responsive loci may identify loci involved in survival during desiccation. This approach enabled identification of the loci asnO and ngg by their reduced ability to grow on increased NaCl concentrations, likely due to their inability to produce the osmoprotectant N-acetylglutaminylglutamine (NAGGN). In addition, the mutant harboring ngg::Tn5luxAB was affected in its ability to survive desiccation and responded to osmotic stress. The desiccation sensitivity may have been due to secondary functions of Ngg (N-acetylglutaminylglutamine synthetase)-like cell wall metabolism as suggested by the presence of a d-alanine-d-alanine ligase (dAla-dAla) domain and by sensitivity of the mutant to β-lactam antibiotics. asnO::Tn5luxAB is expressed during the stationary phase under normal growth conditions. Amino acid sequence similarity to enzymes producing β-lactam inhibitors and increased resistance to β-lactam antibiotics may indicate that asnO is involved in the production of a β-lactam inhibitor.

  5. Repeat-mediated genetic and epigenetic changes at the FMR1 locus in the Fragile X-related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Usdin, Karen; Hayward, Bruce E.; Kumari, Daman; Lokanga, Rachel A.; Sciascia, Nicholas; Zhao, Xiao-Nan

    2014-01-01

    The Fragile X-related disorders are a group of genetic conditions that include the neurodegenerative disorder, Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), the fertility disorder, Fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI) and the intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome (FXS). The pathology in all these diseases is related to the number of CGG/CCG-repeats in the 5′ UTR of the Fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. The repeats are prone to continuous expansion and the increase in repeat number has paradoxical effects on gene expression increasing transcription on mid-sized alleles and decreasing it on longer ones. In some cases the repeats can simultaneously both increase FMR1 mRNA production and decrease the levels of the FMR1 gene product, Fragile X mental retardation 1 protein (FMRP). Since FXTAS and FXPOI result from the deleterious consequences of the expression of elevated levels of FMR1 mRNA and FXS is caused by an FMRP deficiency, the clinical picture is turning out to be more complex than once appreciated. Added complications result from the fact that increasing repeat numbers make the alleles somatically unstable. Thus many individuals have a complex mixture of different sized alleles in different cells. Furthermore, it has become apparent that the eponymous fragile site, once thought to be no more than a useful diagnostic criterion, may have clinical consequences for females who inherit chromosomes that express this site. This review will cover what is currently known about the mechanisms responsible for repeat instability, for the repeat-mediated epigenetic changes that affect expression of the FMR1 gene, and for chromosome fragility. It will also touch on what current and future options are for ameliorating some of these effects. PMID:25101111

  6. Impact of Global Fxr Deficiency on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis and Genetic Variation in the FXR Locus in Human Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nijmeijer, Rian M.; Schaap, Frank G.; Smits, Alexander J. J.; Kremer, Andreas E.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Kroese, Alfons B. A.; Rijkers, Ger. T.; Schipper, Marguerite E. I.; Verheem, André; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Erpecum, Karel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs including the pancreas, exhibits anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting NF-κB activation and is implicated in maintaining intestinal barrier integrity and preventing bacterial overgrowth and translocation. Here we explore, with the aid of complementary animal and human experiments, the potential role of FXR in acute pancreatitis. Methods Experimental acute pancreatitis was induced using the CCK-analogue cerulein in wild-type and Fxr-/- mice. Severity of acute pancreatitis was assessed using histology and a semi-quantitative scoring system. Ileal permeability was analyzed in vitro by Ussing chambers and an in vivo permeability assay. Gene expression of Fxr and Fxr target genes was studied by quantitative RT-PCR. Serum FGF19 levels were determined by ELISA in acute pancreatitis patients and healthy volunteers. A genetic association study in 387 acute pancreatitis patients and 853 controls was performed using 9 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering the complete FXR gene and two additional functional SNPs. Results In wild-type mice with acute pancreatitis, ileal transepithelial resistance was reduced and ileal mRNA expression of Fxr target genes Fgf15, SHP, and IBABP was decreased. Nevertheless, Fxr-/- mice did not exhibit a more severe acute pancreatitis than wild-type mice. In patients with acute pancreatitis, FGF19 levels were lower than in controls. However, there were no associations of FXR SNPs or haplotypes with susceptibility to acute pancreatitis, or its course, outcome or etiology. Conclusion We found no evidence for a major role of FXR in acute human or murine pancreatitis. The observed altered Fxr activity during the course of disease may be a

  7. Repeat-mediated genetic and epigenetic changes at the FMR1 locus in the Fragile X-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Usdin, Karen; Hayward, Bruce E; Kumari, Daman; Lokanga, Rachel A; Sciascia, Nicholas; Zhao, Xiao-Nan

    2014-01-01

    The Fragile X-related disorders are a group of genetic conditions that include the neurodegenerative disorder, Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), the fertility disorder, Fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI) and the intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome (FXS). The pathology in all these diseases is related to the number of CGG/CCG-repeats in the 5' UTR of the Fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. The repeats are prone to continuous expansion and the increase in repeat number has paradoxical effects on gene expression increasing transcription on mid-sized alleles and decreasing it on longer ones. In some cases the repeats can simultaneously both increase FMR1 mRNA production and decrease the levels of the FMR1 gene product, Fragile X mental retardation 1 protein (FMRP). Since FXTAS and FXPOI result from the deleterious consequences of the expression of elevated levels of FMR1 mRNA and FXS is caused by an FMRP deficiency, the clinical picture is turning out to be more complex than once appreciated. Added complications result from the fact that increasing repeat numbers make the alleles somatically unstable. Thus many individuals have a complex mixture of different sized alleles in different cells. Furthermore, it has become apparent that the eponymous fragile site, once thought to be no more than a useful diagnostic criterion, may have clinical consequences for females who inherit chromosomes that express this site. This review will cover what is currently known about the mechanisms responsible for repeat instability, for the repeat-mediated epigenetic changes that affect expression of the FMR1 gene, and for chromosome fragility. It will also touch on what current and future options are for ameliorating some of these effects.

  8. Further evidence for a locus for autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma on chromosome 1q and evidence for genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.; Paglinauan, C.; Stawski, S.

    1994-09-01

    Glaucoma is a term used to describe a group of disorders which have in common a characteristic degeneration of the optic nerve associated with typical visual field defects and usually associated with elevated intraocular pressure. Two percent of white Americans and 6-10% of black Americans are affected by the disease. Compelling data indicate that susceptibility to many types of glaucoma is inherited. Hereditary juvenile glaucoma is one form of glaucoma that develops in children and is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance. Using a single large Caucasian pedigree affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma, Sheffield discovered positive linkage to a group of markers that map to a 30 cM region on the long arm of chromosome 1 (1q21-q31). We have subsequently identified three unrelated Caucasian pedigrees affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma that also demonstrate linkage to this region on chromosome 1, with the highest combined lod score of 5.12 at theta = .05 for marker D1S218. The identification of critical recombinant individuals in our three pedigrees has allowed us to further localize the disease gene to a 12 cM region between markers D1S242 and D1S431. In addition, we have identified several pedigrees which do not demonstrate linkage to chromosome 1q, including a black family affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma that is indistinguishable clinically from the disorder affecting the caucasian pedigrees and three pedigrees affected with pigmentary dispersion syndrome, a form of glaucoma that also affects the juvenile population and is also inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. These findings provide evidence for genetic heterogeneity in juvenile glaucoma.

  9. Identification and Characterization of a NaCl-Responsive Genetic Locus Involved in Survival during Desiccation in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Vriezen, Jan A. C.; de Bruijn, Frans J.

    2013-01-01

    The Rhizobiaceae are a bacterial family of enormous agricultural importance due to the ability of its members to fix atmospheric nitrogen in an intimate relationship with plants. Their survival as naturally occurring soil bacteria in agricultural soils as well as popular seed inocula is affected directly by drought and salinity. Survival after desiccation in the presence of NaCl is enabled by underlying genetic mechanisms in the model organism Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. Since salt stress parallels a loss in water activity, the identification of NaCl-responsive loci may identify loci involved in survival during desiccation. This approach enabled identification of the loci asnO and ngg by their reduced ability to grow on increased NaCl concentrations, likely due to their inability to produce the osmoprotectant N-acetylglutaminylglutamine (NAGGN). In addition, the mutant harboring ngg::Tn5luxAB was affected in its ability to survive desiccation and responded to osmotic stress. The desiccation sensitivity may have been due to secondary functions of Ngg (N-acetylglutaminylglutamine synthetase)-like cell wall metabolism as suggested by the presence of a d-alanine-d-alanine ligase (dAla-dAla) domain and by sensitivity of the mutant to β-lactam antibiotics. asnO::Tn5luxAB is expressed during the stationary phase under normal growth conditions. Amino acid sequence similarity to enzymes producing β-lactam inhibitors and increased resistance to β-lactam antibiotics may indicate that asnO is involved in the production of a β-lactam inhibitor. PMID:23851090

  10. Host Genetic Control of the Microbiome in Humans and Maise or Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Ley, Ruth

    2011-03-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Ruth Ley of Cornell University gives a presentation on "Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011.

  11. Host Genetic Control of the Microbiome in Humans and Maise or Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Ley, Ruth [Cornell University

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Ruth Ley of Cornell University gives a presentation on "Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011.

  12. Ethylene oxide: induction of specific-locus mutations in the ad-3 region of heterokaryon 12 of Neurospora crassa and implications for genetic risk assessment of human exposure in the workplace.

    PubMed

    de Serres, F J; Brockman, H E

    1995-04-01

    Ethylene oxide (ETO) is an important industrial intermediate used extensively in the production of ethylene glycol, as a fumigant, and as a sterilant of choice for various medical devices. The mutagenicity of ETO was studied for the induction of specific-locus mutations in the adenine-3 (ad-3) region of a two-component heterokaryon (H-12) of Neurospora crassa. The objectives of these studies with ETO were to rank its mutagenic potency and to compare its mutational spectrum for induced specific-locus mutations with other chemical mutagens in this lower eukaryotic organism. Specific-locus mutations in the ad-3 region of heterokaryon H12 result from gene/point mutations at the closely linked ad-3A and ad-3B loci, multilocus deletion mutations and multiple-locus mutations. These major genotypic classes are similar to the types of specific-locus mutations that can be detected in higher organisms. Conidial suspensions of H-12 were treated with five different concentrations of ETO (0.1-0.35%) for 3 h at 25 degrees C. Control and ETO-treated conidial suspensions were used to obtain dose-response curves for inactivation as well as the overall induction of ad-3 forward mutations using a non-selective method based on pigment accumulation rather than a requirement for adenine. The results from these experiments are: (1) the slope of the dose-response curve for ETO-induced specific-locus mutations in the ad-3 region is 1.49 +/- 0.07, and (2) the maximum forward-mutation frequency fell between 10 and 100 ad-3 mutations per 10(6) survivors; therefore, ETO is a moderate mutagen. Classical genetic tests were used to characterize the ETO-induced ad-3 mutations from each of two treatments (0.25 and 0.35%). The overall data base demonstrates that ETO-induced ad-3 mutations result from a high percentage (96.9%) of gene/point mutations at the ad-3A and ad-3B loci, as well as from a low percentage (3.1%) of multilocus deletion mutations. The mutagenic activity of ETO is compared with the

  13. The third international meeting on genetic disorders in the RAS/MAPK pathway: towards a therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Korf, Bruce; Ahmadian, Reza; Allanson, Judith; Aoki, Yoko; Bakker, Annette; Wright, Emma Burkitt; Denger, Brian; Elgersma, Ype; Gelb, Bruce D; Gripp, Karen W; Kerr, Bronwyn; Kontaridis, Maria; Lazaro, Conxi; Linardic, Corinne; Lozano, Reymundo; MacRae, Calum A; Messiaen, Ludwine; Mulero-Navarro, Sonia; Neel, Benjamin; Plotkin, Scott; Rauen, Katherine A; Roberts, Amy; Silva, Alcino J; Sittampalam, Sitta G; Zhang, Chao; Schoyer, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    "The Third International Meeting on Genetic Disorders in the RAS/MAPK Pathway: Towards a Therapeutic Approach" was held at the Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld Hotel (August 2-4, 2013). Seventy-one physicians and scientists attended the meeting, and parallel meetings were held by patient advocacy groups (CFC International, Costello Syndrome Family Network, NF Network and Noonan Syndrome Foundation). Parent and patient advocates opened the meeting with a panel discussion to set the stage regarding their hopes and expectations for therapeutic advances. In keeping with the theme on therapeutic development, the sessions followed a progression from description of the phenotype and definition of therapeutic endpoints, to definition of genomic changes, to identification of therapeutic targets in the RAS/MAPK pathway, to preclinical drug development and testing, to clinical trials. These proceedings will review the major points of discussion.

  14. The Third International Meeting on Genetic Disorders in the RAS/MAPK Pathway: Toward a Therapeutic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Korf, Bruce; Ahmadian, Reza; Allanson, Judith; Aoki, Yoko; Bakker, Annette; Wright, Emma Burkitt; Denger, Brian; Elgersma, Ype; Gelb, Bruce D.; Gripp, Karen W.; Kerr, Bronwyn; Kontaridis, Maria; Lazaro, Conxi; Linardic, Corinne; Lozano, Reymundo; MacRae, Calum A.; Messiaen, Ludwine; Mulero-Navarro, Sonia; Neel, Benjamin; Plotkin, Scott; Rauen, Katherine A.; Roberts, Amy; Silva, Alcino J.; Sittampalam, Sitta G.; Zhang, Chao; Schoyer, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    “The Third International Meeting on Genetic Disorders in the RAS/MAPK Pathway: Towards a Therapeutic Approach” was held at the Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld Hotel (August 2–4, 2013). Seventy-one physicians and scientists attended the meeting, and parallel meetings were held by patient advocacy groups (CFC International, Costello Syndrome Family Network, NF Network and Noonan Syndrome Foundation). Parent and patient advocates opened the meeting with a panel discussion to set the stage regarding their hopes and expectations for therapeutic advances. In keeping with the theme on therapeutic development, the sessions followed a progression from description of the phenotype and definition of therapeutic endpoints, to definition of genomic changes, to identification of therapeutic targets in the RAS/MAPK pathway, to preclinical drug development and testing, to clinical trials. These proceedings will review the major points of discussion. PMID:25900621

  15. Genetic and physical mapping of the earliness per se locus Eps-A (m) 1 in Triticum monococcum identifies EARLY FLOWERING 3 (ELF3) as a candidate gene.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M A; Tranquilli, G; Lewis, S; Kippes, N; Dubcovsky, J

    2016-07-01

    Wheat cultivars exposed to optimal photoperiod and vernalization treatments still exhibit differences in flowering time, referred to as earliness per se (Eps). We previously identified the Eps-A (m) 1 locus from Triticum monococcum and showed that the allele from cultivated accession DV92 significantly delays heading time and increases the number of spikelets per spike relative to the allele from wild accession G3116. Here, we expanded a high-density genetic and physical map of the Eps-A (m) 1 region and identified the wheat ortholog of circadian clock regulator EARLY FLOWERING 3 (ELF3) as a candidate gene. No differences in ELF3 transcript levels were found between near-isogenic lines carrying the DV92 and G3116 Eps-A (m) 1 alleles, but the encoded ELF3 proteins differed in four amino acids. These differences were associated with altered transcription profiles of PIF-like, PPD1, and FT1, which are known downstream targets of ELF3. Tetraploid wheat lines with combined truncation mutations in the A- and B-genome copies of ELF3 flowered earlier and had less spikelets per spike than the wild-type control under short- and long-day conditions. Both effects were stronger in a photoperiod-sensitive than in a reduced photoperiod-sensitive background, indicating a significant epistatic interaction between PPD1 and ELF3 (P < 0.0001). By contrast, the introgression of the T. monococcum chromosome segment carrying the Eps-A (m) 1 allele from DV92 into durum wheat delayed flowering and increased the number of spikelets per spike. Taken together, the above results support the hypothesis that ELF3 is Eps-A (m) 1. The ELF3 alleles identified here provide additional tools to modulate reproductive development in wheat.

  16. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Goldberg, Mark S; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M W; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-12-06

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas.

  17. Genetic analysis of strawberry fruit aroma and identification of O-methyltransferase FaOMT as the locus controlling natural variation in mesifurane content.

    PubMed

    Zorrilla-Fontanesi, Yasmín; Rambla, José-Luis; Cabeza, Amalia; Medina, Juan J; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Botella, Miguel A; Granell, Antonio; Amaya, Iraida

    2012-06-01

    Improvement of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruit flavor is an important goal in breeding programs. To investigate genetic factors controlling this complex trait, a strawberry mapping population derived from genotype '1392', selected for its superior flavor, and '232' was profiled for volatile compounds over 4 years by headspace solid phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. More than 300 volatile compounds were detected, of which 87 were identified by comparison of mass spectrum and retention time to those of pure standards. Parental line '1392' displayed higher volatile levels than '232', and these and many other compounds with similar levels in both parents segregated in the progeny. Cluster analysis grouped the volatiles into distinct chemically related families and revealed a complex metabolic network underlying volatile production in strawberry fruit. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) detection was carried out over 3 years based on a double pseudo-testcross strategy. Seventy QTLs covering 48 different volatiles were detected, with several of them being stable over time and mapped as major QTLs. Loci controlling γ-decalactone and mesifurane content were mapped as qualitative traits. Using a candidate gene approach we have assigned genes that are likely responsible for several of the QTLs. As a proof of concept we show that one homoeolog of the O-methyltransferase gene (FaOMT) is the locus responsible for the natural variation of mesifurane content. Sequence analysis identified 30 bp in the promoter of this FaOMT homoeolog containing putative binding sites for basic/helix-loop-helix, MYB, and BZIP transcription factors. This polymorphism fully cosegregates with both the presence of mesifurane and the high expression of FaOMT during ripening.

  18. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21

    PubMed Central

    Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Goldberg, Mark S.; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Marchand, Loic Le; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Investigators, kConFab/AOCS; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas. PMID:27792995

  19. A genome-wide trans-ethnic interaction study links the PIGR-FCAMR locus to coronary atherosclerosis via interactions between genetic variants and residential exposure to traffic.

    PubMed

    Ward-Caviness, Cavin K; Neas, Lucas M; Blach, Colette; Haynes, Carol S; LaRocque-Abramson, Karen; Grass, Elizabeth; Dowdy, Z Elaine; Devlin, Robert B; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Cascio, Wayne E; Miranda, Marie Lynn; Gregory, Simon G; Shah, Svati H; Kraus, William E; Hauser, Elizabeth R

    2017-01-01

    Air pollution is a worldwide contributor to cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity. Traffic-related air pollution is a widespread environmental exposure and is associated with multiple cardiovascular outcomes such as coronary atherosclerosis, peripheral arterial disease, and myocardial infarction. Despite the recognition of the importance of both genetic and environmental exposures to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, studies of how these two contributors operate jointly are rare. We performed a genome-wide interaction study (GWIS) to examine gene-traffic exposure interactions associated with coronary atherosclerosis. Using race-stratified cohorts of 538 African-Americans (AA) and 1562 European-Americans (EA) from a cardiac catheterization cohort (CATHGEN), we identify gene-by-traffic exposure interactions associated with the number of significantly diseased coronary vessels as a measure of chronic atherosclerosis. We found five suggestive (P<1x10-5) interactions in the AA GWIS, of which two (rs1856746 and rs2791713) replicated in the EA cohort (P < 0.05). Both SNPs are in the PIGR-FCAMR locus and are eQTLs in lymphocytes. The protein products of both PIGR and FCAMR are implicated in inflammatory processes. In the EA GWIS, there were three suggestive interactions; none of these replicated in the AA GWIS. All three were intergenic; the most significant interaction was in a regulatory region associated with SAMSN1, a gene previously associated with atherosclerosis and B cell activation. In conclusion, we have uncovered several novel genes associated with coronary atherosclerosis in individuals chronically exposed to increased ambient concentrations of traffic air pollution. These genes point towards inflammatory pathways that may modify the effects of air pollution on cardiovascular disease risk.

  20. A genome-wide trans-ethnic interaction study links the PIGR-FCAMR locus to coronary atherosclerosis via interactions between genetic variants and residential exposure to traffic

    PubMed Central

    Neas, Lucas M.; Blach, Colette; Haynes, Carol S.; LaRocque-Abramson, Karen; Grass, Elizabeth; Dowdy, Z. Elaine; Devlin, Robert B.; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Cascio, Wayne E.; Miranda, Marie Lynn; Gregory, Simon G.; Shah, Svati H.; Kraus, William E.; Hauser, Elizabeth R.

