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  1. Insights into the oral health beliefs and practices of mothers from a north London Orthodox Jewish community

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to explore oral health knowledge and beliefs and access to dental care in a culturally distinct Orthodox Jewish community in North London, with a view to informing local health policy. Methods A dual method qualitative approach to data collection was adopted in this study utilising semi-structured face to face interviews and focus groups with women from this North London orthodox Jewish community. In total nine interviews and four focus groups were conducted with a purposive sample of thirty three mothers from the community aged 21-58 years. The data were transcribed and analysed using Framework Methodology Results Cultural influences, competing pressures and perceptions of hereditary influences, together with a lack of contemporary oral health knowledge are the main factors affecting oral health knowledge and beliefs. This supported an overall perspective of disempowerment or a perceived lack of control over oral health behaviours, both for mothers and their children. Community signposting pointed mothers to dental services, whilst family pressures together with inadequate capacity and capability and generic barriers such as fear and cost acted as barriers. Mothers from this community welcomed community development initiatives from the NHS. Conclusions The results of this study provide insight into the challenges of a culturally isolated community who would welcome community support through schools and expanded culturally appropriate opening hours to improve access to dental care. PMID:20529247

  2. Oral health and oral health behaviours of five-year-old children in the Charedi Orthodox Jewish Community in North London, UK.

    PubMed

    Klass, C; Mondkar, A; Wright, D

    2017-03-01

    To report on the oral health status and oral health behaviours of five-year-old Charedi Orthodox Jewish children attending schools in London, UK. Cross-sectional survey. Clinical examinations mirroring the 2015 National Dental Public Health Epidemiology Programme for England for five-year-olds and a parental questionnaire on oral health behaviours. 137 five-year-olds attending Charedi Orthodox Jewish schools in Hackney, North London. Prevalence dmft⟩0 (%) and severity (mean dmft) of dental caries. Of these children 58% had experienced dental caries (95%CI 50,67), the mean number of decayed, missing and filled teeth was 2.38 (95%CI 1.90,2.82) and 23% (95%CI 16,30) had caries affecting their incisors. Only 20% reported that their children had their teeth brushed twice a day and 16% of the children started having their teeth brushed between six months and one year of age. The oral health of five-year-old children in the Charedi Orthodox Jewish community is significantly worse than their counterparts across Hackney, London and England. The establishment of robust baseline data supports the local authority plan to develop targeted oral health improvement programmes tailored to address the health needs and cultural sensitivities of this community. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  3. Childbirth customs in Orthodox Jewish traditions.

    PubMed Central

    Bodo, K.; Gibson, N.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe cultural beliefs of Orthodox Jewish families regarding childbirth in order to help family physicians enhance the quality and sensitivity of their care. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: These findings were based on a review of the literature searched in MEDLINE (1966 to present), HEALTHSTAR (1975 to present), EMBASE (1988 to present), and Social Science Abstracts (1984 to present). Interviews with several members of the Orthodox Jewish community in Edmonton, Alta, and Vancouver, BC, were conducted to determine the accuracy of the information presented and the relevance of the paper to the current state of health care delivery from the recipients' point of view. MAIN MESSAGE: Customs and practices surrounding childbirth in the Orthodox Jewish tradition differ in several practical respects from expectations and practices within the Canadian health care system. The information presented was deemed relevant and accurate by those interviewed, and the subject matter was considered to be important for improving communication between patients and physicians. Improved communication and recognition of these differences can improve the quality of health care provided to these patients. CONCLUSIONS: Misunderstandings rooted in different cultural views of childbirth and the events surrounding it can adversely affect health care provided to women in the Orthodox Jewish community in Canada. A basic understanding of the cultural foundations of potential misunderstandings will help Canadian physicians provide effective health care to Orthodox Jewish women. PMID:10099807

  4. Childbirth customs in Orthodox Jewish traditions.

    PubMed

    Bodo, K; Gibson, N

    1999-03-01

    To describe cultural beliefs of Orthodox Jewish families regarding childbirth in order to help family physicians enhance the quality and sensitivity of their care. These findings were based on a review of the literature searched in MEDLINE (1966 to present), HEALTHSTAR (1975 to present), EMBASE (1988 to present), and Social Science Abstracts (1984 to present). Interviews with several members of the Orthodox Jewish community in Edmonton, Alta, and Vancouver, BC, were conducted to determine the accuracy of the information presented and the relevance of the paper to the current state of health care delivery from the recipients' point of view. Customs and practices surrounding childbirth in the Orthodox Jewish tradition differ in several practical respects from expectations and practices within the Canadian health care system. The information presented was deemed relevant and accurate by those interviewed, and the subject matter was considered to be important for improving communication between patients and physicians. Improved communication and recognition of these differences can improve the quality of health care provided to these patients. Misunderstandings rooted in different cultural views of childbirth and the events surrounding it can adversely affect health care provided to women in the Orthodox Jewish community in Canada. A basic understanding of the cultural foundations of potential misunderstandings will help Canadian physicians provide effective health care to Orthodox Jewish women.

  5. High group A streptococcal carriage in the Orthodox Jewish community of north Hackney.

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, J; Hennessy, E; Neville, L

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General practitioners and the microbiologist serving north Hackney in north east London formed the impression, that of throat swabs sent to the laboratory, a disproportionate number of those positive for group A streptococcus appeared to come from Orthodox Jewish patients. AIM: To confirm the clinical impression that the pharyngeal carriage of group A streptococci was higher in the Orthodox Jewish population than in other members of the population in the same locality. DESIGN OF STUDY: A general practice questionnaire survey of all patients aged three years or over attending two practices that are about one kilometre apart, over a five-week period. SETTING: Two general practices in north London, one of which had a significant Orthodox Jewish patient list. METHODS: Throat swabs were taken from eligible patients who were invited to participate by completing a questionnaire and having a throat swab taken. RESULTS: Swabs were taken from 1223 people. After correction for age (child or adult) and history of recent sore throat, the Orthodox Jewish community had a significantly higher carriage rate of group A streptococci than the rest of the population (odds ratio = 5.0 [2.1 to 11.9]). The proportion of adults with group A streptococci with and without sore throats was 6.4% and 2.4% respectively in the Orthodox Jewish group and 0.45% and 1% respectively in the 'others' group. The proportion of children with group A streptococci with and without sore throats was 17.4% and 5.9% respectively and 3.4% and 0% respectively in the others. These differences were not explained by the larger family size and domestic overcrowding in the Orthodox Jewish group. CONCLUSIONS: Orthodox Jews in north London have a higher pharyngeal carriage rate of group A streptococci than the neighbouring population. These results may have implications for the diagnosis and treatment of acute sore throat in Orthodox Jewish patients, especially children. PMID:11217620

  6. Gay, Orthodox, and trembling: the rise of Jewish Orthodox gay consciousness, 1970s-2000s.

    PubMed

    Ariel, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    In 2001, the documentary movie, Trembling Before God, was played in Jewish and gay film festivals around the world, provoking strong emotional reactions. Trembling Before God comprises interviews with Orthodox Jewish gay and lesbian persons who vividly and movingly describe their struggles to live their lives as observant Jewish people, being faithful at the same time to their sexual desires and their religious tradition. Almost all the people interviewed in the movie expressed mixed emotions: love towards their tradition and attachment to their community of faith, coupled with resentment against a community, which in their eyes failed to respond with understanding to their emotional needs, thus adding to their pain. This article aims to modify the picture portrayed in the movie. The dilemmas and struggles of gays and lesbians who live their lives in Orthodox Jewish communities are indeed real. Orthodox gays and lesbians experience a greater dissonance between their sexuality and the values of their community and therefore face more anxieties and inner turmoils than gays and lesbians who live in more permissive environments. The struggles of gay and lesbian Orthodox Jews, however, are not necessarily greater than those of gays and lesbians who live their lives in other conservative communities. In fact, while it is almost impossible to be a sexually active gay or lesbian and a practicing Southern Baptist, Seventh-Day Adventist, Jehovah's Witness, or Mormon, it is not impossible for gays and lesbians to live their lives in an Orthodox Jewish environment. Amazingly, since the 1970s, thousands of gays and lesbians have given up on liberal environments and joined the ranks of traditionalist Jewish congregations.

  7. London's Jewish Communities and State Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jane

    2012-01-01

    The Inner London education authority was a notable example of a radical and powerful local government body from which the fight for the comprehensive principle in English secondary education emerged. Building on previous work of women's contribution to state education in London, this articles focuses on Anglo-Jewish educator activists who helped…

  8. Integrating Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Men in Academic Nursing Training.

    PubMed

    Haron, Yafa; Azuri, Pazit

    2016-11-01

    As part of the national plan for integrating the ultra-Orthodox Jewish population in academic studies and in order to promote its labor force participation, the Tel Aviv-Yaffo Academic College School for Nursing Sciences created a BSN program specifically for ultra-Orthodox men, for the first time in Israel. Ultra-Orthodox students' entry into the academic world requires the program to be culturally sensitive without compromising on quality standards. The structure and context may be ultra-Orthodox, but the contents and learning experience expose the students to a different worldview than that of their religious studies. The ultra-Orthodox way of life requires adjustments also in the area of learning aids. Most important, the students are exposed to the Internet for the first time, and some of them are even unable to use a computer. The students in the first class of male ultra-Orthodox nursing students are the pioneers of this community. Their academic success in the first stage-and integration in the labor market in the second-is a test of the national labor force integration project. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Sexuality, birth control and childbirth in orthodox Jewish tradition.

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, P

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines some of the traditional texts that deal with sexuality, birth control and childbirth in the orthodox Jewish tradition and presents the rules governing these areas. For instance, a married woman should avoid being alone with a male physician unless other people are in earshot and have access to the room. A husband and wife must separate during the woman's menses and for the first 7 days afterward. Contraception is permitted if childbearing would endanger a woman's life or health. Termination of pregnancy is also permitted to preserve a woman's health, including her mental health. During childbirth the health of the mother is primary and supercedes all other rules or laws, including those of Sabbath observance. In general, orthodox Jewish women try to live as much as possible within the framework of Halacha. These customs are examined as examples of the need for sensitivity to cultural norms that affect the behaviour of different ethnic groups. PMID:1728349

  10. The Internalization of Jewish Values by Children Attending Orthodox Jewish Schools, and Its Relationship to Autonomy-Supportive Parenting and Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Lori R.; Milyavskaya, Marina; Koestner, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the way in which children attending Orthodox Jewish schools internalize the value of both their Jewish studies and secular studies, as well as the value of Jewish cultural practices. A distinction was made between identified internalization, where children perceive Jewish studies and Jewish culture to be an important…

  11. The Internalization of Jewish Values by Children Attending Orthodox Jewish Schools, and Its Relationship to Autonomy-Supportive Parenting and Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Lori R.; Milyavskaya, Marina; Koestner, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the way in which children attending Orthodox Jewish schools internalize the value of both their Jewish studies and secular studies, as well as the value of Jewish cultural practices. A distinction was made between identified internalization, where children perceive Jewish studies and Jewish culture to be an important…

  12. Worldview Construction and Identity Formation in Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krakowski, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how ultra-Orthodox Jewish elementary schools in America construct and maintain a distinct religious identity through the production of an all-encompassing communal worldview. The author argues that ultra-Orthodox schools model cultural engagement with secular American society by conceptually isolating secular education within…

  13. Seeing Diversity in Difference: Experiences in an Ultra-Orthodox Jewish College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr-Glass, David; Schwartzbaum, Avraham

    2002-01-01

    Reviews organizational and administrative history of Ultra-Orthodox Jewish College in Jerusalem, Israel, that leads to an institutional structure that supports distinctiveness. Examines influence of ultra-Orthodox communities in Jerusalem on the academic quality and distinctiveness of the college. Uses perspective of social construct theory to…

  14. Seeing Diversity in Difference: Experiences in an Ultra-Orthodox Jewish College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr-Glass, David; Schwartzbaum, Avraham

    2002-01-01

    Reviews organizational and administrative history of Ultra-Orthodox Jewish College in Jerusalem, Israel, that leads to an institutional structure that supports distinctiveness. Examines influence of ultra-Orthodox communities in Jerusalem on the academic quality and distinctiveness of the college. Uses perspective of social construct theory to…

  15. Student and Teacher Responses to Prayer at a Modern Orthodox Jewish High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Devra

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the attitudes of students and teachers to prayer at an American Modern Orthodox Jewish high school. Relevant data, based on observation and interviews, emerged from a larger study of the school's Jewish and secular worlds. A significant gap in responses became apparent. Students viewed prayer as a challenge to their autonomy,…

  16. A Virtual "Veibershul": Blogging and the Blurring of Public and Private among Orthodox Jewish Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieber, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    A series of articles appearing in English-language Jewish newspapers in the United States and the United Kingdom have recently announced the "blogosphere"--the world of discourse propelled by the technological innovation of online interactive diaries known as "weblogs"--as a new liberating arena for Orthodox Jewish women. In…

  17. The Legacy of the Linguistic Fence: Linguistic Patterns among Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannenbaum, Michal; Abugov, Netta

    2010-01-01

    This study examined linguistic patterns in the Jewish ultra-Orthodox community in Israel, a group that has rarely been studied from a sociolinguistic perspective. Participants were 92 girls, 10-12 years old, who attend a school where Yiddish is the language of instruction and Hebrew, Israel's official language, is studied only in religious…

  18. Definitions of and Beliefs about Wife Abuse among Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Men from Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Simona; Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a study conducted among 148 men from the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community in Israel. A self-administered questionnaire was utilized to examine their definitions of and beliefs about wife abuse. The definitions provided by the majority of the participants were highly consistent with definitions that are accepted in the…

  19. From the Constitution to the Classroom: Educational Freedom in Antwerp's Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry-Hazan, Lotem

    2014-01-01

    This study explores how the constitutional right to educational freedom penetrates to the schools of the ultra-Orthodox Jewish (Haredi) community in Antwerp, which is one of the largest Haredi communities in the world. The findings indicate that the constitutional educational freedom is altered by various legal rules, social norms, and…

  20. From the Constitution to the Classroom: Educational Freedom in Antwerp's Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry-Hazan, Lotem

    2014-01-01

    This study explores how the constitutional right to educational freedom penetrates to the schools of the ultra-Orthodox Jewish (Haredi) community in Antwerp, which is one of the largest Haredi communities in the world. The findings indicate that the constitutional educational freedom is altered by various legal rules, social norms, and…

  1. Teachers (Melamdim) and Educators (Mehankhim)--Who Are We? Implications for Professionalizing Orthodox Jewish Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saks, Jeffrey

    This paper puts forth an argument for new lines of inquiry and deliberation in the process of professionalizing Orthodox Jewish education. Using professionalization to describe a process that emanates from within the profession and its practitioners, and not issues (such as salary, benefits, and status) which are largely controlled by those…

  2. [The anthropology of women in the Orthodox Jewish community of Antwerpen: identity, emancipation and integration].

    PubMed

    Longman, C

    2010-01-01

    This contribution contains a synthesis of the results of two socio-cultural anthropological research projects among Orthodox Jewry concerning the 'identity', 'emancipation' and 'integration' of women. First the meaning of female religiosity from the perspective of strictly Orthodox, including Chassidic, women is discussed. Whereas in the public and institutional religious sphere men are the paradigmatic "Orthodox Jews", due to the sacralisatie of daily life, religious roles for women are not less extensive or any less important but are predominantly situated in the private and domestic sphere. It is argued that from an anthropological and gender critical perspective, women's religious gender identity therefore cannot be straightforwardly interpreted as either "oppressed" nor "emancipator". The second study concerns Jewish Orthodox women (ranging from strictly to modern Orthodox) in Antwerp who transgress religious gender norms by studying or working in the surrounding secular society. Their life stories show very different trajectories of encounters with the "outside world" that are sometimes enriching yet sometimes also experienced in terms of intercultural conflicts. It is concluded that maintaining cultural identity, next to emancipation and integration from within the Orthodox Jewish community is not impossible, but that this requires minimal mutual dialogue and understanding.

  3. Challenges of Pre- and Post-Test Counseling for Orthodox Jewish Individuals in the Premarital Phase.

    PubMed

    Rose, E; Schreiber-Agus, N; Bajaj, K; Klugman, S; Goldwaser, T

    2016-02-01

    The Jewish community has traditionally taken ownership of its health, and has taken great strides to raise awareness about genetic issues that affect the community, such as Tay-Sachs disease and Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome. Thanks in part to these heightened awareness efforts, many Orthodox Jewish individuals are now using genetics services as they begin to plan their families. Due to unique cultural and religious beliefs and perceptions, the Orthodox Jewish patients who seek genetic counseling face many barriers to a successful counseling session, and often seek the guidance of programs such as the Program for Jewish Genetic Health (PJGH). In this article, we present clinical vignettes from the PJGH's clinical affiliate, the Reproductive Genetics practice at the Montefiore Medical Center. These cases highlight unique features of contemporary premarital counseling and screening within the Orthodox Jewish Community, including concerns surrounding stigma, disclosure, "marriageability," the use of reproductive technologies, and the desire to include a third party in decision making. Our vignettes demonstrate the importance of culturally-sensitive counseling. We provide strategies and points to consider when addressing the challenges of pre- and post-test counseling as it relates to genetic testing in this population.

  4. Ethical issues related to BRCA gene testing in orthodox Jewish women.

    PubMed

    Mor, Pnina; Oberle, Kathleen

    2008-07-01

    Persons exhibiting mutations in two tumor suppressor genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, have a greatly increased risk of developing breast and/or ovarian cancer. The incidence of BRCA gene mutation is very high in Ashkenazi Jewish women of European descent, and many issues can arise, particularly for observant Orthodox women, because of their genetic status. Their obligations under the Jewish code of ethics, referred to as Jewish law, with respect to the acceptability of various risk-reducing strategies, may be poorly understood. In this article the moral direction that Jewish law gives to women regarding testing, confidentiality, and other issues is explored. The intent is to broaden nurses' knowledge of how a particular religious tradition could impact on decision making around genetics testing, with the aim of enhancing their understanding of culturally sensitive ethical care.

