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Sample records for loeys-dietz syndrome type

  1. Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome is a genetic disorder of the body’s connective tissue. It has some features in common with Marfan ... a mutation, growth and development of the body’s connective tissue and other body systems is disrupted, leading to ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Loeys-Dietz syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... a bulge in the blood vessel wall ( an aneurysm ). Stretching of the aorta may also lead to ... People with Loeys-Dietz syndrome can also have aneurysms or dissections in arteries throughout the body and ...

  3. LOEYS-DIETZ SYNDROME: PERIOPERATIVE ANESTHESIA CONSIDERATIONS.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Judy G; Bray, Jacob P; Risher, William H; Kaye, Alan David

    2016-06-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is a rare autosomal dominant disease related to genetic mutations in receptors for the cytokine transforming growth factor-receptor type 1 (TGFB-R1) or 2 gene (TGFB-R2) on the cell surface. LDS results in abnormal protein synthesis and dysfunctional connective tissue, which can result in unique cardiovascular anesthesia challenges related to perioperative management. Patients with LDS may manifest hypertelorism, bifid uvula or cleft palate, and arterial tortuosity. Virtually all LDS patients show some type of abnormal skin findings and bleeding tendency. These patients may show a rapid progression of aortic dilation, regurgitation, and a propensity towards rupture and/or dissection at a much earlier age and smaller aneurysm size. LDS patients who require surgical intervention require meticulous vigilance from the anesthesiologist. We describe a 26 year old patient with documented LDS type 1 who presented for repair of an ascending/root aneurysm in this case report. Recognition of LDS and intra-operative management of the cardiovascular manifestations of this disease is paramount in ensuring successful surgical outcome and to limit morbidity and mortality. PMID:27487644

  4. Loeys-Dietz syndrome: life threatening aortic dissection diagnosed on routine family screening

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Claire A; Clowes, Virginia E; Cooper, John P

    2014-01-01

    A 52-year-old man was found to have a severely dilated aortic root and a Stanford type A dissection on familial screening echocardiography, following diagnosis of a dilated aorta in his son. The dissection required urgent surgical repair. Clinical examination suggested features of Loeys-Dietz syndrome type II, and subsequent demonstration of a mutation in the TGFBR1 gene in the patient and his son confirmed the diagnosis. This article highlights the high prevalence of inherited conditions in dilated aortic root presentations and the importance of family screening and surveillance to allow early surgical intervention. PMID:24495977

  5. [Two Surgical Cases of Loeys-Dietz Syndrome in Childhood].

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Masaaki; Oguma, Fumiaki; Hirahara, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome( LDS) is a recently recognized autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder. Mutations in the genes encoding transforming growth factor-beta( TGF-β) receptor 1 and (2 TGFBR1, TGFBR2)have been associated with LDS. We report here 2 cases of LDS in childhood. Case 1 was a 10-year-old man, who had aneurysm of both the pulmonary trunk and the ascending aorta, associated with pulmonary and aortic valve insufficiency. Surgical repair was performed successfully at the age of 17. The aortic valve was replaced with a mechanical valve. The aneurysmal ascending aorta was replaced with a Dacron graft. Pulmonary valvuloplasty and pulmonary arterioplasty was performed. Case 2 was a 3-month-old female infant, who had a patent ductus arteriosus( PDA) and aortic root dilation. A detailed physical examination revealed hypertelorism, bifid uvula, retrognathia, talipes equinovarus, and camptodactyly. Computed tomography and echocardiography demonstrated PDA, Valsalva sinus dilation, and arterial tortuosity. These findings were consistent with the clinical manifestations of LDS. Surgical ligation and clipping of the PDA was performed with good results. A molecular genetic analysis subsequently demonstrated a heterozygous missense mutation of the TGFBR2. Since aortic dissection occurs at smaller aortic diameters, early diagnosis and close monitoring are important for patients with LDS. PMID:27476563

  6. Further delineation of Loeys-Dietz syndrome type 4 in a family with mild vascular involvement and a TGFB2 splicing mutation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection and widespread systemic connective tissue involvement. LDS type 1 to 4 are caused by mutations in genes of the TGF-β signaling pathway: TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 encoding the TGF-β receptor (LDS1 and LDS2), SMAD3 encoding the TGF-β receptor cytoplasmic effector (LDS3), and TGFB2 encoding the TGF-β2 ligand (LDS4). LDS4 represents the mildest end of the LDS spectrum, since aneurysms are usually observed in fourth decade and the progression of the disease is slower than in the other forms. Case presentation We report the clinical and molecular findings of an LDS4 Italian family. Genetic testing included TGFBR1, TGFBR2, SMAD3, and TGFB2 analysis by Sanger sequencing. In order to verify the effect of the identified splice mutation, RT-PCR analysis was performed. The proband, a 57-year-old woman, showed high palate, hypoplasic uvula, easy bruising, joint hypermobility, chronic pain, scoliosis, multiple relapsing hernias, dural ectasia, and mitral valve prolapse. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed tortuosity and ectasia of carotid, vertebral, cerebral, and segmental pulmonary arteries. Arterial aneurysm and dissection never occurred. Her 39- and 34-year-old daughters presented with a variable degree of musculoskeletal involvement. Molecular analysis disclosed the novel c.839-1G>A splice site mutation in the TGFB2 gene. This mutation activates a cryptic splice acceptor site in exon 6 leading to frameshift, premature termination codon and haploinsufficiency (p.Gly280Aspfs*41). Conclusions Our data confirm that loss-of-function mutations in TGFB2 gene do not always lead to aggressive vascular phenotypes and that articular and skeletal signs are prevalent, therefore suggesting that LDS4 must be considered in patients with sparse signs of LDS and related disorders also in the absence of vascular events. PMID:25163805

  7. Aortic and Pulmonary Root Aneurysms in a Child With Loeys-Dietz Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Stefania; Stellin, Giovanni; Milanesi, Ornella; Padalino, Massimo; Vricella, Luca A; Thiene, Gaetano; Cameron, Duke E; Basso, Cristina; Vida, Vladimiro L

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of an 11-year-old boy with Loeys-Dietz syndrome, with both aortic and pulmonary aneurysms requiring cardiac operation because of progressive valve incompetence resulting from loss of coaptation of the cusps. Arterial medial changes, consisting of disarray of elastic fibers and increased collagen deposition, were observed in surgical specimens from both the aorta and the pulmonary artery of our patient, and the strong pSmad2 nuclear staining of smooth muscle cells of both aortic and pulmonary tunica media are the best evidence of transforming growth factor-β pathway activation in Loeys-Dietz syndrome. PMID:26897209

  8. Loeys-Dietz syndrome with bilateral radial head dislocations: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarush; Agashe, Mandar V; Dhamele, Jaideep; Aroojis, Alaric J; Mehta, Rujuta

    2013-08-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome is characterised by vascular aneurysms, hypertelorism, and a bifid uvula. We report on an 11-year-old boy with Loeys-Dietz syndrome who presented with bilateral radial head dislocations and severe osteopaenia with changes of avascular necrosis in both hips causing an out-toeing, wide gait. Considering the poor prognosis for elbow movement and possible radial head dysplasia, surgical reduction of the radial heads was deferred. A subtrochanteric de-rotation osteotomy of the left hip was performed to improve the gait.

  9. Glue embolus complicating the endovascular treatment of a patient with Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marine, Leopoldo; Gupta, Rishi; Gornik, Heather L; Kashyap, Vikram S

    2010-11-01

    A 34-year-old [corrected] woman was diagnosed with Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Five months later, the patient presented with a symptomatic 2.6-cm subclavian pseudoaneurysm. Staged endovascular treatment was initiated with left vertebral artery embolization, followed by sac ablation and stent graft exclusion. The pseudoaneurysm cavity was filled with n-butylcyanoacrylate ("glue") via a microcatheter. Despite balloon occlusion of the pseudoaneurysm orifice, a small amount of glue debris embolized to the brachial artery, necessitating a vein bypass. In this case, distal embolization of glue may have been avoided by leaving a microcatheter in the aneurysm sac for glue injection after first deploying the stent graft.

  10. [Loeys-Dietz syndrome (TGFβR2 mutation) in a 4-year-old child with thoracic aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    De Potter, M-J; Edouard, T; Amadieu, R; Plaisancié, J; Julia, S; Hadeed, K; Hascoët, S; Acar, P; Dulac, Y

    2016-05-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome is a rare form of connective tissue disorder, whose clinical features can resemble those of Marfan syndrome, but with a more unpolished appearance. Recently brought out, this pathology remains little known; however, its consequences may be dramatic. We report on the case of a 4-year-old girl followed for a congenital hip dislocation, in which a systematic exam found increased cutaneous elasticity and a bifid uvula, suggesting a connective tissue disorder. Symptoms were unpolished, as the child's height was normal, without any positive cardiac, rheumatological, or ophthalmological family history. Cardiovascular tests found a thoracic aortic aneurysm at the Valsalva sinus (26mm, Z-score=+4.24). A genetic investigation found a TGFβR2 gene mutation, leading to the diagnosis of Loeys-Dietz syndrome type 2. Skeletal damage associated with bifid uvula and/or hypertelorism and an aneurysm of the ascending aorta should guide the genetic investigation to the search for TGF-β vasculopathy such as Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

  11. Dexamethasone normalizes aberrant elastic fiber production and collagen 1 secretion by Loeys-Dietz syndrome fibroblasts: a possible treatment?

    PubMed

    Barnett, Christopher P; Chitayat, David; Bradley, Timothy J; Wang, Yanting; Hinek, Aleksander

    2011-06-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder characterized by facial dysmorphism, cleft palate, dilation of the aortic arch, blood vessel tortuosity and a high risk of aortic dissection. It is caused by mutations in the transforming growth factor β-receptor 1 and 2 (TGFβ-R1 and TGFβ-R2) genes. Fibroblasts derived from 12 Loeys-Dietz syndrome patients, six with TGFB-R1 mutations and six with TGFB-R2 mutations, were analyzed using RT-PCR, biochemical assays, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy for production of elastin, fibrillin 1, fibulin 1 and fibulin 4 and deposition of collagen type I. All LDS fibroblasts with TGFβ-R1 mutations demonstrated decreased expression of elastin and fibulin 1 genes and impaired deposition of elastic fibers. In contrast, fibroblasts with TGFβ-R2 mutations consistently demonstrated intracellular accumulation of collagen type I in the presence of otherwise normal elastic fiber production. Treatment of the cell cultures with dexamethasone induced remarkable upregulation in the expression of tropoelastin, fibulin 1- and fibulin 4-encoding mRNAs, leading to normalization of elastic fiber production in fibroblasts with TGFβ-R1 mutations. Treatment with dexamethasone also corrected the abnormal secretion of collagen type I from fibroblasts with TGFβ-R2 gene mutations. As the organogenesis-relevant elastic fiber production occurs exclusively in late fetal and early neonatal life, these findings may have implications for treatment in early life. Further studies are required to determine if dexamethasone treatment of fetuses prenatally diagnosed with LDS would prevent or alleviate the connective tissue and vascular defects seen in this syndrome.

  12. A patient with Loeys-Dietz syndrome treated with chemoradiotherapy for an oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chan, Andrew K; Teoh, Daren; Matthews, Paul; Fresco, Lydia

    2013-09-17

    We present the first published case of a patient with Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) who was treated with radical chemoradiotherapy for an oropharyngeal carcinoma. In view of this newly recognised connective tissue disease, the uncertainty of severe toxicity from chemoradiotherapy to treat a potentially curative cancer posed a management challenge. The patient was treated with chemoradiotherapy and remains well with no evidence of recurrence at 3 years. Furthermore, we have observed minimal late effects secondary to chemoradiotherapy at 3 years following the completion of treatment suggesting that the underlying pathogenesis of LDS may provide an interesting human model to further elucidate the complex interactions of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and tissue fibrosis secondary to chemoradiotherapy. A review of LDS as well as the association of TGF-β1 expression and tissue fibrosis is presented.

  13. A patient with Loeys-Dietz syndrome treated with chemoradiotherapy for an oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chan, Andrew K; Teoh, Daren; Matthews, Paul; Fresco, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    We present the first published case of a patient with Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) who was treated with radical chemoradiotherapy for an oropharyngeal carcinoma. In view of this newly recognised connective tissue disease, the uncertainty of severe toxicity from chemoradiotherapy to treat a potentially curative cancer posed a management challenge. The patient was treated with chemoradiotherapy and remains well with no evidence of recurrence at 3 years. Furthermore, we have observed minimal late effects secondary to chemoradiotherapy at 3 years following the completion of treatment suggesting that the underlying pathogenesis of LDS may provide an interesting human model to further elucidate the complex interactions of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and tissue fibrosis secondary to chemoradiotherapy. A review of LDS as well as the association of TGF-β1 expression and tissue fibrosis is presented. PMID:24045763

  14. Single-Stage Total Arch Replacement Including Resection of Kommerell Diverticulum in a Patient With Loeys-Dietz Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ong, Chin Siang; Kasai, Yuhei; Fukushima, Souta; Hibino, Narutoshi; Magruder, Trent; Suarez-Pierre, Alejandro; Cameron, Duke; Vricella, Luca

    2016-09-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is an autosomal dominant genetic connective tissue disorder associated with aortic aneurysmal disease. Kommerell diverticulum (KD) is a rare aortic diverticulum, for which the indication for surgery and the surgical techniques remain subjects of debate. We describe our experience with a successful total aortic arch replacement including KD resection through a median sternotomy for a pediatric patient with LDS. PMID:27521346

  15. Duplication of the TGFBR1 gene causes features of Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Breckpot, Jeroen; Budts, Werner; De Zegher, Francis; Vermeesch, Joris R; Devriendt, Koenraad

    2010-01-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS; OMIM:609192) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hypertelorism, bifid uvula or cleft palate, and arterial tortuosity with widespread vascular aneurysms and a high risk of aortic dissection at an early age. LDS results from mutations in the transforming growth factor beta-receptor I and II (TGFBR1 and TGFBR2) genes, altering the transmission of the subcellular TGF-β signal, mediated by increased activation of Smad2. We report on a 17-year-old boy with pubertas tarda, a bifid uvula, camptodactyly and facial dysmorphic features, suggestive of LDS. Mutation analysis of TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 was normal. By means of molecular karyotyping two previously unreported chromosomal imbalances were detected: a 120 kb deletion on chromosome 22q13.31q13.32, inherited from an unaffected parent, and a de novo 14.6 Mb duplication on chromosome 9q22.32q31.3, comprising TGFBR1. We hypothesize that copy number gain of TGFBR1 contributes to the phenotype. PMID:20813212

  16. Dysregulated TGF-β signaling alters bone microstructure in a mouse model of Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Ashvin K; Tomlinson, Ryan E; Mitchell, Stuart; Goh, Brian C; Yung, Rachel M; Kumar, Sarvesh; Tan, Eric W; Faugere, Marie-Claude; Dietz, Harry C; Clemens, Thomas L; Sponseller, Paul D

    2015-10-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by vascular and skeletal abnormalities resembling Marfan syndrome, including a predisposition for pathologic fracture. LDS is caused by heterozygous mutations in the genes encoding transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) type 1 and type 2 receptors. In this study, we characterized the skeletal phenotype of mice carrying a mutation in the TGF-β type 2 receptor associated with severe LDS in humans. Cortical bone in LDS mice showed significantly reduced tissue area, bone area, and cortical thickness with increased eccentricity. However, no significant differences in trabecular bone volume were observed. Dynamic histomorphometry performed in calcein-labeled mice showed decreased mineral apposition rates in cortical and trabecular bone with normal numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Mechanical testing of femurs by three-point bending revealed reduced femoral strength and fracture resistance. In vitro, osteoblasts from LDS mice demonstrated increased mineralization with enhanced expression of osteoblast differentiation markers compared with control cells. These changes were associated with impaired TGF-β1-induced Smad2 and Erk1/2 phosphorylation and upregulated TGF-β1 ligand mRNA expression, compatible with G357W as a loss-of-function mutation in the TGF-β type 2 receptor. Paradoxically, phosphorylated Smad2/3 in cortical osteocytes measured by immunohistochemistry was increased relative to controls, possibly suggesting the cross-activation of TGF-β-related receptors. The skeletal phenotype observed in the LDS mouse closely resembles the principal structural features of bone in humans with LDS and establishes this mouse as a valid in vivo model for further investigation of TGF-β receptor signaling in bone.

  17. Differential diagnosis and diagnostic flow chart of joint hypermobility syndrome/ehlers-danlos syndrome hypermobility type compared to other heritable connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed

    Colombi, Marina; Dordoni, Chiara; Chiarelli, Nicola; Ritelli, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) is an evolving and protean disorder mostly recognized by generalized joint hypermobility and without a defined molecular basis. JHS/EDS-HT also presents with other connective tissue features affecting a variety of structures and organs, such as skin, eye, bone, and internal organs. However, most of these signs are present in variable combinations and severity in many other heritable connective tissue disorders. Accordingly, JHS/EDS-HT is an "exclusion" diagnosis which needs the absence of any consistent feature indicative of other partially overlapping connective tissue disorders. While both Villefranche and Brighton criteria include such an exclusion as a mandatory item, a systematic approach for reaching a stringent clinical diagnosis of JHS/EDS-HT is still lacking. The absence of a consensus on the diagnostic approach to JHS/EDS-HT concerning its clinical boundaries with similar conditions contribute to limit our actual understanding of the pathologic and molecular bases of this disorder. In this review, we revise the differential diagnosis of JHS/EDS-HT with those heritable connective tissue disorders which show a significant overlap with the former and mostly include EDS classic, vascular and kyphoscoliotic types, osteogenesis imperfecta, Marfan syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, arterial tortuosity syndrome, and lateral meningocele syndrome. A diagnostic flow chart is also offered with the attempt to support the less experienced clinician in stringently recognizing JHS/EDS-HT and stimulate the debate in the scientific community for both management and research purposes.

  18. Mutations in a TGF-β Ligand, TGFB3, Cause Syndromic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Bertoli-Avella, Aida M.; Gillis, Elisabeth; Morisaki, Hiroko; Verhagen, Judith M.A.; de Graaf, Bianca M.; van de Beek, Gerarda; Gallo, Elena; Kruithof, Boudewijn P.T.; Venselaar, Hanka; Myers, Loretha A.; Laga, Steven; Doyle, Alexander J.; Oswald, Gretchen; van Cappellen, Gert W.A.; Yamanaka, Itaru; van der Helm, Robert M.; Beverloo, Berna; de Klein, Annelies; Pardo, Luba; Lammens, Martin; Evers, Christina; Devriendt, Koenraad; Dumoulein, Michiel; Timmermans, Janneke; Bruggenwirth, Hennie T.; Verheijen, Frans; Rodrigus, Inez; Baynam, Gareth; Kempers, Marlies; Saenen, Johan; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M.; Minatoya, Kenji; Matsukawa, Ritsu; Tsukube, Takuro; Kubo, Noriaki; Hofstra, Robert; Goumans, Marie Jose; Bekkers, Jos A.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; van de Laar, Ingrid M.B.H.; Dietz, Harry C.; Van Laer, Lut; Morisaki, Takayuki; Wessels, Marja W.; Loeys, Bart L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aneurysms affecting the aorta are a common condition associated with high mortality as a result of aortic dissection or rupture. Investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in syndromic types of thoracic aortic aneurysms, such as Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndromes, have revealed an important contribution of disturbed transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling. Objectives This study sought to discover a novel gene causing syndromic aortic aneurysms in order to unravel the underlying pathogenesis. Methods We combined genome-wide linkage analysis, exome sequencing, and candidate gene Sanger sequencing in a total of 470 index cases with thoracic aortic aneurysms. Extensive cardiological examination, including physical examination, electrocardiography, and transthoracic echocardiography was performed. In adults, imaging of the entire aorta using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging was done. Results Here, we report on 43 patients from 11 families with syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysms caused by TGFB3 mutations. We demonstrate that TGFB3 mutations are associated with significant cardiovascular involvement, including thoracic/abdominal aortic aneurysm and dissection, and mitral valve disease. Other systemic features overlap clinically with Loeys-Dietz, Shprintzen-Goldberg, and Marfan syndromes, including cleft palate, bifid uvula, skeletal overgrowth, cervical spine instability and clubfoot deformity. In line with previous observations in aortic wall tissues of patients with mutations in effectors of TGF-β signaling (TGFBR1/2, SMAD3, and TGFB2), we confirm a paradoxical up-regulation of both canonical and noncanonical TGF-β signaling in association with up-regulation of the expression of TGF-β ligands. Conclusions Our findings emphasize the broad clinical variability associated with TGFB3 mutations and highlight the importance of early recognition of the disease because of high cardiovascular risk. PMID:25835445

  19. When flexibility is not necessarily a virtue: a review of hypermobility syndromes and chronic or recurrent musculoskeletal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Cattalini, Marco; Khubchandani, Raju; Cimaz, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Chronic or recurrent musculoskeletal pain is a common complaint in children. Among the most common causes for this problem are different conditions associated with hypermobility. Pediatricians and allied professionals should be well aware of the characteristics of the different syndromes associated with hypermobility and facilitate early recognition and appropriate management. In this review we provide information on Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Marfan Syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Stickler syndrome, and discuss their characteristics and clinical management. PMID:26444669

  20. Differential diagnosis and diagnostic flow chart of joint hypermobility syndrome/ehlers-danlos syndrome hypermobility type compared to other heritable connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed

    Colombi, Marina; Dordoni, Chiara; Chiarelli, Nicola; Ritelli, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) is an evolving and protean disorder mostly recognized by generalized joint hypermobility and without a defined molecular basis. JHS/EDS-HT also presents with other connective tissue features affecting a variety of structures and organs, such as skin, eye, bone, and internal organs. However, most of these signs are present in variable combinations and severity in many other heritable connective tissue disorders. Accordingly, JHS/EDS-HT is an "exclusion" diagnosis which needs the absence of any consistent feature indicative of other partially overlapping connective tissue disorders. While both Villefranche and Brighton criteria include such an exclusion as a mandatory item, a systematic approach for reaching a stringent clinical diagnosis of JHS/EDS-HT is still lacking. The absence of a consensus on the diagnostic approach to JHS/EDS-HT concerning its clinical boundaries with similar conditions contribute to limit our actual understanding of the pathologic and molecular bases of this disorder. In this review, we revise the differential diagnosis of JHS/EDS-HT with those heritable connective tissue disorders which show a significant overlap with the former and mostly include EDS classic, vascular and kyphoscoliotic types, osteogenesis imperfecta, Marfan syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, arterial tortuosity syndrome, and lateral meningocele syndrome. A diagnostic flow chart is also offered with the attempt to support the less experienced clinician in stringently recognizing JHS/EDS-HT and stimulate the debate in the scientific community for both management and research purposes. PMID:25821090

  1. De novo exon 1 missense mutations of SKI and Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome: two new cases and a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Au, P Y Billie; Racher, Hilary E; Graham, John M; Kramer, Nancy; Lowry, R Brian; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Innes, A Micheil

    2014-03-01

    Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (OMIM #182212) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, distinctive craniofacial features, skeletal abnormalities, marfanoid body habitus, aortic dilatation, and intellectual disability. Mutations in exon 1 of SKI have recently been identified as being responsible for approximately 90% of reported individuals diagnosed clinically with Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome. SKI is a known regulator of TGFβ signaling. Therefore, like Marfan syndrome and Loeys-Dietz syndrome, Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome is likely caused by deregulated TGFβ signals, explaining the considerable phenotypic overlap between these three disorders. We describe two additional patients with exon 1 SKI mutations and review the clinical features and literature of Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome.

  2. Vascular manifestations of syndromic aortopathies: role of current and emerging imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Westerland, O; Frigiola, A; Robert, L; Shaw, A; Blakeway, L; Katsanos, K; Kiesewetter, C; Chung, N; Karunanithy, N

    2015-12-01

    Patients with connective tissue diseases such as Marfan's syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, and vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome comprise a small but important group of patients who present early with acute aortic syndrome comprising aneurysmal dilation, rupture, or aortic dissection. Cardiovascular pathologies are an important yet treatable cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Imaging plays an important role in initial diagnosis, surveillance, and identification of complications. Furthermore, these patients are prone to developing complications in other vascular territories. Effective screening and surveillance will allow early diagnosis and elective treatment thus reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with presentation with acute complications. In this article, we will provide an overview of the role of magnetic resonance and computed tomography angiography in the management of syndromic aortopathies. PMID:26388241

  3. Aortic Disease in the Young: Genetic Aneurysm Syndromes, Connective Tissue Disorders, and Familial Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Marcelo; Zeidan, Fernanda; Lobato, Armando C.

    2013-01-01

    There are many genetic syndromes associated with the aortic aneurysmal disease which include Marfan syndrome (MFS), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD), bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV), and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In the absence of familial history and other clinical findings, the proportion of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and dissections resulting from a genetic predisposition is still unknown. In this study, we propose the review of the current genetic knowledge in the aortic disease, observing, in the results that the causative genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm disease remain undiscovered and continue to be an area of intensive research. PMID:23401778

  4. What Are Related Disorders?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dietz syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection. Disorders related to Marfan syndrome can ... Loeys-Dietz Syndrome Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection MASS Phenotype Ectopia Lentis Syndrome Beals ...

  5. Mutations in the TGF-β repressor SKI cause Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome with aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Alexander J; Doyle, Jefferson J; Bessling, Seneca L; Maragh, Samantha; Lindsay, Mark E; Schepers, Dorien; Gillis, Elisabeth; Mortier, Geert; Homfray, Tessa; Sauls, Kimberly; Norris, Russell A; Huso, Nicholas D; Leahy, Dan; Mohr, David W; Caulfield, Mark J; Scott, Alan F; Destrée, Anne; Hennekam, Raoul C; Arn, Pamela H; Curry, Cynthia J; Van Laer, Lut; McCallion, Andrew S; Loeys, Bart L; Dietz, Harry C

    2012-11-01

    Elevated transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysm, including Marfan syndrome (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS). However, the location and character of many of the causal mutations in LDS intuitively imply diminished TGF-β signaling. Taken together, these data have engendered controversy regarding the specific role of TGF-β in disease pathogenesis. Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (SGS) has considerable phenotypic overlap with MFS and LDS, including aortic aneurysm. We identified causative variation in ten individuals with SGS in the proto-oncogene SKI, a known repressor of TGF-β activity. Cultured dermal fibroblasts from affected individuals showed enhanced activation of TGF-β signaling cascades and higher expression of TGF-β-responsive genes relative to control cells. Morpholino-induced silencing of SKI paralogs in zebrafish recapitulated abnormalities seen in humans with SGS. These data support the conclusions that increased TGF-β signaling is the mechanism underlying SGS and that high signaling contributes to multiple syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysm.

  6. Modified pediatric Bentall procedure: A novel technique in a rare case

    PubMed Central

    Salve, Gananjay G; Javali, Satish R; Dalvi, Bharat V; Krishnanaik, Shivaprakash

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of ascending aorta are rarely seen in pediatric age group. Only few cases with Marfans syndrome have been reported in the literature. Preferred treatment for these children has been the standard Bentall procedure (aortic root replacement with composite graft prosthesis). We report a 4-year-old male child with huge aneurysm of ascending aorta and aortic root dilation with severe aortic regurgitation, having phenotypic features of Loeys-Dietz syndrome type I. He underwent Bentall procedure with a novel modification (medial trap-door technique for coronary reimplantation). Short-term result of this procedure is encouraging and he is asymptomatic for the last 14 months of follow-up.

  7. The SMAD-binding domain of SKI: a hotspot for de novo mutations causing Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schepers, Dorien; Doyle, Alexander J; Oswald, Gretchen; Sparks, Elizabeth; Myers, Loretha; Willems, Patrick J; Mansour, Sahar; Simpson, Michael A; Frysira, Helena; Maat-Kievit, Anneke; Van Minkelen, Rick; Hoogeboom, Jeanette M; Mortier, Geert R; Titheradge, Hannah; Brueton, Louise; Starr, Lois; Stark, Zornitza; Ockeloen, Charlotte; Lourenco, Charles Marques; Blair, Ed; Hobson, Emma; Hurst, Jane; Maystadt, Isabelle; Destrée, Anne; Girisha, Katta M; Miller, Michelle; Dietz, Harry C; Loeys, Bart; Van Laer, Lut

    2015-02-01

    Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (SGS) is a rare, systemic connective tissue disorder characterized by craniofacial, skeletal, and cardiovascular manifestations that show a significant overlap with the features observed in the Marfan (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS). A distinguishing observation in SGS patients is the presence of intellectual disability, although not all patients in this series present this finding. Recently, SGS was shown to be due to mutations in the SKI gene, encoding the oncoprotein SKI, a repressor of TGFβ activity. Here, we report eight recurrent and three novel SKI mutations in eleven SGS patients. All were heterozygous missense mutations located in the R-SMAD binding domain, except for one novel in-frame deletion affecting the DHD domain. Adding our new findings to the existing data clearly reveals a mutational hotspot, with 73% (24 out of 33) of the hitherto described unrelated patients having mutations in a stretch of five SKI residues (from p.(Ser31) to p.(Pro35)). This implicates that the initial molecular testing could be focused on mutation analysis of the first half of exon 1 of SKI. As the majority of the known mutations are located in the R-SMAD binding domain of SKI, our study further emphasizes the importance of TGFβ signaling in the pathogenesis of SGS.

  8. A 1-bp duplication in TGFB2 in three family members with a syndromic form of thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Leutermann, Ruth; Sheikhzadeh, Sara; Brockstädt, Lars; Rybczynski, Meike; van Rahden, Vanessa; Kutsche, Kerstin; von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Rosenberger, Georg

    2014-07-01

    A number of autosomal dominantly inherited disorders, such as Marfan syndrome (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), are associated with predisposition to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAADs). In the majority of cases, mutations in genes encoding components of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathway, such as FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2 and SMAD3, underlie the disease. Recently, a familial syndromic form of TAAD with other clinical features that overlap the MFS-LDS spectrum has been described to be caused by heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in TGFB2, encoding the TGF-β2 ligand of TGF-β serine/threonine kinase receptors (TGFBRs). We analyzed the TGFB2 gene by sequencing in a cohort of 88 individuals with a Marfan-like phenotype and/or TAAD, who did not have mutations in known genes causing thoracic aortic disease. We identified the novel heterozygous c.1165dupA mutation in exon 7 of TGFB2 in three members of a family, a 51-year-old male, his brother and nephew with aortic aneurysms, cervical arterial tortuosity and/or skeletal abnormalities as well as craniofacial dysmorphisms. The 1-bp duplication causes a frameshift leading to a stable transcript with a premature stop codon after seven TGF-β2-unrelated amino acids (p.Ser389Lysfs*8). As the resulting protein is unlikely functional and by considering data from the literature, we support the notion that functional haploinsufficiency for TGF-β2 predisposes to thoracic aortic disease. Taken together, TGFB2 is a rarely mutated gene in patients with syndromic TAAD, and the clinical features of our TGFB2 mutation-positive individuals fit in the scheme of LDS, rather than MFS-related disorders.

  9. Modified pediatric Bentall procedure: A novel technique in a rare case.

    PubMed

    Salve, Gananjay G; Javali, Satish R; Dalvi, Bharat V; Krishnanaik, Shivaprakash

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of ascending aorta are rarely seen in pediatric age group. Only few cases with Marfans syndrome have been reported in the literature. Preferred treatment for these children has been the standard Bentall procedure (aortic root replacement with composite graft prosthesis). We report a 4-year-old male child with huge aneurysm of ascending aorta and aortic root dilation with severe aortic regurgitation, having phenotypic features of Loeys-Dietz syndrome type I. He underwent Bentall procedure with a novel modification (medial trap-door technique for coronary reimplantation). Short-term result of this procedure is encouraging and he is asymptomatic for the last 14 months of follow-up. PMID:27625523

  10. Modified pediatric Bentall procedure: A novel technique in a rare case

    PubMed Central

    Salve, Gananjay G; Javali, Satish R; Dalvi, Bharat V; Krishnanaik, Shivaprakash

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of ascending aorta are rarely seen in pediatric age group. Only few cases with Marfans syndrome have been reported in the literature. Preferred treatment for these children has been the standard Bentall procedure (aortic root replacement with composite graft prosthesis). We report a 4-year-old male child with huge aneurysm of ascending aorta and aortic root dilation with severe aortic regurgitation, having phenotypic features of Loeys-Dietz syndrome type I. He underwent Bentall procedure with a novel modification (medial trap-door technique for coronary reimplantation). Short-term result of this procedure is encouraging and he is asymptomatic for the last 14 months of follow-up. PMID:27625523

  11. A rare cause of recurrent aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Yashwant; Gupta, Vishal

    2016-07-01

    We report the case of a 19-year-old man with a history of Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), which was diagnosed when he had a Stanford type A aortic dissection. He also had multiple aneurysms including ones in the innominate, right common carotid, and right internal mammary arteries. He had had multiple procedures including Bentall's procedure, repeat sternotomy with complete arch and valve replacement, and coil embolization of internal mammary artery aneurysm in the past. His LDS was characterized by gene mutation for transforming growth factor-β receptor 1. He presented to our facility with sudden onset of back pain, radiating to the right shoulder and chest. He was diagnosed with Stanford type B aortic dissection and underwent thoracic aorta endovascular repair for his aortic dissection. This case represents the broad spectrum of pathology associated with LDS where even with regular surveillance and aggressive medical management the patient developed Stanford B aortic dissection. PMID:27358537

  12. Genetics Home Reference: otopalatodigital syndrome type 2

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions otopalatodigital syndrome type 2 otopalatodigital syndrome type 2 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Otopalatodigital syndrome type 2 is a disorder involving abnormalities in skeletal development ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: otopalatodigital syndrome type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions otopalatodigital syndrome type 1 otopalatodigital syndrome type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Otopalatodigital syndrome type 1 is a disorder primarily involving abnormalities in skeletal ...

  14. National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-08

    Marfan Syndrome; Turner Syndrome; Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; Loeys-Dietz Syndrome; FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, ACTA2 or MYH11 Genetic Mutation; Bicuspid Aortic Valve Without Known Family History; Bicuspid Aortic Valve With Family History; Bicuspid Aortic Valve With Coarctation; Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissections; Shprintzen-Goldberg Syndrome; Other Aneur/Diss of Thoracic Aorta Not Due to Trauma, <50yo; Other Congenital Heart Disease

  15. Cerebellar involvement of Griscelli syndrome type 2

    PubMed Central

    Işikay, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome type 2 is characterised by partial albinism and primary immunodeficiency. We present a case of a 3-year-old girl diagnosed with cerebellar involvement of Griscelli syndrome type 2. Neurological complications may accompany Griscelli syndrome, however, to the best of my knowledge there are only a few case reports of cerebellar involvement of Griscelli syndrome type 2 in the literature. PMID:25315806

  16. Mucopolysaccharidosis type II, Hunter's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tylki-Szymańska, Anna

    2014-09-01

    Hunter syndrome is caused by deficiency of the lysososmal enzyme iduronate-2-sulphatase that cleaves O-linked sulphate moieties from dermatan sulphate and heparan sulphate and leads to accumulation of GAGs. The disease is a X-linked condition affecting males and rarely females, clinically divided into severe (2/3) and attenuated types. Children with severe form, diagnosed at 12-36 months, have coarse facial feature, short stature, joint stiffness, short neck, broad chest, large head circumference, watery diarrhea, skeletal changes, progressive and profound mental retardation, retinal degeneration' hearing loss, cardiomyopathy, valvular involvement, with progressive thickening and stiffening of the valve leaflets leading to mitral and aortic regurgitation and stenosis . Recurrent and prolonged rhinitis with persistent nasal discharge are the first symptoms of airway disease that manifests itself as noisy breathing and later sleep apnea. Some patients develop ivory-colored skin lesions on the upper back and sides of the upper arms, pathogenomic of Hunter syndrome. The scalp hair becomes coarse, straight and bristly. Inguinal and umbilical hernias occur caused by the disturbed structure of connective tissue and increased liver and spleen volume. Patients with attenuated form have normal intelligence and a milder phenotype. Physical features diagnosed later are similar but less pronounced but progress to severe disease. Sceening is by quantitative assessment of urinary GAGs excretion. Qualitative assessment of GAG by electrophoresis can distinguish the type of mucopolysaccharidosis. Definitive diagnosis is based on enzyme activity assay in leukocytes, fibroblasts or plasma. Molecular testing is recommended mainly for genetic counseling and carrier detection. Limited experience of Haematopoietic stem cell therapy in MPS II showed progressive neurodegeneration. Recombinant 125 Idursulfase, is indicated for long-term treatment. The response appears to depend on the

  17. Mucopolysaccharidosis type II, Hunter's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tylki-Szymańska, Anna

    2014-09-01

    Hunter syndrome is caused by deficiency of the lysososmal enzyme iduronate-2-sulphatase that cleaves O-linked sulphate moieties from dermatan sulphate and heparan sulphate and leads to accumulation of GAGs. The disease is a X-linked condition affecting males and rarely females, clinically divided into severe (2/3) and attenuated types. Children with severe form, diagnosed at 12-36 months, have coarse facial feature, short stature, joint stiffness, short neck, broad chest, large head circumference, watery diarrhea, skeletal changes, progressive and profound mental retardation, retinal degeneration' hearing loss, cardiomyopathy, valvular involvement, with progressive thickening and stiffening of the valve leaflets leading to mitral and aortic regurgitation and stenosis . Recurrent and prolonged rhinitis with persistent nasal discharge are the first symptoms of airway disease that manifests itself as noisy breathing and later sleep apnea. Some patients develop ivory-colored skin lesions on the upper back and sides of the upper arms, pathogenomic of Hunter syndrome. The scalp hair becomes coarse, straight and bristly. Inguinal and umbilical hernias occur caused by the disturbed structure of connective tissue and increased liver and spleen volume. Patients with attenuated form have normal intelligence and a milder phenotype. Physical features diagnosed later are similar but less pronounced but progress to severe disease. Sceening is by quantitative assessment of urinary GAGs excretion. Qualitative assessment of GAG by electrophoresis can distinguish the type of mucopolysaccharidosis. Definitive diagnosis is based on enzyme activity assay in leukocytes, fibroblasts or plasma. Molecular testing is recommended mainly for genetic counseling and carrier detection. Limited experience of Haematopoietic stem cell therapy in MPS II showed progressive neurodegeneration. Recombinant 125 Idursulfase, is indicated for long-term treatment. The response appears to depend on the

  18. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... polyglandular syndrome, type 1 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, type 1 is an inherited condition that affects many of ...

  19. Genetic Risk for Aortic Aneurysm in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Gabe; Alvarado, David M.; Willing, Marcia C.; Braverman, Alan C.; Bridwell, Keith H.; Kelly, Michael; Lenke, Lawrence G.; Luhmann, Scott J.; Gurnett, Christina A.; Dobbs, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Scoliosis is a feature of several genetic disorders that are also associated with aortic aneurysm, including Marfan syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, and type-IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Life-threatening complications of aortic aneurysm can be decreased through early diagnosis. Genetic screening for mutations in populations at risk, such as patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, may improve recognition of these disorders. Methods: The coding regions of five clinically actionable genes associated with scoliosis (COL3A1, FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, and SMAD3) and aortic aneurysm were sequenced in 343 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis cases. Gene variants that had minor allele frequencies of <0.0001 or were present in human disease mutation databases were identified. Variants were classified as pathogenic, likely pathogenic, or variants of unknown significance. Results: Pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations were identified in 0.9% (three) of 343 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis cases. Two patients had pathogenic SMAD3 nonsense mutations consistent with type-III Loeys-Dietz syndrome and one patient had a pathogenic FBN1 mutation with subsequent confirmation of Marfan syndrome. Variants of unknown significance in COL3A1 and FBN1 were identified in 5.0% (seventeen) of 343 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis cases. Six FBN1 variants were previously reported in patients with Marfan syndrome, yet were considered variants of unknown significance based on the level of evidence. Variants of unknown significance occurred most frequently in FBN1 and were associated with greater curve severity, systemic features of Marfan syndrome, and joint hypermobility. Conclusions: Clinically actionable pathogenic mutations in genes associated with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and aortic aneurysm are rare in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis who are not suspected of having these disorders, although variants of unknown significance are relatively common. Clinical

  20. Goldenhar syndrome and hereditary tyrosinemia type 1.

    PubMed

    Al-Sayed, Moeen A; Asmari, Ali M; Rashed, Mohammed S

    2002-12-01

    We report a case of Goldenhar syndrome and hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HTT1), to our knowledge an association not previously described. This case further increases the diversity of observations and clinical descriptions of patients with this complex syndrome. We discuss pathogenetic aspects, and demonstrate further evidence of the effectiveness of 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoromethyl benzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione in the treatment of HTT1.

  1. The neuromuscular differential diagnosis of joint hypermobility.

    PubMed

    Donkervoort, S; Bonnemann, C G; Loeys, B; Jungbluth, H; Voermans, N C

    2015-03-01

    Joint hypermobility is the defining feature of various inherited connective tissue disorders such as Marfan syndrome and various types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and these will generally be the first conditions to be considered by geneticists and pediatricians in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with such findings. However, several congenital and adult-onset inherited myopathies also present with joint hypermobility in the context of often only mild-to-moderate muscle weakness and should, therefore, be included in the differential diagnosis of joint hypermobility. In fact, on the molecular level disorders within both groups represent different ends of the same spectrum of inherited extracellular matrix (ECM) disorders. In this review we will summarize the measures of joint hypermobility, illustrate molecular mechanisms these groups of disorders have in common, and subsequently discuss the clinical features of: 1) the most common connective tissue disorders with myopathic or other neuromuscular features: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan syndrome and Loeys-Dietz syndrome; 2) myopathy and connective tissue overlap disorders (muscle extracellular matrix (ECM) disorders), including collagen VI related dystrophies and FKBP14 related kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome; and 3) various (congenital) myopathies with prominent joint hypermobility including RYR1- and SEPN1-related myopathy. The aim of this review is to assist clinical geneticists and other clinicians with recognition of these disorders. PMID:25821091

  2. Rare case of orofaciodigital syndrome type I

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhishek Bahadur; Girhotra, Manish; Goel, Medha; Bhatia, Shilpee

    2013-01-01

    Orofaciodigital syndrome (OFDS) is a group of congenital anomalies which affects the face, oral structures and digits. There are nine subtypes with different modes of inheritance. OFDS type I is an X-linked dominant trait with lethality in the vast majority of affected males. We report a case of OFDS type I in an Indian girl at the age of seven who had most of the typical features of OFDS type I and nephrocalcinosis. PMID:23417374

  3. Bartter's syndrome with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    See, Ting-Ting; Lee, Siu-Pak

    2009-02-01

    We report a rare case of Bartter's syndrome in a 35-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The patient presented with leg weakness, fatigue, polyuria and polydipsia. Hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, and high renin and aldosterone concentrations were present, but the patient was normotensive. Gitelman's syndrome was excluded because of the presence of hypercalciuria, secondary hyperparathyroidism and bilateral nephrocalcinosis. The patients condition improved upon administration of a prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor (acemetacin), oral potassium chloride and potassium-sparing diuretics. Five months later, the patient discontinued acemetacin because of epigastric discomfort; at the same time, severe hypokalemia and hyperglycemia developed. Glucagon stimulation and water deprivation tests were performed. Type 2 diabetes mellitus with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was diagnosed. To avoid further gastrointestinal complications, the patient was treated with celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor. This case serves as a reminder that Bartter's syndrome is associated with various metabolic derangements including nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, nephrocalcinosis and diabetes mellitus. When treating Bartter's syndrome, it is also prudent to remember that the long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and potassium-sparing diuretics may result in serious adverse reactions.

  4. Pregnancy and Thoracic Aortic Disease: Managing the Risks.

    PubMed

    Wanga, Shaynah; Silversides, Candice; Dore, Annie; de Waard, Vivian; Mulder, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The most common aortopathies in women of childbearing age are bicuspid aortic valve, coarctation of the aorta, Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, SMAD3 aortopathy, Turner syndrome, and familial thoracic aneurysm and dissection. The hemodynamic and hormonal changes of pregnancy increase the risk of progressive dilatation or dissection of the aorta in these women. The presence of hypertension increases the risk further. Therefore, appropriate preconception counselling is advised. For women who become pregnant, serial follow-up by a specialized multidisciplinary team throughout pregnancy and postpartum period is required. In this review we discuss risk assessment and management strategies for women with aortopathies. PMID:26604124

  5. [Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2)].

    PubMed

    Vialettes, Bernard; Dubois-Leonardon, Noémie

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2) are the most frequent disorders associating several organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Their high prevalence is due to the fact that the main manifestations of APS-2, such as thyroidal autoimmunity, type 1 diabetes, autoimmune gastric atrophy and vitiligo, are common diseases. APS-2 represents a clinical model that can serve to help unravel the mechanisms underlying autoimmunity. Diagnosis of APS-2 is a challenge for the clinician, especially in poorly symptomatic forms, and may require systematic screening based on measurement of autoantibodies and functional markers.

  6. Congenital Nephrotic Syndrome – Finish Type

    PubMed Central

    Spahiu, Lidvana; Merovci, Besart; Jashari, Haki; Këpuska, Arbnore Batalli; Rugova, Blerta Elezi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Identification of the NPHS1 gene, which encodes nephrin, was followed by many studies demonstrating its mutation as a frequent cause of congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNS). While this gene is found in 98% of Finnish children with this syndrome, non-Finnish cases have lower level of incidence ranging from 39 to 80%. Case report: This report describes the clinical presentation of a two-week-old neonate who presented with periorbital and lower extremities edema, abdominal distention, heavy proteinuria, serum hypoproteinemia and failure to thrive. Genetic analysis revealed NHPS1 gene mutation leading to CNS-Finnish type diagnosis. Conclusion: Through this case we want to create awareness about diagnosis and treatment challenges in developing countries for rare congenital diseases. PMID:27594755

  7. Spontaneous Bilateral Cervical Internal Carotid and Vertebral Artery Dissection in a Japanese Patient without Collagen Vascular Disease with Special Reference to Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Abe, Arata; Nito, Chikako; Sakamoto, Yuki; Nogami, Akane; Hokama, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Shiro; Kirita, Kumiko; Ueda, Masayuki; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Kimura, Kazumi

    2016-08-01

    Spontaneous cervical artery dissection (sCAD) is a major cause of ischemic stroke in young adults. Frequently, sCAD involves multiple neck arteries, accounting for 13%-28% of the total sCAD cases. However, little is known about factors related to multiple sCAD. In this case, a 52-year-old man was admitted due to headache without aura. There was a personal history of migraine with aura and a family history of similar symptoms. The patient's younger brother had a left vertebral artery (VA) dissecting aneurysm and underwent endovascular occlusion of his parent artery at the age of 48. Magnetic resonance imaging of our admitted patient showed hyperintensities in the right internal carotid artery (ICA) without acute infarction, and magnetic resonance angiography revealed a narrowing of the right ICA. Angiography was then performed, which showed a trace of dissection of the left ICA and both VAs as well as the right ICA. The patient did not fulfill any major criteria of collagen vascular disease such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV or Loeys-Dietz syndrome. The data in our patient are quite similar to those reported in patients with single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of PHACTR1. Obtaining the patient's informed consent, we analyzed a common SNP variation in the rs9349379[G] allele (PHACTR1), which has been reported to be associated with a lower risk of sCAD. PMID:27216377

  8. Surgery for congenital diseases of the aorta.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Duke

    2015-02-01

    Congenital diseases of the aorta tend to be obstructive when they present early in life, and aneurysmal when they present later in life. The latter group also tends to be associated with connective tissue disorders and with repaired conotruncal lesions. The indications for intervention in the aneurysm group are still in evolution but are clearly age- and lesion-dependant. Disorders such as Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Turner syndrome may deserve aggressive prophylactic surgery, as well as Marfan syndrome to a lesser extent. The natural history of the dilated aorta after repair of congenital heart lesions is probably more benign than de novo aneurysms and therefore should be treated conservatively.

  9. Surgery for congenital diseases of the aorta.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Duke

    2015-02-01

    Congenital diseases of the aorta tend to be obstructive when they present early in life, and aneurysmal when they present later in life. The latter group also tends to be associated with connective tissue disorders and with repaired conotruncal lesions. The indications for intervention in the aneurysm group are still in evolution but are clearly age- and lesion-dependant. Disorders such as Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Turner syndrome may deserve aggressive prophylactic surgery, as well as Marfan syndrome to a lesser extent. The natural history of the dilated aorta after repair of congenital heart lesions is probably more benign than de novo aneurysms and therefore should be treated conservatively. PMID:25726075

  10. Targeted therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes: neurofibromatosis type 1, neurofibromatosis type 2, and Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary cancer syndromes are well known in the oncology community, typically affecting children, adolescents, and young adults and thereby resulting in great cumulative morbidity and mortality. These syndromes often lag behind their de novo counterparts in the development of approved novel treatment options due to their rarity in the general population. Recent work has allowed the identification of molecular aberrations and associated targeted therapies that may effectively treat these conditions. In this review, we seek to characterize some of the involved aberrations and associated targeted therapies for several germline malignancies, including neurofibromatosis types 1 and 2, and Gorlin syndrome. Though patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may be too rare to effectively include in large clinical trials, by understanding the pathophysiology of these diseases, clinicians can attain insights into the use of targeted therapies in their own practice when treating affected individuals. PMID:25549703

  11. Modulation of lipid metabolic defects rescues cleft palate in Tgfbr2 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Junichi; Suzuki, Akiko; Pelikan, Richard C; Ho, Thach-Vu; Sanchez-Lara, Pedro A; Chai, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) receptor type II (TGFBR2) cause Loeys-Dietz syndrome, characterized by craniofacial and cardiovascular abnormalities. Mice with a deletion of Tgfbr2 in cranial neural crest cells (Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice) develop cleft palate as the result of abnormal TGFβ signaling activation. However, little is known about metabolic processes downstream of TGFβ signaling during palatogenesis. Here, we show that Tgfbr2 mutant palatal mesenchymal cells spontaneously accumulate lipid droplets, resulting from reduced lipolysis activity. Tgfbr2 mutant palatal mesenchymal cells failed to respond to the cell proliferation stimulator sonic hedgehog, derived from the palatal epithelium. Treatment with p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor or telmisartan, a modulator of p38 MAPK activation and lipid metabolism, blocked abnormal TGFβ-mediated p38 MAPK activation, restoring lipid metabolism and cell proliferation activity both in vitro and in vivo. Our results highlight the influence of alternative TGFβ signaling on lipid metabolic activities, as well as how lipid metabolic defects can affect cell proliferation and adversely impact palatogenesis. This discovery has broader implications for the understanding of metabolic defects and potential prevention of congenital birth defects. PMID:23975680

  12. Nephrocalcinosis as adult presentation of Bartter syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Luiken, G P M; van Riemsdijk, I C; Petrij, F; Zandbergen, A A M; Dees, A

    2014-02-01

    Bartter syndrome consists a group of rare autosomal-recessive renal tubulopathies characterised by renal salt wasting, hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis, hypercalciuria and hyperreninaemic hyperaldosteronism. It is classified into five types. Mutations in the KCNJ1 gene (classified as type II) usually cause the neonatal form of Bartter syndrome. We describe an adult patient with a homozygous KCNJ1 mutation resulting in a remarkably mild phenotype of neonatal type Bartter syndrome. PMID:24659592

  13. Waardenburg syndrome type 2: an orthodontic perspective.

    PubMed

    Şuhani, Raluca Diana; Şuhani, Mihai Flaviu; Muntean, Alexandrina; Mesaroş, Michaela Florica; Badea, Mîndra Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare form of neurocristopathy. It is a disorder in the development of neural crest cells, caused by an altered cellular migration during the embryonic phase. That alteration causes an association of different abnormalities such as pigmentary disturbances of the hair, iris, skin, stria vascularis of the cochlea, dystopia canthorum and sensorineural hearing loss. We report a case of a 14-year-old Romanian male, with a family history of Waardenburg syndrome (mother) and Usher syndrome (father - congenitally sensorineural hearing loss and retinal degeneration). The case particularities are: the correlation between malocclusion and Waardenburg syndrome due to hypoplastic alae nasi and also factors that produced hearing loss, which could be Waardenburg syndrome, Usher syndrome or the presence of the connexin 26 (W24X) gene mutation. PMID:26429191

  14. Cholesterol and Alzheimer Type Dementia among Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Frank

    2008-01-01

    This article reports a summary of research by Warren Zigman and colleagues investigating the link between cholesterol levels and Alzheimer type dementia among adults with Down syndrome. Warren Zigman and colleagues followed 123 adults with Down syndrome between May 1998 and April 2006. The participants were aged between 41 and 78 years at the…

  15. [Oro-facial-digital syndrome type I: phenotypic variable expression].

    PubMed

    Boldrini, María Pía; Giovo, María Elsa; Bogado, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    Oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1 (OFD1; OMIM #311200) is a developmental disorder transmitted as an X-linked dominant condition with embryonic male lethality. It is associated with malformation of the oral cavity, face, and digits. Furthermore, it is characterized by the presence of milia, hypotrichosis and polycystic kidney disease. We present two cases with clinical diagnosis of oral-facial-digital syndrome type I with some phenotypic variability between them.

  16. Gait Strategy in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type and Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigoldi, Chiara; Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Camerota, Filippo; Celletti, Claudia; Tenore, Nunzio; Albertini, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    People suffering from Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) hypermobility type present a severe ligament laxity that results in difficulties in muscle force transmission. The same condition is present in people suffering from Down syndrome (DS) even if their clumsy movements are due to cerebral and cognitive impairments. The aim of this study was to…

  17. Nevus comedonicus in oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1: a new finding or overlapping syndromes?

    PubMed

    Baker, Lauren A; Agim, Nnenna G

    2014-01-01

    We report a patient with oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1 (OFDS1) who exhibited features overlapping those of nevus comedonicus syndrome, an unusual presentation that may potentially represent a new variant of OFDS1. OFDS1 and nevus comedonicus syndrome represent two rare syndromes with numerous overlapping features that have yet to be described in relation to one another. The features present in our patient led us to propose the possibility of a new variant of OFDS1 in which nevus comedonicus represents a cutaneous manifestation of the syndrome. Knowledge of this potential relationship is important for identification and management of the syndromes' accompanying manifestations in affected patients and may offer further insight into crossroads of pathogenesis. PMID:24517846

  18. Burning mouth syndrome due to herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Maria A; Choe, Alexander; Traktinskiy, Igor; Gilden, Don

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterised by chronic orofacial burning pain. No dental or medical cause has been found. We present a case of burning mouth syndrome of 6 months duration in a healthy 65-year-old woman, which was associated with high copy numbers of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA in the saliva. Her pain resolved completely after antiviral treatment with a corresponding absence of salivary HSV-1 DNA 4 weeks and 6 months later. PMID:25833911

  19. Type 2 leprosy reaction with Sweet's syndrome-like presentation*

    PubMed Central

    Chiaratti, Francielle Chiavelli; Daxbacher, Egon Luiz Rodrigues; Neumann, Antonielle Borges Faria; Jeunon, Thiago

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic disease characterized by manifestations in the peripheral nerves and skin. The course of the disease may be interrupted by acute phenomena called reactions. This article reports a peculiar case of type 2 leprosy reaction with Sweet's syndrome-like features as the first clinical manifestation of leprosy, resulting in a delay in the diagnosis due to unusual clinical presentation. The patient had clinical and histopathological features reminiscent of Sweet's syndrome associated with clusters of vacuolated histiocytes containing acid-fast bacilli isolated or forming globi. Herein, it is discussed how to recognize type 2 leprosy reaction with Sweet's syndrome features, the differential diagnosis with type 1 leprosy reaction and the treatment options. When this kind of reaction is the first clinical presentation of leprosy, the correct diagnosis might be not suspected clinically, and established only with histopathologic evaluation. PMID:27438203

  20. Type A aortic dissection presenting as superior vena cava syndrome.

    PubMed

    Raja, Faisal S; Islam, Ali; Khan, Mustafa; Abbasi, Iram

    2013-01-01

    A 51-year-old man presented with a 5-day history of progressive facial swelling, sensation of head fullness, increasing shortness of breath and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. He denied chest pain, syncope or presyncope. Past medical history included mechanical aortic valve replacement 7 years prior and atrial fibrillation treated with warfarin. A clinical diagnosis of acute superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome was made. Portable chest radiograph showed a widened superior mediastinum. Computed tomography scan of the thorax demonstrated a large type A aortic dissection almost completely effacing the SVC. Acute type A aortic dissection (AD) is an emergency requiring prompt diagnosis and treatment. Patients typically present with acute onset of chest and/or back pain, classically described as "ripping" or "tearing." SVC syndrome is rarely, if ever, mentioned as a presentation, as it is usually due to more chronic conditions. This case illustrates a rare incidence of type A AD actually presenting as SVC syndrome.

  1. [Coexistence of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 with diabetes insipidus].

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are conditions characterized by the combination of two or more organ-specific disorders. The underestimation oftheir real frequency probable results from physicians' inadequate knowledge of these clinical entities and sometimes their atypical clinical presentation. Because they comprise a wide spectrum of autoimmune disorders, autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are divided into four types, among which type-3 is the most common one. In this article, we report the case of a young female, initially diagnosed with diabetes mellitus who several years later developed full-blown autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 consisting of autoimmune thyroid disorder and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.The discussed case suggests that in selected patients diabetes insipidus may coexist with autoimmune endocrinopathies and nonendocrine autoimmunopathies, as well as that in some patients idiopathic diabetes insipidus may be secondary to lymphocytic infiltration and destruction of the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei and/or the supraoptic-hypophyseal tract

  2. Mammary-type myofibroblastoma with the nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vankawala, Preksha; Kuperman, Michael B.; Mennel, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a 23-year-old white man who presented with anasarca and a new periumbilical mass. He had preserved kidney function and laboratory findings consistent with nephrotic syndrome, including 9.7 g/day albuminuria. Serum serologies were positive for anti-SSa and anti-SSb and low complements but were negative for antinuclear antibody. Pathologic findings of the abdominal mass showed a mammary-type myofibroblastoma. A kidney biopsy revealed a diffuse proliferative and membranous immune-mediated glomerulonephritis with 10% interstitial fibrosis. This is a novel case of mammary-type myofibroblastoma associated with nephrotic syndrome mimicking a proliferative lupus pattern. PMID:27365885

  3. Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndrome Type 2 with Alopecia Universalis and Hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Dave, Priti; Bhosle, Deepak; Dharme, Madhav; Deshmukh, Deepak; Patel, Jay

    2015-04-01

    A 46 years old female, presented with severe fatigue, nypotension ana hyperpigmentation. Her basal serum cortisol level at 8 a.m. was < 1.0 μg/dl which suggested a diagnosis of Addison's disease. An association with latent autoimmune diabetes of adult and autoimmune hypothyroidism led to a diagnosis of Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome type II (PAS II). She also had alopecia universalis and hypoparathyroidism which are very rare in PAS type II syndrome. On treatment with hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone there was drastic improvement in the clinical features.

  4. Ehlers-danlos syndrome-hypermobility type and hemorrhoids.

    PubMed

    Plackett, Timothy P; Kwon, Edward; Gagliano, Ronald A; Oh, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type (EDS-HT) is a connective tissue disorder associated with chronic musculoskeletal pain. The diagnosis is based on simple clinical examination, although it is easily overlooked. Herein we present a case of EDS-HT associated with hemorrhoids and suggest that there may be an association between the two conditions. PMID:24839575

  5. Oral-facial-digital syndrome gabrielli type: second report.

    PubMed

    Obregón, Maria Gabriela; Barreiro, Cristina Zulema

    2003-05-01

    We describe a second sporadic case, a girl, with the features of Oral-Facial-Digital, type Gabrielli. We comment on several aspects of this condition and confirm this entity as a unique syndrome, different from the other OFDS. To date, the diagnosis is based only on clinical and radiographic findings.

  6. Richner-Hanhart syndrome and tyrosinemia type II.

    PubMed

    Hunziker, N

    1980-01-01

    A patient already published a case of Richner-Hanhart syndrome (RHS) (stabilized corneal lesions and hyperkeratotic lesions on the palms and soles) proved to be associated with tyrosinemia type II. 2 other cases (sister and brother) with only typical dermatologic features of RHS and tyrosinemia type II are described. The treatment with a low phenylalanine and tyrosine diet improves the cutaneous lesions in our 3 cases.

  7. Atypical clinical manifestations of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Kajdaniuk, Dariusz; Marek, Bogdan; Okopień, Bogusław

    2009-03-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a hereditary tumor syndrome characterized by a genetic predisposition to develop a variety of neuroendocrine tumors and hormone excess syndromes. The major components of MEN1 are hyperparathyroidism due to multiple parathyroid adenomas or hyperplasia, duodenopancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and pituitary adenomas, most often producing prolactin. Physicians' inadequate knowledge of this clinical entity and sometimes its atypical presentation result in a probable significant underdiagnosis of MEN1. This describes the case of a 65-year-old female in whom primary hyperparathyroidism, limited to only one parathyroid gland, was preceded by acromegaly that was diagnosed 23 years earlier. This case shows that MEN1 manifests itself even in older groups and hyperparathyroidism may not be the first symptom of this syndrome. Therefore, we believe that all subjects who, regardless of age, gender and initial manifestation present with whichever the major symptom should be followed up regularly for the early detection of MEN1. PMID:19514648

  8. Adult presentation of Bartter syndrome type IV with erythrocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman; Tótoli, Cláudia; Calado, Joaquim Tomaz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bartter syndrome comprises a group of rare autosomal-recessive salt-losing disorders with distinct phenotypes, but one unifying pathophysiology consisting of severe reductions of sodium reabsorption caused by mutations in five genes expressed in the thick ascending limb of Henle, coupled with increased urinary excretion of potassium and hydrogen, which leads to hypokalemic alkalosis. Bartter syndrome type IV, caused by loss-of-function mutations in barttin, a subunit of chloride channel CLC-Kb expressed in the kidney and inner ear, usually occurs in the antenatal-neonatal period. We report an unusual case of late onset presentation of Bartter syndrome IV and mild phenotype in a 20 years-old man who had hypokalemia, deafness, secondary hyperparathyroidism and erythrocytosis. PMID:26537508

  9. Management of pregnancy in Crigler Najjar syndrome type 2

    PubMed Central

    Chaubal, Alisha Nitin; Patel, Ruchir; Choksi, Dhaval; Shah, Kaivan; Ingle, Meghraj; Sawant, Prabha

    2016-01-01

    Crigler Najjar syndrome is associated with indirect hyperbilirubinemia due to a deficiency of enzyme Uridine Di Phospho Glucoronosyl Transferase (UDPGT). Presented here is a case of a female in the first trimester of pregnancy, who was diagnosed to have type 2 Crigler Najjar syndrome. We also discuss the management of this rare disease especially in pregnancy. Unconjugated bilirubin can cross the placental barrier causing neurological damage in the newborn. Patient was carefully monitored during pregnancy and treatment with phenobarbitone in low doses was adjusted such that the serum bilirubin levels were below 10 mg/dL. Crigler Najjar syndrome being rare needs to be diagnosed early in pregnancy to avoid adverse fetal outcomes. Phenobarbitone being an inducer of enzyme UDPGT is used as the first line of treatment and is not teratogenic in the low doses used. Treatment protocol followed was on the basis of previous reported cases and successful perinatal outcome was achieved. PMID:27099654

  10. Eosinophilia associated with disorders of immune deficiency or immune dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kelli W.; Milner, Joshua D.; Freeman, Alexandra F.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Elevated serum eosinophil levels have been associated with multiple disorders of immune deficiency or immune dysregulation. Although primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are rare, it is important to consider these in the differential diagnosis of patients with eosinophilia. This review discusses the clinical features, laboratory findings, diagnosis, and genetic basis of disease of several disorders of immune deficiency or dysregulation – all which have documented eosinophilia as part of the syndrome. The article includes autosomal dominant hyper IgE syndrome, DOCK8 deficiency, PGM3 deficiency, ADA-SCID, Omenn syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome, Comel-Netherton syndrome, and severe dermatitis, multiple allergies, and metabolic wasting syndrome (SAM). PMID:26209898

  11. Neutrophil adhesion in leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome type 2.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M L; Schwartz, B R; Etzioni, A; Bayer, R; Ochs, H D; Paulson, J C; Harlan, J M

    1995-01-01

    We have previously reported a newly discovered congenital disorder of neutrophil adhesion, leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome type 2 (LAD II). The clinical manifestations of this syndrome are similar to those seen in the classic leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome, now designated type 1 (LAD I), but the two syndromes differ in the molecular basis of their adhesion defects. LAD I is caused by a deficiency in the CD18 integrin adhesion molecules while LAD II patients are deficient in expression of sialyl-Lewis X (SLeX), a carbohydrate ligand for selectins. In this report we demonstrate that neutrophils from a LAD II patient bind minimally or not at all to recombinant E-selectin, purified platelet P-selectin, or P-selectin expressed on histamine-activated human umbilical vein endothelial cells, but have normal levels of L-selectin and CD11b/CD18 integrin, and adhere to and migrate across endothelium when CD11b/CD18 is activated. We compare LAD I and LAD II patient neutrophil function in vitro, demonstrating that integrin and selectin adhesion molecules have distinct but interdependent roles in neutrophil adhesion during an inflammatory response. Images PMID:8675661

  12. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV with Bilateral Pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroaki; Wada, Hiroshi; Hajiro, Takashi; Nagao, Taishi; Ogawa, Emiko; Hatamochi, Atsushi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Nakano, Yasutaka

    2015-01-01

    A 17-year-old teen was hospitalized with bilateral pneumothorax. After the bilateral lungs were expanded using catheter tubes, he fully recovered and he was discharged from our hospital. He had a history of colon perforation. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) was suspected due to the combination of colon perforation and pneumothorax, and EDS type IV was confirmed after a genetic study identified a c.1511g>a mutation in the COL3A1 gene. This is the first report of bilateral pneumothorax caused by EDS type IV. Clinicians should consider EDS type IV in the differential diagnosis for bilateral pneumothorax in conjunction with distinct previous histories and radiological findings.

  13. Occurrence of Parkinson's syndrome in type I Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, O; Giladi, N; Elstein, D; Abrahamov, A; Turezkite, T; Aghai, E; Reches, A; Bembi, B; Zimran, A

    1996-09-01

    Gaucher disease, the most prevalent glycolipid storage disorder, is classically subdivided into types according to the presence or absence of neurological involvement. Type I has hitherto been considered non-neuronopathic. We present six cases and a review of the literature of Parkinsonian symptoms in type I Gaucher disease patients. The hallmark of this atypical Parkinsonian syndrome is a relatively severe clinical course with early appearance of neurological signs in the 4th to 6th decade of life, aggressive progression of the signs and refractoriness to conventional anti-Parkinson therapy. We discuss the implications of these findings in the light of enzyme replacement therapy for Gaucher disease. PMID:8917744

  14. Fulminant hepatic failure in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1.

    PubMed

    Sinha, R; Chapman, A R; Reid, G T; Hayes, P C

    2015-01-01

    Fulminant hepatic failure is liver disease that causes encephalopathy within 8 weeks of onset of symptoms or within 2 weeks of onset of jaundice in a patient without prior evidence of liver disease. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 is an autoimmune autosomal-recessive condition causing parathyroid and adrenal insufficiency, alopecia, chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, ectodermal dystrophy and, rarely, hepatitis. Although the liver can be affected as a consequence of the autoimmune process, the spectrum of disease activity is varied. Autoimmune hepatitis develops in 10-20% of patients and successful liver transplantation has been reported in pediatric patients who failed immunosuppressive treatment. We report fulminant hepatic failure in an adult patient with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 who responded to medical treatment and did not require liver transplantation. We highlight the diagnostic scoring system for autoimmune hepatitis and the referral criteria for liver transplantation in fulminant hepatic failure.

  15. Berardinelli-Seip syndrome type 1 in an Egyptian child

    PubMed Central

    Metwalley, Kotb Abbass; Farghaly, Hekma Saad

    2014-01-01

    Berardinelli-Seip syndrome type 1 or Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy 1 (BSCL1) is a very rare genetic disorder characterized by lipoatrophy, hypertriglyceridemia, hepatomegaly and acromegaloid features. Its prevalence in Egypt is not known. Here, we report case of a 12-year-old Egyptian boy with the clinical, metabolic and molecular genetics manifestations of BSCL1 including overt diabetes mellitus. PMID:24959019

  16. DRESS syndrome associated with type 2 diabetes in a child

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Semiha Bahceci; Bag, Ozlem; Karkiner, Canan Sule Unsal; Korkmaz, Huseyin Anil; Can, Demet

    2016-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is an uncommon, life-threatening drug reaction. The basic findings are skin rash, multiorgan involvement, and eosinophilia. Most of the aromatic anticonvulsants, such as phenytoin, phenobarbital and carbamazepine can induce DRESS. Herein we report a 14-year-old patient with DRESS syndrome related to carbamazepine use. The patient presented with signs of involvement of the skin, lungs, liver, and microscopic hematuria. Carbamazepine treatment was discontinued; antihistamines and steroids were started. Hyperglycemia, commencing on the first dose of the steroid given, persisted even after the discontinuation of steroids and improvement of other signs. There were no signs of pancreatitis or type 1 diabetes clinically in laboratory tests. Her blood glucose levels were regulated at first with insulin and later with metformin. Within 1 year of follow-up, still regulated with oral antidiabetics, she has been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Formerly, long-term sequelae related to “drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome” such as hepatic and renal failure, type 1 diabetes mellitus, Grave's disease, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and lupus have also been reported. However, up to date, no cases with type 2 diabetes have been reported as long-term sequelae. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature presenting with type 2 diabetes as long-term sequelae. PMID:26862317

  17. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Capucine

    2015-11-01

    Half of acute aortic dissection in women under the age of 40 occurs during pregnancy or peripartum period. Marfan syndrome is the most common syndromic presentation of ascending aortic aneurysm, but other syndromes such as vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Turner syndrome also have ascending aortic aneurysms and the associated cardiovascular risk of aortic dissection and rupture. Management of aortic root aneurysm has been established in recent recommendations, even if levels of evidence are weak. Pregnancy and postpartum period should be followed very closely and determined to be at high risk. Guidelines suggest that women with aortopathy should be counseled against the risk of pregnancy and about the heritable nature of the disease prior to pregnancy.

