Science.gov

Sample records for locus genetics meets

  1. Wavelets meet genetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Ping

    2005-08-01

    Genetic image analysis is an interdisciplinary area, which combines microscope image processing techniques with the use of biochemical probes for the detection of genetic aberrations responsible for cancers and genetic diseases. Recent years have witnessed parallel and significant progress in both image processing and genetics. On one hand, revolutionary multiscale wavelet techniques have been developed in signal processing and applied mathematics in the last decade, providing sophisticated tools for genetic image analysis. On the other hand, reaping the fruit of genome sequencing, high resolution genetic probes have been developed to facilitate accurate detection of subtle and cryptic genetic aberrations. In the meantime, however, they bring about computational challenges for image analysis. In this paper, we review the fruitful interaction between wavelets and genetic imaging. We show how wavelets offer a perfect tool to address a variety of chromosome image analysis problems. In fact, the same word "subband" has been used in the nomenclature of cytogenetics to describe the multiresolution banding structure of the chromosome, even before its appearance in the wavelet literature. The application of wavelets to chromosome analysis holds great promise in addressing several computational challenges in genetics. A variety of real world examples such as the chromosome image enhancement, compression, registration and classification will be demonstrated. These examples are drawn from fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and microarray (gene chip) imaging experiments, which indicate the impact of wavelets on the diagnosis, treatments and prognosis of cancers and genetic diseases.

  2. Fixing the broken system of genetic locus symbols

    PubMed Central

    Lohmann, Katja; Lang, Anthony; Klein, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Originally, locus symbols (e.g., DYT1) were introduced to specify chromosomal regions that had been linked to a familial disorder with a yet unknown gene. Symbols were systematically assigned in a numerical series to designate mapped loci for a specific phenotype or group of phenotypes. Since the system of designating and using locus symbols was originally established, both our knowledge and our techniques of gene discovery have evolved substantially. The current system has problems that are sources of confusion, perpetuate misinformation, and misrepresent the system as a useful reference tool for a list of inherited disorders of a particular phenotypic class. These include erroneously assigned loci, duplicated loci, missing symbols, missing loci, unconfirmed loci in a consecutively numbered system, combining causative genes and risk factor genes in the same list, and discordance between phenotype and list assignment. In this article, we describe these problems and their impact, and propose solutions. The system could be significantly improved by creating distinct lists for clinical and research purposes, creating more informative locus symbols, distinguishing disease-causing mutations from risk factors, raising the threshold of evidence prior to assigning a locus symbol, paying strict attention to the predominant phenotype when assigning symbols lists, and having a formal system for reviewing and continually revising the list that includes input from both clinical and genetics experts. PMID:22454269

  3. Population genetics of the HRAS1 minisatellite locus

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, B.; Risch, N. ); Krontiris, T. New England Medical Center Hospital, Boston, MA )

    1993-12-01

    Several years ago it was reported that rare HRAS1 VNTR alleles occurred more frequently in US Caucasian cancer patients than in unaffected controls. Such an association, in theory, could be caused by undetected population heterogeneity. Also, in a study clearly relevant to this issue, it was recently reported that significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium exist at this locus in a sample of US Caucasians. These considerations motivate population genetic analysis of the HRAS1 locus. From published studies of the HRAS1 VNTR locus, which classified alleles into types, the authors found only small differences in the allele frequency distributions of samples from various European nations, although there were larger differences among ethnic groups (African American, Caucasian, and Oriental). In an analysis of variation of rare-allele frequencies among samples from four European nations, most of the variance was attributable to molecular methodology, and very little of the variance was accounted for by nationality. In addition, the authors showed that mixture of European subpopulations should result in only minor deviations from expected genotype proportions in a Caucasian database and demonstrated that there was no significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the HRAS1 data. 35 refs., 4 tabs.

  4. Genetic analysis of the claret locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, W.; Nelson, C.R.; Szauter, P. )

    1989-11-01

    The claret (ca) locus of Drosophila melanogaster comprises two separately mutable domains, one responsible for eye color and one responsible for proper disjunction of chromosomes in meiosis and early cleavage divisions. Previously isolated alleles are of three types: (1) alleles of the claret (ca) type that affect eye color only, (2) alleles of the claret-nondisjunctional (ca{sup nd}) type that affect eye color and chromosome behavior, and (3) a meiotic mutation, non-claret disjunctional (ncd), that affects chromosome behavior only. In order to investigate the genetic structure of the claret locus, the authors have isolated 19 radiation-induced alleles of claret on the basis of the eye color phenotype. Two of these 19 new alleles are of the ca{sup nd} type, while 17 are of the ca type, demonstrating that the two domains do not often act as a single target for mutagenesis. This suggests that the two separately mutable functions are likely to be encoded by separate or overlapping genes rather than by a single gene. One of the new alleles of the ca{sup nd} type is a chromosome rearrangement with a breakpoint at the position of the claret locus. If this breakpoint is the cause of the mutant phenotype and there are no other mutations associated with the rearrangement, the two functions must be encoded by overlapping genes.

  5. Genetic mapping of a locus predisposing to human colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peltomaeki, P.; Aaltonen, L.A.; Pylkkaenen, L.; Chappelle, A. de la ); Sistonen, P. Finnish Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service, Helsinki ); Mecklin, J.P. ); Haervinen, H. ); Green, J.S. ); Jass, J.R. ); Weber, J.L. ); Leach, F.S.; Petersen, G.M.; Hamilton, S.R.; Vogelstein, B. Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD )

    1993-05-07

    Genetic linkage analysis was used to determine whether a specific chromosomal locus could be implicated in families with a history of early onset cancer but with no other unique features. Close linkage of disease to anonymous microsatellite markers on chromosome 2 was demonstrated in two large kindreds. The pairwise lod scores for linkage to marker D2S123 in these kindreds were 6.39 and 1.45 at zero recombination, and multipoint linkage with flanking markers resulted in lod scores of 6.47 and 6.01. These results prove the existence of a genetically determined predisposition to colorectal cancer that has important ramifications for understanding and preventing this disease. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Genetic homogeneity at the Friedreich Ataxia locus on chromosome 9

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Susan; Shaw, Jacqui; Wallis, Julie; Rowland, Alison; Chow, Larry; Farrall, Martin; Keats, Bronya; Richter, Andrea; Roy, Madeleine; Melancon, Serge; Deufel, Thomas; Berciano, José; Williamson, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Classical Friedreich ataxia, a progressive, neurodegenerative disorder involving both the central and peripheral nervous systems, has been subclassified according to the observed clinical heterogeneity. The variations in the age at onset and in the spectrum and severity of symptoms have previously been interpreted as evidence of genetic heterogeneity. We have studied the linkage between the disorder and closely linked DNA markers in families of distinct ethnic origins, including the “typical” French–Canadians and the Acadian population of Louisiana. The disease in these two populations, both of continental French origin, has a very similar initial clinical picture. However, a marked difference in the rate of progression of the obligatory symptoms after 10 years of apparent disease is observed. A total of 553 individuals from 80 families with 202 affected members have been typed with the chromosome 9 marker MCT112, which we have previously shown to be closely linked to the disease locus. Evidence for linkage was observed in all families with the generation of a combined total lod score of 25.09 at a recombination fraction of θ = .00, providing strong evidence for genetic homogeneity at this locus for the classical form of this disease. PMID:2929596

  7. Two-trait-locus linkage analysis: A powerful strategy for mapping complex genetic traits

    SciTech Connect

    Schork, N.J.; Boehnke, M. ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Nearly all diseases mapped to date follow clear Mendelian, single-locus segregation patterns. In contrast, many common familial diseases such as diabetes, psoriasis, several forms of cancer, and schizophrenia are familial and appear to have a genetic component but do not exhibit simple Mendelian transmission. More complex models are required to explain the genetics of these important diseases. In this paper, the authors explore two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis in which two trait loci are mapped simultaneously to separate genetic markers. The authors compare the utility of this approach to standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis with and without allowance for heterogeneity. The authors also compare the utility of the two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus analysis to two-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis. For common diseases, pedigrees are often bilineal, with disease genes entering via two or more unrelated pedigree members. Since such pedigrees often are avoided in linkage studies, the authors also investigate the relative information content of unilineal and bilineal pedigrees. For the dominant-or-recessive and threshold models that the authors consider, the authors find that two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis can provide substantially more linkage information, as measured by expected maximum lod score, than standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus methods, even allowing for heterogeneity, while, for a dominant-or-dominant generating model, one-locus models that allow for heterogeneity extract essentially as much information as the two-trait-locus methods. For these three models, the authors also find that bilineal pedigrees provide sufficient linkage information to warrant their inclusion in such studies. The authors discuss strategies for assessing the significance of the two linkages assumed in two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus models. 37 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  8. Genetic Locus for Streptolysin S Production by Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Nizet, Victor; Beall, Bernard; Bast, Darrin J.; Datta, Vivekananda; Kilburn, Laurie; Low, Donald E.; De Azavedo, Joyce C. S.

    2000-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is an important human pathogen that causes pharyngitis and invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis. Streptolysin S (SLS) is the cytolytic factor that creates the zone of beta-hemolysis surrounding GAS colonies grown on blood agar. We recently reported the discovery of a potential genetic determinant involved in SLS production, sagA, encoding a small peptide of 53 amino acids (S. D. Betschel, S. M. Borgia, N. L. Barg, D. E. Low, and J. C. De Azavedo, Infect. Immun. 66:1671–1679, 1998). Using transposon mutagenesis, chromosomal walking steps, and data from the GAS genome sequencing project (www.genome.ou.edu/strep.html), we have now identified a contiguous nine-gene locus (sagA to sagI) involved in SLS production. The sag locus is conserved among GAS strains regardless of M protein type. Targeted plasmid integrational mutagenesis of each gene in the sag operon resulted in an SLS-negative phenotype. Targeted integrations (i) upstream of the sagA promoter and (ii) downstream of a terminator sequence after sagI did not affect SLS production, establishing the functional boundaries of the operon. A rho-independent terminator sequence between sagA and sagB appears to regulate the amount of sagA transcript produced versus transcript for the entire operon. Reintroduction of the nine-gene sag locus on a plasmid vector restored SLS activity to the nonhemolytic sagA knockout mutant. Finally, heterologous expression of the intact sag operon conferred the SLS beta-hemolytic phenotype to the nonhemolytic Lactococcus lactis. We conclude that gene products of the GAS sag operon are both necessary and sufficient for SLS production. Sequence homologies of sag operon gene products suggest that SLS is related to the bacteriocin family of microbial toxins. PMID:10858242

  9. Phenotypic and fine genetic characterization of the D locus controlling fruit acidity in peach

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Acidity is an essential component of the organoleptic quality of fleshy fruits. However, in these fruits, the physiological and molecular mechanisms that control fruit acidity remain unclear. In peach the D locus controls fruit acidity; low-acidity is determined by the dominant allele. Using a peach progeny of 208 F2 trees, the D locus was mapped to the proximal end of linkage group 5 and co-localized with major QTLs involved in the control of fruit pH, titratable acidity and organic acid concentration and small QTLs for sugar concentration. To investigate the molecular basis of fruit acidity in peach we initiated the map-based cloning of the D locus. Results In order to generate a high-resolution linkage map in the vicinity of the D locus, 1,024 AFLP primer combinations were screened using DNA of bulked acid and low-acid segregants. We also screened a segregating population of 1,718 individuals for chromosomal recombination events linked to the D locus and identified 308 individuals with recombination events close to D. Using these recombinant individuals we delimited the D locus to a genetic interval of 0.4 cM. We also constructed a peach BAC library of 52,000 clones with a mean insert size of 90 kb. The screening of the BAC library with markers tightly linked to D locus indicated that 1 cM corresponds to 250 kb at the vicinity of the D locus. Conclusion In the present work we presented the first high-resolution genetic map of D locus in peach. We also constructed a peach BAC library of approximately 15× genome equivalent. This fine genetic and physical characterization of the D locus is the first step towards the isolation of the gene(s) underlying fruit acidity in peach. PMID:19445673

  10. Intra-locus sexual conflict and sexually antagonistic genetic variation in hermaphroditic animals

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Jessica K.

    2011-01-01

    Intra-locus sexual conflict results when sex-specific selection pressures for a given trait act against the intra-sexual genetic correlation for that trait. It has been found in a wide variety of taxa in both laboratory and natural populations, but the importance of intra-locus sexual conflict and sexually antagonistic genetic variation in hermaphroditic organisms has rarely been considered. This is not so surprising given the conceptual and theoretical association of intra-locus sexual conflict with sexual dimorphism, but there is no a priori reason why intra-locus sexual conflict cannot occur in hermaphroditic organisms as well. Here, I discuss the potential for intra-locus sexual conflict in hermaphroditic animals and review the available evidence for such conflict, and for the existence of sexually antagonistic genetic variation in hermaphrodites. I argue that mutations with asymmetric effects are particularly likely to be important in mediating sexual antagonism in hermaphroditic organisms. Moreover, sexually antagonistic genetic variation is likely to play an important role in inter-individual variation in sex allocation and in transitions to and from gonochorism (separate sexes) in simultaneous hermaphrodites. I also describe how sequential hermaphrodites may experience a unique form of intra-locus sexual conflict via antagonistic pleiotropy. Finally, I conclude with some suggestions for further research. PMID:20719776

  11. [The study of tomato fruit weight quantitative trait locus and its application in genetics teaching].

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyan

    2015-08-01

    The classical research cases, which have greatly promoted the development of genetics in history, can be combined with the content of courses in genetics teaching to train students' ability of scientific thinking and genetic analysis. The localization and clone of gene controlling tomato fruit weight is a pioneer work in quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies and represents a complete process of QTL research in plants. Application of this integrated case in genetics teaching, which showed a wonderful process of scientific discovery and the fascination of genetic research, has inspired students' interest in genetics and achieved a good teaching effect.

  12. Genetic heterogeneity in benign familial neonatal convulsions: Identification of a new locus on chromosome 8q

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.B.; Leach, R.J.; O'Connell, P.; Ryan, S.G. ); Ward, K. )

    1993-09-01

    The syndrome of benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by unprovoked seizures in the first weeks of life. One locus for BFNC has been mapped to chromosome 20 in several pedigrees, but the authors have excluded linkage to chromosome 20 in one large kindred. In order to identify this novel BFNC locus, dinucleotide repeat markers distributed throughout the genome were used to screen this family. Maximum pairwise LOD scores of 4.43 were obtained with markers D8S284 and D8S256 on chromosome 8q. Multipoint analysis placed the BFNC locus in the interval spanned by D8S198-D8S274. This study establishes the presence of a new BFNC locus and confirms genetic heterogeneity of this disorder. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. [Genetic study of the Penta E locus and identification of rare alleles].

    PubMed

    Lai, Li; Shen, Xiaoli; Han, Lili; Chen, Dian; Hu, Jie

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the genetic polymorphisms of Penta E locus in Fujian Han population. METHODS Polymorphisms of the Penta E locus in 851 unrelated individuals were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction-short tandem repeat (PCR-STR). The mutation rate of rare alleles was analyzed in 494 paternity identification cases (in a total of 674 meiosis). RESULTS Twenty-six alleles were identified for the Penta E locus, with their frequencies ranging from 0.0006 to 0.1528. There were 7 rare alleles, among which Penta E-28.4 ([AAAGA]29) was identified for the first time. Genetic parameters of the Penta E locus in Fujian Han population were obtained, including PIC= 0.91, PE= 0.817, PD= 0.986, and mutation rate= 0.0015. CONCLUSION The Penta E locus is highly polymorphic and has a low mutation rate in Fujian Han population. It also has a good prospect in genetics applications. DNA sequencing is a good method for identifying rare alleles. PMID:26418985

  14. Genetic and Environmental Influences on the Relationship between Flow Proneness, Locus of Control and Behavioral Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mosing, Miriam A.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Cesarini, David; Johannesson, Magnus; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Nakamura, Jeanne; Madison, Guy; Ullén, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    Flow is a psychological state of high but subjectively effortless attention that typically occurs during active performance of challenging tasks and is accompanied by a sense of automaticity, high control, low self-awareness, and enjoyment. Flow proneness is associated with traits and behaviors related to low neuroticism such as emotional stability, conscientiousness, active coping, self-esteem and life satisfaction. Little is known about the genetic architecture of flow proneness, behavioral inhibition and locus of control – traits also associated with neuroticism – and their interrelation. Here, we hypothesized that individuals low in behavioral inhibition and with an internal locus of control would be more likely to experience flow and explored the genetic and environmental architecture of the relationship between the three variables. Behavioral inhibition and locus of control was measured in a large population sample of 3,375 full twin pairs and 4,527 single twins, about 26% of whom also scored the flow proneness questionnaire. Findings revealed significant but relatively low correlations between the three traits and moderate heritability estimates of .41, .45, and .30 for flow proneness, behavioral inhibition, and locus of control, respectively, with some indication of non-additive genetic influences. For behavioral inhibition we found significant sex differences in heritability, with females showing a higher estimate including significant non-additive genetic influences, while in males the entire heritability was due to additive genetic variance. We also found a mainly genetically mediated relationship between the three traits, suggesting that individuals who are genetically predisposed to experience flow, show less behavioral inhibition (less anxious) and feel that they are in control of their own destiny (internal locus of control). We discuss that some of the genes underlying this relationship may include those influencing the function of dopaminergic

  15. Comparative molecular population genetics of phycoerythrin locus in Prochlorococcus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fangqing; Qin, Song

    2007-03-01

    As the only remainder type of phycobiliproteins in Prochlorococcus, the actual role of phycoerythrin still remains unknown. Previous studies revealed that two different forms of phycoerythrin gene were found in two ecotypes of Prochlorococcus that are specifically adapted to either high light (HL) or low light (LL) conditions. Here we analyze patterns of phycoerythrin nucleotide variation in the HL- and LL-Prochlorococcus populations. Our analyses reveal a significantly greater number of non-synonymous fixed substitutions in peB and peA than expected based on interspecific comparisons. This pattern of excess non-synonymous fixed substitutions is not seen in other five phycoerythrin-related genes (peZ/V/Y/T/S). Several neutrality statistical tests indicate an excess of rare frequency polymorphisms in the LL-Prochlorococcus data, but an excess of intermediate frequency polymorphisms in the HL-Prochlorococcus data. Distributions of the positively selected sites identified using the likelihood ratio test, when mapped onto the phycoerythrin tertiary structure, reveal that HL- and LL-phycoerythrin should be under different selective patterns. These findings may provide insights into the likely role of selection at the phycoerythrin locus and motivate further research to unveil the function of phycoerythrin in Prochlorococcus. PMID:16897463

  16. Primary, Nonsyndromic Vesicoureteric Reflux and Its Nephropathy Is Genetically Heterogeneous, with a Locus on Chromosome 1

    PubMed Central

    Feather, Sally A.; Malcolm, Sue; Woolf, Adrian S.; Wright, Victoria; Blaydon, Diana; Reid, Christopher J. D.; Flinter, Frances A.; Proesmans, Willem; Devriendt, Koen; Carter, Joan; Warwicker, Paul; Goodship, Timothy H. J.; Goodship, Judith A.

    2000-01-01

    Primary vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) affects 1%–2% of whites, and reflux nephropathy (RN) causes up to 15% of end-stage renal failure in children and adults. There is a 30–50-fold increased incidence of VUR in first-degree relatives of probands, compared with the general population. We report the results of the first genomewide search of VUR and RN; we studied seven European families whose members exhibit apparently dominant inheritance. We initially typed 387 polymorphic markers spaced, on average, at 10 cM throughout the genome; we used the GENEHUNTER program to provide parametric and nonparametric linkage analyses of affected individuals. The most positive locus spanned 20 cM on 1p13 between GATA176C01 and D1S1653 and had a nonparametric LOD score (NPL) of 5.76 (P=.0002) and a parametric LOD score of 3.16. Saturation with markers at 1-cM intervals increased the NPL to 5.94 (P=.00009). Hence, VUR maps to a locus on chromosome 1. There was evidence of genetic heterogeneity at the chromosome 1 locus, and 12 additional loci were identified genomewide, with P<.05. No significant linkage was found to 6p, where a renal and ureteric malformation locus has been reported, or to PAX2, mutations of which cause VUR in renal-coloboma syndrome. Our results support the hypothesis that VUR is a genetic disorder. PMID:10739767

  17. Adaptive fixation in two-locus models of stabilizing selection and genetic drift.

    PubMed

    Wollstein, Andreas; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    The relationship between quantitative genetics and population genetics has been studied for nearly a century, almost since the existence of these two disciplines. Here we ask to what extent quantitative genetic models in which selection is assumed to operate on a polygenic trait predict adaptive fixations that may lead to footprints in the genome (selective sweeps). We study two-locus models of stabilizing selection (with and without genetic drift) by simulations and analytically. For symmetric viability selection we find that ∼16% of the trajectories may lead to fixation if the initial allele frequencies are sampled from the neutral site-frequency spectrum and the effect sizes are uniformly distributed. However, if the population is preadapted when it undergoes an environmental change (i.e., sits in one of the equilibria of the model), the fixation probability decreases dramatically. In other two-locus models with general viabilities or an optimum shift, the proportion of adaptive fixations may increase to >24%. Similarly, genetic drift leads to a higher probability of fixation. The predictions of alternative quantitative genetics models, initial conditions, and effect-size distributions are also discussed.

  18. Genetic polymorphism study at 15 autosomal locus in central Indian population.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Pankaj; Jain, Toshi; Trivedi, Veena Ben

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of 15 autosomal STR locus (TH01, D3S1358, vWA, D21S11, TPOX, D7S820, D19S433, D5S818, D2S1338, D16S539, CSF1PO, D13S317, FGA, D18S51, D8S1179) was done in 582 healthy unrelated individuals (Male-366, Female-216) originating from the various geographical regions of Madhya Pradesh, India. All locus fall under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium except TPOX. These STR loci were highly informative and discriminating with combined power of discrimination (CPD) >0.99999. Locus wise allele frequencies of the studied population were compared with the other published populations. Also the Clustering pattern and genetic distance of studied populations is compared and presented with various populations. The studied population showed the genetic proximity with geographically close populations of India and significant genetic variation with distant populations which is also evident by clustering pattern of the NJ tree and the PCA plot.

  19. What to Expect When Meeting with a Genetic Counselor

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF What to Expect When Meeting With a Genetic Counselor Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... prevention, and treatment options and provide support. A genetic counselor’s training and certification A genetic counselor is ...

  20. Integration of genetic and physical maps of the Primula vulgaris S locus and localization by chromosome in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhong; Webster, Margaret A; Wright, Jonathan; Cocker, Jonathan M; Smith, Matthew C; Badakshi, Farah; Heslop-Harrison, Pat; Gilmartin, Philip M

    2015-10-01

    Heteromorphic flower development in Primula is controlled by the S locus. The S locus genes, which control anther position, pistil length and pollen size in pin and thrum flowers, have not yet been characterized. We have integrated S-linked genes, marker sequences and mutant phenotypes to create a map of the P. vulgaris S locus region that will facilitate the identification of key S locus genes. We have generated, sequenced and annotated BAC sequences spanning the S locus, and identified its chromosomal location. We have employed a combination of classical genetics and three-point crosses with molecular genetic analysis of recombinants to generate the map. We have characterized this region by Illumina sequencing and bioinformatic analysis, together with chromosome in situ hybridization. We present an integrated genetic and physical map across the P. vulgaris S locus flanked by phenotypic and DNA sequence markers. BAC contigs encompass a 1.5-Mb genomic region with 1 Mb of sequence containing 82 S-linked genes anchored to overlapping BACs. The S locus is located close to the centromere of the largest metacentric chromosome pair. These data will facilitate the identification of the genes that orchestrate heterostyly in Primula and enable evolutionary analyses of the S locus.

  1. Genetic variation of polymorphic NOS STR locus in ten Indian population groups.

    PubMed

    Shazia, A; Nithya, P; Seshadri, M

    2009-02-01

    The genotyping of 313 random individuals belonging to ten different population groups from three different states of India was performed for polymorphic pentanucleotide repeat present in the 5'-flanking region of nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS2A) to study the effect of geographical and linguistic affiliations on the genetic affinities among these groups. Likelihood ratio tests showed that all the ten populations for this locus were in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium. Eleven different alleles ranging from 7 repeat to 17 repeats and 46 different genotypes were observed. The observed and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.72-0.94 and 0.84-0.89, respectively. The discriminating power of this locus is > or = 0.86 and the polymorphism information content of this locus in ten population groups ranged from 0.80 to 0.85. High PIC, PD and PE value of this STR showed this marker to be informative and can be used for DNA typing and population studies. The eight populations from Kerala showed a lower GST value of 0.016 compared to the GST of ten populations (G(ST) = 0.019), thereby showing that the populations from the same state showed higher genetic proximity probably due to linguistic and geographical proximity between them.

  2. Genetic Control Of Natural Killing and In Vivo Tumor Elimination by the Chok Locus

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Azza H.; Iizuka, Koho; Smith, Hamish R.C.; Scalzo, Anthony A.; Yokoyama, Wayne M.

    1998-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying target recognition during natural killing are not well understood. One approach to dissect the complexities of natural killer (NK) cell recognition is through exploitation of genetic differences among inbred mouse strains. In this study, we determined that interleukin 2–activated BALB/c-derived NK cells could not lyse Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells as efficiently as C57BL/6-derived NK cells, despite equivalent capacity to kill other targets. This strain-determined difference was also exhibited by freshly isolated NK cells, and was determined to be independent of host major histocompatibility haplotype. Furthermore, CHO killing did not correlate with expression of NK1.1 or 2B4 activation molecules. Genetic mapping studies revealed linkage between the locus influencing CHO killing, termed Chok, and loci encoded within the NK gene complex (NKC), suggesting that Chok encodes an NK cell receptor specific for CHO cells. In vivo assays recapitulated the in vitro data, and both studies determined that Chok regulates an NK perforin–dependent cytotoxic process. These results may have implications for the role of NK cells in xenograft rejection. Our genetic analysis suggests Chok is a single locus that affects NK cell–mediated cytotoxicity similar to other NKC loci that also regulate the complex activity of NK cells. PMID:9858511

  3. Fine genetic mapping of the Co locus controlling columnar growth habit in apple.

    PubMed

    Bai, Tuanhui; Zhu, Yuandi; Fernández-Fernández, Felicidad; Keulemans, Johan; Brown, Susan; Xu, Kenong

    2012-05-01

    Tree architecture is an important, complex and dynamic trait affected by diverse genetic, ontogenetic and environmental factors. 'Wijcik McIntosh', a columnar (reduced branching) sport of 'McIntosh' and a valuable genetic resource, has been used intensively in apple-breeding programs for genetic improvement of tree architecture. The columnar growth habit is primarily controlled by the dominant allele of gene Co (columnar) on linkage group-10. But the Co locus is not well mapped and the Co gene remains unknown. To precisely map the Co locus and to identify candidate genes of Co, a sequence-based approach using both peach and apple genomes was used to develop new markers linked more tightly to Co. Five new simple sequence repeats markers were developed (C1753-3520, C18470-25831, C6536-31519, C7223-38004 and C7629-22009). The first four markers were obtained from apple genomic sequences on chromosome-10, whereas the last (C7629-22009) was from an unanchored apple contig that contains an apple expressed sequence tag CV082943, which was identified through synteny analysis between the peach and apple genomes. Genetic mapping of these five markers in four F(1) populations of 528 genotypes and 290 diverse columnar selections/cultivars (818 genotypes in total) delimited the Co locus in a genetic interval with 0.37 % recombination between markers C1753-3520 and C7629-22009. Marker C18470-25831 co-segregates with Co in the 818 genotypes studied. The Co region is estimated to be 193 kb and contains 26 predicted gene in the 'Golden Delicious' genome. Among the 26 genes, three are putative LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES (LOB) DOMAIN (LBD) containing transcription factor genes known of essential roles in plant lateral organ development, and are therefore considered as strong candidates of Co, designated MdLBD1, MdLBD2, and MdLBD3. Although more comprehensive studies are required to confirm the function of MdLBD1-3, the present work represents an important step forward to better

  4. Independent Evidence for an Association between General Cognitive Ability and a Genetic Locus for Educational Attainment

    PubMed Central

    Trampush, Joey W.; Lencz, Todd; Knowles, Emma; Davies, Gail; Guha, Saurav; Pe’er, Itsik; Liewald, David C.; Starr, John M.; Djurovic, Srdjan; Melle, Ingrid; Sundet, Kjetil; Christoforou, Andrea; Reinvang, Ivar; Mukherjee, Semanti; DeRosse, Pamela; Lundervold, Astri; Steen, Vidar M.; John, Majnu; Espeseth, Thomas; Räikkönen, Katri; Widen, Elisabeth; Palotie, Aarno; Eriksson, Johan G.; Giegling, Ina; Konte, Bettina; Ikeda, Masashi; Roussos, Panos; Giakoumaki, Stella; Burdick, Katherine E.; Payton, Antony; Ollier, William; Horan, Mike; Scult, Matthew; Dickinson, Dwight; Straub, Richard E.; Donohoe, Gary; Morris, Derek; Corvin, Aiden; Gill, Michael; Hariri, Ahmad; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Pendleton, Neil; Iwata, Nakao; Darvasi, Ariel; Bitsios, Panos; Rujescu, Dan; Lahti, Jari; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Keller, Matthew C.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Deary, Ian J.; Glahn, David C.; Malhotra, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive deficits and reduced educational achievement are common in psychiatric illness; understanding the genetic basis of cognitive and educational deficits may be informative about the etiology of psychiatric disorders. A recent, large genomewide association study (GWAS) reported a genome-wide significant locus for years of education, which subsequently demonstrated association to general cognitive ability (“g”) in overlapping cohorts. The current study was designed to test whether GWAS hits for educational attainment are involved in general cognitive ability in an independent, large-scale collection of cohorts. Using cohorts in the Cognitive Genomics Consortium (COGENT; up to 20,495 healthy individuals), we examined the relationship between g and variants associated with educational attainment. We next conducted meta-analyses with 24,189 individuals with neurocognitive data from the educational attainment studies, and then with 53,188 largely independent individuals from a recent GWAS of cognition. A SNP (rs1906252) located at chromosome 6q16.1, previously associated with years of schooling, was significantly associated with g (P = 1.47×10−4) in COGENT. The first joint analysis of 43,381 non-overlapping individuals for this a priori-designated locus was strongly significant (P = 4.94×10−7), and the second joint analysis of 68,159 non-overlapping individuals was even more robust (P = 1.65×10−9). These results provide independent replication, in a large-scale dataset, of a genetic locus associated with cognitive function and education. As sample sizes grow, cognitive GWAS will identify increasing numbers of associated loci, as has been accomplished in other polygenic quantitative traits, which may be relevant to psychiatric illness. PMID:25951819

  5. A genetic locus essential for formate-dependent growth of Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C R; Chelm, B K

    1987-01-01

    A genetic locus essential for the formate-dependent growth of Bradyrhizobium japonicum was isolated by complementation of ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutants with a cosmid gene library of B. japonicum DNA. Three related cosmids containing 18.7 kilobase pairs of B. japonicum DNA in common were identified as being able to restore formate-dependent growth capability to mutants lacking either ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase or both ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase activities. To further localize the complementing gene(s), a series of four deletions spanning a total of 16.1 kilobase pairs were introduced into the B. japonicum chromosome. Each resulting deletion mutant lacked formate dehydrogenase activity and lacked ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase activity and immunologically detectable protein. Three of the four also lacked phosphoribulokinase activity. Two other mutants in which the deletion-bearing recombinant plasmid had integrated into the chromosome also lacked ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase activity and protein and phosphoribulokinase activities. The genetic locus defined by these mutants could contain the structural genes for these enzymes or a regulatory gene(s) controlling their expression or both. Images PMID:3036781

  6. Pleiotropic regulatory locus 2 exhibits unequal genetic redundancy with its homolog PRL1.

    PubMed

    Weihmann, Tabea; Palma, Kristoffer; Nitta, Yukino; Li, Xin

    2012-09-01

    In plants, signaling leading to resistance against biotrophic pathogens is complex. Perception of pathogenic microbes by resistance (R) proteins is relayed though successive activities of downstream components, in a network that is not well understood. PLEIOTROPIC REGULATORY LOCUS 1 (PRL1) and >20 other proteins are members of the MOS4-associated complex (MAC), a regulatory node in defense signaling. Of all characterized MAC members, mutations in PRL1 cause the most severe susceptibility towards both virulent and avirulent microbial pathogens. Genetic suppressors of prl1 represent new signaling elements and may aid in further unraveling of defense mechanisms. Our identification and characterization of a dominant suppressor of prl1 revealed a regulatory, gain-of-function mutation in PLEIOTROPIC REGULATORY LOCUS 2 (PRL2), a close homolog of PRL1. Loss-of-function mutants of PRL2 do not exhibit altered phenotypes; however, prl1 prl2 double mutants exhibit enhanced morphological defects consistent with unequal genetic redundancy between the homologs. Up-regulated gene expression mediated by the dominant prl2-1D allele completely suppresses disease susceptibility in the prl1 mutant background and also restores wild-type appearance, further supporting functional equivalence between the two PRL proteins. PMID:22813545

  7. The effect of adaptive mutagenesis on genetic variation at a linked, neutral locus

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, C.; Williams, S.M.

    1995-07-01

    Based on recent studies in single-celled organisms, it has been argued that a fitness benefit associated with a mutation will increase the probability of that mutation occurring. This increase is independent of mutation rates at other loci and is called adaptive mutagenesis. We modeled the effect of adaptive mutagenesis on populations of haploid organisms with adaptive mutation rates ranging from 0 to 1 x 10{sup -5}. Allele frequencies at the selected locus and a neutral linked locus were tracked. We also observed the amount of linkage disequilibrium during the selective sweep and the final heterozygosity after the sweep. The presence of adaptive mutagenesis increases the number of genetic backgrounds carrying the new fitter allele, making the outcomes more representative of the population before the selection. Therefore, more neutral genetic variation is preserved in simulations with adaptive mutagenesis than in those without it due to hitchhiking. Since adaptive mutagensis is time-dependent, it can generate mutants when other mechanisms of mutation cannot. In addition, adaptive mutagenesis has the potential to confound both phylogeny construction and the detection of natural selection from patterns of nucleotide variation. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  8. A 27-locus STR assay to meet all United States and European law enforcement agency standards.

    PubMed

    Schumm, James W; Gutierrez-Mateo, Cristina; Tan, Eugene; Selden, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Different national and international agencies have selected specific STR sets for forensic database use. To enhance database comparison across national and international borders, a 27-locus multiplex system was developed comprising all 15 STR loci of the European standard set, the current 13 STR loci of the CODIS core, the proposed 22 STR loci of the expanded CODIS core, 4 additional commonly used STR loci, and the amelogenin locus. Development required iterative primer design to resolve primer-related artifacts, amplicon sizing, and locus-to-locus balance issues. The 19.5-min assay incorporated newly developed six-dye chemistry analyzed using a novel microfluidic electrophoresis instrument capable of simultaneous detection and discrimination of 8 or more fluorescent dyes. The 27-locus multiplex offers the potential for a new international STR standard permitting laboratories in any jurisdiction to use a single reaction to determine profiles for loci they typically generate plus an expanded common STR profiling set of global interest.

  9. Genetic organization and molecular characterization of secA2 locus in Listeria species.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Krishna K; Mendonca, Marcelo; Aroonnual, Amornrat; Burkholder, Kristin M; Bhunia, Arun K

    2011-12-10

    The translocation of proteins across the bacterial cell wall is carried out by the general secretory (Sec) system. Most bacteria have a single copy of the secA gene, with the exception of a few Gram-positive bacteria, which have an additional copy of secA, designated secA2. secA2 is present in Listeria monocytogenes and is responsible for secretion and translocation of several proteins including virulence factors; however, little is known about the secA2 gene and its genetic organization in nonpathogenic members of the genus Listeria. The goal of this study was to determine the presence of secA2 locus and analyze the genetic relatedness among pathogenic and nonpathogenic Listeria species. Cloning experiments revealed that secA2 is present in all analyzed pathogenic (L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii) and nonpathogenic (L. welshimeri, L. innocua, L. seeligeri, L. grayi and L. marthii) Listeria species except L. rocourtiae. Likewise, SecA2 transcripts were also detected in all species. Sequence analysis further revealed that 2331 nucleotides (776 amino acids) are conserved in L. monocytogenes, L. welshimeri, L. innocua and L. marthii. Three nucleotides are deleted in L. ivanovii and L. seeligeri and six in L. grayi, resulting in amino acid counts of 775, 775 and 774, respectively. secA2 is flanked upstream by iap (encoding p60) and downstream by a putative membrane protein (lmo0583, lmo f2365_0613) in all analyzed Listeria species, demonstrating conserved genetic organization of the secA2 locus in pathogenic and nonpathogenic species. Deletion of secA2 in L. innocua impaired accumulation of SecA2 substrate, N-acetyl muramidase (NamA) in the cell wall, providing evidence for the presence of functional SecA2 in nonpathogenic Listeria.

  10. Global Genetic Architecture of an Erythroid Quantitative Trait Locus, HMIP-2

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Stephan; Rooks, Helen; Zelenika, Diana; Mtatiro, Siana N; Gnanakulasekaran, Akshala; Drasar, Emma; Cox, Sharon; Liu, Li; Masood, Mariam; Silver, Nicholas; Garner, Chad; Vasavda, Nisha; Howard, Jo; Makani, Julie; Adekile, Adekunle; Pace, Betty; Spector, Tim; Farrall, Martin; Lathrop, Mark; Thein, Swee Lay

    2014-01-01

    HMIP-2 is a human quantitative trait locus affecting peripheral numbers, size and hemoglobin composition of red blood cells, with a marked effect on the persistence of the fetal form of hemoglobin, HbF, in adults. The locus consists of multiple common variants in an enhancer region for MYB (chr 6q23.3), which encodes the hematopoietic transcription factor cMYB. Studying a European population cohort and four African-descended groups of patients with sickle cell anemia, we found that all share a set of two spatially separate HbF-promoting alleles at HMIP-2, termed “A” and “B.” These typically occurred together (“A–B”) on European chromosomes, but existed on separate homologous chromosomes in Africans. Using haplotype signatures for “A” and “B,” we interrogated public population datasets. Haplotypes carrying only “A” or “B” were typical for populations in Sub-Saharan Africa. The “A–B” combination was frequent in European, Asian, and Amerindian populations. Both alleles were infrequent in tropical regions, possibly undergoing negative selection by geographical factors, as has been reported for malaria with other hematological traits. We propose that the ascertainment of worldwide distribution patterns for common, HbF-promoting alleles can aid their further genetic characterization, including the investigation of gene–environment interaction during human migration and adaptation. PMID:25069958

  11. Comprehensive genetic assessment of the ESR1 locus identifies a risk region for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    O’Mara, Tracy A; Glubb, Dylan M; Painter, Jodie N; Cheng, Timothy; Dennis, Joe; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Shah, Mitul; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Lambrechts, Diether; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Annibali, Daniela; Amant, Frederic; Zhao, Hui; Goode, Ellen L; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Salvesen, Helga B; Njølstad, Tormund S; Trovik, Jone; Werner, Henrica MJ; Tham, Emma; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Peto, Julian; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F; Thompson, Deborah J; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2015-01-01

    Excessive exposure to estrogen is a well-established risk factor for endometrial cancer (EC), particularly for cancers of endometrioid histology. The physiological function of estrogen is primarily mediated by estrogen receptor alpha, encoded by ESR1. Consequently, several studies have investigated whether variation at the ESR1 locus is associated with risk of EC, with conflicting results. We performed comprehensive fine-mapping analyses of 3,633 genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 6,607 EC cases and 37,925 controls. There was evidence of an EC risk signal located at a potential alternative promoter of the ESR1 gene (lead SNP rs79575945, P = 1.86 × 10−5), which was stronger for cancers of endometrioid subtype (P = 3.76 × 10−6). Bioinformatic analysis suggests that this risk signal is in a functionally important region targeting ESR1, and eQTL analysis found that rs79575945 was associated with expression of SYNE1, a neighbouring gene. In summary, we have identified a single EC risk signal located at ESR1, at study-wide significance. Given SNPs located at this locus have been associated with risk for breast cancer, also a hormonally driven cancer, this study adds weight to the rationale for performing informed candidate fine-scale genetic studies across cancer types. PMID:26330482

  12. Genetic Variation at the O-Antigen Biosynthetic Locus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Christopher K.; Sims, Elizabeth H.; Kas, Arnold; Spencer, David H.; Kutyavin, Tanya V.; Ivey, Richard G.; Zhou, Yang; Kaul, Rajinder; Clendenning, James B.; Olson, Maynard V.

    2002-01-01

    The outer carbohydrate layer, or O antigen, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa varies markedly in different isolates of these bacteria, and at least 20 distinct O-antigen serotypes have been described. Previous studies have indicated that the major enzymes responsible for O-antigen synthesis are encoded in a cluster of genes that occupy a common genetic locus. We used targeted yeast recombinational cloning to isolate this locus from the 20 internationally recognized serotype strains. DNA sequencing of these isolated segments revealed that at least 11 highly divergent gene clusters occupy this region. Homology searches of the encoded protein products indicated that these gene clusters are likely to direct O-antigen biosynthesis. The O15 serotype strains lack functional gene clusters in the region analyzed, suggesting that O-antigen biosynthesis genes for this serotype are harbored in a different portion of the genome. The overall pattern underscores the plasticity of the P. aeruginosa genome, in which a specific site in a well-conserved genomic region can be occupied by any of numerous islands of functionally related DNA with diverse sequences. PMID:12057956

  13. Global genetic architecture of an erythroid quantitative trait locus, HMIP-2.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Stephan; Rooks, Helen; Zelenika, Diana; Mtatiro, Siana N; Gnanakulasekaran, Akshala; Drasar, Emma; Cox, Sharon; Liu, Li; Masood, Mariam; Silver, Nicholas; Garner, Chad; Vasavda, Nisha; Howard, Jo; Makani, Julie; Adekile, Adekunle; Pace, Betty; Spector, Tim; Farrall, Martin; Lathrop, Mark; Thein, Swee Lay

    2014-11-01

    HMIP-2 is a human quantitative trait locus affecting peripheral numbers, size and hemoglobin composition of red blood cells, with a marked effect on the persistence of the fetal form of hemoglobin, HbF, in adults. The locus consists of multiple common variants in an enhancer region for MYB (chr 6q23.3), which encodes the hematopoietic transcription factor cMYB. Studying a European population cohort and four African-descended groups of patients with sickle cell anemia, we found that all share a set of two spatially separate HbF-promoting alleles at HMIP-2, termed "A" and "B." These typically occurred together ("A-B") on European chromosomes, but existed on separate homologous chromosomes in Africans. Using haplotype signatures for "A" and "B," we interrogated public population datasets. Haplotypes carrying only "A" or "B" were typical for populations in Sub-Saharan Africa. The "A-B" combination was frequent in European, Asian, and Amerindian populations. Both alleles were infrequent in tropical regions, possibly undergoing negative selection by geographical factors, as has been reported for malaria with other hematological traits. We propose that the ascertainment of worldwide distribution patterns for common, HbF-promoting alleles can aid their further genetic characterization, including the investigation of gene-environment interaction during human migration and adaptation.

  14. Comprehensive genetic assessment of the ESR1 locus identifies a risk region for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Mara, Tracy A; Glubb, Dylan M; Painter, Jodie N; Cheng, Timothy; Dennis, Joe; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Shah, Mitul; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Lambrechts, Diether; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Annibali, Daniela; Amant, Frederic; Zhao, Hui; Goode, Ellen L; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Salvesen, Helga B; Njølstad, Tormund S; Trovik, Jone; Werner, Henrica M J; Tham, Emma; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Peto, Julian; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F; Thompson, Deborah J; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2015-10-01

    Excessive exposure to estrogen is a well-established risk factor for endometrial cancer (EC), particularly for cancers of endometrioid histology. The physiological function of estrogen is primarily mediated by estrogen receptor alpha, encoded by ESR1. Consequently, several studies have investigated whether variation at the ESR1 locus is associated with risk of EC, with conflicting results. We performed comprehensive fine-mapping analyses of 3633 genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 6607 EC cases and 37 925 controls. There was evidence of an EC risk signal located at a potential alternative promoter of the ESR1 gene (lead SNP rs79575945, P=1.86×10(-5)), which was stronger for cancers of endometrioid subtype (P=3.76×10(-6)). Bioinformatic analysis suggests that this risk signal is in a functionally important region targeting ESR1, and eQTL analysis found that rs79575945 was associated with expression of SYNE1, a neighbouring gene. In summary, we have identified a single EC risk signal located at ESR1, at study-wide significance. Given SNPs located at this locus have been associated with risk for breast cancer, also a hormonally driven cancer, this study adds weight to the rationale for performing informed candidate fine-scale genetic studies across cancer types. PMID:26330482

  15. Locus-specific genetic differentiation at Rw among warfarin-resistant rat (Rattus norvegicus) populations.

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Michael H; Pelz, Hans-Joachim; Wayne, Robert K

    2003-01-01

    Populations may diverge at fitness-related genes as a result of adaptation to local conditions. The ability to detect this divergence by marker-based genomic scans depends on the relative magnitudes of selection, recombination, and migration. We survey rat (Rattus norvegicus) populations to assess the effect that local selection with anticoagulant rodenticides has had on microsatellite marker variation and differentiation at the warfarin resistance gene (Rw) relative to the effect on the genomic background. Initially, using a small sample of 16 rats, we demonstrate tight linkage of microsatellite D1Rat219 to Rw by association mapping of genotypes expressing an anticoagulant-rodenticide-insensitive vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase (VKOR). Then, using allele frequencies at D1Rat219, we show that predicted and observed resistance levels in 27 populations correspond, suggesting intense and recent selection for resistance. A contrast of F(ST) values between D1Rat219 and the genomic background revealed that rodenticide selection has overwhelmed drift-mediated population structure only at Rw. A case-controlled design distinguished these locus-specific effects of selection at Rw from background levels of differentiation more effectively than a population-controlled approach. Our results support the notion that an analysis of locus-specific population genetic structure may assist the discovery and mapping of novel candidate loci that are the object of selection or may provide supporting evidence for previously identified loci. PMID:12871915

  16. Genetic characterization and regulation of the nadB locus of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, B T; Olivera, B M; Roth, J R

    1987-01-01

    The nadB locus encodes the first enzyme of NAD synthesis. It has been reported that this gene and nadA are regulated by a positive regulatory protein encoded in the nadB region. In pursuing this regulatory mechanism, we constructed a fine-structure genetic map of the nadB gene. The region appears to include a single complementation group; no evidence for a positive regulatory element was found. Several mutations causing resistance to the analog 6-aminonicotinamide mapped within the structural gene and probably cause resistance to feedback inhibition. Regulatory mutations for nadB were isolated. These mutants mapped far from nadB near the pnuA gene, which encodes a function required for nicotinamide mononucleotide transport. The regulatory mutations appear to affect a distinct function encoded in the same operon as pnuA. PMID:3305482

  17. Genetic and sequence organization of the mcrBC locus of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Dila, D; Sutherland, E; Moran, L; Slatko, B; Raleigh, E A

    1990-01-01

    The mcrB (rglB) locus of Escherichia coli K-12 mediates sequence-specific restriction of cytosine-modified DNA. Genetic and sequence analysis shows that the locus actually comprises two genes, mcrB and mcrC. We show here that in vivo, McrC modifies the specificity of McrB restriction by expanding the range of modified sequences restricted. That is, the sequences sensitive to McrB(+)-dependent restriction can be divided into two sets: some modified sequences containing 5-methylcytosine are restricted by McrB+ cells even when McrC-, but most such sequences are restricted in vivo only by McrB+ McrC+ cells. The sequences restricted only by McrB+C+ include T-even bacteriophage containing 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (restriction of this phage is the RglB+ phenotype), some sequences containing N4-methylcytosine, and some sequences containing 5-methylcytosine. The sequence codes for two polypeptides of 54 (McrB) and 42 (McrC) kilodaltons, whereas in vitro translation yields four products, of approximately 29 and approximately 49 (McrB) and of approximately 38 and approximately 40 (McrC) kilodaltons. The McrB polypeptide sequence contains a potential GTP-binding motif, so this protein presumably binds the nucleotide cofactor. The deduced McrC polypeptide is somewhat basic and may bind to DNA, consistent with its genetic activity as a modulator of the specificity of McrB. At the nucleotide sequence level, the G+C content of mcrBC is very low for E. coli, suggesting that the genes may have been acquired recently during the evolution of the species. Images PMID:2203735

  18. Extensive genetic diversity and low linkage disequilibrium within the COMT locus in maize exotic populations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongsheng; Blanco, Michael; Ji, Qing; Frei, Ursula Karoline; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The caffeic acid 3-O-methytransferase (COMT) gene is a prime candidate for cell wall digestibility improvement based on the characterization of brown midrib-3 mutants. We compared the genetic diversity and linkage disequilibrium at this locus between exotic populations sampled within the Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) project and 70 inbred lines. In total, we investigated 55 exotic COMT alleles and discovered more than 400 polymorphisms in a 2.2 kb region with pairwise nucleotide diversity (π) up to 0.017, much higher than reported π values of various genes in inbred lines. The ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous SNPs was 3:1 in exotic populations, and significantly higher than the 1:1 ratio for inbred lines. Selection tests detected selection signature in this gene in both pools, but with different evolution patterns. The linkage disequilibrium decay in exotic populations was at least four times more rapid than for inbred lines with r²>0.1 persisting only up to 100 bp. In conclusion, the alleles sampled in the GEM Project offer a valuable genetic resource to broaden genetic variation for the COMT gene, and likely other genes, in inbred background. Moreover, the low linkage disequilibrium makes this material suitable for high resolution association analyses.

  19. Genetic Map-Based Location of the Red Clover (Trifolium pratense L.) Gametophytic Self-incompatibility Locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover is a hermaphadidic allogamous diploid (2n = 2x = 14) with a homomorphic gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) system red clover (Trifolium pratense L.). Red clover GSI has long been studied and it is thought that the genetic control of GSI constitutes a single locus. Although GSI gene...

  20. Evidence for weak genetic recombination at the PTP2 locus of Nosema ceranae.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Moracho, Tamara; Bartolomé, Carolina; Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Higes, Mariano; Maside, Xulio

    2015-04-01

    The microsporidian Nosema ceranae is an emergent pathogen that threatens the health of honeybees and other pollinators all over the world. Its recent rapid spread across a wide variety of host species and environments demonstrated an enhanced ability of adaptation, which seems to contradict the lack of evidence for genetic recombination and the absence of a sexual stage in its life cycle. Here we retrieved fresh data of the patterns of genetic variation at the PTP2 locus in naturally infected Apis mellifera colonies, by means of single genome amplification. This technique, designed to prevent the formation of chimeric haplotypes during polymerase chain reaction (PCR), provides more reliable estimates of the diversity levels and haplotype structure than standard PCR-cloning methods. Our results are consistent with low but significant rates of recombination in the history of the haplotypes detected: estimates of the population recombination rate are of the order of 30 and support recent evidence for unexpectedly high levels of variation of the parasites within honeybee colonies. These observations suggest the existence of a diploid stage at some point in the life cycle of this parasite and are relevant for our understanding of the dynamics of its expanding population.

  1. The Salmonella typhimurium mar locus: molecular and genetic analyses and assessment of its role in virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Sulavik, M C; Dazer, M; Miller, P F

    1997-01-01

    The marRAB operon is a regulatory locus that controls multiple drug resistance in Escherichia coli. marA encodes a positive regulator of the antibiotic resistance response, acting by altering the expression of unlinked genes. marR encodes a repressor of marRAB transcription and controls the production of MarA in response to environmental signals. A molecular and genetic study of the homologous operon in Salmonella typhimurium was undertaken, and the role of marA in virulence in a murine model was assessed. Expression of E. coli marA (marAEC) present on a multicopy plasmid in S. typhimurium resulted in a multiple antibiotic resistance (Mar) phenotype, suggesting that a similar regulon exists in this organism. A genomic plasmid library containing S. typhimurium chromosomal sequences was introduced into an E. coli strain that was deleted for the mar locus and contained a single-copy marR'-'lacZ translational fusion. Plasmid clones that contained both S. typhimurium marR (marRSt) and marA (marASt) genes were identified as those that were capable of repressing expression of the fusion and which resulted in a Mar phenotype. The predicted amino acid sequences of MarRSt, MarASt, and MarBSt were 91, 86, and 42% identical, respectively, to the same genes from E. coli, while the operator/promoter region of the operon was 86% identical to the same 98-nucleotide-upstream region in E. coli. The marRAB transcriptional start sites for both organisms were determined by primer extension, and a marRABSt transcript of approximately 1.1 kb was identified by Northern blot analysis. Its accumulation was shown to be inducible by sodium salicylate. Open reading frames flanking the marRAB operon were also conserved. An S. typhimurium marA disruption strain was constructed by an allelic exchange method and compared to the wild-type strain for virulence in a murine BALB/c infection model. No effect on virulence was noted. The endogenous S. typhimurium plasmid that is associated with virulence

  2. Identification of a genetic locus for ichthyosis vulgaris on chromosome 10q22.3-q24.2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Yang, Qingyu; Wang, Xu; Feng, Aiping; Yang, Tao; Yang, Rong; Wang, Pengyun; Yuang, Mingxiong; Liu, Mugen; Liu, Jing Yu; Wang, Qing K

    2008-06-01

    Ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) is one of the most commonly inherited disorders and has an estimated prevalence rate of 2.29% in China. To date, only one gene responsible for IV, the filaggrin gene (FLG), was identified, but genetic heterogeneity exists. In this study, two Chinese families with autosomal-dominant IV were genetically characterized. The FLG gene was first excluded as the disease-causing gene in the two families. The larger family was then characterized by genome-wide linkage analysis to identify a new genetic locus for IV. Significant linkage was identified with markers on chromosome 10q22.3-q24.2 with a maximum LOD score of 3.19. No other markers showed a LOD score of >1.5. Fine mapping defined the new genetic locus within a 20.7 cM region between markers D10S569 and D10S1709. The second family also showed positive linkage to the same 10q22.3-q24.2 region. The combined maximum LOD score in the two families was 3.95. Identification of linkage in two independent families provides strong genetic evidence that a previously unreported gene for IV is located on chromosome 10q22.3-q24.2. Future studies of the candidate genes at the 10q IV locus will identify a specific gene, which will provide insights into the pathogenesis of IV.

  3. PHACTR1 Is a Genetic Susceptibility Locus for Fibromuscular Dysplasia Supporting Its Complex Genetic Pattern of Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Nathan R.; Castro-Vega, Luis-Jaime; Katz, Alexander; D’Escamard, Valentina; Tréard, Cyrielle; Fraher, Daniel; Albuisson, Juliette; Kadian-Dodov, Daniella; Ye, Zi; Austin, Erin; Yang, Min-Lee; Hunker, Kristina; Cusi, Daniele; Galan, Pilar; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Jouven, Xavier; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Bruneval, Patrick; Hyun Kim, Esther Soo; Olin, Jeffrey W.; Azizi, Michel; Plouin, Pierre-François; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Milan, David J.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila

    2016-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic vascular disease leading to stenosis, dissection and aneurysm affecting mainly the renal and cerebrovascular arteries. FMD is often an underdiagnosed cause of hypertension and stroke, has higher prevalence in females (~80%) but its pathophysiology is unclear. We analyzed ~26K common variants (MAF>0.05) generated by exome-chip arrays in 249 FMD patients and 689 controls. We replicated 13 loci (P<10−4) in 402 cases and 2,537 controls and confirmed an association between FMD and a variant in the phosphatase and actin regulator 1 gene (PHACTR1). Three additional case control cohorts including 512 cases and 669 replicated this result and overall reached the genomic level of significance (OR = 1.39, P = 7.4×10−10, 1,154 cases and 3,895 controls). The top variant, rs9349379, is intronic to PHACTR1, a risk locus for coronary artery disease, migraine, and cervical artery dissection. The analyses of geometrical parameters of carotids from ~2,500 healthy volunteers indicate higher intima media thickness (P = 1.97×10−4) and wall to lumen ratio (P = 0.002) in rs9349379-A carriers, suggesting indices of carotid hypertrophy previously described in carotids of FMD patients. Immunohistochemistry detected PHACTR1 in endothelium and smooth muscle cells of FMD and normal human carotids. The expression of PHACTR1 by genotypes in primary human fibroblasts showed higher expression in rs9349379-A carriers (N = 86, P = 0.003). Phactr1 knockdown in zebrafish resulted in dilated vessels indicating subtle impaired vascular development. We report the first susceptibility locus for FMD and provide evidence for a complex genetic pattern of inheritance and indices of shared pathophysiology between FMD and other cardiovascular and neurovascular diseases. PMID:27792790

  4. More than Meets the Eye: the Relationship between Pupil Size and Locus Coeruleus Activity.

    PubMed

    Costa, Vincent D; Rudebeck, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    Using both direct neural recordings and electrical microstimulation, Joshi et al. (2016) show that locus coeruleus (LC) activity closely matches moment-to-moment changes in pupil size. But what causes these two measures to be related is not straightforward. PMID:26748086

  5. Genetic and molecular analyses of picA, a plant-inducible locus on the Agrobacterium tumefaciens chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Rong, L J; Karcher, S J; Gelvin, S B

    1991-01-01

    picA is an Agrobacterium tumefaciens chromosomal locus, identified by Mu d11681 mutagenesis, that is inducible by certain acidic polysaccharides found in carrot root extract. Cloning and genetic analysis of a picA::lacZ fusion defined a region of the picA promoter that is responsible for the induction of this locus. Furthermore, we identified a possible negative regulator of picA expression upstream of the picA locus. This sequence, denoted pgl, has extensive homology to polygalacturonase genes from several organisms and inhibited the induction of the picA promoter when present in multiple copies in A. tumefaciens. DNA sequence analysis indicated at least two long open reading frames (ORFs) in the picA region. S1 nuclease mapping was used to identify the transcription initiation site of picA. Mutation of ORF1, but not ORF2, of the picA locus was responsible for an increased aggregation of A. tumefaciens, forming "ropes" in the presence of pea root cap cells. In addition, a potato tuber disk virulence assay indicated that a preinduced picA mutant was more virulent than was the wild-type control, a further indication that the picA locus regulates the surface properties of the bacterium in the presence of plant cells or plant cell extracts. Images PMID:1860822

  6. Functional Analysis of APOE Locus Genetic Variation Implicates Regional Enhancers in the Regulation of Both TOMM40 and APOE

    PubMed Central

    Bekris, L.M.; Lutz, F.; Yu, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic variation within the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE) locus is associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease risk and quantitative traits as well as apoE expression in multiple tissues. The aim of this investigation was to explore the influence of APOE locus cis-regulatory element enhancer region genetic variation on regional gene promoter activity. Luciferase reporter constructs containing haplotypes of APOE locus gene promoters; APOE, APOC1, and TOMM40, and regional putative enhancers; TOMM40 IVS2-4, TOMM40 IVS6 poly-T, as well as previously described enhancers; ME1, or BCR, were evaluated for their effects on luciferase activity in 3 human cell lines. Results of this investigation demonstrate that in SHSY5Y cells, the APOE promoter is significantly influenced by the TOMM40 IVS2-4 and ME1 and the TOMM40 promoter is significantly influenced by the TOMM40 IVS6 poly-T, ME1 and BCR. In HepG2 cells, theTOMM40 promoter is significantly influenced by all four enhancers, whereas the APOE promoter is not influenced by any of the enhancers. The main novel finding of this investigation was that multiple APOE locus cis-elements influence both APOE and TOMM40 promoter activity according to haplotype and cell type suggesting that a complex transcriptional regulatory structure modulates regional expression. PMID:22089642

  7. Mapping a new genetic locus for X linked retinitis pigmentosa to Xq28.

    PubMed

    Melamud, A; Shen, G-Q; Chung, D; Xi, Q; Simpson, E; Li, L; Peachey, N S; Zegarra, H; Hagstrom, S A; Wang, Q K; Traboulsi, E I

    2006-06-01

    We have defined a new genetic locus for an X linked form of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) on chromosome Xq28. We examined 15 members of a family in which RP appeared to be transmitted in an X linked manner. Ocular examinations were performed, and fundus photographs and electroretinograms were obtained for selected patients. Blood samples were obtained from all patients and an additional seven family members who were not given examinations. Visual acuity in four affected individuals ranged from 20/40 to 20/80+. Patients described the onset of night blindness and colour vision defects in the second decade of life, with the earliest at 13 years of age. Examined affected individuals had constricted visual fields and retinal findings compatible with RP. Based on full field electroretinography, cone function was more severely reduced than rod function. Female carriers had no ocular signs or symptoms and slightly reduced cone electroretinographic responses. Affected and non-affected family members were genotyped for 20 polymorphic markers on the X-chromosome spaced at 10 cM intervals. Genotyping data were analysed using GeneMapper software. Genotyping and linkage analyses identified significant linkage to markers DXS8061, DXS1073, and DXS1108 with two point LOD scores of 2.06, 2.17, and 2.20, respectively. Haplotype analysis revealed segregation of the disease phenotype with markers at Xq28. PMID:16740911

  8. Genetic basis of climatic adaptation in scots pine by bayesian quantitative trait locus analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Hurme, P; Sillanpää, M J; Arjas, E; Repo, T; Savolainen, O

    2000-01-01

    We examined the genetic basis of large adaptive differences in timing of bud set and frost hardiness between natural populations of Scots pine. As a mapping population, we considered an "open-pollinated backcross" progeny by collecting seeds of a single F(1) tree (cross between trees from southern and northern Finland) growing in southern Finland. Due to the special features of the design (no marker information available on grandparents or the father), we applied a Bayesian quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping method developed previously for outcrossed offspring. We found four potential QTL for timing of bud set and seven for frost hardiness. Bayesian analyses detected more QTL than ANOVA for frost hardiness, but the opposite was true for bud set. These QTL included alleles with rather large effects, and additionally smaller QTL were supported. The largest QTL for bud set date accounted for about a fourth of the mean difference between populations. Thus, natural selection during adaptation has resulted in selection of at least some alleles of rather large effect. PMID:11063704

  9. Genetic changes at the transferrin locus in the red-backed vole (Clethrionomys gapperi)

    SciTech Connect

    Mihok, S.; Fuller, W.A.; Canham, R.P.; McPhee, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Genetic changes at the transferrin locus in Clethrionomys gapperi were intermittently monitored in a subarctic population from 1966 to 1978. Over this 13-year period, only minor fluctuations in gene frequency were observed. Gene frequency of Tf/sup J/ increased over winter during declines from high nonbreeding density in autumn. This phenomenon may have been responsible for a general negative correlation between the frequency of Tf/sup J/ and population density. Outside of winter, no frequency changes were detected within trappable age-classes of voles from relatively discrete seasonal generations. Excess of Tf/sup M/J/ heterozygotes occurred in three of four samples of young voles that matured in the year of their birth. A similar heterozygote excess occurred in one of six samples of overwintered voles taken in a year characterized by a high rate of population growth. These results suggest that selection may occur during ecologically different conditions of high density or population growth. A heterozygote advantage in early-season cohorts may account for the maintenance of transferrin polymorphism. This hypothesis requires further data on the breeding structure and early life history of voles.

  10. Philosophy of race meets population genetics.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Quayshawn

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, I respond to four common semantic and metaphysical objections that philosophers of race have launched at scholars who interpret recent human genetic clustering results in population genetics as evidence for biological racial realism. I call these objections 'the discreteness objection', 'the visibility objection', 'the very important objection', and 'the objectively real objection.' After motivating each objection, I show that each one stems from implausible philosophical assumptions about the relevant meaning of 'race' or the nature of biological racial realism. In order to be constructive, I end by offering some advice for how we can productively critique attempts to defend biological racial realism based on recent human genetic clustering results. I also offer a clarification of the relevant human-population genetic research. PMID:25963045

  11. Philosophy of race meets population genetics.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Quayshawn

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, I respond to four common semantic and metaphysical objections that philosophers of race have launched at scholars who interpret recent human genetic clustering results in population genetics as evidence for biological racial realism. I call these objections 'the discreteness objection', 'the visibility objection', 'the very important objection', and 'the objectively real objection.' After motivating each objection, I show that each one stems from implausible philosophical assumptions about the relevant meaning of 'race' or the nature of biological racial realism. In order to be constructive, I end by offering some advice for how we can productively critique attempts to defend biological racial realism based on recent human genetic clustering results. I also offer a clarification of the relevant human-population genetic research.

  12. A multi-stage association study identifies a breast cancer genetic locus at NCOA7

    PubMed Central

    Higginbotham, Kathryn S. P.; Breyer, Joan P.; Bradley, Kevin M.; Schuyler, Peggy A.; Plummer, W. Dale; Freudenthal, Marcia E.; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A.; Sanders, Melinda E.; Page, David L.; Parl, Fritz F.; Egan, Kathleen M.; Dupont, William D.; Smith, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen metabolism and growth factor signaling pathway genes play key roles in breast cancer development. We evaluated associations between breast cancer and tagging SNPs of 107 candidate genes of these pathways using single allele- and haplotype-based tests. We first sought concordance of associations between two study populations: the Nashville Breast Cohort (510 cases, 988 controls), and the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility breast cancer study (1,145 cases, 1,142 controls). Findings across the two study populations were concordant at tagging SNPs of six genes, and at previously published SNPs of FGFR2. We sought further replication of results for EGFR, NCOA7, and FGFR2 in the independent Collaborative Breast Cancer Study (1,552 cases, 1,185 controls). Associations at NCOA7 and FGFR2 replicated across all three studies. The association at NCOA7 on 6q22.32, detected by a haplotype spanning the initial protein-coding exon (5′ - rs9375411, rs11967627, rs549438, rs529858, rs490361, rs17708107 - 3′), has not been previously reported. The haplotype had a significant inverse association with breast cancer in each study (ORHet 0.69 (NBC), 0.76 (CGEMS), 0.79 (CBCS)), and a meta-analysis ORHet of 0.75 (95% CI 0.65-0.87, P = 1.4 × 10-4) in the combined study populations. The haplotype frequency was 0.07 among cases, and 0.09 among controls; homozygotes were infrequent and each ORHom was not significant. NCOA7 encodes a nuclear receptor co-activator that interacts with estrogen receptor α to modulate its activity. These observations provide consistent evidence that genetic variants at the NCOA7 locus may confer a reduced risk of breast cancer. PMID:21610108

  13. A multistage association study identifies a breast cancer genetic locus at NCOA7.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Kathryn S P; Breyer, Joan P; Bradley, Kevin M; Schuyler, Peggy A; Plummer, W Dale; Freudenthal, Marcia E; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A; Sanders, Melinda E; Page, David L; Parl, Fritz F; Egan, Kathleen M; Dupont, William D; Smith, Jeffrey R

    2011-06-01

    Estrogen metabolism and growth factor signaling pathway genes play key roles in breast cancer development. We evaluated associations between breast cancer and tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of 107 candidate genes of these pathways using single allele- and haplotype-based tests. We first sought concordance of associations between two study populations: the Nashville Breast Cohort (NBC; 510 cases, 988 controls), and the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) breast cancer study (1,145 cases, 1,142 controls). Findings across the two study populations were concordant at tagging SNPs of six genes, and at previously published SNPs of FGFR2. We sought further replication of results for EGFR, NCOA7, and FGFR2 in the independent Collaborative Breast Cancer Study (CBCS; 1,552 cases, 1,185 controls). Associations at NCOA7 and FGFR2 replicated across all three studies. The association at NCOA7 on 6q22.32, detected by a haplotype spanning the initial protein-coding exon (5'-rs9375411, rs11967627, rs549438, rs529858, rs490361, rs17708107-3'), has not been previously reported. The haplotype had a significant inverse association with breast cancer in each study [OR(Het): 0.69 (NBC), 0.76 (CGEMS), 0.79 (CBCS)], and a meta-analysis OR(Het) of 0.75 (95% CI, 0.65-0.87, P = 1.4 × 10(-4)) in the combined study populations. The haplotype frequency was 0.07 among cases, and 0.09 among controls; homozygotes were infrequent and each OR(Hom) was not significant. NCOA7 encodes a nuclear receptor coactivator that interacts with estrogen receptor α to modulate its activity. These observations provide consistent evidence that genetic variants at the NCOA7 locus may confer a reduced risk of breast cancer. PMID:21610108

  14. Molecular genetic analysis of the cytochrome P450-debrisoquine hydroxylase locus and association with cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C A; Moss, J E; Gough, A C; Spurr, N K; Wolf, C R

    1992-01-01

    The cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases play a central role in the metabolism of chemical carcinogens. The action of these enzymes can lead to either carcinogen detoxication or activation. Differences in P450 expression in animal models give rise to large differences in susceptibility to chemical carcinogens, so genetic polymorphisms in P450 expression may be expected to be an important factor in individual human susceptibility to cancer. Of particular interest is the genetic polymorphism at the cytochrome P450-debrisoquine/sparteine hydroxylase locus (CYP2D6). Although this is a minor liver P450, its polymorphic expression is associated with the abnormal metabolism of at least 30 therapeutic drugs, including beta-blockers and tricyclic antidepressants. Conflicting reports have been made on the association of this polymorphism with cancer susceptibility. This disagreement may be attributable to limitations of the phenotyping assay used to identify affected individuals (poor metabolizers, PMs). In order to clarify these anomalies, we have developed a simple DNA-based assay with which we can identify the majority of PMs. The assay is centered around the primary gene defect responsible for the polymorphism, a G to A transition at the junction of intron 3/exon 4 which results in a frame-shift in the resultant mRNA. The frequency of this mutation is 70-80% in PMs. We have studied the frequency of mutated alleles in a control population and in a wide range of cancer patients. No association between this polymorphism and lung cancer susceptibility was observed; however, in other populations of cancer patients some very interesting shifts were found in the proportion of PMs and heterozygotes from that in the normal population. PMID:1486838

  15. Genetic characterization of human-pathogenic Cyclospora cayetanensis parasites from three endemic regions at the 18S ribosomal RNA locus.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Ortega, Ynes; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil

    2014-03-01

    Cyclospora cayetanensis is an apicocomplexan parasite that infects the gastrointestinal tract and causes acute diarrheal disease in humans. In recent years, this human-pathogenic parasite has led to several foodborne outbreaks in the United States and Canada, mostly associated with imported produce. Understanding the biology and epidemiology of C. cayetanensis is difficult because little is known about its origin, possible zoonotic reservoirs, and genetic relationships with other coccidian parasites. Recently, we developed a 70kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) gene based nested PCR protocol for detection of C. cayetanensis parasite and sequenced the PCR products of 16 human isolates from Nepal, Mexico, and Peru. In this study, we have characterized the regions of 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of 17 human C. cayetanensis isolates for molecular detection, and also to ascertain the genetic diversity of this parasite. The 18S rRNA primer sets were further tested by PCR amplification followed by nucleotide sequencing of the PCR amplified products of previously characterized C. cayetanensis isolates from three endemic regions at HSP70 locus. Although no genetic polymorphism was observed at the regions of HSP70 locus characterized in our previous study, the data analysis of this study revealed a minor genetic diversity at the 18S rRNA locus among the C. cayetanensis isolates. The 18S rRNA gene-based nested PCR protocol provides a useful genetic marker for the detection of C. cayetanensis parasite and confirms it as a genetically distinct species in genus Cyclospora. The results also supported lack of geographic segregation and existence of genetically homogeneous population for the C. cayetanensis parasites both at the HSP70 as well as at the18S rRNA loci.

  16. [Properties of the molecular-genetic individual identification system on the basis of D1S111 locus in terms of forensic-expert typing of DNA].

    PubMed

    Efremov, I A; Lebedeva, N N; Zemskova, E Iu; Ivanov, P L

    2005-01-01

    The article presents a comparative analysis of reference nucleotide sequences for locus D1S111, estimation of basic parameters of this locus polymorphism in the representative sample of Russian population for use as an individual identification molecular-genetic system in forensic expert examinations.

  17. Comparative analysis of the within-population genetic structure in wild cherry (Prunus avium L.) at the self-incompatibility locus and nuclear microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Schueler, Silvio; Tusch, Alexandra; Scholz, Florian

    2006-10-01

    Gametophytic self-incompatibility (SI) systems in plants exhibit high polymorphism at the SI controlling S-locus because individuals with rare alleles have a higher probability to successfully pollinate other plants than individuals with more frequent alleles. This process, referred to as frequency-dependent selection, is expected to shape number, frequency distribution, and spatial distribution of self-incompatibility alleles in natural populations. We investigated the genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure within a Prunus avium population at two contrasting gene loci: nuclear microsatellites and the S-locus. The S-locus revealed a higher diversity (15 alleles) than the eight microsatellites (4-12 alleles). Although the frequency distribution of S-alleles differed significantly from the expected equal distribution, the S-locus showed a higher evenness than the microsatellites (Shannon's evenness index for the S-locus: E = 0.91; for the microsatellites: E = 0.48-0.83). Also, highly significant deviations from neutrality were found for the S-locus whereas only minor deviations were found for two of eight microsatellites. A comparison of the frequency distribution of S-alleles in three age-cohorts revealed no significant differences, suggesting that different levels of selection acting on the S-locus or on S-linked sites might also affect the distribution and dynamics of S-alleles. Autocorrelation analysis revealed a weak but significant spatial genetic structure for the multilocus average of the microsatellites and for the S-locus, but could not ascertain differences in the extent of spatial genetic structure between these locus types. An indirect estimate of gene dispersal, which was obtained to explain this spatial genetic pattern, indicated high levels of gene dispersal within our population (sigma(g) = 106 m). This high gene dispersal, which may be partly due to the self-incompatibility system itself, aids the effective gene flow of the

  18. The X-linked F cell production locus: Genetic mapping and role in fetal hemoglobin production

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.C.; Smith, K.D.; Moore, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    Postnatal fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) production is confined to a subset of erythocytes termed F-cells. There is a 10-20 fold variation in F-cell production in sickle cell disease (SCD) and normal individuals. Most of the variation in F-cell production has been attributed to a diallelic (High, Low) X-linked gene, the F-cell production (FCP) locus that we recently mapped to Xp22.2-22.3 (LOD=4.56, theta=0.04). Using multiple regression analysis in 262 Jamaican SCD patients we determined the relative contribution of the FCP locus and other variables previously associated with variation in Hb F level (gender, age, beta-globin haplotypes, number of alpha-globin genes and the FCP locus phenotypes). When the FCP locus is in the regression model, the FCP locus alone accounts for approximately 40% of the variation in Hb F level while the contribution of age, alpha-globin gene number, and beta-globin haplotypes was insignificant. When individuals with High FCP allele are removed from the analysis, the beta globin haplotype now contribute to >10% of the Hb F variation. We conclude that the X-linked FCP locus is the major determinant of all known variables in Hb F production. Using 4 highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat markers that we identified from cosmids in Xp22.2-22.3, have localized the FCP locus to a 1 Mb minimal candidate region between DXS143 and DXS410.