  5. The Faith Is the Pace: Educational Perspectives of Three Women Principals of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Ultra-Orthodox Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karnieli, Mira

    2014-01-01

    Israel is a multicultural state where ultra-Orthodox groups run their own separate schools. The present phenomenological study examined and compared the management patterns and educational emphases of three women principals of religious schools (Muslim, Christian [Franciscan], and ultra-Orthodox Jewish). The findings show that the ultra-Orthodox…

  6. Understanding Causes of and Responses to Intimate Partner Violence in a Jewish Orthodox Community: Survivors' and Leaders' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringel, Shoshana; Bina, Rena

    2007-01-01

    There has been little research on intimate partner violence (IPV) in faith-based communities. This qualitative study examines social attitudes and religious values in an Ultra-Orthodox Jewish community that affect the incidence of IPV and prevent women survivors from seeking help. Interviews were conducted with 8 Orthodox women and 11 community…

  7. The Faith Is the Pace: Educational Perspectives of Three Women Principals of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Ultra-Orthodox Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karnieli, Mira

    2014-01-01

    Israel is a multicultural state where ultra-Orthodox groups run their own separate schools. The present phenomenological study examined and compared the management patterns and educational emphases of three women principals of religious schools (Muslim, Christian [Franciscan], and ultra-Orthodox Jewish). The findings show that the ultra-Orthodox…

  8. Body image and eating behaviors in Orthodox and Secular Jewish women.

    PubMed

    Gluck, Marci E; Geliebter, Allan

    2002-01-01

    To explore the impact of religion on the development of disturbances in body image and eating behaviors. 78 Orthodox Jewish women were compared with 48 secular Jewish women. Participants completed the Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ), the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire Version (EDE-Q), and the Figure Rating Scale (FRS). Despite a similar body mass index of 22.2 +/- 2.8 SDs, the secular women scored significantly higher on the BSQ (P = .005) and the EDE-Q (P = .004) than the Orthodox women. The secular women also had greater eating disorder symptomatology: more laxative use (P = .02) and a trend toward more vomiting (P = .06) and diuretic use (P = .06), although not more binge eating. They were twice as likely to have a fear of becoming fat (P = .05) and were four times as likely to be influenced by their shape and weight (P = .001). Also, despite increased media exposure, the secular group chose an ideal body size on the FRS similar to that of the Orthodox group, suggesting that their greater body dissatisfaction on the BSQ was related, instead, to greater cultural pressure for thinness (P = .007) and more shame about appearance (P = .04). Our findings show that membership in a strict, insulated religious group such as Orthodox Judaism may protect women, to some extent, from developing body dissatisfaction and eating pathology.

  9. What is it to do good medical ethics? An orthodox Jewish physician and ethicist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Avraham

    2015-01-01

    This article, dedicated to the 40th anniversary of the Journal of Medical Ethics, approaches the question 'what does it mean to do good medical ethics?' first from a general perspective and then from the personal perspective of a Jewish Orthodox physician and ethicist who tries, both at a personal clinical level and in national and sometimes international discussions and debates, to reconcile his own religious ethical values-especially the enormous value given by Jewish ethics to the preservation of human life-with the prima facie 'principlist' moral norms of contemporary secular medical ethics, especially that of respect for patients' autonomy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Level of religiosity and disordered eating psychopathology among modern-orthodox Jewish adolescent girls in Israel.

    PubMed

    Latzer, Yael; Orna, Tzischinsky; Gefen, Shira

    2007-01-01

    To examine the relation between level of religiosity, grade level, self-esteem, and level of disordered eating-related psychopathology among Modem Orthodox Jewish adolescent girls in Israel. The sample consisted of 320 Jewish religious adolescent schoolgirls in the 9th to 12th grades of middle and high schools. The girls completed the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2) and the religious questionnaire based on Guttman's instrument. The more religious the student, the less eating-related psychopathology was found. The youngest students (grade 9) were found to be the least religious and to have the highest eating-related psychopathology. The results are discussed in terms of the possibility that level of religiosity might to some extent protect adolescent girls against developing body dissatisfaction and disordered eating pathology. A high level of religiosity is associated with less emphasis on the physical attractiveness of women and less pressure for their success and achievement outside the home.

  11. What are the attitudes of strictly-orthodox Jews to clinical trials: are they influenced by Jewish teachings?

    PubMed

    Box Bayes, Joan

    2013-10-01

    In order to explore whether and how Jewish teachings influence the attitudes of strictly-orthodox Jews to clinical trials, 10 strictly-orthodox Jews were purposively selected and interviewed, using a semi-structured schedule. Relevant literature was searched for similar studies and for publications covering relevant Jewish teachings. Thematic analysis was used to analyse transcribed interviews and explore relationships between attitudes and Jewish teachings identified in the review. Participants' attitudes were influenced in a variety of ways: by Jewish teachings on the over-riding importance of preserving life--the need to avoid risks affecting life and health, while taking risks to preserve life--and the religious obligation to help others, as well as by previous experience. Attitudes mirrored those in the general population, enabling many participants to reach conclusions that did not differ materially from those of the general population or research ethics committees.

  12. A note on eating disorders and appetite and satiety in the orthodox Jewish meal.

    PubMed

    Shafran, Yigal; Wolowelsky, Joel B

    2013-03-01

    The relationship between religion and eating concerns is receiving increasing empirical attention; and because religion seems to be important to many women with eating concerns, there is an interest in investigating the role religion plays and ways that religion might be employed therapeutically. Research has indicated that women who feel loved and accepted by God are buffered from eating disorder risk factors. An aspect of religiosity that is unique to Judaism is Halakhah, the system of Jewish Law and Ethics which informs the life of a religiously observant orthodox Jew. In this note, we briefly describe how Halakhah approaches the issues of appetite and satiety in eating meals. These might well contribute to the protective influence regarding tendencies for eating disorders in a person whose culture demands an awareness of and commitment to halakhic norms. Some of the most significant characteristics of disordered eating-lack of appetite, disturbed satiated response, withdrawal from community and decreased spirituality-correlate inversely with the halakhic requirements of eating a meal. We suggest that future studies of orthodox Jewish women measuring eating-order symptomatology and its correlation with religiosity might focus not only on well-known indicators of halakhic adherence such as kashrut and Sabbath observance, but also on the specifics of how their kosher meals are eaten, including ritually washing one's hands before eating, saying the appropriate blessing before and after eating, eating the required two meals on the Sabbath, and fully participating in the Passover Seder meal.

  13. Working with Jewish ultra-orthodox patients: guidelines for a culturally sensitive therapy.

    PubMed

    Bilu, Y; Witztum, E

    1993-06-01

    The epistemological gap between the medical reality of mental health practitioners and the sacred reality of their Jewish ultra-orthodox patients poses a major challenge for therapy. Based on our work with psychiatric patients from the ultra-orthodox community of northern Jerusalem, we propose a set of guidelines to cope with this challenge. Basically, we seek to incorporate religiously congruent elements, composed of metaphoric images, narratives and actions, into the wide range of our "secular" treatment modalities in order to respond to the patient's suffering, often expressed through distinctively religious idioms of distress. This endeavor calls for "a temporary suspension of disbelief" on both sides. The guidelines presented include three sets of factors which appear pertinent to working with ultra-orthodox patients. The first set is contextual in nature, dealing with the image of the clinic and its physical setting; the second discusses the necessary role requisites of the therapists; and the third one, accorded a central importance, deals on various levels with the therapeutic interventions administered in terms of form and content. Several case vignettes are presented to illustrate three classes of religiously informed interventions: healing rituals, dream interpretation, and the use of culturally congruent metaphors and stories. In the concluding part we discuss ethical and instrumental issues that the proposed therapeutic guidelines may raise.

  14. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as a Bridge to Chemotherapy in an Orthodox Jewish Patient

    PubMed Central

    Ivascu, Natalia S.; Acres, Cathleen A.; Stark, Meredith; Furman, Richard R.; Fins, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) for cardiopulmonary support offers survival possibilities to patients who otherwise would succumb to cardiac failure. Often referred to as “a bridge to recovery,” involving a ventricular assist device or cardiac transplantation, this technology only affords temporary cardiopulmonary support. Physicians may have concerns about initiating VA-ECMO in patients who, in the absence of recovery or transfer to longer-term therapies, might assert religious or cultural objections to the terminal discontinuation of life-sustaining therapy (LST). We present a novel case of VA-ECMO use in an Orthodox Jewish woman with potentially curable lymphoma encasing her heart to demonstrate the value of anticipating and preemptively resolving foreseeable disputes. Patient. A 40-year-old Hasidic Orthodox Jewish woman with lymphoma encasing her right and left ventricles decompensated from heart failure before chemotherapy induction. The medical team, at an academic medical center in New York City, proposed VA-ECMO as a means for providing cardiopulmonary support to enable receipt of chemotherapy. Owing to the patient’s religious tradition, which customarily prohibits terminal discontinuation of LST, clinical staff asked for an ethics consultation to plan for initiation and discontinuation of VA-ECMO. Interventions. Meetings were held with the treating clinicians, clinical ethics consultants, family, religious leaders, and cultural liaisons. Through a deliberative process, VA-ECMO was reconceptualized as a bridge to treatment and not as an LST, a designation assigned to the chemotherapy on this occasion, given the mortal threat posed by the encasing tumor. Conclusion. Traditional religious objections to the terminal discontinuation of LST need not preclude initiation of VA-ECMO. The potential for disputes should be anticipated and steps taken to preemptively address such conflicts. The reconceptualization of VA

  15. Negative Religious Coping Predicts Disordered Eating Pathology Among Orthodox Jewish Adolescent Girls.

    PubMed

    Latzer, Yael; Weinberger-Litman, Sarah L; Gerson, Barbara; Rosch, Anna; Mischel, Rebecca; Hinden, Talia; Kilstein, Jeffrey; Silver, Judith

    2015-10-01

    Recent research suggests the importance of exploring religious and spiritual factors in relation to the continuum of disordered eating. This continuum ranges from mild disordered eating behaviors and attitudes to moderate levels of disordered eating pathology (DEP) through full-blown clinical levels of eating disorders (EDs). The current study is the first to explore the role that religious coping (both positive and negative) plays in the development DEP, which is considered a risk factor for the development of EDs. In addition, the study aims to describe levels of DEP among a non-clinical sample of 102 Orthodox Jewish adolescent females. Participants completed a questionnaire measuring religious coping strategies, DEP and self-esteem. Results indicated that greater use of negative religious coping was associated with higher levels of DEP. Mediation analyses suggested that greater negative religious coping is related to lower levels of self-esteem, which accounts for higher levels of DEP. Furthermore, findings revealed relatively lower overall levels of DEP among this sample, compared to similar populations in Israel and the USA. These results suggest that a strong religious and spiritual identity may serve as a protective factor against DEP.

  16. Measles outbreaks affecting children in Jewish ultra-orthodox communities in Jerusalem

    PubMed Central

    STEIN-ZAMIR, C.; ZENTNER, G.; ABRAMSON, N.; SHOOB, H.; ABOUDY, Y.; SHULMAN, L.; MENDELSON, E.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY In 2003 and 2004 two measles outbreaks occurred in Jewish ultra-orthodox communities in Jerusalem. The index case of the first outbreak (March 2003) was a 2-year-old unvaccinated child from Switzerland. Within 5 months, 107 cases (mean age 8·3±7·5 years) emerged in three crowded neighbourhoods. The first cases of the second outbreak (June 2004) were in three girls aged 4–5 years in one kindergarten in another community. By November 2004, 117 cases (mean age 7·3±6·5 years) occurred. The virus genotypes were D8 and D4 respectively. Altogether, 96 households accounted for the two outbreaks, with two or more patients per family in 79% of cases. Most cases (91·5%) were unvaccinated. Immunization coverage was lower in outbreak than in non-outbreak neighbourhoods (88·3% vs. 90·3%, P=0·001). Controlling the outbreaks necessitated a culture-sensitive approach, and targeted efforts increased MMR vaccine coverage (first dose) to 95·2%. Despite high national immunization coverage (94–95%), special attention to specific sub-populations is essential. PMID:17433131

  17. "It's a horrible sin. If they find out, I will not be able to stay": Orthodox Jewish gay men's experiences living in secrecy.

    PubMed

    Itzhaky, Haya; Kissil, Karni

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the intersection of sexual orientation and religion in the Jewish Orthodox community by exploring 22 Orthodox Jewish gay men's experiences living in secrecy. Analysis of in-depth interviews conducted with these men revealed four primary themes: emotional turmoil, ways of coping, impact on family relationships, and importance of the context. Findings from this study describe the daily struggles these men experienced keeping their homosexuality a secret. The findings suggest that in order to design effective interventions with this population, it is crucial to consider the larger community and religious context.

  18. Satisfaction and Stressors in a Religious Minority: A National Study of Orthodox Jewish Marriage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnall, Eliezer; Pelcovitz, David; Fox, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    The paucity of mental health studies with Orthodox Jews makes culturally competent counseling care unlikely. In this large-scale investigation of marriage among Orthodox Jews, most respondents reported satisfaction with marriage and spouse, although satisfaction was highest among recently married couples. The most significant stressors were…

  19. Satisfaction and Stressors in a Religious Minority: A National Study of Orthodox Jewish Marriage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnall, Eliezer; Pelcovitz, David; Fox, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    The paucity of mental health studies with Orthodox Jews makes culturally competent counseling care unlikely. In this large-scale investigation of marriage among Orthodox Jews, most respondents reported satisfaction with marriage and spouse, although satisfaction was highest among recently married couples. The most significant stressors were…

  20. Caloric Intake on the Sabbath: A Pilot Study of Contributing Factors to Obesity in the Orthodox Jewish Community.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Deborah A; Swencionis, Charles; Segal-Isaacson, C J

    2016-10-01

    The American Orthodox Jewish community has specific cultural factors that may contribute to overweight and obesity. This study aimed to look at caloric intake on the Sabbath and its contribution to overweight and obesity. Twelve married or previously married women who identify themselves as Orthodox Jews were recruited to do 24-h food recalls over the phone. The participants were divided into three weight groups (normal, overweight, and obese) based on their BMI. The overweight and obese participants' data were combined into one group for the purposes of statistical testing. Paired t tests looking at the data for all participants showed significantly great caloric intake during an average Sabbath day than an average weekday [t(4) = 7.58, p < 0.001]. A repeated-measures ANOVA showed significantly greater energy intake on the Sabbath for the overweight-obese women compared to the normal weight women [F(1) = 7.83, p = 0.02]. No statistical difference was seen between the weekday energy intake of the normal weight women as compared to the combined group of overweight-obese women [F(1) = 0.501, p = 0.499]. These results support the hypotheses that all groups eat significantly more on the Sabbath than on weekdays, and overweight and obese individuals eat significantly more on the Sabbath than normal weight individuals. This supports the theory that caloric intake on the Sabbath is a contributing factor to overweight and obesity within the American Orthodox Jewish community.

  1. Culture-sensitive counselling, psychotherapy and support groups in the Orthodox-Jewish community: how they work and how they are experienced.

    PubMed

    Loewenthal, Kate Miriam; Rogers, Marian Brooke

    2004-09-01

    There is political and scientific goodwill towards the provision of culture-sensitive support, but as yet little knowledge about how such support works and what are its strengths and difficulties in practice. To study groups offering culture-sensitive psychological and other support to the strictly orthodox Jewish community in London. Semi-structured interviews with service providers, potential and actual users from the community, and professionals serving the community. Interviews asked about the aims, functioning and achievements of 10 support groups. Thematic analysis identified seven important themes: admiration for the work of the groups; appreciation of the benefits of culture-sensitive services; concerns over confidentiality and stigma; concerns over finance and fund-raising; concerns about professionalism; the importance of liaison with rabbinic authorities; need for better dissemination of information. The strengths and difficulties of providing culture-sensitive services in one community were identified. Areas for attention include vigilance regarding confidentiality, improvements in disseminating information, improvements in the reliability of funding and attention to systematic needs assessment, and to the examination of efficacy of these forms of service provision.

  2. Cultural aspects within caregiver interactions of ultra-orthodox Jewish women and their family members with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Penina; Shor, Ron; Hadas-Lidor, Naomi

    2013-10-01

    The role of cultural dynamics and norms within families of persons with mental illness has been an underexplored subject, although the familial context has been recognized as influential. This subject was studied with 24 ultra-Orthodox Jewish mothers of persons with mental illness who live in a relatively closed religious community. While participating in the Keshet educational program designed for family caregivers in mental health, they wrote Meaningful Interactional Life Episodes that involved a dialogue exchange in their lives. Qualitative analysis of 50 episodes illuminates the significant role that religious and cultural norms have in the perceptions of what are considered stressors and the dynamics in these families surrounding these stressors. The necessity and value of incorporating cultural competence into family educational programs and interventions is emphasized, as this may contribute to the potential use and success of mental health service models within a population that essentially underutilizes these services.

  3. Improving access to mental health care in an Orthodox Jewish community: a critical reflection upon the accommodation of otherness.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, Phil; Williamson, Tracey; Kada, Raphael; Frazer, Debra; Dhliwayo, Chardworth; Gask, Linda

    2017-08-14

    The English National Health Service (NHS) has significantly extended the supply of evidence based psychological interventions in primary care for people experiencing common mental health problems. Yet despite the extra resources, the accessibility of services for 'under-served' ethnic and religious minority groups, is considerably short of the levels of access that may be necessary to offset the health inequalities created by their different exposure to services, resulting in negative health outcomes. This paper offers a critical reflection upon an initiative that sought to improve access to an NHS funded primary care mental health service to one 'under-served' population, an Orthodox Jewish community in the North West of England. A combination of qualitative and quantitative data were drawn upon including naturally occurring data, observational notes, e-mail correspondence, routinely collected demographic data and clinical outcomes measures, as well as written feedback and recorded discussions with 12 key informants. Improvements in access to mental health care for some people from the Orthodox Jewish community were achieved through the collaborative efforts of a distributed leadership team. The members of this leadership team were a self-selecting group of stakeholders which had a combination of local knowledge, cultural understanding, power to negotiate on behalf of their respective constituencies and expertise in mental health care. Through a process of dialogic engagement the team was able to work with the community to develop a bespoke service that accommodated its wish to maintain a distinct sense of cultural otherness. This critical reflection illustrates how dialogic engagement can further the mechanisms of candidacy, concordance and recursivity that are associated with improvements in access to care in under-served sections of the population, whilst simultaneously recognising the limits of constructive dialogue. Dialogue can change the dynamic of

  4. Travel- and Community-Based Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant Shigella sonnei Lineage among International Orthodox Jewish Communities

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Kate S.; Dallman, Timothy J.; Behar, Adi; Weill, François-Xavier; Gouali, Malika; Sobel, Jeremy; Fookes, Maria; Valinsky, Lea; Gal-Mor, Ohad; Connor, Thomas R.; Nissan, Israel; Bertrand, Sophie; Parkhill, Julian; Jenkins, Claire; Cohen, Dani

    2016-01-01

    Shigellae are sensitive indicator species for studying trends in the international transmission of antimicrobial-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Orthodox Jewish communities (OJCs) are a known risk group for shigellosis; Shigella sonnei is cyclically epidemic in OJCs in Israel, and sporadic outbreaks occur in OJCs elsewhere. We generated whole-genome sequences for 437 isolates of S. sonnei from OJCs and non-OJCs collected over 22 years in Europe (the United Kingdom, France, and Belgium), the United States, Canada, and Israel and analyzed these within a known global genomic context. Through phylogenetic and genomic analysis, we showed that strains from outbreaks in OJCs outside of Israel are distinct from strains in the general population and relate to a single multidrug-resistant sublineage of S. sonnei that prevails in Israel. Further Bayesian phylogenetic analysis showed that this strain emerged approximately 30 years ago, demonstrating the speed at which antimicrobial drug–resistant pathogens can spread widely through geographically dispersed, but internationally connected, communities. PMID:27532625

  5. A glimpse into the world of battered ultra-Orthodox Jewish women in Israel: a follow-up study on women who resided in a shelter.