  18. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Capucine

    2015-11-01

    Half of acute aortic dissection in women under the age of 40 occurs during pregnancy or peripartum period. Marfan syndrome is the most common syndromic presentation of ascending aortic aneurysm, but other syndromes such as vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Turner syndrome also have ascending aortic aneurysms and the associated cardiovascular risk of aortic dissection and rupture. Management of aortic root aneurysm has been established in recent recommendations, even if levels of evidence are weak. Pregnancy and postpartum period should be followed very closely and determined to be at high risk. Guidelines suggest that women with aortopathy should be counseled against the risk of pregnancy and about the heritable nature of the disease prior to pregnancy. PMID:26454306

  19. The Expanding Clinical Spectrum of Extracardiovascular and Cardiovascular Manifestations of Heritable Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Timothy J; Bowdin, Sarah C; Morel, Chantal F J; Pyeritz, Reed E

    2016-01-01

    More than 30 heritable conditions are associated with thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD). Heritable syndromic conditions, such as Marfan syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, and vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, have somewhat overlapping systemic features, but careful clinical assessment usually enables a diagnosis that can be validated with genetic testing. Nonsyndromic FTAAD can also occur and in 20%-25% of these probands mutations exist in genes that encode elements of the extracellular matrix, signalling pathways (especially involving transforming growth factor-β), and vascular smooth muscle cytoskeletal and contractile processes. Affected individuals with either a syndromic presentation or isolated TAAD can have mutations in the same gene. In this review we focus on the genes currently known to have causal mutations for syndromic and isolated FTAAD and outline the range of associated extracardiovascular and cardiovascular manifestations with each. PMID:26724513

  20. Griscelli syndrome type 2: A rare and fatal syndrome in a South Indian boy.

    PubMed

    Rajyalakshmi, R; Chakrapani, R N B

    2016-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome (GS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutation in the MYO5A (GS1), RAB27A (GS2), and MLPH (GS3) genes, characterized by a common feature, partial albinism. The common variant of three, GS type 2, in addition, shows primary immunodeficiency which leads to recurrent infections and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. We, herewith, describe a case of GS type 2, in a 4-year-old male child who presented with chronic and recurrent fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and secondary neurological deterioration; highlighting the cytological and histopathological features of lymph nodes. Hair shaft examination of the child confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:26960655

  1. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV with Bilateral Pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroaki; Wada, Hiroshi; Hajiro, Takashi; Nagao, Taishi; Ogawa, Emiko; Hatamochi, Atsushi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Nakano, Yasutaka

    2015-01-01

    A 17-year-old teen was hospitalized with bilateral pneumothorax. After the bilateral lungs were expanded using catheter tubes, he fully recovered and he was discharged from our hospital. He had a history of colon perforation. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) was suspected due to the combination of colon perforation and pneumothorax, and EDS type IV was confirmed after a genetic study identified a c.1511g>a mutation in the COL3A1 gene. This is the first report of bilateral pneumothorax caused by EDS type IV. Clinicians should consider EDS type IV in the differential diagnosis for bilateral pneumothorax in conjunction with distinct previous histories and radiological findings. PMID:26666608

  2. Clinical findings in obligate carriers of type I Usher syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wagenaar, M.; Rahe, B. ter; Aarem, A. van; Huygen, P.; Admiraal, R.

    1995-11-20

    Seventeen obligate carriers from nine families with autosomal recessive Usher syndrome type I underwent otological, audiological, vestibular, and ophthalmological examination in order to identify possible manifestations of heterozygosity. Linkage studies were performed and six families showed linkage to chromosome region 11q13.5 while 3 families have so far failed to show linkage to the candidate regions. Eight obligate carriers had an abnormal puretone audiogram. Two different audiometric patterns could be distinguished when hearing loss was corrected for age and sex. Four carriers (24%) had significant sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) which increased at higher frequencies. The other 13 carriers had SNHL of about 10 dB at 0.25 and 0.5 kHz, but less at higher frequencies. Vestibular findings were generally normal. Electrooculography demonstrated a significant lower mean light peak/dark trough ratio in Usher type I carriers compared to normal control individuals. The methods used in this study were found not to be specific enough to clinically identify carriers of Usher type I syndrome. Nevertheless it is remarkable that a number of obligate carriers showed significant audiological and ophthalmological abnormalities. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. Type 1 diabetes and polyglandular autoimmune syndrome: A review

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Martin P; Matheis, Nina; Kahaly, George J

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disorder caused by inflammatory destruction of the pancreatic tissue. The etiopathogenesis and characteristics of the pathologic process of pancreatic destruction are well described. In addition, the putative susceptibility genes for T1D as a monoglandular disease and the relation to polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (PAS) have also been well explored. The incidence of T1D has steadily increased in most parts of the world, especially in industrialized nations. T1D is frequently associated with autoimmune endocrine and non-endocrine diseases and patients with T1D are at a higher risk for developing several glandular autoimmune diseases. Familial clustering is observed, which suggests that there is a genetic predisposition. Various hypotheses pertaining to viral- and bacterial-induced pancreatic autoimmunity have been proposed, however a definitive delineation of the autoimmune pathomechanism is still lacking. In patients with PAS, pancreatic and endocrine autoantigens either colocalize on one antigen-presenting cell or are expressed on two/various target cells sharing a common amino acid, which facilitates binding to and activation of T cells. The most prevalent PAS phenotype is the adult type 3 variant or PAS type III, which encompasses T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease. This review discusses the findings of recent studies showing noticeable differences in the genetic background and clinical phenotype of T1D either as an isolated autoimmune endocrinopathy or within the scope of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome. PMID:25685279

  4. Skeletal abnormalities of tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome type I.

    PubMed

    de Barros, Guilherme Monteiro; Kakehasi, Adriana Maria

    2016-01-01

    The tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome (TRPS) type I is a rare genetic disorder related to the TRPS1 gene mutation in chromosome 8, characterized by craniofacial abnormalities and disturbances in formation and maturation of bone matrix. The hallmarks are sparse and brittle hair, tendency to premature baldness, bulbous nose called pear-shaped, long and flat filter and low ear implantation. The most noticeable skeletal changes are clinodactyly, phalangeal epiphyses of the hands appearing as cone-shaped, short stature and hip joint malformations. We report a case of a teenager boy diagnosed with TRPS and referred for rheumatologic evaluation due to joint complaints. PMID:27267340

  5. Paradoxical hypertension and salt wasting in Type II Bartter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chan, Winnie Kwai-Yu; To, Ka Fai; Tong, Joanna H M; Law, Chi Wai

    2012-06-01

    Ante/neonatal Bartter syndrome (BS) is a rare hereditary disorder. It is characterized by renal salt wasting, hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis, high renin and aldosterone but normal blood pressure. We report a low birth weight newborn baby who presented with repeated apnoea shortly after birth as well as hyponatraemia, hypochloraemia, hyperkalaemia and metabolic acidosis. Her biochemical features mimicked pseudohypoaldosteronism but with initial hypertension, which had not been described in BS. Her subsequent genetic study confirmed two novel heterozygous mutations in the Exon 5 of KCNJ1 compatible with Type II BS. PMID:26069767

  6. Difficulty eating and significant weight loss in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Baeza-Velasco, Carolina; Van den Bossche, Thomas; Grossin, Daniel; Hamonet, Claude

    2016-06-01

    Joint Hypermobility Syndrome, also known as Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type (JHS/EDS-HT), is a heritable disorder of connective tissue, common but poorly known by the medical community. Although generalized joint hypermobility and fragility of tissues have been described as core features, recent research highlights the multisystemic nature of JHS/EDS-HT, which presents with a wide range of articular and extra-articular symptoms. Among these, gastrointestinal problems, temporomandibular disorders, and smell and taste abnormalities are common among those affected, having significant implications for eating. The present work reviews the literature linking JHS/EDS-HT and eating problems. Two illustrative case reports, in which JHS/EDS-HT manifestations contribute to developing and maintaining disturbed eating behaviors and significant weight loss, are presented.

  7. Difficulty eating and significant weight loss in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Baeza-Velasco, Carolina; Van den Bossche, Thomas; Grossin, Daniel; Hamonet, Claude

    2016-06-01

    Joint Hypermobility Syndrome, also known as Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type (JHS/EDS-HT), is a heritable disorder of connective tissue, common but poorly known by the medical community. Although generalized joint hypermobility and fragility of tissues have been described as core features, recent research highlights the multisystemic nature of JHS/EDS-HT, which presents with a wide range of articular and extra-articular symptoms. Among these, gastrointestinal problems, temporomandibular disorders, and smell and taste abnormalities are common among those affected, having significant implications for eating. The present work reviews the literature linking JHS/EDS-HT and eating problems. Two illustrative case reports, in which JHS/EDS-HT manifestations contribute to developing and maintaining disturbed eating behaviors and significant weight loss, are presented. PMID:26506923

  8. Marfan syndrome: abnormal alpha 2 chain in type I collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Byers, P H; Siegel, R C; Peterson, K E; Rowe, D W; Holbrook, K A; Smith, L T; Chang, Y H; Fu, J C

    1981-01-01

    Cells in culture from a woman with a variety of the Marfan syndrome produce two species of the alpha 2 chains of type I collagen. One alpha 2 chain appears normal; the abnormal chain has a higher apparent molecular weight than normal and migrates more slowly during electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gels. A similar change in electrophoretic behavior is seen in the prepro alpha 2 chain and the pN alpha 2 chain (which contains the amino-terminal extension). Asymmetric cleavage of the pepsin-treated procollagens with a fibroblast collagenase locates the abnormal segment amino terminal to the cleavage site, and analysis of cyanogen bromide peptides of collagenase cleavage peptides and of whole collagens indicates that the abnormal segment is in either the alpha 2CB3 peptide or the short segment of alpha 2CB5 amino terminal to the collagenase site of the altered alpha 2 chain. The higher apparent molecular weight is consistent with the insertion of a small peptide fragment of approximately 20 amino acids. This alteration in chain size has marked effects on crosslinking because collagen from the patient's skin was 5-10 times more extractable in nondenaturing solvents than that from control skins. Although the abnormal chain was not found in several other individuals with the Marfan syndrome, these findings suggest that the phenotype may be the expression of a variety of primary structure alterations in the chains of type I collagen that interfere with normal crosslink formation. Images PMID:6950413

  9. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Soo-Hoo, Sarah; Porten, Brandon R; Engstrom, Bjorn I; Skeik, Nedaa

    2016-04-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) encompasses a group of rare genetic connective tissue disorders. The vascular type (type IV) poses the most serious risk to patients. Diagnosis is usually difficult, especially if patients lack a family history. Life-threatening vascular emergency such as dissection or rupture can be the first presenting symptom. Management of the disease can pose a clinical challenge due to the emergency of presentation, tissue friability, and lack of clear management recommendations. We report a unique case of a 40-year-old man who presented with a ruptured celiac artery and a strong family history of EDS. This case highlights the difficulties and complications associated with treating this uncommon and serious disease.

  10. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Soo-Hoo, Sarah; Porten, Brandon R; Engstrom, Bjorn I; Skeik, Nedaa

    2016-04-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) encompasses a group of rare genetic connective tissue disorders. The vascular type (type IV) poses the most serious risk to patients. Diagnosis is usually difficult, especially if patients lack a family history. Life-threatening vascular emergency such as dissection or rupture can be the first presenting symptom. Management of the disease can pose a clinical challenge due to the emergency of presentation, tissue friability, and lack of clear management recommendations. We report a unique case of a 40-year-old man who presented with a ruptured celiac artery and a strong family history of EDS. This case highlights the difficulties and complications associated with treating this uncommon and serious disease. PMID:26975607

  11. Generalized joint hypermobility, joint hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2015-03-01

    This issue of the American Journal of Medical Genetics Seminar Series Part C is dedicated to generalized joint hypermobility (gJHM), joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT). gJHM is the best known clinical manifestation of inherited defects of the connective tissue. On the other side, JHS and EDS-HT are actually considered one and the same from a clinical perspective by most practitioners and researchers (i.e., JHS/EDS-HT), and their molecular basis remains unknown. For decades, "non-syndromic" gJHM and JHS/EDS-HT have been thought to be simple clinical curiosities or an asset for the "affected" individual. In recent years, the attention on these partially overlapping phenotypes has increased, as they are now recognized risk factors for a series of non-communicable diseases and long-term disabilities. This series consists of 10 papers focused on three main topics, namely (i) assessment and differential diagnosis of children and adults with gJHM, (ii) systematic presentation of selected key non-articular manifestations of JHS/EDS-HT and actual perception of physiotherapy as the best therapeutic resource for this condition, and (iii) exploration of the available knowledge relating "congenital laxity of tissues" to various dysfunctions of the nervous system during development and adulthood. The contributors hope that this collection raises attention to this fascinating field of knowledge, which seems to have ramifications in virtually all medical disciplines.

  12. Generalized joint hypermobility, joint hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2015-03-01

    This issue of the American Journal of Medical Genetics Seminar Series Part C is dedicated to generalized joint hypermobility (gJHM), joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT). gJHM is the best known clinical manifestation of inherited defects of the connective tissue. On the other side, JHS and EDS-HT are actually considered one and the same from a clinical perspective by most practitioners and researchers (i.e., JHS/EDS-HT), and their molecular basis remains unknown. For decades, "non-syndromic" gJHM and JHS/EDS-HT have been thought to be simple clinical curiosities or an asset for the "affected" individual. In recent years, the attention on these partially overlapping phenotypes has increased, as they are now recognized risk factors for a series of non-communicable diseases and long-term disabilities. This series consists of 10 papers focused on three main topics, namely (i) assessment and differential diagnosis of children and adults with gJHM, (ii) systematic presentation of selected key non-articular manifestations of JHS/EDS-HT and actual perception of physiotherapy as the best therapeutic resource for this condition, and (iii) exploration of the available knowledge relating "congenital laxity of tissues" to various dysfunctions of the nervous system during development and adulthood. The contributors hope that this collection raises attention to this fascinating field of knowledge, which seems to have ramifications in virtually all medical disciplines. PMID:25821089

  13. Mutations in PIEZO2 Cause Gordon Syndrome, Marden-Walker Syndrome, and Distal Arthrogryposis Type 5

    PubMed Central

    McMillin, Margaret J.; Beck, Anita E.; Chong, Jessica X.; Shively, Kathryn M.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Gildersleeve, Heidi I.S.; Aracena, Mariana I.; Aylsworth, Arthur S.; Bitoun, Pierre; Carey, John C.; Clericuzio, Carol L.; Crow, Yanick J.; Curry, Cynthia J.; Devriendt, Koenraad; Everman, David B.; Fryer, Alan; Gibson, Kate; Giovannucci Uzielli, Maria Luisa; Graham, John M.; Hall, Judith G.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Heidenreich, Randall A.; Hurst, Jane A.; Irani, Sarosh; Krapels, Ingrid P.C.; Leroy, Jules G.; Mowat, David; Plant, Gordon T.; Robertson, Stephen P.; Schorry, Elizabeth K.; Scott, Richard H.; Seaver, Laurie H.; Sherr, Elliott; Splitt, Miranda; Stewart, Helen; Stumpel, Constance; Temel, Sehime G.; Weaver, David D.; Whiteford, Margo; Williams, Marc S.; Tabor, Holly K.; Smith, Joshua D.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Gordon syndrome (GS), or distal arthrogryposis type 3, is a rare, autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by cleft palate and congenital contractures of the hands and feet. Exome sequencing of five GS-affected families identified mutations in piezo-type mechanosensitive ion channel component 2 (PIEZO2) in each family. Sanger sequencing revealed PIEZO2 mutations in five of seven additional families studied (for a total of 10/12 [83%] individuals), and nine families had an identical c.8057G>A (p.Arg2686His) mutation. The phenotype of GS overlaps with distal arthrogryposis type 5 (DA5) and Marden-Walker syndrome (MWS). Using molecular inversion probes for targeted sequencing to screen PIEZO2, we found mutations in 24/29 (82%) DA5-affected families and one of two MWS-affected families. The presence of cleft palate was significantly associated with c.8057G>A (Fisher’s exact test, adjusted p value < 0.0001). Collectively, although GS, DA5, and MWS have traditionally been considered separate disorders, our findings indicate that they are etiologically related and perhaps represent variable expressivity of the same condition. PMID:24726473

  14. Mutations in PIEZO2 cause Gordon syndrome, Marden-Walker syndrome, and distal arthrogryposis type 5.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Margaret J; Beck, Anita E; Chong, Jessica X; Shively, Kathryn M; Buckingham, Kati J; Gildersleeve, Heidi I S; Aracena, Mariana I; Aylsworth, Arthur S; Bitoun, Pierre; Carey, John C; Clericuzio, Carol L; Crow, Yanick J; Curry, Cynthia J; Devriendt, Koenraad; Everman, David B; Fryer, Alan; Gibson, Kate; Giovannucci Uzielli, Maria Luisa; Graham, John M; Hall, Judith G; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Heidenreich, Randall A; Hurst, Jane A; Irani, Sarosh; Krapels, Ingrid P C; Leroy, Jules G; Mowat, David; Plant, Gordon T; Robertson, Stephen P; Schorry, Elizabeth K; Scott, Richard H; Seaver, Laurie H; Sherr, Elliott; Splitt, Miranda; Stewart, Helen; Stumpel, Constance; Temel, Sehime G; Weaver, David D; Whiteford, Margo; Williams, Marc S; Tabor, Holly K; Smith, Joshua D; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A; Bamshad, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Gordon syndrome (GS), or distal arthrogryposis type 3, is a rare, autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by cleft palate and congenital contractures of the hands and feet. Exome sequencing of five GS-affected families identified mutations in piezo-type mechanosensitive ion channel component 2 (PIEZO2) in each family. Sanger sequencing revealed PIEZO2 mutations in five of seven additional families studied (for a total of 10/12 [83%] individuals), and nine families had an identical c.8057G>A (p.Arg2686His) mutation. The phenotype of GS overlaps with distal arthrogryposis type 5 (DA5) and Marden-Walker syndrome (MWS). Using molecular inversion probes for targeted sequencing to screen PIEZO2, we found mutations in 24/29 (82%) DA5-affected families and one of two MWS-affected families. The presence of cleft palate was significantly associated with c.8057G>A (Fisher's exact test, adjusted p value < 0.0001). Collectively, although GS, DA5, and MWS have traditionally been considered separate disorders, our findings indicate that they are etiologically related and perhaps represent variable expressivity of the same condition. PMID:24726473

  15. Absence of linkage of Noonan syndrome to the neurofibromatosis type 1 locus.

    PubMed Central

    Sharland, M; Taylor, R; Patton, M A; Jeffery, S

    1992-01-01

    Eleven families with Noonan syndrome in either two or three generations have been identified. Following the reports of subjects with features of both Noonan syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1, these pedigrees have been studied using a number of probes at the neurofibromatosis type 1 locus (17q11). A significantly negative lod score was obtained with the intragenic probe NF1-C2, suggesting that the genes for Noonan syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1 are not contiguous. PMID:1348095

  16. Chronic pain in hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hypermobility type): it is a challenge.

    PubMed

    Scheper, Mark C; de Vries, Janneke E; Verbunt, Jeanine; Engelbert, Raoul Hh

    2015-01-01

    Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) is highly prevalent among patients diagnosed with chronic pain. When GJH is accompanied by pain in ≥4 joints over a period ≥3 months in the absence of other conditions that cause chronic pain, the hypermobility syndrome (HMS) may be diagnosed. In addition, GJH is also a clinical sign that is frequently present in hereditary diseases of the connective tissue, such as the Marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, and the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, within the Ehlers-Danlos spectrum, a similar subcategory of patients having similar clinical features as HMS but lacking a specific genetic profile was identified: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT). Researchers and clinicians have struggled for decades with the highly diverse clinical presentation within the HMS and EDS-HT phenotypes (Challenge 1) and the lack of understanding of the pathological mechanisms that underlie the development of pain and its persistence (Challenge 2). In addition, within the HMS/EDS-HT phenotype, there is a high prevalence of psychosocial factors, which again presents a difficult issue that needs to be addressed (Challenge 3). Despite recent scientific advances, many obstacles for clinical care and research still remain. To gain further insight into the phenotype of HMS/EDS-HT and its mechanisms, clearer descriptions of these populations should be made available. Future research and clinical care should revise and create consensus on the diagnostic criteria for HMS/EDS-HT (Solution 1), account for clinical heterogeneity by the classification of subtypes within the HMS/EDS-HT spectrum (Solution 2), and create a clinical core set (Solution 3).

  17. Chronic pain in hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (hypermobility type): it is a challenge

    PubMed Central

    Scheper, Mark C; de Vries, Janneke E; Verbunt, Jeanine; Engelbert, Raoul HH

    2015-01-01

    Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) is highly prevalent among patients diagnosed with chronic pain. When GJH is accompanied by pain in ≥4 joints over a period ≥3 months in the absence of other conditions that cause chronic pain, the hypermobility syndrome (HMS) may be diagnosed. In addition, GJH is also a clinical sign that is frequently present in hereditary diseases of the connective tissue, such as the Marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, and the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome. However, within the Ehlers–Danlos spectrum, a similar subcategory of patients having similar clinical features as HMS but lacking a specific genetic profile was identified: Ehlers–Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT). Researchers and clinicians have struggled for decades with the highly diverse clinical presentation within the HMS and EDS-HT phenotypes (Challenge 1) and the lack of understanding of the pathological mechanisms that underlie the development of pain and its persistence (Challenge 2). In addition, within the HMS/EDS-HT phenotype, there is a high prevalence of psychosocial factors, which again presents a difficult issue that needs to be addressed (Challenge 3). Despite recent scientific advances, many obstacles for clinical care and research still remain. To gain further insight into the phenotype of HMS/EDS-HT and its mechanisms, clearer descriptions of these populations should be made available. Future research and clinical care should revise and create consensus on the diagnostic criteria for HMS/EDS-HT (Solution 1), account for clinical heterogeneity by the classification of subtypes within the HMS/EDS-HT spectrum (Solution 2), and create a clinical core set (Solution 3). PMID:26316810

  18. Chronic pain in hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hypermobility type): it is a challenge.

    PubMed

    Scheper, Mark C; de Vries, Janneke E; Verbunt, Jeanine; Engelbert, Raoul Hh

    2015-01-01

    Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) is highly prevalent among patients diagnosed with chronic pain. When GJH is accompanied by pain in ≥4 joints over a period ≥3 months in the absence of other conditions that cause chronic pain, the hypermobility syndrome (HMS) may be diagnosed. In addition, GJH is also a clinical sign that is frequently present in hereditary diseases of the connective tissue, such as the Marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, and the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, within the Ehlers-Danlos spectrum, a similar subcategory of patients having similar clinical features as HMS but lacking a specific genetic profile was identified: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT). Researchers and clinicians have struggled for decades with the highly diverse clinical presentation within the HMS and EDS-HT phenotypes (Challenge 1) and the lack of understanding of the pathological mechanisms that underlie the development of pain and its persistence (Challenge 2). In addition, within the HMS/EDS-HT phenotype, there is a high prevalence of psychosocial factors, which again presents a difficult issue that needs to be addressed (Challenge 3). Despite recent scientific advances, many obstacles for clinical care and research still remain. To gain further insight into the phenotype of HMS/EDS-HT and its mechanisms, clearer descriptions of these populations should be made available. Future research and clinical care should revise and create consensus on the diagnostic criteria for HMS/EDS-HT (Solution 1), account for clinical heterogeneity by the classification of subtypes within the HMS/EDS-HT spectrum (Solution 2), and create a clinical core set (Solution 3). PMID:26316810

  19. Myositis in Griscelli syndrome type 2 treated with hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Born, Alfred Peter; Müller, Klaus; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke; Heilmann, Carsten; Schejbel, Lone; Vissing, John

    2010-02-01

    Griscelli syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and is occasionally associated with a hemophagocytic syndrome (type 2). We present a 13-year-old girl with Griscelli syndrome type 2, who developed a hemophagocytic syndrome along with marked muscle weakness and elevated plasma creatine kinase. Muscle biopsy showed massive inflammatory changes in some fascicles, while other fascicles were relatively spared. Clinical symptoms and biopsy changes resolved after immunosuppression and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Our results suggest that muscle involvement should be considered in patients with hemophagocytic syndrome to ensure proper treatment.

  20. Targeted Exon Sequencing in Usher Syndrome Type I

    PubMed Central

    Bujakowska, Kinga M.; Consugar, Mark; Place, Emily; Harper, Shyana; Lena, Jaclyn; Taub, Daniel G.; White, Joseph; Navarro-Gomez, Daniel; Weigel DiFranco, Carol; Farkas, Michael H.; Gai, Xiaowu; Berson, Eliot L.; Pierce, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Patients with Usher syndrome type I (USH1) have retinitis pigmentosa, profound congenital hearing loss, and vestibular ataxia. This syndrome is currently thought to be associated with at least six genes, which are encoded by over 180 exons. Here, we present the use of state-of-the-art techniques in the molecular diagnosis of a cohort of 47 USH1 probands. Methods. The cohort was studied with selective exon capture and next-generation sequencing of currently known inherited retinal degeneration genes, comparative genomic hybridization, and Sanger sequencing of new USH1 exons identified by human retinal transcriptome analysis. Results. With this approach, we were able to genetically solve 14 of the 47 probands by confirming the biallelic inheritance of mutations. We detected two likely pathogenic variants in an additional 19 patients, for whom family members were not available for cosegregation analysis to confirm biallelic inheritance. Ten patients, in addition to primary disease–causing mutations, carried rare likely pathogenic USH1 alleles or variants in other genes associated with deaf-blindness, which may influence disease phenotype. Twenty-one of the identified mutations were novel among the 33 definite or likely solved patients. Here, we also present a clinical description of the studied cohort at their initial visits. Conclusions. We found a remarkable genetic heterogeneity in the studied USH1 cohort with multiplicity of mutations, of which many were novel. No obvious influence of genotype on phenotype was found, possibly due to small sample sizes of the genotypes under study. PMID:25468891

  1. Acute Type A Aortic Dissection Missed as Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ansari-Ramandi, Mohammad Mostafa; Firoozi, Ata

    2016-01-01

    Although the aortic dissection is not common, its outcome is frequently fatal, and many patients with aortic dissection die before referral to the hospital or any diagnostic testing. The symptoms of aortic dissection can be similar to myocardial ischemia. A 66-year-old male was referred to our hospital with suspicion of aortic dissection after echocardiography done for evaluating his high blood pressure. He had symptoms of acute coronary syndrome two years before and had done coronary angiography. On presentation to our hospital he had a high blood pressure. On reviewing his past medical history and examining, in the film of coronary angiography, the dissection flap in ascending aorta was identified. Although type A aortic dissection is a catastrophic condition with high mortality and requires prompt surgical treatment but in some cases it may be misdiagnosed as acute coronary syndrome. Sometimes against its high mortality when left untreated, patients survive and are diagnosed later in life incidentally. So it is of great importance to have great clinical suspicion for aortic dissection in patients referring to the hospital with chest pain and the predisposing factors. PMID:27437290

  2. [Anthropometric parameters and metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    de Castro, Simone Henriques; de Mato, Haroldo José; Gomes, Marilia de Brito

    2006-06-01

    To evaluate the value of body mass index (BMI) as predictor of waist circumference of cardiovascular risk (CRWC) and diagnostic of metabolic syndrome (MSWC) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM 2), we assessed BMI and WC in 753 patients with DM 2 (472 women) with 23 +/- 8 years. The participants had been divided in groups in accordance with the presence or absence of ACCR or ACMS. The best BMI cut-off to predict such disturbances was evaluated in women and men. In females, BMI > or = 25.0 kg/m(2) was the best predictor of CRWC. Area under ROC curve and IC 95% were 0.7202 (0.6753 - 0.7652) for CRWC and of [0.8318 (0.7928 - 0.8708)] for MSWC. In males, IMC > or = 25.0 kg/m(2) was better predictor for CRWC presence [0.8527 (0.8098 - 0.8955)], while BMI > or = 30.0 kg/m(2) for MSWC [0.9071 (0.8708 - 0.9433)]. We conclude that BMI can be a simple way to evaluate metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk where there were not material and prepared professionals for the WC evaluation. We need prospective studies to evaluate if it is necessary to change the BMI cut-off adopted as indicative of these disturbances in the diabetic population. PMID:16936985

  3. [Clinical practice guideline 'Complex regional pain syndrome type I'].

    PubMed

    Perez, R S G M; Zollinger, P E; Dijkstra, P U; Thomassen-Hilgersom, I L; Zuurmond, W W A; Rosenbrand, C J G M; Geertzen, J H B

    2007-07-28

    The development and treatment ofthe complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) are a subject of much discussion. Using the method for the development ofevidence-based guidelines, a multidisciplinary guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome has been drawn up. The diagnosis of CRPS-I is based on the clinical observation of signs and symptoms. For pain treatment, the WHO analgesic ladder is advised up to step z. In case of pain ofa neuropathic nature, anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants may be considered. For the treatment ofinflammatory symptoms, free-radical scavengers (dimethylsulphoxide or acetylcysteine) are advised. In order to enhance peripheral blood flow, vasodilatory medication may be considered. Percutaneous sympathetic blockades may be used for a cold extremity ifvasodilatory medication produces insufficient effect. To decrease functional limitations, standardised physiotherapy and occupational therapy are advised. To prevent the occurrence of CRPS-I after wrist fractures, the use of vitamin C is recommended. Adequate perioperative analgesia, limitation of operation time and limited use of bloodlessness are advised for the secondary prevention of CRPS-I. Use of regional anaesthetic techniques can also be considered in this connection.

  4. Type III mixed cryoglobulinemia and antiphospholipid syndrome in a patient with partial DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alice D; Tachdjian, Raffi; Gallagher, Kerry; McCurdy, Deborah K; Lassman, Charles; Stiehm, E Richard; Yadin, Ora

    2006-01-01

    We studied a 14 year-old boy with partial DiGeorge syndrome (DGS), status post complete repair of Tetralogy of Fallot, who developed antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and type III mixed cryoglobulinemia. He presented with recurrent fever and dyspnea upon exertion secondary to right pulmonary embolus on chest computed tomography (CT). Coagulation studies revealed homozygous methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase 677TT mutations, elevated cardiolipin IgM antibodies, and elevated beta(2)-glycoprotein I IgM antibodies. Infectious work-up revealed only positive anti-streptolysin O (ASO) and anti-DNAse B titers. Autoimmune studies showed strongly positive anti-platelet IgM, elevated rheumatoid factor (RF), and positive cryocrit. Renal biopsy for evaluation of proteinuria and hematuria showed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (DPGN) with membranoproliferative features consistent with cryoglobulinemia. Immunofixation showed polyclonal bands. Our patient was treated successfully with antibiotics, prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). This is the first report of a patient with partial DGS presenting with APS and type III mixed cryoglobulinemia possibly due to Streptococcal infection.

  5. Type III Mixed Cryoglobulinemia and Antiphospholipid Syndrome in a Patient With Partial DiGeorge Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alice D.; Tachdjian, Raffi; Gallagher, Kerry; McCurdy, Deborah K.; Lassman, Charles; Stiehm, E. Richard; Yadin, Ora

    2006-01-01

    We studied a 14 year-old boy with partial DiGeorge syndrome (DGS), status post complete repair of Tetralogy of Fallot, who developed antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and type III mixed cryoglobulinemia. He presented with recurrent fever and dyspnea upon exertion secondary to right pulmonary embolus on chest computed tomography (CT). Coagulation studies revealed homozygous methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase 677TT mutations, elevated cardiolipin IgM antibodies, and elevated β2-glycoprotein I IgM antibodies. Infectious work-up revealed only positive anti-streptolysin O (ASO) and anti-DNAse B titers. Autoimmune studies showed strongly positive anti-platelet IgM, elevated rheumatoid factor (RF), and positive cryocrit. Renal biopsy for evaluation of proteinuria and hematuria showed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (DPGN) with membranoproliferative features consistent with cryoglobulinemia. Immunofixation showed polyclonal bands. Our patient was treated successfully with antibiotics, prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). This is the first report of a patient with partial DGS presenting with APS and type III mixed cryoglobulinemia possibly due to Streptococcal infection. PMID:17162366

  6. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type VIIC: A Mexican Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rincón-Sánchez, Ana Rosa; Arce, Irma Elia; Tostado-Rabago, Enrique Alejandro; Vargas, Alberto; Padilla-Gómez, Luis Alfredo; Bolaños, Alejandro; Barrios-Guyot, Selenne; Anguiano-Alvarez, Víctor Manuel; Ledezma-Rodríguez, Víctor Chistian; Islas-Carbajal, María Cristina; Rivas-Estilla, Ana María; Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; Dávalos, Nory Omayra

    2012-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders whose primary clinical features include soft and extensible skin, articular hypermobility and tissue fragility. EDS type VIIC or ‘human dermatosparaxis’ is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by severe skin fragility and sagging redundant skin (major criteria) with a soft, doughy texture, easy bruising, premature rupture of fetal membranes and large hernias (minor criteria). Dermatosparaxis (meaning ‘tearing of skin’), which has been described in several non-human species, is a disorder of the connective tissue resulting from a deficiency of the enzyme that cleaves the registration peptide off the N-terminal end of collagen after it has been secreted from fibroblasts. We describe a Mexican case from consanguineous parents with all the phenotypical characteristics previously described, plus skeletal abnormalities. PMID:22787447

  7. Type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome in Japanese Americans.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, W Y; Bergstrom, R W; Boyko, E J; Chen, K; Kahn, S E; Leonetti, D L; McNeely, M J; Newell, L L; Shofer, J B; Wahl, P W

    2000-10-01

    Japanese Americans have experienced a higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes than in Japan. Research conducted in Seattle suggests that lifestyle factors associated with 'westernization' play a role in bringing out this susceptibility to diabetes. These lifestyle factors include consumption of a diet higher in saturated fat and reduced physical activity. A consequence of this is the development of central (visceral) adiposity, insulin resistance, and other features associated with this insulin resistance metabolic syndrome, such as dyslipidemia (high triglycerides, low HDL-cholesterol, and small and dense LDL particles), hypertension, and coronary heart disease. We have postulated that the superimposition of insulin resistance upon a genetic background of reduced beta-cell reserve results in hyperglycemia and diabetes among Japanese Americans. This article reviews evidence that support this view.

  8. Hypnosis for postpolio syndrome & Type-A behavior.

    PubMed

    Hammond, D C

    1991-07-01

    Many of the hundreds of thousands of survivors of polio are now developing postpolio syndrome. Symptoms include progressive muscle weakness, fatigue, decreased endurance, joint and muscle pain, weight gain, respiratory difficulties, and sleep disturbance, often precipitated or exacerbated by a Type-A Personality pattern. A postpolio patient with Type-A Personality was taught self-hypnosis as a vital component of treatment. Pre-post testing included the Profile of Mood States, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the State-Trait Anger Inventory, and the Personal Orientation Inventory; the patient's spouse was interviewed during the follow-up. At the 6-month follow-up, improvements were documented in pain level, depression, self-regard, self-acceptance, capacity for intimate contact, time competence (living in the present), confusion, anxiety, insomnia, and in trait and state anger. Only a mild improvement occurred in fatigue, and no improvement was found in weight control. Follow-up at 12 months confirmed the maintenance of improvements. Self-hypnosis training may prove extremely helpful for postpolio patients and may prove helpful in modifying central characteristics of Type-A Personality.

  9. Gastrointestinal and nutritional issues in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Pascolini, Giulia; Blundo, Carlo; Grammatico, Paola

    2015-03-01

    Gastrointestinal involvement is a well known complication of Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDSs), mainly in form of abdominal emergencies due to intestinal/abdominal vessels rupture in vascular EDS. In the last decade, a growing number of works investigated the relationship between a wide spectrum of chronic gastrointestinal complaints and various EDS forms, among which the hypermobility type (a.k.a. joint hypermobility syndrome; JHS/EDS-HT) was the most studied. The emerging findings depict a major role for gastrointestinal involvement in the health status and, consequently, management of JHS/EDS-HT patients. Nevertheless, fragmentation of knowledge limits its impact on practice within the boundaries of highly specialized clinics. In this paper, literature review on gastrointestinal manifestations in JHS/EDS-HT was carried out and identified papers categorized as (i) case-control/cohort studies associating (apparently non-syndromic) joint hypermobility and gastrointestinal involvement, (ii) case-control/cohort studies associating JHS/EDS-HT and gastrointestinal involvement, (iii) case reports/series on various gastrointestinal complications in (presumed) JHS/EDS-HT, and (iv) studies reporting gastrointestinal features in heterogeneous EDS patients' cohorts. Gastrointestinal manifestations of JHS/EDS-HT were organized and discussed in two categories, including structural anomalies (i.e., abdominal/diaphragmatic hernias, internal organ/pelvic prolapses, intestinal intussusceptions) and functional features (i.e., dysphagia, gastro-esophageal reflux, dyspepsia, recurrent abdominal pain, constipation/diarrhea), with emphasis on practice and future implications. In the second part of this paper, a summary of possible nutritional interventions in JHS/EDS-HT was presented. Supplementation strategies were borrowed from data available for general population with minor modifications in the light of recent discoveries in the pathogenesis of selected JHS/EDS-HT features.

  10. Gastrointestinal and nutritional issues in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Pascolini, Giulia; Blundo, Carlo; Grammatico, Paola

    2015-03-01

    Gastrointestinal involvement is a well known complication of Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDSs), mainly in form of abdominal emergencies due to intestinal/abdominal vessels rupture in vascular EDS. In the last decade, a growing number of works investigated the relationship between a wide spectrum of chronic gastrointestinal complaints and various EDS forms, among which the hypermobility type (a.k.a. joint hypermobility syndrome; JHS/EDS-HT) was the most studied. The emerging findings depict a major role for gastrointestinal involvement in the health status and, consequently, management of JHS/EDS-HT patients. Nevertheless, fragmentation of knowledge limits its impact on practice within the boundaries of highly specialized clinics. In this paper, literature review on gastrointestinal manifestations in JHS/EDS-HT was carried out and identified papers categorized as (i) case-control/cohort studies associating (apparently non-syndromic) joint hypermobility and gastrointestinal involvement, (ii) case-control/cohort studies associating JHS/EDS-HT and gastrointestinal involvement, (iii) case reports/series on various gastrointestinal complications in (presumed) JHS/EDS-HT, and (iv) studies reporting gastrointestinal features in heterogeneous EDS patients' cohorts. Gastrointestinal manifestations of JHS/EDS-HT were organized and discussed in two categories, including structural anomalies (i.e., abdominal/diaphragmatic hernias, internal organ/pelvic prolapses, intestinal intussusceptions) and functional features (i.e., dysphagia, gastro-esophageal reflux, dyspepsia, recurrent abdominal pain, constipation/diarrhea), with emphasis on practice and future implications. In the second part of this paper, a summary of possible nutritional interventions in JHS/EDS-HT was presented. Supplementation strategies were borrowed from data available for general population with minor modifications in the light of recent discoveries in the pathogenesis of selected JHS/EDS-HT features. PMID

  11. Neurodevelopmental attributes of joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: Update and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ghibellini, Giulia; Brancati, Francesco; Castori, Marco

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade, increasing attention has been devoted to the extra-articular and extra-cutaneous manifestations of joint hypermobility syndrome, also termed Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (i.e., JHS/EDS-HT). Despite the fact that the current diagnostic criteria for both disorders remain focused on joint hypermobility, musculoskeletal pain and skin changes, medical practice and research have started investigating a wide spectrum of visceral, neurological and developmental complications, which represent major burdens for affected individuals. In particular, children with generalized joint hypermobility often present with various neurodevelopmental issues and can be referred for neurological consultation. It is common that investigations in these patients yield negative or inconsistent results, eventually leading to the exclusion of any structural neurological or muscle disorder. In the context of specialized clinics for connective tissue disorders, a clear relationship between generalized joint hypermobility and a characteristic neurodevelopmental profile affecting coordination is emerging. The clinical features of these patients tend to overlap with those of developmental coordination disorder and can be associated with learning and other disabilities. Physical and psychological consequences of these additional difficulties add to the chief manifestations of the pre-existing connective tissue disorder, affecting the well-being and development of children and their families. In this review, particular attention is devoted to the nature of the link between joint hypermobility, coordination difficulties and neurodevelopmental issues in children. Presumed pathogenesis and management issues are explored in order to attract more attention on this association and nurture future clinical research. PMID:25654988

  12. Neurodevelopmental attributes of joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: Update and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ghibellini, Giulia; Brancati, Francesco; Castori, Marco

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade, increasing attention has been devoted to the extra-articular and extra-cutaneous manifestations of joint hypermobility syndrome, also termed Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (i.e., JHS/EDS-HT). Despite the fact that the current diagnostic criteria for both disorders remain focused on joint hypermobility, musculoskeletal pain and skin changes, medical practice and research have started investigating a wide spectrum of visceral, neurological and developmental complications, which represent major burdens for affected individuals. In particular, children with generalized joint hypermobility often present with various neurodevelopmental issues and can be referred for neurological consultation. It is common that investigations in these patients yield negative or inconsistent results, eventually leading to the exclusion of any structural neurological or muscle disorder. In the context of specialized clinics for connective tissue disorders, a clear relationship between generalized joint hypermobility and a characteristic neurodevelopmental profile affecting coordination is emerging. The clinical features of these patients tend to overlap with those of developmental coordination disorder and can be associated with learning and other disabilities. Physical and psychological consequences of these additional difficulties add to the chief manifestations of the pre-existing connective tissue disorder, affecting the well-being and development of children and their families. In this review, particular attention is devoted to the nature of the link between joint hypermobility, coordination difficulties and neurodevelopmental issues in children. Presumed pathogenesis and management issues are explored in order to attract more attention on this association and nurture future clinical research.

  13. Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 1: Activation of Dual Apoptotic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Pastori, Silvia; Virzì, Grazia Maria; Brocca, Alessandra; de Cal, Massimo; Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; Castellani, Chiara; Fedrigo, Marny; Thiene, Gaetano; Valente, Maria Luisa; Angelini, Annalisa; Vescovo, Giorgio; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome type 1 (CRS1) pathophysiology is complex, and immune-mediated damage, including alterations in the immune response with monocyte apoptosis and cytokine release, has been reported as a potential mechanism. In this study, we examined the putative role of renal tubular epithelial cell (RTC) apoptosis as a pathogenic mechanism in CRS1. In particular, we investigated the caspase pathways involved in induced apoptosis. We enrolled 29 patients with acute heart failure (AHF), 11 patients with CRS1, and 15 controls (CTR) without AHF or acute kidney injury (AKI). Patients who had AKI prior to the episode of AHF or who had any other potential causes of AKI were excluded. Plasma from different groups was incubated with RTCs for 24 h. Subsequently, cell apoptosis, DNA fragmentation, and caspase-3, −8, and −9 activities were investigated in RTCs incubated with AHF, CRS1, and CTR plasma. A p value <0.5 was considered statistically significant. A quantitative analysis of apoptosis showed significantly higher apoptosis rates in CRS1 patients compared to AHF patients and CTR (p < 0.01). This increase in apoptosis was strongly confirmed by caspase-3 levels (ρ = 0.73). Caspase-8 and −9 were significantly higher in CRS1 patients compared to AHF patients and CTR (p < 0.01). Furthermore, caspase-3 levels showed a significantly positive correlation with caspase-8 (ρ = 0.57) and −9 (ρ = 0.47; p < 0.001). This study demonstrated the significantly heightened presence of dual apoptotic disequilibrium in CRS1. Our findings indicated that apoptosis may have a central role in the mechanism of CRS1, and it could be a potential therapeutic target in this syndrome. PMID:26648947

  14. A Mouse Model for Meckel Syndrome Type 3

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Susan A.; Collin, Gayle B.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Naggert, Jürgen K.; Liu, Dong P.; Akeson, Ellen C.; Davisson, Muriel T.

    2009-01-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome type 3 (MKS3; OMIM 607361) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bilateral polycystic kidney disease. Other malformations associated with MKS3 include cystic changes in the liver, polydactyly, and brain abnormalities (occipital encephalocele, hydrocephalus, and Dandy Walker–type cerebellar anomalies). The disorder is hypothesized to be caused by defects in primary cilia. In humans, the underlying mutated gene, TMEM67, encodes transmembrane protein 67, also called meckelin (OMIM 609884), which is an integral protein of the renal epithelial cell and membrane of the primary cilium. Here, we describe a spontaneous deletion of the mouse ortholog, Tmem67, which results in polycystic kidney disease and death by 3 wk after birth. Hydrocephalus also occurs in some mutants. We verified the mutated gene by transgenic rescue and characterized the phenotype with microcomputed tomography, histology, scanning electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. This mutant provides a mouse model for MKS3 and adds to the growing set of mammalian models essential for studying the role of the primary cilium in kidney function. PMID:19211713

  15. Fabry's disease: an example of cardiorenal syndrome type 5.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aashish; Sartori, Marco; Zaragoza, Jose J; Villa, Gianluca; Lu, Renhua; Faggiana, Elena; Brocca, Alessandra; Di Lullo, Luca; Feriozzi, Sandro; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome type 5 (CRS-5) includes conditions where there is a simultaneous involvement of the heart and kidney from a systemic disorder. This is a bilateral organ cross talk. Fabry's disease (FD) is a devastating progressive inborn error of metabolism with lysosomal glycosphingolipid deposition in variety of cell types, capillary endothelial cells, renal, cardiac and nerve cells. Basic effect is absent or deficient activity of lysosomal exoglycohydrolase a-galactosidase A. Renal involvement consists of proteinuria, isosthenuria, altered tubular function, presenting in second or third decade leading to azotemia and end-stage renal disease in third to fifth decade mainly due to irreversible changes to glomerular, tubular and vascular structures, especially highlighted by podocytes foot process effacement. Cardiac involvement consists of left ventricular hypertrophy, right ventricular hypertrophy, arrhythmias (sinus node and conduction system impairment), diastolic dysfunction, myocardial ischemia, infarction, transmural replacement fibrosis, congestive heart failure and cardiac death. Management of FD is based on enzymatic replacement therapy and control of renal (with anti-proteinuric agents such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors-and/or angiotensin II receptor blockers), brain (coated aspirin, clopidogrel and statin to prevent strokes) and heart complications (calcium channel blockers for ischemic cardiomyopathy, warfarin and amiodarone or cardioverter device for arrhythmias). PMID:26232292

  16. Bartter syndrome type III and congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract: an antenatal presentation.

    PubMed

    Westland, Rik; Hack, Wilfried W; van der Horst, Henricus J R; Uittenbogaard, Lukas B; van Hagen, Johanna M; van der Valk, Paul; Kamsteeg, Erik J; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; van Wijk, Joanna A E

    2012-12-01

    Bartter syndrome encompasses a variety of inheritable renal tubular transport disorders characterized by hypokalemia and hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis. Bartter syndrome Type III is caused by genetic alterations in the chloride channel kidney B (CLCNKB) gene and often presents in the first 2 years of life, known as classic Bartter syndrome. However, in rare cases Bartter syndrome Type III has an antenatal presentation with polyhydramnios, premature delivery and severe dehydration in the first weeks of life. Associations between congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract and Bartter syndrome are extremely rare. This case report presents a girl with Bartter syndrome Type III due to a homozygous CLCNKB mutation and bilateral congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. In addition, we describe the antenatal presentation as well as its perinatal management.

  17. Rules for distinguishing toxicants that cause type I and type II narcosis syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, G.D.; Broderius, S.J. )

    1990-07-01

    Narcosis is a nonspecific reversible state of arrested activity of protoplasmic structures caused by a wide variety of organic chemicals. The vast majority of industrial organic chemicals can be characterized by a baseline structure-toxicity relationship as developed for diverse aquatic organisms, using only the n-octanol/water partition coefficient as a descriptor. There are, however, many apparent narcotic chemicals that are more toxic than baseline narcosis predicts. Some of these chemicals have been distinguished as polar narcotics. Joint toxic theory and isobole diagrams were used to show that chemicals strictly additive with phenol were generally more toxic than predicted by narcosis I models and characterized by a different mode of action called narcosis II syndrome. This type of toxicity is exemplified by certain amides, amines, phenols, and nitrogen heterocycles. Evidence is provided that suggests that narcosis II syndrome may result from the presence of a strong hydrogen bonding group on the molecule, and narcosis I syndrome results from hydrophobic bonding of the chemical to enzymes and/or membranes. This shift in toxic action is apparently indistinguishable for narcotic chemicals with log P greater than about 2.7. General rules for selecting the appropriate models are proposed.

  18. Rules for distinguishing toxicants that cause type I and type II narcosis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Veith, G D; Broderius, S J

    1990-07-01

    Narcosis is a nonspecific reversible state of arrested activity of protoplasmic structures caused by a wide variety of organic chemicals. The vast majority of industrial organic chemicals can be characterized by a baseline structure-toxicity relationship as developed for diverse aquatic organisms, using only the n-octanol/water partition coefficient as a descriptor. There are, however, many apparent narcotic chemicals that are more toxic than baseline narcosis predicts. Some of these chemicals have been distinguished as polar narcotics. Joint toxic theory and isobole diagrams were used to show that chemicals strictly additive with phenol were generally more toxic than predicted by narcosis I models and characterized by a different mode of action called narcosis II syndrome. This type of toxicity is exemplified by certain amides, amines, phenols, and nitrogen heterocycles. Evidence is provided that suggests that narcosis II syndrome may result from the presence of a strong hydrogen bonding group on the molecule, and narcosis I syndrome results from hydrophobic bonding of the chemical to enzymes and/or membranes. This shift in toxic action is apparently indistinguishable for narcotic chemicals with log P greater than about 2.7. General rules for selecting the appropriate models are proposed. PMID:2269227

  19. Rules for distinguishing toxicants that cause type I and type II narcosis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Veith, G D; Broderius, S J

    1990-07-01

    Narcosis is a nonspecific reversible state of arrested activity of protoplasmic structures caused by a wide variety of organic chemicals. The vast majority of industrial organic chemicals can be characterized by a baseline structure-toxicity relationship as developed for diverse aquatic organisms, using only the n-octanol/water partition coefficient as a descriptor. There are, however, many apparent narcotic chemicals that are more toxic than baseline narcosis predicts. Some of these chemicals have been distinguished as polar narcotics. Joint toxic theory and isobole diagrams were used to show that chemicals strictly additive with phenol were generally more toxic than predicted by narcosis I models and characterized by a different mode of action called narcosis II syndrome. This type of toxicity is exemplified by certain amides, amines, phenols, and nitrogen heterocycles. Evidence is provided that suggests that narcosis II syndrome may result from the presence of a strong hydrogen bonding group on the molecule, and narcosis I syndrome results from hydrophobic bonding of the chemical to enzymes and/or membranes. This shift in toxic action is apparently indistinguishable for narcotic chemicals with log P greater than about 2.7. General rules for selecting the appropriate models are proposed.

  20. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Nsiah, Kwabena; Shang, V Owusua; Boateng, K Agyenim; Mensah, FO

    2015-01-01

    Background: The diabetic condition is influenced by several factors, some of which can accelerate the disease's progression to various complications that aggravate the morbidity. Aims: This study aimed at determining the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its individual components and the most critical predictive risk factors of MetS in type 2 diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study involved 150 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and was conducted at the Diabetes Centre of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, the Ashanti Region of Ghana, from February, 2013 to April, 2013. The study involved the use of a questionnaire to obtain some information on the diabetics, undertaking anthropometric measurements, as well as collecting blood samples for the measurement of some biochemical parameters; fasting blood glucose and lipid profile. MetS was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results: The prevalence of MetS was 58% in the studied Ghanaian population. Hypertension was the commonest risk factor (60%), followed by central obesity (48.67%) and dyslipidemia (37%). Female type 2 diabetics had a higher prevalence of MetS, and carried more components than their male counterparts. Regression analysis showed three factors; femininity, high body mass index and low educational status were the most critical predictive risk factors of MetS, according to this study. Conclusion: With hypertension being the commonest component, future cardiovascular disease prevention strategies should focus attention on its management and prevention, through education. PMID:26097823

  1. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and type 1 diabetes mellitus: more than a chance association?

    PubMed

    Gana, S; Sainati, L; Frau, M R; Monciotti, C; Poli, F; Cannioto, Z; Comelli, M; Danesino, C; Minelli, A

    2011-11-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome is a rare clinical condition consisting of exocrine pancreatic dysfunction, various degree of pancytopenia, and metaphyseal dysplasia. The majority of Shwachman-Diamond syndrome cases result from mutations in the Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond Syndrome gene. To date, type 1 diabetes mellitus has only been reported in 4 independent cases presenting with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, 3 of them with molecular confirmation of the diagnosis. We describe 2 unrelated patients with clinical and molecular features typical of Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and type 1 diabetes mellitus. In addition, we report the occurrence rate of type 1 diabetes mellitus in the Italian registry for Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, which is low (3.23%) but increased at least 30-fold over the type 1 diabetes mellitus occurrence rate in the general population. No evidence of a direct correlation between Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and type 1 diabetes mellitus have been reported, therefore the presence of both diseases in the same patient might be a chance association, however we suggest that the defects in immune regulation of Shwachman-Diamond syndrome might play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  2. Long QT syndrome with craniofacial, digital, and neurologic features: Is it useful to distinguish between Timothy syndrome types 1 and 2?

    PubMed

    Diep, Vinson; Seaver, Laurie H

    2015-11-01

    Timothy syndrome (TS) is a rare genetic condition that associates long QT syndrome, structural heart defects, dysmorphic facial features, syndactyly, seizures, developmental delay, and autism. Timothy syndrome type 1 is caused by a recurrent de novo mutation (p.Gly406Arg) in exon 8A of the L-type calcium channel gene CACNA1C. Timothy syndrome type 2 was originally reported to be associated with a more severe cardiac phenotype but without syndactyly. Timothy syndrome type 2 is caused by mutation in an alternatively spliced exon 8 of the CACNA1C gene. Other mutations in CACNA1C are also reported with long QT syndrome with and without syndromic features overlapping that described in Timothy syndrome. The purpose of this report is to describe the presentation, physical features and natural history of a 4-year-old girl with Timothy syndrome type 2 due to the recurrent p.Gly406Arg mutation in exon 8 of CACNA1C. She has similar facial features to Timothy syndrome type 1 without syndactyly. She is developmentally delayed without autism. She recently had her first episode of torsade de pointes associated with febrile illness and hypoglycemia. The findings in this case provide further information about the phenotype and natural history of CACNA1C exon 8 mutation and together with previously reported cases of Timothy syndrome question whether the clinical and molecular distinction between Timothy syndromes types 1 and 2 remains clinically useful.

  3. Prenatal diagnosis of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, type II.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J A; Aughton, D J; Comstock, C H; von Oeyen, P T; Higgins, J V; Schulz, R

    1994-01-15

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, type II (SLOS-II) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a distinctive face, unusual cleft palate, postaxial polydactyly, congenital heart defects, renal anomalies, and male pseudohermaphroditism. We present the first report of prenatal diagnosis of SLOS-II, as well as an additional report of prenatal detection of multiple anomalies, in which a positive diagnosis of SLOS II was made postnatally. In neither case was the pregnancy known prospectively to be at risk for SLOS-II. In the former case, targeted sonographic examination at 31 weeks of gestation showed intrauterine growth retardation, atrioventricular septal defect, mesomelic shortening of the arms, small kidneys, overlapping fingers, and female external genitalia; a 46,XY chromosome constitution had been ascertained previously. A provisional diagnosis of SLOS-II was made prenatally. In the latter case, targeted sonographic examination at 18 weeks of gestation showed severe oligohydramnios, atrioventricular septal defect, and Dandy-Walker malformation. The kidneys and bladder were not visualized. The chromosome constitution was 46,XX. The diagnosis of SLOS-II was made postnatally. In both cases, additional findings compatible with SLOS-II were noted postnatally. Prenatal detection of congenital heart defects and renal abnormalities, in combination with certain additional findings (most notably, female external genitalia in the presence of a 46,XY karyotype, polydactyly, disproportionately short limbs, or intrauterine growth retardation) and a normal karyotype, suggests the diagnosis of SLOS-II, and warrants further investigation.

  4. Evidence based guidelines for complex regional pain syndrome type 1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is subject to discussion. The purpose of this study was to develop multidisciplinary guidelines for treatment of CRPS-I. Method A multidisciplinary task force graded literature evaluating treatment effects for CRPS-I according to their strength of evidence, published between 1980 to June 2005. Treatment recommendations based on the literature findings were formulated and formally approved by all Dutch professional associations involved in CRPS-I treatment. Results For pain treatment, the WHO analgesic ladder is advised with the exception of strong opioids. For neuropathic pain, anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants may be considered. For inflammatory symptoms, free-radical scavengers (dimethylsulphoxide or acetylcysteine) are advised. To promote peripheral blood flow, vasodilatory medication may be considered. Percutaneous sympathetic blockades may be used to increase blood flow in case vasodilatory medication has insufficient effect. To decrease functional limitations, standardised physiotherapy and occupational therapy are advised. To prevent the occurrence of CRPS-I after wrist fractures, vitamin C is recommended. Adequate perioperative analgesia, limitation of operating time, limited use of tourniquet, and use of regional anaesthetic techniques are recommended for secondary prevention of CRPS-I. Conclusions Based on the literature identified and the extent of evidence found for therapeutic interventions for CRPS-I, we conclude that further research is needed into each of the therapeutic modalities discussed in the guidelines. PMID:20356382

  5. Risk of Restless Legs Syndrome Following Tension-Type Headache

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fu-Chi; Lin, Te-Yu; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Migraine and restless legs syndrome (RLS) appear to be associated, but the relationship between tension-type headache (TTH) and RLS is unknown. This nationwide, population-based, retrospective cohort study explored the potential association between TTH and RLS. We identified 15,504 patients with newly diagnosed TTH from 2000 to 2007 and 62,016 individuals without TTH who were selected by frequency matched based on sex, age, and the index year. The study participants were followed until diagnosed with RLS, withdrawal from the NHI program, or the end of 2011. Cox proportional hazard models were used to identify risk factors for RLS in TTH patients. After adjusting for sex, age, comorbidity, and medications, TTH was significantly associated with an increased risk of RLS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22–2.02). The risk was most prominent in patients aged 20 to 39 years in the TTH group, which exhibited a 2.60-fold higher risk (95% confidence interval = 1.53–4.42) of RLS compared with the non-TTH group. The TTH group had a higher risk of RLS than that of the non-TTH group regardless of sex. Tension-type headache appears to be associated with an increased risk of developing RLS. This similarity to migraines may indicate that headache and RLS have a coincident pathophysiological mechanism, a possibility requiring further study. Clinicians should be more attentive to RLS as a possible comorbidity in patients with TTH. PMID:26579827

  6. Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 in a pediatric patient: Case report.

    PubMed

    Demirdal, Ümit Seçil; Bükülmez, Ayşegül; Solak, Özlem

    2014-03-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 is one of the causes of morbidity of childhood which is also named reflex symphathetic dystrophia. The syndrome is characterized with regional pain and vasomotor, sudomotor and sensory changes in the distal parts of the extremities involved. Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 shows difference in children in terms of clinical picture and imaging methods compared to adults. The most important point is that the prognosis is generally better in children if early diagnosis and treatment is provided. On the other hand, causes including presence of psychological factors or less contribution of imaging methods in children lead to delayed diagnosis or erroneous diagnosis. In this article, a 10 year-old male patient who was diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 was described. Thus, we aimed to remind clinicians that this syndrome should also be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of pain in children.

  7. Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 in a pediatric patient: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Demirdal, Ümit Seçil; Bükülmez, Ayşegül; Solak, Özlem

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 is one of the causes of morbidity of childhood which is also named reflex symphathetic dystrophia. The syndrome is characterized with regional pain and vasomotor, sudomotor and sensory changes in the distal parts of the extremities involved. Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 shows difference in children in terms of clinical picture and imaging methods compared to adults. The most important point is that the prognosis is generally better in children if early diagnosis and treatment is provided. On the other hand, causes including presence of psychological factors or less contribution of imaging methods in children lead to delayed diagnosis or erroneous diagnosis. In this article, a 10 year-old male patient who was diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 was described. Thus, we aimed to remind clinicians that this syndrome should also be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of pain in children. PMID:26078637

  8. [Severe type A insulin resistance syndrome due to a mutation in the insulin receptor gene].

    PubMed

    Ros, P; Colino-Alcol, E; Grasso, V; Barbetti, F; Argente, J

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance syndromes without lipodystrophy are an infrequent and heterogeneous group of disorders with variable clinical phenotypes, associated with hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. The three conditions related to mutations in the insulin receptor gene are leprechaunism or Donohue syndrome, Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, and Type A syndrome. A case is presented on a patient diagnosed with type A insulin resistance, defined by the triad of extreme insulin resistance, acanthosis nigricans, and hyperandrogenism, carrying a heterozygous mutation in exon 19 of the insulin receptor gene coding for its tyrosine kinase domain that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the receptor. The molecular basis of the syndrome is reviewed, focusing on the structure-function relationships of the insulin receptor, knowing that the criteria for survival are linked to residual insulin receptor function. It is also pointed out that, although type A insulin resistance appears to represent a somewhat less severe condition, these patients have a high morbidity and their treatment is still unsatisfactory.

  9. [Severe Frey syndrome after parotidectomy: treatment with botulinum neurotoxin type A].

    PubMed

    Laccourreye, O; Muscatello, L; Gutierrez-Fonseca, R; Seckin, S; Brasnu, D; Bonan, B

    1999-06-01

    Based upon an inception cohort of 30 patients with severe Frey's syndrome, after conservative parotidectomy, the technique and the results of intracutaneous injection of botulinum toxin type A are presented. The skin surface involved with Frey's syndrome was managed with intracutaneous injection of 2.5 international units of botulinum toxin type A per square centimeter. A minimum follow-up of 16 months was achieved. The only adverse side effect encountered was a temporary paresis of the upper lid noted in 2 patients. Frey's syndrome vanished within 2-5 days from the intracutaneous injection of botulinum toxin type A. Frey's syndrome was controlled in 53.2% of cases (17/30) after the initial injection of botulinum toxin type A. Five of the 13 patients with recurrence of Frey's syndrome elicited to undergo a watch and wait policy due to the lack of discomfort induced by the recurrence. The remaining eight patients with recurrence of Frey's syndrome were successfully managed with a secondary intracutaneous injection of botulinum toxin type A. Such preliminary data, together with the review of the literature suggests, that the intracutaneous injection of botulinum toxin type A should now be the first line treatment option in patients with severe Frey syndrome. PMID:10399528

  10. Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome types I and II.

    PubMed

    Tenorio, Jair; Arias, Pedro; Martínez-Glez, Víctor; Santos, Fernando; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Nevado, Julián; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) is a rare overgrowth syndrome clinically characterized by multiple congenital abnormalities, pre/postnatal overgrowth, distinctive craniofacial features, macrocephaly, and organomegaly. Abnormalities of the skeletal system, heart, central nervous system, kidney, and gastrointestinal tract may also be observed. Intellectual disability, early motor milestones and speech delay are sometimes present; however, there are a considerable number of individuals with normal intelligence. PMID:25238977

  11. Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome types I and II.

    PubMed

    Tenorio, Jair; Arias, Pedro; Martínez-Glez, Víctor; Santos, Fernando; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Nevado, Julián; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2014-09-20

    Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) is a rare overgrowth syndrome clinically characterized by multiple congenital abnormalities, pre/postnatal overgrowth, distinctive craniofacial features, macrocephaly, and organomegaly. Abnormalities of the skeletal system, heart, central nervous system, kidney, and gastrointestinal tract may also be observed. Intellectual disability, early motor milestones and speech delay are sometimes present; however, there are a considerable number of individuals with normal intelligence.

  12. Detection of candidal antigens in autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type I.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, P; Perheentupa, J; Krohn, K J

    1996-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type I (APS I) is associated with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. To characterize the antibody responses in this subgroup of Candida albicans infections, we screened a candidal cDNA expression library with patient sera and found four cDNA clones encoding the immunopositive proteins enolase, heat shock protein 90, pyruvate kinase, and alcohol dehydrogenase. The reactivity to these antigens was studied further by immunoprecipitation assays with in vitro-transcribed and -translated proteins. Analysis of sera from 44 APS I patients showed that the highest antibody reactivity was found with enolase (80% of patients reactive), but significant serological responses were also found with heat shock protein 90 (67%), pyruvate kinase (62.5%), and alcohol dehydrogenase (64%). Overall, 95.5% of patients had detectable antibodies to at least one of these proteins. The cDNAs of enolase and heat shock protein 90 were also expressed in Escherichia coli and studied by immunoblotting. Again, 84% of sera reacted with enolase, whereas 44% of sera reacted with heat shock protein 90. A good correlation between the two methods was found for both enolase (r = 0.86; n = 58; P < 0.001) and heat shock protein 90 (r = 0.71; n = 56; P < 0.001). Our results indicate that the four abundant candidal proteins are the major antigens and can be used as accurate markers of candidiasis in APS I patients. The immunoprecipitation assay described here is particularly useful for the rapid analysis of a large number of samples. PMID:8705671

  13. Alveolar Macrophage Dysregulation in Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Farshid N.; Brantly, Mark L.; Markello, Thomas C.; Helip-Wooley, Amanda; O'Brien, Kevin; Hess, Richard; Huizing, Marjan; Gahl, William A.; Gochuico, Bernadette R.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Individuals with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 1 (HPS-1), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by defective biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles, develop an accelerated form of progressive fibrotic lung disease. The etiology of pulmonary fibrosis associated with HPS-1 is unknown. Objectives: To investigate the potential pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis in HPS-1, lung cells and proteins from individuals with HPS-1 were studied. Methods: Forty-one subjects with HPS-1 with and without pulmonary fibrosis were evaluated with pulmonary function tests, high-resolution computed tomography scan, and bronchoscopy. Bronchoalveolar lavage cells and analytes were analyzed. Measurements and Main Results: Concentrations of total bronchoalveolar lavage cells and alveolar macrophages were significantly higher in epithelial lining fluid from subjects with HPS-1 with and without pulmonary fibrosis compared with healthy research volunteers. Concentrations of cytokines and chemokines (i.e., monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) in alveolar epithelial lining fluid were significantly higher in subjects with HPS-1 with and without pulmonary fibrosis compared with healthy research volunteers (P < 0.001). In vitro, HPS-1 pulmonary fibrosis alveolar macrophages, which did not express HPS1 mRNA, secreted significantly higher concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, and regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) protein compared with normal cells (P = 0.001, P = 0.014, and P = 0.011, respectively). Pirfenidone suppressed HPS-1 alveolar macrophage cytokine and chemokine secretion in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions: In HPS-1, alveolar inflammation predominantly involves macrophages and is associated with high lung concentrations of cytokines and chemokines. HPS-1 alveolar macrophages

  14. Type 1 diabetes: Syndromes in resource-challenged settings.

    PubMed

    Nagesh, V Sri; Kalra, Sanjay

    2015-06-01

    Type 1 Diabetes is a complex disorder that is made more complex by the myriad of co-morbid conditions associated with it. Mauriac Syndrome is a well-known but nowadays uncommon condition that presents with growth retardation secondary to poor glycaemic control. Limited Joint Mobility is an often-missed association of diabetes. Its importance lies in the fact that it can cause significant impairment of fine movements in T1DM children. It also indicates poor glycaemic control over a long period of time and can be used as a surrogate marker for development of diabetic microvascular complications. Anaemia in T1DM is protean and can develop due to a combination of nutritional factors, chronic renal disease, coeliac disease and worm infestation. Management is etiological. Vitamin deficiencies are ubiquitous in T1DM and if left untreated, can lead to neurological, haematological and skeletal dysfunction. The best-known co-morbid conditions are the local site reactions clubbed together under the moniker lipodystrophies. These can be either atrophic or hypertrophic and are usually due to repeated injections at the same site, improper technique and needle re-use. Management is often difficult and they are best prevented by appropriate diabetes education and emphasis on proper injection techniques at the time of T1DM diagnosis, with periodic reinforcement. Amyloidosis is a little known condition that shares a lot of features in common with the lipodystrophies and often needs to be differentiated from lipohypertrophy. T1DM is a disease which is often associated with a poor quality of life and these co-morbid conditions also need to be treated for effective general and psychological well-being.

  15. Screening of three Usher syndrome type II candidate genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bloemker, B.K.; Swaroop, A.; Kimberling, W.J.

    1994-09-01

    Usher syndrome type II (US2) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in blindness due to retinitis pigmentosa and congenital hearing loss. The disease affects approximately 1 in 20,000 individuals in the general population and is responsible for over 50% of all cases of deafness with blindness. The underlying US2 defect is unknown. The US2 gene has been localized to the 1q41 region of chromosome 1 by linkage studies. Three genes previously localized to 1q were analyzed to assess their candidacy as the US2 gene. These were evaluated by PCR assays using DNA from a YAC contig spanning the US2 region on chromosome 1. The first gene evaluated was the human choroideremia-like gene (hCHML), which had been mapped to chromosome 1q. The sequence on 1q is a homologue of the human choroideremia gene on chromosome X. Choroideremia is a degenerative disorder causing ocular pathology similar to that observed in US2 patients. Therefore, hCHML is a candidate for the US2 gene. Two cDNAs (A and B) from an enriched human retinal pigment epithelium library have been mapped to 1q41 by in situ hybridization. Both cDNAs are considered good candidates. The hCHML and cDNA A were ruled out as candidates for the US2 gene based on negative results from PCR assays performed on YACs spanning the US2 region. cDNA B could not be ruled out as a candidate for the US2 gene by these assays. Answers to many clinical questions regarding US2 will only be resolved after the gene is identified and characterized. Eventually, understanding the function and expression of the US2 gene will provide a basis for the development of therapy.

  16. Cushing’s Syndrome in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Simonds, William F.; Varghese, Sarah; Marx, Stephen J.; Nieman, Lynnette K.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Objective In patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), Cushing’s syndrome (CS) from endogenous hypercortisolism can result from pituitary, adrenal, or other endocrine tumors. The purpose of this study was to characterize the range of presentations of CS in a large series of MEN1 patients. Design Retrospective review of NIH Clinical Center inpatient records over an approximately 40 year period. Patients 19 patients (8 males, 11 females) with CS and MEN1. Measurements Biochemical, imaging, surgical, and pathological findings. Results An etiology was determined for 14 of the 19 patients with CS and MEN1: 11 (79%) had Cushing’s disease (CD) and three (21%) had ACTH-independent CS due to adrenal tumors, frequencies indistinguishable from sporadic CS. Three of 11 MEN1 patients with CD (27%) had additional non-ACTH secreting pituitary microadenomas identified at surgery, an incidence 10-fold higher than in sporadic CD. Ninety-one percent of MEN1 patients with CD were cured after surgery. Two of three MEN1 patients with ACTH-independent CS (67%) had adrenocortical carcinoma. One patient with adrenal cancer and another with adrenal adenoma were cured by unilateral adrenalectomy. No case of ectopic ACTH secretion was identified in our patient cohort. The etiology of CS could not be defined in five patients; in three of these, hypercortisolism appeared to resolve spontaneously. Conclusions The tumor multiplicity of MEN1 can be reflected in the anterior pituitary, MEN1-associated ACTH-independent CS may be associated with aggressive adrenocortical disease, and an etiology for CS in MEN1 may be elusive in a substantial minority of patients. PMID:21916912

  17. The pathogenesis of the clinical features of oral-facial-digital syndrome type I

    PubMed Central

    AlKattan, Wael M.; Al-Qattan, Mohammad M.; Bafaqeeh, Sameer A.