  19. A discrete genetic locus confers xyloglucan metabolism in select human gut Bacteroidetes

    PubMed Central

    Larsbrink, Johan; Rogers, Theresa E.; Hemsworth, Glyn R.; McKee, Lauren S.; Tauzin, Alexandra S.; Spadiut, Oliver; Klinter, Stefan; Pudlo, Nicholas A.; Urs, Karthik; Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Creagh, A. Louise; Haynes, Charles A.; Kelly, Amelia G.; Cederholm, Stefan Nilsson; Davies, Gideon J.; Martens, Eric C.; Brumer, Harry

    2014-01-01

    A well-balanced human diet includes a significant intake of non-starch polysaccharides, collectively termed “dietary fibre,” from the cell walls of diverse fruits and vegetables.1 Due to a paucity of alimentary enzymes encoded by the human genome,2 our ability to derive energy from dietary fibre depends on saccharification and fermentation of complex carbohydrates by the massive microbial community residing in our distal gut.3,4 The xyloglucans (XyGs), in particular, are a ubiquitous family of highly branched plant cell wall polysaccharides5,6 whose mechanism(s) of degradation in the human gut and consequent importance in nutrition was heretofore unknown.1,7,8 Here, we demonstrate that a single, complex gene locus in Bacteroides ovatus confers xyloglucan catabolism in this common colonic symbiont. Through targeted gene disruption, biochemical analysis of all predicted glycoside hydrolases and carbohydrate-binding proteins, and three-dimensional structural determination of the vanguard endo-xyloglucanase, we reveal the molecular mechanisms through which XyGs are hydrolysed to component monosaccharides for further metabolism. We also observe that orthologous xyloglucan utilization loci (XyGULs) serve as genetic markers of xyloglucan catabolism in Bacteroidetes, that XyGULs are restricted to a limited number of phylogenetically diverse strains, and that XyGULs are ubiquitous in surveyed human metagenomes. Our findings reveal that the metabolism of even highly abundant components of dietary fibre may be mediated by niche species, which has immediate fundamental and practical implications for gut symbiont population ecology in the context of human diet, nutrition and health.9–12 PMID:24463512

  20. Genetic and physical maps around the sex-determining M-locus of the dioecious plant asparagus.

    PubMed

    Telgmann-Rauber, Alexa; Jamsari, Ari; Kinney, Michael S; Pires, J Chris; Jung, Christian

    2007-09-01

    Asparagus officinalis L. is a dioecious plant. A region called the M-locus located on a pair of homomorphic sex chromosomes controls the sexual dimorphism in asparagus. The aim of this work was to clone the region determining sex in asparagus from its position in the genome. The structure of the region encompassing M should be investigated and compared to the sex-determining regions in other dioecious model species. To establish an improved basis for physical mapping, a high-resolution genetic map was enriched with AFLP markers closely linked to the target locus by carrying out a bulked segregant analysis. By screening a BAC library with AFLP- and STS-markers followed by chromosome walking, a physical map with eight contigs could be established. However, the gaps between the contigs could not be closed due to a plethora of repetitive elements. Surprisingly, two of the contigs on one side of the M-locus did not overlap although they have been established with two markers, which mapped in a distance as low as 0.25 cM flanking the sex locus. Thus, the clustering of the markers indicates a reduced recombination frequency within the M-region. On the opposite side of the M-locus, a contig was mapped in a distance of 0.38 cM. Four closely linked BAC clones were partially sequenced and 64 putative ORFs were identified. Interestingly, only 25% of the ORFs showed sequence similarity to known proteins and ESTs. In addition, an accumulation of repetitive sequences and a low gene density was revealed in the sex-determining region of asparagus. Molecular cytogenetic and sequence analysis of BACs flanking the M-locus indicate that the BACs contain highly repetitive sequences that localize to centromeric and pericentromeric locations on all asparagus chromosomes, which hindered the localization of the M-locus to the single pair of sex chromosomes. We speculate that dioecious Silene, papaya and Asparagus species may represent three stages in the evolution of XX, XY sex

  1. Genetic and physical maps around the sex-determining M-locus of the dioecious plant asparagus.

    PubMed

    Telgmann-Rauber, Alexa; Jamsari, Ari; Kinney, Michael S; Pires, J Chris; Jung, Christian

    2007-09-01

    Asparagus officinalis L. is a dioecious plant. A region called the M-locus located on a pair of homomorphic sex chromosomes controls the sexual dimorphism in asparagus. The aim of this work was to clone the region determining sex in asparagus from its position in the genome. The structure of the region encompassing M should be investigated and compared to the sex-determining regions in other dioecious model species. To establish an improved basis for physical mapping, a high-resolution genetic map was enriched with AFLP markers closely linked to the target locus by carrying out a bulked segregant analysis. By screening a BAC library with AFLP- and STS-markers followed by chromosome walking, a physical map with eight contigs could be established. However, the gaps between the contigs could not be closed due to a plethora of repetitive elements. Surprisingly, two of the contigs on one side of the M-locus did not overlap although they have been established with two markers, which mapped in a distance as low as 0.25 cM flanking the sex locus. Thus, the clustering of the markers indicates a reduced recombination frequency within the M-region. On the opposite side of the M-locus, a contig was mapped in a distance of 0.38 cM. Four closely linked BAC clones were partially sequenced and 64 putative ORFs were identified. Interestingly, only 25% of the ORFs showed sequence similarity to known proteins and ESTs. In addition, an accumulation of repetitive sequences and a low gene density was revealed in the sex-determining region of asparagus. Molecular cytogenetic and sequence analysis of BACs flanking the M-locus indicate that the BACs contain highly repetitive sequences that localize to centromeric and pericentromeric locations on all asparagus chromosomes, which hindered the localization of the M-locus to the single pair of sex chromosomes. We speculate that dioecious Silene, papaya and Asparagus species may represent three stages in the evolution of XX, XY sex

  2. Genetic homogeneity of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease: tight linkage to the proteolipoprotein locus in 16 affected families. PMD Clinical Group.

    PubMed Central

    Boespflug-Tanguy, O.; Mimault, C.; Melki, J.; Cavagna, A.; Giraud, G.; Pham Dinh, D.; Dastugue, B.; Dautigny, A.

    1994-01-01

    Among the numerous leukodystrophies that have an early onset and no biochemical markers, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is one that can be identified using strict clinical criteria and demonstrating an abnormal formation of myelin that is restricted to the CNS in electrophysiological studies and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In PMD, 12 different base substitutions and one total deletion of the genomic region containing the PLP gene have been reported, but, despite extensive analysis, PLP exon mutations have been found in only 10%-25% of the families analyzed. To test the genetic homogeneity of this disease, we have carried out linkage analysis with polymorphic markers of the PLP genomic region in 16 families selected on strict diagnostic criteria of PMD. We observed a tight linkage of the PMD locus with markers of the PLP gene (cDNA PLP, exon IV polymorphism) and of the Xq22 region (DXS17, DXS94, and DXS287), whereas the markers located more proximally (DXYS1X and DXS3) or distally (DXS11) were not linked to the PMD locus. Multipoint analysis gave a maximal location score for the PMD locus (13.98) and the PLP gene (8.32) in the same interval between DXS94 and DXS287, suggesting that in all families PMD is linked to the PLP locus. Mutations of the extraexonic PLP gene sequences or of another unknown close gene could be involved in PMD. In an attempt to identify molecular defects of this genomic region that are responsible for PMD, these results meant that RFLP analysis could be used to improve genetic counseling for the numerous affected families in which a PLP exon mutation could not be demonstrated. PMID:7915877

  3. Genetic homogeneity of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease: Tight linkage to the proteolipoprotein locus in 16 affected families

    SciTech Connect

    Boespflug-Tanguy, O.; Mimault, C.; Cavagna, A.; Giraud, G.; Dastugue, B.; Melki, J.; Dinh, D.P.; Dautigny, A.

    1994-09-01

    Among the numerous leukodystrophies that have an early onset and no biochemical markers, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is one that can be identified using strict clinical criteria and demonstrating an abnormal formation of myelin that is restricted to the CNS in electrophysiological studies and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In PMD, 12 different base substitutions and one total deletion of the genomic region containing the PLP gene have been reported, but, despite extensive analysis, PLP exon mutations have been found in only 10%-25% of the families analyzed. To test the genetic homogeneity of this disease, the authors have carried out linkage analysis with polymorphic markers of the PLP genomic region in 16 families selected on strict diagnostic criteria of PMD. They observed a tight linkage of the PMD locus with markers of the PLP gene (cDNA PLP, exon IV polymorphism) and of the Xq22 region (DXS17, DXS94, and DXS287), whereas the markers located more proximally (DXYS1X and DXS3) or distally (DXS11) were not linked to the PMD locus. Multipoint analysis gave a maximal location score for the PMD locus (13.98) and the PLP gene (8.32) in the same interval between DXS94 and DXS287, suggesting that in all families PMD is linked to the PLP locus. Mutations of the extraexonic PLP gene sequences or of another unknown close gene could be involved in PMD. In an attempt to identify molecular defects of this genomic region that are responsible for PMD, these results meant that RFLP analysis could be used to improve genetic counseling for the numerous affected families in which a PLP exon mutation could not be demonstrated. 39 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Genetic instability in Drosophila melanogaster: evidence for regulation, excision and transposition at the white locus.

    PubMed

    Rasmuson, B; Montell, I; Rasmuson, A; Svahlin, H; Westerberg, B M

    1980-01-01

    An unstable long tandem duplication which includes the white locus twice, marked with wsp in the left and w17g in the right locus, when kept in males has been found to produce red-eyed sons which have lost the long duplication and with it the wsp and w17g mutants. Such exceptions were produced also when w17g had been exchanged for wa. Stocks originating from these exceptions are unstable, producing: 1) zeste males, also unstable, 2) w- deletions, stable, 3) transpositions of the white locus to sites in other chromosomes. The instability is interpreted as the effect of an IS element, within or adjacent to the white locus, which is supposed to retain a duplication of the proximal zeste interacting part of this locus. According to the orientation of the IS element the duplicated part can be active or inactive, giving a zeste or red eye phenotype. The frequency of exceptional offspring after X-ray treatment of the red and zeste unstable stocks have been compared to stable stocks with corresponding genotypes. PMID:6247608

  5. A MULTI-LOCUS, MULTI-TAXA PHYLOGEOGRAPHICAL ANALYSIS OF GENETIC DIVERSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In addition to measuring spatial patterns of genetic diversity, population genetic measures of biological resources should include temporal data that indicate whether the observed patterns are the result of historical or contemporary processes. In general, genetic measures focus...

  6. Genetic and molecular characterization of the I locus of Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, C Eduardo; Astua-Monge, Gustavo; Jones, Valerie; Plyler, Tammy R; Sakiyama, Ney S; Mackenzie, Sally A

    2006-02-01

    The I locus of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, controls the development of four different phenotypes in response to inoculation with Bean common mosaic virus, Bean common mosaic necrosis virus, several other related potyviruses, and one comovirus. We have generated a high-resolution linkage map around this locus and have aligned it with a physical map constructed with BAC clones. These clones were obtained from a library of the cultivar "Sprite," which carries the dominant allele at the I locus. We have identified a large cluster of TIR-NBS-LRR sequences associated within this locus, which extends over a distance >425 kb. Bean cultivars from the Andean or Mesoamerican gene pool that contain the dominant allele share the same haplotypes as revealed by gel blot hybridizations with a TIR probe. In contrast, beans with a recessive allele display simpler and variable haplotypes. A survey of wild accessions from Argentina to Mexico showed that this multigene family has expanded significantly during evolution and domestication. RNA gel blot analysis indicated that the TIR family of genes plays a role in the response to inoculations with BCMV or BCMNV. PMID:16322513

  7. Multi-locus DNA sequencing of Toxoplasma gondii isolated from Brazilian pigs identifies genetically divergent strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five Toxoplasma gondii isolates (TgPgBr1-5) were isolated from hearts and brains of pigs freshly purchased at the market of Campos dos Goytacazes, Northern Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Four of the five isolates were highly pathogenic in mice. Four genotypes were identified. Multi-locus DNA sequenci...

  8. Assessment of polymorphic genetic markers for multi-locus typing of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Guy; Chalmers, Rachel M

    2012-10-01

    The use of high resolution molecular tools to study Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis intra-species variation is becoming common practice, but there is currently no consensus in the methods used. The most commonly applied tool is partial gp60 gene sequence analysis. However, multi-locus schemes are acknowledged to improve resolution over analysis of a single locus, which neglects potential re-assortment of genes during the sexual phase of the Cryptosporidium life-cycle. Multi-locus markers have been investigated in isolates from a variety of sampling frames, in varying combinations and using different assays and methods of analysis. To identify the most informative markers as candidates for the development of a standardised multi-locus fragment size-based typing (MLFT) scheme to integrate with epidemiological analyses, we examined the published literature. A total of 31 MLFT studies were found, employing 55 markers of which 45 were applied to both C. parvum and C. hominis. Of the studies, 11 had sufficient raw data, from three or more markers, and a sampling frame containing at least 50 samples, for meaningful in-depth analysis using assessment criteria based on the sampling frame, study size, number of markers investigated in each study, marker characteristics (>2 nucleotide repeats) and the combinations of markers generating all possible multi-locus genotypes. Markers investigated differed between C. hominis and C. parvum. When each scheme was analysed for the fewest markers required to identify 95% of all MLFTs, some redundancy was identified in all schemes; an average redundancy of 40% for C. hominis and 27% for C. parvum. Ranking markers, based on the most productive combinations, identified two different sets of potentially most informative candidate markers, one for each species. These will be subjected to technical evaluation including typability (percentage of samples generating a complete multi-locus type) and discriminatory power by

  9. The 12p13.33/RAD52 locus and genetic susceptibility to squamous cell cancers of upper aerodigestive tract.

    PubMed

    Delahaye-Sourdeix, Manon; Oliver, Javier; Timofeeva, Maria N; Gaborieau, Valérie; Johansson, Mattias; Chabrier, Amélie; Wozniak, Magdalena B; Brenner, Darren R; Vallée, Maxime P; Anantharaman, Devasena; Lagiou, Pagona; Holcátová, Ivana; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Agudo, Antonio; Castellsagué, Xavier; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Barzan, Luigi; Canova, Cristina; Thakker, Nalin S; Conway, David I; Znaor, Ariana; Healy, Claire M; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia; Lissowska, Jolanta; Fabianova, Eleonora; Mates, Ioan Nicolae; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Menezes, Ana; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Eluf-Neto, José; Boffetta, Paolo; Garrote, Leticia Fernández; Serraino, Diego; Lener, Marcin; Jaworowska, Ewa; Lubiński, Jan; Boccia, Stefania; Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Samant, Tanuja A; Mahimkar, Manoj B; Matsuo, Keitaro; Franceschi, Silvia; Byrnes, Graham; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variants located within the 12p13.33/RAD52 locus have been associated with lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC). Here, within 5,947 UADT cancers and 7,789 controls from 9 different studies, we found rs10849605, a common intronic variant in RAD52, to be also associated with upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) squamous cell carcinoma cases (OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.04-1.15, p = 6x10(-4)). We additionally identified rs10849605 as a RAD52 cis-eQTL inUADT(p = 1x10(-3)) and LUSC (p = 9x10(-4)) tumours, with the UADT/LUSC risk allele correlated with increased RAD52 expression levels. The 12p13.33 locus, encompassing rs10849605/RAD52, was identified as a significant somatic focal copy number amplification in UADT(n = 374, q-value = 0.075) and LUSC (n = 464, q-value = 0.007) tumors and correlated with higher RAD52 tumor expression levels (p = 6x10(-48) and p = 3x10(-29) in UADT and LUSC, respectively). In combination, these results implicate increased RAD52 expression in both genetic susceptibility and tumorigenesis of UADT and LUSC tumors.

  10. Correlation between genetic features of the mef(A)-msr(D) locus and erythromycin resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Luca Agostino; Di Luca, Maria Chiara; Prenna, Manuela; Petrelli, Dezemona

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the correlation between the genetic variation within mef(A)-msr(D) determinants of efflux-mediated erythromycin resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes and the level of erythromycin resistance. Twenty-eight mef(A)-positive strains were selected according to erythromycin MIC (4-32 μg/mL), and their mef(A)-msr(D) regions were sequenced. Strains were classified according to the bacteriophage carrying mef(A)-msr(D). A new Φm46.1 genetic variant was found in 8 strains out of 28 and named VP_00501.1. Degree of allelic variation was higher in mef(A) than in msr(D). Hotspots for recombination were mapped within the locus that could have shaped the apparent mosaic structure of the region. There was a general correlation between mef(A)-msr(D) sequence and erythromycin resistance level. However, lysogenic conversion of susceptible strains by mef(A)-msr(D)-carrying Φm46.1 indicated that key determinants may not all reside within the mef(A)-msr(D) locus and that horizontal gene transfer could contribute to changes in the level of antibiotic resistance in S. pyogenes.

  11. Inbreeding depression in self-incompatible North-American Arabidopsis lyrata: disentangling genomic and S-locus-specific genetic load

    PubMed Central

    Stift, M; Hunter, B D; Shaw, B; Adam, A; Hoebe, P N; Mable, B K

    2013-01-01

    Newly formed selfing lineages may express recessive genetic load and suffer inbreeding depression. This can have a genome-wide genetic basis, or be due to loci linked to genes under balancing selection. Understanding the genetic architecture of inbreeding depression is important in the context of the maintenance of self-incompatibility and understanding the evolutionary dynamics of S-alleles. We addressed this using North-American subspecies of Arabidopsis lyrata. This species is normally self-incompatible and outcrossing, but some populations have undergone a transition to selfing. The goals of this study were to: (1) quantify the strength of inbreeding depression in North-American populations of A. lyrata; and (2) disentangle the relative contribution of S-linked genetic load compared with overall inbreeding depression. We enforced selfing in self-incompatible plants with known S-locus genotype by treatment with CO2, and compared the performance of selfed vs outcrossed progeny. We found significant inbreeding depression for germination rate (δ=0.33), survival rate to 4 weeks (δ=0.45) and early growth (δ=0.07), but not for flowering rate. For two out of four S-alleles in our design, we detected significant S-linked load reflected by an under-representation of S-locus homozygotes in selfed progeny. The presence or absence of S-linked load could not be explained by the dominance level of S-alleles. Instead, the random nature of the mutation process may explain differences in the recessive deleterious load among lineages. PMID:22892638

  12. Inbreeding depression in self-incompatible North-American Arabidopsis lyrata: disentangling genomic and S-locus-specific genetic load.

    PubMed

    Stift, M; Hunter, B D; Shaw, B; Adam, A; Hoebe, P N; Mable, B K

    2013-01-01

    Newly formed selfing lineages may express recessive genetic load and suffer inbreeding depression. This can have a genome-wide genetic basis, or be due to loci linked to genes under balancing selection. Understanding the genetic architecture of inbreeding depression is important in the context of the maintenance of self-incompatibility and understanding the evolutionary dynamics of S-alleles. We addressed this using North-American subspecies of Arabidopsis lyrata. This species is normally self-incompatible and outcrossing, but some populations have undergone a transition to selfing. The goals of this study were to: (1) quantify the strength of inbreeding depression in North-American populations of A. lyrata; and (2) disentangle the relative contribution of S-linked genetic load compared with overall inbreeding depression. We enforced selfing in self-incompatible plants with known S-locus genotype by treatment with CO(2), and compared the performance of selfed vs outcrossed progeny. We found significant inbreeding depression for germination rate (δ=0.33), survival rate to 4 weeks (δ=0.45) and early growth (δ=0.07), but not for flowering rate. For two out of four S-alleles in our design, we detected significant S-linked load reflected by an under-representation of S-locus homozygotes in selfed progeny. The presence or absence of S-linked load could not be explained by the dominance level of S-alleles. Instead, the random nature of the mutation process may explain differences in the recessive deleterious load among lineages.

  13. High-density genetic map construction and identification of a locus controlling weeping trait in an ornamental woody plant (Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Qixiang; Cheng, Tangren; Yang, Weiru; Pan, Huitang; Zhong, Junjun; Huang, Long; Liu, Enze

    2015-01-01

    High-density genetic map is a valuable tool for fine mapping locus controlling a specific trait especially for perennial woody plants. In this study, we firstly constructed a high-density genetic map of mei (Prunus mume) using SLAF markers, developed by specific locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq). The linkage map contains 8,007 markers, with a mean marker distance of 0.195 cM, making it the densest genetic map for the genus Prunus. Though weeping trees are used worldwide as landscape plants, little is known about weeping controlling gene(s) (Pl). To test the utility of the high-density genetic map, we did fine-scale mapping of this important ornamental trait. In total, three statistic methods were performed progressively based on the result of inheritance analysis. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis initially revealed that a locus on linkage group 7 was strongly responsible for weeping trait. Mutmap-like strategy and extreme linkage analysis were then applied to fine map this locus within 1.14 cM. Bioinformatics analysis of the locus identified some candidate genes. The successful localization of weeping trait strongly indicates that the high-density map constructed using SLAF markers is a worthy reference for mapping important traits for woody plants. PMID:25776277

  14. High-density genetic map construction and identification of a locus controlling weeping trait in an ornamental woody plant (Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Qixiang; Cheng, Tangren; Yang, Weiru; Pan, Huitang; Zhong, Junjun; Huang, Long; Liu, Enze

    2015-06-01

    High-density genetic map is a valuable tool for fine mapping locus controlling a specific trait especially for perennial woody plants. In this study, we firstly constructed a high-density genetic map of mei (Prunus mume) using SLAF markers, developed by specific locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq). The linkage map contains 8,007 markers, with a mean marker distance of 0.195 cM, making it the densest genetic map for the genus Prunus. Though weeping trees are used worldwide as landscape plants, little is known about weeping controlling gene(s) (Pl). To test the utility of the high-density genetic map, we did fine-scale mapping of this important ornamental trait. In total, three statistic methods were performed progressively based on the result of inheritance analysis. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis initially revealed that a locus on linkage group 7 was strongly responsible for weeping trait. Mutmap-like strategy and extreme linkage analysis were then applied to fine map this locus within 1.14 cM. Bioinformatics analysis of the locus identified some candidate genes. The successful localization of weeping trait strongly indicates that the high-density map constructed using SLAF markers is a worthy reference for mapping important traits for woody plants.

  15. Population structure and genetic bottleneck in sweet cherry estimated with SSRs and the gametophytic self-incompatibility locus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Domestication and breeding involve the selection of particular phenotypes, limiting the genomic diversity of the population and creating a bottleneck. These effects can be precisely estimated when the location of domestication is established. Few analyses have focused on understanding the genetic consequences of domestication and breeding in fruit trees. In this study, we aimed to analyse genetic structure and changes in the diversity in sweet cherry Prunus avium L. Results Three subgroups were detected in sweet cherry, with one group of landraces genetically very close to the analysed wild cherry population. A limited number of SSR markers displayed deviations from the frequencies expected under neutrality. After the removal of these markers from the analysis, a very limited bottleneck was detected between wild cherries and sweet cherry landraces, with a much more pronounced bottleneck between sweet cherry landraces and modern sweet cherry varieties. The loss of diversity between wild cherries and sweet cherry landraces at the S-locus was more significant than that for microsatellites. Particularly high levels of differentiation were observed for some S-alleles. Conclusions Several domestication events may have happened in sweet cherry or/and intense gene flow from local wild cherry was probably maintained along the evolutionary history of the species. A marked bottleneck due to breeding was detected, with all markers, in the modern sweet cherry gene pool. The microsatellites did not detect the bottleneck due to domestication in the analysed sample. The vegetative propagation specific to some fruit trees may account for the differences in diversity observed at the S-locus. Our study provides insights into domestication events of cherry, however, requires confirmation on a larger sampling scheme for both sweet cherry landraces and wild cherry. PMID:20727153

  16. Age and sex based genetic locus heterogeneity in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, A.; Petronis, A.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Two genome scans for susceptibility loci for type 1 diabetes using large collections of families have recently been reported. Apart from strong linkage in both studies of the HLA region on chromosome 6p, clear consistent evidence for linkage was not observed at any other loci. One possible explanation for this is a high degree of locus heterogeneity in type 1 diabetes, and we hypothesised that the sex of affected offspring, age of diagnosis, and parental origin of shared alleles may be the bases of heterogeneity at some loci.
METHODS—Using data from a genome wide linkage study of 356 affected sib pairs with type 1 diabetes, we performed linkage analyses using parental origin of shared alleles in subgroups based on (1) sex of affected sibs and (2) age of diagnosis.
RESULTS—Among the results obtained, we observed that evidence for linkage to IDDM4 on chromosome 11q13 occurred predominantly from opposite sex, rather than same sex sib pairs. At a locus on chromosome 4q, evidence for linkage was observed in sibs where one was diagnosed above the age of 10 years and the other diagnosed below 10 years of age.
CONCLUSIONS—We show that heterogeneity tests based on age of diagnosis, sex of affected subject, and parental origin of shared alleles may be helpful in reducing locus heterogeneity in type 1 diabetes. If repeated in other samples, these findings may assist in the mapping of susceptibility loci for type 1 diabetes. Similar analyses can be recommended in other complex diseases.


Keywords: type 1 diabetes; age of diagnosis; sex; parental origin of alleles PMID:10699054

  17. Rare events in population genetics: stochastic tunneling in a two-locus model with recombination.

    PubMed

    Altland, Alexander; Fischer, Andrej; Krug, Joachim; Szendro, Ivan G

    2011-02-25

    We study the evolution of a population in a two-locus genotype space, in which the negative effects of two single mutations are overcompensated in a high-fitness double mutant. We discuss how the interplay of finite population size N and sexual recombination at rate r affects the escape times t(esc) to the double mutant. For small populations demographic noise generates massive fluctuations in t(esc). The mean escape time varies nonmonotonically with r, and grows exponentially as lnt(esc)∼N(r-r(*))(3/2) beyond a critical value r(*).

  18. Genetic and Genomic Dissection of the Cochliobolus heterostrophus Tox1 Locus Controlling Biosynthesis of the Polyketide Virulence Factor T-toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Turgeon, Barbara G.; Baker, Scott E.

    2007-04-27

    Fungal pathogenesis to plants is an intricate developmental process requiring biological components found in most fungi, as well as factors that are unique to fungal taxa that participate in particular fungus–plant interactions. The host-selective polyketide toxin known as T-toxin produced by Cochliobolus heterostrophus race T, a highly virulent pathogen of maize, is an intriguing example of the latter type of virulence determinant. The Tox1 locus, which controls biosynthesis of T-toxin, originally defined as a single genetic locus, it is, in fact, two exceedingly complex loci on two chromosomes that are reciprocally translocated with respect to their counterparts in weakly pathogenic race O. Race O lacks the Tox1 locus and does not produce T-toxin. Highly virulent race T was first recognized when it caused an epidemic of Southern Corn Leaf Blight, which devastated the US corn crop in 1970. The evolutionary origin of the Tox1 locus remains unknown.

  19. Finding genetic contributions to sporadic disease: a recessive locus at 12q24 commonly contributes to patent ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Mani, Arya; Meraji, Seyed-Mahmoud; Houshyar, Roozbeh; Radhakrishnan, Jayaram; Mani, Alaleh; Ahangar, Mehrabeh; Rezaie, Tayebeh M; Taghavinejad, Mohammad-Ali; Broumand, Behrooz; Zhao, Hongyu; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Lifton, Richard P

    2002-11-12

    The causes of many sporadic diseases are unexplained; the contribution of recessive loci with reduced penetrance is one possibility that has been difficult to explore. We describe an approach to this problem by first searching for diseases with higher prevalence in populations with high rates of consanguinity, then determining whether disease cases are more commonly the product of consanguinous union than controls in such populations, followed by analysis of genetic linkage in consanguinous cases. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by investigation of congenital heart disease in Iran. We found that patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), a common congenital heart disease, accounts for a higher fraction of congenital heart disease in Iran (15%) than in the United States (2-7%). Moreover, Iranian PDA cases demonstrated a marked increase of parental consanguinity (63%), compared with the general Iranian population (25%) or control cases with tetralogy of Fallot (30%). The recurrence of PDA among siblings was 5%. A genomewide analysis of linkage in 21 unrelated consanguinous PDA cases demonstrated a multipoint logarithm of odds score of 6.27 in favor of linkage of PDA to a 3-centimorgan interval of chromosome 12q24, with 53% of kindreds linked. These findings together establish a recessive component to PDA and implicate a single locus, PDA1, in one third or more of all PDA cases in Iran; they further suggest a role for this locus in PDA worldwide. Finally, these results suggest a general approach to the identification of recessive contributions to sporadic diseases.

  20. D20S16 is a complex interspersed repeated sequence: Genetic and physical analysis of the locus

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, D.W.; Krawchuk, M.D.; Howard, T.D.

    1995-01-20

    The genomic structure of the D20S16 locus has been evaluated using genetic and physical methods. D20S16, originally detected with the probe CRI-L1214, is a highly informative, complex restriction fragment length polymorphism consisting of two separate allelic systems. The allelic systems have the characteristics of conventional VNTR polymorphisms and are separated by recombination ({theta} = 0.02, Z{sub max} = 74.82), as demonstrated in family studies. Most of these recombination events are meiotic crossovers and are maternal in origin, but two, including deletion of the locus in a cell line from a CEPH family member, occur without evidence for exchange of flanking markers. DNA sequence analysis suggests that the basis of the polymorphism is variable numbers of a 98-bp sequence tandemly repeated with 87 to 90% sequence similarity between repeats. The 98-bp repeat is a dimer of 49 bp sequence with 45 to 98% identity between the elements. In addition, nonpolymorphic genomic sequences adjacent to the polymorphic 98-bp repeat tracts are also repeated but are not polymorphic, i.e., show no individual to individual variation. Restriction enzyme mapping of cosmids containing the CRI-L1214 sequence suggests that there are multiple interspersed repeats of the CRI-L1214 sequence on chromosome 20. The results of dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments with interphase nuclei are also consistent with multiple repeats of an interspersed sequence on chromosome 20. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Quantitative Trait Locus and Genetical Genomics Analysis Identifies Putatively Causal Genes for Fecundity and Brooding in the Chicken.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Martin; Jonsson, Kenneth B; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per; Wright, Dominic

    2015-12-04

    Life history traits such as fecundity are important to evolution because they make up components of lifetime fitness. Due to their polygenic architectures, such traits are difficult to investigate with genetic mapping. Therefore, little is known about their molecular basis. One possible way toward finding the underlying genes is to map intermediary molecular phenotypes, such as gene expression traits. We set out to map candidate quantitative trait genes for egg fecundity in the chicken by combining quantitative trait locus mapping in an advanced intercross of wild by domestic chickens with expression quantitative trait locus mapping in the same birds. We measured individual egg fecundity in 232 intercross chickens in two consecutive trials, the second one aimed at measuring brooding. We found 12 loci for different aspects of egg fecundity. We then combined the genomic confidence intervals of these loci with expression quantitative trait loci from bone and hypothalamus in the same intercross. Overlaps between egg loci and expression loci, and trait-gene expression correlations identify 29 candidates from bone and five from hypothalamus. The candidate quantitative trait genes include fibroblast growth factor 1, and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins L42 and L32. In summary, we found putative quantitative trait genes for egg traits in the chicken that may have been affected by regulatory variants under chicken domestication. These represent, to the best of our knowledge, some of the first candidate genes identified by genome-wide mapping for life history traits in an avian species.

  2. Quantitative Trait Locus and Genetical Genomics Analysis Identifies Putatively Causal Genes for Fecundity and Brooding in the Chicken.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Martin; Jonsson, Kenneth B; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per; Wright, Dominic

    2016-02-01

    Life history traits such as fecundity are important to evolution because they make up components of lifetime fitness. Due to their polygenic architectures, such traits are difficult to investigate with genetic mapping. Therefore, little is known about their molecular basis. One possible way toward finding the underlying genes is to map intermediary molecular phenotypes, such as gene expression traits. We set out to map candidate quantitative trait genes for egg fecundity in the chicken by combining quantitative trait locus mapping in an advanced intercross of wild by domestic chickens with expression quantitative trait locus mapping in the same birds. We measured individual egg fecundity in 232 intercross chickens in two consecutive trials, the second one aimed at measuring brooding. We found 12 loci for different aspects of egg fecundity. We then combined the genomic confidence intervals of these loci with expression quantitative trait loci from bone and hypothalamus in the same intercross. Overlaps between egg loci and expression loci, and trait-gene expression correlations identify 29 candidates from bone and five from hypothalamus. The candidate quantitative trait genes include fibroblast growth factor 1, and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins L42 and L32. In summary, we found putative quantitative trait genes for egg traits in the chicken that may have been affected by regulatory variants under chicken domestication. These represent, to the best of our knowledge, some of the first candidate genes identified by genome-wide mapping for life history traits in an avian species. PMID:26637433

  3. Quantitative Trait Locus and Genetical Genomics Analysis Identifies Putatively Causal Genes for Fecundity and Brooding in the Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Johnsson, Martin; Jonsson, Kenneth B.; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per; Wright, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Life history traits such as fecundity are important to evolution because they make up components of lifetime fitness. Due to their polygenic architectures, such traits are difficult to investigate with genetic mapping. Therefore, little is known about their molecular basis. One possible way toward finding the underlying genes is to map intermediary molecular phenotypes, such as gene expression traits. We set out to map candidate quantitative trait genes for egg fecundity in the chicken by combining quantitative trait locus mapping in an advanced intercross of wild by domestic chickens with expression quantitative trait locus mapping in the same birds. We measured individual egg fecundity in 232 intercross chickens in two consecutive trials, the second one aimed at measuring brooding. We found 12 loci for different aspects of egg fecundity. We then combined the genomic confidence intervals of these loci with expression quantitative trait loci from bone and hypothalamus in the same intercross. Overlaps between egg loci and expression loci, and trait–gene expression correlations identify 29 candidates from bone and five from hypothalamus. The candidate quantitative trait genes include fibroblast growth factor 1, and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins L42 and L32. In summary, we found putative quantitative trait genes for egg traits in the chicken that may have been affected by regulatory variants under chicken domestication. These represent, to the best of our knowledge, some of the first candidate genes identified by genome-wide mapping for life history traits in an avian species. PMID:26637433

  4. Genetic instability of the lozenge locus in Drosophila melanogaster: Characterization of the lz{sup 75V} allele

    SciTech Connect

    Voloshina, M.A.; Golubovskii, M.D.

    1995-12-01

    Genetic properties of lz{sup 75V}, an unstable allele of the lozenge locus, are described. The lz{sup 75V} allele appeared in progeny of a male from a Far East natural population of Drosophila melanogaster. Mutation of this allele produces a broad spectrum of mutant derivatives with phenotypes varying from normal to extreme. The arising alleles can be stable or unstable. Some lz{sup 75V} derivatives continuously preserve their spontaneous mutability in laboratory conditions, whereas other alleles of the same family show progressive stabilization at the intralocus or intrachromosome level. Instability of the lz{sup 75V}-bearing X chromosome is locus-specific: only the lozenge gene mutates with high frequency, while visible mutations at other loci rarely occur. As shown previously, the lz{sup 75V} allele appears to be caused by a P-element insertion. The appearance of spontaneous instability is discussed with regard to the general problem of transposition regulation in mobile elements. Different systems of hybrid dysgenesis, and, in particular, P elements are assumed to play an important role in induction of unstable mutations in nature. 24 refs., 5 tabs.

  5. Use of genetic and physical mapping to locate the spinal muscular atrophy locus between two new highly polymorphic DNA markers

    SciTech Connect

    Clermont, O.; Burlet, P.; Burglen, L.; Lefebvre, S.; Pascal, F.; McPherson, J.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Cohen, D.; Le Paslier, D.; Weissenbach, J.

    1994-04-01

    The gene for autosomal recessive forms of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has recently been mapped to chromosome 5q13, within a 4-cM region between the blocks D5S465/D5S125 and MAP-1B/D5S112. The authors identified two new highly polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers - namely, AFM265wf5 (D5S629) and AFM281yh9 (D5S637) - which are the closest markers to the SMA locus. Multilocus analysis by the location-score method was used to establish the best estimate of the SMA gene location. The data suggest that the most likely location for SMA is between locus D5S629 and the block D5S637/D5S351/MAP-1B/D5S112/D5S357. Genetic analysis of inbred SMA families, based on homozygosity by descent and physical mapping using meta-YACs, gave additional information for the loci order as follows: cen-D5S6-D5S125/D5S465-D5S435-D5S629-SMA-D5S637-D5S351-MAP-1B/D5S112-D5S357-D5S39-tel. These data give the direction for bidirectional walking in order to clone this interval and isolate the SMA gene. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Complex genetic control of susceptibility to malaria: positional cloning of the Char9 locus

    PubMed Central

    Min-Oo, Gundula; Fortin, Anny; Pitari, Giuseppina; Tam, Mifong; Stevenson, Mary M.; Gros, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Mouse strains AcB55 and AcB61 are resistant to malaria by virtue of a mutation in erythrocyte pyruvate kinase (PklrI90N). Linkage analysis in [AcB55 × A/J] F2 mice detected a second locus (Char9; logarithm of odds = 4.74) that regulates the blood-stage replication of Plasmodium chabaudi AS independently of Pklr. We characterized the 77 genes of the Char9 locus for tissue-specific expression, strain-specific alterations in gene expression, and polymorphic variants that are possibly associated with differential susceptibility. We identified Vnn1/Vnn3 as the likely candidates responsible for Char9. Vnn3/Vnn1 map within a conserved haplotype block and show expression levels that are strictly cis-regulated by this haplotype. The absence of Vnn messenger RNA expression and lack of pantetheinase protein activity in tissues are associated with susceptibility to malaria and are linked to a complex rearrangement in the Vnn3 promoter region. The A/J strain also carries a unique nonsense mutation that leads to a truncated protein. Vanin genes code for a pantetheinase involved in the production of cysteamine, a key regulator of host responses to inflammatory stimuli. Administration of cystamine in vivo partially corrects susceptibility to malaria in A/J mice, as measured by reduced blood parasitemia and decreased mortality. These studies suggest that pantetheinase is critical for the host response to malaria. PMID:17312006

  7. Demography and natural selection have shaped genetic variation in Drosophila melanogaster: a multi-locus approach.

    PubMed

    Glinka, Sascha; Ometto, Lino; Mousset, Sylvain; Stephan, Wolfgang; De Lorenzo, David

    2003-11-01

    Demography and selection have been recognized for their important roles in shaping patterns of nucleotide variability. To investigate the relative effects of these forces in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, we used a multi-locus scan (105 fragments) of X-linked DNA sequence variation in a putatively ancestral African and a derived European population. Surprisingly, we found evidence for a recent size expansion in the African population, i.e., a significant excess of singletons at a chromosome-wide level. In the European population, such an excess was not detected. In contrast to the African population, we found evidence for positive natural selection in the European sample: (i) a large number of loci with low levels of variation and (ii) a significant excess of derived variants at the low-variation loci that are fixed in the European sample but rare in the African population. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the European population has experienced frequent selective sweeps in the recent past during its adaptation to new habitats. Our study shows the advantages of a genomic approach (over a locus-specific analysis) in disentangling demographic and selective forces.

  8. Isolation of a genetic locus associated with metronidazole resistance in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Chang, K C; Ho, S W; Yang, J C; Wang, J T

    1997-07-30

    We examined the molecular mechanism of metronidazole resistance by constructing a lambda-Zap II phagemid expression library with genomic DNA from a metronidazole-resistance strain of Helicobacter pylori. Twenty-two clones were found to have elevated MTZ resistances in XLOLR strain of E. coli. Phagemids belonging to the twenty two clones were extracted and then retransformed into the XLOLR strain of E. coli. After MTZ selection, five clones could confer metronidazole resistance consistently. According to Southern hybridization and DNA sequencing, the five clones contained a same locus, recA. In addition, transforming the five clones into BL21 strain of E. coli produced a higher resistance to MTZ. Interestingly, electroporation of one of the five phagemid clones into two MTZ sensitive H. pylori yielded MTZ resistant strains. Comparing amino acid sequence in MTZ resistant with sensitive isolates revealed two point mutations at this locus. Above results suggest that mutation in recA may be associated with metronidazole resistance of H. pylori. PMID:9245734

  9. The Multi-allelic Genetic Architecture of a Variance-Heterogeneity Locus for Molybdenum Concentration in Leaves Acts as a Source of Unexplained Additive Genetic Variance.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Simon K G; Andreatta, Matthew E; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Danku, John; Salt, David E; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) analyses have generally been used to detect individual loci contributing to the phenotypic diversity in a population by the effects of these loci on the trait mean. More rarely, loci have also been detected based on variance differences between genotypes. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the possible genetic mechanisms leading to such variance signals. However, little is known about what causes these signals, or whether this genetic variance-heterogeneity reflects mechanisms of importance in natural populations. Previously, we identified a variance-heterogeneity GWA (vGWA) signal for leaf molybdenum concentrations in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, fine-mapping of this association reveals that the vGWA emerges from the effects of three independent genetic polymorphisms that all are in strong LD with the markers displaying the genetic variance-heterogeneity. By revealing the genetic architecture underlying this vGWA signal, we uncovered the molecular source of a significant amount of hidden additive genetic variation or "missing heritability". Two of the three polymorphisms underlying the genetic variance-heterogeneity are promoter variants for Molybdate transporter 1 (MOT1), and the third a variant located ~25 kb downstream of this gene. A fourth independent association was also detected ~600 kb upstream of MOT1. Use of a T-DNA knockout allele highlights Copper Transporter 6; COPT6 (AT2G26975) as a strong candidate gene for this association. Our results show that an extended LD across a complex locus including multiple functional alleles can lead to a variance-heterogeneity between genotypes in natural populations. Further, they provide novel insights into the genetic regulation of ion homeostasis in A. thaliana, and empirically confirm that variance-heterogeneity based GWA methods are a valuable tool to detect novel associations of biological importance in natural populations.

  10. The Multi-allelic Genetic Architecture of a Variance-Heterogeneity Locus for Molybdenum Concentration in Leaves Acts as a Source of Unexplained Additive Genetic Variance

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Andreatta, Matthew E.; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Danku, John; Salt, David E.; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) analyses have generally been used to detect individual loci contributing to the phenotypic diversity in a population by the effects of these loci on the trait mean. More rarely, loci have also been detected based on variance differences between genotypes. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the possible genetic mechanisms leading to such variance signals. However, little is known about what causes these signals, or whether this genetic variance-heterogeneity reflects mechanisms of importance in natural populations. Previously, we identified a variance-heterogeneity GWA (vGWA) signal for leaf molybdenum concentrations in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, fine-mapping of this association reveals that the vGWA emerges from the effects of three independent genetic polymorphisms that all are in strong LD with the markers displaying the genetic variance-heterogeneity. By revealing the genetic architecture underlying this vGWA signal, we uncovered the molecular source of a significant amount of hidden additive genetic variation or “missing heritability”. Two of the three polymorphisms underlying the genetic variance-heterogeneity are promoter variants for Molybdate transporter 1 (MOT1), and the third a variant located ~25 kb downstream of this gene. A fourth independent association was also detected ~600 kb upstream of MOT1. Use of a T-DNA knockout allele highlights Copper Transporter 6; COPT6 (AT2G26975) as a strong candidate gene for this association. Our results show that an extended LD across a complex locus including multiple functional alleles can lead to a variance-heterogeneity between genotypes in natural populations. Further, they provide novel insights into the genetic regulation of ion homeostasis in A. thaliana, and empirically confirm that variance-heterogeneity based GWA methods are a valuable tool to detect novel associations of biological importance in natural populations. PMID:26599497

  11. Genetic and Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis for Bio-Oil Compounds after Fast Pyrolysis in Maize Cobs.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, Brandon; Kuzhiyil, Najeeb; de Leon, Natalia; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis has been identified as one of the biorenewable conversion platforms that could be a part of an alternative energy future, but it has not yet received the same attention as cellulosic ethanol in the analysis of genetic inheritance within potential feedstocks such as maize. Ten bio-oil compounds were measured via pyrolysis/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py/GC-MS) in maize cobs. 184 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of the intermated B73 x Mo17 (IBM) Syn4 population were analyzed in two environments, using 1339 markers, for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. QTL mapping was performed using composite interval mapping with significance thresholds established by 1000 permutations at α = 0.05. 50 QTL were found in total across those ten traits with R2 values ranging from 1.7 to 5.8%, indicating a complex quantitative inheritance of these traits. PMID:26745365

  12. Genetic mapping of the spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA2) locus on chromosome 12q23-q24.1

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, A.; Magarino, C.; Gispert, S.

    1995-01-20

    A refined genetic map of the spinocerebellar ataxia 2 locus was constructed through linkage and haplotype analysis of 11 large pedigrees from the Holguin SCA2 family collective. Three-point analysis makes a localization of the SCA2 mutation in the 6-cM interval D12S84-D12S79 likely. This is consistent with haplotype results indicating a crossover event between two branches of the SCA2 family Rs and placing the mutation on the telomeric side of D12S84. The microsatellite D12S105 within this interval shows a peak two-point lod score of Z = 16.14 at {theta} = 0.00 recombination and complete linkage disequilibrium among affected individuals. These data together with the observation of a common disease haplotype among all family ancestors support the notion of an SCA2 founder effect in Holguin province. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Genetic and Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis for Bio-Oil Compounds after Fast Pyrolysis in Maize Cobs.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, Brandon; Kuzhiyil, Najeeb; de Leon, Natalia; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis has been identified as one of the biorenewable conversion platforms that could be a part of an alternative energy future, but it has not yet received the same attention as cellulosic ethanol in the analysis of genetic inheritance within potential feedstocks such as maize. Ten bio-oil compounds were measured via pyrolysis/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py/GC-MS) in maize cobs. 184 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of the intermated B73 x Mo17 (IBM) Syn4 population were analyzed in two environments, using 1339 markers, for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. QTL mapping was performed using composite interval mapping with significance thresholds established by 1000 permutations at α = 0.05. 50 QTL were found in total across those ten traits with R2 values ranging from 1.7 to 5.8%, indicating a complex quantitative inheritance of these traits.

  14. Genetic and Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis for Bio-Oil Compounds after Fast Pyrolysis in Maize Cobs

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey, Brandon; Kuzhiyil, Najeeb; de Leon, Natalia; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis has been identified as one of the biorenewable conversion platforms that could be a part of an alternative energy future, but it has not yet received the same attention as cellulosic ethanol in the analysis of genetic inheritance within potential feedstocks such as maize. Ten bio-oil compounds were measured via pyrolysis/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py/GC-MS) in maize cobs. 184 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of the intermated B73 x Mo17 (IBM) Syn4 population were analyzed in two environments, using 1339 markers, for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. QTL mapping was performed using composite interval mapping with significance thresholds established by 1000 permutations at α = 0.05. 50 QTL were found in total across those ten traits with R2 values ranging from 1.7 to 5.8%, indicating a complex quantitative inheritance of these traits. PMID:26745365

  15. Genetic relationship between lodging and lodging components in barley (Hordeum vulgare) based on unconditional and conditional quantitative trait locus analyses.

    PubMed

    Chen, W Y; Liu, Z M; Deng, G B; Pan, Z F; Liang, J J; Zeng, X Q; Tashi, N M; Long, H; Yu, M Q

    2014-03-17

    Lodging (LD) is a major constraint limiting the yield and forage quality of barley. Detailed analyses of LD component (LDC) traits were conducted using 246 F2 plants generated from a cross between cultivars ZQ320 and 1277. Genetic relationships between LD and LDC were evaluated by unconditional and conditional quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping with 117 simple sequence repeat markers. Ultimately, 53 unconditional QTL related to LD were identified on seven barley chromosomes. Up to 15 QTL accounted for over 10% of the phenotypic variation, and up to 20 QTL for culm strength were detected. Six QTL with pleiotropic effects showing significant negative correlations with LD were found between markers Bmag353 and GBM1482 on chromosome 4H. These alleles and alleles of QTL for wall thickness, culm strength, plant height, and plant weight originated from ZQ320. Conditional mapping identified 96 additional QTL for LD. Conditional QTL analysis demonstrated that plant height, plant height center of gravity, and length of the sixth internode had the greatest contribution to LD, whereas culm strength and length of the fourth internode, and culm strength of the second internode were the key factors for LD-resistant. Therefore, lodging resistance in barley can be improved based on selection of alleles affecting culm strength, wall thickness, plant height, and plant weight. The conditional QTL mapping method can be used to evaluate possible genetic relationships between LD and LDC while efficiently and precisely determining counteracting QTL, which will help in understanding the genetic basis of LD in barley.

  16. Genetic diversity of the class II major histocompatibility DRA locus in European, Asiatic and African domestic donkeys.

    PubMed

    Vranova, Marie; Alloggio, Ingrid; Qablan, Moneeb; Vyskocil, Mirko; Baumeisterova, Aneta; Sloboda, Michal; Putnova, Lenka; Vrtkova, Irena; Modry, David; Horin, Petr

    2011-07-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes coding for antigen presenting molecules are the most polymorphic genes in vertebrate genome. The MHC class II DRA gene shows only small variation in many mammalian species, but it exhibits relatively high level of polymorphism in Equidae, especially in donkeys. This extraordinary degree of polymorphism together with signatures of selection in specific amino acids sites makes the donkey DRA gene a suitable model for population diversity studies. The objective of this study was to investigate the DRA gene diversity in three different populations of donkeys under infectious pressure of protozoan parasites, Theileria equi and Babesia caballi. Three populations of domestic donkeys from Italy (N = 68), Jordan (N = 43), and Kenya (N = 78) were studied. A method of the donkey MHC DRA genotyping based on PCR-RFLP and sequencing was designed. In addition to the DRA gene, 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci were genotyped. The presence of Theileria equi and Babesia caballi parasites in peripheral blood was investigated by PCR. Allele and genotype frequencies, observed and expected heterozygosities and F(IS) values were computed as parameters of genetic diversity for all loci genotyped. Genetic distances between the three populations were estimated based on F(ST) values. Statistical associations between parasite infection and genetic polymorphisms were sought. Extensive DRA locus variation characteristic for Equids was found. The results showed differences between populations both in terms of numbers of alleles and their frequencies as well as variation in expected heterozygosity values. Based on comparisons with neutral microsatellite loci, population sub-structure characteristics and association analysis, convincing evidence of pathogen-driven selection at the population level was not provided. It seems that genetic diversity observed in the three populations reflects mostly effects of selective breeding and their different

  17. Genetic locus half baked is necessary for morphogenesis of the ectoderm.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Karen N; Warga, Rachel M; Kane, Donald A

    2005-06-01

    The zebrafish epiboly mutants partially block epiboly, the vegetalward movement of the blastoderm around the giant yolk cell. Here, we show that the epiboly mutations are located near the centromere of Linkage Group 7 in a single locus, termed the half baked locus. Nevertheless, except for the similar mutants lawine and avalanche, we find the epiboly traits of each of the alleles to be distinguishable, forming an allelic series. Using in situ analysis, we show that the specification and the formation of the germ layers is unaffected. However, during early gastrulation, convergence movements are slowed in homozygous and zygotic maternal dominant (ZMD) heterozygous mutants, especially in the epiblast layer of the blastoderm. Using triple-mutant analysis with squint and cyclops, we show that ablating involution and hypoblast formation in hab has no effect on the epiboly phenotype on the ventral and lateral sides of the embryo, suggesting that the hypoblast has no role in epiboly. Moreover, the triple mutant enhances the depletion of cells on the dorsal side of the embryo, consistent with the idea that convergence movements are defective. Double-mutant analysis with one-eyed pinhead reveals that hab is necessary in the ectodermal portion of the hatching gland. In ZMD heterozygotes, in addition to the slowing of epiboly, morphogenesis of the neural tube is abnormal, with gaps forming in the midline during segmentation stages; later, ectopic rows of neurons form in the widened spinal cord and hindbrain. Cell transplantation reveals that half baked acts both autonomously and nonautonomously in interactions among cells of the forming neural tube. Together, these results suggest that half baked is necessary within the epiblast for morphogenesis during both epiboly and neurulation and suggest that the mechanisms that drive epiboly possess common elements with those that underlie convergence and extension.

  18. Construction of a genetic map based on high-throughput SNP genotyping and genetic mapping of a TuMV resistance locus in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hee; Jeong, Young-Min; Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Soo-Seong; Chung, Won-Hyong; Yu, Hee-Ju

    2014-04-01

    Brassica rapa is a member of the Brassicaceae family and includes vegetables and oil crops that are cultivated worldwide. The introduction of durable resistance against turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) into agronomically important cultivars has been a significant challenge for genetic and horticultural breeding studies of B. rapa. Based on our previous genome-wide analysis of DNA polymorphisms between the TuMV-resistant doubled haploid (DH) line VC40 and the TuMV-susceptible DH line SR5, we constructed a core genetic map of the VCS-13M DH population, which is composed of 83 individuals derived from microspore cultures of a F1 cross between VC40 and SR5, by analyzing the segregation of 314 sequence-characterized genetic markers. The genetic markers correspond to 221 SNPs and 31 InDels of genes as well as 62 SSRs, covering 1,115.9 cM with an average distance of 3.6 cM between the adjacent marker loci. The alignment and orientation of the constructed map showed good agreement with the draft genome sequence of Chiifu, thus providing an efficient strategy to map genic sequences. Using the genetic map, a novel dominant TuMV resistance locus (TuMV-R) in the VCS-13M DH population was identified as a 0.34 Mb region in the short arm of chromosome A6 in which four CC-NBS-LRR resistance genes and two pathogenesis-related-1 genes reside. The genetic map developed in this study can play an important role in the genetic study of TuMV resistance and the molecular breeding of B. rapa.

  19. Construction of a genetic map based on high-throughput SNP genotyping and genetic mapping of a TuMV resistance locus in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hee; Jeong, Young-Min; Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Soo-Seong; Chung, Won-Hyong; Yu, Hee-Ju

    2014-04-01

    Brassica rapa is a member of the Brassicaceae family and includes vegetables and oil crops that are cultivated worldwide. The introduction of durable resistance against turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) into agronomically important cultivars has been a significant challenge for genetic and horticultural breeding studies of B. rapa. Based on our previous genome-wide analysis of DNA polymorphisms between the TuMV-resistant doubled haploid (DH) line VC40 and the TuMV-susceptible DH line SR5, we constructed a core genetic map of the VCS-13M DH population, which is composed of 83 individuals derived from microspore cultures of a F1 cross between VC40 and SR5, by analyzing the segregation of 314 sequence-characterized genetic markers. The genetic markers correspond to 221 SNPs and 31 InDels of genes as well as 62 SSRs, covering 1,115.9 cM with an average distance of 3.6 cM between the adjacent marker loci. The alignment and orientation of the constructed map showed good agreement with the draft genome sequence of Chiifu, thus providing an efficient strategy to map genic sequences. Using the genetic map, a novel dominant TuMV resistance locus (TuMV-R) in the VCS-13M DH population was identified as a 0.34 Mb region in the short arm of chromosome A6 in which four CC-NBS-LRR resistance genes and two pathogenesis-related-1 genes reside. The genetic map developed in this study can play an important role in the genetic study of TuMV resistance and the molecular breeding of B. rapa. PMID:24326528

  20. Genetic linkage studies in familial partial epilepsy: Exclusion of the human chromosome regions syntenic to the El-1 mouse locus

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cendes, I.; Mulley, J.C.; Andermann, E.

    1994-09-01

    Recently, six families with a familial form of partial epilepsy were described. All pedigrees showed autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Affected individuals present with predominantly nocturnal seizures with frontal lobe semiology. In 1959, a genetic mouse model for partial epilepsy, the El mouse, was reported. In the El mouse, a major seizure susceptibility gene, El-1, segregates in an autosomal dominant fashion and has been localized to a region distal to the centromere of mouse chromosome 9. Comparative genetic maps between man and mouse have been used for prediction of localization of several human disease genes. Because the region of mouse chromosome 9 that is the most likely to contain the El-1 locus is syntenic to regions on human chromosomes 3q21-p22, 3q21-q23.3, 6q12 and 15q24, we adopted the candidate gene approach as an initial linkage strategy. Twenty-two polymorphic microsatellite markers covering these regions were used for genotyping individuals in the three larger families ascertained, two of which are Australian and one French-Canadian. Negative two-point lod scores were obtained separately for each family. The analysis of all three families combined significantly excludes the candidate regions on chromosomes 3, 6 and 15.

  1. Genetic map of randomly amplified DNA polymorphisms closely linked to the mating type locus of tetrahymenta thermophila

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, T.J.; Brickner, J.; Orias, E.; Nakano, K.J.

    1995-12-01

    We have used the PCR-based randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method to efficiently identify and map DNA polymorphisms in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. The polymorphisms segregate as Mendelian genetic markers. A targeted screen, using DNA from pooled meiotic segregants, yielded the polymorphisms most closely linked to the mat locus. A total of 10 polymorphisms linked to the mat-Pmr segment of the left arm of micronuclear chromosome 2 have been identified. This constitutes the largest linkage group described in T. thermophila. We also provide here the first crude estimate of the frequency of meiotic recombination in the mat region, 20 kb/cM. This frequency is much higher than that observed in most other eukaryotes. Special features of Tetrahymena genetics enhanced the power of the RAPD method: the ability to obtain in a single step meiotic segregants that are whole-genome homozygotes and the availability of nullisomic strains permitting quick deletion mapping of polymorphisms to micronuclear chromosomes or chromosomes segments. The RAPD method appears to provide a practical and relatively inexpensive approach to the construction of a high-resolution map of the Tetrahymena genome. 39 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Genetic architecture of growth traits in Populus revealed by integrated quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis and association studies.

    PubMed

    Du, Qingzhang; Gong, Chenrui; Wang, Qingshi; Zhou, Daling; Yang, Haijiao; Pan, Wei; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-02-01

    Deciphering the genetic architecture underlying polygenic traits in perennial species can inform molecular marker-assisted breeding. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing have enabled strategies that integrate linkage-linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping in Populus. We used an integrated method of quantitative trait locus (QTL) dissection with a high-resolution linkage map and multi-gene association mapping to decipher the nature of genetic architecture (additive, dominant, and epistatic effects) of potential QTLs for growth traits in a Populus linkage population (1200 progeny) and a natural population (435 individuals). Seventeen QTLs for tree height, diameter at breast height, and stem volume mapped to 11 linkage groups (logarithm of odds (LOD) ≥ 2.5), and explained 2.7-18.5% of the phenotypic variance. After comparative mapping and transcriptome analysis, 187 expressed genes (10 046 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)) were selected from the segmental homology regions (SHRs) of 13 QTLs. Using multi-gene association models, we observed 202 significant SNPs in 63 promising genes from 10 QTLs (P ≤ 0.0001; FDR ≤ 0.10) that exhibited reproducible associations with additive/dominant effects, and further determined 11 top-ranked genes tightly linked to the QTLs. Epistasis analysis uncovered a uniquely interconnected gene-gene network for each trait. This study opens up opportunities to uncover the causal networks of interacting genes in plants using an integrated linkage-LD mapping approach.

  3. Coamplification of Myc/Pvt1 and homozygous deletion of Nlrp1 locus are frequent genetics changes in mouse osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Rao, Pulivarthi H; Zhao, Shuying; Zhao, Yi-Jue; Yu, Alexander; Rainusso, Nino; Trucco, Matteo; Allen-Rhoades, Wendy; Satterfield, Laura; Fuja, Daniel; Borra, Vishnupriya J; Man, Tsz-Kwong; Donehower, Lawrence A; Yustein, Jason T

    2015-12-01

    Osteosarcomas (OSs) are characterized by high levels of genomic instability (GI). To gain insights into the GI and its contribution toward understanding the genetic basis of OS, we characterized 19 primary and 13 metastatic mouse tumors in a genetically engineered novel mouse model of OS by a combination of genomic techniques. Through the bone-specific deletion of the wild-type Trp53 locus or activation of a metastatic-promoting missense R172Hp53 allele, C57BL/6 mice developed either localized or metastatic OS. Subsequent tumors were isolated and primary cultures created from primary bone and/or distal metastatic lesions, for example, lung and liver. These tumors exhibited high levels of GI with complex chromosomal rearrangements, amplifications, and deletions comparable to human OS. The combined genomic approaches identified frequent amplification of chromosome 15D1 and loss of 11B4 by CGH and/or SKY. Both 15D1 and 11B4 have homology with frequently altered chromosomal bands 8q24 and 17p13 in human OS, respectively. Subsequent array CGH, FISH, and qRT-PCR analysis identified coamplification and overexpression of Myc/Pvt1 transcripts from the 15D1 amplicon and loss and decreased expression of the Nlrp1b from 11B4. The Nlrp1 gene is the key mediator of apoptosis and interacts strongly with caspase 2. PMID:26355645

  4. Genetic analysis of a novel plasmid encoded durancin locus in Enterococcus durans 41D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enterococcus durans is commonly found in the intestinal tract in humans and animals and several strains are known to produce bacteriocins. Durancin GL, a novel bacteriocin of Enterococcus durans 41D with antilisterial activity was isolated from artisanal cheese samples and its genetic determinants ...

  5. Fast-forward genetics by radiation hybrids to saturate the locus regulating nuclear-cytoplasmic compatibility in Triticum.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Filippo M; Ghavami, Farhad; Hayden, Matthew J; Wang, Yi; Forrest, Kerrie L; Kong, Stephan; Dizon, Rhoderissa; Michalak de Jimenez, Monika K; Meinhardt, Steven W; Mergoum, Mohamed; Gu, Yong Q; Kianian, Shahryar F

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear-encoded species cytoplasm specific (scs) genes control nuclear-cytoplasmic compatibility in wheat (genus Triticum). Alloplasmic cells, which have nucleus and cytoplasm derived from different species, produce vigorous and vital organisms only when the correct version of scs is present in their nucleus. In this study, bulks of in vivo radiation hybrids segregating for the scs phenotype have been genotyped by sequencing with over 1.9 million markers. The high marker saturation obtained for a critical region of chromosome 1D allowed identification of 3318 reads that mapped in close proximity of the scs. A novel in silico approach was deployed to extend these short reads to sequences of up to 70 Kb in length and identify candidate open reading frames (ORFs). Markers were developed to anchor the short contigs containing ORFs to a radiation hybrid map of 650 individuals with resolution of 288 Kb. The region containing the scs locus was narrowed to a single Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) contig of Aegilops tauschii. Its sequencing and assembly by nano-mapping allowed rapid identification of a rhomboid gene as the only ORF existing within the refined scs locus. Resequencing of this gene from multiple germplasm sources identified a single nucleotide mutation, which gives rise to a functional amino acid change. Gene expression characterization revealed that an active copy of this rhomboid exists on all homoeologous chromosomes of wheat, and depending on the specific cytoplasm each copy is preferentially expressed. Therefore, a new methodology was applied to unique genetic stocks to rapidly identify a strong candidate gene for the control of nuclear-cytoplasmic compatibility in wheat.

  6. [The INK4a-ARF locus: role in the genetic predisposition to familial melanoma and in skin carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Soufir, N; Basset-Seguin, N

    2001-11-01

    The INK4a-ARF locus, localized on 9p21, encodes two tumor suppressor proteins, p16INK4a and p14ARF, acting respectively through the CDK4-pRb and the p53 pathways. Familial melanoma (comprising between 8 and 12% of all melanoma cases) is a genodermatosis transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait, often associated with clinically atypical moles (AN). Germline mutations of p16INK4a are found in up to 20-30% of melanoma prone families. Mutated families often contain more than three family members affected and/or comprise at least one relative with multiple melanomas. Most of these mutations have been shown to affect p16INK4a protein function (i.e. CDK4 binding or pRB phosphorylation). Germline mutations of p16INK4a are also found in a lesser extend in sporadic multiple melanoma and in familial pancreatic cancer. The INK4a-ARF locus plays also an important role in skin carcinogenesis. P16INK4a UV induced mutations (CC:GG > TT:AA tandem transition or C:G > T:A transition at dipyrimidic site) are found in 12% of sporadic skin carcinomas, mainly in epidermoid tumors, and seem to occur independently of p53 mutations. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by an inheritable DNA repair defect (involving the nucleotid excision repair (NER) system) predisposing to skin carcinomas. In skin tumors from (XP) patients, p16INK4a UV induced mutations occur more frequently, are often multiple, and significantly associated with the presence of p53 mutations. Such data, which could be related to the XP genetic instability and indicates a possible cooperative effect of inactivation of these pathways in the tumoral process of XP skin tumors. PMID:11741799

  7. Fast-forward genetics by radiation hybrids to saturate the locus regulating nuclear-cytoplasmic compatibility in Triticum.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Filippo M; Ghavami, Farhad; Hayden, Matthew J; Wang, Yi; Forrest, Kerrie L; Kong, Stephan; Dizon, Rhoderissa; Michalak de Jimenez, Monika K; Meinhardt, Steven W; Mergoum, Mohamed; Gu, Yong Q; Kianian, Shahryar F

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear-encoded species cytoplasm specific (scs) genes control nuclear-cytoplasmic compatibility in wheat (genus Triticum). Alloplasmic cells, which have nucleus and cytoplasm derived from different species, produce vigorous and vital organisms only when the correct version of scs is present in their nucleus. In this study, bulks of in vivo radiation hybrids segregating for the scs phenotype have been genotyped by sequencing with over 1.9 million markers. The high marker saturation obtained for a critical region of chromosome 1D allowed identification of 3318 reads that mapped in close proximity of the scs. A novel in silico approach was deployed to extend these short reads to sequences of up to 70 Kb in length and identify candidate open reading frames (ORFs). Markers were developed to anchor the short contigs containing ORFs to a radiation hybrid map of 650 individuals with resolution of 288 Kb. The region containing the scs locus was narrowed to a single Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) contig of Aegilops tauschii. Its sequencing and assembly by nano-mapping allowed rapid identification of a rhomboid gene as the only ORF existing within the refined scs locus. Resequencing of this gene from multiple germplasm sources identified a single nucleotide mutation, which gives rise to a functional amino acid change. Gene expression characterization revealed that an active copy of this rhomboid exists on all homoeologous chromosomes of wheat, and depending on the specific cytoplasm each copy is preferentially expressed. Therefore, a new methodology was applied to unique genetic stocks to rapidly identify a strong candidate gene for the control of nuclear-cytoplasmic compatibility in wheat. PMID:26915753

  8. Molecular Genetic Characterization of Six Recessive Viable Alleles of the Mouse Agouti Locus

    PubMed Central

    Hustad, C. M.; Perry, W. L.; Siracusa, L. D.; Rasberry, C.; Cobb, L.; Cattanach, B. M.; Kovatch, R.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1995-01-01

    The agouti locus on mouse chromosome 2 encodes a secreted cysteine-rich protein of 131 amino acids that acts as a molecular switch to instruct the melanocyte to make either yellow pigment (phaeomelanin) or black pigment (eumelanin). Mutations that up-regulate agouti expression are dominant to those causing decreased expression and result in yellow coat color. Other associated effects are obesity, diabetes, and increased susceptibility to tumors. To try to define important functional domains of the agouti protein, we have analyzed the molecular defects present in a series of recessive viable agouti mutations. In total, six alleles (a(mJ), a(u), a(da), a(16H), a(18H), a(e)) were examined at both the RNA and DNA level. Two of the alleles, a(16H) and a(e), result from mutations in the agouti coding region. Four alleles (a(mJ), a(u), a(18H), and a(da)) appear to represent regulatory mutations that down-regulate agouti expression. Interestingly, one of these mutations, a(18H), also appears to cause an immunological defect in the homozygous condition. This immunological defect is somewhat analogous to that observed in motheaten (me) mutant mice. Short and long-range restriction enzyme analyses of homozygous a(18H) DNA are consistent with the hypothesis that a(18H) results from a paracentric inversion where one end of the inversion maps in the 5' regulatory region of agouti and the other end in or near a gene that is required for normal immunological function. Cloning the breakpoints of this putative inversion should allow us to identify the gene that confers this interesting immunological disorder. PMID:7635290

  9. Genetic mapping reveals that sinefungin resistance in Toxoplasma gondii is controlled by a putative amino acid transporter locus that can be used as a negative selectable marker.

    PubMed

    Behnke, Michael S; Khan, Asis; Sibley, L David

    2015-02-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping studies have been integral in identifying and understanding virulence mechanisms in the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. In this study, we interrogated a different phenotype by mapping sinefungin (SNF) resistance in the genetic cross between type 2 ME49-FUDR(r) and type 10 VAND-SNF(r). The genetic map of this cross was generated by whole-genome sequencing of the progeny and subsequent identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) inherited from the parents. Based on this high-density genetic map, we were able to pinpoint the sinefungin resistance phenotype to one significant locus on chromosome IX. Within this locus, a single nonsynonymous SNP (nsSNP) resulting in an early stop codon in the TGVAND_290860 gene was identified, occurring only in the sinefungin-resistant progeny. Using CRISPR/CAS9, we were able to confirm that targeted disruption of TGVAND_290860 renders parasites sinefungin resistant. Because disruption of the SNR1 gene confers resistance, we also show that it can be used as a negative selectable marker to insert either a positive drug selection cassette or a heterologous reporter. These data demonstrate the power of combining classical genetic mapping, whole-genome sequencing, and CRISPR-mediated gene disruption for combined forward and reverse genetic strategies in T. gondii.

  10. Using multi-locus allelic sequence data to estimate genetic divergence among four Lilium (Liliaceae) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Arwa; Smulders, Marinus J M; van Tuyl, Jaap M; Arens, Paul; Bakker, Freek T

    2014-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) may enable estimating relationships among genotypes using allelic variation of multiple nuclear genes simultaneously. We explored the potential and caveats of this strategy in four genetically distant Lilium cultivars to estimate their genetic divergence from transcriptome sequences using three approaches: POFAD (Phylogeny of Organisms from Allelic Data, uses allelic information of sequence data), RAxML (Randomized Accelerated Maximum Likelihood, tree building based on concatenated consensus sequences) and Consensus Network (constructing a network summarizing among gene tree conflicts). Twenty six gene contigs were chosen based on the presence of orthologous sequences in all cultivars, seven of which also had an orthologous sequence in Tulipa, used as out-group. The three approaches generated the same topology. Although the resolution offered by these approaches is high, in this case there was no extra benefit in using allelic information. We conclude that these 26 genes can be widely applied to construct a species tree for the genus Lilium. PMID:25368628

  11. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Leishmania infantum from Southeastern France: Evaluation Using Multi-Locus Microsatellite Typing.

    PubMed

    Pomares, Christelle; Marty, Pierre; Bañuls, Anne Laure; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Pratlong, Francine; Faucher, Benoît; Jeddi, Fakhri; Moore, Sandy; Michel, Grégory; Aluru, Srikanth; Piarroux, Renaud; Hide, Mallorie

    2016-01-01

    In the south of France, Leishmania infantum is responsible for numerous cases of canine leishmaniasis (CanL), sporadic cases of human visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and rare cases of cutaneous and muco-cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL and MCL, respectively). Several endemic areas have been clearly identified in the south of France including the Pyrénées-Orientales, Cévennes (CE), Provence (P), Alpes-Maritimes (AM) and Corsica (CO). Within these endemic areas, the two cities of Nice (AM) and Marseille (P), which are located 150 km apart, and their surroundings, concentrate the greatest number of French autochthonous leishmaniasis cases. In this study, 270 L. infantum isolates from an extended time period (1978-2011) from four endemic areas, AM, P, CE and CO, were assessed using Multi-Locus Microsatellite Typing (MLMT). MLMT revealed a total of 121 different genotypes with 91 unique genotypes and 30 repeated genotypes. Substantial genetic diversity was found with a strong genetic differentiation between the Leishmania populations from AM and P. However, exchanges were observed between these two endemic areas in which it seems that strains spread from AM to P. The genetic differentiations in these areas suggest strong epidemiological structuring. A model-based analysis using STRUCTURE revealed two main populations: population A (consisting of samples primarily from the P and AM endemic areas with MON-1 and non-MON-1 strains) and population B consisting of only MON-1 strains essentially from the AM endemic area. For four patients, we observed several isolates from different biological samples which provided insight into disease relapse and re-infection. These findings shed light on the transmission dynamics of parasites in humans. However, further data are required to confirm this hypothesis based on a limited sample set. This study represents the most extensive population analysis of L. infantum strains using MLMT conducted in France. PMID:26808522

  12. Identification of a genetic locus on chromosome 4q34-35 for type 2 diabetes with overweight.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Hyun; Kwak, Soo Heon; Kim, Kwang Joong; Go, Min Jin; Lee, Hye-Ja; Kim, Kyung-Seon; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Kimm, Kuchan; Cho, Young-Min; Lee, Hong Kyu; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Jong-Young

    2013-02-08

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes is rising rapidly because of an increase in the incidence of being overweight and obesity. Identification of genetic determinants for complex diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, may provide insight into disease pathogenesis. The aim of the study was to investigate the shared genetic factors that predispose individuals to being overweight and developing type 2 diabetes. We conducted genome-wide linkage analyses for type 2 diabetes in 386 affected individuals (269 sibpairs) from 171 Korean families and association analyses with single-nucleotide polymorphisms of candidate genes within linkage regions to identify genetic variants that predispose individuals to being overweight and developing type 2 diabetes. Through fine-mapping analysis of chromosome 4q34-35, we detected a locus potentially linked (nonparametric linkage 2.81, logarithm of odds 2.27, P=6×10(-4)) to type 2 diabetes in overweight or obese individuals (body mass index, BMI≥23 kg m(-2)). Multiple regression analysis with type 2 diabetes-related phenotypes revealed a significant association (false discovery rate (FDR) P=0.006 for rs13144140; FDR P=0.002 for rs6830266) between GPM6A (rs13144140) and BMI and waist-hip ratio, and between NEIL3 (rs6830266) and insulin level from 1314 normal individuals. Our systematic search of genome-wide linkage and association studies, demonstrate that a linkage peak for type 2 diabetes on chromosome 4q34-35 contains two type 2 diabetes-related genes, GPM6A and NEIL3.

  13. Genetic and physical mapping at the limb-girdle muscular dystrophy locus (LGMD2B) on chromosome 2p

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, R.; Keers, S.; Strachan, T.