    PubMed

    Shechory-Bitton, Mally

    2014-01-01

    Using a mixed-methods approach to content analysis, we interviewed 88 ultra-Orthodox Jewish women who had endured spousal abuse and chose to find refuge in the only shelter in Israel specifically designated for religious women. All had experienced some type of spousal abuse for several years. The majority summarized the period they spent in the shelter in positive terms and reported that they had developed personal strength and that their social and family relationships had improved. About half of them described the postshelter period in positive terms, while the rest described it in both positive and negative terms or in negative terms only. Negative themes were mostly related to the women's economic situation and to emotional and behavioral problems of their children. Further research is required to expand existing knowledge regarding this population.

  6. A Case Study of Culturally Sensitive Mail Survey Methods for Understanding Walking within an Orthodox Jewish Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahan, David

    2006-01-01

    Adequate response to mail health surveys by minority populations has proved problematic. The impact of mail survey design features utilized to promote Orthodox Jews' responses (N = 138; 82 eligible synagogue member households) to a mailed questionnaire used to measure walking behavior are described and assessed. An examination of response…

  7. Your faith or mine: a pregnancy spacing intervention in an ultra-orthodox Jewish community in Israel.

    PubMed

    Birenbaum-Carmeli, Daphna

    2008-11-01

    Ultra-orthodox (haredi) Jews in Israel have an exceptionally high fertility rate of 7.7. As most fathers spend their days studying the Bible, the women struggle to support their large families under severe economic pressures. Some women experience maternal exhaustion coping with this life situation. Contraception for pregnancy spacing raises myriad dilemmas in the haredi community, however, many of which apply to promoting family planning in religious settings more generally. In a health promotion course for 23 haredi registered nurses at the University of Haifa in 2006-2007, pregnancy spacing was selected as the subject of the class project, the main aim of which was to convey an influential health message in a culturally acceptable manner. As the issue was debated, it was agreed the project should also address a range of women's health problems as well as pregnancy spacing. Thus, maternal nutrition, pelvic floor tone, dental health, maternal exhaustion and competition over number of children were added. A brochure was prepared and widely distributed in the haredi community, where it was well received. This paper describes the classroom dynamics during the planning and application of the project. It illustrates the importance of cultural awareness when addressing sensitive issues and communities with particular cultural dispositions.

  8. Knowledge, Attitudes and Perceptions About Routine Childhood Vaccinations Among Jewish Ultra-Orthodox Mothers Residing in Communities with Low Vaccination Coverage in the Jerusalem District.

    PubMed

    Stein Zamir, Chen; Israeli, Avi

    2017-05-01

    Background and aims Childhood vaccinations are an important component of primary prevention. Maternal and Child Health (MCH) clinics in Israel provide routine vaccinations without charge. Several vaccine-preventable-diseases outbreaks (measles, mumps) emerged in Jerusalem in the past decade. We aimed to study attitudes and knowledge on vaccinations among mothers, in communities with low immunization coverage. Methods A qualitative study including focus groups and semi-structured interviews. Results Low immunization coverage was defined below the district's mean (age 2 years, 2013) for measles-mumps-rubella-varicella 1st dose (MMR1\\MMRV1) and diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis 4th dose (DTaP4), 96 and 89%, respectively. Five communities were included, all were Jewish ultra-orthodox. The mothers' (n = 87) median age was 30 years and median number of children 4. Most mothers (94%) rated vaccinations as the main activity in the MCH clinics with overall positive attitudes. Knowledge about vaccines and vaccination schedule was inadequate. Of vaccines scheduled at ages 0-2 years (n = 13), the mean number mentioned was 3.9 ± 2.8 (median 4, range 0-9). Vaccines mentioned more often were outbreak-related (measles, mumps, polio) and HBV (given to newborns). Concerns about vaccines were obvious, trust issues and religious beliefs were not. Vaccination delay was very common and timeliness was considered insignificant. Practical difficulties in adhering to the recommended schedule prevailed. The vaccinations visits were associated with pain and stress. Overall, there was a sense of self-responsibility accompanied by inability to influence others. Conclusion Investigating maternal knowledge and attitudes on childhood vaccinations provides insights that may assist in planning tailored intervention programs aimed to increase both vaccination coverage and timeliness.

  9. Orthodox Judaism and psychoanalysis: toward dialogue and reconciliation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mariam; Gereboff, Joel

    2004-01-01

    The authors examine the conflicted relationship between Orthodox Judaism and psychoanalysis. Orthodox Jewish thinkers about psychology have responded to psychoanalysis as incompatible with the practice of Orthodox Judaism. On the other hand, those psychoanalytic writers who have examined the beliefs and practices of Orthodox Jews have tended to treat these issues in a reductionistic fashion. However, the authors find possibilities for reconciliation and dialogue in the work of Aaron Rabinowitz and Moshe Halevi Spero.

  10. Torah-True and Feminist Too: A Psychotherapist's View of the Conflict Between Orthodox Judaism and the Women's Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clamar, Aphrodite

    Today, while secular society has opened up a new range of roles and psychological expectations to women, the status and life of Orthodox Jewish women remain circumscribed by Jewish religious law. Orthodox women face inequality in four areas: in the synagogue and participation in prayer; in religious education; in legal areas such as status in…

  11. Pedophiles in the Ultra-Orthodox Haredi Sector in Israel: Thought Processes Regarding their Actions.

    PubMed

    Hamo, Gil; Idisis, Yael

    2017-01-01

    This study explores thought patterns of Jewish Ashkenazi Ultra-Orthodox pedophiles in Israel and how they resolve the contradiction between their commitment to Jewish Law and having committed sexual offenses against minors. Ten adult men participated in this study. Using open semistructured interviews, their cognitive distortions before, during, and after the abuse were examined. Content analysis revealed that participants used cognitive distortions based on their own world of Jewish Law and social-cultural values. The insular nature of Ultra-Orthodox society and its many prohibitions, especially regarding sexuality, tempted offenders to test boundaries. When sexual drive was high, internal control mechanisms were ineffective even in presence of external control mechanisms. Some participants recognized the contradiction between their behaviors and being Ultra-Orthodox Jews, and others did not. Based on the findings, a flow chart was devised describing the cognitive processes of Jewish Ultra-Orthodox pedophiles. Theoretical and practical implications of the results were examined.

  12. Community Attitudes towards Culture-Influenced Mental Illness: Scrupulosity vs. Nonreligious OCD among Orthodox Jews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirutinsky, Steven; Rosmarin, David H.; Pargament, Kenneth I.

    2009-01-01

    Culture may particularly influence community attitudes towards mental illness, when the illness itself is shaped by a cultural context. To explore the influence of culture-specific, religious symptoms on Orthodox Jewish community attitudes, the authors compared the attitudes of 169 Orthodox Jews, who randomly viewed one of two vignettes describing…

  13. Community Attitudes towards Culture-Influenced Mental Illness: Scrupulosity vs. Nonreligious OCD among Orthodox Jews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirutinsky, Steven; Rosmarin, David H.; Pargament, Kenneth I.

    2009-01-01

    Culture may particularly influence community attitudes towards mental illness, when the illness itself is shaped by a cultural context. To explore the influence of culture-specific, religious symptoms on Orthodox Jewish community attitudes, the authors compared the attitudes of 169 Orthodox Jews, who randomly viewed one of two vignettes describing…

  14. Am I "That Jew"? North African Jewish Experiences in the Toronto Jewish Day School System and the Establishment of or Haemet Sephardic School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Train, Kelly Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the North African Jewish community's establishment of Or Haemet Sephardic School as a response to the forced "Ashkenazification" of Sephardic students in the Orthodox Jewish day school system. The establishment of the school signifies the North African Jewish community's refusal and resistance to an essentialist…

  15. Women Pursuing Higher Education in Ultra-Orthodox Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Nehami; Yedidya, Tova; Schwartz, Chaya; Aran, Ofra

    2014-01-01

    The study reported in this article concerns the beginnings of higher education for women in the Haredi (ultra-Orthodox) enclave in Israel. Haredi Jews are a self-secluded fundamentalist group committed to particularly strict interpretation of Jewish religious law. In recent years, they have been compelled by poverty and other factors to allow…

  16. Women Pursuing Higher Education in Ultra-Orthodox Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Nehami; Yedidya, Tova; Schwartz, Chaya; Aran, Ofra

    2014-01-01

    The study reported in this article concerns the beginnings of higher education for women in the Haredi (ultra-Orthodox) enclave in Israel. Haredi Jews are a self-secluded fundamentalist group committed to particularly strict interpretation of Jewish religious law. In recent years, they have been compelled by poverty and other factors to allow…

  17. Jewish medical ethics – a brief overview

    PubMed Central

    Jakobovits, Immanuel

    1983-01-01

    This paper outlines the traditional Jewish approach to medical ethics, as perceived by the Chief Rabbi of the British Commonwealth, himself an academic specialist in this field. It is based on a `St Paul's Lecture' given to the London Diocesan Council for Christian Jewish understanding. PMID:6576175

  18. Hebrew-Language Narratives of Yiddish-Speaking Ultra-Orthodox Girls in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannenbaum, Michal; Abugov, Netta; Ravid, Dorit

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a study conducted with children belonging to a rarely studied minority group, the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community in Israel, an extremely religious group that endorses patterns of voluntary segregation. The research population also demonstrates linguistic segregation, as they use only Yiddish for daily communication with…

  19. Jewish perspectives on pregnancy and childbearing.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Judith A

    2003-01-01

    There are approximately 6 million Jewish people in the United States today. They may be affiliated with the Orthodox, Conservative, or Reform streams of Jewish practice, or they may be secular and unaffiliated. Although religious practices and levels of observance among these streams of Judaism vary widely, nurses should become familiar with the religious traditions of Judaism in order to provide the most comprehensive care for a childbearing Jewish woman and her partner. This article describes the range of practices that may be observed, and offers information that may assist the nurse in providing culturally competent care. While it is important to tailor care to the individual needs of each childbearing couple, background knowledge of customs and traditions will help provide a basic context that can be used as a basis for understanding cultural variation and specific practices.

  20. Jewish Holidays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Joan

    This paper examines the development of Hebrew literature since the recording of Genesis and provides resources for teaching about Jewish holidays and folklore. Although originally designed for use in teaching a six-week junior high school unit, the materials included may be adapted for use with students at the elementary through senior high school…

  1. Rosenak "Teaching Jewish Values"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, David

    2014-01-01

    Rosenak's "Teaching Jewish Values" (1986) is perhaps his most accessible book about Jewish education. After diagnosing the "diseases" of Jewish education, he endorses "teaching Jewish values" as the curricular strategy most likely to succeed given the chasm which divides traditional Jewish subject matter and the…

  2. Rosenak "Teaching Jewish Values"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, David

    2014-01-01

    Rosenak's "Teaching Jewish Values" (1986) is perhaps his most accessible book about Jewish education. After diagnosing the "diseases" of Jewish education, he endorses "teaching Jewish values" as the curricular strategy most likely to succeed given the chasm which divides traditional Jewish subject matter and the…

  3. A Mentoring Volunteer Program for Orthodox Jewish Adults with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Robin Fran

    2012-01-01

    Prevocational and vocational training are interventions that are widely recognized as personally satisfying forms of occupation that can increase self-determination and employability while improving a person's health and well-being. In recent years a related intervention, structured peer mentoring, has been associated with increased community…

  4. A Mentoring Volunteer Program for Orthodox Jewish Adults with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Robin Fran

    2012-01-01

    Prevocational and vocational training are interventions that are widely recognized as personally satisfying forms of occupation that can increase self-determination and employability while improving a person's health and well-being. In recent years a related intervention, structured peer mentoring, has been associated with increased community…

  5. An Analysis of Cultural Patterns among Orthodox Jews as Contrasted to those of Select White Middle Class Christian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenner, Florence; And Others

    Christians have a limited understanding of the contemporary Jewish community in its variety, devotion, contribution to character, and perception of its heritage. This research project contrasts family cultural patterns of the Orthodox Jew to those of select white middle class Christian families in America (especially Catholics) to help foster…

  6. Are There Jewish Digital Badges?: A Study of Religious Middle- and High-School Girls' Perception of an Emerging Educational Technology-Based Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramovich, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    For Jewish education, digital badges can provide an alternative to traditional assessments. However, the emerging research on badges suggests a complex relationship between learning opportunities, the learner, and the design of the badge. An investigation of a digital badge system at an ultra-Orthodox Jewish middle and high school for girls…

  7. 'There is a time to be born and a time to die' (Ecclesiastes 3:2a): Jewish perspectives on euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Baeke, Goedele; Wils, Jean-Pierre; Broeckaert, Bert

    2011-12-01

    Reviewing the publications of prominent American rabbis who have (extensively) published on Jewish biomedical ethics, this article highlights Orthodox, Conservative and Reform opinions on a most pressing contemporary bioethical issue: euthanasia. Reviewing their opinions against the background of the halachic character of Jewish (biomedical) ethics, this article shows how from one traditional Jewish textual source diverse, even contradictory, opinions emerge through different interpretations. In this way, in the Jewish debate on euthanasia the specific methodology of Jewish (bio)ethical reasoning comes forward as well as a diversity of opinion within Judaism and its branches.

  8. Adult Jewish Education and Participation among Reform Jewish Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mareschal, Teresa L.

    2012-01-01

    The history of adult Jewish education is rich and is replete with learning opportunities for Jewish adults, and Jewish women are active participants in adult Jewish education. In this chapter, the author examines Reform Jewish women's motivations to participate in adult Jewish education. First, she provides a historical overview of Judaism and…

  9. Adult Jewish Education and Participation among Reform Jewish Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mareschal, Teresa L.

    2012-01-01

    The history of adult Jewish education is rich and is replete with learning opportunities for Jewish adults, and Jewish women are active participants in adult Jewish education. In this chapter, the author examines Reform Jewish women's motivations to participate in adult Jewish education. First, she provides a historical overview of Judaism and…

  10. 'We are (not) the master of our body': elderly Jewish women's attitudes towards euthanasia and assisted suicide.

    PubMed

    Baeke, Goedele; Wils, Jean-Pierre; Broeckaert, Bert

    2011-06-01

    In Belgium, dominant ideological traditions--Christianity and non-religious humanism--have the floor in debates on euthanasia and hardly any attention is paid to the practices and attitudes of ethnic and religious minorities, for instance, Jews. This article aims to meet this lacuna. Qualitative empirical research was performed in the Orthodox Jewish community of Antwerp (Belgium) with a purposive sample of elderly Jewish (non-)Hasidic and secularised Orthodox women. In-depth interviews were conducted to elicit their attitudes towards (non-)voluntary euthanasia and assisted suicide. The research reveals diverse views among women in the community on intentionally terminating a patient's life. Absolute rejection of every act which deliberately terminates life is found among the overwhelming majority of (religiously observant) Orthodox (Hasidic and non-Hasidic) women, as they have an unconditional faith and trust in God's sovereign power over the domain of life and death. On the other hand, the views of secularised Orthodox women--mostly irreligious women, who do not consider themselves Orthodox, thus not following Jewish law, yet say they belong to the Orthodox Jewish community--show an acceptance of voluntary euthanasia and assisted suicide but non-voluntary euthanasia is approached more negatively. As they perceive illness and death as merely profane facts, they stress a patient's absolute right towards self-determination, in particular with regard to one's end of life. Among non-Hasidic Orthodox respondents, more openness is found for cultivating a personal opinion which deviates from Jewish law and for the right of self-determination with regard to questions concerning life and death. In this study, these participants occupy an intermediate position. Our study reveals an interplay between ethical attitudes on euthanasia and religious convictions. The image one has of a transcendental reality, or of God, has a stronger effect on one's (dis)approval of euthanasia

  11. Translation as a Site of Language Policy Negotiation in Jewish Day School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avni, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    This article examines how students and teachers at a non-Orthodox Jewish day school in New York City negotiate the use of translation within the context of an institutionalized language policy that stresses the use of a sacred language over that of the vernacular. Specifically, this paper analyzes the negotiation of a Hebrew-only policy through…

  12. Jewish Fundamentalism in Israel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-01

    1 Jewish Fundamentalism in Israeli Society ........................ 3 Definitions , Terminology, and Historical Background...discussed. ad2 .4 .4.o Lustick Jewish Fundamentalism Jewish Fundamentalism in Israeli Society Definitions , Terminology, and Historical Background...fundamentalist movement, requires the application of a broader, but carefully construed definition of "fundamentalist." For the purposes of this study a belief

  13. Education and the Orthodox Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirill, Metropolitan

    2009-01-01

    These days many interested observers, in both this and other countries, are asking why for so many years the Russian Orthodox Church has been persistently raising the same questions in the field of education and, very likely, will continue to do so. Some attribute it to a desire to gain power over society and limit the freedom of citizens. A few…

  14. HISTORY OF ADULT JEWISH EDUCATION IN FOUR NATIONAL JEWISH ORGANIZATIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COHEN, SAMUEL I.