    2015-01-01

    Oral-facial-digital syndrome type I (OFDI) is an X-linked syndrome, which has several craniofacial and limb features; and hence, patients frequently present to craniofacial and plastic surgeons. Oral-facial-digital syndrome type I is caused by mutations in the CXORF5 gene. The gene product is one of the basal body proteins of a slim microtubule-based organelle called the “primary cilium”. Most of the clinical features of OFDI patients are related to dysfunctions of the primary cilium leading to abnormal Hedgehog signal transduction, depressed planar cell polarity pathway, and errors in cell cycle control. PMID:26593159

  18. Type IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: A Surgical Emergency? A Case of Massive Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chun, Stephen G; Pedro, Patrick; Yu, Mihae; Takanishi, Danny M

    2011-01-01

    Retroperitoneal hemorrhagic bleeding is a known manifestation of Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome that is caused by loss-of-function mutations of the pro-alpha-1 chains of type III pro-collagen (COL3A1) resulting in vascular fragility. A number of previous reports describe futile surgical intervention for retroperitoneal bleeding in Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome with high post-operative mortality, although the rarity of retroperitoneal bleeding associated with Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome precludes an evidence-based approach to clinical management. We report a 23-year-old male with history of Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome who presented with severe abdominal pain and tachycardia following an episode of vomiting. Further work-up of his abdominal pain revealed massive retroperitoneal bleeding by CT-scan of the abdomen. Given numerous cases of catastrophic injury caused by surgical intervention in Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, the patient was treated non-operatively, and the patient made a full recovery. This case suggests that even in cases of large retroperitoneal hemorrhages associated with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, it may not truly represent a surgical emergency. PMID:21966332

  19. Type IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: A Surgical Emergency? A Case of Massive Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chun, Stephen G; Pedro, Patrick; Yu, Mihae; Takanishi, Danny M

    2011-01-01

    Retroperitoneal hemorrhagic bleeding is a known manifestation of Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome that is caused by loss-of-function mutations of the pro-alpha-1 chains of type III pro-collagen (COL3A1) resulting in vascular fragility. A number of previous reports describe futile surgical intervention for retroperitoneal bleeding in Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome with high post-operative mortality, although the rarity of retroperitoneal bleeding associated with Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome precludes an evidence-based approach to clinical management. We report a 23-year-old male with history of Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome who presented with severe abdominal pain and tachycardia following an episode of vomiting. Further work-up of his abdominal pain revealed massive retroperitoneal bleeding by CT-scan of the abdomen. Given numerous cases of catastrophic injury caused by surgical intervention in Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, the patient was treated non-operatively, and the patient made a full recovery. This case suggests that even in cases of large retroperitoneal hemorrhages associated with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, it may not truly represent a surgical emergency.

  20. A Critical Evaluation of the Down Syndrome Diagnosis for LB1, Type Specimen of Homo floresiensis

    PubMed Central

    Baab, Karen L.; Brown, Peter; Falk, Dean; Richtsmeier, Joan T.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Smith, Kirk; Jungers, William

    2016-01-01

    The Liang Bua hominins from Flores, Indonesia, have been the subject of intense scrutiny and debate since their initial description and classification in 2004. These remains have been assigned to a new species, Homo floresiensis, with the partial skeleton LB1 as the type specimen. The Liang Bua hominins are notable for their short stature, small endocranial volume, and many features that appear phylogenetically primitive relative to modern humans, despite their late Pleistocene age. Recently, some workers suggested that the remains represent members of a small-bodied island population of modern Austro-Melanesian humans, with LB1 exhibiting clinical signs of Down syndrome. Many classic Down syndrome signs are soft tissue features that could not be assessed in skeletal remains. Moreover, a definitive diagnosis of Down syndrome can only be made by genetic analysis as the phenotypes associated with Down syndrome are variable. Most features that contribute to the Down syndrome phenotype are not restricted to Down syndrome but are seen in other chromosomal disorders and in the general population. Nevertheless, we re-evaluated the presence of those phenotypic features used to support this classification by comparing LB1 to samples of modern humans diagnosed with Down syndrome and euploid modern humans using comparative morphometric analyses. We present new data regarding neurocranial, brain, and symphyseal shape in Down syndrome, additional estimates of stature for LB1, and analyses of inter- and intralimb proportions. The presence of cranial sinuses is addressed using CT images of LB1. We found minimal congruence between the LB1 phenotype and clinical descriptions of Down syndrome. We present important differences between the phenotypes of LB1 and individuals with Down syndrome, and quantitative data that characterize LB1 as an outlier compared with Down syndrome and non-Down syndrome groups. Homo floresiensis remains a phenotypically unique, valid species with its roots

  1. A Critical Evaluation of the Down Syndrome Diagnosis for LB1, Type Specimen of Homo floresiensis.

    PubMed

    Baab, Karen L; Brown, Peter; Falk, Dean; Richtsmeier, Joan T; Hildebolt, Charles F; Smith, Kirk; Jungers, William

    2016-01-01

    The Liang Bua hominins from Flores, Indonesia, have been the subject of intense scrutiny and debate since their initial description and classification in 2004. These remains have been assigned to a new species, Homo floresiensis, with the partial skeleton LB1 as the type specimen. The Liang Bua hominins are notable for their short stature, small endocranial volume, and many features that appear phylogenetically primitive relative to modern humans, despite their late Pleistocene age. Recently, some workers suggested that the remains represent members of a small-bodied island population of modern Austro-Melanesian humans, with LB1 exhibiting clinical signs of Down syndrome. Many classic Down syndrome signs are soft tissue features that could not be assessed in skeletal remains. Moreover, a definitive diagnosis of Down syndrome can only be made by genetic analysis as the phenotypes associated with Down syndrome are variable. Most features that contribute to the Down syndrome phenotype are not restricted to Down syndrome but are seen in other chromosomal disorders and in the general population. Nevertheless, we re-evaluated the presence of those phenotypic features used to support this classification by comparing LB1 to samples of modern humans diagnosed with Down syndrome and euploid modern humans using comparative morphometric analyses. We present new data regarding neurocranial, brain, and symphyseal shape in Down syndrome, additional estimates of stature for LB1, and analyses of inter- and intralimb proportions. The presence of cranial sinuses is addressed using CT images of LB1. We found minimal congruence between the LB1 phenotype and clinical descriptions of Down syndrome. We present important differences between the phenotypes of LB1 and individuals with Down syndrome, and quantitative data that characterize LB1 as an outlier compared with Down syndrome and non-Down syndrome groups. Homo floresiensis remains a phenotypically unique, valid species with its roots

  2. A Critical Evaluation of the Down Syndrome Diagnosis for LB1, Type Specimen of Homo floresiensis.

    PubMed

    Baab, Karen L; Brown, Peter; Falk, Dean; Richtsmeier, Joan T; Hildebolt, Charles F; Smith, Kirk; Jungers, William

    2016-01-01

    The Liang Bua hominins from Flores, Indonesia, have been the subject of intense scrutiny and debate since their initial description and classification in 2004. These remains have been assigned to a new species, Homo floresiensis, with the partial skeleton LB1 as the type specimen. The Liang Bua hominins are notable for their short stature, small endocranial volume, and many features that appear phylogenetically primitive relative to modern humans, despite their late Pleistocene age. Recently, some workers suggested that the remains represent members of a small-bodied island population of modern Austro-Melanesian humans, with LB1 exhibiting clinical signs of Down syndrome. Many classic Down syndrome signs are soft tissue features that could not be assessed in skeletal remains. Moreover, a definitive diagnosis of Down syndrome can only be made by genetic analysis as the phenotypes associated with Down syndrome are variable. Most features that contribute to the Down syndrome phenotype are not restricted to Down syndrome but are seen in other chromosomal disorders and in the general population. Nevertheless, we re-evaluated the presence of those phenotypic features used to support this classification by comparing LB1 to samples of modern humans diagnosed with Down syndrome and euploid modern humans using comparative morphometric analyses. We present new data regarding neurocranial, brain, and symphyseal shape in Down syndrome, additional estimates of stature for LB1, and analyses of inter- and intralimb proportions. The presence of cranial sinuses is addressed using CT images of LB1. We found minimal congruence between the LB1 phenotype and clinical descriptions of Down syndrome. We present important differences between the phenotypes of LB1 and individuals with Down syndrome, and quantitative data that characterize LB1 as an outlier compared with Down syndrome and non-Down syndrome groups. Homo floresiensis remains a phenotypically unique, valid species with its roots

  3. 15 YEARS OF PARAGANGLIOMA: Clinical manifestations of paraganglioma syndromes types 1–5

    PubMed Central

    Benn, Diana E; Robinson, Bruce G; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J

    2015-01-01

    The paraganglioma (PGL) syndromes types 1–5 are autosomal dominant disorders characterized by familial predisposition to PGLs, phaeochromocytomas (PCs), renal cell cancers, gastrointestinal stromal tumours and, rarely, pituitary adenomas. Each syndrome is associated with mutation in a gene encoding a particular subunit (or assembly factor) of succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx). The clinical manifestations of these syndromes are protean: patients may present with features of catecholamine excess (including the classic triad of headache, sweating and palpitations), or with symptoms from local tumour mass, or increasingly as an incidental finding on imaging performed for some other purpose. As genetic testing for these syndromes becomes more widespread, presymptomatic diagnosis is also possible, although penetrance of disease in these syndromes is highly variable and tumour development does not clearly follow a predetermined pattern. PGL1 syndrome (SDHD) and PGL2 syndrome (SDHAF2) are notable for high frequency of multifocal tumour development and for parent-of-origin inheritance: disease is almost only ever manifest in subjects inheriting the defective allele from their father. PGL4 syndrome (SDHB) is notable for an increased risk of malignant PGL or PC. PGL3 syndrome (SDHC) and PGL5 syndrome (SDHA) are less common and appear to be associated with lower penetrance of tumour development. Although these syndromes are all associated with SDH deficiency, few genotype–phenotype relationships have yet been established, and indeed it is remarkable that such divergent phenotypes can arise from disruption of a common molecular pathway. This article reviews the clinical presentations of these syndromes, including their component tumours and underlying genetic basis. PMID:26273102

  4. Family Therapy of the Moderate Type of Parental Alienation Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Richard A.

    1999-01-01

    Modification of traditional family therapy approaches are warranted if there is to be any chance of success in the treatment of Parental Alienation Syndrome families. Especially important is the full support of the court. Describes the special family therapeutic techniques warranted in the treatment of families in which the Parental Alienation…

  5. Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 and scurvy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravindra; Aggarwal, Anju; Faridi, M M A

    2009-06-01

    A 5 year old female developed features of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) i.e excessive pain to touch, decreased sweating and edema of left ankle 2 years after fracture of left tibia. Gum bleeding, petechiae and pseudoparalysis and suggestive radiograph characterized scurvy. Hyperesthesia improved and child walked with support following administration of vitamin C.

  6. X-linked albinism-deafness syndrome and Waardenburg syndrome type II: A hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zlotogora, J.

    1995-11-20

    Margolis reported on a large pedigree with a {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} X-linked syndrome of profound deafness and albinism (MIM 300700, albinism-deafness syndrome). The affected males presented with profound deafness and severe pigmentary abnormalities of the skin. At birth the skin appeared as almost albinotic except for areas of light pigmentation over the gluteal and scrotal areas, and thereafter pigmentation gradually increased over the body. Skin changes ultimately included areas of hypopigmentation and spots of hyperpigmentation. Some of the affected males also had blue irides, heterochromia, or segmental color iris changes. In carrier females, variable hearing impairment was documented without any pigmentary changes. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Clinical and genetic aspects of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, classic type.

    PubMed

    Malfait, Fransiska; Wenstrup, Richard J; De Paepe, Anne

    2010-10-01

    Classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a heritable connective tissue disorder characterized by skin hyperextensibility, fragile and soft skin, delayed wound healing with formation of atrophic scars, easy bruising, and generalized joint hypermobility. It comprises Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type I and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II, but it is now apparent that these form a continuum of clinical findings and differ only in phenotypic severity. It is currently estimated that approximately 50% of patients with a clinical diagnosis of classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome harbor mutations in the COL5A1 and the COL5A2 gene, encoding the α1 and the α2-chain of type V collagen, respectively. However, because no prospective molecular studies of COL5A1 and COL5A2 have been performed in a clinically well-defined patient group, this number may underestimate the real proportion of patients with classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome harboring a mutation in one of these genes. In the majority of patients with molecularly characterized classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, the disease is caused by a mutation leading to a nonfunctional COL5A1 allele and resulting in haploinsufficiency of type V collagen. A smaller proportion of patients harbor a structural mutation in COL5A1 or COL5A2, causing the production of a functionally defective type V collagen protein. Most mutations identified so far result in a reduced amount of type V collagen in the connective tissues available for collagen fibrillogenesis. Inter- and intrafamilial phenotypic variability is observed, but no genotype-phenotype correlations have been observed. No treatment for the underlying defect is presently available for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, a series of preventive guidelines are applicable.

  8. Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome) in the pre-Columbian culture of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Pachajoa, Harry; Rodriguez, Carlos Armando

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI or Maroteaux Lamy syndrome is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of arylsulfatase B, the clinical features include short stature, hepatosplenomegaly, dysostosis multiplex, stiff joints, corneal clouding, cardiac abnormalities, and facial dysmorphism, with intelligence usually normal. We present evidence of the possible existence of Maroteaux Lamy syndrome in pre-Columbian pottery 2000 years ago, in the Colombo-Ecuadorian Pacific coast of the Tumaco-Tolita culture.

  9. Metachronous multifocal desmoid-type fibromatoses along the neuraxis with adenomatous polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chung, K H Carlos; Charlton, Amanda; Arbuckle, Susan; Chaseling, Raymond; Owler, Brian K

    2010-10-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatosis, aggressive fibromatosis, or desmoid tumor is an uncommon benign but locally aggressive fibroblastic lesion. Although intraabdominal desmoid-type fibromatoses are well described in association with adenomatous polyposis syndrome, their occurrence along the neuraxis is extremely rare. The authors report the case of a 14-year-old boy with metachronous intracranial and spinal desmoid-type fibromatoses with preceding medulloblastoma. He was ultimately diagnosed with adenomatous polyposis syndrome. This is the first reported case of spinal desmoid-type fibromatosis in association with adenomatous polyposis syndrome. The identification of an underlying genetic instability allows for screening to detect lesions and institute measures to avoid preventable mortality from nonneurological tumors.

  10. Perisigmoid Abscess Leading to a Diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    PubMed Central

    Kesavan, Anil; Srikumar, Pillai B.; McConnie, Randolph M.

    2016-01-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by triad of joint hypermobility, skin extensibility, and tissue fragility. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV places patients at risk for life-threatening, spontaneous, vascular or visceral rupture due to reduced or abnormal secretion of type III collagen. We present an adolescent male who was found to have a perisigmoid abscess with a fistula connecting to adjacent sigmoid colon secondary to undiagnosed EDS type IV. Conservative management with antibiotics and bowel rest was pursued to allow for elective resection for his acute complicated diverticulitis at a safer time. PMID:26958560

  11. Perisigmoid Abscess Leading to a Diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV.

    PubMed

    Normatov, Inessa; Kesavan, Anil; Srikumar, Pillai B; McConnie, Randolph M

    2016-01-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by triad of joint hypermobility, skin extensibility, and tissue fragility. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV places patients at risk for life-threatening, spontaneous, vascular or visceral rupture due to reduced or abnormal secretion of type III collagen. We present an adolescent male who was found to have a perisigmoid abscess with a fistula connecting to adjacent sigmoid colon secondary to undiagnosed EDS type IV. Conservative management with antibiotics and bowel rest was pursued to allow for elective resection for his acute complicated diverticulitis at a safer time. PMID:26958560

  12. A study of migraine characteristics in joint hypermobility syndrome a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Puledda, Francesca; Viganò, Alessandro; Celletti, Claudia; Petolicchio, Barbara; Toscano, Massimiliano; Vicenzini, Edoardo; Castori, Marco; Laudani, Guido; Valente, Donatella; Camerota, Filippo; Di Piero, Vittorio

    2015-08-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two clinically overlapping heritable connective tissue disorders strongly associated with musculoskeletal pain, fatigue and headache. Migraine with or without aura is considered the most common form of headache in JHS/EDS-HT. In this population of chronically ill patients, we investigated whether migraine characteristics were different from those of a control population of migraine patients. The study was carried out on 33 selected JHS/EDS-HT patients, diagnosed according to current criteria. Sixty-six migraine subjects matching age and gender were consecutively selected as controls (MO group) among patients attending our Headache Clinic. JHS/EDS-HT and MO were screened for a series of headache characteristics, such as frequency, intensity, age of onset, level of disability, use of rescue and prophylactic medications. Differences between the two groups were tested by using independent group comparisons. Results showed that in JHS/EDS-HT: (1) migraine has an earlier onset (12.6 vs 17 years of age; p = 0.005); (2) the rate of migraine days/month is higher (15 vs 9.3 days/month; p = 0.01); (3) accompanying symptoms are usually more frequent; (4) HIT-6 and MIDAS scores are higher (p = 0.04 and p = 0.03); (5) efficacy of rescue medication is almost identical, although, total drug consumption is significantly lower (p < 0.04). Joint hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type patients have a more severe headache syndrome with respect to the MO group, therefore demonstrating that migraine has a very high impact on quality of life in this disease.

  13. A study of migraine characteristics in joint hypermobility syndrome a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Puledda, Francesca; Viganò, Alessandro; Celletti, Claudia; Petolicchio, Barbara; Toscano, Massimiliano; Vicenzini, Edoardo; Castori, Marco; Laudani, Guido; Valente, Donatella; Camerota, Filippo; Di Piero, Vittorio

    2015-08-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two clinically overlapping heritable connective tissue disorders strongly associated with musculoskeletal pain, fatigue and headache. Migraine with or without aura is considered the most common form of headache in JHS/EDS-HT. In this population of chronically ill patients, we investigated whether migraine characteristics were different from those of a control population of migraine patients. The study was carried out on 33 selected JHS/EDS-HT patients, diagnosed according to current criteria. Sixty-six migraine subjects matching age and gender were consecutively selected as controls (MO group) among patients attending our Headache Clinic. JHS/EDS-HT and MO were screened for a series of headache characteristics, such as frequency, intensity, age of onset, level of disability, use of rescue and prophylactic medications. Differences between the two groups were tested by using independent group comparisons. Results showed that in JHS/EDS-HT: (1) migraine has an earlier onset (12.6 vs 17 years of age; p = 0.005); (2) the rate of migraine days/month is higher (15 vs 9.3 days/month; p = 0.01); (3) accompanying symptoms are usually more frequent; (4) HIT-6 and MIDAS scores are higher (p = 0.04 and p = 0.03); (5) efficacy of rescue medication is almost identical, although, total drug consumption is significantly lower (p < 0.04). Joint hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type patients have a more severe headache syndrome with respect to the MO group, therefore demonstrating that migraine has a very high impact on quality of life in this disease. PMID:25791889

  14. Relationship between Fatigue and Gait Abnormality in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celletti, Claudia; Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Castori, Marco; Albertini, Giorgio; Camerota, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterised by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and tissue fragility. It has recently been shown that muscle weakness occurs frequently in EDS, and that fatigue is a common and clinically important symptom. The…

  15. Cushing's syndrome in type 2 diabetes patients with poor glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Gungunes, Askin; Sahin, Mustafa; Demirci, Taner; Ucan, Bekir; Cakir, Evrim; Arslan, Muyesser Sayki; Unsal, Ilknur Ozturk; Karbek, Basak; Calıskan, Mustafa; Ozbek, Mustafa; Cakal, Erman; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2014-12-01

    Cushing's syndrome may be more frequent in some specific patient groups such as type 2 diabetes and obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Cushing's syndrome in outpatients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control despite at least 3-months insulin therapy. Outpatients with type 2 diabetes whose glycemic control is poor (Hb Alc value >7 %) despite receiving at least 3-months long insulin treatment (insulin alone or insulin with oral antidiabetics) were included. Patients with classic features of Cushing's syndrome were excluded. Overnight 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test (DST) was performed as a screening test. A total of 277 patients with type 2 diabetes whose glycemic control is poor (Hb Alc value >7 %) despite insulin therapy were included. Two of the 277 patients with type 2 diabetes were diagnosed with Cushing's syndrome (0.72 %). Hypertension was statistically more frequent in the patients with cortisol levels ≥1.8 μg/dL than the patients with cortisol levels <1.8 μg/dL after overnight 1 mg DST (p = 0.041). Statistically significant correlation was determined between cortisol levels after 1 mg DST and age, daily insulin dose (r = 0.266 and p < 0.001, r = 0.163 and p = 0.008, respectively). According to our findings, the prevalence of Cushing's syndrome among patients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control despite insulin therapy is much higher than in the general population. The patients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control despite at least three months of insulin therapy should be additionally tested for Cushing's syndrome if they have high dose insülin requirements.

  16. [Chronic type A aortic dissection associated with Turner syndrome; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hideyuki; Kozaki, Tomofumi; Kume, Masazumi; Miyamoto, Shinji

    2014-12-01

    Aortic dissection is a critical but rare complication of Turner syndrome. This report describes a case of chronic aortic dissection in a patient with Turner syndrome. A 54-year-old woman, suffering from mild back pain for 1 month, was referred to our hospital with a diagnosis of Stanford type A chronic aortic dissection and a bicuspid aortic valve with moderate regurgitation. Computed tomography revealed aortic dissection, involving all arch branches, extending from the ascending to the abdominal aorta. The true lumen of the brachial artery was nearly obstructed by the thrombosed false lumen. Elective aortic arch repair and aortic valve replacement were successfully performed. The patient was diagnosed with 45, XO Turner syndrome after surgery. Taking aortopathy of Turner syndrome into consideration, surveillance of the residual aorta was performed. No rapidly progressive dilatation of the residual aorta was detected during the 6 years' follow-up.

  17. Oromandibular Limb Hypogenesis Syndrome Type IIB: Case Report of Hypoglossia-Hypodactyly

    PubMed Central

    Meundi, Manasa Anand; Nair, Gopakumar R.; Sreenivasan, Prathima; Raj, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglossia-hypodactyly is a rare congenital anomaly affecting the tongue and the limbs. Hall in 1971 classified it under a complex group of disorders called oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndromes. It is an extremely rare condition with around 40 cases reported in the world literature. The cause of the syndrome is unknown. Some type of intrauterine trauma is the most widely accepted etiology. The characteristic features of the syndrome are hypoglossia, limb anomalies of variable degree, and micrognathia of the mandible. This unique case report of hypoglossia-hypodactyly was observed in a patient with normal mandible. In addition, patient also had pulmonary regurgitation. His parents and other siblings were normal. Positive prenatal history of maternal hyperthermia was obtained suspecting it to be the cause of the syndrome. PMID:23431477

  18. Chiari Type I malformation yielded to the diagnosis of Crouzon syndrome.

    PubMed

    Canpolat, Aydin; Akçakaya, Mehmet Osman; Altunrende, Emre; Ozlü, Harun Mehmet; Duman, Hakan; Ton, Tuğrul; Akdemir, Osman

    2014-01-01

    Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) related to syndromic craniosynostosis in pediatric patients has been well-studied. The surgical management consists of cranial vault remodeling with or without posterior fossa decompression. There were also cases, in whom CM-I was diagnosed prior to the craniosynostosis in early childhood. We present a 16-year-old boy who admitted with symptoms related to CM-I. With careful examination and further genetic investigations, a diagnosis of Crouzon syndrome was made, of which the patient and his family was unaware before. The patient underwent surgery for posterior fossa decompression and followed-up for Crouzon's syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the only case report indicating a late adolescent diagnosis of Crouzon syndrome through clinical symptoms of an associated CM-I. PMID:24741262

  19. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in a patient with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type III.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Bipul Kumar; Saiki, Uma Kaimal; Sarm, Dipti; Choudhury, Bikash Narayan; Choudhury, Sarojini Dutta; Saharia, Dhiren; Saikia, Mihir

    2011-11-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes (APS) comprise a wide clinical spectrum of autoimmune disorders. APS is divided into Type I, Type II, Type I and Type IV depending upon the pattern of disease combination. Ghronic diarrhoea is one of the many manifestations of APS and many aetiological factors have been suggested for it. Apart from the established aetiological factors, intestinal lymphangiectasia may be responsible for chronic diarrhea in some cases.Intestinal lymphangiectasia has been reported in Type I APS. We report a case of Type III APS with hypocalcaemia and hypothyroidism who had chronic diarrhea of long duration and was finally diagnosed to have intestinal lymphangiectasia. PMID:22616341

  20. Systemic capillary leak syndrome induced by influenza type A infection

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kyeong Won; Heo, Sang Taek; Han, Sang Hoon; Park, Yong-Geun; Park, Hyun Soo

    2014-01-01

    A 42-year-old man visited the emergency department complaining of lower extremity swelling and myalgia. His influenza A antigen test was positive, and he was admitted for supportive care of severe myalgia. On the first hospital day, the swelling in his lower legs was aggravated with intolerable pain, and his creatine phosphokinase and hemoglobin levels were elevated. He was treated with massive hydration, albumin replacement, continuous venovenous hemofiltration, phlebotomy, and oseltamivir. The swelling and pain in his extremities were decreased without renal dysfunction, even though peripheral neuropathy and muscular complication persisted. Systemic capillary leak syndrome is a rare but life-threatening condition. The diagnosis is made clinically based on a classic triad of hypotension, hypoalbuminemia, and hemoconcentration. In our case, the influenza A infection was related to the capillary leakage.

  1. Orocardiodigital syndrome: an oral-facial-digital type II variant associated with atrioventricular canal.

    PubMed Central

    Digilio, M C; Marino, B; Giannotti, A; Dallapiccola, B

    1996-01-01

    We report on a patient with a constellation of anomalies including hamartomas of the tongue, polysyndactyly, and atrioventricular canal. A similar association has been previously described by Orstavik et al in two sibs. The clinical spectrum of the oralfacial-digital syndrome (OFDS) type II includes all these features. In particular, congenital heart defect, mainly atrioventricular canal, has been described in a few cases. It has been previously suggested that these latter patients may be affected by a variant of OFDS type II. We propose to distinguish this orocardiodigital variant and point out the association of the syndrome with atrioventricular canal. Images PMID:8733055

  2. Hereditary epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (Vörner type) in a family with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mofid, M Z; Costarangos, C; Gruber, S B; Koch, S E

    1998-05-01

    We describe a kindred in whom epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma occurred in association with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type III (benign hypermobility syndrome). This kindred consisted of 27 members of four generations, 14 of whom had palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK). Of those who had palmoplantar keratoderma, 6 had Ehlers-Danlos type III (EDS II). The proband presented with diffuse, symmetrical hyperkeratotic plaques that were yellow and sharply demarcated, covering the entire palms and soles, in addition to marked large and small joint flexibility and skin hyperextensibility. A biopsy specimen from the palm revealed features of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis with acanthosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PPK in a family with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Linkage analysis of these two clinical traits showed that the genes responsible for PPK and EDS III are not closely linked, and therefore are not immediately adjacent. However, linkage at greater genetic distances could not be excluded.

  3. [Duane's retraction syndrome--overview and diagnosis of clinical types].

    PubMed

    Otradovec, J

    2001-05-01

    The author presents a postgraduate review of the problem. In the introduction he reviews typical features of Duane's retraction syndrome (DS) and its main symptoms and reminds of the main approaches to classification: (1) Malbrane s (Duane I, II and III), (2) Huber's which is based on EMG findings in ZOS and (3) Kaufman's which classifies DS according to the enforced position of the head. The author maintains that even according to the above many atypical rare pictures cannot be classified or explained pathogenetically. Some are mentioned: (1) "Inverse" DS, which was recorded and documented by Chytilová-Divisová (1949) in a girl with congenital paralysis of abduction on both eyes retraction of the bulbus developed and narrowing of the palpebral aperture when attempting abduction (1) of the eye, (2) Bilateral acquired DS in a female patient with a tumour of the brain stem confirmed by EMG records of both horizontal muscles. (3) Unilateral DS in a child from a family with familial incidence of congenital ZOS fibrosis with an obscure ratio of the neurogenic and myogenic and fibrous component of the two pictures. In another member of this family the Marcus Gunn phenomenon was present. The latter findings support the idea that in the development of the fairly uniform picture of DS a combination of neurogenic, myogenic and connective tissue changes participate. PMID:11433591

  4. Endocrine tumours in neurofibromatosis type 1, tuberous sclerosis and related syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2010-06-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) and tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) are two familial syndromes known as phakomatoses that may be associated with endocrine tumours. These hereditary cutaneous conditions affect the central nervous system and are characterised by the development of hamartomas. Over the past 20 years, there have been major advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of these diseases. Both NF-1 and TSC are disorders of unregulated progression through the cell cycle, in which causative genes behave as tumour suppressor genes. The pathogenesis of these familial syndromes is linked by the shared regulation of a common pathway, the protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Additional related disorders that also converge on the mTOR pathway include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and Cowden syndrome. All of these inherited cancer syndromes are associated with characteristic skin findings that offer a clue to their recognition and treatment. The discovery of mTOR inhibitors has led to a possible new therapeutic modality for patients with endocrine tumours as part of these familial syndromes.

  5. Metachronous Bilateral Posterior Tibial Artery Aneurysms in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    SciTech Connect

    Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Bonatti, Hugo; Sabri, Saher; Arslan, Bulent; Harthun, Nancy L.

    2011-04-15

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV is a life-threatening genetic connective tissue disorder. We report a 24-year-old woman with EDS-IV who presented with metachronous bilateral aneurysms/pseudoaneurysms of the posterior tibial arteries 15 months apart. Both were treated successfully with transarterial coil embolization from a distal posterior tibial approach.

  6. A rare type of congenital Sturge-Weber Syndrome: presenting with history of perinatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Ejike, Obuoha; Odume, Calistus; Ekwochi, Uchenna; Ndu, Ikenna; Imanyikwa, Ugochukwu

    2016-08-01

    The presentation of a newborn with perinatal asphyxia and poor developmental milestones in a resource-poor setting. Many a times, obscured, unsuspected, and uncommon etiologies compound well-known causes of failure to thrive; in this case a rare finding of Type III Sturge-Weber Syndrome was revealed by Brain CT scanning. PMID:27525070

  7. Prospective Study of the Prevalence of Alzheimer-Type Dementia in Institutionalized Individuals with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser, F. E.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Institutionalized patients with Down syndrome (N=307) were monitored for 5 to 10 years to determine prevalence of Alzheimer-type dementia. Prevalence increased from 11% between ages 40 and 49 to 77% between 60 and 69. All patients 70 and over had dementia. Mean age of onset of dementia was 56 years. Neuropathological findings were consistent with…

  8. Psychosocial Implications of Usher Syndrome, Type I, throughout the Life Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, I. D.

    1995-01-01

    Usher syndrome, Type I, requires multiple adaptations throughout the life cycle because each stage of life has tasks and losses associated with deafness and progressive retinitis pigmentosa. This article examines the issues raised at each stage, using clinical vignettes from persons who have this condition and their families. (Author/DB)

  9. A rare type of congenital Sturge-Weber Syndrome: presenting with history of perinatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Ejike, Obuoha; Odume, Calistus; Ekwochi, Uchenna; Ndu, Ikenna; Imanyikwa, Ugochukwu

    2016-08-01

    The presentation of a newborn with perinatal asphyxia and poor developmental milestones in a resource-poor setting. Many a times, obscured, unsuspected, and uncommon etiologies compound well-known causes of failure to thrive; in this case a rare finding of Type III Sturge-Weber Syndrome was revealed by Brain CT scanning.

  10. Physical and Psychological Health in Persons with Deafblindness that Is due to Usher Syndrome Type II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahlqvist, Moa; Moller, Claes; Moller, Kerstin; Danermark, Berth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The objectives of the study reported here were to describe the physical and psychological health of persons with Usher syndrome Type II (USH2) and to explore any differences in terms of gender. Methods: The participants were recruited from the Swedish Usher database. In the first step, 122 persons received the questionnaire by mail,…

  11. Glucose Transporter Type 1 Deficiency Syndrome with Carbohydrate-Responsive Symptoms but without Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koy, Anne; Assmann, Birgit; Klepper, Joerg; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2011-01-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is caused by a defect in glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier. The main symptoms are epilepsy, developmental delay, movement disorders, and deceleration of head circumference. A ketogenic diet has been shown to be effective in controlling epilepsy in GLUT1-DS. We report a female…

  12. Survival of an aortic trauma patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV: a case report.

    PubMed

    Levine, M P

    2000-12-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV is the most lethal variant of that illness and is associated with fatal large vessel arterial hemorrhages. The literature reports only two survivors of elective aortic surgery and two survivors of spontaneous aortic hemorrhage. This article presents a 14-year-old boy who had aortic and vena cava blunt trauma and survived.

  13. Posterior spinal fusion for scoliosis in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, kyphoscoliosis type.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Gao, Rui; Zhou, Xuhui; Yuan, Wen

    2011-06-14

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes comprise a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders characterized by articular hypermobility, skin extensibility, and tissue fragility. Surgical treatment of scoliosis associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome poses a challenge to spine surgeons because of the high risk of major complications. There is a paucity of evidence in the literature on surgical treatment for scoliosis in the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome patient.This article describes 3 adolescent patients diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, kyphoscoliosis type, which was treated by posterior spinal fusion only. After unsuccessful conservative treatment for at least 1 year, the patients underwent posterior spinal surgery for the correction of spinal deformity. A satisfactory correction in the spinal curve was achieved, with no obvious loss of correction during follow-up. No intra- or postoperative major complications were observed.Our experience supports that a satisfactory correction of scoliosis can be achieved by posterior spinal fusion only in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, kyphoscoliosis type.

  14. Exploration of Differences in Types of Sleep Disturbance and Severity of Sleep Problems between Individuals with Cri du Chat Syndrome, Down's Syndrome, and Jacobsen Syndrome: A Case Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maas, Anneke P. H. M.; Didden, Robert; Korzilius, Hubert; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of sleep problems in individuals with intellectual disability (ID) seems to vary between genetic syndromes associated with ID. Different types of sleep disturbances may indicate underlying causes of sleep problems and these types of sleep disturbances may vary between different genetic syndromes. We examined and compared five types…

  15. Herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chrétien, F; Bélec, L; Hilton, D A; Flament-Saillour, M; Guillon, F; Wingertsmann, L; Baudrimont, M; de Truchis, P; Keohane, C; Vital, C; Love, S; Gray, F

    1996-10-01

    Herpes simplex (HSV) infection of the central nervous system is uncommon in AIDS and usually has an atypical topography. This review is centred around the case of a 49-year-old homosexual patient with AIDS who died from diffuse encephalopathy. Neuropathological examination revealed necrotic and haemorrhagic changes involving both temporal lobes, insulae and cingulate gyri. Cowdry type A intranuclear inclusion bodies were abundant but inflammation was minimal. Electron microscopy confirmed characteristic herpes virus particles. Immunocyto-chemistry was positive for HSV type 1 and 2. In situ hybridization and PCR, however, were positive for HSV type 1 but excluded HSV type 2. There was associated cytomegalovirus ventriculitis but clearly separated from HSV encephalitis. There were no histological features of HIV encephalitis and HIV could not be demonstrated by immunocytochemistry or by PCR to demonstrate proviral DNA. Apoptotic neurons were numerous in areas with a severe macrophage reaction. Only two pathological cases with characteristic limbic distribution and necrotic haemorrhagic histologic have been reported previously. The rarity of these reports suggests that in advanced AIDS, the immune reaction causing a typical necrotizing encephalitis cannot be mounted. Distinction between HSV type 1 and 2 infection may be difficult by immunocytochemistry and usually requires in situ hybridization, tissue culture or PCR. In AIDS patients, HSV-1 has been identified as responsible for encephalitis whereas HSV-2 has been more responsible for myelitis. Associated productive HIV infection of the CNS was found in none of the cases. In contrast, cytomegalovirus encephalitis was found in nine of 11 cases of AIDS-associated HSV encephalitis. PMID:8930949

  16. Pulmonary Alveolar Type II Epithelial Cells and Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    During the past ten years, functions of alveolar type II cells have been well characterized with isolated cells in vitro. Some of the functions were well known from studies in vivo, but others such as transepithelial sodium transport were unsuspected. A better understanding of this important pulmonary cell type improves our knowledge of the pathophysiology of adult respiratory distress syndrome and may in time lead to new therapeutic strategies. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:3909639

  17. Richner-Hanhart syndrome (tyrosinemia type II). Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    al-Hemidan, A I; al-Hazzaa, S A

    1995-03-01

    Richner-Hanhart syndrome (Tyrosinemia Type II) is an autosomal recessive disorder of amino acid metabolism characterized by ocular changes, painful palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, and mental retardation. Serum tyrosine increases due to tyrosine aminotransferase deficiency resulting in the deposition of tyrosine crystals in the cornea and in corneal inflammation. Patients are often misdiagnosed as having herpes simplex keratitis. We report on a child who presented with bilateral keratitis secondary to Tyrosinemia Type II diagnosed as herpes simplex keratitis.

  18. Sleep-disordered breathing, type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seetho, Ian W; Wilding, John P H

    2014-11-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) encompasses a spectrum of conditions that can lead to altered sleep homeostasis. In particular, obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is the most common form of SDB and is associated with adverse cardiometabolic manifestations including hypertension, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, ultimately increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease. The pathophysiological basis of these associations may relate to repeated intermittent hypoxia and fragmented sleep episodes that characterize OSA which drive further mechanisms with adverse metabolic and cardiovascular consequences. The associations of OSA with type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome have been described in studies ranging from epidemiological and observational studies to controlled trials investigating the effects of OSA therapy with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). In recent years, there have been rising prevalence rates of diabetes and obesity worldwide. Given the established links between SDB (in particular OSA) with both conditions, understanding the potential influence of OSA on the components of the metabolic syndrome and diabetes and the underlying mechanisms by which such interactions may contribute to metabolic dysregulation are important in order to effectively and holistically manage patients with SDB, type 2 diabetes or the metabolic syndrome. In this article, we review the literature describing the associations, the possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms linking these conditions and the effects of interventions including CPAP treatment and weight loss.

  19. Mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome type B: relation of phenotypic features to background strain.

    PubMed

    Gografe, Sylvia I; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Willing, Alison E; Haas, Ken; Chamizo, Wilfredo; Sanberg, Paul R

    2003-12-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B or mucopolysaccharidosis type III B (MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disorder that is inherited in autosomal recessive manner. It is characterized by systemic heparan sulfate accumulation in lysosomes due to deficiency of the enzyme alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Naglu). Devastating clinical abnormalities with severe central nervous system involvement and somatic disease lead to premature death. A mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome type B was created by targeted disruption of the gene encoding Naglu, providing a powerful tool for understanding pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic strategies. However, the JAX GEMM Strain B6.129S6-Naglutm1Efn mouse, although showing biochemical similarities to humans with Sanfilippo syndrome, exhibits aging and behavioral differences. We observed idiosyncrasies, such as skeletal dysmorphism, hydrocephalus, ocular abnormalities, organomegaly, growth retardation, and anomalies of the integument, in our breeding colony of Naglu mutant mice and determined that several of them were at least partially related to the background strain C57BL/6. These background strain abnormalities, therefore, potentially mimic or overlap signs of the induced syndrome in our mice. Our observations may prove useful in studies of Naglu mutant mice. The necessity for distinguishing background anomalies from signs of the modeled disease is apparent. PMID:14727810

  20. Precocious presentation of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 associated with an AIRE mutation.

    PubMed

    Resende, Eduarda; Gόmez, Gemma Novoa; Nascimento, Marta; Loidi, Lourdes; Saborido Fiaño, Rebeca; Cabanas Rodrίguez, Paloma; Castro-Feijoo, Lidia; Barreiro Conde, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 (type 2 APS), or Schmidt's syndrome, is defined by the presence of Addison's disease in combination with type 1 diabetes and/or autoimmune thyroid disease. The estimated prevalence of this syndrome is 1.4-4.5 per 100,000 inhabitants and it is more frequent in middle-aged females, whilst it is quite rare in children. Type 2 APS, which shows a pattern of autosomal dominant inheritance with low penetrance, has been associated with HLA specific DR3/DQ2 and DR4/DQ8 haplotypes. However, it has been hypothesized that genetic variability in the AIRE gene, which causing type 1 APS, may play a role in more common organ-specific autoimmune conditions like type 1 diabetes, Hashimoto's disease and type 2 APS, among others. Here we present the case of an 8-year-old girl, with a past medical history of type 1 diabetes diagnosed at the age of 3. She was taken to the Emergency Department because she complained of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, and her blood analysis revealed a severe hyponatremia. She also had seizures as a consequence of the hyponatremia and frequent hypoglycemia. She was ultimately found to be suffering from autoimmune primary adrenal insufficiency. The combination of both mentioned conditions, type 1 diabetes and Addison's disease, in the absence of chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, made a diagnosis of type 2 APS plausible in this girl. The genetic study showed two heterozygous variants: NM_000383.2:C.1411C>T (p. Arg471Cys) in exon 12 and IVS9+6G>A in intron 9 of the AIRE gene. The description of an uncommon case of type 2 APS with precocious presentation associated with an AIRE mutation in a very young girl could help to clarify the role of AIRE in the development of autoimmune diseases.

  1. Review of evidence that epidemics of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes/metabolic syndrome are polar opposite responses to iatrogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Classen, John B

    2012-11-01

    There is an epidemic in children of metabolic syndrome, obesity, type 2 diabetes and other individual diseases that form the components of metabolic syndrome. Poor diet and low exercise can not explain many facets of the epidemic including the onset in children 6 month of age, the protective effect of obesity on the incidence of type 1 diabetes and the epidemic of type 2 diabetes/metabolic syndrome in grass fed horses. Poor diet and exercise also do not explain the epidemic of type 1 diabetes in children that resembles the epidemic of type 2 diabetes/metabolic syndrome. Several papers have been published to indicate that the epidemics of type 1 and type 2 diabetes/metabolic syndrome in children are linked and are polar opposite responses to iatrogenic inflammation. Several lines of research support this. Data from different races indicates that there is an inverse relationship between developing type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Races with high risk of developing type 2 diabetes have a decreased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Data from Italy confirmed an inverse association between obesity and type 1 diabetes. Further studies indicate the inverse relationship between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes/obesity is due to cortisol production. Data indicates those with low cortisol responses have a predilection for type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune disorders following inflammation, while those with high cortisol/ immune suppressive responses develop type 2 diabetes/metabolic syndrome/obesity which resembles a Cushingoid state but are spared in the autoimmune disorders. Japanese children produce much more cortisol following immunization than Caucasian children. The later explains why discontinuation of BCG vaccination was associated with a decrease in type 1 diabetes in European children and a decrease in type 2 diabetes in Japanese children. Both the epidemics of type 1 diabetes and metabolic syndrome correlate with an increase in immunization. Finally

  2. Tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome type 1 as an outcome of in vitro fertilization?

    PubMed

    Karaer, K; Yüksel, Z

    2014-01-01

    Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type I [OMIM #190350] is an autosomal dominant disorder. Common features are: Slowly growing sparse hair, laterally thin eyebrows, bulbous tip of the nose, long philtrum, thin upper lip, protruding ears. Common skeletal anomalies include shortening of phalanges and metacarpals causing mild to severe brachydactyly, cone shaped epiphyses, hip dysplasia and short stature. Recently many reports have been published on the use of assisted reproductive technology (ART) and the increased risk of congenital major malformations or syndromes. We present a 6 years old Turkish Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS) case of a twin pair after in vitro fertilization (IVF). TRPS with IVF pregnancy has not been reported previously. This new case reported herein will contribute to a better understanding whether ART pregnancy increases congenital malformations. PMID:24783650

  3. Unusual phenotype of glucose transport protein type 1 deficiency syndrome: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Posar, Annio; Santucci, Margherita

    2014-01-01

    The glucose transport protein type 1 (GLUT1) deficit causes a chronic brain energy failure. The classic phenotype of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is characterized by: Mild to severe motor delay and mental retardation; infantile-onset epilepsy; head growth deceleration; movement disorders (ataxia, dystonia, spasticity); and non-epileptic paroxysmal events (intermittent ataxia, periodic confusion, recurrent headaches). During last years the classic phenotype of this syndrome, as originally reported, has expanded. We report the atypical phenotype of a boy with GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, characterized by mild mental retardation and drug-resistant absence seizures with onset at the age of 6 years, without movement disorders nor decrease of head circumference. A prompt diagnosis of this disorder is mandatory since the ketogenic diet might represent an effective treatment. PMID:24891901

  4. Management of dyslipidemias in the presence of the metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Matikainen, Niina; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta

    2012-12-01

    In the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, excess energy intake on the background of genetic predisposition and lifestyle factors leads to the dysregulation of fatty acid metabolism and acquired insulin resistance. These initial metabolic defects are reflected to both lipoprotein and glucose metabolism and contribute to increased risk for cardiovascular disease. However, even after controlling for the traditional cardiovascular risk factors, subjects with the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes remain at high residual cardiovascular risk despite of low/normal LDL-cholesterol concentration. For 2 decades, statin therapy has been the cornerstone of treatment of dyslipidemia in these disorders. In the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, only statin treatment has demonstrated consistently a significant reduction in cardiovascular and all cause mortality in clinical trials. Lately, increased incidence of diabetes especially in the high-risk populations using statins has raised the debate whether statins are indicated for primary prevention especially in the metabolic syndrome. Guidelines recommend intensified lifestyle intervention to those in high risk groups on statin therapy to reduce the residual risk. Despite of the proven efficacy on plasma lipids, fibrate, or niacin as monotherapy, or in combination with statins has failed in reducing cardiovascular mortality. This underlies the fact that improvement in dyslipidemia or other biomarkers is not equal to the reduction in cardiovascular events. However, fibrates in combination with statins seem to be beneficial to reduce CVD events in subjects with low HDL-cholesterol (< 0.9-1.1 mmol/L) and elevated triglycerides (> 2.3 mmol/L), but the data are derived from subgroup analysis of clinical trials. The position of niacin and ezetimibe and omega-3 fatty acids in treatment of dyslipidemia in the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes is even less clear and remains to be established in future clinical trials.

  5. Spontaneous rupture of the spleen in type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Privitera, Antonio; Milkhu, Chaz; Datta, Vivek; Sayegh, Mazim; Cohen, Richard; Windsor, Alastair

    2009-01-01

    The vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, type IV, is associated with severe complications, including arterial rupture and visceral perforation. However, to our knowledge, there has been only one previous report of splenic rupture caused by a spontaneous hemorrhage in type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We report another case of this uncommon complication, occurring in a 35-year-old woman who presented after the sudden onset of acute abdominal pain. Patients should be stabilized quickly in the intensive care unit and the most timesaving surgical techniques used. Moreover, tissues must be handled with great care intraoperatively in view of their extreme fragility. Despite prompt and appropriate treatment, the prognosis is often dismal. PMID:19132469

  6. Myocardial infarction resulting from coronary artery dissection in an adolescent with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV due to a type III collagen mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Adès, L. C.; Waltham, R. D.; Chiodo, A. A.; Bateman, J. F.

    1995-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome encompasses a group of inherited disorders of connective tissue, some of which are characterised by abnormalities of collagen metabolism. The chromosomal location, identified genes and biochemical defects, inheritance pattern, and clinical features for the various known subtypes are outlined. Prenatal diagnosis is possible for types IV, VI, VIIA1, and VIIA2. An unusual presentation of type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in a 16 year old boy with an anterior myocardial infarction resulting from dissection of the left anterior descending coronary artery is reported here. A clinical diagnosis of type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was made subsequently and confirmed by the reduced production, impaired secretion, and abnormally slow electrophoretic migration of type III collagen, indicating an underlying mutation in the COL3A1 gene. This patient represents the first case of type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with symptomatic coronary artery dissection. Images PMID:7546986

  7. Plasma Fibrinogen in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and its Relation with Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) and Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mahendra, J.V.; Anuradha, T.S.; Talikoti, Prashanth; Nagaraj, R.S.; Vishali, V.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Metabolic syndrome or Syndrome X is characterized by hyperlipidemia, increased blood pressure, abdominal obesity and hyperglycemia, which increases the risk of cardiovascular complications. In addition to these, it is also associated with nontraditional risk factor like C- reactive protein, Plasminogen activator and fibrinogen. Various studies have documented association of these nontraditional risk factor, in Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Thus patients with diabetes mellitus are higher risk of developing micro and macro vascular complications like ischemic heart disease (IHD) and diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of decreased visual acuity, which is associated with maculopathy and profierative complications of it. Chronic hyperglycemia and its associated nonenzymatic glycation play an important role in the development of microangiopathy. Aims and Objectives: To study the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus. To study the plasma fibrinogen and its relationship with IHD and retinopathy in type 2 Diabetes mellitus patients with metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods: Patients of type 2 diabetes Mellitus were recruited based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. History of IHD and ECG evidence of ischemia was obtained. Retinopathy was diagnosed by direct opthalmoscopy. Fasting glucose, lipid profile and plasma fibrinogen were analyzed. Stastical analysis was carried by Chi square test and student‘t’ test. Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in study population of 100 type 2 diabetic patients is 58% and is significantly associated with duration of the disease (p<0.001). Fifty eight patients have hyperfibrinogenemia and mean fibrinogen level is significantly high in diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome when compared to diabetic patients without metabolic syndrome (p<0.001). Diabetic patient with metabolic syndrome and hyperfibrinogenemia have higher prevalence of IHD and

  8. Polyglandular endocrinopathy type II (Schmidt's syndrome) in a Dobermann pinscher.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, J A; Stone, J; Rick, M; Dunning, M D

    2016-09-01

    A three-year-old, female neutered, Dobermann pinscher was presented for investigation of lethargy, episodic collapse, ataxia and myxoedema. Primary hypothyroidism and primary cortisol-deficient hypoadrenocorticism were diagnosed based on history, physical examination and compatible hormonal analysis. Increased serum concentrations of thyroglobulin autoantibodies and 21-hydroxylase autoantibodies indicated an immune-mediated aetiology. The case was complicated by lymphadenopathy with hand-mirror lymphocytes, classically identified in lymphoma. A polymerase chain reaction test for antigen receptor rearrangement indicated polyclonality and therefore reactive lymphadenopathy. The dog's clinical signs resolved following introduction of levothyroxine and prednisolone. Prioritising the problem-based approach in this case facilitated the diagnosis of hypoadrenocorticism in addition to hypothyroidism due to the persistence of clinical signs despite thyroxine replacement. Importantly, atypical adrenal gland dysfunction was not misinterpreted as inadequate therapeutic response to thyroxine supplementation. The observation that polyglandular endocrinopathy type II can occur in dogs suggests that in dogs with a suboptimal response to treatment for hypothyroidism or hypoadrenocorticism comorbid endocrinopathies should be investigated. PMID:27487017

  9. Inflammatory Cytokine Profile Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Hermosillo, Aldo; Molina-Ayala, Mario; Ramírez-Rentería, Claudia; Vargas, Guadalupe; Gonzalez, Baldomero; Isibasi, Armando; Archundia-Riveros, Irma; Mendoza, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the serum concentration of IL-6, IL-10, TNF, IL-8, resistin, and adiponectin in type 1 diabetic patients with and without metabolic syndrome and to determine the cut-off point of the estimated glucose disposal rate that accurately differentiated these groups. Design. We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation of all patients in our type 1 diabetes clinic from January 2012 to January 2013. Patients were considered to have metabolic syndrome when they fulfilled the joint statement criteria and were evaluated for clinical, biochemical, and immunological features. Methods. We determined serum IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF with flow cytometry and adiponectin and resistin concentrations with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with and without metabolic syndrome. We also compared estimated glucose disposal rate between groups. Results. We tested 140 patients. Forty-four percent fulfilled the metabolic syndrome criteria (n = 61), 54% had central obesity, 30% had hypertriglyceridemia, 29% had hypoalphalipoproteinemia, and 19% had hypertension. We observed that resistin concentrations were higher in patients with MS. Conclusion. We found a high prevalence of MS in Mexican patients with T1D. The increased level of resistin may be related to the increased fat mass and could be involved in the development of insulin resistance. PMID:26273680

  10. Knowledge, assessment, and management of adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type among Flemish physiotherapists.

    PubMed

    Rombaut, Lies; Deane, Janet; Simmonds, Jane; De Wandele, Inge; De Paepe, Anne; Malfait, Fransiska; Calders, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Physiotherapy plays a fundamental role in managing adults with the joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT). However, it is a challenge for both the patient and the physiotherapist as the condition is poorly understood and treatment for JHS/EDS-HT is currently undefined. Insight into current practice is, therefore, necessary in order to establish baseline knowledge in this area and in the long term to improve the standard of patient care. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate current physiotherapists' knowledge of JHS/EDS-HT and to gain insight into current physiotherapy practice with emphasis on assessment, management, and treatment efficacy. Three hundred twenty-five Flemish physiotherapists participated in the study by filling out electronically a modified version of the "Hypermobility and Hypermobility Syndrome Questionnaire" (HHQ), which covered theoretical constructs such as general knowledge, assessment, management, and learning in relation to generalized joint hypermobility and JHS/EDS-HT. The results show that physiotherapists report a low level of confidence with regard to assessment and management of JHS/EDS-HT. Knowledge of hypermobility and JHS/EDS-HT is weak, especially regarding the features associated with JHS/EDS-HT. Many treatment approaches are used by physiotherapists with the majority showing preference for education, reassurance, muscle strengthening, proprioceptive and core stability training. Almost all approaches were perceived as being clinically effective by the physiotherapists, highlighting a lack of consensus. In conclusion, this study in Flemish physiotherapists confirms that JHS/EDS-HT is under-recognized, not well known and deemed difficult to treat. Further education is required and sought by the physiotherapists surveyed, and future research is needed.

  11. Knowledge, assessment, and management of adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type among Flemish physiotherapists.

    PubMed

    Rombaut, Lies; Deane, Janet; Simmonds, Jane; De Wandele, Inge; De Paepe, Anne; Malfait, Fransiska; Calders, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Physiotherapy plays a fundamental role in managing adults with the joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT). However, it is a challenge for both the patient and the physiotherapist as the condition is poorly understood and treatment for JHS/EDS-HT is currently undefined. Insight into current practice is, therefore, necessary in order to establish baseline knowledge in this area and in the long term to improve the standard of patient care. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate current physiotherapists' knowledge of JHS/EDS-HT and to gain insight into current physiotherapy practice with emphasis on assessment, management, and treatment efficacy. Three hundred twenty-five Flemish physiotherapists participated in the study by filling out electronically a modified version of the "Hypermobility and Hypermobility Syndrome Questionnaire" (HHQ), which covered theoretical constructs such as general knowledge, assessment, management, and learning in relation to generalized joint hypermobility and JHS/EDS-HT. The results show that physiotherapists report a low level of confidence with regard to assessment and management of JHS/EDS-HT. Knowledge of hypermobility and JHS/EDS-HT is weak, especially regarding the features associated with JHS/EDS-HT. Many treatment approaches are used by physiotherapists with the majority showing preference for education, reassurance, muscle strengthening, proprioceptive and core stability training. Almost all approaches were perceived as being clinically effective by the physiotherapists, highlighting a lack of consensus. In conclusion, this study in Flemish physiotherapists confirms that JHS/EDS-HT is under-recognized, not well known and deemed difficult to treat. Further education is required and sought by the physiotherapists surveyed, and future research is needed. PMID:25821093

  12. Heart rate, conduction and ultrasound abnormalities in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Camerota, Filippo; Castori, Marco; Celletti, Claudia; Colotto, Marco; Amato, Silvia; Colella, Alessandra; Curione, Mario; Danese, Chiara

    2014-07-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two clinically overlapping heritable connective tissue disorders strongly associating with pain, fatigue and other secondary aspects. Though not considered a diagnostic criterion for most EDS subtypes, cardiovascular involvement is a well-known complication in EDS. A case-control study was carried out on 28 adults with JHS/EDS-HT diagnosed according to current criteria, compared to 29 healthy subjects evaluating resting electrocardiographic (ECG), 24-h ECG and resting heart ultrasound data. Results obtained in the ECG studies showed a moderate excess in duration of the PR interval and P wave, an excess of heart conduction and rate abnormalities and an increased rate of mitral and tricuspid valve insufficiency often complicating with "true" mitral valve prolapse in the ecocardiographic study. These variable ECG subclinical anomalies reported in our sample may represent the resting surrogate of such a subnormal cardiovascular response to postural changes that are known to be present in patients with JHS/EDS-HT. Our findings indicate the usefulness of a full cardiologic evaluation of adults with JHS/EDS-HT for the correct management. PMID:24752348

  13. The role of narrative medicine in the management of joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Knight, Isobel

    2015-03-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) is a hereditary connective tissue disorder affecting every bodily system. It is largely underdiagnosed by many practitioners, with the result of a considerable delay in diagnosis and, consequently, in the onset of adequate management schedule and treatment. Patients may also experience to be misbelieved, erroneously considered affected by a psychiatric or psychosomatic disorders, and rejected by the medical profession, which can lead to feelings of anger and resentment. Patient journeys are often long and complicated, but if doctors allowed the patient time to tell the full story, and were more prepared to think holistically, there may be a far more positive outcome. Here, the patients' perspective is presented with a narrative medicine approach, illustrating the tri-dimensional experience of a JHS/EDS-HT patient, who is also a Bowen Practitioner and a medical writer/educator. Narrative medicine would be invaluable in working with JHS/EDS-HT so that the patient can tell the story, and offer the practitioner a whole picture of her/his suffering and, often, the key for understanding the cause(s). Once this has been achieved, it might be possible to build upon a more positive and therapeutic dialogue which would result in better treatment and more effective management. It is also important for doctors to communicate with JHS/EDS-HT experts who will ultimately improve the patient journey and treatment outcomes of such a complex connective tissue disorder.

  14. The role of narrative medicine in the management of joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Knight, Isobel

    2015-03-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) is a hereditary connective tissue disorder affecting every bodily system. It is largely underdiagnosed by many practitioners, with the result of a considerable delay in diagnosis and, consequently, in the onset of adequate management schedule and treatment. Patients may also experience to be misbelieved, erroneously considered affected by a psychiatric or psychosomatic disorders, and rejected by the medical profession, which can lead to feelings of anger and resentment. Patient journeys are often long and complicated, but if doctors allowed the patient time to tell the full story, and were more prepared to think holistically, there may be a far more positive outcome. Here, the patients' perspective is presented with a narrative medicine approach, illustrating the tri-dimensional experience of a JHS/EDS-HT patient, who is also a Bowen Practitioner and a medical writer/educator. Narrative medicine would be invaluable in working with JHS/EDS-HT so that the patient can tell the story, and offer the practitioner a whole picture of her/his suffering and, often, the key for understanding the cause(s). Once this has been achieved, it might be possible to build upon a more positive and therapeutic dialogue which would result in better treatment and more effective management. It is also important for doctors to communicate with JHS/EDS-HT experts who will ultimately improve the patient journey and treatment outcomes of such a complex connective tissue disorder. PMID:25821096

  15. Cerebro-fronto-facial syndrome type 3 with polymicrogyria: a clinical presentation of Baraitser-Winter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eker, Hatice Koçak; Derinkuyu, Betül Emine; Ünal, Sevim; Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Drunat, Séverine; Verloes, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Baraitser-Winter syndrome (BRWS) is a rare condition affecting the development of the brain and the face. The most common characteristics are unusual facial appearance including hypertelorism and ptosis, ocular colobomas, hearing loss, impaired neuronal migration and intellectual disability. BRWS is caused by mutations in the ACTB and ACTG1 genes. Cerebro-fronto-facial syndrome (CFFS) is a clinically heterogeneous condition with distinct facial dysmorphism, and brain abnormalities. Three subtypes are identified. We report a female infant with striking facial features and brain anomalies (included polymicrogyria) that fit into the spectrum of the CFFS type 3 (CFFS3). She also had minor anomalies on her hands and feet, heart and kidney malformations, and recurrent infections. DNA investigations revealed c.586C>T mutation (p.Arg196Cys) in ACTB. This mutation places this patient in the spectrum of BRWS. The same mutation has been detected in a polymicrogyric patient reported previously in literature. We expand the malformation spectrum of BRWS/CFFS3, and present preliminary findings for phenotype-genotype correlation in this spectrum.

  16. Type III Guyon Syndrome in 'B Boy' Break-Dancer: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hu, Soo-Young; Choi, Jin-Gyu; Son, Byung-Chul

    2015-10-01

    Although the musculoskeletal injuries associated with break-dancing which is gaining more popularity among adolescent and young people has been reported, the report regarding a peripheral nerve injury associated with breakdance is scarce. We report a rare case of a young amateur break-dancer, 'b-boy' who suffered from a painful paresthesia in his left hand, later diagnosed as type III Guyon's canal syndrome. A 23-year-old, right handed college man presented with a tenderness over the left hypothenar eminence and painful paresthesia over the ring and little fingers of 3 months duration. He trained himself as an amateur 'b boy' break-dancer for the last 10 months. Conservative management under the diagnosis of wrist sprain before presentation did not improve his hand pain. An magnetic resonance imaging and electrodiagnostic study revealed that painful paresthesia was caused by type III Guyon's canal syndrome, and 4 weeks of corticosteroid treatment was given with resolution of pain and paresthesia.

  17. [Low birth weight and delayed risk of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Svacina, S

    2003-12-01

    Low birth weight is according to many studies associated with later incidence of type 2 diabetes, hypertension and in lower degree with obesity and hypertriacylglycerolemia. Detection of history of low birth weight could have some importance in detection of persons with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk. In the pathogenesis can be involved fetal selection of thrifty genes which are later unable to overcome low physical activity and overfeeding in adult age. More probable is that low birth weight is primary of genetic origin. The same genetic origin can be involved in BMI rebound in childhood, development of insulin resistance, weight gain and later incidence of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Detection of all these phenomena is important in selecting patients in diabetes and cardiovascular risk for preventive intervention.

  18. Daughter and mother with orofaciodigital syndrome type 1 and glomerulocystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takashi; Hoshino, Junichi; Mise, Koki; Sumida, Keiichi; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Hayami, Noriko; Ueno, Toshiharu; Takaichi, Kenmei; Fujii, Takeshi; Ohashi, Kenichi; Morisada, Naoya; Iijima, Kazumoto; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2016-09-01

    A 35-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for evaluation of end-stage renal failure. Diagnostic imaging, including ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, showed polycystic kidneys and peribiliary hepatic cysts, but the renal cysts were isointense and her kidneys were smaller than the end-stage kidneys of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Glomerulocystic kidney disease was diagnosed by renal biopsy. Clinical examination revealed findings such as a missing maxillary canine, lingual anomalies, and brachydactyly. Genetic testing gave a diagnosis of orofaciodigital syndrome type 1 with a 5 nucleotide deletion indicating a frameshift mutation in exon 9. The patient's mother had the same mutation and similar clinical findings. This case is useful for understanding kidney and liver involvement in orofaciodigital syndrome type 1. PMID:27131853

  19. Cardiac arrest refractory to standard intervention in atypical Timothy syndrome (LQT8 type 2)

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Fred H.

    2016-01-01

    Timothy syndrome (TS) is a rare, multisystem disorder most commonly associated with profound QTc prolongation and cutaneous dysmorphia arising from mutations of the L-type calcium channel. We present a case of a 12-day-old newborn who presented with respiratory distress and cyanosis. Diagnostic workup was notable for multiple cardiac abnormalities, and genetic analysis was consistent with an exon 8 mutation of the CACNA1C gene, which is diagnostic for TS type 2 (atypical TS). This patient presented with a novel constellation of symptoms, without dysmorphic features, and with a more moderate QTc interval. The heterogeneity of phenotypes suggests that this disorder may be characterized by variable expressivity or a spectrum of disease rather than a clearly defined syndrome. PMID:27034553

  20. [Target Molecule for a Demyelinating Type of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is classified into demyelinating type, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) and axonal form, acute axonal motor neuropathy (AMAN). It has been clearly established that the target molecule for the former is a ganglioside. In contrast, despite years of effort, the target molecule for the latter has not been identified. Recently, molecules around the nodes of Ranvier have entered the spotlight, and "moesin" was reported to be a target molecule for cytomegalovirus associated-AIDP.

  1. Extended phenotypes in a boy and his mother with oto-palato-digital-syndrome type II

    PubMed Central

    Kaissi, Ali Al; Kraschl, Raimund; Kaulfersch, Wilhelm; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We describe additional phenotypic features in a boy and his mother. Both manifested the phenotypic/genotypic correlation of oto-palato-digital syndrome type II. The mother′s radiographs showed wormian bones of the skull, and paranasal bossing, her feet showed bilateral fusion of the cuboid with the lateral cuneiform bone with subsequent development of metatarsus varus associated with dysplastic distal phalanges. PMID:26401283

  2. Möbius syndrome associated with neurofibromatosis Type 1: A rare co-occurrence.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ankush; Gupta, Nitin; Talwar, Tejinder; Gupta, Munish

    2015-01-01

    Möbius syndrome is a rare congenital disorder presenting with facial diplegia and horizontal gaze disturbance. Patients can have additional cranial nerve palsies and musculoskeletal deformities. Neurofibromatosis Type 1 is an uncommon neurocutaneous disorder. The only plausible link between these two disorders is autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Simultaneous occurrence of these two uncommon disorders has not been yet reported in literature, and it is the first case report to the best of our knowledge. PMID:26167228

  3. Oral-facial-digital type 1 syndrome of Papillon-Léage and Psaume.

    PubMed

    Larralde de Luna, M; Raspa, M L; Ibargoyen, J

    1992-03-01

    A female infant was classified as having oral-facial-digital syndrome (OFDS) type 1, with oral (cleft palate, bifid uvula, lingual cleft, numerous hypertrophic frenula), facial (numerous milia on face, scalp, and ears; frontal bossing; hypertelorism; hypoplasia of nasal alar cartilage; micrognathia), and digital (bilateral brachydactyly of hands) symptoms. She also had diffuse, nonscarring alopecia with wiry, dry hair. Results of roentgenographic and ultrasound studies were normal. At her present age of 11 months, her psychomotor development is appropriate for her age.

  4. Induced pluripotent stem cells as a model for telomeric abnormalities in ICF type I syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sagie, Shira; Ellran, Erika; Katzir, Hagar; Shaked, Rony; Yehezkel, Shiran; Laevsky, Ilana; Ghanayim, Alaa; Geiger, Dan; Tzukerman, Maty; Selig, Sara

    2014-07-15

    Human telomeric regions are packaged as constitutive heterochromatin, characterized by extensive subtelomeric DNA methylation and specific histone modifications. ICF (immunodeficiency, centromeric instability, facial anomalies) type I patients carry mutations in DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) that methylates de novo repetitive sequences during early embryonic development. ICF type I patient fibroblasts display hypomethylated subtelomeres, abnormally short telomeres and premature senescence. In order to study the molecular mechanism by which the failure to de novo methylate subtelomeres results in accelerated telomere shortening, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from 3 ICF type I patients. Telomeres were elongated in ICF-iPSCs during reprogramming, and the senescence phenotype was abolished despite sustained subtelomeric hypomethylation and high TERRA levels. Fibroblast-like cells (FLs) isolated from differentiated ICF-iPSCs maintained abnormally high TERRA levels, and telomeres in these cells shortened at an accelerated rate, leading to early senescence, thus recapitulating the telomeric phenotype of the parental fibroblasts. These findings demonstrate that the abnormal telomere phenotype associated with subtelomeric hypomethylation is overridden in cells expressing telomerase, therefore excluding telomerase inhibition by TERRA as a central mechanism responsible for telomere shortening in ICF syndrome. The data in the current study lend support to the use of ICF-iPSCs for modeling of phenotypic and molecular defects in ICF syndrome and for unraveling the mechanism whereby subtelomeric hypomethylation is linked to accelerated telomeric loss in this syndrome.

  5. Math Learning Disability and Math LD Subtypes: Evidence from Studies of Turner Syndrome, Fragile X Syndrome, and Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzocco, Michele M. M.

    2001-01-01

    This study examined whether indicators of math learning disability were observed in 35 5- and 6-year-olds with either neurofibromatosis, Turner Syndrome, or fragile X syndrome and compared to controls. Findings indicate that girls with fragile X or Turner syndrome but not neurofibromatosis are significantly more likely to have specific math…

  6. Timing and Type of Alcohol Consumption and the Metabolic Syndrome - ELSA-Brasil

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Bruna Angelo; Luft, Vivian Cristine; Schmidt, Maria Inês; Chambless, Lloyd Ellwood; Chor, Dora; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is rising worldwide. Its association with alcohol intake, a major lifestyle factor, is unclear, particularly with respect to the influence of drinking with as opposed to outside of meals. We investigated the associations of different aspects of alcohol consumption with the metabolic syndrome and its components. In cross-sectional analyses of 14,375 active or retired civil servants (aged 35–74 years) participating in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil), we fitted logistic regression models to investigate interactions between the quantity of alcohol, the timing of its consumption with respect to meals, and the predominant beverage type in the association of alcohol consumption with the metabolic syndrome. In analyses adjusted for age, sex, educational level, income, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, smoking, body mass index, and physical activity, light consumption of alcoholic beverages with meals was inversely associated with the metabolic syndrome (≤4 drinks/week: OR = 0.85, 95%CI 0.74–0.97; 4 to 7 drinks/week: OR = 0.75, 95%CI 0.61–0.92), compared to abstention/occasional drinking. On the other hand, greater consumption of alcohol consumed outside of meals was significantly associated with the metabolic syndrome (7 to 14 drinks/week: OR = 1.32, 95%CI 1.11–1.57; ≥14 drinks/week: OR = 1.60, 95%CI 1.29–1.98). Drinking predominantly wine, which occurred mostly with meals, was significantly related to a lower syndrome prevalence; drinking predominantly beer, most notably when outside of meals and in larger quantity, was frequently associated with a greater prevalence. In conclusion, the alcohol—metabolic syndrome association differs markedly depending on the relationship of intake to meals. Beverage preference—wine or beer—appears to underlie at least part of this difference. Notably, most alcohol was consumed in metabolically unfavorable type and timing. If further investigations

  7. Timing and Type of Alcohol Consumption and the Metabolic Syndrome - ELSA-Brasil.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Bruna Angelo; Luft, Vivian Cristine; Schmidt, Maria Inês; Chambless, Lloyd Ellwood; Chor, Dora; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is rising worldwide. Its association with alcohol intake, a major lifestyle factor, is unclear, particularly with respect to the influence of drinking with as opposed to outside of meals. We investigated the associations of different aspects of alcohol consumption with the metabolic syndrome and its components. In cross-sectional analyses of 14,375 active or retired civil servants (aged 35-74 years) participating in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil), we fitted logistic regression models to investigate interactions between the quantity of alcohol, the timing of its consumption with respect to meals, and the predominant beverage type in the association of alcohol consumption with the metabolic syndrome. In analyses adjusted for age, sex, educational level, income, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, smoking, body mass index, and physical activity, light consumption of alcoholic beverages with meals was inversely associated with the metabolic syndrome (≤4 drinks/week: OR = 0.85, 95%CI 0.74-0.97; 4 to 7 drinks/week: OR = 0.75, 95%CI 0.61-0.92), compared to abstention/occasional drinking. On the other hand, greater consumption of alcohol consumed outside of meals was significantly associated with the metabolic syndrome (7 to 14 drinks/week: OR = 1.32, 95%CI 1.11-1.57; ≥14 drinks/week: OR = 1.60, 95%CI 1.29-1.98). Drinking predominantly wine, which occurred mostly with meals, was significantly related to a lower syndrome prevalence; drinking predominantly beer, most notably when outside of meals and in larger quantity, was frequently associated with a greater prevalence. In conclusion, the alcohol-metabolic syndrome association differs markedly depending on the relationship of intake to meals. Beverage preference-wine or beer-appears to underlie at least part of this difference. Notably, most alcohol was consumed in metabolically unfavorable type and timing. If further investigations extend these

  8. Timing and Type of Alcohol Consumption and the Metabolic Syndrome - ELSA-Brasil.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Bruna Angelo; Luft, Vivian Cristine; Schmidt, Maria Inês; Chambless, Lloyd Ellwood; Chor, Dora; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is rising worldwide. Its association with alcohol intake, a major lifestyle factor, is unclear, particularly with respect to the influence of drinking with as opposed to outside of meals. We investigated the associations of different aspects of alcohol consumption with the metabolic syndrome and its components. In cross-sectional analyses of 14,375 active or retired civil servants (aged 35-74 years) participating in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil), we fitted logistic regression models to investigate interactions between the quantity of alcohol, the timing of its consumption with respect to meals, and the predominant beverage type in the association of alcohol consumption with the metabolic syndrome. In analyses adjusted for age, sex, educational level, income, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, smoking, body mass index, and physical activity, light consumption of alcoholic beverages with meals was inversely associated with the metabolic syndrome (≤4 drinks/week: OR = 0.85, 95%CI 0.74-0.97; 4 to 7 drinks/week: OR = 0.75, 95%CI 0.61-0.92), compared to abstention/occasional drinking. On the other hand, greater consumption of alcohol consumed outside of meals was significantly associated with the metabolic syndrome (7 to 14 drinks/week: OR = 1.32, 95%CI 1.11-1.57; ≥14 drinks/week: OR = 1.60, 95%CI 1.29-1.98). Drinking predominantly wine, which occurred mostly with meals, was significantly related to a lower syndrome prevalence; drinking predominantly beer, most notably when outside of meals and in larger quantity, was frequently associated with a greater prevalence. In conclusion, the alcohol-metabolic syndrome association differs markedly depending on the relationship of intake to meals. Beverage preference-wine or beer-appears to underlie at least part of this difference. Notably, most alcohol was consumed in metabolically unfavorable type and timing. If further investigations extend these

  9. [The psychopathological pictures of the early stages of dementia syndromes (vasogenic and of Alzheimer's type)].