    1996-04-01

    The limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, different forms of which have been mapped to at least six distinct genetic loci. We have mapped to at least six distinct genetic loci. We have mapped an autosomal recessive form of LGMD (LGMD2B) to chromosome 2p13. Two other conditions have been shown to map to this region or to the homologous region in mouse: a gene for a form of autosomal recessive distal muscular dystrophy, Miyoshi myopathy, shows linkage to the same markers on chromosome 2p as LGMD2B, and an autosomal recessive mouse mutation mnd2, in which there is rapidly progressive paralysis and muscle atrophy, has been mapped to mouse chromosome 6 to a region showing conserved synteny with human chromosome 2p12-p13. We have assembled a 6-cM YAC contig spanning the LGMD2B locus and have mapped seven genes and 13 anonymous polymorphic microsatellites to it. Using haplotype analysis in the linked families, we have narrowed our region of interest to a 0-cM interval between D2S2113 and D2S145, which does not overlap with the critical region for mnd2 in mouse. Use of these most closely linked markers will help to determine the relationship between LGMD2B and Miyoshi myopathy. YACs selected from our contig will be the starting point for the cloning of the LGMD2B gene and thereby establish the biological basis for this form of muscular dystrophy and its relationship with the other limb-girdle muscular dystrophies. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Leishmania infantum from Southeastern France: Evaluation Using Multi-Locus Microsatellite Typing

    PubMed Central

    Pomares, Christelle; Marty, Pierre; Bañuls, Anne Laure; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Pratlong, Francine; Faucher, Benoît; Jeddi, Fakhri; Moore, Sandy; Michel, Grégory; Aluru, Srikanth; Piarroux, Renaud; Hide, Mallorie

    2016-01-01

    In the south of France, Leishmania infantum is responsible for numerous cases of canine leishmaniasis (CanL), sporadic cases of human visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and rare cases of cutaneous and muco-cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL and MCL, respectively). Several endemic areas have been clearly identified in the south of France including the Pyrénées-Orientales, Cévennes (CE), Provence (P), Alpes-Maritimes (AM) and Corsica (CO). Within these endemic areas, the two cities of Nice (AM) and Marseille (P), which are located 150 km apart, and their surroundings, concentrate the greatest number of French autochthonous leishmaniasis cases. In this study, 270 L. infantum isolates from an extended time period (1978–2011) from four endemic areas, AM, P, CE and CO, were assessed using Multi-Locus Microsatellite Typing (MLMT). MLMT revealed a total of 121 different genotypes with 91 unique genotypes and 30 repeated genotypes. Substantial genetic diversity was found with a strong genetic differentiation between the Leishmania populations from AM and P. However, exchanges were observed between these two endemic areas in which it seems that strains spread from AM to P. The genetic differentiations in these areas suggest strong epidemiological structuring. A model-based analysis using STRUCTURE revealed two main populations: population A (consisting of samples primarily from the P and AM endemic areas with MON-1 and non-MON-1 strains) and population B consisting of only MON-1 strains essentially from the AM endemic area. For four patients, we observed several isolates from different biological samples which provided insight into disease relapse and re-infection. These findings shed light on the transmission dynamics of parasites in humans. However, further data are required to confirm this hypothesis based on a limited sample set. This study represents the most extensive population analysis of L. infantum strains using MLMT conducted in France. PMID:26808522

  15. Association Between Genetic Variants on Chromosome 15q25 Locus and Objective Measures of Tobacco Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Timofeeva, Maria N.; Morris, Richard W.; Prieto-Merino, David; Sattar, Naveed; Brennan, Paul; Johnstone, Elaine C.; Relton, Caroline; Johnson, Paul C. D.; Walther, Donna; Whincup, Peter H.; Casas, Juan P.; Uhl, George R.; Vineis, Paolo; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Jefferis, Barbara J.; Amuzu, Antoinette; Riboli, Elio; Upton, Mark N.; Aveyard, Paul; Ebrahim, Shah; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Watt, Graham; Palmer, Tom M.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Davey Smith, George

    2012-01-01

    Background Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms, rs1051730 and rs16969968, located within the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene cluster on chromosome 15q25 locus, are associated with heaviness of smoking, risk for lung cancer, and other smoking-related health outcomes. Previous studies have typically relied on self-reported smoking behavior, which may not fully capture interindividual variation in tobacco exposure. Methods We investigated the association of rs1051730 and rs16969968 genotype (referred to as rs1051730–rs16969968, because these are in perfect linkage disequilibrium and interchangeable) with both self-reported daily cigarette consumption and biochemically measured plasma or serum cotinine levels among cigarette smokers. Summary estimates and descriptive statistical data for 12 364 subjects were obtained from six independent studies, and 2932 smokers were included in the analyses. Linear regression was used to calculate the per-allele association of rs1051730–rs16969968 genotype with cigarette consumption and cotinine levels in current smokers for each study. Meta-analysis of per-allele associations was conducted using a random effects method. The likely resulting association between genotype and lung cancer risk was assessed using published data on the association between cotinine levels and lung cancer risk. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Pooled per-allele associations showed that current smokers with one or two copies of the rs1051730–rs16969968 risk allele had increased self-reported cigarette consumption (mean increase in unadjusted number of cigarettes per day per allele = 1.0 cigarette, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.57 to 1.43 cigarettes, P = 5.22 × 10−6) and cotinine levels (mean increase in unadjusted cotinine levels per allele = 138.72 nmol/L, 95% CI = 97.91 to 179.53 nmol/L, P = 2.71 × 10−11). The increase in cotinine levels indicated an increased risk of lung cancer with each additional copy of the rs

  16. The genetic basis of Muir-Torre syndrome includes the hMLH1 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Bapat, B.; Xia, L.; Mitri, A.

    1996-09-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS) (McKusick 158320) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the development of sebaceous gland tumors and skin cancers, including keratoacanthomas and basal cell carcinomas. Affected family members may manifest a wide spectrum of internal malignancies, which include colorectal, endometrial, urologic, and upper gastrointestinal neoplasms. Sebaceous gland tumors, which are rare in the general population, are considered to be the hallmark of MTS and may arise prior to the development of other visceral cancers. Despite the high incidence of synchronous and metachronous tumors, prognosis is often favorable. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is one of the most common autosomal dominantly inherited colorectal cancer susceptibility syndromes. In some HNPCC families, extracolonic tumors of the endometrium, ovary, small bowel, and renal and biliary tract occur at an increased frequency. On the basis of similarities in clinical symptoms of MTS and HNPCC, it is proposed that these two syndromes may have a common genetic basis. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Atypical genetic locus associated with constitutive production of enterocin B by Enterococcus faecium BFE 900.

    PubMed

    Franz, C M; Worobo, R W; Quadri, L E; Schillinger, U; Holzapfel, W H; Vederas, J C; Stiles, M E

    1999-05-01

    A purified bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus faecium BFE 900 isolated from black olives was shown by Edman degradation and mass spectrometric analyses to be identical to enterocin B produced by E. faecium T136 from meat (P. Casaus, T. Nilsen, L. M. Cintas, I. F. Nes, P. E. Hernández, and H. Holo, Microbiology 143:2287-2294, 1997). The structural gene was located on a 2.2-kb HindIII fragment and a 12.0-kb EcoRI chromosomal fragment. The genetic characteristics and production of EntB by E. faecium BFE 900 differed from that described so far by the presence of a conserved sequence like a regulatory box upstream of the EntB gene, and its production was constitutive and not regulated. The 2.2-kb chromosomal fragment contained the hitherto undetected immunity gene for EntB in an atypical orientation that is the reverse of that of the structural gene. Typical transport and other genes associated with bacteriocin production were not detected on the 12.0-kb chromosomal fragment containing the EntB structural gene. This makes the EntB genetic system different from most other bacteriocin systems, where transport and possible regulatory genes are clustered. EntB was subcloned and expressed by the dedicated secretion machinery of Carnobacterium piscicola LV17A. The structural gene was amplified by PCR, fused to the divergicin A signal peptide, and expressed by the general secretory pathway in Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 19433.

  18. Moroccan Leishmania infantum: Genetic Diversity and Population Structure as Revealed by Multi-Locus Microsatellite Typing

    PubMed Central

    Lemrani, Meryem; Mouna, Idrissi; Mohammed, Hida; Mostafa, Sabri; Rhajaoui, Mohamed; Hamarsheh, Omar; Schönian, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Leishmania infantum causes Visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis in northern Morocco. It predominantly affects children under 5 years with incidence of 150 cases/year. Genetic variability and population structure have been investigated for 33 strains isolated from infected dogs and humans in Morocco. A multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT) approach was used in which a MLMtype based on size variation in 14 independent microsatellite markers was compiled for each strain. MLMT profiles of 10 Tunisian, 10 Algerian and 21 European strains which belonged to zymodeme MON-1 and non-MON-1 according to multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) were included for comparison. A Bayesian model-based approach and phylogenetic analysis inferred two L.infantum sub-populations; Sub-population A consists of 13 Moroccan strains grouped with all European strains of MON-1 type; and sub-population B consists of 15 Moroccan strains grouped with the Tunisian and Algerian MON-1 strains. Theses sub-populations were significantly different from each other and from the Tunisian, Algerian and European non MON-1 strains which constructed one separate population. The presence of these two sub-populations co-existing in Moroccan endemics suggests multiple introduction of L. infantum from/to Morocco; (1) Introduction from/to the neighboring North African countries, (2) Introduction from/to the Europe. These scenarios are supported by the presence of sub-population B and sub-population A respectively. Gene flow was noticed between sub-populations A and B. Five strains showed mixed A/B genotypes indicating possible recombination between the two populations. MLMT has proven to be a powerful tool for eco-epidemiological and population genetic investigations of Leishmania. PMID:24147078

  19. Genetic evidence for a product of the Fv-1 locus that transfers resistance to mouse leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, R W; Schluter, B; Myer, F E; Otten, J A; Yang, W K; Brown, A

    1976-01-01

    Extracts of mouse cells have been shown to transfer to N- or B-trophic host range types of mouse leukemia viruses. The genetic specificity of the inhibition was tested in two ways: (i) by correlating the Fv-1 genotype of a number of mouse strains with the restriction-transferring activity of extracts of the respective embryo cell cultures, and (ii) by correlating the Fv-1 genotype of BLC3F2 (C57BL/6 female [Fv-1bb] by C3H male [Fv-1nn] parental strains) mouse embryos, which segregate the Fv-1 alleles in a 12:1 ratio, with the inhibitor activity of extracts of the cells from each embryo. Five independent matings, totaling 45 individual embryos, were tested. Each embryo was cultured, and the Fv-1 genotype was determined independently by titration of N- and B-tropic viruses; the extracts of replicate secondary cultures were tested for their effect on infection of permissive cells by N- and B-tropic viruses. The specific-restriction-transferring activity of the embryos was found to segregate with the appropriate Fv-1 genotype. These res-lts confirm the suggestion that the inhibitor of the leukemia virus host range types in the cellular extracts is a product of the Fv-1 locus. PMID:186636

  20. Genetic variation at the tomato Cf-4/Cf-9 locus induced by EMS mutagenesis and intralocus recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Brande B H; Thomas, Colwyn M; Parniske, Martin; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and the leaf mold pathogen Cladosporium fulvum is an excellent model for investigating disease resistance gene evolution. The interaction is controlled in a gene-for-gene manner by Cf genes that encode type I transmembrane extracellular leucine-rich repeat glycoproteins that recognize their cognate fungal avirulence (Avr) proteins. Cf-4 from L. hirsutum and Cf-9 from L. pimpinellifolium are located at the same locus on the short arm of tomato chromosome 1 in an array of five paralogs. Molecular analysis has shown that one mechanism for generating sequence variation in Cf genes is intragenic sequence exchange through unequal crossing over or gene conversion. To investigate this we used a facile genetic selection to identify novel haplotypes in the progeny of Cf-4/Cf-9 trans-heterozygotes that lacked Cf-4 and Cf-9. This selection is based on the ability of Avr4 and Avr9 to induce Cf-4- or Cf-9-dependent seedling death. The crossovers were localized to the same intergenic region defining a recombination hotspot in this cross. As part of a structure-function analysis of Cf-9 and Cf-4, nine EMS-induced mutant alleles have been characterized. Most mutations result in single-amino-acid substitutions in their C terminus at residues that are conserved in other Cf proteins. PMID:15166169

  1. A novel genetic locus for low renin hypertension: familial hyperaldosteronism type II maps to chromosome 7 (7p22)

    PubMed Central

    Lafferty, A.; Torpy, D.; Stowasser, M.; Taymans, S.; Lin, J. P.; Huggard, P.; Gordon, R.; Stratakis, C.

    2000-01-01

    Familial hyperaldosteronism type II (FH-II) is caused by adrenocortical hyperplasia or aldosteronoma or both and is frequently transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion. Unlike FH type I (FH-I), which results from fusion of the CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 genes, hyperaldosteronism in FH-II is not glucocorticoid remediable. A large family with FH-II was used for a genome wide search and its members were evaluated by measuring the aldosterone:renin ratio. In those with an increased ratio, FH-II was confirmed by fludrocortisone suppression testing. After excluding most of the genome, genetic linkage was identified with a maximum two point lod score of 3.26 at θ=0, between FH-II in this family and the polymorphic markers D7S511, D7S517, and GATA24F03 on chromosome 7, a region that corresponds to cytogenetic band 7p22. This is the first identified locus for FH-II; its molecular elucidation may provide further insight into the aetiology of primary aldosteronism.


Keywords: chromosome 7; aldosterone; familial hyperaldosteronism type II; hypertension PMID:11073536

  2. The macromelanophore locus and the melanoma oncogene Xmrk are separate genetic entities in the genome of Xiphophorus.

    PubMed

    Weis, S; Schartl, M

    1998-08-01

    Fish of the genus Xiphophorus are polymorphic for black pigmentation patterns. Certain intra- or interspecific hybrids exhibit enhanced expression of these patterns, leading in many cases to malignant melanoma. Because no recombination was ever observed between the pattern information and the genetic predisposition to develop melanoma after hybridization, a "tumor gene" (Tu) was postulated that encodes both phenotypes. A dominant oncogene, ONC-Xmrk, was then found to be necessary and sufficient for the transforming function of Tu. Here we present molecular evidence that ONC-Xmrk and the pigment pattern information are encoded by separate, although intimately linked loci. No ONC-Xmrk gene was present in the 15 Xiphophorus strains investigated which exhibit no black pigmentation pattern. Five different patterns from Xiphophorus maculatus, X. evelynae, X. milleri, X. cortezi, and X. montezumae were associated with ONC-Xmrk and were melanomagenic, while fish of X. helleri, X. variatus, X. nezahualcoyotl, and X. montezumae with five other patterns had no ONC-Xmrk and consequently did not produce hybrid melanoma. These data provide evidence that ONC-Xmrk is sufficient for tumorigenesis in Xiphophorus hybrids, and that a separate, pigment pattern-encoding locus is closely linked to it. PMID:9691046

  3. The macromelanophore locus and the melanoma oncogene Xmrk are separate genetic entities in the genome of Xiphophorus.

    PubMed Central

    Weis, S; Schartl, M

    1998-01-01

    Fish of the genus Xiphophorus are polymorphic for black pigmentation patterns. Certain intra- or interspecific hybrids exhibit enhanced expression of these patterns, leading in many cases to malignant melanoma. Because no recombination was ever observed between the pattern information and the genetic predisposition to develop melanoma after hybridization, a "tumor gene" (Tu) was postulated that encodes both phenotypes. A dominant oncogene, ONC-Xmrk, was then found to be necessary and sufficient for the transforming function of Tu. Here we present molecular evidence that ONC-Xmrk and the pigment pattern information are encoded by separate, although intimately linked loci. No ONC-Xmrk gene was present in the 15 Xiphophorus strains investigated which exhibit no black pigmentation pattern. Five different patterns from Xiphophorus maculatus, X. evelynae, X. milleri, X. cortezi, and X. montezumae were associated with ONC-Xmrk and were melanomagenic, while fish of X. helleri, X. variatus, X. nezahualcoyotl, and X. montezumae with five other patterns had no ONC-Xmrk and consequently did not produce hybrid melanoma. These data provide evidence that ONC-Xmrk is sufficient for tumorigenesis in Xiphophorus hybrids, and that a separate, pigment pattern-encoding locus is closely linked to it. PMID:9691046

  4. Occurrence and genetic characterization of Giardia duodenalis from captive nonhuman primates by multi-locus sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Díaz, Rafael Alberto; Sansano-Maestre, José; Martínez-Herrero, María Del Carmen; Ponce-Gordo, Francisco; Gómez-Muñoz, María Teresa

    2011-09-01

    Giardia is the most common enteric protozoan that can be pathogenic to both humans and animals. Transmission can be direct through the faecal-oral route, or through ingestion of contaminated water or food. Genetic characterization of Giardia duodenalis isolates has demonstrated the existence of seven groups (assemblages A to G) which differ in their host distribution. Assemblages A and B are present in humans and other primates, dogs, cats, rodents, and other species of wild mammals, but the role of the different host animals in the epidemiology of human infection remains unclear. With this preliminary data, we can infer that nonhuman primates (NHP) might be a potential reservoir for zoonotic transmission. This research paper discusses the presence of Giardia in nonhuman primates housed in two Spanish zoological gardens (located in Valencia and Madrid). Twenty faecal samples obtained from 16 different species of NHP were studied; 70% were positives to Giardia, and genetic analyses were performed by sequencing of four genes (SSrRNA, glutamate dehydrogenase, triose phosphate isomerase, and beta-giardin). The assemblage A was the most frequent (63.4%) in the species studied. A sequence from a red ruffed lemur (corresponding to genotype AI) was obtained, and this is the first reported sequence of a gdh gene obtained from this species. The multi-locus sequence analysis was also performed on the samples positive to nested PCR belonging to assemblage B. After amplification using the GDHeF, GDHiF, and GDHiR gdh primers; AL3543, AL3546, AL3544, and AL3545 tpi primers; G7, G759, GBF, and GBR bg primers, amplicons of 432, 500, and 511 bp respectively were obtained. Amplification products were sequenced and the sequence and phylogenetic analyses showed that genotype IV like was the most frequent in the samples belonging to this assemblage. PMID:21327988

  5. Genetic diversity at the Dhn3 locus in Turkish Hordeum spontaneum populations with comparative structural analyses

    PubMed Central

    Uçarlı, Cüneyt; McGuffin, Liam J.; Çaputlu, Süleyman; Aravena, Andres; Gürel, Filiz

    2016-01-01

    We analysed Hordeum spontaneum accessions from 21 different locations to understand the genetic diversity of HsDhn3 alleles and effects of single base mutations on the intrinsically disordered structure of the resulting polypeptide (HsDHN3). HsDHN3 was found to be YSK2-type with a low-frequency 6-aa deletion in the beginning of Exon 1. There is relatively high diversity in the intron region of HsDhn3 compared to the two exon regions. We have found subtle differences in K segments led to changes in amino acids chemical properties. Predictions for protein interaction profiles suggest the presence of a protein-binding site in HsDHN3 that coincides with the K1 segment. Comparison of DHN3 to closely related cereals showed that all of them contain a nuclear localization signal sequence flanking to the K1 segment and a novel conserved region located between the S and K1 segments [E(D/T)DGMGGR]. We found that H. vulgare, H. spontaneum, and Triticum urartu DHN3s have a greater number of phosphorylation sites for protein kinase C than other cereal species, which may be related to stress adaptation. Our results show that the nature and extent of mutations in the conserved segments of K1 and K2 are likely to be key factors in protection of cells. PMID:26869072

  6. Genetic diversity and phylogeny of toxic cyanobacteria determined by DNA polymorphisms within the phycocyanin locus.

    PubMed Central

    Neilan, B A; Jacobs, D; Goodman, A E

    1995-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are a highly diverse group in relation to form, function, and habitat. Current cyanobacterial systematics relies on the observation of minor and plastic morphological characters. Accurate and reliable delineation of toxic and bloom-forming strains of cyanobacteria has not been possible by traditional methods. We have designed general primers to the phycocyanin operon (cpc gene) and developed a PCR which allows the amplification of a region of this gene, including a variable intergenic spacer sequence. Because of the specificity of this PCR for cyanobacterial isolates, the assay is appropriate for the rapid and reliable identification of strains in freshwater samples. Successive restriction endonuclease digestion of this amplification product, with a total of nine enzymes, yielded many identifying DNA profiles specific to the various taxonomic levels of cyanobacteria. The restriction enzyme profiles for MspI, RsaI, and TaqI were conserved for strains within each of the eight genera (40 strains) studied and clearly discriminated among these genera. Intrageneric delineation of strains was revealed by the enzymes AluI, CfoI, and HaeIII for members of the genus Microcystis, while strains of genus Anabaena were differentiated by the digestion patterns provided by AluI, CfoI, and ScrFI. Phenetic and cladistic analyses of the data were used to infer the genetic relatedness and evolution of toxic and bloom-forming cyanobacteria. PMID:8526499

  7. Spontaneous isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection: genetic heterogeneity of chromosome locus 5q13-14 in 2 male familial cases.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhongzhi; Zhang, Xiaoping; Wang, Weiping; Tian, Feng; Jiang, Guomin; Li, Maoquan

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection (SISMAD) is a rare disease that occurs sporadically. In this report, we describe 2 cases of SISMAD involving an uncle and his nephew. Genetic studies revealed the presence of heterogeneity of a chromosome locus at 5q13-14 in 3 family members (the 2 patients and the nephew's mother), an area previously found to be linked to familial ascending aortic aneurysms and dissections.

  8. Genetic recombination events which position the Friedreich ataxia locus proximal to the D9S15/D9S5 linkage group on chromosome 9q

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, S.; Shaw, J.; Wilkes, D.; Carvajal, J.; Hillerman, R.; Doudney, K.; Williamson, R. ); Farrall, M. ); Harding, A.E. ); Sirugo, G.; Fujita, R.; Koenig, M.; Mandel, J.L. ); Palau, F.; Monros, E.; Vilchez, J.; Prieto, F. ); Richter, A.; Vanasse, M.; Melancon, S. ); Cocozza, S.; Cavalcanti, F.; Pianese, L.; Filla, A. ); Redolfi, E.; DiDonato, S.; Pandolfo, M. )

    1993-01-01

    The absence of recombination between the mutation causing Friedreich ataxia and the two loci which originally assigned the disease locus to chromosome 9 has slowed attempts to isolate and characterize the genetic defect underlying this neurodegenerative disorder. A proximity of less than 1 cM to the linkage group has been proved by the generation of high maximal lod score (Z) to each of the two tightly linked markers D9S15 (Z = 96.69; recombination fraction [[theta

  9. Smooth and Rough Biotypes of Arcanobacterium haemolyticum Can Be Genetically Distinguished at the Arcanolysin Locus

    PubMed Central

    Ruther, Haley S.; Phillips, Kalyn; Ross, Dolores; Crawford, Alyssa; Weidner, M. Payton; Sammra, Osama; Lämmler, Christoph; McGee, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Arcanobacterium haemolyticum is a Gram-positive, β-hemolytic emerging human pathogen that is classified into smooth or rough biotypes. This bacterial species is also a rare pathogen of animals. Smooth biotypes possess smooth colony edges, are moderate to strong in β-hemolysis, and predominately cause wound infections. In contrast, rough biotypes possess rough and irregular colony edges, have weak to no β-hemolytic activity, and predominately cause pharyngitis. Using horse erythrocytes we confirmed that smooth isolates are generally more hemolytic than rough isolates. A hemolysin from A. haemolyticum, arcanolysin (aln/ALN), was recently discovered and is a member of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) family. PCR amplification of aln from all 36 smooth A. haemolyticum isolates yielded the expected 2.0 kb product. While 21 rough isolates yielded the 2.0 kb product, 16 isolates had a 3.2 kb product. The extra 1.2 kb segment was 99% identical to IS911 (insertion sequence) from Corynebacterium diphtheriae. PCR amplification and sequence analysis of the upstream region of aln revealed ~40 nucleotide polymorphisms among 73 clinical isolates from Finland, Denmark, Germany and United States (Nebraska). Remarkably, multi-sequence alignments of the aln upstream region demonstrated that ~90% of the isolates phylogenetically clustered as either smooths or roughs. Differential restriction enzyme analysis of the aln upstream region also demonstrated that the aln upstream region of most (~75%) smooth isolates was cleaved with ClaI while this region in most (~86%) rough isolates was cleaved with XcmI. We conclude that the aln upstream region can be used to genetically distinguish between smooth and rough biotypes of this important emerging pathogen. PMID:26382754

  10. Generation of a Multi-Locus Chicken Introgression Line to Study the Effects of Genetic Interactions on Metabolic Phenotypes in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Ek, Weronica; Marklund, Stefan; Ragavendran, Ashok; Siegel, Paul; Muir, William; Carlborg, Örjan

    2012-01-01

    Most biological traits are regulated by a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. By intercrossing divergent lines, it is possible to identify individual and interacting QTL involved in the genetic architecture of these traits. When the loci have been mapped, alternative strategies are needed for fine-mapping and studying the individual and interactive effects of the QTL in detail. We have previously identified, replicated, and fine mapped a four-locus QTL network that determines nearly half of the eightfold difference in body weight at 56 days of age between two divergently selected chicken lines. Here, we describe, to our knowledge, the first generation of a three-locus QTL introgression line in chickens. Recurrent marker-assisted backcrossing was used to simultaneously transfer QTL alleles from the low-weight selected line into the high-weight selected line. Three generations of backcrossing and one generation of intercrossing resulted in an introgression line where all three introgressed QTL and several unlinked and linked control-loci were segregating at nearly expected allele frequencies. We show how intensive selection can be applied using artificial insemination to rapidly generate a multi-locus introgression line and provide recommendations for future breeding of introgression lines. This confirmed introgression line will facilitate later detailed studies of the effects of genetic interactions on complex traits in this population, including growth, and body-composition traits. PMID:22403584

  11. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies GPC5 as a Novel Genetic Locus Protective against Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Post, Wendy; Jui, Jonathan; Hilton, Gina; O'Connor, Ashley; Prineas, Ronald J.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Psaty, Bruce M.; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Rea, Thomas; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Siscovick, David S.; Burke, Gregory L.; Marban, Eduardo; Spooner, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Existing studies indicate a significant genetic component for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide an unbiased approach for identification of novel genes. We performed a GWAS to identify genetic determinants of SCA. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a case-control design within the ongoing Oregon Sudden Unexpected Death Study (Oregon-SUDS). Cases (n = 424) were SCAs with coronary artery disease (CAD) among residents of Portland, OR (2002–07, population ∼1,000,000) and controls (n = 226) were residents with CAD, but no history of SCA. All subjects were of White-European ancestry and GWAS was performed using Affymetrix 500K/5.0 and 6.0 arrays. High signal markers were genotyped in SCA cases (n = 521) identified from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC) and the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) (combined n = 19,611). No SNPs reached genome-wide significance (p<5×10−8). SNPs at 6 loci were prioritized for follow-up primarily based on significance of p<10−4 and proximity to a known gene (CSMD2, GPR37L1, LIN9, B4GALNT3, GPC5, and ZNF592). The minor allele of GPC5 (GLYPICAN 5, rs3864180) was associated with a lower risk of SCA in Oregon-SUDS, an effect that was also observed in ARIC/CHS whites (p<0.05) and blacks (p<0.04). In a combined Cox proportional hazards model analysis that adjusted for race, the minor allele exhibited a hazard ratio of 0.85 (95% CI 0.74 to 0.98; p<0.01). Conclusions/Significance A novel genetic locus for SCA, GPC5, was identified from Oregon-SUDS and successfully validated in the ARIC and CHS cohorts. Three other members of the Glypican family have been previously implicated in human disease, including cardiac conditions. The mechanism of this specific association requires further study. PMID:20360844

  12. Effect of balancing selection on spatial genetic structure within populations: theoretical investigations on the self-incompatibility locus and empirical studies in Arabidopsis halleri

    PubMed Central

    Leducq, J-B; Llaurens, V; Castric, V; Saumitou-Laprade, P; Hardy, O J; Vekemans, X

    2011-01-01

    The effect of selection on patterns of genetic structure within and between populations may be studied by contrasting observed patterns at the genes targeted by selection with those of unlinked neutral marker loci. Local directional selection on target genes will produce stronger population genetic structure than at neutral loci, whereas the reverse is expected for balancing selection. However, theoretical predictions on the intensity of this signal under precise models of balancing selection are still lacking. Using negative frequency-dependent selection acting on self-incompatibility systems in plants as a model of balancing selection, we investigated the effect of such selection on patterns of spatial genetic structure within a continuous population. Using numerical simulations, we tested the effect of the type of self-incompatibility system, the number of alleles at the self-incompatibility locus and the dominance interactions among them, the extent of gene dispersal, and the immigration rate on spatial genetic structure at the selected locus and at unlinked neutral loci. We confirm that frequency-dependent selection is expected to reduce the extent of spatial genetic structure as compared to neutral loci, particularly in situations with low number of alleles at the self-incompatibility locus, high frequency of codominant interactions among alleles, restricted gene dispersal and restricted immigration from outside populations. Hence the signature of selection on spatial genetic structure is expected to vary across species and populations, and we show that empirical data from the literature as well as data reported here on three natural populations of the herb Arabidopsis halleri confirm these theoretical results. PMID:20531450

  13. SYSGENET: a meeting report from a new European network for systems genetics.

    PubMed

    Schughart, Klaus

    2010-08-01

    The first scientific meeting of the newly established European SYSGENET network took place at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI) in Braunschweig, April 7-9, 2010. About 50 researchers working in the field of systems genetics using mouse genetic reference populations (GRP) participated in the meeting and exchanged their results, phenotyping approaches, and data analysis tools for studying systems genetics. In addition, the future of GRP resources and phenotyping in Europe was discussed.

  14. 75 FR 52949 - Notice of Meeting: Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Notice of Meeting: Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics... the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society (SACGHS), U.S. Public Health... cast. The main agenda item will be a review of the revised draft report on genetics education...

  15. 75 FR 21002 - Notice of Meeting: Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... Genetics, Health, and Society Pursuant to Public Law 92-463, notice is hereby given of the twenty-second meeting of the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society (SACGHS), U.S. Public... wishing to provide public comment on any issue related to genetics, health and society. Please note...

  16. 75 FR 21295 - Notice of Meeting: Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Notice of Meeting: Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics... the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society (SACGHS), U.S. Public Health... wishing to provide public comment on any issue related to genetics, health and society. Please note...

  17. 75 FR 52949 - Notice of Meeting: Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... Genetics, Health, and Society Pursuant to Public Law 92-463, notice is hereby given of the twenty-third meeting of the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society (SACGHS), U.S. Public... cast. The main agenda item will be a review of the revised draft report on genetics education...

  18. A paracentric inversion suppresses genetic recombination at the FON3 locus with breakpoints corresponding to sequence gaps on rice chromosome 11L.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Zhang, Wenli; Xia, Zhihui; Jiang, Guanghuai; Qian, Qian; Li, Aili; Cheng, Zhukuan; Zhu, Lihuang; Mao, Long; Zhai, Wenxue

    2007-03-01

    Paracentric inversion is known to inhibit genetic recombination between normal and inverted chromosomal segments in heterozygous arrangements. Insect inversion polymorphisms have been studied to reveal adaptive processes for maintaining genetic variation. We report the first paracentric inversion in rice (Oryza sativa), which was discovered in our effort to clone the floral organ number gene FON3. Recombination at the FON3 locus on the long arm of chromosome 11 was severely suppressed over a distance of more than 36 cM. An extensive screening among 8,242 F(2) progeny failed to detect any recombinants. Cytological analysis revealed a loop-like structure on pachytene chromosomes, whereas FISH analysis showed the migration of a BAC clone from a distal location to a position closer to the centromere. Interestingly, the locations where the genetic recombination suppression began were coincided with the positions of two physical gaps on the chromosome 11, suggesting a correlation between the physical gaps, the inversion breakpoints. Transposons and retrotransposons, and tandemly arranged members of gene families were among the sequences immediately flanking the gaps. Taken together, we propose that the genetic suppression at the FON3 locus was caused by a paracentric inversion. The possible genetic mechanism causing such a spontaneous inversion was proposed.

  19. Evidence that the Saethre-Chotzen syndrome locus lies between D7S664 and D7S507, by genetic analysis and detection of a microdeletion in a patient

    SciTech Connect

    Lewanda, A.F.; Jerald, H.; Taylor, E.; Jabs, E.W.; Green, E.D.; Weissenbach, J.; Summar, M.L.; Phillips, J.A. III; Cohen, M.; Feingold, M.

    1994-12-01

    The locus for Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, a common autosomal dominant disorder of craniosynostosis and digital anomalies, was previously mapped to chromosome 7p between D7S513 and D7S516. We used linkage and haplotype analyses to narrow the disease locus to an 8-cM region between D7S664 and D7S507. The tightest linkage was to locus D7S664 (Z = 7.16, {theta} = .00). chromosomes from a Saethre-Chotzen syndrome patient with t(2;7) (p23;p22) were used for in situ hybridization with YAC clones containing D7S664 and D7S507. The D7S664 locus was found to lie distal to the 7p22 breakpoint, and the D7S507 locus was deleted from the translocation chromosomes. These genetic and physical mapping data independently show that the disease locus resides in this interval.

  20. Effects of Intraventricular Locus Coeruleus Transplants on Seizure Severity in Genetically Epilepsy-Prone Rats Following Depletion of Brain Norepinephrine

    PubMed Central

    Clough, R. W.; Browning, R. A.; Maring, M. L.; Statnick, M. A.; Wang, C.; Jobe, P. C.

    1994-01-01

    Audiogenic seizures (AGS) in genetically epilepsy-prone rats (GEPR) of the moderateseizure substrain (GEPR-3s) were investigated to determine whether norepinephrine (NE) depletion induced by 6-hydroxydopalnine (6-OHDA) microinfusion into the locus coeruleus (LC) could alter the efficacy of intraventricular NE tissue grafts in promoting reductions in seizure severity in AGS. GEPR-3s were stereotaxically infused with 6-OHDA (4μg/side/rat), or vehicle into the region of the LC. Following 6-OHDA treatment all animals were subjected to 3 AGS tests. GEPR-3s seizure severities were increased in 39.5% of the animals after microinfusion of 6-OHDA into the region of the LC. Following the third AGS test, each rat was stereotaxicaily implanted with 17 gestational day rat fetal tissue obtained from the dorsal pons and containing the primordia of the LC or with tissue obtained from the neocortex or were sham-grafted. Subsequent to grafting, rats were subjected to 3 additional AGS tests. 53% (10/19) of 6-OHDA treated GEPRs showed a significant reduction in seizure severity following transplantation of fetal LC tissue. In contrast, only 20% (1/5) of GEPRs infused with saline rather than 6-OHDA showed, a reduction of seizure severity following fetal LC transplantation. NE content in the cortex and pons/medulla was decreased by 78% and 46% respectively following 6-OHDA microinfusion into the LC. Prominent grafts with numerous TH positive neurons and neurites were present within the third ventricle of grafted animals, while cortex grafts contained no TH immunostained structures. These findings suggest that the efficacy of fetal LC tissue to promote reductions in seizure severity in GEPRs is increased following depletion of central NE by microinfusion of 6-OHDA. PMID:7819373

  1. A genetic locus and gene expression patterns associated with the priming effect on lettuce seed germination at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Schwember, Andrés R; Bradford, Kent J

    2010-05-01

    Seeds of most cultivated varieties of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) fail to germinate at warm temperatures (i.e., above 25-30 degrees C). Seed priming (controlled hydration followed by drying) alleviates this thermoinhibition by increasing the maximum germination temperature. We conducted a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of seed germination responses to priming using a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between L. sativa cv. Salinas and L. serriola accession UC96US23. Priming significantly increased the maximum germination temperature of the RIL population, and a single major QTL was responsible for 47% of the phenotypic variation due to priming. This QTL collocated with Htg6.1, a major QTL from UC96US23 associated with high temperature germination capacity. Seeds of three near-isogenic lines (NILs) carrying an Htg6.1 introgression from UC96US23 in a Salinas genetic background exhibited synergistic increases in maximum germination temperature in response to priming. LsNCED4, a gene encoding a key enzyme (9-cis-epoxycarotinoid dioxygenase) in the abscisic acid biosynthetic pathway, maps precisely with Htg6.1. Expression of LsNCED4 after imbibition for 24 h at high temperature was greater in non-primed seeds of Salinas, of a second cultivar (Titan) and of NILs containing Htg6.1 compared to primed seeds of the same genotypes. In contrast, expression of genes encoding regulated enzymes in the gibberellin and ethylene biosynthetic pathways (LsGA3ox1 and LsACS1, respectively) was enhanced by priming and suppressed by imbibition at elevated temperatures. Developmental and temperature regulation of hormonal biosynthetic pathways is associated with seed priming effects on germination temperature sensitivity.

  2. Layered genetic control of DNA methylation and gene expression: a locus of multiple sclerosis in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jean; Bourdon, Celine; Bernard, Manon; Wilson, Michael D; Reischl, Eva; Waldenberger, Melanie; Ruggeri, Barbara; Schumann, Gunter; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Leemans, Alexander; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Leonard, Gabriel; Richer, Louis; Bouchard, Luigi; Gaudet, Daniel; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka

    2015-10-15

    DNA methylation may contribute to the etiology of complex genetic disorders through its impact on genome integrity and gene expression; it is modulated by DNA-sequence variants, named methylation quantitative trait loci (meQTLs). Most meQTLs influence methylation of a few CpG dinucleotides within short genomic regions (<3 kb). Here, we identified a layered genetic control of DNA methylation at numerous CpGs across a long 300 kb genomic region. This control involved a single long-range meQTL and multiple local meQTLs. The long-range meQTL explained up to 75% of variance in methylation of CpGs located over extended areas of the 300 kb region. The meQTL was identified in four samples (P = 2.8 × 10(-17), 3.1 × 10(-31), 4.0 × 10(-71) and 5.2 × 10(-199)), comprising a total of 2796 individuals. The long-range meQTL was strongly associated not only with DNA methylation but also with mRNA expression of several genes within the 300 kb region (P = 7.1 × 10(-18)-1.0 × 10(-123)). The associations of the meQTL with gene expression became attenuated when adjusted for DNA methylation (causal inference test: P = 2.4 × 10(-13)-7.1 × 10(-20)), indicating coordinated regulation of DNA methylation and gene expression. Further, the long-range meQTL was found to be in linkage disequilibrium with the most replicated locus of multiple sclerosis, a disease affecting primarily the brain white matter. In middle-aged adults free of the disease, we observed that the risk allele was associated with subtle structural properties of the brain white matter found in multiple sclerosis (P = 0.02). In summary, we identified a long-range meQTL that controls methylation and expression of several genes and may be involved in increasing brain vulnerability to multiple sclerosis.

  3. Layered genetic control of DNA methylation and gene expression: a locus of multiple sclerosis in healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jean; Bourdon, Celine; Bernard, Manon; Wilson, Michael D.; Reischl, Eva; Waldenberger, Melanie; Ruggeri, Barbara; Schumann, Gunter; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Leemans, Alexander; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Leonard, Gabriel; Richer, Louis; Bouchard, Luigi; Gaudet, Daniel; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation may contribute to the etiology of complex genetic disorders through its impact on genome integrity and gene expression; it is modulated by DNA-sequence variants, named methylation quantitative trait loci (meQTLs). Most meQTLs influence methylation of a few CpG dinucleotides within short genomic regions (<3 kb). Here, we identified a layered genetic control of DNA methylation at numerous CpGs across a long 300 kb genomic region. This control involved a single long-range meQTL and multiple local meQTLs. The long-range meQTL explained up to 75% of variance in methylation of CpGs located over extended areas of the 300 kb region. The meQTL was identified in four samples (P = 2.8 × 10−17, 3.1 × 10−31, 4.0 × 10−71 and 5.2 × 10−199), comprising a total of 2796 individuals. The long-range meQTL was strongly associated not only with DNA methylation but also with mRNA expression of several genes within the 300 kb region (P = 7.1 × 10−18–1.0 × 10−123). The associations of the meQTL with gene expression became attenuated when adjusted for DNA methylation (causal inference test: P = 2.4 × 10−13–7.1 × 10−20), indicating coordinated regulation of DNA methylation and gene expression. Further, the long-range meQTL was found to be in linkage disequilibrium with the most replicated locus of multiple sclerosis, a disease affecting primarily the brain white matter. In middle-aged adults free of the disease, we observed that the risk allele was associated with subtle structural properties of the brain white matter found in multiple sclerosis (P = 0.02). In summary, we identified a long-range meQTL that controls methylation and expression of several genes and may be involved in increasing brain vulnerability to multiple sclerosis. PMID:26220975

  4. The genetic locus for free sialic acid storage disease maps to the long arm of chromosome 6

    SciTech Connect

    Haataja, L.; Schleutker, J.; Laine, A.P.; Savontaus, M.L.; Aula, P. ); Renlund, M. ); Dib, C.; Weissenbach, J. ); Peltonen, L. )

    1994-06-01

    Salla disease (SD), or adult-type free sialic acid storage disease, is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by impaired transport of free sialic acid across the lysosomal membrane and severe psychomotor retardation. Random linkage analysis of a sample of 27 Finnish families allowed localization of the SD locus to the long arm of chromosome 6. The highest lod score of 8.95 was obtained with a microsatellite marker of locus D6S286 at [theta] - .00. Evidence for linkage disequilibrium was observed between the SD locus and the alleles of three closely linked markers, suggesting that the length of the critical region for the SD locus is in the order of 190 kb. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Genetic variation at the MHC DRB1 locus is similar across Gunnison's prairie dog (Cynomys gunnisoni) colonies regardless of plague history.

    PubMed

    Cobble, Kacy R; Califf, Katy J; Stone, Nathan E; Shuey, Megan M; Birdsell, Dawn N; Colman, Rebecca E; Schupp, James M; Aziz, Maliha; Van Andel, Roger; Rocke, Tonie E; Wagner, David M; Busch, Joseph D

    2016-04-01

    Yersinia pestis was introduced to North America around 1900 and leads to nearly 100% mortality in prairie dog (Cynomys spp.) colonies during epizootic events, which suggests this pathogen may exert a strong selective force. We characterized genetic diversity at an MHC class II locus (DRB1) in Gunnison's prairie dog (C. gunnisoni) and quantified population genetic structure at the DRB1 versus 12 microsatellite loci in three large Arizona colonies. Two colonies, Seligman (SE) and Espee Ranch (ES), have experienced multiple plague-related die-offs in recent years, whereas plague has never been documented at Aubrey Valley (AV). We found fairly low allelic diversity at the DRB1 locus, with one allele (DRB1*01) at high frequency (0.67-0.87) in all colonies. Two other DRB1 alleles appear to be trans-species polymorphisms shared with the black-tailed prairie dog (C. ludovicianus), indicating that these alleles have been maintained across evolutionary time frames. Estimates of genetic differentiation were generally lower at the MHC locus (F ST = 0.033) than at microsatellite markers (F ST = 0.098). The reduced differentiation at DRB1 may indicate that selection has been important for shaping variation at MHC loci, regardless of the presence or absence of plague in recent decades. However, genetic drift has probably also influenced the DRB1 locus because its level of differentiation was not different from that of microsatellites in an F ST outlier analysis. We then compared specific MHC alleles to plague survivorship in 60 C. gunnisoni that had been experimentally infected with Y. pestis. We found that survival was greater in individuals that carried at least one copy of the most common allele (DRB1*01) compared to those that did not (60% vs. 20%). Although the sample sizes of these two groups were unbalanced, this result suggests the possibility that this MHC class II locus, or a nearby linked gene, could play a role in plague survival. PMID:27066243

  6. Genetic variation at the MHC DRB1 locus is similar across Gunnison's prairie dog (Cynomys gunnisoni) colonies regardless of plague history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobble, Kacy R.; Califf, Katy J.; Stone, Nathan E.; Shuey, Megan M.; Birdsell, Dawn; Colman, Rebecca E.; Schupp, James M.; Aziz, Maliha; Van Andel, Roger; Rocke, Tonie E.; Wagner, David M.; Busch, Joseph D.

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia pestis was introduced to North America around 1900 and leads to nearly 100% mortality in prairie dog (Cynomys spp.) colonies during epizootic events, which suggests this pathogen may exert a strong selective force. We characterized genetic diversity at an MHC class II locus (DRB1) in Gunnison's prairie dog (C. gunnisoni) and quantified population genetic structure at the DRB1versus 12 microsatellite loci in three large Arizona colonies. Two colonies, Seligman (SE) and Espee Ranch (ES), have experienced multiple plague-related die-offs in recent years, whereas plague has never been documented at Aubrey Valley (AV). We found fairly low allelic diversity at the DRB1 locus, with one allele (DRB1*01) at high frequency (0.67–0.87) in all colonies. Two otherDRB1 alleles appear to be trans-species polymorphisms shared with the black-tailed prairie dog (C. ludovicianus), indicating that these alleles have been maintained across evolutionary time frames. Estimates of genetic differentiation were generally lower at the MHC locus (FST = 0.033) than at microsatellite markers (FST = 0.098). The reduced differentiation at DRB1 may indicate that selection has been important for shaping variation at MHC loci, regardless of the presence or absence of plague in recent decades. However, genetic drift has probably also influenced theDRB1 locus because its level of differentiation was not different from that of microsatellites in anFST outlier analysis. We then compared specific MHC alleles to plague survivorship in 60C. gunnisoni that had been experimentally infected with Y. pestis. We found that survival was greater in individuals that carried at least one copy of the most common allele (DRB1*01) compared to those that did not (60% vs. 20%). Although the sample sizes of these two groups were unbalanced, this result suggests the possibility that this MHC class II locus, or a nearby linked gene, could play a role in plague survival.

  7. Large-Scale SNP Discovery and Genotyping for Constructing a High-Density Genetic Map of Tea Plant Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq).

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian-Qiang; Huang, Long; Ma, Chun-Lei; Jin, Ji-Qiang; Li, Chun-Fang; Wang, Rong-Kai; Zheng, Hong-Kun; Yao, Ming-Zhe; Chen, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Genetic maps are important tools in plant genomics and breeding. The present study reports the large-scale discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for genetic map construction in tea plant. We developed a total of 6,042 valid SNP markers using specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq), and subsequently mapped them into the previous framework map. The final map contained 6,448 molecular markers, distributing on fifteen linkage groups corresponding to the number of tea plant chromosomes. The total map length was 3,965 cM, with an average inter-locus distance of 1.0 cM. This map is the first SNP-based reference map of tea plant, as well as the most saturated one developed to date. The SNP markers and map resources generated in this study provide a wealth of genetic information that can serve as a foundation for downstream genetic analyses, such as the fine mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL), map-based cloning, marker-assisted selection, and anchoring of scaffolds to facilitate the process of whole genome sequencing projects for tea plant.

  8. Linkage disequilibrium utilized to establish a refined genetic position of the Salla disease locus on 6q14-q15

    SciTech Connect

    Schleutker, J.; Laine, A.P.; Haataja, L. |

    1995-05-20

    Salla disease (SD), an inherited free sialic acid storage disorder, is caused by impaired transport of free sialic acid across the lyosomal membrane. Clinical characteristics of the disease include severe psychomotor retardation and some neurological abnormalities. The authors report detailed linkage analyses of 50 Finnish SD families that localize the SD disease gene to a refined chromosomal area on 6q14-q15. The highest lod score of 17.30 was obtained with a microsatellite marker of locus D6S280. When linkage disequilibrium was adopted in the linkage analyses, they could further assign the SD locus to the immediate vicinity of marker locus D6S406. Linkage disequilibrium facilitated further restriction of the critical chromosomal region to approximately 80 kb, well within the limits of positional cloning techniques. 31 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Admixture mapping of white cell count: genetic locus responsible for lower white blood cell count in the Health ABC and Jackson Heart studies.

    PubMed

    Nalls, Michael A; Wilson, James G; Patterson, Nick J; Tandon, Arti; Zmuda, Joseph M; Huntsman, Scott; Garcia, Melissa; Hu, Donglei; Li, Rongling; Beamer, Brock A; Patel, Kushang V; Akylbekova, Ermeg L; Files, Joe C; Hardy, Cheryl L; Buxbaum, Sarah G; Taylor, Herman A; Reich, David; Harris, Tamara B; Ziv, Elad

    2008-01-01

    White blood cell count (WBC) is an important clinical marker that varies among different ethnic groups. African Americans are known to have a lower WBC than European Americans. We surveyed the entire genome for loci underlying this difference in WBC by using admixture mapping. We analyzed data from African American participants in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study and the Jackson Heart Study. Participants of both studies were genotyped across >or= 1322 single nucleotide polymorphisms that were pre-selected to be informative for African versus European ancestry and span the entire genome. We used these markers to estimate genetic ancestry in each chromosomal region and then tested the association between WBC and genetic ancestry at each locus. We found a locus on chromosome 1q strongly associated with WBC (p < 10(-12)). The strongest association was with a marker known to affect the expression of the Duffy blood group antigen. Participants who had both copies of the common West African allele had a mean WBC of 4.9 (SD 1.3); participants who had both common European alleles had a mean WBC of 7.1 (SD 1.3). This variant explained approximately 20% of population variation in WBC. We used admixture mapping, a novel method for conducting genetic-association studies, to find a region that was significantly associated with WBC on chromosome 1q. Additional studies are needed to determine the biological mechanism for this effect and its clinical implications.

  10. Admixture Mapping of White Cell Count: Genetic Locus Responsible for Lower White Blood Cell Count in the Health ABC and Jackson Heart Studies

    PubMed Central

    Nalls, Michael A.; Wilson, James G.; Patterson, Nick J.; Tandon, Arti; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Huntsman, Scott; Garcia, Melissa; Hu, Donglei; Li, Rongling; Beamer, Brock A.; Patel, Kushang V.; Akylbekova, Ermeg L.; Files, Joe C.; Hardy, Cheryl L.; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Taylor, Herman A.; Reich, David; Harris, Tamara B.; Ziv, Elad

    2008-01-01

    White blood cell count (WBC) is an important clinical marker that varies among different ethnic groups. African Americans are known to have a lower WBC than European Americans. We surveyed the entire genome for loci underlying this difference in WBC by using admixture mapping. We analyzed data from African American participants in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study and the Jackson Heart Study. Participants of both studies were genotyped across ≥ 1322 single nucleotide polymorphisms that were pre-selected to be informative for African versus European ancestry and span the entire genome. We used these markers to estimate genetic ancestry in each chromosomal region and then tested the association between WBC and genetic ancestry at each locus. We found a locus on chromosome 1q strongly associated with WBC (p < 10−12). The strongest association was with a marker known to affect the expression of the Duffy blood group antigen. Participants who had both copies of the common West African allele had a mean WBC of 4.9 (SD 1.3); participants who had both common European alleles had a mean WBC of 7.1 (SD 1.3). This variant explained ∼20% of population variation in WBC. We used admixture mapping, a novel method for conducting genetic-association studies, to find a region that was significantly associated with WBC on chromosome 1q. Additional studies are needed to determine the biological mechanism for this effect and its clinical implications. PMID:18179887

  11. Reverse Genetics of Drosophila RNA Polymerase II: Identification and Characterization of Rpii140, the Genomic Locus for the Second-Largest Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, B. J.; Mortin, M. A.; Greenleaf, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    We have used a reverse genetics approach to isolate genes encoding two subunits of Drosophila melanogaster RNA polymerase II. RpII18 encodes the 18-kDa subunit and maps cytogenetically to polytene band region 83A. RpII140 encodes the 140-kDa subunit and maps to polytene band region 88A10:B1,2. Focusing on RpII140, we used in situ hybridization to map this gene to a small subinterval defined by the endpoints of a series of deficiencies impinging on the 88A/B region and showed that it does not represent a previously known genetic locus. Two recently defined complementation groups, A5 and Z6, reside in the same subinterval and thus were candidates for the RpII140 locus. Phenotypes of A5 mutants suggested that they affect RNA polymerase II, in that the lethal phase and the interaction with developmental loci such as Ubx resemble those of mutants in the gene for the largest subunit, RpII215. Indeed, we have achieved complete genetic rescue of representative recessive lethal mutations of A5 with a P-element construct containing a 9.1-kb genomic DNA fragment carrying RpII140. Interestingly, the initial construct also rescued lethal alleles in the neighboring complementation group, Z6, revealing that the 9.1-kb insert carries two genes. Deleting coding region sequences of RpII140, however, yielded a transformation vector that failed to rescue A5 alleles but continued to rescue Z6 alleles. These results strongly support the conclusion that the A5 complementation group is equivalent to the genomic RpII140 locus. PMID:8325487

  12. Positional cloning of the nude locus: Genetic, physical, and transcription maps of the region and mutations in the mouse and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Segre, J.A.; Lander, E.S. |; Taylor, B.A.

    1995-08-10

    Mutations in the nude locus in mice and rats produce the pleiotropic phenotype of hairlessness and athymia, resulting in severely compromised immune system. To identify the causative gene, we utilized modern tools and techniques of positional cloning. Specifically, spanning the region in which the nude locus resides, we constructed a genetic map of polymorphic markers, a physical map of yeast artificial chromosomes and bacteriophage P1 clones, and a transcription map of genes obtained by direct cDNA selection and exon trapping. We identified seven novel transcripts with similarity to genes from Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, rat or human and three previously identified mouse genes. Based on our transcription mapping results, we present a novel approach to estimate that the nude locus resides in a region approximately threefold enriched for genes. We confirm a recently published report that the nude phenotype is caused by mutations in a gene encoding a novel winged helix or fork head domain transcription factor, whn. We report as well as the mutations in the rat rnu allele and the complete coding sequence of the rat whn mRNA. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Genetic variation at the 22q11 PRODH2/DGCR6 locus presents an unusual pattern and increases susceptibility to schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Heath, Simon C.; Sobin, Christina; Roos, J. Louw; Galke, Brandi L.; Blundell, Maude L.; Lenane, Marge; Robertson, Brian; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Rapoport, Judith L.; Gogos, Joseph A.; Karayiorgou, Maria

    2002-01-01

    The location of a schizophrenia susceptibility locus at chromosome 22q11 has been suggested by genome-wide linkage studies. Additional support was provided by the observation of a higher-than-expected frequency of 22q11 microdeletions in patients with schizophrenia and the demonstration that ≈20–30% of individuals with 22q11 microdeletions develop schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder in adolescence and adulthood. Analysis of the extent of these microdeletions by using polymorphic markers afforded further refinement of this locus to a region of ≈1.5 Mb. Recently, a high rate of 22q11 microdeletions was also reported for a cohort of 47 patients with Childhood Onset Schizophrenia, a rare and severe form of schizophrenia with onset by age 13. It is therefore likely that this 1.5-Mb region contains one or more genes that predispose to schizophrenia. In three independent samples, we provide evidence for a contribution of the PRODH2/DGCR6 locus in 22q11-associated schizophrenia. We also uncover an unusual pattern of PRODH2 gene variation that mimics the sequence of a linked pseudogene. Several of the pseudogene-like variants we identified result in missense changes at conserved residues and may prevent synthesis of a fully functional enzyme. Our results have implications for understanding the genetic basis of the 22q11-associated psychiatric phenotypes and provide further insights into the genomic instability of this region. PMID:11891283

  14. Report of the 1989 Asilomar meeting on education in genetic counseling.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, A P; Scott, J A; Biesecker, B B; Conover, B; Blake, W; Djurdjinovic, L

    1990-01-01

    In September, 1989, 35 individuals representing training programs for genetic counselors and genetic nurse specialists, the Education Committee of the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC), and others with interest and expertise in genetic counselor education met at Asilomar, CA. The purpose of this meeting was to reevaluate training program curricula, both didactic and experiential; to discuss the need for and desirability of advanced graduate education in genetic counseling; and to consider whether alternatives to master's-level training are needed to overcome a growing manpower shortage in the provision of genetics services. This article summarizes recommendations for master's-level training curricula, reviews options and implications for post-master's genetic counselor education, and examines issues related to training for people without a master's degree who also provide patient and community genetics education. PMID:2339714

  15. Identification of Genetic Loci Affecting the Severity of Symptoms of Hirschsprung Disease in Rats Carrying Ednrbsl Mutations by Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Torigoe, Daisuke; Lei, Chuzhao; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong; Sasaki, Nobuya; Wang, Jinxi; Agui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR) is a congenital disease in neonates characterized by the absence of the enteric ganglia in a variable length of the distal colon. This disease results from multiple genetic interactions that modulate the ability of enteric neural crest cells to populate developing gut. We previously reported that three rat strains with different backgrounds (susceptible AGH-Ednrbsl/sl, resistant F344-Ednrbsl/sl, and LEH-Ednrbsl/sl) but the same null mutation of Ednrb show varying severity degrees of aganglionosis. This finding suggests that strain-specific genetic factors affect the severity of HSCR. Consistent with this finding, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for the severity of HSCR on chromosome (Chr) 2 was identified using an F2 intercross between AGH and F344 strains. In the present study, we performed QTL analysis using an F2 intercross between the susceptible AGH and resistant LEH strains to identify the modifier/resistant loci for HSCR in Ednrb-deficient rats. A significant locus affecting the severity of HSCR was also detected within the Chr 2 region. These findings strongly suggest that a modifier gene of aganglionosis exists on Chr 2. In addition, two potentially causative SNPs (or mutations) were detected upstream of a known HSCR susceptibility gene, Gdnf. These SNPs were possibly responsible for the varied length of gut affected by aganglionosis. PMID:25790447

  16. Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map Based on Large-Scale Marker Development in Mango Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq).

    PubMed

    Luo, Chun; Shu, Bo; Yao, Quangsheng; Wu, Hongxia; Xu, Wentian; Wang, Songbiao

    2016-01-01

    Genetic maps are particularly important and valuable tools for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping and marker assisted selection (MAS) of plant with desirable traits. In this study, 173 F1 plants from a cross between Mangifera indica L. "Jin-Hwang" and M. indica L. "Irwin" and their parent plants were subjected to high-throughput sequencing and specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) library construction. After preprocessing, 66.02 Gb of raw data containing 330.64 M reads were obtained. A total of 318,414 SLAFs were detected, of which 156,368 were polymorphic. Finally, 6594 SLAFs were organized into a linkage map consisting of 20 linkage groups (LGs). The total length of the map was 3148.28 cM and the average distance between adjacent markers was 0.48 cM. This map could be considered, to our knowledge, the first high-density genetic map of mango, and might form the basis for fine QTL mapping and MAS of mango. PMID:27625670

  17. High-resolution genetic localization of a modifying locus affecting disease severity in the juvenile cystic kidneys (jck) mouse model of polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Beier, David R.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a locus on proximal Chr 4 modifies disease severity in the juvenile cystic kidney (jck) mouse, a model of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) that carries a mutation of the Nek8 serine-threonine kinase. In this study we used QTL analysis of independently constructed B6.D2 congenic lines to confirm this and showed that this locus has a highly significant effect. We constructed sub-congenic lines to more specifically localize the modifier and have determined it resides in a 3.2 Mb interval containing 28 genes. These include Invs and Anks6, which are both excellent candidates for the modifier as mutations in these genes result in PKD and both genes are known to genetically and physically interact with Nek8. However, examination of strain-specific DNA sequence and kidney expression did not reveal clear differences that might implicate either gene as a modifier of PKD severity. The fact that our high-resolution analysis did not yield an unambiguous result highlights the challenge of establishing the causality of strain-specific variants as genetic modifiers, and suggests that alternative strategies be considered. PMID:27114383

  18. Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map Based on Large-Scale Marker Development in Mango Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq)

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chun; Shu, Bo; Yao, Quangsheng; Wu, Hongxia; Xu, Wentian; Wang, Songbiao

    2016-01-01

    Genetic maps are particularly important and valuable tools for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping and marker assisted selection (MAS) of plant with desirable traits. In this study, 173 F1 plants from a cross between Mangifera indica L. “Jin-Hwang” and M. indica L. “Irwin” and their parent plants were subjected to high-throughput sequencing and specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) library construction. After preprocessing, 66.02 Gb of raw data containing 330.64 M reads were obtained. A total of 318,414 SLAFs were detected, of which 156,368 were polymorphic. Finally, 6594 SLAFs were organized into a linkage map consisting of 20 linkage groups (LGs). The total length of the map was 3148.28 cM and the average distance between adjacent markers was 0.48 cM. This map could be considered, to our knowledge, the first high-density genetic map of mango, and might form the basis for fine QTL mapping and MAS of mango. PMID:27625670

  19. Genetic analysis of the genes involved in synthesis of the lipopolysaccharide core in Escherichia coli K-12: three operons in the rfa locus.

    PubMed Central

    Roncero, C; Casadaban, M J

    1992-01-01

    The region of the Escherichia coli K-12 chromosome encoding the enzymes responsible for the synthesis of responsible for the synthesis of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core has been cloned in vivo by using a mini-Mu vector. This region, formerly known as the rfa locus, comprises 18 kb of DNA between the markers tdh and rpmBG. Results of in vitro mutagenesis of this region with MudII1734 indicate the presence of at least 17 open reading frames or genes, a number considerably higher than expected on the basis of genetic and biochemical studies. Specific insertions in different genes have been recombined into the chromosome, and the mutations have been phenotypically characterized. Complementation analysis indicates that these genes are arranged in three different operons transcribed in opposite directions. A detailed physical map of this region has been constructed on the basis of complementation analysis, fusion protein data, and phenotypic characterizations. Additionally, the role of some genes in the synthesis of LPS has been defined by complementation analysis with known Salmonella typhimurium LPS mutants. The genetic organization of this locus seems to be identical in E. coli K-12 and S. typhimurium. Images PMID:1577693

  20. Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map Based on Large-Scale Marker Development in Mango Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq)

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chun; Shu, Bo; Yao, Quangsheng; Wu, Hongxia; Xu, Wentian; Wang, Songbiao

    2016-01-01

    Genetic maps are particularly important and valuable tools for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping and marker assisted selection (MAS) of plant with desirable traits. In this study, 173 F1 plants from a cross between Mangifera indica L. “Jin-Hwang” and M. indica L. “Irwin” and their parent plants were subjected to high-throughput sequencing and specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) library construction. After preprocessing, 66.02 Gb of raw data containing 330.64 M reads were obtained. A total of 318,414 SLAFs were detected, of which 156,368 were polymorphic. Finally, 6594 SLAFs were organized into a linkage map consisting of 20 linkage groups (LGs). The total length of the map was 3148.28 cM and the average distance between adjacent markers was 0.48 cM. This map could be considered, to our knowledge, the first high-density genetic map of mango, and might form the basis for fine QTL mapping and MAS of mango.

  1. Genome-Wide Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Discovery and High-Density Genetic Map Construction in Cauliflower Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenqing; Gu, Honghui; Sheng, Xiaoguang; Yu, Huifang; Wang, Jiansheng; Huang, Long; Wang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers and genetic maps play an important role in plant genomics and breeding studies. Cauliflower is an important and distinctive vegetable; however, very few molecular resources have been reported for this species. In this study, a novel, specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing strategy was employed for large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and high-density genetic map construction in a double-haploid, segregating population of cauliflower. A total of 12.47 Gb raw data containing 77.92 M pair-end reads were obtained after processing and 6815 polymorphic SLAFs between the two parents were detected. The average sequencing depths reached 52.66-fold for the female parent and 49.35-fold for the male parent. Subsequently, these polymorphic SLAFs were used to genotype the population and further filtered based on several criteria to construct a genetic linkage map of cauliflower. Finally, 1776 high-quality SLAF markers, including 2741 SNPs, constituted the linkage map with average data integrity of 95.68%. The final map spanned a total genetic length of 890.01 cM with an average marker interval of 0.50 cM, and covered 364.9 Mb of the reference genome. The markers and genetic map developed in this study could provide an important foundation not only for comparative genomics studies within Brassica oleracea species but also for quantitative trait loci identification and molecular breeding of cauliflower.

  2. Genome-Wide Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Discovery and High-Density Genetic Map Construction in Cauliflower Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhenqing; Gu, Honghui; Sheng, Xiaoguang; Yu, Huifang; Wang, Jiansheng; Huang, Long; Wang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers and genetic maps play an important role in plant genomics and breeding studies. Cauliflower is an important and distinctive vegetable; however, very few molecular resources have been reported for this species. In this study, a novel, specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing strategy was employed for large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and high-density genetic map construction in a double-haploid, segregating population of cauliflower. A total of 12.47 Gb raw data containing 77.92 M pair-end reads were obtained after processing and 6815 polymorphic SLAFs between the two parents were detected. The average sequencing depths reached 52.66-fold for the female parent and 49.35-fold for the male parent. Subsequently, these polymorphic SLAFs were used to genotype the population and further filtered based on several criteria to construct a genetic linkage map of cauliflower. Finally, 1776 high-quality SLAF markers, including 2741 SNPs, constituted the linkage map with average data integrity of 95.68%. The final map spanned a total genetic length of 890.01 cM with an average marker interval of 0.50 cM, and covered 364.9 Mb of the reference genome. The markers and genetic map developed in this study could provide an important foundation not only for comparative genomics studies within Brassica oleracea species but also for quantitative trait loci identification and molecular breeding of cauliflower. PMID:27047515

  3. Movable Genetic Elements: Detection of Changes in Maize DNA at the Shrunken Locus Due to the Intervention of Ds Elements

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Burr, B.; Burr, F.A.

    1980-05-28

    This report describes our initial attempts at the molecular characterization of a maize controlling element. We have prepared a cDNA probe and used it to detect changes at a locus where Ds elements are found. Evidence of their presence are indicated by changes in the restriction patterns, but there is as yet no information on the physical nature of the controlling elements nor on the kinds of rearrangements they cause.

  4. Movable genetic elements: detection of changes in maize DNA at the Shrunken locus due to the intervention of Ds elements

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, B.; Burr, F.A.

    1980-05-28

    This report describes our initial attempts at the molecular characterization of a maize controlling element. We have prepared a cDNA probe and used it to detect changes at a locus where Ds elements are found. Evidence of their presence are indicated by changes in the restriction patterns, but there is as yet no information on the physical nature of the controlling elements nor on the kinds of rearrangements they cause.

  5. High-resolution genetic mapping of the sucrose octaacetate taste aversion (Soa) locus on mouse Chromosome 6

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Li, Xia; Li, Shanru; Neira, Mauricio; Beauchamp, Gary K.; Azen, Edwin A.

    2013-01-01

    An acetylated sugar, sucrose octaacetate (SOA), tastes bitter to humans and has an aversive taste to at least some mice and other animals. In mice, taste aversion to SOA depends on allelic variation of a single locus, Soa. Three Soa alleles determine ‘taster’ (Soaa), ‘nontaster’ (Soab), and ‘demitaster’ (Soac) phenotypes of taste sensitivity to SOA. Although Soa has been mapped to distal Chromosome (Chr) 6, the limits of the Soa region have not been defined. In this study, mice from congenic strains SW.B6-Soab, B6.SW-Soaa, and C3.SW-Soaa/c and from an outbred CFW strain were genotyped with polymorphic markers on Chr 6. In the congenic strains, the limits of introgressed donor fragments were determined. In the outbred mice, linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analyses were conducted. Positions of the markers were further resolved by using radiation hybrid mapping. The results show that the Soa locus is contained in a ~1-cM (3.3–4.9 Mb) region including the Prp locus. PMID:11641717

  6. Domestication-related genetic effects on social behavior in chickens - effects of genotype at a major growth quantitative trait locus.

    PubMed

    Wirén, A; Gunnarsson, U; Andersson, L; Jensen, P

    2009-06-01

    Domestication is an evolutionary process in which animals become adapted to a life in close proximity to humans. There are typically specific selection pressures associated with this, including living in larger social groups than their wild ancestors. We hypothesized that the genotype at a major growth QTL could affect aspects of social behavior in chickens as well. We performed social behavior tests in red junglefowl (RJF) and White Leghorn (WL) chickens and in chickens from a selected advanced intercross line (SAIL) between RJF and WL, selected for different genotypes at a microsatellite marker locus within the QTL region. Four-week-old pure WL inspected strangers significantly more than pure RJF. Male 4-wk-old SAIL birds, homozygous for the WL allele at the marker locus, differed from those with RJF alleles in a similar way as the pure WL differed from RJF. Furthermore, 155- to 170-d-old male SAIL birds homozygous for the WL allele at the marker locus were less aggressive to unfamiliar conspecifics in a dominance test. The results suggest that domestication has caused changes in social behavior, which, in males, may partly depend on variations in the genotype at the growth QTL where the avian homolog of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1a (AVPR1a) is located. This gene is therefore one of several putative candidate genes for future research. PMID:19439625

  7. Assessing minimum viable population size: Demography meets population genetics.

    PubMed

    Nunney, L; Campbell, K A

    1993-07-01

    The discussion of a population's minimum viable size provides a focus for the study of ecological and genetic factors that influence the persistence of a threatened population. There are many causes of extinction and the fate of a specific population cannot generally be predicted. This uncertainty has been dealt with in two ways: through stochastic demographic models to determine how to minimize extinction probabilities; and through population genetic theory to determine how best to maintain genetic variation, in the belief that the ability to evolve helps buffer a population against the unknown. Recent work suggests that these two very different approaches lead to very similar conclusions, at least under panmictic conditions. However, defining the ideal spatial distribution for an endangered species remains an important challenge.

  8. Association Genetics of Populus trichocarpa or Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Tuskan, Gerry

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Gerry Tuskan of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  9. Association Genetics of Populus trichocarpa or Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, Gerry

    2011-03-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Gerry Tuskan of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  10. Genetic linkage mapping for a susceptibility locus to bipolar illness: Chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, 10p, 11p, 22, and Xpter

    SciTech Connect

    Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Hseih, W.T.; Goldin, L.R.

    1994-09-15

    We are conducting a genome search for a predisposing locus to bipolar (manic-depressive) illness by genotyping 21 moderate-sized pedigrees. We report linkage data derived from screening marker loci on chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, 10p, 11p, 22, and the pseudoautosomal region at Xpter. To analyze for linkage, two-point marker to illness lod scores were calculated under a dominant model with either 85% or 50% maximum penetrance and a recessive model with 85% maximum penetrance, and two affection status models. Under the dominant high penetrance model the cumulative lod scores in the pedigree series were less than -2 at {theta} = 0.01 in 134 of 142 loci examined, indicating that if the disease is genetically homogeneous, linkage could be excluded in these marker regions. Similar results were obtained using the other genetic models. Heterogeneity analysis was conducted when indicated, but no evidence for linkage was found. In the course of mapping we found a positive total lod score greater than +3 at the D7S78 locus at {theta} = 0.01 under a dominant, 50% penetrance model. The lod scores for additional markers within the D7S78 region failed to support the initial finding, implying that this was a spurious positive. Analysis with affected pedigree member method for COL1A2 and D7S78 showed no significance for linkage, but for PLANH1, at the weighting functions f(p)=1 and f(p)=1/sqrt(p), borderline P values of 0.036 and 0.047 were obtained. We also detected new polymorphisms at the mineralo-corticoid receptor (MLR) and calmodulin II (CALMII) genes. These genes were genetically mapped and under affection status model 2 and a dominant, high penetrance mode of transmission the lod scores of {le}2 at {theta} = 0.01 were found. 39 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Genetic and physical mapping of the Treacher Collins syndrome locus with respect to loci in the chromosome 5q3 region

    SciTech Connect

    Jabs, E.W.; Li, Xiang; Coss, C.; Taylor, E. ); Lovett, M. ); Yamaoka, L.H.; Speer, M.C. ); Cadle, R.; Hall, B. ); Brown, K. )

    1993-10-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant, craniofacial developmental disorder, and its locus (TCOF1) has been mapped to chromosome 5q3. To refine the location of the gene within this region, linkage analysis was performed among the TCOF1 locus and 12 loci (IL9, FGFA, GRL, D5S207, D5S210, D5S376, CSF1R, SPARC, D5S119, D5S209, D5S527, FGFR4) in 13 Treacher Collins syndrome families. The highest maximum lod score was obtained between loci TCOF1 and D5S210 (Z = 10.52; [theta] = 0.02 [+-] 0.07). The best order, IL9-GRL-D5S207/D5S210-CSF1R-SPARC-D5S119, and genetic distances among these loci were determined in the 40 CEPH families by multipoint linkage analysis. YAC clones were used to establish the order of loci, centromere-5[prime]GRL3[prime]-D5S207-D5S210-D5S376-CSF1R-SPARC-D5S119-telomere. By combining known physical mapping data with ours, the order of chromosome 5q3 markers is centomere-IL9-FGFA-5[prime]GRL3[prime]-D5s207-D5S210-D5S376-CSF1R-SPARC-D5S119-D5S209-FGFR4-telomere. Based on this order, haplotype analysis suggests that the TCOF1 locus resides distal CSF1R and proximal to SPARC within a region less than 1 Mb in size. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Intra-and inter-population genetic diversity at the HLA-DQA1 locus and their implications for parentage analysis and human identification

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas, F. |; Cerda-Flores, R. |; Zhong, Y.

    1994-09-01

    HLA-DQA1 locus, studied by PCR-based sequence specific oligonucleotide probes, is highly polymorphic in all populations thus far studied. From the literature we compiled genotype and allele frequency data at this locus for 87 populations to examine the pattern of intra- and inter- population genetic diversity. In general, allele frequency variations in populations are consistent with their ethno-history, although small isolated populations (e.g. Pacific Islanders) exhibit somewhat disparate variations of allele frequencies. A nested gene diversity analysis of 41 populations, classified into 5 ethnic groups (African, n = 3; Caucasian, n = 18; American Native, n = 3; Asian, n = 8; Pacific Islanders, n = 9) showed that the total gene diversity (80.4%) is largely (95%) due to intra-population variation. Only 3% of the gene diversity is due to inter-population within ethnic group variation, with the remaining 2% due to between ethnic group variation. In terms of average heterozygosity, probability of paternity exlusion, and probability of individual identification, the inter-ethnic group variation is larger than that between poulation samples within the ethnic groups. No significant departure from Hardy-Weinberg expectations of genotype frequencies was observed in any population. With an average heterozygosity of 77% around the world, this locus provides a 57% chance of exclusion of a falsely accused person from paternity, and is able to exclude 91% of individuals for identification purposes. In terms of allele fequencies, the geometric positions of the admixed populations (e.g. African-Americans and American-Hispanics) are consistent with their admixture estimates in their gene pool.