    2017-01-01

    Air pollution is a worldwide contributor to cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity. Traffic-related air pollution is a widespread environmental exposure and is associated with multiple cardiovascular outcomes such as coronary atherosclerosis, peripheral arterial disease, and myocardial infarction. Despite the recognition of the importance of both genetic and environmental exposures to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, studies of how these two contributors operate jointly are rare. We performed a genome-wide interaction study (GWIS) to examine gene-traffic exposure interactions associated with coronary atherosclerosis. Using race-stratified cohorts of 538 African-Americans (AA) and 1562 European-Americans (EA) from a cardiac catheterization cohort (CATHGEN), we identify gene-by-traffic exposure interactions associated with the number of significantly diseased coronary vessels as a measure of chronic atherosclerosis. We found five suggestive (P<1x10-5) interactions in the AA GWIS, of which two (rs1856746 and rs2791713) replicated in the EA cohort (P < 0.05). Both SNPs are in the PIGR-FCAMR locus and are eQTLs in lymphocytes. The protein products of both PIGR and FCAMR are implicated in inflammatory processes. In the EA GWIS, there were three suggestive interactions; none of these replicated in the AA GWIS. All three were intergenic; the most significant interaction was in a regulatory region associated with SAMSN1, a gene previously associated with atherosclerosis and B cell activation. In conclusion, we have uncovered several novel genes associated with coronary atherosclerosis in individuals chronically exposed to increased ambient concentrations of traffic air pollution. These genes point towards inflammatory pathways that may modify the effects of air pollution on cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:28355232

  1. Genetic variants and cellular stressors associated with exfoliation syndrome modulate promoter activity of a lncRNA within the LOXL1 locus

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Michael A.; Aboobakar, Inas F.; Liu, Yutao; Miura, Shiroh; Whigham, Benjamin T.; Challa, Pratap; Wheeler, Joshua; Williams, Andrew; Santiago-Turla, Cecelia; Qin, Xuejun; Rautenbach, Robyn M.; Ziskind, Ari; Ramsay, Michèle; Uebe, Steffen; Song, Lingyun; Safi, Alexias; Vithana, Eranga N.; Mizoguchi, Takanori; Nakano, Satoko; Kubota, Toshiaki; Hayashi, Ken; Manabe, Shin-ichi; Kazama, Shigeyasu; Mori, Yosai; Miyata, Kazunori; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Reis, Andre; Crawford, Gregory E.; Pasutto, Francesca; Carmichael, Trevor R.; Williams, Susan E. I.; Ozaki, Mineo; Aung, Tin; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Stamer, W. Daniel; Ashley-Koch, Allison E.; Allingham, R. Rand

    2015-01-01

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is a common, age-related, systemic fibrillinopathy. It greatly increases risk of exfoliation glaucoma (XFG), a major worldwide cause of irreversible blindness. Coding variants in the lysyl oxidase-like 1 (LOXL1) gene are strongly associated with XFS in all studied populations, but a functional role for these variants has not been established. To identify additional candidate functional variants, we sequenced the entire LOXL1 genomic locus (∼40 kb) in 50 indigenous, black South African XFS cases and 50 matched controls. The variants with the strongest evidence of association were located in a well-defined 7-kb region bounded by the 3'-end of exon 1 and the adjacent region of intron 1 of LOXL1. We replicated this finding in US Caucasian (91 cases/1031 controls), German (771 cases/1365 controls) and Japanese (1484 cases/1188 controls) populations. The region of peak association lies upstream of LOXL1-AS1, a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) encoded on the opposite strand of LOXL1. We show that this region contains a promoter and, importantly, that the strongly associated XFS risk alleles in the South African population are functional variants that significantly modulate the activity of this promoter. LOXL1-AS1 expression is also significantly altered in response to oxidative stress in human lens epithelial cells and in response to cyclic mechanical stress in human Schlemm's canal endothelial cells. Taken together, these findings support a functional role for the LOXL1-AS1 lncRNA in cellular stress response and suggest that dysregulation of its expression by genetic risk variants plays a key role in XFS pathogenesis. PMID:26307087

  2. The grain Hardness locus characterized in a diverse wheat panel (Triticum aestivum L.) adapted to the central part of the Fertile Crescent: genetic diversity, haplotype structure, and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Shaaf, Salar; Sharma, Rajiv; Baloch, Faheem Shehzad; Badaeva, Ekaterina D; Knüpffer, Helmut; Kilian, Benjamin; Özkan, Hakan

    2016-06-01

    Wheat belongs to the most important crops domesticated in the Fertile Crescent. In this region, fortunately, locally adapted wheat landraces are still present in farmers' fields. This material might be of immense value for future breeding programs. However, especially wheat germplasm adapted to the central part of the Fertile Crescent has been poorly characterized for allelic variation at key loci of agricultural importance. Grain hardness is an important trait influencing milling and baking quality of wheat. This trait is mainly determined by three tightly linked genes, namely, Puroindoline a (Pina), Puroindoline b (Pinb), and Grain softness protein-1 (Gsp-1), at the Hardness (Ha-D) locus on chromosome 5DS. To investigate genetic diversity and haplotype structure, we resequenced 96 diverse wheat lines at Pina-D1, Pinb-D1, Gsp-A1, Gsp-B1, and Gsp-D1. Three types of null alleles were identified using diagnostic primers: the first type was a multiple deletion of Pina-D1, Pinb-D1, and Gsp-D1 (Pina-D1k), the second was a Pina-D1 deletion (Pina-D1b); and the third type was a deletion of Gsp-D1, representing a novel null allele designated here as Gsp-D1k. Sequence analysis resulted in four allelic variants at Pinb-D1 and five at Gsp-A1, among them Gsp-A1-V was novel. Pina-D1, Gsp-B1 and Gsp-D1 sequences were monomorphic. Haplotype and phylogenetic analysis suggested that (1) bread wheat inherited its 5DS telomeric region probably from wild diploid Ae. tauschii subsp. tauschii found within an area from Transcaucasia to Caspian Iran; and that (2) the Ha-A and Ha-B homoeoloci were most closely related to sequences of wild tetraploid T. dicocco ides. This study provides a good overview of available genetic diversity at Pina-D1, Pinb-D1, and Gsp-1, which can be exploited to extend the range of grain texture traits in wheat.

  3. Spatial variation in genetic diversity and natural selection on the thrombospondin-related adhesive protein locus of Plasmodium vivax (PvTRAP).

    PubMed

    Kosuwin, Rattiporn; Putaporntip, Chaturong; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Jongwutiwes, Somchai

    2014-01-01

    Thrombospondin-related adhesive protein (TRAP) of malaria parasites is essential for sporozoite motility and invasions into mosquito's salivary gland and vertebrate's hepatocyte; thereby, it is a promising target for pre-erythrocytic vaccine. TRAP of Plasmodium vivax (PvTRAP) exhibits sequence heterogeneity among isolates, an issue relevant to vaccine development. To gain insights into variation in the complete PvTRAP sequences of parasites in Thailand, 114 vivax malaria patients were recruited in 2006-2007 from 4 major endemic provinces bordering Myanmar (Tak in the northwest, n = 30 and Prachuap Khirikhan in the southwest, n = 25), Cambodia (Chanthaburi in the east, n = 29) and Malaysia (Yala and Narathiwat in the south, n = 30). In total, 26 amino acid substitutions were detected and 9 of which were novel, resulting in 44 distinct haplotypes. Haplotype and nucleotide diversities were lowest in southern P. vivax population while higher levels of diversities were observed in other populations. Evidences of positive selection on PvTRAP were demonstrated in domains II and IV and purifying selection in domains I, II and VI. Genetic differentiation was significant between each population except that between populations bordering Myanmar where transmigration was common. Regression analysis of pairwise linearized Fst and geographic distance suggests that P. vivax populations in Thailand have been isolated by distance. Sequence diversity of PvTRAP seems to be temporally stable over one decade in Tak province based on comparison of isolates collected in 1996 (n = 36) and 2006-2007. Besides natural selection, evidences of intragenic recombination have been supported in this study that could maintain and further generate diversity in this locus. It remains to be investigated whether amino acid substitutions in PvTRAP could influence host immune responses although several predicted variant T cell epitopes drastically altered the epitope scores. Knowledge

  4. Spatial Variation in Genetic Diversity and Natural Selection on the Thrombospondin-Related Adhesive Protein Locus of Plasmodium vivax (PvTRAP)

    PubMed Central

    Kosuwin, Rattiporn; Putaporntip, Chaturong; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Jongwutiwes, Somchai

    2014-01-01

    Thrombospondin-related adhesive protein (TRAP) of malaria parasites is essential for sporozoite motility and invasions into mosquito’s salivary gland and vertebrate’s hepatocyte; thereby, it is a promising target for pre-erythrocytic vaccine. TRAP of Plasmodium vivax (PvTRAP) exhibits sequence heterogeneity among isolates, an issue relevant to vaccine development. To gain insights into variation in the complete PvTRAP sequences of parasites in Thailand, 114 vivax malaria patients were recruited in 2006–2007 from 4 major endemic provinces bordering Myanmar (Tak in the northwest, n = 30 and Prachuap Khirikhan in the southwest, n = 25), Cambodia (Chanthaburi in the east, n = 29) and Malaysia (Yala and Narathiwat in the south, n = 30). In total, 26 amino acid substitutions were detected and 9 of which were novel, resulting in 44 distinct haplotypes. Haplotype and nucleotide diversities were lowest in southern P. vivax population while higher levels of diversities were observed in other populations. Evidences of positive selection on PvTRAP were demonstrated in domains II and IV and purifying selection in domains I, II and VI. Genetic differentiation was significant between each population except that between populations bordering Myanmar where transmigration was common. Regression analysis of pairwise linearized Fst and geographic distance suggests that P. vivax populations in Thailand have been isolated by distance. Sequence diversity of PvTRAP seems to be temporally stable over one decade in Tak province based on comparison of isolates collected in 1996 (n = 36) and 2006–2007. Besides natural selection, evidences of intragenic recombination have been supported in this study that could maintain and further generate diversity in this locus. It remains to be investigated whether amino acid substitutions in PvTRAP could influence host immune responses although several predicted variant T cell epitopes drastically altered the epitope scores

  5. Pathways and barriers to genetic testing and screening: Molecular genetics meets the high-risk family. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Duster, T.

    1998-11-01

    The proliferation of genetic screening and testing is requiring increasing numbers of Americans to integrate genetic knowledge and interventions into their family life and personal experience. This study examines the social processes that occur as families at risk for two of the most common autosomal recessive diseases, sickle cell disease (SC) and cystic fibrosis (CF), encounter genetic testing. Each of these diseases is found primarily in a different ethnic/racial group (CF in Americans of North European descent and SC in Americans of West African descent). This has permitted them to have a certain additional lens on the role of culture in integrating genetic testing into family life and reproductive planning. A third type of genetic disorder, the thalassemias was added to the sample in order to extent the comparative frame and to include other ethnic and racial groups.

  6. The influence of genetic factors associated with the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus on the development of benign monoclonal gammapathy in ageing IgH-congenic mice.

    PubMed

    van den Akker, T W; de Glopper-van der Veer, E; Radl, J; Benner, R

    1988-09-01

    The role of genetic factors associated with the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus (Igh) in the development of benign monoclonal gammapathy (BMG), a benign B-cell proliferative disorder, was investigated in six Igh congenic mouse strains during ageing. The strains used had a C57BL or BALB background: C57BL/6, BALB.Igb and CB-20 carrying the C57BL Igh (Ighb allotype), BALB/c and C57BL/6.Iga carrying the BALB/c Igh (Igha allotype) and BAB-14, that is of BALB/c origin with the exception of the constant part of the Igh, which is of C57BL origin. The frequency of homogeneous immunoglobulins (H-Ig), both single and multiple, was the highest in C57BL/6 mice, followed by C57BL/6.Iga. The frequencies of H-Ig in BALB.Igb and CB-20 mice were higher than those of BALB/c and BAB-14, although somewhat lower than in C57BL/6.Iga mice. Multiple H-Ig were found especially in the sera of C57BL/6 mice. Categorization of the monoclonal gammapathies (MG) on the basis of their origin showed a single transient monoclonal B-cell proliferation in 0-8% of the mice of all strains. Persistent, non-progressive MG, presumably BMG, were detected in 64% of C57BL/6, 30% of C57BL/6.Iga, 22% of BALB.Igb, 17% of CB-20, 13% of BAB-14 and 6% of BALB/c mice. Multiple myeloma or Waldenström-like B-cell lymphoma were found to be responsible for 2-4% of the paraproteinemias in all strains. The remaining H-Ig, varying from 11% of the C57BL/6 to 70% of the BAB-14 mice, could not be evaluated in time. The most frequent isotypes of the BMG within C57BL/6 and C57BL/6.Iga were IgG2a and IgG2b, respectively; IgM was the most frequent isotype within the four BALB congenic strains. The immunoglobulin heavy chain allotypes under investigation appeared to be only partly related to the onset, occurrence, multiplicity and persistence of the BMG developing in these Igh congenic C57BL and BALB strains during ageing. The immunoglobulin heavy chain allotypes, however, were not related to the major isotype of the BMG. The

  7. Genetic characterization of the hmp locus, a chemotaxis-like gene cluster that regulates hormogonium development and motility in Nostoc punctiforme.

    PubMed

    Risser, Douglas D; Chew, William G; Meeks, John C

    2014-04-01

    Filamentous cyanobacteria are capable of gliding motility, but the mechanism of motility is not well defined. Here we present a detailed characterization of the hmp locus from Nostoc punctiforme, which encodes chemotaxis-like proteins. Deletions of hmpB, C, D and E abolished differentiation of hormogonia under standard growth conditions, but, upon addition of a symbiotic partner exudate, the mutant strains differentiated hormogonium-like filaments that lacked motility and failed to secrete hormogonium specific polysaccharide. The hmp locus is expressed as two transcripts, one originating 5' of hmpA and encompassing the entire hmp locus, and the other 5' of hmpB and encompassing hmpBCDE. The CheA-like HmpE donates phosphate to its own C-terminal receiver domain, and to the CheY-like HmpB, but not to the PatA family CheY-like HmpA. A GFP-tagged variant of each hmp locus protein localized to a ring adjacent to the septum on each end of the rod-shaped cell. Immunofluorescence demonstrated that PilA localizes to a ring at the junction between cells. The phenotype of the deletion strains, and the localization of the Hmp proteins and the putative PilA protein to rings at the cell junctions are consistent with the hypothesis that these proteins are part of the junctional pore complex observed in a number of filamentous cyanobacteria.

  8. New roles for model genetic organisms in understanding and treating human disease: report from the 2006 Genetics Society of America meeting.

    PubMed

    Spradling, Allan; Ganetsky, Barry; Hieter, Phil; Johnston, Mark; Olson, Maynard; Orr-Weaver, Terry; Rossant, Janet; Sanchez, Alejandro; Waterston, Robert

    2006-04-01

    Fundamental biological knowledge and the technology to acquire it have been immeasurably advanced by past efforts to understand and manipulate the genomes of model organisms. Has the utility of bacteria, yeast, worms, flies, mice, plants, and other models now peaked and are humans poised to become the model organism of the future? The Genetics Society of America recently convened its 2006 meeting entitled "Genetic Analysis: Model Organisms to Human Biology" to examine the future role of genetic research. (Because of time limitations, the meeting was unable to cover the substantial contributions and future potential of research on model prokaryotic organisms.) In fact, the potential of model-organism-based studies has grown substantially in recent years. The genomics revolution has revealed an underlying unity between the cells and tissues of eukaryotic organisms from yeast to humans. No uniquely human biological mechanisms have yet come to light. This common evolutionary heritage makes it possible to use genetically tractable organisms to model important aspects of human medical disorders such as cancer, birth defects, neurological dysfunction, reproductive failure, malnutrition, and aging in systems amenable to rapid and powerful experimentation. Applying model systems in this way will allow us to identify common genes, proteins, and processes that underlie human medical conditions. It will allow us to systematically decipher the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions that influence complex multigenic disorders. Above all, disease models have the potential to address a growing gap between our ability to collect human genetic data and to productively interpret and apply it. If model organism research is supported with these goals in mind, we can look forward to diagnosing and treating human disease using information from multiple systems and to a medical science built on the unified history of life on earth.

  9. Genetic Regulation of Grass Biomass Accumulation and Biological Conversion Quality (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Sam

    2013-03-01

    Sam Hazen of the University of Massachusetts on "Genetic Regulation of Grass Biomass Accumulation and Biological Conversion Quality" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  10. [The study on the haplotype of MICA and MICB microsatellite locus in Guangzhou Han population].

    PubMed

    Feng, Ming-Liang; Zhang, Jing-Yi; Xie, Jun-Hua; Chen, Liang; Lu, Qiong; Guo, Xiao-Jun; Yang, Jian-Hao; Ji, Yun

    2004-05-01

    This study is to investigate genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes of microsatellite locus in the exon 5 of the MICA gene and intron 1 of the MICB gene based on 106 samples of Guangzhou Han Population by polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent technique (6-FAM). The corresponding haplotype frequencies, linkage disequilibria values and relative linkage disequilibria values were estimated based on population data. The results show that the genotype distributions of MICA and MICB microsatellite meet Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in Guangdong Han population. In total, 5 alleles of MICA microsatellite locus and 14 alleles of MICB microsatellite locus were observed. MICA A5 was the most common allele (0.2877), whereas A4 was the least popular one (0.1321). MICB CA14 was the most common allele (0.3255), and CA19 and CA28 were the least popular ones (0.0047). CA27 was not observed. Twenty-one kinds of MICA-MICB haplotypes occurred at frequencies of more than 1% (linkage disequilibria value>0). The common MICA-MICB haplotypes were A5-CA14 (16.73%) , A5.1- CA18 (8.75%), A4- CA26(3.76%),A9-CA15(3.66%) and A6-CA21(2.61%) (chi(2)>3.84, P<0.05) , and they were strong linkage disequilibria. The polymorphisms and haplotypes distributions of MICA and MICB microsatellite locus in Guangzhou Han population have their own genetic characteristics. The microsatellite locus of the exon5 of the MICA gene and intron 1 of the MICB gene could be used as the genetic markers in the studies of anthropology, linkage analysis of genetic disease genes, individual identification and paternity test in forensic medicine.

  11. A census of cells in time: quantitative genetics meets developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Chitwood, Daniel H; Sinha, Neelima R

    2013-02-01

    Quantitative genetics has become a popular method for determining the genetic basis of natural variation. Combined with genomic methods, it provides a tool for discerning the genetic basis of gene expression. So-called genetical genomics approaches yield a wealth of genomic information, but by necessity, because of cost and time, fail to resolve the differences between organs, tissues, and/or cell types. Similarly, quantitative approaches in development that might potentially address these issues are seldom applied to quantitative genetics. We discuss recent advances in cell type-specific isolation methods, the quantitative analysis of phenotype, and developmental modeling that are compatible with quantitative genetics and, with time, promise to bridge the gap between these two powerful disciplines yielding unprecedented biological insight.

  12. Molecular Identification of the Schwannomatosis Locus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0445 TITLE: Molecular Identification of the Schwannomatosis Locus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mia M. MacCollin, M.D...NUMBER Molecular Identification of the Schwannomatosis Locus 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03-1-0445 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...can be found on next page. 15. SUBJECT TERMS schwannomatosis, tumor suppressor gene, NF2, molecular genetics 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  13. Meeting review. Uncovering the genetic basis of adaptive change: on the intersection of landscape genomics and theoretical population genetics.

    PubMed

    Joost, Stéphane; Vuilleumier, Séverine; Jensen, Jeffrey D; Schoville, Sean; Leempoel, Kevin; Stucki, Sylvie; Widmer, Ivo; Melodelima, Christelle; Rolland, Jonathan; Manel, Stéphanie

    2013-07-01

    A workshop recently held at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL, Switzerland) was dedicated to understanding the genetic basis of adaptive change, taking stock of the different approaches developed in theoretical population genetics and landscape genomics and bringing together knowledge accumulated in both research fields. Indeed, an important challenge in theoretical population genetics is to incorporate effects of demographic history and population structure. But important design problems (e.g. focus on populations as units, focus on hard selective sweeps, no hypothesis-based framework in the design of the statistical tests) reduce their capability of detecting adaptive genetic variation. In parallel, landscape genomics offers a solution to several of these problems and provides a number of advantages (e.g. fast computation, landscape heterogeneity integration). But the approach makes several implicit assumptions that should be carefully considered (e.g. selection has had enough time to create a functional relationship between the allele distribution and the environmental variable, or this functional relationship is assumed to be constant). To address the respective strengths and weaknesses mentioned above, the workshop brought together a panel of experts from both disciplines to present their work and discuss the relevance of combining these approaches, possibly resulting in a joint software solution in the future.