    PubMed

    Bidzan, L

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the research is to determine the early symptoms predicting dementia syndromes both Vasogenic and Alzheimer type. The investigations covered: 36 people without any psychopathological syndrome, 32 people with dementia of Alzheimer type and 36 people with vasogenic dementia. DSM IV criteria were accepted as a basis for recognition of dementia syndromes. The qualified patients underwent basic examination consisting of the following elements: AMDP scale (the estimation of psychic and somatic condition), Global Scale of Dementia, Hachinski scale, Blessed scale, Folsteins scale (MMS), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, Physical self Maintenance Scale and two methods of the authors: Current Events Card and Prodromal Symptoms Card. On the basis of examinations the following conclusions can be stated:--persons in early stages of dementia differ from those without any symptoms of it by the occurrence of many psychopathological symptoms--not only connected with the cognitive sphere;--in the period preceding the development of dementia the frequency of occurrence of some symptoms is different according to etiology of the process (Alzheimer or vasogenic);--the applied clinical scales differ significantly in their value for the diagnosis and the estimation of intensification of dementia processes. PMID:9920996

  10. Localization of two genes for Usher syndrome type I to chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.J.H.; Daiger, S.P. ); Jay, M.; Bird, A. ); Reardon, W. ); Guest, M. ); Kimberling, W.J.; Pelias, M.Z.; Keats, B.J.B.

    1992-12-01

    The Usher syndromes (USH) are autosomal recessive diseases characterized by congenital sensorineural hearing loss and progressive pigmentary retinopathy. While relatively rare in the general population, collectively they account for approximately 6% of the congenitally deaf population. Usher syndrome type II (USH2) has been mapped to chromosome 1q, and one form of Usher syndrome type I (USH1) has been mapped to chromosome 14q. These loci have been excluded as regions of USH genes in this data set, which is composed of 8 French-Acadian USH1 families and 11 British USH1 families. Both of these sets of families show linkage to loci on chromosome 11. Linkage analysis demonstrates locus heterogeneity between these sets of families, with the French-Acadian families showing linkage to D11S419 (Z = 4.20, [theta] = 0) and the British families showing linkage to D11S527 (Z = 6.03, [theta] = 0). Genetic heterogeneity of the data set was confirmed using HOMOG and the M test (log likelihood ratio > 10[sup 5]). These results confirm the presence of two distinct USH1 loci on chromosome 11. 41 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. A Case of Acute Aortic Dissection Type B Associated with Cushing's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Petramala, Luigi; Cotesta, Dario; Sapienza, Paolo; Zinnamosca, Laura; Moroni, Enrico; di Marzio, Luca; De Toma, Giorgio; Letizia, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a 63-year-old man, with a previous history of hypertension and glucose intolerance associated troncular obesity that was emergently admitted to our Institution for evaluation of a severe, constant posterior chest pain which radiated anteriorly and dyspnoea with a suspected diagnosis of acute aortic dissection. A CT scan of thorax and abdomen demonstrated a dissection starting just below left succlavian artery and extending downward to the left renal artery, involving the celiac tripod and superior mesenteric artery. The dissection was classified as Stanford B, De Bakey III. Moreover, CT scan of abdomen revealed incidentally a left adrenal tumor of 25 mm of diameter. An emergent prosthetic graft was placed just below the origin of the left succlavian artery up-to the diaphragmatic hiatus. Furthermore, a diagnostic evaluation of the mass revealed an increase of cortisol production, and a diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome was done and the patient underwent an adrenalectomy via laparotomic approach. We report an association of acute aortic dissection of acute aortic dissection type B associated to Cushing's syndrome. Keywords Cushing's syndrome; Adrenocortical adenoma; Aortic dissection type B PMID:22505966

  12. Unexpected association between joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Massimo; Celletti, Claudia; Berardelli, Isabella; Roselli, Valentina; Mastroeni, Simona; Castori, Marco; Biondi, Massimo; Camerota, Filippo

    2014-05-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) is a largely unrecognized, heritable connective tissue disorder, mainly characterized by joint instability complications, widespread musculoskeletal pain, and minor skin features. In a case-control study, 47 consecutive JHS/EDS-HT patients were investigated for the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and compared to 45 healthy controls in a single center. The psychiatric evaluation consisted of structured clinical interview for DSM-IV criteria by using the SCID-I and the SCID-II. Symptom severity was assessed using the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D), and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). The Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF) was used to assess the overall severity of psychological, social, and occupational functions. JHS/EDS-HT patients had significantly higher mean scores for all questionnaires: HAM-A (6.7 vs. 3.8), HAM-D (6.4 vs. 2.7), GAF (75.0 vs. 86.1), and BPRS (27.5 vs. 25.6). The JHS/EDS-HT group had a 4.3 higher risk of being affected by any psychiatric disorder, and in particular, a 5.8 higher risk of having a personality disorder. In particular, 5 JHS/EDS-HT suffered from obsessive-compulsive personality disorder with an observed prevalence rate of 10.6 % (3.6-23.1). Psychiatric assessment of JHS/EDS-HT patients showed an extremely high prevalence of personality disorders (21 %), and of Axis-I disorders (38 %), mostly depressive. This study did not confirm the previously reported increased rate of panic disorders in JHS/EDS-HT. PMID:24272065

  13. Spectrum of mucocutaneous manifestations in 277 patients with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Dordoni, Chiara; Morlino, Silvia; Sperduti, Isabella; Ritelli, Marco; Valiante, Michele; Chiarelli, Nicola; Zanca, Arianna; Celletti, Claudia; Venturini, Marina; Camerota, Filippo; Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo; Grammatico, Paola; Colombi, Marina

    2015-03-01

    Cutaneous manifestations are a diagnostic criterion of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS). These two conditions, originally considered different disorders, are now accepted as clinically indistinguishable and often segregate as a single-familial trait. EDS-HT and JHS are still exclusion diagnoses not supported by any specific laboratory test. Accuracy of clinical diagnosis is, therefore, crucial for appropriate patients' classification and management, but it is actually hampered by the low consistency of many applied criteria including the cutaneous one. We report on mucocutaneous findings in 277 patients with JHS/EDS-HT with both sexes and various ages. Sixteen objective and five anamnestic items were selected and ascertained in two specialized outpatient clinics. Feature rates were compared by sex and age by a series of statistical tools. Data were also used for a multivariate correspondence analysis with the attempt to identify non-causal associations of features depicting recognizable phenotypic clusters. Our findings identified a few differences between sexes and thus indicated an attenuated sexual dimorphism for mucocutaneous features in JHS/EDS-HT. Ten features showed significantly distinct rates at different ages and this evidence corroborated the concept of an evolving phenotype in JHS/EDS-HT also affecting the skin. Multivariate correspondence analysis identified three relatively discrete phenotypic profiles, which may represent the cutaneous counterparts of the three disease phases previously proposed for JHS/EDS-HT. These findings could be used for revising the cutaneous criterion in a future consensus for the clinical diagnosis of JHS/EDS-HT.

  14. Transcriptome-Wide Expression Profiling in Skin Fibroblasts of Patients with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type.

    PubMed

    Chiarelli, Nicola; Carini, Giulia; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Dordoni, Chiara; Ritelli, Marco; Venturini, Marina; Castori, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), is likely the most common systemic heritable connective tissue disorder, and is mostly recognized by generalized joint hypermobility, joint instability complications, minor skin changes and a wide range of satellite features. JHS/EDS-HT is considered an autosomal dominant trait but is still without a defined molecular basis. The absence of (a) causative gene(s) for JHS/EDS-HT is likely attributable to marked genetic heterogeneity and/or interaction of multiple loci. In order to help in deciphering such a complex molecular background, we carried out a comprehensive immunofluorescence analysis and gene expression profiling in cultured skin fibroblasts from five women affected with JHS/EDS-HT. Protein study revealed disarray of several matrix structural components such as fibrillins, tenascins, elastin, collagens, fibronectin, and their integrin receptors. Transcriptome analysis indicated perturbation of different signaling cascades that are required for homeostatic regulation either during development or in adult tissues as well as altered expression of several genes involved in maintenance of extracellular matrix architecture and homeostasis (e.g., SPON2, TGM2, MMP16, GPC4, SULF1), cell-cell adhesion (e.g., CDH2, CHD10, PCDH9, CLDN11, FLG, DSP), immune/inflammatory/pain responses (e.g., CFD, AQP9, COLEC12, KCNQ5, PRLR), and essential for redox balance (e.g., ADH1C, AKR1C2, AKR1C3, MAOB, GSTM5). Our findings provide a picture of the gene expression profile and dysregulated pathways in JHS/EDS-HT skin fibroblasts that correlate well with the systemic phenotype of the patients. PMID:27518164

  15. Transcriptome-Wide Expression Profiling in Skin Fibroblasts of Patients with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

    PubMed Central

    Chiarelli, Nicola; Carini, Giulia; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Dordoni, Chiara; Ritelli, Marco; Venturini, Marina; Castori, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers–Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), is likely the most common systemic heritable connective tissue disorder, and is mostly recognized by generalized joint hypermobility, joint instability complications, minor skin changes and a wide range of satellite features. JHS/EDS-HT is considered an autosomal dominant trait but is still without a defined molecular basis. The absence of (a) causative gene(s) for JHS/EDS-HT is likely attributable to marked genetic heterogeneity and/or interaction of multiple loci. In order to help in deciphering such a complex molecular background, we carried out a comprehensive immunofluorescence analysis and gene expression profiling in cultured skin fibroblasts from five women affected with JHS/EDS-HT. Protein study revealed disarray of several matrix structural components such as fibrillins, tenascins, elastin, collagens, fibronectin, and their integrin receptors. Transcriptome analysis indicated perturbation of different signaling cascades that are required for homeostatic regulation either during development or in adult tissues as well as altered expression of several genes involved in maintenance of extracellular matrix architecture and homeostasis (e.g., SPON2, TGM2, MMP16, GPC4, SULF1), cell-cell adhesion (e.g., CDH2, CHD10, PCDH9, CLDN11, FLG, DSP), immune/inflammatory/pain responses (e.g., CFD, AQP9, COLEC12, KCNQ5, PRLR), and essential for redox balance (e.g., ADH1C, AKR1C2, AKR1C3, MAOB, GSTM5). Our findings provide a picture of the gene expression profile and dysregulated pathways in JHS/EDS-HT skin fibroblasts that correlate well with the systemic phenotype of the patients. PMID:27518164

  16. Unexpected association between joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Massimo; Celletti, Claudia; Berardelli, Isabella; Roselli, Valentina; Mastroeni, Simona; Castori, Marco; Biondi, Massimo; Camerota, Filippo

    2014-05-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) is a largely unrecognized, heritable connective tissue disorder, mainly characterized by joint instability complications, widespread musculoskeletal pain, and minor skin features. In a case-control study, 47 consecutive JHS/EDS-HT patients were investigated for the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and compared to 45 healthy controls in a single center. The psychiatric evaluation consisted of structured clinical interview for DSM-IV criteria by using the SCID-I and the SCID-II. Symptom severity was assessed using the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D), and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). The Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF) was used to assess the overall severity of psychological, social, and occupational functions. JHS/EDS-HT patients had significantly higher mean scores for all questionnaires: HAM-A (6.7 vs. 3.8), HAM-D (6.4 vs. 2.7), GAF (75.0 vs. 86.1), and BPRS (27.5 vs. 25.6). The JHS/EDS-HT group had a 4.3 higher risk of being affected by any psychiatric disorder, and in particular, a 5.8 higher risk of having a personality disorder. In particular, 5 JHS/EDS-HT suffered from obsessive-compulsive personality disorder with an observed prevalence rate of 10.6 % (3.6-23.1). Psychiatric assessment of JHS/EDS-HT patients showed an extremely high prevalence of personality disorders (21 %), and of Axis-I disorders (38 %), mostly depressive. This study did not confirm the previously reported increased rate of panic disorders in JHS/EDS-HT.

  17. Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 relieved by acupuncture point injections with placental extract.

    PubMed

    Cho, Tae Hwan; Park, Kyeong Mee

    2014-06-01

    This is a case report of a female patient who developed complex regional pain syndrome in the left upper limb after a traumatic injury to the distal part of the left forearm. The pain was immediate and resistant to oral analgesics and continued transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Five months after the injury, the patient presented to our clinic with severe pain, swelling, redness, cold sensation of the left hand, and loss of function from the left hand up to the left shoulder. Acupuncture points LI5, LU2, SI10, HT1, GB21, and SI11 (which are localized in the joints or in the muscles responsible for the movement of the left upper limb) were selected for the application of the placental extract. Injection of placental extract into the acupuncture points resulted in dramatic pain relief, swelling remission, motor recovery, temperature normalization, and disappearance of redness in this patient with complex regional pain syndrome type 1.

  18. A Rare Clinical Variant of Oromandibular Limb Hypogenesis Syndrome Type I B

    PubMed Central

    Godhane, Alkesh; Kalaskar, Ashita; Demble, Swati

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aglossia is a rare congenital malformation that often occurs as an isolated disorder or is observed in association with other congenital deformities, particularly limb defects. We present a unique case of a 7-year-old girl with aglossia, hypodactyli, rudimentary ears, retrognathic and V-shaped mandible. Her parental history revealed intrauterine exposure of medicines. The patient had problems in difficulty in eating, speech, taste sensation and hearing. The present case does not fit into Hall’s classification of oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome (OLHS) which best describes hypoglossia and limb deformities. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to document the rare variant of OLHS which can be included in Hall’s classification. How to cite this article: Kalaskar RR, Godhane A, Kalaskar A, Demble S. A Rare Clinical Variant of Oromandibular Limb Hypogenesis Syndrome Type I B. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):78-81. PMID:27274161

  19. Dietary carbohydrate restriction in type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome: time for a critical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Accurso, Anthony; Bernstein, Richard K; Dahlqvist, Annika; Draznin, Boris; Feinman, Richard D; Fine, Eugene J; Gleed, Amy; Jacobs, David B; Larson, Gabriel; Lustig, Robert H; Manninen, Anssi H; McFarlane, Samy I; Morrison, Katharine; Nielsen, Jørgen Vesti; Ravnskov, Uffe; Roth, Karl S; Silvestre, Ricardo; Sowers, James R; Sundberg, Ralf; Volek, Jeff S; Westman, Eric C; Wood, Richard J; Wortman, Jay; Vernon, Mary C

    2008-01-01

    Current nutritional approaches to metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes generally rely on reductions in dietary fat. The success of such approaches has been limited and therapy more generally relies on pharmacology. The argument is made that a re-evaluation of the role of carbohydrate restriction, the historical and intuitive approach to the problem, may provide an alternative and possibly superior dietary strategy. The rationale is that carbohydrate restriction improves glycemic control and reduces insulin fluctuations which are primary targets. Experiments are summarized showing that carbohydrate-restricted diets are at least as effective for weight loss as low-fat diets and that substitution of fat for carbohydrate is generally beneficial for risk of cardiovascular disease. These beneficial effects of carbohydrate restriction do not require weight loss. Finally, the point is reiterated that carbohydrate restriction improves all of the features of metabolic syndrome. PMID:18397522

  20. Human USP18 deficiency underlies type 1 interferonopathy leading to severe pseudo-TORCH syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meuwissen, Marije E C; Schot, Rachel; Buta, Sofija; Oudesluijs, Grétel; Tinschert, Sigrid; Speer, Scott D; Li, Zhi; van Unen, Leontine; Heijsman, Daphne; Goldmann, Tobias; Lequin, Maarten H; Kros, Johan M; Stam, Wendy; Hermann, Mark; Willemsen, Rob; Brouwer, Rutger W W; Van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Martin-Fernandez, Marta; de Coo, Irenaeus; Dudink, Jeroen; de Vries, Femke A T; Bertoli Avella, Aida; Prinz, Marco; Crow, Yanick J; Verheijen, Frans W; Pellegrini, Sandra; Bogunovic, Dusan; Mancini, Grazia M S

    2016-06-27

    Pseudo-TORCH syndrome (PTS) is characterized by microcephaly, enlarged ventricles, cerebral calcification, and, occasionally, by systemic features at birth resembling the sequelae of congenital infection but in the absence of an infectious agent. Genetic defects resulting in activation of type 1 interferon (IFN) responses have been documented to cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome, which is a cause of PTS. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase 18 (USP18) is a key negative regulator of type I IFN signaling. In this study, we identified loss-of-function recessive mutations of USP18 in five PTS patients from two unrelated families. Ex vivo brain autopsy material demonstrated innate immune inflammation with calcification and polymicrogyria. In vitro, patient fibroblasts displayed severely enhanced IFN-induced inflammation, which was completely rescued by lentiviral transduction of USP18. These findings add USP18 deficiency to the list of genetic disorders collectively termed type I interferonopathies. Moreover, USP18 deficiency represents the first genetic disorder of PTS caused by dysregulation of the response to type I IFNs. Therapeutically, this places USP18 as a promising target not only for genetic but also acquired IFN-mediated CNS disorders. PMID:27325888

  1. Metabolic syndrome as a predictor of type 2 diabetes, and its clinical interpretations and usefulness.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jeong-Ah; Lee, Jin-Hee; Lim, Sun-Young; Ha, Hee-Sung; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Park, Yong-Moon; Lee, Won-Chul; Kang, Moo-Il; Yim, Hyeon-Woo; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Son, Ho-Young

    2013-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome is defined as a cluster of glucose intolerance, hypertension, dyslipidemia and central obesity with insulin resistance as the source of pathogenesis. Although several different combinations of criteria have been used to define metabolic syndrome, a recently published consensus recommends the use of ethnic-specific criteria, including waist circumference as an indicator of central obesity, triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol as indicators of dyslipidemia, and blood pressure greater than 130/85 mmHg. The definition of dysglycemia, and whether central obesity and insulin resistance are essential components remain controversial. Regardless of the definition, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome is increasing in Western and Asian countries, particularly in developing areas undergoing rapid socioenvironmental changes. Numerous clinical trials have shown that metabolic syndrome is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), type 2 diabetes mellitus and all-cause mortality. Therefore, metabolic syndrome might be useful as a practical tool to predict these two major metabolic disorders. Comprehensive management of risk factors is very important to the improvement of personal and public health. However, recent studies have focused on the role metabolic syndrome plays as a risk factor for CVD; its importance in the prediction of incident diabetes is frequently overlooked. In the present review, we summarize the known evidence supporting metabolic syndrome as a predictor for type 2 diabetes mellitus and CVD. Additionally, we suggest how metabolic syndrome might be useful in clinical practice, especially for the prediction of diabetes. PMID:24843675

  2. Candidate regions for Waardenburg syndrome type II: Search for a second WS locus

    SciTech Connect

    Nance, W.E.; Pandya, A.; Blanton, S.H.

    1994-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by deafness and pigmentary abnormalities such as heterochromia of irides, hypopigmented skin patches, white forlock and premature graying. Clinically the syndrome has been classified into three types. Type II differs from type I in that dystopia canthorum is generally absent, and type III has associated limb anomalies. Recently linkage analysis localized the gene for WSI to chromosome 2q. PAX-3, which is a human analogue of the murine pax-3 locus, maps to this region and mutations in this gene have been found to segregate with WSI. However genetic heterogeneity clearly exists: most if not all WSII families are unlinked to PAX-3 while most if not all WSI cases are linked. We ascertained a four-year-old female child with an interstitial deletion of chromosome 13 who had features of WS including bilateral congenital sensorineural hearing loss, pale blue irides and pinched nostrils as well as hypertelorism microcephaly, bilateral eyelid ptosis, digitalization of thumbs and fifth finger clinodactyly. High resolution chromosomal analysis revealed a de novo interstitial deletion of 13q22-33.2. There was no family history of WS or retardation. A similar deletion in the region of 13q21-32 has been described in a 13-year-old boy with features of WSII. These two cases strongly suggested that this chromosomal region may include a second locus for WS. We have identified eight families with clinical features of WS type I which have been excluded from linkage to the PAX-3 locus. We have typed these families for microsatellite markers spanning chromosome 13. Linkage between WSII and the chromosome 13 markers was excluded in these families. Hirschsprung disease has been associated with WS and it has recently been mapped to chromosome 10q11.2-q21.1. We are currently typing the 8 families for microsatellites in this region.

  3. Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 5: In Vitro Cytotoxicity Effects on Renal Tubular Cells and Inflammatory Profile

    PubMed Central

    Brocca, Alessandra; Virzì, Grazia Maria; Pasqualin, Chiara; Pastori, Silvia; Marcante, Stefano; de Cal, Massimo; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 5 (CRS Type 5) reflects concomitant cardiac and renal dysfunctions in the setting of a wide spectrum of systemic disorders. Our aim was to study in vitro effects of CRS Type 5 plasma on renal tubular cells (RTCs), in terms of cellular death and the characterization of inflammatory plasma profile in these patients. Material and Methods. We enrolled 11 CRS Type 5 patients from ICU and 16 healthy controls. Plasma from patients and controls was incubated with renal tubular cells (RTCs) and cell death was evaluated. Plasma cytokines were detected. Results. RTCs incubated with CRS Type 5 plasma showed significantly higher apoptosis and necrosis with respect to controls. Plasma cytokine profile of CRS Type 5 patients was significantly different from controls: we observed the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators in these patients. Caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 were activated in cells treated with CRS Type 5 plasma compared to controls. Conclusions. Our results underline the cytotoxic effect of CRS Type 5 mediators on RTC viability, probably due to the activation of both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis and to the deregulation of cytokine release. The consequence may be the damage of distant organs which lead to the worsening of condition of patients. PMID:26266085

  4. Frequency of Usher syndrome type 1 in deaf children by massively parallel DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Hidekane; Miyagawa, Maiko; Kumakawa, Kozo; Nishio, Shin-ya; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1) is the most severe of the three USH subtypes due to its profound hearing loss, absent vestibular response and retinitis pigmentosa appearing at a prepubescent age. Six causative genes have been identified for USH1, making early diagnosis and therapy possible through DNA testing. Targeted exon sequencing of selected genes using massively parallel DNA sequencing (MPS) technology enables clinicians to systematically tackle previously intractable monogenic disorders and improve molecular diagnosis. Using MPS along with direct sequence analysis, we screened 227 unrelated non-syndromic deaf children and detected recessive mutations in USH1 causative genes in five patients (2.2%): three patients harbored MYO7A mutations and one each carried CDH23 or PCDH15 mutations. As indicated by an earlier genotype–phenotype correlation study of the CDH23 and PCDH15 genes, we considered the latter two patients to have USH1. Based on clinical findings, it was also highly likely that one patient with MYO7A mutations possessed USH1 due to a late onset age of walking. This first report describing the frequency (1.3–2.2%) of USH1 among non-syndromic deaf children highlights the importance of comprehensive genetic testing for early disease diagnosis. PMID:26791358

  5. Scintigraphic portrayal of the syndrome of multiple endocrine neoplasia type-2B

    SciTech Connect

    Yobbagy, J.J.; Levatter, R.; Sisson, J.C.; Shulkin, B.L.; Polley, T.

    1988-06-01

    The scintigraphic appearance of the neoplasms in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN-2B) and the interpretations of the image patterns are described. An 18-year-old male patient with the MEN-2B syndrome underwent TI-201 imaging that showed concentrations of TI-201 in the primary medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) tumor and in cervical lymph node metastases. After total thyroidectomy and lymph node dissection, the TI-201 image was normal. Catecholamine levels in the blood and urine were only borderline elevated. Yet, greater than normal concentrations of I-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine (I-131 MIBG) were present in both adrenal glands. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed normal adrenal glands. These results were consistent with the diagnosis of adrenal medullary hyperplasia, a precursor of pheochromocytoma. No operation was indicated to remove the adrenal glands. Imaging with TI-201 appears to be useful in identifying sites of MTC in patients with the MEN-2B syndrome. I-131 MIBG imaging, in conjunction with computed tomography of the adrenal glands and appropriate catecholamine measurements, should be performed in patients with the MEN-2B syndrome to determine the status of the adrenal medullae, which then may be classified as normal, hyperplastic, or tumorous with pheochromocytoma.

  6. Laparoscopic Treatment of Type III Mirizzi Syndrome by T-Tube Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Yetışır, Fahri; Şarer, Akgün Ebru; Acar, H. Zafer; Polat, Yılmaz; Osmanoglu, Gokhan; Aygar, Muhittin; Ciftciler, A. Erdinc; Parlak, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Mirizzi syndrome (MS) is an impacted stone in the cystic duct or Hartmann's pouch that mechanically obstructs the common bile duct. We would like to report laparoscopic treatment of type III MS. A 75-year-old man was admitted with the complaint of abdominal pain and jaundice. The patient was accepted as MS type III according to radiological imaging and intraoperative view. Laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy, extraction of impacted stone by opening anterior surface of dilated cystic duct and choledochus, and repair of this opening by using the remaining part of gallbladder over the T-tube drainage were performed in a patient with type III MS. Application of reinforcement suture over stump was done in light of the checking with oliclinomel N4 injection trough the T-tube. At the 18-month follow-up, he was symptom-free with normal liver function tests. PMID:27293947

  7. Laparoscopic Treatment of Type III Mirizzi Syndrome by T-Tube Drainage.

    PubMed

    Yetışır, Fahri; Şarer, Akgün Ebru; Acar, H Zafer; Polat, Yılmaz; Osmanoglu, Gokhan; Aygar, Muhittin; Ciftciler, A Erdinc; Parlak, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Mirizzi syndrome (MS) is an impacted stone in the cystic duct or Hartmann's pouch that mechanically obstructs the common bile duct. We would like to report laparoscopic treatment of type III MS. A 75-year-old man was admitted with the complaint of abdominal pain and jaundice. The patient was accepted as MS type III according to radiological imaging and intraoperative view. Laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy, extraction of impacted stone by opening anterior surface of dilated cystic duct and choledochus, and repair of this opening by using the remaining part of gallbladder over the T-tube drainage were performed in a patient with type III MS. Application of reinforcement suture over stump was done in light of the checking with oliclinomel N4 injection trough the T-tube. At the 18-month follow-up, he was symptom-free with normal liver function tests. PMID:27293947

  8. Pregnancy and delivery in ehlers-danlos syndrome (hypermobility type): review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Indranil; Wilson, Helen; Oteri, Odiri

    2011-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of connective tissue disorders which are divided into various distinguishable phenotypes. The type of EDS determines the potential obstetric complications. Due to the spectrum of clinical manifestation and overlap between phenotypes, there are no standardised obstetric management guidelines. Existing literature illustrates different obstetric management in hypermobility type of EDS, including uneventful term vaginal deliveries as well as preterm cesarean section deliveries. This paper discusses obstetric management of a woman with EDS hypermobility type. Cesarean section was deemed the most appropriate delivery method in this patient due to the possible complications including risk of joint dislocation and pain morbidity. No obstetric complications were experienced, and good maternal and neonatal outcomes were achieved. PMID:21765833

  9. Wolfram Syndrome: a rare optic neuropathy in youth with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bucca, Brian C; Klingensmith, Georgeanna; Bennett, Jeffrey L

    2011-11-01

    Wolfram Syndrome (WS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder that causes non-autoimmune type 1 diabetes. The etiology involves a single gene mutation of the wolframin protein inducing endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in selected cell types with resultant diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and sensory-neural deafness. Symptoms are initially absent and signs within the posterior segment of the eye are usually the earliest indicator of WS.These cases characterize unusual and poorly described findings of pigmentary maculopathy in WS and illustrate the importance of collaboration between diabetes and eye care providers; especially in cases of non-autoimmune type 1 diabetes exhibiting atypical human leukocyte-associated antigen haplotypes.

  10. Spontaneous Carotid-Cavernous Fistula in the Type IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Gyun; Cho, Won-Sang; Kim, Jeong Eun

    2014-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a rare inherited connective disease. Among several subgroups, type IV EDS is frequently associated with spontaneous catastrophic bleeding from a vascular fragility. We report on a case of carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) in a patient with type IV EDS. A 46-year-old female presented with an ophthalmoplegia and chemosis in the right eye. Subsequently, seizure and cerebral infarction with micro-bleeds occurred. CCF was completely occluded with transvenous coil embolization without complications. Thereafter, the patient was completely recovered. Transvenous coil embolization can be a good treatment of choice for spontaneous CCF with type IV EDS. However, every caution should be kept during invasive procedure. PMID:24653803

  11. Two patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIII with unexpected hoarseness.

    PubMed

    George, S M C; Vandersteen, A; Nigar, E; Ferguson, D J P; Topham, E J; Pope, F M

    2016-10-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) encompasses a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of connective tissue disorders, characterized by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and tissue fragility. It is a rare condition, and inheritance is either autosomal dominant or recessive. Previously grouped into 11 different subtypes, with increasing knowledge of the underlying molecular defects, it was reclassified in 1997 into 6 major groups, with type VIII excluded from this classification. Type VIII EDS is a very rare subtype, characterized by severe, early-onset periodontitis, skin fragility and abnormal scarring. Voice abnormalities have occasionally been described in other forms of the condition, and may be due to defects in the collagen of the vocal ligament. We report two cases of patients with EDS type VIII and hoarseness. PMID:27663155

  12. Clinical variability of type 1 neurofibromatosis: is there a neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Stern, H J; Saal, H M; Lee, J S; Fain, P R; Goldgar, D E; Rosenbaum, K N; Barker, D F

    1992-01-01

    Detailed clinical, ophthalmological, and molecular studies were performed on a multigeneration family in which there were many subjects with type 1 neurofibromatosis, a common autosomal dominant disorder. Affected family members displayed a wide range of clinical findings including, in two subjects, features seen in Noonan syndrome (triangular facies, downward slanting palpebral fissures, micrognathia, short stature, and learning disability). Subjects have been described previously whose features have overlapped with neurofibromatosis and Noonan syndrome, and it has been suggested that these persons might represent a separate condition. DNA haplotype analysis showed linkage of the neurofibromatosis phenotype seen in this family to the proximal long arm of chromosome 17 in the region where the type 1 neurofibromatosis gene has been mapped. These results imply that the Noonan phenotype seen in some patients with type 1 neurofibromatosis might be the result of variable or variant expression of the neurofibromatosis gene on chromosome 17. The possible role of non-specific factors, such as fetal hypotonia, in producing the neurofibromatosis-Noonan phenotype needs further investigation. The availability of closely linked and intragenic molecular markers for neurofibromatosis could potentially be useful in the diagnosis and characterisation of patients and families with atypical forms of neurofibromatosis. Images PMID:1348094

  13. [Vascular and/or cardiac manifestations of type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. 9 cases].

    PubMed

    de Wazières, B; Coppere, B; Durieu, I; Fest, T; Ninet, J; Levrat, R; Vuitton, D A; Dupond, J L

    1995-10-14

    Type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a rare disease caused by abnormal synthesis of type III collagen, often leads to vascular fragility. We report 9 cases (6 men and 3 women, mean age 35 years). For 7 of the patients, the inaugural signs were arterial complications including haemoperitoneum in 2 patients with multiple aneurysmal dystrophy of the abdominal arteries, one case of ruptured subclavian artery, two dissections of the renal artery, one case with rupture of a cerebral aneurysm, one rupture of the mesenteric artery and a haematoma after arterial puncture. Other vascular manifestations were acrosyndrome (n = 4), varicose veins (n = 3), and prolapsus of the mitral valve (n = 2). In addition, 8 of the 9 patients presented extravascular signs. There was a history of familial disease in 5 cases. Pregnancy was completed to term in three patients: a cesarean section was required in one case and intra-uterine growth retardation was seen in 2. Morbidity was important with hemiparesia, blindness and paraparesis sequellae. One patient died from haemorrhage. This series of patients with type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome illustrates the severity of this disease whose prevalence is often underestimated. The disease is transmitted by autosomal dominant inheritance, underscoring the importance of familial testing for early diagnosis. Clinicians should be aware of the vascular manifestations and avoid invasive punctures or operations except in exceptional indications. PMID:8545315

  14. Blunt aortic trauma in a patient with the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome type VI

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Marco Yat Hang; Murray, Jennifer; Thompson, Errington C.

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old male with the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS) type VI (ocular scoliotic) who was kicked in the abdomen presented to the emergency room (ER) with abdominal pain. He was found to have a blunt traumatic aortic injury. The patient was treated nonoperatively. He was stable and discharged home on the eighth day. The patient returned to the ER several days later hypotensive and tachycardic. The patient was taken immediately to the operating room, but vascular repair was not possible. The patient expired. We discuss the challenges of taking care of a patient with EDS and offer suggestions that might improve future patient's outcome. PMID:26956239

  15. Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome effectively treated with modified Atkins diet.

    PubMed

    Haberlandt, Edda; Karall, Daniela; Jud, Veronika; Baumgartner, Sara Sigl; Zotter, Sibylle; Rostasy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Scholl-Buergi, Sabine

    2014-04-01

    This is a report on the successful treatment of a 6-year-old girl with genetically proven glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) with modified Atkins diet (MAD). GLUT1-DS is an inborn disorder of glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier, which leads to energy deficiency of the brain with a broad spectrum of neurological symptoms including therapy-resistant epilepsy. Usually classical ketogenic diet (KD) is the standard treatment for patients with GLUT1-DS. Treatment with MAD, a variant of KD, for an observation period of 17 months resulted in improvement of seizures, alertness, cognitive abilities, and electroencephalography in this patient.

  16. A gene for Usher syndrome type I (USH1A) maps to chromosome 14q

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.; Gerber, S.; Rozet, J.M.; Delrieu, O.; Briard, M.L.; Dollfus, H.; Frezal, J.; Munnich, A. ); Bonneau, D. ); Ghazi, I. )

    1992-12-01

    Usher syndrome (US) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by congenital hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa. It is the most frequent cause of deaf-blindness in adults and accounts for 3 to 6% of deaf children. Here, the authors report the genetic mapping of a gene for US type I (USH1A), the most severe form of the disease, to the long arm of chromosome 14, by linkage to probe MLJ14 at the D14S13 locus in 10 families of Western France ancestry ([cflx Z] = 4.13 at [cflx [theta

  17. Tyrosinemia type II in two cases previously reported as Richner-Hanhart syndrome.

    PubMed

    Balato, N; Cusano, F; Lembo, G; Santoianni, P

    1986-01-01

    Two sibs with palmo-plantar keratosis and dendritic corneal opacities, previously described as suffering from Richner-Hanhart syndrome by other authors, about 25 years ago, showed increased plasma and urine tyrosine levels. Their neurological and mental features were within normal limits. A comprehensive review of the literature showed a total of 47 cases of fully documented tyrosinemia type II; 8 more patients also had the clinical features of the disease, but aminoacidemia had never been observed. The importance of early diagnosis is stressed, since a low tyrosine-phenylalanine diet dramatically improves the symptoms and may prevent mental retardation.

  18. Stanford type A aortic dissection in a patient with Marfan syndrome during pregnancy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Ho; Bae, Jisue; Choi, Seung Won; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Chung Su; Cho, Hyun Sung; Lee, Sangmin M

    2016-02-01

    Aortic dissection during pregnancy is a devastating event for both the pregnant woman and the baby. We report a case of acute aortic dissection (Stanford type A) in a pregnant woman with Marfan syndrome at the 29(th) week of gestation. She underwent a cesarean section followed by an ascending aorta and total arch replacement with cardiopulmonary bypass, without a prior sternotomy. The hemodynamic parameters were kept stable during the cesarean section by using inotropes and vasopressors under transesophageal echocardiography monitoring. The newborn survived after endotracheal intubation and management in a neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:26885307

  19. Blunt aortic trauma in a patient with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI.

    PubMed

    Yung, Marco Yat Hang; Murray, Jennifer; Thompson, Errington C

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old male with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type VI (ocular scoliotic) who was kicked in the abdomen presented to the emergency room (ER) with abdominal pain. He was found to have a blunt traumatic aortic injury. The patient was treated nonoperatively. He was stable and discharged home on the eighth day. The patient returned to the ER several days later hypotensive and tachycardic. The patient was taken immediately to the operating room, but vascular repair was not possible. The patient expired. We discuss the challenges of taking care of a patient with EDS and offer suggestions that might improve future patient's outcome. PMID:26956239

  20. Complex regional pain syndrome type 1. Some treatments assessed versus placebo, limited efficacy.

    PubMed

    2009-12-01

    (1) Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 generally occurs after trauma and usually affects a limb; (2) How is complex regional pain syndrome type 1 diagnosed? What is its natural course? How safe and effective are available treatments? To answer these questions, we reviewed the literature using the standard Prescrire methodology; (3) Diagnosis is mainly based on clinical features, including pain disproportionate to the initial trauma, associated with cutaneous vasomotor, trophic and sweating disorders; (4) Some clinical signs call for additional examinations to help rule out another vascular, neurological, infectious or rheumatic disorder. Radiological evidence of bone demineralisation supports the diagnosis, but radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and scintigraphy generally contribute little to the diagnosis of complex regional pain syndrome; (5) Some patients recover spontaneously after a few weeks, while others develop chronic pain or even severe disability after a period of years; (6) The results of small placebo-controlled trials suggest that corticosteroids are effective during the initial phase of this syndrome; (7) A very high oral dose of alendronic acid provided sustained pain relief in a randomised trial. Other studies suggest that bisphosphonates have some impact. The adverse effects of alendronic acid given at such high doses are poorly known; (8) Calcitonin, antiepileptics, antidepressants and opiates have no proven efficacy; (9) Transcutaneous neurostimulation is rapidly effective and safe, but its efficacy also diminishes rapidly. Therefore, the sessions have to take place at increasingly shorter intervals. (10) Spinal neurostimulation with implanted electrodes has been assessed in a comparative trial in 54 patients. Some efficacy was observed, but one-third of patients had complications requiring further surgery; (11) Various substances have been given intravenously with the goal of achieving regional anaesthesia, but none was found to

  1. Exploration of differences in types of sleep disturbance and severity of sleep problems between individuals with Cri du Chat syndrome, Down's syndrome, and Jacobsen syndrome: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Maas, Anneke P H M; Didden, Robert; Korzilius, Hubert; Curfs, Leopold M G

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of sleep problems in individuals with intellectual disability (ID) seems to vary between genetic syndromes associated with ID. Different types of sleep disturbances may indicate underlying causes of sleep problems and these types of sleep disturbances may vary between different genetic syndromes. We examined and compared five types of sleep disturbance as well as severity of sleep problems in individuals with Cri du Chat syndrome (CDC), Down's syndrome (DS), Jacobsen syndrome (JS), and individuals with non-specific ID (NS). We used Simonds and Parraga's Sleep Questionnaire (1982) to assess prevalence of types of sleep disturbance and to explore differences in types of sleep disturbance and severity of sleep problems between the four diagnostic groups. In each group, mean scores for Snoring were significantly higher than those for Sleep apnea and Snoring was the most prevalent type of sleep disturbance in CDC, DS, and JS. The mean score on Complaints related to sleep was remarkably high in the JS group. There were no differences in severity of sleep problems between groups. These findings suggest that snoring is an important underlying cause of sleep problems in individuals with CDS, DS, and JS. PMID:22699250

  2. [Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS I). Pathophysiology, diagnostics, and therapy].

    PubMed

    Köck, F X; Borisch, N; Koester, B; Grifka, J

    2003-05-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS type I)--formerly termed Sudeck's atrophy or reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD)--causes chronic, poorly controllable pain, autonomic, sensorimotor disorders,and serious trophic alterations in the later stages. It develops in the distal extremities mostly after minimal trauma or surgical intervention and rarely spontaneously. The severity of symptoms is disproportionate to the causative event. The latest scientific findings show that the previously called reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), which was supposed to be a result of a hyperreactive autonomic nervous system,is a very complex syndrome that occurs on different integration levels of the nervous system. Sympathetically maintained pain (SMP) may be facultatively characteristic, but is not to be misunderstood as an underlying mechanism. A neurogenic inflammation reaction has recently been discussed, just as had been postulated by Paul Sudeck long before. That was the reason why the International Association for the Study of Pain (ISAP) introduced the more descriptive term "complex regional pain syndrome" (CRPS) type I in 1994. Due to the complexity of the process necessitating qualified knowledge, it is important to immediately refer patients to a specialized pain OPD or clinic. The diagnosis of CRPS type I is based upon a carefully taken case history and a clinical examination by an experienced practitioner. Imaging diagnostic tools and laboratory findings are of no or only low predicative value. The question of whether SMP exists after diagnosing CRPS type I is eminent for therapy planning. Therefore, diagnostic regional anesthetics are still important in spite of their uncertain prognostic relevance. Physical therapy, occupational therapy, medical treatment, and psychotherapy play an important role in the primary treatment of CRPS type I as noninvasive procedures. Despite heavy criticism, invasive sympathetic block, subsequent to adequate diagnostics, is an

  3. Abducens Nerve in Patients with Type 3 Duane’s Retraction Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background We have previously reported that the presence of the abducens nerve was variable in patients with type 3 Duane’s retraction syndrome (DRS), being present in 2 of 5 eyes (40%) and absent in 3 (60%) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The previous study included only 5 eyes with unilateral DRS type 3. Objectives To supplement existing scarce pathologic information by evaluating the presence of the abducens nerve using high resolution thin-section MRI system in a larger number of patients with DRS type 3, thus to provide further insight into the pathogenesis of DRS. Data Extraction A retrospective review of medical records on ophthalmologic examination and high resolution thin-section MRI at the brainstem level and orbit was performed. A total of 31 patients who showed the typical signs of DRS type 3, including abduction and adduction deficit, globe retraction, narrowing of fissure on adduction and upshoot and/or downshoot, were included. The abducens nerve and any other extraocular muscle abnormalities discovered by MRI were noted. Results DRS was unilateral in 26 patients (84%) and bilateral in 5 patients (16%). Two out of 5 bilateral patients had DRS type 3 in the right eye and DRS type 1 in the left eye. Of the 34 affected orbits with DRS type 3 in 31 patients, the abducens nerve was absent or hypoplastic in 31 eyes (91%) and present in 3 eyes (9%). Patients with a present abducens nerve showed more limitation in adduction compared to patients with an absent abducens nerve (P = 0.030). Conclusions The abducens nerve is absent or hypoplastic in 91% of DRS type 3. Patients with a present abducens nerve showed more prominent limitation of adduction. As DRS type 3 partly share the same pathophysiology with type 1 and 2 DRS, the classification of DRS may have to be revised according to MRI findings. PMID:27352171

  4. Clinical, morphological, and biochemical phenotype of a new case of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIIC.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, A; Wilcox, W R; Cohn, D H

    1997-01-10

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type VIIC is a newly recognized human disorder which results from failure to remove the amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen. Four cases of EDS type VIIC have been reported, and here we describe a fifth case. The propositus was a 1,445 g male infant born at 30 weeks of gestation following premature rupture of membranes. He had wide fontanelles, prominent eyes with swollen eyelids and blue sclerae, anteverted nostrils, micrognathia, umbilical hernia, short stubby fingers, and cutis laxa with hirsutism. At age 3 months, during the repair of the umbilical hernia, he was noted to have unusual skin fragility. Examination of skin by scanning electron microscopy showed frayed collagen fibrils, and transmission electron microscopy showed the hieroglyphic collagen fibril morphology characteristic of the disorder. As reported in other cases, cultured fibroblasts synthesized type I procollagen that was very poorly processed at the amino-terminal propeptide cleavage site. the 5 known cases of human EDS type VIIC characterize a distinct clinical phenotype, making this condition recognizable at birth before manifestation of severe skin fragility. The diagnosis can be confirmed by biochemical studies of type I procollagen synthesis and by electron microscopic examination of skin. PMID:8986271

  5. Association of Parental Age and the Type of Down Syndrome on the Territory of Bosnia and Herzegovina

    PubMed Central

    Sotonica, Mia; Mackic-Djurovic, Mirela; Hasic, Sabaheta; Kiseljakovic, Emina; Jadric, Radivoj; Ibrulj, Slavka

    2016-01-01

    Background: Advanced paternal and/or maternal age is a classic risk factor for Down syndrome. The aim of the study was to investigate the frequency of Down syndrome types in children and its association with maternal and paternal age in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Subjects and Methods: The cross sectional, observational study included 127 children, 49 girls and 78 boys, aged 1-180 months suspected to have Down syndrome, admitted to the Centre for Genetics, Faculty of Medicine University of Sarajevo, for cytogenetic analysis and differential diagnosis of Down syndrome during the period from January 2010 to May 2015. Standard method of 72 hours cultivation of peripheral blood lymphocytes has been applied. The accepted level of statistical significance was p<0.05. Study Results: The most common type of Down syndrome was standard trisomy (86.6%), comparing to translocation and mosaicism (7.1%; 6.3%, respectively). The highest frequency of Down syndrome cases was in mother and father’s group from 30-39 years old (57; 57 children, respectively) compared to mother and father’s groups with younger than 30 (44; 29, respectively) and 40 and older (26; 41, respectively). The significant difference was found in maternal age between translocation and mosaicism groups (p=0.036). Difference between parental years and type of Down syndrome was significant when Standard trisomy 21 and translocation (p=0.045), as well as mosaicism and translocation (p=0.036), were compared. Conclusion: The most common type of Down syndrome was standard trisomy 21, with highest occurrence in parents from 30 to 39 years old. Parents were the youngest in translocation group. Obtained results suggest that multidisciplinary approach to identifying the trigger for trisomy appearance and the influence of maternal age is required. PMID:27147778

  6. Treatment for Acute Stage Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type II with Polydeoxyribonucleotide Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2016-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type II is a syndrome that develops after nerve injury. Symptoms may be severe, and vary depending on the degree of sympathetic nerve involvement. As yet, there is no satisfactory treatment. We report the case of a female patient who had an L5 left transverse process fracture and an S2 body fracture, who developed symptoms of CRPS type II in her left lower leg that were aggravated during ambulation in spite of absolute bed rest for one month after the trauma. Several treatments, including bed rest, medication, and numerous nerve blocks were attempted, but the pain persisted. We finally tried injection of polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN) solution at the left L5 transverse process fracture site because we knew of the anti-inflammatory effect of PDRN. One day after this treatment, her symptoms had almost disappeared and three days later, she was discharged. We will also further discuss the possibility of using PDRN solution for the treatment of CRPS.

  7. A new COL3A1 mutation in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV.

    PubMed

    Eder, Johanna; Laccone, Franco; Rohrbach, Marianne; Giunta, Cecilia; Aumayr, Klaus; Reichel, Christofer; Trautinger, Franz

    2013-03-01

    The vascular type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV, EDS IV; OMIM #130050) is a rare connective tissue disorder with autosomal dominant transmission caused by mutations in the COL3A1 gene resulting in increased fragility of connective tissue with arterial, intestinal, and uterine ruptures and premature death. We present a 28-year-old female who in addition to typical EDS IV symptoms had severe peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) and subtotal stenosis of the abdominal aorta. COL3A1 sequencing resulted in detection of an as yet undescribed mutation in exon 36 at position 2465 leading to a nucleotide replacement (c.2465G>C; p.G822A). Ultrastructural analysis of a skin biopsy revealed abnormal morphology and distribution of dermal collagen fibres. We conclude that PAOD is a possible manifestation of EDS IV and that further research is required to define its true prevalence among patients with EDS IV and its molecular pathology including genotype-phenotype correlation.

  8. Delayed diagnosis with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 causing acute adrenal crisis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojing; Ping, Fan; Qi, Cuijuan; Xiao, Xinhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 (APS-2), also known as Schmidt's syndrome, is an uncommon disorder characterized by the coexistence of Addison's disease with thyroid autoimmune disease and/or type 1 diabetes mellitus. Addison's disease as the obligatory component is potentially life-threatening. Unfortunately, the delayed diagnosis of Addison's disease is common owing to its rarity and the nonspecific clinical manifestation. Methods: Here we reported a case of 38-year-old female patient who presented with 2 years’ history of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and received levothyroxine replacement. One year later, skin hyperpigmentation, fatigue, loss of appetite, and muscle soreness occurred. She was advised to increase the dose of levothyroxine, but the symptoms were not relieved. After 4 months, the patient accompanied with dizziness, nausea, nonbloody vomiting, and fever. However, she was diagnosed with acute gastroenteritis and fell into shock and ventricular fibrillation subsequently. Further evaluation in our hospital revealed elevated adrenocorticotrophic hormone and low morning serum cortisol, associated with hyponatremia and atrophic adrenal gland. Hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and Hashimoto's thyroiditis were also demonstrated. Results: After the supplementation with hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone was initiated, the physical discomforts were alleviated and plasma electrolytes were back to normal. Conclusion: The uncommon case involving 3 endocrine organs reinforced the significance of a timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment of APS-2, and physicians needed to sharpen their awareness of the potentially life-threatening disease. PMID:27759634

  9. Treatment for Acute Stage Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type II with Polydeoxyribonucleotide Injection.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kun Soo; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2016-09-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type II is a syndrome that develops after nerve injury. Symptoms may be severe, and vary depending on the degree of sympathetic nerve involvement. As yet, there is no satisfactory treatment. We report the case of a female patient who had an L5 left transverse process fracture and an S2 body fracture, who developed symptoms of CRPS type II in her left lower leg that were aggravated during ambulation in spite of absolute bed rest for one month after the trauma. Several treatments, including bed rest, medication, and numerous nerve blocks were attempted, but the pain persisted. We finally tried injection of polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN) solution at the left L5 transverse process fracture site because we knew of the anti-inflammatory effect of PDRN. One day after this treatment, her symptoms had almost disappeared and three days later, she was discharged. We will also further discuss the possibility of using PDRN solution for the treatment of CRPS. PMID:27651875

  10. Type III Guyon Syndrome in 'B Boy' Break-Dancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Soo-young; Choi, Jin-gyu

    2015-01-01

    Although the musculoskeletal injuries associated with break-dancing which is gaining more popularity among adolescent and young people has been reported, the report regarding a peripheral nerve injury associated with breakdance is scarce. We report a rare case of a young amateur break-dancer, 'b-boy' who suffered from a painful paresthesia in his left hand, later diagnosed as type III Guyon's canal syndrome. A 23-year-old, right handed college man presented with a tenderness over the left hypothenar eminence and painful paresthesia over the ring and little fingers of 3 months duration. He trained himself as an amateur 'b boy' break-dancer for the last 10 months. Conservative management under the diagnosis of wrist sprain before presentation did not improve his hand pain. An magnetic resonance imaging and electrodiagnostic study revealed that painful paresthesia was caused by type III Guyon's canal syndrome, and 4 weeks of corticosteroid treatment was given with resolution of pain and paresthesia. PMID:27169091

  11. Type III Guyon Syndrome in 'B Boy' Break-Dancer: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hu, Soo-Young; Choi, Jin-Gyu; Son, Byung-Chul

    2015-10-01

    Although the musculoskeletal injuries associated with break-dancing which is gaining more popularity among adolescent and young people has been reported, the report regarding a peripheral nerve injury associated with breakdance is scarce. We report a rare case of a young amateur break-dancer, 'b-boy' who suffered from a painful paresthesia in his left hand, later diagnosed as type III Guyon's canal syndrome. A 23-year-old, right handed college man presented with a tenderness over the left hypothenar eminence and painful paresthesia over the ring and little fingers of 3 months duration. He trained himself as an amateur 'b boy' break-dancer for the last 10 months. Conservative management under the diagnosis of wrist sprain before presentation did not improve his hand pain. An magnetic resonance imaging and electrodiagnostic study revealed that painful paresthesia was caused by type III Guyon's canal syndrome, and 4 weeks of corticosteroid treatment was given with resolution of pain and paresthesia. PMID:27169091

  12. Treatment for Acute Stage Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type II with Polydeoxyribonucleotide Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2016-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type II is a syndrome that develops after nerve injury. Symptoms may be severe, and vary depending on the degree of sympathetic nerve involvement. As yet, there is no satisfactory treatment. We report the case of a female patient who had an L5 left transverse process fracture and an S2 body fracture, who developed symptoms of CRPS type II in her left lower leg that were aggravated during ambulation in spite of absolute bed rest for one month after the trauma. Several treatments, including bed rest, medication, and numerous nerve blocks were attempted, but the pain persisted. We finally tried injection of polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN) solution at the left L5 transverse process fracture site because we knew of the anti-inflammatory effect of PDRN. One day after this treatment, her symptoms had almost disappeared and three days later, she was discharged. We will also further discuss the possibility of using PDRN solution for the treatment of CRPS. PMID:27651875

  13. 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 inhibitors for metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schnackenberg, Christine G

    2008-03-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a constellation of interrelated metabolic risk factors that appear to promote the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These risk factors include abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. 11beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11beta-HSD) catalyzes the interconversion of glucocorticoids through the activity of two isozymes: type 1 (11beta-HSD1) and type 2 (11beta-HSD2). 11beta-HSD1 converts inactive glucocorticoid to the active form, whereas 11beta-HSD2 converts active glucocorticoid to the inactive form. It is well established that reduced 11beta-HSD2 activity causes hypertension and electrolyte abnormalities. More recently, the pathophysiological role of 11beta-HSD1 has been explored and studies suggest that increased 11beta-HSD1 activity within target tissues may promote insulin resistance, obesity, hypertension and dyslipidemia. This review will discuss the evidence that inhibition of 11beta-HSD1 may be therapeutic in the treatment of the metabolic syndrome.

  14. Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 1: A Defective Regulation of Monocyte Apoptosis Induced by Proinflammatory and Proapoptotic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Pastori, Silvia; Virzì, Grazia Maria; Brocca, Alessandra; de Cal, Massimo; Clementi, Anna; Vescovo, Giorgio; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the possible immune-mediated mechanisms in cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) type 1 pathogenesis. We enrolled 40 patients with acute heart failure (AHF), 11 patients with CRS type 1 and 15 controls. Plasma from the different groups was incubated with monocytes; subsequently, cell apoptosis was evaluated by DNA fragmentation, caspase activity and cytofluorometric assay. Cytokine quantification in plasma and supernatant was performed by ELISA. Monocytes treated with CRS type 1 plasma showed significantly higher apoptosis compared with those treated with AHF and the controls (p < 0.05). Caspase-3 (CRS type 1: 2.20 ng/ml, IQR 2.06-2.33; AHF: 1.48 ng/ml, IQR 1.31-1.56; controls: 0.71 ng/ml, IQR 0.67-0.81) and caspase-8 levels (CRS type 1: 1.49 ng/ml, IQR 1.42-1.57; AHF: 0.94 ng/ml, IQR 0.84-0.98; controls: 0.56 ng/ml, IQR 0.51-0.58) in cells incubated with plasma from these patients demonstrated a significantly higher concentration. We observed a strong upregulation of plasma IL-6 and IL-18 in CRS type 1 compared with AHF and the controls (p < 0.05). Interestingly, we observed a similar concentration of TNF-α in CRS type 1 and AHF. In CRS type 1 patients, IL-6 (52.13 ng/ml, IQR 47.29-66.83) and IL-18 levels (197.75 ng/ml, IQR 120.80-265.49) in supernatant were significantly higher than in AHF patients (IL-6: 28.79 ng/ml, IQR 19.90-36.10; IL-18: 21.98 ng/ml, IQR 15.98-29.85) and controls (IL-6: 5.02 ng/ml, IQR 4.56-6.44; IL-18: 7.91 ng/ml, IQR 5.57-10.62). These findings suggest the presence of a defective regulation of monocyte apoptosis in CRS type 1 patients and the involvement of an immune-mediated mechanism in the pathophysiology of this syndrome. PMID:25999959

  15. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type II Secondary to Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hamilton; Tafazoli, Sharwin

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain disorder characterized by severe pain and vasomotor and pseudomotor changes. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms is a recent advance in vascular surgery that has allowed repair of AAA while offering reduced intensive care unit and hospital lengths of stay, reduced blood loss, fewer major complications, and more rapid recovery. Pseudoaneurysms are a rare complication of an EVAR procedure that may result in a wide range of complications. The present report examines CRPS type II as a novel consequence of pseudoaneurysm formation from brachial artery access in the EVAR procedure. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of CRPS type II presentation as sequelae of an EVAR procedure. PMID:25650247

  16. [Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 after fracture of distal phalanx: case report].

    PubMed

    Boyacı, Ahmet; Tutoğlu, Ahmet; Boyacı, Fatıma Nurefşan; Yalçın, Şaban

    2014-01-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a disease characterized especially by pain, swelling, limited range of motion, vasomotor instability and patchy bone demineralization in the extremities. In this case, we report a 46-year-old woman diagnosed with CRPS type 1, whose complaints, such as swelling in the left hand, pain, and limitation of movement, started 2 months after a fracture of the distal phalanx in the left 4th finger. Her complaints were reduced with treatment of calcitonin, gabapentin, calcium and vitamin D3, retrograde edema massage, contrast baths, conventional TENS, pulsed ultrasound, desensitization and exercise with range of joint motion. CRPS type 1 should be considered in the differential diagnosis of upper limb pains which start after a fracture of the distal phalanx.

  17. Expanding the spectrum of genetic mutations in antenatal Bartter syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Fretzayas, Andreas; Gole, Evangelia; Attilakos, Achilleas; Daskalaki, Anna; Nicolaidou, Polyxeni; Papadopoulou, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Bartter syndrome (BS) is a group of genetic disorders characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, hyponatremia and elevated renin and aldosterone plasma concentrations. BS type II is caused by mutations in the KCNJ1 gene and usually presents with transient hyperkalemia. We report here a novel KCNJ1 mutation in a male neonate, prematurely born after a pregnancy complicated by polyhydramnios. The infant presented with typical clinical and laboratory findings of BS type II, such as hyponatremia, hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis, severe weight loss, elevated renin and aldosterone levels and transient hyperkalemia in the early postnatal period, which were later normalized. Molecular analysis revealed a compound heterozygous mutation in the KCNJ1 gene, consisting of a novel K76E and an already described V315G mutation, both affecting functional domains of the channel protein. Typical manifestations of antenatal BS in combination with hyperkalemia should prompt the clinician to search for mutations in the KCNJ1 gene first. PMID:23782368

  18. Bloom's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Glycogen Storage Disease, Type 1A Joubert Syndrome Maple Syrup Urine Disease and DLD Mucolipidosis IV (MLIV) Nemaline ... Glycogen Storage Disease, Type 1A Joubert Syndrome Maple Syrup Urine Disease and DLD Mucolipidosis IV (MLIV) Nemaline ...

  19. The multifaceted and complex hypermobility syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type): evaluation and management through a rehabilitative approach.

    PubMed

    Celletti, C; Camerota, F

    2013-01-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) is a hereditary disorder of connective tissue recently considered the one and the same as the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type (EDS-HT). The JHS/EDS-HT is mainly characterized by joint hypermobility, chronic pain and a variable skin involvement. Clinical manifestations expressed by patients are multiple and varied. The rehabilitative approach may play a fundamental role in the understanding and management of symptoms and clinical manifestation. Aim of this study is to make a literature revision of all the aspects of this not so rare disease. PMID:24045532

  20. Molecular etiology and genotype-phenotype correlation of Chinese Han deaf patients with type I and type II Waardenburg Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lianhua; Li, Xiaohua; Shi, Jun; Pang, Xiuhong; Hu, Yechen; Wang, Xiaowen; Wu, Hao; Yang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary abnormalities is genetically heterogeneous and phenotypically variable. This study investigated the molecular etiology and genotype-phenotype correlation of WS in 36 Chinese Han deaf probands and 16 additional family members that were clinically diagnosed with WS type I (WS1, n = 8) and type II (WS2, n = 42). Mutation screening of six WS-associated genes detected PAX3 mutations in 6 (86%) of the 7 WS1 probands. Among the 29 WS2 probands, 13 (45%) and 10 (34%) were identified with SOX10 and MITF mutations, respectively. Nineteen of the 26 detected mutations were novel. In WS2 probands whose parental DNA samples were available, de novo mutations were frequently seen for SOX10 mutations (7/8) but not for MITF mutations (0/5, P = 0.005). Excessive freckle, a common feature of WS2 in Chinese Hans, was frequent in WS2 probands with MITF mutations (7/10) but not in those with SOX10 mutations (0/13, P = 4.9 × 10−4). Our results showed that mutations in SOX10 and MITF are two major causes for deafness associated with WS2. These two subtypes of WS2 can be distinguished by the high de novo rate of the SOX10 mutations and the excessive freckle phenotype exclusively associated with the MITF mutations. PMID:27759048

  1. Biochemical changes in blood of type 2 diabetes with and without metabolic syndrome and their association with metabolic syndrome components

    PubMed Central

    Zadhoush, Fouzieh; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Pourfarzam, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple factors are involved in the development and progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DMII) to DMII with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular complications. To identify some of these factors, we aim to investigate the changes in erythrocyte membrane Na+/K+-ATPase activity, serum glucose, insulin, lipid profile, hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), anthropometric measurements, and blood pressure in DMII with and without MetS. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study comprised 155 male subjects distributed into three groups as healthy controls (50 non-DMII volunteers), Group I (50 DMII without MetS), and Group II (55 DMII with MetS). Fasting blood samples were taken for the measurement of glucose, insulin, HbA1c, hs-CRP and lipid profile. Na+/K+-ATPase activity was determined in erythrocyte ghost. Results: Na+/K+-ATPase activity was significantly decreased in DMII groups compared with controls. No significant difference was shown in Na+/K+-ATPase activity between DMII groups. Total ATPase activity, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels were similar in the three groups. Levels of insulin, hs-CRP, triacylglycerols, systolic blood pressure, weight, waist and hip circumference, waist/hip ratio, and body mass index were significantly elevated and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol significantly decreased only in Group II. Significant differences in serum glucose and hip circumference were seen between the groups. No significant differences in HbA1c levels were observed between DMII groups. Conclusion: Changes in many of the measured risk factors that occurred only in Group II compared with controls and Group I may provide an explanation of how DMII progresses to DMII with MetS and future cardiovascular complications. PMID:26664424

  2. Conservative management of small bowel perforation in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV.

    PubMed

    Allaparthi, Satya; Verma, Himanshu; Burns, David L; Joyce, Ann M

    2013-08-16

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders caused by collagen synthesis defects. EDS type IV, or vascular EDS, is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the type III pro-collagen gene (COL3A1). Common complications of EDS type IV include gastrointestinal bleeding and bowel perforations, posing diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas for both surgeons and gastroenterologists. Here, we describe a complicated case of EDS type IV in a 35-year-old caucasian female who presented with overt gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient had a prior history of spontaneous colonic perforation, and an uncomplicated upper endoscopy was performed. A careful ileoscopy was terminated early due to tachycardia and severe abdominal pain, and a subsequent computed tomography scan confirmed the diagnosis of ileal perforation. The patient was managed conservatively, and demonstrated daily improvement. At the time of hospital discharge, no further episodes of gastrointestinal blood loss had occurred. This case highlights the benefit of conservative management for EDS patients with gastrointestinal hemorrhage. It is recommended that surgical treatment should be reserved for patients who fail conservative treatment or in cases of hemodynamic instability. Finally, this case demonstrates the necessity for a higher threshold of operative or endoscopic interventions in EDS type IV patients. PMID:23951395

  3. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome associated with Chiari type I malformation caused by a large 16p13.3 microdeletion: a contiguous gene syndrome?

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Cezary; Volz, Kim; Ranola, Maria; Kitch, Karla; Karim, Tariza; O'Neil, Joseph; Smith, Jodi; Torres-Martinez, Wilfredo

    2010-02-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RSTS, OMIM 180849) is a rare condition, which in 65% of cases is caused by haploinsufficiency of CREBBP (cAMP response element binding protein binding protein) localized to 16p13.3. A small subset of RSTS cases caused by 16p13.3 microdeletions involving neighboring genes have been recently suggested to be a true contiguous gene syndrome called severe RSTS or 16p13.3 deletion syndrome (OMIM 610543). In the present report, we describe a case of a 2-year-old female with RSTS who, besides most of the typical features of RSTS has corpus callosum dysgenesis and a Chiari type I malformation which required neurosurgical decompression. CGH microarray showed a approximately 520.7 kb microdeletion on 16p13.3 involving CREBBP, ADCY9, and SRL genes. We hypothesize that the manifestations in this patient might be influenced by the haploinsufficiency for ADCY9 and SRL.

  4. Energy Types of Snoring Sounds in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: A Preliminary Observation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Li-Ang; Yu, Jen-Fang; Lo, Yu-Lun; Chen, Yen-Sheng; Wang, Ding-Li; Cho, Chih-Ming; Ni, Yung-Lun; Chen, Ning-Hung; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Chung-Guei; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Background Annoying snore is the principle symptom and problem in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). However, investigation has been hampered by the complex snoring sound analyses. Objective This study was aimed to investigate the energy types of the full-night snoring sounds in patients with OSAS. Patients and Method Twenty male OSAS patients underwent snoring sound recording throughout 6 hours of in-lab overnight polysomnogragphy. Snoring sounds were processed and analyzed by a new sound analytic program, named as Snore Map®. We transformed the 6-hour snoring sound power spectra into the energy spectrum and classified it as snore map type 1 (monosyllabic low-frequency snore), type 2 (duplex low-&mid-frequency snore), type 3 (duplex low- & high-frequency snore), and type 4 (triplex low-, mid-, & high-frequency snore). The interrator and test-retest reliabilities of snore map typing were assessed. The snore map types and their associations among demographic data, subjective snoring questionnaires, and polysomnographic parameters were explored. Results The interrator reliability of snore map typing were almost perfect (κ = 0.87) and the test-retest reliability was high (r = 0.71). The snore map type was proportional to the body mass index (r = 0.63, P = 0.003) and neck circumference (r = 0.52, P = 0.018). Snore map types were unrelated to subjective snoring questionnaire scores (All P>0.05). After adjustment for body mass index and neck circumference, snore map type 3–4 was significantly associated with severity of OSAS (r = 0.52, P = 0.026). Conclusions Snore map typing of a full-night energy spectrum is feasible and reliable. The presence of a higher snore map type is a warning sign of severe OSAS and indicated priority OSAS management. Future studies are warranted to evaluate whether snore map type can be used to discriminate OSAS from primary snoring and whether it is affected by OSAS management. PMID:23300931

  5. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 manifested as Hashimoto's thyroiditis and adrenocortical insufficiency, in Turner syndrome woman, with onset following introduction of treatment with recombinant human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Cyniak-Magierska, Anna; Lasoń, Agnieszka; Smyczyńska, Joanna; Lewiński, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome is a constellation of signs and symptoms of simultaneous insufficiencies of several endocrine glands. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 (APS 2) may be diagnosed when the adrenocortical insufficiency is associated with an autoimmune thyroid disease (Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease), and/or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Turner syndrome is the most common chromosomal disorder in females, caused by complete or partial X chromosome monosomy. We present the case of a 20-year-old woman with Turner syndrome, in whom APS 2 (Hashimoto's thyroiditis and adrenocortical insufficiency) has been diagnosed after introduction of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy. In Turner syndrome, examination of the patient must regularly be conducted in order to diagnose a possible onset of autoimmune diseases; respective treatment must be applied as soon as the diagnosis is established. In particular, therapy of rhGH, used for short stature treatment, may be a trigger factor of adrenal insufficiency. The cortisol level in blood should be assessed before rhGH administration and carefully monitored during the therapy, especially in case of autoimmune thyroid disease coexistence.