  13. Genetic Organization of the citCDEF Locus and Identification of mae and clyR Genes from Leuconostoc mesenteroides

    PubMed Central

    Bekal-Si Ali, Sadjia; Diviès, Charles; Prévost, Hervé

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we describe two open reading frames coding for a NAD-dependent malic enzyme (mae) and a putative regulatory protein (clyR) found in the upstream region of citCDEFG of Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris 195. The transcriptional analysis of the citrate lyase locus revealed one polycistronic mRNA covering the mae and citCDEF genes. This transcript was detected only on RNA prepared from cells grown in the presence of citrate. Primer extension experiments suggest that clyR and the citrate lyase operon are expressed from a bidirectional A-T-rich promoter region located between mae and clyR. PMID:10400601

  14. Tilapia sex determination: Where temperature and genetics meet.

    PubMed

    Baroiller, J F; D'Cotta, H; Bezault, E; Wessels, S; Hoerstgen-Schwark, G

    2009-05-01

    This review deals with the complex sex determining system of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, governed by the interactions between a genetic determination and the influence of temperature, shown in both domestic and wild populations. Naturally sex reversed individuals are strongly suggested in two wild populations. This can be due to the masculinising temperatures which some fry encounter during their sex differentiation period when they colonise shallow waters, and/or to the influence of minor genetic factors. Differences regarding a) thermal responsiveness of sex ratios between and within Nile tilapia populations, b) maternal and paternal effects on temperature dependent sex ratios and c) nearly identical results in offspring of repeated matings, demonstrate that thermosensitivity is under genetic control. Selection experiments to increase the thermosensitivity revealed high responses in the high and low sensitive lines. The high-line showed approximately 90% males after 2 generations of selection whereas the weakly sensitive line had 54% males. This is the first evidence that a surplus of males in temperature treated groups can be selected as a quantitative trait. Expression profiles of several genes (Cyp19a, Foxl2, Amh, Sox9a,b) from the gonad and brain were analysed to define temperature action on the sex determining/differentiating cascade in tilapia. The coexistence of GSD and TSD is discussed. PMID:19101647

  15. Multi-locus genotyping reveals absence of genetic structure in field populations of the brown ear tick (Rhipicephalus appendiculatus) in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kanduma, Esther G; Mwacharo, Joram M; Mwaura, Stephen; Njuguna, Joyce N; Nzuki, Inosters; Kinyanjui, Peter W; Githaka, Naftaly; Heyne, Heloise; Hanotte, Olivier; Skilton, Robert A; Bishop, Richard P

    2016-02-01

    Rhipicephalus appendiculatus is an important tick vector of several pathogens and parasitizes domestic and wild animals across eastern and southern Africa. However, its inherent genetic variation and population structure is poorly understood. To investigate whether mammalian host species, geographic separation and resulting reproductive isolation, or a combination of these, define the genetic structure of R. appendiculatus, we analyzed multi-locus genotype data from 392 individuals from 10 geographic locations in Kenya generated in an earlier study. These ticks were associated with three types of mammalian host situations; (1) cattle grazing systems, (2) cattle and wildlife co-grazing systems (3) wildlife grazing systems without livestock. We also analyzed data from 460 individuals from 10 populations maintained as closed laboratory stocks and 117 individuals from five other species in the genus Rhipicephalus. The pattern of genotypes observed indicated low levels of genetic differentiation between the ten field populations (FST=0.014±0.002) and a lack of genetic divergence corresponding to the degree of separation of the geographic sampling locations. There was also no clear association of particular tick genotypes with specific host species. This is consistent with tick dispersal over large geographic ranges and lack of host specificity. In contrast, the 10 laboratory populations (FST=0.248±0.015) and the five other species of Rhipicephalus (FST=0.368±0.032) were strongly differentiated into distinct genetic groups. Some laboratory bred populations diverged markedly from their field counterparts in spite of originally being sampled from the same geographic locations. Our results demonstrate a lack of defined population genetic differentiation in field populations of the generalist R. appendiculatus in Kenya, which may be a result of the frequent anthropogenic movement of livestock and mobility of its several wildlife hosts between different locations. PMID

  16. Multi-locus genotyping reveals absence of genetic structure in field populations of the brown ear tick (Rhipicephalus appendiculatus) in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kanduma, Esther G; Mwacharo, Joram M; Mwaura, Stephen; Njuguna, Joyce N; Nzuki, Inosters; Kinyanjui, Peter W; Githaka, Naftaly; Heyne, Heloise; Hanotte, Olivier; Skilton, Robert A; Bishop, Richard P

    2016-02-01

    Rhipicephalus appendiculatus is an important tick vector of several pathogens and parasitizes domestic and wild animals across eastern and southern Africa. However, its inherent genetic variation and population structure is poorly understood. To investigate whether mammalian host species, geographic separation and resulting reproductive isolation, or a combination of these, define the genetic structure of R. appendiculatus, we analyzed multi-locus genotype data from 392 individuals from 10 geographic locations in Kenya generated in an earlier study. These ticks were associated with three types of mammalian host situations; (1) cattle grazing systems, (2) cattle and wildlife co-grazing systems (3) wildlife grazing systems without livestock. We also analyzed data from 460 individuals from 10 populations maintained as closed laboratory stocks and 117 individuals from five other species in the genus Rhipicephalus. The pattern of genotypes observed indicated low levels of genetic differentiation between the ten field populations (FST=0.014±0.002) and a lack of genetic divergence corresponding to the degree of separation of the geographic sampling locations. There was also no clear association of particular tick genotypes with specific host species. This is consistent with tick dispersal over large geographic ranges and lack of host specificity. In contrast, the 10 laboratory populations (FST=0.248±0.015) and the five other species of Rhipicephalus (FST=0.368±0.032) were strongly differentiated into distinct genetic groups. Some laboratory bred populations diverged markedly from their field counterparts in spite of originally being sampled from the same geographic locations. Our results demonstrate a lack of defined population genetic differentiation in field populations of the generalist R. appendiculatus in Kenya, which may be a result of the frequent anthropogenic movement of livestock and mobility of its several wildlife hosts between different locations.

  17. A new locus on chromosome 22q13.31 linked to recessive genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) in a Tunisian consanguineous family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is a familial epilepsy syndrome with extremely variable expressivity. The aim of our study was to identify the responsible locus for GEFS+ syndrome in a consanguineous Tunisian family showing three affected members, by carrying out a genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyping followed by a whole-exome sequencing. We hypothesized an autosomal recessive (AR) mode of inheritance. Results Parametric linkage analysis and haplotype reconstruction identified a new unique identical by descent (IBD) interval of 527 kb, flanking by two microsatellite markers, 18GTchr22 and 15ACchr22b, on human chromosome 22q13.31 with a maximum multipoint LOD score of 2.51. Our analysis was refined by the use of a set of microsatellite markers. We showed that one of them was homozygous for the same allele in all affected individuals and heterozygous in healthy members of this family. This microsatellite marker, we called 17ACchr22, is located in an intronic region of TBC1D22A gene, which encodes a GTPase activator activity. Whole-exome sequencing did not reveal any mutation on chromosome 22q13.31 at the genome wide level. Conclusions Our findings suggest that TBC1D22A is a new locus for GEFS+. PMID:24067191

  18. Localization of a locus for juvenile myoclonic epilepsy on chromosome 6p11-21.2 and evidence for genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.W.; Delgado-Escueta, A.V. |; Alonso, V.M.E.

    1994-09-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a common form of primary idiopathic generalized epilepsy characterized by myoclonias, tonic-clonic or clonic tonic-clonic convulsions and absences. Ictal electroencephalograms (EEGs) show high amplitude multispikes folowed by slow waves and interictal EEGs manifest 3.5-6 Hz diffuse multispike wave complexes. JME affected about 7-10% of patients with epilepsies and its onset peaks between 13-15 years of age. We recently mapped a JME locus on chromosome 6p21.1-6p11 by linkage analysis of one relatively large JME family from Los Angeles and Belize. Assuming autosomal dominant inheritance with 70% penetrance, pairwise analyses tightly linked JME to D6S257 (Z = 3.67), D6S428 (Z = 3.08) and D6S272 (Z = 3.56) at {theta} = 0, m = f. Recombination and multipoints linkage analysis also suggested a locus is between markers D6S257 and D6S272. We then screened three relatively larger Mexican JME pedigrees with D6S257, D6S272, D6S282, TNF, D6S276, D6S273, D6S105 and F13A1 on chromosome 6p. Assuming autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance, linkage to chromosome 6p DNA markers are excluded. Our findings underline the genetic heterogeneity of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

  19. Genetic mapping identifies a major locus spanning P450 clusters associated with pyrethroid resistance in kdr-free Anopheles arabiensis from Chad.

    PubMed

    Witzig, C; Parry, M; Morgan, J C; Irving, H; Steven, A; Cuamba, N; Kerah-Hinzoumbé, C; Ranson, H; Wondji, C S

    2013-04-01

    Prevention of malaria transmission throughout much of Africa is dependent on bednets that are impregnated with pyrethroid insecticides. Anopheles arabiensis is the major malaria vector in Chad and efforts to control this vector are threatened by the emergence of pyrethroid resistance. WHO bioassays revealed that An. arabiensis from Ndjamena is resistant to pyrethroids and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) but fully susceptible to carbamates and organophosphates. No 1014F or 1014S kdr alleles were detected in this population. To determine the mechanisms that are responsible for resistance, genetic crosses were established between the Ndja strain and an insecticide susceptible population from Mozambique. Resistance was inherited as an autosomal trait and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping identified a single major locus on chromosome 2R, which explained 24.4% of the variance in resistance. This QTL is enriched in P450 genes including 25 cytochrome P450s in total. One of these, Cyp6p4 is 22-fold upregulated in the Ndja strain compared with the susceptible. Piperonyl butoxide (PBO) synergist and biochemical assays further support a role for P450s in conferring pyrethroid resistance in this population.

  20. Genetic characterization of a complex locus necessary for the transport and catabolism of erythritol, adonitol and L-arabitol in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Barney A; Oresnik, Ivan J

    2012-08-01

    The Sinorhizobium meliloti locus necessary for the utilization of erythritol as a sole carbon source, contains 17 genes, including genes that encode an ABC transporter necessary for the transport of erythritol, as well as the genes encoding EryA, EryB, EryC, TpiB and the regulators EryD and EryR (SMc01615). Construction of defined deletions and complementation experiments show that the other genes at this locus encode products that are necessary for the catabolism of adonitol (ribitol) and l-arabitol, but not d-arabitol. These analyses show that aside from one gene that is specific for the catabolism of l-arabitol (SMc01619, lalA), the rest of the catabolic genes are necessary for both polyols (SMc01617, rbtC; SMc01618, rbtB; SMc01622, rbtA). Genetic and biochemical data show that in addition to utilizing erythritol as a substrate, EryA is also capable of utilizing adonitol and l-arabitol. Similarly, transport experiments using labelled erythritol show that adonitol, l-arabitol and erythritol share a common transporter (MptABCDE). Quantitative RT-PCR experiments show that transcripts containing genes necessary for adonitol and l-arabitol utilization are induced by these sugars in an eryA-dependent manner.

  1. Sequencing of the human IG light chain loci from a hydatidiform mole BAC library reveals locus-specific signatures of genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Tina A.; Warren, Rene L.; Malig, Maika; Schein, Jacqueline; Wilson, Richard K.; Holt, Robert A.; Eichler, Evan E.; Breden, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Germline variation at immunoglobulin (IG) loci is critical for pathogen-mediated immunity, but establishing complete haplotype sequences in these regions has been problematic because of complex sequence architecture and diploid source DNA. We sequenced BAC clones from the effectively haploid human hydatidiform mole cell line, CHM1htert, across the light chain IG loci, kappa (IGK) and lambda (IGL), creating single haplotype representations of these regions. The IGL haplotype generated here is 1.25 Mb of contiguous sequence, including four novel V alleles and one novel C allele and an 11.9 kb insertion. The CH17 IGK haplotype consists of two 644 kb proximal and 466 kb distal contigs separated by a large gap of unknown size; these assemblies added 49 kb of unique sequence extending into this gap. Our analysis also resulted in the characterization of seven novel IGKV alleles and a 16.7 kb region exhibiting signatures of interlocus sequence exchange between distal and proximal IGKV gene clusters. Genetic diversity in IGK/IGL was compared to that of the IG heavy chain (IGH) locus within the same haploid genome, revealing 3-fold (IGK) and 6-fold (IGL) higher diversity in the IGH locus, potentially associated with increased levels of segmental duplication and the telomeric location of IGH. PMID:25338678

  2. Quantitative trait locus mapping with background control in genetic populations of clonal F1 and double cross

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luyan; Li, Huihui; Ding, Junqiang; Wu, Jianyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we considered five categories of molecular markers in clonal F1 and double cross populations, based on the number of distinguishable alleles and the number of distinguishable genotypes at the marker locus. Using the completed linkage maps, incomplete and missing markers were imputed as fully informative markers in order to simplify the linkage mapping approaches of quantitative trait genes. Under the condition of fully informative markers, we demonstrated that dominance effect between the female and male parents in clonal F1 and double cross populations can cause the interactions between markers. We then developed an inclusive linear model that includes marker variables and marker interactions so as to completely control additive effects of the female and male parents, as well as the dominance effect between the female and male parents. The linear model was finally used for background control in inclusive composite interval mapping (ICIM) of quantitative trait locus (QTL). The efficiency of ICIM was demonstrated by extensive simulations and by comparisons with simple interval mapping, multiple‐QTL models and composite interval mapping. Finally, ICIM was applied in one actual double cross population to identify QTL on days to silking in maize. PMID:25881980

  3. Genetic mapping of human heart-skeletal muscle adenine nucleotide translocator and its relationship to the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Haraguchi, Y.; Chung, A.B.; Torroni, A.; Stepien, G.; Shoffner, J.M.; Costigan, D.A.; Polak, M.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Altherr, M.R.; Winokur, S.T.

    1993-05-01

    The mitochondrial heart-skeletal muscle adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT1) was regionally mapped to 4q35-qter using somatic cell hybrids containing deleted chromosome 4. The regional location was further refined through family studies using ANT1 intron and promoter nucleotide polymorphisms recognized by the restriction endonucleases MboII, NdeI, and HaeIII. Two alleles were found, each at a frequency of 0.5. The ANT1 locus was found to be closely linked to D4S139, D4S171, and the dominant skeletal muscle disease locus facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). A crossover that separated D4S171 and ANT1 from D4S139 was found. Since previous studies have established the chromosome 4 map order as centromere-D4S171-D4S139-FSHD, it was concluded that ANT1 is located on the side of D4S139, that is opposite from FSHD. This conclusion was confirmed by sequencing the exons and analyzing the transcripts of ANT1 from several FSHD patients and finding no evidence of aberration. 35 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Quantitative trait locus mapping with background control in genetic populations of clonal F1 and double cross.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luyan; Li, Huihui; Ding, Junqiang; Wu, Jianyu; Wang, Jiankang

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we considered five categories of molecular markers in clonal F1 and double cross populations, based on the number of distinguishable alleles and the number of distinguishable genotypes at the marker locus. Using the completed linkage maps, incomplete and missing markers were imputed as fully informative markers in order to simplify the linkage mapping approaches of quantitative trait genes. Under the condition of fully informative markers, we demonstrated that dominance effect between the female and male parents in clonal F1 and double cross populations can cause the interactions between markers. We then developed an inclusive linear model that includes marker variables and marker interactions so as to completely control additive effects of the female and male parents, as well as the dominance effect between the female and male parents. The linear model was finally used for background control in inclusive composite interval mapping (ICIM) of quantitative trait locus (QTL). The efficiency of ICIM was demonstrated by extensive simulations and by comparisons with simple interval mapping, multiple-QTL models and composite interval mapping. Finally, ICIM was applied in one actual double cross population to identify QTL on days to silking in maize.

  5. Impact of negative frequency-dependent selection on mating pattern and genetic structure: a comparative analysis of the S-locus and nuclear SSR loci in Prunus lannesiana var. speciosa

    PubMed Central

    Shuri, K; Saika, K; Junko, K; Michiharu, K; Nagamitsu, T; Iwata, H; Tsumura, Y; Mukai, Y

    2012-01-01

    Mating processes of local demes and spatial genetic structure of island populations at the self-incompatibility (S-) locus under negative frequency-dependent selection (NFDS) were evaluated in Prunus lannesiana var. speciosa in comparison with nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci that seemed to be evolutionarily neutral. Our observations of local mating patterns indicated that male–female pair fecundity was influenced by not only self-incompatibility, but also various factors, such as kinship, pollen production and flowering synchrony. In spite of the mating bias caused by these factors, the NFDS effect on changes in allele frequencies from potential mates to mating pollen was detected at the S-locus but not at the SSR loci, although the changes from adult to juvenile cohorts were not apparent at any loci. Genetic differentiation and isolation-by-distance over various spatial scales were smaller at the S-locus than at the SSR loci, as expected under the NFDS. Allele-sharing distributions among the populations also had a unimodal pattern at the S-locus, indicating the NFDS effect except for alleles unique to individual populations probably due to isolation among islands, although this pattern was not exhibited by the SSR loci. Our results suggest that the NFDS at the S-locus has an impact on both the mating patterns and the genetic structure in the P. lannesiana populations studied. PMID:22669074

  6. Next Generation Genetic Mapping of the Ligon-lintless-2 (Li2) Locus in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next generation sequencing offers new ways to identify the genetic mechanisms that underlie mutant phenotypes. The release of a reference diploid Gossypium raimondii (D5) genome and bioinformatics tools to sort tetraploid reads into subgenomes has brought cotton genetic mapping into the genomics er...

  7. Fine genetic mapping of the Batten disease locus (CLN3) by haplotype analysis and demonstration of allelic association with chromosome 16p microsatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchison, H.M.; McKay, T.R.; Thompson, A.D.; Mulley, J.C.; Kozman, H.M.; Richards, R.I.; Callen, D.F.; Stallings, R.L.; Doggett, N.A.; Attwood, J.

    1993-05-01

    Batten disease, juvenile onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment in neurons and other cell types. The disease locus (CLN3) has previously been assigned to chromosome 16p. The genetic localization of CLN3 has been refined by analyzing 70 families using a high-resolution map of 15 marker loci encompassing the CLN3 region on 16p. Crossovers in three maternal meioses allowed localization of CLN3 to the interval between D16S297 and D16S57. Within that interval alleles at three highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat loci (D16S288, D16S298, D16S299) were found to be in strong linkage disequilibrium with CLN3. Analysis of haplotypes suggests that a majority of CLN3 chromosomes have arisen from a single founder mutation. 15 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Genetics and Epigenetics of the Skin Meet Deep Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jeffrey B.; Cho, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid advances in next-generation sequencing technology are revolutionizing approaches to genomic and epigenomic studies of skin. Deep sequencing of cutaneous malignancies reveals heavily mutagenized genomes with large numbers of low-prevalence mutations and multiple resistance mechanisms to targeted therapies. Next-generation sequencing approaches have already paid rich dividends in identifying the genetic causes of dermatologic disease, both in heritable mutations and the somatic aberrations that underlie cutaneous mosaicism. Although epigenetic alterations clearly influence tumorigenesis, pluripotent stem cell biology, and epidermal cell lineage decisions, labor and cost-intensive approaches long delayed a genome-scale perspective. New insights into epigenomic mechanisms in skin disease should arise from the accelerating assessment of histone modification, DNA methylation, and related gene expression signatures. PMID:22237701

  9. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences. (ERB)

  10. Genetic organization of the mle locus and identification of a mleR-like gene from Leuconostoc oenos.

    PubMed Central

    Labarre, C; Diviès, C; Guzzo, J

    1996-01-01

    Characterization of the mle locus harboring the malolactic enzyme gene mleA and malate permease gene mleP from Leuconostoc oenos was completed in this study by mRNA analysis. Northern (RNA) blot experiments revealed a 2.6-kb transcript, suggesting an operon structure harboring mleA and mleP genes. Primer extension analysis showed that the mle operon has a single transcription start site located 17 nucleotides upstream of the ATG translation start site for the mleA gene. We found sequences, TTGACT and TATGAT (which are separated by 18 bp), that are closely related to the gram-positive and Escherichia coli consensus promoter sequences. Upstream of the mleA gene, an 894-bp open reading frame that transcribed divergently from the mle operon was found. Sequence analysis and expression in E. coli minicells suggest that this open reading frame encodes a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 34 kDa belonging to the LysR-type regulatory protein family. Protein comparisons showed the highest level of identity with the MleR regulatory protein from Lactococcus lactis, which is involved in the expression of the malolactic genes in the presence of L-malate. However, the MleR-like protein of L. oenos seems different from the protein of Lactococcus lactis, since no regulation of the malolactic enzyme by L-malate was effective under our experimental conditions. PMID:8953720

  11. Genetic mapping of the cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) locus on chromosome band 6p21 to include a microdeletion

    SciTech Connect

    Gelb, B.D.; Desnick, R.J.; Shevell, M.

    1995-08-28

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a generalized skeletal dysplasia with autosomal dominant inheritance. Recently, the CCD disease locus was localized to 23 and 17 cM regions of chromosome band 6p21 by linkage studies of seven affected families. Of note, the 23 cM region contained a microdeletion detected in one family at D6S459, an interval that was excluded in the 17 cM overlapping region. Here, linkage of CCD to 6p21 was independently confirmed with a maximal two-point LOD score of Z=5.12 with marker D6S452 at {theta}=0.00. Recombinant events in two affected individuals defined a CCD region of 7 cM from D6S465 to D6S282, which overlapped with the CCD region containing the microdeletion but did not overlap with the 17 cM critical region from D6S282 to D6S291. These results suggest the refined localization of the CCD region to 6 cM spanning markers D6S438 to D6S282, thereby reviving the possibility that the CCD gene lies within the microdeletion at D6S459. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF EPIC GENETIC MARKERS AND THE UTILITY OF A MULTI-LOCUS, MULTI-TAXA PHYLOGEOGRAPHICAL APPROACH TO EXAMINING PATTERNS OF GENETIC DIVERSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of population genetic measures for assessing the structure of natural populations and the condition of biological resources has increased steadily since the 1970's. Traditionally, genetic diversity within and among geographic areas is assessed based on a one-time sampling of...

  13. A genetic map of chromosome 20q12-q13. 1: Multiple highly polymorphic microsatellite and RFLP markers linked to the maturity-onset diabetes of the Young (MODY) locus

    SciTech Connect

    Rothschild, C.B.; Akots, G.; Hayworth, R.; Pettenati, M.J.; Rao, P.N.; Wood, P. ); Stolz, F.M.; Hansmann, I. ); Serino, K.; Keith, T.P. ); Fajans, S.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Multiple highly polymorphic markers have been used to construct a genetic map of the q12-q13.1 region of chromosome 20 and to map the location of the maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) locus. The genetic map encompasses 23 cM and includes 11 loci with PIC values >.50, seven of which have PICs >.70. New dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms associated with the D20S17, PPGB, and ADA loci have been identified and mapped. The dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms have increased the PIC of the ADA locus to .89 and, with an additional RFLP at the D20S17 locus, the PIC of the D20S17 locus to .88. The order of the D20S17 and ADA loci determined genetically (cen-ADA-D20S17-qter) was confirmed by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization. The previously unmapped PPGB marker is closely linked to D20S17, with a two-point lod score of 50.53 at [cflx [theta

  14. Molecular genetic analysis of the candidate gene for MOD, a locus required for self-incompatibility in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Fukai, E; Nishio, T; Nasrallah, M E

    2001-05-01

    The MIP-MOD (for MOD-locus associated Major Intrinsic Protein) gene encodes an aquaporin-like product, and has been reported to be a candidate for the MOD gene which is required for the self-incompatibility response in Brassica rapa. In an antisense suppression experiment designed to investigate the role of MIP-MOD, we found that levels of MIP-MOD mRNA in the stigmas of fourteen antisense transgenics, as well as in the self-incompatible cultivar Osome (Osm), were much lower than in the stigmas of the self-incompatible S8 homozygous (S8) strain. Therefore, we analyzed the molecular structure of the MIP-MOD gene in three B. rapa strains: S8, Osm, and the self-compatible var. Yellow Sarson (YS). Nucleotide sequence analysis of the MIP-MOD genes isolated from the three strains revealed that all three encode the same amino acid sequence and that YS and Osm contain the same MIP-MOD allele, designated MIP-MOD(YS). Analysis of other self-incompatible B. rapa strains that are homozygous for the MIP-MOD(YS) allele indicated that high levels of MIP-MOD transcripts are not essential for the self-incompatibility response. Furthermore, a MOD mutant generated by gamma-irradiation was found to contain a wild-type MIP-MOD gene that is expressed at normal levels. These data suggest that MIP-MOD is not MOD itself. We suggest that this gene should be renamed MLM (for MIP gene linked to MOD).

  15. High-resolution genetic linkage mapping, high-temperature tolerance and growth-related quantitative trait locus (QTL) identification in Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xia; Luan, Sheng; Hu, Long Yang; Mao, Yong; Tao, Ye; Zhong, Sheng Ping; Kong, Jie

    2016-06-01

    The Kuruma prawn, Marsupenaeus japonicus, is one of the most promising marine invertebrates in the industry in Asia, Europe and Australia. However, the increasing global temperatures result in considerable economic losses in M. japonicus farming. In the present study, to select genetically improved animals for the sustainable development of the Kuruma prawn industry, a high-resolution genetic linkage map and quantitative trait locus (QTL) identification were performed using the RAD technology. The maternal map contained 5849 SNP markers and spanned 3127.23 cM, with an average marker interval of 0.535 cM. Instead, the paternal map contained 3927 SNP markers and spanned 3326.19 cM, with an average marker interval of 0.847 cM. The consensus map contained 9289 SNP markers and spanned 3610.90 cM, with an average marker interval of 0.388 cM and coverage of 99.06 % of the genome. The markers were grouped into 41 linkage groups in the maps. Significantly, negative correlation was detected between high-temperature tolerance (UTT) and body weight (BW). The QTL mapping revealed 129 significant QTL loci for UTT and four significant QTL loci for BW at the genome-wide significance threshold. Among these QTLs, 129 overlapped with linked SNPs, and the remaining four were located in regions between contiguous SNPs. They explained the total phenotypic variance ranging from 8.9 to 12.4 %. Because of a significantly negative correlation between growth and high-temperature tolerance, we demonstrate that this high-resolution linkage map and QTLs would be useful for further marker-assisted selection in the genetic improvement of M. japonicus.

  16. Congenic mice provide in vivo evidence for a genetic locus that modulates intrinsic transforming growth factor β1-mediated signaling and bone acquisition.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Aditi; Larson, Emily A; Carlos, Amy S; Belknap, John K; Rotwein, Peter; Klein, Robert F

    2012-06-01

    Osteoporosis, the most common skeletal disorder, is characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and an increased risk of fragility fractures. BMD is the best clinical predictor of future osteoporotic fracture risk, but is a complex trait controlled by multiple environmental and genetic determinants with individually modest effects. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping is a powerful method for identifying chromosomal regions encompassing genes involved in shaping complex phenotypes, such as BMD. Here we have applied QTL analysis to male and female genetically-heterogeneous F(2) mice derived from a cross between C57BL/6 and DBA/2 strains, and have identified 11 loci contributing to femoral BMD. Further analysis of a QTL on mouse chromosome 7 following the generation of reciprocal congenic strains has allowed us to determine that the high BMD trait, which tracks with the DBA/2 chromosome and exerts equivalent effects on male and female mice, is manifested by enhanced osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro and by increased growth of metatarsal bones in short-term primary culture. An insertion/deletion DNA polymorphism in Ltbp4 exon 12 that causes the in-frame removal of 12 codons in the DBA/2-derived gene maps within 0.6 Mb of the marker most tightly linked to the QTL. LTBP4, one of four paralogous mouse proteins that modify the bioavailability of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family of growth factors, is expressed in differentiating MSC-derived osteoblasts and in long bones, and reduced responsiveness to TGF-β1 is observed in MSCs of mice homozygous for the DBA/2 chromosome 7. Taken together, our results identify a potential genetic and biochemical relationship between decreased TGF-β1-mediated signaling and enhanced femoral BMD that may be regulated by a variant LTBP4 molecule.

  17. High-resolution genetic linkage mapping, high-temperature tolerance and growth-related quantitative trait locus (QTL) identification in Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xia; Luan, Sheng; Hu, Long Yang; Mao, Yong; Tao, Ye; Zhong, Sheng Ping; Kong, Jie

    2016-06-01

    The Kuruma prawn, Marsupenaeus japonicus, is one of the most promising marine invertebrates in the industry in Asia, Europe and Australia. However, the increasing global temperatures result in considerable economic losses in M. japonicus farming. In the present study, to select genetically improved animals for the sustainable development of the Kuruma prawn industry, a high-resolution genetic linkage map and quantitative trait locus (QTL) identification were performed using the RAD technology. The maternal map contained 5849 SNP markers and spanned 3127.23 cM, with an average marker interval of 0.535 cM. Instead, the paternal map contained 3927 SNP markers and spanned 3326.19 cM, with an average marker interval of 0.847 cM. The consensus map contained 9289 SNP markers and spanned 3610.90 cM, with an average marker interval of 0.388 cM and coverage of 99.06 % of the genome. The markers were grouped into 41 linkage groups in the maps. Significantly, negative correlation was detected between high-temperature tolerance (UTT) and body weight (BW). The QTL mapping revealed 129 significant QTL loci for UTT and four significant QTL loci for BW at the genome-wide significance threshold. Among these QTLs, 129 overlapped with linked SNPs, and the remaining four were located in regions between contiguous SNPs. They explained the total phenotypic variance ranging from 8.9 to 12.4 %. Because of a significantly negative correlation between growth and high-temperature tolerance, we demonstrate that this high-resolution linkage map and QTLs would be useful for further marker-assisted selection in the genetic improvement of M. japonicus. PMID:26965508

  18. Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map and Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping in the Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Tian, Meilin; Li, Yangping; Jing, Jing; Mu, Chuang; Du, Huixia; Dou, Jinzhuang; Mao, Junxia; Li, Xue; Jiao, Wenqian; Wang, Yangfan; Hu, Xiaoli; Wang, Shi; Wang, Ruijia; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-10-06

    Genetic linkage maps are critical and indispensable tools in a wide range of genetic and genomic research. With the advancement of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) methods, the construction of a high-density and high-resolution linkage maps has become achievable in marine organisms lacking sufficient genomic resources, such as echinoderms. In this study, high-density, high-resolution genetic map was constructed for a sea cucumber species, Apostichopus japonicus, utilizing the 2b-restriction site-associated DNA (2b-RAD) method. A total of 7839 markers were anchored to the linkage map with the map coverage of 99.57%, to our knowledge, this is the highest marker density among echinoderm species. QTL mapping and association analysis consistently captured one growth-related QTL located in a 5 cM region of linkage group (LG) 5. An annotated candidate gene, retinoblastoma-binding protein 5 (RbBP5), which has been reported to be an important regulator of cell proliferation, was recognized in the QTL region. This linkage map represents a powerful tool for research involving both fine-scale QTL mapping and marker assisted selection (MAS), and will facilitate chromosome assignment and improve the whole-genome assembly of sea cucumber in the future.

  19. Development of a 10,000 locus genetic map of the sunflower genome based on multiple crosses.

    PubMed

    Bowers, John E; Bachlava, Eleni; Brunick, Robert L; Rieseberg, Loren H; Knapp, Steven J; Burke, John M

    2012-07-01

    Genetic linkage maps have the potential to facilitate the genetic dissection of complex traits and comparative analyses of genome structure, as well as molecular breeding efforts in species of agronomic importance. Until recently, the majority of such maps was based on relatively low-throughput marker technologies, which limited marker density across the genome. The availability of high-throughput genotyping technologies has, however, made possible the efficient development of high-density genetic maps. Here, we describe the analysis and integration of genotypic data from four sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) mapping populations to produce a consensus linkage map of the sunflower genome. Although the individual maps (which contained 3500-5500 loci each) were highly colinear, we observed localized variation in recombination rates in several genomic regions. We also observed several gaps up to 26 cM in length that completely lacked mappable markers in individual crosses, presumably due to regions of identity by descent in the mapping parents. Because these regions differed by cross, the consensus map of 10,080 loci contained no such gaps, clearly illustrating the value of simultaneously analyzing multiple mapping populations.

  20. Development of a 10,000 Locus Genetic Map of the Sunflower Genome Based on Multiple Crosses

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, John E.; Bachlava, Eleni; Brunick, Robert L.; Rieseberg, Loren H.; Knapp, Steven J.; Burke, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps have the potential to facilitate the genetic dissection of complex traits and comparative analyses of genome structure, as well as molecular breeding efforts in species of agronomic importance. Until recently, the majority of such maps was based on relatively low-throughput marker technologies, which limited marker density across the genome. The availability of high-throughput genotyping technologies has, however, made possible the efficient development of high-density genetic maps. Here, we describe the analysis and integration of genotypic data from four sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) mapping populations to produce a consensus linkage map of the sunflower genome. Although the individual maps (which contained 3500–5500 loci each) were highly colinear, we observed localized variation in recombination rates in several genomic regions. We also observed several gaps up to 26 cM in length that completely lacked mappable markers in individual crosses, presumably due to regions of identity by descent in the mapping parents. Because these regions differed by cross, the consensus map of 10,080 loci contained no such gaps, clearly illustrating the value of simultaneously analyzing multiple mapping populations. PMID:22870395

  1. The First High-Density Genetic Map Construction in Tree Peony (Paeonia Sect. Moutan) using Genotyping by Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Changfu; Cheng, Fang-Yun; Wu, Jing; Zhong, Yuan; Liu, Gaixiu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps, permitting the elucidation of genome structure, are one of most powerful genomic tools to accelerate marker-assisted breeding. However, due to a lack of sufficient user-friendly molecular markers, no genetic linkage map has been developed for tree peonies (Paeonia Sect. Moutan), a group of important horticultural plants worldwide. Specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a recent molecular marker development technology that enable the large-scale discovery and genotyping of sequence-based marker in genome-wide. In this study, we performed SLAF sequencing of an F1 population, derived from the cross P. ostti ‘FenDanBai’ × P. × suffruticosa ‘HongQiao’, to identify sufficient high-quality markers for the construction of high-density genetic linkage map in tree peonies. After SLAF sequencing, a total of 78 Gb sequencing data and 285,403,225 pair-end reads were generated. We detected 309,198 high-quality SLAFs from these data, of which 85,124 (27.5%) were polymorphic. Subsequently, 3518 of the polymorphic markers, which were successfully encoded in to Mendelian segregation types, and were in conformity with the criteria of high-quality markers, were defined as effective markers and used for genetic linkage mapping. Finally, we constructed an integrated genetic map, which comprised 1189 markers on the five linkage groups, and spanned 920.699 centiMorgans (cM) with an average inter-marker distance of 0.774 cM. There were 1115 ‘SNP-only’ markers, 18 ‘InDel-only’ markers, and 56 ‘SNP&InDel’ markers on the map. Among these markers, 450 (37.85%) showed significant segregation distortion (P < 0.05). In conclusion, this investigation reported the first large-scale marker development and high-density linkage map construction for tree peony. The results of this study will serve as a solid foundation not only for marker-assisted breeding, but also for genome sequence assembly for tree peony. PMID:26010095

  2. The First High-Density Genetic Map Construction in Tree Peony (Paeonia Sect. Moutan) using Genotyping by Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Cai, Changfu; Cheng, Fang-Yun; Wu, Jing; Zhong, Yuan; Liu, Gaixiu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps, permitting the elucidation of genome structure, are one of most powerful genomic tools to accelerate marker-assisted breeding. However, due to a lack of sufficient user-friendly molecular markers, no genetic linkage map has been developed for tree peonies (Paeonia Sect. Moutan), a group of important horticultural plants worldwide. Specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a recent molecular marker development technology that enable the large-scale discovery and genotyping of sequence-based marker in genome-wide. In this study, we performed SLAF sequencing of an F1 population, derived from the cross P. ostti 'FenDanBai' × P. × suffruticosa 'HongQiao', to identify sufficient high-quality markers for the construction of high-density genetic linkage map in tree peonies. After SLAF sequencing, a total of 78 Gb sequencing data and 285,403,225 pair-end reads were generated. We detected 309,198 high-quality SLAFs from these data, of which 85,124 (27.5%) were polymorphic. Subsequently, 3518 of the polymorphic markers, which were successfully encoded in to Mendelian segregation types, and were in conformity with the criteria of high-quality markers, were defined as effective markers and used for genetic linkage mapping. Finally, we constructed an integrated genetic map, which comprised 1189 markers on the five linkage groups, and spanned 920.699 centiMorgans (cM) with an average inter-marker distance of 0.774 cM. There were 1115 'SNP-only' markers, 18 'InDel-only' markers, and 56 'SNP&InDel' markers on the map. Among these markers, 450 (37.85%) showed significant segregation distortion (P < 0.05). In conclusion, this investigation reported the first large-scale marker development and high-density linkage map construction for tree peony. The results of this study will serve as a solid foundation not only for marker-assisted breeding, but also for genome sequence assembly for tree peony.

  3. Genetic variation at the 8q24.21 renal cancer susceptibility locus affects HIF binding to a MYC enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Grampp, Steffen; Platt, James L.; Lauer, Victoria; Salama, Rafik; Kranz, Franziska; Neumann, Viviana K.; Wach, Sven; Stöhr, Christine; Hartmann, Arndt; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Mole, David R.; Schödel, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by loss of function of the von Hippel–Lindau tumour suppressor (VHL) and unrestrained activation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). Genetic and epigenetic determinants have an impact on HIF pathways. A recent genome-wide association study on renal cancer susceptibility identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in an intergenic region located between the oncogenes MYC and PVT1. Here using assays of chromatin conformation, allele-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome editing, we show that HIF binding to this regulatory element is necessary to trans-activate MYC and PVT1 expression specifically in cells of renal tubular origins. Moreover, we demonstrate that the risk-associated polymorphisms increase chromatin accessibility and activity as well as HIF binding to the enhancer. These findings provide further evidence that genetic variation at HIF-binding sites modulates the oncogenic transcriptional output of the VHL–HIF axis and provide a functional explanation for the disease-associated effects of SNPs in ccRCC. PMID:27774982

  4. Genetic and developmental study of a complex locus in the house mouse. Progress report, 1979-1980

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D.

    1980-01-01

    More than 50 T/t-complex and other mouse chromosome variants have been maintained for genetic study, and for distribution to other investigators. Deletion mapping has been used to analyze a lethal t-haplotype, t/sup w73/, and has shown that the t/sup w73/ chromosome carries an additional parasitic lethal factor separate and different from the t-lethal factor. In other mapping experiments it was shown that the dominant mutation Kb (knobbly) is allelic to the previously described mutation Ki, although their embryonic lethal effects are different. Experiments to extract and analyze t-haplotypes from wild populations and to determine their H-2 types, as well as to characterize viable t-haplotypes produced by existing t-lethals have been continued.

  5. A Genome-Wide Association Study Uncovers a Genetic Locus Associated with Thoracic-to-Hip Ratio in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Seongwon; Park, Ah Yeon; Kang, Changsoo

    2015-01-01

    The thoracic-to-hip circumference ratio (THR) is an anthropometric marker recently described as a predictor of type 2 diabetes. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) followed by confirmatory analyses to identify genetic markers associated with THR. A total of 7,240 Korean subjects (4,988 for the discovery stage and 2,252 for the confirmatory analyses) were recruited for this study, and genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping of the initial 4,988 individuals was performed using Affymetrix Human SNP array 5.0. Linear regression analysis was then performed to adjust for the effects of age, sex, and current diabetes medication status on the THR of the study subjects. In the initial discovery stage, there was a statistically nominal association between minor alleles of SNP markers on chromosomes 4, 8, 10, and 12, and THR changes (p < 5.0 × 10−6). The subsequent confirmatory analyses of these markers, however, only detected a significant association between two SNPs in the HECTD4 gene and decreased THRs. Notably, this association was detected in male (rs11066280: p = 1.14 × 10−2; rs2074356: p = 1.10 × 10−2), but not in female subjects. Meanwhile, the combined results from the two analyses (initial and confirmatory) indicated that minor alleles of these two intronic variants exhibited a significant genome-wide association with decreased THR in the male subjects (n = 3,155; rs11066280: effect size = −0.008624, p = 6.19 × 10−9; rs2074356: effect size = −0.008762, p = 1.89 × 10−8). Furthermore, minor alleles of these two SNPs exhibited protective effects on patients’ risks for developing type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, we have identified two genetic variations in HECTD4 that are associated with THR, particularly in men. PMID:26675016

  6. Amplification of a single-locus variable-number direct repeats with restriction fragment length polymorphism (DR-PCR/RFLP) for genetic typing of Acinetobacter baumannii strains.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Zaleska, Alicja; Krawczyk, Beata; Kotłowski, Roman; Mikucka, Agnieszka; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2008-01-01

    In search of an effective DNA typing technique for Acinetobacter baumannii strains for hospital epidemiology use, the performance and convenience of a new target sequence was evaluated. Using known genomic sequences of Acinetobacter baumannii strains AR 319754 and ATCC 17978, we developed single-locus variable-number direct-repeat analysis using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (DR-PCR/RFLP) method. A total of 90 Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from patients of the Clinical Hospital in Bydgoszcz, Poland, were examined. Initially, all strains were typed using macrorestriction analysis of the chromosomal DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (REA-PFGE). Digestion of the chromosomal DNA with the ApaI endonuclease and separation of the fragments by PFGE revealed 21 unique types. Application of DR-PCR/RFLP resulted in recognition of 12 clusters. The results showed that the DR-PCR/RFLP method is less discriminatory than REA-PFGE, however, the novel genotyping method can be used as an alternative technique for generating DNA profiles in epidemiological studies of intra-species genetic relatedness of Acinetobacter baumannii strains.

  7. Quantitative genetic bases of anthocyanin variation in grape (Vitis vinifera L. ssp. sativa) berry: a quantitative trait locus to quantitative trait nucleotide integrated study.

    PubMed

    Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Le Cunff, Loïc; Gomez, Camila; Doligez, Agnès; Ageorges, Agnès; Roux, Catherine; Bertrand, Yves; Souquet, Jean-Marc; Cheynier, Véronique; This, Patrice

    2009-11-01

    The combination of QTL mapping studies of synthetic lines and association mapping studies of natural diversity represents an opportunity to throw light on the genetically based variation of quantitative traits. With the positional information provided through quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, which often leads to wide intervals encompassing numerous genes, it is now feasible to directly target candidate genes that are likely to be responsible for the observed variation in completely sequenced genomes and to test their effects through association genetics. This approach was performed in grape, a newly sequenced genome, to decipher the genetic architecture of anthocyanin content. Grapes may be either white or colored, ranging from the lightest pink to the darkest purple tones according to the amount of anthocyanin accumulated in the berry skin, which is a crucial trait for both wine quality and human nutrition. Although the determinism of the white phenotype has been fully identified, the genetic bases of the quantitative variation of anthocyanin content in berry skin remain unclear. A single QTL responsible for up to 62% of the variation in the anthocyanin content was mapped on a Syrah x Grenache F(1) pseudo-testcross. Among the 68 unigenes identified in the grape genome within the QTL interval, a cluster of four Myb-type genes was selected on the basis of physiological evidence (VvMybA1, VvMybA2, VvMybA3, and VvMybA4). From a core collection of natural resources (141 individuals), 32 polymorphisms revealed significant association, and extended linkage disequilibrium was observed. Using a multivariate regression method, we demonstrated that five polymorphisms in VvMybA genes except VvMybA4 (one retrotransposon, three single nucleotide polymorphisms and one 2-bp insertion/deletion) accounted for 84% of the observed variation. All these polymorphisms led to either structural changes in the MYB proteins or differences in the VvMybAs promoters. We concluded that

  8. Genetic stability of Brucella abortus isolates from an outbreak by multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA16)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Brucellosis caused by Brucella abortus is one of the most important zoonoses in the world. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA16) has been shown be a useful tool to epidemiological traceback studies in B. abortus infection. Thus, the present study aimed (i) to evaluate the genetic diversity of B. abortus isolates from a brucellosis outbreak, and (ii) to investigate the in vivo stability of the MLVA16 markers. Results Three-hundred and seventy-five clinical samples, including 275 vaginal swabs and 100 milk samples, were cultured from a brucellosis outbreak in a cattle herd, which adopted RB51 vaccination and test-and-slaughter policies. Thirty-seven B. abortus isolates were obtained, eight from milk and twenty-nine from post-partum/abortion vaginal swabs, which were submitted to biotyping and genotyping by MLVA16. Twelve B. abortus isolates obtained from vaginal swabs were identified as RB51. Twenty four isolates, seven obtained from milk samples and seventeen from vaginal swabs, were identified as B. abortus biovar 3, while one isolate from vaginal swabs was identified as B. abortus biovar 1. Three distinct genotypes were observed during the brucellosis outbreak: RB observed in all isolates identified as RB51; W observed in all B. abortus biovar 3 isolates; and Z observed in the single B. abortus biovar 1 isolate. Epidemiological and molecular data show that the B. abortus biovar 1 genotype Z strain is not related to the B. abortus biovar 3 genotype W isolates, and represents a new introduction B. abortus during the outbreak. Conclusions The results of the present study on typing of multiple clinical B. abortus isolates from the same outbreak over a sixteen month period indicate the in vivo stability of MLVA16 markers, a low genetic diversity among B. abortus isolates and the usefulness of MLVA16 for epidemiological studies of bovine brucellosis. PMID:25015840

  9. Evolution of a unique predatory feeding apparatus: functional anatomy, development and a genetic locus for jaw laterality in Lake Tanganyika scale-eating cichlids

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While bilaterality is a defining characteristic of triploblastic animals, several assemblages have managed to break this symmetry in order to exploit the adaptive peaks garnered through the lateralization of behaviour or morphology. One striking example of an evolved asymmetry in vertebrates comes from a group of scale-eating cichlid fishes from Lake Tanganyika. Members of the Perissodini tribe of cichlid fishes have evolved dental and craniofacial asymmetries in order to more effectively remove scales from the left or right flanks of prey. Here we examine the evolution and development of craniofacial morphology and laterality among Lake Tanganyika scale-eating cichlids. Results Using both geometric and traditional morphometric methods we found that the craniofacial evolution in the Perissodini involved discrete shifts in skeletal anatomy that reflect differences in habitat preference and predation strategies. Further, we show that the evolutionary history of the Perissodini is characterized by an accentuation of craniofacial laterality such that certain taxa show elaborate sided differences in craniofacial shape consistent with the sub-partitioning of function between sides of the head during attacks. Craniofacial laterality in the scale-eating specialist Perissodus microlepis was found to be evident early in development and exhibited a unimodal distribution, which is contrary to the adult condition where jaw laterality has been described as a discrete, bimodal antisymmetry. Finally, using linkage and association analyses we identified a conserved locus for jaw handedness that segregates among East African cichlids. Conclusions We suggest that, during the evolution of the Perissodini, selection has accentuated a latent, genetically determined handedness of the craniofacial skeleton, enabling the evolution of jaw asymmetries in order to increase predation success. Continued work on the developmental genetic basis of laterality in the Perissodini will

  10. Genetic Susceptible Locus in NOTCH2 Interacts with Arsenic in Drinking Water on Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wen-Chi; Kile, Molly L.; Seow, Wei Jie; Lin, Xihong; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Mahiuddin, Golam; Mostofa, Golam; Lu, Quan; Christiani, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) but the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Objectives This study evaluated the interaction between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes associated with diabetes and arsenic exposure in drinking water on the risk of developing T2DM. Methods In 2009–2011, we conducted a follow up study of 957 Bangladeshi adults who participated in a case-control study of arsenic-induced skin lesions in 2001–2003. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between 38 SNPs in 18 genes and risk of T2DM measured at follow up. T2DM was defined as having a blood hemoglobin A1C level greater than or equal to 6.5% at follow-up. Arsenic exposure was characterized by drinking water samples collected from participants' tubewells. False discovery rates were applied in the analysis to control for multiple comparisons. Results Median arsenic levels in 2001–2003 were higher among diabetic participants compared with non-diabetic ones (71.6 µg/L vs. 12.5 µg/L, p-value <0.001). Three SNPs in ADAMTS9 were nominally associated with increased risk of T2DM (rs17070905, Odds Ratio (OR)  = 2.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17–4.50; rs17070967, OR = 2.02, 95%CI 1.00–4.06; rs6766801, OR = 2.33, 95%CI 1.18–4.60), but these associations did not reach the statistical significance after adjusting for multiple comparisons. A significant interaction between arsenic and NOTCH2 (rs699780) was observed which significantly increased the risk of T2DM (p for interaction = 0.003; q-value = 0.021). Further restricted analysis among participants exposed to water arsenic of less than 148 µg/L showed consistent results for interaction between the NOTCH2 variant and arsenic exposure on T2DM (p for interaction  = 0.048; q-value = 0.004). Conclusions These findings suggest that genetic variation in NOTCH2 increased

  11. Next-Generation Genetics in Plants: Evolutionary Trade-off, Immunity and Speciation (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Wiegel, Detlef

    2016-07-12

    Detlef Wiegel from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology on "Next-generation genetics in plants: Evolutionary tradeoffs, immunity and speciation" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  12. Next-Generation Genetics in Plants: Evolutionary Trade-off, Immunity and Speciation (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegel, Detlef

    2010-03-25

    Detlef Wiegel from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology on "Next-generation genetics in plants: Evolutionary tradeoffs, immunity and speciation" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  13. Genetic analysis of heterosis for yield and yield components in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) by quantitative trait locus mapping.

    PubMed

    Radoev, Mladen; Becker, Heiko C; Ecke, Wolfgang

    2008-07-01

    The main objective in this research was the genetic analysis of heterosis in rapeseed at the QTL level. A linkage map comprising 235 SSR and 144 AFLP markers covering 2045 cM was constructed in a doubled-haploid population from a cross between the cultivar "Express" and the resynthesized line "R53." In field experiments at four locations in Germany 250 doubled-haploid (DH) lines and their corresponding testcrosses with Express were evaluated for grain yield and three yield components. The heterosis ranged from 30% for grain yield to 0.7% for kernel weight. QTL were mapped using three different data sets, allowing the estimation of additive and dominance effects as well as digenic epistatic interactions. In total, 33 QTL were detected, of which 10 showed significant dominance effects. For grain yield, mainly complete dominance or overdominance was observed, whereas the other traits showed mainly partial dominance. A large number of epistatic interactions were detected. It was concluded that epistasis together with all levels of dominance from partial to overdominance is responsible for the expression of heterosis in rapeseed.

  14. Pleiotropic Properties and Genetic Organization of the tolA, B Locus of Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Alan; Rolfe, Barry; Onodera, Kazukiyo

    1972-01-01

    Colicin-tolerant mutants of Escherichia coli K-12, which map near gal at 17 min (tolA, B mutants), have been isolated and characterized. These mutants exhibited a very broad spectrum of phenotypic changes consistent with the interpretation that they are cell surface mutants. In addition to being colicintolerant and sensitive to deoxycholate and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, tolA, B mutants are sensitive to vancomycin, bacitracin, and dodecyl sulfate. The tolA, B mutants from most strains also formed mucoid colonies at 30 C on nutrient agar plates and had a greatly increased plating efficiency for lysisdefective S mutants of bacteriophage λ. Complementation analysis showed that the four phenotypic groups of tol mutants that map near gal fall into three complementation groups: tolP, tolA, and tolB. Recombination analysis by three-factor crosses established the order of the three groups as tolP-tolA-tolB—gal. Because of the wide variety of phenotypic changes that accompanies mutation to colicin tolerance, revertants were isolated to test whether single or multiple mutations were involved. The reversion analysis, as well as other genetic criteria, confirmed that only single mutations were involved, suggesting that these pleiotropic changes are a consequence of a single change in the E. coli cell surface. Images PMID:4627928

  15. Genetic analysis of heterosis for yield and yield components in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) by quantitative trait locus mapping.

    PubMed

    Radoev, Mladen; Becker, Heiko C; Ecke, Wolfgang

    2008-07-01

    The main objective in this research was the genetic analysis of heterosis in rapeseed at the QTL level. A linkage map comprising 235 SSR and 144 AFLP markers covering 2045 cM was constructed in a doubled-haploid population from a cross between the cultivar "Express" and the resynthesized line "R53." In field experiments at four locations in Germany 250 doubled-haploid (DH) lines and their corresponding testcrosses with Express were evaluated for grain yield and three yield components. The heterosis ranged from 30% for grain yield to 0.7% for kernel weight. QTL were mapped using three different data sets, allowing the estimation of additive and dominance effects as well as digenic epistatic interactions. In total, 33 QTL were detected, of which 10 showed significant dominance effects. For grain yield, mainly complete dominance or overdominance was observed, whereas the other traits showed mainly partial dominance. A large number of epistatic interactions were detected. It was concluded that epistasis together with all levels of dominance from partial to overdominance is responsible for the expression of heterosis in rapeseed. PMID:18562665

  16. Physiological characterization and genetic modifiers of aberrant root thigmomorphogenesis in mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana MILDEW LOCUS O genes.

    PubMed

    Bidzinski, Przemyslaw; Noir, Sandra; Shahi, Shermineh; Reinstädler, Anja; Gratkowska, Dominika Marta; Panstruga, Ralph

    2014-12-01

    Root architecture and growth patterns are plant features that are still poorly understood. When grown under in vitro conditions, seedlings with mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana genes MLO4 or MLO11 exhibit aberrant root growth patterns upon contact with hard surfaces, exemplified as tight root spirals. We used a set of physiological assays and genetic tools to characterize this thigmomorphogenic defect in detail. We observed that the mlo4/mlo11-associated root curling phenotype is not recapitulated in a set of mutants with altered root growth patterns or architecture. We further found that mlo4/mlo11-conditioned root curling is not dependent upon light and endogenous flavonoids, but is pH-sensitive and affected by exogenous calcium levels. Based upon the latter two characteristics, mlo4-associated root coiling appears to be mechanistically different from the natural strong root curvature of the Arabidopsis ecotype Landsberg erecta. Gravistimulation reversibly overrides the aberrant thigmomorphogenesis of mlo4 seedlings. Mutants with dominant negative defects in α-tubulin modulate the extent and directionality of mlo4/mlo11-conditioned root coils, whereas mutants defective in polar auxin transport (axr4, aux1) or gravitropism (pgm1) completely suppress the mlo4 root curling phenotype. Our data implicate a joint contribution of calcium signalling, pH regulation, microtubular function, polar auxin transport and gravitropism in root thigmomorphogenesis.

  17. The effects of locus number, genetic divergence, and genotyping error on the utility of dominant markers for hybrid identification

    PubMed Central

    Sovic, Michael G; Kubatko, Laura S; Fuerst, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    In surveys of hybrid zones, dominant genetic markers are often used to identify individuals of hybrid origin and assign these individuals to one of several potential hybrid classes. Quantitative analyses that address the statistical power of dominant markers in such inference are scarce. In this study, dominant genotype data were simulated to evaluate the effects of, first, the number of loci analyzed, second, the magnitude of differentiation between the markers scored in the groups that are hybridizing, and third, the level of genotyping error associated with the data when assigning individuals to various parental and hybrid categories. The overall performance of the assignment methods was relatively modest at the lowest level of divergence examined (Fst ˜ 0.4), but improved substantially at higher levels of differentiation (Fst ˜ 0.67 or 0.8). The effect of genotyping error was dependent on the level of divergence between parental taxa, with larger divergences tempering the effects of genotyping error. These results highlight the importance of considering the effects of each of the variables when assigning individuals to various parental and hybrid categories, and can help guide decisions regarding the number of loci employed in future hybridization studies to achieve the power and level of resolution desired. PMID:24634730

  18. Hybrid Incompatibility in Arabidopsis Is Determined by a Multiple-Locus Genetic Network1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Burkart-Waco, Diana; Josefsson, Caroline; Dilkes, Brian; Kozloff, Nora; Torjek, Otto; Meyer, Rhonda; Altmann, Thomas; Comai, Luca

    2012-01-01

    The cross between Arabidopsis thaliana and the closely related species Arabidopsis arenosa results in postzygotic hybrid incompatibility, manifested as seed death. Ecotypes of A. thaliana were tested for their ability to produce live seed when crossed to A. arenosa. The identified genetic variation was used to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) encoded by the A. thaliana genome that affect the frequency of postzygotic lethality and the phenotypes of surviving seeds. Seven QTLs affecting the A. thaliana component of this hybrid incompatibility were identified by crossing a Columbia × C24 recombinant inbred line population to diploid A. arenosa pollen donors. Additional epistatic loci were identified based on their pairwise interaction with one or several of these QTLs. Epistatic interactions were detected for all seven QTLs. The two largest additive QTLs were subjected to fine-mapping, indicating the action of at least two genes in each. The topology of this network reveals a large set of minor-effect loci from the maternal genome controlling hybrid growth and viability at different developmental stages. Our study establishes a framework that will enable the identification and characterization of genes and pathways in A. thaliana responsible for hybrid lethality in the A. thaliana × A. arenosa interspecific cross. PMID:22135429

  19. Assignment of a locus (GLC3A) for primary congenital glaucoma (Buphthalmos) to 2p21 and evidence for genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfarazi, M.; Akarsu, A.N.; Hossain, A.

    1995-11-20

    Primary congenital glaucoma (GLC3) is an inherited eye disorder that accounts for 0.01-0.04% of total blindness. Although a large number of chromosomal abnormalities have already been reported in patients with congenital glaucoma, the precise location and pathogenesis of this condition remain elusive. By using a group of 17 GLC3 families and a combination of both candidate regional and general positional mapping strategies, we have mapped a locus for GLC3 to the short arm of chromosome 2. Eleven families showed no recombination with 3 tightly linked markers of D2S177 (Z = 9.40), D2S1346 (Z = 8.83), and D2S1348 (Z = 8.90) with a combined haplotype lod score of 11.50. Haplotype and multipoint linkage analyses of 14 DNA markers from 2p indicated that the disease gene is located in the 2p21 region and is flanked by DNA markers D2S1788/D2S1325 ({theta} = 0.03; Z = 5.42) and D2S1356 ({theta} = 0.05; Z = 4.69). Inspection of haplotype and heterogeneity analysis confirmed that 6 families are not linked to the 2p21 region, thus providing the first proof of genetic heterogeneity for this phenotype. We therefore designated the locus on 2p21 GLC3A and positioned it in the overall linkage map of Tel-D2S405-D2S367-(D2S1788/D2S1325)-[(GLC 3A,D2S177)/(D2S1346/D2S1348)]-D2S1356-D2S119-D2S1761-D2S1248-D2S1352-D2S406-D2S441-Cen. Of the seven genes mapping to the 2p21 region, CAD, CALM2, and LHCGR are centromeric to D2S119 and can be excluded as a candidate for GLC3A, but mutations in PRK-R, TIK, SOS1, or SPTBN1 may still be accountable for this phenotype. As human 2p21 shows homology with mouse chromosomes 11 and 17, the homolog of GLC3A is expected to reside on one of these two chromosomes. 36 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Comprehensive genetic and epigenetic analysis of sporadic meningioma for macro-mutations on 22q and micro-mutations within the NF2 locus

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Caisa M; Buckley, Patrick G; Grigelioniene, Giedre; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Hellström, Anders R; Mantripragada, Kiran; Jarbo, Caroline; Mathiesen, Tiit; Dumanski, Jan P

    2007-01-01

    Background Meningiomas are the most common intracranial neoplasias, representing a clinically and histopathologically heterogeneous group of tumors. The neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) tumor suppressor is the only gene known to be frequently involved in early development of meningiomas. The objective of this study was to identify genetic and/or epigenetic factors contributing to the development of these tumors. A large set of sporadic meningiomas were analyzed for presence of 22q macro-mutations using array-CGH in order to identify tumors carrying gene dosage aberrations not encompassing NF2. The NF2 locus was also comprehensively studied for point mutations within coding and conserved non-coding sequences. Furthermore, CpG methylation within the NF2 promoter region was thoroughly analyzed. Results Monosomy 22 was the predominant finding, detected in 47% of meningiomas. Thirteen percent of the tumors contained interstitial/terminal deletions and gains, present singly or in combinations. We defined at least two minimal overlapping regions outside the NF2 locus that are small enough (~550 kb and ~250 kb) to allow analysis of a limited number of candidate genes. Bialleinactivationo the NF2 gne was detected in 36% of meningiomas. Among the monosomy 22 cases, no additional NF2 mutations could be identified in 35% (17 out of 49) of tumors. Furthermore, the majority of tumors (9 out of 12) with interstitial/terminal deletions did not have any detectable NF2 mutations. Methylation within the NF2 promoter region was only identified at a single CpG site in one tumor sample. Conclusion We confirmed previous findings of pronounced differences in mutation frequency between different histopathological subtypes. There is a higher frequency of biallelic NF2 inactivation in fibroblastic (52%) compared to meningothelial (18%) tumors. The presence of macro-mutations on 22q also shows marked differences between fibroblastic (86%) and meningothelial (39%) subtypes. Thus, inactivation of

  1. Repeat-mediated genetic and epigenetic changes at the FMR1 locus in the Fragile X-related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Usdin, Karen; Hayward, Bruce E.; Kumari, Daman; Lokanga, Rachel A.; Sciascia, Nicholas; Zhao, Xiao-Nan

    2014-01-01

    The Fragile X-related disorders are a group of genetic conditions that include the neurodegenerative disorder, Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), the fertility disorder, Fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI) and the intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome (FXS). The pathology in all these diseases is related to the number of CGG/CCG-repeats in the 5′ UTR of the Fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. The repeats are prone to continuous expansion and the increase in repeat number has paradoxical effects on gene expression increasing transcription on mid-sized alleles and decreasing it on longer ones. In some cases the repeats can simultaneously both increase FMR1 mRNA production and decrease the levels of the FMR1 gene product, Fragile X mental retardation 1 protein (FMRP). Since FXTAS and FXPOI result from the deleterious consequences of the expression of elevated levels of FMR1 mRNA and FXS is caused by an FMRP deficiency, the clinical picture is turning out to be more complex than once appreciated. Added complications result from the fact that increasing repeat numbers make the alleles somatically unstable. Thus many individuals have a complex mixture of different sized alleles in different cells. Furthermore, it has become apparent that the eponymous fragile site, once thought to be no more than a useful diagnostic criterion, may have clinical consequences for females who inherit chromosomes that express this site. This review will cover what is currently known about the mechanisms responsible for repeat instability, for the repeat-mediated epigenetic changes that affect expression of the FMR1 gene, and for chromosome fragility. It will also touch on what current and future options are for ameliorating some of these effects. PMID:25101111

  2. Integrated Genetic and Epigenetic Analysis Identifies Haplotype-Specific Methylation in the FTO Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Gareth A.; Rakyan, Vardhman K.; Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Akan, Pelin; Stupka, Elia; Down, Thomas A.; Prokopenko, Inga; Morison, Ian M.; Mill, Jonathan; Pidsley, Ruth; Deloukas, Panos; Frayling, Timothy M.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Beck, Stephan; Hitman, Graham A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent multi-dimensional approaches to the study of complex disease have revealed powerful insights into how genetic and epigenetic factors may underlie their aetiopathogenesis. We examined genotype-epigenotype interactions in the context of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), focussing on known regions of genomic susceptibility. We assayed DNA methylation in 60 females, stratified according to disease susceptibility haplotype using previously identified association loci. CpG methylation was assessed using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation on a targeted array (MeDIP-chip) and absolute methylation values were estimated using a Bayesian algorithm (BATMAN). Absolute methylation levels were quantified across LD blocks, and we identified increased DNA methylation on the FTO obesity susceptibility haplotype, tagged by the rs8050136 risk allele A (p = 9.40×10−4, permutation p = 1.0×10−3). Further analysis across the 46 kb LD block using sliding windows localised the most significant difference to be within a 7.7 kb region (p = 1.13×10−7). Sequence level analysis, followed by pyrosequencing validation, revealed that the methylation difference was driven by the co-ordinated phase of CpG-creating SNPs across the risk haplotype. This 7.7 kb region of haplotype-specific methylation (HSM), encapsulates a Highly Conserved Non-Coding Element (HCNE) that has previously been validated as a long-range enhancer, supported by the histone H3K4me1 enhancer signature. This study demonstrates that integration of Genome-Wide Association (GWA) SNP and epigenomic DNA methylation data can identify potential novel genotype-epigenotype interactions within disease-associated loci, thus providing a novel route to aid unravelling common complex diseases. PMID:21124985

  3. Further evidence for a locus for autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma on chromosome 1q and evidence for genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.; Paglinauan, C.; Stawski, S.

    1994-09-01

    Glaucoma is a term used to describe a group of disorders which have in common a characteristic degeneration of the optic nerve associated with typical visual field defects and usually associated with elevated intraocular pressure. Two percent of white Americans and 6-10% of black Americans are affected by the disease. Compelling data indicate that susceptibility to many types of glaucoma is inherited. Hereditary juvenile glaucoma is one form of glaucoma that develops in children and is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance. Using a single large Caucasian pedigree affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma, Sheffield discovered positive linkage to a group of markers that map to a 30 cM region on the long arm of chromosome 1 (1q21-q31). We have subsequently identified three unrelated Caucasian pedigrees affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma that also demonstrate linkage to this region on chromosome 1, with the highest combined lod score of 5.12 at theta = .05 for marker D1S218. The identification of critical recombinant individuals in our three pedigrees has allowed us to further localize the disease gene to a 12 cM region between markers D1S242 and D1S431. In addition, we have identified several pedigrees which do not demonstrate linkage to chromosome 1q, including a black family affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma that is indistinguishable clinically from the disorder affecting the caucasian pedigrees and three pedigrees affected with pigmentary dispersion syndrome, a form of glaucoma that also affects the juvenile population and is also inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. These findings provide evidence for genetic heterogeneity in juvenile glaucoma.

  4. Population genetic and phylogenetic evidence for positive selection on regulatory mutations at the factor VII locus in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Matthew W; Rockman, Matthew V; Soranzo, Nicole; Goldstein, David B; Wray, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    The abundance of cis-regulatory polymorphisms in humans suggests that many may have been important in human evolution, but evidence for their role is relatively rare. Four common polymorphisms in the 5' promoter region of factor VII (F7), a coagulation factor, have been shown to affect its transcription and protein abundance both in vitro and in vivo. Three of these polymorphisms have low-frequency alleles that decrease expression of F7 and may provide protection against myocardial infarction (heart attacks). The fourth polymorphism has a minor allele that increases the level of transcription. To look for evidence of natural selection on the cis-regulatory variants flanking F7, we genotyped three of the polymorphisms in six Old World populations for which we also have data from a group of putatively neutral SNPs. Our population genetic analysis shows evidence for selection within humans; surprisingly, the strongest evidence is due to a large increase in frequency of the high-expression variant in Singaporean Chinese. Further characterization of a Japanese population shows that at least part of the increase in frequency of the high-expression allele is found in other East Asian populations. In addition, to examine interspecific patterns of selection we sequenced the homologous 5' noncoding region in chimpanzees, bonobos, a gorilla, an orangutan, and a baboon. Analysis of these data reveals an excess of fixed differences within transcription factor binding sites along the human lineage. Our results thus further support the hypothesis that regulatory mutations have been important in human evolution. PMID:15238535

  5. 76 FR 6623 - Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Molecular and Clinical Genetics...

  6. Genetically modified crops for the bioeconomy: meeting public and regulatory expectations.

    PubMed

    Chapotin, Saharah Moon; Wolt, Jeffrey D

    2007-12-01

    As the United States moves toward a plant-based bioeconomy, a large research and development effort is focused on creating new feedstocks to meet biomass demand for biofuels, bioenergy, and specialized bioproducts, such as industrial compounds and biomaterial precursors. Most bioeconomy projections assume the widespread deployment of novel feedstocks developed through the use of modern molecular breeding techniques, but rarely consider the challenges involved with the use of genetically modified crops, which can include hurdles due to regulatory approvals, market adoption, and public acceptance. In this paper we consider the implications of various transgenic crops and traits under development for the bioeconomy that highlight these challenges. We believe that an awareness of the issues in crop and trait selection will allow developers to design crops with maximum stakeholder appeal and with the greatest potential for widespread adoption, while avoiding applications unlikely to meet regulatory approval or gain market and public acceptance. PMID:17701080

  7. Genetically modified crops for the bioeconomy: meeting public and regulatory expectations.

    PubMed

    Chapotin, Saharah Moon; Wolt, Jeffrey D

    2007-12-01

    As the United States moves toward a plant-based bioeconomy, a large research and development effort is focused on creating new feedstocks to meet biomass demand for biofuels, bioenergy, and specialized bioproducts, such as industrial compounds and biomaterial precursors. Most bioeconomy projections assume the widespread deployment of novel feedstocks developed through the use of modern molecular breeding techniques, but rarely consider the challenges involved with the use of genetically modified crops, which can include hurdles due to regulatory approvals, market adoption, and public acceptance. In this paper we consider the implications of various transgenic crops and traits under development for the bioeconomy that highlight these challenges. We believe that an awareness of the issues in crop and trait selection will allow developers to design crops with maximum stakeholder appeal and with the greatest potential for widespread adoption, while avoiding applications unlikely to meet regulatory approval or gain market and public acceptance.

  8. Genetic and physical mapping of the earliness per se locus Eps-A (m) 1 in Triticum monococcum identifies EARLY FLOWERING 3 (ELF3) as a candidate gene.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M A; Tranquilli, G; Lewis, S; Kippes, N; Dubcovsky, J

    2016-07-01

    Wheat cultivars exposed to optimal photoperiod and vernalization treatments still exhibit differences in flowering time, referred to as earliness per se (Eps). We previously identified the Eps-A (m) 1 locus from Triticum monococcum and showed that the allele from cultivated accession DV92 significantly delays heading time and increases the number of spikelets per spike relative to the allele from wild accession G3116. Here, we expanded a high-density genetic and physical map of the Eps-A (m) 1 region and identified the wheat ortholog of circadian clock regulator EARLY FLOWERING 3 (ELF3) as a candidate gene. No differences in ELF3 transcript levels were found between near-isogenic lines carrying the DV92 and G3116 Eps-A (m) 1 alleles, but the encoded ELF3 proteins differed in four amino acids. These differences were associated with altered transcription profiles of PIF-like, PPD1, and FT1, which are known downstream targets of ELF3. Tetraploid wheat lines with combined truncation mutations in the A- and B-genome copies of ELF3 flowered earlier and had less spikelets per spike than the wild-type control under short- and long-day conditions. Both effects were stronger in a photoperiod-sensitive than in a reduced photoperiod-sensitive background, indicating a significant epistatic interaction between PPD1 and ELF3 (P < 0.0001). By contrast, the introgression of the T. monococcum chromosome segment carrying the Eps-A (m) 1 allele from DV92 into durum wheat delayed flowering and increased the number of spikelets per spike. Taken together, the above results support the hypothesis that ELF3 is Eps-A (m) 1. The ELF3 alleles identified here provide additional tools to modulate reproductive development in wheat.

  9. Genetic and Informatic Analyses Implicate Kif12 as a Candidate Gene within the Mpkd2 Locus That Modulates Renal Cystic Disease Severity in the Cys1cpk Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mrug, Michal; Zhou, Juling; Yang, Chaozhe; Aronow, Bruce J.; Cui, Xiangqin; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Siegal, Gene P.; Yoder, Bradley K; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously mapped the interval on Chromosome 4 for a major polycystic kidney disease modifier (Mpkd) of the B6(Cg)-Cys1cpk/J mouse model of recessive polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Informatic analyses predicted that this interval contains at least three individual renal cystic disease severity-modulating loci (Mpkd1-3). In the current study, we provide further validation of these predicted effects using a congenic mouse line carrying the entire CAST/EiJ (CAST)-derived Mpkd1-3 interval on the C57BL/6J background. We have also generated a derivative congenic line with a refined CAST-derived Mpkd1-2 interval and demonstrated its dominantly-acting disease-modulating effects (e.g., 4.2-fold increase in total cyst area; p<0.001). The relative strength of these effects allowed the use of recombinants from these crosses to fine map the Mpkd2 effects to a <14 Mbp interval that contains 92 RefSeq sequences. One of them corresponds to the previously described positional Mpkd2 candidate gene, Kif12. Among the positional Mpkd2 candidates, only expression of Kif12 correlates strongly with the expression pattern of Cys1 across multiple anatomical nephron structures and developmental time points. Also, we demonstrate that Kif12 encodes a primary cilium-associated protein. Together, these data provide genetic and informatic validation of the predicted renal cystic disease-modulating effects of Mpkd1-3 loci and implicate Kif12 as the candidate locus for Mpkd2. PMID:26295839

  10. Quantitative trait locus analysis, pathway analysis, and consomic mapping show genetic variants of Tnni3k, Fpgt, or H28 control susceptibility to viral myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Wiltshire, Sean A; Leiva-Torres, Gabriel André; Vidal, Silvia M

    2011-06-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection is the most common cause of viral myocarditis. The pathogenesis of viral myocarditis is strongly controlled by host genetic factors. Although certain indispensable components of immunity have been identified, the genes and pathways underlying natural variation between individuals remain unclear. Previously, we isolated the viral myocarditis susceptibility 1 (Vms1) locus on chromosome 3, which influences pathogenesis. We hypothesized that confirmation and further study of Vms1 controlling CVB3-mediated pathology, combined with pathway analysis and consomic mapping approaches, would elucidate both pathological and protective mechanisms accounting for natural variation in response to CVB3 infection. Vms1 was originally mapped to chromosome 3 using a segregating cross between susceptible A/J and resistant B10.A mice. To validate Vms1, C57BL/6J-Chr 3(A)/NaJ (a chromosome substitution strain that carries a diploid A/J chromosome 3) were used to replicate susceptibility compared with resistant C57BL/6J (B6). A second segregating F2 cross was generated between these, confirming both the localization and effects of Vms1. Microarray analysis of the four strains (A/J, B10.A, C57BL/6J, and C57BL/6J-Chr 3(A)/NaJ) illuminated a core program of response to CVB3 in all strains that is comprised mainly of IFN-stimulated genes. Microarray analysis also revealed strain-specific differential expression programs and genes that may be prognostic or diagnostic of susceptibility to CVB3 infection. A combination of analyses revealed very strong evidence for the existence and location of Vms1. Differentially expressed pathways were identified by microarray, and candidate gene analysis revealed Fpgt, H28, and Tnni3k as likely candidates for Vms1.

  11. Genetic analysis of strawberry fruit aroma and identification of O-methyltransferase FaOMT as the locus controlling natural variation in mesifurane content.

    PubMed

    Zorrilla-Fontanesi, Yasmín; Rambla, José-Luis; Cabeza, Amalia; Medina, Juan J; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Botella, Miguel A; Granell, Antonio; Amaya, Iraida

    2012-06-01

    Improvement of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruit flavor is an important goal in breeding programs. To investigate genetic factors controlling this complex trait, a strawberry mapping population derived from genotype '1392', selected for its superior flavor, and '232' was profiled for volatile compounds over 4 years by headspace solid phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. More than 300 volatile compounds were detected, of which 87 were identified by comparison of mass spectrum and retention time to those of pure standards. Parental line '1392' displayed higher volatile levels than '232', and these and many other compounds with similar levels in both parents segregated in the progeny. Cluster analysis grouped the volatiles into distinct chemically related families and revealed a complex metabolic network underlying volatile production in strawberry fruit. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) detection was carried out over 3 years based on a double pseudo-testcross strategy. Seventy QTLs covering 48 different volatiles were detected, with several of them being stable over time and mapped as major QTLs. Loci controlling γ-decalactone and mesifurane content were mapped as qualitative traits. Using a candidate gene approach we have assigned genes that are likely responsible for several of the QTLs. As a proof of concept we show that one homoeolog of the O-methyltransferase gene (FaOMT) is the locus responsible for the natural variation of mesifurane content. Sequence analysis identified 30 bp in the promoter of this FaOMT homoeolog containing putative binding sites for basic/helix-loop-helix, MYB, and BZIP transcription factors. This polymorphism fully cosegregates with both the presence of mesifurane and the high expression of FaOMT during ripening.