    SINCE THE END OF WORLD WAR II, NATIONAL JEWISH MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS HAVE BEEN GIVING INCREASING ATTENTION TO ADULT JEWISH EDUCATION. THE DEVELOPMENT OF ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN FOUR GENERAL CULTURAL-SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS--B'NAI B'RITH, THE NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN, THE AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE, AND THE AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS--IS…

  15. HISTORY OF ADULT JEWISH EDUCATION IN FOUR NATIONAL JEWISH ORGANIZATIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COHEN, SAMUEL I.

    SINCE THE END OF WORLD WAR II, NATIONAL JEWISH MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS HAVE BEEN GIVING INCREASING ATTENTION TO ADULT JEWISH EDUCATION. THE DEVELOPMENT OF ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN FOUR GENERAL CULTURAL-SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS--B'NAI B'RITH, THE NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN, THE AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE, AND THE AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS--IS…

  16. Jewish theology and bioethics.

    PubMed

    Newman, L E

    1992-06-01

    This article explores the theological foundations of both classical and contemporary Jewish ethics, with special reference to biomedical issues. Traditional views concerning God's revelation to Israel are shown to underlie the methodological orientation of classical Jewish ethics, which is both legalistic and particularistic. Contemporary Jewish ethicists, by contrast, have tended to embrace more liberal views of revelation which have mitigated both the legalism and the particularism of their approach. Apart from methodological considerations, much of the content of Jewish medical ethics has also been shaped by theological concerns. Specifically, a Jewish theology of creation provides basic norms and values which inform Jewish responses to a range of contemporary biomedical issues. Finally, it is suggested that the theological roots of this ethical tradition do not disqualify it from making a significant contribution to the wider discussion of biomedical issues in our secular, pluralistic society.

  17. Does negative religious coping accompany, precede, or follow depression among Orthodox Jews?

    PubMed

    Pirutinsky, Steven; Rosmarin, David H; Pargament, Kenneth I; Midlarsky, Elizabeth

    2011-08-01

    Cross sectional research suggests that negative religious coping (e.g., anger at God and religious disengagement) strongly correlates with depression and anxiety. However, causality is difficult to establish as negative coping can accompany, cause, or result from distress. Among Orthodox Jews, some studies have found correlations between negative religious coping and anxiety and depression, while others found that high levels of negative coping related with decreased distress. We therefore examined longitudinal relationships between negative coping and depressive symptoms among Orthodox Jews. Participants (80 Orthodox Jews) completed the Jewish Religious Coping Scale and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies' Depression Scale at two times. Using Structural Equation Modeling, we compared four models describing possible causal patterns. Negative religious coping and depressive symptoms were linearly related. Furthermore, a model including negative coping as a predictor of future depression fit the data best and did not significantly differ from a saturated model. This research was limited by reliance on self-report measures, an internet sample, and examination of only negative religious coping. Consistent with a "primary spiritual struggles" conceptualization, negative religious coping appears to precede and perhaps cause future depression among Orthodox Jews. Clinical interventions should target spiritual struggles, and more research integrating this construct into theory and practice is warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. "Jewish Education" and American Jewish Education, Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasner, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    This series of articles explores the history of Jewish Education magazine, later known as the Journal of Jewish Education, with a particular emphasis on its intersection with the history of American Jewish education and, more generally, American Jewish life. Major themes and issues that preoccupied the magazine's editors and writers are isolated…

  19. "Jewish Education" and American Jewish Education, Part III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasner, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    This is the last in a series of articles exploring the history of "Jewish Education" magazine, later known as the "Journal of Jewish Education," with a particular emphasis on its intersection with the history of American Jewish education and, more generally, American Jewish life. Major themes and issues that preoccupied the…

  20. Teaching about Catholic-Jewish Relations: Some Guidelines to Assist the Work of Teachers in Catholic Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jardine, Clare

    2015-01-01

    In this journal, "International Studies in Catholic Education" Vol 5. No 2. October 2013, Dr. Helena Miller of the United Jewish Israel Appeal in London argued the need to develop a dialogue between Jewish and Catholic educators. This article is offered as one response to that call. Suggestions are proposed in terms of fundamental…

  1. When religion and obsessive-compulsive disorder collide: treating scrupulosity in Ultra-Orthodox Jews.

    PubMed

    Huppert, Jonathan D; Siev, Jedidiah; Kushner, Elyssa S

    2007-10-01

    Evidence-based practice suggests that clinicians should integrate the best available research with clinical judgment and patient values. Treatment of religious patients with scrupulosity provides a paradigmatic example of such integration. The purpose of this study is to describe potential adaptations to make exposure and response prevention, the first-line treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder, acceptable and consistent with the values of members of the Ultra-Orthodox Jewish community. We believe that understanding these challenges will enhance the clinician's ability to increase patient motivation and participation in therapy and thereby provide more effective treatment for these and other religious patients. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Pharmacogenetics in Jewish populations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yao; Peter, Inga; Scott, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    Spanning over 2000 years, the Jewish population has a long history of migration, population bottlenecks, expansions, and geographical isolation, which has resulted in a unique genetic architecture among the Jewish people. As such, many Mendelian disease genes and founder mutations for autosomal recessive diseases have been discovered in several Jewish groups, which have prompted recent genomic studies in the Jewish population on common disease susceptibility and other complex traits. Although few studies on the genetic determinants of drug response variability have been reported in the Jewish population, a number of unique pharmacogenetic variants have been discovered that are more common in Jewish populations than in other major racial groups. Notable examples identified in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population include the vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) c.106G>T (p.D36Y) variant associated with high warfarin dosing requirements and the recently reported cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) allele, CYP2C19*4B, that harbors both loss-of-function [*4 (c.1A>G)] and increased-function [*17 (c.−806C>T)] variants on the same haplotype. These data are encouraging in that like other ethnicities and subpopulations, the Jewish population likely harbors numerous pharmacogenetic variants that are uncommon or absent in other larger racial groups and ethnicities. In addition to unique variants, common multi-ethnic variants in key drug metabolism genes (e.g., ABCB1, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, NAT2) have also been detected in the AJ and other Jewish groups. This review aims to summarize the currently available pharmacogenetics literature and discuss future directions for related research with this unique population. PMID:24867283

  3. Sexuality in advanced age in Jewish thought and law.

    PubMed

    David, Benjamin E; Weitzman, Gideon A

    2015-01-01

    Judaism has a positive attitude to sexual relations within a marriage, and views such sexual relations as important not only for procreation but also as part of the framework of marriage. This is true for any age group, and sexuality is seen as an essential element of marriage for couples of advanced age. In this article, the authors present the views of Jewish law and thought regarding sexuality among older couples. The authors illustrate this using 3 case studies of couples who sought guidance in the area of sexuality. In addition, this area of counseling benefits greatly from an ongoing relationship and dialogue between expert rabbis in the field and therapists treating older Orthodox Jewish patients for sexual dysfunction. The triad relationship of couple, therapist, and rabbi enhances the ability to treat and assist such couples to seek treatment and overcome their difficulties.

  4. Fritz London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavroglu, Kostas

    2005-11-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Part I. From Philosophy to Physics: The years that left nothing unaffected; 1. The appeal of ideas; 2. Goëthe as a scientist; 3. How absolute is our knowledge?; 4. How do we come to know things?; 5. London's teachers in philosophy; 6. Husserl's teachings; 7. Expectations of things to come; 8. The thesis in philosophy; 9. Tolman's principle of similitude; 10. The necessary clarifications; 11. Work on quantum theory; 12. Transformation theory; 13. Unsuccessful attempts at unification; Part II. The Years in Berlin and the Beginnings of Quantum Chemistry: The mysterious bond; 14. London in Zürich; 15. Binding forces; 16. The Pauli principle; 17. Reactions to the Heitler-London paper; 18. Polyelectronic molecules and the application of group theory to problems of chemical valence; 19. Chemists as physicists?; 20. London's first contacts in Berlin; 21. Marriage; 22. Job offers; 23. Intermolecular forces; 24. The book which could not be written; 25. Leningrad and Rome; 26. Difficulties with group theory; 27. Linus Pauling's resonance structures; 28. Robert Mulliken's molecular orbitals; Part III. Oxford and Superconductivity: The rise of the Nazis; 29. Going to Oxford; 30. Lindemann, Simon and Heinz London; 31. Electricity in the very cold; 32. The end of old certainties; 33. The thermodynamic treatment; 34. The theory of Fritz and Heinz London; 35. Initial reactions by von Laue; 36. The discussion at the Royal Society; 37. Termination of the ICI fellowship; Part IV. Paris and Superfluidity: The Front Populaire; 38. The article in Nature 1937 and 'Nouvelle Conception'; 39. Laue again; 40. The structure of solid helium; 41. The peculiar properties of helium; 42. Bose-Einstein condensation; 43. The note in Nature; 44. The two-fluid model; 45. The trip to Jerusalem; 46. Leaving again; 47. The observer in quantum mechanics; Part V. United States and the Typing up of Loose Ends: Duke University, North Carolina; 48. The Soviet Union, Kapitza and

  5. Hitler's Jewish Physicians.

    PubMed

    Weisz, George M

    2014-07-01

    The mystery behind the behavior of infamous personalities leaves many open questions, particularly when related to the practice of medicine. This paper takes a brief look at two Jewish physicians who played memorable roles in the life of Adolf Hitler.

  6. [Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) in the ultra-orthodox community--cultural aspects of diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Vinker, Michal; Jaworowski, Sol; Mergui, Joseph

    2014-08-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is reflected similarly in different communities, while symptoms are affected by the patient's cultural and spiritual world. An ultra-orthodox Jew with OCD will perform compulsive actions and will have obsessive thoughts related to the Jewish religious world. The religious symptoms do not necessarily correspond with the main commandments. Despite their significance, Shabbat or moral commandments such as respecting one's parents do not play a central role in the compulsive pattern. The religious compulsiveness of OCD patients focuses on commandments having to do with order and cleanliness and is characterized by repetition, checking and slowness. Obsessive thoughts and compulsive actions of ultra-orthodox OCD patients are usually based on the Jewish scriptures. One might assume that religion, as a framework with rules and dictated rituals, serves as a strong foundation for the development of OCD. However, it is estimated that the prevalence of OCD in the ultra-orthodox community is similar to the general population. Rabbis acknowledge OCD as a psychiatric illness and do not encourage the obsessive punctuality in following the commandments. An ultra-orthodox patient will first consult his rabbi, and after receiving his recommendation, will turn to psychiatric treatment. He might prefer to receive drug treatment rather than Cognitive Behavioral Therapy that may oppose his beliefs. Understanding the cultural background of the patient is essential, in particular when the patient is ultra-orthodox and the treatment is considered "secular". Therefore, cooperation with the patient's rabbi is important in order to obtain the patient's trust and develop a treatment plan.

  7. Culturally sensitive mental health care: a study of contemporary psychiatric treatment for ultra-orthodox Jews in Israel.

    PubMed

    Stolovy, Tali; Levy, Yvan Moses; Doron, Adiel; Melamed, Yuval

    2013-12-01

    The literature describes psychiatric treatment of ultra-orthodox Jews as complex and challenging, in light of this community's unique characteristics and the ideological gap between ultra-orthodox patients and secular professionals. Recent data indicate that patient-centred culturally sensitive care contributes to the treatment outcomes among cultural minorities. To examine the effect of the level of a physician's religiosity and cultural sensitivity, as perceived by ultra-orthodox Jewish psychiatric patients, as well as the treatment venue (i.e. the distance of the treatment facility from the patients' community) on treatment outcomes (working alliance, medical adherence and the patients' social adaptation). The sample included 38 ultra-orthodox Jewish men and women receiving psychiatric treatment at the Lev Hasharon Mental Health Centre. The participants completed questionnaires about the physician's religiousness and cultural sensitivity, working alliance, medical adherence and social adaptation. Working alliance was positively related to the treatment location, meaning that patients were more committed and involved in the treatment when it took place in a facility distanced from their community. Working alliance was also correlated with medical adherence. Regression analysis revealed that the doctor's acquaintance with religion and cultural sensitivity predicted patients' reported social adaptation level. In contrary to common perceptions, ultra-orthodox patients are not necessarily reluctant to be treated by secular physicians. These patients prefer a discreet treatment far from their community's public eye. Their perception of a doctor who acknowledges and respects their religiosity positively affects the way that they perceive their social functioning. Culturally sensitive treatment enables patients to feel respected and acknowledged through their sociocultural affiliation, and not only through their disorder. It seems essential to train physicians about the

  8. "Jewish Education" and American Jewish Education, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasner, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    In this series of articles, I explore the history of "Jewish Education" magazine with particular emphasis on its intersection with the history of American Jewish education and American Jewish life more generally. I isolate major themes and issues that preoccupied the magazine's editors and writers, and analyze how their discourse sheds light on…

  9. London, England

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-18

    For almost 2,000 years, the River Thames has served as the life force of London, capital of the United Kingdom and one of the world's most famous cities. In AD 43 the Romans established the trading settlement of Londinium at a favorable crossing point on the river. The Romans remained until the 5th century, when the city came under Saxon control. The early 17th century saw enormous growth, but the deadly plague of 1664 and 1665 ravaged the population, and in the following year the Great Fire, which burned for four days, destroyed most of the city. A public transportation system and other city services in the early 19th century eased many of the increasing urban problems of the burgeoning capital of the wealthy British Empire. After coping with the devastating effects of bombing during World War II and the gradual dismantling of the empire, London today thrives as a vital modern metropolis. London is one of 100 cities being studied using ASTER data to map and monitor urban use patterns and growth. This image was acquired on October 12, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04301

  10. Considering the Informal Jewish Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winer, Laura Novak

    2007-01-01

    Informal Jewish education can and must put greater focus on the goals of education. While socialization is a key component, it is not its sole goal. Informal Jewish education must make more central deep, serious Jewish learning in which learners can experience moments of transcendence, connection, and transformation. A key to reaching this goal…

  11. Human reproduction: Jewish perspectives.

    PubMed

    Schenker, Joseph G

    2013-11-01

    Developments in science and technology and corresponding clinical applications raise new religious questions, often without clear answers. The role of theology in bioethics is integral to clarify perceived attitudes toward these developments for different religious communities. The Jewish attitude towards procreation is derived from the first commandment of God to Adam to 'Be fruitful and multiply'. Judaism allows the practice of all techniques of assisted reproduction when the oocyte and spermatozoon originate from the wife and husband respectively. This paper presents the attitude of Jewish Law -- Halacha to therapeutic procedures, such as IVF-embryo transfer, spermatozoa, oocytes, embryo donation, cryopreservation of genetic material, surrogacy, posthumous reproduction, gender preselection, reproductive and therapeutic cloning.

  12. Remembering More Jewish Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, George M.; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The history of medicine has been an intriguing topic for both authors. The modern relevance of past discoveries led both authors to take a closer look at the lives and contributions of persecuted physicians. The Jewish physicians who died in the Holocaust stand out as a stark example of those who merit being remembered. Many made important contributions to medicine which remain relevant to this day. Hence, this paper reviews the lives and important contributions of two persecuted Jewish physicians: Arthur Kessler (1903–2000) and Bronislawa Fejgin (1883–1943). PMID:27487308

  13. An Historical Survey of the British Mandate in Palestine 1920-1948: Policies Contributing to the Jewish/Arab Conflict

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-01

    of state 79 Ilan Pappe , The Making of the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1947-1951 (London: I. B. Tauris...English, 2nd edition, London: Longman Group, Ltd., 1979. Pappe , Ilan , The Making of the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1947-1951, London: I. B. Tauris...States, and Post-War Imperialism (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1984) p. 414. 82 Pappe , p. 33. 83 Seton-Williams, p. 161. 32 building. The Jewish

  14. Jewish denominations and longevity.

    PubMed

    Abel, Ernest L; Kruger, Michael L

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between affiliation with one of three denominations within Judaism representing a conservative-liberal continuum of Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform Judaism. The criterion for affiliation was burial in a cemetery maintained by these denominations. Longevities of married congregants born 1850-1910 were compared, controlling for birth year. Orthodox Jews had the shortest life spans (77 years); Conservative and Reform Jews had very similar life spans (80.7 years). Differences in years of survival of husbands after death of a spouse did not differ significantly. Reform widows survived longest (16.5 years) after death of a spouse. Conservative and Reform widows did not differ significantly from one another.

  15. In Search of the jüdische Typus: A Proposed Benchmark to Test the Genetic Basis of Jewishness Challenges Notions of “Jewish Biomarkers”

    PubMed Central

    Elhaik, Eran

    2016-01-01

    The debate as to whether Jewishness is a biological trait inherent from an “authentic” “Jewish type” (jüdische Typus) ancestor or a system of beliefs has been raging for over two centuries. While the accumulated biological and anthropological evidence support the latter argument, recent genetic findings, bolstered by the direct-to-consumer genetic industry, purport to identify Jews or quantify one’s Jewishness from genomic data. To test the merit of claims that Jews and non-Jews are genetically distinguishable, we propose a benchmark where genomic data of Jews and non-Jews are hybridized over two generations and the observed and predicted Jewishness of the terminal offspring according to either the Orthodox religious law (Halacha) or the Israeli Law of Return are compared. Members of academia, the public, and 23andMe were invited to use the benchmark to test claims that Jews are genetically distinct from non-Jews. Here, we report the findings from these trials. We also compare the genomic similarity of ∼300 individuals from nearly thirty Afro-Eurasian Jewish communities to a simulated jüdische Typus population. The results are discussed in light of modern trends in the genetics of Jews and related fields and provide a tentative answer to the ageless question “who is a Jew?” PMID:27547215

  16. London, England

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    For almost 2,000 years, the River Thames has served as the life force of London, capital of the United Kingdom and one of the world's most famous cities. In AD 43 the Romans established the trading settlement of Londinium at a favorable crossing point on the river. The Romans remained until the 5th century, when the city came under Saxon control. The early 17th century saw enormous growth, but the deadly plague of 1664 and 1665 ravaged the population, and in the following year the Great Fire, which burned for four days, destroyed most of the city. A public transportation system and other city services in the early 19th century eased many of the increasing urban problems of the burgeoning capital of the wealthy British Empire. After coping with the devastating effects of bombing during World War II and the gradual dismantling of the empire, London today thrives as a vital modern metropolis. London is one of 100 cities being studied using ASTER data to map and monitor urban use patterns and growth.