  6. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 manifested as Hashimoto's thyroiditis and adrenocortical insufficiency, in Turner syndrome woman, with onset following introduction of treatment with recombinant human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Cyniak-Magierska, Anna; Lasoń, Agnieszka; Smyczyńska, Joanna; Lewiński, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome is a constellation of signs and symptoms of simultaneous insufficiencies of several endocrine glands. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 (APS 2) may be diagnosed when the adrenocortical insufficiency is associated with an autoimmune thyroid disease (Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease), and/or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Turner syndrome is the most common chromosomal disorder in females, caused by complete or partial X chromosome monosomy. We present the case of a 20-year-old woman with Turner syndrome, in whom APS 2 (Hashimoto's thyroiditis and adrenocortical insufficiency) has been diagnosed after introduction of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy. In Turner syndrome, examination of the patient must regularly be conducted in order to diagnose a possible onset of autoimmune diseases; respective treatment must be applied as soon as the diagnosis is established. In particular, therapy of rhGH, used for short stature treatment, may be a trigger factor of adrenal insufficiency. The cortisol level in blood should be assessed before rhGH administration and carefully monitored during the therapy, especially in case of autoimmune thyroid disease coexistence. PMID:26071578

  7. Genetic analysis of Tunisian families with Usher syndrome type 1: toward improving early molecular diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Rebeh, Imen; Bonnet, Crystel; Bouassida, Walid; Hadjamor, Imen; Ayadi, Hammadi; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Petit, Christine; Masmoudi, Saber

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Usher syndrome accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deaf-blindness cases. The most severe form of this syndrome, Usher syndrome type I (USH1), is characterized by profound congenital sensorineural deafness, vestibular dysfunction, and retinitis pigmentosa. Six USH1 genes have been identified, MYO7A, CDH23, PCDH15, USH1C, SANS, and CIB2, encoding myosin VIIA, cadherin-23, protocadherin-15, harmonin, scaffold protein containing ankyrin repeats and a sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain, and calcium- and integrin-binding member 2, respectively. Methods In the present study, we recruited four Tunisian families with a diagnosis of USH1, together with healthy unrelated controls. Affected members underwent detailed audiologic and ocular examinations. We used the North African Deafness (NADf) chip to search for known North African mutations associated with USH. Then, we selected microsatellite markers covering USH1 known loci to genotype the DNA samples. Finally, we performed DNA sequencing of three known USH1 genes: MYO7A, PCDH15, and USH1C. Results Four biallelic mutations, all single base changes, were found in the MYO7A, USH1C, and PCDH15 genes. These mutations consist of a previously reported splicing defect c.470+1G>A in MYO7A, three novel variants, including two nonsense (p.Arg3X and p.Arg134X) in USH1C and PCDH15, respectively, and one frameshift (p.Lys615Asnfs*6) in MYO7A. Conclusions We found a remarkable genetic heterogeneity in the studied families with USH1 with a variety of mutations, among which three were novel. These novel mutations will be included in the NADf mutation screening chip that will allow a higher diagnosis efficiency of this extremely genetically heterogeneous disease. Ultimately, efficient molecular diagnosis of USH in a patient’s early childhood is of utmost importance, allowing better educational and therapeutic management. PMID:27440999

  8. Role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gene polymorphisms in type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chen; Zhou, Hui; Shen, Chong; Yu, Lu-Gang; Ding, Yi; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Guo, Zhi-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are the serious public health problems worldwide. Moreover, it is estimated that MetS patients have about five-fold greater risk of the T2DM development compared with people without the syndrome. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are a subgroup of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors which play an important role in the pathogenesis of MetS and T2DM. All three members of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) nuclear receptor subfamily, PPARα, PPARβ/δ and PPARγ are critical in regulating insulin sensitivity, adipogenesis, lipid metabolism, and blood pressure. Recently, more and more studies indicated that the gene polymorphism of PPARs, such as Leu162Val and Val227Ala of PPARα, +294T > C of PPARβ/δ, Pro12Ala and C1431T of PPARγ, are significantly associated with the onset and progressing of MetS and T2DM in different population worldwide. Furthermore, a large body of evidence demonstrated that the glucose metabolism and lipid metabolism were influenced by gene-gene interaction among PPARs genes. However, given the complexity pathogenesis of metabolic disease, it is unlikely that genetic variation of a single locus would provide an adequate explanation of inter-individual differences which results in diverse clinical syndromes. Thus, gene-gene interactions and gene-environment interactions associated with T2DM and MetS need future comprehensive studies. PMID:25987964

  9. Predicting the age of the mutation for Usher syndrome type I in the Acadian population

    SciTech Connect

    Nouri, N.; Risch, N.J.; Pelias, M.Z.

    1994-09-01

    The locus for Usher syndrome type I (USH1C) in the Acadian population is in the p15.1-p14 region of chromosome 11. This recessive disease is characterized by sensorineural hearing impairment, vestibular dysfunction, and pigmentary retinopathy. Three separate loci have been localized for Usher syndrome type I. All Acadian, but no non-Acadian, families show linkage to the 11p locus, suggesting a founder effect in the Acadian population. Linkage and haplotype analyses of eight markers spanning 10 centiMorgans demonstrate that USH1C lies between D11S1397 and D11S1310. Based on analyses of Usher and CEPH families the most likely linkage map for the eight markers is: D11S569-(.02)-D11S861-(.01)-D11S419-(.01)-D11S1397-(.004)-D11S921-(.007)-D11S1310-(.01)-D11S899-(.04)-D11S928. Evidence of linkage disequilibrium with USH1C was found for all markers, indicating a recent origin of a unique mutation. Parental haplotypes were separated into those with the disease allele and those with the normal allele at the USH1C locus. Of the 54 chromosomes with the disease allele, 17 had an identical haplotype for the eight markers. All but one of the haplotypes on the remaining 37 chromosomes could be explained by a few recombination events, suggesting that a single mutation is responsible for nearly all cases of Usher syndrome type I in the Acadian population. The same alleles were found at D11S921 and D11S1310 on 50 of the 54 chromosomes with the disease allele and on only 5 of the 50 chromosomes with the normal allele. Analysis of recombination and linkage disequilibrium between USH1C and each of the markers suggests that the age of the mutation is approximately 15 generations, which corresponds with the time that the Acadians arrived in the Canadian territory of Acadia. The analysis indicates that this mutation was already established in the Acadians who made their way to Louisiana after 1755.

  10. Recurring and generalized visceroptosis in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Dordoni, Chiara; Ritelli, Marco; Venturini, Marina; Chiarelli, Nicola; Pezzani, Lidia; Vascellaro, Annalisa; Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo; Colombi, Marina

    2013-05-01

    Visceroptosis is described in several heritable connective tissue disorders, including the hypermobility type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS), a.k.a. joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS). Clinical features of hEDS comprise joint hypermobility, mild skin hyperextensibility, joint instability complications, chronic joint/limb pain, and positive family history. Uterine and rectal prolapse has been reported in nulliparous women. We report on a family with two patients with hEDS. The proposita, a 38-year-old woman, present bilateral kidney prolapse requiring three nephropexies, gastric ptosis treated with gastropexy and Billroth I gastrectomy, and liver prolapse treated with a non-codified hepatopexy procedure. Radiological evaluation also showed ovarian and heart prolapse. To our knowledge this is the first case of multiple visceral ptoses in hEDS. Visceral prolapse may lead to severe morbidity, affecting quality of life and a high rate of relapses after surgical procedures. Further investigations are needed to understand the molecular basis of the disease and retrospective studies on surgical outcomes, presentation of case series can be effective in order to offer a better treatment and prevention for hEDS patients. PMID:23533212

  11. Carbohydrate restriction as the default treatment for type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Feinman, Richard D; Volek, Jeff S

    2008-08-01

    Dietary carbohydrate restriction in the treatment of diabetes and metabolic syndrome is based on an underlying principle of control of insulin secretion and the theory that insulin resistance is a response to chronic hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. As such, the theory is intuitive and has substantial experimental support. It has generally been opposed by health agencies because of concern that carbohydrate will be replaced by fat, particularly saturated fat, thereby increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease as dictated by the so-called diet-heart hypothesis. Here we summarize recent data showing that, in fact, substitution of fat for carbohydrate generally improves cardiovascular risk factors. Removing the barrier of concern about dietary fat makes carbohydrate restriction a reasonable, if not the preferred method for treating type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. We emphasize the ability of low carbohydrate diets to improve glycemic control, hemoglobin A1C and to reduce medication. We review evidence that such diets are effective even in the absence of weight loss.

  12. Waardenburg syndrome type I: Dental phenotypes and genetic analysis of an extended family

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino, Sibele-Nascimento; Paranaíba, Lívia-Maris-R.; Gomes, Andreia; dos-Santos-Neto, Pedro; Coletta, Ricardo-D.; Cardoso, Aline-Francoise; Frota, Ana-Cláudia; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of inheritance and the clinical features in a large family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1), detailing the dental abnormalities and screening for PAX3 mutations. Material and Methods To characterize the pattern of inheritance and clinical features, 29 family members were evaluated by dermatologic, ophthalmologic, otorhinolaryngologic and orofacial examination. Molecular analysis of the PAX3 gene was performed. Results The pedigree of the family,including the last four generations, was constructed and revealed non-consanguineous marriages. Out of 29 descendants, 16 family members showed features of WS1, with 9 members showing two major criteria indicative of WS1. Five patients showed white forelock and iris hypopigmentation, and four showed dystopia canthorum and iris hypopigmentation. Two patients had hearing loss. Dental abnormalities were identified in three family members, including dental agenesis, conical teeth and taurodontism. Sequencing analysis failed to identify mutations in the PAX3 gene. Conclusions These results confirm that WS1 was transmitted in this family in an autosomal dominant pattern with variable expressivity and high penetrance. The presence of dental manifestations, especially tooth agenesis and conical teeth which resulted in considerable aesthetic impact on affected individuals was a major clinical feature. Clinical relevance: This article reveals the presence of well-defined dental changes associated with WS1 and tries to establish a possible association between these two entities showing a new spectrum of WS1. Key words:Waardenburg syndrome, hearing loss, oral manifestations, mutation. PMID:27031059

  13. [Drug-induced exacerbation of hypoaldosteronism in autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2].

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2012-01-01

    Hypoaldosteronism is a clinical condition resulting from inadequate stimulation of aIdosterone secretion (hyporeninemic hypoaIdosteronism), defects in adrenal synthesis of aldosterone (hyperreninemic hypoaldosteronism), or resistance to the peripheral action of this hormone (pseudohypoaldosteronism). The disease is characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, ranging from asymptomatic hyperkalemia to life-threatening volume depletion, and, if unrecognized and untreated, it increases morbidity and mortality rates. In this paper, we report a case of a woman diagnosed with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2. As a consequence of adrenal cortex destruction, the patient developed subclinical hypoaldosteronism which was effectively treated with small doses of fludrocortisone. Two and fours years later, she required ibuprofen and atenolol treatment and each of these treatments was accompanied by a transient deterioration in mineralocorticoid activity which resolved after drug withdrawal. This case shows for the first time that drugs reducing plasma renin activity may unmask subclinical hypoaldosteronism in subjects with autoimmune polyglandular syndromes, and that they should be avoided in patients with even small disturbances in the hormonal function of the zona glomerulosa.

  14. Impaired Empathic Abilities among Patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (Type I)

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Hong-Suk; Lee, Do-Hyeong; Lee, Kyung-Jun; Noh, Eun Chung; Choi, Soo-Hee; Jang, Joon Hwan; Kim, Yong Chul

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to evaluate differences in empathic abilities between patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) Type I and healthy control subjects (HCs) and to assess correlations between empathic abilities and multidimensional aspects of pain. Methods Empathic ability was measured in 32 patients with CRPS Type I and in 36 HCs using the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI). A comprehensive assessment of pain was conducted in the patient group using the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (WHYMPI). Psychiatric symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories (BDI and BAI), and quality of life was evaluated using the WHO Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire. Results Patients with CRPS showed impaired cognitive and emotional empathic abilities compared with HCs. Significantly lower levels of perspective taking and empathic concern and higher levels of personal distress on the IRI were exhibited by the patient group. Perspective taking and personal distress were associated with affective distress and poor quality of life in social contexts (BDI, BAI, and WHOQOL). However, empathic concern was positively correlated with pain severity and social support from others (WHYMPI). Conclusion A tendency toward self-oriented distress in social cognition was exhibited among patients with CRPS Type I. Impaired empathic ability was shown to have potentially negative effects on subjective emotional outcomes and social performance in the lives of patients. Interventions to improve emotional awareness and theory of mind would be beneficial for enhancing social functioning in patients with CRPS Type I. PMID:26766944

  15. Classification of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by Types of Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Jason, Leonard A.; Boulton, Aaron; Porter, Nicole S.; Jessen, Tricia; Njoku, Mary Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Persons with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) often complain of fatigue states (e.g. post-exertional malaise, brain fog) that are qualitatively different than normal, daily fatigue. Given the heterogeneous nature of ME/CFS, it is likely that individuals with this illness experience these fatigue types differently in terms of severity and frequency. It is also possible that meaningful subgroups of patients exist regarding different patterns of the fatigue experience. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether individuals with ME/CFS can be classified in a meaningful way according to the different types of fatigue they experience. One hundred individuals with ME/CFS participated in the study. Individuals that met inclusion criteria were administered the Multiple Fatigue Types Questionnaire (MFTQ), a five-factor instrument that distinguishes between different types of fatigue. A cluster analysis was used to classify patients into various clusters based upon factor subscale scores. Using a three-factor solution, individuals were classified according to illness severity (low, moderate, severe) across the different fatigue factors. However, a 5-cluster solution enabled participants with moderate to severe fatigue levels to fall out into more differentiated clusters and demonstrate distinct fatigue state patterns. These results suggest that fatigue patterns of individuals with ME/CFS are heterogeneous and patients may be classified into meaningful subgroups. PMID:20185398

  16. Aberrant splicing of U12-type introns is the hallmark of ZRSR2 mutant myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Vikas; Kanojia, Deepika; Li, Jia; Okamoto, Ryoko; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Kohlmann, Alexander; Sanada, Masashi; Grossmann, Vera; Sundaresan, Janani; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Miyano, Satoru; Thol, Felicitas; Ganser, Arnold; Yang, Henry; Haferlach, Torsten; Ogawa, Seishi; Koeffler, H. Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the spliceosome gene ZRSR2 — located on the X chromosome — are associated with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). ZRSR2 is involved in the recognition of 3΄ splice site during the early stages of spliceosome assembly; however, its precise role in RNA splicing has remained unclear. Here, we characterize ZRSR2 as an essential component of the minor spliceosome (U12-dependent) assembly. shRNA mediated knockdown of ZRSR2 leads to impaired splicing of the U12-type introns, and RNA-Sequencing of MDS bone marrow reveals that loss of ZRSR2 activity causes increased mis-splicing. These splicing defects involve retention of the U12-type introns while splicing of the U2-type introns remain mostly unaffected. ZRSR2 deficient cells also exhibit reduced proliferation potential and distinct alterations in myeloid and erythroid differentiation in vitro. These data identify a specific role for ZRSR2 in RNA splicing and highlight dysregulated splicing of U12-type introns as a characteristic feature of ZRSR2 mutations in MDS. PMID:25586593

  17. Postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome produced in gnotobiotic pigs following exposure to various amounts of porcine circovirus type 2a or type 2b

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In late 2005, a postweaning, high mortality syndrome spread rapidly through fattening barns in swine dense areas of the United States. Diagnostic investigations consistently isolated porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) from diseased tissues. Subsequent genetic analysis revealed the infectious agent was...

  18. Paternal isodisomy for chromosome 2 as the cause of Crigler-Najjar type I syndrome.

    PubMed

    Petit, François M; Gajdos, Vincent; Parisot, Frédéric; Capel, Liliane; Aboura, Azzedine; Lachaux, Alain; Tachdjian, Gérard; Poüs, Christian; Labrune, Philippe

    2005-03-01

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I (CN-I) is a rare and severe autosomal recessive metabolic disease due to a total deficiency of bilirubin uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase located on chromosome 2. We report on a child with CN-I due to a phenylalanine residue deletion inherited only from the father carrying this deletion at the heterozygous state. Cytogenetic analyses showed no deletion of the chromosomal 2q37 region. Microsatellite analysis of the child and his parents was consistent with paternal isodisomy for chromosome 2 in the child. This report demonstrates that uniparental disomy may be at the origin of very rare diseases transmitted as autosomal recessive traits and emphasizes the need for parental DNA analysis in such cases.

  19. Sturge-Weber syndrome type II treated with PDL 595 nm laser.

    PubMed

    Kowalska-Brocka, Joanna; Brocki, Maciej; Uczniak, Sebastian; Uczniak, Kamila; Kaszuba, Andrzej; Jurowski, Piotr

    2015-02-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is rare congenital disorder presenting facial port-wine stains (PWS) eye abnormalities and cerebrovascular malformations. The frequency of SWS is estimated at 1 in 50 000. Cerebrovascular abnormalities can be responsible for seizures, hemiparesis, mental retardation and ophthalmologic abnormalities cause intraocular pressure, glaucoma. Etiopathogenesis of SWS remains elusive. We present a case of a 7-year-old girl with SWS type II. A port-wine stain involves the upper right part of half face and has been associated with glaucoma of both eyes. In the Department of Dermatology in 2009-2012 we performed 23 procedures within 2 months. We have been using PDL laser at wavelength 595 nm and very good cosmetic results were achieved. Given positive treatment effects, the laser therapy of port-wine stains is a method of selection. Port-wine stains in the course of SWS requires a large number of laser treatment. PMID:25821431

  20. An Adult Case of Bartter Syndrome Type III Presenting with Proteinuria

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Eun Jung; Hwang, Won Min; Yun, Sung-Ro; Park, Moon Hyang

    2016-01-01

    Bartter syndrome (BS) I–IV is a rare autosomal recessive disorder affecting salt reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle. This report highlights clinicopathological findings and genetic studies of classic BS in a 22-year-old female patient who presented with persistent mild proteinuria for 2 years. A renal biopsy demonstrated a mild to moderate increase in the mesangial cells and matrix of most glomeruli, along with marked juxtaglomerular cell hyperplasia. These findings suggested BS associated with mild IgA nephropathy. Focal tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and lymphocytic infiltration were also observed. A genetic study of the patient and her parents revealed a mutation of the CLCNKB genes. The patient was diagnosed with BS, type III. This case represents an atypical presentation of classic BS in an adult patient. Pathologic findings of renal biopsy combined with genetic analysis and clinicolaboratory findings are important in making an accurate diagnosis. PMID:26755355

  1. Evidence for genetic heterogeneity in the carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type I (CDG1)

    SciTech Connect

    Matthijs, G.; Legius, E.; Schollen, E.

    1996-08-01

    We have analyzed a series of polymorphic markers on chromosome 16p13 in 17 families with carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type I (CDG1). First, linkage to the region between D15S406 and D16S500 is confirmed. The telomeric border of the candidate region is now definitively placed proximal to D16S406 by crossovers observed in 2 families. Second, in 1 family with affected siblings, the disease is not linked to chromosome 16p. Genetic heterogeneity has not been previously reported for CDG1, and this observation has implications for prenatal diagnosis. Third, allelic associations suggest that the disease locus is localized close to D16S414/D16S497. This places the region of interest centromeric of its published localization. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Otopalatodigital syndrome type 2 in a male infant: A case report with a novel sequence variation

    PubMed Central

    Sankararaman, Senthilkumar; Kurepa, Dalibor; Shen, Yiping; Kakkilaya, Venkatakrishna; Ursin, Sussone; Chen, Harold

    2013-01-01

    We report a male infant with typical clinical, pathological and radiological features of otopalatodigital syndrome type 2 (OPD 2) with a novel sequence variation in the FLNA gene. His clinical manifestations include typical craniofacial features, cleft palate, hearing impairment, omphalocele, bowing of the long bones, absent fibulae and digital abnormalities consistent with OPD 2. Two hemizygous sequence variations in the FLNA gene were identified. The variation c.5290G>A/p.Ala1764Thr has been previously reported in a patient with periventricular nodular heterotopia, but subsequently it has been reported as a polymorphism. The other variation c.613T>C/p.Cys205Arg detected in the proband has not been previously reported and our analysis indicates that this is a novel disease-causing mutation for OPD2. PMID:27625837

  3. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type I – a novel AIRE mutation in a North American patient

    PubMed Central

    Huibregtse, Kelly Egan; Wolfgram, Peter; Winer, Karen K.; Connor, Ellen L.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1), also referred to as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), is a rare autoimmune disease that results from autosomal recessive mutations of the human autoimmune regulatory (AIRE) gene. We present the case of a 17-year-old North American girl of primarily Norwegian descent with a novel AIRE gene mutation causing APS-1. In addition to the classic triad of chronic candidiasis, hypoparathyoidism and autoimmune adrenocortical insufficiency, she also has vitiligo, intestinal malabsorption, autoimmune hepatitis, autoimmune hypothyroidism, myositis, myalgias, chronic fatigue, and failure to thrive. Genetic testing revealed heterozygosity for c.20_115de196 and c.967_979del13 mutations in the AIRE gene. The AIRE gene c.20_115de196 mutation has not been previously reported. PMID:24945421

  4. Otopalatodigital syndrome type 2 in a male infant: A case report with a novel sequence variation.

    PubMed

    Sankararaman, Senthilkumar; Kurepa, Dalibor; Shen, Yiping; Kakkilaya, Venkatakrishna; Ursin, Sussone; Chen, Harold

    2013-03-01

    We report a male infant with typical clinical, pathological and radiological features of otopalatodigital syndrome type 2 (OPD 2) with a novel sequence variation in the FLNA gene. His clinical manifestations include typical craniofacial features, cleft palate, hearing impairment, omphalocele, bowing of the long bones, absent fibulae and digital abnormalities consistent with OPD 2. Two hemizygous sequence variations in the FLNA gene were identified. The variation c.5290G>A/p.Ala1764Thr has been previously reported in a patient with periventricular nodular heterotopia, but subsequently it has been reported as a polymorphism. The other variation c.613T>C/p.Cys205Arg detected in the proband has not been previously reported and our analysis indicates that this is a novel disease-causing mutation for OPD2. PMID:27625837

  5. Tyrosinemia type II (Richner-Hanhart syndrome): a new mutation in the TAT gene.

    PubMed

    Culic, Vida; Betz, Regina C; Refke, Melanie; Fumic, Ksenija; Pavelic, Jasminka

    2011-01-01

    In the present study we report the clinical features and the molecular genetic investigation of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene in a young girl from Croatia with Richner-Hanhart syndrome, mainly suffering from photophobia, hyperkeratosis of the palmes and soles and slight neurological abnormalities. Sequencing analysis of the TAT gene revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation c.1250G>A (p.R417Q) in exon 12, and herewith confirmed the clinical diagnosis. Showing the first symptoms in babyhood, at the age of 8 years it was for the first time clinically diagnosed that the patient suffers from tyrosinemia type II and a therapy with tyrosine and phenylalanine reduced diet has been started successfully. All symptoms disappeared within 2-4 weeks. Since that time, we have been following the girl until today for more than ten years. She is in a good condition, and attends the normal high school program.

  6. Generation of Hermansky Pudlak syndrome type 2 (HPS2) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

    PubMed

    Maguire, Jean Ann; Lu, Lin; Mills, Jason A; Sullivan, Lisa M; Gadue, Paul; French, Deborah L

    2016-03-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 2 (HPS2) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from functional mutations in the adaptor-related protein complex 3, beta 1 subunit (AP3B1) gene. This gene plays a role in organelle biogenesis associated with melanosomes, platelet dense granules, and lysosomes. Here we describe the generation of an HPS2 iPS cell line (CHOPHPS2) using a Cre-excisable polycistronic STEMCCA lentivirus. This line was derived from human fibroblasts isolated from a patient carrying two mutations in the AP3B1 gene. The patient presented with severe neutropenia, ocular albinism, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, hemorrhagic diathesis, and an absence of platelet-dense granules. PMID:27345985

  7. [Acute Kidney Injury, Type - 3 cardiorenal syndrome, Biomarkers, Renal Replacement Therapy].

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; Bellasi, Antonio; Barbera, Vincenzo; Cozzolino, Mario; Russo, Domenico; De Pascalis, Antonio; Santoboni, Francesca; Villani, Annalisa; De Rosa, Silvia; Colafelice, Marco; Russo, Luigi; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease and major cardiovascular events represent main cause of death in both acute and chronic kidney disease patients. Kidney and heart failure are common and frequently co-exist This organ-organ interaction, also called organ cross-talk, leads to well-known definition of cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). Here we will describe cardiovascular involvement in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Also known as Type-3 CRS or acute reno-cardiac CRS, it occurs when AKI contributes and/or precipitates development of acute cardiac injury. AKI may directly or indirectly produces an acute cardiac event and it can be associated with volume overload, metabolic acidosis and electrolytes disorders such as hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia, coronary artery disease, left ventricular dysfunction and fibrosis which has been also described in patients with AKI with the consequence of direct negative effects on cardiac performance. PMID:27374388

  8. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type I - a novel AIRE mutation in a North American patient.

    PubMed

    Huibregtse, Kelly Egan; Wolfgram, Peter; Winer, Karen K; Connor, Ellen L

    2014-11-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1), also referred to as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), is a rare autoimmune disease that results from autosomal recessive mutations of the human autoimmune regulatory (AIRE) gene. We present the case of a 17-year-old North American girl of primarily Norwegian descent with a novel AIRE gene mutation causing APS-1. In addition to the classic triad of chronic candidiasis, hypoparathyoidism and autoimmune adrenocortical insufficiency, she also has vitiligo, intestinal malabsorption, autoimmune hepatitis, autoimmune hypothyroidism, myositis, myalgias, chronic fatigue, and failure to thrive. Genetic testing revealed heterozygosity for c.20_115de196 and c.967_979del13 mutations in the AIRE gene. The AIRE gene c.20_115de196 mutation has not been previously reported.

  9. Type 1 Diabetes in Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy-Candidiasis-Ectodermal Dystrophy Syndrome (APECED): A "Rare" Manifestation in a "Rare" Disease.

    PubMed

    Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS1) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator gene (AIRE); the encoded Aire protein plays an important role in the establishment of the immunological tolerance acting as a transcriptional regulator of the expression of organ-specific antigens within the thymus in perinatal age. While a high prevalence for this rare syndrome is reported in Finland and Scandinavia (Norway), autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy syndrome (APECED) cohorts of patients are also detected in continental Italy and Sardinia, among Iranian Jews, as well as in other countries. The syndrome is diagnosed when patients present at least two out of the three fundamental disorders including chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Among the associated conditions insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (Type 1 diabetes) has been rarely reported in different series of patients and occurring more frequently in Finnish APECED patients. In this review, we analyze the incidence of Type 1 diabetes as a clinical manifestation of APECED in different populations highlighting the peculiar genetic and immunological features of the disease when occurring in the context of this syndrome. PMID:27420045

  10. [Cardiac complications in a metamizole-induced type I Kounis syndrome].

    PubMed

    Juste, Jose F Martínez; Garces, Tomas Ruiz; Enguita, Rafael Gonzalez; Blasco, Pedro Cia; Trallero, Jara Altemir

    2016-01-01

    Kounis syndrome is defined as the coincidental occurrence of allergic reaction and acute coronary syndrome secondary to vasospasm. Anti-inflammatory drugs are included as one of the multiple causes. Current data available about this syndrome come from case reports. We present the case of a patient who suffered Kounis syndrome with cardiogenic shock and asystole after intravenous infusion of Metamizole, and in which no lesions were observed in coronariography.

  11. Cardiac complications in a metamizole-induced type I Kounis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Juste, Jose F Martínez; Garces, Tomas Ruiz; Enguita, Rafael Gonzalez; Blasco, Pedro Cia; Trallero, Jara Altemir

    2016-01-01

    Kounis syndrome is defined as the coincidental occurrence of allergic reaction and acute coronary syndrome secondary to vasospasm. Anti-inflammatory drugs are included as one of the multiple causes. Current data available about this syndrome come from case reports. We present the case of a patient who suffered Kounis syndrome with cardiogenic shock and asystole after intravenous infusion of Metamizole, and in which no lesions were observed in coronariography.

  12. Metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes in youth: from diagnosis to treatment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Overweight and obesity in youth is a worldwide public health problem. Overweight and obesity in childhood and adolescents have a substantial effect upon many systems, resulting in clinical conditions such as metabolic syndrome, early atherosclerosis, dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Obesity and the type of body fat distribution are still the core aspects of insulin resistance and seem to be the physiopathologic links common to metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and T2D. The earlier the appearance of the clustering of risk factors and the higher the time of exposure, the greater will be the chance of developing coronary disease with a more severe endpoint. The age when the event may occur seems to be related to the presence and aggregation of risk factors throughout life. The treatment in this age-group is non pharmacological and aims at promoting changes in lifestyle. However, pharmacological treatments are indicated in special situations. The major goals in dietary treatments are not only limited to weight loss, but also to an improvement in the quality of life. Modification of risk factors associated to comorbidities, personal satisfaction of the child or adolescent and trying to establish healthy life habits from an early age are also important. There is a continuous debate on the best possible exercise to do, for children or adolescents, in order to lose weight. The prescription of physical activity to children and adolescents requires extensive integrated work among multidisciplinary teams, patients and their families, in order to reach therapeutic success. The most important conclusion drawn from this symposium was that if the growing prevalence of overweight and obesity continues at this pace, the result will be a population of children and adolescents with metabolic syndrome. This would lead to high mortality rates in young adults, changing the current increasing trend of worldwide longevity. Government actions and a better

  13. Metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes in youth: from diagnosis to treatment.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Alfredo; Mancini, Marcio C; Magalhães, Maria Eliane C; Fisberg, Mauro; Radominski, Rosana; Bertolami, Marcelo C; Bertolami, Adriana; de Melo, Maria Edna; Zanella, Maria Teresa; Queiroz, Marcia S; Nery, Marcia

    2010-08-18

    Overweight and obesity in youth is a worldwide public health problem. Overweight and obesity in childhood and adolescents have a substantial effect upon many systems, resulting in clinical conditions such as metabolic syndrome, early atherosclerosis, dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Obesity and the type of body fat distribution are still the core aspects of insulin resistance and seem to be the physiopathologic links common to metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and T2D. The earlier the appearance of the clustering of risk factors and the higher the time of exposure, the greater will be the chance of developing coronary disease with a more severe endpoint. The age when the event may occur seems to be related to the presence and aggregation of risk factors throughout life.The treatment in this age-group is non pharmacological and aims at promoting changes in lifestyle. However, pharmacological treatments are indicated in special situations.The major goals in dietary treatments are not only limited to weight loss, but also to an improvement in the quality of life. Modification of risk factors associated to comorbidities, personal satisfaction of the child or adolescent and trying to establish healthy life habits from an early age are also important. There is a continuous debate on the best possible exercise to do, for children or adolescents, in order to lose weight. The prescription of physical activity to children and adolescents requires extensive integrated work among multidisciplinary teams, patients and their families, in order to reach therapeutic success.The most important conclusion drawn from this symposium was that if the growing prevalence of overweight and obesity continues at this pace, the result will be a population of children and adolescents with metabolic syndrome. This would lead to high mortality rates in young adults, changing the current increasing trend of worldwide longevity. Government actions and a better

  14. Linkage of Usher syndrome type I gene (USH1B) to the long arm of chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberling, W.; Kenyon, J.B.; Grunkemeyers, J.A. ); Moeller, C.G. ); Davenport, S. ); Priluck, I.A. ); Beighton, H.; Greenberg, J. ); Reardon, W. ); Weston, M.D.

    1992-12-01

    Usher syndrome is the most commonly recognized cause of combined visual and hearing loss in technologically developed countries. There are several different types and all are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. There may be as many as five different genes responsible for at least two closely related phenotypes. The nature of the gene defects is unknown, and positional cloning strategies are being employed to identify the genes. This is a report of the localization of one gene for Usher syndrome type I to chromosome 11q, probably distal to marker D11S527. Another USH1 gene had been previously localized to chromosome 14q, and this second localization established the existence of a new and independent locus for Usher syndrome. 31 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Concurrent vaccination of pigs with type 1 and type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) protects against type 1 PRRSV but not against type 2 PRRSV on dually challenged pigs.

    PubMed

    Park, Changhoon; Choi, Kyuhyung; Jeong, Jiwoon; Kang, Ikjae-; Park, Su-Jin; Chae, Chanhee

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of concurrent vaccination of pigs with both type 1 and type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccine against heterologous dual challenge of both genotypes and compare with single vaccination of pigs against heterologous single challenge of both genotypes. Pigs were administered both type 1 and type 2 PRRSV vaccine concurrently into separate anatomical sites at 28 days of age and inoculated intranasally with both genotypes at 63 days of age. Neutralizing antibodies (NA) were not detected in any pigs in any group (NA titer <2 log2) throughout the experiment. In addition, concurrent vaccination of pigs with two PRRSV genotypes had significantly lower numbers of type 1 and type 2 PRRSV-specific interferon-γ secreting cells (IFN-γ-SC) compared to vaccination of pigs with type 1 or type 2 PRRSV only. Despite the decreased induction of type 1 PRRSV-specific IFN-γ-SC, concurrent vaccination is still able to reduce type 1 PRRSV viremia whereas the decreased induction of type 2 PRRSV-specific IFN-γ-SC by concurrent vaccination correlates with lack of reduction of type 2 PRRSV viremia after dual challenge. The results of this study demonstrated that concurrent vaccination of pigs with two PRRSV genotypes is able to reduce the levels of type 1 PRRSV viremia and lung lesions but not able to reduce the levels of type 2 PRRSV viremia and lung lesions.

  16. Re-writing the natural history of pain and related symptoms in the joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Celletti, Claudia; Ghibellini, Giulia; Bruschini, Michela; Grammatico, Paola; Blundo, Carlo; Camerota, Filippo

    2013-12-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two clinically overlapping connective tissue disorders characterized by chronic/recurrent pain, joint instability complications, and minor skin changes. Fatigue and headache are also common, although are not yet considered diagnostic criteria. JHS/EDS-HT is a unexpectedly common condition that remains underdiagnosed by most clinicians and pain specialists. This results in interventions limited to symptomatic and non-satisfactory treatments, lacking reasonable pathophysiologic rationale. In this manuscript the fragmented knowledge on pain, fatigue, and headache in JHS/EDS is presented with review of the available published information and a description of the clinical course by symptoms, on the basis of authors' experience. Pathogenic mechanisms are suggested through comparisons with other functional somatic syndromes (e.g., chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, and functional gastrointestinal disorders). The re-writing of the natural history of JHS/EDS-HT is aimed to raise awareness among clinical geneticists and specialists treating chronic pain conditions about pain and other complications of JHS/EDS-HT. Symptoms' clustering by disease stage is proposed to investigate both the molecular causes and the symptoms management of JHS/EDS-HT in future studies. PMID:24254847

  17. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV is associated with a novel G984R COL3A1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yao; Wei, Shijie; Hu, Shijun; Chen, Jinlan; Tan, Zhiping; Yang, Yifeng

    2015-07-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disease. Mutations in COL3A1 have been identified to underlie this disease; however, to the best of our knowledge, no COL3A1 mutations have been reported in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV patients with an ascending aortic aneurysm. In order to develop further understanding of COL3A1 mutations, an Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV patient diagnosed with an ascending aortic aneurysm and a familial history of sudden mortality was analyzed. Genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood of the patient and his family members. All coding exons of eight aneurysm-related genes (FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR 2, MYH11, ACTA2, SLC2A10, NOTCH1 and COL3A1) were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products were sequenced with the ABI 3100 Genetic Analyzer, and a mutation was predicted and identified using Polyphen-2, SIFT and Mutation Taster. The novel mutation was identified as c.2950G>A in COL3A1, which results in p.G984R. All three programs predicted this mutation to be deleterous to the protein function. The novel mutation identified in this study is potentially responsible for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV in this patient, and expands the spectrum of COL3A1 mutations.

  18. A Review of College-Level Health Textbooks for Coverage of Type 2 Diabetes, Prediabetes, and Metabolic Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ethan, Danna; Rennis, Lesley; Samuel, Lalitha; Seidel, Erica J.; Basch, Corey H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Type 2 diabetes, prediabetes, and metabolic syndrome are increasingly relevant health problems for United States (US) college-aged students and their family members. This study's aim was to determine the extent to which these chronic conditions were covered in leading college-level personal health textbooks and to what degree the…

  19. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV is associated with a novel G984R COL3A1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yao; Wei, Shijie; Hu, Shijun; Chen, Jinlan; Tan, Zhiping; Yang, Yifeng

    2015-07-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disease. Mutations in COL3A1 have been identified to underlie this disease; however, to the best of our knowledge, no COL3A1 mutations have been reported in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV patients with an ascending aortic aneurysm. In order to develop further understanding of COL3A1 mutations, an Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV patient diagnosed with an ascending aortic aneurysm and a familial history of sudden mortality was analyzed. Genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood of the patient and his family members. All coding exons of eight aneurysm-related genes (FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR 2, MYH11, ACTA2, SLC2A10, NOTCH1 and COL3A1) were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products were sequenced with the ABI 3100 Genetic Analyzer, and a mutation was predicted and identified using Polyphen-2, SIFT and Mutation Taster. The novel mutation was identified as c.2950G>A in COL3A1, which results in p.G984R. All three programs predicted this mutation to be deleterous to the protein function. The novel mutation identified in this study is potentially responsible for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV in this patient, and expands the spectrum of COL3A1 mutations. PMID:25776230

  20. [Use of the round ligament in the repair of large bile duct defects in type II Mirizzi's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Turégano-Fuentes, Fernando; Mercader-Cidoncha, Enrique; Pérez-Díaz, Dolores; Sanz-Sánchez, Mercedes; Jiménez-Gómez, Luis Miguel

    2006-06-01

    Mirizzi's syndrome is a rare complication of cholelithiasis, and type II (cholecystocholedochal fistula) can be a technical challenge due to inflammation and the biliary duct defect. We report two cases that were treated with a simple and little known technique that uses the round ligament as a plasty to seal the large bile duct defect. PMID:16769004

  1. Strategies and Considerations for Teaching an Adolescent with Down Syndrome and Type I Diabetes to Self-Administer Insulin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosner, Sylvia M.; Belfiore, Phillip J.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a system of least prompts, partial participation, and parental involvement was used to successfully teach an adolescent with Down syndrome, moderate mental retardation, and Type I diabetes to self-administer an injection of insulin as part of an overall plan to increase self-determination and independence. (Contains seven…

  2. Aspects of speech-language abilities are influenced by MECP2 mutation type in girls with Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Downs, Jenny; Girdler, Sonya; Ciccone, Natalie; Leonard, Helen

    2015-02-01

    This study investigates relationships between methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) mutation type and speech-language abilities in girls with Rett syndrome. Cross-sectional data on 766 girls, aged 15 years and under, with genetically confirmed Rett syndrome was obtained from the Australian Rett Syndrome Database (ARSD) (n = 244) and the International Rett Syndrome Phenotype Database (InterRett) (n = 522). Relationships between MECP2 mutation type and age of regression in speech-language abilities, and the level of speech-language abilities before and after this regression were investigated. The females had a median age of 4.95 years in the ARSD and 5.25 years in InterRett. The majority (89%, 685/766) acquired speech-language abilities in the form of babble or words at some point in time. Of those who acquired babble or words, 85% (581/685) experienced a regression in these abilities. Those with a p.Arg133Cys mutation were the most likely to use one or more words, prior to (RRR = 3.45; 95% CI 1.15-10.41) and after (RRR = 5.99; 95% CI 2.00-17.92), speech-language regression. Girls with Rett syndrome vary in their use of speech and language, and in their experience of speech-language regression and these variations are partly explained by genotype.

  3. Relation of Osteoprotegerin, Visfatin and Ghrelin to Metabolic Syndrome in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Manal Basyouni; Ismail, Maha Imam Ahmed; Meki, Abdel-Raheim M.

    2015-01-01

    Background It is now realized that insulin resistance plays a principal role in initiating the pathologic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the possible role of osteoprotegerin, visfatin and ghrelin in the pathogenesis of MetS among type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Design and methods Serum blood samples were obtained from 116 subjects (39 T2DM; 48 T2DM with MetS; 29 healthy controls). Glycemic status and lipid profile were assessed by enzymatic method. Osteoprotegerin, visfatin, ghrelin and insulin were measured by ELISA method. Results Osteoprotegerin and visfatin were significantly higher, while ghrelin was significantly lower in diabetic patients compared to healthy control group (p<0.05). Moreover, Osteoprotegerin and visfatin showed significant higher levels in T2DM patients with MetS than those without MetS (p<0.05). The best cut-off values for the investigated markers were determined by ROC curve. Osteoprotegerin (1.06 ng/mL), visfatin (32.27 ng/mL) and ghrelin (33.65 pg/mL) presented sensitivity of 76%, 92% and 39.1%; respectively and specificity of 41%, 69.2% and 62.9%; respectively, in predicting MetS among T2DM. Among the investigated parameters, Visfatin was the one which predicts MetS among diabetic patients [AUC=0.88, p<0.05]. Conclusion Osteoprotegerin, visfatin and ghrelin might be implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes. Moreover, osteoprotegerin and visfatin may have additional potential role in the development of the metabolic syndrome. Visfatin was superior among studied parameters in predicting MetS among T2DM. PMID:26309431

  4. A recurrent germline mutation in the PIGA gene causes Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 2.

    PubMed

    Fauth, Christine; Steindl, Katharina; Toutain, Annick; Farrell, Sandra; Witsch-Baumgartner, Martina; Karall, Daniela; Joset, Pascal; Böhm, Sebastian; Baumer, Alessandra; Maier, Oliver; Zschocke, Johannes; Weksberg, Rosanna; Marshall, Christian R; Rauch, Anita

    2016-02-01

    Hypomorphic germline mutations in the PIGA (phosphatidylinositol glycan class A) gene recently were recognized as the cause of a clinically heterogeneous spectrum of X-linked disorders including (i) early onset epileptic encephalopathy with severe muscular hypotonia, dysmorphism, multiple congenital anomalies, and early death ("MCAHS2"), (ii) neurodegenerative encephalopathy with systemic iron overload (ferro-cerebro-cutaneous syndrome, "FCCS"), and (iii) intellectual disability and seizures without dysmorphism. Previous studies showed that the recurrent PIGA germline mutation c.1234C>T (p.Arg412*) leads to a clinical phenotype at the most severe end of the spectrum associated with early infantile lethality. We identified three additional individuals from two unrelated families with the same PIGA mutation. Major clinical findings include early onset intractable epileptic encephalopathy with a burst-suppression pattern on EEG, generalized muscular hypotonia, structural brain abnormalities, macrocephaly and increased birth weight, joint contractures, coarse facial features, widely spaced eyes, a short nose with anteverted nares, gingival overgrowth, a wide mouth, short limbs with short distal phalanges, and a small penis. Based on the phenotypic overlap with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 2 (SGBS2), we hypothesized that both disorders might have the same underlying cause. We were able to confirm the same c.1234C>T (p.Arg412*) mutation in the DNA sample from an affected fetus of the original family affected with SGBS2. We conclude that the recurrent PIGA germline mutation c.1234C>T leads to a recognizable clinical phenotype with a poor prognosis and is the cause of SGBS2.

  5. Diabetes-Associated Dry Eye Syndrome in a New Humanized Transgenic Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Shahnawaz; Elagin, Raya B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Patients with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) are at high risk of developing lacrimal gland dysfunction. We have developed a new model of human T1D using double-transgenic mice carrying HLA-DQ8 diabetes-susceptibility haplotype instead of mouse MHC-class II and expressing the human beta cell autoantigen Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase in pancreatic beta cells. We report here the development of dry eye syndrome (DES) after diabetes induction in our humanized transgenic model. Methods Double-transgenic mice were immunized with DNA encoding human GAD65, either naked or in adenoviral vectors, to induce T1D. Mice monitored for development of diabetes developed lacrimal gland dysfunction. Results Animals developed lacrimal gland disease (classically associated with diabetes in Non Obese Diabetic [NOD] mice and with T1D in humans) as they developed glucose intolerance and diabetes. Animals manifested obvious clinical signs of dry eye syndrome (DES), from corneal erosions to severe keratitis. Histological studies of peri-bulbar areas revealed lymphocytic infiltration of glandular structures. Indeed, infiltrative lesions were observed in lacrimal/Harderian glands within weeks following development of glucose intolerance. Lesions ranged from focal lymphocytic infiltration to complete acinar destruction. We observed a correlation between the severity of the pancreatic infiltration and the severity of the ocular disease. Conclusions Our results demonstrate development of DES in association with antigen-specific insulitis and diabetes following immunization with clinically relevant human autoantigen concomitantly expressed in pancreatic beta cells of diabetes-susceptible mice. As in the NOD mouse model and as in human T1D, our animals developed diabetes-associated DES. This specific finding stresses the relevance of our model for studying these human diseases. We believe our model will facilitate studies to prevent/treat diabetes-associated DES as well as human diabetes. PMID

  6. Mapping of the locus for congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type (CNF) on chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Kestilae, M.; Maennikkoe, M.; Tryggvason, K.

    1994-09-01

    Congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type (CNF) is an autosomal recessive disease which forms a distinct entity among congenital nephrotic syndromes. It is characterized by massive proteinuria starting already in utero, large placenta and manifestation of nephrosis soon after birth. The incidence in Finland is about 1 in 8000 newborns, and the disease has been reported occasionally in other countries, particularly in Minnesota, USA. The gene defect in CNF is unknown, but the gene product is likely to be important for kidney development of glomerular filtration. We have used a random mapping approach in 17 Finnish CNF families resulting in the localization of the gene to chromosome 19q12-q13.1. Based on observed recombination events, the CNF locus is flanked by markers D19S191 and D19S224 corresponding to a region under 1 Mb in physical length. Cosmid contigs have been isolated from this region and at least two new polymorphic CA-repeat markers (MKMM1, MKMM2) have been identified from those clones. Statistically highly significant linkage disequilibrium can be observed with markers MKMM1, D19S224 and D19S220, the allelic association being about 65%. The most common haplotype, which was combined from these markers, is found in 60% of chromosomes carrying the CNF mutation. This work has enabled DNA-based diagnosis of CNF, and recently linkage and linkage disequilibrium analyses were used in prenatal diagnostics in a family with one affected child and two healthy siblings. DNA isolated from chorion villus biopsy was analyzed using markers D19S191, MKMM1, D19S224 and D19S220, and the fetus was shown to have the same genotype as the affected child.

  7. Is it worthwhile to screen patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus for subclinical Cushing's syndrome?

    PubMed

    Budyal, Sweta; Jadhav, Swati Sachin; Kasaliwal, Rajeev; Patt, Hiren; Khare, Shruti; Shivane, Vyankatesh; Lila, Anurag R; Bandgar, Tushar; Shah, Nalini S

    2015-12-01

    Variable prevalence of subclinical Cushing's syndrome (SCS) has been reported in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), making the need for screening in this population uncertain. It is unknown if this variability is solely due to study-related methodological differences or a reflection of true differences in ethnic predisposition. The objective of this study is to explore the prevalence of SCS in Asian Indian patients with T2DM. In this prospective single center study conducted in a tertiary care referral center, 993 T2DM outpatients without any discriminatory clinical features (easy bruising, facial plethora, proximal muscle weakness, and/or striae) of hypercortisolism underwent an overnight 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test (ODST). ODST serum cortisol ≥1.8 μg/dl was considered positive, and those with positive results were subjected to 48 h, 2 mg/day low dose DST (LDDST). A stepwise evaluation for endogenous hypercortisolism was planned for patients with LDDST serum cortisol ≥1.8 μg/dl. Patients with positive ODST and negative LDDST were followed up clinically and re-evaluated a year later for the development of clinically evident Cushing's syndrome (CS). In this largest single center study reported to date, we found 37 out of 993 (3.72%) patients had ODST serum cortisol ≥1.8 μg/dl. None of them had LDDST cortisol ≥1.8 μg/dl, nor did they develop clinically evident CS over a follow-up period of 1 year. Specificity of ODST for screening of CS was 96.3% in our cohort. None of the T2DM outpatients in our cohort had SCS, hence cautioning against routine biochemical screening for SCS in this cohort. We suggest screening be based on clinical suspicion only.

  8. Genetic Analysis of Three Korean Patients with Clinical Features of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Seung-Tae; Kim, Jee-Ah; Kim, Sung Hae; Jang, Shin-Yi; Ki, Chang-Seok

    2007-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a hereditary disorder of the connective tissue. EDS type IV (EDS IV), the vascular type of the disease, is characterized by easy bruising, thin skin with visible veins, and spontaneous rupture of the large arteries, uterus, or bowel. EDS IV is caused by mutations in the gene for type III procollagen (COL3A1). However, recent studies suggest that the causative mutation of EDS IV is not homogeneous. We report our experience with three patients presenting with clinical features of type IV EDS. A 48-yr-old woman presented with acute aortic dissection (patient 1) and 36-yr-old and 21-yr-old women presented with carotid-cavernous fistula (patients 2 and 3, respectively). All three patients bruised easily. Two patients (patients 1 and 3) had thin transparent skin with visible veins. Genetic analysis of COL3A1 revealed a Gly732Val (c.2195G>T) mutation in patient 1 and a duplication of 15 base pairs (c.3221_3235dup) which resulted in an interposition of five amino acids (p.Gly1074_Pro1078dup) in patient 2. However, no mutations were observed in COL3A1 or transforming growth factor β receptors 1 and 2 in patients 3, which might be either due to a deletion of single or multiple exons in the COL3A1 gene or due to a genetic heterogeneity. This is the first report of genetically confirmed cases of EDS IV in Korea. PMID:17728513

  9. Impacts of Usher Syndrome Type IB Mutations on Human Myosin VIIa Motor Function†

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinya; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Ikebe, Reiko; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a human hereditary disorder characterized by profound congenital deafness, retinitis pigmentosa and vestibular dysfunction. Myosin VIIa has been identified as the responsible gene for USH type 1B, and a number of missense mutations have been identified in the affected families. However, the molecular basis of the dysfunction of USH gene, myosin VIIa, in the affected families is unknown to date. Here we clarified the effects of USH1B mutations on human myosin VIIa motor function for the first time. The missense mutations of USH1B significantly inhibited the actin activation of ATPase activity of myosin VIIa. G25R, R212C, A397D and E450Q mutations abolished the actin-activated ATPase activity completely. P503L mutation increased the basal ATPase activity for 2-3 fold, but reduced the actin-activated ATPase activity to 50% of the wild type. While all the mutations examined, except for R302H, reduced the affinity for actin and the ATP hydrolysis cycling rate, they did not largely decrease the rate of ADP release from acto-myosin, suggesting that the mutations reduce the duty ratio of myosin VIIa. Taken together, the results suggest that the mutations responsible for USH1B cause the complete loss of the actin-activated ATPase activity or the reduction of duty ratio of myosin VIIa. PMID:18700726

  10. [Neonatal herpes simplex type II virus infection complicated with meningitis and virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Arai, Chie; Nozawa, Tomo; Hara, Takuma; Kikuchi, Masako; Momomura, Mei; Kizawa, Toshiki; Tanoshima, Reita; Kita, Maiko; Yokosuka, Tomoko; Miyamae, Takako; Iwasaki, Shiho; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Yokota, Shunpei

    2012-01-01

    A 14-day-old neonate was transferred to our university hospital because of respiratory distress and mild disturbance of consciousness. He had no history of abnormal pregnancy or delivery, but had developed apnea at 6 days old. Thereafter, respiratory distress progressed and his condition deteriorated. On admission to our hospital, several vesicles were found on the left upper arm, and moderate hepatomegaly was also present. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type II genome was detected from serum, spinal fluid, and bone marrow. Laboratory examinations revealed typical abnormalities of disseminated intravascular coagulation, increased levels of serum ferritin, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase. Bone marrow aspiration demonstrated activated macrophages and hemophagocytosis. Spinal tap revealed numerous mononuclear cells. Meningitis and virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (VAHS) due to systemic HSV type II infection were thus diagnosed. Acyclovir (60 mg/kg/day) and vidarabine were promptly administered. Dexamethasone palmitate and intravenous cyclosporine were also administered for systemic inflammation due to VAHS. Finally, these aggressive therapies rescued the patient without any sequelae. In general, neonatal systemic HSV infection is life-threatening and results in poor intact survival. Our case report suggests that not only antiviral treatment for HSV, but also anti-inflammatory treatment including steroid and cyclosporine should be considered from the early phase of neonatal systemic HSV infection.

  11. Lumbar Sympathetic Block with Botulinum Toxin Type B for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunjoo; Cho, Chan Woo; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Pyung Bok; Nahm, Francis Sahngun

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar sympathetic block (LSB) is an effective method for relief of sympathetically mediated pain in the lower extremities. To prolong the sympathetic blockade, sympathetic destruction with alcohol or radiofrequency has been used. The pre-ganglionic sympathetic nerves are cholinergic, and botulinum toxin (BTX) has been found to inhibit the release of acetylcholine at the cholinergic nerve terminals. Moreover, BTX type B (BTX-B) is more convenient to use than BTX type A. Based on these findings, we performed LSB on the 2 patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in the lower extremity. Levobupivacaine 0.25% 5 mL mixed with BTX-B 5,000 IU was given under fluoroscopic guidance. Two months after LSB with BTX-B, pain intensity and the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs (LANSS) score were significantly reduced. Allodynia and coldness disappeared and skin color came back to normal. In conclusion, BTX-B can produce an efficacious and durable sympathetic blocking effect on patients with CRPS.

  12. Purkinje Cells as Sources of Arrhythmias in Long QT Syndrome Type 3

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Vivek; Roman-Campos, Danilo; Sampson, Kevin J.; Kang, Guoxin; Fishman, Glenn I.; Kass, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is characterized by ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Purkinje cells (PC) within the specialized cardiac conduction system have unique electrophysiological properties that we hypothesize may produce the primary sources of arrhythmia in heritable LQTS. LQTS type 3 (LQT3) transgenic mice harboring the ΔKPQ+/− mutation were crossed with Contactin2-EGFP BAC transgenic mice, which express a fluorescent reporter gene within the Purkinje fiber network. Isolated ventricular myocytes (VMs) (EGFP−) and PCs (EGFP+) from wild type and ΔKPQ mutant hearts were compared using the whole-cell patch clamp technique and microfluorimetry of calcium transients. Increased late sodium current was seen in ΔKPQ-PCs and ΔKPQ-VMs, with larger density in ΔKPQ-PCs. Marked prolongation of action potential duration of ΔKPQ-PCs was seen compared to ΔKPQ-VMs. ΔKPQ-PCs, but not ΔKPQ-VMs, exhibited frequent early afterdepolarizations, which corresponded to repetitive oscillations of intracellular calcium. Abnormalities in cell repolarization were reversed with exposure to mexiletine. We present the first direct experimental evidence that PCs are uniquely sensitive to LQT3 mutations, displaying electrophysiological behavior that is highly pro-arrhythmic. PMID:26289036

  13. Purkinje Cells as Sources of Arrhythmias in Long QT Syndrome Type 3.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Vivek; Roman-Campos, Danilo; Sampson, Kevin J; Kang, Guoxin; Fishman, Glenn I; Kass, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is characterized by ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Purkinje cells (PC) within the specialized cardiac conduction system have unique electrophysiological properties that we hypothesize may produce the primary sources of arrhythmia in heritable LQTS. LQTS type 3 (LQT3) transgenic mice harboring the ΔKPQ(+/-) mutation were crossed with Contactin2-EGFP BAC transgenic mice, which express a fluorescent reporter gene within the Purkinje fiber network. Isolated ventricular myocytes (VMs) (EGFP(-)) and PCs (EGFP(+)) from wild type and ΔKPQ mutant hearts were compared using the whole-cell patch clamp technique and microfluorimetry of calcium transients. Increased late sodium current was seen in ΔKPQ-PCs and ΔKPQ-VMs, with larger density in ΔKPQ-PCs. Marked prolongation of action potential duration of ΔKPQ-PCs was seen compared to ΔKPQ-VMs. ΔKPQ-PCs, but not ΔKPQ-VMs, exhibited frequent early afterdepolarizations, which corresponded to repetitive oscillations of intracellular calcium. Abnormalities in cell repolarization were reversed with exposure to mexiletine. We present the first direct experimental evidence that PCs are uniquely sensitive to LQT3 mutations, displaying electrophysiological behavior that is highly pro-arrhythmic. PMID:26289036

  14. Urinary pyridinoline cross-links in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmann, B.; Eyre, D.R.; Shao, P. |

    1995-12-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous group of heritable disorders of connective tissue, affecting skin, ligaments, joints, blood vessels, and internal organs. The main general findings are hyperextensibility and bruisability of the skin, with abnormal scarring, and joint laxity. On the basis of clinical, genetic, and biochemical findings, EDS can be classified today into at least 10 different types. Among them, EDS type VI (MIM 225400) is characterized by marked muscular hypotonia from birth; kyphoscoliosis, often present at birth and progressing to a severe form; marfanoid habitus; eye involvement, often with microcornea and a tendency of the eyeballs to rupture after minor trauma; osteoporosis; and sometimes spontaneous rupture of arteries. The disorder is due to a deficiency of lysyl hydroxylase (E.C.1.14.11.4), inherited in an autosomal recessive mode. Traditionally, the clinical diagnosis is confirmed by an insufficiency of hydroxylysine, on analysis of hydrolyzed dermis and/or reduced enzyme activity in cultured skin fibroblasts. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Spontaneous colon perforations associated with a vascular type of ehlers-danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Akira; Okada, Kazuya; Okubo, Hitoshi; Matsuo, Mitsutoshi; Kishikawa, Hiroki; Naing, Banyar Than; Watanabe, Atsushi; Shimada, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, vascular type (vEDS) (MIM #130050) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutation in the type III collagen gene, COL3A1, leading to fragility of blood vessels, bowel and uterus that leads to spontaneous rupture. We report a previously undiagnosed vEDS patient with bowel complications. A 20-year-old female patient was referred to our hospital with abdominal pain. Computed tomography showed notable dilatation of the sigmoid colon with intraperitoneal fluid. Laparotomy revealed dilatation of the sigmoid colon, breakdown of serosa and muscularis propria of the sigmoid colon with impending perforation, and intra-abdominal hemorrhage caused by breakdown of the mesenterium. Resection of the sigmoid colon with Hartmann's pouch and an end colostomy were performed. Physical examination showed joint hypermobility, translucent skin with venous prominence and facial structure abnormalities. Genetic analysis using cDNA extracted from the patient's fibroblasts by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction direct sequencing showed a missense mutation within the triple helix region of COL3A1 (c.2150 G>A; Gly717Asp). PMID:24932165

  16. Lumbar Sympathetic Block with Botulinum Toxin Type B for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunjoo; Cho, Chan Woo; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Pyung Bok; Nahm, Francis Sahngun

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar sympathetic block (LSB) is an effective method for relief of sympathetically mediated pain in the lower extremities. To prolong the sympathetic blockade, sympathetic destruction with alcohol or radiofrequency has been used. The pre-ganglionic sympathetic nerves are cholinergic, and botulinum toxin (BTX) has been found to inhibit the release of acetylcholine at the cholinergic nerve terminals. Moreover, BTX type B (BTX-B) is more convenient to use than BTX type A. Based on these findings, we performed LSB on the 2 patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in the lower extremity. Levobupivacaine 0.25% 5 mL mixed with BTX-B 5,000 IU was given under fluoroscopic guidance. Two months after LSB with BTX-B, pain intensity and the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs (LANSS) score were significantly reduced. Allodynia and coldness disappeared and skin color came back to normal. In conclusion, BTX-B can produce an efficacious and durable sympathetic blocking effect on patients with CRPS. PMID:26431145

  17. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of…

  18. Tandem duplication within a neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene exon in a family with features of Watson syndrome and Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Tassabehji, M; Strachan, T; Sharland, M; Colley, A; Donnai, D; Harris, R; Thakker, N

    1993-01-01

    Type 1 neurofibromatosis (NF1), Watson syndrome (WS), and Noonan syndrome (NS) show some overlap in clinical manifestations. In addition, WS has been shown to be linked to markers flanking the NF1 locus and a deletion at the NF1 locus demonstrated in a WS patient. This suggests either that WS and NF1 are allelic or that phenotypes arise from mutations in very closely linked genes. Here we provide evidence for the former by demonstrating a mutation in the NF1 gene in a family with features of both WS and NS. The mutation is an almost perfect in-frame tandem duplication of 42 bases in exon 28 of the NF1 gene. Unlike the mutations previously described in classical NF1, which show a preponderance of null alleles, the mutation in this family would be expected to result in a mutant neurofibromin product. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8317503

  19. The phenotype of the musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to CHST14 mutations.

    PubMed

    Janecke, Andreas R; Li, Ben; Boehm, Manfred; Krabichler, Birgit; Rohrbach, Marianne; Müller, Thomas; Fuchs, Irene; Golas, Gretchen; Katagiri, Yasuhiro; Ziegler, Shira G; Gahl, William A; Wilnai, Yael; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Geller, Herbert M; Giunta, Cecilia; Slavotinek, Anne; Steinmann, Beat

    2016-01-01

    The musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (MC-EDS) has been recently recognized as a clinical entity. MC-EDS represents a differential diagnosis within the congenital neuromuscular and connective tissue disorders spectrum. Thirty-one and three patients have been reported with MC-EDS so far with bi-allelic mutations identified in CHST14 and DSE, respectively, encoding two enzymes necessary for dermatan sulfate (DS) biosynthesis. We report seven additional patients with MC-EDS from four unrelated families, including the follow-up of a sib-pair originally reported with the kyphoscoliotic type of EDS in 1975. Brachycephaly, a characteristic facial appearance, an asthenic build, hyperextensible and bruisable skin, tapering fingers, instability of large joints, and recurrent formation of large subcutaneous hematomas are always present. Three of seven patients had mildly elevated serum creatine kinase. The oldest patient was blind due to retinal detachment at 45 years and died at 59 years from intracranial bleeding; her affected brother died at 28 years from fulminant endocarditis. All patients in this series harbored homozygous, predicted loss-of-function CHST14 mutations. Indeed, DS was not detectable in fibroblasts from two unrelated patients with homozygous mutations. Patient fibroblasts produced higher amounts of chondroitin sulfate, showed intracellular retention of collagen types I and III, and lacked decorin and thrombospondin fibrils compared with control. A great proportion of collagen fibrils were not integrated into fibers, and fiber bundles were dispersed into the ground substance in one patient, all of which is likely to contribute to the clinical phenotype. This report should increase awareness for MC-EDS.

  20. Presymptomatic genetic analysis during pregnancy for vascular type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naing, Banyar Than; Watanabe, Atsushi; Tanigaki, Shinji; Ono, Masae; Iwashita, Mitsutoshi; Shimada, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), EDS type IV (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man [MIM] #130050) is characterized by thin, translucent skin, easy bruising, and arterial, intestinal, and/or uterine fragility during pregnancy, which may lead to sudden death. It is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder caused by type III procollagen gene (COL3A1: MIM #120180) mutations. Approximately 50% of the COL3A1 mutations are inherited from an affected parent, and 50% are de novo mutations. Each child of an affected individual has a 50% chance of inheriting the mutation and developing the disorder. Pregnant women with vascular EDS are at an increased risk of uterine and arterial rupture during the peripartum period, with high maternal morbidity and mortality rates. We report the first case of an asymptomatic 35-year-old woman at a risk of complications of vascular EDS who underwent presymptomatic evaluation during pregnancy. The sequencing results of both her brother and mother had a one-base-pair deletion, resulting in Glutamate at position 730 changing to Lysine and causing a frame shift and premature termination codon at 61 amino acids from the mutation position (p. Glu730Lysfs*61) on exon 32 of COL3A1. This deletion caused frameshift, leading to a premature termination codon (TAG) at 181 nucleotides downstream in exon 35, which could not be detected by previous total RNA (ribonucleic acid) method. Thus, she was at risk of complications of vascular EDS, and diagnostic testing was employed at 8 weeks of pregnancy to minimize the risk of developing vascular EDS-related complications. The negative presymptomatic diagnostic result allowed the patient to choose normal delivery at term. Vascular EDS is a serious disorder, with high mortality, especially in high-risk women with vascular EDS during pregnancy. The presymptomatic genetic testing of vascular EDS during pregnancy for a high-risk family can help with the early establishment of preventive measures

  1. The phenotype of the musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to CHST14 mutations.

    PubMed

    Janecke, Andreas R; Li, Ben; Boehm, Manfred; Krabichler, Birgit; Rohrbach, Marianne; Müller, Thomas; Fuchs, Irene; Golas, Gretchen; Katagiri, Yasuhiro; Ziegler, Shira G; Gahl, William A; Wilnai, Yael; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Geller, Herbert M; Giunta, Cecilia; Slavotinek, Anne; Steinmann, Beat

    2016-01-01

    The musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (MC-EDS) has been recently recognized as a clinical entity. MC-EDS represents a differential diagnosis within the congenital neuromuscular and connective tissue disorders spectrum. Thirty-one and three patients have been reported with MC-EDS so far with bi-allelic mutations identified in CHST14 and DSE, respectively, encoding two enzymes necessary for dermatan sulfate (DS) biosynthesis. We report seven additional patients with MC-EDS from four unrelated families, including the follow-up of a sib-pair originally reported with the kyphoscoliotic type of EDS in 1975. Brachycephaly, a characteristic facial appearance, an asthenic build, hyperextensible and bruisable skin, tapering fingers, instability of large joints, and recurrent formation of large subcutaneous hematomas are always present. Three of seven patients had mildly elevated serum creatine kinase. The oldest patient was blind due to retinal detachment at 45 years and died at 59 years from intracranial bleeding; her affected brother died at 28 years from fulminant endocarditis. All patients in this series harbored homozygous, predicted loss-of-function CHST14 mutations. Indeed, DS was not detectable in fibroblasts from two unrelated patients with homozygous mutations. Patient fibroblasts produced higher amounts of chondroitin sulfate, showed intracellular retention of collagen types I and III, and lacked decorin and thrombospondin fibrils compared with control. A great proportion of collagen fibrils were not integrated into fibers, and fiber bundles were dispersed into the ground substance in one patient, all of which is likely to contribute to the clinical phenotype. This report should increase awareness for MC-EDS. PMID:26373698

  2. Twins with progressive thoracic aortic aneurysm, recurrent dissection and ACTA2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Ware, Stephanie M; Shikany, Amy; Landis, Benjamin J; James, Jeanne F; Hinton, Robert B

    2014-10-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a genetically mediated disease with variable age of onset. In the pediatric age range, nonsyndromic TAA frequently has a milder course than syndromic forms of TAA, such as Marfan syndrome or Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Herein, we describe 17-year-old identical twin brothers with severe progressive TAA due to a novel de novo ACTA2 mutation. Interestingly, both boys were diagnosed at age 11 with congenital mydriasis, a recently recognized manifestation of some ACTA2 mutations due to smooth muscle dysfunction. One of the brothers presented with acute-onset lower back pain that was identified as dissection of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Imaging of the chest at this time showed severe fusiform TAA. Cardiac imaging in his twin showed similar TAA, but no abdominal aortic aneurysm. Both brothers underwent valve-sparing aortic root replacement, but have had progressive aortic disease with recurrent dissection requiring multiple surgeries. This case emphasizes the importance of identifying physical stigmata of smooth muscle dysfunction, such as mydriasis, as potential markers for associated aortopathy and vascular diseases.

  3. Pre- and Postoperative Imaging of the Aortic Root.

    PubMed

    Hanneman, Kate; Chan, Frandics P; Mitchell, R Scott; Miller, D Craig; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional datasets acquired using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are ideally suited for characterization of the aortic root. These modalities offer different advantages and limitations, which must be weighed according to the clinical context. This article provides an overview of current aortic root imaging, highlighting normal anatomy, pathologic conditions, imaging techniques, measurement thresholds, relevant surgical procedures, postoperative complications and potential imaging pitfalls. Patients with a range of clinical conditions are predisposed to aortic root disease, including Marfan syndrome, bicuspid aortic valve, vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Various surgical techniques may be used to repair the aortic root, including placement of a composite valve graft, such as the Bentall and Cabrol procedures; placement of an aortic root graft with preservation of the native valve, such as the Yacoub and David techniques; and implantation of a biologic graft, such as a homograft, autograft, or xenograft. Potential imaging pitfalls in the postoperative period include mimickers of pathologic processes such as felt pledgets, graft folds, and nonabsorbable hemostatic agents. Postoperative complications that may be encountered include pseudoaneurysms, infection, and dehiscence. Radiologists should be familiar with normal aortic root anatomy, surgical procedures, and postoperative complications, to accurately interpret pre- and postoperative imaging performed for evaluation of the aortic root. Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26761529

  4. De Novo 17q paracentric inversion mosaicism in a patient with beemer-langer type short rib-polydactyly syndrome with special consideration to the classification of short rib polydactyly syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Mirkin, D.; Yang, S.

    1994-11-01

    A de novo 17q paracentric inversion mosaicism is detected in a fetus with type IV short rib (polydactyly) syndrome (Beemer-Langer). The cytogenetic finding in our case suggests a possible location of the gene or cluster of linked genes responsible for SR (P) S type IV to 17q21 or 17q23. Since this chromosome abnormality has not been described in short rib polydactyly syndromes and the existence of type IV SR (P) S has been controversial, the literature of this entity is reviewed with special consideration to the classification of short rib polydactyly syndromes. 28 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. A Type A and Type D Combined Personality Typology in Essential Hypertension and Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients: Associations with Demographic, Psychological, Clinical, and Lifestyle Indicators.

    PubMed

    Steca, Patrizia; D'Addario, Marco; Magrin, Maria Elena; Miglioretti, Massimo; Monzani, Dario; Pancani, Luca; Sarini, Marcello; Scrignaro, Marta; Vecchio, Luca; Fattirolli, Francesco; Giannattasio, Cristina; Cesana, Francesca; Riccobono, Salvatore Pio; Greco, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have focused on Type A and Type D personality types in the context of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), but nothing is known about how these personality types combine to create new profiles. The present study aimed to develop a typology of Type A and Type D personality in two groups of patients affected by and at risk for coronary disease. The study involved 711 patients: 51.6% with acute coronary syndrome, 48.4% with essential hypertension (mean age = 56.4 years; SD = 9.7 years; 70.7% men). Cluster analysis was applied. External variables, such as socio-demographic, psychological, lifestyle, and clinical parameters, were assessed. Six groups, each with its own unique combined personality profile scores, were identified: Type D, Type A-Negatively Affected, Not Type A-Negatively Affected, Socially Inhibited-Positively Affected, Not Socially Inhibited, and Not Type A-Not Type D. The Type A-Negatively Affected cluster and, to a lesser extent, the Type D cluster, displayed the worst profile: namely higher total cardiovascular risk index, physical inactivity, higher anxiety and depression, and lower self-esteem, optimism, and health status. Identifying combined personality profiles is important in clinical research and practice in cardiovascular diseases. Practical implications are discussed. PMID:27589065

  6. A Type A and Type D Combined Personality Typology in Essential Hypertension and Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients: Associations with Demographic, Psychological, Clinical, and Lifestyle Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Steca, Patrizia; D’Addario, Marco; Magrin, Maria Elena; Miglioretti, Massimo; Monzani, Dario; Pancani, Luca; Sarini, Marcello; Scrignaro, Marta; Vecchio, Luca; Fattirolli, Francesco; Giannattasio, Cristina; Cesana, Francesca; Riccobono, Salvatore Pio

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have focused on Type A and Type D personality types in the context of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), but nothing is known about how these personality types combine to create new profiles. The present study aimed to develop a typology of Type A and Type D personality in two groups of patients affected by and at risk for coronary disease. The study involved 711 patients: 51.6% with acute coronary syndrome, 48.4% with essential hypertension (mean age = 56.4 years; SD = 9.7 years; 70.7% men). Cluster analysis was applied. External variables, such as socio-demographic, psychological, lifestyle, and clinical parameters, were assessed. Six groups, each with its own unique combined personality profile scores, were identified: Type D, Type A-Negatively Affected, Not Type A-Negatively Affected, Socially Inhibited-Positively Affected, Not Socially Inhibited, and Not Type A-Not Type D. The Type A-Negatively Affected cluster and, to a lesser extent, the Type D cluster, displayed the worst profile: namely higher total cardiovascular risk index, physical inactivity, higher anxiety and depression, and lower self-esteem, optimism, and health status. Identifying combined personality profiles is important in clinical research and practice in cardiovascular diseases. Practical implications are discussed. PMID:27589065

  7. An Atypical Presentation of a Male with Oral-Facial-Digital Syndrome Type 1 Related Ciliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Ethan M.; Reynoso, Francis Jeshira; Pradhan, Madhura

    2016-01-01

    Background. Oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1 (OFD1) is a rare condition with X-linked dominant inheritance caused by mutations in the Cxorf5 (OFD1) gene. This gene encodes the OFD1 protein located within centrosomes and basal bodies of primary cilia. Approximately 15–50% of patients with OFD1 progress to end-stage kidney disease following development of polycystic changes within the kidneys. This condition almost always causes intrauterine lethality in males. Description of Case Diagnosis and Treatment. A Caucasian male aged 9 years and 9 months presented with increased urinary frequency, increased thirst, and decreased appetite. Physical examination demonstrated short stature, hearing loss, photophobia, murmur, and hypogonadism. He had no other dysmorphic features. Laboratory results revealed anemia, renal insufficiency, and dilute urine with microscopic hematuria but no proteinuria. Ultrasound showed small kidneys with increased echogenicity but no evidence of cystic changes. A Ciliopathy Panel showed a novel and likely pathogenic deletion, approximately 7.9 kb, in the OFD1 gene encompassing exons 16, 17, and 19 (c.1654+833_2599+423del). Brain MRI did not demonstrate typical OFD1 findings. He is currently on chronic hemodialysis awaiting transplant from a living donor. Conclusions. We present a male patient with OFD1 mutation who lacks the classic OFD1 phenotype who presented with end-stage renal disease without evidence of polycystic changes within the kidneys.