  14. Construction of a high-density genetic map by specific locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) and its application to Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) analysis for boll weight in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Shang, Haihong; Shi, Yuzhen; Huang, Long; Li, Junwen; Ge, Qun; Gong, Juwu; Liu, Aiying; Chen, Tingting; Wang, Dan; Wang, Yanling; Palanga, Koffi Kibalou; Muhammad, Jamshed; Li, Weijie; Lu, Quanwei; Deng, Xiaoying; Tan, Yunna; Song, Weiwu; Cai, Juan; Li, Pengtao; Rashid, Harun or; Gong, Wankui; Yuan, Youlu

    2016-04-11

    Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is one of the most important worldwide crops it provides natural high-quality fiber for the industrial production and everyday use. Next-generation sequencing is a powerful method to identify single nucleotide polymorphism markers on a large scale for the construction of a high-density genetic map for quantitative trait loci mapping. In this research, a recombinant inbred lines population developed from two upland cotton cultivars 0-153 and sGK9708 was used to construct a high-density genetic map through the specific locus amplified fragment sequencing method. The high-density genetic map harbored 5521 single nucleotide polymorphism markers which covered a total distance of 3259.37 cM with an average marker interval of 0.78 cM without gaps larger than 10 cM. In total 18 quantitative trait loci of boll weight were identified as stable quantitative trait loci and were detected in at least three out of 11 environments and explained 4.15-16.70 % of the observed phenotypic variation. In total, 344 candidate genes were identified within the confidence intervals of these stable quantitative trait loci based on the cotton genome sequence. These genes were categorized based on their function through gene ontology analysis, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis and eukaryotic orthologous groups analysis. This research reported the first high-density genetic map for Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) with a recombinant inbred line population using single nucleotide polymorphism markers developed by specific locus amplified fragment sequencing. We also identified quantitative trait loci of boll weight across 11 environments and identified candidate genes within the quantitative trait loci confidence intervals. The results of this research would provide useful information for the next-step work including fine mapping, gene functional analysis, pyramiding breeding of functional genes as well as marker-assisted selection.

  15. Genetic Variation at Exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB Locus in Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) from the Gulf of California.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Santillán, Diana D; Lacey, Eileen A; Gendron, Diane; Ortega, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) play an important role in the vertebrate immune response and are among the most polymorphic genes known in vertebrates. In some marine mammals, MHC genes have been shown to be characterized by low levels of polymorphism compared to terrestrial taxa; this reduction in variation is often explained as a result of lower pathogen pressures in marine habitats. To determine if this same reduction in variation applies to the migratory population of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) that occurs in the Gulf of California, we genotyped a 172 bp fragment of exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB locus for 80 members of this population. Twenty-two putatively functional DQB allotypes were identified, all of which were homologous with DQB sequences from other cetacean species. Up to 5 putative alleles per individual were identified, suggesting that gene duplication has occurred at this locus. Rates of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions (ω) and maximum likelihood analyses of models of nucleotide variation provided potential evidence of ongoing positive selection at this exon. Phylogenetic analyses of DQB alleles from B. musculus and 16 other species of cetaceans revealed trans-specific conservation of MHC variants, suggesting that selection has acted on this locus over prolonged periods of time. Collectively our findings reveal that immunogenic variation in blue whales is comparable to that in terrestrial mammals, thereby providing no evidence that marine taxa are subject to reduced pathogen-induced selective pressures.

  16. Genetic Variation at Exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB Locus in Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) from the Gulf of California

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Santillán, Diana D.; Lacey, Eileen A.; Gendron, Diane; Ortega, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) play an important role in the vertebrate immune response and are among the most polymorphic genes known in vertebrates. In some marine mammals, MHC genes have been shown to be characterized by low levels of polymorphism compared to terrestrial taxa; this reduction in variation is often explained as a result of lower pathogen pressures in marine habitats. To determine if this same reduction in variation applies to the migratory population of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) that occurs in the Gulf of California, we genotyped a 172 bp fragment of exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB locus for 80 members of this population. Twenty-two putatively functional DQB allotypes were identified, all of which were homologous with DQB sequences from other cetacean species. Up to 5 putative alleles per individual were identified, suggesting that gene duplication has occurred at this locus. Rates of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions (ω) and maximum likelihood analyses of models of nucleotide variation provided potential evidence of ongoing positive selection at this exon. Phylogenetic analyses of DQB alleles from B. musculus and 16 other species of cetaceans revealed trans-specific conservation of MHC variants, suggesting that selection has acted on this locus over prolonged periods of time. Collectively our findings reveal that immunogenic variation in blue whales is comparable to that in terrestrial mammals, thereby providing no evidence that marine taxa are subject to reduced pathogen-induced selective pressures. PMID:26761201

  17. A combined functional and structural genomics approach identified an EST-SSR marker with complete linkage to the Ligon lintless-2 genetic locus in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cotton fiber length is an important quality attribute to the textile industry and longer fibers can be more efficiently spun into yarns to produce superior fabrics. There is typically a negative correlation between yield and fiber quality traits such as length. An understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling fiber length can potentially provide a valuable tool for cotton breeders to improve fiber length while maintaining high yields. The cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fiber mutation Ligon lintless-2 is controlled by a single dominant gene (Li2) that results in significantly shorter fibers than a wild-type. In a near-isogenic state with a wild-type cotton line, Li2 is a model system with which to study fiber elongation. Results Two near-isogenic lines of Ligon lintless-2 (Li2) cotton, one mutant and one wild-type, were developed through five generations of backcrosses (BC5). An F2 population was developed from a cross between the two Li2 near-isogenic lines and used to develop a linkage map of the Li2 locus on chromosome 18. Five simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were closely mapped around the Li2 locus region with two of the markers flanking the Li2 locus at 0.87 and 0.52 centimorgan. No apparent differences in fiber initiation and early fiber elongation were observed between the mutant ovules and the wild-type ones. Gene expression profiling using microarrays suggested roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis and cytokinin regulation in the Li2 mutant phenotype. Microarray gene expression data led to successful identification of an EST-SSR marker (NAU3991) that displayed complete linkage to the Li2 locus. Conclusions In the field of cotton genomics, we report the first successful conversion of gene expression data into an SSR marker that is associated with a genomic region harboring a gene responsible for a fiber trait. The EST-derived SSR marker NAU3991 displayed complete linkage to the Li2 locus on chromosome 18 and resided in a

  18. Genetic Interaction between Arabidopsis Qpm3.1 Locus and Bacterial Effector Gene hopW1-1 Underlies Natural Variation in Quantitative Disease Resistance to Pseudomonas Infection

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qi; Liu, Wei-Wei; Pan, Ke-Di; Peng, You-Liang; Fan, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Wide quantitative variation in plant disease resistance across Arabidopsis wild populations has been documented and the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. To investigate the genetic and molecular basis of this variation, Arabidopsis recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from Aa-0 × Col-0 and Gie-0 × Col-0 crosses were constructed and used for inoculation with Pseudomonas syringae pathovars maculicola ES4326 (ES4326) and tomato DC3000 (DC3000). Bacterial growth assays revealed continuous distribution across the large differences between the most and the least susceptible lines in the RILs. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping analyses identified a number of QTLs underpinning the variance in disease resistance, among which Qpm3.1, a major QTL on chromosome III from both Aa-0 and Gie-0 accessions, preferentially restricted the growth of ES4326. A genetic screen for the ES4326 gene selectively leading to bacterial growth inhibition on accession Aa-0 uncovered the effector gene hopW1-1. Further QTL analysis of disease in RILs inoculated with DC3000 carrying hopW1-1 showed that the genetic interaction between Qpm3.1 and hopW1-1 determined Arabidopsis resistance to bacterial infection. These findings illustrate the complexity of Arabidopsis-Pseudomonas interaction and highlight the importance of pathogen effectors in delineating genetic architectures of quantitative variation in plant disease resistance. PMID:28523008

  19. The Association between Serum LDL Cholesterol and Genetic Variation in Chromosomal Locus 1p13.3 among Coronary Artery Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Nasser M.; El-Menyar, Ayman; Mohamed Baluli, Hissa; Alali, Khalid; Farag, Fathi; Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2015-01-01

    Background. Several polymorphisms of a locus on chromosome 1p13.3 have a significant effect on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), atherosclerosis, and acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods. We aimed to investigate the association between rs599839, rs646776, and rs4970834 of locus 1p13.3 and serum LDL-C and severity of coronary artery stenosis in ACS patients. Genotyping of the rs599839, rs646776, and rs4970834 polymorphisms was performed on Arab patients undergoing coronary angiography for ACS. Patients were divided into group A (ACS with insignificant stenosis (<50%)) and group B (with significant stenosis (≥50%)). Results. Patients carrying the minor G allele in rs599839 had significantly lower mean of LDL-C (2.58 versus 3.44 mM, P = 0.026) than homozygous A allele carriers (GG versus AA). Carriers of minor C allele in rs64776 had significantly higher mean of HDL-C (2.16 versus 1.36 mM, P = 0.004) than carriers of the T alleles (AA versus GG). The odd ratio and 95% confidence interval for dominant model for G allele carriers of rs599839 were 0.51 (0.30–0.92), P = 0.038, among patients with significant stenosis. Conclusions. Polymorphisms rs646776 and rs599839 of locus 1p13.3 were significantly associated with LDL-C and other lipid parameters. In addition, the G-allele carriers of variant rs599839 had a significant protective effect against the atherosclerosis. PMID:25969834

  20. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Complex by 24-Locus Based MIRU-VNTR Typing in Conjunction with Spoligotyping to Assess Genetic Diversity of Strains Circulating in Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Bouklata, Nada; Supply, Philip; Jaouhari, Sanae; Charof, Reda; Seghrouchni, Fouad; Sadki, Khalid; El Achhab, Youness; Nejjari, Chakib; Filali-Maltouf, Abdelkarim

    2015-01-01

    Background Standard 24-locus Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit Variable Number Tandem Repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing allows to get an improved resolution power for tracing TB transmission and predicting different strain (sub) lineages in a community. Methodology During 2010–2012, a total of 168 Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex (MTBC) isolates were collected by cluster sampling from 10 different Moroccan cities, and centralized by the National Reference Laboratory of Tuberculosis over the study period. All isolates were genotyped using spoligotyping, and a subset of 75 was genotyped using 24-locus based MIRU-VNTR typing, followed by first line drug susceptibility testing. Corresponding strain lineages were predicted using MIRU-VNTRplus database. Principal Findings Spoligotyping resulted in 137 isolates in 18 clusters (2–50 isolates per cluster: clustering rate of 81.54%) corresponding to a SIT number in the SITVIT database, while 31(18.45%) patterns were unique of which 10 were labelled as “unknown” according to the same database. The most prevalent spoligotype family was LAM; (n = 81 or 48.24% of isolates, dominated by SIT42, n = 49), followed by Haarlem (23.80%), T superfamily (15.47%), >Beijing (2.97%), > U clade (2.38%) and S clade (1.19%). Subsequent 24-Locus MIRU-VNTR typing identified 64 unique types and 11 isolates in 5 clusters (2 to 3isolates per cluster), substantially reducing clusters defined by spoligotyping only. The single cluster of three isolates corresponded to two previously treated MDR-TB cases and one new MDR-TB case known to be contact a same index case and belonging to a same family, albeit residing in 3 different administrative regions. MIRU-VNTR loci 4052, 802, 2996, 2163b, 3690, 1955, 424, 2531, 2401 and 960 were highly discriminative in our setting (HGDI >0.6). Conclusions 24-locus MIRU-VNTR typing can substantially improve the resolution of large clusters initially defined by spoligotyping alone and predominating in Morocco

  1. Construction of a high-density genetic map and the X/Y sex-determining gene mapping in spinach based on large-scale markers developed by specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq).

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei; Fan, Guiyan; Liu, Dandan; Zhang, Helong; Wang, Xiaowu; Wu, Jian; Xu, Zhaosheng

    2017-04-04

    Cultivated spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is one of the most widely cultivated types of leafy vegetable in the world, and it has a high nutritional value. Spinach is also an ideal plant for investigating the mechanism of sex determination because it is a dioecious species with separate male and female plants. Some reports on the sex labeling and localization of spinach in the study of molecular markers have surfaced. However, there have only been two reports completed on the genetic map of spinach. The lack of rich and reliable molecular markers and the shortage of high-density linkage maps are important constraints in spinach research work. In this study, a high-density genetic map of spinach based on the Specific-locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq) technique was constructed; the sex-determining gene was also finely mapped. Through bio-information analysis, 50.75 Gb of data in total was obtained, including 207.58 million paired-end reads. Finally, 145,456 high-quality SLAF markers were obtained, with 27,800 polymorphic markers and 4080 SLAF markers were finally mapped onto the genetic map after linkage analysis. The map spanned 1,125.97 cM with an average distance of 0.31 cM between the adjacent marker loci. It was divided into 6 linkage groups corresponding to the number of spinach chromosomes. Besides, the combination of Bulked Segregation Analysis (BSA) with SLAF-seq technology(super-BSA) was employed to generate the linkage markers with the sex-determining gene. Combined with the high-density genetic map of spinach, the sex-determining gene X/Y was located at the position of the linkage group (LG) 4 (66.98 cM-69.72 cM and 75.48 cM-92.96 cM), which may be the ideal region for the sex-determining gene. A high-density genetic map of spinach based on the SLAF-seq technique was constructed with a backcross (BC1) population (which is the highest density genetic map of spinach reported at present). At the same time, the sex-determining gene X/Y was mapped

  2. Genetic recombination at the human RH locus: A family study of the red-cell Evans phenotype reveals a transfer of exons 2-6 from the RHD to the RHCE gene

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.H.; Chen, Y.; Reid, M.; Ghosh, S.

    1996-10-01

    The human RH locus appears to consist of two structural genes, D and CE, which map on the short arm p34-36 of chromosome 1 and specify a most complex system of blood-group genetic polymorphisms. Here we describe a family study of the Evans (also known as {open_quotes}D..{open_quotes}) phenotype, a codominant trait associated with both qualitative and quantitative changes in D-antigen expression. A cataract-causing mutation was also inherited in this family and was apparently cotransmitted with Evans, suggesting a chromosomal linkage of these two otherwise unrelated traits. Southern blot analysis and allele-specific PCR showed the linkage of Evans with a SphI RFLP marker and the presence of a hybrid gene in the RH locus. To delineate the pattern of gene expression, the composition and structure of Rh-polypeptide transcripts were characterized by reverse transcriptase-PCR and nucleotide sequencing. This resulted in the identification of a novel Rh transcript expressed only in the Evans-positive erythroid cells. Sequence analysis showed that the transcript maintained a normal open reading frame but occurred as a CE-D-CE composite in which exons 2-6 of the CE gene were replaced by the homologous counterpart of the D gene. This hybrid gene was predicted to encode a CE-D-CE fusion protein whose surface expression correlates with the Evans phenotype. The mode and consequence of such a recombination event suggest the occurrence, in the RH locus, of a segmental DNA transfer via the mechanism of gene conversion. 31 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Genetic dissection of a TIR-NB-LRR locus from the wild North American grapevine species Muscadinia rotundifolia identifies paralogous genes conferring resistance to major fungal and oomycete pathogens in cultivated grapevine.

    PubMed

    Feechan, Angela; Anderson, Claire; Torregrosa, Laurent; Jermakow, Angelica; Mestre, Pere; Wiedemann-Merdinoglu, Sabine; Merdinoglu, Didier; Walker, Amanda R; Cadle-Davidson, Lance; Reisch, Bruce; Aubourg, Sebastien; Bentahar, Nadia; Shrestha, Bipna; Bouquet, Alain; Adam-Blondon, Anne-Françoise; Thomas, Mark R; Dry, Ian B

    2013-11-01

    The most economically important diseases of grapevine cultivation worldwide are caused by the fungal pathogen powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator syn. Uncinula necator) and the oomycete pathogen downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola). Currently, grapegrowers rely heavily on the use of agrochemicals to minimize the potentially devastating impact of these pathogens on grape yield and quality. The wild North American grapevine species Muscadinia rotundifolia was recognized as early as 1889 to be resistant to both powdery and downy mildew. We have now mapped resistance to these two mildew pathogens in M. rotundifolia to a single locus on chromosome 12 that contains a family of seven TIR-NB-LRR genes. We further demonstrate that two highly homologous (86% amino acid identity) members of this gene family confer strong resistance to these unrelated pathogens following genetic transformation into susceptible Vitis vinifera winegrape cultivars. These two genes, designated resistance to Uncinula necator (MrRUN1) and resistance to Plasmopara viticola (MrRPV1) are the first resistance genes to be cloned from a grapevine species. Both MrRUN1 and MrRPV1 were found to confer resistance to multiple powdery and downy mildew isolates from France, North America and Australia; however, a single powdery mildew isolate collected from the south-eastern region of North America, to which M. rotundifolia is native, was capable of breaking MrRUN1-mediated resistance. Comparisons of gene organization and coding sequences between M. rotundifolia and the cultivated grapevine V. vinifera at the MrRUN1/MrRPV1 locus revealed a high level of synteny, suggesting that the TIR-NB-LRR genes at this locus share a common ancestor. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Physical and functional characterization of the genetic locus of IBtk, an inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase: evidence for three protein isoforms of IBtk

    PubMed Central

    Spatuzza, Carmen; Schiavone, Marco; Di Salle, Emanuela; Janda, Elzbieta; Sardiello, Marco; Fiume, Giuseppe; Fierro, Olga; Simonetta, Marco; Argiriou, Notis; Faraonio, Raffaella; Capparelli, Rosanna; Quinto, Ileana

    2008-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is required for B-cell development. Btk deficiency causes X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) in humans and X-linked immunodeficiency (Xid) in mice. Btk lacks a negative regulatory domain and may rely on cytoplasmic proteins to regulate its activity. Consistently, we identified an inhibitor of Btk, IBtk, which binds to the PH domain of Btk and down-regulates the Btk kinase activity. IBtk is an evolutionary conserved protein encoded by a single genomic sequence at 6q14.1 cytogenetic location, a region of recurrent chromosomal aberrations in lymphoproliferative disorders; however, the physical and functional organization of IBTK is unknown. Here, we report that the human IBTK locus includes three distinct mRNAs arising from complete intron splicing, an additional polyadenylation signal and a second transcription start site that utilizes a specific ATG for protein translation. By northern blot, 5′RACE and 3′RACE we identified three IBTKα, IBTKβ and IBTKγ mRNAs, whose transcription is driven by two distinct promoter regions; the corresponding IBtk proteins were detected in human cells and mouse tissues by specific antibodies. These results provide the first characterization of the human IBTK locus and may assist in understanding the in vivo function of IBtk. PMID:18596081

  5. Analysis of genetic variation at the prolactin-RsaI (PRL-RsaI) locus in Indian native cattle breeds (Bos indicus).

    PubMed

    Sodhi, M; Mukesh, M; Mishra, B P; Parvesh, K; Joshi, B K

    2011-02-01

    This study assessed the distribution pattern of allelic variants at the prolactin-RsaI locus in 23 Indian native cattle breeds (Bos indicus). PCR-RFLP genotyping of a 156 bp fragment of prolactin (PRL) in exon 3 revealed the predominance of the heterozygous AB genotype (mean frequency 0.58) irrespective of utility type (dairy, dual, draft), geographic region (northern, central, southern), and coat color (red, gray) of the breeds analyzed. The overall frequencies of homozygous AA (0.22) and BB (0.20) genotypes were in a similar range. The PRL (A) and PRL (B) alleles exhibited similar gene frequencies (means 0.52 and 0.48, respectively). The existing profile of the PRL-RsaI gene locus in a large set of Indian native cattle breeds was different from that of Bos taurus and cattle breeds of other countries, where either the BB genotype and PRL (B) allele or the AA genotype and PRL (A) allele have been reported to be more prevalent.

  6. Development of Murine Lupus Involves the Combined Genetic Contribution of the SLAM and FcγR Intervals within the Nba2 Autoimmune Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Trine N.; Alfaro, Jennifer; Enriquez, Hilda L.; Jiang, Chao; Loo, William M.; Atencio, Stephanie; Bupp, Melanie R. Gubbels; Mailloux, Christina M.; Metzger, Troy; Flannery, Shannon; Rozzo, Stephen J.; Kotzin, Brian L.; Rosemblatt, Mario; Bono, María Rosa; Erickson, Loren D.