  12. Characterization of the dapA-nlpB genetic locus involved in regulation of swarming motility, cell envelope architecture, hemolysin production, and cell attachment ability in Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Soo, Po-Chi; Wei, Jun-Rong; Horng, Yu-Tze; Hsieh, Shang-Chen; Ho, Shen-Wu; Lai, Hsin-Chih

    2005-09-01

    Swarming migration of Serratia marcescens requires both flagellar motility and cellular differentiation and is a population-density-dependent behavior. While the flhDC and quorum-sensing systems have been characterized as important factors regulating S. marcescens swarming, the underlying molecular mechanisms are currently far from being understood. Serratia swarming is thermoregulated and is characterized by continuous surface migration on rich swarming agar surfaces at 30 degrees C but not at 37 degrees C. To further elucidate the mechanisms, identification of specific and conserved regulators that govern the initiation of swarming is essential. We performed transposon mutagenesis to screen for S. marcescens strain CH-1 mutants that swarmed at 37 degrees C. Analysis of a "precocious-swarming" mutant revealed that the defect in a conserved dapA(Sm)-nlpB(Sm) genetic locus which is closely related to the synthesis of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan is responsible for the aberrant swarming phenotype. Further complementation and gene knockout studies showed that nlpB(Sm), which encodes a membrane lipoprotein, NlpB(Sm), but not dapA(Sm), is specifically involved in swarming regulation. On the other hand, dapA(Sm) but not nlpB(Sm) is responsible for the determination of cell envelope architecture, regulation of hemolysin production, and cellular attachment capability. While the nlpB(Sm) mutant showed similar cytotoxicity to its parent strain, the dapA(Sm) mutant significantly increased in cytotoxicity. We present evidence that DapA(Sm) is involved in the determination of cell-envelope-associated phenotypes and that NlpB(Sm) is involved in the regulation of swarming motility.

  13. The grain Hardness locus characterized in a diverse wheat panel (Triticum aestivum L.) adapted to the central part of the Fertile Crescent: genetic diversity, haplotype structure, and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Shaaf, Salar; Sharma, Rajiv; Baloch, Faheem Shehzad; Badaeva, Ekaterina D; Knüpffer, Helmut; Kilian, Benjamin; Özkan, Hakan

    2016-06-01

    Wheat belongs to the most important crops domesticated in the Fertile Crescent. In this region, fortunately, locally adapted wheat landraces are still present in farmers' fields. This material might be of immense value for future breeding programs. However, especially wheat germplasm adapted to the central part of the Fertile Crescent has been poorly characterized for allelic variation at key loci of agricultural importance. Grain hardness is an important trait influencing milling and baking quality of wheat. This trait is mainly determined by three tightly linked genes, namely, Puroindoline a (Pina), Puroindoline b (Pinb), and Grain softness protein-1 (Gsp-1), at the Hardness (Ha-D) locus on chromosome 5DS. To investigate genetic diversity and haplotype structure, we resequenced 96 diverse wheat lines at Pina-D1, Pinb-D1, Gsp-A1, Gsp-B1, and Gsp-D1. Three types of null alleles were identified using diagnostic primers: the first type was a multiple deletion of Pina-D1, Pinb-D1, and Gsp-D1 (Pina-D1k), the second was a Pina-D1 deletion (Pina-D1b); and the third type was a deletion of Gsp-D1, representing a novel null allele designated here as Gsp-D1k. Sequence analysis resulted in four allelic variants at Pinb-D1 and five at Gsp-A1, among them Gsp-A1-V was novel. Pina-D1, Gsp-B1 and Gsp-D1 sequences were monomorphic. Haplotype and phylogenetic analysis suggested that (1) bread wheat inherited its 5DS telomeric region probably from wild diploid Ae. tauschii subsp. tauschii found within an area from Transcaucasia to Caspian Iran; and that (2) the Ha-A and Ha-B homoeoloci were most closely related to sequences of wild tetraploid T. dicocco ides. This study provides a good overview of available genetic diversity at Pina-D1, Pinb-D1, and Gsp-1, which can be exploited to extend the range of grain texture traits in wheat. PMID:26898967

  14. Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    As the first Meeting Chairman for the Spring and Fall meetings, Martin Walt has achieved notable success in realizing the many goals set forth by the Union for its annual meetings. Under his guidance, the Meeting Program Committee has been able to reduce the number of conflicting sessions and provide for the presentation of well-organized and effectively displayed poster sessions. The early planning of Union sessions and the introduction of ‘mini-frontiers,’ along with careful scheduling, has provided an increased opportunity for participation. A record high of 2785 registrants was recorded during the 1981 Fall Meeting, topping very slightly the old record of 2775 for the 1974 Spring Meeting.

  15. Meeting Report: International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History II.

    PubMed

    Artan, Murat; Hwang, Ara B; Lee, Seung V; Nam, Hong Gil

    2015-06-01

    The second International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History was held at the campus of Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu, South Korea, from May 14 to 16, 2014. Many leading scientists in the field of aging research from all over the world contributed to the symposium by attending and presenting their recent work and thoughts. The aim of the symposium was to stimulate international collaborations and interactions among scientists who work on the biology of aging. In the symposium, the most recent and exciting work on aging research was presented, covering a wide range of topics, including the genetics of aging, age-associated diseases, and cellular senescence. The work was conducted in various organisms, includingC. elegans, mice, plants, and humans. Topics covered in the symposium stimulated discussion of novel directions for future research on aging. The meeting ended with a commitment for the third International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History, which will be held in 2016.

  16. Meeting Report: International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History II

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung‐Jae V.; Nam, Hong Gil

    2015-01-01

    The second International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History was held at the campus of Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu, South Korea, from May 14 to 16, 2014. Many leading scientists in the field of aging research from all over the world contributed to the symposium by attending and presenting their recent work and thoughts. The aim of the symposium was to stimulate international collaborations and interactions among scientists who work on the biology of aging. In the symposium, the most recent and exciting work on aging research was presented, covering a wide range of topics, including the genetics of aging, age‐associated diseases, and cellular senescence. The work was conducted in various organisms, including C. elegans, mice, plants, and humans. Topics covered in the symposium stimulated discussion of novel directions for future research on aging. The meeting ended with a commitment for the third International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History, which will be held in 2016. PMID:26115541

  17. Spatial variation in genetic diversity and natural selection on the thrombospondin-related adhesive protein locus of Plasmodium vivax (PvTRAP).

    PubMed

    Kosuwin, Rattiporn; Putaporntip, Chaturong; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Jongwutiwes, Somchai

    2014-01-01

    Thrombospondin-related adhesive protein (TRAP) of malaria parasites is essential for sporozoite motility and invasions into mosquito's salivary gland and vertebrate's hepatocyte; thereby, it is a promising target for pre-erythrocytic vaccine. TRAP of Plasmodium vivax (PvTRAP) exhibits sequence heterogeneity among isolates, an issue relevant to vaccine development. To gain insights into variation in the complete PvTRAP sequences of parasites in Thailand, 114 vivax malaria patients were recruited in 2006-2007 from 4 major endemic provinces bordering Myanmar (Tak in the northwest, n = 30 and Prachuap Khirikhan in the southwest, n = 25), Cambodia (Chanthaburi in the east, n = 29) and Malaysia (Yala and Narathiwat in the south, n = 30). In total, 26 amino acid substitutions were detected and 9 of which were novel, resulting in 44 distinct haplotypes. Haplotype and nucleotide diversities were lowest in southern P. vivax population while higher levels of diversities were observed in other populations. Evidences of positive selection on PvTRAP were demonstrated in domains II and IV and purifying selection in domains I, II and VI. Genetic differentiation was significant between each population except that between populations bordering Myanmar where transmigration was common. Regression analysis of pairwise linearized Fst and geographic distance suggests that P. vivax populations in Thailand have been isolated by distance. Sequence diversity of PvTRAP seems to be temporally stable over one decade in Tak province based on comparison of isolates collected in 1996 (n = 36) and 2006-2007. Besides natural selection, evidences of intragenic recombination have been supported in this study that could maintain and further generate diversity in this locus. It remains to be investigated whether amino acid substitutions in PvTRAP could influence host immune responses although several predicted variant T cell epitopes drastically altered the epitope scores. Knowledge

  18. Spatial Variation in Genetic Diversity and Natural Selection on the Thrombospondin-Related Adhesive Protein Locus of Plasmodium vivax (PvTRAP)

    PubMed Central

    Kosuwin, Rattiporn; Putaporntip, Chaturong; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Jongwutiwes, Somchai

    2014-01-01

    Thrombospondin-related adhesive protein (TRAP) of malaria parasites is essential for sporozoite motility and invasions into mosquito’s salivary gland and vertebrate’s hepatocyte; thereby, it is a promising target for pre-erythrocytic vaccine. TRAP of Plasmodium vivax (PvTRAP) exhibits sequence heterogeneity among isolates, an issue relevant to vaccine development. To gain insights into variation in the complete PvTRAP sequences of parasites in Thailand, 114 vivax malaria patients were recruited in 2006–2007 from 4 major endemic provinces bordering Myanmar (Tak in the northwest, n = 30 and Prachuap Khirikhan in the southwest, n = 25), Cambodia (Chanthaburi in the east, n = 29) and Malaysia (Yala and Narathiwat in the south, n = 30). In total, 26 amino acid substitutions were detected and 9 of which were novel, resulting in 44 distinct haplotypes. Haplotype and nucleotide diversities were lowest in southern P. vivax population while higher levels of diversities were observed in other populations. Evidences of positive selection on PvTRAP were demonstrated in domains II and IV and purifying selection in domains I, II and VI. Genetic differentiation was significant between each population except that between populations bordering Myanmar where transmigration was common. Regression analysis of pairwise linearized Fst and geographic distance suggests that P. vivax populations in Thailand have been isolated by distance. Sequence diversity of PvTRAP seems to be temporally stable over one decade in Tak province based on comparison of isolates collected in 1996 (n = 36) and 2006–2007. Besides natural selection, evidences of intragenic recombination have been supported in this study that could maintain and further generate diversity in this locus. It remains to be investigated whether amino acid substitutions in PvTRAP could influence host immune responses although several predicted variant T cell epitopes drastically altered the epitope scores

  19. Host Genetic Control of the Microbiome in Humans and Maise or Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Ley, Ruth [Cornell University

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Ruth Ley of Cornell University gives a presentation on "Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011.

  20. Host Genetic Control of the Microbiome in Humans and Maise or Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Ley, Ruth

    2011-03-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Ruth Ley of Cornell University gives a presentation on "Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011.

  1. Locus of control and obesity.

    PubMed

    Neymotin, Florence; Nemzer, Louis R

    2014-01-01

    In the developed world, the hazards associated with obesity have largely outstripped the risk of starvation. Obesity remains a difficult public health issue to address, due in large part to the many disciplines involved. A full understanding requires knowledge in the fields of genetics, endocrinology, psychology, sociology, economics, and public policy - among others. In this short review, which serves as an introduction to the Frontiers in Endocrinology research topic, we address one cross-disciplinary relationship: the interaction between the hunger/satiation neural circuitry, an individual's perceived locus of control, and the risk for obesity. Mammals have evolved a complex system for modulating energy intake. Overlaid on this, in humans, there exists a wide variation in "perceived locus of control" - that is, the extent to which an individual believes to be in charge of the events that affect them. Whether one has primarily an internal or external locus of control itself affects, and is affected by, external and physiological factors and has been correlated with the risk for obesity. Thus, the path from hunger and satiation to an individual's actual behavior may often be moderated by psychological factors, included among which is locus of control. PMID:25339940

  2. Genetic Basis of Nonsyndromic Sensorineural Hearing Loss in the Sub-Saharan African Island Population of São Tomé and Príncipe: The Role of the DFNB1 Locus?

    PubMed

    Caroça, Cristina; de Matos, Tiago Morim; Ribeiro, Diogo; Lourenço, Vera; Martins, Tânia; Campelo, Paula; Fialho, Graça; Silva, Susana Nunes; Paço, João; Caria, Helena

    2016-08-01

    Hearing loss (HL) is a common condition with both genetic and environmental causes, and it greatly impacts global health. The prevalence of HL is reportedly higher in developing countries such as the Sub-Saharan African island of São Tomé and Príncipe, where the deaf community is estimated to be less than 1% of the population. We investigated the role of the DFNB1 locus (GJB2 and GJB6 genes) in the etiology of nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (NSSHL) in São Tomé and Príncipe. A sample of 316 individuals, comprising 136 NSSHL patients (92 bilateral, 44 unilateral) and 180 controls, underwent a clinical and audiological examination. Sequencing of the GJB2 coding region and testing for the (GJB6-D13S1830) and del(GJB6-D13S1854) GJB6 deletions were performed. A total of 311 out of 316 individuals were successfully analyzed regarding the GJB2 and GJB6 genetic variations, respectively. The frequency of the GJB2 coding mutations in patients and controls was low. Some of those coding mutations are the most commonly found in Eurasian and Mediterranean populations and have also been identified in Portugal. None of the GJB6 deletions was present. The presence of certain coding variants in São Tomé and Príncipe suggests a non-Sub-Saharan genetic influx and supports the previously reported genetic influx from European (mainly Portuguese) ancestors. In summary, DFNB1 locus does not appear to be a major contributor to NSSHL in São Tomé and Príncipe. However, the presence of both pathogenic and likely pathogenic mutations in GJB2 suggests that GJB2-related NSSHL might still occur in this population, warranting further research on GJB2 testing in NSSHL cases. PMID:27501294

  3. Genetic Variation at Exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB Locus in Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) from the Gulf of California.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Santillán, Diana D; Lacey, Eileen A; Gendron, Diane; Ortega, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) play an important role in the vertebrate immune response and are among the most polymorphic genes known in vertebrates. In some marine mammals, MHC genes have been shown to be characterized by low levels of polymorphism compared to terrestrial taxa; this reduction in variation is often explained as a result of lower pathogen pressures in marine habitats. To determine if this same reduction in variation applies to the migratory population of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) that occurs in the Gulf of California, we genotyped a 172 bp fragment of exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB locus for 80 members of this population. Twenty-two putatively functional DQB allotypes were identified, all of which were homologous with DQB sequences from other cetacean species. Up to 5 putative alleles per individual were identified, suggesting that gene duplication has occurred at this locus. Rates of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions (ω) and maximum likelihood analyses of models of nucleotide variation provided potential evidence of ongoing positive selection at this exon. Phylogenetic analyses of DQB alleles from B. musculus and 16 other species of cetaceans revealed trans-specific conservation of MHC variants, suggesting that selection has acted on this locus over prolonged periods of time. Collectively our findings reveal that immunogenic variation in blue whales is comparable to that in terrestrial mammals, thereby providing no evidence that marine taxa are subject to reduced pathogen-induced selective pressures. PMID:26761201

  4. Genetic Variation at Exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB Locus in Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) from the Gulf of California.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Santillán, Diana D; Lacey, Eileen A; Gendron, Diane; Ortega, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) play an important role in the vertebrate immune response and are among the most polymorphic genes known in vertebrates. In some marine mammals, MHC genes have been shown to be characterized by low levels of polymorphism compared to terrestrial taxa; this reduction in variation is often explained as a result of lower pathogen pressures in marine habitats. To determine if this same reduction in variation applies to the migratory population of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) that occurs in the Gulf of California, we genotyped a 172 bp fragment of exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB locus for 80 members of this population. Twenty-two putatively functional DQB allotypes were identified, all of which were homologous with DQB sequences from other cetacean species. Up to 5 putative alleles per individual were identified, suggesting that gene duplication has occurred at this locus. Rates of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions (ω) and maximum likelihood analyses of models of nucleotide variation provided potential evidence of ongoing positive selection at this exon. Phylogenetic analyses of DQB alleles from B. musculus and 16 other species of cetaceans revealed trans-specific conservation of MHC variants, suggesting that selection has acted on this locus over prolonged periods of time. Collectively our findings reveal that immunogenic variation in blue whales is comparable to that in terrestrial mammals, thereby providing no evidence that marine taxa are subject to reduced pathogen-induced selective pressures.

  5. Synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides as tools in molecular genetics: the characterization of the CYC1 (iso-1-cytochrome c encoding) locus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Smith, M

    1985-01-01

    The use of synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides as tools for the isolation, characterization and mutagenesis of eukaryote genes has played a major role in the molecular definition of the CYC1 locus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is the structural gene for the apoprotein of iso-1-cytochrome c. Thus, the possibility of using a synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide as a probe to identify and monitor the isolation of a specific gene was first established by model studies which defined the melting temperatures (TmS) for duplexes of oligonucleotides of different lengths and base compositions. This led to the isolation of the CYC1 locus using a synthetic 13 nucleotide probe. A more convenient strategy for determination of DNA sequences by the Sanger method was provided by using synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides as primers with denatured double-strand plasmid DNA as template. By this means, the sequence of the CYC1 locus was determined by "walking" along the gene without isolating restriction fragments of the DNA or separating DNA strands. Synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides, used as primers for reverse transcriptase with mRNA as template, were also used to precisely define the 5'- and 3'-ends of the iso-1-cytochrome c mRNA. Yet another application of synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides is their use as specific mutagens after in vitro incorporation into double-stranded DNA. In the case of iso-1-cytochrome c, this mutagenic strategy is being used to define the role of conserved amino-acids in cytochrome function.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Genetic Variation at Exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB Locus in Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) from the Gulf of California

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Santillán, Diana D.; Lacey, Eileen A.; Gendron, Diane; Ortega, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) play an important role in the vertebrate immune response and are among the most polymorphic genes known in vertebrates. In some marine mammals, MHC genes have been shown to be characterized by low levels of polymorphism compared to terrestrial taxa; this reduction in variation is often explained as a result of lower pathogen pressures in marine habitats. To determine if this same reduction in variation applies to the migratory population of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) that occurs in the Gulf of California, we genotyped a 172 bp fragment of exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB locus for 80 members of this population. Twenty-two putatively functional DQB allotypes were identified, all of which were homologous with DQB sequences from other cetacean species. Up to 5 putative alleles per individual were identified, suggesting that gene duplication has occurred at this locus. Rates of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions (ω) and maximum likelihood analyses of models of nucleotide variation provided potential evidence of ongoing positive selection at this exon. Phylogenetic analyses of DQB alleles from B. musculus and 16 other species of cetaceans revealed trans-specific conservation of MHC variants, suggesting that selection has acted on this locus over prolonged periods of time. Collectively our findings reveal that immunogenic variation in blue whales is comparable to that in terrestrial mammals, thereby providing no evidence that marine taxa are subject to reduced pathogen-induced selective pressures. PMID:26761201

  7. The Third International Meeting on Genetic Disorders in the RAS/MAPK Pathway: Toward a Therapeutic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Korf, Bruce; Ahmadian, Reza; Allanson, Judith; Aoki, Yoko; Bakker, Annette; Wright, Emma Burkitt; Denger, Brian; Elgersma, Ype; Gelb, Bruce D.; Gripp, Karen W.; Kerr, Bronwyn; Kontaridis, Maria; Lazaro, Conxi; Linardic, Corinne; Lozano, Reymundo; MacRae, Calum A.; Messiaen, Ludwine; Mulero-Navarro, Sonia; Neel, Benjamin; Plotkin, Scott; Rauen, Katherine A.; Roberts, Amy; Silva, Alcino J.; Sittampalam, Sitta G.; Zhang, Chao; Schoyer, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    “The Third International Meeting on Genetic Disorders in the RAS/MAPK Pathway: Towards a Therapeutic Approach” was held at the Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld Hotel (August 2–4, 2013). Seventy-one physicians and scientists attended the meeting, and parallel meetings were held by patient advocacy groups (CFC International, Costello Syndrome Family Network, NF Network and Noonan Syndrome Foundation). Parent and patient advocates opened the meeting with a panel discussion to set the stage regarding their hopes and expectations for therapeutic advances. In keeping with the theme on therapeutic development, the sessions followed a progression from description of the phenotype and definition of therapeutic endpoints, to definition of genomic changes, to identification of therapeutic targets in the RAS/MAPK pathway, to preclinical drug development and testing, to clinical trials. These proceedings will review the major points of discussion. PMID:25900621

  8. Genetic recombination at the human RH locus: A family study of the red-cell Evans phenotype reveals a transfer of exons 2-6 from the RHD to the RHCE gene

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.H.; Chen, Y.; Reid, M.; Ghosh, S.

    1996-10-01

    The human RH locus appears to consist of two structural genes, D and CE, which map on the short arm p34-36 of chromosome 1 and specify a most complex system of blood-group genetic polymorphisms. Here we describe a family study of the Evans (also known as {open_quotes}D..{open_quotes}) phenotype, a codominant trait associated with both qualitative and quantitative changes in D-antigen expression. A cataract-causing mutation was also inherited in this family and was apparently cotransmitted with Evans, suggesting a chromosomal linkage of these two otherwise unrelated traits. Southern blot analysis and allele-specific PCR showed the linkage of Evans with a SphI RFLP marker and the presence of a hybrid gene in the RH locus. To delineate the pattern of gene expression, the composition and structure of Rh-polypeptide transcripts were characterized by reverse transcriptase-PCR and nucleotide sequencing. This resulted in the identification of a novel Rh transcript expressed only in the Evans-positive erythroid cells. Sequence analysis showed that the transcript maintained a normal open reading frame but occurred as a CE-D-CE composite in which exons 2-6 of the CE gene were replaced by the homologous counterpart of the D gene. This hybrid gene was predicted to encode a CE-D-CE fusion protein whose surface expression correlates with the Evans phenotype. The mode and consequence of such a recombination event suggest the occurrence, in the RH locus, of a segmental DNA transfer via the mechanism of gene conversion. 31 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Pathways and barriers to genetic testing and screening: Molecular genetics meets the high-risk family. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Duster, T.

    1998-11-01

    The proliferation of genetic screening and testing is requiring increasing numbers of Americans to integrate genetic knowledge and interventions into their family life and personal experience. This study examines the social processes that occur as families at risk for two of the most common autosomal recessive diseases, sickle cell disease (SC) and cystic fibrosis (CF), encounter genetic testing. Each of these diseases is found primarily in a different ethnic/racial group (CF in Americans of North European descent and SC in Americans of West African descent). This has permitted them to have a certain additional lens on the role of culture in integrating genetic testing into family life and reproductive planning. A third type of genetic disorder, the thalassemias was added to the sample in order to extent the comparative frame and to include other ethnic and racial groups.

  10. Genetic Characterization of Resistance to Wheat Stem Rust Race TTKSK in Landrace and Wild Barley Accessions Identifies the rpg4/Rpg5 Locus.

    PubMed

    Mamo, Bullo Erena; Smith, Kevin P; Brueggeman, Robert S; Steffenson, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    Race TTKSK of the wheat stem rust pathogen (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) threatens the production of wheat and barley worldwide because of its broad-spectrum virulence on many widely grown cultivars. Sources of resistance against race TTKSK were recently identified in several barley landraces (Hordeum vulgare subsp. vulgare) and wild barley accessions (H. vulgare subsp. spontaneum). The objectives of this study were to characterize the inheritance of resistance to wheat stem rust race TTKSK in four barley landraces (Hv501, Hv545, Hv602, and Hv612) and two wild barley (WBDC213 and WBDC345) accessions, map the resistance genes, and determine the allelic relationships among the genes in these accessions and the previously described rpg4/Rpg5 locus. Resistant accessions were crossed with the susceptible cv. Steptoe and resulting F3 populations were evaluated for resistance to race TTKSK at the seedling stage. Segregation of F3 families in populations involving the resistance sources of Hv501, Hv545, Hv612, WBDC213, and WBDC345 fit a 1:2:1 ratio for homozygous resistant (HR)/segregating (SEG)/homozygous susceptible (HS) progenies (with χ2=2.27 to 5.87 and P=0.053 to 0.321), indicating that a single gene confers resistance to race TTKSK. Segregation of F3 families in cross Steptoe/Hv602 did not fit a 1:2:1 ratio (HR/SEG/HS of 20:47:43 with χ2=11.95 and P=0.003), indicating that more than one gene is involved in imparting resistance to race TTKSK. Bulked segregant analysis using >1,500 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers positioned a resistance locus in all six populations on chromosome 5HL in very close proximity to the known location of the rpg4/Rpg5 complex locus. Allelism tests were conducted by making crosses among resistant accessions Hv501, Hv545, and Hv612 and also Q21861 with the rpg4/Rpg5 complex. No segregation was observed in F2 families inoculated with race TTKSK, demonstrating that all Hv lines carry the same allele for resistance and that it

  11. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... result, one of which is a statistically significant dose-related increase in the number of specific locus... a statistically significant dose-related increase in the number of specific locus mutations or a... eukaryotes which are the carriers of the genetic information for the species. (c) Reference......

  12. Chimerization at the AQP2–AQP3 locus is the genetic basis of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in clinical Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Fabrice E.; Baker, Nicola; Munday, Jane C.; de Koning, Harry P.; Horn, David; Mäser, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Aquaglyceroporin-2 is a known determinant of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in Trypanosoma brucei brucei laboratory strains. Recently, chimerization at the AQP2–AQP3 tandem locus was described from melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistant Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates from sleeping sickness patients in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Here, we demonstrate that reintroduction of wild-type AQP2 into one of these isolates fully restores drug susceptibility while expression of the chimeric AQP2/3 gene in aqp2–aqp3 null T. b. brucei does not. This proves that AQP2–AQP3 chimerization is the cause of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in the T. b. gambiense isolates. PMID:26042196

  13. Genetics and Molecular Mapping of Black Rot Resistance Locus Xca1bc on Chromosome B-7 in Ethiopian Mustard (Brassica carinata A. Braun).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Brij Bihari; Kalia, Pritam; Yadava, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Dinesh; Sharma, Tilak Raj

    2016-01-01

    Black rot caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Pam.) Dowson is the most destructive disease of cauliflower causing huge loss to the farmers throughout the world. Since there are limited sources of resistance to black rot in B. oleracea (C genome Brassica), exploration of A and B genomes of Brassica was planned as these were thought to be potential reservoirs of black rot resistance gene(s). In our search for new gene(s) for black rot resistance, F2 mapping population was developed in Brassica carinata (BBCC) by crossing NPC-17, a susceptible genotype with NPC-9, a resistant genotype. Out of 364 Intron length polymorphic markers and microsatellite primers used in this study, 41 distinguished the parental lines. However, resistant and susceptible bulks could be distinguished by three markers At1g70610, SSR Na14-G02 and At1g71865 which were used for genotyping of F2 mapping population. These markers were placed along the resistance gene, according to order, covering a distance of 36.30 cM. Intron length polymorphic markers At1g70610 and At1g71865 were found to be linked to black rot resistance locus (Xca1bc) at 6.2 and 12.8 cM distance, respectively. This is the first report of identification of markers linked to Xca1bc locus in Brassica carinata on B-7 linkage group. Intron length polymorphic markers provided a novel and attractive option for marker assisted selection due to high cross transferability and cost effectiveness for marker assisted alien gene introgression into cauliflower. PMID:27023128

  14. Genetics and Molecular Mapping of Black Rot Resistance Locus Xca1bc on Chromosome B-7 in Ethiopian Mustard (Brassica carinata A. Braun)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Brij Bihari; Kalia, Pritam; Yadava, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Dinesh; Sharma, Tilak Raj

    2016-01-01

    Black rot caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Pam.) Dowson is the most destructive disease of cauliflower causing huge loss to the farmers throughout the world. Since there are limited sources of resistance to black rot in B. oleracea (C genome Brassica), exploration of A and B genomes of Brassica was planned as these were thought to be potential reservoirs of black rot resistance gene(s). In our search for new gene(s) for black rot resistance, F2 mapping population was developed in Brassica carinata (BBCC) by crossing NPC-17, a susceptible genotype with NPC-9, a resistant genotype. Out of 364 Intron length polymorphic markers and microsatellite primers used in this study, 41 distinguished the parental lines. However, resistant and susceptible bulks could be distinguished by three markers At1g70610, SSR Na14-G02 and At1g71865 which were used for genotyping of F2 mapping population. These markers were placed along the resistance gene, according to order, covering a distance of 36.30 cM. Intron length polymorphic markers At1g70610 and At1g71865 were found to be linked to black rot resistance locus (Xca1bc) at 6.2 and 12.8 cM distance, respectively. This is the first report of identification of markers linked to Xca1bc locus in Brassica carinata on B-7 linkage group. Intron length polymorphic markers provided a novel and attractive option for marker assisted selection due to high cross transferability and cost effectiveness for marker assisted alien gene introgression into cauliflower. PMID:27023128

  15. Genetics and Molecular Mapping of Black Rot Resistance Locus Xca1bc on Chromosome B-7 in Ethiopian Mustard (Brassica carinata A. Braun).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Brij Bihari; Kalia, Pritam; Yadava, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Dinesh; Sharma, Tilak Raj

    2016-01-01

    Black rot caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Pam.) Dowson is the most destructive disease of cauliflower causing huge loss to the farmers throughout the world. Since there are limited sources of resistance to black rot in B. oleracea (C genome Brassica), exploration of A and B genomes of Brassica was planned as these were thought to be potential reservoirs of black rot resistance gene(s). In our search for new gene(s) for black rot resistance, F2 mapping population was developed in Brassica carinata (BBCC) by crossing NPC-17, a susceptible genotype with NPC-9, a resistant genotype. Out of 364 Intron length polymorphic markers and microsatellite primers used in this study, 41 distinguished the parental lines. However, resistant and susceptible bulks could be distinguished by three markers At1g70610, SSR Na14-G02 and At1g71865 which were used for genotyping of F2 mapping population. These markers were placed along the resistance gene, according to order, covering a distance of 36.30 cM. Intron length polymorphic markers At1g70610 and At1g71865 were found to be linked to black rot resistance locus (Xca1bc) at 6.2 and 12.8 cM distance, respectively. This is the first report of identification of markers linked to Xca1bc locus in Brassica carinata on B-7 linkage group. Intron length polymorphic markers provided a novel and attractive option for marker assisted selection due to high cross transferability and cost effectiveness for marker assisted alien gene introgression into cauliflower.

  16. Design and analysis of genetic association studies to finely map a locus identified by linkage analysis: sample size and power calculations.

    PubMed

    Hanson, R L; Looker, H C; Ma, L; Muller, Y L; Baier, L J; Knowler, W C

    2006-05-01

    Association (e.g. case-control) studies are often used to finely map loci identified by linkage analysis. We investigated the influence of various parameters on power and sample size requirements for such a study. Calculations were performed for various values of a high-risk functional allele (fA), frequency of a marker allele associated with the high risk allele (f1), degree of linkage disquilibrium between functional and marker alleles (D') and trait heritability attributable to the functional locus (h2). The calculations show that if cases and controls are selected from equal but opposite extreme quantiles of a quantitative trait, the primary determinants of power are h2 and the specific quantiles selected. For a dichotomous trait, power also depends on population prevalence. Power is optimal if functional alleles are studied (fA= f1 and D'= 1.0) and can decrease substantially as D' diverges from 1.0 or as f(1) diverges from fA. These analyses suggest that association studies to finely map loci are most powerful if potential functional polymorphisms are identified a priori or if markers are typed to maximize haplotypic diversity. In the absence of such information, expected minimum power at a given location for a given sample size can be calculated by specifying a range of potential frequencies for fA (e.g. 0.1-0.9) and determining power for all markers within the region with specification of the expected D' between the markers and the functional locus. This method is illustrated for a fine-mapping project with 662 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 24 Mb. Regions differed by marker density and allele frequencies. Thus, in some, power was near its theoretical maximum and little additional information is expected from additional markers, while in others, additional markers appear to be necessary. These methods may be useful in the analysis and interpretation of fine-mapping studies. PMID:16674556

  17. A suppressor locus for MODY3-diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel A.; Carette, Claire; Bagattin, Alessia; Chiral, Magali; Makinistoglu, Munevver Parla; Garbay, Serge; Prévost, Géraldine; Madaras, Cécile; Hérault, Yann; Leibovici, Michel; Pontoglio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young type 3 (MODY3), linked to mutations in the transcription factor HNF1A, is the most prevalent form of monogenic diabetes mellitus. HNF1alpha-deficiency leads to defective insulin secretion via a molecular mechanism that is still not completely understood. Moreover, in MODY3 patients the severity of insulin secretion can be extremely variable even in the same kindred, indicating that modifier genes may control the onset of the disease. With the use of a mouse model for HNF1alpha-deficiency, we show here that specific genetic backgrounds (C3H and CBA) carry a powerful genetic suppressor of diabetes. A genome scan analysis led to the identification of a major suppressor locus on chromosome 3 (Moda1). Moda1 locus contains 11 genes with non-synonymous SNPs that significantly interacts with other loci on chromosomes 4, 11 and 18. Mechanistically, the absence of HNF1alpha in diabetic-prone (sensitive) strains leads to postnatal defective islets growth that is remarkably restored in resistant strains. Our findings are relevant to human genetics since Moda1 is syntenic with a human locus identified by genome wide association studies of fasting glycemia in patients. Most importantly, our results show that a single genetic locus can completely suppress diabetes in Hnf1a-deficiency. PMID:27667715

  18. Genetic Regulation of Grass Biomass Accumulation and Biological Conversion Quality (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Sam

    2013-03-01

    Sam Hazen of the University of Massachusetts on "Genetic Regulation of Grass Biomass Accumulation and Biological Conversion Quality" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  19. Meeting review. Uncovering the genetic basis of adaptive change: on the intersection of landscape genomics and theoretical population genetics.

    PubMed

    Joost, Stéphane; Vuilleumier, Séverine; Jensen, Jeffrey D; Schoville, Sean; Leempoel, Kevin; Stucki, Sylvie; Widmer, Ivo; Melodelima, Christelle; Rolland, Jonathan; Manel, Stéphanie

    2013-07-01

    A workshop recently held at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL, Switzerland) was dedicated to understanding the genetic basis of adaptive change, taking stock of the different approaches developed in theoretical population genetics and landscape genomics and bringing together knowledge accumulated in both research fields. Indeed, an important challenge in theoretical population genetics is to incorporate effects of demographic history and population structure. But important design problems (e.g. focus on populations as units, focus on hard selective sweeps, no hypothesis-based framework in the design of the statistical tests) reduce their capability of detecting adaptive genetic variation. In parallel, landscape genomics offers a solution to several of these problems and provides a number of advantages (e.g. fast computation, landscape heterogeneity integration). But the approach makes several implicit assumptions that should be carefully considered (e.g. selection has had enough time to create a functional relationship between the allele distribution and the environmental variable, or this functional relationship is assumed to be constant). To address the respective strengths and weaknesses mentioned above, the workshop brought together a panel of experts from both disciplines to present their work and discuss the relevance of combining these approaches, possibly resulting in a joint software solution in the future. PMID:24003454

  20. A new type of genetic regulation of allogeneic response. A novel locus on mouse chromosome 4, Alan2 controls MLC reactivity to three different alloantigens: C57BL/10, BALB/c and CBA.

    PubMed

    Havelková, H; Badalová, J; Demant, P; Lipoldová, M

    2000-12-01

    The intensity of the mixed lymphocyte response (MLR) depends on the genetic disparity between the donors of responding and stimulating cells. Differences in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and Mls1 antigens induce the strongest responses. However, even with comparable incompatibilities in MHC and Mls antigens, some strains of genetically defined mice respond remarkably better than other strains. Apparently other, so far undefined, genetic factors contribute to the magnitude of the MLR. The strain OcB-9 (H2pz) has 87.5% genes from the strain O20/A (O20) and 12.5% genes from strain B10.O20 (both H2pz). In spite of the overal similarity of their genomes, OcB-9 mice differed from O20 mice in response to three different alloantigens C57BL/10 (H2b), BALB/c (H2d) and CBA (H2k). As both O20 and OcB-9 strains carry identical haplotype H2pz, their differences in alloantigen response depend only on non-MHC genes. We analyzed the genetic basis of these strain differences using (OcB-9 x O20)F2 hybrids, and we mapped a novel locus Alan2 (Alloantigen response 2) on chromosome 4 near D4Mit72 that influences the response to all alloantigens tested. This linkage was significant for C57BL/10 and for BALB/c alloantigens (corrected P values 0.0475 and 0.0158, respectively) and highly suggestive for CBA (corrected P = 0.0661). The response to DBA/1 (H2q) alloantigens exhibited a similar pattern but the linkage was not significant. As MLR reflects the recognition phase of transplantation reaction, identification of human counterparts of the Alan genes and a better understanding of the regulation of alloresponsiveness might lead to a better prediction of patients' reactions to allografts and to a more individualized measures to prevent rejection.

  1. Coronary-Heart-Disease-Associated Genetic Variant at the COL4A1/COL4A2 Locus Affects COL4A1/COL4A2 Expression, Vascular Cell Survival, Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability and Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Xiangyuan; Ren, Meixia; An, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruoxin; Yan, Shunying; Situ, Haiteng; He, Xinjie; Chen, Yequn; Tan, Xuerui; Xiao, Qingzhong; Tucker, Arthur T.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Ye, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed an association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and genetic variation on chromosome 13q34, with the lead single nucleotide polymorphism rs4773144 residing in the COL4A2 gene in this genomic region. We investigated the functional effects of this genetic variant. Analyses of primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) from different individuals showed a difference between rs4773144 genotypes in COL4A2 and COL4A1 expression levels, being lowest in the G/G genotype, intermediate in A/G and highest in A/A. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by allelic imbalance assays of primary cultures of SMCs and ECs that were of the A/G genotype revealed that the G allele had lower transcriptional activity than the A allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and luciferase reporter gene assays showed that a short DNA sequence encompassing the rs4773144 site interacted with a nuclear protein, with lower efficiency for the G allele, and that the G allele sequence had lower activity in driving reporter gene expression. Analyses of cultured SMCs from different individuals demonstrated that cells of the G/G genotype had higher apoptosis rates. Immunohistochemical and histological examinations of ex vivo atherosclerotic coronary arteries from different individuals disclosed that atherosclerotic plaques with the G/G genotype had lower collagen IV abundance and thinner fibrous cap, a hallmark of unstable, rupture-prone plaques. A study of a cohort of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease showed that patients of the G/G genotype had higher rates of myocardial infarction, a phenotype often caused by plaque rupture. These results indicate that the CHD-related genetic variant at the COL4A2 locus affects COL4A2/COL4A1 expression, SMC survival, and atherosclerotic plaque stability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the association between the genetic variant and CHD

  2. Coronary-Heart-Disease-Associated Genetic Variant at the COL4A1/COL4A2 Locus Affects COL4A1/COL4A2 Expression, Vascular Cell Survival, Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability and Risk of Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Ng, Fu Liang; Chan, Kenneth; Pu, Xiangyuan; Poston, Robin N; Ren, Meixia; An, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruoxin; Wu, Jingchun; Yan, Shunying; Situ, Haiteng; He, Xinjie; Chen, Yequn; Tan, Xuerui; Xiao, Qingzhong; Tucker, Arthur T; Caulfield, Mark J; Ye, Shu

    2016-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed an association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and genetic variation on chromosome 13q34, with the lead single nucleotide polymorphism rs4773144 residing in the COL4A2 gene in this genomic region. We investigated the functional effects of this genetic variant. Analyses of primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) from different individuals showed a difference between rs4773144 genotypes in COL4A2 and COL4A1 expression levels, being lowest in the G/G genotype, intermediate in A/G and highest in A/A. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by allelic imbalance assays of primary cultures of SMCs and ECs that were of the A/G genotype revealed that the G allele had lower transcriptional activity than the A allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and luciferase reporter gene assays showed that a short DNA sequence encompassing the rs4773144 site interacted with a nuclear protein, with lower efficiency for the G allele, and that the G allele sequence had lower activity in driving reporter gene expression. Analyses of cultured SMCs from different individuals demonstrated that cells of the G/G genotype had higher apoptosis rates. Immunohistochemical and histological examinations of ex vivo atherosclerotic coronary arteries from different individuals disclosed that atherosclerotic plaques with the G/G genotype had lower collagen IV abundance and thinner fibrous cap, a hallmark of unstable, rupture-prone plaques. A study of a cohort of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease showed that patients of the G/G genotype had higher rates of myocardial infarction, a phenotype often caused by plaque rupture. These results indicate that the CHD-related genetic variant at the COL4A2 locus affects COL4A2/COL4A1 expression, SMC survival, and atherosclerotic plaque stability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the association between the genetic variant and CHD

  3. Genetic mapping of a locus for multiple ephiphyseal dysplasia (EDM2) to a region of chromosome 1 containing a type IX collagen gene

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, M.D.; Choi, HiChang; Warman, M.L.; Loughlin, J.A.; Wordsworth, P.; Sykes, B.C.; Irven, C.M.M.; Smith, M.; Wynne-Davies, R.; Lipson, M.H.

    1994-10-01

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is a dominantly inherited chondrodysplasia characterized by mild short stature and early-onset osteoarthrosis. Some forms of MED clinically resemble another chondrodysplasia phenotype, the mild form of pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH). On the basis of their clinical similarities as well as similar ultra-structural and biochemical features in cartilage from some patients, it has been proposed that MED and PSACH belong to a single bone-dysplasia family. Recently, both mild and severe PSACH as well as a form of MED have been linked to the same interval on chromosome 19, suggesting that they may be allelic disorders. Linkage studies with the chromosome 19 markers were carried out in a large family with MED and excluded the previously identified interval. Using this family, we have identified a MED locus on the short arm of chromosome 1, in a region containing the gene (COL9A2) that encodes the {alpha}2 chain of type IX collagen, a structural component of the cartilage extracellular matrix. 39 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Genetic interactions between diverged alleles of Early heading date 1 (Ehd1) and Heading date 3a (Hd3a)/ RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (RFT1) control differential heading and contribute to regional adaptation in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Chen, Hongyi; Ren, Ding; Tang, Huiwu; Qiu, Rong; Feng, Jinglei; Long, Yunming; Niu, Baixiao; Chen, Danping; Zhong, Tianyu; Liu, Yao-Guang; Guo, Jingxin

    2015-11-01

    Initiation of flowering, also called heading, in rice (Oryza sativa) is determined by the florigens encoded by Heading date 3a (Hd3a) and RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (RFT1). Early heading date 1 (Ehd1) regulates Hd3a and RFT1. However, different rice varieties have diverged alleles of Ehd1 and Hd3a/RFT1 and their genetic interactions remain largely unclear. Here we generated three segregating populations for different combinations of diverged Ehd1 and Hd3a/RFT1 alleles, and analyzed their genetic interactions between these alleles. We demonstrated that, in an ehd1 mutant background, Hd3a was silenced, but RFT1 was expressed (although at lower levels than in plants with a functional Ehd1) under short-day (SD) and long-day (LD) conditions. We identified a nonfunctional RFT1 allele (rft1); the lines carrying homozygous ehd1 and Hd3a/rft1 failed to induce the floral transition under SD and LD conditions. Like Hd3a, RFT1 also interacted with 14-3-3 proteins, the florigen receptors, but a nonfunctional RFT1 with a crucial E105K mutation failed to interact with 14-3-3 proteins. Furthermore, analyses of sequence variation and geographic distribution suggested that functional RFT1 alleles were selected during rice adaptation to high-latitude regions. Our results demonstrate the important roles of RFT1 in rice flowering and regional adaptation.

  5. Interaction between genetic and epigenetic variation defines gene expression patterns at the asthma-associated locus 17q12-q21 in lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Berlivet, Soizik; Moussette, Sanny; Ouimet, Manon; Verlaan, Dominique J; Koka, Vonda; Al Tuwaijri, Abeer; Kwan, Tony; Sinnett, Daniel; Pastinen, Tomi; Naumova, Anna K

    2012-07-01

    Phenotypic variation results from variation in gene expression, which is modulated by genetic and/or epigenetic factors. To understand the molecular basis of human disease, interaction between genetic and epigenetic factors needs to be taken into account. The asthma-associated region 17q12-q21 harbors three genes, the zona pellucida binding protein 2 (ZPBP2), gasdermin B (GSDMB) and ORM1-like 3 (ORMDL3), that show allele-specific differences in expression levels in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and CD4+ T cells. Here, we report a molecular dissection of allele-specific transcriptional regulation of the genes within the chromosomal region 17q12-q21 combining in vitro transfection, formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements, chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA methylation assays in LCLs. We found that a single nucleotide polymorphism rs4795397 influences the activity of ZPBP2 promoter in vitro in an allele-dependent fashion, and also leads to nucleosome repositioning on the asthma-associated allele. However, variable methylation of exon 1 of ZPBP2 masks the strong genetic effect on ZPBP2 promoter activity in LCLs. In contrast, the ORMDL3 promoter is fully unmethylated, which allows detection of genetic effects on its transcription. We conclude that the cis-regulatory effects on 17q12-q21 gene expression result from interaction between several regulatory polymorphisms and epigenetic factors within the cis-regulatory haplotype region.

  6. GENETIC VARIATION AT AN IMMUNE SYSTEM LOCUS PROVIDES BOTH A GENERALIZED AND SPECIFIC STRESS INDICATOR: EFFECTS OF PERSISTENT, BIOACCUMULATIVE AND TOXIC CONTAIMINANT EXPOSURES ON AN ESTUARINE FISH POPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a group of linked genes that mediates the adaptive immune response in vertebrates. Studies using mammals and birds have shown that environmental stressors can directly and indirectly produce genetic changes at MHC loci that can affect...

  7. Molecular analysis of the bacteriocin-encoding plasmid pDGL1 from Enterococcus durans and genetic characterization of the durancin locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enterococci constitute a significant component of lactic acid bacteria normally present in the intestinal microflora and include strains that produce bacteriocins. The genetic determinants for durancin GL in Enterococcus durans 41D were identified on the 8,347 bp plasmid pDGL1 by plasmid curing exp...

  8. Genetic variation at the SLCO1B1 gene locus and low density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering response to pravastatin in the elderly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our goal was to determine whether genetic variation at genes affecting statin metabolism or targets of statin therapy would influence low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol lowering with pravastatin, baseline heart disease, or cardiac endpoints on trial. We examined associations of single nucleot...

  9. STRONG SELECTIVE SIGNAL AND HIGH GENETIC VARIABILITY AT AN IMMUNE SYSTEM LOCUS IN CONTAMINATED AND UNCONTAMINATED POPULATIONS OF AN ESTUARINE FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a group of linked genes that mediates the adaptive immune response in vertebrates. Studies using mammals and birds have shown that environmental stressors can produce genetic changes at MHC loci that can affect immune system function....

  10. Image simulation using LOCUS

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Roberts, J.A.

    1989-09-01

    The LOCUS data base program has been used to simulate images and to solve simple equations. This has been accomplished by making each record (which normally would represent a data entry)represent sequenced or random number pairs.

  11. A new three-locus model for rootstock-induced dwarfing in apple revealed by genetic mapping of root bark percentage.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Nicola; Harrison, Richard J; Barber-Perez, Nuria; Cascant-Lopez, Emma; Cobo-Medina, Magdalena; Lipska, Marzena; Conde-Ruíz, Rebeca; Brain, Philip; Gregory, Peter J; Fernández-Fernández, Felicidad

    2016-03-01

    Rootstock-induced dwarfing of apple scions revolutionized global apple production during the twentieth century, leading to the development of modern intensive orchards. A high root bark percentage (the percentage of the whole root area constituted by root cortex) has previously been associated with rootstock-induced dwarfing in apple. In this study, the root bark percentage was measured in a full-sib family of ungrafted apple rootstocks and found to be under the control of three loci. Two quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for root bark percentage were found to co-localize to the same genomic regions on chromosome 5 and chromosome 11 previously identified as controlling dwarfing, Dw1 and Dw2, respectively. A third QTL was identified on chromosome 13 in a region that has not been previously associated with dwarfing. The development of closely linked sequence-tagged site markers improved the resolution of allelic classes, thereby allowing the detection of dominance and epistatic interactions between loci, with high root bark percentage only occurring in specific allelic combinations. In addition, we report a significant negative correlation between root bark percentage and stem diameter (an indicator of tree vigour), measured on a clonally propagated grafted subset of the mapping population. The demonstrated link between root bark percentage and rootstock-induced dwarfing of the scion leads us to propose a three-locus model that is able to explain levels of dwarfing from the dwarf 'M.27' to the semi-invigorating rootstock 'M.116'. Moreover, we suggest that the QTL on chromosome 13 (Rb3) might be analogous to a third dwarfing QTL, Dw3, which has not previously been identified.

  12. A new three-locus model for rootstock-induced dwarfing in apple revealed by genetic mapping of root bark percentage

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Nicola; Harrison, Richard J.; Barber-Perez, Nuria; Cascant-Lopez, Emma; Cobo-Medina, Magdalena; Lipska, Marzena; Conde-Ruíz, Rebeca; Brain, Philip; Gregory, Peter J.; Fernández-Fernández, Felicidad

    2016-01-01

    Rootstock-induced dwarfing of apple scions revolutionized global apple production during the twentieth century, leading to the development of modern intensive orchards. A high root bark percentage (the percentage of the whole root area constituted by root cortex) has previously been associated with rootstock-induced dwarfing in apple. In this study, the root bark percentage was measured in a full-sib family of ungrafted apple rootstocks and found to be under the control of three loci. Two quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for root bark percentage were found to co-localize to the same genomic regions on chromosome 5 and chromosome 11 previously identified as controlling dwarfing, Dw1 and Dw2, respectively. A third QTL was identified on chromosome 13 in a region that has not been previously associated with dwarfing. The development of closely linked sequence-tagged site markers improved the resolution of allelic classes, thereby allowing the detection of dominance and epistatic interactions between loci, with high root bark percentage only occurring in specific allelic combinations. In addition, we report a significant negative correlation between root bark percentage and stem diameter (an indicator of tree vigour), measured on a clonally propagated grafted subset of the mapping population. The demonstrated link between root bark percentage and rootstock-induced dwarfing of the scion leads us to propose a three-locus model that is able to explain levels of dwarfing from the dwarf ‘M.27’ to the semi-invigorating rootstock ‘M.116’. Moreover, we suggest that the QTL on chromosome 13 (Rb3) might be analogous to a third dwarfing QTL, Dw3, which has not previously been identified. PMID:26826217

  13. A new three-locus model for rootstock-induced dwarfing in apple revealed by genetic mapping of root bark percentage.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Nicola; Harrison, Richard J; Barber-Perez, Nuria; Cascant-Lopez, Emma; Cobo-Medina, Magdalena; Lipska, Marzena; Conde-Ruíz, Rebeca; Brain, Philip; Gregory, Peter J; Fernández-Fernández, Felicidad

    2016-03-01

    Rootstock-induced dwarfing of apple scions revolutionized global apple production during the twentieth century, leading to the development of modern intensive orchards. A high root bark percentage (the percentage of the whole root area constituted by root cortex) has previously been associated with rootstock-induced dwarfing in apple. In this study, the root bark percentage was measured in a full-sib family of ungrafted apple rootstocks and found to be under the control of three loci. Two quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for root bark percentage were found to co-localize to the same genomic regions on chromosome 5 and chromosome 11 previously identified as controlling dwarfing, Dw1 and Dw2, respectively. A third QTL was identified on chromosome 13 in a region that has not been previously associated with dwarfing. The development of closely linked sequence-tagged site markers improved the resolution of allelic classes, thereby allowing the detection of dominance and epistatic interactions between loci, with high root bark percentage only occurring in specific allelic combinations. In addition, we report a significant negative correlation between root bark percentage and stem diameter (an indicator of tree vigour), measured on a clonally propagated grafted subset of the mapping population. The demonstrated link between root bark percentage and rootstock-induced dwarfing of the scion leads us to propose a three-locus model that is able to explain levels of dwarfing from the dwarf 'M.27' to the semi-invigorating rootstock 'M.116'. Moreover, we suggest that the QTL on chromosome 13 (Rb3) might be analogous to a third dwarfing QTL, Dw3, which has not previously been identified. PMID:26826217

  14. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, genetic homogeneity, and mapping of the locus within a 2-cM interval

    SciTech Connect

    Ducros, A.; Alamowitch, S.; Nagy, T.

    1996-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a recently identified autosomal dominant cerebral arteriopathy characterized by the recurrence of subcortical infarcts leading to dementia. A genetic linkage analysis conducted in two large families recently allowed us to map the affected gene on chromosome 19 in a 12-cM interval bracketed by D19S221 and D19S215. In the present study, these first 2 families and 13 additional ones, including a total of 199 potentially informative meiosis, have been genotyped with eight polymorphic markers located between D19S221 and D19S215. All families were linked to chromosome 19. The highest combined lod score (Z{sub max} = 37.24 at {theta} = .01) was obtained with marker D19S841, a new CA{sub n} microsatellite marker that we isolated from chromosome 19 cosmids. The recombinant events observed within these families were used to refine the genetic mapping of CADASIL within a 2-cM interval that is now bracketed by D19S226 and D19S199 on 19p13.1. These data strongly suggest the genetic homogeneity of this recently identified condition and establish the value of its clinical and neuroimaging diagnostic criteria. Besides their importance for the ongoing positional cloning of the CADASIL gene, these data help to refine the genetic mapping of CADASIL relative to familial hemiplegic migraine and hereditary paroxysmal cerebellar ataxia, conditions that we both mapped within the same chromosome 19 region. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Genetic Map Construction and Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) Detection of Six Economic Traits Using an F2 Population of the Hybrid from Saccharina longissima and Saccharina japonica

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Tao; Feng, Rongfang; Liu, Cui; Chi, Shan

    2015-01-01

    Saccharina (Laminaria) is one of the most important economic seaweeds. Previously, four genetic linkage maps of Saccharina have been constructed and five QTLs have been identified. However, they were not enough for its breeding. In this work, Saccharina longissima (♀) and Saccharina japonica (♂), which showed obvious differences in morphology and genetics, were applied in hybridization to yield the F2 mapping population with 102 individuals. Using these 102 F2 hybrids, the genetic linkage map of Saccharina was constructed by MapMaker software based on 37 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), 22 sequence-related amplified polymorphisms (SRAPs) and 139 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) markers. Meanwhile, QTL analysis was performed for six economic traits. The linkage map constructed in this research consisted of 422 marker loci (137 AFLPs, 57 SRAPs and 228 SSRs), which formed 45 linkage groups (LGs) with an average marker space of 7.92 cM; they spanned a total length of 2233.1 cM, covering the whole estimated genome size. A total of 29 QTLs were identified for six economic traits, which explained 1.06 to 64.00% of phenotypic variation, including three QTLs for frond length (FL) and raw weight (RW), five QTLs for frond width (FW), two QTLs for frond fascia width (FFW) and frond thickness (FT), and fourteen QTLs for base shape (BS). The results of this research will improve the breeding efficiency and be beneficial for marker-assisted selection (MAS) schemes in Saccharina breeding. PMID:26010152

  16. Immunological and genetic characterization of 2-deoxygalactose-resistant, galactokinase-deficient mutants of Chinese hamster cells: evidence for structural mutations at the galK locus.

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, B; de Souza, C A; Banville, D; Thirion, J P

    1984-01-01

    Ten independent mutants resistant to 2-deoxygalactose and without any detectable galactokinase activity (null-galactokinase mutations) were isolated from mutagenized Chinese hamster somatic cells. They were analyzed for the presence of serologically cross-reacting material (CRM) with antiserum generated against highly purified Chinese hamster galactokinase. All 10 mutants contain cross-reacting material (i.e., were CRM+), indicating that all the mutations affect the correct expression of a product of the galactokinase structural gene. Complementation analysis among them shows that the 10 mutations fall in one functional genetic unit. PMID:6513922

  17. Genetic mapping of the Batten disease locus (CLN3) to the interval D16S288-D16S383 by analysis of haplotypes and allelic association

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchison, H.M.; O`Rawe, A.M.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1994-07-15

    CLN3, the gene for juvenile-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL) or Batten disease, has been localized by genetic linkage analysis to chromosome 16p between loci D16S297 and D16S57. The authors have now further refined the localization of CLN3 by haplotype analysis using two new microsatellite markers from loci D16S383 and SPN in the D16S297-D16S57 interval on a larger collaborative family resource consisting of 142 JNCL pedigrees. Crossover events in 3 maternal meioses define new flanking markers for CLN3 and localize the gene to the interval at 16p12.1-11.2 between D16S288 and D16S383, which corresponds to a genetic distance of 2.1 cM. Within this interval 4 microsatellite loci are in strong linkage disequilibrium with CLN3, and extended haplotype analysis of the associated alleles indicates that CLN3 is in closest proximity to loci D16S299 and D16S298. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Genetic and Molecular Analyses of Natural Variation Indicate CBF2 as a Candidate Gene for Underlying a Freezing Tolerance Quantitative Trait Locus in Arabidopsis1[w

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Blanco, Carlos; Gomez-Mena, Concepción; Llorente, Francisco; Koornneef, Maarten; Salinas, Julio; Martínez-Zapater, José M.

    2005-01-01

    Natural variation for freezing tolerance is a major component of adaptation and geographic distribution of plant species. However, little is known about the genes and molecular mechanisms that determine its naturally occurring diversity. We have analyzed the intraspecific freezing tolerance variation existent between two geographically distant accessions of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), Cape Verde Islands (Cvi) and Landsberg erecta (Ler). They differed in their freezing tolerance before and after cold acclimation, as well as in the cold acclimation response in relation to photoperiod conditions. Using a quantitative genetic approach, we found that freezing tolerance differences after cold acclimation were determined by seven quantitative trait loci (QTL), named FREEZING TOLERANCE QTL 1 (FTQ1) to FTQ7. FTQ4 was the QTL with the largest effect detected in two photoperiod conditions, while five other FTQ loci behaved as photoperiod dependent. FTQ4 colocated with the tandem repeated genes C-REPEAT BINDING FACTOR 1 (CBF1), CBF2, and CBF3, which encode transcriptional activators involved in the cold acclimation response. The low freezing tolerance of FTQ4-Cvi alleles was associated with a deletion of the promoter region of Cvi CBF2, and with low RNA expression of CBF2 and of several CBF target genes. Genetic complementation of FTQ4-Cvi plants with a CBF2-Ler transgene suggests that such CBF2 allelic variation is the cause of CBF2 misexpression and the molecular basis of FTQ4. PMID:16244146

  19. The HIF1A functional genetic polymorphism at locus +1772 associates with progression to metastatic prostate cancer and refractoriness to hormonal castration.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Avelino; Ribeiro, Ricardo; Príncipe, Paulo; Lobato, Carlos; Pina, Francisco; Maurício, Joaquina; Monteiro, Cátia; Sousa, Hugo; Calais da Silva, F; Lopes, Carlos; Medeiros, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1a) is a key regulator of tumour cell response to hypoxia, orchestrating mechanisms known to be involved in cancer aggressiveness and metastatic behaviour. In this study we sought to evaluate the association of a functional genetic polymorphism in HIF1A with overall and metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) risk and with response to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). The HIF1A +1772 C>T (rs11549465) polymorphism was genotyped, using DNA isolated from peripheral blood, in 1490 male subjects (754 with prostate cancer and 736 controls cancer-free) through Real-Time PCR. A nested group of cancer patients who were eligible for androgen deprivation therapy was followed up. Univariate and multivariate models were used to analyse the response to hormonal treatment and the risk for developing distant metastasis. Age-adjusted odds ratios were calculated to evaluate prostate cancer risk. Our results showed that patients under ADT carrying the HIF1A +1772 T-allele have increased risk for developing distant metastasis (OR, 2.0; 95%CI, 1.1-3.9) and an independent 6-fold increased risk for resistance to ADT after multivariate analysis (OR, 6.0; 95%CI, 2.2-16.8). This polymorphism was not associated with increased risk for being diagnosed with prostate cancer (OR, 0.9; 95%CI, 0.7-1.2). The HIF1A +1772 genetic polymorphism predicts a more aggressive prostate cancer behaviour, supporting the involvement of HIF1a in prostate cancer biological progression and ADT resistance. Molecular profiles using hypoxia markers may help predict clinically relevant prostate cancer and response to ADT.

  20. MEDIATING EFFECTS OF SMOKING AND CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE AIRWAY DISEASE ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CHRNA5-A3 GENETIC LOCUS AND LUNG CANCER RISK

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Spitz, Margaret R.; Amos, Christopher I.; Wilkinson, Anna V.; Wu, Xifeng; Shete, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies of lung cancer have shown that the CHRNA5-A3 region on chromosome 15q24-25.1 is strongly associated with an increased risk of lung cancer and nicotine dependence, and thought to be associated with chronic obstructive airways disease as well. However, it has not been established whether the association between genetic variants and lung cancer risk is a direct one or one mediated by nicotine dependence. Methods In this paper we applied a rigorous statistical approach, mediation analysis, to examine the mediating effect of smoking behavior and self-reported physician-diagnosed emphysema (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]) on the relationship between the CHRNA5-A3 region genetic variant rs1051730 and the risk of lung cancer. Results Our results showed that rs1051730 is directly associated with lung cancer risk, but that it is also associated with lung cancer risk through its effect on both smoking behavior and COPD. Furthermore, we showed that COPD is a mediating phenotype that explains part of the effect of smoking behavior on lung cancer. Our results also suggested that smoking behavior is a mediator of the relationship between rs1051730 and COPD risk. Conclusions Smoking behavior and COPD are mediators of the association between the SNP rs1051730 and the risk of lung cancer. Also, COPD is a mediator of the association between smoking behavior and lung cancer. Finally, smoking behavior also has mediating effects on the association between the SNP and COPD. PMID:20564069

  1. Mendel Meets CSI: Forensic Genotyping as a Method to Teach Genetics & DNA Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurowski, Scotia; Reiss, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a forensic DNA science laboratory exercise for advanced high school and introductory college level biology courses. Students use a commercial genotyping kit and genetic analyzer or gene sequencer to analyze DNA recovered from a fictitious crime scene. DNA profiling and STR genotyping are outlined. DNA extraction, PCR, and…

  2. Parent-offspring conflict and co-adaptation: behavioural ecology meets quantitative genetics.

    PubMed

    Smiseth, Per T; Wright, Jonathan; Kölliker, Mathias

    2008-08-22

    The evolution of the complex and dynamic behavioural interactions between caring parents and their dependent offspring is a major area of research in behavioural ecology and quantitative genetics. While behavioural ecologists examine the evolution of interactions between parents and offspring in the light of parent-offspring conflict and its resolution, quantitative geneticists explore the evolution of such interactions in the light of parent-offspring co-adaptation due to combined effects of parental and offspring behaviours on fitness. To date, there is little interaction or integration between these two fields. Here, we first review the merits and limitations of each of these two approaches and show that they provide important complementary insights into the evolution of strategies for offspring begging and parental resource provisioning. We then outline how central ideas from behavioural ecology and quantitative genetics can be combined within a framework based on the concept of behavioural reaction norms, which provides a common basis for behavioural ecologists and quantitative geneticists to study the evolution of parent-offspring interactions. Finally, we discuss how the behavioural reaction norm approach can be used to advance our understanding of parent-offspring conflict by combining information about the genetic basis of traits from quantitative genetics with key insights regarding the adaptive function and dynamic nature of parental and offspring behaviours from behavioural ecology.

  3. Natural Product Chemistry Meets Genetics: When is a Genotype a Chemotype?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemotype of a microbial or plant species has traditionally been defined as its profile of natural products, and the genotype as its genetic constitution or DNA sequence. The purpose of this perspective is to discuss applications of DNA genotyping, particularly by PCR-amplification methods, to ...

  4. Association of DNA Methylation at CPT1A Locus with Metabolic Syndrome in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN) Study.

    PubMed

    Das, Mithun; Sha, Jin; Hidalgo, Bertha; Aslibekyan, Stella; Do, Anh N; Zhi, Degui; Sun, Dianjianyi; Zhang, Tao; Li, Shengxu; Chen, Wei; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Tiwari, Hemant K; Absher, Devin; Ordovas, Jose M; Berenson, Gerald S; Arnett, Donna K; Irvin, Marguerite R

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we conducted an epigenome-wide association study of metabolic syndrome (MetS) among 846 participants of European descent in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN). DNA was isolated from CD4+ T cells and methylation at ~470,000 cytosine-phosphate-guanine dinucleotide (CpG) pairs was assayed using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. We modeled the percentage methylation at individual CpGs as a function of MetS using linear mixed models. A Bonferroni-corrected P-value of 1.1 x 10(-7) was considered significant. Methylation at two CpG sites in CPT1A on chromosome 11 was significantly associated with MetS (P for cg00574958 = 2.6x10(-14) and P for cg17058475 = 1.2x10(-9)). Significant associations were replicated in both European and African ancestry participants of the Bogalusa Heart Study. Our findings suggest that methylation in CPT1A is a promising epigenetic marker for MetS risk which could become useful as a treatment target in the future. PMID:26808626

  5. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  6. Gene therapy for inherited muscle diseases: where genetics meets rehabilitation medicine.

    PubMed

    Braun, Robynne; Wang, Zejing; Mack, David L; Childers, Martin K

    2014-11-01

    The development of clinical vectors to correct genetic mutations that cause inherited myopathies and related disorders of skeletal muscle is advancing at an impressive rate. Adeno-associated virus vectors are attractive for clinical use because (1) adeno-associated viruses do not cause human disease and (2) these vectors are able to persist for years. New vectors are now becoming available as gene therapy delivery tools, and recent preclinical experiments have demonstrated the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of gene therapy with adeno-associated virus for long-term correction of muscle pathology and weakness in myotubularin-deficient canine and murine disease models. In this review, recent advances in the application of gene therapies to treat inherited muscle disorders are presented, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy and x-linked myotubular myopathy. Potential areas for therapeutic synergies between rehabilitation medicine and genetics are also discussed.

  7. Human high-altitude adaptation: forward genetics meets the HIF pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bigham, Abigail W.

    2014-01-01

    Humans have adapted to the chronic hypoxia of high altitude in several locations, and recent genome-wide studies have indicated a genetic basis. In some populations, genetic signatures have been identified in the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway, which orchestrates the transcriptional response to hypoxia. In Tibetans, they have been found in the HIF2A (EPAS1) gene, which encodes for HIF-2α, and the prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2, also known as EGLN1) gene, which encodes for one of its key regulators, PHD2. High-altitude adaptation may be due to multiple genes that act in concert with one another. Unraveling their mechanism of action can offer new therapeutic approaches toward treating common human diseases characterized by chronic hypoxia. PMID:25319824

  8. Genetic Counseling

    MedlinePlus

    Genetic counseling provides information and support to people who have, or may be at risk for, genetic disorders. A ... meets with you to discuss genetic risks. The counseling may be for yourself or a family member. ...

  9. Tetralogy of Fallot and Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome – Complex Clinical Phenotypes Meet Complex Genetic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lahm, Harald; Schön, Patric; Doppler, Stefanie; Dreßen, Martina; Cleuziou, Julie; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Ewert, Peter; Lange, Rüdiger; Krane, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In many cases congenital heart disease (CHD) is represented by a complex phenotype and an array of several functional and morphological cardiac disorders. These malformations will be briefly summarized in the first part focusing on two severe CHD phenotypes, hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). In most cases of CHD the genetic origin remains largely unknown, though the complexity of the clinical picture strongly argues against a dysregulation which can be attributed to a single candidate gene but rather suggests a multifaceted polygenetic origin with elaborate interactions. Consistent with this idea, genome-wide approaches using whole exome sequencing, comparative sequence analysis of multiplex families to identify de novo mutations and global technologies to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms, copy number variants, dysregulation of the transcriptome and epigenetic variations have been conducted to obtain information about genetic alterations and potential predispositions possibly linked to the occurrence of a CHD phenotype. In the second part of this review we will summarize and discuss the available literature on identified genetic alterations linked to TOF and HLHS. PMID:26069455

  10. Development of a Multiple-Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Typing Scheme for Genetic Fingerprinting of Burkholderia cenocepacia and Application to Nationwide Epidemiological Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thouverez, Michelle; Barthe, Antoine; Bossuet-Greif, Nadège; Tisseyre, Lenka; Plésiat, Patrick; Vergnaud, Gilles; Chabanon, Gérard; Pourcel, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Organisms of the Burkholderia cepacia complex are especially important pathogens in cystic fibrosis (CF), with a propensity for patient-to-patient spread and long-term respiratory colonization. B. cenocepacia and Burkholderia multivorans account for the majority of infections in CF, and major epidemic clones have been recognized throughout the world. The aim of the present study was to develop and evaluate a multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) scheme for B. cenocepacia. Potential VNTR loci were identified upon analysis of the annotated genome sequences of B. cenocepacia strains AU1054, J2315, and MCO-3, and 10 of them were selected on the basis of polymorphisms and size. A collection of 100 B. cenocepacia strains, including epidemiologically related and unrelated strains, as well as representatives of the major epidemic lineages, was used to evaluate typeability, epidemiological concordance, and the discriminatory power of MLVA-10 compared with those of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Longitudinal stability was assessed by testing 39 successive isolates from 14 patients. Typeability ranged from 0.91 to 1, except for that of one marker, which was not amplified in 53% of the B. cenocepacia IIIA strains. The MLVA types were shown to be stable in chronically colonized patients and within outbreak-related strains, with excellent epidemiological concordance. Epidemic and/or globally distributed lineages (epidemic Edinburgh-Toronto electrophoretic type 12 [ET-12], sequence type 32 [ST-32], ST-122, ST-234, and ST-241) were successfully identified. Conversely, the discriminatory power of MLVA was lower than that of PFGE or MLST, although PFGE variations within the epidemic lineages sometimes masked their genetic relatedness. In conclusion, MLVA represents a promising cost-effective first-line tool in B. cenocepacia surveillance. PMID:25411181

  11. Development of a multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat typing scheme for genetic fingerprinting of Burkholderia cenocepacia and application to nationwide epidemiological analysis.

    PubMed

    Segonds, Christine; Thouverez, Michelle; Barthe, Antoine; Bossuet-Greif, Nadège; Tisseyre, Lenka; Plésiat, Patrick; Vergnaud, Gilles; Chabanon, Gérard; Pourcel, Christine

    2015-02-01

    Organisms of the Burkholderia cepacia complex are especially important pathogens in cystic fibrosis (CF), with a propensity for patient-to-patient spread and long-term respiratory colonization. B. cenocepacia and Burkholderia multivorans account for the majority of infections in CF, and major epidemic clones have been recognized throughout the world. The aim of the present study was to develop and evaluate a multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) scheme for B. cenocepacia. Potential VNTR loci were identified upon analysis of the annotated genome sequences of B. cenocepacia strains AU1054, J2315, and MCO-3, and 10 of them were selected on the basis of polymorphisms and size. A collection of 100 B. cenocepacia strains, including epidemiologically related and unrelated strains, as well as representatives of the major epidemic lineages, was used to evaluate typeability, epidemiological concordance, and the discriminatory power of MLVA-10 compared with those of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Longitudinal stability was assessed by testing 39 successive isolates from 14 patients. Typeability ranged from 0.91 to 1, except for that of one marker, which was not amplified in 53% of the B. cenocepacia IIIA strains. The MLVA types were shown to be stable in chronically colonized patients and within outbreak-related strains, with excellent epidemiological concordance. Epidemic and/or globally distributed lineages (epidemic Edinburgh-Toronto electrophoretic type 12 [ET-12], sequence type 32 [ST-32], ST-122, ST-234, and ST-241) were successfully identified. Conversely, the discriminatory power of MLVA was lower than that of PFGE or MLST, although PFGE variations within the epidemic lineages sometimes masked their genetic relatedness. In conclusion, MLVA represents a promising cost-effective first-line tool in B. cenocepacia surveillance.

  12. Monster potential meets potential monster: pros and cons of deploying genetically modified microalgae for biofuels production

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, K. J.; Mitra, A.; Greenwell, H. C.; Sui, J.

    2013-01-01

    Biofuels production from microalgae attracts much attention but remains an unproven technology. We explore routes to enhance production through modifications to a range of generic microalgal physiological characteristics. Our analysis shows that biofuels production may be enhanced ca fivefold through genetic modification (GM) of factors affecting growth rate, respiration, photoacclimation, photosynthesis efficiency and the minimum cell quotas for nitrogen and phosphorous (N : C and P : C). However, simulations indicate that the ideal GM microalgae for commercial deployment could, on escape to the environment, become a harmful algal bloom species par excellence, with attendant risks to ecosystems and livelihoods. In large measure, this is because an organism able to produce carbohydrate and/or lipid at high rates, providing stock metabolites for biofuels production, will also be able to attain a stoichiometric composition that will be far from optimal as food for the support of zooplankton growth. This composition could suppress or even halt the grazing activity that would otherwise control the microalgal growth in nature. In consequence, we recommend that the genetic manipulation of microalgae, with inherent consequences on a scale comparable to geoengineering, should be considered under strict international regulation. PMID:24427510

  13. Monster potential meets potential monster: pros and cons of deploying genetically modified microalgae for biofuels production.

    PubMed

    Flynn, K J; Mitra, A; Greenwell, H C; Sui, J

    2013-02-01

    Biofuels production from microalgae attracts much attention but remains an unproven technology. We explore routes to enhance production through modifications to a range of generic microalgal physiological characteristics. Our analysis shows that biofuels production may be enhanced ca fivefold through genetic modification (GM) of factors affecting growth rate, respiration, photoacclimation, photosynthesis efficiency and the minimum cell quotas for nitrogen and phosphorous (N : C and P : C). However, simulations indicate that the ideal GM microalgae for commercial deployment could, on escape to the environment, become a harmful algal bloom species par excellence, with attendant risks to ecosystems and livelihoods. In large measure, this is because an organism able to produce carbohydrate and/or lipid at high rates, providing stock metabolites for biofuels production, will also be able to attain a stoichiometric composition that will be far from optimal as food for the support of zooplankton growth. This composition could suppress or even halt the grazing activity that would otherwise control the microalgal growth in nature. In consequence, we recommend that the genetic manipulation of microalgae, with inherent consequences on a scale comparable to geoengineering, should be considered under strict international regulation.