  8. Prenatal diagnosis of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP).

    PubMed

    Francoual, Jeanne; Trioche, Pascale; Mokrani, Chahnez; Seboui, Hassen; Khrouf, Naïma; Chalas, Jacqueline; Clement, Marina; Capel, Liliane; Tachdjian, Gérard; Labrune, Philippe

    2002-10-01

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I (CN-I) is a rare and severe inherited disorder of bilirubin metabolism, caused by the total deficiency of bilirubin-UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity. Enzymatic diagnosis cannot be performed in chorionic villi or amniocytes as UGT is not active in these tissues. The cloning of the UGT1 gene and the identification of disease-causing mutations have led to the possibility of performing DNA-based diagnosis. Here we report DNA-based prenatal diagnosis of CN-I in two Tunisian families in whom CN-I patients were diagnosed. As we had previously shown that CN-I was, in Tunisia, associated with homozygosity for the Q357R mutation within the UGT1 gene, we were able to detect this mutation in both families and to show that it was easily recognized by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. In both cases, SSCP analysis of fetal DNA showed that the fetus was heterozygous for the Q357R mutation. In one family, the pregnancy was carried to term and a healthy baby was born, whereas, in the other family, the pregnancy is still continuing. Thus the prenatal diagnosis of CN-I is possible, provided disease-causing mutations have been identified. SSCP analysis of DNA prepared either from amniocytes or from chorionic villi is a simple, reliable and fast method for prenatal diagnosis.

  9. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: A characterization of the patients' lived experience.

    PubMed

    Murray, Brittney; Yashar, Beverly M; Uhlmann, Wendy R; Clauw, Daniel J; Petty, Elizabeth M

    2013-12-01

    Hypermobility type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS-HT) is an inherited connective tissue disorder clinically diagnosed by the presence of significant joint hypermobility and associated skin manifestations. This article presents a large-scale study that reports the lived experience of EDS-HT patients, the broad range of symptoms that individuals with EDS-HT experience, and the impact these symptoms have on daily functioning. A 237-item online survey, including validated questions regarding pain and depression, was developed. Four hundred sixty-six (466) adults (90% female, 52% college or higher degree) with a self-reported diagnosis of EDS-HT made in a clinic or hospital were included. The most frequently reported symptoms were joint pain (99%), hypermobility (99%), and limb pain (91%). They also reported a high frequency of other conditions including chronic fatigue (82%), anxiety (73%), depression (69%), and fibromyalgia (42%). Forty-six percent of respondents reported constant pain often described as aching and tiring/exhausting. Despite multiple interventions and therapies, many individuals (53%) indicated that their diagnosis negatively affected their ability to work or attend school. Our results show that individuals with EDS-HT can experience a wide array of symptoms and co-morbid conditions. The degree of constant pain and disability experienced by the majority of EDS-HT respondents is striking and illustrates the impact this disorder has on quality of life as well as the clinical challenges inherent in managing this complex connective tissue disorder. PMID:24254846

  10. Management of spontaneous colonic perforation in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julie R; Fishman, Steven J

    2004-02-01

    A 14-year-old girl with a family history of fatal colonic rupture, presented with a 2-day history of abdominal pain and signs of peritonitis. At laparotomy, a full-thickness perforation of the sigmoid colon was found, which was exteriorized as a loop colostomy. Subsequently, molecular studies of the patient's cultured fibroblasts found a point mutation in the COL3A1 gene, confirming a diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV (EDS-IV). Four and a half years later, a total abdominal colectomy and ileoproctostomy were performed, restoring intestinal continuity. At 5 years follow-up, the patient has had no further complications. Although spontaneous colonic perforation is a well-reported manifestation of EDS-IV, a consensus on the surgical management of this complication in EDS-IV has yet to be determined. Given the high rate of reperforation in EDS-IV when the colon is left in place and the low incidence of reported small bowel and rectal perforations, subtotal colectomy is a reasonable treatment. Primary anastomosis and avoidance of an end-ileostomy was possible in this young patient, with no evidence of anastomotic leakage nor reperforation to date. Lifelong close follow-up should be continued in these patients, because the natural history of this anatomy in EDS-IV is not known. PMID:14966763

  11. An Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIA patient with cystic malformations of the meninges.

    PubMed

    Yeowell, Heather N; Walker, Linda C; Neumann, Luitgard M

    2005-01-01

    We have characterized a patient with the phenotype of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIA (EDS VIA: kyphoscoliotic form), accompanied by the unique feature of cystic malformations of the meninges, to be homozygous for a large duplication of 8.9 kb in the lysyl hydroxylase 1 (LH1) gene that is the cause of severely decreased levels of LH activity in her skin fibroblasts. Electrophoresis of full length cDNA for LH1, prepared from the patient's fibroblasts and amplified by PCR, showed an abnormally large DNA fragment indicative of a duplication mutation; this mutation was confirmed in genomic DNA by PCR using duplication-specific primers and sequence analysis of the duplication junction. The homozygosity of this mutation was confirmed by analysis of DNA from the unaffected parents which showed them to be carriers of this duplication. This seven exon duplication is the most common mutation in the LH1 gene in patients with EDS VIA and occurs via a homologous recombination of Alu sequences in introns 9 and 16. Using the data from this study and other recent reports, we have updated the allele frequency for this mutation, based on 19 duplicated alleles out of a total of 104 genetically independent alleles from 53 EDS VIA families, to be 18.3%.

  12. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: A characterization of the patients' lived experience.

    PubMed

    Murray, Brittney; Yashar, Beverly M; Uhlmann, Wendy R; Clauw, Daniel J; Petty, Elizabeth M

    2013-12-01

    Hypermobility type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS-HT) is an inherited connective tissue disorder clinically diagnosed by the presence of significant joint hypermobility and associated skin manifestations. This article presents a large-scale study that reports the lived experience of EDS-HT patients, the broad range of symptoms that individuals with EDS-HT experience, and the impact these symptoms have on daily functioning. A 237-item online survey, including validated questions regarding pain and depression, was developed. Four hundred sixty-six (466) adults (90% female, 52% college or higher degree) with a self-reported diagnosis of EDS-HT made in a clinic or hospital were included. The most frequently reported symptoms were joint pain (99%), hypermobility (99%), and limb pain (91%). They also reported a high frequency of other conditions including chronic fatigue (82%), anxiety (73%), depression (69%), and fibromyalgia (42%). Forty-six percent of respondents reported constant pain often described as aching and tiring/exhausting. Despite multiple interventions and therapies, many individuals (53%) indicated that their diagnosis negatively affected their ability to work or attend school. Our results show that individuals with EDS-HT can experience a wide array of symptoms and co-morbid conditions. The degree of constant pain and disability experienced by the majority of EDS-HT respondents is striking and illustrates the impact this disorder has on quality of life as well as the clinical challenges inherent in managing this complex connective tissue disorder.

  13. An Atypical Presentation of a Male with Oral-Facial-Digital Syndrome Type 1 Related Ciliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Ethan M.; Reynoso, Francis Jeshira; Pradhan, Madhura

    2016-01-01

    Background. Oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1 (OFD1) is a rare condition with X-linked dominant inheritance caused by mutations in the Cxorf5 (OFD1) gene. This gene encodes the OFD1 protein located within centrosomes and basal bodies of primary cilia. Approximately 15–50% of patients with OFD1 progress to end-stage kidney disease following development of polycystic changes within the kidneys. This condition almost always causes intrauterine lethality in males. Description of Case Diagnosis and Treatment. A Caucasian male aged 9 years and 9 months presented with increased urinary frequency, increased thirst, and decreased appetite. Physical examination demonstrated short stature, hearing loss, photophobia, murmur, and hypogonadism. He had no other dysmorphic features. Laboratory results revealed anemia, renal insufficiency, and dilute urine with microscopic hematuria but no proteinuria. Ultrasound showed small kidneys with increased echogenicity but no evidence of cystic changes. A Ciliopathy Panel showed a novel and likely pathogenic deletion, approximately 7.9 kb, in the OFD1 gene encompassing exons 16, 17, and 19 (c.1654+833_2599+423del). Brain MRI did not demonstrate typical OFD1 findings. He is currently on chronic hemodialysis awaiting transplant from a living donor. Conclusions. We present a male patient with OFD1 mutation who lacks the classic OFD1 phenotype who presented with end-stage renal disease without evidence of polycystic changes within the kidneys. PMID:27651963

  14. Alveolar Type II Epithelial Cell Dysfunction in Rat Experimental Hepatopulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenli; Hu, Bingqian; Wu, Wei; Batra, Sachin; Blackburn, Michael R.; Alcorn, Joseph L.; Fallon, Michael B.; Zhang, Junlan

    2014-01-01

    The hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) develops when pulmonary vasodilatation leads to abnormal gas exchange. However, in human HPS, restrictive ventilatory defects are also observed supporting that the alveolar epithelial compartment may also be affected. Alveolar type II epithelial cells (AT2) play a critical role in maintaining the alveolar compartment by producing four surfactant proteins (SPs, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D) which also facilitate alveolar repair following injury. However, no studies have evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment in experimental HPS. In this study, we evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment and particularly AT2 cells in experimental HPS induced by common bile duct ligation (CBDL). We found a significant reduction in pulmonary SP production associated with increased apoptosis in AT2 cells after CBDL relative to controls. Lung morphology showed decreased mean alveolar chord length and lung volumes in CBDL animals that were not seen in control models supporting a selective reduction of alveolar airspace. Furthermore, we found that administration of TNF-α, the bile acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and FXR nuclear receptor activation (GW4064) induced apoptosis and impaired SP-B and SP-C production in alveolar epithelial cells in vitro. These results imply that AT2 cell dysfunction occurs in experimental HPS and is associated with alterations in the alveolar epithelial compartment. Our findings support a novel contributing mechanism in experimental HPS that may be relevant to humans and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:25419825

  15. Sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome and type 2 diabetes. A reciprocal relationship?

    PubMed

    Martínez Cerón, Elisabet; Casitas Mateos, Raquel; García-Río, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiological data suggest that sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS) is independently associated with the development of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Moreover, despite significant methodological limitations, some studies report a high prevalence of SAHS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). A recent meta-analysis shows that moderate-severe SAHS is associated with an increased risk of DM2 (relative risk=1.63 [1.09 to 2.45]), compared to the absence of apneas and hypopneas. Common alterations in various pathogenic pathways add biological plausibility to this relationship. Intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation, caused by successive apnea-hypopnea episodes, induce several intermediate disorders, such as activation of the sympathetic nervous system, oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, alterations in appetite-regulating hormones and activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis which, in turn, favor the development of insulin resistance, its progression to glucose intolerance and, ultimately, to DM2. Concomitant SAHS seems to increase DM2 severity, since it worsens glycemic control and enhances the effects of atherosclerosis on the development of macrovascular complications. Furthermore, SAHS may be associated with the development of microvascular complications: retinopathy, nephropathy or diabetic neuropathy in particular. Data are still scant, but it seems that DM2 may also worsen SAHS progression, by increasing the collapsibility of the upper airway and the development of central apneas and hypopneas.

  16. Spinal cord detethering in children with tethered cord syndrome and Chiari type 1 malformations.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Chad; Cheema, Ahmed A; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Gross, Naina L; Martin, Michael D; Mapstone, Timothy B

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the association between tethered cord syndrome (TCS) and Chiari type 1 malformation (CM1), and report on the surgical outcomes of children with CM1 and TCS who underwent sectioning of the filum terminale (SFT). The relationship between TCS and CM1 is unclear. A retrospective review of 170 consecutive spinal cord detetherings between 2008 and 2012 was performed. We identified 17 children with CM1 who underwent SFT. Information regarding clinical presentation, radiographic findings, surgical procedures, and clinical outcomes was analyzed. A mean tonsillar herniation of 10.0mm (range: 5-21) was noted. Children with a fatty or thickened filum terminale demonstrated a greater amount of tonsillar displacement (p<0.005). A low conus medullaris was found in 12 children and a syrinx was present in three. The preoperative symptoms improved in all children. The postoperative MRI (mean 21.8 months) revealed an unchanged tonsillar position in all but one child. No worsening of neurologic function was noted. Pediatric patients who have both CM1 and TCS, but do not demonstrate classic Chiari-related symptoms, may experience symptomatic improvement after filum terminale sectioning.

  17. Spinal cord detethering in children with tethered cord syndrome and Chiari type 1 malformations.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Chad; Cheema, Ahmed A; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Gross, Naina L; Martin, Michael D; Mapstone, Timothy B

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the association between tethered cord syndrome (TCS) and Chiari type 1 malformation (CM1), and report on the surgical outcomes of children with CM1 and TCS who underwent sectioning of the filum terminale (SFT). The relationship between TCS and CM1 is unclear. A retrospective review of 170 consecutive spinal cord detetherings between 2008 and 2012 was performed. We identified 17 children with CM1 who underwent SFT. Information regarding clinical presentation, radiographic findings, surgical procedures, and clinical outcomes was analyzed. A mean tonsillar herniation of 10.0mm (range: 5-21) was noted. Children with a fatty or thickened filum terminale demonstrated a greater amount of tonsillar displacement (p<0.005). A low conus medullaris was found in 12 children and a syrinx was present in three. The preoperative symptoms improved in all children. The postoperative MRI (mean 21.8 months) revealed an unchanged tonsillar position in all but one child. No worsening of neurologic function was noted. Pediatric patients who have both CM1 and TCS, but do not demonstrate classic Chiari-related symptoms, may experience symptomatic improvement after filum terminale sectioning. PMID:26165471

  18. A-type lamins and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: pathogenesis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Jose M; Pla, Davinia; Perez-Sala, Dolores; Andres, Vicente

    2011-06-01

    Lamin A and lamin C (A-type lamins, both encoded by the LMNA gene) are major components of the mammalian nuclear lamina, a complex proteinaceous structure that acts as a scaffold for protein complexes that regulate nuclear structure and function. Abnormal accumulation of farnesylated-progerin, a mutant form of prelamin A, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a devastating disorder that causes the death of affected children at an average age of 13.5 years, predominantly from premature atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction or stroke. Remarkably, progerin is also present in normal cells and appears to progressively accumulate during aging of non-HGPS cells. Therefore, understanding how this mutant form of lamin A provokes HGPS may shed significant insight into physiological aging. In this review, we discuss recent advances into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying HGPS, the main murine models of the disease, and the therapeutic strategies developed in cellular and animal models with the aim of reducing the accumulation of farnesylated-progerin, as well as their use in clinical trials of HGPS.

  19. Elosulfase Alfa: a review of its use in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (Morquio A syndrome).

    PubMed

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A

    2014-10-01

    Elosulfase alfa (Vimizim(®)) is a recombinant form of the human lysosomal enzyme N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) that is lacking in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome). It is the first, and currently only, disease-specific treatment option for this very rare, progressively degenerative, autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disorder. Enzyme replacement therapy with elosulfase alfa aims to restore GALNS activity, thereby preventing the accumulation of keratan sulfate (KS) and chondroitin-6-sulfate in lysosomal compartments of cells that results in the clinical manifestations of MPS IVA. In clinical trials in children and adults with MPS IVA, intravenous elosulfase alfa 2 mg/kg/week provided significant and sustained improvements in urinary levels of KS (a pharmacodynamic biomarker for the disease). In the key placebo-controlled, 24-week, phase 3 trial in patients with MPS IVA aged ≥5 years, elosulfase alfa 2 mg/kg/week significantly improved endurance [least squares mean placebo-adjusted change from baseline in 6-min walk test distance 22.5 m (95 % CI 4.0-40.9)]. Infusion-associated reactions, the primary tolerability issue associated with elosulfase alfa, are generally mild to moderate in severity, self-limiting, and manageable. In the absence of a cure, GALNS enzyme replacement therapy with elosulfase alfa is an important achievement in the treatment of MPS IVA.

  20. Do psychological factors influence recovery from complex regional pain syndrome type 1? A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bean, Debbie J; Johnson, Malcolm H; Heiss-Dunlop, Wolfgang; Lee, Arier C; Kydd, Robert R

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that the outcomes of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) vary significantly between patients, but few studies have identified prognostic indicators. The aim of this study was to determine whether psychological factors are associated with recovery from recently onset CRPS amongst patients followed prospectively for 1 year. Sixty-six patients with CRPS (type 1) were recruited within 12 weeks of symptom onset and assessed immediately and at 6 and 12 months, during which time they received treatment as usual. At each assessment, the following were measured: signs and symptoms of CRPS, pain, disability, depression, anxiety, stress, pain-related fear, pain catastrophising, laterality task performance, body perception disturbance, and perceived ownership of the limb. Mixed-effects models for repeated measures were conducted to identify baseline variables associated with CRPS severity, pain, and disability over the 12 months. Results showed that scores for all 3 outcome variables improved over the study period. Males and those with lower levels of baseline pain and disability experienced the lowest CRPS severity scores over 12 months. Those with lower baseline anxiety and disability had the lowest pain intensity over the study period, and those with lower baseline pain and pain-related fear experienced the least disability over the 12 months. This suggests that anxiety, pain-related fear, and disability are associated with poorer outcomes in CRPS and could be considered as target variables for early treatment. The findings support the theory that CRPS represents an aberrant protective response to perceived threat of tissue injury.

  1. Modified Atkins diet therapy for a case with glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ito, Susumu; Oguni, Hirokazu; Ito, Yasushi; Ishigaki, Keiko; Ohinata, Junko; Osawa, Makiko

    2008-03-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT-1 DS), giving rise to impaired glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier, is characterized by infantile seizures, complex motor disorders, global developmental delay, acquired microcephaly, and hypoglycorrhachia. GLUT-1 DS can be treated effectively with a ketogenic diet because it can provide an alternative fuel for brain metabolism; however, the excessive restriction of food intake involved frequently makes it difficult for patients to initiate or continue the diet. Recently, the modified Atkins diet, which is much less restrictive in terms of the total calorie and protein intake than the classical ketogenic diet, has been shown to be effective and well tolerated in children with intractable epilepsy. We successfully introduced the modified Atkins diet to a 7-year-old boy with GLUT-1 DS, whose caregivers refused ketogenic diet treatment because of strong concerns over restricting the diet. The modified Atkins diet should be considered for patients with GLUT-1 DS as an alternative to the traditional ketogenic diet.

  2. NEK1 mutations cause short-rib polydactyly syndrome type majewski.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Christian; Kessler, Kristin; Giessl, Andreas; Dimmler, Arno; Shalev, Stavit A; von der Haar, Sigrun; Zenker, Martin; Zahnleiter, Diana; Stöss, Hartmut; Beinder, Ernst; Abou Jamra, Rami; Ekici, Arif B; Schröder-Kress, Nadja; Aigner, Thomas; Kirchner, Thomas; Reis, André; Brandstätter, Johann H; Rauch, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Defects of ciliogenesis have been implicated in a wide range of human phenotypes and play a crucial role in signal transduction and cell-cycle coordination. We used homozygosity mapping in two families with autosomal-recessive short-rib polydactyly syndrome Majewski type to identify mutations in NEK1 as an underlying cause of this lethal osteochondrodysplasia. NEK1 encodes a serine/threonine kinase with proposed function in DNA double-strand repair, neuronal development, and coordination of cell-cycle-associated ciliogenesis. We found that absence of functional full-length NEK1 severely reduces cilia number and alters ciliar morphology in vivo. We further substantiate a proposed digenic diallelic inheritance of ciliopathies by the identification of heterozygous mutations in NEK1 and DYNC2H1 in an additional family. Notably, these findings not only increase the broad spectrum of ciliar disorders, but suggest a correlation between the degree of defective microtubule or centriole elongation and organization and the severity of the resulting phenotype.

  3. An Atypical Presentation of a Male with Oral-Facial-Digital Syndrome Type 1 Related Ciliopathy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sheena; Kalish, Jennifer M; Goldberg, Ethan M; Reynoso, Francis Jeshira; Pradhan, Madhura

    2016-01-01

    Background. Oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1 (OFD1) is a rare condition with X-linked dominant inheritance caused by mutations in the Cxorf5 (OFD1) gene. This gene encodes the OFD1 protein located within centrosomes and basal bodies of primary cilia. Approximately 15-50% of patients with OFD1 progress to end-stage kidney disease following development of polycystic changes within the kidneys. This condition almost always causes intrauterine lethality in males. Description of Case Diagnosis and Treatment. A Caucasian male aged 9 years and 9 months presented with increased urinary frequency, increased thirst, and decreased appetite. Physical examination demonstrated short stature, hearing loss, photophobia, murmur, and hypogonadism. He had no other dysmorphic features. Laboratory results revealed anemia, renal insufficiency, and dilute urine with microscopic hematuria but no proteinuria. Ultrasound showed small kidneys with increased echogenicity but no evidence of cystic changes. A Ciliopathy Panel showed a novel and likely pathogenic deletion, approximately 7.9 kb, in the OFD1 gene encompassing exons 16, 17, and 19 (c.1654+833_2599+423del). Brain MRI did not demonstrate typical OFD1 findings. He is currently on chronic hemodialysis awaiting transplant from a living donor. Conclusions. We present a male patient with OFD1 mutation who lacks the classic OFD1 phenotype who presented with end-stage renal disease without evidence of polycystic changes within the kidneys. PMID:27651963

  4. Intervention trials for prevention of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes: focus on Asian Indians.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Usha; Misra, Anoop

    2014-08-01

    Prevalence of diabetes continues to increase in urban areas, and escalation is discernible in semi-urban and rural areas. It is reported to affect Asian Indians a decade earlier compared with other populations, and complications (e.g., nephropathy) occur earlier and are severe and more prevalent than in other races. Because of these adverse features and suboptimal management practices, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) poses a huge health and economic burden to the country. Simple and culturally sensitive interventions for Asian Indians have been shown to be effective in prevention/amelioration of diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors in multiple settings, among urban and rural residents, in migrants, and in those who are healthy or obese or have metabolic syndrome or T2DM. Furthermore, short-term intensive lifestyle intervention in children improves anthropometric and metabolic parameters. Finally, intervention with specific nutrient or oil substitution in Indian diets has been reported to produce benefit in multiple metabolic cardiovascular risk factors. There is, however, further need for conducting well-designed and planned intervention trials with robust outcome data at the primary and secondary levels. These trials must be culturally sensitive and should investigate cost-effective strategies.

  5. Inflammation in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes: Impact of dietary glucose.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Kerstin; Rose, Bettina; Herder, Christian; Kleophas, Ursula; Martin, Stephan; Kolb, Hubert

    2006-11-01

    Chronic overnutrition combined with a lack of exercise is the main cause for the rapidly increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity. It seems accepted that adipositis (macrophage infiltration and inflammation of adipose tissue in obesity) and systemic low grade inflammation affect the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Therefore, modern weight reduction programs additionally focus on strategies to attenuate the inflammation state. Exercise is one major factor, which contributes to the reduction of both the incidence of T2DM and inflammation, and the immunomodulatory effects of exercise are supported by similarly beneficial effects of dietary changes. In this context, glucose is the most extensively studied nutrient and current investigations focus on postprandial glucose-induced inflammation, one possible reason why hyperglycemia is detrimental. Indeed, glucose may modulate the mRNA expression and serum concentrations of immune parameters but these alterations rapidly normalize in normoglycemic subjects. In case of an impaired metabolic state, however, postprandial hyperglycemia increases magnitude and duration of systemic inflammatory responses, which probably promotes the development of T2DM and of cardiovascular disease.

  6. Alveolar type II epithelial cell dysfunction in rat experimental hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS).

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenli; Hu, Bingqian; Wu, Wei; Batra, Sachin; Blackburn, Michael R; Alcorn, Joseph L; Fallon, Michael B; Zhang, Junlan

    2014-01-01

    The hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) develops when pulmonary vasodilatation leads to abnormal gas exchange. However, in human HPS, restrictive ventilatory defects are also observed supporting that the alveolar epithelial compartment may also be affected. Alveolar type II epithelial cells (AT2) play a critical role in maintaining the alveolar compartment by producing four surfactant proteins (SPs, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D) which also facilitate alveolar repair following injury. However, no studies have evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment in experimental HPS. In this study, we evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment and particularly AT2 cells in experimental HPS induced by common bile duct ligation (CBDL). We found a significant reduction in pulmonary SP production associated with increased apoptosis in AT2 cells after CBDL relative to controls. Lung morphology showed decreased mean alveolar chord length and lung volumes in CBDL animals that were not seen in control models supporting a selective reduction of alveolar airspace. Furthermore, we found that administration of TNF-α, the bile acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and FXR nuclear receptor activation (GW4064) induced apoptosis and impaired SP-B and SP-C production in alveolar epithelial cells in vitro. These results imply that AT2 cell dysfunction occurs in experimental HPS and is associated with alterations in the alveolar epithelial compartment. Our findings support a novel contributing mechanism in experimental HPS that may be relevant to humans and a potential therapeutic target.

  7. Sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome and type 2 diabetes. A reciprocal relationship?

    PubMed

    Martínez Cerón, Elisabet; Casitas Mateos, Raquel; García-Río, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiological data suggest that sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS) is independently associated with the development of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Moreover, despite significant methodological limitations, some studies report a high prevalence of SAHS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). A recent meta-analysis shows that moderate-severe SAHS is associated with an increased risk of DM2 (relative risk=1.63 [1.09 to 2.45]), compared to the absence of apneas and hypopneas. Common alterations in various pathogenic pathways add biological plausibility to this relationship. Intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation, caused by successive apnea-hypopnea episodes, induce several intermediate disorders, such as activation of the sympathetic nervous system, oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, alterations in appetite-regulating hormones and activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis which, in turn, favor the development of insulin resistance, its progression to glucose intolerance and, ultimately, to DM2. Concomitant SAHS seems to increase DM2 severity, since it worsens glycemic control and enhances the effects of atherosclerosis on the development of macrovascular complications. Furthermore, SAHS may be associated with the development of microvascular complications: retinopathy, nephropathy or diabetic neuropathy in particular. Data are still scant, but it seems that DM2 may also worsen SAHS progression, by increasing the collapsibility of the upper airway and the development of central apneas and hypopneas. PMID:25145320

  8. Molecular findings of Colombian patients with type VI mucopolysaccharidosis (Maroteaux–Lamy syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Gustavo Adolfo; Ayala-Ramírez, Paola; Prieto, Juan Carlos; García-Robles, Reggie; Acosta, Johanna Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Maroteaux–Lamy syndrome, or mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type VI, is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficient activity of the enzyme arylsulfatase B (ARSB), required to degrade dermatan sulfate. The onset and progression of the disease vary, producing a spectrum of clinical presentation. So far, 133 mutations have been reported. The aim of this study is to determine the mutations in the ARSB gene that are responsible for this disease in Colombian patients. Results Fourteen patients with clinical manifestations and biochemical diagnosis of MPS VI were studied, including two siblings. The 8 exons of the gene were directly sequenced from patients' DNA, and 14 mutations were found. 57% of these mutations had not been previously reported (p.H111P, p.C121R, p.G446S, p.*534W, p.S334I, p.H147P, c.900T > G, and c.1531_1553del) and 43% had been previously reported (p.G144R, p.W322*, p.G302R, p.C447F, p.L128del, and c.1143-1G > C). Of the previously reported mutations, 80% have been associated with severe phenotypes and 20% with intermediate-severe phenotypes. Bioinformatic predictions indicate that the new mutations reported in this paper are also highly deleterious. Conclusions Most of the Colombian patients in this study had private mutations. PMID:26909334

  9. A case of variant biochemical phenotype of Niemann-Pick disease type C accompanying savant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hamatani, Mio; Jingami, Naoto; Uemura, Kengo; Nakasone, Naoe; Kinoshita, Hisanori; Yamakado, Hodaka; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2016-06-22

    A 40-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of vertical supranuclear gaze palsy, frequent sudden loss of muscle tonus and ataxia for several years. He had a history of prolonged neonatal jaundice. He was given a diagnosis of autism in his childhood, followed by a diagnosis of schizophrenia in his teenage. He also developed a savant skill of calendar calculating. (123)I-IMP-SPECT showed decreased cerebral blood flow in the left frontotemporal lobe as often seen in savant syndrome. Although genetic analysis of NPC1 and NPC2 revealed no pathogenic mutation, filipin staining of cultured fibroblasts from his biopsied skin revealed a certain amount of intracellular cholesterol storage pattern, indicating a variant biochemical phenotype of Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC). The diagnosis of adulthood onset NPC is difficult and challenging, especially for neurologists, because the symptoms and signs are not as clear as those in the classical childhood onset NPC and this subtype is not yet widely known. However, the diagnosis can be made by a combination of filipin staining of fibroblast and/or gene analysis. As a disease-specific therapy for NPC has been approved in Japan, the diagnosis of NPC is of significance.

  10. Proteome-wide survey of the autoimmune target repertoire in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1

    PubMed Central

    Landegren, Nils; Sharon, Donald; Freyhult, Eva; Hallgren, Åsa; Eriksson, Daniel; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Bensing, Sophie; Wahlberg, Jeanette; Nelson, Lawrence M.; Gustafsson, Jan; Husebye, Eystein S.; Anderson, Mark S.; Snyder, Michael; Kämpe, Olle

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1) is a monogenic disorder that features multiple autoimmune disease manifestations. It is caused by mutations in the Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene, which promote thymic display of thousands of peripheral tissue antigens in a process critical for establishing central immune tolerance. We here used proteome arrays to perform a comprehensive study of autoimmune targets in APS1. Interrogation of established autoantigens revealed highly reliable detection of autoantibodies, and by exploring the full panel of more than 9000 proteins we further identified MAGEB2 and PDILT as novel major autoantigens in APS1. Our proteome-wide assessment revealed a marked enrichment for tissue-specific immune targets, mirroring AIRE’s selectiveness for this category of genes. Our findings also suggest that only a very limited portion of the proteome becomes targeted by the immune system in APS1, which contrasts the broad defect of thymic presentation associated with AIRE-deficiency and raises novel questions what other factors are needed for break of tolerance. PMID:26830021

  11. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junyu; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Zhiyuan; Liao, Yong; Guo, Luo; Wang, Honglian; He, Lin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Xing, Qinghe

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser) in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203) containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  12. Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIA presents as a variant of Klüver-Bucy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Potegal, Michael; Yund, Brianna; Rudser, Kyle; Ahmed, Alia; Delaney, Kate; Nestrasil, Igor; Whitley, Chester B; Shapiro, Elsa G

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIA (MPS IIIA) is a neurodegenerative disease with behavioral symptoms unique among the mucopolysaccharidoses. Children with MPS IIIA reportedly mouth things, explore novel environments almost continuously, disregard danger, and empathize/socialize and comply less with parents. These characteristics resemble Klüver-Bucy syndrome (K-Bs). To test the K-Bs hypothesis, 30 children with MPS IIIA were compared to 8 "posttransplant" mucopolysaccharidosis Type IH patients in an experimental "risk room." The room contained attractive and mildly frightening objects, exposure to a 92-dB startle noise triggered by contact with an attractive toy, mother's return after a brief absence, and compliance with her cleanup directive. Children with MPS IIIA: (a) left mother sooner, (b) wandered more, (c) were more likely to approach frightening objects, (d) were less likely to respond to loud noise with whole body startle, (e) were less likely to avoid the toy associated with the startle noise, (f) interacted less with mother upon her return, and (g) complied less with her cleanup command. K-Bs is associated with loss of amygdala function. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of a subset of the children with MPS IIIA showed volume loss that was greater in the amygdala than in the hippocampus; only amygdala loss correlated with reduced fearfulness. MPS IIIA may be the first identified pediatric disease presenting systematically as a K-Bs variant. If validated by further studies, the K-Bs hypothesis of MPS IIIA would provide important clinical and theoretical information for the guidance of families as well as markers for natural disease progression and treatment effects. PMID:23745734

  13. Defective membrane expression of human growth hormone (GH) receptor causes Laron-type GH insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Duquesnoy, P; Sobrier, M L; Amselem, S; Goossens, M

    1991-01-01

    Mutations in the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene can cause growth hormone (GH) resistance. Given the sequence homology between the extracellular domain of the GHR and a soluble GH-binding protein (GH-BP), it is remarkable that GH-BP binding activity is absent from the serum of patients with Laron-type GH insensitivity, a hereditary form of severe dwarfism. We have previously identified a mutation within the extracellular domain of this receptor, replacing phenylalanine by serine at position 96 of the mature protein, in a patient with Laron syndrome. We have now investigated the effect of this Phe----Ser substitution on hormone binding activity by expressing the total human GHR cDNA and mutant form in eukaryotic cells. The wild-type protein expressed was able to bind GH but no plasma membrane binding was detectable on cells transfected with the mutant cDNA; this was also the case of cells transfected with a Phe96----Ala mutant cDNA, suggesting that the lack of binding activity is not due to a posttranslational modification of serine. Examination of the variant proteins in subcellular fractions revealed the presence of specific GH binding activity in the lysosomal fraction, whereas immunofluorescence studies located mutant proteins in the cytosol. Our findings suggest that these mutant GHRs fail to follow the correct intracellular transport pathway and underline the potential importance of this phenylalanine residue, which is conserved among the GH, prolactin, and erythropoietin receptors that belong to the same cytokine receptor superfamily. Images PMID:1719554

  14. A Longitudinal Follow-up of Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndrome Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Bruserud, Øyvind; Oftedal, Bergithe E.; Landegren, Nils; Erichsen, Martina M.; Bratland, Eirik; Lima, Kari; Jørgensen, Anders P.; Myhre, Anne G.; Svartberg, Johan; Fougner, Kristian J.; Bakke, Åsne; Nedrebø, Bjørn G.; Mella, Bjarne; Breivik, Lars; Viken, Marte K.; Knappskog, Per M.; Marthinussen, Mihaela C.; Løvås, Kristian; Kämpe, Olle; Wolff, Anette B.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1) is a childhood-onset monogenic disease defined by the presence of two of the three major components: hypoparathyroidism, primary adrenocortical insufficiency, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). Information on longitudinal follow-up of APS1 is sparse. Objective: To describe the phenotypes of APS1 and correlate the clinical features with autoantibody profiles and autoimmune regulator (AIRE) mutations during extended follow-up (1996–2016). Patients: All known Norwegian patients with APS1. Results: Fifty-two patients from 34 families were identified. The majority presented with one of the major disease components during childhood. Enamel hypoplasia, hypoparathyroidism, and CMC were the most frequent components. With age, most patients presented three to five disease manifestations, although some had milder phenotypes diagnosed in adulthood. Fifteen of the patients died during follow-up (median age at death, 34 years) or were deceased siblings with a high probability of undisclosed APS1. All except three had interferon-ω) autoantibodies, and all had organ-specific autoantibodies. The most common AIRE mutation was c.967_979del13, found in homozygosity in 15 patients. A mild phenotype was associated with the splice mutation c.879+1G>A. Primary adrenocortical insufficiency and type 1 diabetes were associated with protective human leucocyte antigen genotypes. Conclusions: Multiple presumable autoimmune manifestations, in particular hypoparathyroidism, CMC, and enamel hypoplasia, should prompt further diagnostic workup using autoantibody analyses (eg, interferon-ω) and AIRE sequencing to reveal APS1, even in adults. Treatment is complicated, and mortality is high. Structured follow-up should be performed in a specialized center. PMID:27253668

  15. Quality of life, unmet needs, and iatrogenic injuries in rehabilitation of patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome hypermobility type/Joint Hypermobility Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bovet, Claire; Carlson, Matthew; Taylor, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and the joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) are connective tissue disorders that form an overlapping clinical syndrome and are associated with frequent medical visits and substantial morbidity. EDS-HT/JHS-associated pain correlates with poor quality of life. While physical therapy is the recommended treatment for EDS-HT/JHS, little is known about therapy-related patient experiences and iatrogenic injuries. We studied 38 adult EDS-HT/JHS patients, eliciting health-related quality of life (HRQoL) from 28 patients through the RAND SF-36 questionnaire. We also explored physical therapy experiences through focus groups with 13 patients. Our patients displayed poor HRQoL, with 71% reporting worse health over the past year. SF-36 scores were significantly lower than the scores of the average American population (P < 0.001 for 8 of 10 categories assessed), but were comparable to EDS-HT/JHS populations in Belgium, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Italy. Focus groups identified factors associated with: negative past physical therapy experiences, iatrogenic joint injuries, positive treatment experiences, and unmet rehabilitation needs. This group of EDS-HT/JHS patients has significant decrements in HRQoL and many unmet treatment needs, as well as a risk for iatrogenic injuries. We identify several approaches to help meet patients' needs and improve joint rehabilitation in patients with EDS-HT/JHS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Psychopathological manifestations of joint hypermobility and joint hypermobility syndrome/ Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: The link between connective tissue and psychological distress revised.

    PubMed

    Sinibaldi, Lorenzo; Ursini, Gianluca; Castori, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Psychological distress is a known feature of generalized joint hypermobility (gJHM), as well as of its most common syndromic presentation, namely Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (a.k.a. joint hypermobility syndrome - JHS/EDS-HT), and significantly contributes to the quality of life of affected individuals. Most published articles dealt with the link between gJHM (or JHS/EDS-HT) and anxiety-related conditions, and a novel generation of studies is emerging aimed at investigating the psychopathologic background of such an association. In this paper, literature review was carried out with a semi-systematic approach spanning the entire spectrum of psychopathological findings in gJHM and JHS/EDS-HT. Interestingly, in addition to the confirmation of a tight link between anxiety and gJHM, preliminary connections with depression, attention deficit (and hyperactivity) disorder, autism spectrum disorders, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder were also found. Few papers investigated the relationship with schizophrenia with contrasting results. The mind-body connections hypothesized on the basis of available data were discussed with focus on somatotype, presumed psychopathology, and involvement of the extracellular matrix in the central nervous system. The hypothesis of positive Beighton score and alteration of interoceptive/proprioceptive/body awareness as possible endophenotypes in families with symptomatic gJHM or JHS/EDS-HT is also suggested. Concluding remarks addressed the implications of the psychopathological features of gJHM and JHS/EDS-HT in clinical practice.

  17. Psychopathological manifestations of joint hypermobility and joint hypermobility syndrome/ Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: The link between connective tissue and psychological distress revised.

    PubMed

    Sinibaldi, Lorenzo; Ursini, Gianluca; Castori, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Psychological distress is a known feature of generalized joint hypermobility (gJHM), as well as of its most common syndromic presentation, namely Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (a.k.a. joint hypermobility syndrome - JHS/EDS-HT), and significantly contributes to the quality of life of affected individuals. Most published articles dealt with the link between gJHM (or JHS/EDS-HT) and anxiety-related conditions, and a novel generation of studies is emerging aimed at investigating the psychopathologic background of such an association. In this paper, literature review was carried out with a semi-systematic approach spanning the entire spectrum of psychopathological findings in gJHM and JHS/EDS-HT. Interestingly, in addition to the confirmation of a tight link between anxiety and gJHM, preliminary connections with depression, attention deficit (and hyperactivity) disorder, autism spectrum disorders, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder were also found. Few papers investigated the relationship with schizophrenia with contrasting results. The mind-body connections hypothesized on the basis of available data were discussed with focus on somatotype, presumed psychopathology, and involvement of the extracellular matrix in the central nervous system. The hypothesis of positive Beighton score and alteration of interoceptive/proprioceptive/body awareness as possible endophenotypes in families with symptomatic gJHM or JHS/EDS-HT is also suggested. Concluding remarks addressed the implications of the psychopathological features of gJHM and JHS/EDS-HT in clinical practice. PMID:25821094

  18. Quality of life, unmet needs, and iatrogenic injuries in rehabilitation of patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome hypermobility type/Joint Hypermobility Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bovet, Claire; Carlson, Matthew; Taylor, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and the joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) are connective tissue disorders that form an overlapping clinical syndrome and are associated with frequent medical visits and substantial morbidity. EDS-HT/JHS-associated pain correlates with poor quality of life. While physical therapy is the recommended treatment for EDS-HT/JHS, little is known about therapy-related patient experiences and iatrogenic injuries. We studied 38 adult EDS-HT/JHS patients, eliciting health-related quality of life (HRQoL) from 28 patients through the RAND SF-36 questionnaire. We also explored physical therapy experiences through focus groups with 13 patients. Our patients displayed poor HRQoL, with 71% reporting worse health over the past year. SF-36 scores were significantly lower than the scores of the average American population (P < 0.001 for 8 of 10 categories assessed), but were comparable to EDS-HT/JHS populations in Belgium, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Italy. Focus groups identified factors associated with: negative past physical therapy experiences, iatrogenic joint injuries, positive treatment experiences, and unmet rehabilitation needs. This group of EDS-HT/JHS patients has significant decrements in HRQoL and many unmet treatment needs, as well as a risk for iatrogenic injuries. We identify several approaches to help meet patients' needs and improve joint rehabilitation in patients with EDS-HT/JHS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27273746

  19. Executive Functioning in Children with Asperger Syndrome, ADHD-Combined Type, ADHD-Predominately Inattentive Type, and Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Walkowiak, Jenifer; Wilkinson, Alison; Butcher, Brianne

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate neuropsychological and behavioral rating measures of executive functions (EF) in children with two subtypes of ADHD, Asperger syndrome (AS), and controls. Relative to the control group, the clinical groups experienced more difficulty in EF. The AS group showed the most difficulty in emotional control,…

  20. A unique combination of autoimmune limbic encephalitis, type 1 diabetes, and Stiff person syndrome associated with GAD-65 antibody

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Chandra Mohan; Pandey, Rajendra Kumar; Kumawat, Banshi Lal; Khandelwal, Dinesh; Gandhi, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies to GAD-65 have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes, limbic encephalitis and Stiff person syndrome, however these diseases rarely occur concurrently. We intend to present a rare case of 35 year old female who was recently diagnosed as having type 1 diabetes presented with 1½ month history of recurrent seizures, subacute onset gait ataxia, dysathria, psychiatric disturbance and cognitive decline. No tumor was found on imaging and the classic paraneoplastic panel was negative. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood was positive for GAD-65 antibodies. Patient showed significant improvement with immunomodulatory therapy. Association of GAD-65 antibodies has been found with various disorders including type 1 diabetes, limbic encephalitis, Stiff person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia and palatal myoclonus. This case presents with unique combination of type 1 diabetes, Stiff person syndrome and limbic encephalitis associated with GAD-65 antibodies that is responsive to immunotherapy. It also highlights the emerging concept of autoimmunity in the causation of various disorders and there associations. PMID:27011652

  1. A unique combination of autoimmune limbic encephalitis, type 1 diabetes, and Stiff person syndrome associated with GAD-65 antibody.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Chandra Mohan; Pandey, Rajendra Kumar; Kumawat, Banshi Lal; Khandelwal, Dinesh; Gandhi, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies to GAD-65 have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes, limbic encephalitis and Stiff person syndrome, however these diseases rarely occur concurrently. We intend to present a rare case of 35 year old female who was recently diagnosed as having type 1 diabetes presented with 1½ month history of recurrent seizures, subacute onset gait ataxia, dysathria, psychiatric disturbance and cognitive decline. No tumor was found on imaging and the classic paraneoplastic panel was negative. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood was positive for GAD-65 antibodies. Patient showed significant improvement with immunomodulatory therapy. Association of GAD-65 antibodies has been found with various disorders including type 1 diabetes, limbic encephalitis, Stiff person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia and palatal myoclonus. This case presents with unique combination of type 1 diabetes, Stiff person syndrome and limbic encephalitis associated with GAD-65 antibodies that is responsive to immunotherapy. It also highlights the emerging concept of autoimmunity in the causation of various disorders and there associations. PMID:27011652

  2. The association between Type D personality and the metabolic syndrome: a cross-sectional study in a University-based outpatient lipid clinic

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Type D personality has been associated in the past with increased cardiovascular mortality among patients with established coronary heart disease. Very few studies have investigated the association of type D personality with traditional cardiovascular risk factors. In this study, we assessed the association between type D personality and the metabolic syndrome. Findings New consecutive patients referred to an outpatient lipid clinic for evaluation of possible metabolic syndrome were eligible for inclusion in the study. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) diagnostic criteria. Type D personality was assessed with the DS-14 scale. Multivariate regression techniques were used to investigate the association between personality and metabolic syndromes adjusting for a number of medical and psychiatric confounders. Three hundred and fifty-nine persons were screened of whom 206 met the diagnostic criteria for the metabolic syndrome ("cases") and 153 did not ("control group"). The prevalence of type D personality was significantly higher in the cases as compared to the control group (44% versus 15% respectively, p < 0.001). In multivariate logistic regression analysis the presence of Type D personality was significantly associated with metabolic syndrome independently of other clinical factors, anxiety and depressive symptoms (odds ratio 3.47; 95% Confidence Interval: 1.90 - 6.33). Conclusions Type D personality was independently associated with the metabolic syndrome in this cross-sectional study. The potential implications of this finding, especially from a clinical or preventive perspective, should be examined in future research. PMID:21466680

  3. Type IX Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and Menkes syndrome: the decrease in lysyl oxidase activity is associated with a corresponding deficiency in the enzyme protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kuivaniemi, H; Peltonen, L; Kivirikko, K I

    1985-01-01

    Type IX of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (E-D IX) and the Menkes syndrome are X-linked recessively inherited disorders characterized by abnormalities in copper metabolism. These abnormalities are associated with a severe reduction in the activity of lysyl oxidase, the extracellular copper enzyme that initiates crosslinking of collagens and elastin. No increase in this deficient enzyme activity was obtained when culture media from fibroblasts of patients with E-D IX or the Menkes syndrome were incubated with copper under various conditions in vitro. A distinct, although small, increase in lysyl oxidase activity was obtained, however, when copper-supplemented media were used during culturing of the fibroblasts, although even under these conditions, the enzyme activity in the media from the affected cells remained markedly below that of the controls. Immunoprecipitation, dot-blotting, and immunoperoxidase staining experiments with antisera to human lysyl oxidase indicated that fibroblasts from patients with E-D IX or the Menkes syndrome do not secrete into their medium, or contain inside the cell, any significant amounts of a copper-deficient, catalytically inactive lysyl oxidase protein. These findings appear to be consistent with the hypothesis that synthesis of the lysyl oxidase protein itself is impaired. The possibility is not excluded, however, that a copper-deficient enzyme protein may be synthesized in normal amounts but become degraded very rapidly inside the cell. The failure to obtain any large increase in the deficient lysyl oxidase activity upon various forms of copper administration suggests that it may not be possible to obtain any significant improvement in the connective tissue manifestations of these disorders by copper therapy. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:9556668

  4. Cervical artery dissections and type A aortic dissection in a family with a novel missense COL3A1 mutation of vascular type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Makrygiannis, Georgios; Loeys, Bart; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Sakalihasan, Natzi

    2015-11-01

    Cervical artery dissection (CeAD) is a rare condition. One of the causes is the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS). A novel missense mutation in COL3A1 was found in a young patient with CeAD as the single manifestation of vEDS. This is a heterozygous c.953G > A mutation in exon 14, disrupting the normal Gly-X-Y repeats of type III procollagen, by converting glycine to aspartic acid.

  5. Cervical artery dissections and type A aortic dissection in a family with a novel missense COL3A1 mutation of vascular type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Makrygiannis, Georgios; Loeys, Bart; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Sakalihasan, Natzi

    2015-11-01

    Cervical artery dissection (CeAD) is a rare condition. One of the causes is the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS). A novel missense mutation in COL3A1 was found in a young patient with CeAD as the single manifestation of vEDS. This is a heterozygous c.953G > A mutation in exon 14, disrupting the normal Gly-X-Y repeats of type III procollagen, by converting glycine to aspartic acid. PMID:26497932

  6. Alternative splicing modifies the effect of mutations in COL11A1 and results in recessive type 2 Stickler syndrome with profound hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Allan J; Fincham, Gregory S; McNinch, Annie; Hill, David; Poulson, Arabella V; Castle, Bruce; Lees, Melissa M; Moore, Anthony T; Scott, John D; Snead, Martin P

    2013-01-01

    Background Stickler syndromes types 1, 2 and 3 are usually dominant disorders caused by mutations in the genes COL2A1, COL11A1 and COL11A2 that encode the fibrillar collagens types II and XI present in cartilage and vitreous. Rare recessive forms of Stickler syndrome exist that are due to mutations in genes encoding type IX collagen (COL9A1 type 4 Stickler syndrome and COL9A2 type 5 Stickler syndrome). Recently, recessive mutations in the COL11A1 gene have been demonstrated to result in fibrochondrogenesis, a much more severe skeletal dysplasia, which is often lethal. Here we demonstrate that some mutations in COL11A1 are recessive, modified by alternative splicing and result in type 2 Stickler syndrome rather than fibrochondrogenesis. Methods Patients referred to the national Stickler syndrome diagnostic service for England, UK were assessed clinically and subsequently sequenced for mutations in COL11A1. Additional in silico and functional studies to assess the effect of sequence variants on pre-mRNA processing and collagen structure were performed. Results In three different families, heterozygous COL11A1 biallelic null, null/missense or silent/missense mutations, were found. They resulted in a recessive form of type 2 Stickler syndrome characterised by particularly profound hearing loss and are clinically distinct from the recessive types 4 and 5 variants of Stickler syndrome. One mutant allele in each family is capable of synthesising a normal α1(XI) procollagen molecule, via variable pre-mRNA processing. Conclusion This new variant has important implications for molecular diagnosis and counselling families with type 2 Stickler syndrome. PMID:23922384

  7. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  8. Buccal anomalies, cephalometric analysis and genetic study of two sisters with orofaciodigital syndrome type I.

    PubMed

    Romero, Martín; Franco, Brunella; del Pozo, Jaime Sánchez; Romance, Ana

    2007-11-01

    Orofaciodigital syndromes have many clinical and cephalometric anomalies, including facial irregularities, oral cavity abnormalities, and malformations of fingers and toes. In this case of twin girls, buccal exploration, cephalometric examination, and genetic analysis were performed to diagnose Orofaciodigital I or Orofaciodigital II syndrome. Clinically, the twins had several dental and skeletal irregularities. Genetic analysis revealed a DNA segment abnormality corresponding to exon 3 and presence of nucleotide change, 243C>G, leading to the missense mutation H81Q. This causative mutation associated with the OFD1 gene has not been reported previously. Both patients were diagnosed as having Orofaciodigital I syndrome.

  9. Fatal Peritoneal Bleeding Following Embolization of a Carotid-Cavernous Fistula in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    SciTech Connect

    Usinskiene, Jurgita; Mazighi, Mikael; Bisdorff, Annouk; Houdart, Emmanuel

    2006-12-15

    We report the case of a 25-year-old woman treated for a spontaneous carotid-cavernous fistula in a context of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV. Embolization with a transvenous approach was achieved without complications; however, the patient died 72 hr later of massive intraperitoneal bleeding. At autopsy, no lesion of the digestive arteries was identified. Possible causes of this bleeding are discussed.

  10. The Relationship between "MECP2" Mutation Type and Health Status and Service Use Trajectories over Time in a Rett Syndrome Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Deidra; Bebbington, Ami; de Klerk, Nick; Bower, Carol; Nagarajan, Lakshmi; Leonard, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the trajectories over time of health status and health service use in Rett syndrome by mutation type. Data were obtained from questionnaires administered over 6 years to 256 participants from the Australian Rett Syndrome Database. Health status (episodes of illness and medication load) and health service use…

  11. Multiple strokes and bilateral carotid dissections: a fulminant case of newly diagnosed Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV.

    PubMed

    Dohle, C; Baehring, J M

    2012-07-15

    Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is a rare group of inheritable disorders resulting in abnormal collagen production, leading to skin fragility, joint hypermobility and easy bruising. Six major subtypes have been identified, of which Type IV most often leads to neurovascular complications, may lead to inner organ rupture and overall has the worst prognosis. Early recognition followed by genetic testing is key, since this diagnosis will guide decision making in the management of complications, influence the choice of antiplatelet medications versus anticoagulants and allow for potentially affected family members to be identified, undergo genetic testing and reproductive counseling. We here report the case of a 50 year old woman with a fulminant presentation of Ehlers Danlos Syndrome Type IV, including bilateral carotid and vertebral artery dissection, multiple strokes and liver rupture. Of note, this patient did not have a known history or obvious clinical features of connective tissue disease. Genetic testing confirmed the diagnosis. Review of her family history revealed multiple family members with a history of aortic dissection or aneurysm rupture. This case illustrates that Ehlers Danlos Syndrome Type IV is an important differential diagnosis even in adult patients without a known history of connective tissue disease and no prior complications.

  12. Coexistence of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 and diabetes insipidus in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Samborek, Malgorzata

    2011-11-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are rarely diagnosed conditions characterized by the association of at least 2 organ-specific autoimmune disorders. Very few cases of these syndromes have been described during pregnancy. The authors report a case of a patient diagnosed with autoimmune thyroiditis and a history of HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet) syndrome in a prior pregnancy. After increasing the levothyroxine dose, she developed Addisonian crisis. Normalization of adrenal cortex function resulted in the appearance of diabetes insipidus. This report shows that pregnancy may influence the course of preexisting endocrine disorders and lead to their unmasking. Although the risk of the development of autoimmune polyglandular syndromes during pregnancy is small, they may pose a serious health problem. The possible presence of these clinical entities should be considered in every woman with 1 or more endocrine disturbances.

  13. Complex regional pain syndrometype I: What’s in a name?

    PubMed Central

    Coderre, Terence J.

    2015-01-01

    Within a two year period in the 1940’s, two Boston physicians published dramatically opposing views on the underlying nature of a syndrome now known as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Evans suggested, in several papers in 1946–1947, that sympathetic reflexes maintain pain and dystrophy in affected limbs. Foisie, in 1947, suggested arterial vasospasms were key in the etiology of this pain syndrome. Evans’ hypothesis established the nomenclature for this syndrome for 60 years, and his term “reflex sympathetic dystrophy” guided clinical treatment and research activities over the same period. Foisie’s proposed nomenclature was unrecognized, and had virtually no impact on the field. Recent evidence suggests that Evans’ contribution to the field may have in fact lead clinicians and researchers astray all those years. This focus article on CRPS compares recent observations with these 2 earlier theories and asks the question -- what if we had adopted Foisie’s nomenclature from the beginning? PMID:20634146

  14. Lack of deafness in Crigler-Najjar syndrome type 1: a patient survey.

    PubMed

    Suresh, G; Lucey, J F

    1997-11-01

    We performed a questionnaire survey about 42 patients with Crigler-Najjar syndrome type 1 who were currently alive. Information was obtained on their age, sex, birth weight, gestation, parental consanguinity, other family members affected, age of onset of jaundice, neonatal and postneonatal bilirubin values, neonatal and postneonatal therapy, problems faced with phototherapy, liver transplantation, current growth status, current neurologic status, and the status of hearing. Patients were between 2 months and 21 years of age. There were 18 males and 24 females. Thirty-nine patients had been born at full term gestation and 3 had been preterm. Jaundice was noted on postnatal day 1 in 34%, between days 2 and 4 in 55%, and after day 11 of life in 11% of patients. In the neonatal period bilirubin values (mean +/- SD) were typically 19.8 +/- 4.5 mg/dL. Eighty-six percent of patients had neonatal peak bilirubin values of >20 mg/dL. Parental consanguinity was present in 44% and a history of Gilbert's disease in one parent was present in 10% of patients. Causes of exacerbations of jaundice reported were respiratory infections, febrile illnesses, vaccinations, fasting, surgery, emotional stress, and noncompliance with treatment. Neonatal therapy consisted of exchange transfusion in 28%, phototherapy in 79%, phenobarbitone in 20%, and cholestyramine, albumin, infusions, and plasmapheresis in one case each. The mainstay of postneonatal therapy was home phototherapy for 10 to 16 hours, primarily at night during sleep, using blue lights or a combination of blue and fluorescent lights. Some patients used innovatively designed phototherapy units. Problems reported with phototherapy were decreased effectiveness with age, poor compliance, restriction of activity and play, inability to travel or take vacations, irritation from eye shades, difficulty keeping eye protection on, difficulties in temperature maintenance, tanning of the skin, embarrassment from the need to be nearly nude

  15. Do psychological factors influence recovery from complex regional pain syndrome type 1? A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bean, Debbie J; Johnson, Malcolm H; Heiss-Dunlop, Wolfgang; Lee, Arier C; Kydd, Robert R

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that the outcomes of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) vary significantly between patients, but few studies have identified prognostic indicators. The aim of this study was to determine whether psychological factors are associated with recovery from recently onset CRPS amongst patients followed prospectively for 1 year. Sixty-six patients with CRPS (type 1) were recruited within 12 weeks of symptom onset and assessed immediately and at 6 and 12 months, during which time they received treatment as usual. At each assessment, the following were measured: signs and symptoms of CRPS, pain, disability, depression, anxiety, stress, pain-related fear, pain catastrophising, laterality task performance, body perception disturbance, and perceived ownership of the limb. Mixed-effects models for repeated measures were conducted to identify baseline variables associated with CRPS severity, pain, and disability over the 12 months. Results showed that scores for all 3 outcome variables improved over the study period. Males and those with lower levels of baseline pain and disability experienced the lowest CRPS severity scores over 12 months. Those with lower baseline anxiety and disability had the lowest pain intensity over the study period, and those with lower baseline pain and pain-related fear experienced the least disability over the 12 months. This suggests that anxiety, pain-related fear, and disability are associated with poorer outcomes in CRPS and could be considered as target variables for early treatment. The findings support the theory that CRPS represents an aberrant protective response to perceived threat of tissue injury. PMID:26133727

  16. Therapeutic alternatives for the treatment of type 1 hepatorenal syndrome: A Delphi technique-based consensus

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Juan P; Claro, Juan C; Arancibia, Juan P; Contreras, Jorge; Gómez, Fernando; Muñoz, Cristian; Nazal, Leyla; Roessler, Eric; Wolff, Rodrigo; Arrese, Marco; Benítez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    AIM To propose several alternatives treatment of type 1 hepatorenal syndrome (HRS-1) what is the most severe expression of circulatory dysfunction on patients with portal hypertension. METHODS A group of eleven gastroenterologists and nephrologists performed a structured analysis of available literature. Each expert was designated to review and answer a question. They generated draft statements for evaluation by all the experts. Additional input was obtained from medical community. In order to reach consensus, a modified three-round Delphi technique method was used. According to United States Preventive Services Task Force criteria, the quality of the evidence and level of recommendation supporting each statement was graded. RESULTS Nine questions were formulated. The available evidence was evaluated considering its quality, number of patients included in the studies and the consistency of its results. The generated questions were answered by the expert panel with a high level of agreement. Thus, a therapeutic algorithm was generated. The role of terlipressin and norepinephrine was confirmed as the pharmacologic treatment of choice. On the other hand the use of the combination of octreotide, midodrine and albumin without vasoconstrictors was discouraged. The role of several other options was also evaluated and the available evidence was explored and discussed. Liver transplantation is considered the definitive treatment for HRS-1. The present consensus is an important effort that intends to organize the available strategies based on the available evidence in the literature, the quality of the evidence and the benefits, adverse effects and availability of the therapeutic tools described. CONCLUSION Based on the available evidence the expert panel was able to discriminate the most appropriate therapeutic alternatives for the treatment of HRS-1.

  17. New Splice Site Acceptor Mutation in AIRE Gene in Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndrome Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Mireia; Hanzu, Felicia A.; Pradas-Juni, Marta; Aranda, Gloria B.; Halperin, Irene; Puig-Domingo, Manuel; Aguiló, Sira; Fernández-Rebollo, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1, OMIM 240300) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by the presence of at least two of three major diseases: hypoparathyroidism, Addison’s disease, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. We aim to identify the molecular defects and investigate the clinical and mutational characteristics in an index case and other members of a consanguineous family. We identified a novel homozygous mutation in the splice site acceptor (SSA) of intron 5 (c.653-1G>A) in two siblings with different clinical outcomes of APS-1. Coding DNA sequencing revealed that this AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the constitutive SSA of intron 5, splicing upstream onto a nearby cryptic SSA in intron 5. Surprisingly, the use of an alternative SSA entails the uncovering of a cryptic donor splice site in exon 5. This new transcript generates a truncated protein (p.A214fs67X) containing the first 213 amino acids and followed by 68 aberrant amino acids. The mutation affects the proper splicing, not only at the acceptor but also at the donor splice site, highlighting the complexity of recognizing suitable splicing sites and the importance of sequencing the intron-exon junctions for a more precise molecular diagnosis and correct genetic counseling. As both siblings were carrying the same mutation but exhibited a different APS-1 onset, and one of the brothers was not clinically diagnosed, our finding highlights the possibility to suspect mutations in the AIRE gene in cases of childhood chronic candidiasis and/or hypoparathyroidism otherwise unexplained, especially when the phenotype is associated with other autoimmune diseases. PMID:24988226

  18. Myosin VIIA mutation screening in 189 Usher syndrome type 1 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, M.D.; Kelley, P.M.; Overbeck, L.D.

    1996-11-01

    Usher syndrome type 1b (USH1B) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital profound hearing loss, vestibular abnormalities, and retinitis pigmentosa. The disorder has recently been shown to be caused by mutations in the myosin VIIa gene (MYO7A) located on 11q14. In the current study, a panel of 189 genetically independent Usher I cases were screened for the presence of mutations in the N-terminal coding portion of the motor domain of MYO7A by heteroduplex analysis of 14 exons. Twenty-three mutations were found segregating with the disease in 20 families. Of the 23 mutations, 13 were unique, and 2 of the 13 unique mutations (Arg212His and Arg212Cys) accounted for the greatest percentage of observed mutant alleles (8/23, 31%). Six of the 13 mutations caused premature stop codons, 6 caused changes in the amino acid sequence of the myosin VIIa protein, and 1 resulted in a splicing defect. Three patients were homozygotes or compound heterozygotes for mutant alleles; these three cases were Tyr333Stop/Tyr333Stop, Arg212His-Arg302His/Arg212His-Arg302His, and IVS13nt-8c{r_arrow}g/ G1u450Gln. All the other USH1B mutations observed were simple heterozygotes, and it is presumed that the mutation on the other allele is present in the unscreened regions of the gene. None of the mutations reported here were observed in 96 unrelated control samples, although several polymorphisms were detected. These results add three patients to a single case reported previously where mutations have been found in both alleles and raises the total number of unique mutations in MYO7A to 16. 22 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Clinical characteristics and long-term outcomes of moyamoya syndrome associated with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Han, Cong; Yang, Wei-Zhong; Zhang, Hong-Tao; Ye, Ting; Duan, Lian

    2015-02-01

    Moyamoya syndrome (MMS) associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) has rarely been reported anywhere in the world, particularly in Asia. Because of the rarity of this disorder, its natural history, clinical symptoms, management, and follow-up findings remain unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical presentation, neurological imaging, and long-term outcomes of patients with this disease by reviewing Chinese patients with MMS associated with NF1. A retrospective review was conducted from the moyamoya disease (MMD) and MMS patient database of our hospital. Six patients who were diagnosed with MMS associated with NF1 between January 2003 and October 2013 were identified. The clinical symptoms were transient ischemic attack (TIA, three patients), headache (one patient), intracerebral hemorrhage (one patient), and cerebral infarction (one patient). The mean age of diagnosis for NF1 and MMS was 2.7 ± 2.1 years (range, 1-6 years) and 11.4 ± 8.3 years (range, 3.5-23 years), respectively. Five of six patients (nine hemispheres) underwent revascularization surgery, and their clinical symptoms were stable during a 46.3 ± 36.1 month (range, 18-108 month) follow-up. One non-surgical patient had a new infarct that resulted in visual field deficits during follow-up. Three patients had radiographic follow-up, and the postoperative angiograms showed successful revascularizations in the operated hemispheres. To conclude, the clinical and radiographic features for MMS-NF1 are similar to those of typical MMD. Routine vascular screening for NF1 patients is necessary for the early identification of MMS and other cerebral arteriopathies. Revascularization surgery may prevent the progression of clinical symptoms and reduce the risk of subsequent strokes.

  20. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes type 2 in cryptogenic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Tellez-Avila, Felix I; Sanchez-Avila, Francisco; García-Saenz-de-Sicilia, Mauricio; Chavez-Tapia, Norberto C; Franco-Guzman, Ada M; Lopez-Arce, Gustavo; Cerda-Contreras, Eduardo; Uribe, Misael

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS), obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a group of Mexican Mestizo patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis (CC) and to compare this group with patients with cirrhosis secondary to other causes (disease controls). METHODS: Patients with CC, diagnosed between January, 1990 and April, 2005, were included in a retrospective study. Patients with cirrhosis caused by chronic hepatitis C, alcohol abuse or autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) served as disease controls. RESULTS: A total of 134 patients with CC were analyzed. Disease controls consisted of 81 patients with chronic hepatitis C, 33 with alcohol abuse and 20 with AIH. The median age of patients with CC was 57 years (range, 16-87); 83 (61.9%) patients were female; 53 (39.6%) were Child A, 65 (48.5%) Child B, and 16 (11.9%) were Child C cirrhosis. The prevalence of MS (29.1% vs 6%; P < 0.001), obesity (16.4% vs 8.2%; P = 0.04) and T2DM (40% vs 22.4%; P = 0.013) was higher in CC patients than in disease controls. There were no differences in sex, age or liver function tests between the two groups. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of MS, obesity and T2DM were higher in patients with CC than in patients with cirrhosis secondary to others causes. Our findings support the hypothesis that non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) plays an under-recognized role in CC. PMID:18720537

  1. Effects of dairy protein and fat on the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bjørnshave, Ann; Hermansen, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide. Evidence supports a negative relationship between the consumption of dairy products and risk of MetS and T2D. Dairy proteins are known to have a directly beneficial effect on hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia, but a detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms is missing. It has been confirmed by observations that the insulinotropic effect of dairy proteins is associated with the amino acid composition; in particular branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) seem to be of vital importance. Dairy protein-derived peptides may also contribute to the insulinotropic effect via dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitory activity, and may lower the blood pressure (BP). The lipid metabolism may be improved by whey protein (WP), which acts to reduce the postprandial triglyceride (TG) response. The effect of dairy fat is much more controversial because of the potentially harmful effect exerted by saturated fatty acid (SFA) on metabolic health. Recent observations suggest less adverse effects of SFA on metabolic health than previous assumed. However, little is known about dairy lipid fractions belonging to the groups of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and phospholipids (PL). Dairy fat seems to act differently depending on the dairy product and the composition of macronutrients in the meal. Therefore, for a better understanding of the mechanisms behind the dairy protein and fat effect on MetS, we suggest that more human studies should be carried out to clarify the interactions of dairy protein and fat with macronutrients in the meal and other dairy components, such as micronutrients and microorganisms from fermented products.

  2. Health-related quality of life in 975 patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    van Velzen, Gijsbrecht A J; Perez, Roberto S G M; van Gestel, Miriam A; Huygen, Frank J P M; van Kleef, Maarten; van Eijs, Frank; Dahan, Albert; van Hilten, Jacobus J; Marinus, Johan

    2014-03-01

    There are limited data available on health-related quality of life (QoL) in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In the present study we examined QoL in 975 CRPS patients attending 6 different clinics in the Netherlands. QoL was assessed using the MOS 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) with the Mental Health Summary Score (MHS) and the Physical Health Summary Score (PHS) as dependent variables. The influences of gender, type of affected limb, disease duration, pain scores, CRPS severity and set of diagnostic criteria used were investigated. We found the lowest scores of QoL in the physical domains of the SF-36, with lower-limb CRPS patients reporting poorer results than patients with an affected upper limb. Influence of gender on QoL was not observed, and correlations of QoL with disease duration and the CRPS severity score were weak. Pain correlated moderately with QoL. In addition, patients fulfilling stricter diagnostic criteria (ie, the Budapest criteria) had lower QoL scores than patients fulfilling less strict criteria (ie, the Orlando criteria). We conclude that loss of QoL in CRPS patients is due mainly to reduced physical health. A comparison with data available from the literature shows that CRPS patients generally report poorer QoL than patients with other chronic pain conditions, particularly in the physical domains. Pain correlated moderately with QoL and therefore deserves ongoing attention by physicians. Finally, patients meeting the diagnostic Budapest criteria have lower QoL scores than patients meeting the Orlando criteria, highlighting the impact of different sets of criteria on population characteristics.

  3. Tracking the Cognitive, Social, and Neuroanatomical Profile in Early Neurodegeneration: Type III Cockayne Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baez, Sandra; Couto, Blas; Herrera, Eduar; Bocanegra, Yamile; Trujillo-Orrego, Natalia; Madrigal-Zapata, Lucia; Cardona, Juan Felipe; Manes, Facundo; Ibanez, Agustin; Villegas, Andres

    2013-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is an autosomal recessive disease associated with premature aging, progressive multiorgan degeneration, and nervous system abnormalities including cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, brain calcifications, and white matter abnormalities. Although several clinical descriptions of CS patients have reported developmental delay and cognitive impairment with relative preservation of social skills, no previous studies have carried out a comprehensive neuropsychological and social cognition assessment. Furthermore, no previous research in individuals with CS has examined the relationship between brain atrophy and performance on neuropsychological and social cognition tests. This study describes the case of an atypical late-onset type III CS patient who exceeds the mean life expectancy of individuals with this pathology. The patient and a group of healthy controls underwent a comprehensive assessment that included multiple neuropsychological and social cognition (emotion recognition, theory of mind, and empathy) tasks. In addition, we compared the pattern of atrophy in the patient to controls and to its concordance with ERCC8 gene expression in a healthy brain. The results showed memory, language, and executive deficits that contrast with the relative preservation of social cognition skills. The cognitive profile of the patient was consistent with his pattern of global cerebral and cerebellar loss of gray matter volume (frontal structures, bilateral cerebellum, basal ganglia, temporal lobe, and occipito-temporal/occipito-parietal regions), which in turn was anatomically consistent with the ERCC8 gene expression level in a healthy donor's brain. The study of exceptional cases, such as the one described here, is fundamental to elucidating the processes that affect the brain in premature aging diseases, and such studies provide an important source of information for understanding the problems associated with normal and pathological aging.

  4. GASTRIC CARCINOID TYPE 1 IN A PATIENT WITH AUTOIMMUNE POLYGLANDULAR SYNDROME: ADDITIONAL ENDOCRINOLOGICAL EVALUATION REQUIRED.