    2010-01-01

    Autoantibodies are of central importance in the pathogenesis of Ab-mediated autoimmune disorders. The murine lupus susceptibility locus Nba2 on chromosome 1 and the syntenic human locus are associated with a loss of immune tolerance that leads to antinuclear Ab production. To identify gene intervals within Nba2 that control the development of autoantibody-producing B cells and to determine the cellular components through which Nba2 genes accomplish this, we generated congenic mice expressing various Nba2 intervals where genes for the FcγR, SLAM, and IFN-inducible families are encoded. Analysis of congenic strains demonstrated that the FcγR and SLAM intervals independently controlled the severity of autoantibody production and renal disease, yet are both required for lupus susceptibility. Deregulated homeostasis of terminally differentiated B cells was found to be controlled by the FcγR interval where FcγRIIb-mediated apoptosis of germinal center B cells and plasma cells was impaired. Increased numbers of activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells that were distinctly CD19+ and promoted plasma cell differentiation via the proinflammatory cytokines IL-10 and IFNα were linked to the SLAM interval. These findings suggest that SLAM and FcγR intervals act cooperatively to influence the clinical course of disease through supporting the differentiation and survival of autoantibody-producing cells. PMID:20018631

  7. Mendel Meets CSI: Forensic Genotyping as a Method to Teach Genetics & DNA Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurowski, Scotia; Reiss, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a forensic DNA science laboratory exercise for advanced high school and introductory college level biology courses. Students use a commercial genotyping kit and genetic analyzer or gene sequencer to analyze DNA recovered from a fictitious crime scene. DNA profiling and STR genotyping are outlined. DNA extraction, PCR, and…

  8. Natural Product Chemistry Meets Genetics: When is a Genotype a Chemotype?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The chemotype of a microbial or plant species has traditionally been defined as its profile of natural products, and the genotype as its genetic constitution or DNA sequence. The purpose of this perspective is to discuss applications of DNA genotyping, particularly by PCR-amplification methods, to ...

  9. Mendel Meets CSI: Forensic Genotyping as a Method to Teach Genetics & DNA Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurowski, Scotia; Reiss, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a forensic DNA science laboratory exercise for advanced high school and introductory college level biology courses. Students use a commercial genotyping kit and genetic analyzer or gene sequencer to analyze DNA recovered from a fictitious crime scene. DNA profiling and STR genotyping are outlined. DNA extraction, PCR, and…

  10. Association of ulcerative colitis with the inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility locus IBD2 in non-Jewish Caucasians and evidence of genetic heterogeneity among racial and ethnic populations with Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Uthoff, Sonja M S; Crawford, Nigel P S; Eichenberger, M Robert; Hamilton, Crystal J; Petras, Robert E; Martin, Eden R; Galandiuk, Susan

    2002-12-01

    Genomewide scanning has been used to identify chromosomal regions encoding susceptibility loci to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The greatest evidence for linkage to IBD has been reported for a region of chromosome 12q14 surrounding the microsatellite marker D12S83, with a logarithm of odds score of 5.47 and a positive transmission disequilibrium test, and which was subsequently named IBD2. We wished to confirm this locus by genotyping the highly polymorphic microsatellites D12S1022, D12S1056, and D12S83, spanning a continuous region on chromosome 12 of 342 kb, in a cohort of nonrelated individuals with ulcerative colitis (89 patients), Crohn disease (121 patients), and population-based control subjects (100 patients). In non-Jewish Caucasians, one D12S1022 allele, one D12S1056 genotype, and three D12S83 alleles were found to have statistically significant differences in distribution between the two disease groups and the control population. These data support a significant association of IBD with the IBD2 locus in close vicinity to the three markers studied. The replication of genetic risk loci in a case control association study may indicate susceptibility genes in this region and may facilitate identification of candidate genes for IBD. Subgroup analysis revealed a notable difference in genotype distribution among Jewish Caucasian and African American patients affected with Crohn disease when compared with similarly affected non-Jewish Caucasians. Using Fisher exact test, statistically significant distribution differences were observed for D12S1022 and D12S83. These data indicate that there may be significant genetic heterogeneity between different ethnic and racial IBD populations or may simply reflect differences in marker allele frequencies among populations. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Popliteal pterygium syndrome in a Swedish family--clinical findings and genetic analysis with the van der Woude syndrome locus at 1q32-q41.

    PubMed

    Wong, F K; Gustafsson, B

    2000-04-01

    The present study describes a Swedish family in which the mother and her son were affected with signs of popliteal pterygium syndrome (PPS, OMIM 119500). Both individuals had bilateral complete cleft lip and palate, oral synechiae, paramedian pits on the lower lip, toe syndactyly and a piece of triangular skin overgrowth on the great toes. The son also presented with soft tissue syndactyly of the 2nd and 3rd fingers. Although popliteal pterygium was not found, the above clinical features were diagnostic for PPS. Chromosomal abnormalities were not revealed in either case by cytogenetic analyses. A test for microdeletion in the VWS region at 1q32-q41 was performed in the family using 5 polymorphic microsatellite markers from the region. The affected son was found to be heterozygous for all 5 markers, suggesting that microdeletion at the VWS region was unlikely. The VWS locus, however, was not excluded by haplotype analysis of the family.

  12. Chimerization at the AQP2-AQP3 locus is the genetic basis of melarsoprol-pentamidine cross-resistance in clinical Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates.

    PubMed

    Graf, Fabrice E; Baker, Nicola; Munday, Jane C; de Koning, Harry P; Horn, David; Mäser, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    Aquaglyceroporin-2 is a known determinant of melarsoprol-pentamidine cross-resistance in Trypanosoma brucei brucei laboratory strains. Recently, chimerization at the AQP2-AQP3 tandem locus was described from melarsoprol-pentamidine cross-resistant Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates from sleeping sickness patients in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Here, we demonstrate that reintroduction of wild-type AQP2 into one of these isolates fully restores drug susceptibility while expression of the chimeric AQP2/3 gene in aqp2-aqp3 null T. b. brucei does not. This proves that AQP2-AQP3 chimerization is the cause of melarsoprol-pentamidine cross-resistance in the T. b. gambiense isolates.

  13. Genetic Recombination at the Buff Spore Color Locus in SORDARIA BREVICOLLIS. II. Analysis of Flanking Marker Behavior in Crosses between Buff Mutants.

    PubMed

    Sang, H; Whitehouse, H L

    1983-02-01

    Aberrant asci containing one or more wild-type spores were selected from crosses between pairs of alleles of the buff locus in the presence of closely linked flanking markers. Data were obtained relating to the site of aberrant segregation and the position of any associated crossover giving recombination of flanking markers. Aberrant segregation at a proximal site within the buff gene may be associated with a crossover proximal to the site of aberrant segregation or, with equal frequency, with a crossover distal to the site of the second mutant present in the cross. Similarly, segregation at a distal site may be associated with a crossover distal to the site or, with lower frequency, with a crossover proximal to the site of the proximal mutant present in the cross. Crossovers between the alleles were rare. This evidence for the relationship between hybrid DNA and crossing over is discussed in terms of current models for the mechanism of recombination.

  14. Which Sry locus is the hypertensive Y chromosome locus?

    PubMed

    Turner, Monte E; Farkas, Joel; Dunmire, Jeff; Ely, Daniel; Milsted, Amy

    2009-02-01

    The Y chromosome of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) contains a genetic component that raises blood pressure compared with the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) Y chromosome. This research tests the Sry gene complex as the hypertensive component of the SHR Y chromosome. The Sry loci were sequenced in 1 strain with a hypertensive Y chromosome (SHR/Akr) and 2 strains with a normotensive Y chromosome (SHR/Crl and WKY/Akr). Both SHR strains have 7 Sry loci, whereas the WKY strain has 6. The 6 loci in common between SHR and WKY strains were identical in the sequence compared (coding region, 392-bp 5' prime flanking, 1200-bp 3' flanking). Both SHR strains have a locus (Sry3) not found in WKY rats, but this locus is different between SHR/Akr and SHR/Crl rats. Six mutations have accumulated in Sry3 between the SHR strains, whereas the other 6 Sry loci are identical. This pattern of an SHR-specific locus and mutation in this locus in SHR/Crl coinciding with the loss of Y chromosome hypertension is an expected pattern if Sry3 is the Y chromosome-hypertensive component. The SHR/y strain showed a significant increase in total Sry expression in the kidney between 4 and 15 weeks of age. There are significant differences in Sry expression between adrenal glands and the kidney (15 to 30 times higher in kidneys) but no significant differences between strains. These results, along with previous studies demonstrating an interaction of Sry with the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter and increased blood pressure with exogenous Sry expression, suggest the Sry loci as the hypertensive component of the SHR Y chromosome.

  15. Genetics and Molecular Mapping of Black Rot Resistance Locus Xca1bc on Chromosome B-7 in Ethiopian Mustard (Brassica carinata A. Braun)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Brij Bihari; Kalia, Pritam; Yadava, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Dinesh; Sharma, Tilak Raj

    2016-01-01

    Black rot caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Pam.) Dowson is the most destructive disease of cauliflower causing huge loss to the farmers throughout the world. Since there are limited sources of resistance to black rot in B. oleracea (C genome Brassica), exploration of A and B genomes of Brassica was planned as these were thought to be potential reservoirs of black rot resistance gene(s). In our search for new gene(s) for black rot resistance, F2 mapping population was developed in Brassica carinata (BBCC) by crossing NPC-17, a susceptible genotype with NPC-9, a resistant genotype. Out of 364 Intron length polymorphic markers and microsatellite primers used in this study, 41 distinguished the parental lines. However, resistant and susceptible bulks could be distinguished by three markers At1g70610, SSR Na14-G02 and At1g71865 which were used for genotyping of F2 mapping population. These markers were placed along the resistance gene, according to order, covering a distance of 36.30 cM. Intron length polymorphic markers At1g70610 and At1g71865 were found to be linked to black rot resistance locus (Xca1bc) at 6.2 and 12.8 cM distance, respectively. This is the first report of identification of markers linked to Xca1bc locus in Brassica carinata on B-7 linkage group. Intron length polymorphic markers provided a novel and attractive option for marker assisted selection due to high cross transferability and cost effectiveness for marker assisted alien gene introgression into cauliflower. PMID:27023128

  16. Genetics and Molecular Mapping of Black Rot Resistance Locus Xca1bc on Chromosome B-7 in Ethiopian Mustard (Brassica carinata A. Braun).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Brij Bihari; Kalia, Pritam; Yadava, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Dinesh; Sharma, Tilak Raj

    2016-01-01

    Black rot caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Pam.) Dowson is the most destructive disease of cauliflower causing huge loss to the farmers throughout the world. Since there are limited sources of resistance to black rot in B. oleracea (C genome Brassica), exploration of A and B genomes of Brassica was planned as these were thought to be potential reservoirs of black rot resistance gene(s). In our search for new gene(s) for black rot resistance, F2 mapping population was developed in Brassica carinata (BBCC) by crossing NPC-17, a susceptible genotype with NPC-9, a resistant genotype. Out of 364 Intron length polymorphic markers and microsatellite primers used in this study, 41 distinguished the parental lines. However, resistant and susceptible bulks could be distinguished by three markers At1g70610, SSR Na14-G02 and At1g71865 which were used for genotyping of F2 mapping population. These markers were placed along the resistance gene, according to order, covering a distance of 36.30 cM. Intron length polymorphic markers At1g70610 and At1g71865 were found to be linked to black rot resistance locus (Xca1bc) at 6.2 and 12.8 cM distance, respectively. This is the first report of identification of markers linked to Xca1bc locus in Brassica carinata on B-7 linkage group. Intron length polymorphic markers provided a novel and attractive option for marker assisted selection due to high cross transferability and cost effectiveness for marker assisted alien gene introgression into cauliflower.

  17. Genetic control of a central pattern generator: rhythmic oromotor movement in mice is controlled by a major locus near Atp1a2.

    PubMed

    Boughter, John D; Mulligan, Megan K; St John, Steven J; Tokita, Kenichi; Lu, Lu; Heck, Detlef H; Williams, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    Fluid licking in mice is a rhythmic behavior that is controlled by a central pattern generator (CPG) located in a complex of brainstem nuclei. C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA/2J (D2) strains differ significantly in water-restricted licking, with a highly heritable difference in rates (h(2)≥0.62) and a corresponding 20% difference in interlick interval (mean ± SEM = 116.3±1 vs 95.4±1.1 ms). We systematically quantified motor output in these strains, their F(1) hybrids, and a set of 64 BXD progeny strains. The mean primary interlick interval (MPI) varied continuously among progeny strains. We detected a significant quantitative trait locus (QTL) for a CPG controlling lick rate on Chr 1 (Lick1), and a suggestive locus on Chr 10 (Lick10). Linkage was verified by testing of B6.D2-1D congenic stock in which a segment of Chr 1 of the D2 strain was introgressed onto the B6 parent. The Lick1 interval on distal Chr 1 contains several strong candidate genes. One of these is a sodium/potassium pump subunit (Atp1a2) with widespread expression in astrocytes, as well as in a restricted population of neurons. Both this subunit and the entire Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase molecule have been implicated in rhythmogenesis for respiration and locomotion. Sequence variants in or near Apt1a2 strongly modulate expression of the cognate mRNA in multiple brain regions. This gene region has recently been sequenced exhaustively and we have cataloged over 300 non-coding and synonymous mutations segregating among BXD strains, one or more of which is likely to contribute to differences in central pattern generator tempo.

  18. Design and analysis of genetic association studies to finely map a locus identified by linkage analysis: sample size and power calculations.

    PubMed

    Hanson, R L; Looker, H C; Ma, L; Muller, Y L; Baier, L J; Knowler, W C

    2006-05-01

    Association (e.g. case-control) studies are often used to finely map loci identified by linkage analysis. We investigated the influence of various parameters on power and sample size requirements for such a study. Calculations were performed for various values of a high-risk functional allele (fA), frequency of a marker allele associated with the high risk allele (f1), degree of linkage disquilibrium between functional and marker alleles (D') and trait heritability attributable to the functional locus (h2). The calculations show that if cases and controls are selected from equal but opposite extreme quantiles of a quantitative trait, the primary determinants of power are h2 and the specific quantiles selected. For a dichotomous trait, power also depends on population prevalence. Power is optimal if functional alleles are studied (fA= f1 and D'= 1.0) and can decrease substantially as D' diverges from 1.0 or as f(1) diverges from fA. These analyses suggest that association studies to finely map loci are most powerful if potential functional polymorphisms are identified a priori or if markers are typed to maximize haplotypic diversity. In the absence of such information, expected minimum power at a given location for a given sample size can be calculated by specifying a range of potential frequencies for fA (e.g. 0.1-0.9) and determining power for all markers within the region with specification of the expected D' between the markers and the functional locus. This method is illustrated for a fine-mapping project with 662 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 24 Mb. Regions differed by marker density and allele frequencies. Thus, in some, power was near its theoretical maximum and little additional information is expected from additional markers, while in others, additional markers appear to be necessary. These methods may be useful in the analysis and interpretation of fine-mapping studies.

  19. Evidence from two independent backcross experiments supports genetic linkage of microsatellite Hcms8a20, but not other candidate loci, to a major ivermectin resistance locus in Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Rezansoff, Andrew M; Laing, Roz; Gilleard, John S

    2016-09-01

    Haemonchus contortus is the leading parasitic nematode species used to study anthelmintic drug resistance. A variety of candidate loci have been implicated as being associated with ivermectin resistance in this parasite but definitive evidence of their importance is still lacking. We have previously performed two independent serial backcross experiments to introgress ivermectin resistance loci from two H. contortus ivermectin-resistant strains - MHco4(WRS) and MHco10(CAVR) - into the genetic background of the ivermectin-susceptible genome reference strain MHco3(ISE). We have interrogated a number of candidate ivermectin resistance loci in the resulting backcross populations and assessed the evidence for their genetic linkage to an ivermectin resistance locus. These include the microsatellite marker Hcms8a20 and six candidate genes Hco-glc-5, Hco-avr-14, Hco-lgc-37 (previously designated Hco-hg-1), Hco-pgp-9 (previously designated Hco-pgp-1), Hco-pgp-2 and Hco-dyf-7. We have sampled the haplotype diversity of amplicon markers within, or adjacent to, each of these loci in the parental strains and fourth generation backcross populations to assess the evidence for haplotype introgression from the resistant parental strain into the genomic background of the susceptible parental strain in each backcross. The microsatellite Hcms8a20 locus showed strong evidence of such introgression in both independent backcrosses, suggesting it is linked to an important ivermectin resistance mutation in both the MHco4(WRS) and MHco10(CAVR) strains. In contrast, Hco-glc-5, Hco-avr-14, Hco-pgp-9 and Hco-dyf-7 showed no evidence of introgression in either backcross. Hco-lgc-37 and Hco-pgp-2 showed only weak evidence of introgression in the MHco3/4 backcross but not in the MHco3/10 backcross. Overall, these results suggest that microsatellite marker Hcms8a20, but not the other candidate genes tested, is linked to a major ivermectin resistance locus in the MHco4(WRS) and MHco10(CAVR) strains

  20. Gene therapy for inherited muscle diseases: where genetics meets rehabilitation medicine.

    PubMed

    Braun, Robynne; Wang, Zejing; Mack, David L; Childers, Martin K

    2014-11-01

    The development of clinical vectors to correct genetic mutations that cause inherited myopathies and related disorders of skeletal muscle is advancing at an impressive rate. Adeno-associated virus vectors are attractive for clinical use because (1) adeno-associated viruses do not cause human disease and (2) these vectors are able to persist for years. New vectors are now becoming available as gene therapy delivery tools, and recent preclinical experiments have demonstrated the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of gene therapy with adeno-associated virus for long-term correction of muscle pathology and weakness in myotubularin-deficient canine and murine disease models. In this review, recent advances in the application of gene therapies to treat inherited muscle disorders are presented, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy and x-linked myotubular myopathy. Potential areas for therapeutic synergies between rehabilitation medicine and genetics are also discussed.

  1. Gene therapy for inherited muscle diseases: Where genetics meets rehabilitation medicine

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Robynne; Wang, Zejing; Mack, David L.; Childers, Martin K.

    2014-01-01

    The development of clinical vectors to correct genetic mutations that cause inherited myopathies and related disorders of skeletal muscle is advancing at an impressive rate. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are attractive for clinical use because (i) AAVs do not cause human disease, and (ii) these vectors are able to persist for years. New vectors are now becoming available as gene therapy delivery tools, and recent preclinical experiments have demonstrated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of gene therapy with AAV for long-term correction of muscle pathology and weakness in myotubularin-deficient canine and murine disease models. In this review, we present recent advances in the application of gene therapies to treat inherited muscle disorders including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and X-linked Myotubular Myopathy. Potential areas for therapeutic synergies between rehabilitation medicine and genetics are also discussed. PMID:25313664

  2. Human high-altitude adaptation: forward genetics meets the HIF pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bigham, Abigail W.