    This image was acquired on October 12, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats

  17. London, England

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    For almost 2,000 years, the River Thames has served as the life force of London, capital of the United Kingdom and one of the world's most famous cities. In AD 43 the Romans established the trading settlement of Londinium at a favorable crossing point on the river. The Romans remained until the 5th century, when the city came under Saxon control. The early 17th century saw enormous growth, but the deadly plague of 1664 and 1665 ravaged the population, and in the following year the Great Fire, which burned for four days, destroyed most of the city. A public transportation system and other city services in the early 19th century eased many of the increasing urban problems of the burgeoning capital of the wealthy British Empire. After coping with the devastating effects of bombing during World War II and the gradual dismantling of the empire, London today thrives as a vital modern metropolis. London is one of 100 cities being studied using ASTER data to map and monitor urban use patterns and growth.

    This image was acquired on October 12, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats

  18. Science and Orthodox Christianity: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Nicolaidis, Efthymios; Delli, Eudoxie; Livanos, Nikolaos; Tampakis, Kostas; Vlahakis, George

    2016-09-01

    This essay offers an overview of the history of the relations between science and Eastern Christianity based on Greek-language sources. The civilizations concerned are the Byzantine Empire, the Christian Orthodox communities of the Ottoman Empire, and modern Greece, as a case study of a national state. Beginning with the Greek Church Fathers, the essay investigates the ideas of theologians and scholars on nature. Neoplatonism, the theological debates of Iconoclasm and Hesychasm, the proposed union of the Eastern and Western Churches, and the complex relations with the Hellenic past all had notable impacts on the conception of science held by the Byzantine Orthodox. From the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries, the Christian Orthodox world did not actively participate in the making of the new science that was developing in modern Europe. It had to deal with the assimilation of scientific ideas produced by Western Christianity, and its main concern was the “legitimacy” of knowledge that did not originate directly from its own spiritual tradition. Finally, with regard to the Greek state, beyond the specific points of contact between the sciences and Orthodox Christianity—pertaining, for example, to materialism, evolution, and the calendar—the essay presents the constant background engagement with religion visible in most public pronouncements of scientists and intellectuals.

  19. Multicultural Counseling and the Orthodox Jew

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnall, Eliezer

    2006-01-01

    The cultural diversity literature largely ignores the effects of religion, and especially Judaism, on counseling and psychotherapy. The author reviews the meager and mostly anecdotal accounts relating to Orthodox Jews in the literature of several related disciplines, including counseling, social work, psychology, and psychiatry. The objective is…

  20. Exploration of Jewish Ethnic Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Abby N.; Inman, Arpana G.; Fine, Stephanie G.; Ritter, Hollie A.; Howard, Erin E.

    2010-01-01

    Despite a growing amount of research on the topic of ethnic identity, Jews, and the important aspects of a Jewish identity, have not been included in the multicultural and psychological literature. Using consensual qualitative research (C. E. Hill et al., 2005), the authors sought to gain an understanding of Jewish ethnic identity in 10 American…

  1. Underground "jewish University"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, B.

    What a strange thing, memory. Its selectivity and countless gaps are terribly annoying. The events in a twenty-year span of my life, the functioning of a so-called "Jewish People's University", graduate school at Mechmat, failing the defense of my thesis, defending my thesis in Stockholm, a mass exodus from Moscow of everyone and everybody, two immigrations, the fall of the Soviet Union, a long line of professional and personal successes and no fewer the number of defeats, overshadow the period when all my mathematical activities began (and when they could just as easily never have begun)…

  2. NEW DIRECTIONS IN ADULT JEWISH EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COHEN, SAMUEL I.

    TRADITIONALLY ADULT JEWISH EDUCATION WAS SYNAGOGUE OR INSTITUTION SPONSORED AND ORIENTED. SINCE THE WORLD WAR II, A NUMBER OF NATIONAL JEWISH MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS HAVE EMERGED AS MAJOR SPONSORS OF ADULT JEWISH EDUCATION PROGRAMS. THIS SPONSORSHIP REPRESENTS A NEW DIMENSION IN JEWISH EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY AND PRACTICE. THIS STUDY EVALUATED THE…

  3. Curricular Choices of Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Communities: Translating International Human Rights Law into Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry-Hazan, Lotem

    2015-01-01

    This paper employs the provisions of international human rights law in order to analyse whether and how liberal states should regulate Haredi educational practices, which sanctify the exclusive focus on religious studies in schools for boys. It conceptualises the conflict between the right to acceptable education and the right to adaptable…

  4. An Introduction to Sexuality Education for Orthodox Jewish Female High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diament, Sara

    2007-01-01

    Issues regarding sexuality are often little discussed in high schools serving students from religiously conservative backgrounds. Frequently, parents and school administrators are uncomfortable with, and reluctant to discuss the topic, and as a result students have inadequate opportunities to engage in discussions about sex and relationships. This…

  5. Curricular Choices of Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Communities: Translating International Human Rights Law into Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry-Hazan, Lotem

    2015-01-01

    This paper employs the provisions of international human rights law in order to analyse whether and how liberal states should regulate Haredi educational practices, which sanctify the exclusive focus on religious studies in schools for boys. It conceptualises the conflict between the right to acceptable education and the right to adaptable…

  6. An Introduction to Sexuality Education for Orthodox Jewish Female High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diament, Sara

    2007-01-01

    Issues regarding sexuality are often little discussed in high schools serving students from religiously conservative backgrounds. Frequently, parents and school administrators are uncomfortable with, and reluctant to discuss the topic, and as a result students have inadequate opportunities to engage in discussions about sex and relationships. This…

  7. Osler and the Jewish people

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, D B; Clarfield, A M

    1997-01-01

    In his writings and actions, Sir William Osler betrayed no evidence of anti-Semitism. In his era, this trait was unusual. Two of his articles, "Letter from Berlin" and "Israel and medicine," dealt directly with his thoughts on the Jewish people. In both he spoke out against anti-Semitism. Osler had friendships with Jewish colleagues--an example is the great regard in which he held US pediatrician Dr. Abraham Jacobi. Osler was not a saint, and he had his "rough side," but in his relationships with Jewish colleagues his example remains relevant. PMID:9176423

  8. Selected Jewish views of life and medical practice.

    PubMed

    Lindenthal, J J; Michelson, L N; Schlesinger, E

    1985-10-01

    This article discusses some basic tenets of Judaism as they apply to 3 health care delivery issues: death, abortion, and triage. The most pervasive value in Judaism is the utter sanctity of life and an obligation to prevent disease. Orthodox Jewish thought requires the following criteria and standards of death: unresponsive coma, absence of spontaneous respiration and movement, absence of reflexes, absence of pupillary response to light, absence of oculocephalic response, substance screening, and radioisotope angiography to differentiate true brain death from other causes. General endorsement of euthanasia is rejected, but, in cases where these criteria have been met, further medical support systems can be discontinued. Jewish law generally prohibits abortion, except in cases where pregnancy poses a threat to the woman's life. However, those from the conservative denomination accept abortion in cases where there is a probability of severe physical deformities or profound retardation. Those from the reform movement recognize psychological factors as being as important as physical factors in the determination of the appropriateness of abortion; moreover, they stress that the decision regarding abortion should rest with the pregnant woman and her family. Triage, the allocation of health care on the basis of priority, is generally rejected in favor of serving people on a first-need basis.

  9. The use of narrative in Jewish medical ethics.

    PubMed

    Jotkowitz, Alan

    2013-09-01

    Anne Jones has pointed out that over the last three decades, stories have been important to medical ethics in at least three ways: (1). Stories as cases for teaching principle-based medical ethics (2). Narratives for moral guides on what is considered living a good life (3). Stories as testimonials written by both patients and physicians. A pioneer in this effort, particularly in regard to using narratives as moral guides, has been the ethicist and philosopher Stanley Hauerwas. Heavily influenced by virtue ethics, Hauerwas believes that it is a person's particular narrative tradition that provides one with convictions that form the basis of one's morality. Befitting a Protestant theologian, he is particularly concerned with the Christian narrative. From a Jewish perspective, there has been much less written on the use of narrative in medical ethics. However, it is a mistake to think that narrative has little, if any, role in Rabbinic ethical decision making. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the centrality of narrative in the thought of Orthodox Jewish decisors and the problems inherent in this methodology.

  10. Jewish College Women: Future Leaders of the Jewish Community?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Abraham D.

    1977-01-01

    It is concluded from this data that the American Jewish community deprives itself of many needed talents to the extent that it does not encourage participation in its leadership positions of all individuals, regardless of sex. (Author/AM)

  11. [The terminal patient: Jewish religious law, the Steinberg report and the bioethical discourse in Israel].

    PubMed

    Barilan, Y Michael

    2003-07-01

    This article surveys key texts in contemporary orthodox Jewish law (Halakha) with regard to end-of-life decision making. The author proposes twelve principles that govern Jewish law in that matter. The article proceeds to examine the Steinberg report in the light of Halakha. Orthodox Judaism regards human life as a prime value, which is always beyond consideration of economical means or quality of life. The avoidance of suffering is the only justification to shorten the life of the sufferer, provided that the acts performed do not fall within the Halakhic definition of murder, namely active and direct action that shortens life. It is argued that the main challenge of bioethics in Israel is the bridging between the positive law of Halakha whose fundamental value is submission to God's will as manifested in Halakha, and the rationalism, universalism, and egalitarianism which constitute naturalistic ethics. This challenge may produce ideas such as the "clock machine". It is too early to know if this is a trickery, or genuine ethical creativity.

  12. Norton & Elaine Sarnoff Center for Jewish Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview Jews and Hereditary Cancer What’s Jewish About BRCA? Asses Your Risk Other Hereditary Cancers Resources Personal ... Events Donate Blog Get Screened What’s Jewish about BRCA? For Medical Professionals Upcoming Events Family Health History ...

  13. Compliance of Ultra-Orthodox and secular pedestrians with traffic lights in Ultra-Orthodox and secular locations.

    PubMed

    Rosenbloom, Tova; Shahar, Amit; Perlman, Amotz

    2008-11-01

    Following a previous study that revealed the disobedience of Ultra-Orthodox citizens, as compared to secular citizens, of traffic lights at crosswalks, the present study examined the road habits of 995 Ultra-Orthodox and secular pedestrians in neighboring Ultra-Orthodox and secular cities. Using an observation grid designed specially for this study, the pedestrians were observed at two crosswalks--one in an Ultra-Orthodox city and one in a secular city--as far as similar traffic parameters, using a logistic regression. The tendency to cross on a red light was assessed as a function of estimated age, gender, religiosity, location (religious/secular), the duration of the red light, the number of vehicles crossing and the number of pedestrians waiting at the curb. Ultra-Orthodox pedestrians committed more violations than secular pedestrians did, and there were more road violations in the Ultra-Orthodox location than there were in the secular location. Fewer traffic violations were committed by "local" pedestrians (Ultra-Orthodox pedestrians in the Ultra-Orthodox location and secular pedestrians in the secular location) than by "foreigners" (Ultra-Orthodox pedestrians in the secular location and secular pedestrians in the Ultra-Orthodox location). The odds of crossing on a red light decreased as a function of both the number of people waiting at the curb and the number of vehicles. Consistent with previous research, males crossed on red much more than females did, regardless of religiosity and location. Our discussion focuses on theoretical and practical explanations of the findings.

  14. [Migration and changes in the Jewish population].

    PubMed

    Svob, M

    1995-12-01

    "This paper presents an overview of the distribution, number and position of Jewish communities in the world, in the light of historical and political conditions which formerly [influenced], and even today continue to influence Jewish migration. The Jewish community in Croatia and Zagreb is analysed. Nevertheless, attention is focused primarily on East Europe and Israel as areas of large changes." (EXCERPT)

  15. The Greening of "Informal Jewish Education" Talk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chazan, Barry

    2007-01-01

    The concept "informal education" is receiving new attention in Jewish education. That is a welcome development since this is an important idea in Jewish life. However, these developments are accompanied by a plethora of loose and sloppy use of terms, concepts, and ideas. Joseph Reimer's article, "Beyond More Jews Doing Jewish: Clarifying the Goals…

  16. Bioethics for clinicians: 22. Jewish bioethics

    PubMed Central

    Goldsand, Gary; Rosenberg, Zahava R.S.; Gordon, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Jewish bioethics in the contemporary era emerges from the traditional practice of applying principles of Jewish law (Halacha) to ethical dilemmas. The Bible (written law) and the Talmud (oral law) are the foundational texts on which such deliberations are based. Interpretation of passages in these texts attempts to identify the duties of physicians, patients and families faced with difficult health care decisions. Although Jewish law is an integral consideration of religiously observant Jews, secularized Jewish patients often welcome the wisdom of their tradition when considering treatment options. Jewish bioethics exemplifies how an ethical system based on duties may differ from the secular rights-based model prevalent in North American society. PMID:11332319

  17. Practical Parenting: A Jewish Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipsitz, Gail Josephson

    Based on the clinical expertise of social workers at Jewish Family Services of Central Maryland, this book presents practical advice for parents of all faiths, with each of 34 chapters exploring a specific parenting issue. The book is divided into five sections: (1) "Many Kinds of Families," dealing with only children, sibling struggles,…

  18. The Perspective of Jewish Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ronald M.

    1988-01-01

    Examines traditional Jewish teachings about disease and relates them to the AIDS epidemic. Describes two traditional attitudes toward infectious disease: the first emphasizes self-protection and avoidance, whereas the second advocates compassion and service to victims. Concludes that, where AIDS is concerned, Jews are now part of mainstream…

  19. Hitler’s Jewish Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, George M.

    2014-01-01

    The mystery behind the behavior of infamous personalities leaves many open questions, particularly when related to the practice of medicine. This paper takes a brief look at two Jewish physicians who played memorable roles in the life of Adolf Hitler. PMID:25120923

  20. Correlates of genetic counseling and testing among Orthodox Jews.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Shulamis Juni

    2011-12-01

    One hundred and thirty-six Orthodox Jews responded to questions about their family background, disability attitudes, and their participation in genetic counseling and testing. Findings showed that only birth order and the presence of a disabled family member correlated with increased chances of an individual going for genetic counseling/testing. Results are discussed in the context of the contemporary sociology of Orthodox Judaism, with a particular focus on better understanding the experience of having a disabled family member.

  1. Thyroid cancer incidence in highly observant Jewish neighborhoods in metropolitan New York City.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Laura E; Boscoe, Francis P; Schymura, Maria J; Kahn, Amy R; Weinstein, Aura L; Qiao, Baozhen; McLaughlin, Colleen C

    2011-11-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence in New York State has increased rapidly in recent years, particularly in New York City and its surrounding metropolitan area. In 2007 among white non-Hispanics, incidence rates were about 40% higher in the New York City metropolitan area than in the rest of the state. Here we explore the extent to which living in neighborhoods with a high percentage of highly observant Jews may be associated with this pattern. We identify neighborhoods with concentrations of highly observant Jewish persons based on the use of Yiddish among children and the location of Orthodox synagogues. Thyroid cancer risk is modeled as a function of living in such a neighborhood, adjusting for age, sex, and other factors. The model was repeated for small (<2 cm) and large (≥2 cm) tumors to assess the role of diagnostic improvements in driving the spatial-temporal patterns. A moderate association with thyroid cancer was found among those living in Jewish neighborhoods and downstate New York. A lesser association was found among those who live in neighborhoods of high levels of people born in Russia, Belarus, or Ukraine. Similar elevated rate ratios were seen for small and large tumors in Jewish neighborhoods, providing evidence against differences in diagnostic practices in this group. Smaller tumors were more pronounced among women and persons diagnosed more recently. The associations found do not seem to be diagnostically driven, but rather due to environmental, genetic, or cultural factors in the highly observant population of New York State.

  2. "Help must first come from the divine:" a response to Fr. George Eber's claim of the so-called incommensurability of Orthodox and non-Orthodox Christian bioethics.

    PubMed

    Keenan, James F

    1995-09-01

    Orthodox bioethics is distinctive in how it reflects on issues in bioethics. This distinctiveness is found in the relationship of spirituality and liturgy to ethics. Eber's essay, however, treats the distinctiveness as absolute uniqueness. In so focusing on the incommensurability of Orthodox bioethics Eber fails to tell his reader what Orthodox bioethics is about. Furthermore, his description of Western Christian ethics is seriously inaccurate.

  3. The Calendar of the Greek Orthodox Church

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, M. S.; Theodossiou, E.

    2002-01-01

    At the Orthodox Church Council in 1923 in Constantinople a proposal concerning the reform of the calendar, elaborated by the Serbian astronomer Milutin Milankovic´ together with professor Maksim Trpkovic´, was submitted, providing for a more exact calendar than the Gregorian one. Instead of three days in 4 centuries one should omit 7 days in 9 centuries or 0.0077 days per year. This means that only 2 years out of 9 ending the centuries would be leap years. The rule is that those years whose ordinal number ends with two zeros are leap years only provided that the number of centuries they belong to, divided by 9, yields the remainder 2 or 6. For instance the year 2000, ending the 20th century, is a leap year since 20 divided by 9 equals to 2 plus the remainder 2. Milankovic´'s proposal implies a much smaller difference, with respect to the true tropical year, than the Gregorian calendar. Further improvements concerning the approach to the duration of the tropical year are not necessary since that duration itself undergoes changes over longer periods.

  4. Jack London's "White Fang."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westall, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Relates the kinds of reading done in childhood by a now distinguished writer, Robert Westall. Describes specifically how Jack London's novel, "White Fang," influenced the development of this writer. Narrates and comments on the action of the novel. (HB)

  5. The London Schools Planetarium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards-Jones, P.

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes the scientific activities conducted at the London Schools Planetarium by students of primary and secondary schools and of teacher colleges. Included is a table illustrating the astronomical background of student teachers. (CC)

  6. Materials modelling in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciudad, David

    2016-04-01

    Angelos Michaelides, Professor in Theoretical Chemistry at University College London (UCL) and co-director of the Thomas Young Centre (TYC), explains to Nature Materials the challenges in materials modelling and the objectives of the TYC.

  7. [The Greek Orthodox Church and position regarding birth control].