    PubMed

    Vrkljan, Ana Marija; Grasić, David; Kruljac, Ivan; Nikolić, Marko; Filipović-Cugura, Jaksa; Ulamec, Monika; Kovacić, Ksenija; Babić, Nenad; Ljubicić, Neven

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome by definition consists of two or more endocrinological insufficiencies or two organ specific autoimmune diseases. There are no stringent criteria for endocrinological evaluation of patients with one endocrine insufficiency. However, detailed endocrinological evaluation should be undertaken in patients with two autoimmune diseases. Additionally, follow up thereafter should be a must in these patients in order to avoid the possibility of not diagnosing subsequent autoimmune diseases that can occur. The aim of this case report is to point to the necessity of endocrinological screening to be made in patients presenting with gastric carcinoid type 1. We report on a 62-year-old woman who was diagnosed with primary hypothyroidism in 1993. In 2011, she was re-admitted to the hospital due to increasing fatigue. Macrocytic anemia, low vitamin B12 levels and positive parietal antibodies confirmed pernicious anemia. Furthermore, she underwent gastroscopy, which revealed two polyps in the corpus of the stomach and one in the fornix. Endoscopic mucosal resection was performed and histopathologic analysis confirmed three G1 gastric carcinoids (Ki67 2%). Additional endocrinological evaluation disclosed positive glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies, but normal fasting and postprandial glucose and HbA1c. In 2013, she was diagnosed with glucose intolerance and subsequently with latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood. Plasma glucose and HbA1c normalized after dietary intervention. Due to the increase of serum chromogranin A, prophylactic antrectomy was performed in 2014. The patient is still followed-up and has normal chromogranin A, gastrin and HbA1c levels. PMID:27017730

  5. Corrections of diverse forms of lower limb deformities in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (Morquio syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Kenis, Vladimir; Melchenko, Eugeniy; Ghachem, Maher Ben; Csepan, Robert; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thoracolumbar kyphosis has been considered as the first presenting deformity and is often a key diagnostic clue noted in children with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type IV (Morquio's syndrome). However, we observed that the progressive irregularities of the epiphyses of the long bones were the most prominent skeletal pathology, causing effectively the development of diverse forms of lower limbs deformities with extreme variation in age of onset. Materials and Methods: Ten patients (seven children and three adults) with an average age of 15 years have been enrolled in this study. Age of diagnosis of MPS IVA has a variable age of onset and a MISLEADING rate of severity. Hip dislocations, genu valgum, protrusio acetabuli and osteoarthritis were the most common lower limbs deformities in these patients. Clinical and radiographic phenotypes were the baseline tools of documentation. Urinary screening and genotypic characterizations have been applied accordingly. Results: Combined pelvic and femoral procedures for hip dislocation, epiphysiodeses and supracondylar osteotomy for genu valgum and hip arthroplasty for protrusio acetabuli have been performed. All patients manifested insufficient activity of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulphate sulphatase, an enzyme that degrades keratin sulphate and chondroitin-6 sulphate. Conclusion: The extensive clinical heterogeneity contributed significantly in the delay in establishing the diagnosis particularly in adult patients with MPS IV. The epiphyseal irregularities of the long bones and the progressive flattening pathology of MPS IV A were the reason to falsely diagnose some patients as spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenital and/or tarda. Proximal femoral osteotomy, realignment osteotomy and total hip arthroplasty have been performed for coxa vara, genu valgum and protrusio acetabuli, respectively, in children and adult group of patients. The importance of early diagnosis on MPS IV A is to receive enzyme replacement therapy

  6. Complex regional pain syndrome type I affects brain structure in prefrontal and motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Pleger, Burkhard; Draganski, Bogdan; Schwenkreis, Peter; Lenz, Melanie; Nicolas, Volkmar; Maier, Christoph; Tegenthoff, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare but debilitating pain disorder that mostly occurs after injuries to the upper limb. A number of studies indicated altered brain function in CRPS, whereas possible influences on brain structure remain poorly investigated. We acquired structural magnetic resonance imaging data from CRPS type I patients and applied voxel-by-voxel statistics to compare white and gray matter brain segments of CRPS patients with matched controls. Patients and controls were statistically compared in two different ways: First, we applied a 2-sample ttest to compare whole brain white and gray matter structure between patients and controls. Second, we aimed to assess structural alterations specifically of the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the CRPS affected side. To this end, MRI scans of patients with left-sided CRPS (and matched controls) were horizontally flipped before preprocessing and region-of-interest-based group comparison. The unpaired ttest of the "non-flipped" data revealed that CRPS patients presented increased gray matter density in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. The same test applied to the "flipped" data showed further increases in gray matter density, not in the S1, but in the M1 contralateral to the CRPS-affected limb which were inversely related to decreased white matter density of the internal capsule within the ipsilateral brain hemisphere. The gray-white matter interaction between motor cortex and internal capsule suggests compensatory mechanisms within the central motor system possibly due to motor dysfunction. Altered gray matter structure in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex may occur in response to emotional processes such as pain-related suffering or elevated analgesic top-down control.

  7. Auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation for Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I.

    PubMed Central

    Rela, M; Muiesan, P; Vilca-Melendez, H; Dhawan, A; Baker, A; Mieli-Vergani, G; Heaton, N D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation (APOLT) has the long-term potential to correct the underlying abnormality in Crigler-Najjar syndrome type 1 (CNS1) without the need for total liver replacement. BACKGROUND: Orthotopic liver transplantation has been used successfully to replace the defective enzyme in CNS1. Experimental studies have shown that only 1% to 2% of the normal hepatocyte mass is needed for bilirubin conjugation. If APOLT corrects the underlying metabolic abnormality, it has the advantage of preserving the native liver, which would serve as a "safety net" should the graft fail, and there is the potential for gene therapy in the future with possible withdrawal of immunosuppression. METHODS: Seven APOLT procedures were performed in six recipients with CNS1. Median age at transplantation was 10.5 years. Six transplants were performed as a left auxiliary liver transplant, and one was performed as a right auxiliary liver transplant. Median serum bilirubin level at transplantation was 320 micromol/L. All patients required 12 to 16 hours of phototherapy daily before the transplant to maintain serum bilirubin levels between 250 and 350 micromol/L. RESULTS: Median serum bilirubin level was 50 micromol/L at day 5 after the transplant and 23 micromol/L at a median follow-up of 32 months. In four children, early severe acute rejection developed, requiring conversion to tacrolimus; one underwent a second transplant for chronic rejection and graft atrophy but died from lymphoproliferative disease 6 months after the second transplant. CONCLUSIONS: This report shows that APOLT is technically feasible and provides adequate hepatocyte mass to correct the underlying metabolic abnormality in CNS1. PMID:10203091

  8. Effects of Dairy Protein and Fat on the Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bjørnshave, Ann; Hermansen, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide. Evidence supports a negative relationship between the consumption of dairy products and risk of MetS and T2D. Dairy proteins are known to have a directly beneficial effect on hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia, but a detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms is missing. It has been confirmed by observations that the insulinotropic effect of dairy proteins is associated with the amino acid composition; in particular branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) seem to be of vital importance. Dairy protein-derived peptides may also contribute to the insulinotropic effect via dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitory activity, and may lower the blood pressure (BP). The lipid metabolism may be improved by whey protein (WP), which acts to reduce the postprandial triglyceride (TG) response. The effect of dairy fat is much more controversial because of the potentially harmful effect exerted by saturated fatty acid (SFA) on metabolic health. Recent observations suggest less adverse effects of SFA on metabolic health than previous assumed. However, little is known about dairy lipid fractions belonging to the groups of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and phospholipids (PL). Dairy fat seems to act differently depending on the dairy product and the composition of macronutrients in the meal. Therefore, for a better understanding of the mechanisms behind the dairy protein and fat effect on MetS, we suggest that more human studies should be carried out to clarify the interactions of dairy protein and fat with macronutrients in the meal and other dairy components, such as micronutrients and microorganisms from fermented products. PMID:25396403

  9. Sanfilippo syndrome type B: cDNA and gene encoding human {alpha}-N-acetylglucosaminidase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H.G.; Lopez, R.; Rennecker, J.

    1994-09-01

    Deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme {alpha}-N-acetlyglucosaminidase underlies the type B Sanfilippo syndrome (MPS III B), a mucopolysaccharide storage disease with profound neurologic deterioration. We are acquiring tools to study the molecular basis of the disorder. The enzyme was purified from bovine testis; after ConA-, DEAE- and phenyl-Sepharose chromatography, it was subjected to SDS-PAGE without preheating. Of two bands of activity detected on the gel, 170 kDa and 87 kDa, the larger one, which coincided with a well-defined Coomassie blue band, was selected for sequence analysis. Degenerate 17-base oligonucleotides, corresponding to the ends of an internal 23 amino acid sequence, were used for RT-PCR of RNA from human fibroblasts. A 41-mer was synthesized from the sequence of the RT-PCR product and used to screen a human testis cDNA library. A number of cDNA inserts were isolated, all lacking the 5{prime} end and none longer than 1.7 kb. An additional 300 bp segment has been obtained by RACE. The cDNA sequence accounts for 9 of 11 peptides, allowing for species difference. Northern analysis of fibroblast RNA with a 1.5 kb cDNA probe showed the presence of a 3 kb mRNA; marked deficiency of this mRNA in two MPS III B fibroblast lines confirmed the authenticity of the cloned cDNA. While no homologous amino acid sequence has been found in a search of GenBank, the nucleotide sequence (interrupted by 4 introns) is present in a flanking region upstream of an unrelated gene on chromosome 17q11-21 (human 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase). This must therefore be the chromosomal locus of the {alpha}-N-acetylglucosaminidase gene and of MPS III B.

  10. Orthopedic manifestations in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome) enrolled in the Hunter Outcome Survey

    PubMed Central

    Link, Bianca; de Camargo Pinto, Louise Lapagesse; Giugliani, Roberto; Wraith, James Edmond; Guffon, Nathalie; Eich, Elke; Beck, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II or Hunter syndrome) is a rare, inherited disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. As a result of this deficiency, glycosaminoglycans accumulate in lysosomes in many tissues, leading to progressive multisystemic disease. The cardiopulmonary and neurological problems associated with MPS II have received considerable attention. Orthopedic manifestations are common but not as well characterized. This study aimed to characterize the prevalence and severity of orthopedic manifestations of MPS II and to determine the relationship of these signs and symptoms with cardiovascular, pulmonary and central nervous system involvement. Orthopedic manifestations of MPS II were studied using cross-sectional data from the Hunter Outcome Survey (HOS). The HOS is a global, physician-led, multicenter observational database that collects information on the natural history of MPS II and the long-term safety and effectiveness of enzyme replacement therapy. As of January 2009, the HOS contained baseline data on joint range of motion in 124 males with MPS II. In total, 79% of patients had skeletal manifestations (median onset, 3.5 years) and 25% had abnormal gait (median onset, 5.4 years). Joint range of motion was restricted for all joints assessed (elbow, shoulder, hip, knee and ankle). Extension was the most severely affected movement: the exception to this was the shoulder. Surgery for orthopedic problems was rare. The presence of orthopedic manifestations was associated with the presence of central nervous system and pulmonary involvement, but not so clearly with cardiovascular involvement. Orthopedic interventions should be considered on an individual-patient basis. Although some orthopedic manifestations associated with MPS II may be managed routinely, a good knowledge of other concurrent organ system involvement is essential. A multidisciplinary approach is required. PMID:21808707

  11. Depression, anxiety disorders, and metabolic syndrome in a population at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, Kai G; Schweiger, Ulrich; Correll, Christoph; Müller, Conrad; Busch, Marie-Luise; Bauer, Michael; Schwarz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Depressive symptoms have been associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but less is known about anxiety disorders that can be comorbid or exist without depression. Methods We evaluated the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in subjects consecutively examined at an outpatient clinic for diabetes prevention who were at-risk for T2DM, defined by FINDRISK scores, and compared metabolic syndrome (MetS) frequencies between subjects with and without psychiatric morbidity, entering also relevant variables for MetS into multivariate analyses. All subjects underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Psychiatric diagnosis was confirmed using a Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Results Of 260 consecutively screened subjects, 150 (56.9 ± 8.1 years old, males = 56.7%, BMI = 27.2 ± 4.1 kg/m2) were at-risk for T2DM and were included. MetS, present in 27% of males and 25% of females, was significantly associated with having a current anxiety disorder (P < 0.001) and lifetime major depression (P < 0.001). In logistic regression analysis, MetS was significantly associated with lifetime major depression, presence of any anxiety disorder, body weight, and physical activity. Conclusions Our data in a high-risk group for T2DM support the association between depressive disorders and MetS, pointing to a similar role of anxiety disorders. Screening for anxiety and depression is recommended in this group at risk for T2DM. PMID:25642391

  12. Therapeutic alternatives for the treatment of type 1 hepatorenal syndrome: A Delphi technique-based consensus

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Juan P; Claro, Juan C; Arancibia, Juan P; Contreras, Jorge; Gómez, Fernando; Muñoz, Cristian; Nazal, Leyla; Roessler, Eric; Wolff, Rodrigo; Arrese, Marco; Benítez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    AIM To propose several alternatives treatment of type 1 hepatorenal syndrome (HRS-1) what is the most severe expression of circulatory dysfunction on patients with portal hypertension. METHODS A group of eleven gastroenterologists and nephrologists performed a structured analysis of available literature. Each expert was designated to review and answer a question. They generated draft statements for evaluation by all the experts. Additional input was obtained from medical community. In order to reach consensus, a modified three-round Delphi technique method was used. According to United States Preventive Services Task Force criteria, the quality of the evidence and level of recommendation supporting each statement was graded. RESULTS Nine questions were formulated. The available evidence was evaluated considering its quality, number of patients included in the studies and the consistency of its results. The generated questions were answered by the expert panel with a high level of agreement. Thus, a therapeutic algorithm was generated. The role of terlipressin and norepinephrine was confirmed as the pharmacologic treatment of choice. On the other hand the use of the combination of octreotide, midodrine and albumin without vasoconstrictors was discouraged. The role of several other options was also evaluated and the available evidence was explored and discussed. Liver transplantation is considered the definitive treatment for HRS-1. The present consensus is an important effort that intends to organize the available strategies based on the available evidence in the literature, the quality of the evidence and the benefits, adverse effects and availability of the therapeutic tools described. CONCLUSION Based on the available evidence the expert panel was able to discriminate the most appropriate therapeutic alternatives for the treatment of HRS-1. PMID:27660674

  13. The neuropsychological profile of patients with 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type III, Costeff syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sofer, S; Schweiger, A; Blumkin, L; Yahalom, G; Anikster, Y; Lev, D; Ben-Zeev, B; Lerman-Sagie, T; Hassin-Baer, S

    2015-04-01

    Costeff syndrome is a rare genetic neuro-ophthalmological syndrome consisting of early-onset bilateral optic atrophy along with a progressive complex motor disorder with elevated levels of urinary 3-methylglutaconic acid and 3-methylglutaric acid. While borderline to mild cognitive deficits have been considered to be common in patients with this syndrome, a comprehensive cognitive assessment has never been performed. The aim of the current study was to explore the cognitive profile associated with Costeff syndrome. Sixteen adult patients diagnosed with Costeff syndrome were administered a neuropsychological test battery that was composed of standardized verbal tests adapted for the blind. General intelligence ranged from average to borderline, with a group mean consistent with intact general cognitive functioning (VIQmean  = 85, z = -1) in the low-average range of the general population. The auditory immediate and delayed memory indexes were in the average range and were significantly higher than the general cognitive functioning, whereas the working memory index was significantly lower than the general cognitive functioning. Adult patients with Costeff syndrome have intact global cognition and learning abilities and strong auditory memory performance. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25657044

  14. Potential Risk Factors for the Onset of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Shipton, Edward A.; Mulder, Roger T.

    2015-01-01

    Anaesthetists in the acute and chronic pain teams are often involved in treating Complex Regional Pain Syndromes. Current literature about the risk factors for the onset of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1 (CRPS 1) remains sparse. This syndrome has a low prevalence, a highly variable presentation, and no gold standard for diagnosis. In the research setting, the pathogenesis of the syndrome continues to be elusive. There is a growing body of literature that addresses efficacy of a wide range of interventions as well as the likely mechanisms that contribute to the onset of CRPS 1. The objective for this systematic search of the literature focuses on determining the potential risk factors for the onset of CRPS 1. Eligible articles were analysed, dated 1996 to April 2014, and potential risk factors for the onset of CRPS 1 were identified from 10 prospective and 6 retrospective studies. Potential risk factors for the onset of CRPS 1 were found to include being female, particularly postmenopausal female, ankle dislocation or intra-articular fracture, immobilisation, and a report of higher than usual levels of pain in the early phases of trauma. It is not possible to draw definite conclusions as this evidence is heterogeneous and of mixed quality, relevance, and weighting strength against bias and has not been confirmed across multiple trials or in homogenous studies. PMID:25688265

  15. Successful treatment with bortezomib and thalidomide for POEMS syndrome associated with multicentric mixed-type Castleman's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Ye, Shanhui; Xiong, Chunping; Gao, Jianquan; Xiao, Chuying; Xing, Xiangbin

    2011-10-01

    Polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein and skin changes syndrome is a rare multi-systematic disorder of uncertain etiology, if associated with multicentric Castleman's disease, it can lead to a more serious condition. We here presented a case of polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein and skin changes syndrome in a 37-year-old male patient who initially presented with progressive lower limb weakness accompanied by pain, low skin temperature, and hyperpigmentation. He was admitted with increasingly serious dyspnea and lower leg edema. Fluid of serous cavities in the patient were also indicated in ultrasonic inspection and X-ray. Furthermore, biopsy of a left axillary lymph node showed mixed hyaline-vascular and plasma cell type of multicentric Castleman's disease. Administration of bortezomib (Velcade) (1.3 mg/m(2) on days 1, 4, 8 and 11 of a 21-day cycle) combined with thalidomide (100 mg/day and 21-day cycle) dramatically improved the condition of this disease. Of note, in our study, combination therapy of bortezomib and thalidomide successfully improved the condition of the patient with polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein and skin changes syndrome associated with multicentric Castleman's disease, suggesting that the combination therapy may be an effective therapeutic strategy for the intractable polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein and skin changes syndrome associated with multicentric Castleman's disease.

  16. Chronic inhibition of 11 β -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity decreases hypertension, insulin resistance, and hypertriglyceridemia in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schnackenberg, Christine G; Costell, Melissa H; Krosky, Daniel J; Cui, Jianqi; Wu, Charlene W; Hong, Victor S; Harpel, Mark R; Willette, Robert N; Yue, Tian-Li

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of risk factors including hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and obesity that promote the development of cardiovascular disease. Metabolic syndrome has been associated with changes in the secretion or metabolism of glucocorticoids, which have important functions in adipose, liver, kidney, and vasculature. Tissue concentrations of the active glucocorticoid cortisol are controlled by the conversion of cortisone to cortisol by 11 β -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11 β -HSD1). Because of the various cardiovascular and metabolic activities of glucocorticoids, we tested the hypothesis that 11 β -HSD1 is a common mechanism in the hypertension, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome. In obese and lean SHR/NDmcr-cp (SHR-cp), cardiovascular, metabolic, and renal functions were measured before and during four weeks of administration of vehicle or compound 11 (10 mg/kg/d), a selective inhibitor of 11 β -HSD1. Compound 11 significantly decreased 11 β -HSD1 activity in adipose tissue and liver of SHR-cp. In obese SHR-cp, compound 11 significantly decreased mean arterial pressure, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia, and plasma renin activity with no effect on heart rate, body weight gain, or microalbuminuria. These results suggest that 11 β -HSD1 activity in liver and adipose tissue is a common mediator of hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome.

  17. Chronic Inhibition of 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 Activity Decreases Hypertension, Insulin Resistance, and Hypertriglyceridemia in Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schnackenberg, Christine G.; Costell, Melissa H.; Krosky, Daniel J.; Cui, Jianqi; Wu, Charlene W.; Hong, Victor S.; Harpel, Mark R.; Willette, Robert N.; Yue, Tian-Li

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of risk factors including hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and obesity that promote the development of cardiovascular disease. Metabolic syndrome has been associated with changes in the secretion or metabolism of glucocorticoids, which have important functions in adipose, liver, kidney, and vasculature. Tissue concentrations of the active glucocorticoid cortisol are controlled by the conversion of cortisone to cortisol by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1). Because of the various cardiovascular and metabolic activities of glucocorticoids, we tested the hypothesis that 11β-HSD1 is a common mechanism in the hypertension, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome. In obese and lean SHR/NDmcr-cp (SHR-cp), cardiovascular, metabolic, and renal functions were measured before and during four weeks of administration of vehicle or compound 11 (10 mg/kg/d), a selective inhibitor of 11β-HSD1. Compound 11 significantly decreased 11β-HSD1 activity in adipose tissue and liver of SHR-cp. In obese SHR-cp, compound 11 significantly decreased mean arterial pressure, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia, and plasma renin activity with no effect on heart rate, body weight gain, or microalbuminuria. These results suggest that 11β-HSD1 activity in liver and adipose tissue is a common mediator of hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome. PMID:23586038

  18. Comparative analysis of lipid profiles among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension and concurrent type 2 diabetes, and hypertension: a view of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Isezuo, S. A.; Badung, S. L. H.; Omotoso, A. B. O.

    2003-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension are independent risk factors for atherosclerotic lesions that are partly linked with dyslipidaemia. This risk is additive when diabetes and hypertension occur concurrently. In order to determine if concurrent type 2 diabetes and hypertension results in putative increases in dyslipidaemia in a Nigerian population, we compared the plasma lipid levels, atherogenic index and prevalence of dyslipidaemia among age and sex-matched indigenous Nigerians with type 2 diabetes, hypertension and concurrent diabetes and hypertension. Age and sex-matched healthy Nigerians that are free of diabetes and hypertension served as controls. The patients as a whole were more likely to have dyslipidaemia than controls (p < 0.05). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol was similar among patients and controls. Mean total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels, atherogenic index and prevalence of dyslipidaemia did not differ significantly among patients with hypertension, diabetes, and concurrent hypertension and diabetes (p = 0.99 for each parameter). It is concluded that concurrent hypertension and type 2 diabetes does not result in a more severe dyslipidaemia than when either of the two conditions occurs in isolation. We attribute this to the common pathogenic link between hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidaemia in metabolic syndrome. Evidence, albeit indirect, of this syndrome among native Africans is, therefore, provided. PMID:12793789

  19. Assignment of the locus for Waardenburg syndrome type I to human chromosome 2q37 and possible homology to the Splotch mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Foy, C; Newton, V; Wellesley, D; Harris, R; Read, A P

    1990-01-01

    We have demonstrated close linkage between the locus for the autosomal dominant Waardenburg syndrome type I and the placental alkaline phosphatase locus on chromosome 2q37. In five families the peak lod score was 4.76 at a recombination fraction of .023. In the mouse the Splotch locus maps to near the homologous position. Splotch mice have white spotting and hearing defects, suggesting that Splotch may be the murine homologue of Waardenburg syndrome type I. PMID:2339698

  20. Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1 with multiple neurofibromas of the entire spinal nerve roots

    PubMed Central

    Onu, David O; Hunn, Andrew W; Peters-Willke, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The coexistence of polyneuropathy which has the definite clinical and electromyographical findings consistent with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) has infrequently been reported. We describe a patient with both CMT and NF1, who had multiple neurofibromas involving the entire spinal neural axis. In addition, he had multiple neurofibromas distributed within the ileopsoas and gluteus muscles and subcutaneous tissues. These lesions were detected readily by MRI and the patient underwent successful surgical resection of the largest tumours compressing bilateral C2 nerve roots. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of CMT syndrome coexisting with NF1 in which multiple neurofibromas involved the entire spinal nerve roots. We discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, emphasising the role of MRI and electrophysiology in such cases and provide a literature review. PMID:23853192

  1. Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1 with multiple neurofibromas of the entire spinal nerve roots.

    PubMed

    Onu, David O; Hunn, Andrew W; Peters-Willke, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The coexistence of polyneuropathy which has the definite clinical and electromyographical findings consistent with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) has infrequently been reported. We describe a patient with both CMT and NF1, who had multiple neurofibromas involving the entire spinal neural axis. In addition, he had multiple neurofibromas distributed within the ileopsoas and gluteus muscles and subcutaneous tissues. These lesions were detected readily by MRI and the patient underwent successful surgical resection of the largest tumours compressing bilateral C2 nerve roots. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of CMT syndrome coexisting with NF1 in which multiple neurofibromas involved the entire spinal nerve roots. We discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, emphasising the role of MRI and electrophysiology in such cases and provide a literature review.

  2. Diet-induced swine model with obesity/leptin resistance for the study of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Torres-Rovira, L; Astiz, S; Caro, A; Lopez-Bote, C; Ovilo, C; Pallares, P; Perez-Solana, M L; Sanchez-Sanchez, R; Gonzalez-Bulnes, A

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the suitability of a swine breed with leptin resistance and predisposition to obesity (the Iberian pig) as model for studies on metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Thus, six Iberian sows had ad libitum access to food enriched with saturated fat (SFAD group; food consumption was estimated to be 4.5 kg/animal/day) whilst four females acted as controls and were fed with 2 kg/animal/day of a commercial maintenance diet. After three months of differential feeding, SFAD animals developed central obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance, and elevated blood pressure; the five parameters associated with the metabolic syndrome. Thus, the current study characterizes the Iberian pig as a robust, amenable, and reliable translational model for studies on nutrition-associated diseases.

  3. Diet-Induced Swine Model with Obesity/Leptin Resistance for the Study of Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Rovira, L.; Astiz, S.; Caro, A.; Lopez-Bote, C.; Ovilo, C.; Pallares, P.; Perez-Solana, M. L.; Sanchez-Sanchez, R.; Gonzalez-Bulnes, A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the suitability of a swine breed with leptin resistance and predisposition to obesity (the Iberian pig) as model for studies on metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Thus, six Iberian sows had ad libitum access to food enriched with saturated fat (SFAD group; food consumption was estimated to be 4.5 kg/animal/day) whilst four females acted as controls and were fed with 2 kg/animal/day of a commercial maintenance diet. After three months of differential feeding, SFAD animals developed central obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance, and elevated blood pressure; the five parameters associated with the metabolic syndrome. Thus, the current study characterizes the Iberian pig as a robust, amenable, and reliable translational model for studies on nutrition-associated diseases. PMID:22629144

  4. Lunch energy density and the metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Menegotto, Giovana; Moraes Silva, Flávia; de Azevedo, Mirela Jobim; de Almeida, Jussara Carnevale

    2013-11-14

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible associations between dietary energy density (ED) and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in patients with type 2 diabetes. In the present case-control study, the dietary ED of 125 patients with type 2 diabetes (seventy-eight with (cases) the MetS and forty-seven without (controls) the MetS; mean age 62·0 (SD 9·4) years, mean diabetes duration 12·5 (SD 8·4) years and mean glycated Hb 7·2 (SD 1·3) %) was assessed by weighed diet records. The MetS was defined according to the 2009 Joint Interim Statement and ED by the amount of energy (kJ) in a given weight of food. Data are expressed as means (standard deviations) or medians (interquartile ranges). Patients with the MetS reported lower intakes of total energy and fibre, and a higher total food amount than the controls; the total ED did not differ, but the cases had a higher ED at lunch (mean 6·3 (SD 1·3) v. 5·9 (SD 0·8) kJ/g; P= 0·017). In this meal, patients with the MetS had lower intakes of beans (median 0·7 (interquartile range 0·4-1·1) v. 1·1 (interquartile range 0·6-1·6) g/kg; P= 0·020), vegetables (median 1·2 (interquartile range 0·6-1·7) v. 1·4 (interquartile range 1·0-2·0) g/kg; P= 0·046) and total meat (median 1·3 (interquartile range 1·0-1·6) v. 1·4 (interquartile range 1·2-1·8) g/kg; P= 0·034) than patients without the MetS. The associations between lunch ED (kJ/g) and food groups (g/kg) were confirmed for vegetables (r - 0·584; P< 0·001), fruits (r - 0·233; P= 0·070), beans (r - 0·189; P= 0·037) and oils (r 0·323; P< 0·001). In a multivariate logistic regression model, a high lunch ED was associated with the MetS (OR 6·89, 95 % CI 1·35, 35·15; P =0·020) after adjusting for confounders. In conclusion, a high ED at lunch increased the odds of the presence of the MetS in patients with type 2 diabetes. Beans and vegetables may be the major contributors to this association and their consumption might be

  5. Management of pain and fatigue in the joint hypermobility syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type): principles and proposal for a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Celletti, Claudia; Celli, Mauro; Morrone, Aldo; Colombi, Marina; Camerota, Filippo; Grammatico, Paola

    2012-08-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) hypermobility type (EDS-HT), is a underdiagnosed heritable connective tissue disorder characterized by generalized joint hypermobility and a wide range of visceral, pelvic, neurologic, and cognitive dysfunctions. Deterioration of quality of life is mainly associated with pain and fatigue. Except for the recognized effectiveness of physiotherapy for some musculoskeletal features, there are no standardized guidelines for the assessment and treatment of pain and fatigue. In this work, a practical classification of pain presentations and factors contributing in generating painful sensations in JHS/EDS-HT is proposed. Pain can be topographically classified in articular limb (acute/subacute and chronic), muscular limb (myofascial and fibromyalgia), neuropathic limb, back/neck, abdominal and pelvic pain, and headache. For selected forms of pain, specific predisposing characteristics are outlined. Fatigue appears as the result of multiple factors, including muscle weakness, respiratory insufficiency, unrefreshing sleep, dysautonomia, intestinal malabsorption, reactive depression/anxiety, and excessive use of analgesics. A set of lifestyle recommendations to instruct patients as well as specific investigations aimed at characterizing pain and fatigue are identified. Available treatment options are discussed in the set of a structured multidisciplinary approach based on reliable outcome tools. PMID:22786715

  6. The effects of neuromuscular taping on gait walking strategy in a patient with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers–Danlos syndrome hypermobility type

    PubMed Central

    Camerota, Filippo; Galli, Manuela; Celletti, Claudia; Ancillao, Andrea; Blow, David; Albertini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this case study, biomechanical alterations induced by neuromuscular taping (NMT) were quantified, during walking, in a patient with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers–Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT). Methods: A female JHS/EDS-HT patient underwent NMT applications over the low back spine and bilaterally to the knee. Quantitative gait analyses were collected before the NMT application and at the end of the treatment (2 weeks after the first application of NMT). Results: At the end of treatment following the NMT application, left step length showed improvements in cadence and velocity, the left knee showed a reduction in its flexed position at initial contact, and the right ankle joint improved its position at initial contact and in the swing phase. Improvements were also found in kinetics, in terms of the ankle moment and power. Conclusions: Results show that NMT seems to be a promising low-cost intervention for improving gait strategy in patients with JHS/EDS-HT. Further investigations are needed to assess the effects of this treatment intervention on pathological symptoms. PMID:25649985

  7. Cerebral hemihypoplasia and nevus flammeus in a child with oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome type III.

    PubMed

    Toral-López, Jaime; Córdoba-Cabeza, Tania; Villeda, Maricela; Cortes-Castillo, Gabriel; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2013-03-01

    Oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome (OMLH; OMIM 103300) encompasses a group of uncommon disorders characterized by malformations in the mouth, jaw and limbs. It has been associated with various entities such as gastroschisis, pulmonary hypoplasia, intestinal atresia, renal agenesis, hydrocephalus and other syndromes. We describe a boy of Mexican origin with features of OMLH. In addition, brain magnetic resonance imaging shows cerebral hemiatrophy and hemihypoplasia and an ipsilateral arachnoid cyst, as well as microcephaly and frontal nevus flammeus were observed. This association, to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously reported in the literature and could be part of a same spectrum of vascular defect with OMLH. PMID:27625839

  8. Cerebral hemihypoplasia and nevus flammeus in a child with oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome type III

    PubMed Central

    Toral-López, Jaime; Córdoba-Cabeza, Tania; Villeda, Maricela; Cortes-Castillo, Gabriel; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome (OMLH; OMIM 103300) encompasses a group of uncommon disorders characterized by malformations in the mouth, jaw and limbs. It has been associated with various entities such as gastroschisis, pulmonary hypoplasia, intestinal atresia, renal agenesis, hydrocephalus and other syndromes. We describe a boy of Mexican origin with features of OMLH. In addition, brain magnetic resonance imaging shows cerebral hemiatrophy and hemihypoplasia and an ipsilateral arachnoid cyst, as well as microcephaly and frontal nevus flammeus were observed. This association, to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously reported in the literature and could be part of a same spectrum of vascular defect with OMLH. PMID:27625839

  9. Type and strength of food preferences of individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R L; Caldwell, M L

    1985-03-01

    The results of these experiments indicate that, contrary to popular belief, individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome demonstrate definite food preferences. These data are consistent with and extend recent findings of Caldwell & Taylor (1983). The general conclusions are that the foods preferred by most individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome are sweet, and that the strength of the food preference is related to the level of cognitive ability (the higher the cognitive level, the stronger the preference). A comparison of the food preferences of an obese, non-Prader-Willi group with similar cognitive deficiencies would be worthy of empirical investigation.

  10. New lethal disease involving type I and III collagen defect resembling geroderma osteodysplastica, De Barsy syndrome, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome IV.

    PubMed

    Jukkola, A; Kauppila, S; Risteli, L; Vuopala, K; Risteli, J; Leisti, J; Pajunen, L

    1998-06-01

    We describe the clinical findings and biochemical features of a male child suffering from a so far undescribed lethal connective tissue disorder characterised by extreme hypermobility of the joints, lax skin, cataracts, severe growth retardation, and insufficient production of type I and type III procollagens. His features are compared with Ehlers-Danlos type IV, De Barsy syndrome, and geroderma osteodysplastica, as these disorders show some symptoms and signs shared with our patient. The child died because of failure of the connective tissue structures joining the skull and the spine, leading to progressive spinal stenosis. The aortic valve was translucent and insufficient. The clinical symptoms and signs, together with histological findings, suggested a collagen defect. Studies on both skin fibroblast cultures and the patient's serum showed reduced synthesis of collagen types I and III at the protein and RNA levels. The sizes of the mRNAs and newly synthesised proteins were normal, excluding gross structural abnormalities. These findings are not in accordance with any other collagen defect characterised so far.

  11. In what type of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome is DMSO intravesical instillation therapy effective?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) is the most-used agent for intravesical instillation. We conducted this retrospective clinical study to determine in what type of the interstitial cystitis (IC)/bladder pain syndrome (BPS) DMSO was effective. Methods We combined DMSO with hydrodistension in 2003 and from 2004 we performed hydrodistension alone. Hydrodistension had been performed in 7 cases of IC/BPS with Hunner’s lesions (H group) and 7 cases of IC/BPS without Hunner’s lesions (non-H group), and they served as the control group (C group; n=14). There was also a DMSO group (D group; n=14) that consisted of an H group of 7 cases and an non-H group of 7 cases in which the hydrodistension had been immediately followed by intravesical instillation of 50% DMSO 50 mL. Before, and 2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months (M) after the intervention, the patients were asked to complete a 4-day frequency-volume chart (FVC) and the O’Leary-Sant IC symptom index (ICSI) questionnaire and IC problem index (ICPI) questionnaire, and to rate their pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS). Results All parameters were improved after hydrodistension in both the C group and the D group. However, comparison of the C group and D group according to whether Hunner lesions were present showed that there were no significant differences in any of the postoperative parameters between the non-H groups in the C group and D group, but in the H groups, average and maximum voided volume were significantly higher and the ICSI, ICPI, and VAS scores were lower in the D group. Moreover, the significant differences increased with the duration of the postoperative period. Conclusions DMSO intravesical instillation therapy was useful in both maintaining and improving the effectiveness of hydrodistension in IC/BPS with Hunner lesions. However, DMSO did not have any particular efficacy in the treatment of IC/BPS in the absence of Hunner lesions. PMID:26816859

  12. Soy Protein Supplementation Reduces Clinical Indices in Type 2 Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun-Bo; Chi, Mei-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Clinical trials have studied the use of soy protein for treating type 2 diabetes (T2D) and metabolic syndrome (MS). The purpose of this study was to outline evidence on the effects of soy protein supplementation on clinical indices in T2D and MS subjects by performing a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Materials and Methods We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases up to March 2015 for RCTs. Pooled estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by the fixed-and-random-effects model. A total of eleven studies with eleven clinical variables met the inclusion criteria. Results The meta-analysis showed that fasting plasma glucose (FPG) [weighted mean difference (WMD), -0.207; 95% CI, -0.374 to -0.040; p=0.015], fasting serum insulin (FSI) (WMD, -0.292; 95% CI, -0.496 to -0.088; p=0.005), homeostasis model of assessment for insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) (WMD, -0.346; 95% CI, -0.570 to -0.123; p=0.002), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (WMD, -0.230; 95% CI, -0.441 to -0.019; p=0.033), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (WMD, -0.304; 95% CI, -0.461 to -0.148; p=0.000), total cholesterol (TC) (WMD, -0.386; 95% CI, -0.548 to -0.225; p=0.000), and C-reactive protein (CRP) (WMD, -0.510; 95% CI, -0.722 to -0.299; p=0.000) are significant reduced with soy protein supplementation, compared with a placebo control group, in T2D and MS patients. Furthermore, soy protein supplementation for longer duration (≥6 mo) significantly reduced FPG, LDL-C, and CRP, while that for a shorter duration (<6 mo) significantly reduced FSI and HOMA-IR. Conclusion Soy protein supplementation could be beneficial for FPG, FSI, HOMA-IR, DBP, LDL-C, TC, and CRP control in plasma. PMID:26996569

  13. Metabolic syndrome and subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Dragsbæk, Katrine; Neergaard, Jesper S.; Laursen, Janne M.; Hansen, Henrik B.; Christiansen, Claus; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Karsdal, Morten A.; Brix, Susanne; Henriksen, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The prognostic value of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) is believed to vary with age. With an elderly population expecting to triple by 2060, it is important to evaluate the validity of MetS in this age group. We examined the association of MetS risk factors with later risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in elderly Caucasian women. We further investigated if stratification of individuals not defined with MetS would add predictive power in defining future disease prevalence of individuals with MetS. The Prospective Epidemiological Risk Factor Study, a community-based cohort study, followed 3905 Danish women since 2000 (age: 70.1 ± 6.5) with no previous diagnosis of T2DM or CVD, holding all measurements used for MetS definition; central obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and hyperglycemia combined with register-based follow-up information. Elderly women with defined MetS presented a 6.3-fold increased risk of T2DM (95% confidence interval: [3.74–10.50]) and 1.7-fold increased risk of CVD (1.44–2.05) compared to women with no MetS risk factors. Subdividing the control group without defined MetS revealed that both centrally obese controls and controls holding other MetS risk factors also had increased risk of T2DM (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.21 [1.25–3.93] and HR = 1.75 [1.04–2.96]) and CVD (HR = 1.51 [1.25–1.83] and HR = 1.36 [1.15–1.60]) when compared to controls with no MetS risk factors. MetS in elderly Caucasian women increased risk of future T2DM and CVD. While not defined with MetS, women holding only some risk factors for MetS were also at increased risk of T2DM or CVD compared to women with no MetS risk factors. PMID:27603394

  14. Peripheral nerve blocks in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Patzkowski, Michael S

    2016-03-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an inherited disorder of collagen production that results in multiorgan dysfunction. Patients with hypermobility type display skin hyperextensibility and joint laxity, which can result in chronic joint instability, dislocation, peripheral neuropathy, and severe musculoskeletal pain. A bleeding diathesis can be found in all subtypes of varying severity despite a normal coagulation profile. There have also been reports of resistance to local anesthetics in these patients. Several sources advise against the use of regional anesthesia in these patients citing the 2 previous features. There have been reports of successful neuraxial anesthesia, but few concerning peripheral nerve blocks, none of which describe nerves of the lower extremity. This report describes 2 cases of successful peripheral regional anesthesia in the lower extremity. In case 1, a 16-year-old adolescent girl with hypermobility type presented for osteochondral grafting of tibiotalar joint lesions. She underwent a popliteal sciatic (with continuous catheter) and femoral nerve block under ultrasound guidance. She proceeded to surgery and tolerated the procedure under regional block and intravenous sedation. She did not require any analgesics for the following 15 hours. In case 2, an 18-year-old woman with hypermobility type presented for medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction for chronic patella instability. She underwent a saphenous nerve block above the knee with analgesia in the distribution of the saphenous nerve lasting for approximately 18 hours. There were no complications in either case. Prohibitions against peripheral nerve blocks in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type, appear unwarranted.

  15. Peripheral nerve blocks in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Patzkowski, Michael S

    2016-03-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an inherited disorder of collagen production that results in multiorgan dysfunction. Patients with hypermobility type display skin hyperextensibility and joint laxity, which can result in chronic joint instability, dislocation, peripheral neuropathy, and severe musculoskeletal pain. A bleeding diathesis can be found in all subtypes of varying severity despite a normal coagulation profile. There have also been reports of resistance to local anesthetics in these patients. Several sources advise against the use of regional anesthesia in these patients citing the 2 previous features. There have been reports of successful neuraxial anesthesia, but few concerning peripheral nerve blocks, none of which describe nerves of the lower extremity. This report describes 2 cases of successful peripheral regional anesthesia in the lower extremity. In case 1, a 16-year-old adolescent girl with hypermobility type presented for osteochondral grafting of tibiotalar joint lesions. She underwent a popliteal sciatic (with continuous catheter) and femoral nerve block under ultrasound guidance. She proceeded to surgery and tolerated the procedure under regional block and intravenous sedation. She did not require any analgesics for the following 15 hours. In case 2, an 18-year-old woman with hypermobility type presented for medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction for chronic patella instability. She underwent a saphenous nerve block above the knee with analgesia in the distribution of the saphenous nerve lasting for approximately 18 hours. There were no complications in either case. Prohibitions against peripheral nerve blocks in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type, appear unwarranted. PMID:26897449

  16. Binge eating disorder and night eating syndrome in adults with type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the prevalence of binge eating disorder (BED) and night eating syndrome (NES) among applicants to the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) study. The Eating Disorders Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q) and the Night Eating Questionnaire (NEQ) were used to screen patients. Phone int...

  17. Complex regional pain syndrome (Type 1) following steroid injection for stenosing tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Adrian D; Lloyd-Hughes, Hawys; Ahmed, Jamil

    2010-10-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic progressive disease characterised by severe pain, swelling and changes in the skin. Precipitating factors include injury and surgery, and a variety of causes have been described. We present the case of a 68-year-old lady who presented with features indicative of a CRPS following steroid injection for a 'trigger' thumb. PMID:20510663

  18. Spontaneous onset of complex regional pain syndrome Type I in a woman infected with Bartonella koehlerae.

    PubMed

    Vera, Cristina Pérez; Maggi, Ricardo G; Woods, Christopher W; Mascarelli, Patricia E; Breitschwerdt, Edward B

    2014-04-01

    After a short-term fever, complex regional pain syndrome, characterized by hyperalgesia, intermittent swelling, erythema and cyanosis of both feet, was diagnosed in a female veterinarian. The woman was infected with Bartonella koehlerae and she was also Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii seroreactive. Having failed other treatments, symptoms resolved following initiation of antibiotics.

  19. Uric acid concentration in subjects at risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: relationship to components of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costa, A; Igualá, I; Bedini, J; Quintó, L; Conget, I

    2002-03-01

    High uric acid concentration is a common finding in subjects with risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), including some characteristics of the metabolic syndrome. However, its exact role in this setting and in the progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is not well understood and could be affected by confounding factors such as hypertriglyceridemia. Our study aimed to establish the relationship between uric acid (avoiding the interference of high triglyceride levels), insulin sensitivity, and components of the metabolic syndrome in a group of subjects at high risk of developing DM. Among 201 subjects included in the study, 111 (55.2%) showed an abnormal oral glucose tolerance and uric acid levels higher than those measured in subjects with normal glucose tolerance. Body mass index (BMI), triglycerides, diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and 2-hour glycemia in the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) contributed independently to uric acid concentration (R2 =.59). However, uric acid did not affect either insulin sensitivity or glucose tolerance. The recovery tests revealed that a triglyceride concentration > or = 3 mmol/L interfered with the measurement of uric acid level when a colorimetric method was used, but not when a dry-chemistry method was used. In conclusion, uric acid concentration is higher in subjects at high risk of DM with abnormal glucose tolerance and is independently determined by various components of the metabolic syndrome.

  20. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type: An Underdiagnosed Hereditary Connective Tissue Disorder with Mucocutaneous, Articular, and Systemic Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Castori, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type, constituting a phenotypic continuum with or, perhaps, corresponding to the joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS/EDS-HT), is likely the most common, though the least recognized, heritable connective tissue disorder. Known for decades as a hereditary condition with predominant rheumatologic manifestations, it is now emerging as a multisystemic disorder with widespread manifestations. Nevertheless, the practitioners' awareness of this condition is generally poor and most patients await years or, perhaps, decades before reaching the correct diagnosis. Among the various sites of disease manifestations, skin and mucosae represent a neglected organ where the dermatologist can easily spot diagnostic clues, which consistently integrate joint hypermobility and other orthopedic/neurologic manifestations at physical examination. In this paper, actual knowledge on JHS/EDS-HT is summarized in various sections. Particular attention has been posed on overlooked manifestations, including cutaneous, mucosal, and oropharyngeal features, and early diagnosis techniques, as a major point of interest for the practicing dermatologist. Actual research progresses on JH/EDS-HT envisage an unexpected link between heritable dysfunctions of the connective tissue and a wide range of functional somatic syndromes, most of them commonly diagnosed in the office of various specialists, comprising dermatologists. PMID:23227356

  1. Polymorphisms in candidate genes for type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Mexican population with metabolic syndrome findings.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Corona, J; Flores-Martínez, S E; Machorro-Lazo, M V; Galaviz-Hernández, C; Morán-Moguel, M C; Perea, F J; Mújica-López, K I; Vargas-Ancona, L; Laviada-Molina, H A; Fernández, V; Pardío, J; Arroyo, P; Barrera, H; Hanson, R L

    2004-01-01

    The metabolic or insulin resistance syndrome, characterized by hypertension, dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia, may have genetic determinants. The insulin gene (INS), insulin receptor gene (INSR) and insulin receptor substrate 1 gene (IRS1) have been proposed as candidate genes. We examined eight polymorphisms in these genes in 163 individuals from Yucatan, Mexico; this population has a high prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia. Subjects were evaluated for body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure. Blood samples were collected to determine glucose, insulin, triglycerides and cholesterol levels, as well as for DNA isolation. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms in INS, INSR and IRS1 were identified by polymerase chain reaction and digestion with selected restriction enzymes. Among the eight polymorphisms analyzed, the PstI polymorphism in INS was significantly associated with hypertriglyceridemia and with the presence of at least one abnormality related to the metabolic syndrome (P=0.007 and 0.004, respectively). The MaeIII polymorphism in INS was associated with fasting hyperinsulinemia (P=0.045). In multilocus analyses including both INS polymorphisms, significant associations were seen with hypertriglyceridemia (P=0.006), hypercholesterolemia (P=0.031) and with presence of at least one metabolic abnormality (P=0.009). None of the polymorphisms in INSR or IRS1 was associated with any of these traits. These findings suggest that the insulin gene may be an important determinant of metabolic syndrome, and particularly of dyslipidemia, in this population.

  2. A Novel Frameshift Mutation of the USH2A Gene in a Korean Patient with Usher Syndrome Type II.

    PubMed

    Boo, Sung Hyun; Song, Min-Jung; Kim, Hee-Jin; Cho, Yang-Sun; Chu, Hosuk; Ko, Moon-Hee; Chung, Won-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2013-03-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is the most common form of Usher syndrome, characterized by moderate to severe hearing impairment and progressive visual loss due to retinitis pigmentosa. It has been shown that mutations in the USH2A gene are responsible for USH2. The authors herein describe a 34-year-old Korean woman with the typical clinical manifestation of USH2; she had bilateral hearing disturbance and progressive visual deterioration, without vestibular dysfunction. Molecular genetic study of the USH2A gene revealed a novel frameshift mutation (c.2310delA; Glu771LysfsX17). She was heterozygous for this mutation, and no other mutation was found in USH2A, suggesting the possibility of an intronic or large genomic rearrangement mutation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a genetically confirmed case of USH2 in Korea. More investigations are needed to delineate genotype-phenotype correlations and ethnicity-specific genetic background of Usher syndrome. PMID:23526569

  3. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and mixed dyslipidemia: how similar, how different, and how to treat?

    PubMed

    Halcox, Julian; Misra, Anoop

    2015-02-01

    Individuals with mixed atherogenic dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and metabolic syndrome are at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and can often benefit greatly from preventive lifestyle and medical interventions. These conditions typically co-exist in an individual, and the lipid profiles associated with them have several features in common. The worldwide prevalence of T2DM, atherogenic dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome is increasing, particularly in southern Asia and the Middle East. Statins can lower low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and reduce the risk of CVD in these high-risk individuals, but there is a residual risk of CVD associated with additional lipid abnormalities, such as high levels of triglycerides and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. These abnormalities are commonly found in patients with T2DM and metabolic syndrome. Additional lipid-modifying therapies that target these abnormalities, such as fibrates and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, may be able to improve lipid profiles and further reduce the risk of CVD in these patients. PMID:25402738

  4. Duration of Type 2 Diabetes and Very Low Density Lipoprotein Levels Are Associated with Cognitive Dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yogi-Morren, Divya; Galioto, Rachel; Strandjord, Sarah Elizabeth; Kennedy, L.; Manroa, Pooja; Kirwan, John P.; Kashyap, Sangeeta; Gunstad, John

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is now recognized as an independent risk factor for accelerated cognitive decline and neurological conditions like Alzheimer's disease. Less is known about the neurocognitive function of T2D patients with comorbid metabolic syndrome, despite their elevated risk for impairment. Computerized testing in 47 adults with T2D that met criteria for NCEP metabolic syndrome revealed that cognitive impairment was prevalent, including 13% in tests of memory, 50% in attention, and 35% in executive function. Partial correlations showed that longer duration of diabetes was associated with poorer performance on tests of basic attention (r = −0.43), working memory (r = 0.43), and executive function (r = 0.42). Strong associations between very low density lipoprotein and poor cognitive function also emerged, including tests of set shifting (r = 0.47) and cognitive inhibition (r = −0.51). Findings suggest that patients with T2D that meet criteria for metabolic syndrome are at high risk for cognitive impairment. Prospective studies should look to replicate these findings and examine the possible neuroprotective effects of lipid-lowering medication in this population. PMID:25057411

  5. [EHLERS-DANLOS SYNDROME OF THE HYPERMOBILE TYPE: A MULTISYSTEMIC DISORDER. CONTRIBUTION OF SKIN ULTRASTRUCTURE TO INDIVIDUAL MANAGEMENT].

    PubMed

    Hermanns-Lê, T; Piérard, G E; Piérard-Franchimont, C

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) represents a heterogeneous group of disorders of the connective tissue structure. Currently, several types are distinguished following a limited set of clinical signs and genetic mutations. However, there is a lack of specificity of most recognized genetic alterations with the current clinical typing. In addition, the criteria from dermatopathology, ultrastructure and biomechanics are not considered. In addition, the established EDS frontiers are hazardous because a series of anatomo-clinical signs are not considered in the classical EDS concept. The hypermobile type EDS represents an example of the diagnostic uncertainties. It results that guidelines based on evidence-based medicine cannot be established. Only an individual management can be offered to the concerned patients.

  6. [EHLERS-DANLOS SYNDROME OF THE HYPERMOBILE TYPE: A MULTISYSTEMIC DISORDER. CONTRIBUTION OF SKIN ULTRASTRUCTURE TO INDIVIDUAL MANAGEMENT].

    PubMed

    Hermanns-Lê, T; Piérard, G E; Piérard-Franchimont, C

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) represents a heterogeneous group of disorders of the connective tissue structure. Currently, several types are distinguished following a limited set of clinical signs and genetic mutations. However, there is a lack of specificity of most recognized genetic alterations with the current clinical typing. In addition, the criteria from dermatopathology, ultrastructure and biomechanics are not considered. In addition, the established EDS frontiers are hazardous because a series of anatomo-clinical signs are not considered in the classical EDS concept. The hypermobile type EDS represents an example of the diagnostic uncertainties. It results that guidelines based on evidence-based medicine cannot be established. Only an individual management can be offered to the concerned patients. PMID:26285461

  7. Recurrent arterial aneurysm rupture of the upper extremity in a patient with vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Koji; Tajiri, Nobuhisa; Nakai, Mikizo; Shimizu, Shuji

    2014-10-01

    Arterial aneurysm rupture is one of the most critical complications in patients with vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS). Here, we report a case of recurrent aneurysm rupture successfully treated by endovascular embolization. A 38-year old woman who underwent brachial artery ligation for a ruptured aneurysm was diagnosed postoperatively with vEDS. Impending rupture of a collateral artery aneurysm was encountered 5 months after the initial open surgery. Endovascular embolization with a liquid embolic agent was successfully performed. Given that arterial rupture can occur repeatedly in patients with vEDS, careful life-long follow-up is necessary.

  8. Endovascular Treatment of a Carotid Dissecting Pseudoaneurysm in a Patient with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV with Fatal Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Siok Ping Duddy, Martin J.

    2008-01-15

    We present a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV (EDS IV) with a carotid dissecting pseudoaneurysm causing severe carotid stenosis. This lesion was treated endovascularly. Unfortunately, the patient died of remote vascular catastrophes (intracranial hemorrhage and abdominal aortic rupture). This unique case illustrates the perils of endovascular treatment of EDS IV patients and the need for preoperative screening for concomitant lesions. It also shows that a dissecting pseudoaneurysm can feasibly be treated with a covered stent and that closure is effective using Angioseal in patients with EDS IV.

  9. Photoacoustic microscopy of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-1) after stellate ganglion blocks in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Yi, Xiaobin; Xing, Wenxin; Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We used photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) to assist diagnoses and monitor the progress and treatment outcome of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1). Blood vasculature and oxygen saturation (sO2) were imaged by PAM in eight adult patients with CRPS-1. Patients' hands and cuticles were imaged both before and after stellate ganglion block (SGB) for comparison. For all patients, both the vascular structure and sO2 could be assessed by PAM. In addition, more vessels and stronger signals were observed after SGB.

  10. Mutations at Ser331 in the HSN type I gene SPTLC1 are associated with a distinct syndromic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Bode, Heiko; Pieber, Thomas R; Schabhüttl, Maria; Fischer, Dirk; Seidl, Rainer; Graf, Elisabeth; Wieland, Thomas; Schuh, Reinhard; Vacariu, Gerda; Grill, Franz; Timmerman, Vincent; Strom, Tim M; Hornemann, Thorsten

    2013-05-01

    Mutations in the serine palmitoyltransferase subunit 1 (SPTLC1) gene are the most common cause of hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1 (HSN1). Here we report the clinical and molecular consequences of a particular mutation (p.S331Y) in SPTLC1 affecting a patient with severe, diffuse muscle wasting and hypotonia, prominent distal sensory disturbances, joint hypermobility, bilateral cataracts and considerable growth retardation. Normal plasma sphingolipids were unchanged but 1-deoxy-sphingolipids were significantly elevated. In contrast to other HSN patients reported so far, our findings strongly indicate that mutations at amino acid position Ser331 of the SPTLC1 gene lead to a distinct syndrome. PMID:23454272

  11. Thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma in an 11-year-old boy with type 1 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mazerkina, Nadia; Trunin, Yuri; Gorelyshev, Sergey; Golanov, Andrey; Kadashev, Boris; Shishkina, Liudmila; Rotin, Daniil; Karmanov, Maxim; Orlova, Elizabet

    2016-02-01

    Thyrotropinomas (TSHomas) are rare pituitary adenomas, particularly in childhood. We present here the case of an 11-year-old boy with type 1 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS1) and TSHoma which was diagnosed by elevated thyroid - stimulating hormone and thyroid hormones levels without evident clinical signs of hyperthyroidism. He was underwent partial resection of the tumor via transsphenoidal approach and subsequently radiation therapy. Consequently, 1 year after radiotherapy, the patient developed growth hormone deficiency, three and half years after radiation became euthyroid, and five and half years after treatment - hypothyroid. This is the first case of the coexistence of these two rare endocrine diseases in one patient. PMID:26244671

  12. Congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type maps to the long arm of chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Kestilae, M.; Maennikkoe, M.; Tryggvason, K.; Savolainen, E.R. ); Holmberg, C.; Peltonen, L. ); Gyapay, G.; Weissenbach, J.

    1994-05-01

    Congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish (CNF) is an autosomal recessive disease that is characterized by massive proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome at birth. CNF represents a unique, apparently specific dysfunction of the renal basement membranes, and the estimated incidence of CNF in the isolated population of Finland is 1 in 8,000 newborns. The basic defect is unknown, and no specific biochemical defect or chromosomal aberrations have been described. Here the authors report the assignment of the CNF locus to 19[sub q]12-q13.1 on the basis of linkage analysis in 17 Finnish families. Multipoint analyses and observed recombination events place the CNF locus between multiallelic markers D19S416 and D19S224, and the significant linkage disequilibrium observed suggests that the CNF gene lies in the immediate vicinity of the markers D19S224 and D19S220. 16 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. An unusual case of left venous renal entrapment syndrome: a new type of nutcracker phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Polguj, Michał; Topol, Mirosław; Majos, Agata

    2013-04-01

    Left venous renal entrapment syndrome was observed during multidetector 64-row computer tomography and color Doppler ultrasonography in a 58-year-old Caucasian female hospitalized due to choledocholithiasis. The patient demonstrated no typical symptoms of nutcracker syndrome. The left renal vein (LRV) was compressed as it passed between the superior mesenteric artery and the right renal artery. The LRV lumen measured 1.7 × 7.8 mm (width × height) at the point of narrowing and 7.5 × 17 mm before this. Secondary to the nutcracker phenomenon, the course of left ovarian vein was winding and was significantly wider than the contralateral vessel.

  14. Rheumatologic and neurological events in an elderly patient with tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome type I.

    PubMed

    Rué, Marjory; Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Sibon, Igor; Richez, Christophe; Taine, Laurence; Foubert-Samier, Alexandra; Arveiler, Benoit; Schaeverbeke, Thierry; Lacombe, Didier; Tison, François; Goizet, Cyril

    2011-01-01

    Sparse scalp hair, a peculiar shape of the nose, and cone-shaped epiphyses of the phalanges are the hallmarks of the tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndromes (TRPS). Short stature, hip dysplasia, and malformations of inner organs including mitral valve prolpase have also often been described for these conditions. Here, we described a 64-year-old woman with molecularly proved TRPS I and several atypical late-onset rheumatologic and neurological symptoms.

  15. Griscelli Syndrome Type 3: Two New Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Nouriel, Ariella; Zisquit, Jonah; Helfand, Alexander M; Anikster, Yair; Greenberger, Shoshana

    2015-01-01

    A 3-year-old Arab boy with a history of hypoplastic left heart syndrome was referred to the pediatric dermatology clinic at Sheba Medical Center for evaluation of hypomelanosis, manifested by fair skin pigmentation and silvery-grey hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes. The child had one older brother with similar hypopigmentation and another older brother who had died of congenital heart disease. The child had no history of neurologic deficits or immunodeficiency and no additional findings on clinical evaluation. PMID:26337734

  16. [Latin American consensus on hypertension in patients with diabetes type 2 and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    López-Jaramillo, Patricio; Sánchez, Ramiro A; Díaz, Margarita; Cobos, Leonardo; Bryce, Alfonso; Parra-Carrillo, José Z; Lizcano, Fernando; Lanas, Fernando; Sinay, Isaac; Sierra, Iván D; Peñaherrera, Ernesto; Benderky, Mario; Schmid, Helena; Botero, Rodrigo; Urina, Manuel; Lara, Joffre; Foos, Milton C; Márquez, Gustavo; Harrap, Stephen; Ramírez, Agustín J; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The present document has been prepared by a group of experts, members of Cardiology, Endocrinology, Internal Medicine, Nephrology and Diabetes societies of Latin American countries, to serve as a guide to physicians taking care of patients with diabetes, hypertension and comorbidities or complications of both conditions. Although the concept of metabolic syndrome is currently disputed, the higher prevalence in Latin America of that cluster of metabolic alterations has suggested that metabolic syndrome is useful nosography entity in the context of Latin American medicine. Therefore, in the present document, particular attention is paid to this syndrome in order to alert physicians on a particular high- risk population, usually underestimated and undertreated. These recommendations results from presentation and debates by discussion panels during a 2-day conference held in Bucaramanga, in October 2012, and all the participants have approved the final conclusions. The authors acknowledge that the publication and diffusion of guidelines do not suffice to achieve the recommended changes in diagnostic or therapeutic strategies, and plan suitable interventions overcoming both physicians and patients from effectively adhering to guideline recommendations. PMID:24365579

  17. Latin American consensus on hypertension in patients with diabetes type 2 and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    López-Jaramillo, Patricio; Sánchez, Ramiro A; Diaz, Margarita; Cobos, Leonardo; Bryce, Alfonso; Parra Carrillo, Jose Z; Lizcano, Fernando; Lanas, Fernando; Sinay, Isaac; Sierra, Iván D; Peñaherrera, Ernesto; Bendersky, Mario; Schmid, Helena; Botero, Rodrigo; Urina, Manuel; Lara, Joffre; Foss, Milton C; Márquez, Gustavo; Harrap, Stephen; Ramírez, Agustín J; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    The present document has been prepared by a group of experts, members of cardiology, endocrinology and diabetes societies of Latin American countries, to serve as a guide to physicians taking care of patients with diabetes, hypertension and comorbidities or complications of both conditions. Although the concept of 'metabolic syndrome' is currently disputed, the higher prevalence in Latin America of that cluster of metabolic alterations has suggested that 'metabolic syndrome' is a useful nosographic entity in the context of Latin American medicine. Therefore, in the present document, particular attention is paid to this syndrome in order to alert physicians on a particularly high-risk population, usually underestimated and undertreated. These recommendations result from presentations and debates by discussion panels during a 2-day conference held in Bucaramanga, in October 2012, and all the participants have approved the final conclusions. The authors acknowledge that the publication and diffusion of guidelines do not suffice to achieve the recommended changes in diagnostic or therapeutic strategies, and plan suitable interventions overcoming knowledge, attitude and behavioural barriers, preventing both physicians and patients from effectively adhering to guideline recommendations.

  18. [Latin American consensus on hypertension in patients with diabetes type 2 and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    López-Jaramillo, Patricio; Sánchez, Ramiro A; Diaz, Margarita; Cobos, Leonardo; Bryce, Alfonso; Parra-Carrillo, Jose Z; Lizcano, Fernando; Lanas, Fernando; Sinay, Isaac; Sierra, Iván D; Peñaherrera, Ernesto; Bendersky, Mario; Schmid, Helena; Botero, Rodrigo; Urina, Manuel; Lara, Joffre; Foss, Milton C; Márquez, Gustavo; Harrap, Stephen; Ramírez, Agustín J; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2014-04-01

    The present document has been prepared by a group of experts, members of cardiology, endocrinology, internal medicine, nephrology and diabetes societies of Latin American countries, to serve as a guide to physicians taking care of patients with diabetes, hypertension and comorbidities or complications of both conditions. Although the concept of metabolic syndrome is currently disputed, the higher prevalence in Latin America of that cluster of metabolic alterations has suggested that metabolic syndrome is a useful nosography entity in the context of Latin American medicine. Therefore, in the present document, particular attention is paid to this syndrome in order to alert physicians on a particular high-risk population, usually underestimated and undertreated. These recommendations result from presentations and debates by discussion panels during a 2-day conference held in Bucaramanga, in October 2012, and all the participants have approved the final conclusions. The authors acknowledge that the publication and diffusion of guidelines do not suffice to achieve the recommended changes in diagnostic or therapeutic strategies, and plan suitable interventions overcoming knowledge, attitude and behavioural barriers, preventing both physicians and patients from effectively adhering to guideline recommendations.

  19. [Latin American consensus on hypertension in patients with diabetes type 2 and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    López-Jaramillo, Patricio; Sánchez, Ramiro A; Díaz, Margarita; Cobos, Leonardo; Bryce, Alfonso; Parra-Carrillo, José Z; Lizcano, Fernando; Lanas, Fernando; Sinay, Isaac; Sierra, Iván D; Peñaherrera, Ernesto; Benderky, Mario; Schmid, Helena; Botero, Rodrigo; Urina, Manuel; Lara, Joffre; Foos, Milton C; Márquez, Gustavo; Harrap, Stephen; Ramírez, Agustín J; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The present document has been prepared by a group of experts, members of Cardiology, Endocrinology, Internal Medicine, Nephrology and Diabetes societies of Latin American countries, to serve as a guide to physicians taking care of patients with diabetes, hypertension and comorbidities or complications of both conditions. Although the concept of metabolic syndrome is currently disputed, the higher prevalence in Latin America of that cluster of metabolic alterations has suggested that metabolic syndrome is useful nosography entity in the context of Latin American medicine. Therefore, in the present document, particular attention is paid to this syndrome in order to alert physicians on a particular high- risk population, usually underestimated and undertreated. These recommendations results from presentation and debates by discussion panels during a 2-day conference held in Bucaramanga, in October 2012, and all the participants have approved the final conclusions. The authors acknowledge that the publication and diffusion of guidelines do not suffice to achieve the recommended changes in diagnostic or therapeutic strategies, and plan suitable interventions overcoming both physicians and patients from effectively adhering to guideline recommendations.

  20. Nosology and inheritance pattern(s) of joint hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: a study of intrafamilial and interfamilial variability in 23 Italian pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Dordoni, Chiara; Valiante, Michele; Sperduti, Isabella; Ritelli, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Chiarelli, Nicola; Celletti, Claudia; Venturini, Marina; Camerota, Filippo; Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo; Grammatico, Paola; Colombi, Marina

    2014-12-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two markedly overlapping heritable connective tissue disorders. The cumulative frequency of JHS and EDS-HT seems high, but their recognition remains an exclusion diagnosis based on different sets of diagnostic criteria. Although proposed by a panel of experts, clinical identity between JHS and EDS-HT is still a matter of debate due to unknown molecular basis. We present 23 families with three or more individuals with a diagnosis of JHS and/or EDS-HT. Rough data from the 82 individuals were used to assess the frequency of major and minor criteria, as well as selected additional features. A series of statistical tools were applied to assess intrafamilial and interfamilial variability, emphasizing intergenerational, and intersex differences. This study demonstrates marked heterogeneity within and between families in terms of agreement of available diagnostic criteria. In 21 pedigrees affected individuals belong to two or three phenotypic sub-categories among JHS, EDS-HT, and JHS + EDS-HT overlap. Intergenerational analysis depicts a progressive shifting, also within the same pedigree, from EDS-HT in childhood, to JHS + EDS-HT in early adulthood and JHS later in life. Female-male ratio is 2.1:1, which results lower than previously observed in unselected patients' cohorts. In these pedigrees, JHS, EDS-HT, and JHS + EDS-HT segregate as a single dominant trait with complete penetrance, variable expressivity, and a markedly evolving phenotype. This study represents a formal demonstration that EDS-HT and JHS contitute the same clinical entity, and likely share the same genetic background, at least, in familial cases.

  1. Mutations in PAX3 that cause Waardenburg syndrome type I: Ten new mutations and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, C.T.; Hoth, C.F.; Milunsky, A.