    2014-01-01

    Humans have adapted to the chronic hypoxia of high altitude in several locations, and recent genome-wide studies have indicated a genetic basis. In some populations, genetic signatures have been identified in the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway, which orchestrates the transcriptional response to hypoxia. In Tibetans, they have been found in the HIF2A (EPAS1) gene, which encodes for HIF-2α, and the prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2, also known as EGLN1) gene, which encodes for one of its key regulators, PHD2. High-altitude adaptation may be due to multiple genes that act in concert with one another. Unraveling their mechanism of action can offer new therapeutic approaches toward treating common human diseases characterized by chronic hypoxia. PMID:25319824

  3. The society for craniofacial genetics and developmental biology 38th annual meeting.

    PubMed

    Taneyhill, Lisa A; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Lozanoff, Scott; Marcucio, Ralph; Richtsmeier, Joan T; Trainor, Paul A

    2016-07-01

    The mission of the Society for Craniofacial Genetics and Developmental Biology (SCGDB) is to promote education, research, and communication about normal and abnormal development of the tissues and organs of the head. The SCGDB welcomes as members undergraduate students, graduate students, post doctoral researchers, clinicians, orthodontists, scientists, and academicians who share an interest in craniofacial biology. Each year our members come together to share their novel findings, build upon, and challenge current knowledge of craniofacial biology. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Tetralogy of Fallot and Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome – Complex Clinical Phenotypes Meet Complex Genetic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lahm, Harald; Schön, Patric; Doppler, Stefanie; Dreßen, Martina; Cleuziou, Julie; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Ewert, Peter; Lange, Rüdiger; Krane, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In many cases congenital heart disease (CHD) is represented by a complex phenotype and an array of several functional and morphological cardiac disorders. These malformations will be briefly summarized in the first part focusing on two severe CHD phenotypes, hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). In most cases of CHD the genetic origin remains largely unknown, though the complexity of the clinical picture strongly argues against a dysregulation which can be attributed to a single candidate gene but rather suggests a multifaceted polygenetic origin with elaborate interactions. Consistent with this idea, genome-wide approaches using whole exome sequencing, comparative sequence analysis of multiplex families to identify de novo mutations and global technologies to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms, copy number variants, dysregulation of the transcriptome and epigenetic variations have been conducted to obtain information about genetic alterations and potential predispositions possibly linked to the occurrence of a CHD phenotype. In the second part of this review we will summarize and discuss the available literature on identified genetic alterations linked to TOF and HLHS. PMID:26069455

  5. A suppressor locus for MODY3-diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel A.; Carette, Claire; Bagattin, Alessia; Chiral, Magali; Makinistoglu, Munevver Parla; Garbay, Serge; Prévost, Géraldine; Madaras, Cécile; Hérault, Yann; Leibovici, Michel; Pontoglio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young type 3 (MODY3), linked to mutations in the transcription factor HNF1A, is the most prevalent form of monogenic diabetes mellitus. HNF1alpha-deficiency leads to defective insulin secretion via a molecular mechanism that is still not completely understood. Moreover, in MODY3 patients the severity of insulin secretion can be extremely variable even in the same kindred, indicating that modifier genes may control the onset of the disease. With the use of a mouse model for HNF1alpha-deficiency, we show here that specific genetic backgrounds (C3H and CBA) carry a powerful genetic suppressor of diabetes. A genome scan analysis led to the identification of a major suppressor locus on chromosome 3 (Moda1). Moda1 locus contains 11 genes with non-synonymous SNPs that significantly interacts with other loci on chromosomes 4, 11 and 18. Mechanistically, the absence of HNF1alpha in diabetic-prone (sensitive) strains leads to postnatal defective islets growth that is remarkably restored in resistant strains. Our findings are relevant to human genetics since Moda1 is syntenic with a human locus identified by genome wide association studies of fasting glycemia in patients. Most importantly, our results show that a single genetic locus can completely suppress diabetes in Hnf1a-deficiency. PMID:27667715

  6. Epigenetics meets genetics in acute myeloid leukemia: clinical impact of a novel seven-gene score.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, Guido; Yan, Pearlly; Maharry, Kati; Frankhouser, David; Nicolet, Deedra; Metzeler, Klaus H; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Wu, Yue-Zhong; Bucci, Donna; Curfman, John P; Whitman, Susan P; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Mendler, Jason H; Schwind, Sebastian; Becker, Heiko; Bär, Constance; Carroll, Andrew J; Baer, Maria R; Wetzler, Meir; Carter, Thomas H; Powell, Bayard L; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Byrd, John C; Plass, Christoph; Garzon, Ramiro; Caligiuri, Michael A; Stone, Richard M; Volinia, Stefano; Bundschuh, Ralf; Bloomfield, Clara D

    2014-02-20

    Molecular risk stratification of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is largely based on genetic markers. However, epigenetic changes, including DNA methylation, deregulate gene expression and may also have prognostic impact. We evaluated the clinical relevance of integrating DNA methylation and genetic information in AML. Next-generation sequencing analysis of methylated DNA identified differentially methylated regions (DMRs) associated with prognostic mutations in older (≥ 60 years) cytogenetically normal (CN) patients with AML (n = 134). Genes with promoter DMRs and expression levels significantly associated with outcome were used to compute a prognostic gene expression weighted summary score that was tested and validated in four independent patient sets (n = 355). In the training set, we identified seven genes (CD34, RHOC, SCRN1, F2RL1, FAM92A1, MIR155HG, and VWA8) with promoter DMRs and expression associated with overall survival (OS; P ≤ .001). Each gene had high DMR methylation and lower expression, which were associated with better outcome. A weighted summary expression score of the seven gene expression levels was computed. A low score was associated with a higher complete remission (CR) rate and longer disease-free survival and OS (P < .001 for all end points). This was validated in multivariable models and in two younger (< 60 years) and two older independent sets of patients with CN-AML. Considering the seven genes individually, the fewer the genes with high expression, the better the outcome. Younger and older patients with no genes or one gene with high expression had the best outcomes (CR rate, 94% and 87%, respectively; 3-year OS, 80% and 42%, respectively). A seven-gene score encompassing epigenetic and genetic prognostic information identifies novel AML subsets that are meaningful for treatment guidance.

  7. Epigenetics Meets Genetics in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Clinical Impact of a Novel Seven-Gene Score

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Guido; Yan, Pearlly; Maharry, Kati; Frankhouser, David; Nicolet, Deedra; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Wu, Yue-Zhong; Bucci, Donna; Curfman, John P.; Whitman, Susan P.; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Mendler, Jason H.; Schwind, Sebastian; Becker, Heiko; Bär, Constance; Carroll, Andrew J.; Baer, Maria R.; Wetzler, Meir; Carter, Thomas H.; Powell, Bayard L.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Byrd, John C.; Plass, Christoph; Garzon, Ramiro; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Stone, Richard M.; Volinia, Stefano; Bundschuh, Ralf; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Molecular risk stratification of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is largely based on genetic markers. However, epigenetic changes, including DNA methylation, deregulate gene expression and may also have prognostic impact. We evaluated the clinical relevance of integrating DNA methylation and genetic information in AML. Methods Next-generation sequencing analysis of methylated DNA identified differentially methylated regions (DMRs) associated with prognostic mutations in older (≥ 60 years) cytogenetically normal (CN) patients with AML (n = 134). Genes with promoter DMRs and expression levels significantly associated with outcome were used to compute a prognostic gene expression weighted summary score that was tested and validated in four independent patient sets (n = 355). Results In the training set, we identified seven genes (CD34, RHOC, SCRN1, F2RL1, FAM92A1, MIR155HG, and VWA8) with promoter DMRs and expression associated with overall survival (OS; P ≤ .001). Each gene had high DMR methylation and lower expression, which were associated with better outcome. A weighted summary expression score of the seven gene expression levels was computed. A low score was associated with a higher complete remission (CR) rate and longer disease-free survival and OS (P < .001 for all end points). This was validated in multivariable models and in two younger (< 60 years) and two older independent sets of patients with CN-AML. Considering the seven genes individually, the fewer the genes with high expression, the better the outcome. Younger and older patients with no genes or one gene with high expression had the best outcomes (CR rate, 94% and 87%, respectively; 3-year OS, 80% and 42%, respectively). Conclusion A seven-gene score encompassing epigenetic and genetic prognostic information identifies novel AML subsets that are meaningful for treatment guidance. PMID:24378410

  8. Monster potential meets potential monster: pros and cons of deploying genetically modified microalgae for biofuels production.

    PubMed

    Flynn, K J; Mitra, A; Greenwell, H C; Sui, J

    2013-02-06

    Biofuels production from microalgae attracts much attention but remains an unproven technology. We explore routes to enhance production through modifications to a range of generic microalgal physiological characteristics. Our analysis shows that biofuels production may be enhanced ca fivefold through genetic modification (GM) of factors affecting growth rate, respiration, photoacclimation, photosynthesis efficiency and the minimum cell quotas for nitrogen and phosphorous (N : C and P : C). However, simulations indicate that the ideal GM microalgae for commercial deployment could, on escape to the environment, become a harmful algal bloom species par excellence, with attendant risks to ecosystems and livelihoods. In large measure, this is because an organism able to produce carbohydrate and/or lipid at high rates, providing stock metabolites for biofuels production, will also be able to attain a stoichiometric composition that will be far from optimal as food for the support of zooplankton growth. This composition could suppress or even halt the grazing activity that would otherwise control the microalgal growth in nature. In consequence, we recommend that the genetic manipulation of microalgae, with inherent consequences on a scale comparable to geoengineering, should be considered under strict international regulation.

  9. Monster potential meets potential monster: pros and cons of deploying genetically modified microalgae for biofuels production

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, K. J.; Mitra, A.; Greenwell, H. C.; Sui, J.

    2013-01-01

    Biofuels production from microalgae attracts much attention but remains an unproven technology. We explore routes to enhance production through modifications to a range of generic microalgal physiological characteristics. Our analysis shows that biofuels production may be enhanced ca fivefold through genetic modification (GM) of factors affecting growth rate, respiration, photoacclimation, photosynthesis efficiency and the minimum cell quotas for nitrogen and phosphorous (N : C and P : C). However, simulations indicate that the ideal GM microalgae for commercial deployment could, on escape to the environment, become a harmful algal bloom species par excellence, with attendant risks to ecosystems and livelihoods. In large measure, this is because an organism able to produce carbohydrate and/or lipid at high rates, providing stock metabolites for biofuels production, will also be able to attain a stoichiometric composition that will be far from optimal as food for the support of zooplankton growth. This composition could suppress or even halt the grazing activity that would otherwise control the microalgal growth in nature. In consequence, we recommend that the genetic manipulation of microalgae, with inherent consequences on a scale comparable to geoengineering, should be considered under strict international regulation. PMID:24427510

  10. Genetic Variation in Choline-Metabolizing Enzymes Alters Choline Metabolism in Young Women Consuming Choline Intakes Meeting Current Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Ariel B.; Cohen, Vanessa V.; Swersky, Camille C.; Stover, Julie; Vitiello, Gerardo A.; Lovesky, Jessica; Chuang, Jasmine C.; Shields, Kelsey; Fomin, Vladislav G.; Lopez, Yusnier S.; Mohan, Sanjay; Ganti, Anita; Carrier, Bradley; Malysheva, Olga V.; Caudill, Marie A.

    2017-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in choline metabolizing genes are associated with disease risk and greater susceptibility to organ dysfunction under conditions of dietary choline restriction. However, the underlying metabolic signatures of these variants are not well characterized and it is unknown whether genotypic differences persist at recommended choline intakes. Thus, we sought to determine if common genetic risk factors alter choline dynamics in pregnant, lactating, and non-pregnant women consuming choline intakes meeting and exceeding current recommendations. Women (n = 75) consumed 480 or 930 mg choline/day (22% as a metabolic tracer, choline-d9) for 10–12 weeks in a controlled feeding study. Genotyping was performed for eight variant SNPs and genetic differences in metabolic flux and partitioning of plasma choline metabolites were evaluated using stable isotope methodology. CHKA rs10791957, CHDH rs9001, CHDH rs12676, PEMT rs4646343, PEMT rs7946, FMO3 rs2266782, SLC44A1 rs7873937, and SLC44A1 rs3199966 altered the use of choline as a methyl donor; CHDH rs9001 and BHMT rs3733890 altered the partitioning of dietary choline between betaine and phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the cytidine diphosphate (CDP)-choline pathway; and CHKA rs10791957, CHDH rs12676, PEMT rs4646343, PEMT rs7946 and SLC44A1 rs7873937 altered the distribution of dietary choline between the CDP-choline and phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) denovo pathway. Such metabolic differences may contribute to disease pathogenesis and prognosis over the long-term. PMID:28134761

  11. Coronary-Heart-Disease-Associated Genetic Variant at the COL4A1/COL4A2 Locus Affects COL4A1/COL4A2 Expression, Vascular Cell Survival, Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability and Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Xiangyuan; Ren, Meixia; An, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruoxin; Yan, Shunying; Situ, Haiteng; He, Xinjie; Chen, Yequn; Tan, Xuerui; Xiao, Qingzhong; Tucker, Arthur T.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Ye, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed an association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and genetic variation on chromosome 13q34, with the lead single nucleotide polymorphism rs4773144 residing in the COL4A2 gene in this genomic region. We investigated the functional effects of this genetic variant. Analyses of primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) from different individuals showed a difference between rs4773144 genotypes in COL4A2 and COL4A1 expression levels, being lowest in the G/G genotype, intermediate in A/G and highest in A/A. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by allelic imbalance assays of primary cultures of SMCs and ECs that were of the A/G genotype revealed that the G allele had lower transcriptional activity than the A allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and luciferase reporter gene assays showed that a short DNA sequence encompassing the rs4773144 site interacted with a nuclear protein, with lower efficiency for the G allele, and that the G allele sequence had lower activity in driving reporter gene expression. Analyses of cultured SMCs from different individuals demonstrated that cells of the G/G genotype had higher apoptosis rates. Immunohistochemical and histological examinations of ex vivo atherosclerotic coronary arteries from different individuals disclosed that atherosclerotic plaques with the G/G genotype had lower collagen IV abundance and thinner fibrous cap, a hallmark of unstable, rupture-prone plaques. A study of a cohort of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease showed that patients of the G/G genotype had higher rates of myocardial infarction, a phenotype often caused by plaque rupture. These results indicate that the CHD-related genetic variant at the COL4A2 locus affects COL4A2/COL4A1 expression, SMC survival, and atherosclerotic plaque stability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the association between the genetic variant and CHD

  12. H5N1 vaccine-elicited memory B cells are genetically constrained by the IGHV locus in the recognition of a neutralizing epitope in the HA stem

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Adam K; Whittle, James RR; Lingwood, Daniel; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Yassine, Hadi M; Ma, Steven S; Narpala, Sandeep R; Prabhakaran, Madhu S; Matus-Nicodemos, Rodrigo A; Bailer, Robert T; Nabel, Gary J; Graham, Barney S; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Koup, Richard A; McDermott, Adrian B

    2015-01-01

    Due to significant viral diversity, vaccines that elicit durable and broad protection against influenza have been elusive. Recent research has focused on the potential of highly conserved regions of the viral hemagglutinin (HA) as targets for broadly neutralizing antibody responses. Antibodies that bind the highly conserved stem or stalk of HA can be elicited by vaccination in humans and animal models and neutralize diverse influenza strains. However, the frequency and phenotype of HA stem-specific B cells in vivo remains unclear. Here we characterize HA stem-specific B cell responses following H5N1 vaccination and describe the re-expansion of a pre-existing population of memory B cells specific for stem epitopes. This population utilizes primarily, but not exclusively, IGHV1-69-based immunoglobulins for HA recognition. However within some subjects, allelic polymorphism at the ighv1-69 locus can limit IGHV1-69 immunodominance and may reduce circulating frequencies of stem-reactive B cells in vivo. The accurate definition of allelic selection, recombination requirements and ontogeny of neutralizing antibody responses to influenza will aid rational influenza vaccine design. PMID:26078272

  13. Genetic Diversity of Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup C ST-4821 in China Based on Multiple-Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Xiaoying; Zhang, Ji; Zhou, Haijian; Zhu, Bingqing; Xu, Li; Shao, Zhujun; Jiang, Baofa

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis sequence type (ST)-4821 was first reported in China in 2003, and a new hyper-virulent lineage has been designated as the ST-4821 complex. A large number of N. meningitidis ST-4821 strains have been identified in China since 2003; however, the microevolution characteristics of this complex are unclear. Different combinations of variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) loci were used in multiple-locus VNTR analysis (MLVA) to analyze 118 N. meningitidis serogroup C ST-4821 strains isolated from seventeen provinces between 2003 and 2012. Additionally, MLVA with five VNTR loci was performed due to its high discriminatory power. One hundred and eighteen isolates were found to comprise 112 subtypes based on MLVA, and 16 outbreak-associated strains were clustered into one group. These data indicate a high level of diversity for N. meningitidis ST-4821 due to microevolution in the last decade. In addition, the results revealed high similarity between isolates from the same geographic origins, which is helpful when monitoring the spread of N. meningitidis serogroup C ST-4821 and will provide valuable information for the control and prevention of bacterial meningitis in China. PMID:25375168

  14. Recommendations from a meeting on health implications of genetically modified organism (GMO).

    PubMed

    Amofah, George

    2014-06-01

    The Ghana Public Health Association organized a scientific seminar to examine the introduction of genetically modified organisms into public use and the health consequences. The seminar was driven by current public debate on the subject. The seminar identified some of the advantages of GMOs and also the health concerns. It is clear that there is the need to enhance local capacity to research the introduction and use of GMOs; to put in place appropriate regulatory mechanisms including particularly the labeling of GMO products and post-marketing surveillance for possible negative health consequences in the long term. Furthermore the appropriate state agency should put in place advocacy strategies to keep the public informed about GMOs.

  15. Genotype-by-sequencing facilitates genetic mapping of a stem rust resistance locus in Aegilops umbellulata, a wild relative of cultivated wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Wild relatives of wheat play a significant role in wheat improvement as a source of genetic diversity. Stem rust disease of wheat causes significant yield losses at the global level and stem rust pathogen race TTKSK (Ug99) is virulent to most previously deployed resistance genes. Therefo...

  16. Molecular analysis of the bacteriocin-encoding plasmid pDGL1 from Enterococcus durans and genetic characterization of the durancin locus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Enterococci constitute a significant component of lactic acid bacteria normally present in the intestinal microflora and include strains that produce bacteriocins. The genetic determinants for durancin GL in Enterococcus durans 41D were identified on the 8,347 bp plasmid pDGL1 by plasmid curing exp...

  17. Genetic variation at the SLCO1B1 gene locus and low density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering response to pravastatin in the elderly

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our goal was to determine whether genetic variation at genes affecting statin metabolism or targets of statin therapy would influence low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol lowering with pravastatin, baseline heart disease, or cardiac endpoints on trial. We examined associations of single nucleot...

  18. STRONG SELECTIVE SIGNAL AND HIGH GENETIC VARIABILITY AT AN IMMUNE SYSTEM LOCUS IN CONTAMINATED AND UNCONTAMINATED POPULATIONS OF AN ESTUARINE FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a group of linked genes that mediates the adaptive immune response in vertebrates. Studies using mammals and birds have shown that environmental stressors can produce genetic changes at MHC loci that can affect immune system function....

  19. GENETIC VARIATION AT AN IMMUNE SYSTEM LOCUS PROVIDES BOTH A GENERALIZED AND SPECIFIC STRESS INDICATOR: EFFECTS OF PERSISTENT, BIOACCUMULATIVE AND TOXIC CONTAIMINANT EXPOSURES ON AN ESTUARINE FISH POPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a group of linked genes that mediates the adaptive immune response in vertebrates. Studies using mammals and birds have shown that environmental stressors can directly and indirectly produce genetic changes at MHC loci that can affect...

  20. GENETIC VARIATION AT AN IMMUNE SYSTEM LOCUS PROVIDES BOTH A GENERALIZED AND SPECIFIC STRESS INDICATOR: EFFECTS OF PERSISTENT, BIOACCUMULATIVE AND TOXIC CONTAIMINANT EXPOSURES ON AN ESTUARINE FISH POPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a group of linked genes that mediates the adaptive immune response in vertebrates. Studies using mammals and birds have shown that environmental stressors can directly and indirectly produce genetic changes at MHC loci that can affect...

  1. STRONG SELECTIVE SIGNAL AND HIGH GENETIC VARIABILITY AT AN IMMUNE SYSTEM LOCUS IN CONTAMINATED AND UNCONTAMINATED POPULATIONS OF AN ESTUARINE FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a group of linked genes that mediates the adaptive immune response in vertebrates. Studies using mammals and birds have shown that environmental stressors can produce genetic changes at MHC loci that can affect immune system function....

  2. The genetics of green thorax, a new larval colour mutant, non-linked with ruby - eye locus in the malaria mosquito, Anopheles stephensi.

    PubMed

    Sanil, D; Shetty, N J

    2009-06-01

    Anopheles stephensi, an important vector of malaria continues to be distributed widely in the Indian subcontinent. The natural vigour of the species combined with its new tolerance, indeed resistance to insecticides has made it obligatory that we look for control methods involving genetic manipulation. Hence, there is an immediate need for greater understanding of the genetics of this vector species. One of the requirements for such genetic studies is the establishment of naturally occurring mutants, establishment of the genetic basis for the same and use of such mutants in the genetic transformation studies and other genetic control programme(s). This paper describes the isolation and genetic studies of a larval colour mutant, green thorax (gt), and linkage studies involving another autosomal recessive mutant ruby- eye (ru) in An. stephensi. After the initial discovery, the mutant green thorax was crossed inter se and pure homozygous stock of the mutant was established. The stock of the mutant ruby- eye, which has been maintained as a pure stock in the laboratory. Crosses were made between the wild type and mutant, green thorax to determine the mode of inheritance of green thorax. For linkage studies, crosses were made between the mutant green thorax and another autosomal recessive mutant ruby-eye. The percentage cross-over was calculated for the genes linkage relationship for gt and gt ru. Results of crosses between mutant and wild type showed that the inheritance of green thorax (gt) in An. stephensi is monofactorial in nature. The gt allele is recessive to wild type and is autosomal. The linkage studies showed no linkage between ru and gt. The mutant gt represents an excellent marker for An. stephensi as it is expressed in late III instar stage of larvae and is prominent in IV instar and pupal stages with complete penetrance and high viability. The said mutant could be easily identified without the aid of a microscope. This mutant can be used extensively to

  3. Genetic Relatedness of Clostridium difficile Isolates from Various Origins Determined by Triple-Locus Sequence Analysis Based on Toxin Regulatory Genes tcdC, tcdR, and cdtR▿

    PubMed Central

    Bouvet, Philippe J. M.; Popoff, Michel R.