    PubMed

    Kapor-stanulovic, N; Beric, B M

    1983-09-01

    The Christian Orthodox Church has 100-150 million baptized members worldwide. Its official position on fertility regulation is little known among nontheologians. The Christian Orthodox Church is resolutely opposed to all attempts to permit induced abortion, and has been since its earliest history. In the 4th century the aborting woman was considered in the same category as a murderer, and the position was reiterated through the centuries in the canons of the Church. However, the common practice of Church members differed greatly from the official position. During the Roman period and the 1st years of the Christian era, abortion and the exposure of newborns were very common. Many of the earlier arguments in favor of abortion that were countered by the Church are still offered. The liberalization of abortion legislation in the US was opposed by American Christian Orthodox Church members. The Church's position on contraception is less well known than its stand on abortion. Several official publications have condemned family planning, regarding it as a form of prostitution within the family and as a sin. The official position of the Greek Orthodox Church was set forth in an encyclical written in 1937, which recommended abstinence as the only legal method of avoiding conception. The position of the Christian Orthodox Church on abortion and contraception is fundamentally identical to that of the Roman Catholic Church. Because the position of the Christian Orthodox Church on birth control, which has been fixed for centuries, has not been officially debated and has not been communicated to the members, it has not fully guided daily life. One might suppose that members of the Christian Orthodox Church are freer of church control of their fertility behavior than are Catholics.

  8. Technology: So Pervasive in Jewish Living, so Absent from Jewish Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schein, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The Jewish world, like the world civilization that hosts it, is awash in new technologies. Appropriately, there is a great deal of attention paid to how to improve the Jewish world and Jewish identity through technology. Paradoxically there is a paucity of literature characterizing the relationship of Jews and Judaism to technology. This article…

  9. The "International Handbook of Jewish Education" (2011): Developing a Dialogue between Jewish and Catholic Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Helena

    2013-01-01

    This article is an attempt to highlight some main themes in the "International Handbook of Jewish Education", which may resonate with themes that are pre-occupying Catholic educators, and which may help Catholic educators understand some of the pressing issues and concerns of Jewish educators and Jewish education. Its intention is to…

  10. Technology: So Pervasive in Jewish Living, so Absent from Jewish Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schein, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The Jewish world, like the world civilization that hosts it, is awash in new technologies. Appropriately, there is a great deal of attention paid to how to improve the Jewish world and Jewish identity through technology. Paradoxically there is a paucity of literature characterizing the relationship of Jews and Judaism to technology. This article…

  11. Jewish Education in Extremis: A Prolegomenon to Postmodern Jewish Educational Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Hanan A.

    2003-01-01

    In this article the author argues that for 150 years Jewish education has negotiated the tensions between modernity and Judaism by means of liberal religion, ultra Orthodoxy, and secular Zionism. All three are in crisis today due to the rise of postmodernism. Jewish educational thought therefore needs to create new syntheses between Jewish and…

  12. Pride in One's Country and Citizenship Orientations in a Divided Society: The Case of Israeli Palestinian Arab and Orthodox and Non-Orthodox Jewish Israeli Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ichilov, Orit

    2005-01-01

    Using data collected in Israel as part of the Civic Education Study of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA), this study explores how the divide between Israeli Jews and Israeli Palestinian Arabs is reflected in youngsters' citizenship orientations. To put this case study in context, the article first…

  13. Pride in One's Country and Citizenship Orientations in a Divided Society: The Case of Israeli Palestinian Arab and Orthodox and Non-Orthodox Jewish Israeli Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ichilov, Orit

    2005-01-01

    Using data collected in Israel as part of the Civic Education Study of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA), this study explores how the divide between Israeli Jews and Israeli Palestinian Arabs is reflected in youngsters' citizenship orientations. To put this case study in context, the article first…

  14. Are patients who use alternative medicine dissatisfied with orthodox medicine?

    PubMed

    Donnelly, W J; Spykerboer, J E; Thong, Y H

    1985-05-13

    Approximately 45% of asthmatic families and 47% of non-asthmatic families had consulted an alternative-medicine practitioner at some time. The most popular form of alternative medicine was chiropractic (21.1% and 26.4%, respectively), followed by homoeopathy/naturopathy (18.8% and 12.7%, respectively), acupuncture (9.4% and 10.9%, respectively), and herbal medicine (4.7% and 6.4%, respectively), while the remainder (20.3% and 11.8% respectively) was distributed among iridology, osteopathy, hypnosis, faith healing and megavitamin therapy. More families were satisfied with orthodox medicine (87.1% and 93.6%, respectively) than with alternative medicine (84.2% and 75.1%, respectively). Crosstabulation analysis of pooled data both from asthma and from non-asthma groups showed that 76.4% were satisfied both with orthodox and with alternative medicine, and 16.4% were satisfied with orthodox, but not with alternative, medicine. In contrast, only 2.7% were dissatisfied with orthodox medicine and satisfied with alternative medicine (chi2 = 9.33; P less than 0.01). These findings do not support the view that patients who use alternative medicine are those who are disgruntled with orthodox medicine.

  15. Coming out of the Hasidic closet: Jiří Mordechai Langer (1894–1943) and the fashioning of homosexual-Jewish identity.

    PubMed

    Halper, Shaun Jacob

    2011-01-01

    This essay inaugurates the historical study of the modern homosexual Jewish experience before Stonewall. I begin with a historiographic introduction to the emerging subfield of gay Jewish history. I then turn to reintroduce Jiri Langer, a homosexual and Hasidic writer affiliated with the interwar "Prague circle" (and friend of Franz Kafka and Max Brod) into the purview of modern Jewish Studies. I take up two questions: first, how Langer reconciled his homosexual and Orthodox religious identity; and second, why Langer"s homosexuality became exigent as a Jewish question at this particular historical moment. In his key text, Die Erotik der Kabbala, Langer engages with the dominant interwar debates on homosexuality, but most directly with the work of Hans Blüher, the major theoretician of the German Wandervogelbewegung. In the course of correcting Blüher's antisemitic claims about Jews and homosexuality, Langer managed to delineate a specifically homosexual Jewish identity by renegotiating the relationship between homosexuality and Judaism and by adumbrating a history of "gay" Jews. I contextualize this long-neglected text within Langer's fascinating biography; the debates in the early homosexual rights movement; the particular cultural features of the "Prague circle" in which Langer wrote; and the dislocation and devastation of Langer's beloved eastern-European Hasidic communities caused by World War I—communities that Langer experienced as deeply homoerotic.

  16. 110. Shaws Cove Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    110. Shaws Cove Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 122.65. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  17. 111. Shaws Cove Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    111. Shaws Cove Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 122.65. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  18. 117. Thames River Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    117. Thames River Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4215, MP 124.09. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  19. William Brickman's Legacy in Jewish Education Worldwide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Aryeh

    2010-01-01

    While William W. Brickman has been acknowledged as an erudite scholar, prolific writer, and pioneer of comparative education, his substantial contribution to Jewish education is largely unknown. This article seeks to redress this shortcoming by examining his work in training aspiring Jewish educators, his efforts for the accreditation of fledgling…

  20. Teaching Jewish History to the "Other."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goffman, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    Presents a course in Jewish history and culture for non-Jewish students. Stresses the importance of understanding and respecting all cultures, eliminating cultural stereotypes, and preventing polarization and xenophobia. Includes a weekly course syllabus and bibliography. Discusses the importance of countering stereotypes before presenting some…

  1. Jewish religion and risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Egan, K M; Newcomb, P A; Longnecker, M P; Trentham-Dietz, A; Baron, J A; Trichopoulos, D; Stampfer, M J; Willett, W C

    1996-06-15

    The excess risk of breast cancer among Jewish women has been attributed to the effects of difference in lifestyle and reproductive patterns, but there is now evidence that Jewish women may be more likely than other women to inherit mutations in breast-cancer genes. We investigated whether any excessive risk among Jewish women is confined to those with a family history of breast cancer. We assessed the effect of Jewish religion on breast cancer in a large population-based case-control study (6611 women with breast cancer and 9026 controls) in USA. Participants were given telephone interviews and asked about known and suspected risk factors for breast cancer. Overall, Jewish women had only a slightly raised relative risk of breast cancer (1.10 [95% CI 0.84-1.44]; p=0.49). However, the relative risk was much higher for Jewish women with a first-degree relative who had breast cancer (3.78 [1.74-8.16]; p<0.001). The effect of family history was greater in Jewish women than in women of other religions (p interaction = 0.05). These results are consistent with data suggesting that certain groups of Jewish women have a higher than expected rate of mutation in the breast-cancer gene BRCA1.

  2. Experiential Jewish Education Has Arrived! Now What?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kress, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Experiential Jewish education has been experiencing a time of growth, during which theory development, research, and practice have established a strong voice for the construct. Much of the focus to this point has been on definitions (particularly the distinction between "experiential" and "informal" Jewish education) and on…

  3. Female, Lesbian, and Jewish: Complex and Invisible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, Sari H.

    Managing a marginal identity different from the dominant culture is a difficult process. For a woman who is a lesbian and also Jewish, this means feeling marginal in each of the communities she considers to be her primary support systems. Within the Jewish community, lesbianism is not acceptable, and within the lesbian community, there is often…

  4. Religious Experience as a Jewish Educational Ideal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levisohn, Jon A.

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the question of whether one ought to hold religious experience as a Jewish educational goal and, more fundamentally, to ask what this might mean. The objective is to begin to probe what an education toward (Jewish) religious experience would entail and what some of the theoretical, moral and practical obstacles might be. The…

  5. Ethnolect Debate: Evidence from Jewish Lithuanian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschik, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the concept of Jewish Lithuanian as a range of post-Yiddish varieties spoken by some Jews in Lithuania and seeks to synthesise findings in contemporary ethnolect studies and in the field of Jewish language research. The legitimacy of the term "ethnolect" is questioned by some researchers; however, it is argued that…

  6. Experiential Jewish Education Has Arrived! Now What?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kress, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Experiential Jewish education has been experiencing a time of growth, during which theory development, research, and practice have established a strong voice for the construct. Much of the focus to this point has been on definitions (particularly the distinction between "experiential" and "informal" Jewish education) and on…

  7. Ethnolect Debate: Evidence from Jewish Lithuanian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschik, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the concept of Jewish Lithuanian as a range of post-Yiddish varieties spoken by some Jews in Lithuania and seeks to synthesise findings in contemporary ethnolect studies and in the field of Jewish language research. The legitimacy of the term "ethnolect" is questioned by some researchers; however, it is argued that…

  8. Intergenerational Challenges in Australian Jewish School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Zehavit; Rutland, Suzanne D.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the intergenerational changes that have occurred in Australian Jewish day schools and the challenges these pose for religious and Jewish education. Using a grounded theory approach according to the constant comparative method (Strauss 1987), data from three sources (interviews [296], observations [27],…

  9. Intergenerational Challenges in Australian Jewish School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Zehavit; Rutland, Suzanne D.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the intergenerational changes that have occurred in Australian Jewish day schools and the challenges these pose for religious and Jewish education. Using a grounded theory approach according to the constant comparative method (Strauss 1987), data from three sources (interviews [296], observations [27],…

  10. Key Resources on Jewish Religious Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauber, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    This review examines seven scholarly, high quality publications on Jewish religious education that have appeared in the past decade and that are also accessible for various forms of readers. The books in question represent the best in the academic study of Jewish education, and they share the virtue of being engaging and useful resources for a…

  11. The wrong London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Hugh; Tong, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Your article "Optics pioneers scoop Nobel prize" (November 2009 pp6-7) incorrectly states that Charles Kao, who shared the 2009 Nobel Prize for Physics with Willard Boyle and George Smith, received his PhD from Imperial College London.

  12. Prevalence of nine mutations among Jewish and non-Jewish Gaucher disease patients

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, M.; Tzuri, G.; Eyal, N. ); Berebi, A. ); Kolodny, E.H. ); Brady, R.O.; Barton, N.W. ); Abrahamov, A.; Zimran, A. )

    1993-10-01

    The frequency of nine different mutated alleles known to occur in the glucocerebrosidase gene was determined in 247 Gaucher patients, of whom 176 were of Jewish extraction, 2 were Jewish with one converted parent, and 69 were of non-Jewish origin. DNA was prepared from peripheral blood, active glucocerebrosidase sequences were amplified by using the PCR technique, and the mutations were identified by using the allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization method. The N37OS mutation appeared in 69.77% of the mutated alleles in Jewis patients and in 22.86% of the mutated alleles in non-Jews. The 84GG mutation, which has not been found so far among non-Jewish patients, existed in 10.17% of the disease alleles among Jewish patients. The IVS2+1 mutation constituted 2.26% of the disease alleles among Jewish Patients and 1.43% among the non-Jewish patients. RecTL, a complex allele containing four single-base-pair changes, occurred in 2.26% of the alleles in Jewish patients and was found in two (1.43%) of the patients of non-Jewish extraction. Another complex allele, designated [open quotes]RecNcil[close quotes] and containing three single-point mutations, appeared in 7.8% of alleles of non-Jewish patients and in only two (0.56%) of the Jewish families. The prevalence of the L444P mutation among non-Jewish Gaucher patients was 31.43%, while its prevalence among Jewish patients was only 4.24%. The prevalence of two other point mutations-D409H and R463C- was 5.00% and 3.57%, respectively, among non-Jewish patients and was not found among the Jewish Gaucher patient population. The prevalence of the R496H mutation, found so far only among Jewish patients, is 1.13%. The results presented demonstrate that seven mutations identify 90.40% of the mutations among Jewish patients and that these seven mutations allow diagnosis of only 73.52% of the non-Jewish patients. Identification of additional mutant alleles will enhance the accuracy of carrier detection. 33 refs, 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Revisiting the problem of Jewish bioethics: the case of terminal care.

    PubMed

    Barilan, Y Michael

    2003-06-01

    This paper examines the main Jewish sources relevant to end-of-life ethics, two Talmudic stories, the early modern code of law (Shulhan Aruch), and contemporary Halakhaic (religious law) responsa. Some Orthodox rabbis object to the use of artificial life support that prolongs the life of a dying patient and permit its active discontinuation when the patient is suffering. Other rabbis believe that every medical measure must be taken in order to prolong life. The context of the discussion is the most recent release of the "Steinberg Report," which proposes a law regulating end-of-life issues in Israel. It is argued that the Orthodox rabbis base their views on a strongly positivist concept of religious law. The rabbis deliberate the law as a manifestation of the will of God and try to stretch the law as much as possible in order to benefit the patient, even when it is good for the patient to die. Direct and active actions that kill are prohibited; certain forms of passive euthanasia and contrivances that terminate life support without needing direct human action are accepted.

  14. Teaching Jewish-Christian Relations in the University Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shermis, Michael, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This special issue on "Teaching Jewish-Christian Relations in the University Classroom" is meant to be a resource for those involved in Jewish studies and who teach about Jewish-Christian relations. It offers an introduction to the topics of the Jewish-Christian encounter, Israel, anti-Semitism, Christian Scriptures, the works of Elie…

  15. Catholicity and Context: The Cenotaphs of Orthodox Theological Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marangos, Frank

    2006-01-01

    For more than twenty-five years, field education programs have been the primary pedagogical strategy by which contextual (practical) theological training has occurred at most Orthodox theological schools in America. These programs are based on a developmental approach, with students progressing from observation to participation to actual…

  16. [Jewish veterinarians in Germany, 1918-1945].

    PubMed

    Möllers, G; Schaffer, J

    2005-10-01

    In 1998 there were only twelve Jewish veterinarians known who practised in Germany between 1918 and 1945. 133 of them have now been found. Most of the Jewish veterinarians had their roots in merchant families and were general practitioners in the countryside. To be "Jewish" did not concern until 1933. Compared with the other medical professionals like human medical professionals (10,9 %), in 1933 the number of Jewish veterinarians was low (1,6 %, whole German Jewish population 0,77 %). Right with the beginning of the National Socialistic rule Jewish veterinarians were exposed to different forms of harassment. Soon after, on April 7th 1933, with the so-called Gesetz zur Wiederherstellung des Berufsbeamtentums (BBG; law for the restoration of civil service), the prosecution took on an official quality. The Reichstierärztekammer (Chamber of veterinary service) was very eager to Aryanize the German veterinary service. The BBG made the Jewish veterinarians who worked in public positions lose their jobs with the single exception of those who had the status of a so-called "Frontkämpfer" (a soldier who fought at the frontline during World War I). Many of the Jewish veterinarians who were still in Germany in November 1938 were arrested after the pogrom of November 9/10th and kept in concentration camps and prisons for about one month. The few students of veterinary medicine who already had started their studies in 1933 still could make their exams in Germany, but they did not get a licence. On January 31st 1939 all Jewish veterinarians in Germany lost their licence. 55 Jewish vets managed to emigrate in time. Nineteen German Jewish Veterinarians died in concentration camps and ghettos. Two are known to have committed suicide. Until 1997, there was no act of appreciation or rehabilitation of German Jewish veterinarians. In 2003 the degrees of two Jewish veterinarians, Hermann Cussel and Paul Stern, were renewed posthumously by the Hanover School of Veterinary Medicine

  17. Synthetic biology: a Jewish view.

    PubMed

    Glick, Shimon

    2012-01-01

    The discipline of synthetic biology may be one of the most dramatic advances of the past few decades. It represents a radical upgrading of humankind's ability to manipulate the world in which we live. The potential for benefits to society is enormous, but the risks for deliberate abuse or dangerous miscalculations are no less great. There are serious ethical issues, legitimate concerns for biosafety, and fears of bioterrorism. The ethical dilemmas posed are new and challenging and are being addressed by various groups and commissions. The present paper presents a Jewish approach to some of the ethical issues posed by this new technology. Judaism traditionally looks favorably on man as a co-creator with God and encourages research for the benefit of humankind. Thus it would have a positive attitude towards the current goals of synthetic biology. But in the Jewish tradition man is also charged with stewardship over nature and is admonished to preserve and nurture, not just to exploit and destroy. In line with the Presidential Commission on Bioethics, it would support a carefully weighed balance between the precautionary and the "proactionary" approaches.

  18. "Low Income"--Levels in the Jewish Population; The "Jewish Poor" in Los Angeles. A Summary of Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massarik, Fred

    The concept "Jewish Poor" is defined simply as Jewish households (viz. households containing one or more persons defined as Jewish) whose total household cash income (1969, comparable to U.S. Census) was under 4000 dollars. The data were obtained from four sources: (1) analysis of "Jewish Poor" drawn from Los Angeles phase of…

  19. Medical Ethics in Nephrology: A Jewish Perspective.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Allon N

    2016-04-19

    Jewish medical ethics is arguably the oldest recorded system of bioethics still in use. It should be of interest to practicing nephrologists because of its influence on the ethical systems of Christianity, Islam, and Western secular society; because of the extensive written documentation of rabbinical response in addressing a broad range of bioethical dilemmas; and in understanding the values of patients who choose to adhere to religious Jewish law. The goal of this review is to provide a brief overview of the basic principles underlying mainstream traditional Jewish medical ethics, apply them to common clinical scenarios experienced in nephrology practice, and contrast them with that of secular medical ethics.