  14. Recommendations from a meeting on health implications of genetically modified organism (GMO).

    PubMed

    Amofah, George

    2014-06-01

    The Ghana Public Health Association organized a scientific seminar to examine the introduction of genetically modified organisms into public use and the health consequences. The seminar was driven by current public debate on the subject. The seminar identified some of the advantages of GMOs and also the health concerns. It is clear that there is the need to enhance local capacity to research the introduction and use of GMOs; to put in place appropriate regulatory mechanisms including particularly the labeling of GMO products and post-marketing surveillance for possible negative health consequences in the long term. Furthermore the appropriate state agency should put in place advocacy strategies to keep the public informed about GMOs. PMID:25667561

  15. Recommendations from a meeting on health implications of genetically modified organism (GMO).

    PubMed

    Amofah, George

    2014-06-01

    The Ghana Public Health Association organized a scientific seminar to examine the introduction of genetically modified organisms into public use and the health consequences. The seminar was driven by current public debate on the subject. The seminar identified some of the advantages of GMOs and also the health concerns. It is clear that there is the need to enhance local capacity to research the introduction and use of GMOs; to put in place appropriate regulatory mechanisms including particularly the labeling of GMO products and post-marketing surveillance for possible negative health consequences in the long term. Furthermore the appropriate state agency should put in place advocacy strategies to keep the public informed about GMOs.

  16. When Darwin meets Lorenz: Evolving new chaotic attractors through genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Indranil; Das, Saptarshi

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel methodology for automatically finding new chaotic attractors through a computational intelligence technique known as multi-gene genetic programming (MGGP). We apply this technique to the case of the Lorenz attractor and evolve several new chaotic attractors based on the basic Lorenz template. The MGGP algorithm automatically finds new nonlinear expressions for the different state variables starting from the original Lorenz system. The Lyapunov exponents of each of the attractors are calculated numerically based on the time series of the state variables using time delay embedding techniques. The MGGP algorithm tries to search the functional space of the attractors by aiming to maximise the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) of the evolved attractors. To demonstrate the potential of the proposed methodology, we report over one hundred new chaotic attractor structures along with their parameters, which are evolved from just the Lorenz system alone.

  17. Report on the 6th African Society of Human Genetics (AfSHG) Meeting, March 12–15, 2009, Yaoundé, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Sirugo, Giorgio; Williams, Scott M.; Royal, Charmaine D. M.; Newport, Melanie J.; Hennig, Branwen J.; Mariani-Costantini, Renato; Buonaguro, Franco M.; Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Ibrahim, Muntaser; Soodyall, Himla; Wonkam, Ambroise; Ramesar, Raj; Rotimi, Charles N.

    2010-01-01

    The African Society of Human Genetics (AfSHG), founded in 2003 with its inaugural meeting in Accra, Ghana,1 has the stated missions of (1) disseminating information about human genetics research in Africa, (2) establishing a mentorship network providing educational resources, including the development of appropriate technology transfer, (3) providing advocacy for human genetic research in Africa, and (4) encouraging collaborative research. Despite its young age, the AfSHG has developed a strong cadre of active researchers, both within and outside of Africa, with more than 400 members (from 16 countries across Africa as well as 8 other countries), and has held six successful meetings, five in Africa and one in the United States. PMID:20682860

  18. History of the discovery of a master locus producing piRNAs: the flamenco/COM locus in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Goriaux, Coline; Théron, Emmanuelle; Brasset, Emilie; Vaury, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of transposable elements (TEs) in the 1950s by B. McClintock implied the existence of cellular regulatory systems controlling TE activity. The discovery of flamenco (flam) an heterochromatic locus from Drosophila melanogaster and its ability to survey several TEs such as gypsy, ZAM, and Idefix contributed to peer deeply into the mechanisms of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of TEs. flam was the first cluster producing small RNAs to be discovered long before RNAi pathways were identified in 1998. As a result of the detailed genetic analyses performed by certain laboratories and of the sophisticated genetic tools they developed, this locus has played a major role in our understanding of piRNA mediated TE repression in animals. Here we review the first discovery of this locus and retrace decades of studies that led to our current understanding of the relationship between genomes and their TE targets. PMID:25136352

  19. History of the discovery of a master locus producing piRNAs: the flamenco/COM locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Coline, Goriaux; Théron, Emmanuelle; Brasset, Emilie; Vaury, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of transposable elements (TEs) in the 1950s by B. McClintock implied the existence of cellular regulatory systems controlling TE activity. The discovery of flamenco (flam) an heterochromatic locus from Drosophila melanogaster and its ability to survey several TEs such as gypsy, ZAM, and Idefix contributed to peer deeply into the mechanisms of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of TEs. flam was the first cluster producing small RNAs to be discovered long before RNAi pathways were identified in 1998. As a result of the detailed genetic analyses performed by certain laboratories and of the sophisticated genetic tools they developed, this locus has played a major role in our understanding of piRNA mediated TE repression in animals. Here we review the first discovery of this locus and retrace decades of studies that led to our current understanding of the relationship between genomes and their TE targets. PMID:25136352

  20. A highly polymorphic STR locus in Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hsing-Mei; Hou, Rur-Jyun; Tsai, Li-Chin; Wei, Chih-Sheng; Liu, Su-Wen; Huang, Li-Hung; Kuo, Yi-Chen; Linacre, Adrian; Lee, James Chun-I

    2003-01-01

    We report on the first short tandem repeat (STR) locus to be isolated from the plant Cannabis sativa. The STR locus, isolated by a hybrid-capture enrichment procedure, was found to contain a simple sequence repeat motif of 6 bp. This 6 bp repeat motif showed no variation in repeat length but with minor variations in repeat unit sequences. The data show the locus to be highly polymorphic with the number of repeat units ranging from 3 to 40 in 108 screened samples. The observed heterozygosity was approximately 87.04%. The forward and reverse primers (CS1F and CS1R) produced no PCR products in cross-reaction study from 20 species of plants, including highly related species such as Humulus japonicus and Nicotiana tabacum. This hexanucleotide repeat DNA locus could be used to identify cannabis samples and predict their genetic relationship as the test is specific to C. sativa and is highly reproducible.

  1. Tension versus ecological zones in a two-locus system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin-Sheng

    2005-08-01

    Previous theories show that tension and ecological zones are indistinguishable in terms of gene frequency clines. Here I analytically show that these two types of zones can be distinguished in terms of genetic statistics other than gene frequency. A two-locus cline model is examined with the assumptions of random mating, weak selection, no drift, no mutation, and multiplicative viabilities. The genetic statistics for distinguishing the two types of zones are the deviations of one- or two-locus genotypic frequencies from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) or from random association of gametes (RAG), and the deviations of additive and dominance variances from the values at HWE. These deviations have a discontinuous distribution in space and different extents of interruptions in the ecological zone with a sharp boundary, but exhibit a continuous distribution in the tension zone. Linkage disequilibrium enhances the difference between the deviations from HWE and from RAG for any two-locus genotypic frequency.

  2. Two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS)

    SciTech Connect

    Tienari, P.J. Univ. of Helsinki ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. ); Palo, J. ); Peltonen, L. )

    1994-01-15

    One of the major challenges in genetic linkage analyses is the study of complex diseases. The authors demonstrate here the use of two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS), a multifactorial disease with a complex mode of inheritance. In a set of Finnish multiplex families, they have previously found evidence for linkage between MS susceptibility and two independent loci, the myelin basic protein gene (MBP) on chromosome 18 and the HLA complex on chromosome 6. This set of families provides a unique opportunity to perform linkage analysis conditional on two loci contributing to the disease. In the two-trait-locus/two-marker-locus analysis, the presence of another disease locus is parametrized and the analysis more appropriately treats information from the unaffected family member than single-disease-locus analysis. As exemplified here in MS, the two-locus analysis can be a powerful method for investigating susceptibility loci in complex traits, best suited for analysis of specific candidate genes, or for situations in which preliminary evidence for linkage already exists or is suggested. 41 refs., 6 tabs.

  3. Identifying a novel locus for psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Budu-Aggrey, Ashley; Bowes, John

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have identified genetic risk loci for PsA, the majority of which also confer risk for psoriasis. The stronger heritability of PsA in comparison with psoriasis suggests that there should be risk loci that are specific for PsA. Identifying such loci could potentially inform therapy development to provide more effective treatments for PsA patients, especially with a considerable proportion being non-responsive to current therapies. Evidence of a PsA-specific locus has been previously found at HLA-B27 within the MHC region. A recent study has provided evidence of non-HLA risk loci that are specific for PsA at IL23R, PTPN22 and on chromosome 5q31. Functional characterization of these loci will provide further understanding of the pathways underlying PsA, and enable us to apply genetic findings for patient benefit. PMID:26255310

  4. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  5. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  6. The Genetics of Dopa Decarboxylase in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER I. Isolation and Characterization of Deficiencies That Delete the Dopa-Decarboxylase-Dosage-Sensitive Region and the α-Methyl-Dopa-Hypersensitive Locus

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Theodore R. F.; Hodgetts, Ross B.; Sherald, Allen F.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed cytogenetic investigation of 16 overlapping deficiencies in the 36C-40A region on the left arm of the second chromosome (2L) in Drosophila melanogaster is reported. These deficiencies permit a localization of both the dopa-decarboxylase-dosage-sensitive region and the α-methyl-dopa-hypersensitive locus, l(2)amd, to the same region, 37B10-37C7. PMID:826447

  7. 75 FR 62406 - Plan To Develop a Genetic Testing Registry at the National Institutes of Health; Public Meeting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ....m. Location: The public meeting will be held at the Walter E. Johnson Convention Center, Room 147... accommodations: Anyone planning to attend the meeting who needs special assistance, such as sign language... requests by e-mail to cfomous@od.nih.gov ; by fax to 301-496-9839; or via postal service to Cathy...

  8. IFPA meeting 2014 workshop report: Animal models to study pregnancy pathologies; new approaches to study human placental exposure to xenobiotics; biomarkers of pregnancy pathologies; placental genetics and epigenetics; the placenta and stillbirth and fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Barbaux, S; Erwich, J J H M; Favaron, P O; Gil, S; Gallot, D; Golos, T G; Gonzalez-Bulnes, A; Guibourdenche, J; Heazell, A E P; Jansson, T; Laprévote, O; Lewis, R M; Miller, R K; Monk, D; Novakovic, B; Oudejans, C; Parast, M; Peugnet, P; Pfarrer, C; Pinar, H; Roberts, C T; Robinson, W; Saffery, R; Salomon, C; Sexton, A; Staff, A C; Suter, M; Tarrade, A; Wallace, J; Vaillancourt, C; Vaiman, D; Worton, S A; Lash, G E

    2015-04-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2014 there were six themed workshops, five of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to various aspects of placental biology but collectively covered areas of animal models, xenobiotics, pathological biomarkers, genetics and epigenetics, and stillbirth and fetal growth restriction.

  9. Santorini mutation detection meeting 2011: rapid advance in sequencing technology poses challenges for interpretation of genetic variations.

    PubMed

    Stavrou, Eleana F; Goriely, Anne

    2012-10-01

    The 11th International Symposium on Mutations in the Genome was held on 6-10 June, 2011, in Santorini, Greece. Meeting participants described novel detection technologies, rapid advances in whole genome and whole-exome sequencing, but also highlighted the urgent need for the development of sequence variation databases and the clinical interpretation of the genomic data. This report summarizes some of the major themes presented during the meeting.

  10. A locus necessary for the transport and catabolism of erythritol in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Barney A; Pickering, Brad S; Poysti, Nathan J; Collins, Heather; Yudistira, Harry; Oresnik, Ivan J

    2010-10-01

    In this work we have genetically defined an erythritol utilization locus in Sinorhizobium meliloti. A cosmid containing the locus was isolated by complementation of a transposon mutant and was subsequently mutagenized using Tn5 : : B20. The locus was found to consist of five transcriptional units, each of which was necessary for the utilization of erythritol. Genetic complementation experiments using genes putatively annotated as erythritol catabolic genes clearly showed that, of the 17 genes at this locus, six genes are not necessary for the utilization of erythritol as a sole carbon source. The remaining genes encode EryA, EryB, EryC and TpiB as well as an uncharacterized ABC-type transporter. Transport experiments using labelled erythritol showed that components of the ABC transporter are necessary for the uptake of erythritol. The locus also contains two regulators: EryD, a SorC class regulator, and SMc01615, a DeoR class regulator. Quantitative RT-PCR experiments showed that each of these regulators negatively regulates its own transcription. In addition, induction of the erythritol locus was dependent upon EryD and a product of erythritol catabolism. Further characterization of polar mutations revealed that in addition to erythritol, the locus contains determinants for adonitol and l-arabitol utilization. The context of the mutations suggests that the locus is important for both the transport and catabolism of adonitol and l-arabitol.

  11. Discriminating among single locus models using small pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Beaty, T H

    1980-01-01

    Simulated small pedigrees (2 parents, 4 offspring) were used to illustrate the applications and limitations of a "model choice" approach designed to detect genetic heterogeneity in familial diseases. While it is possible to identify groups of pedigrees which have different genetic causes for quanitative phenotypic trait(s), theoretical limitations on discriminating between 4 single locus models exist for certain pedigree structures. These limitations originate from the overlapping phenotypic predictions of the various genetic models. Such limitations must be carefully considered in the design of genetic studies. Studies aimed at detecting genetic heterogeneity in familial diseases should limit the different genetic models being considered and tailor the sampling strategy to avoid collecting pedigrees which are non-informative for certain comparisons. PMID:7424975

  12. Next-generation sequencing meets genetic diagnostics: development of a comprehensive workflow for the analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes

    PubMed Central

    Feliubadaló, Lídia; Lopez-Doriga, Adriana; Castellsagué, Ester; del Valle, Jesús; Menéndez, Mireia; Tornero, Eva; Montes, Eva; Cuesta, Raquel; Gómez, Carolina; Campos, Olga; Pineda, Marta; González, Sara; Moreno, Victor; Brunet, Joan; Blanco, Ignacio; Serra, Eduard; Capellá, Gabriel; Lázaro, Conxi

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is changing genetic diagnosis due to its huge sequencing capacity and cost-effectiveness. The aim of this study was to develop an NGS-based workflow for routine diagnostics for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOCS), to improve genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2. A NGS-based workflow was designed using BRCA MASTR kit amplicon libraries followed by GS Junior pyrosequencing. Data analysis combined Variant Identification Pipeline freely available software and ad hoc R scripts, including a cascade of filters to generate coverage and variant calling reports. A BRCA homopolymer assay was performed in parallel. A research scheme was designed in two parts. A Training Set of 28 DNA samples containing 23 unique pathogenic mutations and 213 other variants (33 unique) was used. The workflow was validated in a set of 14 samples from HBOCS families in parallel with the current diagnostic workflow (Validation Set). The NGS-based workflow developed permitted the identification of all pathogenic mutations and genetic variants, including those located in or close to homopolymers. The use of NGS for detecting copy-number alterations was also investigated. The workflow meets the sensitivity and specificity requirements for the genetic diagnosis of HBOCS and improves on the cost-effectiveness of current approaches. PMID:23249957

  13. Inferring relationships between pairs of individuals from locus heterozygosities

    PubMed Central

    Presciuttini, Silvano; Toni, Chiara; Tempestini, Elena; Verdiani, Simonetta; Casarino, Lucia; Spinetti, Isabella; Stefano, Francesco De; Domenici, Ranieri; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E

    2002-01-01

    Background The traditional exact method for inferring relationships between individuals from genetic data is not easily applicable in all situations that may be encountered in several fields of applied genetics. This study describes an approach that gives affordable results and is easily applicable; it is based on the probabilities that two individuals share 0, 1 or both alleles at a locus identical by state. Results We show that these probabilities (zi) depend on locus heterozygosity (H), and are scarcely affected by variation of the distribution of allele frequencies. This allows us to obtain empirical curves relating zi's to H for a series of common relationships, so that the likelihood ratio of a pair of relationships between any two individuals, given their genotypes at a locus, is a function of a single parameter, H. Application to large samples of mother-child and full-sib pairs shows that the statistical power of this method to infer the correct relationship is not much lower than the exact method. Analysis of a large database of STR data proves that locus heterozygosity does not vary significantly among Caucasian populations, apart from special cases, so that the likelihood ratio of the more common relationships between pairs of individuals may be obtained by looking at tabulated zi values. Conclusions A simple method is provided, which may be used by any scientist with the help of a calculator or a spreadsheet to compute the likelihood ratios of common alternative relationships between pairs of individuals. PMID:12441003

  14. Development of self-compatible B. rapa by RNAi-mediated S locus gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hee-Jeong; Jung, Hyo-Jin; Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Park, Jong-In; Kang, Kwon-Kyoo; Hur, Yoonkang; Lim, Yong-Pyo; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2012-01-01

    The self-incompatibility (SI) system is genetically controlled by a single polymorphic locus known as the S-locus in the Brassicaceae. Pollen rejection occurs when the stigma and pollen share the same S-haplotype. Recognition of S-haplotype specificity has recently been shown to involve at least two S-locus genes, S-receptor kinase (SRK) and S-locus protein 11 or S locus Cysteine-rich (SP11/SCR) protein. Here, we examined the function of S(60), one SP11/SCR allele of B. rapa cv. Osome, using a RNAi-mediated gene silencing approach. The transgenic RNAi lines were highly self-compatible, and this trait was stable in subsequent generations, even after crossing with other commercial lines. These findings also suggested that the resultant self-compatibility could be transferred to commercial cultivars with the desired performances in B. rapa.

  15. Development of Self-Compatible B. rapa by RNAi-Mediated S Locus Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hee-Jeong; Jung, Hyo-Jin; Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Park, Jong-In; Kang, Kwon-Kyoo; Hur, Yoonkang; Lim, Yong-Pyo; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2012-01-01

    The self-incompatibility (SI) system is genetically controlled by a single polymorphic locus known as the S-locus in the Brassicaceae. Pollen rejection occurs when the stigma and pollen share the same S-haplotype. Recognition of S-haplotype specificity has recently been shown to involve at least two S-locus genes, S-receptor kinase (SRK) and S-locus protein 11 or S locus Cysteine-rich (SP11/SCR) protein. Here, we examined the function of S60, one SP11/SCR allele of B. rapa cv. Osome, using a RNAi-mediated gene silencing approach. The transgenic RNAi lines were highly self-compatible, and this trait was stable in subsequent generations, even after crossing with other commercial lines. These findings also suggested that the resultant self-compatibility could be transferred to commercial cultivars with the desired performances in B. rapa. PMID:23145180

  16. Locus-specific view of flax domestication history.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yong-Bi; Diederichsen, Axel; Allaby, Robin G

    2012-01-01

    Crop domestication has been inferred genetically from neutral markers and increasingly from specific domestication-associated loci. However, some crops are utilized for multiple purposes that may or may not be reflected in a single domestication-associated locus. One such example is cultivated flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), the earliest oil and fiber crop, for which domestication history remains poorly understood. Oil composition of cultivated flax and pale flax (L. bienne Mill.) indicates that the sad2 locus is a candidate domestication locus associated with increased unsaturated fatty acid production in cultivated flax. A phylogenetic analysis of the sad2 locus in 43 pale and 70 cultivated flax accessions established a complex domestication history for flax that has not been observed previously. The analysis supports an early, independent domestication of a primitive flax lineage, in which the loss of seed dispersal through capsular indehiscence was not established, but increased oil content was likely occurred. A subsequent flax domestication process occurred that probably involved multiple domestications and includes lineages that contain oil, fiber, and winter varieties. In agreement with previous studies, oil rather than fiber varieties occupy basal phylogenetic positions. The data support multiple paths of flax domestication for oil-associated traits before selection of the other domestication-associated traits of seed dispersal loss and fiber production. The sad2 locus is less revealing about the origin of winter tolerance. In this case, a single domestication-associated locus is informative about the history of domesticated forms with the associated trait while partially informative on forms less associated with the trait.

  17. Genomic characterization of the Atlantic cod sex-locus.

    PubMed

    Star, Bastiaan; Tørresen, Ole K; Nederbragt, Alexander J; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Pampoulie, Christophe; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    A variety of sex determination mechanisms can be observed in evolutionary divergent teleosts. Sex determination is genetic in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), however the genomic location or size of its sex-locus is unknown. Here, we characterize the sex-locus of Atlantic cod using whole genome sequence (WGS) data of 227 wild-caught specimens. Analyzing more than 55 million polymorphic loci, we identify 166 loci that are associated with sex. These loci are located in six distinct regions on five different linkage groups (LG) in the genome. The largest of these regions, an approximately 55 Kb region on LG11, contains the majority of genotypes that segregate closely according to a XX-XY system. Genotypes in this region can be used genetically determine sex, whereas those in the other regions are inconsistently sex-linked. The identified region on LG11 and its surrounding genes have no clear sequence homology with genes or regulatory elements associated with sex-determination or differentiation in other species. The functionality of this sex-locus therefore remains unknown. The WGS strategy used here proved adequate for detecting the small regions associated with sex in this species. Our results highlight the evolutionary flexibility in genomic architecture underlying teleost sex-determination and allow practical applications to genetically sex Atlantic cod. PMID:27499266

  18. Genomic characterization of the Atlantic cod sex-locus

    PubMed Central

    Star, Bastiaan; Tørresen, Ole K.; Nederbragt, Alexander J.; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.; Pampoulie, Christophe; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    A variety of sex determination mechanisms can be observed in evolutionary divergent teleosts. Sex determination is genetic in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), however the genomic location or size of its sex-locus is unknown. Here, we characterize the sex-locus of Atlantic cod using whole genome sequence (WGS) data of 227 wild-caught specimens. Analyzing more than 55 million polymorphic loci, we identify 166 loci that are associated with sex. These loci are located in six distinct regions on five different linkage groups (LG) in the genome. The largest of these regions, an approximately 55 Kb region on LG11, contains the majority of genotypes that segregate closely according to a XX-XY system. Genotypes in this region can be used genetically determine sex, whereas those in the other regions are inconsistently sex-linked. The identified region on LG11 and its surrounding genes have no clear sequence homology with genes or regulatory elements associated with sex-determination or differentiation in other species. The functionality of this sex-locus therefore remains unknown. The WGS strategy used here proved adequate for detecting the small regions associated with sex in this species. Our results highlight the evolutionary flexibility in genomic architecture underlying teleost sex-determination and allow practical applications to genetically sex Atlantic cod. PMID:27499266

  19. A second locus for Rieger syndrome maps to chromosome 13q14.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J. C.; del Bono, E. A.; Haines, J. L.; Pralea, A. M.; Cohen, J. S.; Greff, L. J.; Wiggs, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    Rieger syndrome is a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous disorder typically characterized by malformations of the eyes, teeth, and umbilicus. The syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and exhibits significant variable expressivity. One locus associated with this disorder has been mapped to 4q25. Using a large four-generation pedigree, we have identified a second locus for Rieger syndrome located on chromosome 13q14. PMID:8751862

  20. Heterotic Trait Locus (HTL) Mapping Identifies Intra-Locus Interactions That Underlie Reproductive Hybrid Vigor in Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Israel, Imri; Kilian, Benjamin; Nida, Habte; Fridman, Eyal

    2012-01-01

    Identifying intra-locus interactions underlying heterotic variation among whole-genome hybrids is a key to understanding mechanisms of heterosis and exploiting it for crop and livestock improvement. In this study, we present the development and first use of the heterotic trait locus (HTL) mapping approach to associate specific intra-locus interactions with an overdominant heterotic mode of inheritance in a diallel population using Sorghum bicolor as the model. This method combines the advantages of ample genetic diversity and the possibility of studying non-additive inheritance. Furthermore, this design enables dissecting the latter to identify specific intra-locus interactions. We identified three HTLs (3.5% of loci tested) with synergistic intra-locus effects on overdominant grain yield heterosis in 2 years of field trials. These loci account for 19.0% of the heterotic variation, including a significant interaction found between two of them. Moreover, analysis of one of these loci (hDPW4.1) in a consecutive F2 population confirmed a significant 21% increase in grain yield of heterozygous vs. homozygous plants in this locus. Notably, two of the three HTLs for grain yield are in synteny with previously reported overdominant quantitative trait loci for grain yield in maize. A mechanism for the reproductive heterosis found in this study is suggested, in which grain yield increase is achieved by releasing the compensatory tradeoffs between biomass and reproductive output, and between seed number and weight. These results highlight the power of analyzing a diverse set of inbreds and their hybrids for unraveling hitherto unknown allelic interactions mediating heterosis. PMID:22761720

  1. Locus of Control and Status Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensman, Miriam Roza; Haller, Archibald O.

    Utilizing data derived from 277 rural, male respondents initially enrolled in Lenawee County, Michigan high schools, the Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale was employed to test the hypothesis that locus of control will have interactive rather than additive effects on the process of status attainment. Locus of control was defined as…

  2. Molecular Mapping of the ROSY Locus in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Coté, Babette; Bender, Welcome; Curtis, Daniel; Chovnick, Arthur

    1986-01-01

    The DNA from the chromosomal region of the Drosophila rosy locus has been examined in 83 rosy mutant strains. Several spontaneous and radiation-induced alleles were associated with insertions and deletions, respectively. The lesions are clustered in a 4-kb region. Some of the alleles identified on the DNA map have been located on the genetic map by fine-structure recombination experiments. The genetic and molecular maps are collinear, and the alignment identifies the DNA location of the rosy control region. A rosy RNA of 4.5 kb has been identified; its 5' end lies in or near the control region. PMID:2420682

  3. Exploring Genetic Diversity in Plants Using High-Throughput Sequencing Techniques.

    PubMed

    Onda, Yoshihiko; Mochida, Keiichi

    2016-08-01

    Food security has emerged as an urgent concern because of the rising world population. To meet the food demands of the near future, it is required to improve the productivity of various crops, not just of staple food crops. The genetic diversity among plant populations in a given species allows the plants to adapt to various environmental conditions. Such diversity could therefore yield valuable traits that could overcome the food-security challenges. To explore genetic diversity comprehensively and to rapidly identify useful genes and/or allele, advanced high-throughput sequencing techniques, also called next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, have been developed. These provide practical solutions to the challenges in crop genomics. Here, we review various sources of genetic diversity in plants, newly developed genetic diversity-mining tools synergized with NGS techniques, and related genetic approaches such as quantitative trait locus analysis and genome-wide association study. PMID:27499684

  4. IFPA meeting 2014 workshop report: Animal models to study pregnancy pathologies; new approaches to study human placental exposure to xenobiotics; biomarkers of pregnancy pathologies; placental genetics and epigenetics; the placenta and stillbirth and fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Barbaux, S; Erwich, J J H M; Favaron, P O; Gil, S; Gallot, D; Golos, T G; Gonzalez-Bulnes, A; Guibourdenche, J; Heazell, A E P; Jansson, T; Laprévote, O; Lewis, R M; Miller, R K; Monk, D; Novakovic, B; Oudejans, C; Parast, M; Peugnet, P; Pfarrer, C; Pinar, H; Roberts, C T; Robinson, W; Saffery, R; Salomon, C; Sexton, A; Staff, A C; Suter, M; Tarrade, A; Wallace, J; Vaillancourt, C; Vaiman, D; Worton, S A; Lash, G E

    2015-04-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2014 there were six themed workshops, five of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to various aspects of placental biology but collectively covered areas of animal models, xenobiotics, pathological biomarkers, genetics and epigenetics, and stillbirth and fetal growth restriction. PMID:25703592

  5. Molecular Epidemiology of sil Locus in Clinical Streptococcus pyogenes Strains

    PubMed Central

    Plainvert, Céline; Dinis, Márcia; Ravins, Miriam; Hanski, Emanuel; Touak, Gérald; Dmytruk, Nicolas; Fouet, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) causes a wide variety of diseases, ranging from mild noninvasive to severe invasive infections. Mutations in regulatory components have been implicated in the switch from colonization to invasive phenotypes. The inactivation of the sil locus, composed of six genes encoding a quorum-sensing complex, gives rise to a highly invasive strain. However, studies conducted on limited collections of GAS strains suggested that sil prevalence is around 15%; furthermore, whereas a correlation between the presence of sil and the genetic background was suggested, no link between the presence of a functional sil locus and the invasive status was assessed. We established a collection of 637 nonredundant strains covering all emm genotypes present in France and of known clinical history; 68%, 22%, and 10% were from invasive infections, noninvasive infections, and asymptomatic carriage, respectively. Among the 637 strains, 206 were sil positive. The prevalence of the sil locus varied according to the emm genotype, being present in >85% of the emm4, emm18, emm32, emm60, emm87, and emm90 strains and absent from all emm1, emm28, and emm89 strains. A random selection based on 2009 French epidemiological data indicated that 16% of GAS strains are sil positive. Moreover, due to mutations leading to truncated proteins, only 9% of GAS strains harbor a predicted functional sil system. No correlation was observed between the presence or absence of a functional sil locus and the strain invasiveness status. PMID:24671796

  6. Design and analysis of genetic association studies to finely map a locus identified by linkage analysis: assessment of the extent to which an association can account for the linkage.

    PubMed

    Hanson, R L; Knowler, W C

    2008-01-01

    Association studies are often used to finely map quantitative trait loci identified by linkage analysis. Once a polymorphism associated with the trait has been identified, it may be useful to conduct linkage analyses which adjust for this polymorphism to determine the extent to which the association accounts for the linkage signal. However, methods for conducting statistical significance tests for an observed reduction in the linkage signal are not well developed. In the present study we develop methods for assessment of the statistical significance of an observed reduction in the variance due to the linked locus, with variance components or with Haseman-Elston linkage methods. Simulations indicate that these methods have appropriate levels of type I error and that, like other association statistics, their power depends on the magnitude of linkage disequilibrium between functional and marker alleles and on the extent of similarity between the frequency of the functional allele and the frequency of the associated marker allele. These methods can help determine which association results are likely due to strong linkage disequilibrium with functional alleles and, thus, can facilitate the selection of small chromosomal regions for more extensive study.

  7. In situ localization of the genetic locus encoding the lysosomal acid lipase/cholesteryl esterase (LIPA) deficient in wolman disease to chromosome 10q23. 2-q23. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.A.; Rao, N.; Byrum, R.S.; Rothschild, C.B.; Bowden, D.W.; Hayworth, R.; Pettenati, M. )

    1993-01-01

    Human acid lipase/cholesteryl esterase (EC 3.1.1.13) is a 46-kDa glycoprotein required for the lysosomal hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides that cells acquire through the receptor-mediated endocytosis of low-density lipoproteins. This activity is essential in the provision of free cholesterol for cell metabolism as well as for the feedback signal that modulates endogenous cellular cholesterol production. The extremely low level of lysosomal acid lipase in patients afflicted with the hereditary, allelic lysosomal storage disorders Woman disease (WD) and cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) (MIM Number 278000 (6)) is associated with the massive intralysosomal lipid storage and derangements in the regulation of cellular cholesterol production (10). Both WD and CESD cells lack a specific acid lipase isoenzyme and it is thought that the different mutations associated with WD and CESD are in the structural gene for this isoenzyme, LIPA. Analysis of the activity of the acid lipase isoenzyme in cell extracts from human-Chinese hamster somatic cell hybrids (4, 11) demonstrated the concordant segregation of the gene locus for lysosomal acid lipase with the glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase-1 (GOT1) enzyme marker for human chromosome 10 which was subsequently localized to 10q24.1 q25.1 (8). 11 refs., 1 figs.

  8. Recombinant Inbred Strain and Interspecific Backcross Analysis of Molecular Markers Flanking the Murine Agouti Coat Color Locus

    PubMed Central

    Siracusa, L. D.; Buchberg, A. M.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1989-01-01

    Recombinant inbred strain and interspecific backcross mice were used to create a molecular genetic linkage map of the distal portion of mouse chromosome 2. The orientation and distance of the Ada, Emv-13, Emv-15, Hck-1, Il-1a, Pck-1, Psp, Src-1 and Svp-1 loci from the β(2)-microglobulin locus and the agouti locus were established. Our mapping results have provided the identification of molecular markers both proximal and distal to the agouti locus. The recombinants obtained provide valuable resources for determining the direction of chromosome walking experiments designed to clone sequences at the agouti locus. Comparisons between the mouse and human genome maps suggest that the human homolog of the agouti locus resides on human chromosome 20q. Three loci not present on mouse chromosome 2 were also identified and were provisionally named Psp-2, Hck-2 and Hck-3. The Psp-2 locus maps to mouse chromosome 14. The Hck-2 locus maps near the centromere of mouse chromosome 4 and may identify the Lyn locus. The Hck-3 locus maps near the distal end of mouse chromosome 4 and may identify the Lck locus. PMID:2759422

  9. [Study of the transcriptional and transpositional activities of the Tirant retrotransposon in Drosophila melanogaster strains mutant for the flamenco locus].

    PubMed

    Nefedova, L N; Urusov, F A; Romanova, N I; Shmel'kova, A O; Kim, A I

    2012-11-01

    Transpositions of the gypsy retrotransposon in the Drosophila melanogaster genome are controlled by the flamenco locus, which is represented as an accumulation of defective copies of transposable elements. In the present work, genetic control by the flamenco locus of the transcriptional and transpositional activities of the Tirant retrotransposon from the gypsy group was studied. Tissue-specific expression of Tirant was detected in the tissues of ovaries in a strain mutant for the flamenco locus. Tirant was found to be transpositionally active in isogenic D. melanogaster strains mutant for the flamenco locus. The sites of two new insertions have been localized by the method of subtractive hybridization. It has been concluded from the results obtained that the flamenco locus is involved in the genetic control of Tirant transpositions. PMID:23297482

  10. Speaking rate effects on locus equation slope.

    PubMed

    Berry, Jeff; Weismer, Gary

    2013-11-01

    A locus equation describes a 1st order regression fit to a scatter of vowel steady-state frequency values predicting vowel onset frequency values. Locus equation coefficients are often interpreted as indices of coarticulation. Speaking rate variations with a constant consonant-vowel form are thought to induce changes in the degree of coarticulation. In the current work, the hypothesis that locus slope is a transparent index of coarticulation is examined through the analysis of acoustic samples of large-scale, nearly continuous variations in speaking rate. Following the methodological conventions for locus equation derivation, data pooled across ten vowels yield locus equation slopes that are mostly consistent with the hypothesis that locus equations vary systematically with coarticulation. Comparable analyses between different four-vowel pools reveal variations in the locus slope range and changes in locus slope sensitivity to rate change. Analyses across rate but within vowels are substantially less consistent with the locus hypothesis. Taken together, these findings suggest that the practice of vowel pooling exerts a non-negligible influence on locus outcomes. Results are discussed within the context of articulatory accounts of locus equations and the effects of speaking rate change.

  11. Deletions of the PRKAR1A Locus at 17q24.2-q24.3 in Carney Complex: Genotype-Phenotype Correlations and Implications for Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Salpea, Paraskevi; Horvath, Anelia; London, Edra; Faucz, Fabio R.; Vetro, Annalisa; Levy, Isaac; Gourgari, Evgenia; Dauber, Andrew; Holm, Ingrid A.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Keil, Margaret F.; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Smith, Eric D.; Sanidad, Marc A.; Kelly, JoAnn C.; Dai, Zunyan; Mowrey, Philip; Forlino, Antonella; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2014-01-01

    Background: Carney complex (CNC) is a multiple neoplasia syndrome caused by PRKAR1A-inactivating mutations. One-third of the patients, however, have no detectable PRKAR1A coding sequence defects. Small deletions of the gene were previously reported in few patients, but large deletions of the chromosomal PRKAR1A locus have not been studied systematically in a large cohort of patients with CNC. Setting: A tertiary care referral center was the setting for analysis of an international cohort of patients with CNC. Methods: Methods included genome-wide array analysis followed by fluorescent in situ hybridization, mRNA, and other studies as well as a retrospective analysis of clinical information and phenotype-genotype correlation. Results: We detected 17q24.2-q24.3 deletions of varying size that included the PRKAR1A gene in 11 CNC patients (of 51 tested). Quantitative PCR showed that these patients had significantly lower PRKAR1A mRNA levels. Phenotype varied but was generally severe and included manifestations that are not commonly associated with CNC, presumably due to haploinsufficiency of other genes in addition to PRKAR1A. Conclusions: A significant number (21.6%) of patients with CNC that are negative in currently available testing may have PRKAR1A haploinsufficiency due to genomic defects that are not detected by Sanger sequencing. Array-based studies are necessary for diagnostic confirmation of these defects and should be done in patients with unusual and severe phenotypes who are PRKAR1A mutation-negative. PMID:24170103

  12. True hermaphroditism in a 46, XY individual, caused by a postzygotic somatic point mutation in the male gonadal sex-determining locus (SRY): Molecular genetics and histological findings in a sporadic case

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, A.; Kammerer, S.; Cleve, H.; Loehrs, U.; Schwarz, H.P.; Kuhnle, U. )

    1993-03-01

    Recently, the gene for the determination of maleness has been identified in the sex-determining region on the short arm of the Y chromosome (SRY) between the Y-chromosomal pseudoautosomal boundary (PABY) and the ZFY gene locus. Experiments with transgenic mice confirmed that SRY is a part of the testis-determining factor (TDF). The authors describe a sporadic case of a patient with intersexual genitalia and the histological finding of ovotestes in the gonad, which resembles the mixed type of gonadal tissue without primordial follicle structures. The karyotype of the patient was 46,XY. By PCR amplification, they tested for the presence of SRY by using DNA obtained from histological gonadal slices. The SRY products of both DNA preparations were further analyzed by direct sequencing. All three parts of the sex-determining region of the Y chromosome could be amplified from leukocytic DNA. The patient's and the father's SRY sequences were identical with the published sequence. In the SRY PCR product of gonadal DNA, the wild-type and two point mutations were present in the patient's sequence, simulating a heterozygous state of a Y-chromosomal gene: one of the mutations was silent, while the other encoded for a nonconservative amino acid substitution from leucine to histidine. Subcloning procedures showed that the two point mutations always occurred together. The origin of the patient's intersexuality is a postzygotic mutation of the SRY occurring in part of the gonadal tissue. This event caused the loss of the testis-determining function in affected cells. 37 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Confirmation of Single-Locus Sex Determination and Female Heterogamety in Willow Based on Linkage Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lecheng; Li, Xiaoping; Yin, Tongming

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we constructed high-density genetic maps of Salix suchowensis and mapped the gender locus with an F1 pedigree. Genetic maps were separately constructed for the maternal and paternal parents by using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers and the pseudo-testcross strategy. The maternal map consisted of 20 linkage groups that spanned a genetic distance of 2333.3 cM; whereas the paternal map contained 21 linkage groups that covered 2260 cM. Based on the established genetic maps, it was found that the gender of willow was determined by a single locus on linkage group LG_03, and the female was the heterogametic gender. Aligned with mapped SSR markers, linkage group LG_03 was found to be associated with chromosome XV in willow. It is noteworthy that marker density in the vicinity of the gender locus was significantly higher than that expected by chance alone, which indicates severe recombination suppression around the gender locus. In conclusion, this study confirmed the findings on the single-locus sex determination and female heterogamety in willow. It also provided additional evidence that validated the previous studies, which found that different autosomes evolved into sex chromosomes between the sister genera of Salix (willow) and Populus (poplar). PMID:26828940

  14. Genetic mapping of the Tsw locus for resistance to the Tospovirus Tomato spotted wilt virus in Capsicum spp. and its relationship to the Sw-5 gene for resistance to the same pathogen in tomato.

    PubMed

    Jahn, M; Paran, I; Hoffmann, K; Radwanski, E R; Livingstone, K D; Grube, R C; Aftergoot, E; Lapidot, M; Moyer, J

    2000-06-01

    The Tsw gene conferring dominant resistance to the Tospovirus Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in Capsicum spp. has been tagged with a random amplified polymorphic DNA marker and mapped to the distal portion of chromosome 10. No mapped homologues of Sw-5, a phenotypically similar dominant TSWV resistance gene in tomato, map to this region in C. annuum, although a number of Sw-5 homologues are found at corresponding positions in pepper and tomato. The relationship between Tsw and Sw-5 was also examined through genetic studies of TSWV. The capacity of TSWV-A to overcome the Tsw gene in pepper and the Sw-5 gene in tomato maps to different TSWV genome segments. Therefore, despite phenotypic and genetic similarities of resistance in tomato and pepper, we infer that distinct viral gene products control the outcome of infection in plants carrying Sw-5 and Tsw, and that these loci do not appear to share a recent common evolutionary ancestor.

  15. Coordinate regulation of two genes encoding gluconeogenic enzymes by the trans-dominant locus Tse-1.

    PubMed Central

    Lem, J; Chin, A C; Thayer, M J; Leach, R J; Fournier, R E

    1988-01-01

    Tissue-specific extinguisher-1 (Tse-1) is a mouse genetic locus that can repress liver-specific tyrosine aminotransferase gene expression in trans. To search for other Tse-1-responsive genes, hepatoma microcell hybrids retaining mouse chromosome 11 or human chromosome 17, containing murine Tse-1 and human TSE1, respectively, were screened for expression of liver-specific mRNAs. While most liver gene activity was unaffected in such hybrids, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and tyrosine aminotransferase gene expression was coordinately repressed in these clones. Extinction of both genes was apparently mediated by a single genetic locus that resides on human chromosome 17. Images PMID:2902627

  16. Comparative mapping reveals partial conservation of synteny at the apomixis locus in Paspalum spp.

    PubMed

    Pupilli, F; Martinez, E J; Busti, A; Calderini, O; Quarin, C L; Arcioni, S

    2004-01-01

    In plants, gametophytic apomixis is a form of asexual reproduction that leads to the formation of seed-derived offspring that are genetically identical to the mother plant. A common set of RFLP markers, including five rice anchor markers previously shown to be linked to apomixis in Paspalum simplex, were used to detect linkage with apomixis in P. notatum and P. malacophyllum. A comparative map of the region around the apomixis locus was constructed for the three Paspalum species, and compared to the rice map. The locus that controls apomixis in P. simplex was almost completely conserved in the closely related species P. malacophyllum, whereas it was only partially represented in the distantly related species P. notatum. Although strong synteny of markers was noted between this locus and a portion of rice chromosome 12 in both P. simplex and P. malacophyllum, the same locus in P. notatum was localized to a hybrid chromosome which carries markers that map to rice chromosomes 2 and 12. All three Paspalum species showed recombination suppression at the apomixis locus; in the case of P. notatum, this might be due to a heterozygosity for a translocation that most probably negatively interferes with chromosomal pairing near the locus. A common set of markers that show linkage with apomixis in all three Paspalum species define a portion of the apomixis-controlling locus that is likely to contain genes critical for apomictic reproduction.

  17. Organization and evolutionary trajectory of the mating type (MAT) locus in dermatophyte and dimorphic fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjun; Metin, Banu; White, Theodore C; Heitman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in fungi is governed by a specialized genomic region, the mating type (MAT) locus, whose gene identity, organization, and complexity are diverse. We identified the MAT locus of five dermatophyte fungal pathogens (Microsporum gypseum, Microsporum canis, Trichophyton equinum, Trichophyton rubrum, and Trichophyton tonsurans) and a dimorphic fungus, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, and performed phylogenetic analyses. The identified MAT locus idiomorphs of M. gypseum control cell type identity in mating assays, and recombinant progeny were produced. Virulence tests in Galleria mellonella larvae suggest the two mating types of M. gypseum may have equivalent virulence. Synteny analysis revealed common features of the MAT locus shared among these five dermatophytes: namely, a small size ( approximately 3 kb) and a novel gene arrangement. The SLA2, COX13, and APN2 genes, which flank the MAT locus in other Ascomycota are instead linked on one side of the dermatophyte MAT locus. In addition, the transcriptional orientations of the APN2 and COX13 genes are reversed compared to the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Coccidioides posadasii. A putative transposable element, pogo, was found to have inserted in the MAT1-2 idiomorph of one P. brasiliensis strain but not others. In conclusion, the evolution of the MAT locus of the dermatophytes and dimorphic fungi from the last common ancestor has been punctuated by both gene acquisition and expansion, and asymmetric gene loss. These studies further support a foundation to develop molecular and genetic tools for dermatophyte and dimorphic human fungal pathogens. PMID:19880755

  18. Adaptation of Maize to Temperate Climates: Mid-Density Genome-Wide Association Genetics and Diversity Patterns Reveal Key Genomic Regions, with a Major Contribution of the Vgt2 (ZCN8) Locus

    PubMed Central

    Bouchet, Sophie; Servin, Bertrand; Bertin, Pascal; Madur, Delphine; Combes, Valérie; Dumas, Fabrice; Brunel, Dominique; Laborde, Jacques; Charcosset, Alain; Nicolas, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    The migration of maize from tropical to temperate climates was accompanied by a dramatic evolution in flowering time. To gain insight into the genetic architecture of this adaptive trait, we conducted a 50K SNP-based genome-wide association and diversity investigation on a panel of tropical and temperate American and European representatives. Eighteen genomic regions were associated with flowering time. The number of early alleles cumulated along these regions was highly correlated with flowering time. Polymorphism in the vicinity of the ZCN8 gene, which is the closest maize homologue to Arabidopsis major flowering time (FT) gene, had the strongest effect. This polymorphism is in the vicinity of the causal factor of Vgt2 QTL. Diversity was lower, whereas differentiation and LD were higher for associated loci compared to the rest of the genome, which is consistent with selection acting on flowering time during maize migration. Selection tests also revealed supplementary loci that were highly differentiated among groups and not associated with flowering time in our panel, whereas they were in other linkage-based studies. This suggests that allele fixation led to a lack of statistical power when structure and relatedness were taken into account in a linear mixed model. Complementary designs and analysis methods are necessary to unravel the architecture of complex traits. Based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) estimates corrected for population structure, we concluded that the number of SNPs genotyped should be at least doubled to capture all QTLs contributing to the genetic architecture of polygenic traits in this panel. These results show that maize flowering time is controlled by numerous QTLs of small additive effect and that strong polygenic selection occurred under cool climatic conditions. They should contribute to more efficient genomic predictions of flowering time and facilitate the dissemination of diverse maize genetic resources under a wide range of

  19. The Locus of Career Vitality. ASHE 1983 Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toombs, William

    The context for considering faculty career vitality is addressed. It is suggested that the unit of study should be individual, and that both internal and external influences should be considered. A contrasting view is that the institution should be the unit of study. A Pennsylvania State University study revealed that faculty career decisions were…

  20. Pleiotropic locus for emotion recognition and amygdala volume identified using univariate and bivariate linkage

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Emma E. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Kent, Jack W.; Sprooten, Emma; Carless, Melanie A.; Curran, Joanne E.; de Almeida, Marcio A. A.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Göring, Harald H. H.; Olvera, Rene; Duggirala, Ravi; Fox, Peter; Almasy, Laura; Blangero, John; Glahn, David. C.

    2014-01-01

    The role of the amygdala in emotion recognition is well established and separately each trait has been shown to be highly heritable, but the potential role of common genetic influences on both traits has not been explored. Here we present an investigation of the pleiotropic influences of amygdala and emotion recognition in a sample of randomly selected, extended pedigrees (N = 858). Using a combination of univariate and bivariate linkage we found a pleiotropic region for amygdala and emotion recognition on 4q26 (LOD = 4.34). Association analysis conducted in the region underlying the bivariate linkage peak revealed a variant meeting the corrected significance level (pBonferroni = 5.01×10−05) within an intron of PDE5A (rs2622497, Χ2 =16.67, p = 4.4×10−05) as being jointly influential on both traits. PDE5A has been implicated previously in recognition-memory deficits and is expressed in subcortical structures that are thought to underlie memory ability including the amygdala. The present paper extends our understanding of the shared etiology between amygdala and emotion recognition by showing that the overlap between the two traits is due, at least in part, to common genetic influences. Moreover, the present paper identifies a pleiotropic locus for the two traits and an associated variant, which localizes the genetic signal even more precisely. These results, when taken in the context of previous research, highlight the potential utility of PDE5-inhibitors for ameliorating emotion-recognition deficits in populations including, but not exclusively, those individuals suffering from mental or neurodegenerative illness. PMID:25322361

  1. Hybrid male sterility in rice is due to epistatic interactions with a pollen killer locus.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takahiko; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Kurata, Nori

    2011-11-01

    In intraspecific crosses between cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) subspecies indica and japonica, the hybrid male sterility gene S24 causes the selective abortion of male gametes carrying the japonica allele (S24-j) via an allelic interaction in the heterozygous hybrids. In this study, we first examined whether male sterility is due solely to the single locus S24. An analysis of near-isogenic lines (NIL-F(1)) showed different phenotypes for S24 in different genetic backgrounds. The S24 heterozygote with the japonica genetic background showed male semisterility, but no sterility was found in heterozygotes with the indica background. This result indicates that S24 is regulated epistatically. A QTL analysis of a BC(2)F(1) population revealed a novel sterility locus that interacts with S24 and is found on rice chromosome 2. The locus was named Epistatic Factor for S24 (EFS). Further genetic analyses revealed that S24 causes male sterility when in combination with the homozygous japonica EFS allele (efs-j). The results suggest that efs-j is a recessive sporophytic allele, while the indica allele (EFS-i) can dominantly counteract the pollen sterility caused by S24 heterozygosity. In summary, our results demonstrate that an additional epistatic locus is an essential element in the hybrid sterility caused by allelic interaction at a single locus in rice. This finding provides a significant contribution to our understanding of the complex molecular mechanisms underlying hybrid sterility and microsporogenesis.

  2. Chromosomal locus for staphylococcal enterotoxin B.

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, W M; Iandolo, J J

    1978-01-01

    The genetic locus of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) was investigated in the Staphylococcus aureus food-poisoning isolates, strains S6 and 277. Direct neutral sucrose gradient centrifugation analysis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-sodium chloride-mediated cleared lysates demonstrated that strain S6 contained a single 37S plasmid. Transductional analysis revealed that the 37S plasmid in S6 encoded for cadmium resistance (Cad) but not SEB. Additionally, elimination of cadmium resistance in S6 provided a plasmid-negative derivative that produced SEB at the same level as the parent. Examination of strain 277 showed two plasmids, a 37S species encoding for penicillin resistance (Penr) and a 21S species containing the gene(s) responsible for tetracycline resistance (Tetr). Elimination of the 37S, penr plasmid in 277 had no effect on SEB production, whereas introduction of the 21S tetr plasmid via transformation into strain 8325 (SEB--) did not confer enterotoxigenesis upon the transformants. The data obtained in this investigation suggest that the SEB gene(s) in these food-poisoning isolates of S. aureus is chromosomal. Images PMID:669796

  3. Sequence variation and haplotype structure at the human HFE locus.

    PubMed Central

    Toomajian, Christopher; Kreitman, Martin

    2002-01-01

    The HFE locus encodes an HLA class-I-type protein important in iron regulation and segregates replacement mutations that give rise to the most common form of genetic hemochromatosis. The high frequency of one disease-associated mutation, C282Y, and the nature of this disease have led some to suggest a selective advantage for this mutation. To investigate the context in which this mutation arose and gain a better understanding of HFE genetic variation, we surveyed nucleotide variability in 11.2 kb encompassing the HFE locus and experimentally determined haplotypes. We fully resequenced 60 chromosomes of African, Asian, or European ancestry as well as one chimpanzee, revealing 41 variable sites and a nucleotide diversity of 0.08%. This indicates that linkage to the HLA region has not substantially increased the level of HFE variation. Although several haplotypes are shared between populations, one haplotype predominates in Asia but is nearly absent elsewhere, causing higher than average genetic differentiation among the three major populations. Our samples show evidence of intragenic recombination, so the scarcity of recombination events within the C282Y allele class is consistent with selection increasing the frequency of a young allele. Otherwise, the pattern of variability in this region does not clearly indicate the action of positive selection at this or linked loci. PMID:12196404

  4. Targeted disruption of the porcine immunoglobulin kappa light chain locus.

    PubMed

    Ramsoondar, J; Mendicino, M; Phelps, C; Vaught, T; Ball, S; Monahan, J; Chen, S; Dandro, A; Boone, J; Jobst, P; Vance, A; Wertz, N; Polejaeva, I; Butler, J; Dai, Y; Ayares, D; Wells, K

    2011-06-01

    Inactivation of the endogenous pig immunoglobulin (Ig) loci, and replacement with their human counterparts, would produce animals that could alleviate both the supply and specificity issues of therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies (PAbs). Platform genetics are being developed in pigs that have all endogenous Ig loci inactivated and replaced by human counterparts, in order to address this unmet clinical need. This report describes the deletion of the porcine kappa (κ) light chain constant (Cκ) region in pig primary fetal fibroblasts (PPFFs) using gene targeting technology, and the generation of live animals from these cells via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning. There are only two other targeted loci previously published in swine, and this is the first report of a targeted disruption of an Ig light chain locus in a livestock species. Pigs with one targeted Cκ allele (heterozygous knockout or ±) were bred together to generate Cκ homozygous knockout (-/-) animals. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) from Cκ -/- pigs were devoid of κ-containing Igs. Furthermore, there was an increase in lambda (λ) light chain expression when compared to that of wild-type littermates (Cκ +/+). Targeted inactivation of the Ig heavy chain locus has also been achieved and work is underway to inactivate the pig lambda light chain locus.

  5. Efficient marker-free recovery of custom genetic modifications with CRISPR/Cas9 in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Arribere, Joshua A; Bell, Ryan T; Fu, Becky X H; Artiles, Karen L; Hartman, Phil S; Fire, Andrew Z

    2014-11-01

    sqt-1 that meet these criteria and demonstrate that these too can be used as effective conversion markers. Coconversion was observed using a variety of donor molecules at the second (unselected) locus, including oligonucleotides, PCR products, and plasmids. We note that the coconversion approach described here could be applied in any of the variety of systems where suitable coconversion markers can be identified from previous intensive genetic analyses of gain-of-function alleles.

  6. Efficient marker-free recovery of custom genetic modifications with CRISPR/Cas9 in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Arribere, Joshua A; Bell, Ryan T; Fu, Becky X H; Artiles, Karen L; Hartman, Phil S; Fire, Andrew Z

    2014-11-01

    sqt-1 that meet these criteria and demonstrate that these too can be used as effective conversion markers. Coconversion was observed using a variety of donor molecules at the second (unselected) locus, including oligonucleotides, PCR products, and plasmids. We note that the coconversion approach described here could be applied in any of the variety of systems where suitable coconversion markers can be identified from previous intensive genetic analyses of gain-of-function alleles. PMID:25161212

  7. Propagation of genetic variation in gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Plahte, Erik; Gjuvsland, Arne B.; Omholt, Stig W.

    2013-01-01

    A future quantitative genetics theory should link genetic variation to phenotypic variation in a causally cohesive way based on how genes actually work and interact. We provide a theoretical framework for predicting and understanding the manifestation of genetic variation in haploid and diploid regulatory networks with arbitrary feedback structures and intra-locus and inter-locus functional dependencies. Using results from network and graph theory, we define propagation functions describing how genetic variation in a locus is propagated through the network, and show how their derivatives are related to the network’s feedback structure. Similarly, feedback functions describe the effect of genotypic variation of a locus on itself, either directly or mediated by the network. A simple sign rule relates the sign of the derivative of the feedback function of any locus to the feedback loops involving that particular locus. We show that the sign of the phenotypically manifested interaction between alleles at a diploid locus is equal to the sign of the dominant feedback loop involving that particular locus, in accordance with recent results for a single locus system. Our results provide tools by which one can use observable equilibrium concentrations of gene products to disclose structural properties of the network architecture. Our work is a step towards a theory capable of explaining the pleiotropy and epistasis features of genetic variation in complex regulatory networks as functions of regulatory anatomy and functional location of the genetic variation. PMID:23997378

  8. Propagation of genetic variation in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Plahte, Erik; Gjuvsland, Arne B; Omholt, Stig W

    2013-08-01

    A future quantitative genetics theory should link genetic variation to phenotypic variation in a causally cohesive way based on how genes actually work and interact. We provide a theoretical framework for predicting and understanding the manifestation of genetic variation in haploid and diploid regulatory networks with arbitrary feedback structures and intra-locus and inter-locus functional dependencies. Using results from network and graph theory, we define propagation functions describing how genetic variation in a locus is propagated through the network, and show how their derivatives are related to the network's feedback structure. Similarly, feedback functions describe the effect of genotypic variation of a locus on itself, either directly or mediated by the network. A simple sign rule relates the sign of the derivative of the feedback function of any locus to the feedback loops involving that particular locus. We show that the sign of the phenotypically manifested interaction between alleles at a diploid locus is equal to the sign of the dominant feedback loop involving that particular locus, in accordance with recent results for a single locus system. Our results provide tools by which one can use observable equilibrium concentrations of gene products to disclose structural properties of the network architecture. Our work is a step towards a theory capable of explaining the pleiotropy and epistasis features of genetic variation in complex regulatory networks as functions of regulatory anatomy and functional location of the genetic variation.

  9. Factors Determining Adolescent Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopera-Frye, Karen F.; And Others

    Previous research has demonstrated an association between locus of control in adolescence and a successful transition to adulthood. Having an external locus of control has been implicated as an important factor in adolescent behaviors such as teenage pregnancy and delinquency, and has been found to be negatively related to school achievement. This…

  10. Scrutinizing the FTO locus: compelling evidence for a complex, long-range regulatory context.

    PubMed

    Rask-Andersen, Mathias; Almén, Markus Sällman; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-11-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within a genetic region including the first two introns of the gene encoding FTO have consistently been shown to be the strongest genetic factors influencing body mass index (BMI). However, this same also contains several regulatory DNA elements that affect the expression of IRX3 and IRX5, which respectively, are located approximately 500 kb and 1.2 Mbp downstream from the BMI-associated FTO locus. Through these affected regulatory elements, genetic variation at the FTO locus influences adipocyte development leading to decreased thermogenesis and increased lipid storage. These findings provide a genomic model for the functional implications of genetic variations at this locus, and also demonstrate the importance of accounting for chromatin-chromatin interactions when constructing hypotheses for the mechanisms of trait and disease-associated common genetic variants. Several consortia have generated genome-wide datasets describing different aspects of chromatin biology which can be utilized to predict functionality and propose biologically relevant descriptions of specific DNA regions. Here, we review some of the publically available data resources on genome function and organization that can be used to gain an overview of genetic regions of interest and to generate testable hypotheses for future studies. We use the BMI- and obesity-associated FTO locus as a subject as it poses an illustrative example on the value of these resources. We find that public databases strongly support long-range interactions between regulatory elements in the FTO locus with the IRXB cluster genes IRX3 and IRX5. Chromatin configuration capture data also support interactions across a large region stretching across from the RPGRIP1L gene, FTO and the IRXB gene cluster. PMID:26340902

  11. MHC ANTIGEN-BINDING LOCUS SHOWS STRONG SIGNAL OF SELECTION AND HIGH VARIABILITY IN FUNDULUS HETEROCLITUS POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major histocompatibility system provides a unique genetic locus in vertebrates to assess genetic diversity and to look for the effects of selecti.on on the immune system. Fish population studies using MHC are fairly new, and thus far they have focused on endangered population...

  12. Applied Genomics in Cattle – Identification of the SLICK locus in tropically adapted cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the past 3 years, ARS scientists have been working to identify the underlying genetic variants responsible for a heat tolerance phenotype in cattle associated with the SLICK locus typically found in Senepol cattle. This presentation reviews the general field of applied genomics in cattle, and ...

  13. Locus heterogeneity disease genes encode proteins with high interconnectivity in the human protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Keith, Benjamin P; Robertson, David L; Hentges, Kathryn E

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes potentially lead to a number of genetic diseases with differing severity. These disease genes have been the focus of research in recent years showing that the disease gene population as a whole is not homogeneous, and can be categorized according to their interactions. Locus heterogeneity describes a single disorder caused by mutations in different genes each acting individually to cause the same disease. Using datasets of experimentally derived human disease genes and protein interactions, we created a protein interaction network to investigate the relationships between the products of genes associated with a disease displaying locus heterogeneity, and use network parameters to suggest properties that distinguish these disease genes from the overall disease gene population. Through the manual curation of known causative genes of 100 diseases displaying locus heterogeneity and 397 single-gene Mendelian disorders, we use network parameters to show that our locus heterogeneity network displays distinct properties from the global disease network and a Mendelian network. Using the global human proteome, through random simulation of the network we show that heterogeneous genes display significant interconnectivity. Further topological analysis of this network revealed clustering of locus heterogeneity genes that cause identical disorders, indicating that these disease genes are involved in similar biological processes. We then use this information to suggest additional genes that may contribute to diseases with locus heterogeneity.

  14. A third locus for autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia Type I maps to chromosome 14q24. 3-qter: Evidence for the existence of a fourth locus

    SciTech Connect

    Stevanin, G.; Guern, E.L.; Ravise, N.; Chneiweiss, H.; Duerr, A.; Cancel, G.; Vignal, A.; Boch, A.L.; Ruberg, M.; Penet, C.; Pothin, Y.; Lagroua, I.; Haguenau, M.; Rancurel, G.; Weissenbach, J.; Agid, Y.; Brice, A.

    1994-01-01

    The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCA) type I are a group of neurological disorders that are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Two genes implicated in the disease, SCA1 (spinal cerebellar ataxia 1) and SCA2, are already localized. The authors have mapped a third locus to chromosome 14q24.3-qter, by linkage analysis in a non-SCA1/non-SCA2 family and have confirmed its existence in a second such family. The authors suggest designating this new locus [open quotes]SCA3.[close quotes] Combined analysis of the two families restricted the SCA3 locus to a 15-cM interval between markers D14S67 and D14S81. The gene for Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), a clinically different form of ADCA type I, has been recently assigned to chromosome 14q24.3-q32. Although the SCA3 locus is within the MJD region, linkage analyses cannot yet demonstrate whether they result from mutations of the same gene. Linkage to all three loci (SCA1, SCA2, and SCA3) was excluded in another family, which indicates the existence of a fourth ADCA type I locus. 36 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Mapping of crown gall resistance locus Rcg1 in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Kuczmog, Anett; Galambos, Anikó; Horváth, Szabina; Mátai, Anikó; Kozma, Pál; Szegedi, Ernő; Putnoky, Péter

    2012-11-01

    Agrobacteria are efficient plant pathogens. They are able to transform plant cells genetically resulting in abnormal cell proliferation. Cultivars of Vitis vinifera are highly susceptible to many virulent Agrobacterium strains but certain wild Vitis species, including Vitis amurensis have resistant genotypes. Studies of the molecular background of such natural resistance are of special importance, not only for practical benefits in agricultural practice but also for understanding the role of plant genes in the transformation process. Earlier, crown gall resistance from V. amurensis was introgressed into V. vinifera through interspecific breeding and it was shown to be inherited as a single and dominant Mendelian trait. To develop this research further, towards understanding underlying molecular mechanisms, a mapping population was established, and resistance-coupled molecular DNA markers were identified by three different approaches. First, RAPD makers linked to the resistance locus (Rcg1) were identified, and on the basis of their DNA sequences, we developed resistance-coupled SCAR markers. However, localization of these markers in the grapevine genome sequence failed due to their similarity to many repetitive regions. Next, using SSR markers of the grapevine reference linkage map, location of the resistance locus was established on linkage group 15 (LG15). Finally, this position was supported further by developing new chromosome-specific markers and by the construction of the genetic map of the region including nine loci in 29.1 cM. Our results show that the closest marker is located 3.3 cM from the Rcg1 locus that may correspond to 576 kb. PMID:22801874

  16. Mapping of crown gall resistance locus Rcg1 in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Kuczmog, Anett; Galambos, Anikó; Horváth, Szabina; Mátai, Anikó; Kozma, Pál; Szegedi, Ernő; Putnoky, Péter

    2012-11-01

    Agrobacteria are efficient plant pathogens. They are able to transform plant cells genetically resulting in abnormal cell proliferation. Cultivars of Vitis vinifera are highly susceptible to many virulent Agrobacterium strains but certain wild Vitis species, including Vitis amurensis have resistant genotypes. Studies of the molecular background of such natural resistance are of special importance, not only for practical benefits in agricultural practice but also for understanding the role of plant genes in the transformation process. Earlier, crown gall resistance from V. amurensis was introgressed into V. vinifera through interspecific breeding and it was shown to be inherited as a single and dominant Mendelian trait. To develop this research further, towards understanding underlying molecular mechanisms, a mapping population was established, and resistance-coupled molecular DNA markers were identified by three different approaches. First, RAPD makers linked to the resistance locus (Rcg1) were identified, and on the basis of their DNA sequences, we developed resistance-coupled SCAR markers. However, localization of these markers in the grapevine genome sequence failed due to their similarity to many repetitive regions. Next, using SSR markers of the grapevine reference linkage map, location of the resistance locus was established on linkage group 15 (LG15). Finally, this position was supported further by developing new chromosome-specific markers and by the construction of the genetic map of the region including nine loci in 29.1 cM. Our results show that the closest marker is located 3.3 cM from the Rcg1 locus that may correspond to 576 kb.

  17. The Ink4/Arf locus is a barrier for iPS reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Li, Han; Collado, Manuel; Villasante, Aranzazu; Strati, Katerina; Ortega, Sagrario; Cañamero, Marta; Blasco, Maria A.; Serrano, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the reprogramming of differentiated cells into induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cells by Oct4, Klf4 and Sox2 (3F) remain poorly understood 1. The Ink4/Arf tumour suppressor locus encodes three potent inhibitors of proliferation, namely p16Ink4a, p15Ink4b and Arf, which are basally expressed in differentiated cells and upregulated by aberrant mitogenic signals 2-4. We show here that the locus is completely silenced in iPS cells, as well as in embryonic stem (ES) cells, acquiring the epigenetic marks of a bivalent chromatin domain, and retaining the ability to be reactivated upon differentiation. Cell culture conditions during reprogramming enhance the expression of the Ink4/Arf locus, further highlighting the importance of silencing the locus to allow proliferation and reprogramming. Indeed, the 3F together repress the Ink4/Arf locus soon after their expression and concomitant with the appearance of the first molecular markers of stemness. This downregulation also occurs in cells carrying the oncoprotein large-T, which functionally inactivates the pathways regulated by the Ink4/Arf locus, thus implying that the silencing of the locus is intrinsic to reprogramming and not the result of a selective process. Genetic inhibition of the Ink4/Arf locus has a profound positive impact on the efficiency of iPS generation, increasing both the kinetics of reprogramming and the number of emerging iPS colonies. In murine cells, Arf, rather than Ink4a, is the main barrier to reprogramming through activation of p53 and p21; whereas, in human fibroblasts, INK4a is more important than ARF. Finally, organismal aging upregulates the Ink4/Arf locus 2,5 and, accordingly, reprogramming is less efficient in cells from old organisms, but this defect can be rescued by inhibiting the locus with an shRNA. All together, we conclude that the silencing of Ink4/Arf locus is rate limiting for reprogramming, and its transient inhibition may significantly improve the

  18. Updated listing of haplotypes at the human phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) locus

    SciTech Connect

    Eisensmith, R.C.; Woo, S.L.C. )

    1992-12-01

    Analysis of mutant PAH chromosomes has identified approximately 60 different single-base substitutions and deletions within the PAH locus. Nearly all of these molecular lesions are in strong linkage disequilibrium with specific RFLP haplotypes in different ethnic populations. Thus, haplotype analysis is not only useful for diagnostic purposes but is proving to be a valuable tool in population genetic studies of the origin and spread of phenylketonuria alleles in human populations. PCR-based methods have been developed to detect six of the eight polymorphic restriction sites used for determination of RFLP haplotypes at the PAH locus. A table of the proposed expanded haplotypes is given.

  19. No intra-locus sexual conflict over reproductive fitness or ageing in field crickets.

    PubMed

    Zajitschek, Felix; Hunt, John; Zajitschek, Susanne R K; Jennions, Michael D; Brooks, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Differences in the ways in which males and females maximize evolutionary fitness can lead to intra-locus sexual conflict in which genes delivering fitness benefits to one sex are costly when expressed in the other. Trade-offs between current reproductive effort and future reproduction and survival are fundamental to the evolutionary biology of ageing. This leads to the prediction that sex differences in the optimization of age-dependent reproductive effort may generate intra-locus sexual conflict over ageing rates. Here we test for intra-locus sexual conflict over age-dependent reproductive effort and longevity in the black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. Using a half-sib breeding design, we show that the most important components of male and female reproductive effort (male calling effort and the number of eggs laid by females) were positively genetically correlated, especially in early adulthood. However, the genetic relationships between longevity and reproductive effort were different for males and females, leading to low genetic covariation between male and female longevity. The apparent absence of intra-locus sexual conflict over ageing suggests that male and female longevity can evolve largely independently of one another.

  20. Oakleaf: an S locus-linked mutation of Primula vulgaris that affects leaf and flower development.

    PubMed

    Cocker, Jonathan M; Webster, Margaret A; Li, Jinhong; Wright, Jonathan; Kaithakottil, Gemy; Swarbreck, David; Gilmartin, Philip M

    2015-10-01

    In Primula vulgaris outcrossing is promoted through reciprocal herkogamy with insect-mediated cross-pollination between pin and thrum form flowers. Development of heteromorphic flowers is coordinated by genes at the S locus. To underpin construction of a genetic map facilitating isolation of these S locus genes, we have characterised Oakleaf, a novel S locus-linked mutant phenotype. We combine phenotypic observation of flower and leaf development, with classical genetic analysis and next-generation sequencing to address the molecular basis of Oakleaf. Oakleaf is a dominant mutation that affects both leaf and flower development; plants produce distinctive lobed leaves, with occasional ectopic meristems on the veins. This phenotype is reminiscent of overexpression of Class I KNOX-homeodomain transcription factors. We describe the structure and expression of all eight P. vulgaris PvKNOX genes in both wild-type and Oakleaf plants, and present comparative transcriptome analysis of leaves and flowers from Oakleaf and wild-type plants. Oakleaf provides a new phenotypic marker for genetic analysis of the Primula S locus. We show that none of the Class I PvKNOX genes are strongly upregulated in Oakleaf leaves and flowers, and identify cohorts of 507 upregulated and 314 downregulated genes in the Oakleaf mutant.

  1. Evolution of sex-specific wing shape at the widerwing locus in four species of Nasonia.

    PubMed

    Loehlin, D W; Enders, L S; Werren, J H

    2010-03-01

    How do morphological differences between species evolve at the genetic level? This study investigates the genetic basis of recent divergence in male wing size between species of the model parasitoid wasp Nasonia. The forewings of flightless Nasonia vitripennis males are 2.3 times smaller than males of their flighted sister species N. giraulti. We describe a major genetic contributor to this difference: the sex-specific widerwing (wdw) locus, which we have backcrossed from N. giraulti into N. vitripennis and mapped to an 0.9 megabase region of chromosome 1. This introgression of wdw from large-winged N. giraulti into small-winged N. vitripennis increases male but not female forewing width by 30% through wing region-specific size changes. Indirect evidence suggests that cell number changes across the wing explain the majority of the wdw wing-size difference, whereas changes in cell size are important in the center of the wing. Introgressing the same locus from the other species in the genus, N. longicornis and N. oneida, into N. vitripennis produces intermediate and large male wing sizes. To our knowledge, this is the first study to introgress a morphological quantitative trait locus (QTL) from multiple species into a common genetic background. Epistatic interactions between wdw and other QTL are also identified by introgressing wdw from N. vitripennis into N. giraulti. The main findings are (1) the changes at wdw have sex- and region-specific effects and could, therefore, be regulatory, (2) the wdw locus seems to be a co-regulator of cell size and cell number, and (3) the wdw locus has evolved different wing width effects in three species.

  2. Evolution of sex-specific wing shape at the widerwing locus in four species of Nasonia

    PubMed Central

    Loehlin, David W.; Enders, Laramy S.; Werren, John H.