    2008-01-01

    A triple-locus nucleotide sequence analysis based on toxin regulatory genes tcdC, tcdR and cdtR was initiated to assess the sequence variability of these genes among Clostridium difficile isolates and to study the genetic relatedness between isolates. A preliminary investigation of the variability of the tcdC gene was done with 57 clinical and veterinary isolates. Twenty-three isolates representing nine main clusters were selected for tcdC, tcdR, and cdtR analysis. The numbers of alleles found for tcdC, tcdR and cdtR were nine, six, and five, respectively. All strains possessed the cdtR gene except toxin A-negative toxin B-positive variants. All but one binary toxin CDT-positive isolate harbored a deletion (>1 bp) in the tcdC gene. The combined analyses of the three genes allowed us to distinguish five lineages correlated with the different types of deletion in tcdC, i.e., 18 bp (associated or not with a deletion at position 117), 36 bp, 39 bp, and 54 bp, and with the wild-type tcdC (no deletion). The tcdR and tcdC genes, though located within the same pathogenicity locus, were found to have evolved separately. Coevolution of the three genes was noted only with strains harboring a 39-bp or a 54-bp deletion in tcdC that formed two homogeneous, separate divergent clusters. Our study supported the existence of the known clones (PCR ribotype 027 isolates and toxin A-negative toxin B-positive C. difficile variants) and evidence for clonality of isolates with a 39-bp deletion (toxinotype V, PCR ribotype 078) that are frequently isolated worldwide from human infections and from food animals. PMID:18832125

  4. Positional dissociation between the genetic mutation responsible for pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib and the associated methylation defect at exon A/B: evidence for a long-range regulatory element within the imprinted GNAS1 locus.

    PubMed

    Bastepe, M; Pincus, J E; Sugimoto, T; Tojo, K; Kanatani, M; Azuma, Y; Kruse, K; Rosenbloom, A L; Koshiyama, H; Jüppner, H

    2001-06-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (PHP-Ib) is a paternally imprinted disorder which maps to a region on chromosome 20q13.3 that comprises GNAS1 at its telomeric boundary. Exon A/B of this gene was recently shown to display a loss of methylation in several PHP-Ib patients. In nine unrelated PHP-Ib kindreds, in whom haplotype analysis and mode of inheritance provided no evidence against linkage to this chromosomal region, we confirmed lack of exon A/B methylation for affected individuals, while unaffected carriers showed no epigenetic abnormality at this locus. However, affected individuals in one kindred (Y2) displayed additional methylation defects involving exons NESP55, AS and XL, and unaffected carriers in this family showed an abnormal methylation at exon NESP55, but not at other exons. Taken together, current evidence thus suggests that distinct mutations within or close to GNAS1 can lead to PHP-Ib and the associated epigenetic changes. To further delineate the telomeric boundary of the PHP-Ib locus, the previously reported kindred F, in which patient F-V/51 is recombinant within GNAS1, was investigated with several new markers and direct nucleotide sequence analysis. These studies revealed that F-V/51 remains recombinant at a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located 1.2 kb upstream of XL. No heterozygous mutation was identified between exon XL and an SNP approximately 8 kb upstream of NESP55, where this affected individual becomes linked, suggesting that the genetic defect responsible for parathyroid hormone resistance in kindred F, and probably other PHP-Ib patients, is located >or=56 kb centromeric of the abnormally methylated exon A/B. A region upstream of the known coding exons of GNAS1 is therefore predicted to exert, presumably through imprinting of exon A/B, long-range effects on G(s)alpha expression.

  5. Sustained NF-kappaB activity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is independent of genetic and epigenetic alterations in the TNFAIP3 (A20) locus.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Lukas P; Claus, Rainer; Plume, Nadine; Schwamb, Janine; Konermann, Carolin; Pallasch, Christian P; Claasen, Julia; Brinker, Reinhild; Wollnik, Bernd; Plass, Christoph; Wendtner, Clemens-Martin

    2011-05-15

    Inappropriate nuclear factor (NF) κB activity is one major hallmark of B-cell malignancies and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). NFκB-dependent genes are involved in antiapoptosis, cell proliferation and metastasis and are responsible for survival and proliferation of tumors. However, the mechanisms of NFκB activity in CLL still need to be elucidated. Previously, we identified translocations in a region on chromosome 6q that encodes tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 3, which is a key player in negative feedback loop regulation of NFκB. Inactivation of this ubiquitin-editing enzyme is involved in immunopathologies and in tumorigenesis. Frequent mutations in the A20 locus--leading to sustained NFκB activity--could be shown to play a dominant role in development of different B-cell malignancies. To check if A20 is involved in upregulation of NFκB activity in CLL, we sequenced Exons 2-9 of the A20 gene in 55 CLL DNA samples. Furthermore, we determined the methylation status of the promoter region in 63 CLL DNA samples and compared to 10 control DNAs of B cells from healthy donors. Contrary to reports from other B-cell malignancies, the A20 region showed neither mutations nor aberrant DNA methylation. Moreover, its expression could be confirmed by immunoblotting and showing comparable results to healthy B cells. These results indicate that malignant development in CLL differs from most of other B-cell malignancies, which show frequent inactivation of A20.

  6. A new three-locus model for rootstock-induced dwarfing in apple revealed by genetic mapping of root bark percentage.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Nicola; Harrison, Richard J; Barber-Perez, Nuria; Cascant-Lopez, Emma; Cobo-Medina, Magdalena; Lipska, Marzena; Conde-Ruíz, Rebeca; Brain, Philip; Gregory, Peter J; Fernández-Fernández, Felicidad

    2016-03-01

    Rootstock-induced dwarfing of apple scions revolutionized global apple production during the twentieth century, leading to the development of modern intensive orchards. A high root bark percentage (the percentage of the whole root area constituted by root cortex) has previously been associated with rootstock-induced dwarfing in apple. In this study, the root bark percentage was measured in a full-sib family of ungrafted apple rootstocks and found to be under the control of three loci. Two quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for root bark percentage were found to co-localize to the same genomic regions on chromosome 5 and chromosome 11 previously identified as controlling dwarfing, Dw1 and Dw2, respectively. A third QTL was identified on chromosome 13 in a region that has not been previously associated with dwarfing. The development of closely linked sequence-tagged site markers improved the resolution of allelic classes, thereby allowing the detection of dominance and epistatic interactions between loci, with high root bark percentage only occurring in specific allelic combinations. In addition, we report a significant negative correlation between root bark percentage and stem diameter (an indicator of tree vigour), measured on a clonally propagated grafted subset of the mapping population. The demonstrated link between root bark percentage and rootstock-induced dwarfing of the scion leads us to propose a three-locus model that is able to explain levels of dwarfing from the dwarf 'M.27' to the semi-invigorating rootstock 'M.116'. Moreover, we suggest that the QTL on chromosome 13 (Rb3) might be analogous to a third dwarfing QTL, Dw3, which has not previously been identified.

  7. A new three-locus model for rootstock-induced dwarfing in apple revealed by genetic mapping of root bark percentage

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Nicola; Harrison, Richard J.; Barber-Perez, Nuria; Cascant-Lopez, Emma; Cobo-Medina, Magdalena; Lipska, Marzena; Conde-Ruíz, Rebeca; Brain, Philip; Gregory, Peter J.; Fernández-Fernández, Felicidad

    2016-01-01

    Rootstock-induced dwarfing of apple scions revolutionized global apple production during the twentieth century, leading to the development of modern intensive orchards. A high root bark percentage (the percentage of the whole root area constituted by root cortex) has previously been associated with rootstock-induced dwarfing in apple. In this study, the root bark percentage was measured in a full-sib family of ungrafted apple rootstocks and found to be under the control of three loci. Two quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for root bark percentage were found to co-localize to the same genomic regions on chromosome 5 and chromosome 11 previously identified as controlling dwarfing, Dw1 and Dw2, respectively. A third QTL was identified on chromosome 13 in a region that has not been previously associated with dwarfing. The development of closely linked sequence-tagged site markers improved the resolution of allelic classes, thereby allowing the detection of dominance and epistatic interactions between loci, with high root bark percentage only occurring in specific allelic combinations. In addition, we report a significant negative correlation between root bark percentage and stem diameter (an indicator of tree vigour), measured on a clonally propagated grafted subset of the mapping population. The demonstrated link between root bark percentage and rootstock-induced dwarfing of the scion leads us to propose a three-locus model that is able to explain levels of dwarfing from the dwarf ‘M.27’ to the semi-invigorating rootstock ‘M.116’. Moreover, we suggest that the QTL on chromosome 13 (Rb3) might be analogous to a third dwarfing QTL, Dw3, which has not previously been identified. PMID:26826217

  8. Genetic variation at the FADS1-FADS2 gene locus influences delta-5 desaturase activity and LC-PUFA proportions after fish oil supplement[S

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hilal, Maryam; AlSaleh, Aseel; Maniou, Zoitsa; Lewis, Fiona J.; Hall, Wendy L.; Sanders, Thomas A. B.; O'Dell, Sandra D.

    2013-01-01

    Delta-5 and delta-6 desaturases (D5D and D6D) are key enzymes in endogenous synthesis of long-chain PUFAs. In this sample of healthy subjects (n = 310), genotypes of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs174537, rs174561, and rs3834458 in the FADS1-FADS2 gene cluster were strongly associated with proportions of LC-PUFAs and desaturase activities estimated in plasma and erythrocytes. Minor allele carriage associated with decreased activities of D5D (FADS1) (5.84 × 10−19 ≤ P ≤ 4.5 × 10−18) and D6D (FADS2) (6.05 × 10−8 ≤ P ≤ 4.20 × 10−7) was accompanied by increased substrate and decreased product proportions (0.05 ≤ P ≤ 2.49 × 10−16). The significance of haplotype association with D5D activity (P = 2.19 × 10−17) was comparable to that of single SNPs, but haplotype association with D6D activity (P = 3.39 × 10−28) was much stronger. In a randomized controlled dietary intervention, increasing eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) intake significantly increased D5D (P = 4.0 × 10−9) and decreased D6D activity (P = 9.16 × 10−6) after doses of 0.45, 0.9, and 1.8 g/day for six months. Interaction of rs174537 genotype with treatment was a determinant of D5D activity estimated in plasma (P = 0.05). In conclusion, different sites at the FADS1-FADS2 locus appear to influence D5D and D6D activity, and rs174537 genotype interacts with dietary EPA+DHA to modulate D5D. PMID:23160180

  9. A low frequency variant within the GWAS locus of MTNR1B affects fasting glucose concentrations: genetic risk is modulated by obesity.

    PubMed

    Been, L F; Hatfield, J L; Shankar, A; Aston, C E; Ralhan, S; Wander, G S; Mehra, N K; Singh, J R; Mulvihill, J J; Sanghera, D K

    2012-11-01

    Two common variants (rs1387153, rs10830963) in MTNR1B have been reported to have independent effects on fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels with increased risk to type 2 diabetes (T2D) in recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS). In this investigation, we report the association of these two variants, and an additional variant (rs1374645) within the GWAS locus of MTNR1B with FBG, 2h glucose, insulin resistance (HOMA IR), β-cell function (HOMA B), and T2D in our sample of Asian Sikhs from India. Our cohort comprised 2222 subjects [1201 T2D, 1021 controls]. None of these SNPs was associated with T2D in this cohort. Our data also could not confirm association of rs1387153 and rs10830963 with FBG phenotype. However, upon stratifying data according to body mass index (BMI) (low ≤ 25 kg/m(2) and high > 25 kg/m(2)) in normoglycemic subjects (n = 1021), the rs1374645 revealed a strong association with low FBG levels in low BMI group (β = -0.073, p = 0.002, Bonferroni p = 0.01) compared to the high BMI group (β = 0.015, p = 0.50). We also detected a strong evidence of interaction between rs1374645 and BMI with respect to FBG levels (p = 0.002). Our data provide new information about the significant impact of another MTNR1B variant on FBG levels that appears to be modulated by BMI. Future confirmation on independent datasets and functional studies will be required to define the role of this variant in fasting glucose variation.

  10. Novel genetic locus implicated for HIV-1 acquisition with putative regulatory links to HIV replication and infectivity: a genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Eric O; Hancock, Dana B; Gaddis, Nathan C; Levy, Joshua L; Page, Grier; Novak, Scott P; Glasheen, Cristie; Saccone, Nancy L; Rice, John P; Moreau, Michael P; Doheny, Kimberly F; Romm, Jane M; Brooks, Andrew I; Aouizerat, Bradley E; Bierut, Laura J; Kral, Alex H

    2015-01-01

    Fifty percent of variability in HIV-1 susceptibility is attributable to host genetics. Thus identifying genetic associations is essential to understanding pathogenesis of HIV-1 and important for targeting drug development. To date, however, CCR5 remains the only gene conclusively associated with HIV acquisition. To identify novel host genetic determinants of HIV-1 acquisition, we conducted a genome-wide association study among a high-risk sample of 3,136 injection drug users (IDUs) from the Urban Health Study (UHS). In addition to being IDUs, HIV-controls were frequency-matched to cases on environmental exposures to enhance detection of genetic effects. We tested independent replication in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (N=2,533). We also examined publicly available gene expression data to link SNPs associated with HIV acquisition to known mechanisms affecting HIV replication/infectivity. Analysis of the UHS nominated eight genetic regions for replication testing. SNP rs4878712 in FRMPD1 met multiple testing correction for independent replication (P=1.38x10(-4)), although the UHS-WIHS meta-analysis p-value did not reach genome-wide significance (P=4.47x10(-7) vs. P<5.0x10(-8)) Gene expression analyses provided promising biological support for the protective G allele at rs4878712 lowering risk of HIV: (1) the G allele was associated with reduced expression of FBXO10 (r=-0.49, P=6.9x10(-5)); (2) FBXO10 is a component of the Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that targets Bcl-2 protein for degradation; (3) lower FBXO10 expression was associated with higher BCL2 expression (r=-0.49, P=8x10(-5)); (4) higher basal levels of Bcl-2 are known to reduce HIV replication and infectivity in human and animal in vitro studies. These results suggest new potential biological pathways by which host genetics affect susceptibility to HIV upon exposure for follow-up in subsequent studies.

  11. Copper(II) and the pathological H50Q α-synuclein mutant: Environment meets genetics

    PubMed Central

    Villar-Piqué, Anna; Rossetti, Giulia; Ventura, Salvador; Carloni, Paolo; Fernández, Claudio O.; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Copper is one of the metals described to bind the Parkinson disease-related protein α-synuclein (aSyn), and to promote its aggregation. Although histidine at position 50 in the aSyn sequence is one of the most studied copper-anchoring sites, its precise role in copper binding and aSyn aggregation is still unclear. Previous studies suggested that this residue does not significantly affect copper-mediated aSyn aggregation. However, our findings showed that the aggregation of the pathological H50Q aSyn mutant is enhanced by copper hints otherwise. Despite the inexistence of a model for aSyn H50Q-copper complexation, we discuss possible mechanisms by which this metal contributes to the misfolding and self-assembly of this particular aSyn mutant. Considering the genetic association of the H50Q mutation with familial forms of Parkinson disease, and the fact that copper homeostasis is deregulated in this disorder, understanding the interplay between both factors will shed light into the molecular and cellular mechanisms triggering the development and spreading of the aSyn pathology. PMID:28289488

  12. Gene Editing and Genetic Lung Disease. Basic Research Meets Therapeutic Application.

    PubMed

    Alapati, Deepthi; Morrisey, Edward E

    2017-03-01

    Although our understanding of the genetics and pathology of congenital lung diseases such as surfactant protein deficiency, cystic fibrosis, and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is extensive, treatment options are lacking. Because the lung is a barrier organ in direct communication with the external environment, targeted delivery of gene corrective technologies to the respiratory system via intratracheal or intranasal routes is an attractive option for therapy. CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing technology is a promising approach to repairing or inactivating disease-causing mutations. Recent reports have provided proof of concept by using CRISPR/Cas9 to successfully repair or inactivate mutations in animal models of monogenic human diseases. Potential pulmonary applications of CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing include gene correction of monogenic diseases in pre- or postnatal lungs and ex vivo gene editing of patient-specific airway stem cells followed by autologous cell transplant. Strategies to enhance gene-editing efficiency and eliminate off-target effects by targeting pulmonary stem/progenitor cells and the assessment of short-term and long-term effects of gene editing are important considerations as the field advances. If methods continue to advance rapidly, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing may provide a novel opportunity to correct monogenic diseases of the respiratory system.

  13. Copper(II) and the pathological H50Q α-synuclein mutant: Environment meets genetics.

    PubMed

    Villar-Piqué, Anna; Rossetti, Giulia; Ventura, Salvador; Carloni, Paolo; Fernández, Claudio O; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming

    2017-01-01

    Copper is one of the metals described to bind the Parkinson disease-related protein α-synuclein (aSyn), and to promote its aggregation. Although histidine at position 50 in the aSyn sequence is one of the most studied copper-anchoring sites, its precise role in copper binding and aSyn aggregation is still unclear. Previous studies suggested that this residue does not significantly affect copper-mediated aSyn aggregation. However, our findings showed that the aggregation of the pathological H50Q aSyn mutant is enhanced by copper hints otherwise. Despite the inexistence of a model for aSyn H50Q-copper complexation, we discuss possible mechanisms by which this metal contributes to the misfolding and self-assembly of this particular aSyn mutant. Considering the genetic association of the H50Q mutation with familial forms of Parkinson disease, and the fact that copper homeostasis is deregulated in this disorder, understanding the interplay between both factors will shed light into the molecular and cellular mechanisms triggering the development and spreading of the aSyn pathology.

  14. Image simulation using LOCUS

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Roberts, J.A.

    1989-09-01

    The LOCUS data base program has been used to simulate images and to solve simple equations. This has been accomplished by making each record (which normally would represent a data entry)represent sequenced or random number pairs.

  15. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, genetic homogeneity, and mapping of the locus within a 2-cM interval

    SciTech Connect

    Ducros, A.; Alamowitch, S.; Nagy, T.

    1996-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a recently identified autosomal dominant cerebral arteriopathy characterized by the recurrence of subcortical infarcts leading to dementia. A genetic linkage analysis conducted in two large families recently allowed us to map the affected gene on chromosome 19 in a 12-cM interval bracketed by D19S221 and D19S215. In the present study, these first 2 families and 13 additional ones, including a total of 199 potentially informative meiosis, have been genotyped with eight polymorphic markers located between D19S221 and D19S215. All families were linked to chromosome 19. The highest combined lod score (Z{sub max} = 37.24 at {theta} = .01) was obtained with marker D19S841, a new CA{sub n} microsatellite marker that we isolated from chromosome 19 cosmids. The recombinant events observed within these families were used to refine the genetic mapping of CADASIL within a 2-cM interval that is now bracketed by D19S226 and D19S199 on 19p13.1. These data strongly suggest the genetic homogeneity of this recently identified condition and establish the value of its clinical and neuroimaging diagnostic criteria. Besides their importance for the ongoing positional cloning of the CADASIL gene, these data help to refine the genetic mapping of CADASIL relative to familial hemiplegic migraine and hereditary paroxysmal cerebellar ataxia, conditions that we both mapped within the same chromosome 19 region. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Genetic map construction and quantitative trait locus (QTL) detection of growth-related traits in Litopenaeus vannamei for selective breeding applications.

    PubMed

    Andriantahina, Farafidy; Liu, Xiaolin; Huang, Hao

    2013-01-01

    Growth is a priority trait from the point of view of genetic improvement. Molecular markers linked to quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been regarded as useful for marker-assisted selection (MAS) in complex traits as growth. Using an intermediate F2 cross of slow and fast growth parents, a genetic linkage map of Pacific whiteleg shrimp, Litopenaeusvannamei, based on amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) and simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers was constructed. Meanwhile, QTL analysis was performed for growth-related traits. The linkage map consisted of 451 marker loci (429 AFLPs and 22 SSRs) which formed 49 linkage groups with an average marker space of 7.6 cM; they spanned a total length of 3627.6 cM, covering 79.50% of estimated genome size. 14 QTLs were identified for growth-related traits, including three QTLs for body weight (BW), total length (TL) and partial carapace length (PCL), two QTLs for body length (BL), one QTL for first abdominal segment depth (FASD), third abdominal segment depth (TASD) and first abdominal segment width (FASW), which explained 2.62 to 61.42% of phenotypic variation. Moreover, comparison of linkage maps between L. vannamei and Penaeusjaponicus was applied, providing a new insight into the genetic base of QTL affecting the growth-related traits. The new results will be useful for conducting MAS breeding schemes in L. vannamei .