  20. History of abuse and organic difficulties in a convenience sample of 46 ultra-orthodox males with pedophilia.

    PubMed

    Witztum, Eliezer; Daie, Netzer; Daie-Gabai, Ayala; Rosler, Ariel

    2012-01-01

    Evidence has started to accumulate that relates pedophilia to a history of being a victim of sexual abuse as well as to comorbidity with organic vulnerabilities. During a naturalistic study regarding treatment of pedophilia, the authors had access to clinical and psychodiagnostic evaluations of Israeli Jewish ultraorthodox male pedophiles outside the forensic system. Using psychiatric examination as well as a battery of psychological tests, presence of history of trauma as well as comorbidity with organic vulnerabilities among this unique sub-group was examined. This survey was part of a larger scale research on the effectiveness of Decapeptyl injections as treatment for pedophilia. All participants in the original research underwent comprehensive psychological assessment including an extensive clinical interview as well as psychological tests (Bender, Rorschach and TAT). Of the patients participating in the research, this survey focused on the group of 46 ultra-orthodox male pedophiles. Cross-tabs analyses were conducted in order to examine prevalence of history of trauma and organic vulnerabilities in this specific group. Based on self reports combined with corroborating reports (obtained from parents, educators and medical staff), together with indications in psychological tests, we found that 82.6% of participants were victims of sexual trauma as children and 87% suffer from some kind of organic vulnerability (learning disabilities, disinhibitions, etc.). LIMITATIONS of this small convenience sample that influence ability to generalize are discussed. The current survey indicates that in this sample, the ultra-orthodox male pedophile was frequently a victim of childhood sexual trauma, and exhibited indications of organic vulnerabilities. This is more pronounced than findings in previous studies, and calls for further research in order to understand the underlying causes.

  1. Atmospheric merger in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    At the invitation of Imperial College, the Laboratory for Planetary Atmospheres, University College London, will be integrated in August with the Atmospheric Physics Group to form a single teaching and research unit. The new group, to be located at Imperial College, will be headed by Garry Hunt.The new group will possess a balanced research program in the observational and interpretative aspects of atmospheric physics. The existing Imperial College group actively researches cumulonimbus dynamics and climate modeling.

  2. North African Jewish and non-Jewish populations form distinctive, orthogonal clusters.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Christopher L; Palamara, Pier F; Dubrovsky, Maya; Botigué, Laura R; Fellous, Marc; Atzmon, Gil; Oddoux, Carole; Pearlman, Alexander; Hao, Li; Henn, Brenna M; Burns, Edward; Bustamante, Carlos D; Comas, David; Friedman, Eitan; Pe'er, Itsik; Ostrer, Harry

    2012-08-21

    North African Jews constitute the second largest Jewish Diaspora group. However, their relatedness to each other; to European, Middle Eastern, and other Jewish Diaspora groups; and to their former North African non-Jewish neighbors has not been well defined. Here, genome-wide analysis of five North African Jewish groups (Moroccan, Algerian, Tunisian, Djerban, and Libyan) and comparison with other Jewish and non-Jewish groups demonstrated distinctive North African Jewish population clusters with proximity to other Jewish populations and variable degrees of Middle Eastern, European, and North African admixture. Two major subgroups were identified by principal component, neighbor joining tree, and identity-by-descent analysis-Moroccan/Algerian and Djerban/Libyan-that varied in their degree of European admixture. These populations showed a high degree of endogamy and were part of a larger Ashkenazi and Sephardic Jewish group. By principal component analysis, these North African groups were orthogonal to contemporary populations from North and South Morocco, Western Sahara, Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt. Thus, this study is compatible with the history of North African Jews-founding during Classical Antiquity with proselytism of local populations, followed by genetic isolation with the rise of Christianity and then Islam, and admixture following the emigration of Sephardic Jews during the Inquisition.

  3. North African Jewish and non-Jewish populations form distinctive, orthogonal clusters

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Christopher L.; Palamara, Pier F.; Dubrovsky, Maya; Botigué, Laura R.; Fellous, Marc; Atzmon, Gil; Oddoux, Carole; Pearlman, Alexander; Hao, Li; Henn, Brenna M.; Burns, Edward; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Comas, David; Friedman, Eitan; Pe'er, Itsik; Ostrer, Harry

    2012-01-01

    North African Jews constitute the second largest Jewish Diaspora group. However, their relatedness to each other; to European, Middle Eastern, and other Jewish Diaspora groups; and to their former North African non-Jewish neighbors has not been well defined. Here, genome-wide analysis of five North African Jewish groups (Moroccan, Algerian, Tunisian, Djerban, and Libyan) and comparison with other Jewish and non-Jewish groups demonstrated distinctive North African Jewish population clusters with proximity to other Jewish populations and variable degrees of Middle Eastern, European, and North African admixture. Two major subgroups were identified by principal component, neighbor joining tree, and identity-by-descent analysis—Moroccan/Algerian and Djerban/Libyan—that varied in their degree of European admixture. These populations showed a high degree of endogamy and were part of a larger Ashkenazi and Sephardic Jewish group. By principal component analysis, these North African groups were orthogonal to contemporary populations from North and South Morocco, Western Sahara, Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt. Thus, this study is compatible with the history of North African Jews—founding during Classical Antiquity with proselytism of local populations, followed by genetic isolation with the rise of Christianity and then Islam, and admixture following the emigration of Sephardic Jews during the Inquisition. PMID:22869716

  4. Interpretations of Freud's Jewishness, 1924-1974.

    PubMed

    Miller, J

    1981-07-01

    During the first fifty years of historical and biographical commentary on Freud and the origins of psychoanalysis there were three periods of interpretation of Freud's Jewishness. During the first period, extending from the mid-1920s until the 1950s, it was widely assumed, following the works of Wittels, that Freud was essentially Viennese, that his Jewishness was at most incidental. During the second period, extending until the late 1960s, Freud was believed by some, following Bakan, to be essentially Jewish, and to have concealed that important aspect of his life intentionally. During the most recent period, and especially in the early 1970s, psychoanalysis was interpreted as a compromise wrought by Freud to meet the conflicting demands of secular German and scientific modernity and Jewish and other traditions.

  5. Teacher Perceptions of Distress and Disturbance Regarding Student Behaviors in an All-Male Orthodox Jewish Yeshiva Elementary School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Karen Golda

    2012-01-01

    Substantial empirical data indicates that elementary school teachers are disturbed by student behavior problems in a classroom. The current study was conducted in order to determine which behaviors teachers report to be most disturbing, whether there are any teacher gender differences, and what teachers report as being most effective in handling…

  6. Impact of Disability Awareness and Self-Efficacy on Preschool Teachers' Attitudes toward Inclusion in Orthodox Jewish Day Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerson, Wendy Devorah

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between preschool teachers' awareness of disabilities, their exposure to disabilities, and their self-efficacy in a classroom, and how they affect teachers' attitudes toward inclusion. Another purpose was to investigate the extent to which class composition (all boys, all girls, co-ed…

  7. The Russian Orthodox Church as moral norm entrepreneur

    PubMed Central

    Stoeckl, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Conflicts over religious symbols in the public sphere, gay marriage, abortion or gender equality have shown their disruptive potential across many societies in the world. They have also become the subject of political and legal debates in international institutions. These conflicts emerge out of different worldviews and normative conceptions of the good, and they are frequently framed in terms of competing interpretations of human rights. One newcomer voice in conflicts over rights and values in the international sphere is the Russian Orthodox Church (ROC), which in recent years has become an active promoter of ‘traditional values’ both inside Russia and internationally. This article studies the ideational prerequisites and dynamics of Russian Orthodox ‘norm protagonism’ in the international arena. PMID:27660397

  8. The Russian Orthodox Church as moral norm entrepreneur.

    PubMed

    Stoeckl, Kristina

    2016-04-02

    Conflicts over religious symbols in the public sphere, gay marriage, abortion or gender equality have shown their disruptive potential across many societies in the world. They have also become the subject of political and legal debates in international institutions. These conflicts emerge out of different worldviews and normative conceptions of the good, and they are frequently framed in terms of competing interpretations of human rights. One newcomer voice in conflicts over rights and values in the international sphere is the Russian Orthodox Church (ROC), which in recent years has become an active promoter of 'traditional values' both inside Russia and internationally. This article studies the ideational prerequisites and dynamics of Russian Orthodox 'norm protagonism' in the international arena.

  9. Jewish Learning in American Universities: The First Century. The Modern Jewish Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritterband, Paul; Wechsler, Harold S.

    This book examines the evolution of Jewish studies as an academic discipline within the history and sociology of higher education in the United States from the late 19th century to the present. Chapter 1 discusses the effects of European and American academic history on the late 19th-century appearance of Jewish learning in American universities.…

  10. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infection following Jewish ritual circumcisions that included direct orogenital suction - New York City, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    2012-06-08

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection commonly causes "cold sores" (HSV type 1 [HSV-1]) and genital herpes (HSV-1 or HSV type 2 [HSV-2]); HSV infection in newborns can result in death or permanent disability. During November 2000-December 2011, a total of 11 newborn males had laboratory-confirmed HSV infection in the weeks following out-of-hospital Jewish ritual circumcision, investigators from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) learned. Ten of the 11 newborns were hospitalized; two died. In six of the 11 cases, health-care providers confirmed parental reports that the ritual circumcision included an ultra-Orthodox Jewish practice known as metzitzah b'peh, in which the circumciser (mohel, plural: mohelim) places his mouth directly on the newly circumcised penis and sucks blood away from the circumcision wound (direct orogenital suction). In the remaining cases, other evidence suggested that genital infection was introduced by direct orogenital suction (probable direct orogenital suction). Based on cases reported to DOHMH during April 2006-December 2011, the risk for neonatal herpes caused by HSV-1 and untyped HSV following Jewish ritual circumcision with confirmed or probable direct orogenital suction in New York City was estimated at 1 in 4,098 or 3.4 times greater than the risk among male infants considered unlikely to have had direct orogenital suction. Oral contact with a newborn's open wound risks transmission of HSV and other pathogens. Circumcision is a surgical procedure that should be performed under sterile conditions. Health-care professionals advising parents and parents choosing Jewish ritual circumcision should inquire in advance whether direct orogenital suction will be performed, and orogenital suction should be avoided.

  11. Cultural identity and belonging in later life: is extra care housing an attractive concept to older Jewish people living in Britain?

    PubMed

    Holland, Caroline A; Katz, Jeanne S

    2010-03-01

    The extra care housing concept of supported independence within a caring community is one that may offer much to minority communities, particularly those with changing patterns of family care. The context for this study is a UK population which is ageing, with a relatively small but growing number of older people within religious and ethnic minority groups who have needs specific to their cultural identity in addition to those in common with the majority. In considering its need for new forms of later life accommodation, the British Jewish community is looking for models that are acceptable both in terms of specifically Jewish cultural requirements and with respect to 'mainstream' middle class expectations of amenity, service, and social inclusion. This article presents findings of sixteen focus groups with middle-aged and older members of Jewish communities in London and the south east of England, and reflects on their attitudes to specificity in cultural provision in extra care.

  12. The Incidence of Jewish Alcoholism: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bainwol, Suzanne; Gressard, Charles F.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a review and critique of recent research on the rate of Jewish alcoholism. Concludes that alcoholism is probably still relatively rare among Jews. Predictions of future Jewish drinking practices and implications for further research are discussed. (Author/BL)

  13. Lifelong Education in Jewish Sources: Principles and Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kodesh, Shlomo

    1997-01-01

    Jewish cultural tradition shows strong support for lifelong learning and study for its own sake. Basic principles of Jewish education include functionalism (life change resulting from education) and accessibility (all are entitled to education). (SK)

  14. London: An Art Teacher's Inspiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guhin, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Often overshadowed in people's minds by Paris, London is truly an artist's jewel. The art and architecture, history, gardens and museums are inspiring, yes, but there's so much more to this ancient city. The performances, attractions and markets are a boon to the creative soul. London can be surprisingly inexpensive to visit. Gazing at statues,…

  15. London: An Art Teacher's Inspiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guhin, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Often overshadowed in people's minds by Paris, London is truly an artist's jewel. The art and architecture, history, gardens and museums are inspiring, yes, but there's so much more to this ancient city. The performances, attractions and markets are a boon to the creative soul. London can be surprisingly inexpensive to visit. Gazing at statues,…

  16. London International Youth Science Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the 2010 London International Youth Science Forum (LIYSF) and shares his experience in attending the forum. Unlike the Harry Messel event in Sydney, which takes place every two years, LIYSF is an annual event. Before moving to Imperial College London, LIYSF was held at the Institute of Electrical Engineers and…

  17. The New "Journal of Jewish Education" at Ten: An Appraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasner, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This article documents the "Journal of Jewish Education's" acquisition by the Network for Research in Jewish Education, in 2004, and evaluates the contribution of the re-launched Journal to the field of Jewish education. I explore how the Journal contributed over the past decade in three discrete yet often overlapping areas, thereby…

  18. College Guide for Jewish Youth. 1978-1979 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feingold, S. Norman, Ed.; And Others

    This guide is a source of information for Jewish youth interested in ascertaining the Jewish-related demographic aspects of leading colleges and universities in the U.S. and Canada. Part I describes major factors which influence college selection, admission and cost of education. Items of specific concern to Jewish students are detailed. Part II…

  19. Jewish Education in Dublin: Organizational Development and Conflicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, David

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to dwell on the trends in the development of Jewish education in Dublin. The discussion is based on books written about the Jewish community and central figures in it, on interviews with people who were involved in shaping the Jewish education and with others who were familiar with it, on community magazines and documents…

  20. Contemporary Concerns, Assessments, and Aspirations in Jewish Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This essay reviews the Vision and Practice section of the "International Handbook of Jewish Education" published in 2011. Gathered in this section, 24 Jewish educators (spread across 18 chapters) offer theoretical reflections on the state of Jewish education in the contemporary moment. These chapters seem, on first reading, a rather eclectic…

  1. Pluralism and Its Purposeful Introduction to a Jewish Day School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conyer, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    Pluralism is an ambiguous term with a multiplicity of meanings. In recent decades there has been a proliferation of a newer category of Jewish Day Schools, the Jewish Community School. Jewish Community Schools distinguish themselves by positioning pluralism as a foundational concept of their school's ethos. Very little is known about how…

  2. 75 FR 25099 - Jewish American Heritage Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... Month, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation In 1883, the Jewish American.... During Jewish American Heritage Month we celebrate this proud history and honor the invaluable... United States, do hereby proclaim May 2010 as Jewish American Heritage Month. I call upon all...

  3. The New "Journal of Jewish Education" at Ten: An Appraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasner, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This article documents the "Journal of Jewish Education's" acquisition by the Network for Research in Jewish Education, in 2004, and evaluates the contribution of the re-launched Journal to the field of Jewish education. I explore how the Journal contributed over the past decade in three discrete yet often overlapping areas, thereby…

  4. Religious fundamentalism and religious orientation among the Greek Orthodox.

    PubMed

    Mora, Louis Ernesto; Stavrinides, Panayiotis; McDermut, Wilson

    2014-10-01

    The experimenters explored how religious fundamentalism related with religious orientation, irrational thinking, and immature defense mechanisms. They also explored the possible moderational role of the Big 5 personality factors. The participants were predominantly Greek Orthodox College students from a Cypriot University. The experimenters employed a cross-sectional design and required participants to complete a series of self-report measures. Religious fundamentalism significantly predicted irrational thinking. Intrinsic and personal extrinsic religious orientations significantly predicted religious fundamentalism. The results provide support for the idea that the more dogmatically one holds their religious beliefs, the more likely they are to think irrationally.

  5. Homosexuality in Classroom Discourse at an American Modern Orthodox High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Devra

    2011-01-01

    In light of recent developments in the Modern Orthodox community's approach to homosexuality, this article presents a classroom discussion on homosexuality that took place at a Modern Orthodox high school. An examination of the discussion's heteroglossia, or multiplicity of languages existing in tension, along with attention to the discussion's…

  6. Homosexuality in Classroom Discourse at an American Modern Orthodox High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Devra

    2011-01-01

    In light of recent developments in the Modern Orthodox community's approach to homosexuality, this article presents a classroom discussion on homosexuality that took place at a Modern Orthodox high school. An examination of the discussion's heteroglossia, or multiplicity of languages existing in tension, along with attention to the discussion's…

  7. Looking into 'London'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This mosaic image from the microscopic imager on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rock abrasion tool target, 'London.' The image was taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on its 149th sol on Mars (June 24, 2004). Scientists 'read' the geology of the image from bottom to top, with the youngest material pictured at the bottom of the image and the oldest material in the layers pictured at the top. Millimeter-scale layers run horizontally across the exposed surface, with two sliced sphere-like objects, or 'blueberries' on the upper left and upper right sides of the impression. This material is similar to the evaporative material found in 'Eagle Crater.' However, the intense review of these layers in Endurance Crater is, in essence, deepening the water story authored by ancient Mars.

    In Eagle Crater, the effects of water were traced down a matter of centimeters. Endurance Crater's depth has allowed the tracing of water's telltale marks up to meters. Another process that significantly affects martian terrain is muddying the water story a bit. Although it is clear that the layers in Endurance were affected by water, it is also evident that Aeolian, or wind, processes have contributed to the makeup of the crater.

  8. The commerce of human body parts: an Eastern Orthodox response.

    PubMed

    Reardon, P H

    2000-08-01

    The Orthodox Church teaches that the bodies of those in Christ are to be regarded as sanctified by the hearing of the Word and faithful participation in the Sacraments, most particularly the Holy Eucharist; because of the indwelling of the Holy Spirit the consecrated bodies of Christians do not belong to them but to Christ; with respect to the indwelling Holy Spirit there is no difference between the bodies of Christians before and after death; whether before or after death, the Christian body is also to receive the same veneration; and notwithstanding the physical corruptions that the body endures by reason of death, there remains a strict continuity between the body in which the Christian dies and the body in which the Christian will rise again. That is to say, it is the very same reality that is sown in corruption and will be raised in incorruption. Given such consideration, the notion of "selling" and integral part of a human being is simply outside the realm of rational comprehension. Indeed, it is profoundly repugnant to those Orthodox Christian sentiments that are formed and nourished by the Church's sacramental teaching and liturgical worship. One does not sell or purchase that which has been consecrated in those solemn ways that the Church consecrates the human body.