    2009-01-01

    How do morphological differences between species evolve at the genetic level? This study investigates the genetic basis of recent divergence in male wing size between species of the model parasitoid wasp Nasonia. The forewings of flightless N. vitripennis males are 2.3 times smaller than males of their flighted sister species N. giraulti. We describe a major genetic contributor to this difference: the sex-specific widerwing (wdw) locus, which we have backcrossed from N. giraulti into N. vitripennis and mapped to an 0.9 megabase region of chromosome 1. This introgression of wdw from large-winged N. giraulti into small-winged N. vitripennis increases male but not female forewing width by 30% through wing region-specific size changes. Indirect evidence suggests that cell number changes across the wing explain the majority of the wdw wing size difference while changes in cell size are important in the center of the wing. Introgressing the same locus from the other species in the genus, N. longicornis and N. oneida, into N. vitripennis produces intermediate and large male wing sizes. To our knowledge, this is the first study to introgress a morphological quantitative trait locus (QTL) from multiple species into a common genetic background. Epistatic interactions between wdw and other QTL are also identified by introgressing wdw from N. vitripennis into N. giraulti. The main findings are 1) the changes at wdw have sex- and region-specific effects and could therefore be regulatory, 2) the wdw locus appears to be a co-regulator of cell size and cell number, and 3) the wdw locus has evolved different wing width effects in three species. PMID:20087390

  3. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies a Novel Canine Glaucoma Locus

    PubMed Central

    Ahonen, Saija J.; Pietilä, Elina; Mellersh, Cathryn S.; Tiira, Katriina; Hansen, Liz; Johnson, Gary S.; Lohi, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy and one of the leading causes of blindness. Its hereditary forms are classified into primary closed-angle (PCAG), primary open-angle (POAG) and primary congenital glaucoma (PCG). Although many loci have been mapped in human, only a few genes have been identified that are associated with the development of glaucoma and the genetic basis of the disease remains poorly understood. Glaucoma has also been described in many dog breeds, including Dandie Dinmont Terriers (DDT) in which it is a late-onset (>7 years) disease. We designed clinical and genetic studies to better define the clinical features of glaucoma in the DDT and to identify the genetic cause. Clinical diagnosis was based on ophthalmic examinations of the affected dogs and 18 additionally investigated unaffected DDTs. We collected DNA from over 400 DTTs and a genome wide association study was performed in a cohort of 23 affected and 23 controls, followed by a fine mapping, a replication study and candidate gene sequencing. The clinical study suggested that ocular abnormalities including abnormal iridocorneal angles and pectinate ligament dysplasia are common (50% and 72%, respectively) in the breed and the disease resembles human PCAG. The genetic study identified a novel 9.5 Mb locus on canine chromosome 8 including the 1.6 Mb best associated region (p = 1.63×10−10, OR = 32 for homozygosity). Mutation screening in five candidate genes did not reveal any causative variants. This study indicates that although ocular abnormalities are common in DDTs, the genetic risk for glaucoma is conferred by a novel locus on CFA8. The canine locus shares synteny to a region in human chromosome 14q, which harbors several loci associated with POAG and PCG. Our study reveals a new locus for canine glaucoma and ongoing molecular studies will likely help to understand the genetic etiology of the disease. PMID:23951034

  4. A locus on chromosome 7 determines myocardial cell necrosis and calcification (dystrophic cardiac calcinosis) in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Ivandic, B T; Qiao, J H; Machleder, D; Liao, F; Drake, T A; Lusis, A J

    1996-01-01

    Dystrophic cardiac calcinosis, an age-related cardiomyopathy that occurs among certain inbred strains of mice, involves myocardial injury, necrosis, and calcification. Using a complete linkage map approach and quantitative trait locus analysis, we sought to identify genetic loci determining dystrophic cardiac calcinosis in an F2 intercross of resistant C57BL/6J and susceptible C3H/HeJ inbred strains. We identified a single major locus, designated Dyscalc, located on proximal chromosome 7 in a region syntenic with human chromosomes 19q13 and 11p15. The statistical significance of Dyscalc (logarithm of odds score 14.6) was tested by analysis of permuted trait data. Analysis of BxH recombinant inbred strains confirmed the mapping position. The inheritance pattern indicated that this locus influences susceptibility of cells both to enter necrosis and to subsequently undergo calcification. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8643601

  5. Gene encoding T-cell-activating protein TAP maps to the Ly-6 locus.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, H; Yeh, E T; Gramm, C F; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1986-01-01

    Recently we described two murine T-cell membrane proteins, TAP (T-cell-activating protein) and TAPa (TAP-associated protein). Previous experiments suggested that TAP is involved in physiologic T-cell activation. The subject of this report is a genetic analysis of these molecules. TAP and TAPa map to the Ly-6 locus. The relationship of these molecules to other antigens encoded in this locus is examined. Based on tissue distribution, molecular structure, and functional properties, TAP is distinct from any previously described Ly-6 antigen, whereas TAPa is probably identical to the 34-11-3 antigen. TAP and TAPa are coexpressed on all cell types examined so far. Moreover, comparative studies demonstrate a complex developmentally regulated pattern in the expression of molecules encoded in this locus. Images PMID:3010324

  6. Geographic Differences in Genetic Locus Linkages for Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Travinsky, Bridgit; Bunikis, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    Borrelia burdorferi genotype in the northeastern United States is associated with Lyme borreliosis severity. Analysis of DNA sequences of the outer surface protein C gene and rrs-rrlA intergenic spacer from extracts of Ixodes spp. ticks in 3 US regions showed linkage disequilibrium between the 2 loci within a region but not consistently between regions. PMID:20587192

  7. Homozygosity mapping of the Achromatopsia locus in the Pingelapese.

    PubMed

    Winick, J D; Blundell, M L; Galke, B L; Salam, A A; Leal, S M; Karayiorgou, M

    1999-06-01

    Achromatopsia, or total color blindness (also referred to as "rod monochromacy"), is a severe retinal disorder characterized clinically by an inability to distinguish colors, impaired visual acuity in daylight, photophobia, and nystagmus. Inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, achromatopsia is rare in the general population (1:20,000-1:50,000). Among the Pingelapese people of the Eastern Caroline Islands, however, the disorder occurs at an extremely high frequency, as recounted in Oliver Sacks's popular book The Island of the Colorblind: 4%-10% of this island population have the disorder and approximately 30% carry the gene. This extraordinary enrichment of the disease allele most likely resulted from a sharp reduction in population in the late 18th century, in the aftermath of a typhoon and subsequent geographic and cultural isolation. To obtain insights into the genetic basis of achromatopsia, as well as into the genetic history of this region of Micronesia, a genomewide search for linkage was performed in three Pingelapese kindreds with achromatopsia. A two-step search was used with a DNA pooling strategy, followed by genotyping of individual family members. Genetic markers that displayed a shift toward homozygosity in the affected DNA pool were used to genotype individual members of the kindreds, and an achromatopsia locus was identified on 8q21-q22. A maximal multipoint LOD score of 9.5 was observed with marker D8S1707. Homozygosity was seen for three adjacent markers (D8S275, D8S1119, and D8S1707), whereas recombination was observed with the flanking markers D8S1757 and D8S270, defining the outer boundaries of the disease-gene locus that spans a distance of <6.5cM. PMID:10330355

  8. Homozygosity mapping of the Achromatopsia locus in the Pingelapese.

    PubMed Central

    Winick, J D; Blundell, M L; Galke, B L; Salam, A A; Leal, S M; Karayiorgou, M

    1999-01-01

    Achromatopsia, or total color blindness (also referred to as "rod monochromacy"), is a severe retinal disorder characterized clinically by an inability to distinguish colors, impaired visual acuity in daylight, photophobia, and nystagmus. Inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, achromatopsia is rare in the general population (1:20,000-1:50,000). Among the Pingelapese people of the Eastern Caroline Islands, however, the disorder occurs at an extremely high frequency, as recounted in Oliver Sacks's popular book The Island of the Colorblind: 4%-10% of this island population have the disorder and approximately 30% carry the gene. This extraordinary enrichment of the disease allele most likely resulted from a sharp reduction in population in the late 18th century, in the aftermath of a typhoon and subsequent geographic and cultural isolation. To obtain insights into the genetic basis of achromatopsia, as well as into the genetic history of this region of Micronesia, a genomewide search for linkage was performed in three Pingelapese kindreds with achromatopsia. A two-step search was used with a DNA pooling strategy, followed by genotyping of individual family members. Genetic markers that displayed a shift toward homozygosity in the affected DNA pool were used to genotype individual members of the kindreds, and an achromatopsia locus was identified on 8q21-q22. A maximal multipoint LOD score of 9.5 was observed with marker D8S1707. Homozygosity was seen for three adjacent markers (D8S275, D8S1119, and D8S1707), whereas recombination was observed with the flanking markers D8S1757 and D8S270, defining the outer boundaries of the disease-gene locus that spans a distance of <6.5cM. PMID:10330355

  9. Molecular analysis of instability in flower pigmentation of Antirrhinum majus, following isolation of the pallida locus by transposon tagging

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Cathie; Carpenter, Rosemary; Sommer, Hans; Saedler, Heinz; Coen, Enrico S.

    1985-01-01

    The pal locus of Antirrhinum majus was cloned using the transposable element, Tam 3, as a probe. The pal clone was used to examine, at the molecular level, those aspects of instability previously observed phenotypically and genetically. The effects of temperature and of genetic background on excision of the element at pal are considered, and related quantitatively to the phenotype. We describe the identification of the transcript of the pal locus and show that insertion of Tam 3 blocks the production of a normal pal transcript in developing flower buds. ImagesFig. 2.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7. PMID:16453618

  10. Genetic Diversity and Molecular Evolution of Chinese Waxy Maize Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hongjian; Wang, Hui; Yang, Hua; Wu, Jinhong; Shi, Biao; Cai, Run; Xu, Yunbi; Wu, Aizhong; Luo, Lijun

    2013-01-01

    Waxy maize (Zea mays L. var. certaina Kulesh), with many excellent characters in terms of starch composition and economic value, has grown in China for a long history and its production has increased dramatically in recent decades. However, the evolution and origin of waxy maize still remains unclear. We studied the genetic diversity of Chinese waxy maize including typical landraces and inbred lines by SSR analysis and the results showed a wide genetic diversity in the Chinese waxy maize germplasm. We analyzed the origin and evolution of waxy maize by sequencing 108 samples, and downloading 52 sequences from GenBank for the waxy locus in a number of accessions from genus Zea. A sharp reduction of nucleotide diversity and significant neutrality tests (Tajima’s D and Fu and Li’s F*) were observed at the waxy locus in Chinese waxy maize but not in nonglutinous maize. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Chinese waxy maize originated from the cultivated flint maize and most of the modern waxy maize inbred lines showed a distinct independent origin and evolution process compared with the germplasm from Southwest China. The results indicated that an agronomic trait can be quickly improved to meet production demand by selection. PMID:23818949

  11. Identification of the Mating-Type (MAT) Locus That Controls Sexual Reproduction of Blastomyces dermatitidis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjun; Sullivan, Thomas D.; Walton, Eric; Averette, Anna Floyd; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Cuomo, Christina A.; Klein, Bruce S.

    2013-01-01

    Blastomyces dermatitidis is a dimorphic fungal pathogen that primarily causes blastomycosis in the midwestern and northern United States and Canada. While the genes controlling sexual development have been known for a long time, the genes controlling sexual reproduction of B. dermatitidis (teleomorph, Ajellomyces dermatitidis) are unknown. We identified the mating-type (MAT) locus in the B. dermatitidis genome by comparative genomic approaches. The B. dermatitidis MAT locus resembles those of other dimorphic fungi, containing either an alpha-box (MAT1-1) or an HMG domain (MAT1-2) gene linked to the APN2, SLA2, and COX13 genes. However, in some strains of B. dermatitidis, the MAT locus harbors transposable elements (TEs) that make it unusually large compared to the MAT locus of other dimorphic fungi. Based on the MAT locus sequences of B. dermatitidis, we designed specific primers for PCR determination of the mating type. Two B. dermatitidis isolates of opposite mating types were cocultured on mating medium. Immature sexual structures were observed starting at 3 weeks of coculture, with coiled-hyphae-containing cleistothecia developing over the next 3 to 6 weeks. Genetic recombination was detected in potential progeny by mating-type determination, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses, suggesting that a meiotic sexual cycle might have been completed. The F1 progeny were sexually fertile when tested with strains of the opposite mating type. Our studies provide a model for the evolution of the MAT locus in the dimorphic and closely related fungi and open the door to classic genetic analysis and studies on the possible roles of mating and mating type in infection and virulence. PMID:23143684

  12. Bundle-Forming Pilus Locus of Aeromonas veronii bv. Sobria

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, Nahal; Yang, Qin; Barnett, Timothy C.; Tabei, S. Mohammed B.; Kirov, Sylvia M.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the colonization mechanisms of Aeromonas spp. Previous work has suggested that the type IV bundle-forming pilus (Bfp) is an aeromonad intestinal colonization factor. This study provides the first genetic characterization of this structure. To define the role of Bfp in Aeromonas veronii bv. Sobria adherence, a 22-kb locus encoding the bundle-forming pilus was isolated; this contained 17 pilus-related genes similar to the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA) of Vibrio cholerae. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) demonstrated that the locus had two major transcriptional units, mshI to mshF and mshB to mshQ. Transcriptional fusion experiments demonstrated the presence of two strong promoters upstream of mshI and mshB. The locus encoded four putative prepilin proteins, one of which (MshA) corresponded to the N-terminal sequence of the previously isolated major pilin protein. All the pilin genes were inactivated, mutation of each minor or major pilin gene greatly reduced the bacterium's ability to adhere and form biofilms, and complementation of each mutant in trans rescued this phenotype. Mutation of the major pilin MshA and MshB, a minor pilin, resulted in their loss. The position of the mshH gene is conserved within a number of bacteria, and we have shown it is not transcriptionally linked to the other msh genes; moreover, its mutation did not have a dramatic effect on either adhesion or biofilm formation. We conclude that the bundle-forming pilus is required for A. veronii bv. Sobria adherence and biofilm formation; furthermore, both the major and minor pilin proteins are essential for this process. PMID:22311923

  13. Intragenic recombination at the human phosphoglucomutase 1 locus: Predictions fulfilled

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Norio ); Neel, J.V. )

    1993-11-15

    In 1982, the authors advanced a phylogeny that attributed eight alleles of the phosphoglucomutase 1 locus (PGM1) to three independent mutations in a primal allele, followed by four intragenic recombination events involving these mutants. The recent description of a cDNA probe for this locus now renders it possible to test the validity of this phylogeny. cDNAs of PGM1 reverse-transcribed from mRNAs obtained from Japanese individuals possessing eight different electrophoretically defined alleles (PGM1*1+, PGM1*1-, PGM1*2+, PGM1*2-, PGM1*3+, PGM1*3-, PGM1*7+, PGM1*7-) were amplified by PCR and the sequences were determined. Only three different base substitutions were identified when PGM1*1+ was taken as the reference allele, as follows: an A to T transversion at residue 265, a C to T transition at residue 723, and a T to C transition at residue 1320. The second of these substitutions creates a BglII restriction enzyme site and the third creates a Nla III site. At the amino acid level, these substitutions alter amino acid 67 from Lys to Met, amino acid 220 from Arg to Cys, and amino acid 419 from Tyr to His, respectively. These mutations resulted in the electrophoretic properties defining PGM1*7+, the PGM1*2+, and PGM1*1- alleles, respectively. Subsequent intragenic recombinational events resulted in the remaining four alleles. For two of these latter alleles (PGM1*7- and PGM1*3-), more than one type of intragenic crossover can produce the allele. These findings verify the predicted phylogeny and provide a case study in the evolution of complexity at a genetic locus.

  14. A new and versatile method for the successful conversion of AFLP markers into simple single locus markers

    PubMed Central

    Brugmans, Bart; van der Hulst, Ron G. M.; Visser, Richard G. F.; Lindhout, Pim; van Eck, Herman J.

    2003-01-01

    Genetic markers can efficiently be obtained by using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting because no prior information on DNA sequence is required. However, the conversion of AFLP markers from complex fingerprints into simple single locus assays is perceived as problematic because DNA sequence information is required for the design of new locus-specific PCR primers. In addition, single locus polymorphism (SNP) information is required to design an allele-specific assay. This paper describes a new and versatile method for the conversion of AFLP markers into simple assays. The protocol presented in this paper offers solutions for frequently occurring pitfalls and describes a procedure for the identification of the SNP responsible for the AFLP. By following this approach, a high success rate for the conversion of AFLP markers into locus-specific markers was obtained. PMID:12736321

  15. Locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia: Evidence for the existence of a fifth locus

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrazin, J.; Rouleau, G.A.; Andermann, E.

    1994-09-01

    The autosomal dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. To date, four loci have been identified: the SCA-1 locus (on chromosome (chr) 6p), the SCA-2 locus (on chr 12q), the SCA-3/MJD locus (on chr 14q), and more recently an SCA-4 locus was described (chr 16q) in a Utah kindred. We have studied one large French Canadian kindred with four generations of living affected individuals segregating an autosomal dominant form of SCA. Linkage analysis using anonymous DNA markers which flank the four previously described loci significantly excludes the French Canadian kindred from the SCA-1, SCA-2, SCA-3/MJD and SCA-4 loci. Therefore a fifth, still unmapped, SCA locus remains to be identified.

  16. Different Foreign Genes Incidentally Integrated into the Same Locus of the Streptococcus suis Genome

    PubMed Central

    Sekizaki, Tsutomu; Takamatsu, Daisuke; Osaki, Makoto; Shimoji, Yoshihiro

    2005-01-01

    Some strains of Streptococcus suis possess a type II restriction-modification (RM) system, whose genes are thought to be inserted into the genome between purH and purD from a foreign source by illegitimate recombination. In this study, we characterized the purHD locus of the S. suis genomes of 28 serotype reference strains by DNA sequencing. Four strains contained the RM genes in the locus, as described before, whereas 11 strains possessed other genetic regions of seven classes. The genetic regions contained a single gene or multiple genes that were either unknown or similar to hypothetical genes of other bacteria. The mutually exclusive localization of the genetic regions with the atypical G+C contents indicated that these regions were also acquired from foreign sources. No transposable element or long-repeat sequence was found in the neighboring regions. An alignment of the nucleotide sequences, including the RM gene regions, suggested that the foreign regions were integrated by illegitimate recombination via short stretches of nucleotide identity. By using a thermosensitive suicide plasmid, the RM genes were experimentally introduced into an S. suis strain that did not contain any foreign genes in that locus. Integration of the plasmid into the S. suis genome did not occur in the purHD locus but occurred at various chromosomal loci, where there were 2 to 10 bp of nucleotide identity between the chromosome and the plasmid. These results suggest that various foreign genes described here were incidentally integrated into the same locus of the S. suis genome. PMID:15659665

  17. The discovery of the microphthalmia locus and its gene, Mitf

    PubMed Central

    Arnheiter, Heinz

    2010-01-01

    Summary The history of the discovery of the microphthalmia locus and its gene, now called Mitf, is a testament to the triumph of serendipity. Although the first microphthalmia mutation was discovered among the descendants of a mouse that was irradiated for the purpose of mutagenesis, the mutation most likely was not radiation-induced but occurred spontaneously in one of the parents of a later breeding. Although Mitf might eventually have been identified by other molecular genetic techniques, it was first cloned from a chance transgene insertion at the microphthalmia locus. And although Mitf was found to encode a member of a well-known transcription factor family, its analysis might still be in its infancy had Mitf not turned out to be of crucial importance for the physiology and pathology of many distinct organs, including eye, ear, immune system, bone, and skin, and in particular for melanoma. In fact, near seven decades of Mitf research have led to many insights about development, function, degeneration, and malignancies of a number of specific cell types, and it is hoped that these insights will one day lead to therapies benefitting those afflicted with diseases originating in these cell types. PMID:20807369

  18. The discovery of the microphthalmia locus and its gene, Mitf.

    PubMed

    Arnheiter, Heinz

    2010-12-01

    The history of the discovery of the microphthalmia locus and its gene, now called Mitf, is a testament to the triumph of serendipity. Although the first microphthalmia mutation was discovered among the descendants of a mouse that was irradiated for the purpose of mutagenesis, the mutation most likely was not radiation induced but occurred spontaneously in one of the parents of a later breeding. Although Mitf might eventually have been identified by other molecular genetic techniques, it was first cloned from a chance transgene insertion at the microphthalmia locus. And although Mitf was found to encode a member of a well-known transcription factor family, its analysis might still be in its infancy had Mitf not turned out to be of crucial importance for the physiology and pathology of many distinct organs, including eye, ear, immune system, bone, and skin, and in particular for melanoma. In fact, near seven decades of Mitf research have led to many insights about development, function, degeneration, and malignancies of a number of specific cell types, and it is hoped that these insights will one day lead to therapies benefitting those afflicted with diseases originating in these cell types.

  19. AN ENZYMATIC LOCUS PARTICIPATING IN CELLULAR DIVISION OF A YEAST

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Walter J.

    1954-01-01

    Growing cells of a filamentous mutant of a yeast, Candida albicans, were found to accumulate and reduce tetrazolium dyes whereas cells of the parent strain, growing as a normally budding yeast, accumulated the dye but did not reduce it. In older cultures, in which rapidly metabolizable carbohydrate has been depleted, the parent strain characteristically produces filaments. These cells, growing in the absence of cellular division, also exhibit tetrazolium reduction. The filamentous mutant synthesizes cell mass at a rate almost equal to that of the parent strain and is not distinguished therefrom in fermentation ability, nutritional requirements for growth, rate of endogenous respiration, or polysaccharide composition. These facts, in conjunction with the striking differences in tetrazolium reduction, lead to the conclusion that the morphological mutant has an impairment to a cellular oxidation mechanism at a flavoprotein locus. This locus is, then, the site at which a reaction essential for cellular division, is coupled via an oxidation-reduction to cellular metabolism. Preliminary evidence is presented providing good indication that uncoupling of cellular division (by genetic block) in the mutant or in the parent (by substrate exhaustion) results from impairment to a dissociable metal chelate mechanism which normally couples a reaction essential to cellular division to flavoprotein oxidation. PMID:13143184

  20. Drosophila histone locus bodies form by hierarchical recruitment of components.

    PubMed

    White, Anne E; Burch, Brandon D; Yang, Xiao-Cui; Gasdaska, Pamela Y; Dominski, Zbigniew; Marzluff, William F; Duronio, Robert J

    2011-05-16

    Nuclear bodies are protein- and RNA-containing structures that participate in a wide range of processes critical to genome function. Molecular self-organization is thought to drive nuclear body formation, but whether this occurs stochastically or via an ordered, hierarchical process is not fully understood. We addressed this question using RNAi and proteomic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster to identify and characterize novel components of the histone locus body (HLB), a nuclear body involved in the expression of replication-dependent histone genes. We identified the transcription elongation factor suppressor of Ty 6 (Spt6) and a homologue of mammalian nuclear protein of the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated locus that is encoded by the homeotic gene multisex combs (mxc) as novel HLB components. By combining genetic manipulation in both cell culture and embryos with cytological observations of Mxc, Spt6, and the known HLB components, FLICE-associated huge protein, Mute, U7 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein, and MPM-2 phosphoepitope, we demonstrated sequential recruitment and hierarchical dependency for localization of factors to HLBs during development, suggesting that ordered assembly can play a role in nuclear body formation. PMID:21576393

  1. Drosophila histone locus bodies form by hierarchical recruitment of components

    PubMed Central

    White, Anne E.; Burch, Brandon D.; Yang, Xiao-cui; Gasdaska, Pamela Y.; Dominski, Zbigniew; Marzluff, William F.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear bodies are protein- and RNA-containing structures that participate in a wide range of processes critical to genome function. Molecular self-organization is thought to drive nuclear body formation, but whether this occurs stochastically or via an ordered, hierarchical process is not fully understood. We addressed this question using RNAi and proteomic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster to identify and characterize novel components of the histone locus body (HLB), a nuclear body involved in the expression of replication-dependent histone genes. We identified the transcription elongation factor suppressor of Ty 6 (Spt6) and a homologue of mammalian nuclear protein of the ataxia telangiectasia–mutated locus that is encoded by the homeotic gene multisex combs (mxc) as novel HLB components. By combining genetic manipulation in both cell culture and embryos with cytological observations of Mxc, Spt6, and the known HLB components, FLICE-associated huge protein, Mute, U7 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein, and MPM-2 phosphoepitope, we demonstrated sequential recruitment and hierarchical dependency for localization of factors to HLBs during development, suggesting that ordered assembly can play a role in nuclear body formation. PMID:21576393

  2. A method for detecting epistasis in genome-wide studies using case-control multi-locus association analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gayán, Javier; González-Pérez, Antonio; Bermudo, Fernando; Sáez, María Eugenia; Royo, Jose Luis; Quintas, Antonio; Galan, Jose Jorge; Morón, Francisco Jesús; Ramirez-Lorca, Reposo; Real, Luis Miguel; Ruiz, Agustín

    2008-01-01

    Background The difficulty in elucidating the genetic basis of complex diseases roots in the many factors that can affect the development of a disease. Some of these genetic effects may interact in complex ways, proving undetectable by current single-locus methodology. Results We have developed an analysis tool called Hypothesis Free Clinical Cloning (HFCC) to search for genome-wide epistasis in a case-control design. HFCC combines a relatively fast computing algorithm for genome-wide epistasis detection, with the flexibility to test a variety of different epistatic models in multi-locus combinations. HFCC has good power to detect multi-locus interactions simulated under a variety of genetic models and noise conditions. Most importantly, HFCC can accomplish exhaustive genome-wide epistasis search with large datasets as demonstrated with a 400,000 SNP set typed on a cohort of Parkinson's disease patients and controls. Conclusion With the current availability of genetic studies with large numbers of individuals and genetic markers, HFCC can have a great impact in the identification of epistatic effects that escape the standard single-locus association analyses. PMID:18667089

  3. Physical mapping of a pollen modifier locus controlling self-incompatibility in apricot and synteny analysis within the Rosaceae.

    PubMed

    Zuriaga, Elena; Molina, Laura; Badenes, María Luisa; Romero, Carlos

    2012-06-01

    S-locus products (S-RNase and F-box proteins) are essential for the gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) specific recognition in Prunus. However, accumulated genetic evidence suggests that other S-locus unlinked factors are also required for GSI. For instance, GSI breakdown was associated with a pollen-part mutation unlinked to the S-locus in the apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) cv. 'Canino'. Fine-mapping of this mutated modifier gene (M-locus) and the synteny analysis of the M-locus within the Rosaceae are here reported. A segregation distortion loci mapping strategy, based on a selectively genotyped population, was used to map the M-locus. In addition, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig was constructed for this region using overlapping oligonucleotides probes, and BAC-end sequences (BES) were blasted against Rosaceae genomes to perform micro-synteny analysis. The M-locus was mapped to the distal part of chr.3 flanked by two SSR markers within an interval of 1.8 cM corresponding to ~364 Kb in the peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) genome. In the integrated genetic-physical map of this region, BES were mapped against the peach scaffold_3 and BACs were anchored to the apricot map. Micro-syntenic blocks were detected in apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) LG17/9 and strawberry (Fragaria vesca L.) FG6 chromosomes. The M-locus fine-scale mapping provides a solid basis for self-compatibility marker-assisted selection and for positional cloning of the underlying gene, a necessary goal to elucidate the pollen rejection mechanism in Prunus. In a wider context, the syntenic regions identified in peach, apple and strawberry might be useful to interpret GSI evolution in Rosaceae.

  4. Search for a schizophrenia susceptibility locus of human chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Hoff, M.; Holik, J.

    1994-06-15

    We used 10 highly informative DNA polymorphic markers and genetic linkage analysis to examine whether a gene locus predisposing to schizophrenia is located on chromosome 22, in 105 families with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. The LOD score method, including analysis for heterogeneity, provided no conclusive evidence of linkage under a dominant, recessive, or penetrance free model of inheritance. Affected sib-pair analysis was inconclusive. Affected Pedigree Member (APM) analysis gave only suggestive evidence for linkage. Multipoint APM analysis, using 4 adjacent loci including D22S281 and IL2RB, a region of interest from the APM analysis, gave non-significant results for the three different weighting functions. 18 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  5. Molecular cloning of a putative receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus of Brassica oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.C.; Howlett, B.; Boyes, D.C.; Nasrallah, M.E.; Nasrallah, J.B. )

    1991-10-01

    Self-recognition between pollen and stigma during pollination in Brassica oleracea is genetically controlled by the multiallelic self-incompatibility locus (S). The authors describe the S receptor kinase (SRK) gene, a previously uncharacterized gene that residues at the S locus. The nucleotide sequences of genomic DNA and of cDNAs corresponding to SRK predict a putative transmembrane receptor having serine/threonine-specific protein kinase activity. Its extracellular domain exhibits striking homology to the secreted product of the S-locus genotypes are highly polymorphic and have apparently evolved in unison with genetically linked alleles of SLG. SRK directs the synthesis of several alternative transcripts, which potentially encode different protein products, and these transcripts were detected exclusively in reproductive organs. The identification of SRK may provide new perspectives into the signal transduction mechanism underlying pollen recognition.

  6. Locus Adh of Drosophila melanogaster under selection for delayed senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Khaustova, N.D.

    1995-05-01

    Dynamics of the Adh activity and frequencies of alleles Adh{sup F} and Adh{sup S} were analyzed under selection for delayed senescence. The experiments were performed on Drosophila melanogaster. Lines Adh{sup S}cn and Adh{sup F}vg and experimental populations cn` and vg`, selected for an increased duration of reproductive period (late oviposition) were used. Analysis of fertility, longevity, viability and resistance to starvation showed that selection for late oviposition resulted in delayed senescence of flies of the experimental populations. Genetic structure of population vg` changed considerably with regard to the Adh locus. This was confirmed by parameters of activity, thermostability, and electrophoretic mobility of the enzyme isolated from flies after 30 generations of selection. Analysis of frequencies of the Adh alleles showed that in both selected populations, which initially had different genetic composition, accumulated allele Adh{sup S}, which encodes the isozyme that is less active but more resistant to inactivation. Genetic mechanism of delayed senescence in Drosophila is assumed to involve selection at vitally important enzyme loci, including Adh. 18 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  7. Differential activity of a tissue-specific extinguisher locus in hepatic and nonhepatic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gourdeau, H; Peterson, T C; Fournier, R E

    1989-01-01

    Tissue-specific extinguisher 1 (Tse-1) is a genetic locus on mouse chromosome 11 that can repress expression of several liver genes in trans. This locus is clearly active in fibroblasts, as hepatoma cells retaining fibroblast chromosome 11 are extinguished for both tyrosine aminotransferase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene expression. To assess the activity of Tse-1 in other tissues, we transferred mouse chromosome 11 from several different cell types into rat hepatoma recipients. Tse-1 was active in nonhepatic cell lines derived from each primary germ layer, but Tse-1 activity was not apparent in hybrids between hepatoma cells and primary mouse hepatocytes. These differences in the genetic activity of murine Tse-1 were apparently heritable in cis. Images PMID:2568581

  8. Differential activity of a tissue-specific extinguisher locus in hepatic and nonhepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Gourdeau, H; Peterson, T C; Fournier, R E

    1989-05-01

    Tissue-specific extinguisher 1 (Tse-1) is a genetic locus on mouse chromosome 11 that can repress expression of several liver genes in trans. This locus is clearly active in fibroblasts, as hepatoma cells retaining fibroblast chromosome 11 are extinguished for both tyrosine aminotransferase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene expression. To assess the activity of Tse-1 in other tissues, we transferred mouse chromosome 11 from several different cell types into rat hepatoma recipients. Tse-1 was active in nonhepatic cell lines derived from each primary germ layer, but Tse-1 activity was not apparent in hybrids between hepatoma cells and primary mouse hepatocytes. These differences in the genetic activity of murine Tse-1 were apparently heritable in cis.

  9. Exclusion mapping of the hereditary dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy gene from the Huntington's disease locus.

    PubMed

    Kondo, I; Ohta, H; Yazaki, M; Ikeda, J E; Gusella, J F; Kanazawa, I

    1990-02-01

    Hereditary dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder. Clinical and genetic findings in hereditary DRPLA are very similar to those of Huntington's disease (HD). However, it can be differentiated from HD by the pathological findings of dentatorubral and pallidoluysian atrophies and by a lack of prominent atrophy of the striatum at necropsy. The hereditary DRPLA gene has not been localised and the possibility that the two disease loci are allelic has been suggested. We have searched for linkage between the locus for hereditary DRPLA and D4S10 using the G8 probe, which is a genetic marker linked to HD. In four families, there were negative scores at all recombination fractions and the lod score was -2.215 at recombination fraction theta = 0.15. These data indicate that the locus for hereditary DRPLA is not closely linked to D4S10 and that hereditary DRPLA is a distinct disease from HD.

  10. Mining drug-disease relationships as a complement to medical genetics-based drug repositioning: Where a recommendation system meets genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Gu, Q; Wei, J; Cao, Z; Liu, Q

    2015-05-01

    A novel recommendation-based drug repositioning strategy is presented to simultaneously determine novel drug indications and side effects in one integrated framework. This strategy provides a complementary method to medical genetics-based drug repositioning, which reduces the occurrence of false positives in medical genetics-based drug repositioning, resulting in a ranked list of new candidate indications and/or side effects with different confidence levels. Several new drug indications and side effects are reported with high prediction confidences.

  11. Locus of Control in Alcoholics Undergoing Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Shirley C.

    Alcoholism is a complex behavior pattern. Social learning theory, which is concerned with the analysis of why individuals behave in certain ways and the effects of reinforcement patterns in their behaviors, offers an alternative to traditional treatments of alcoholics. Among alcoholics, drinking is a control issue. Locus of control is viewed as a…

  12. Aspirations, Attributions, and Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuel, William; McNall, Sidne J.

    Self-evaluation is thought to play a major role in personality and motivation. Preliminary experience with success or failure, levels of aspiration, attributions for performance, and locus of control may all be interrelated factors in human motivation. After receiving success, failure, or no feedback on a concept formation task, subjects (N=90)…

  13. Molecular genetics of human color vision.

    PubMed

    Deeb, S S; Motulsky, A G

    1996-05-01

    The significant advances in our understanding of color vision has been due to the convergence of information from behavioral and molecular genetic analyses. The molecular biology of the visual pigments; molecular genetic basis of variation in normal and abnormal color vision, and regulation of the genes at the LWS-MWS pigment gene locus are discussed.

  14. Pollen genetic markers for detection of mutagens in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Nilan, R.A.; Rosichan, J.L.; Arenaz, P.; Hodgdon, A.L.; Kleinhofs, A.

    1980-01-01

    To utilize and exploit pollen for in situ mutagen monitoring, screening and toxicology, the range of genetic traits in pollen must be identified and analyzed. To be useful for the development of mutagen detection systems proteins should be: (1) activity stainable or immunologically identifiable in the pollen, (2) the products of one to three loci; and (3) gametophytic and nuclear in origin. Several proteins, including alcohol dehydrogenase in maize, which meet these criteria are discussed. The waxy locus in barley and maize which controls starch deposition for pollen screening and mutant detection. Thirty waxy mutant lines, induced by sodium azide and gamma-rays are characterized for spontaneous and induced reversion frequencies, allelism, karyotype, amylose content, and UDPglucose glucosyltransferase (waxy gene product) activity. Twelve mutant alleles are being mapped by recombinant frequencies.

  15. Understanding & Teaching Genetics Using Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Scott; Himelblau, Ed

    2013-01-01

    We present a collection of analogies that are intended to help students better understand the foreign and often nuanced vocabulary of the genetics curriculum. Why is it called the "wild type"? What is the difference between a locus, a gene, and an allele? What is the functional (versus a rule-based) distinction between dominant and…

  16. Interactions between Proteins Encoded within the Human Cytomegalovirus UL133-UL138 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Petrucelli, Alex; Umashankar, Mahadevaiah; Zagallo, Patricia; Rak, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We previously described a novel genetic locus within the ULb′ region of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome that, while dispensable for replication in fibroblasts, suppresses replication in hematopoietic progenitors and augments replication in endothelial cells. This locus, referred to as the UL133-UL138 locus, encodes four proteins, pUL133, pUL135, pUL136, and pUL138. In this work, we have mapped the interactions among these proteins. An analysis of all pairwise interactions during transient expression revealed a robust interaction between pUL133 and pUL138. Potential interactions between pUL136 and both pUL133 and pUL138 were also revealed. In addition, each of the UL133-UL138 locus proteins self-associated, suggesting a potential to form higher-order homomeric complexes. As both pUL133 and pUL138 function in promoting viral latency in CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) infected in vitro, we further focused on this interaction. pUL133 and pUL138 are the predominant complex detected when all proteins are expressed together and require no other proteins in the locus for their association. During infection, the interaction between pUL133 and pUL138 or pUL136 can be detected. A recombinant virus that fails to express both pUL133 and pUL138 exhibited a latency phenotype similar to that of viruses that fail to express either pUL133 or pUL138, indicating that these proteins function cooperatively in latency and do not have independent functions that additively contribute to HCMV latency. These studies identify protein interactions among proteins encoded by the UL133-UL138 locus and demonstrate an important interaction impacting the outcome of HCMV infection. PMID:22674978

  17. Single locus affects embryonic segment polarity and multiple aspects of an adult evolutionary novelty

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The characterization of the molecular changes that underlie the origin and diversification of morphological novelties is a key challenge in evolutionary developmental biology. The evolution of such traits is thought to rely largely on co-option of a toolkit of conserved developmental genes that typically perform multiple functions. Mutations that affect both a universal developmental process and the formation of a novelty might shed light onto the genetics of traits not represented in model systems. Here we describe three pleiotropic mutations with large effects on a novel trait, butterfly eyespots, and on a conserved stage of embryogenesis, segment polarity. Results We show that three mutations affecting eyespot size and/or colour composition in Bicyclus anynana butterflies occurred in the same locus, and that two of them are embryonic recessive lethal. Using surgical manipulations and analysis of gene expression patterns in developing wings, we demonstrate that the effects on eyespot morphology are due to changes in the epidermal response component of eyespot induction. Our analysis of morphology and of gene expression in mutant embryos shows that they have a typical segment polarity phenotype, consistent with the mutant locus encoding a negative regulator of Wingless signalling. Conclusions This study characterizes the segregation and developmental effects of alleles at a single locus that controls the morphology of a lineage-specific trait (butterfly eyespots) and a conserved process (embryonic segment polarity and, specifically, the regulation of Wingless signalling). Because no gene with such function was found in the orthologous, highly syntenic genomic regions of two other lepidopterans, we hypothesize that our locus is a yet undescribed, possibly lineage-specific, negative regulator of the conserved Wnt/Wg pathway. Moreover, the fact that this locus interferes with multiple aspects of eyespot morphology and maps to a genomic region containing

  18. An efficient strategy for gene mapping using multipoint linkage analysis: exclusion of the multiple endocrine neoplasia 2A (MEN2A) locus from chromosome 13.

    PubMed

    Farrer, L A; Goodfellow, P J; Lamarche, C M; Franjkovic, I; Myers, S; White, B N; Holden, J J; Kidd, J R; Simpson, N E; Kidd, K K

    1987-04-01

    Members of four families in which multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN-2A) is segregating were typed for seven DNA markers and one red cell enzyme marker on chromosome 13. Close linkage was excluded between the MEN2A locus and each marker locus tested. By means of multipoint analysis and the genetic map of chromosome 13 developed by Leppert et al., MEN2A was excluded from any position between the most proximal marker locus (D13S6) and the most distal marker locus (D13S3) and from within 12 cMorgans outside these two loci, respectively. However, the support of exclusion within an interval was diminished under the assumption of a substantially larger genetic map in females. The strategy of multipoint analysis, which excluded between 1.5 and 2.0 times more chromosome 13 than did two-point analysis, demonstrates the utility of linkage maps in mapping disease genes. PMID:2883889

  19. Incorporating Single-Locus Tests into Haplotype Cladistic Analysis in Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianfeng; Papasian, Chris; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2007-01-01

    In case-control studies, genetic associations for complex diseases may be probed either with single-locus tests or with haplotype-based tests. Although there are different views on the relative merits and preferences of the two test strategies, haplotype-based analyses are generally believed to be more powerful to detect genes with modest effects. However, a main drawback of haplotype-based association tests is the large number of distinct haplotypes, which increases the degrees of freedom for corresponding test statistics and thus reduces the statistical power. To decrease the degrees of freedom and enhance the efficiency and power of haplotype analysis, we propose an improved haplotype clustering method that is based on the haplotype cladistic analysis developed by Durrant et al. In our method, we attempt to combine the strengths of single-locus analysis and haplotype-based analysis into one single test framework. Novel in our method is that we develop a more informative haplotype similarity measurement by using p-values obtained from single-locus association tests to construct a measure of weight, which to some extent incorporates the information of disease outcomes. The weights are then used in computation of similarity measures to construct distance metrics between haplotype pairs in haplotype cladistic analysis. To assess our proposed new method, we performed simulation analyses to compare the relative performances of (1) conventional haplotype-based analysis using original haplotype, (2) single-locus allele-based analysis, (3) original haplotype cladistic analysis (CLADHC) by Durrant et al., and (4) our weighted haplotype cladistic analysis method, under different scenarios. Our weighted cladistic analysis method shows an increased statistical power and robustness, compared with the methods of haplotype cladistic analysis, single-locus test, and the traditional haplotype-based analyses. The real data analyses also show that our proposed method has practical

  20. Incorporating single-locus tests into haplotype cladistic analysis in case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianfeng; Papasian, Chris; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2007-03-23

    In case-control studies, genetic associations for complex diseases may be probed either with single-locus tests or with haplotype-based tests. Although there are different views on the relative merits and preferences of the two test strategies, haplotype-based analyses are generally believed to be more powerful to detect genes with modest effects. However, a main drawback of haplotype-based association tests is the large number of distinct haplotypes, which increases the degrees of freedom for corresponding test statistics and thus reduces the statistical power. To decrease the degrees of freedom and enhance the efficiency and power of haplotype analysis, we propose an improved haplotype clustering method that is based on the haplotype cladistic analysis developed by Durrant et al. In our method, we attempt to combine the strengths of single-locus analysis and haplotype-based analysis into one single test framework. Novel in our method is that we develop a more informative haplotype similarity measurement by using p-values obtained from single-locus association tests to construct a measure of weight, which to some extent incorporates the information of disease outcomes. The weights are then used in computation of similarity measures to construct distance metrics between haplotype pairs in haplotype cladistic analysis. To assess our proposed new method, we performed simulation analyses to compare the relative performances of (1) conventional haplotype-based analysis using original haplotype, (2) single-locus allele-based analysis, (3) original haplotype cladistic analysis (CLADHC) by Durrant et al., and (4) our weighted haplotype cladistic analysis method, under different scenarios. Our weighted cladistic analysis method shows an increased statistical power and robustness, compared with the methods of haplotype cladistic analysis, single-locus test, and the traditional haplotype-based analyses. The real data analyses also show that our proposed method has practical

  1. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia: reduction of the FSP1 candidate region on chromosome 14q to 7 cM and locus heterogeneity.

    PubMed Central

    Gispert, S; Santos, N; Damen, R; Voit, T; Schulz, J; Klockgether, T; Orozco, G; Kreuz, F; Weissenbach, J; Auburger, G

    1995-01-01

    Three large pedigrees of German descent with autosomal dominant "pure" familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) were characterized clinically and genetically. Haplotype and linkage analyses, with microsatellites covering the FSP region on chromosome 14q (locus FSP1), were performed. In pedigree W, we found a haplotype that cosegregates with the disease and observed three crossing-over events, reducing the FSP1 candidate region to 7 cM; in addition, the observation of apparent anticipation in this family suggests a trinucleotide repeat expansion as the mutation. In pedigrees D and S, the gene locus could be excluded from the whole FSP1 region, confirming the locus heterogeneity of autosomal dominant FSP. PMID:7825576

  2. Locus of Control and Psychological Distress among the Aged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, W. Daniel; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined relationship between locus of control and self-reported psychopathology in 139 residents of retirement complex. Correlation coefficients computed for locus of control and each of nine symptom dimensions of the Brief Symptom Inventory indicated that locus of control was correlated with self-reported psychopatholgoy for older women but not…

  3. Cognitive Evaluation Theory, Locus of Control and Positive Verbal Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonky, Edward; Reihman, Jacqueline

    This study tests the hypothesis that individual differences in locus of control orientation may mediate elementary school students' responses to positive verbal feedback. A total of 30 kindergarten through fourth grade subjects were assessed for locus of control orientation using the Bialer Children's Locus of Control Questionnaire. To establish a…

  4. A major locus expressed in the male gametophyte with incomplete penetrance is responsible for in situ gynogenesis in maize.

    PubMed

    Barret, P; Brinkmann, M; Beckert, M

    2008-08-01

    In flowering plants, double fertilization occurs when the egg cell and the central cell are each fertilized by one sperm cell. In maize, some lines produce pollen capable of inducing in situ gynogenesis thereby leading to maternal haploids that originate exclusively from the female plant. In this paper, we present a genetic analysis of in situ gynogenesis in maize. Using a cross between non-inducing and inducing lines, we identified a major locus on maize chromosome 1 controlling in situ gynogenesis (ggi1, for gynogenesis inducer 1). Fine mapping of this locus was performed, and BAC physical contigs spanning the locus were identified using the rice genome as anchor. Genetic component analysis showed that (a) a segregation distortion against the inducer parent was present at this locus, (b) segregation resulted only from male deficiency and (c) there was a correlation between the rate of segregation distortion and the level of gynogenetic induction. In addition, our results showed that the genotype of the pollen determined its capacity to induce the formation of a haploid female embryo, indicating gametophytic expression of the character with incomplete penetrance. We propose the occurrence of a gametophytic-specific process which leads to segregation distortion at the ggi1 locus associated with gynogenetic induction with incomplete penetrance.

  5. [Polymorphism of nine STR locus in Nu population from Yunnan Province].

    PubMed

    Gao, Shu-Hui; Wang, Xin-Huai; Lai, Jiang-Hua; Zheng, Hai-Bo; Li, Sheng-Bin

    2002-03-01

    In this study,blood samples were randomly drawn from 84 unrelated Nu individuals. The polymorphism of nine STR loci and Amelogenin locus were determined by DNA GeneScan. The genetic database on the distribution of gene frequency on the nine STR loci was established, statistical results showed that the genotype distributions were in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg equation. Compared with other population,the results in our study were of great value in human DNA genetic data instant method with the characteristics of precision and sensitivity. PMID:16118123

  6. The Huntington disease locus is most likely within 325 kilobases of the chromosome 4p telomere

    SciTech Connect

    Doggett, N.A.; Cheng, J.F.; Smith, C.L.; Cantor, C.R. )

    1989-12-01

    The genetic defect responsible for Huntington disease was originally localized near the tip of the short arm of chromosome 4 by genetic linkage to the locus D4S10. Several markers closer to Huntington disease have since been isolated, but these all appear to be proximal to the defect. A physical map that extends from the most distal of these loci, D4S90, to the telomere of chromosome 4 was constructed. This map identifies at least two CpG islands as markers for Huntington disease candidate genes and places the most likely location of the Huntington disease defect remarkably close (within 325 kilobases) to the telomere.

  7. Locus-specific database domain and data content analysis: evolution and content maturation toward clinical use.

    PubMed

    Mitropoulou, Christina; Webb, Adam J; Mitropoulos, Konstantinos; Brookes, Anthony J; Patrinos, George P

    2010-10-01

    Genetic variation databases have become indispensable in many areas of health care. In addition, more and more experts are depositing published and unpublished disease-causing variants of particular genes into locus-specific databases (LSDBs). Some of these databases contain such extensive information that they have become known as knowledge bases. Here, we analyzed 1,188 LSDBs and their content for the presence or absence of 44 content criteria related to database features (general presentation, locus-specific information, database structure) and data content (data collection, summary table of variants, database querying). Our analyses revealed that several elements have helped to advance the field and reduce data heterogeneity, such as the development of specialized database management systems and the creation of data querying tools. We also identified a number of deficiencies, namely, the lack of detailed disease and phenotypic descriptions for each genetic variant and links to relevant patient organizations, which, if addressed, would allow LSDBs to better serve the clinical genetics community. We propose a structure, based on LSDBs and closely related repositories (namely, clinical genetics databases), which would contribute to a federated genetic variation browser and also allow the maintenance of variation data. PMID:20672379

  8. Ancient roots for polymorphism at the HLA-DQ. alpha. locus in primates

    SciTech Connect

    Gyllensten, U.B.; Erlich, H.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The genes encoding the human histocompatibility antigens (HLA) exhibit a remarkable degree of polymorphism as revealed by immunologic and molecular analyses. This extensive sequence polymorphism either may have been generated during the lifetime of the human species or could have arisen before speciation and been maintained in the contemporary human population by selection or, possibly, by genetic drift. These two hypotheses were examined using the polymerase chain reaction method to amplify polymorphic sequences from the DQ{alpha} locus, as well as the DX{alpha} locus, an homologous but nonexpressed locus, in a series of primates that diverged at known times. In general, the amino acid sequence of a specific human DQ{alpha} allelic type is more closely related to its chimpanzee or gorilla counterpart than to other human DQ{alpha} alleles. Phylogenetic analysis of the silent nucleotide position changes shows that the similarity of allelic types between species is due to common ancestry rather than convergent evolution. Thus, most of the polymorphism at the DQ{alpha} locus in the human species was already present at least 5 million years ago in the ancestral species that gave rise to the chimpanzee, gorilla, and human lineages. However, one of the DQ{alpha} alleles may have arisen after speciation by recombination between two ancestral alleles.

  9. Molecular characterization of DNA sequences from the Primula vulgaris S-locus.

    PubMed

    Manfield, Iain W; Pavlov, Vassily K; Li, Jinhong; Cook, Holly E; Hummel, Florian; Gilmartin, Philip M

    2005-04-01

    Primula species provide possibly the best known examples of heteromorphic flower development and this breeding system has attracted considerable attention, including that of Charles Darwin. However, despite considerable recent advances in molecular genetics, nothing is known about the molecular basis of floral heteromorphy. The first molecular marker for the Primula S-locus is reported here. This DNA sequence was identified by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR, further defined as a sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker, and subsequently shown to correspond to a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) that is linked to the thrum allele of the Primula S-locus. The sequence of 8.8 kb of genomic DNA encompassing this thrum-specific RFLP is presented. Analysis of this DNA reveals a highly repetitive sequence structure similar to that found at the S-locus in other species; it also contains sequences similar to elements of a Gypsy-like retrotransposon. The identification of a specific DNA sequence associated with the thrum allele of the Primula S-locus provides the first molecular probe with which to investigate the molecular basis of heteromorphic flower development in Primula.

  10. The Finnish lapphund retinal atrophy locus maps to the centromeric region of CFA9

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre-Hernández, Jesús; Wickström, Kaisa; Sargan, David R

    2007-01-01

    Background Dogs have the second largest number of genetic diseases, after humans. Among the diseases present in dogs, progressive retinal atrophy has been reported in more than a hundred breeds. In some of them, the mutation has been identified and genetic tests have allowed the identification of carriers, thus enabling a drastic reduction in the incidence of the disease. The Finnish lapphund is a dog breed presenting late-onset progressive retinal atrophy for which the disease locus remains unknown. Results In this study we mapped the progressive retinal atrophy locus in the Finnish lapphund using a DNA pooling approach, assuming that all affected dogs within the breed share the same identical-by descent-mutation as the cause of the disease (genetic homogeneity). Autosomal recessive inheritance was also assumed, after ruling out, from pedigree analysis, dominant and X-linked inheritance. DNA from 12 Finnish lapphund cases was mixed in one pool, and DNA from 12 first-degree relatives of these cases was mixed to serve as the control pool. The 2 pools were tested with 133 microsatellite markers, 3 of which showed a shift towards homozygosity in the cases. Individual genotyping with these 3 markers confirmed homozygosity for the GALK1 microsatellite only (chromosome 9). Further individual genotyping with additional samples (4 cases and 59 controls) confirmed the association between this marker and the disease locus (p < 0.001). Closely related to this breed are the Swedish lapphund and the Lapponian herder for which a small number of retinal atrophy cases have been reported. Swedish lapphund cases, but not Lapponian herder cases, had the same GALK1 microsatellite genotype as Finnish lapphund cases. Conclusion The locus for progressive rod-cone degeneration is known to be close to the GALK1 locus, on the telomeric region of chromosome 9, where the retinal atrophy locus of the Finnish lapphund has been mapped. This suggests that the disease in this breed, as well as in

  11. Genetics of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Fontenla, Cristina; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex disease caused by the interaction of multiple genetic and environmental factors. This review focuses on the studies that have contributed to the discovery of genetic susceptibility factors in OA. The most relevant associations discovered until now are discussed in detail: GDF-5, 7q22 locus, MCF2L, DOT1L, NCOA3 and also some important findings from the arcOGEN study. Moreover, the different approaches that can be used to minimize the specific problems of the study of OA genetics are discussed. These include the study of microsatellites, phenotype standardization and other methods such as meta-analysis of GWAS and gene-based analysis. It is expected that these new approaches contribute to finding new susceptibility genetic factors for OA.

  12. The fester locus in Botryllus schlosseri experiences selection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Allorecognition, the ability of an organism to distinguish self from non-self, occurs throughout the entire tree of life. Despite the prevalence and importance of allorecognition systems, the genetic basis of allorecognition has rarely been characterized outside the well-known MHC (Major Histocompatibility Complex) in vertebrates and SI (Self-Incompatibility) in plants. Where loci have been identified, their evolutionary history is an open question. We have previously identified the genes involved in self/non-self recognition in the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri, and we can now begin to investigate their evolution. In B. schlosseri, colonies sharing 1 or more alleles of a gene called FuHC (Fusion Histocompatibility) will fuse. Protein products of a locus called fester, located ~300 kb from FuHC, have been shown to play multiple roles in the histocompatibility reaction, as activating and/or inhibitory receptors. We test whether the proteins encoded by this locus are evolving neutrally or are experiencing balancing, directional, or purifying selection. Results Nearly all of the variation in the fester locus resides within populations. The 13 housekeeping genes (12 nuclear genes and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I) have substantially more structure among populations within groups and among groups than fester. All polymorphism statistics (Tajima's D, Fu and Li's D* and F*) are significantly negative for the East Coast A-type alleles, and Fu and Li's F* statistic is significantly negative for the West Coast A-type alleles. These results are likely due to selection rather than demography, given that 10 of the housekeeping loci have no populations with significant values for any of the polymorphism statistics. The majority of codons in the fester proteins have ω values < 1, but 15–27 codons have > 95% posterior probability of ω values > 1. Conclusion Fester proteins are evolving non-neutrally. The polymorphism statistics are consistent with

  13. The potato R locus codes for dihydroflavonol 4-reductase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongfei; Cheng, Shuping; De Jong, Darlene; Griffiths, Helen; Halitschke, Rayko; De Jong, Walter

    2009-09-01

    The potato R locus is required for the production of red pelargonidin-based anthocyanin pigments in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). Red color also requires tissue-specific regulatory genes, such as D (for expression in tuber skin) and F (expression in flowers). A related locus, P, is required for production of blue/purple anthocyanins; P is epistatic to R. We have previously reported that the dihydroflavonol 4-reductase gene (dfr) co-segregates with R. To test directly whether R corresponds to dfr, we placed the allele of dfr associated with red color under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter and introduced it into the potato cultivar Prince Hairy (genotype dddd rrrr P-), which has white tubers and pale blue flowers. Transgenic Prince Hairy tubers remained white, but flower color changed to purple. Three independent transgenic lines, as well as a vector-transformed line, were then crossed with the red-skinned variety Chieftain (genotype D-R-pppp), to establish populations that segregated for D, R, P, and the dfr transgene or empty vector. Markers were used to genotype progeny at D and R. Progeny carrying the empty vector in the genetic background D-rrrr produced white or purple tubers, while progeny with the same genotype and the dfr transgene produced red or purple tubers. HPLC and LC-MS/MS analyses of anthocyanins present in Chieftain and in a red-skinned progeny clone with the dfr transgene in a D-rrrr background revealed no qualitative differences. Thus, dfr can fully complement R, both in terms of tuber color and anthocyanin composition.

  14. PAHdb 2003: what a locus-specific knowledgebase can do.

    PubMed

    Scriver, Charles R; Hurtubise, Mélanie; Konecki, David; Phommarinh, Manyphong; Prevost, Lynne; Erlandsen, Heidi; Stevens, Ray; Waters, Paula J; Ryan, Shannon; McDonald, David; Sarkissian, Christineh

    2003-04-01

    PAHdb, a legacy of and resource in genetics, is a relational locus-specific database (http://www.pahdb.mcgill.ca). It records and annotates both pathogenic alleles (n = 439, putative disease-causing) and benign alleles (n = 41, putative untranslated polymorphisms) at the human phenylalanine hydroxylase locus (symbol PAH). Human alleles named by nucleotide number (systematic names) and their trivial names receive unique identifier numbers. The annotated gDNA sequence for PAH is typical for mammalian genes. An annotated gDNA sequence is numbered so that cDNA and gDNA sites are interconvertable. A site map for PAHdb leads to a large array of secondary data (attributes): source of the allele (submitter, publication, or population); polymorphic haplotype background; and effect of the allele as predicted by molecular modeling on the phenylalanine hydroxylase enzyme (EC 1.14.16.1) or by in vitro expression analysis. The majority (63%) of the putative pathogenic PAH alleles are point mutations causing missense in translation of which few have a primary effect on PAH enzyme kinetics. Most apparently have a secondary effect on its function through misfolding, aggregation, and intracellular degradation of the protein. Some point mutations create new splice sites. A subset of primary PAH mutations that are tetrahydrobiopterin-responsive is highlighted on a Curators' Page. A clinical module describes the corresponding human clinical disorders (hyperphenylalaninemia [HPA] and phenylketonuria [PKU]), their inheritance, and their treatment. PAHdb contains data on the mouse gene (Pah) and on four orthologous mutant mouse models and their use (for example, in research on oral treatment of PKU with the enzyme phenylalanine ammonia lyase [EC 4.3.1.5]).

  15. Locus equations derived from compensatory articulation.

    PubMed

    Sussman, H M; Fruchter, D; Cable, A

    1995-05-01

    Locus equations are linear regressions of the onset of F2 transitions on their offsets. These functions vowel-normalize the F2 transitions such that they are able to characterize consonantal place categories. The purpose of this research was to determine if compensatory articulation due to bite blocks would alter the normally linear relationship between F2 transition onset and offset frequencies or alter the differential slopes and y intercepts of locus equations as a function of stop place. Six speakers, three male and three female, each produced /bVt/, /dVt/, and /gVt/ tokens for ten vowel contexts under normal and bite block conditions. Extremely linear and practically identical scatterplots were obtained in the two speaking conditions. No adaptation to the bite blocks was found when comparing locus equations derived from the initial versus the final bite block trial. Results are discussed in relation to the "orderly output constraint," which postulates a perceptual function for linearly related F2 transition end points within consonantal place categories.

  16. Bipolar disorder: Evidence for a major locus

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, M.A.; Flodman, P.L.; Sadovnick, A.D.; Ameli, H.

    1995-10-09

    Complex segregation analyses were conducted on families of bipolar I and bipolar II probands to delineate the mode of inheritance. The probands were ascertained from consecutive referrals to the Mood Disorder Service, University Hospital, University of British Columbia and diagnosed by DSM-III-R and Research Diagnostic Criteria. Data were available on over 1,500 first-degree relatives of the 186 Caucasian probands. The purpose of the analyses was to determine if, after correcting for age and birth cohort, there was evidence for a single major locus. Five models were fit to the data using the statistical package SAGE: (1) dominant, (2) recessive, (3) arbitrary mendelian inheritance, (4) environmental, and (5) no major effects. A single dominant, mendelian major locus was the best fitting of these models for the sample of bipolar I and II probands when only bipolar relatives were defined as affected (polygenic inheritance could not be tested). Adding recurrent major depression to the diagnosis {open_quotes}affected{close_quotes} for relatives reduced the evidence for a major locus effect. Our findings support the undertaking of linkage studies and are consistent with the analyses of the National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH) Collaborative Study data by Rice et al. and Blangero and Elston. 39 refs., 4 tabs.

  17. Managing Meetings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Meetings are a means of giving people a chance to contribute. Meetings are also the nursery where the people's skills of listening, speaking, and building good working relationships are honed. They are where people practice being courteously challenging and confident, and they are where people are fascinated and fascinating. Meetings are where…

  18. A survey of EMS-induced biennial Beta vulgaris mutants reveals a novel bolting locus which is unlinked to the bolting gene B.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Bianca; Abou-Elwafa, Salah F; Zhang, Wenying; Jung, Christian; Müller, Andreas E

    2010-10-01

    Beta vulgaris is a facultative perennial species which exhibits large intraspecific variation in vernalization requirement and includes cultivated biennial forms such as the sugar beet. Vernalization requirement is under the genetic control of the bolting locus B on chromosome II. Previously, ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis of an annual accession had yielded several mutants which require vernalization to bolt and behave as biennials. Here, five F2 populations derived from crosses between biennial mutants and annual beets were tested for co-segregation of bolting phenotypes with genotypic markers located at the B locus. One mutant appears to be mutated at the B locus, suggesting that an EMS-induced mutation of B can be sufficient to abolish annual bolting. Co-segregation analysis in four populations indicates that the genetic control of bolting also involves previously unknown major loci not linked to B, one of which also affects bolting time and was genetically mapped to chromosome IX.

  19. Evidence for locus heterogeneity in human autosomal dominant split hand/split foot malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.E.; Wijsman, E.M.; Stephens, K.; Evans, J.P. ); Scherer, S.W.; Tsui, L.C. ); Kukolich, M. )

    1994-07-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHSF; also known as ectrodactyly) is a human developmental disorder characterized by missing central digits and other distal limb malformations. An association between SHSF and cytogenetically visible rearrangements of chromosome 7 at bands q21-q22 provides compelling evidence for the location of a causative gene at this location, and the locus has been designated SHFD1. In the present study, marker loci were localized to the SHFD1 critical region through the analysis of somatic cell hybrids derived from individuals with SHSF and cytogenetic abnormalities involving the 7q21-q22 region. Combined genetic and physical data suggest that the order of markers in the SHFD1 critical region is cen-D7S492-D7S527-(D7S479-D7S491)-SHFD1-D7S553-D7S518-qter. Dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms at three of these loci were used to test for linkage of SHSF to this region in a large pedigree that demonstrates autosomal dominant SHSF. Evidence against linkage of the SHSF gene to 7q21-q22 was obtained in this pedigree. Therefore, combined molecular and genetic data provide evidence for locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant SHSF. The authors propose the name SHSF2 for this second locus. 34 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. A gene locus for targeted ectopic gene integration in Zymoseptoria tritici☆

    PubMed Central

    Kilaru, S.; Schuster, M.; Latz, M.; Das Gupta, S.; Steinberg, N.; Fones, H.; Gurr, S.J.; Talbot, N.J.; Steinberg, G.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the cellular organization and biology of fungal pathogens requires accurate methods for genomic integration of mutant alleles or fluorescent fusion-protein constructs. In Zymoseptoria tritici, this can be achieved by integrating of plasmid DNA randomly into the genome of this wheat pathogen. However, untargeted ectopic integration carries the risk of unwanted side effects, such as altered gene expression, due to targeting regulatory elements, or gene disruption following integration into protein-coding regions of the genome. Here, we establish the succinate dehydrogenase (sdi1) locus as a single “soft-landing” site for targeted ectopic integration of genetic constructs by using a carboxin-resistant sdi1R allele, carrying the point-mutation H267L. We use various green and red fluorescent fusion constructs and show that 97% of all transformants integrate correctly into the sdi1 locus as single copies. We also demonstrate that such integration does not affect the pathogenicity of Z. tritici, and thus the sdi1 locus is a useful tool for virulence analysis in genetically modified Z. tritici strains. Furthermore, we have developed a vector which facilitates yeast recombination cloning and thus allows assembly of multiple overlapping DNA fragments in a single cloning step for high throughput vector and strain generation. PMID:26092798

  1. The Lbw2 locus promotes autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Scatizzi, John C; Haraldsson, Maria K; Pollard, K Michael; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N; Kono, Dwight H

    2012-04-01

    The lupus-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) strain uniquely develops a genetically imposed severe spontaneous autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) that is very similar to the corresponding human disease. Previous studies have mapped anti-erythrocyte Ab (AEA)-promoting NZB loci to several chromosomal locations, including chromosome 4; however, none of these have been analyzed with interval congenics. In this study, we used NZB.NZW-Lbw2 congenic (designated Lbw2 congenic) mice containing an introgressed fragment of New Zealand White (NZW) on chromosome 4 encompassing Lbw2, a locus previously linked to survival, glomerulonephritis, and splenomegaly, to investigate its role in AIHA. Lbw2 congenic mice exhibited marked reductions in AEAs and splenomegaly but not in anti-nuclear Abs. Furthermore, Lbw2 congenics had greater numbers of marginal zone B cells and reduced expansion of peritoneal cells, particularly the B-1a cell subset at early ages, but no reduction in B cell response to LPS. Analysis of a panel of subinterval congenic mice showed that the full effect of Lbw2 on AEA production was dependent on three subloci, with splenomegaly mapping to two of the subloci and expansions of peritoneal cell populations, including B-1a cells to one. These results directly demonstrated the presence of AEA-specific promoting genes on NZB chromosome 4, documented a marked influence of background genes on autoimmune phenotypes related to Lbw2, and further refined the locations of the underlying genetic variants. Delineation of the Lbw2 genes should yield new insights into both the pathogenesis of AIHA and the nature of epistatic interactions of lupus-modifying genetic variants.

  2. Evolution and ecology meet molecular genetics: adaptive phenotypic plasticity in two isolated Negev desert populations of Acacia raddiana at either end of a rainfall gradient

    PubMed Central

    Ward, David; Shrestha, Madan K.; Golan-Goldhirsh, Avi

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The ecological, evolutionary and genetic bases of population differentiation in a variable environment are often related to the selection pressures that plants experience. We compared differences in several growth- and defence-related traits in two isolated populations of Acacia raddiana trees from sites at either end of an extreme environmental gradient in the Negev desert. Methods We used random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) to determine the molecular differences between populations. We grew plants under two levels of water, three levels of nutrients and three levels of herbivory to test for phenotypic plasticity and adaptive phenotypic plasticity. Key Results The RAPD analyses showed that these populations are highly genetically differentiated. Phenotypic plasticity in various morphological traits in A. raddiana was related to patterns of population genetic differentiation between the two study sites. Although we did not test for maternal effects in these long-lived trees, significant genotype × environment (G × E) interactions in some of these traits indicated that such plasticity may be adaptive. Conclusions The main selection pressure in this desert environment, perhaps unsurprisingly, is water. Increased water availability resulted in greater growth in the southern population, which normally receives far less rain than the northern population. Even under the conditions that we defined as low water and/or nutrients, the performance of the seedlings from the southern population was significantly better, perhaps reflecting selection for these traits. Consistent with previous studies of this genus, there was no evidence of trade-offs between physical and chemical defences and plant growth parameters in this study. Rather, there appeared to be positive correlations between plant size and defence parameters. The great variation in several traits in both populations may result in a diverse potential for responding to selection pressures in

  3. Interaction of the Stubble-Stubbloid Locus and the Broad-Complex of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Beaton, A. H.; Kiss, I.; Fristrom, D.; Fristrom, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    The 2B5 region on the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster forms an early ecdysone puff at the end of the third instar. The region is coextensive with a complex genetic locus, the Broad-Complex (BR-C). The BR-C is a regulatory gene that contains two major functional domains, the br domain and the l(1)2Bc domain. BR-C mutants prevent metamorphosis, including morphogenesis of imaginal discs; br mutants prevent elongation and eversion of appendages and l(1)2Bc mutants prevent fusion of the discs. The Stubble-stubbloid (Sb-sbd) locus at 89B9-10 is best known for the effects of its mutants on bristle structure. Mutants of the BR-C and the Sb-sbd locus interact to produce severe malformation of appendages. Viable heteroallelic and homoallelic combinations of Sb-sbd mutants, including loss-of-function mutants, affect the elongation of imaginal disc appendages. Thus, the Sb-sbd(+) product is essential for normal appendage elongation. Sb-sbd mutants, however, do not affect eversion or fusion of discs. Correspondingly, only BR-C mutants deficient in br function interact with Sb-sbd mutants. The interaction occurs in deficiency heterozygotes using single, wild-type doses of the BR-C, of the Sb-sbd locus, or of both loci. These last results are formally consistent with the possibility that the BR-C acts as a positive regulator of the Sb-sbd locus. The data do not exclude other possible nonregulatory interactions between the two loci, e.g., interactions between the products of both genes. PMID:3143619

  4. Genetic analysis of 12 unrelated CADASIL families: Demonstration of genetic homogeneity: Physical mapping of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tournier-Lasserve, E.; Nibbio, A.; Vahedi, K.

    1994-09-01

    CADASIL is the acronym (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Ischemic Strokes and Leukoencephalopathy) designating a recently identified mendelian cerebral arteriopathy characterized by the recurrence of ischemic sensory and motor deficits leading to a progressive subcortical dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain shows extensive areas of increased signal in the hemispheric white matter. We recently mapped the CADASIL locus in 2 large families on chromosome 19 in a 14 cM interval bracketed by D19S221 and D19S215{sup *}. Forty additional families have been collected. Twelve of them including more than 200 members have already been genotyped with a set of 10 highly polymorphic markers located between D19S221 and D19S215. All families are significantly linked to chromosome 19 demonstrating genetic homogeneity. Combined lod scores for several of these markers are above 30. The size of the mapping interval has been reduced to 2 cM. Genetic testing for presymptomatic individuals is now possible with respect to all ethical rules in this severe condition. Lastly, physical mapping of the affected gene has been started and data will be presented at the meeting.

  5. Bloom syndrome: an analysis of consanguineous families assigns the locus mutated to chromosome band 15q26.1.

    PubMed Central

    German, J; Roe, A M; Leppert, M F; Ellis, N A

    1994-01-01

    By the principle of identity by descent, parental consanguinity in individuals with rare recessively transmitted disorders dictates homozygosity not just at the mutated disease-associated locus but also at sequences that flank that locus closely. In 25 of 26 individuals with Bloom syndrome examined whose parents were related, a polymorphic tetranucleotide repeat in an intron of the protooncogene FES was homozygous, far more often than expected (P < 0.0001 by chi 2). Therefore, BLM, the gene that when mutated gives rise to Bloom syndrome, is tightly linked to FES, a gene whose chromosome position is known to be 15q26.1. This successful approach to the assignment of the Bloom syndrome locus to one short segment of the human genome simultaneously (i) demonstrates the power of homozygosity mapping and (ii) becomes the first step in a "reverse" genetics definition of the primary defect in Bloom syndrome. Images PMID:8022833

  6. Bloom syndrome: An analysis of consanguineous families assigns the locus mutated to chromosome band 15q26. 1

    SciTech Connect

    German, J.; Roe, A.M.; Ellis, N.A. ); Leppert, M.F. )

    1994-07-05

    By the principle of identity by descent, parental consanguinity in individuals with rare recessively transmitted disorders dictates homozygosity not just at the mutated disease-associated locus but also at sequences that flank that locus closely. In 25 of 26 individuals with Bloom syndrome examined whose parents were related, a polymorphic tetranucleotide repeat in an intron of the protooncogene FES was homozygous far more often than expected (P < 0.0001 by x[sup 2]). Therefore, BLM, the gene that when mutated gives rise to Bloom syndrome, is tightly linked to FES, a gene whose chromosome position is known to be 15q26.1. This successful approach to the assignment of the Bloom syndrome locus to one short segment of the human genome simultaneously (i) demonstrates the power of homozygosity mapping and (ii) becomes the first step in a [open quotes]reverse[close quotes] genetics definition of the primary defect in Bloom syndrome.

  7. Analysis of microsatellite polymorphisms within the GLC1F locus in Japanese patients with normal tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Kaori; Ota, Masao; Shiota, Tomoko; Nomura, Naoko; Kashiwagi, Kenji; Mabuchi, Fumihiko; Iijima, Hiroyuki; Kawase, Kazuhide; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Makoto; Negi, Akira; Sagara, Takeshi; Nishida, Teruo; Inatani, Masaru; Tanihara, Hidenobu; Aihara, Makoto; Araie, Makoto; Fukuchi, Takeo; Abe, Haruki; Higashide, Tomomi; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa; Kanamoto, Takashi; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki; Iwase, Aiko; Ohno, Shigeaki; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether the GLC1F locus is associated with normal tension glaucoma (NTG) in Japanese patients. Methods We recruited 242 unrelated Japanese subjects, including, 141 NTG patients and 101 healthy controls. The patients exhibiting a comparatively early onset were selected as they suggest that genetic factors may show stronger involvement. Genotyping and assessment of allelic diversity was performed on 11 highly polymorphic microsatellite markers in and around the GLC1F locus. Results Individuals carrying the 163 allele of D7S1277i had a statistically significant increased risk of NTG (p=0.0013, pc=0.016, OR=2.47, 95%CI=1.42–4.30). None of the other markers identified significant loci (pc>0.05) after Bonferroni’s correction. Conclusions These findings suggested that the genes in the GLC1F locus may be associated with the pathogenesis of NTG. PMID:20309402

  8. PAH Mutation Analysis Consortium Database: a database for disease-producing and other allelic variation at the human PAH locus.

    PubMed

    Hoang, L; Byck, S; Prevost, L; Scriver, C R

    1996-01-01

    The PAH Mutation Analysis Consortium (81 investigators, 26 countries) is engaged in mutation detection at the human PAH locus. Ascertainment of probands occurs largely through newborn screening for hyperphenylalaninemia. A relational database records allelic variation (disease-producing and polymorphic) at the locus. Information is distributed by Newsletter, diskette (WINPAHDB software stand-alone executable on IBM compatible hardware), and at a 'real' site on the Worldwide Web (http://www.mcgill.ca/pahdb). The database presently records (Sept. 27, 1995) 248 alleles in 798 different associations (with polymorphic haplotype, geographic region and population) along with additional information. The database, as a record of human genetic diversity, at a particular locus, contributes to the study of human evolution and demic expansion; it also has medical relevance.

  9. Mapping of the Hor-3 locus encoding D hordein in Barley.

    PubMed

    Blake, T K; Ullrich, S E; Nilan, R A

    1982-12-01

    The hordein storage proteins of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) are of intense interest due to their genetic diversity and prominence and impact on the industrial and agricultural uses of the seed. Two major hordein loci have been previously mapped on chromosome 5 (Hor-1 and Hor-2 encoding the C and B hordeins, respectively). A third major locus, Hor-3, which codes for D hordein, has been located in the centromeric region of chromosome 5, probably on the long arm. Two allelic variants with apparent molecular weights of 83,000 and 91,000 and similar isoelectric points of 8.0 comprise the products of this locus in the barley varieties 'Advance' and 'Triple Awned Lemma'. The D hordein examined is similar in molecular weight and isoelectric point to the high molecular weight (HMW) glutenin proteins encoded by the 1B chromosome of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

  10. New polymorphic markers in the vicinity of the pearl locus on mouse chromosome 13.

    PubMed

    Xu, H P; Yanak, B L; Wigler, M H; Gorin, M B

    1996-01-01

    We have used a Mus domesticus/-Mus spretus congenic animal that was selected for retention of Mus spretus DNA around the pearl locus to create a highly polymorphic region suitable for screening new markers. Representation difference analysis (RDA) was performed with either DNA from the congenic animal or C57BL/6J as the driver for subtraction. Four clones were identified, characterized, and converted to PCR-based polymorphic markers. Three of the four markers equally subdivide a 10-cM interval containing the pearl locus, with the fourth located centromeric to it. These markers have been placed on the mouse genetic map by use of an interspecific backcross panel between Mus domesticus (C57BL/6J) and Mus spretus generated by The Jackson Laboratory.

  11. Familial cutaneous malignant melanoma: autosomal dominant trait possibly linked to the Rh locus.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, M H; Goldin, L R; Clark, W H; Lovrien, E; Kraemer, K H; Tucker, M A; Elder, D E; Fraser, M C; Rowe, S

    1983-01-01

    Segregation and linkage analyses were undertaken in families with multiple cases of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) and a recently-described melanoma precursor, the dysplastic nevus syndrome (DNS). Clinical and laboratory data, including 23 genetic markers, were collected on 401 members of 14 high-risk kindreds. Pedigree analysis was compatible with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance for the familial CMM trait. Although a similar model probably applies to the DNS trait as well, segregation analysis could not confirm the presence of a major locus. However, linkage analysis suggested that an autosomal dominant model was appropriate for the DNS, and that a DNS/CMM susceptibility gene may be located on the short arm of chromosome 1, within 30 map units of the Rh locus [maximum logarithm of odds (lod) score = 2.00]. Images PMID:6577466

  12. Multi-locus Analyses Reveal Four Giraffe Species Instead of One.

    PubMed

    Fennessy, Julian; Bidon, Tobias; Reuss, Friederike; Kumar, Vikas; Elkan, Paul; Nilsson, Maria A; Vamberger, Melita; Fritz, Uwe; Janke, Axel

    2016-09-26

    Traditionally, one giraffe species and up to eleven subspecies have been recognized [1]; however, nine subspecies are commonly accepted [2]. Even after a century of research, the distinctness of each giraffe subspecies remains unclear, and the genetic variation across their distribution range has been incompletely explored. Recent genetic studies on mtDNA have shown reciprocal monophyly of the matrilines among seven of the nine assumed subspecies [3, 4]. Moreover, until now, genetic analyses have not been applied to biparentally inherited sequence data and did not include data from all nine giraffe subspecies. We sampled natural giraffe populations from across their range in Africa, and for the first time individuals from the nominate subspecies, the Nubian giraffe, Giraffa camelopardalis camelopardalis Linnaeus 1758 [5], were included in a genetic analysis. Coalescence-based multi-locus and population genetic analyses identify at least four separate and monophyletic clades, which should be recognized as four distinct giraffe species under the genetic isolation criterion. Analyses of 190 individuals from maternal and biparental markers support these findings and further suggest subsuming Rothschild's giraffe into the Nubian giraffe, as well as Thornicroft's giraffe into the Masai giraffe [6]. A giraffe survey genome produced valuable data from microsatellites, mobile genetic elements, and accurate divergence time estimates. Our findings provide the most inclusive analysis of giraffe relationships to date and show that their genetic complexity has been underestimated, highlighting the need for greater conservation efforts for the world's tallest mammal. PMID:27618261

  13. Regulatory organization of the staphylococcal sae locus.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Rajan P; Novick, Richard P

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes an investigation of the complex internal regulatory circuitry of the staphylococcal sae locus and the impact of modifying this circuitry on the expression of external genes in the sae regulon. The sae locus contains four genes, the saeR and S two-component signalling module (TCS), and saeP and Q, two upstream genes of hitherto unknown function. It is expressed from two promoters, P(A)sae, which transcribes only the TCS, and P(C)sae, which transcribes the entire locus. A bursa aurealis (bursa) transposon insertion in saeP in a derivative of Staphylococcus aureus NCTC 8325 has a profound effect on sae function. It modifies the activity of the TCS, changing the expression of many genes in the sae regulon, even though transcription of the TCS (from P(A)sae) is not interrupted. Moreover, these effects are not due to disruption of saeP since an in-frame deletion in saeP has essentially no phenotype. The phenotype of S. aureus strain Newman is remarkably similar to that of the saeP : : bursa and this similarity is explained by an amino acid substitution in the Newman saeS gene that is predicted to modify profoundly the signalling function of the protein. This concurrence suggests that the saeP : : bursa insertion affects the signalling function of saeS, a suggestion that is supported by the ability of an saeQR clone, but not an saeR clone, to complement the effects of the saeP : : bursa insertion.