  17. Genetic Map Construction and Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) Detection of Six Economic Traits Using an F2 Population of the Hybrid from Saccharina longissima and Saccharina japonica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Tao; Feng, Rongfang; Liu, Cui; Chi, Shan

    2015-01-01

    Saccharina (Laminaria) is one of the most important economic seaweeds. Previously, four genetic linkage maps of Saccharina have been constructed and five QTLs have been identified. However, they were not enough for its breeding. In this work, Saccharina longissima (♀) and Saccharina japonica (♂), which showed obvious differences in morphology and genetics, were applied in hybridization to yield the F2 mapping population with 102 individuals. Using these 102 F2 hybrids, the genetic linkage map of Saccharina was constructed by MapMaker software based on 37 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), 22 sequence-related amplified polymorphisms (SRAPs) and 139 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) markers. Meanwhile, QTL analysis was performed for six economic traits. The linkage map constructed in this research consisted of 422 marker loci (137 AFLPs, 57 SRAPs and 228 SSRs), which formed 45 linkage groups (LGs) with an average marker space of 7.92 cM; they spanned a total length of 2233.1 cM, covering the whole estimated genome size. A total of 29 QTLs were identified for six economic traits, which explained 1.06 to 64.00% of phenotypic variation, including three QTLs for frond length (FL) and raw weight (RW), five QTLs for frond width (FW), two QTLs for frond fascia width (FFW) and frond thickness (FT), and fourteen QTLs for base shape (BS). The results of this research will improve the breeding efficiency and be beneficial for marker-assisted selection (MAS) schemes in Saccharina breeding.

  18. Genetic Map Construction and Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) Detection of Six Economic Traits Using an F2 Population of the Hybrid from Saccharina longissima and Saccharina japonica

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Tao; Feng, Rongfang; Liu, Cui; Chi, Shan

    2015-01-01

    Saccharina (Laminaria) is one of the most important economic seaweeds. Previously, four genetic linkage maps of Saccharina have been constructed and five QTLs have been identified. However, they were not enough for its breeding. In this work, Saccharina longissima (♀) and Saccharina japonica (♂), which showed obvious differences in morphology and genetics, were applied in hybridization to yield the F2 mapping population with 102 individuals. Using these 102 F2 hybrids, the genetic linkage map of Saccharina was constructed by MapMaker software based on 37 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), 22 sequence-related amplified polymorphisms (SRAPs) and 139 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) markers. Meanwhile, QTL analysis was performed for six economic traits. The linkage map constructed in this research consisted of 422 marker loci (137 AFLPs, 57 SRAPs and 228 SSRs), which formed 45 linkage groups (LGs) with an average marker space of 7.92 cM; they spanned a total length of 2233.1 cM, covering the whole estimated genome size. A total of 29 QTLs were identified for six economic traits, which explained 1.06 to 64.00% of phenotypic variation, including three QTLs for frond length (FL) and raw weight (RW), five QTLs for frond width (FW), two QTLs for frond fascia width (FFW) and frond thickness (FT), and fourteen QTLs for base shape (BS). The results of this research will improve the breeding efficiency and be beneficial for marker-assisted selection (MAS) schemes in Saccharina breeding. PMID:26010152

  19. The First Genetic and Comparative Map of White Lupin (Lupinus albus L.): Identification of QTLs for Anthracnose Resistance and Flowering Time, and a Locus for Alkaloid Content

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Huyen T. T.; Ellwood, Simon R.; Adhikari, Kedar; Nelson, Matthew N.; Oliver, Richard P.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract We report the first genetic linkage map of white lupin (Lupinus albus L.). An F8 recombinant inbred line population developed from Kiev mutant × P27174 was mapped with 220 amplified fragment length polymorphism and 105 gene-based markers. The genetic map consists of 28 main linkage groups (LGs) that varied in length from 22.7 cM to 246.5 cM and spanned a total length of 2951 cM. There were seven additional pairs and 15 unlinked markers, and 12.8% of markers showed segregation distortion at P < 0.05. Syntenic relationships between Medicago truncatula and L. albus were complex. Forty-five orthologous markers that mapped between M. truncatula and L. albus identified 17 small syntenic blocks, and each M. truncatula chromosome aligned to between one and six syntenic blocks in L. albus. Genetic mapping of three important traits: anthracnose resistance, flowering time, and alkaloid content allowed loci governing these traits to be defined. Two quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with significant effects were identified for anthracnose resistance on LG4 and LG17, and two QTLs were detected for flowering time on the top of LG1 and LG3. Alkaloid content was mapped as a Mendelian trait to LG11. PMID:17526914

  20. Report on the 6th African Society of Human Genetics (AfSHG) Meeting, March 12–15, 2009, Yaoundé, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Sirugo, Giorgio; Williams, Scott M.; Royal, Charmaine D. M.; Newport, Melanie J.; Hennig, Branwen J.; Mariani-Costantini, Renato; Buonaguro, Franco M.; Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Ibrahim, Muntaser; Soodyall, Himla; Wonkam, Ambroise; Ramesar, Raj; Rotimi, Charles N.

    2010-01-01

    The African Society of Human Genetics (AfSHG), founded in 2003 with its inaugural meeting in Accra, Ghana,1 has the stated missions of (1) disseminating information about human genetics research in Africa, (2) establishing a mentorship network providing educational resources, including the development of appropriate technology transfer, (3) providing advocacy for human genetic research in Africa, and (4) encouraging collaborative research. Despite its young age, the AfSHG has developed a strong cadre of active researchers, both within and outside of Africa, with more than 400 members (from 16 countries across Africa as well as 8 other countries), and has held six successful meetings, five in Africa and one in the United States. PMID:20682860

  1. Specific-locus mutation rates in the mouse following inhalation of ethylene oxide, and application of the results to estimation of human genetic risk.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B; Cumming, R B; Hunsicker, P R

    1984-12-01

    Male (101 X C3H)F1 mice were exposed in an inhalation chamber to ethylene oxide (EtO) in air at a concentration of (generally) 255 ppm. After accumulating total exposures of 101 000 or 150 000 ppm.h in 16-23 weeks, the males were mated to T-stock females for a standard specific-locus mutation-rate study in which 71387 offspring were observed. The spermatogonial stem-cell mutation rate at each exposure level, as well as the combined result, does not differ significantly from the historical control frequency. At the lower and higher exposure levels, the results rule out (at the 5% significance level) an induced frequency that is, respectively, 0.97 and 6.33 times the spontaneous rate; the combined results rule out a multiple of 1.64. The relationship between mouse spermatogonial stem-cell mutation rates and EtO-induced testis ethylations was compared with the relationship between Drosophila post-stem-cell mutation rates and sperm ethylations (Lee, 1980). The comparison does not rule out equal mutability per ethylation; but it cannot prove parallelism. An assessment of the mouse-Drosophila relationship will require a more efficient alkylator than EtO and the use of comparable germ-cell stages. More meaningful conclusions may be drawn by utilizing the data for direct estimation of human risk by expressing the induced mutation frequency that is ruled out (at the 5% significance level) as a multiple of control rate and extrapolating to human exposure levels. The probable absence of major stem-cell killing (and thus, possibly, cell selection) by EtO indicates that such extrapolation probably does not produce an underestimate. For a human exposure concentration of 0.1 ppm on working days during the reproductive lifespan, the mouse experimental results rule out (at the 5% significance level) an induced spermatogonial stem-cell gene mutation rate greater than 8% of the spontaneous rate; for 1.0 ppm, they rule out an induced rate roughly equal to the spontaneous rate. The

  2. Identification of shared genetic susceptibility locus for coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity: a meta-analysis of genome-wide studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chaoneng; Gong, Yunguo; Yuan, Jie; Gong, Hui; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2012-06-14

    Type 2 diabetes (2DM), obesity, and coronary artery disease (CAD) are frequently coexisted being as key components of metabolic syndrome. Whether there is shared genetic background underlying these diseases remained unclear. We performed a meta-analysis of 35 genome screens for 2DM, 36 for obesity or body mass index (BMI)-defined obesity, and 21 for CAD using genome search meta-analysis (GSMA), which combines linkage results to identify regions with only weak evidence and provide genetic interactions among different diseases. For each study, 120 genomic bins of approximately 30 cM were defined and ranked according to the best linkage evidence within each bin. For each disease, bin 6.2 achieved genomic significanct evidence, and bin 9.3, 10.5, 16.3 reached suggestive level for 2DM. Bin 11.2 and 16.3, and bin 10.5 and 9.3, reached suggestive evidence for obesity and CAD respectively. In pooled all three diseases, bin 9.3 and 6.5 reached genomic significant and suggestive evidence respectively, being relatively much weaker for 2DM/CAD or 2DM/obesity or CAD/obesity. Further, genomewide significant evidence was observed of bin 16.3 and 4.5 for 2DM/obesity, which is decreased when CAD was added. These findings indicated that bin 9.3 and 6.5 are most likely to be shared by 2DM, obesity and CAD. And bin 16.3 and 4.5 are potentially common regions to 2DM and obesity only. The observed shared susceptibility regions imply a partly overlapping genetic aspects of disease development. Fine scanning of these regions will definitely identify more susceptibility genes and causal variants.

  3. The HIF1A functional genetic polymorphism at locus +1772 associates with progression to metastatic prostate cancer and refractoriness to hormonal castration.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Avelino; Ribeiro, Ricardo; Príncipe, Paulo; Lobato, Carlos; Pina, Francisco; Maurício, Joaquina; Monteiro, Cátia; Sousa, Hugo; Calais da Silva, F; Lopes, Carlos; Medeiros, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1a) is a key regulator of tumour cell response to hypoxia, orchestrating mechanisms known to be involved in cancer aggressiveness and metastatic behaviour. In this study we sought to evaluate the association of a functional genetic polymorphism in HIF1A with overall and metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) risk and with response to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). The HIF1A +1772 C>T (rs11549465) polymorphism was genotyped, using DNA isolated from peripheral blood, in 1490 male subjects (754 with prostate cancer and 736 controls cancer-free) through Real-Time PCR. A nested group of cancer patients who were eligible for androgen deprivation therapy was followed up. Univariate and multivariate models were used to analyse the response to hormonal treatment and the risk for developing distant metastasis. Age-adjusted odds ratios were calculated to evaluate prostate cancer risk. Our results showed that patients under ADT carrying the HIF1A +1772 T-allele have increased risk for developing distant metastasis (OR, 2.0; 95%CI, 1.1-3.9) and an independent 6-fold increased risk for resistance to ADT after multivariate analysis (OR, 6.0; 95%CI, 2.2-16.8). This polymorphism was not associated with increased risk for being diagnosed with prostate cancer (OR, 0.9; 95%CI, 0.7-1.2). The HIF1A +1772 genetic polymorphism predicts a more aggressive prostate cancer behaviour, supporting the involvement of HIF1a in prostate cancer biological progression and ADT resistance. Molecular profiles using hypoxia markers may help predict clinically relevant prostate cancer and response to ADT.

  4. A haplotype at the UCP1 gene locus contributes to genetic risk for type 2 diabetes in Asian Indians (CURES-72).

    PubMed

    Vimaleswaran, Karani S; Radha, Venkatesan; Ghosh, Saurabh; Majumder, Partha P; Rao, M R S; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2010-02-01

    The gene encoding for uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) is considered to be a candidate gene for type 2 diabetes because of its role in thermogenesis and energy expenditure. The objective of the study was to examine whether genetic variations in the UCP1 gene are associated with type 2 diabetes and its related traits in Asian Indians. The study subjects, 810 type 2 diabetic subjects and 990 normal glucose tolerant (NGT) subjects, were chosen from the Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiological Study (CURES), an ongoing population-based study in southern India. The polymorphisms were genotyped using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) was estimated from the estimates of haplotypic frequencies. The three polymorphisms, namely -3826A-->G, an A-->C transition in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and Met229Leu, were not associated with type 2 diabetes. However, the frequency of the A-C-Met (-3826A-->G-5'UTR A-->C-Met229Leu) haplotype was significantly higher among the type 2 diabetic subjects (2.67%) compared with the NGT subjects (1.45%, P < 0.01). The odds ratio for type 2 diabetes for the individuals carrying the haplotype A-C-Met was 1.82 (95% confidence interval, 1.29-2.78, P = 0.009). The haplotype, A-C-Met, in the UCP1 gene is significantly associated with the increased genetic risk for developing type 2 diabetes in Asian Indians.

  5. Genetic Analysis Using an Isogenic Mating Pair of Aspergillus fumigatus Identifies Azole Resistance Genes and Lack of MAT Locus's Role in Virulence.

    PubMed

    Losada, Liliana; Sugui, Janyce A; Eckhaus, Michael A; Chang, Yun C; Mounaud, Stephanie; Figat, Abigail; Joardar, Vinita; Pakala, Suman B; Pakala, Suchitra; Venepally, Pratap; Fedorova, Natalie; Nierman, William C; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J

    2015-04-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) due to Aspergillus fumigatus is a major cause of mortality in immunocompromised patients. The discovery of highly fertile strains of A. fumigatus opened the possibility to merge classical and contemporary genetics to address key questions about this pathogen. The merger involves sexual recombination, selection of desired traits, and genomics to identify any associated loci. We constructed a highly fertile isogenic pair of A. fumigatus strains with opposite mating types and used them to investigate whether mating type is associated with virulence and to find the genetic loci involved in azole resistance. The pair was made isogenic by 9 successive backcross cycles of the foundational strain AFB62 (MAT1-1) with a highly fertile (MAT1-2) progeny. Genome sequencing showed that the F9 MAT1-2 progeny was essentially identical to the AFB62. The survival curves of animals infected with either strain in three different animal models showed no significant difference, suggesting that virulence in A. fumigatus was not associated with mating type. We then employed a relatively inexpensive, yet highly powerful strategy to identify genomic loci associated with azole resistance. We used traditional in vitro drug selection accompanied by classical sexual crosses of azole-sensitive with resistant isogenic strains. The offspring were plated under varying drug concentrations and pools of resulting colonies were analyzed by whole genome sequencing. We found that variants in 5 genes contributed to azole resistance, including mutations in erg11A (cyp51A), as well as multi-drug transporters, erg25, and in HMG-CoA reductase. The results demonstrated that with minimal investment into the sequencing of three pools from a cross of interest, the variation(s) that contribute any phenotype can be identified with nucleotide resolution. This approach can be applied to multiple areas of interest in A. fumigatus or other heterothallic pathogens, especially for virulence

  6. Genetic interactions between diverged alleles of Early heading date 1 (Ehd1) and Heading date 3a (Hd3a)/ RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (RFT1) control differential heading and contribute to regional adaptation in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Chen, Hongyi; Ren, Ding; Tang, Huiwu; Qiu, Rong; Feng, Jinglei; Long, Yunming; Niu, Baixiao; Chen, Danping; Zhong, Tianyu; Liu, Yao-Guang; Guo, Jingxin

    2015-11-01

    Initiation of flowering, also called heading, in rice (Oryza sativa) is determined by the florigens encoded by Heading date 3a (Hd3a) and RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (RFT1). Early heading date 1 (Ehd1) regulates Hd3a and RFT1. However, different rice varieties have diverged alleles of Ehd1 and Hd3a/RFT1 and their genetic interactions remain largely unclear. Here we generated three segregating populations for different combinations of diverged Ehd1 and Hd3a/RFT1 alleles, and analyzed their genetic interactions between these alleles. We demonstrated that, in an ehd1 mutant background, Hd3a was silenced, but RFT1 was expressed (although at lower levels than in plants with a functional Ehd1) under short-day (SD) and long-day (LD) conditions. We identified a nonfunctional RFT1 allele (rft1); the lines carrying homozygous ehd1 and Hd3a/rft1 failed to induce the floral transition under SD and LD conditions. Like Hd3a, RFT1 also interacted with 14-3-3 proteins, the florigen receptors, but a nonfunctional RFT1 with a crucial E105K mutation failed to interact with 14-3-3 proteins. Furthermore, analyses of sequence variation and geographic distribution suggested that functional RFT1 alleles were selected during rice adaptation to high-latitude regions. Our results demonstrate the important roles of RFT1 in rice flowering and regional adaptation. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  8. Suppressor T-cell factor(s) display an altered pattern of Igh (immunoglobulin heavy chain locus) genetic restriction when developed in an Igh-congeneic host

    SciTech Connect

    HayGlass, K.T.; Naides, S.J.; Benacerraf, B.; Sy, M.S.

    1985-04-01

    Suppressor T cell factor(s) (TsF/sub 1/) inhibit the in vivo priming of azobenzenearsonate-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses. The activity of TsF/sub 1/ is restricted by genes linked to Igh-1 allotypic markers. TsF/sub 1/ obtained from B6.Igh-1/sup n/ mice was unable to suppress the immune response in B6.Igh-1/sup b/ mice and vice versa. However, TsF/sub 1/ prepared from B6.Igh-1/sup n/ T cells parked in an Igh-congeneic B6.Igh-1/sup b/ environment displays an additional restriction specificity of the host. Thus, TsF/sub 1/ prepared from these Igh-chimeric mice suppressed immune responses in both B6.Igh-1/sup n/ (donor) and B6.Igh-1/sup b/ (recipient) mice but not in mice of the unrelated strain BALB/c.Igh-1/sup a/. The results indicate that the establishment of the suppressor T-cell repertoire is dependent not only upon the genetic background of the individual T cell but also upon the influence of Igh-linked determinants present when T-cell clones are selected during the response.

  9. Suppressor T-cell factor(s) display an altered pattern of Igh (immunoglobulin heavy chain locus) genetic restriction when developed in an Igh-congeneic host.

    PubMed

    HayGlass, K T; Naides, S J; Benacerraf, B; Sy, M S

    1985-04-01

    Suppressor T-cell factor(s) (TsF1) inhibit the in vivo priming of azobenzenearsonate-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses. The activity of TsF1 is restricted by genes linked to Igh-1 allotypic markers. TsF1 obtained from B6.Igh-1n mice was unable to suppress the immune response in B6.Igh-1b mice and vice versa. However, TsF1 prepared from B6.Igh-1n T cells "parked" in an Igh-congeneic B6.Igh-1b environment displays an additional restriction specificity of the host. Thus, TsF1 prepared from these Igh-chimeric mice suppressed immune responses in both B6.Igh-1n (donor) and B6.Igh-1b (recipient) mice but not in mice of the unrelated strain BALB/c.Igh-1a. The results indicate that the establishment of the suppressor T-cell repertoire is dependent not only upon the genetic background of the individual T cell but also upon the influence of Igh-linked determinants present when T-cell clones are selected during the response.

  10. Suppressor T-cell factor(s) display an altered pattern of Igh (immunoglobulin heavy chain locus) genetic restriction when developed in an Igh-congeneic host.

    PubMed Central

    HayGlass, K T; Naides, S J; Benacerraf, B; Sy, M S

    1985-01-01

    Suppressor T-cell factor(s) (TsF1) inhibit the in vivo priming of azobenzenearsonate-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses. The activity of TsF1 is restricted by genes linked to Igh-1 allotypic markers. TsF1 obtained from B6.Igh-1n mice was unable to suppress the immune response in B6.Igh-1b mice and vice versa. However, TsF1 prepared from B6.Igh-1n T cells "parked" in an Igh-congeneic B6.Igh-1b environment displays an additional restriction specificity of the host. Thus, TsF1 prepared from these Igh-chimeric mice suppressed immune responses in both B6.Igh-1n (donor) and B6.Igh-1b (recipient) mice but not in mice of the unrelated strain BALB/c.Igh-1a. The results indicate that the establishment of the suppressor T-cell repertoire is dependent not only upon the genetic background of the individual T cell but also upon the influence of Igh-linked determinants present when T-cell clones are selected during the response. PMID:3920661

  11. Association of DNA Methylation at CPT1A Locus with Metabolic Syndrome in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN) Study.

    PubMed

    Das, Mithun; Sha, Jin; Hidalgo, Bertha; Aslibekyan, Stella; Do, Anh N; Zhi, Degui; Sun, Dianjianyi; Zhang, Tao; Li, Shengxu; Chen, Wei; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Tiwari, Hemant K; Absher, Devin; Ordovas, Jose M; Berenson, Gerald S; Arnett, Donna K; Irvin, Marguerite R

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we conducted an epigenome-wide association study of metabolic syndrome (MetS) among 846 participants of European descent in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN). DNA was isolated from CD4+ T cells and methylation at ~470,000 cytosine-phosphate-guanine dinucleotide (CpG) pairs was assayed using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. We modeled the percentage methylation at individual CpGs as a function of MetS using linear mixed models. A Bonferroni-corrected P-value of 1.1 x 10(-7) was considered significant. Methylation at two CpG sites in CPT1A on chromosome 11 was significantly associated with MetS (P for cg00574958 = 2.6x10(-14) and P for cg17058475 = 1.2x10(-9)). Significant associations were replicated in both European and African ancestry participants of the Bogalusa Heart Study. Our findings suggest that methylation in CPT1A is a promising epigenetic marker for MetS risk which could become useful as a treatment target in the future.

  12. Genetic background (DDD/Sgn versus C57BL/6J) strongly influences postnatal growth of male mice carrying the A(y) allele at the agouti locus: identification of quantitative trait loci associated with diabetes and body weight loss.