    1995-08-28

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, dystopia canthorum, and pigmentary disturbances, and it represents the most common form of inherited deafness in infants. WS type I is characterized by the presence of dystopia canthorum, while individuals with WS type II have normally-located canthi. WS type III is similar to WS type I but is also characterized by musculoskeletal abnormalities. Defects in the PAX3 gene, a transcription factor expressed during embryonic development, have been shown to cause WS types I and III in several families. In contrast, mutations in PAX3 do not cause WS type II, and linkage of the disease to other chromosomal regions has been demonstrated. We describe 10 additional mutations in the PAX3 gene in families with WS type I. Eight of these mutations are in the region of PAX3, where only one mutation has been previously described. These mutations, together with those previously reported, cover essentially the entire PAX3 gene and represent a wide spectrum of mutations that can cause WS type I. Thus far, all but one of the mutations are private; only one mutation has been reported in two apparently unrelated families. Our analysis thus far demonstrates little correlation between genotype and phenotype; deletions of the entire PAX3 gene result in phenotypes indistinguishable from those associated with single-base substitutions in the paired domain or homeodomain of PAX3. Moreover, two similar mutations in close proximity can result in significantly different phenotypes, WS type I in one family and WS type III in another. 47 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Type III 3-Methylglutaconic Aciduria (Optic Atrophy Plus Syndrome, or Costeff Optic Atrophy Syndrome): Identification of the OPA3 Gene and Its Founder Mutation in Iraqi Jews

    PubMed Central

    Anikster, Yair; Kleta, Robert; Shaag, Avraham; Gahl, William A.; Elpeleg, Orly

    2001-01-01

    Type III 3-methylglutaconic aciduria (MGA) (MIM 258501) is a neuro-ophthalmologic syndrome that consists of early-onset bilateral optic atrophy and later-onset spasticity, extrapyramidal dysfunction, and cognitive deficit. Urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid and of 3-methylglutaric acid is increased. The disorder has been reported in ∼40 patients of Iraqi Jewish origin, allowing the mapping of the disease to chromosome 19q13.2-q13.3, by linkage analysis. To isolate the causative gene, OPA3, we sequenced four genes within the critical interval and identified, in the intronic sequence of a gene corresponding to cDNA clone FLJ22187, a point mutation that segregated with the type III MGA phenotype. The FLJ22187-cDNA clone, which we identified as the OPA3 gene, consists of two exons and encodes a peptide of 179 amino acid residues. Northern blot analysis revealed a primary transcript of ∼5.0 kb that was ubiquitously expressed, most prominently in skeletal muscle and kidney. Within the brain, the cerebral cortex, the medulla, the cerebellum, and the frontal lobe, compared to other parts of the brain, had slightly increased expression. The intronic G→C mutation abolished mRNA expression in fibroblasts from affected patients and was detected in 8 of 85 anonymous Israeli individuals of Iraqi Jewish origin. Milder mutations in OPA3 should be sought in patients with optic atrophy with later onset, even in the absence of additional neurological abnormalities. PMID:11668429

  3. Hepatic Atypical Protein Kinase C: An Inherited Survival-Longevity Gene that Now Fuels Insulin-Resistant Syndromes of Obesity, the Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Farese, Robert V.; Lee, Mackenzie C.; Sajan, Mini P.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on how insulin signals to metabolic processes in health, why this signaling is frequently deranged in Western/Westernized societies, how these derangements lead to, or abet development of, insulin-resistant states of obesity, the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus, and what our options are for restoring insulin signaling, and glucose/lipid homeostasis. A central theme in this review is that excessive hepatic activity of an archetypal protein kinase enzyme, “atypical” protein kinase C (aPKC), plays a critically important role in the development of impaired glucose metabolism, systemic insulin resistance, and excessive hepatic production of glucose, lipids and proinflammatory factors that underlie clinical problems of glucose intolerance, obesity, hepatosteatosis, hyperlipidemia, and, ultimately, type 2 diabetes. The review suggests that normally inherited genes, in particular, the aPKC isoforms, that were important for survival and longevity in times of food scarcity are now liabilities in times of over-nutrition. Fortunately, new knowledge of insulin signaling mechanisms and how an aberration of excessive hepatic aPKC activation is induced by over-nutrition puts us in a position to target this aberration by diet and/or by specific inhibitors of hepatic aPKC. PMID:26237474

  4. Visualizing myocardial inflammation in a rat model of type 4 cardiorenal syndrome by dual-modality molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Chang, Di; Wang, Yuan-Cheng; Zhang, Shi-Jun; Bai, Ying-Ying; Liu, Dong-Fang; Zang, Feng-Chao; Wang, Guozheng; Wang, Binghui; Ju, Shenghong

    2015-11-01

    Type 4 cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) is a life-threatening world health problem in which chronic kidney disease leads to progressive cardiovascular disease. In type 4 CRS, cardiac inflammation is an excellent target for both detection and therapy; however, this progression was underestimated by previous studies due to the lack of effective detection methods. To noninvasively visualize cardiac inflammation and monitor therapeutic efficacy of anti-inflammatory treatment in type 4 CRS, we here synthesized a dual-modality magneto-fluorescent nanoparticle (MNP) by combining ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle and Rhodamine B for both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical imaging. This dual-functional MNP exhibited excellent performance such as high r2 relaxivity coefficient (283.4 mM(-1) s(-1)), high magnetism (96.7 emu/g iron) and a near neutral surface charge to minimize the reticuloendothelial system uptake. In vivo cardiac MRI showed significant negative contrast in the type 4 CRS rats, and the signal intensity on optical imaging was significantly higher in the type 4 CRS group compared with sham-operated and drug-treated groups. The specific targeting profile of MNPs to monocyte-macrophages was proven by histopathological analysis. Taken together, we demonstrate that this dual-modality strategy is feasible for noninvasively assessing myocardial inflammation and monitoring therapeutic efficacy in type 4 CRS. PMID:26264647

  5. Gait Strategy in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type: A Kinematic and Kinetic Evaluation Using 3D Gait Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Rigoldi, Chiara; Castori, Marco; Celletti, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio; Camerota, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the gait patterns of adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (JHS/EDS-HT) hypermobility type, using Gait Analysis. We quantified the gait strategy in 12 JHS/EDS-HT adults individuals (age: 43.08 + 6.78 years) compared to 20 healthy controls (age: 37.23 plus or minus 8.91 years), in…

  6. Natural history and manifestations of the hypermobility type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a pilot study on 21 patients.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Camerota, Filippo; Celletti, Claudia; Danese, Chiara; Santilli, Valter; Saraceni, Vincenzo Maria; Grammatico, Paola

    2010-03-01

    Hypermobility type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (HT-EDS) is a relatively frequent, although commonly misdiagnosed variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, mainly characterized by marked joint instability and mild cutaneous involvement. Chronic pain, asthenia, and gastrointestinal and pelvic dysfunction are characteristic additional manifestations. We report on 21 HT-EDS patients selected from a group of 40 subjects with suspected mild hereditary connective tissue disorder. General, mucocutaneous, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, neurologic, gastrointestinal, urogynecological, and ear-nose-throat abnormalities are investigated systematically and tabulated. Six distinct clinical presentations of HT-EDS are outlined, whose tabulation is a mnemonic for the practicing clinical geneticist in an attempt to diagnose this condition accurately. With detailed clinical records and phenotype comparison among patients of different ages, the natural history of the disorder is defined. Three phases (namely, hypermobility, pain, and stiffness) are delineated based on distinguishing manifestations. A constellation of additional, apparently uncommon abnormalities is also identified, including dolichocolon, dysphonia, and Arnold-Chiari type I malformation. Their further investigation may contribute to an understanding of the pathogenesis of the protean manifestations of HT-EDS, and a more effective approach to the evaluation and management of affected individuals. PMID:20140961

  7. Laparoscopic Resection of Cholecystocolic Fistula and Subtotal Cholecystectomy by Tri-Staple in a Type V Mirizzi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yetişir, Fahri; Şarer, Akgün Ebru; Acar, Hasan Zafer; Parlak, Omer; Basaran, Basar; Yazıcıoğlu, Omer

    2016-01-01

    The Mirizzi syndrome (MS) is an impacted stone in the cystic duct or Hartmann's pouch that mechanically obstructs the common bile duct (CBD). We would like to report laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy (SC) and resection of cholecystocolic fistula by the help of Tri-Staple™ in a case with type V MS and cholecystocolic fistula, for first time in the literature. A 24-year-old man was admitted to emergency department with the complaint of abdominal pain, intermittent fever, jaundice, and diarrhea. Two months ago with the same complaint, ERCP was performed. Laparoscopic resection of cholecystocolic fistula and subtotal cholecystectomy were performed by the help of Tri-Staple. At the eight-month follow-up, he was symptom-free with normal liver function tests. In a patient with type V MS and cholecystocolic fistula, laparoscopic resection of cholecystocolic fistula and SC can be performed by using Tri-Staple safely. PMID:26904324

  8. Richner-Hanhart syndrome (tyrosinemia type II): a case report of delayed diagnosis with pseudodendritic corneal lesion.

    PubMed

    Iskeleli, Güzin; Bilgeç, Mustafa Değer; Arici, Ceyhun; Atalay, Eray; Oğreden, Tülin; Aydin, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Richner-Hanhart syndrome (tyrosinemia type II) is a rare autosomal recessive disease associated with high serum tyrosine levels caused by the deficiency of tyrosine aminotransferase enzyme. We report a 15-year-old female patient with complaints of bilateral photophobia and tearing, which started during the infancy period. Biomicroscopic examination revealed bilateral circular corneal opacities on the inferior quadrant and small dendritic lesions at the center of the circular opacities. Blood tests showed a tyrosine level of 508 micromol/L (normal range: 30-150). On her dermatologic examination, plantar hyperkeratosis and seborrheic dermatitis were noted, and mild mental retardation was detected. One and a half months after the tyrosine- and phenylalanine-restricted diet, her tyrosine level dropped to 395 micromol/L level, her corneal lesions subsided, and a symptomatic relief was achieved. Tyrosinemia type II should be suspected in patients demonstrating dermatologic signs, especially palmoplantar keratosis, associated with bilateral pseudodendritic corneal lesions unresponsive to antiviral therapy.

  9. Type I and II interferon signatures in Sjogren's syndrome pathogenesis: Contributions in distinct clinical phenotypes and Sjogren's related lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nezos, Adrianos; Gravani, Fotini; Tassidou, Anna; Kapsogeorgou, Efstathia K.; Voulgarelis, Michael; Koutsilieris, Michael; Crow, Mary K.; Mavragani, Clio P.

    2015-01-01

    Both type I and II interferons (IFNs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Sjogren's syndrome (SS). We aimed to explore the contribution of type I and II IFN signatures in the generation of distinct SS clinical phenotypes including lymphoma development. Peripheral blood (PB) from SS patients (n=31), SS patients complicated by lymphoma (n=13) and healthy controls (HC, n=30) were subjected to real-time PCR for 3 interferon inducible genes (IFIGs) preferentially induced by type I IFN, 2 IFIGs preferentially induced by IFNγ as well as for IFNα and IFNγ genes. The same analysis was performed in minor salivary gland tissues (MSG) derived from 31 SS patients, 10 SS-lymphoma patients and 17 sicca controls (SC). In PB and MSG tissues, overexpression of both type I and type II IFIGs was observed in SS patients versus HC and SC, respectively, with a predominance of type I IFN signature in PB and a type II IFN signature in MSG tissues. In SS-lymphoma MSG tissues, lower IFNα, but higher IFNγ and type II IFIG transcripts compared to both SS and SC were observed. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, IFNγ/IFNα mRNA ratio in MSG tissues showed the best discrimination for lymphoma development. Discrete expression patterns of type I and II IFN signatures might be related to distinct SS clinical phenotypes. Additionally, IFNγ/IFNα mRNA ratio in diagnostic salivary gland biopsies is proposed as a novel histopathological biomarker for the prediction of in situ lymphoma development in the setting of SS. PMID:26183766

  10. Apocynin Attenuates Cardiac Injury in Type 4 Cardiorenal Syndrome via Suppressing Cardiac Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 With Oxidative Stress Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Xun; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Kun; Huang, Feifei; Wang, Jing-Feng; Tang, Wanchun; Huang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 4 cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) refers to the cardiac injury induced by chronic kidney disease. We aimed to assess oxidative stress and cardiac injury in patients with type 4 CRS, determine whether the antioxidant apocynin attenuated cardiac injury in rats with type 4 CRS, and explore potential mechanisms. Methods and Results A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients with type 4 CRS (n=17) and controls (n=16). Compared with controls, patients with type 4 CRS showed elevated oxidative stress, which was significantly correlated with cardiac hypertrophy and decreased ejection fraction. In vivo study, male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy and sham surgery, followed with apocynin or vehicle treatment for 8 weeks. Eight weeks after surgery, the 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy rats mimicked type 4 CRS, showing increased serum creatinine, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and decreased ejection fraction compared with sham-operated animals. Cardiac malondialdehyde, NADPH oxidase activity, fibroblast growth factor-2, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation increased significantly in the 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy rats. These changes were significantly attenuated by apocynin. In vitro study showed that apocynin reduced angiotensin II–induced NADPH oxidase–dependent oxidative stress, upregulation of fibroblast growth factor-2 and fibrosis biomarkers, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in cardiac fibroblasts. Importantly, the ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 reduced the upregulation of fibroblast growth factor-2 and fibrosis biomarkers in angiotensin II–treated fibroblasts. Conclusions Oxidative stress is a candidate mediator for type 4 CRS. Apocynin attenuated cardiac injury in type 4 CRS rats via inhibiting NADPH oxidase–dependent oxidative stress-activated ERK1/2 pathway and subsequent fibroblast growth factor-2 upregulation. Our study added evidence to the beneficial effect of apocynin in type 4 CRS. PMID:26109504

  11. PTPRD (protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type delta) is associated with restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schormair, Barbara; Kemlink, David; Roeske, Darina; Eckstein, Gertrud; Xiong, Lan; Lichtner, Peter; Ripke, Stephan; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Zimprich, Alexander; Stiasny-Kolster, Karin; Oertel, Wolfgang; Bachmann, Cornelius G; Paulus, Walter; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit; Gschliesser, Viola; Poewe, Werner; Peglau, Ines; Vodicka, Pavel; Vávrová, Jana; Sonka, Karel; Nevsimalova, Sona; Montplaisir, Jacques; Turecki, Gustavo; Rouleau, Guy; Gieger, Christian; Illig, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Holsboer, Florian; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Meitinger, Thomas; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2008-08-01

    We identified association of restless legs syndrome (RLS) with PTPRD at 9p23-24 in 2,458 affected individuals and 4,749 controls from Germany, Austria, Czechia and Canada. Two independent SNPs in the 5' UTR of splice variants expressed predominantly in the central nervous system showed highly significant P values (rs4626664, P(nominal/lambda corrected) = 5.91 x 10(-10), odds ratio (OR) = 1.44; rs1975197, P(nominal/lambda corrected) = 5.81 x 10(-9), OR = 1.31). This work identifies PTPRD as the fourth genome-wide significant locus for RLS.

  12. Clinical picture and problems of keratoplasty in Richner-Hanhart syndrome (tyrosinemia type II).

    PubMed

    Sayar, R B; von Domarus, D; Schäfer, H J; Beckenkamp, G

    1988-01-01

    The Richner-Hanhart syndrome seen in a middle-aged woman is described. The patient had the typical clinical manifestations of tyrosinemia II with a bilateral keratopathy, palmar and plantar hyperkeratosis. The patient was subjected to a specific diet and to perforating keratoplasty. Postoperative systemic therapy with steroids had a negative influence on the clinical manifestations; dendritic lesions which developed on the corneal graft disappeared after interruption of the systemic steroid therapy. This suggests that cortisone treatment after keratoplasty should be avoided in this special metabolic disorder.

  13. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine circovirus type 2 infections in wild boar (Sus scrofa) in southwestern Germany.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Ralf; Ritzmann, Mathias; Palzer, Andreas; Lang, Christiane; Hammer, Birgit; Pesch, Stefan; Ladinig, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Samples were collected from 203 wild boars (Sus scrofa) hunted in Baden-Wurtemburg, Germany from November-January 2008 and 2009. Samples from the lung and tonsil were analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) type 1 (European type) and type 2 (American type). A qPCR to detect porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2)-specific genome was performed on tissue homogenates including lung, tonsils, and inguinal lymph nodes. Serum samples were tested for antibodies against PRRSV and PCV2 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). No PRRSV was detected in any of the 203 samples and one sample had detectable antibodies against PRRSV. We detected PCV2 in organ materials from 103 wild boars with a prevalence of 50.7%. The number of wild boars positive for PCV2 by PCR varied according to the population density of wild boars among woodlands. More positive samples were detected in woodlands with a high density of wild boars. We found no correlation between the number of PCV2-positive wild boars and the density of domestic pigs in the surrounding area. The number of wild boars positive for antibodies against PCV2 by the INGEZIM Circovirus IgG/IgM test kit was low (53 sera positive for IgG- and three sera positive for IgM-antibodies) in comparison to the higher positive results from the INGEZIM CIRCO IgG test kit (102 positive and 12 inconclusive results).

  14. The first Japanese case of the arthrochalasia type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with COL1A2 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Hatamochi, Atsushi; Hamada, Takahiro; Yoshino, Makoto; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2014-03-15

    This is the first report for a Japanese case of arthrochalasia type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). A 46-year-old woman consulted us for joint hypermobility and skin hyperextensibility that had been present soon after birth. There was no family history of a similar disease. She was diagnosed as having bilateral congenital hip dislocation and bilateral habitual shoulder dislocation at her childhood. Her skin was velvety, doughy and hyperextensible. She showed hypermobility of the joints of the hands and feet and generalized joint laxity, with no evidence of scoliosis. Electrophoretic analysis of collagenous proteins revealed the presence of an additional band in the position of pNα2(I) in the sample from culture medium of the patient fibroblasts. Analysis of the α2 chains of type I collagen gene, COL1A2, showed a heterozygous G to T transition at the +1 position of the exon 6 donor splice site (c.279+1G>T). This mutation resulted in skipping of exon 6, which leads to deficient processing of the amino-terminal end of proα2(I) chains of type I collagen. Based on these findings, we made a diagnosis of the arthrochalasia type of EDS, which corresponds to EDS type VIIB in the former classification.

  15. Linkage of the gene that encodes the alpha 1 chain of type V collagen (COL5A1) to type II Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS II).

    PubMed

    Loughlin, J; Irven, C; Hardwick, L J; Butcher, S; Walsh, S; Wordsworth, P; Sykes, B

    1995-09-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of heritable disorders of connective tissue with skin, ligaments and blood vessels being the main sites affected. The commonest variant (EDS II) exhibits an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance and is characterized by joint hypermobility, cigarette paper scars, lax skin and excessive bruising. As yet no gene has been linked to EDS II, nor has linkage been established to a specific region of the genome. However, several candidate genes encoding proteins of the extracellular matrix have been excluded. Using an intragenic simple sequence repeat polymorphism, we report linkage of the COL5A1 gene, which encodes the alpha 1(V) chain of type V collagen, to EDS II. A maximum LOD score (Zmax) for linkage of 8.3 at theta = 0.00 was generated for a single large pedigree.

  16. A wild-type DNA ligase I gene is expressed in Bloom's syndrome cells

    SciTech Connect

    Petrini, J.H.J.; Huwiler, K.G.; Weaver, D.T. )

    1991-09-01

    Alteration of DNA ligase I activity is a consistent biochemical feature of Bloom's syndrome (BS) cells. DNA ligase I activity in BS cells either is reduced and abnormally thermolabile or is present in an anomalously dimeric form. To assess the role of DNA ligase function in the etiology of BS, the authors have cloned the DNA ligase I cDNA from normal human cells by a PCR strategy using degenerate oligonucleotide primers based on conserved regions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA ligase genes. Human DNA ligase I cDNAs from normal and BS cells complemented a S. cerevisiae DNA ligase mutation, and protein extracts prepared from S. cerevisiae transformants expressing normal and BS cDNA contained comparable levels of DNA ligase I activity. DNA sequencing and Northern blot analysis of DNA ligase I expression in two BS human fibroblast lines representing each of the two aberrant DNA ligase I molecular phenotypes demonstrated that this gene was unchanged in BS cells. Thus, another factor may be responsible for the observed reduction in DNA ligase I activity associated with this chromosomal breakage syndrome.

  17. An unusual case of adolescent type 2 diabetes mellitus: Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Basheer, Riyas; Jalal, Muhammed Jasim Abdul; Gomez, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex genetic disorder, characterized by neonatal hypotonia, developmental delay, short stature, childhood obesity, hypogonadism, and characteristic facial features. Here we report a 21-year-old male who presented with uncontrolled glycemic status. He was diagnosed to have diabetes mellitus at the age of 15 with osmotic symptoms - polyuria, polydipsia, and polyphagia. In the early period, after diagnosis, his blood sugars were reasonably controlled with oral hypoglycemic agents. However, a year back, he was switched onto insulin therapy due to secondary OHA failure. On examination, his body mass index was 36 kg/m(2). He had bilateral gynecomastia, decreased biparietal diameter, almond shaped eyes with esotropia. He had hypogonadism and also had mild cognitive impairment. He did not have any proximal myopathy or other focal neurological deficits. Hormonal evaluation showed low testosterone and inappropriately normal fluorescence in situ hybridization suggestive of central hypogonadism. With fetal and neonatal hypotonia, delayed developmental milestones, hypogonadism, and early onset diabetes, he fulfilled the clinical criteria for the diagnosis of PWS. Multidisciplinary approach of clinicians together with family and social support are essential to bring out the optimal outcome for such syndromic cases.

  18. An unusual case of adolescent type 2 diabetes mellitus: Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Basheer, Riyas; Jalal, Muhammed Jasim Abdul; Gomez, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex genetic disorder, characterized by neonatal hypotonia, developmental delay, short stature, childhood obesity, hypogonadism, and characteristic facial features. Here we report a 21-year-old male who presented with uncontrolled glycemic status. He was diagnosed to have diabetes mellitus at the age of 15 with osmotic symptoms - polyuria, polydipsia, and polyphagia. In the early period, after diagnosis, his blood sugars were reasonably controlled with oral hypoglycemic agents. However, a year back, he was switched onto insulin therapy due to secondary OHA failure. On examination, his body mass index was 36 kg/m(2). He had bilateral gynecomastia, decreased biparietal diameter, almond shaped eyes with esotropia. He had hypogonadism and also had mild cognitive impairment. He did not have any proximal myopathy or other focal neurological deficits. Hormonal evaluation showed low testosterone and inappropriately normal fluorescence in situ hybridization suggestive of central hypogonadism. With fetal and neonatal hypotonia, delayed developmental milestones, hypogonadism, and early onset diabetes, he fulfilled the clinical criteria for the diagnosis of PWS. Multidisciplinary approach of clinicians together with family and social support are essential to bring out the optimal outcome for such syndromic cases. PMID:27453871

  19. Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome-associated Cx26 mutants produce nonfunctional gap junctions but hyperactive hemichannels when co-expressed with wild type Cx43.

    PubMed

    García, Isaac E; Maripillán, Jaime; Jara, Oscar; Ceriani, Ricardo; Palacios-Muñoz, Angelina; Ramachandran, Jayalakshmi; Olivero, Pablo; Perez-Acle, Tomas; González, Carlos; Sáez, Juan C; Contreras, Jorge E; Martínez, Agustín D

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in Cx26 gene are found in most cases of human genetic deafness. Some mutations produce syndromic deafness associated with skin disorders, like the Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness syndrome (KID). Because in the human skin connexin 26 (Cx26) is co-expressed with other connexins, like Cx43 and Cx30, and as the KID syndrome is inherited as autosomal dominant condition, it is possible that KID mutations change the way Cx26 interacts with other co-expressed connexins. Indeed, some Cx26 syndromic mutations showed gap junction dominant negative effect when co-expressed with wild-type connexins, including Cx26 and Cx43. The nature of these interactions and the consequences on hemichannels and gap junction channel (GJC) functions remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that syndromic mutations, at the N terminus segment of Cx26, change connexin oligomerization compatibility, allowing aberrant interactions with Cx43. Strikingly, heteromeric oligomer formed by Cx43/Cx26 (syndromic mutants) shows exacerbated hemichannel activity but nonfunctional GJCs; this also occurs for those Cx26 KID mutants that do not show functional homomeric hemichannels. Heterologous expression of these hyperactive heteromeric hemichannels increases cell membrane permeability, favoring ATP release and Ca(2+) overload. The functional paradox produced by oligomerization of Cx43 and Cx26 KID mutants could underlie the severe syndromic phenotype in human skin.

  20. Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness syndrome-associated Cx26 mutants produce nonfunctional gap junctions but hyperactive hemichannels when co-expressed with wild type Cx43

    PubMed Central

    García, Isaac E.; Maripillán, Jaime; Jara, Oscar; Ceriani, Ricardo; Palacios-Muñoz, Angelina; Ramachandran, Jayalakshimi; Olivero, Pablo; Pérez-Acle, Tomás; González, Carlos; Sáez, Juan C.; Contreras, Jorge E.; Martínez, Agustín D.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in Cx26 gene are found in most cases of human genetic deafness. Some mutations produce syndromic deafness associated with skin disorders, like Keratitis Ichthyosis Deafness syndrome (KID). Because in the human skin Cx26 is co-expressed with other connexins, like Cx43 and Cx30, and since KID syndrome is inherited as autosomal dominant condition, it is possible that KID mutations change the way Cx26 interacts with other co-expressed connexins. Indeed, some Cx26 syndromic mutations showed gap junction dominant negative effect when co-expressed with wild type connexins, including Cx26 and Cx43. The nature of these interactions and the consequences on hemichannels and gap junction channels functions remain unknown. In this study we demonstrate that syndromic mutations at the N-terminus segment of Cx26, change connexin oligomerization compatibility, allowing aberrant interactions with Cx43. Strikingly, heteromeric oligomer formed by Cx43/Cx26 (syndromic mutants) show exacerbated hemichannel activity, but nonfunctional gap junction channels; this also occurs for those Cx26 KID mutants that do not show functional homomeric hemichannels. Heterologous expression of these hyperactive heteromeric hemichannels increases cell membrane permeability, favoring ATP release and Ca2+ overload. The functional paradox produced by oligomerization of Cx43 and Cx26 KID mutants could underlie the severe syndromic phenotype in human skin. PMID:25625422

  1. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in DYNC2H1 in a patient with severe short-rib polydactyly syndrome type III phenotype.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Toshio; Nagaya, Ken; Kawata, Yumi; Asai, Hiroko; Tsuchida, Etsushi; Nohara, Fumikatsu; Okajima, Kazuki; Azuma, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Short-rib polydactyly syndrome type III is an autosomal recessive lethal skeletal ciliopathy, which is phenotypically similar to nonlethal asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy. Mutations in DYNC2H1 have been identified in both of these disorders, indicating that they are variants of a single disorder. However, short-rib polydactyly syndrome type III is the more severe variant. Here, we report novel compound heterozygous mutations in DYNC2H1 (p.E1894fsX10 and p.R3004C) in a patient with typical short-rib polydactyly syndrome type III phenotype. R3004 is located within the microtubule-binding domain of DYNC2H1, and its substitution is predicted to disrupt the interaction with microtubules. Considering the severe phenotype of our patient, our findings suggest that R3004 may be a key residue for the microtubule-binding affinity of dynein.

  2. A case of lean polycystic ovary syndrome with early stage of type 1 diabetes successfully treated with metformin.

    PubMed

    Shigiyama, Fumika; Kumashiro, Naoki; Rikitake, Takayuki; Usui, Shuki; Saegusa, Michiko; Kitamura, Mamoru; Uchino, Hiroshi; Hirose, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is common in obese women with insulin resistant type 2 diabetes for which metformin treatment is getting established in addition to clomiphene. However, lean PCOS patients are sometimes accompanied with type 1 diabetes. It remains unclear whether these patients are insulin resistant and whether metformin is effective for them. A 32-year-old woman, who suffered from acne, hirsutism, and menstrual disorders since age 29, was diagnosed as PCOS by serum high LH levels and polycystic ovary on echography. Interestingly, her body mass index (BMI) had consistently been 21.0 kg/m2 since age 20. She was first treated with clomiphene for one year for infertility but it did not improve her menstrual cycle nor did she get pregnant during that period. She was then assessed with diabetes mellitus and subsequently diagnosed as type 1 diabetes with mild hyperglycemia (HbA1c 6.0%). Since her insulin secretion was still well preserved, to assess insulin sensitivity, hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp test was performed and showed her to be insulin resistant. Low dose insulin and low dose metformin treatment was started without clomiphene. After her ovulation and menstrual cycle were ameliorated only one month later, her treatment was supplemented with clomiphene for the next three months enabling her to at last become pregnant. This report highlights the efficacy of metformin in lean PCOS with type 1 diabetes. Insulin therapy is essential for type 1 diabetes but hyperinsulinemia potentially exacerbates PCOS through hyperandrogenism. Metformin is therefore recommended for treatment of lean PCOS with type 1 diabetes as well as common obese PCOS with type 2 diabetes.

  3. A Neonate with Susceptibility to Long QT Syndrome Type 6 who Presented with Ventricular Fibrillation and Sudden Unexpected Infant Death

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Charles W.; Marc-Aurele, Krishelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 19-day Final Diagnosis: 19 day old neonate with susceptibility to Long QT syndrome • ventricular fibrillation Symptoms: Cardiac arrest • cardiac arrhythmia • encephalopathy Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Cardioversion Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Rare disease Background: This is a case of a neonate with susceptibility to long QT syndrome (LQTS) who presented with a sudden unexpected infant death. Experts continue to debate whether universal electrocardiogram (ECG) screening of all newborns is feasible, practical, and cost-effective. Case Report: A 19-day-old neonate was found unresponsive by her mother. ECG showed ventricular fibrillation and a combination of a lidocaine drip plus multiple defibrillations converted the rhythm to normal sinus. Unfortunately, MRI brain imaging showed multiple infarcts and EEG showed burst suppression pattern with frequent seizures; life supportive treatment was stopped and the infant died. Genetic testing revealed two mutations in the KCNE2 gene consistent with susceptibility to LQTS type 6. Conclusions: We believe this case is the first to demonstrate both a precipitating electrocardiographic and genetic cause of death for an infant with LQTS, showing a cause-and-effect relationship between LQTS mutation, ventricular arrhythmia, and death. We wonder whether universal ECG newborn screening to prevent LQTS death could have saved this baby. PMID:27465075

  4. DYNC2H1 mutations cause asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy and short rib-polydactyly syndrome, type III.

    PubMed

    Dagoneau, Nathalie; Goulet, Marie; Geneviève, David; Sznajer, Yves; Martinovic, Jelena; Smithson, Sarah; Huber, Céline; Baujat, Geneviève; Flori, Elisabeth; Tecco, Laura; Cavalcanti, Denise; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Serre, Valérie; Le Merrer, Martine; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2009-05-01

    Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD) is an autosomal-recessive chondrodysplasia characterized by short ribs and a narrow thorax, short long bones, inconstant polydactyly, and trident acetabular roof. ATD is closely related to the short rib polydactyly syndrome (SRP) type III, which is a more severe condition characterized by early prenatal expression and lethality and variable malformations. We first excluded IFT80 in a series of 26 fetuses and children belonging to 14 families diagnosed with either ATD or SRP type III. Studying a consanguineous family from Morocco, we mapped an ATD gene to chromosome 11q14.3-q23.1 in a 20.4 Mb region and identified homozygous mutations in the cytoplasmic dynein 2 heavy chain 1 (DYNC2H1) gene in the affected children. Compound heterozygosity for DYNC2H1 mutations was also identified in four additional families. Among the five families, 3/5 were diagnosed with ATD and 2/5 included pregnancies terminated for SRP type III. DYNC2H1 is a component of a cytoplasmic dynein complex and is directly involved in the generation and maintenance of cilia. From this study, we conclude that ATD and SRP type III are variants of a single disorder belonging to the ciliopathy group.

  5. Aggressive change of a carotid-cavernous fistula in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Atsuhiro; Saga, Isako; Tomio, Ryosuke; Kosho, Tomoki; Hatamochi, Atsushi

    2015-06-01

    The authors report a rare case of a carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) secondary to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV which showed an aggressive angiographical change.A 59-year-old woman presented with headache, right pulsatile tinnitus, and diplopia on the right side. The diagnostic angiography demonstrated a right CCF. Accordingly transarterial embolization of the fistula was attempted 5 days later. The initial right internal carotid angiography showed an aneurysm on the petrous portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) which was not recognized in the diagnostic angiography. Spontaneous reduction of the shunt flow and long dissection of the ICA were also revealed. The aneurysm was successfully occluded with coils, and only minor shunt flow was shown on the final angiogram. EDS type IV was diagnosed with a skin biopsy for a collagen abnormality. After the operation, the stenosis of the right ICA gradually progressed, although there was no recurrence of the CCF.Interventional treatment for patients with EDS can cause devastating vascular complication. We should be aware of the possibility of EDS type IV when a spontaneous CCF shows unusual angiographical change because early diagnosis of EDS type IV is crucial for determination of the optimum treatment option. PMID:26015525

  6. Management of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1 With Total Spinal Block

    PubMed Central

    Ok, Se Jin; Son, Ju Hyung; Jeong, Won Ju; Lee, Yoon Sook; Kim, Woon Young; Park, Young Cheol

    2010-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a painful and disabling disorder that can affect one or more extremities. Unfortunately, the knowledge concerning its natural history and mechanism is very limited and many current rationales in treatment of CRPS are mainly dependent on efficacy originated in other common conditions of neuropathic pain. Therefore, in this study, we present a case using a total spinal block (TSB) for the refractory pain management of a 16-year-old male CRPS patient, who suffered from constant stabbing and squeezing pain, with severe touch allodynia in the left upper extremity following an operation of chondroblastoma. After the TSB, the patient's continuous and spontaneous pain became mild and the allodynia disappeared and maintained decreased for 1 month. PMID:20552078

  7. Management of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 with total spinal block.

    PubMed

    Ok, Se Jin; Yang, Jong Yeun; Son, Ju Hyung; Jeong, Won Ju; Lee, Yoon Sook; Kim, Woon Young; Park, Young Cheol

    2010-03-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a painful and disabling disorder that can affect one or more extremities. Unfortunately, the knowledge concerning its natural history and mechanism is very limited and many current rationales in treatment of CRPS are mainly dependent on efficacy originated in other common conditions of neuropathic pain. Therefore, in this study, we present a case using a total spinal block (TSB) for the refractory pain management of a 16-year-old male CRPS patient, who suffered from constant stabbing and squeezing pain, with severe touch allodynia in the left upper extremity following an operation of chondroblastoma. After the TSB, the patient's continuous and spontaneous pain became mild and the allodynia disappeared and maintained decreased for 1 month. PMID:20552078

  8. Evidence suggesting digenic inheritance of Waardenburg syndrome type II with ocular albinism.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Pei-Wen; Spector, Elaine; McGregor, Tracy L

    2009-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a series of auditory-pigmentary disorders inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. In most patients, WS2 results from mutations in the MITF gene. MITF encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that activates transcription of tyrosinase and other melanocyte proteins. The clinical presentation of WS is highly variable, and we believe that Tietz syndrome and WS2 with ocular albinism (OA) are likely two variations of WS2 due to the presence of modifiers. One family with a molecular diagnosis of WS2 co-segregating with OA has previously been reported. A digenic mutation mechanism including both a MITF mutation and the TYR(R402Q) hypomorphic allele was proposed to be the cause of OA in this family. Here, we present a second WS2 family with OA and provide evidence suggesting the TYR(R402Q) allele does not cause OA in this family. We hypothesize the presence of a novel OCA3 mutation together with the MITF del p.R217 mutation account for the OA phenotype in this family. Since MITF is a transcription factor for pigmentation genes, a mutation in MITF plus a heterozygous mutation in OCA3 together provide an adverse effect crossing a quantitative threshold; therefore, WS2 with OA occurs. We have hypothesized previously that the clinical spectrum and mutation mechanism of OCA depend on the pigmentation threshold of an affected individual. This unique family has provided further evidence supporting this hypothesis. We suggest that by studying OCA patients alongside WS patients with various pigmentation profiles we can facilitate further understanding of the pigmentation pathway. PMID:19938076

  9. Deep vein thrombosis, an unreported first manifestation of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type III

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, P; Oliver, T

    2016-01-01

    Summary A 71-year-old woman with severe right lower leg pain, edema and erythema was presented to the Emergency Department and was found to have an extensive deep vein thrombosis (DVT) confirmed by ultrasound. She underwent an extensive evaluation due to her prior history of malignancy and new hypercoagulable state, but no evidence of recurrent disease was detected. Further investigation revealed pernicious anemia (PA), confirmed by the presence of a macrocytic anemia (MCV=115.8fL/red cell, Hgb=9.0g/dL), decreased serum B12 levels (56pg/mL), with resultant increased methylmalonic acid (5303nmol/L) and hyperhomocysteinemia (131μmol/L), the presumed etiology of the DVT. The patient also suffered from autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), and both antithyroglobulin and anti-intrinsic factor antibodies were detected. She responded briskly to anticoagulation with heparin and coumadin and treatment of PA with intramuscular vitamin B12 injections. Our case suggests that a DVT secondary to hyperhomocystenemia may represent the first sign of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome III-B (PAS III-B), defined as the coexistent autoimmune conditions AITD and PA. It is important to recognize this clinical entity, as patients may not only require acute treatment with vitamin B12 supplementation and prolonged anticoagulation, as in this patient, but may also harbor other autoimmune diseases. Learning points A DVT can be the first physical manifestation of a polyglandular autoimmune syndrome. Hyperhomocysteinemia secondary to pernicious anemia should be considered as an etiology of an unprovoked DVT in a euthyroid patient with autoimmune thyroid disease. Patients with DVT secondary to hyperhomocysteinemia should undergo screening for the presence of co-existent autoimmune diseases in addition to treatment with B12 supplementation and anticoagulation to prevent recurrent thromboembolism. PMID:27482386

  10. Deletions at the SOX10 Gene Locus Cause Waardenburg Syndrome Types 2 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Bondurand, Nadege ; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence ; Stanchina, Laure ; Collot, Nathalie ; Baral, Viviane ; Marlin, Sandrine ; Attie-Bitach, Tania ; Giurgea, Irina ; Skopinski, Laurent ; Reardon, William ; Toutain, Annick ; Sarda, Pierre ; Echaieb, Anis ; Lackmy-Port-Lis, Marilyn ; Touraine, Renaud ; Amiel, Jeanne ; Goossens, Michel ; Pingault, Veronique 

    2007-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder that exhibits varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair and skin. Depending on additional symptoms, WS is classified into four subtypes, WS1–WS4. Absence of additional features characterizes WS2. The association of facial dysmorphic features defines WS1 and WS3, whereas the association with Hirschsprung disease (aganglionic megacolon) characterizes WS4, also called “Waardenburg-Hirschsprung disease.” Mutations within the genes MITF and SNAI2 have been identified in WS2, whereas mutations of EDN3, EDNRB, and SOX10 have been observed in patients with WS4. However, not all cases are explained at the molecular level, which raises the possibility that other genes are involved or that some mutations within the known genes are not detected by commonly used genotyping methods. We used a combination of semiquantitative fluorescent multiplex polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization to search for SOX10 heterozygous deletions. We describe the first characterization of SOX10 deletions in patients presenting with WS4. We also found SOX10 deletions in WS2 cases, making SOX10 a new gene of WS2. Interestingly, neurological phenotypes reminiscent of that observed in WS4 (PCWH syndrome [peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, WS, and Hirschsprung disease]) were observed in some WS2-affected patients with SOX10 deletions. This study further characterizes the molecular complexity and the close relationship that links the different subtypes of WS. PMID:17999358

  11. Shoulder function, pain and health related quality of life in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Elise Christine; Reiten, Helle Sundnes; Løvaas, Helene; Maeland, Silje; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To investigate shoulder function, pain and Health-Related Quality of life (HRQoL) among adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), compared with the general population (controls). Method In a cross-sectional study using postal survey, 110 patients diagnosed with JHS/EDS-HT and 140 gender- and age-matched healthy controls from Statistics Norway participated. Shoulder function, pain and HRQol were registered by Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI), Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), pain drawings, 36-item Short Form (SF-36). Results Eighty-one individuals responded, with response rate 34% (JHS/EDS-HT: 53%, controls: 21%). JHS/EDS-HT had lower shoulder function (WOSI total: 49.9 versus 83.3; p < 0.001), lower HRQol on SF-36 Physical Component Scale (PCS: 28.1 versus 49.9; p < 0.001), and higher pain intensity (NRS: 6.4 versus 2.7; p < 0.001) than controls. Neck and shoulder joints were rated as primary painful areas in both groups, with significantly higher frequency in JHS/EDS-HT (neck: 90% versus 27%; shoulder: 80% versus 37%). Further, JHS/EDS-HT most often reported generalized pain (96%). Conclusions Adults with JHS/EDS-HT have impaired shoulder function, increased pain intensity, as well as reduced physical HRQoL compared with controls. Although neck and shoulder were most frequently rated as painful, significantly more JHS/EDS-HT also reported generalized pain compared to controls. Implications for Rehabilitation Adults with JHS/EDS-HT have impaired shoulder function, and most often painful areas in the neck and shoulder joints, which need to be targeted in the treatment strategy. Compared with the general population adults with JHS/EDS-HT have reduced physical HRQoL, supporting a physical approach for this group. Adults with JHS/EDS-HT may present with both specific painful joints and generalized pain.

  12. Shoulder function, pain and health related quality of life in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Elise Christine; Reiten, Helle Sundnes; Løvaas, Helene; Maeland, Silje; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To investigate shoulder function, pain and Health-Related Quality of life (HRQoL) among adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), compared with the general population (controls). Method In a cross-sectional study using postal survey, 110 patients diagnosed with JHS/EDS-HT and 140 gender- and age-matched healthy controls from Statistics Norway participated. Shoulder function, pain and HRQol were registered by Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI), Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), pain drawings, 36-item Short Form (SF-36). Results Eighty-one individuals responded, with response rate 34% (JHS/EDS-HT: 53%, controls: 21%). JHS/EDS-HT had lower shoulder function (WOSI total: 49.9 versus 83.3; p < 0.001), lower HRQol on SF-36 Physical Component Scale (PCS: 28.1 versus 49.9; p < 0.001), and higher pain intensity (NRS: 6.4 versus 2.7; p < 0.001) than controls. Neck and shoulder joints were rated as primary painful areas in both groups, with significantly higher frequency in JHS/EDS-HT (neck: 90% versus 27%; shoulder: 80% versus 37%). Further, JHS/EDS-HT most often reported generalized pain (96%). Conclusions Adults with JHS/EDS-HT have impaired shoulder function, increased pain intensity, as well as reduced physical HRQoL compared with controls. Although neck and shoulder were most frequently rated as painful, significantly more JHS/EDS-HT also reported generalized pain compared to controls. Implications for Rehabilitation Adults with JHS/EDS-HT have impaired shoulder function, and most often painful areas in the neck and shoulder joints, which need to be targeted in the treatment strategy. Compared with the general population adults with JHS/EDS-HT have reduced physical HRQoL, supporting a physical approach for this group. Adults with JHS/EDS-HT may present with both specific painful joints and generalized pain. PMID:26824670

  13. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, vascular type: a novel missense mutation in the COL3A1 gene.

    PubMed

    Masuno, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Atsushi; Naing, Banyar Than; Shimada, Takashi; Fujimoto, Wataru; Ninomiya, Shinsuke; Ueda, Yasunori; Kadota, Kazushige; Kotaka, Tatsuya; Kondo, Eisei; Yamanouchi, Yasuko; Inoue, Mika; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Kuroki, Yoshikazu

    2012-12-01

    We report a 34-year-old Japanese female with the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. She had thin translucent skin, extensive bruising, toe joint hypermobility, left lower extremity varicose veins, and chronic wrist, knee and ankle joint pain. She also had dizziness caused by autonomic dysfunction. Magnetic resonance angiography showed tortuous vertebral and basilar arteries, mild left carotid canal bulging, and right anterior tibial artery hypoplasia. Electron microscopic examinations of a skin biopsy revealed extremely dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum in dermal fibroblasts and wide variability of individual collagen fibril diameters. A molecular analysis using a conventional total RNA method and a high-resolution melting curve analysis using genomic DNA revealed a novel missense mutation within exon 48 of the COL3A1 gene, c.3428G>A, leading to p.Gly1143Glu. PMID:23181496

  14. [Vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome incidentally diagnosed at surgical treatment for hemothorax; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Kazunori; Yoshizu, Akira; Kashizaki, Fumihiro

    2013-02-01

    Vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome(vEDS) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder of the connective tissue, which often causes arterial ruptures and surgical complications. We report the case of a vEDS patient who was incidentally diagnosed at surgical treatment for hemothorax. A 64-year-old woman with a past history of hysterectomy due to excessive bleeding during childbirth visited our hospital complaining of chest pain. Chest computed tomography revealed right pleural effusion suspected of hemothorax and a high density area behind the right anterior chest wall. Emergency thoracoscopy revealed bloody spots throughout the mediastinal pleura, suggestive of bleeding from the right internal thoracic artery. During thoracoscopy, easy bruising of the tissue by surgical manipulation was noted which led us to suspect connective tissue disease. A biochemical analysis by cultured dermal fibroblasts and molecular biological examination established the diagnosis of vEDS. PMID:23381370

  15. Retroviral sequences related to human T-lymphotropic virus type II in patients with chronic fatigue immune dysfunction syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    DeFreitas, E.; Hilliard, B.; Cheney, P.R.; Bell, D.S.; Kiggundu, E.; Sankey, D.; Wroblewska, Z.; Palladino, M.; Woodward, J.P.; Koprowski, H. )

    1991-04-01

    Chronic fatigue immune dysfunction syndrome (CFIDS) is a recently recognized illness characterized by debilitating fatigue as well as immunological and neurological abnormalities. Once thought to be caused by Epstein-Barr virus, it is now thought to have a different but unknown etiology. The authors evaluted 30 adult and pediatric CFIDS patients from six eastern states for the presence of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) types I and II by Western immunoblotting, polymerase chain reaction, and in situ hybridization of blood samples. The majority of patients were positive for HTLV antibodies by Western blotting and for HTLV-II gag sequences by polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization. Twenty nonexposure healthy controls were negative in all assays. These data support an association between an HTLV-II-like virus and CFIDS.

  16. Chin-sternum-heart syndrome type of injury observed in a pedestrian victim of car traffic accident.

    PubMed

    Furumiya, Junichi; Nishimura, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Akinori; Hashimoto, Yoshiaki

    2009-04-01

    We report an autopsy case of a pedestrian victim of car traffic accident with the chin-sternum-heart syndrome type of injury. A drunken man who lay on the road was run over by a car. He died immediately at the scene. The autopsy findings were as follows: large scalp lacerations, abrasions in the chin and the sternal region, a transverse fracture of the sternum, ruptures of the heart, ruptures of the ascending and descending aortae, rupture and hemorrhage of the nuchal muscle, ring fracture of the base of the skull, subarachnoid hemorrhage at the base of the brain, multiple rib fractures, anterior compression fracture of the 11th thoracic vertebra, and small lacerations of the liver. Blood ethanol level was 2.92 mg/g. These findings indicate that there was hyperflexion of the neck and then the victim's heart was strongly compressed and ruptured by the collision of the chin with the sternal region of the chest.

  17. Treatment of chronic regional pain syndrome type 1 with palmitoylethanolamide and topical ketamine cream: modulation of nonneuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Keppel Hesselink, Jan M; Kopsky, David J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic regional pain syndrome (CRPS) can be intractable to treat and patients sometimes suffer for many years. Therefore, new treatment strategies are needed to alleviate symptoms in CRPS patients. This case report describes a patient suffering from intractable CRPS type 1 for 13 years. Due to her swollen painful feet and left knee she is wheelchair-bound. The combination of palmitoylethanolamide and ketamine 10% cream reduced her pain by more than 50% after 1 month of treatment, and a marked reduction in swelling and skin discoloration was noticed. Furthermore, she could walk independently again and she experienced no side effects. Thus, palmitoylethanolamide and topical ketamine could be a combination therapy option for treating CRPS patients. PMID:23658493

  18. Treatment of chronic regional pain syndrome type 1 with palmitoylethanolamide and topical ketamine cream: modulation of nonneuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Keppel Hesselink, Jan M; Kopsky, David J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic regional pain syndrome (CRPS) can be intractable to treat and patients sometimes suffer for many years. Therefore, new treatment strategies are needed to alleviate symptoms in CRPS patients. This case report describes a patient suffering from intractable CRPS type 1 for 13 years. Due to her swollen painful feet and left knee she is wheelchair-bound. The combination of palmitoylethanolamide and ketamine 10% cream reduced her pain by more than 50% after 1 month of treatment, and a marked reduction in swelling and skin discoloration was noticed. Furthermore, she could walk independently again and she experienced no side effects. Thus, palmitoylethanolamide and topical ketamine could be a combination therapy option for treating CRPS patients. PMID:23658493

  19. Intrapericardial and retrocardial implantation of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead in a child with type 3 long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Yasuhiro; Iwamoto, Mari; Yanagi, Sadamitsu; Masuda, Munetaka

    2011-10-01

    A 6-year-old girl with type 3 long QT syndrome was safely and successfully implanted with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) system. Prior to implantation, she had experienced uncontrollable life-threatening arrhythmia in spite of high-dose administration of mexiletine. An ICD coil lead for transvenous use was placed in the intrapericardial and retrocardial space and was connected to a generator placed in front of the posterior sheath of the right abdominal rectal muscle. Administration of a beta-blocker in addition to atrial pacing almost completely eliminated the patient's life-threatening arrhythmia attacks. Intrapericardial and retrocardial implantation of ICD coil leads might be useful for children. PMID:21818650

  20. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome type B and left bundle-branch block: electrophysiologic and radionuclide study

    SciTech Connect

    Rakovec, P.; Kranjec, I.; Fettich, J.J.; Jakopin, J.; Fidler, V.; Turk, J.

    1985-01-01

    Coinciding left bundle-branch block and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome type B, a very rare electrocardiographic occurrence, was found in a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy. Electrophysiologic study revealed eccentric retrograde atrial activation during ventricular pacing, suggesting right-sided accessory pathway. At programmed atrial pacing, effective refractory period of the accessory pathway was 310 ms; at shorter pacing coupling intervals, normal atrioventricular conduction with left bundle-branch block was seen. Left bundle-branch block was seen also with His bundle pacing. Radionuclide phase imaging demonstrated right ventricular phase advance and left ventricular phase delay; both right and left ventricular phase images revealed broad phase distribution histograms. Combined electrophysiologic and radionuclide investigations are useful to disclose complex conduction abnormalities and their mechanical correlates.

  1. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cell line from a patient with a long QT syndrome type 2.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Azra; Ivanyuk, Dina; Herms, Stefan; Heilmann-Heimbach, Stefanie; O'Shea, Orla; Chapman, Charlotte; Izsvák, Zsuszanna; Farr, Martin; Hescheler, Jürgen; Šarić, Tomo

    2016-03-01

    We report here the generation of human iPS cell line UKKi009-A from dermal fibroblasts of a patient carrying heterozygous mutation c.3035-3045delTCCCTCGATGC, p.Leu1012Pro (fs*55) in KCNH2 gene leading to long QT syndrome type 2 (LQT2). We used the Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmids expressing OSKM along with microRNAs 307/367 to reprogram the fibroblasts. The iPS cells possess pluripotent stem cell characteristics and differentiate to cell lineages of all three germ layers. This cell line can serve as a source for in vitro modeling of LQT2. This cell line is distributed by the European Collection of Authenticated Cell Cultures (ECACC). PMID:27345990

  2. Acrofacial Dysostosis, Cincinnati Type, a Mandibulofacial Dysostosis Syndrome with Limb Anomalies, Is Caused by POLR1A Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, K. Nicole; Watt, Kristin E. Noack; Hufnagel, Robert B.; Navajas Acedo, Joaquin; Linscott, Luke L.; Sund, Kristen L.; Bender, Patricia L.; König, Rainer; Lourenco, Charles M.; Hehr, Ute; Hopkin, Robert J.; Lohmann, Dietmar R.; Trainor, Paul A.; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Saal, Howard M.

    2015-01-01

    We report three individuals with a cranioskeletal malformation syndrome that we define as acrofacial dysostosis, Cincinnati type. Each individual has a heterozygous mutation in POLR1A, which encodes a core component of RNA polymerase 1. All three individuals exhibit varying degrees of mandibulofacial dysostosis, and two additionally have limb anomalies. Consistent with this observation, we discovered that polr1a mutant zebrafish exhibited cranioskeletal anomalies mimicking the human phenotype. polr1a loss of function led to perturbed ribosome biogenesis and p53-dependent cell death, resulting in a deficiency of neural-crest-derived skeletal precursor cells and consequently craniofacial anomalies. Our findings expand the genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity of congenital acrofacial disorders caused by disruption of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:25913037

  3. Mutations in ADAR1 cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome associated with a type I interferon signature.

    PubMed

    Rice, Gillian I; Kasher, Paul R; Forte, Gabriella M A; Mannion, Niamh M; Greenwood, Sam M; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Dickerson, Jonathan E; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Zampini, Massimiliano; Briggs, Tracy A; Jenkinson, Emma M; Bacino, Carlos A; Battini, Roberta; Bertini, Enrico; Brogan, Paul A; Brueton, Louise A; Carpanelli, Marialuisa; De Laet, Corinne; de Lonlay, Pascale; del Toro, Mireia; Desguerre, Isabelle; Fazzi, Elisa; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Heiberg, Arvid; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kumar, Ram; Lin, Jean-Pierre S-M; Lourenco, Charles M; Male, Alison M; Marques, Wilson; Mignot, Cyril; Olivieri, Ivana; Orcesi, Simona; Prabhakar, Prab; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Robinson, Robert A; Rozenberg, Flore; Schmidt, Johanna L; Steindl, Katharina; Tan, Tiong Y; van der Merwe, William G; Vanderver, Adeline; Vassallo, Grace; Wakeling, Emma L; Wassmer, Evangeline; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Livingston, John H; Lebon, Pierre; Suzuki, Tamio; McLaughlin, Paul J; Keegan, Liam P; O'Connell, Mary A; Lovell, Simon C; Crow, Yanick J

    2012-11-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and thereby potentially alter the information content and structure of cellular RNAs. Notably, although the overwhelming majority of such editing events occur in transcripts derived from Alu repeat elements, the biological function of non-coding RNA editing remains uncertain. Here, we show that mutations in ADAR1 (also known as ADAR) cause the autoimmune disorder Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS). As in Adar1-null mice, the human disease state is associated with upregulation of interferon-stimulated genes, indicating a possible role for ADAR1 as a suppressor of type I interferon signaling. Considering recent insights derived from the study of other AGS-related proteins, we speculate that ADAR1 may limit the cytoplasmic accumulation of the dsRNA generated from genomic repetitive elements.

  4. Mutations in ADAR1 cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome associated with a type I interferon signature

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Gillian I; Kasher, Paul R; Forte, Gabriella M A; Mannion, Niamh M; Greenwood, Sam M; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Dickerson, Jonathan E; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Zampini, Massimiliano; Briggs, Tracy A; Jenkinson, Emma M; Bacino, Carlos A; Battini, Roberta; Bertini, Enrico; Brogan, Paul A; Brueton, Louise A; Carpanelli, Marialuisa; Laet, Corinne De; de Lonlay, Pascale; del Toro, Mireia; Desguerre, Isabelle; Fazzi, Elisa; Garcia-Cazorla, Àngels; Heiberg, Arvid; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kumar, Ram; Lin, Jean-Pierre S-M; Lourenco, Charles M; Male, Alison M; Marques, Wilson; Mignot, Cyril; Olivieri, Ivana; Orcesi, Simona; Prabhakar, Prab; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Robinson, Robert A; Rozenberg, Flore; Schmidt, Johanna L; Steindl, Katharina; Tan, Tiong Y; van der Merwe, William G; Vanderver, Adeline; Vassallo, Grace; Wakeling, Emma L; Wassmer, Evangeline; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Livingston, John H; Lebon, Pierre; Suzuki, Tamio; McLaughlin, Paul J; Keegan, Liam P; O’Connell, Mary A; Lovell, Simon C; Crow, Yanick J

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and thereby potentially alter the information content and structure of cellular RNAs. Notably, although the overwhelming majority of such editing events occur in transcripts derived from Alu repeat elements, the biological function of non-coding RNA editing remains uncertain. Here, we show that mutations in ADAR1 (also known as ADAR) cause the autoimmune disorder Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS). As in Adar1-null mice, the human disease state is associated with upregulation of interferon-stimulated genes, indicating a possible role for ADAR1 as a suppressor of type I interferon signaling. Considering recent insights derived from the study of other AGS-related proteins, we speculate that ADAR1 may limit the cytoplasmic accumulation of the dsRNA generated from genomic repetitive elements. PMID:23001123

  5. Embolization as an Alternative Treatment of Insulinoma in a Patient with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Peppa, Melpomeni; Brountzos, Elias; Economopoulos, Nicolaos; Boutati, Eleni; Pikounis, Vasilios; Patapis, Paul; Economopoulos, Theofanis; Raptis, Sotirios A.; Hadjidakis, Dimitrios

    2009-07-15

    Insulinoma is a rare neuroendocrine tumor, most commonly originating from the pancreas, which is either sporadic or familial as a component of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome (MEN1). It is characterized by increased insulin secretion leading to hypoglycemia. Surgical removal is considered the treatment of choice, with limited side effects and relatively low morbidity and mortality, both being improved by the laparoscopic procedure. We present the case of a 30-year-old patient with MEN1 and recurrent insulinoma with severe hypoglycemic episodes who could not be surgically treated due to the adherence of the tumor to large blood vessels and to prior multiple surgical operations. He was treated by repeated embolization using spherical polyvinyl alcohol particles, resulting in shrinkage of the tumor, improvement of the frequency and severity of the hypoglycemic episodes, and better quality of life.

  6. Type 1 Diabetes in Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy-Candidiasis-Ectodermal Dystrophy Syndrome (APECED): A “Rare” Manifestation in a “Rare” Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS1) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator gene (AIRE); the encoded Aire protein plays an important role in the establishment of the immunological tolerance acting as a transcriptional regulator of the expression of organ-specific antigens within the thymus in perinatal age. While a high prevalence for this rare syndrome is reported in Finland and Scandinavia (Norway), autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy syndrome (APECED) cohorts of patients are also detected in continental Italy and Sardinia, among Iranian Jews, as well as in other countries. The syndrome is diagnosed when patients present at least two out of the three fundamental disorders including chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison’s disease. Among the associated conditions insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (Type 1 diabetes) has been rarely reported in different series of patients and occurring more frequently in Finnish APECED patients. In this review, we analyze the incidence of Type 1 diabetes as a clinical manifestation of APECED in different populations highlighting the peculiar genetic and immunological features of the disease when occurring in the context of this syndrome. PMID:27420045

  7. Enigmatic in vivo iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) mutant transcript correction to wild-type in Hunter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lualdi, Susanna; Tappino, Barbara; Di Duca, Marco; Dardis, Andrea; Anderson, Christopher J; Biassoni, Roberto; Thompson, Peter W; Corsolini, Fabio; Di Rocco, Maja; Bembi, Bruno; Regis, Stefano; Cooper, David N; Filocamo, Mirella

    2010-04-01

    Sequence analysis of the X-linked iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) gene in two Hunter syndrome patients revealed a lack of concordance between IDS genomic DNA and cDNA. These individuals were found to be hemizygous respectively for a nonsense mutation [c.22C>T;p.R8X] and a frameshift micro-insertion [c.10insT;p.P4Sfs] in their genomic DNA. However, both wild-type and mutant IDS sequences were evident upon cDNA analysis. Similar discrepant results were also obtained in a third unrelated patient carrying the same p.R8X mutation. Since both p.R8X mutations were inherited from carrier mothers, somatic mosaicism could be excluded. Although the presence of wild-type IDSmRNA-transcripts was confirmed in all three patients by restriction enzyme digestion, clone sequencing, pyrosequencing and single nucleotide primer extension (SNuPE), no wild-type IDS genomic sequence was detectable. The relative abundance of wild-type and mutation-bearing IDS-transcripts in different tissues was quantified by SNuPE. Although IDS transcript levels, as measured by real-time PCR, were reduced (51-71% normal) in these patients, some wild-type IDS protein was detectable by western blotting. Various possible explanations for these unprecedented findings (e.g. accidental contamination, artefactual in vitro nucleotide misincorporation, malsegregation of an extra maternal X-chromosome) were explored and experimentally excluded. PCR-based discriminant assay and segregation analysis of a linked IDS polymorphism (rs1141608) also served to exclude the presence of IDS cDNA derived from the maternal wild-type chromosome. Although it remains to be formally demonstrated by direct experimentation, the intriguing possibility arises that we have observed the in vivo correction of heritable gene lesions at the RNA level operating via a correction mechanism akin to RNA-editing. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. The existence of Usher syndrome type III proven by assignment of its locus to chromosome 3q by linkage

    SciTech Connect

    Sankila, E.M.; Aittomaeki, K.; Kaeaeriaeinen, H.

    1994-09-01

    Usher syndromes (USH) are genetically and clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorders with combined visual and hearing loss. Usher syndrome type III (USH3) is characterized by progressive bilateral sensorineural deafness and progressive pigmentary retinopathy leading to blindness. USH3 has been conservatively estimated to comprise 2% of the three clinical USH types, and its existence has even been questioned. However, based on clinical criteria, in Finland 42% of USH patients have USH3 suggesting gene enrichment by a founder effect. Genes whose defects cause USH have so far been mapped to four different locations in three chromosomes. We have excluded the previously mapped USH regions as the site of USH3 disease locus. Systematic search for USH3 by genetic linkage analyses of 11 multiple affected families using highly polymorphic microsatellite markers revealed significant linkage with five markers mapping to chromosome 3q. Two-point lod scores at zero recombination distance were 5.24 for D3S1308, and 7.71 for D3S1299, respectively. Multipoint linkage analysis gave a maximum lod score of 8.68 at D3S1299 assigning USH3 to the 4 cM interval between markers D3S1555 and D3S1279 in 3q21-25. Of 20 parental disease chromosomes, 15 had identical alleles at three marker loci covering 3 cM genetic distance and the putative USH3 mutation. These findings prove the existence of USH3 as a distinct entity, pinpoint a fifth USH locus, and suggest enrichment of a major mutation in the isolated Finnish population.

  9. Immunochemical analysis of uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase in four patients with the Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I.

    PubMed Central

    van Es, H H; Goldhoorn, B G; Paul-Abrahamse, M; Elferink, R P; Jansen, P L

    1990-01-01

    The functional heterogeneity of uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UDPGT) and its deficiency in human liver were investigated. The monoclonal antibody (MAb) WP1, which inhibits bilirubin and phenol-glucuronidating activity, was used to immunopurify UDPGTs from human liver. Purified UDPGTs were injected into mice to obtain new MAbs. Immunoblotting of microsomes with MAb HEB7 revealed at least three polypeptides in liver (56, 54, and 53 kD) and one in kidney (54 kD). In liver microsomes from four patients (A, B, C, and D) with Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I (CN type I), UDPGT activity towards bilirubin was undetectable (A, B, C, and D) and activity towards phenolic compounds and 5-hydroxytryptamine either reduced (A and B) or normal (C and D). UDPGT activity toward steroids was normal. Immunoblot studies revealed that the monoclonal antibody WP1 recognized two polypeptides (56 and 54 kD) in liver microsomes from patient A and none in patient B. With HEB7 no immunoreactive polypeptides were seen in these two patients. Patient C showed a normal banding pattern and in patient D only the 53-kD band showed decreased intensity. These findings suggest considerable heterogeneity with regard to the expression of UDPGT isoenzymes among CN type I patients. Images PMID:2108190

  10. Large-scale mutational analysis of Kv11.1 reveals molecular insights into type 2 long QT syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Corey L.; Kuzmicki, Catherine E.; Childs, Ryan R.; Hintz, Caleb J.; Delisle, Brian P.; January, Craig T.

    2014-11-01

    It has been suggested that deficient protein trafficking to the cell membrane is the dominant mechanism associated with type 2 Long QT syndrome (LQT2) caused by Kv11.1 potassium channel missense mutations, and that for many mutations the trafficking defect can be corrected pharmacologically. However, this inference was based on expression of a small number of Kv11.1 mutations. We performed a comprehensive analysis of 167 LQT2-linked missense mutations in four Kv11.1 structural domains and found that deficient protein trafficking is the dominant mechanism for all domains except for the distal carboxy-terminus. Also, most pore mutations—in contrast to intracellular domain mutations—were found to have severe dominant-negative effects when co-expressed with wild-type subunits. Finally, pharmacological correction of the trafficking defect in homomeric mutant channels was possible for mutations within all structural domains. However, pharmacological correction is dramatically improved for pore mutants when co-expressed with wild-type subunits to form heteromeric channels.

  11. A Case of Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndrome (APS) Type II with Hypothyroidism, Hypoadrenalism, and Celiac Disease - A Rare Combination.

    PubMed

    Lakhotia, Manoj; Pahadia, Hans Raj; Kumar, Harish; Singh, Jagdish; Tak, Sandeep

    2015-04-01

    Autoimmune Polyglandular syndrome (APS) are rare condition characterised by presence of immune dysfunction of two or more endocrine glands and other non-endocrine organs. APS is divided into 2 major subtypes based on age of presentation, pattern of disease combinations and mode of inheritance. APS 1(juvenile) usually manifest in early adolescence or in infancy. It is characterised by multiple endocrinal deficiency with mucocutaneous candidiasis and ectodermal dystrophy. Of the endocrine diseases, hypoparathyroidism form an important component followed by Addison's disease, type 1A diabetes, hypogonadism and thyroid disease. On the other hand APS II usually manifest in 3rd or 4th decade of life with female preponderance. Endocrine diseases commonly include autoimmune thyroid disease (graves or autoimmune thyroiditis), type 1A diabetes, and Addison's disease. Hypoparathyroidism is of rare occurrence and there is no mucocutaneous candidiasis. We report here a case of APS type II in a 29-year-old male who initially presented with hypothyroidism, which was soon followed by Addison's disease. The involvement of thyroid gland preceding the involvement of adrenal is of rare occurrence. The patient also had celiac disease which makes the combination further uncommon.

  12. Effect of dietary protein source and cereal type on the incidence of sudden death syndrome in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Blair, R; Jacob, J P; Gardiner, E E

    1990-08-01

    Three experiments were conducted to compare the incidence of Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS) in male Peterson by Arbor Acre broiler chickens fed diets with either corn or wheat as the grain type and meat meal or soybean meal as the main protein source. In the first two experiments, the broilers were raised in floor pens to 6 wk of age, and in the third experiment they were raised in battery-brooder cages to 4 wk of age. In both floor pen studies, total mortality and the incidence of SDS were significantly higher for wheat-fed birds, while SDS as a percentage of total mortality was not affected by cereal type. In the brooder study, neither total mortality nor mortality from SDS was significantly affected by cereal type. In the floor pen studies, the incidence of SDS as a percentage of the birds housed, was reduced by the inclusion of meat meal in the diet. In the brooder study, total mortality and the incidence of SDS were not affected by protein source, but SDS as a percentage of total mortality was reduced with the inclusion of meat meal in the diet. PMID:2235846

  13. Aase syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Aase-Smith syndrome; Hypoplastic anemia - triphalangeal thumbs, Aase-Smith type ... Jones KL, Jones MC, Del Campo M, eds. Smith's Recognizable Patterns of Human Malformation . 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  14. Scheie syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... for families who have a child with Scheie syndrome, to help them understand the condition and possible treatments. Prenatal testing is available. Alternative Names Mucopolysaccharidosis type I S; MPS ...

  15. Inflammation as a link between obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Esser, Nathalie; Legrand-Poels, Sylvie; Piette, Jacques; Scheen, André J; Paquot, Nicolas

    2014-08-01

    It is recognized that a chronic low-grade inflammation and an activation of the immune system are involved in the pathogenesis of obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Systemic inflammatory markers are risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes and its macrovascular complications. Adipose tissue, liver, muscle and pancreas are themselves sites of inflammation in presence of obesity. An infiltration of macrophages and other immune cells is observed in these tissues associated with a cell population shift from an anti-inflammatory to a pro-inflammatory profile. These cells are crucial for the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which act in an autocrine and paracrine manner to interfere with insulin signaling in peripheral tissues or induce β-cell dysfunction and subsequent insulin deficiency. Particularly, the pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β is implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes through the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. The objectives of this review are to expose recent data supporting the role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes and to examine various mechanisms underlying this relationship. If type 2 diabetes is an inflammatory disease, anti-inflammatory therapies could have a place in prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  16. The Prevalence of Autoantibodies in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I

    PubMed Central

    Schreurs, Marco W. J.; de Mos, Marissa; Stronks, Dirk L.; Huygen, Frank J. P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity has been suggested as one of the pathophysiologic mechanisms that may underlie complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Screening for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) is one of the diagnostic tests, which is usually performed if a person is suspected to have a systemic autoimmune disease. Antineuronal antibodies are autoantibodies directed against antigens in the central and/or peripheral nervous system. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of these antibodies in CRPS patients with the normal values of those antibodies in the healthy population. Twenty seven (33%) of the 82 CRPS patients of whom serum was available showed a positive ANA test. This prevalence is significantly higher than in the general population. Six patients (7.3%) showed a positive result for typical antineuronal antibodies. This proportion, however, does not deviate from that in the general population. Our findings suggest that autoantibodies may be associated with the pathophysiology of CRPS, at least in a subset of patients. Further research is needed into defining this subset and into the role of autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of CRPS. PMID:25741131

  17. Hemizygosity for SMCHD1 in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Type 2: Consequences for 18p Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lemmers, Richard J L F; van den Boogaard, Marlinde L; van der Vliet, Patrick J; Donlin-Smith, Colleen M; Nations, Sharon P; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Heard, Patricia; Bakker, Bert; Tapscott, Stephen; Cody, Jannine D; Tawil, Rabi; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2015-07-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is most often associated with variegated expression in somatic cells of the normally repressed DUX4 gene within the D4Z4-repeat array. The most common form, FSHD1, is caused by a D4Z4-repeat array contraction to a size of 1-10 units (normal range 10-100 units). The less common form, FSHD2, is characterized by D4Z4 CpG hypomethylation and is most often caused by loss-of-function mutations in the structural maintenance of chromosomes hinge domain 1 (SMCHD1) gene on chromosome 18p. The chromatin modifier SMCHD1 is necessary to maintain a repressed D4Z4 chromatin state. Here, we describe two FSHD2 families with a 1.2-Mb deletion encompassing the SMCHD1 gene. Numerical aberrations of chromosome 18 are relatively common and the majority of 18p deletion syndrome (18p-) cases have, such as these FSHD2 families, only one copy of SMCHD1. Our finding therefore raises the possibility that 18p- cases are at risk of developing FSHD. To address this possibility, we combined genome-wide array analysis data with D4Z4 CpG methylation and repeat array sizes in individuals with 18p- and conclude that approximately 1:8 18p- cases might be at risk of developing FSHD. PMID:25820463

  18. Hemizygosity for SMCHD1 in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 2: Consequences for 18p deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lemmers, Richard J.L.F.; van den Boogaard, Marlinde L.; van der Vliet, Patrick J.; Donlin-Smith, Colleen M.; Nations, Sharon P.; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A.L.; Heard, Patricia; Bakker, Bert; Tapscott, Stephen; Cody, Jannine D.; Tawil, Rabi; van der Maarel, Silvère M.

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is most often associated with variegated expression in somatic cells of the normally repressed DUX4 gene within the D4Z4 repeat array. The most common form, FSHD1, is caused by a D4Z4 repeat array contraction to a size of 1-10 units (normal range 10–100 units). The less common form, FSHD2, is characterized by D4Z4 CpG hypomethylation and is most often caused by loss of function mutations in the structural maintenance of chromosomes hinge domain 1 (SMCHD1) gene on chromosome 18p. The chromatin modifier SMCHD1 is necessary to maintain a repressed D4Z4 chromatin state. Here we describe two FSHD2 families with a 1.2 Mb deletion encompassing the SMCHD1 gene. Numerical aberrations of chromosome 18 are relatively common and the majority of 18p deletion syndrome (18p-) cases have, like these FSHD2 families, only one copy of SMCHD1. Our finding therefore raises the possibility that 18p- cases are at risk of developing FSHD. To address this possibility, we combined genome wide array analysis data with D4Z4 CpG methylation and repeat array sizes in individuals with 18p- and conclude that approximately 1:8 18p- cases might be at risk of developing FSHD. PMID:25820463

  19. snow white, a zebrafish model of Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome type 5.

    PubMed

    Daly, Christina M S; Willer, Jason; Gregg, Ronald; Gross, Jeffrey M

    2013-10-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS) is a set of genetically heterogeneous diseases caused by mutations in one of nine known HPS genes. HPS patients display oculocutaneous hypopigmentation and bleeding diathesis and, depending on the disease subtype, pulmonary fibrosis, congenital nystagmus, reduced visual acuity, and platelet aggregation deficiency. Mouse models for all known HPS subtypes have contributed greatly to our understanding of the disease, but many of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying HPS remain unknown. Here, we characterize ocular defects in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) mutant snow white (snw), which possesses a recessive, missense mutation in hps5 (hps5I76N). Melanosome biogenesis is disrupted in snw/hps5 mutants, resulting in hypopigmentation, a significant decrease in the number, size, and maturity of melanosomes, and the presence of ectopic multi-melanosome clusters throughout the mutant retina and choroid. snw/hps5I76N is the first Hps5 mutation identified within the N-terminal WD40 repeat protein-protein binding domain. Through in vitro coexpression assays, we demonstrate that Hps5I76N retains the ability to bind its protein complex partners, Hps3 and Hps6. Furthermore, while Hps5 and Hps6 stabilize each other's expression, this stabilization is disrupted by Hps5I76N. The snw/hps5I76N mutant provides a valuable resource for structure-function analyses of Hps5 and enables further elucidation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying HPS. PMID:23893484

  20. [Persistent inflammation immunosuppression catabolism syndrome: a special type of chronic critical illness].

    PubMed

    Ding, Renyu; Ma, Xiaochun

    2016-07-01

    After the concept of "chronic critical illness (CCI)" was proposed, the new concept persistent inflammation immunosuppression catabolism syndrome (PICS) is present recently. Patients with PICS are manifested by fast decreasing body weight, poor nutritional status, long-term immunosuppression and repeated nosocomial infections. These patients are faced with great challenges of persistent inflammation, acquired immunosuppression and high catabolism, which finally results in repeated nosocomial infections, prolonged hospital stay and increased mortality. At present, main problems of PICS diagnosis standard include varying length of ICU stay, difference in normal C reactive protein value, poor value of nutrition indexes, absence of clinical verification. Though associated pathophysiology mechanism is not clear, PICS is preventable and magageable with certain therapy, including early comprehensive prevention and treatment focused on infection control for CCI patients to stop the progression of PICS, application of immune modulator to improve immune function and prognosis of patients, and reasonable nutritional support and treatment. Besides, through the analysis of the association between PICS and CCI, authors draw a conclusion that PICS is a new phenotype of CCI, and immune paralysis is its main feature. PMID:27452746