  14. Development of a core set of single-locus SSR markers for allotetraploid rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Li, Haitao; Younas, Muhammad; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Xuemin; Chen, Lin; Zhao, Bo; Chen, Xun; Xu, Jinsong; Hou, Fan; Hong, Baohua; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Hongyang; Wu, Xueli; Du, Hongzhi; Wu, Jiangsheng; Liu, Kede

    2013-04-01

    Brassica napus (AACC) is a recent allotetraploid species evolved through hybridization between two diploids, B. rapa (AA) and B. oleracea (CC). Due to extensive genome duplication and homoeology within and between the A and C genomes of B. napus, most SSR markers display multiple fragments or loci, which limit their application in genetics and breeding studies of this economically important crop. In this study, we collected 3,890 SSR markers from previous studies and also developed 5,968 SSR markers from genomic sequences of B. rapa, B. oleracea and B. napus. Of these, 2,701 markers that produced single amplicons were putative single-locus markers in the B. napus genome. Finally, a set of 230 high-quality single-locus SSR markers were established and assigned to the 19 linkage groups of B. napus using a segregating population with 154 DH individuals. A subset of 78 selected single-locus SSR markers was proved to be highly stable and could successfully discriminate each of the 45 inbred lines and hybrids. In addition, most of the 230 SSR markers showed the single-locus nature in at least one of the Brassica species of the U's triangle besides B. napus. These results indicated that this set of single-locus SSR markers has a wide range of coverage with excellent stability and would be useful for gene tagging, sequence scaffold assignment, comparative mapping, diversity analysis, variety identification and association mapping in Brassica species.

  15. The APOE locus advances disease progression in late onset familial Alzheimer`s disease but is not causative

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, F.; Bennett, C.; Osborne, A.

    1994-09-01

    An association has been observed in several independent data sets between late onset Alzheimer`s disease (AD) and the APOE locus on chromosomes 19. We have examined the genotype in family history positive (FHP) and family history negative (FHN) cases and find a distortion of the APOE allele frequencies in accord with previous studies. However, when we examined the allele distribution of the at-risk siblings of the FHP group we found an excess of the {epsilon}4 allele which also differs significantly from historic controls but not from the affected siblings. The age distribution of the affected and unaffected siblings was similar, suggesting that the allelic frequency distortion in the unaffected siblings was not due to their being below the mean age of onset. Lod score linkage analysis, with age dependent onset and nonstringent specification of the genetic parameters, did not suggest linkage to the APOE locus. Furthermore, an analysis of variance of the age of disease-free survival suggested that APOE genotype contributes a small fraction of the total variance, indicating that the APOE locus is a poor predictor of disease-free survival time within late onset families. We suggest that the APOE locus enhances the rate of progression of the disease in otherwise predisposed individuals and that variation at this locus is not able in and of itself to cause this disease.

  16. Recombination Can Initiate and Terminate at a Large Number of Sites within the Rosy Locus of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Clark, S. H.; Hilliker, A. J.; Chovnick, A.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the results of a recombination experiment designed to question the existence of special sites for the initiation or termination of a recombination heteroduplex within the region of the rosy locus. Intragenic recombination events were monitored between two physically separated rosy mutant alleles ry(301) and ry(2) utilizing DNA restriction site polymorphisms as genetic markers. Both ry(301) and ry(2) are known from previous studies to be associated with gene conversion frequencies an order of magnitude lower than single site mutations. The mutations are associated with large, well defined insertions located as internal sites within the locus in prior intragenic mapping studies. On the molecular map, they represent large insertions approximately 2.7 kb apart in the second and third exons, respectively, of the XDH coding region. The present study monitors intragenic recombination in a mutant heterozygous genotype in which DNA homology is disrupted by these large discontinuities, greater than the region of DNA homology and flanking both sides of the locus. If initiation/or termination requires separate sites at either end of the locus, then intragenic recombination within the rosy locus of the heterozygote should be eliminated. Contrary to expectation, significant recombination between these sites is seen. PMID:2834266

  17. Locus of control and psychological distress among the aged.

    PubMed

    Hale, W D; Hedgepeth, B E; Taylor, E B

    A relationship between locus of control and adjustment has been found in many studies of young adults, with externals generally reporting higher levels of psychological distress. However, studies of locus of control and adjustment in the aged have produced conflicting results. This investigation examined the relationship between locus of control and self-reported psychopathology in a sample of 139 residents of a retirement complex. Correlation coefficients were computed for locus of control and each of the nine symptom dimensions of the Brief Symptom Inventory. These analyses were carried out separately for males and for females to determine if locus of control orientation was associated with adjustment for both males and females. Results indicate that locus of control is correlated with self-reported psychopathology for older women but not for older men. These results and those of related investigations are discussed within the context of Rotter's social learning theory.

  18. Genetic epidemiology of visceral leishmaniasis in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Peacock, C S; Collins, A; Shaw, M A; Silveira, F; Costa, J; Coste, C H; Nascimento, M D; Siddiqui, R; Shaw, J J; Blackwell, J M

    2001-04-01

    Familial clustering of disease, racial differences in asymptomatic:disease ratios, and studies of mice all point to a genetic component for disease susceptibility in visceral leishmaniasis. Analysis of 87 multi-case pedigrees (824 individuals; 138 nuclear families) from a region of northeastern Brazil endemic for Leishmania chagasi demonstrates a high relative risk ratio (lambda(2S) = 34) to further siblings of affected sibling pairs. Complex segregation analysis using POINTER and COMDS show that all single locus models, as well as polygenic and multifactorial models, provide a significantly (P < 0.001) better fit to the data than a sporadic model. Of the genetic models, the general single locus model was not significantly different from additive or dominant single locus models, all of which gave a gene frequency for the putative disease susceptibility allele of approximately 0.002. The general single locus model was strongly favored (P < 0.001) over a recessive single gene model. Using POINTER, polygenic and multifactorial models were clearly rejected (P < 0.001 in all cases) in favor of the general single locus model. Using COMDS, the analysis was extended to consider two locus models. Results under a general two-locus model did not differ significantly from the dominant, additive, or general single locus models. Under this model, one locus was estimated at a gene frequency of 0.0017, i.e., in the same range as the disease susceptibility locus for the most favored single gene models, with the second locus at a much lower frequency of 0.0002. Hence, the data support the hypothesis that a single major gene may be important in determining disease susceptibility in this population. To identify the gene(s) involved, a genome scan with replication using two subsets of these larger pedigrees with power to detect linkage is in progress. PMID:11255246

  19. Genetic epidemiology of visceral leishmaniasis in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Peacock, C S; Collins, A; Shaw, M A; Silveira, F; Costa, J; Coste, C H; Nascimento, M D; Siddiqui, R; Shaw, J J; Blackwell, J M

    2001-04-01

    Familial clustering of disease, racial differences in asymptomatic:disease ratios, and studies of mice all point to a genetic component for disease susceptibility in visceral leishmaniasis. Analysis of 87 multi-case pedigrees (824 individuals; 138 nuclear families) from a region of northeastern Brazil endemic for Leishmania chagasi demonstrates a high relative risk ratio (lambda(2S) = 34) to further siblings of affected sibling pairs. Complex segregation analysis using POINTER and COMDS show that all single locus models, as well as polygenic and multifactorial models, provide a significantly (P < 0.001) better fit to the data than a sporadic model. Of the genetic models, the general single locus model was not significantly different from additive or dominant single locus models, all of which gave a gene frequency for the putative disease susceptibility allele of approximately 0.002. The general single locus model was strongly favored (P < 0.001) over a recessive single gene model. Using POINTER, polygenic and multifactorial models were clearly rejected (P < 0.001 in all cases) in favor of the general single locus model. Using COMDS, the analysis was extended to consider two locus models. Results under a general two-locus model did not differ significantly from the dominant, additive, or general single locus models. Under this model, one locus was estimated at a gene frequency of 0.0017, i.e., in the same range as the disease susceptibility locus for the most favored single gene models, with the second locus at a much lower frequency of 0.0002. Hence, the data support the hypothesis that a single major gene may be important in determining disease susceptibility in this population. To identify the gene(s) involved, a genome scan with replication using two subsets of these larger pedigrees with power to detect linkage is in progress.

  20. 75 FR 62549 - National Library of Medicine; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... the following meeting of the Medical Genetics Working Group. ] The meeting will be open to the public... Genetics Working Group. Date: November 10, 2010. Time: 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: Programmatic and policy needs and opportunities related to NCBI information resources in the medical genetics area....

  1. The cell: locus or object of inquiry?

    PubMed

    Bechtel, William

    2010-09-01

    Research in many fields of biology has been extremely successful in decomposing biological mechanisms to discover their parts and operations. It often remains a significant challenge for scientists to recompose these mechanisms to understand how they function as wholes and interact with the environments around them. This is true of the eukaryotic cell. Although initially identified in nineteenth-century cell theory as the fundamental unit of organisms, researchers soon learned how to decompose it into its organelles and chemical constituents and have been highly successful in understanding how these carry out many operations important to life. The emphasis on decomposition is particularly evident in modern cell biology, which for the most part has viewed the cell as merely a locus of the mechanisms responsible for vital phenomena. The cell, however, is also an integrated system and for some explanatory purposes it is essential to recompose it and understand it as an organized whole. I illustrate both the virtues of decomposition (treating the cell as a locus) and recomposition (treating the cell as an object) with recent work on circadian rhythms. Circadian researchers have both identified critical intracellular operations that maintain endogenous oscillations and have also addressed the integration of cells into multicellular systems in which cells constitute units.

  2. Interallelic complementation at the mouse Mitf locus.

    PubMed Central

    Steingrímsson, Eiríkur; Arnheiter, Heinz; Hallsson, Jón Hallsteinn; Lamoreux, M Lynn; Copeland, Neal G; Jenkins, Nancy A

    2003-01-01

    Mutations at the mouse microphthalmia locus (Mitf) affect the development of different cell types, including melanocytes, retinal pigment epithelial cells of the eye, and osteoclasts. The MITF protein is a member of the MYC supergene family of basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine-zipper (bHLHZip) transcription factors and is known to regulate the expression of cell-specific target genes by binding DNA as homodimer or as heterodimer with related proteins. The many mutations isolated at the locus have different effects on the phenotype and can be arranged in an allelic series in which the phenotypes range from near normal to white microphthalmic animals with osteopetrosis. Previous investigations have shown that certain combinations of Mitf alleles complement each other, resulting in a phenotype more normal than that of each homozygote alone. Here we analyze this interallelic complementation in detail and show that it is limited to one particular allele, Mitf(Mi-white) (Mitf(Mi-wh)), a mutation affecting the DNA-binding domain. Both loss- and gain-of-function mutations are complemented, as are other Mitf mutations affecting the DNA-binding domain. Furthermore, this behavior is not restricted to particular cell types: Both eye development and coat color phenotypes are complemented. Our analysis suggests that Mitf(Mi-wh)-associated interallelic complementation is due to the unique biochemical nature of this mutation. PMID:12586714

  3. Familial migraine: Exclusion of the susceptibility gene from the reported locus of familial hemiplegic migraine on 19p

    SciTech Connect

    Hovatta, I.; Peltonen, L.; Kallela, M.; Faerkkilae, M.

    1994-10-01

    Genetic isolates are highly useful in analyses of the molecular background of complex diseases since the enrichment of a limited number of predisposing genes can be predicted in representative families or in specific geographical regions. It has been suggested that the pathophysiology and etiology of familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) and typical migraine with aura are most probably the same. Recent assignment of FHM locus to chromosome 19p in two French families makes it now possible to test this hypothesis. We report here linkage data on four families with multiple cases of migraine disorder originating from the genetically isolated population of Finland. We were interested to discover whether the migraine in these families would also show linkage to the markers on 19p. We could exclude a region of 50 cM, flanking the reported FHM locus, as a site of migraine locus in our four families. It seems evident that locus heterogeneity exists between different diagnostic classes of migraine spectrum of diseases and also between different ethnic groups. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: Mapping of a new locus to chromosome 3 and fine-mapping of the chromosome 16 linked locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kwitek-Black, A.E.; Rokhlina, T.; Nishimura, D.Y.

    1994-09-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by mental retardation, post-axial polydactyly, obesity, retinitis pigmentosa, and hypogonadism. Other features of this disease include renal and cardiovascular abnormalities and an increased incidence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. The molecular etiology for BBS is not known. We previously linked BBS to chromosome 16q13 in a large inbred Bedouin family, and excluded this locus in a second large inbred Bedouin family. We now report linkage of this second family to markers on chromosome 3q, proving non-allelic, genetic heterogeneity in the Bedouin population. A third large inbred Bedouin family was excluded from the 3q and 16q BBS loci. In addition to the identification of a new BBS locus on chromosome 3, we have identified and utilized additional short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) in the 16q BBS region to narrow the candidate interval to 3 cM. Additional recombinant individuals will allow further refinement of the interval. Identification of genes causing BBS has the potential to provide insight into diverse genetic traits and disease processes including obesity, hypertension, diabetes, retinal degeneration, and abnormal limb, renal and cardiac development.

  5. Mutations affecting expression of the rosy locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.S.; Curtis, D.; McCarron, M.; Love, C.; Gray, M.; Bender, W.; Chovnick, A.

    1987-05-01

    The rosy locus in Drosophila melanogaster codes for the enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). Previous studies defined a control element near the 5' end of the gene, where variant sites affected the amount of rosy mRNA and protein produced. The authors have determined the DNA sequence of this region from both genomic and cDNA clones, and from the ry/sup +10/ underproducer strain. This variant strain had many sequence differences, so that the site of the regulatory change could not be fixed. A mutagenesis was also undertaken to isolate new regulatory mutations. They induced 376 new mutations with 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea (ENU) and screened them to isolate those that reduced the amount of XDH protein produced, but did not change the properties of the enzyme. Genetic mapping was used to find mutations located near the 5' end of the gene. DNA from each of seven mutants was cloned and sequenced through the 5' region. Mutant base changes were identified in all seven; they appear to affect splicing and translation of the rosy mRNA. In a related study, the genomic and cDNA sequences are extended through the 3' end of the gene; the combined sequences define the processing pattern of the rosy transcript and predict the amino acid sequence of XDH.

  6. Characterization of mutations at the mouse phenylalanine hydroxylase locus

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.D.; Charlton, C.K.

    1997-02-01

    Two genetic mouse models for human phenylketonuria have been characterized by DNA sequence analysis. For each, a distinct mutation was identified within the protein coding sequence of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene. This establishes that the mutated locus is the same as that causing human phenylketonuria and allows a comparison between these mouse phenylketonuria models and the human disease. A genotype/phenotype relationship that is strikingly similar to the human disease emerges, underscoring the similarity of phenylketonuria in mouse and man. In PAH{sup ENU1}, the phenotype is mild. The Pah{sup enu1} mutation predicts a conservative valine to alanine amino acid substitution and is located in exon 3, a gene region where serious mutations are rare in humans. In PAH{sup ENU2} the phenotype is severe. The Pah{sup enu2} mutation predicts a radical phenylalanine to serine substitution and is located in exon 7, a gene region where serious mutations are common in humans. In PAH{sup ENU2}, the sequence information was used to devise a direct genotyping system based on the creation of a new Alw26I restriction endonuclease site. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Nice to meet you: genetic, epigenetic and metabolic controls of plant perception of beneficial associative and endophytic diazotrophic bacteria in non-leguminous plants.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, T L G; Ballesteros, H G F; Thiebaut, F; Ferreira, P C G; Hemerly, A S

    2016-04-01

    A wide range of rhizosphere diazotrophic bacteria are able to establish beneficial associations with plants, being able to associate to root surfaces or even endophytically colonize plant tissues. In common, both associative and endophytic types of colonization can result in beneficial outcomes to the plant leading to plant growth promotion, as well as increase in tolerance against biotic and abiotic stresses. An intriguing question in such associations is how plant cell surface perceives signals from other living organisms, thus sorting pathogens from beneficial ones, to transduce this information and activate proper responses that will finally culminate in plant adaptations to optimize their growth rates. This review focuses on the recent advances in the understanding of genetic and epigenetic controls of plant-bacteria signaling and recognition during beneficial associations with associative and endophytic diazotrophic bacteria. Finally, we propose that "soil-rhizosphere-rhizoplane-endophytes-plant" could be considered as a single coordinated unit with dynamic components that integrate the plant with the environment to generate adaptive responses in plants to improve growth. The homeostasis of the whole system should recruit different levels of regulation, and recognition between the parties in a given environment might be one of the crucial factors coordinating these adaptive plant responses.

  8. Nice to meet you: genetic, epigenetic and metabolic controls of plant perception of beneficial associative and endophytic diazotrophic bacteria in non-leguminous plants.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, T L G; Ballesteros, H G F; Thiebaut, F; Ferreira, P C G; Hemerly, A S

    2016-04-01

    A wide range of rhizosphere diazotrophic bacteria are able to establish beneficial associations with plants, being able to associate to root surfaces or even endophytically colonize plant tissues. In common, both associative and endophytic types of colonization can result in beneficial outcomes to the plant leading to plant growth promotion, as well as increase in tolerance against biotic and abiotic stresses. An intriguing question in such associations is how plant cell surface perceives signals from other living organisms, thus sorting pathogens from beneficial ones, to transduce this information and activate proper responses that will finally culminate in plant adaptations to optimize their growth rates. This review focuses on the recent advances in the understanding of genetic and epigenetic controls of plant-bacteria signaling and recognition during beneficial associations with associative and endophytic diazotrophic bacteria. Finally, we propose that "soil-rhizosphere-rhizoplane-endophytes-plant" could be considered as a single coordinated unit with dynamic components that integrate the plant with the environment to generate adaptive responses in plants to improve growth. The homeostasis of the whole system should recruit different levels of regulation, and recognition between the parties in a given environment might be one of the crucial factors coordinating these adaptive plant responses. PMID:26821805

  9. CTF Meeting 2012: Translation of the Basic Understanding of the Biology and Genetics of NF1, NF2, and Schwannomatosis Toward the Development of Effective Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Widemann, Brigitte C.; Acosta, Maria T.; Ammoun, Sylvia; Belzberg, Allan J.; Bernards, Andre; Blakeley, Jaishri; Bretscher, Antony; Cichowski, Karen; Clapp, D. Wade; Dombi, Eva; Evans, Gareth D.; Ferner, Rosalie; Fernandez-Valle, Cristina; Fisher, Michael J.; Giovannini, Marco; Gutmann, David H.; Hanemann, C. Oliver; Hennigan, Robert; Huson, Susan; Ingram, David; Kissil, Joe; Korf, Bruce R.; Legius, Eric; Packer, Roger J.; McClatchey, Andrea I; McCormick, Frank; North, Kathryn; Pehrsson, Minja; Plotkin, Scott R.; Ramesh, Vijaya; Ratner, Nancy; Schirmer, Susann; Sherman, Larry; Schorry, Elizabeth; Stevenson, David; Stewart, Douglas R.; Ullrich, Nicole; Bakker, Annette C.; Morrison, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The neurofibromatoses (NF) are autosomal dominant genetic disorders that encompass the rare diseases NF1, NF2, and schwannomatosis. The NFs affect more people worldwide than Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Huntington's disease combined. NF1 and NF2 are caused by mutations of known tumor suppressor genes (NF1 and NF2, respectively). For schwannomatosis, although mutations in SMARCB1 were identified in a subpopulation of schwannomatosis patients, additional causative gene mutations are still to be discovered. Individuals with NF1 may demonstrate manifestations in multiple organ systems, including tumors of the nervous system, learning disabilities, and physical disfigurement. NF2 ultimately can cause deafness, cranial nerve deficits, and additional severe morbidities caused by tumors of the nervous system. Unmanageable pain is a key finding in patients with schwannomatosis. Although today there is no marketed treatment for NF-related tumors, a significant number of clinical trials have become available. In addition, significant preclinical efforts have led to a more rational selection of potential drug candidates for NF trials. An important element in fueling this progress is the sharing of knowledge. For over 20 years the Children's Tumor Foundation has convened an annual NF Conference, bringing together NF professionals to share novel findings, ideas, and build collaborations. The 2012 NF Conference held in New Orleans hosted over 350 NF researchers and clinicians. This article provides a synthesis of the highlights presented at the conference and as such, is a “state-of-the-field” for NF research in 2012. PMID:24443315

  10. Role of TRAV Locus in Low Caries Experience

    PubMed Central

    Briseño-Ruiz, Jessica; Shimizu, Takehiko; Deeley, Kathleen; Dizak, Piper M.; Ruff, Timothy D.; Faraco, Italo M.; Poletta, Fernando A.; Brancher, João A.; Pecharki, Giovana D.; Küchler, Erika C.; Tannure, Patricia N.; Lips, Andrea; Vieira, Thays C.S.; Patir, Asli; Koruyucu, Mine; Mereb, Juan C.; Resick, Judith M.; Brandon, Carla A.; Letra, Ariadne; Silva, Renato M.; Cooper, Margaret E.; Seymen, Figen; Costa, Marcelo C.; Granjeiro, José M.; Trevilatto, Paula C.; Orioli, Iêda M.; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Marazita, Mary L.; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2013-01-01

    Caries is the most common chronic, multifactorial disease in the world today; and little is still known about the genetic factors influencing susceptibility. Our previous genome- wide linkage scan has identified five loci related to caries susceptibility: 5q13.3, 13q31.1, 14q11.2, 14q 24.3, and Xq27. In the present study, we fine mapped the 14q11.2 locus in order to identify genetic contributors to caries susceptibility. Four hundred seventy-seven subjects from 72 pedigrees with similar cultural and behavioral habits and limited access to dental care living in the Philippines were studied. An additional 387 DNA samples from unrelated individuals were used to determine allele frequencies. For replication purposes, a total of 1,446 independent subjects from four different populations were analyzed based on their caries experience (low versus high). Forty-eight markers in 14q11.2 were genotyped using TaqMan chemistry. Transmission disequilibrium test was used to detect overtransmission of alleles in the Filipino families, and chi-square, Fisher’s exact and logistic regression were used to test for association between low caries experience and variant alleles in the replication data sets. We finally assessed the mRNA expression of TRAV4 in the saliva of 143 study subjects. In the Filipino families, statistically significant associations were found between low caries experience and markers in TRAV4. We were able to replicate these results in the populations studied that were characteristically from underserved areas. Direct sequencing of 22 subjects carrying the associated alleles detect one missense mutation (Y30R) that is predicted to be probably damaging. Finally, we observed higher expression in children and teenagers with low caries experience, correlating with specific alleles in TRAV4. Our results suggest TRAV4 may have a role in protecting against caries. PMID:23657505

  11. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.C.; Lippman, M.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  12. Multi-ethnic genome-wide association study identifies novel locus for type 2 diabetes susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Cook, James P; Morris, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have traditionally been undertaken in homogeneous populations from the same ancestry group. However, with the increasing availability of GWAS in large-scale multi-ethnic cohorts, we have evaluated a framework for detecting association of genetic variants with complex traits, allowing for population structure, and developed a powerful test of heterogeneity in allelic effects between ancestry groups. We have applied the methodology to identify and characterise loci associated with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2D) using GWAS data from the Resource for Genetic Epidemiology on Adult Health and Aging, a large multi-ethnic population-based cohort, created for investigating the genetic and environmental basis of age-related diseases. We identified a novel locus for T2D susceptibility at genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8) that maps to TOMM40-APOE, a region previously implicated in lipid metabolism and Alzheimer's disease. We have also confirmed previous reports that single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the TCF7L2 locus demonstrate the greatest extent of heterogeneity in allelic effects between ethnic groups, with the lowest risk observed in populations of East Asian ancestry. PMID:27189021

  13. Positional cloning of the chromosome 14 Alzheimer`s disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.F.; Korenblat, K.M.; Goate, A.M.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic linkage analysis had indicated a locus for familial early-onset Alzheimer`s disease (FAD) on chromosome 14 at q24.3. The FAD locus has been shown previously to lie between the dinucleotide markers D14S61 and D14S63, a genetic distance of approximately 13 cM. We are currently attempting to identify the gene using a positional cloning strategy. The first step towards the isolation and characterization of this locus was the construction of an overlapping YAC contig covering the entire region. Over forty YACs which map to this region have been isolated from the St. Louis and CEPH libraries by a combination of YAC end sequence walking and sequence tagged site mapping. Our contig fully spans the complete domain, encompassing all genetic markers non-recombinant with FAD (i.e. D14S76, D14S43, D14S71, D14S77) and the two nearest flanking FAD-recombinant markers. With restriction mapping of the domain, we can determine the exact size of the region. As a second step, the YACs in this contig are currently being inspected for expressed sequences by exon trapping, initially on those YACs known to be nonchimeric. We have currently made exon-trapped libraries from YACs that have the markers D14S76 and D14S43. Sequence analysis of these libraries indicates that a trapped exon is identified on average for each 30 kb of YAC DNA. The trapped exons are being screened to identify likely candidate genes, which will be examined for mutations in FAD families.

  14. Association of bone mineral density with a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism at the calcitonin (CT) locus.

    PubMed

    Miyao, M; Hosoi, T; Emi, M; Nakajima, T; Inoue, S; Hoshino, S; Shiraki, M; Orimo, H; Ouchi, Y

    2000-01-01

    Calcitonin (CT), a calcium-regulating hormone, lowers the calcium level in serum by inhibiting bone resorption. Because CT may play a role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, genetic variations in or adjacent to the CT gene may be associated with variations in bone mineral density (BMD). The present study examined the correlation between a dinucleotide (cytosine-adenine; CA) repeat polymorphism at the CT locus and BMD in 311 Japanese postmenopausal women (mean age, 64.1 years). Seven alleles were present in this population; each allele contained 10, 11, 16, 17, 18, 19, or 20 CA repeats. Thus, we designated the respective genotypes A10, A11, A16, A17, A18, A19, and A20. The A10 and A17 alleles were the predominant alleles in the population studied. Z scores (a parameter representing deviation from the age-specific weight-adjusted average BMD) were compared between individuals that possessed one or two alleles of each genotype and those that did not possess the allele. Subjects who possessed one or two A10 alleles had lower BMD Z scores than those who did not (lumbar 2-4 BMD Z score; -0.148 +/- 1.23 vs 0.182 +/- 1.54; P = 0.04). No significant relationships were observed between allelic status and background data or biochemical parameters. The significant association observed between BMD and genetic variations at the CT locus implies that polymorphism at this locus may be a useful marker for the genetic study of osteoporosis. PMID:11185743

  15. TRANSLATING ECOLOGY, PHYSIOLOGY, BIOCHEMISTRY, AND POPULATION GENETICS RESEARCH TO MEET THE CHALLENGE OF TICK AND TICK-BORNE DISEASES IN NORTH AMERICA.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Gassent, Maria D; Castro-Arellano, Ivan; Feria-Arroyo, Teresa P; Patino, Ramiro; Li, Andrew Y; Medina, Raul F; de León, Adalberto A Pérez; Rodríguez-Vivas, Roger Iván

    2016-05-01

    Emerging and re-emerging tick-borne diseases threaten public health and the wellbeing of domestic animals and wildlife globally. The adoption of an evolutionary ecology framework aimed to diminish the impact of tick-borne diseases needs to be part of strategies to protect human and animal populations. We present a review of current knowledge on the adaptation of ticks to their environment, and the impact that global change could have on their geographic distribution in North America. Environmental pressures will affect tick population genetics by selecting genotypes able to withstand new and changing environments and by altering the connectivity and isolation of several tick populations. Research in these areas is particularly lacking in the southern United States and most of Mexico with knowledge gaps on the ecology of these diseases, including a void in the identity of reservoir hosts for several tick-borne pathogens. Additionally, the way in which anthropogenic changes to landscapes may influence tick-borne disease ecology remains to be fully understood. Enhanced knowledge in these areas is needed in order to implement effective and sustainable integrated tick management strategies. We propose to refocus ecology studies with emphasis on metacommunity-based approaches to enable a holistic perspective addressing whole pathogen and host assemblages. Network analyses could be used to develop mechanistic models involving multihost-pathogen communities. An increase in our understanding of the ecology of tick-borne diseases across their geographic distribution will aid in the design of effective area-wide tick control strategies aimed to diminish the burden of pathogens transmitted by ticks.

  16. TRANSLATING ECOLOGY, PHYSIOLOGY, BIOCHEMISTRY, AND POPULATION GENETICS RESEARCH TO MEET THE CHALLENGE OF TICK AND TICK-BORNE DISEASES IN NORTH AMERICA.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Gassent, Maria D; Castro-Arellano, Ivan; Feria-Arroyo, Teresa P; Patino, Ramiro; Li, Andrew Y; Medina, Raul F; de León, Adalberto A Pérez; Rodríguez-Vivas, Roger Iván

    2016-05-01

    Emerging and re-emerging tick-borne diseases threaten public health and the wellbeing of domestic animals and wildlife globally. The adoption of an evolutionary ecology framework aimed to diminish the impact of tick-borne diseases needs to be part of strategies to protect human and animal populations. We present a review of current knowledge on the adaptation of ticks to their environment, and the impact that global change could have on their geographic distribution in North America. Environmental pressures will affect tick population genetics by selecting genotypes able to withstand new and changing environments and by altering the connectivity and isolation of several tick populations. Research in these areas is particularly lacking in the southern United States and most of Mexico with knowledge gaps on the ecology of these diseases, including a void in the identity of reservoir hosts for several tick-borne pathogens. Additionally, the way in which anthropogenic changes to landscapes may influence tick-borne disease ecology remains to be fully understood. Enhanced knowledge in these areas is needed in order to implement effective and sustainable integrated tick management strategies. We propose to refocus ecology studies with emphasis on metacommunity-based approaches to enable a holistic perspective addressing whole pathogen and host assemblages. Network analyses could be used to develop mechanistic models involving multihost-pathogen communities. An increase in our understanding of the ecology of tick-borne diseases across their geographic distribution will aid in the design of effective area-wide tick control strategies aimed to diminish the burden of pathogens transmitted by ticks. PMID:27062414

  17. A nullimorphic ERLIN2 mutation defines a complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia locus (SPG18).

    PubMed

    Alazami, Anas M; Adly, Nouran; Al Dhalaan, Hisham; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2011-11-01

    Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurological disorders that are characterized by progressive spasticity of the lower extremities. We describe an extended consanguineous Saudi family in which HSP is linked to SPG18, a previously reported autosomal recessive locus, and show that it is associated with a nullimorphic deletion of ERLIN2, a component of endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation. This finding adds to the growing diversity of cellular functions that are now known to be involved in the maintenance of the corticospinal tract neurons.

  18. Localization of a locus responsible for the bovine chondrodysplastic dwarfism (bcd) on chromosome 6.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, K; Moritomo, Y; Takami, M; Hirata, S; Kikukawa, Y; Kunieda, T

    1999-06-01

    A hereditary chondrodysplastic dwarfism caused by an autosomal recessive gene has been reported in a population of Japanese Brown cattle. Affected calves show an insufficiency of endochondral ossification at the long bones of the limbs. In the present study, we mapped the locus responsible for the disease (bcd) by linkage analysis, using microsatellite markers and a single paternal half-sib pedigree obtained from commercial herds. Linkage analysis revealed a significant linkage between the bcd locus and marker loci on the distal region of bovine Chromosome (Chr) 6. The bcd locus was mapped in the interval between microsatellite markers BM9257 and BP7 or BMS511 with a recombination fraction of 0.05 and 0.06, and a lod score of 8.6 and 10.1, respectively. A comparison of genetic maps between bovine Chr 6 and human Chr 4 or mouse Chr 5 indicates possible candidate genes including FGFR3 and BMP3 genes, which are responsible for human chondrodysplasias and associated with bone morphogenesis, respectively.

  19. Molecular and recombinational mapping of mutations in the Ace locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Nagoshi, R.N.; Gelbart, W.M.

    1987-11-01

    The Ace locus in Drosophila melanogaster is known to be the structural gene for acetylcholinesterase. Ace is located in a region of chromosome arm 3R which has been subjected to intensive genetic and molecular analysis. Previous deletion mapping studies have identified a 40-kb region with which the Ace gene resides. This report focuses on the further localization of Ace within this 40-kb interval. Within this region, selective fine structure recombinational analysis was employed to localize three recessive Ace lethals relative to unselected restriction site variations. These three mutations fall into a segment of 7 kb within the Ace interval. Fine structure recombinational analysis was also used to confirm that the Ace/sup -/ phenotype of one deletion, Df(3R)Ace/sup HD1/, co-segregated with the molecular deletion. This deletion does not fully remove Ace activity, but it behaves as a recessive Ace lethal. Df(3R)Ace/sup HD1/ is the most distal Ace lesion identified and indicates that the Ace locus must extend at least 16 kb. Several poly(A)transcripts are detectable in the region defined by the Ace lesions. The position and extent of the Ace locus, as well as the types of transcripts found, is consistent with the recent findings which identified Torpedo-AChE homologous cDNA sequences in this region.

  20. A new locus for arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia on the long arm of chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect

    Severini, G.M.; Krajinovic, M.; Falaschi, A.

    1996-01-15

    Familial arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or dysplasia (ARVD) is an idiopathic heart muscle disease with an autosomal-dominant pattern of transmission, characterized by fibro-fatty replacement of the right ventricular myocardium and ventricular arrhythmias. Recently, linkage to the chromosome 14q23-q24 (locus D14S42) has been reported in two families. In the present study, three unrelated families with ARVD were investigated. According to strict diagnostic criteria, 13 of 37 members were considered to be affected. Linkage to the D14S42 locus was excluded. On the other hand, linkage was found in the region 14q12-q22 in all three families (cumulative two-point lod score is 3.26 for D14S252), with no recombination between the detected locus and the disease gene. With multipoint linkage analysis, a maximal cumulative lod score of 4.7 was obtained in the region between loci D14S252 and D14S257. These data indicate that a novel gene causing familial ARVD (provisionally named ARVD2) maps to the long arm of chromosome 14, thus supporting the hypothesis of genetic heterogeneity in this disease. 33 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. The MTAP-CDKN2A Locus Confers Susceptibility to a Naturally Occurring Canine Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shearin, Abigail L.; Hedan, Benoit; Cadieu, Edouard; Erich, Suzanne A.; Schmidt, Emmett V.; Faden, Daniel L.; Cullen, John; Abadie, Jerome; Kwon, Erika M.; Gröne, Andrea; Devauchelle, Patrick; Rimbault, Maud; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Lynch, Mary; Galibert, Francis; Breen, Matthew; Rutteman, Gerard R.; André, Catherine; Parker, Heidi G.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Advantages offered by canine population substructure, combined with clinical presentations similar to human disorders, makes the dog an attractive system for studies of cancer genetics. Cancers that have been difficult to study in human families or populations are of particular interest. Histiocytic sarcoma is a rare and poorly understood neoplasm in humans that occurs in 15–25% of Bernese Mountain Dogs (BMD). Methods Genomic DNA was collected from affected and unaffected BMD in North America (NA) and Europe. Both independent and combined genome wide association studies (GWAS) were used to identify cancer-associated loci. Fine mapping and sequencing narrowed the primary locus to a single gene region. Results Both populations shared the same primary locus, which features a single haplotype spanning MTAP and part of CDKN2A and is present in 96% of affected BMD. The haplotype is within the region homologous to human chromosome 9p21, which has been implicated in several types of cancer. Conclusions We present the first GWAS for HS in any species. The data identify an associated haplotype in the highly cited tumor suppressor locus near CDKN2A. These data demonstrate the power of studying distinctive malignancies in highly predisposed dog breeds. Impact Here, we establish a naturally-occurring model of cancer susceptibility due to CDKN2 dysregulation, thus providing insight regarding this cancer-associated, complex, and poorly understood genomic region. PMID:22623710

  2. Externality and Locus of Control in Obese Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isbitsky, Joyce Renee; White, Donna Romano

    1981-01-01

    Significant sex differences indicated that boys generally ate more than girls and held more internal locus of control expectancies. However, obese and normal-weighted children were not differentiated by their performance on either food-related measures nor by their locus of control expectancies. (Author/MP)

  3. Anxiety, locus of control and appraisal of air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, P.L.; Simpson-Housley, P.; de Man, A.F.

    1987-06-01

    100 residents of Santiago de Chile took part in a study of the relationship among locus of control, trait-anxiety, and perception of air pollution. Concern over the problem of atmospheric pollution and number of antipollution measures taken was related to trait-anxiety. Locus of control was associated with variation in awareness of pollution hazard.

  4. Locus of Control in Underachieving and Achieving Gifted Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, Robert; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study, with 87 underachieving and 77 achieving gifted students in grades 6-9, found that general locus of control measures did not differentiate between the 2 groups, that both scored significantly higher on positive internal than on negative internal locus of control, and that there were no gender or grade effects. (Author/DB)

  5. Locus of Control and Marital Stability: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantine, John A.; Bahr, Stephen J.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated relationship between locus of control and marital stability of young men. Factors derived from locus of control measures included leadership, personal, and fate scales. Results indicated the only significant difference was on the leadership scale between men remaining married and those who did not. (RC)

  6. Personality and Locus of Control among School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandya, Archana A.; Jogsan, Yogesh A.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this investigation is to find out the sex differences in personality traits and locus of control among school children. A total 60 children (30 boys and 30 girls) were taken as a sample. The research tool for personality, children personality questionnaire was used, which was made by Cattell and Porter. Locus of control was…

  7. The Cajal Body and Histone Locus Body

    PubMed Central

    Nizami, Zehra; Deryusheva, Svetlana; Gall, Joseph G.

    2010-01-01

    The Cajal body (CB) is a nuclear organelle present in all eukaryotes that have been carefully studied. It is identified by the signature protein coilin and by CB-specific RNAs (scaRNAs). CBs contain high concentrations of splicing small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) and other RNA processing factors, suggesting that they are sites for assembly and/or posttranscriptional modification of the splicing machinery of the nucleus. The histone locus body (HLB) contains factors required for processing histone pre-mRNAs. As its name implies, the HLB is associated with the genes that code for histones, suggesting that it may function to concentrate processing factors at their site of action. CBs and HLBs are present throughout the interphase of the cell cycle, but disappear during mitosis. The biogenesis of CBs shows the features of a self-organizing structure. PMID:20504965

  8. Locus of Control Orientation: Parents, Peers, and Place.

    PubMed

    Ahlin, Eileen M; Lobo Antunes, Maria João

    2015-09-01

    An internal locus of control contributes to positive youth outcomes such as a general well-being and academic success, while also serving as a protective factor against exposure to community violence and reducing negative behaviors like violence. Despite these benefits, very little is known about antecedents of an internal locus of control orientation. Without an understanding of what factors contribute to the development of an internal locus of control, it is not clear how to best encourage its formation. This study uses data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods to examine whether various mesosystem variables (family management strategies, peer interactions, neighborhood context, and individual-level characteristics) are associated with an internal locus of control orientation among 1,076 youth ages 9-19 living in 78 Chicago neighborhoods. Study participants were Hispanic (46 %), African American (34 %), and White (15 %), and 50 % were female. The findings suggest that, while most levels of the mesosystem influence locus of control orientation, family management strategies are more prominent determinants of an internal locus of control than peers, neighborhood context, or individual characteristics. Parental supervision over the time a youth spends at home and family socioeconomic status are consistent predictors of an internal locus of control, while harsh discipline is associated with an external locus of control. The discussion examines the import of various parenting techniques in shaping an internal locus of control and considers future avenues for research to further unpack how antecedents of locus of control can vary across youth. PMID:25617000

  9. Locus of Control Orientation: Parents, Peers, and Place.

    PubMed

    Ahlin, Eileen M; Lobo Antunes, Maria João

    2015-09-01

    An internal locus of control contributes to positive youth outcomes such as a general well-being and academic success, while also serving as a protective factor against exposure to community violence and reducing negative behaviors like violence. Despite these benefits, very little is known about antecedents of an internal locus of control orientation. Without an understanding of what factors contribute to the development of an internal locus of control, it is not clear how to best encourage its formation. This study uses data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods to examine whether various mesosystem variables (family management strategies, peer interactions, neighborhood context, and individual-level characteristics) are associated with an internal locus of control orientation among 1,076 youth ages 9-19 living in 78 Chicago neighborhoods. Study participants were Hispanic (46 %), African American (34 %), and White (15 %), and 50 % were female. The findings suggest that, while most levels of the mesosystem influence locus of control orientation, family management strategies are more prominent determinants of an internal locus of control than peers, neighborhood context, or individual characteristics. Parental supervision over the time a youth spends at home and family socioeconomic status are consistent predictors of an internal locus of control, while harsh discipline is associated with an external locus of control. The discussion examines the import of various parenting techniques in shaping an internal locus of control and considers future avenues for research to further unpack how antecedents of locus of control can vary across youth.

  10. Genetic Aspects of Early Childhood Stuttering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Nicoline Grinager; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of pedigrees from parents of 69 preschool children who stuttered revealed that more male than female relatives ever stuttered but that female subjects who stuttered had more female relatives who ever stuttered than did male subjects. Segregation analyses suggest that transmission of a single major genetic locus increases the liability to…

  11. Analysis of human chromosome 21 for a locus conferring susceptibility to Hirschsprung Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bolk, S.; Duggan, D.J.; Chakravarti, A.

    1994-09-01

    It has been estimated that approximately 5% of patients diagnosed with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or aganglionic megacolon, have trisomy 21. Since the incidence of Hirschsprung disease is 1/5000 live births and the incidence of trisomy 21 is approximately 1/1000 live births, the observed occurrence of HSCR in trisomy 21 is fifty times higher than expected. We propose that at least one locus on chromosome 21 predisposes to HSCR. Although at fifty times elevated risk, only 1% of Down Syndrome cases have HSCR. Thus additional genes or genetic events are necessary for HSCR to manifest in patients with trisomy 21. Based on segregation analysis, Badner et al. postulated that recessive genes may be responsible for up to 80% of HSCR. We postulate that at least one such gene is on chromosome 21 and increased homozygosity for common recessive HSCR mutations may be one cause for the elevated risk of HSCR in cases of trisomy 21. To map such a chromosome 21 locus, we are searching for segments of human chromosome 21 which are identical by descent from the parent in whom non-disjunction occurred. These segments will arise either from meiosis I (followed by a crossover between the centromere and the locus) or from meiosis II (followed by no crossovers). Nine nuclear families with a proband diagnosed with HSCR and Down Syndrome have been genotyped for 18 microsatellite markers spanning human chromosome 21q. In all nine cases analyzed thus far, trisomy 21 resulted from maternal non-disjunction at meiosis I. At this point no single IBD region is apparent. Therefore, additional families are being ascertained and additional markers at high density are being genotyped to map the HSCR locus.

  12. Mutants at the Slender1 locus of barley cv Himalaya. Molecular and physiological characterization.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Peter Michael; Marion-Poll, Annie; Ellis, Marc; Gubler, Frank

    2002-05-01

    A dominant dwarf mutant of barley (Hordeum vulgare) that resembles dominant gibberellin (GA) "-insensitive" or "-nonresponsive" mutants in other species is described. alpha-Amylase production by endosperm half-grains of the mutant required GA3 at concentrations about 100 times that of the WT. The mutant showed only a slight growth response to GA3, even at very high concentrations. However, when additionally dwarfed, growth rate responded to GA3 over the normal concentration range, although only back to the original (dwarf) elongation rate. Genetic studies indicated that the dominant dwarf locus was either closely linked or identical to the Sln1 (Slender1) locus. A barley sequence related to Arabidopsis GAI/RGA was isolated, and shown to represent the Sln1 locus by the analysis of sln1 mutants. The dominant dwarf mutant was also altered in this sequence, indicating that it too is an allele at Sln1. Thus, mutations at Sln1 generate plants of radically different phenotypes; either dwarfs that are largely dominant and GA "-insensitive/-nonresponsive," or the recessive slender types in which GA responses appear to be constitutive. Immunoblotting studies showed that in growing leaves, SLN1 protein localized almost exclusively to the leaf elongation zone. In mutants at the Sln1 locus, there were differences in both the abundance and distribution of SLN1 protein, and large changes in the amounts of bioactive GAs, and of their metabolic precursors and catabolites. These results suggest that there are dynamic interactions between SLN1 protein and GA content in determining leaf elongation rate.

  13. Impact of variation at the FTO locus on milk fat yield in Holstein dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Zielke, Lea G; Bortfeldt, Ralf H; Reissmann, Monika; Tetens, Jens; Thaller, Georg; Brockmann, Gudrun A

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the biological role of the Fat Mass and Obesity associated (FTO) gene locus on milk composition in German Holstein cattle. Since FTO controls energy homeostasis and expenditure and the FTO locus has repeatedly shown association with obesity in human studies, we tested FTO as a candidate gene in particular for milk fat yield, which represents a high amount of energy secreted during lactation. The study was performed on 2,402 bulls and 860 cows where dense milk composition data were available. Genetic information was taken from a 2 Mb region around FTO. Five SNPs and two haplotype blocks in a 725 kb region covering FTO and the neighboring genes RPGRIP1L, U6ATAC, and 5 S rRNA were associated with milk fat yield and also affected protein yield in the same direction. Interestingly, higher frequency SNP alleles and haplotypes within the FTO gene increased milk fat and protein yields by up to 2.8 and 2.2 kg per lactation, respectively, while the most frequent haplotype in the upstream block covering exon 1 of FTO to exon 15 of RPGRIP1L had opposite effects with lower fat and milk yield. Both haplotype blocks were also significant in cows. The loci accounted for about 1% of the corresponding trait variance in the population. The association signals not only provided evidence for at least two causative mutations in the FTO locus with a functional effect on milk but also milk protein yield. The pleiotropic effects suggest a biological function on the usage of energy resources and the control of energy balance rather than directly affecting fat and protein synthesis. The identified effect of the obesity gene locus on milk energy content suggests an impact on infant nutrition by breast feeding in humans.

  14. Haplotype variation of Glu-D1 locus and the origin of Glu-D1d allele conferring superior end-use qualities in common wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In common wheat (Triticum aestivum, AABBDD), the Glu-D1 locus possesses multiple alleles, with Glu-D1a (coding for 1Dx2 and 1Dy12 subunits) and Glu-D1d (encoding 1Dx5 and 1Dy10 subunits) being intensively used in the genetic improvement of end-use qualities. Here, we studied the molecular variatio...

  15. The arabidopsis ISR1 locus controlling rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance is involved in ethylene signaling.

    PubMed

    Ton, J; Davison, S; Van Wees, S C; Van Loon, L; Pieterse, C M

    2001-02-01

    In Arabidopsis, the rhizobacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS417r triggers an induced systemic resistance (ISR) response that is effective against different types of pathogens. The ISR signaling pathway functions independent of salicylic acid, but requires responsiveness to jasmonate (JA) and ethylene. Using the genetic variability of ISR inducibility between Arabidopsis accessions, we recently identified a locus (ISR1) on chromosome III that is involved in ISR signaling. Accessions RLD and Wassilewskija (Ws) are recessive at the ISR1 locus and are, therefore, unable to develop ISR. Here we investigated whether the ISR1 locus is involved in JA or ethylene signaling. Compared with the ISR-inducible accession Columbia (Col), accessions RLD and Ws were not affected in JA-induced inhibition of root growth and expression of the JA-responsive gene Atvsp, suggesting that the ISR1 locus is not involved in JA signaling. However, RLD and Ws showed an affected expression of the triple response and a reduced expression of the ethylene responsive genes Hel and Pdf1.2 after exogenous application of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate. Moreover, in contrast to Col, RLD and Ws did not develop resistance against P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 after treatment of the leaves with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate. Analysis of the F(2) and F(3) progeny of a cross between Col (ISR1/ISR1) and RLD (isr1/isr1) revealed that reduced sensitivity to ethylene cosegregates with the recessive alleles of the ISR1 locus. These results suggest that the ISR1 locus encodes a component of the ethylene response, which is required for the expression of rhizobacteria-mediated ISR.

  16. A Novel Quantitative Trait Locus on Mouse Chromosome 18, “era1,” Modifies the Entrainment of Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Wisor, Jonathan P.; Striz, Martin; DeVoss, Jason; Murphy, Greer M.; Edgar, Dale M.; O'Hara, Bruce F.

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: The mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus conveys 24-h rhythmicity to sleep-wake cycles, locomotor activity, and other behavioral and physiological processes. The timing of rhythms relative to the light/dark (LD12:12) cycle is influenced in part by the endogenous circadian period and the time of day specific sensitivity of the clock to light. We now describe a novel circadian rhythm phenotype, and a locus influencing that phenotype, in a segregating population of mice. Methods: By crossbreeding 2 genetically distinct nocturnal strains of mice (Cast/Ei and C57BL/6J) and backcrossing the resulting progeny to Cast/Ei, we have produced a novel circadian phenotype, called early runner mice. Results: Early runner mice entrain to a light/dark cycle at an advanced phase, up to 9 hours before dark onset. This phenotype is not significantly correlated with circadian period in constant darkness and is not associated with disruption of molecular circadian rhythms in the SCN, as assessed by analysis of period gene expression. We have identified a genomic region that regulates this phenotype—a major quantitative trait locus on chromosome 18 (near D18Mit184) that we have named era1 for Early Runner Activity locus one. Phase delays caused by light exposure early in the subjective night were of smaller magnitude in backcross offspring that were homozygous Cast/Ei at D18Mit184 than in those that were heterozygous at this locus. Conclusion: Genetic variability in the circadian response to light may, in part, explain the variance in phase angle of entrainment in this segregating mouse population. Citation: Wisor JP; Striz M; DeVoss J; Murphy GM; Edgar DM; O'Hara BF. A novel quantitative trait locus on mouse chromosome 18, “era1,” modifies the entrainment of circadian rhythms. SLEEP 2007;30(10):1255-1263. PMID:17969459

  17. Physical analysis of the complex rye (Secale cereale L.) Alt4 aluminium (aluminum) tolerance locus using a whole-genome BAC library of rye cv. Blanco.

    PubMed

    Shi, B-J; Gustafson, J P; Button, J; Miyazaki, J; Pallotta, M; Gustafson, N; Zhou, H; Langridge, P; Collins, N C

    2009-08-01

    Rye is a diploid crop species with many outstanding qualities, and is important as a source of new traits for wheat and triticale improvement. Rye is highly tolerant of aluminum (Al) toxicity, and possesses a complex structure at the Alt4 Al tolerance locus not found at the corresponding locus in wheat. Here we describe a BAC library of rye cv. Blanco, representing a valuable resource for rye molecular genetic studies, and assess the library's suitability for investigating Al tolerance genes. The library provides 6 x genome coverage of the 8.1 Gb rye genome, has an average insert size of 131 kb, and contains only ~2% of empty or organelle-derived clones. Genetic analysis attributed the Al tolerance of Blanco to the Alt4 locus on the short arm of chromosome 7R, and revealed the presence of multiple allelic variants (haplotypes) of the Alt4 locus in the BAC library. BAC clones containing ALMT1 gene clusters from several Alt4 haplotypes were identified, and will provide useful starting points for exploring the basis for the structural variability and functional specialization of ALMT1 genes at this locus.

  18. Cosmid walking and chromosome jumping in the region of PKD1 reveal a locus duplication and three CpG islands.

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, G A; Germino, G G; Somlo, S; Weinstat-Saslow, D; Breuning, M H; Reeders, S T

    1990-01-01

    The locus responsible for the most common form of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD1) is located on chromosome 16p13.3. Genetic mapping studies indicate that PKD1 is flanked on the proximal side by the DNA marker 26.6 (D16S125). Here we show that 26.6 has undergone a locus duplication and that the two loci are less than 150kb apart. One of the two loci contains a polymorphic TaqI site that has been used in genetic studies and represents the proximal boundary for the PKD1 locus. We demonstrate that the polymorphic locus is the more proximal of the two 26.6-hybridizing loci. Therefore, four cosmids isolated from the distal 26.6-hybridizing locus contain candidate sequences for the PKD1 gene. These cosmids were found to contain two CpG islands that are likely markers for transcribed regions. A third CpG island was detected and cloned by directional chromosome jumping. Images PMID:1979857

  19. Low Cost Upper Atmosphere Sounder (LOCUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Daniel; Swinyard, Bruce M.; Ellison, Brian N.; Aylward, Alan D.; Aruliah, Anasuya; Plane, John M. C.; Feng, Wuhu; Saunders, Christopher; Friend, Jonathan; Bird, Rachel; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Parkes, Steve

    2014-05-01

    near future. We describe the current instrument configuration of LOCUS, and give a first preview of the expected science return such a mission would yield. The LOCUS instrument concept calls for four spectral bands, a first band at 4.7 THz to target atomic oxygen (O), a second band at 3.5 THz to target hydroxyl (OH), a third band at 1.1 THz to cover several diatomic species (NO, CO, O3, H2O) and finally a fourth band at 0.8 THz to retrieve pointing information from molecular oxygen (O2). LOCUS would be the first satellite instrument to measure atomic oxygen on a global scale with a precision that will allow the retrieval of the global O distribution. It would also be the first time that annual and diurnal changes in O are measured. This will be a significant step forward in understanding the chemistry and dynamics of the MLT. Current indications (derived from CRISTA measurement) lead us to believe that current models only give a poor representation of upper atmospheric O. The secondary target species can help us to address additional scientific questions related to both Climate (distribution of climate relevant gases, highly geared cooling of the MLT in response to Climate change, increased occurrence of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC), etc) and Space Weather (precipitation of electrically charged particles and impact on NOx chemistry, fluctuations of solar Lyman-alpha flux through shown in the the distribution of photochemically active species, etc).

  20. Identification of Potentially Pathogenic Variants in the Posterior Polymorphous Corneal Dystrophy 1 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Le, Derek J.; Chung, Duk-Won D.; Frausto, Ricardo F.; Kim, Michelle J.; Aldave, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy 1 (PPCD1) is a genetic disorder that affects corneal endothelial cell function and leads to loss of visual acuity. PPCD1 has been linked to a locus on chromosome 20 in multiple families; however, Sanger sequencing of protein-coding genes in the consensus region failed to identify any causative missense mutations. In this study, custom capture probes were utilized for targeted next-generation sequencing of the linked region in a previously reported family with PPCD1. Variants were detected through two bioinformatics pipelines and filtered according to multiple criteria. Additionally, a high-resolution microarray was used to detect copy number variations. No non-synonymous variants in the protein-coding region of annotated genes were identified. However, 12 single nucleotide variants in 10 genes, and 9 indels in 7 genes met the filtering criteria and were considered candidate variants for PPCD1. Eleven single nucleotide variants were confirmed by Sanger sequencing, including 2 synonymous variants and 9 non-coding variants, in 9 genes. One microdeletion was detected in an intron of OVOL2 by microarray but was subsequently not identified by PCR. Using a comprehensive next-generation sequencing approach, a total of 16 genes containing single nucleotide variants or indels that segregated with the affected phenotype in an affected family previously mapped to the PPCD1 locus were identified. Screening of these candidate genes in other families previously mapped to the PPCD1 locus will likely result in the identification of the genetic basis of PPCD1. PMID:27355326

  1. Transcription mapping of the region containing the locus for Treacher Collins syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, C.A.; Gallardo, T.D.; Li, X.

    1994-09-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome, an autosomal dominant craniofacial disorder and the most common mandibulofacial dysostosis disorder, has been genetically localized to chromosome 5q32. We have previously constructed a YAC contig of approximately 3 megabases cross the region that includes this locus. A single 1.6 Mb YAC from within this contig contains the genetic markers that flank the disease locus as well as two known genes, osteonectin (SPARC) and annexin VI (ANX6). This was converted to cosmid clones by using inter-Alu PCR products from the YAC to screen the LANL chromosome 5-specific cosmid library. One hundred and seventy five cosmids covering the candidate interval were used in a direct selection strategy to enrich for cDNAs encoded by this region. Over 30 selected cDNAs derived from fetal face, fetal brain, activated T cells, placenta, and fetal cranial tissues have been mapped to the region and DNA sequenced. The majority of these cDNAs show little or no homology to previously described DNA sequences. However, one known gene encoding the G (M2) activator protein was selected as a cDNA and mapped to the region immediately flanking the ANX6 locus. A partial cosmid contig covering the critical interval was built from the cosmids by a combination of end walking and fingerprinting methods. Additional polymorphic markers developed from the contig have allowed the Treacher Collins critical region to be further refined to less than 500 kb. Full length cDNA clones that map to this smaller critical region are currently being derived and evaluated in affected pedigrees.

  2. Hybrid Sterility Locus on Chromosome X Controls Meiotic Recombination Rate in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Balcova, Maria; Faltusova, Barbora; Gergelits, Vaclav; Bhattacharyya, Tanmoy; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Knopf, Corinna; Fotopulosova, Vladana; Chvatalova, Irena; Gregorova, Sona; Forejt, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination safeguards proper segregation of homologous chromosomes into gametes, affects genetic variation within species, and contributes to meiotic chromosome recognition, pairing and synapsis. The Prdm9 gene has a dual role, it controls meiotic recombination by determining the genomic position of crossover hotspots and, in infertile hybrids of house mouse subspecies Mus m. musculus (Mmm) and Mus m. domesticus (Mmd), it further functions as the major hybrid sterility gene. In the latter role Prdm9 interacts with the hybrid sterility X 2 (Hstx2) genomic locus on Chromosome X (Chr X) by a still unknown mechanism. Here we investigated the meiotic recombination rate at the genome-wide level and its possible relation to hybrid sterility. Using immunofluorescence microscopy we quantified the foci of MLH1 DNA mismatch repair protein, the cytological counterparts of reciprocal crossovers, in a panel of inter-subspecific chromosome substitution strains. Two autosomes, Chr 7 and Chr 11, significantly modified the meiotic recombination rate, yet the strongest modifier, designated meiotic recombination 1, Meir1, emerged in the 4.7 Mb Hstx2 genomic locus on Chr X. The male-limited transgressive effect of Meir1 on recombination rate parallels the male-limited transgressive role of Hstx2 in hybrid male sterility. Thus, both genetic factors, the Prdm9 gene and the Hstx2/Meir1 genomic locus, indicate a link between meiotic recombination and hybrid sterility. A strong female-specific modifier of meiotic recombination rate with the effect opposite to Meir1 was localized on Chr X, distally to Meir1. Mapping Meir1 to a narrow candidate interval on Chr X is an important first step towards positional cloning of the respective gene(s) responsible for variation in the global recombination rate between closely related mouse subspecies. PMID:27104744

  3. A genomewide screen for chronic rhinosinusitis genes identifies a locus on chromosome 7q

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Jayant M.; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Schneider, Daniel; Naclerio, Robert M.; Ober, Carole

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis is an important public health problem with substantial impact on patient quality of life and health care costs. We hypothesized that genetic variation may be one factor that affects this disease. Objective To identify genetic variation underlying susceptibility to chronic rhinosinusitis using a genome-wide approach. Methods We studied a religious isolate that practices a communal lifestyle and shares common environmental exposures. Using physical examination, medical interviews, and a review of medical records, we identified 8 individuals with chronic rhinosinusitis out of 291 screened. These 8 individuals were related to each other in a single 60 member, 9 generation pedigree. A genome-wide screen for loci influencing susceptibility to chronic rhinosinusitis using 1123 genome-wide markers was conducted. Results The largest linkage peak (P = 0.0023; 127.15 cM, equivalent to LOD=2.01) was on chromosome 7q31.1-7q32.1, 7q31 (127.15 cM; 1-LOD support region: 115cM to 135cM) and included the CFTR locus. Genotyping of 38 mutations in the CFTR gene did not reveal variation accounting for this linkage signal. Conclusion Understanding the genes involved in chronic rhinosinusitis may lead to improvements in its diagnosis and treatment. Our results represent the first genome-wide screen for chronic rhinosinusitis and suggest that a locus on 7q31.1-7q32.1 influences disease susceptibility. This may be the CFTR gene or another nearby locus. PMID:18622306

  4. Hybrid Sterility Locus on Chromosome X Controls Meiotic Recombination Rate in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Balcova, Maria; Faltusova, Barbora; Gergelits, Vaclav; Bhattacharyya, Tanmoy; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Knopf, Corinna; Fotopulosova, Vladana; Chvatalova, Irena; Gregorova, Sona; Forejt, Jiri

    2016-04-01

    Meiotic recombination safeguards proper segregation of homologous chromosomes into gametes, affects genetic variation within species, and contributes to meiotic chromosome recognition, pairing and synapsis. The Prdm9 gene has a dual role, it controls meiotic recombination by determining the genomic position of crossover hotspots and, in infertile hybrids of house mouse subspecies Mus m. musculus (Mmm) and Mus m. domesticus (Mmd), it further functions as the major hybrid sterility gene. In the latter role Prdm9 interacts with the hybrid sterility X 2 (Hstx2) genomic locus on Chromosome X (Chr X) by a still unknown mechanism. Here we investigated the meiotic recombination rate at the genome-wide level and its possible relation to hybrid sterility. Using immunofluorescence microscopy we quantified the foci of MLH1 DNA mismatch repair protein, the cytological counterparts of reciprocal crossovers, in a panel of inter-subspecific chromosome substitution strains. Two autosomes, Chr 7 and Chr 11, significantly modified the meiotic recombination rate, yet the strongest modifier, designated meiotic recombination 1, Meir1, emerged in the 4.7 Mb Hstx2 genomic locus on Chr X. The male-limited transgressive effect of Meir1 on recombination rate parallels the male-limited transgressive role of Hstx2 in hybrid male sterility. Thus, both genetic factors, the Prdm9 gene and the Hstx2/Meir1 genomic locus, indicate a link between meiotic recombination and hybrid sterility. A strong female-specific modifier of meiotic recombination rate with the effect opposite to Meir1 was localized on Chr X, distally to Meir1. Mapping Meir1 to a narrow candidate interval on Chr X is an important first step towards positional cloning of the respective gene(s) responsible for variation in the global recombination rate between closely related mouse subspecies.

  5. Evolution of the mating type locus: insights gained from the dimorphic primary fungal pathogens Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Coccidioides posadasii.

    PubMed

    Fraser, James A; Stajich, Jason E; Tarcha, Eric J; Cole, Garry T; Inglis, Diane O; Sil, Anita; Heitman, Joseph

    2007-04-01

    Sexual reproduction of fungi is governed by the mating type (MAT) locus, a specialized region of the genome encoding key transcriptional regulators that direct regulatory networks to specify cell identity and fate. Knowledge of MAT locus structure and evolution has been considerably advanced in recent years as a result of genomic analyses that enable the definition of MAT locus sequences in many species as well as provide an understanding of the evolutionary plasticity of this unique region of the genome. Here, we extend this analysis to define the mating type locus of three dimorphic primary human fungal pathogens, Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Coccidioides posadasii, using genomic analysis, direct sequencing, and bioinformatics. These studies provide evidence that all three species possess heterothallic bipolar mating type systems, with isolates encoding either a high-mobility-group (HMG) domain or an alpha-box transcriptional regulator. These genes are intact in all loci examined and have not been subject to loss or decay, providing evidence that the loss of fertility upon passage in H. capsulatum is not attributable to mutations at the MAT locus. These findings also suggest that an extant sexual cycle remains to be defined in both Coccidioides species, in accord with population genetic evidence. Based on these MAT sequences, a facile PCR test was developed that allows the mating type to be rapidly ascertained. Finally, these studies highlight the evolutionary forces shaping the MAT locus, revealing examples in which flanking genes have been inverted or subsumed and incorporated into an expanding MAT locus, allowing us to propose an expanded model for the evolution of the MAT locus in the phylum Ascomycota. PMID:17337636

  6. Exclusion of close linkage between the synaptic vesicular monoamine transporter locus and schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Persico, A.M.; Uhl, G.R.; Wang, Zhe Wu

    1995-12-18

    The principal brain synaptic vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) is responsible for the reuptake of serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and histamine from the cytoplasm into synaptic vesicles, thus contributing to determination of the size of releasable neurotransmitter vesicular pools. Potential involvement of VMAT2 gene variants in the etiology of schizophrenia and related disorders was tested using polymorphic VMAT2 gene markers in 156 subjects from 16 multiplex pedigrees with schizophrenia, schizophreniform, schizoaffective, and schizotypal disorders and mood incongruent psychotic depression. Assuming genetic homogeneity, complete ({theta} = 0.0) linkage to the schizophrenia spectrum was excluded under both dominant and recessive models. Allelic variants at the VMAT2 locus do not appear to provide major genetic contributions to the etiology of schizophrenia spectrum disorders in these pedigrees. 16 refs.

  7. Molecular genetics of ABO.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, F

    2000-01-01

    This year commemorates the 100th anniversary of the discovery of the ABO blood group system by Karl Landsteiner. His findings of red cell agglutination by serum and recognition of blood groups laid the scientific basis for safe practice of blood transfusion. Even though dozens of blood systems have been identified, the ABO system still remains to be one of the most important systems in transfusion medicine. In 1990, we elucidated the molecular genetic basis of three major alleles at the ABO locus. Since then we have witnessed the progress in our understanding of ABO genes and A and B glycosyltransferases specified by a variety of functional alleles at this locus. Mutations affecting the activity and specificity of the enzymes have been identified. Not only has ABO genotyping become possible, but it has also become possible to genetically engineer the activity and specificity of the enzymes. We are now at a point of embarking upon the quest of understanding the functional significance of ABO polymorphism.

  8. Linkage mapping of the locus for inherited ovine arthrogryposis (IOA) to sheep chromosome 5.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Angela M; MacHugh, David E; Park, Stephen D E; Scraggs, Erik; Haley, Chris S; Lynn, David J; Boland, Maurice P; Doherty, Michael L

    2007-01-01

    Arthrogryposis is a congenital malformation affecting the limbs of newborn animals and infants. Previous work has demonstrated that inherited ovine arthrogryposis (IOA) has an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Two affected homozygous recessive (art/art) Suffolk rams were used as founders for a backcross pedigree of half-sib families segregating the IOA trait. A genome scan was performed using 187 microsatellite genetic markers and all backcross animals were phenotyped at birth for the presence and severity of arthrogryposis. Pairwise LOD scores of 1.86, 1.35, and 1.32 were detected for three microsatellites, BM741, JAZ, and RM006, that are located on sheep Chr 5 (OAR5). Additional markers in the region were identified from the genetic linkage map of BTA7 and by in silico analyses of the draft bovine genome sequence, three of which were informative. Interval mapping of all autosomes produced an F value of 21.97 (p < 0.01) for a causative locus in the region of OAR5 previously flagged by pairwise linkage analysis. Inspection of the orthologous region of HSA5 highlighted a previously fine-mapped locus for human arthrogryposis multiplex congenita neurogenic type (AMCN). A survey of the HSA5 genome sequence identified plausible candidate genes for both IOA and human AMCN.

  9. The sexually linked Mpi locus is presumably involved in imidothiazole resistance in Oesophagostomum dentatum parasites.

    PubMed

    Snábel, V; DeMeeŵs, T; Várady, M; Nansen, P; Bjørn, H; Corba, J

    2000-06-01

    Information about genetic changes during the selection process could indicate mechanisms underlying the spread of resistance to anthelmintic drugs. For clarification of the role of the Mpi locus encoding mannose-phosphate isomerase enzyme in determining resistance, genotyping of Oesophagostomum dentatum strains was performed using an isoelectrofocusing technique. In levamisole- and pyrantel-selected strains the allele associated with resistance has probably been found. Significant values for genetic differentiation between treated and untreated strains of common origin were recorded by F(st) indices (theta = 0.078; P = 0.0008). The specific genomic makeup of a flubendazole-resistant strain, which did not correlate with that of the remaining isolates, might be ascribed to a different action of the anthelmintic or different environmental conditions under which resistance against this drug arose. The absence of heterozygotes in male populations indicated an XX/X0 system of sex determination for the Mpi locus, thus providing a greater potential for the development of resistance. A possible involvement of alleles linked with mannose-phosphate isomerase in alterations of membrane receptors that can be associated with resistance against imidothiazole-based drugs is discussed.

  10. Dopamine D3 receptor gene locus: Association with schizophrenia, as well age of onset

    SciTech Connect

    Nimgsonkar, V.L.; Zhang, X.R.; Brar, J.S.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic factors are clearly involved in the etiology of schizophrenia, but their specific nature is unknown. If the genetic etiology is multifactorial or polygenic, the role of specific genes as susceptibility factors can be directly evaluated by examining allelic variation at these loci among cases in comparison with controls. Two studies have independently demonstrated an association of schizophrenia with homozygosity at the dopamine D3 receptor gene (D3RG) locus, using a biallelic polymorphism in the first exon of D3RG. These results are important because D3RG is a favored candidate gene. Three other studies have identified associations among sub-groups of patients, but the majority were negative. The present study involved patients with schizophrenia (DSM-III-R criteria) of Caucasian or African-American ethnicity (n=130). Two groups of controls, matched for ethnicity, were used: adults screened for schizophrenia (n=128) and unselected neonates (n=160). Multivariate analysis revealed an association between allele no. 1 homozygosity and schizophrenia in comparison with adult, but not neonatal controls. The association was most marked among Caucasian patients with a family history of schizophrenia (odds ratio 13.7, C.I. 1.8, 104.3). An association of the D3RG locus with age of onset (AOO) was also noted. The discrepancies in earlier studies may due to variations in control groups, differencies in mean AOO among different cohorts, or ethnic variations in susceptibility attributable to D3RG.

  11. Lactobacillus buchneri genotyping on the basis of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) locus diversity.

    PubMed

    Briner, Alexandra E; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2014-02-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in combination with associated sequences (cas) constitute the CRISPR-Cas immune system, which uptakes DNA from invasive genetic elements as novel "spacers" that provide a genetic record of immunization events. We investigated the potential of CRISPR-based genotyping of Lactobacillus buchneri, a species relevant for commercial silage, bioethanol, and vegetable fermentations. Upon investigating the occurrence and diversity of CRISPR-Cas systems in Lactobacillus buchneri genomes, we observed a ubiquitous occurrence of CRISPR arrays containing a 36-nucleotide (nt) type II-A CRISPR locus adjacent to four cas genes, including the universal cas1 and cas2 genes and the type II signature gene cas9. Comparative analysis of CRISPR spacer content in 26 L. buchneri pickle fermentation isolates associated with spoilage revealed 10 unique locus genotypes that contained between 9 and 29 variable spacers. We observed a set of conserved spacers at the ancestral end, reflecting a common origin, as well as leader-end polymorphisms, reflecting recent divergence. Some of these spacers showed perfect identity with phage sequences, and many spacers showed homology to Lactobacillus plasmid sequences. Following a comparative analysis of sequences immediately flanking protospacers that matched CRISPR spacers, we identified a novel putative protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM), 5'-AAAA-3'. Overall, these findings suggest that type II-A CRISPR-Cas systems are valuable for genotyping of L. buchneri.

  12. c-MYC is a radiosensitive locus in human breast cells

    PubMed Central

    Wade, M A; Sunter, N J; Fordham, S E; Long, A; Masic, D; Russell, L J; Harrison, C J; Rand, V; Elstob, C; Bown, N; Rowe, D; Lowe, C; Cuthbert, G; Bennett, S; Crosier, S; Bacon, C M; Onel, K; Scott, K; Scott, D; Travis, L B; May, F E B; Allan, J M

    2015-01-01

    Ionising radiation is a potent human carcinogen. Epidemiological studies have shown that adolescent and young women are at increased risk of developing breast cancer following exposure to ionising radiation compared with older women, and that risk is dose-dependent. Although it is well understood which individuals are at risk of radiation-induced breast carcinogenesis, the molecular genetic mechanisms that underlie cell transformation are less clear. To identify genetic alterations potentially responsible for driving radiogenic breast transformation, we exposed the human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A to fractionated doses of X-rays and examined the copy number and cytogenetic alterations. We identified numerous alterations of c-MYC that included high-level focal amplification associated with increased protein expression. c-MYC amplification was also observed in primary human mammary epithelial cells following exposure to radiation. We also demonstrate that the frequency and magnitude of c-MYC amplification and c-MYC protein expression is significantly higher in breast cancer with antecedent radiation exposure compared with breast cancer without a radiation aetiology. Our data also demonstrate extensive intratumor heterogeneity with respect to c-MYC copy number in radiogenic breast cancer, suggesting continuous evolution at this locus during disease development and progression. Taken together, these data identify c-MYC as a radiosensitive locus, implicating this oncogenic transcription factor in the aetiology of radiogenic breast cancer. PMID:25531321

  13. In Vitro Whole-Genome Analysis Identifies a Susceptibility Locus for HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Ciuffi, Angela; Robyr, Daniel; Taffé, Patrick; Muñoz, Miguel; Beckmann, Jacques S; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Telenti, Amalio

    2008-01-01

    Advances in large-scale analysis of human genomic variability provide unprecedented opportunities to study the genetic basis of susceptibility to infectious agents. We report here the use of an in vitro system for the identification of a locus on HSA8q24.3 associated with cellular susceptibility to HIV-1. This locus was mapped through quantitative linkage analysis using cell lines from multigeneration families, validated in vitro, and followed up by two independent associati