    PubMed

    Suto, Jun-ichi; Satou, Kunio

    2013-05-04

    Mice carrying the A(y) allele at the agouti locus become obese and are heavier than their non-A(y) littermates. However, this does not hold true for the genetic background of the DDD mouse strain. At 22 weeks of age, DDD.Cg-A(y) females are heavier than DDD females, whereas DDD.Cg-A(y) males are lighter than DDD males. This study aimed to determine the possible cause and identify the genes responsible for the lower body weight of DDD.Cg-A(y) males. Growth curves of DDD.Cg-A(y) mice were analyzed and compared with those of B6.Cg-A(y) mice from 5 to 25 weeks. In DDD.Cg-A(y) males, body weight gain stopped between 16 and 17 weeks and the body weight gradually decreased; thus, the lower body weight was a consequence of body weight loss. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed in backcrossed (BC) males of DDD × (B6 × DDD.Cg-A(y)) F(1)-A(y) mice. For the body weight at 25 weeks, significant QTLs were identified on chromosomes 1 and 4. The DDD allele was associated with a lower body weight at both loci. In particular, the QTL on chromosome 4 interacted with the A(y) allele. Furthermore, suggestive QTLs for plasma glucose and high molecular weight adiponectin levels were coincidentally mapped to chromosome 4. The DDD allele was associated with increased glucose and decreased adiponectin levels. When the body weight at 25 weeks and plasma glucose levels were considered as dependent and independent variables, respectively, BC A(y) males were classified into two groups according to statistical analysis using the partition method. Mice of one group had significantly higher glucose and lower adiponectin levels than those of the other group and exhibited body weight loss as observed with DDD-A(y) males. The lower body weight of DDD.Cg-A(y) male mice was a consequence of body weight loss. Diabetes mellitus has been suggested to be a possible contributory factor causing body weight loss. The QTL on distal chromosome 4 contained the major responsible genes. This QTL

  13. Genetic background (DDD/Sgn versus C57BL/6J) strongly influences postnatal growth of male mice carrying the Ay allele at the agouti locus: identification of quantitative trait loci associated with diabetes and body weight loss

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mice carrying the Ay allele at the agouti locus become obese and are heavier than their non-Ay littermates. However, this does not hold true for the genetic background of the DDD mouse strain. At 22 weeks of age, DDD.Cg-Ay females are heavier than DDD females, whereas DDD.Cg-Ay males are lighter than DDD males. This study aimed to determine the possible cause and identify the genes responsible for the lower body weight of DDD.Cg-Ay males. Results Growth curves of DDD.Cg-Ay mice were analyzed and compared with those of B6.Cg-Ay mice from 5 to 25 weeks. In DDD.Cg-Ay males, body weight gain stopped between 16 and 17 weeks and the body weight gradually decreased; thus, the lower body weight was a consequence of body weight loss. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed in backcrossed (BC) males of DDD × (B6 × DDD.Cg-Ay) F1-Ay mice. For the body weight at 25 weeks, significant QTLs were identified on chromosomes 1 and 4. The DDD allele was associated with a lower body weight at both loci. In particular, the QTL on chromosome 4 interacted with the Ay allele. Furthermore, suggestive QTLs for plasma glucose and high molecular weight adiponectin levels were coincidentally mapped to chromosome 4. The DDD allele was associated with increased glucose and decreased adiponectin levels. When the body weight at 25 weeks and plasma glucose levels were considered as dependent and independent variables, respectively, BC Ay males were classified into two groups according to statistical analysis using the partition method. Mice of one group had significantly higher glucose and lower adiponectin levels than those of the other group and exhibited body weight loss as observed with DDD-Ay males. Conclusions The lower body weight of DDD.Cg-Ay male mice was a consequence of body weight loss. Diabetes mellitus has been suggested to be a possible contributory factor causing body weight loss. The QTL on distal chromosome 4 contained the major responsible genes

  14. Rapporteur summaries of plenary, symposia, and oral sessions from the XXIIIrd World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics Meeting in Toronto, Canada, 16-20 October 2015.

    PubMed

    Zai, Gwyneth; Alberry, Bonnie; Arloth, Janine; Bánlaki, Zsófia; Bares, Cristina; Boot, Erik; Camilo, Caroline; Chadha, Kartikay; Chen, Qi; Cole, Christopher B; Cost, Katherine T; Crow, Megan; Ekpor, Ibene; Fischer, Sascha B; Flatau, Laura; Gagliano, Sarah; Kirli, Umut; Kukshal, Prachi; Labrie, Viviane; Lang, Maren; Lett, Tristram A; Maffioletti, Elisabetta; Maier, Robert; Mihaljevic, Marina; Mittal, Kirti; Monson, Eric T; O'Brien, Niamh L; Østergaard, Søren D; Ovenden, Ellen; Patel, Sejal; Peterson, Roseann E; Pouget, Jennie G; Rovaris, Diego L; Seaman, Lauren; Shankarappa, Bhagya; Tsetsos, Fotis; Vereczkei, Andrea; Wang, Chenyao; Xulu, Khethelo; Yuen, Ryan K C; Zhao, Jingjing; Zai, Clement C; Kennedy, James L

    2016-12-01

    The XXIIIrd World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics meeting, sponsored by the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics, was held in Toronto, ON, Canada, on 16-20 October 2015. Approximately 700 participants attended to discuss the latest state-of-the-art findings in this rapidly advancing and evolving field. The following report was written by trainee travel awardees. Each was assigned one session as a rapporteur. This manuscript represents the highlights and topics that were covered in the plenary sessions, symposia, and oral sessions during the conference, and contains major notable and new findings.

  15. Quantitative trait locus mapping based on resampling in a vast maize testcross experiment and its relevance to quantitative genetics for complex traits.

    PubMed

    Schön, Chris C; Utz, H Friedrich; Groh, Susanne; Truberg, Bernd; Openshaw, Steve; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2004-05-01

    From simulation studies it is known that the allocation of experimental resources has a crucial effect on power of QTL detection as well as on accuracy and precision of QTL estimates. In this study, we used a very large experimental data set composed of 976 F(5) maize testcross progenies evaluated in 19 environments and cross-validation to assess the effect of sample size (N), number of test environments (E), and significance threshold on the number of detected QTL, the proportion of the genotypic variance explained by them, and the corresponding bias of estimates for grain yield, grain moisture, and plant height. In addition, we used computer simulations to compare the usefulness of two cross-validation schemes for obtaining unbiased estimates of QTL effects. The maximum, validated genotypic variance explained by QTL in this study was 52.3% for grain moisture despite the large number of detected QTL, thus confirming the infinitesimal model of quantitative genetics. In both simulated and experimental data, the effect of sample size on power of QTL detection as well as on accuracy and precision of QTL estimates was large. The number of detected QTL and the proportion of genotypic variance explained by QTL generally increased more with increasing N than with increasing E. The average bias of QTL estimates and its range were reduced by increasing N and E. Cross-validation performed well with respect to yielding asymptotically unbiased estimates of the genotypic variance explained by QTL. On the basis of our findings, recommendations for planning of QTL mapping experiments and allocation of experimental resources are given.

  16. Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping for Verticillium wilt Resistance in an Upland Cotton Recombinant Inbred Line Using SNP-Based High Density Genetic Map

    PubMed Central

    Palanga, Koffi Kibalou; Jamshed, Muhammad; Rashid, Md. Harun or; Gong, Juwu; Li, Junwen; Iqbal, Muhammad Sajid; Liu, Aiying; Shang, Haihong; Shi, Yuzhen; Chen, Tingting; Ge, Qun; Zhang, Zhen; Dilnur, Tussipkan; Li, Weijie; Li, Pengtao; Gong, Wankui; Yuan, Youlu

    2017-01-01

    Verticillium wilt (VW) caused by Verticillium dahlia Kleb is one of the most destructive diseases of cotton. Numerous efforts have been made to improve the resistance of upland cotton against VW, with little progress achieved due to the paucity of upland cotton breeding germplasms with high level of resistance to VW. Gossypium barbadense was regarded as more resistant compared to upland cotton; however, it is difficult to apply the resistance from G. barbadense to upland cotton improvement because of the hybrid breakdown and the difficulty to fix resistant phenotype in their interspecific filial. Here we reported QTLs related to VW resistance identified in upland cotton based on 1 year experiment in greenhouse with six replications and 4 years investigations in field with two replications each year. In total, 119 QTLs of disease index (DI) and of disease incidence (DInc) were identified on 25 chromosome of cotton genome except chromosome 13 (c13). For DI, 62 QTLs explaining 3.7–12.2% of the observed phenotypic variations were detected on 24 chromosomes except c11 and c13. For DInc, 59 QTLs explaining 2.3–21.30% of the observed PV were identified on 19 chromosomes except c5, c8, c12-c13, c18-c19, and c26. Seven DI QTLs were detected to be stable in at least environments, among which six have sGK9708 alleles, while 28 DInc QTLs were detected to be stable in at least environments. Eighteen QTL clusters containing 40 QTLs were identified on 13 chromosomes (c1-c4, c6-c7, c10, c14, c17 c20-c22, and c24-c25). Most of the stable QTLs aggregated into these clusters. These QTLs and clusters identification can be an important step toward Verticillium wilt resistant gene cloning in upland cotton and provide useful information to understand the complex genetic bases of Verticillium wilt resistance. PMID:28424708

  17. Development of a multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat typing scheme for genetic fingerprinting of Burkholderia cenocepacia and application to nationwide epidemiological analysis.

    PubMed

    Segonds, Christine; Thouverez, Michelle; Barthe, Antoine; Bossuet-Greif, Nadège; Tisseyre, Lenka; Plésiat, Patrick; Vergnaud, Gilles; Chabanon, Gérard; Pourcel, Christine

    2015-02-01

    Organisms of the Burkholderia cepacia complex are especially important pathogens in cystic fibrosis (CF), with a propensity for patient-to-patient spread and long-term respiratory colonization. B. cenocepacia and Burkholderia multivorans account for the majority of infections in CF, and major epidemic clones have been recognized throughout the world. The aim of the present study was to develop and evaluate a multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) scheme for B. cenocepacia. Potential VNTR loci were identified upon analysis of the annotated genome sequences of B. cenocepacia strains AU1054, J2315, and MCO-3, and 10 of them were selected on the basis of polymorphisms and size. A collection of 100 B. cenocepacia strains, including epidemiologically related and unrelated strains, as well as representatives of the major epidemic lineages, was used to evaluate typeability, epidemiological concordance, and the discriminatory power of MLVA-10 compared with those of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Longitudinal stability was assessed by testing 39 successive isolates from 14 patients. Typeability ranged from 0.91 to 1, except for that of one marker, which was not amplified in 53% of the B. cenocepacia IIIA strains. The MLVA types were shown to be stable in chronically colonized patients and within outbreak-related strains, with excellent epidemiological concordance. Epidemic and/or globally distributed lineages (epidemic Edinburgh-Toronto electrophoretic type 12 [ET-12], sequence type 32 [ST-32], ST-122, ST-234, and ST-241) were successfully identified. Conversely, the discriminatory power of MLVA was lower than that of PFGE or MLST, although PFGE variations within the epidemic lineages sometimes masked their genetic relatedness. In conclusion, MLVA represents a promising cost-effective first-line tool in B. cenocepacia surveillance.

  18. Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping for Verticillium wilt Resistance in an Upland Cotton Recombinant Inbred Line Using SNP-Based High Density Genetic Map.

    PubMed

    Palanga, Koffi Kibalou; Jamshed, Muhammad; Rashid, Md Harun Or; Gong, Juwu; Li, Junwen; Iqbal, Muhammad Sajid; Liu, Aiying; Shang, Haihong; Shi, Yuzhen; Chen, Tingting; Ge, Qun; Zhang, Zhen; Dilnur, Tussipkan; Li, Weijie; Li, Pengtao; Gong, Wankui; Yuan, Youlu

    2017-01-01

    Verticillium wilt (VW) caused by Verticillium dahlia Kleb is one of the most destructive diseases of cotton. Numerous efforts have been made to improve the resistance of upland cotton against VW, with little progress achieved due to the paucity of upland cotton breeding germplasms with high level of resistance to VW. Gossypium barbadense was regarded as more resistant compared to upland cotton; however, it is difficult to apply the resistance from G. barbadense to upland cotton improvement because of the hybrid breakdown and the difficulty to fix resistant phenotype in their interspecific filial. Here we reported QTLs related to VW resistance identified in upland cotton based on 1 year experiment in greenhouse with six replications and 4 years investigations in field with two replications each year. In total, 119 QTLs of disease index (DI) and of disease incidence (DInc) were identified on 25 chromosome of cotton genome except chromosome 13 (c13). For DI, 62 QTLs explaining 3.7-12.2% of the observed phenotypic variations were detected on 24 chromosomes except c11 and c13. For DInc, 59 QTLs explaining 2.3-21.30% of the observed PV were identified on 19 chromosomes except c5, c8, c12-c13, c18-c19, and c26. Seven DI QTLs were detected to be stable in at least environments, among which six have sGK9708 alleles, while 28 DInc QTLs were detected to be stable in at least environments. Eighteen QTL clusters containing 40 QTLs were identified on 13 chromosomes (c1-c4, c6-c7, c10, c14, c17 c20-c22, and c24-c25). Most of the stable QTLs aggregated into these clusters. These QTLs and clusters identification can be an important step toward Verticillium wilt resistant gene cloning in upland cotton and provide useful information to understand the complex genetic bases of Verticillium wilt resistance.

  19. The IGF2 Locus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a peptide hormone regulating various cellular processes such as proliferation and apoptosis. IGF2 is vital to embryo development. The IGF2 locus covers approximately 150-kb genomic region on human chromosome 11, containing two imprinted genes, IGF2 and H19, sha...

  20. Genetic Analysis of Strawberry Fruit Aroma and Identification of O-Methyltransferase FaOMT as the Locus Controlling Natural Variation in Mesifurane Content1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zorrilla-Fontanesi, Yasmín; Rambla, José-Luis; Cabeza, Amalia; Medina, Juan J.; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F.; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Botella, Miguel A.; Granell, Antonio; Amaya, Iraida

    2012-01-01

    Improvement of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruit flavor is an important goal in breeding programs. To investigate genetic factors controlling this complex trait, a strawberry mapping population derived from genotype ‘1392’, selected for its superior flavor, and ‘232’ was profiled for volatile compounds over 4 years by headspace solid phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. More than 300 volatile compounds were detected, of which 87 were identified by comparison of mass spectrum and retention time to those of pure standards. Parental line ‘1392’ displayed higher volatile levels than ‘232’, and these and many other compounds with similar levels in both parents segregated in the progeny. Cluster analysis grouped the volatiles into distinct chemically related families and revealed a complex metabolic network underlying volatile production in strawberry fruit. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) detection was carried out over 3 years based on a double pseudo-testcross strategy. Seventy QTLs covering 48 different volatiles were detected, with several of them being stable over time and mapped as major QTLs. Loci controlling γ-decalactone and mesifurane content were mapped as qualitative traits. Using a candidate gene approach we have assigned genes that are likely responsible for several of the QTLs. As a proof of concept we show that one homoeolog of the O-methyltransferase gene (FaOMT) is the locus responsible for the natural variation of mesifurane content. Sequence analysis identified 30 bp in the promoter of this FaOMT homoeolog containing putative binding sites for basic/helix-loop-helix, MYB, and BZIP transcription factors. This polymorphism fully cosegregates with both the presence of mesifurane and the high expression of FaOMT during ripening. PMID:22474217

  1. Genome-Wide Linkage Screen for Systolic Blood Pressure in the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES) of Mexican-Americans and Confirmation of a Major Susceptibility Locus on Chromosome 6q14.1

    PubMed Central

    Puppala, Sobha; Coletta, Dawn K.; Schneider, Jennifer; Hu, Shirley L.; Farook, Vidya S.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Arya, Rector; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Jenkinson, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Hypertension or high blood pressure is a strong correlate of diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. We conducted a genome-wide linkage screen to identify susceptibility genes influencing systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Mexican-Americans from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES). Methods Using data from 1,089 individuals distributed across 266 families, we performed a multipoint linkage analysis to localize susceptibility loci for SBP and DBP by applying two models. In model 1, we added a sensible constant to the observed BP values in treated subjects [Tobin et al.; Stat Med 2005;24:2911–2935] to account for antihypertensive use (i.e. 15 and 10 mm Hg to SBP and DBP values, respectively). In model 2, we fixed values of 140 mm Hg for SBP and 90 mm Hg for DBP, if the treated values were less than the standard referenced treatment thresholds of 140/90 mm Hg for hypertensive status. However, if the observed treated BP values were found to be above these standard treatment thresholds, the actual observed treated BP values were retained in order not to reduce them by substitution of the treatment threshold values. Results The multipoint linkage analysis revealed strong linkage signals for SBP compared with DBP. The strongest evidence for linkage of SBP (model 1, LOD = 5.0; model 2, LOD = 3.6) was found on chromosome 6q14.1 near the marker D6S1031 (89 cM) in both models. In addition, some evidence for SBP linkage occurred on chromosomes 1q, 4p, and 16p. Most importantly, our major SBP linkage finding on chromosome 6q near marker D6S1031 was independently confirmed in a Caucasian population (LOD = 3.3). In summary, our study found evidence for a major locus on chromosome 6q influencing SBP levels in Mexican-Americans. PMID:21293138

  2. Allelic Variation within the Emv-15 Locus Defines Genomic Sequences Closely Linked to the agouti Locus on Mouse Chromosome 2

    PubMed Central

    Siracusa, Linda D.; Russell, Liane B.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.

    1987-01-01

    Gene(s) at the agouti locus act within the microenvironment of the hair follicle to switch pigment synthesis in the melanocyte between eumelanin (black or brown pigment) and phaeomelanin (yellow pigment). Many phenotypic variants of this locus have been described. The mechanism(s) of gene action causing such variation in coat-color phenotype is not known. The close linkage of an endogenous ecotropic murine leukemia provirus, Emv-15 , to the lethal yellow mutation of the agouti locus provides a means to molecularly access genes at or near the agouti locus. We have identified and used a unique mouse sequence flanking the Emv-15 provirus to define three alleles of the Emv-15 locus. We found a correlation between the presence of specific Emv-15 alleles and the origins of specific agouti locus mutations, confirming close linkage. However, we found some exceptions which suggest that the Emv-15 locus is closely linked to, but genetically separable from, the agouti locus. PMID:2822532

  3. History of the discovery of a master locus producing piRNAs: the flamenco/COM locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Coline, Goriaux; Théron, Emmanuelle; Brasset, Emilie; Vaury, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of transposable elements (TEs) in the 1950s by B. McClintock implied the existence of cellular regulatory systems controlling TE activity. The discovery of flamenco (flam) an heterochromatic locus from Drosophila melanogaster and its ability to survey several TEs such as gypsy, ZAM, and Idefix contributed to peer deeply into the mechanisms of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of TEs. flam was the first cluster producing small RNAs to be discovered long before RNAi pathways were identified in 1998. As a result of the detailed genetic analyses performed by certain laboratories and of the sophisticated genetic tools they developed, this locus has played a major role in our understanding of piRNA mediated TE repression in animals. Here we review the first discovery of this locus and retrace decades of studies that led to our current understanding of the relationship between genomes and their TE targets. PMID:25136352

  4. History of the discovery of a master locus producing piRNAs: the flamenco/COM locus in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Goriaux, Coline; Théron, Emmanuelle; Brasset, Emilie; Vaury, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of transposable elements (TEs) in the 1950s by B. McClintock implied the existence of cellular regulatory systems controlling TE activity. The discovery of flamenco (flam) an heterochromatic locus from Drosophila melanogaster and its ability to survey several TEs such as gypsy, ZAM, and Idefix contributed to peer deeply into the mechanisms of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of TEs. flam was the first cluster producing small RNAs to be discovered long before RNAi pathways were identified in 1998. As a result of the detailed genetic analyses performed by certain laboratories and of the sophisticated genetic tools they developed, this locus has played a major role in our understanding of piRNA mediated TE repression in animals. Here we review the first discovery of this locus and retrace decades of studies that led to our current understanding of the relationship between genomes and their TE targets.

  5. Detecting purely epistatic multi-locus interactions by an omnibus permutation test on ensembles of two-locus analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wongseree, Waranyu; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Piroonratana, Theera; Sinsomros, Saravudh; Limwongse, Chanin; Chaiyaratana, Nachol

    2009-01-01

    Background Purely epistatic multi-locus interactions cannot generally be detected via single-locus analysis in case-control studies of complex diseases. Recently, many two-locus and multi-locus analysis techniques have been shown to be promising for the epistasis detection. However, exhaustive multi-locus analysis requires prohibitively large computational efforts when problems involve large-scale or genome-wide data. Furthermore, there