  9. Theology and Science in the Orthodox World: Some Doubts from a Latin Perspective.

    PubMed

    Lüthy, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Efthymios Nicolaidis et alii open their essay with what amounts to a paradox: they maintain that Orthodox Christianity “scarcely participated in the making of the new European science” but also quote John William Draper’s positive assessment of the openness of the Orthodox Church to the sciences. Whether they manage to resolve this paradox is unclear. This response to their overview suggests that they neglect two key elements: the categorical difference between medieval scientia and modern science; and the role of institutions such as universities and scientific societies. Furthermore, to gauge the relation of Orthodox Christianity to modern science, one would also have had to take the Russian Orthodox Church into account, as after the fall of Constantinople the Greek Orthodox Church was deprived of much of its political and institutional power.

  10. Jewish Studies: A Guide to Reference Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill Univ., Montreal (Quebec). McLennan Library.

    An annotated bibliography to the reference sources for Jewish Studies in the McLennan Library of McGill University (Canada) is presented. Any titles in Hebrew characters are listed by their transliterated equivalents. There is also a list of relevant Library of Congress Subject Headings. General reference sources listed are: encyclopedias,…

  11. The Groningen Protocol - the Jewish perspective.

    PubMed

    Gesundheit, Benjamin; Steinberg, Avraham; Blazer, Shraga; Jotkowitz, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Despite significant advances in neonatology, there will always be newborns with serious life-threatening conditions creating most difficult bioethical dilemmas. Active euthanasia for adult patients is one of the most controversial bioethical questions; for severely ill neonates, the issue is even more complex, due to their inability to take part in any decision concerning their future. The Groningen Protocol introduced in 2005 by P.J. Sauer proposes criteria allowing active euthanasia for severely ill, not necessarily terminal, newborns with incurable conditions and poor quality of life in order to spare them unbearable suffering. We discuss the ethical dilemma and ideological foundations of the protocol, the opinions of its defenders and critics, and the dangers involved. The Jewish perspective relating to the subject is presented based on classical Jewish sources, which we trust may enrich modern bioethical debates. In Jewish law, the fetus acquires full legal status only after birth. However, while the lives of terminally ill neonates must in no way be actively destroyed or shortened, there is no obligation to make extraordinary efforts to prolong their lives. Accurate preimplantation or prenatal diagnosis might significantly reduce the incidence of nonviable births, but active killing of infants violates the basic foundations of Jewish law, and opens the 'slippery slope' for uncontrolled abuse. Therefore, we call upon the international medical and bioethical community to reject the Groningen Protocol that permits euthanization and to develop ethical guidelines for the optimal care of severely compromised neonates. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Jewish Studies: A Guide to Reference Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill Univ., Montreal (Quebec). McLennan Library.

    An annotated bibliography to the reference sources for Jewish Studies in the McLennan Library of McGill University (Canada) is presented. Any titles in Hebrew characters are listed by their transliterated equivalents. There is also a list of relevant Library of Congress Subject Headings. General reference sources listed are: encyclopedias,…

  13. Jewish Culture and the American Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    81 2. Cases of Intolerance .........................81 H. JEWISH UPBRINGING .................................82 I. SUMMARY OF IMPRESSIONS ...personnel during the war is long and impressive , with over 50,000 awards being presented. Of these, 64 were Distinguished Service Crosses; 27 were Navy...83 Beth J. Asch , et al., What Factors Affect the Military Enlistment of Hispanic Youth? A Look at Enlistment Qualifications (Santa Monica, Calif

  14. PISA Assessment: The Problematic Issue of Administrating PISA Science Literacy Survey to Ultra-Orthodox Pupils in Israel, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamir, Sara; Sabo, Helena

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present article is to point out the problematic issue of administrating PISA science literacy exam to the ultra-orthodox schools in Israel. It has been assumed that some texts included in the test may offend the feelings of the ultra-orthodox population or may contradict Orthodox upbringing and therefore constitute a cultural bias.

  15. Teachers' Study Guide: Jewish Legends. The Image of the Jew in Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mersand, Joseph; Wiesel, Elie

    The Jewish legends which are a major part of Jewish life and literature are the focus of this study guide for teachers. Excerpts from a lecture on Jewish legends are followed by suggestions for classroom activities, discussion topics related to the study of Jewish legends, and a bibliography for both teachers and students on Jewish legend and…

  16. Management of cancer pain: 1. Wider implications of orthodox analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Susannah K; Dawson, Jill; Lee, Jack A; Osman, Gizem; Levitin, Maria O; Guzel, Refika Mine; Djamgoz, Mustafa BA

    2014-01-01

    In this review, the first of two parts, we first provide an overview of the orthodox analgesics used commonly against cancer pain. Then, we examine in more detail the emerging evidence for the potential impact of analgesic use on cancer risk and disease progression. Increasing findings suggest that long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, particularly aspirin, may reduce cancer occurrence. However, acetaminophen may raise the risk of some hematological malignancies. Drugs acting upon receptors of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABA “mimetics” (eg, gabapentin) appear generally safe for cancer patients, but there is some evidence of potential carcinogenicity. Some barbiturates appear to slightly raise cancer risks and can affect cancer cell behavior in vitro. For cannabis, studies suggest an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, larynx, and possibly lung. Morphine may stimulate human microvascular endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis; it is not clear whether this might cause harm or produce benefit. The opioid, fentanyl, may promote growth in some tumor cell lines. Opium itself is an emerging risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma and possibly cancers of the esophagus, bladder, larynx, and lung. It is concluded that analgesics currently prescribed for cancer pain can significantly affect the cancer process itself. More futuristically, several ion channels are being targeted with novel analgesics, but many of these are also involved in primary and/or secondary tumorigenesis. Further studies are needed to elucidate possible cellular and molecular effects of orthodox analgesics and their possible long-term impact, both positive and negative, and thus enable the best possible clinical gain for cancer patients. PMID:24470767

  17. Management of cancer pain: 1. Wider implications of orthodox analgesics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Susannah K; Dawson, Jill; Lee, Jack A; Osman, Gizem; Levitin, Maria O; Guzel, Refika Mine; Djamgoz, Mustafa Ba

    2014-01-01

    In this review, the first of two parts, we first provide an overview of the orthodox analgesics used commonly against cancer pain. Then, we examine in more detail the emerging evidence for the potential impact of analgesic use on cancer risk and disease progression. Increasing findings suggest that long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, particularly aspirin, may reduce cancer occurrence. However, acetaminophen may raise the risk of some hematological malignancies. Drugs acting upon receptors of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABA "mimetics" (eg, gabapentin) appear generally safe for cancer patients, but there is some evidence of potential carcinogenicity. Some barbiturates appear to slightly raise cancer risks and can affect cancer cell behavior in vitro. For cannabis, studies suggest an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, larynx, and possibly lung. Morphine may stimulate human microvascular endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis; it is not clear whether this might cause harm or produce benefit. The opioid, fentanyl, may promote growth in some tumor cell lines. Opium itself is an emerging risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma and possibly cancers of the esophagus, bladder, larynx, and lung. It is concluded that analgesics currently prescribed for cancer pain can significantly affect the cancer process itself. More futuristically, several ion channels are being targeted with novel analgesics, but many of these are also involved in primary and/or secondary tumorigenesis. Further studies are needed to elucidate possible cellular and molecular effects of orthodox analgesics and their possible long-term impact, both positive and negative, and thus enable the best possible clinical gain for cancer patients.

  18. Jewish holidays and their associated medical risks.

    PubMed

    Urkin, Jacob; Naimer, Sody

    2015-02-01

    Religiosity is inherent in human cultures. Being different in many aspects, all have rules regarding appropriate behavior and rituals. Celebrations of social events and of holidays prevail in all major religions. These include code of dress, prayers, special food and activities which may have negative health implications. The Jewish religion is 'blessed' with an abundance of holidays each with its unique health implications. In this paper we provide an outline of the character of these festivals and possible medical repercussions on those celebrating them. Observant members of the Jewish religion and teams treating this population should be knowledgeable of potentially associated risks. Pre-holiday periods should be specifically targeted for educational and preventive activity in order diminish injury or morbidity.

  19. Genetic markers cannot determine Jewish descent

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Humans differentiate, classify, and discriminate: social interaction is a basic property of human Darwinian evolution. Presumably inherent differential physical as well as behavioral properties have always been criteria for identifying friend or foe. Yet, biological determinism is a relatively modern term, and scientific racism is, oddly enough, largely a consequence or a product of the Age of Enlightenment and the establishment of the notion of human equality. In recent decades ever-increasing efforts and ingenuity were invested in identifying Biblical Israelite genotypic common denominators by analysing an assortment of phenotypes, like facial patterns, blood types, diseases, DNA-sequences, and more. It becomes overwhelmingly clear that although Jews maintained detectable vertical genetic continuity along generations of socio-religious-cultural relationship, also intensive horizontal genetic relations were maintained both between Jewish communities and with the gentile surrounding. Thus, in spite of considerable consanguinity, there is no Jewish genotype to identify. PMID:25653666

  20. Robotics and artificial intelligence: Jewish ethical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Z H

    2006-01-01

    In 16th Century Prague, Rabbi Loew created a Golem, a humanoid made of clay, to protect his community. When the Golem became too dangerous to his surroundings, he was dismantled. This Jewish theme illustrates some of the guiding principles in its approach to the moral dilemmas inherent in future technologies, such as artificial intelligence and robotics. Man is viewed as having received the power to improve upon creation and develop technologies to achieve them, with the proviso that appropriate safeguards are taken. Ethically, not-harming is viewed as taking precedence over promoting good. Jewish ethical thinking approaches these novel technological possibilities with a cautious optimism that mankind will derive their benefits without coming to harm.

  1. The medicinal leech in Jewish writings.

    PubMed

    Rosner, F

    1999-12-01

    Leeches were widely used for healing throughout antiquity and the Middle Ages. The rabbinic responsa literature acknowledges the use of leeching for the prevention and treatment of certain illnesses, and classic Jewish sources including the Bible, Talmud, and Codes of Jewish Law describe leeches and mention their medicinal use. Although the swallowing of a leech is considered dangerous and may lead to abdominal swelling, the Talmud describes an oral concoction containing leeches in wine for patients with enlarged spleens. It is also documented that engorged leeches placed in salt quickly discharge their blood and can be used again. Modern plastic and microsurgery have rediscovered the medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, to reduce venous congestion. Clearly, the value of this annelid worm lies in its secretion of an anticoagulant known as hirudin, which has several advantages over heparin. One cannot help but marvel at the wisdom and ingenuity of our forefathers.

  2. Euthanasia: an overview and the jewish perspective.

    PubMed

    Gesundheit, Benjamin; Steinberg, Avraham; Glick, Shimon; Or, Reuven; Jotkovitz, Alan

    2006-10-01

    End-of-life care poses fundamental ethical problems to clinicians. Defining euthanasia is a difficult and complex task, which causes confusion in its practical clinical application. Over the course of history, abuse of the term has led to medical atrocities. Familiarity with the relevant bioethical issues and the development of practical guidelines might improve clinical performance. To define philosophical concepts, to present historical events, to discuss the relevant attitudes in modern bioethics and law that may be helpful in elaborating practical guidelines for clinicians regarding euthanasia and end-of-life care. Concepts found in the classic sources of Jewish tradition might shed additional light on the issue and help clinicians in their decision-making process. An historical overview defines the concepts of active versus passive euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide and related terms. Positions found in classical Jewish literature are presented and analyzed with their later interpretations. The relevance and application in modern clinical medicine of both the general and Jewish approaches are discussed. The overview of current bioethical concepts demonstrates the variety of approaches in western culture and legal systems. Philosophically and conceptually, there is a crucial distinction between active and passive euthanasia. The legitimacy of active euthanasia has been the subject of major controversy in recent times in various countries and religious traditions. The historical overview and the literature review demonstrate the need to provide clearer definitions of the concepts relating to euthanasia, for in the past the term has led to major confusion and uncontrolled abuse. Bioethical topics should, therefore, be included in medical training and continuing education. There are major debates and controversies regarding the current clinical and legal approaches. We trust that classical Jewish sources might contribute to the establishment of clinical

  3. [Complementary medicine--Jewish medical ethics].

    PubMed

    Katz, Yisrae; Schiff, Elad

    2011-08-01

    In Israel, as in the Western world, the use of different methods of complementary and alternative medicine ICAM) is spreading. CAM raises ethical questions of concern to healthcare providers and to the public: Can physicians recommend a treatment that has no scientific evidence? Should the government include such therapies in the health budget? Can complementary therapists receive protection against lawsuits if their treatment is recognized? The purpose of this article is to present a Jewish perspective on these issues. The fundamental sources that deal with the subject are based on the approach of rabbinic authorities toward unproven medicine, as expressed in the "Mishnah" and "Talmud" (200-500 C.E). The great Jewish scholar who discusses the subject in detail is Maimonides (1135-1204), who defines what "medicine" is and claims that medicine has to rely on reason or experience. Contemporary Jewish commentators present their position based on the interpretation of Maimonides' texts. In this article we claim that treatments can be divided into four groups, each group having a different halachic status: (1) Treatment that might be dangerous--should not be used. (2) Treatment that is safe--can be used, but has no other special status. (3) Treatment recognized by alternative therapists--has consequences for the observant Jew, such as laws of Kashrut and Shabbat. (4) Treatment that was tested and proven using modern medical methods has public significance--the therapist is entitled to legal defense if he made a reasonable mistake; the government can consider funding such treatment using public money. This article presents the Jewish halachic sources upon which we propose an ethical-practical approach to CAM.

  4. Jewish -- Zionist Terrorism and the Establishment of Israel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    to advance Hebrew language and Hebrew culture; to purchase land in Palestine for the Jewish people, through the Jewish National Fund; to develop...holds that the Hebrew defense organization put an end to the one-sided attacks by the Arabs, e.g., 1920 in Jerusalem, 1921 in Jaffa, the riots of 1929...34criminal anti- Hebrew activities: ŕ. illegal entry into the Jewish homeland; 2. membership of the British criminal terrorist organization known as the Army

  5. Genetic affinities of the Jewish populations of India.

    PubMed

    Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Singh, Manvendra; Rai, Niraj; Kariappa, Mini; Singh, Kamayani; Singh, Ashish; Pratap Singh, Deepankar; Tamang, Rakesh; Selvi Rani, Deepa; Reddy, Alla G; Kumar Singh, Vijay; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2016-01-13

    Due to the lack of written records or inscription, the origin and affiliation of Indian Jewish populations with other world populations remain contentious. Previous genetic studies have found evidence for a minor shared ancestry of Indian Jewish with Middle Eastern (Jewish) populations. However, these studies (relied on limited individuals), haven't explored the detailed temporal and spatial admixture process of Indian Jewish populations with the local Indian populations. Here, using large sample size with combination of high resolution biparental (autosomal) and uniparental markers (Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA), we reconstructed genetic history of Indian Jewish by investigating the patterns of genetic diversity. Consistent with the previous observations, we detected minor Middle Eastern specific ancestry component among Indian Jewish communities, but virtually negligible in their local neighbouring Indian populations. The temporal test of admixture suggested that the first admixture of migrant Jewish populations from Middle East to South India (Cochin) occurred during fifth century. Overall, we concluded that the Jewish migration and admixture in India left a record in their genomes, which can link them to the 'Jewish Diaspora'.

  6. Genetic affinities of the Jewish populations of India

    PubMed Central

    Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Singh, Manvendra; Rai, Niraj; Kariappa, Mini; Singh, Kamayani; Singh, Ashish; Pratap Singh, Deepankar; Tamang, Rakesh; Selvi Rani, Deepa; Reddy, Alla G.; Kumar Singh, Vijay; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2016-01-01

    Due to the lack of written records or inscription, the origin and affiliation of Indian Jewish populations with other world populations remain contentious. Previous genetic studies have found evidence for a minor shared ancestry of Indian Jewish with Middle Eastern (Jewish) populations. However, these studies (relied on limited individuals), haven’t explored the detailed temporal and spatial admixture process of Indian Jewish populations with the local Indian populations. Here, using large sample size with combination of high resolution biparental (autosomal) and uniparental markers (Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA), we reconstructed genetic history of Indian Jewish by investigating the patterns of genetic diversity. Consistent with the previous observations, we detected minor Middle Eastern specific ancestry component among Indian Jewish communities, but virtually negligible in their local neighbouring Indian populations. The temporal test of admixture suggested that the first admixture of migrant Jewish populations from Middle East to South India (Cochin) occurred during fifth century. Overall, we concluded that the Jewish migration and admixture in India left a record in their genomes, which can link them to the ‘Jewish Diaspora’. PMID:26759184

  7. Reactions to terror attacks in ultra-orthodox jews: the cost of maintaining strict identity.

    PubMed

    Ankri, Yael L E; Bachar, Eytan; Shalev, Arieh Y

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic events can shatter faith and beliefs. The responses of Ultra-Orthodox survivors of deadly terrorist attacks illustrate an effort to reconcile dreadful experiences with deeply embedded beliefs. Qualified clinicians prospectively evaluated self-reported and interviewer-generated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and cognitive appraisal in Ultra-Orthodox (n = 20) and non-Ultra-Orthodox (n = 33) survivors of suicide bus-bombing incidents in Jerusalem. Ultra-Orthodox survivors reported higher levels of PTSD symptoms and more personal guilt. Their narratives reflected an unshaken belief in Just Providence, within which being a victim of terror was perceived as a Just retribution for known or unknown wrongdoing. Survivors' reactions to trauma often reflect an effort to reconcile incongruous experiences with previously held beliefs. When treating strict believers, helpers should be sensitive to the identity-preserving function of posttraumatic cognitions.

  8. Professor Dr Med Oskar Fehr: the fate of an outstanding German-Jewish ophthalmologist: an early contributor to cornea and external disease.

    PubMed

    Lisch, Walter; Mannis, Mark J

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to recount the immense and abrupt change in the private and professional life of a prominent German-Jewish ophthalmologist in the transition from democracy to dictatorship in Germany during the first half of the 20th century. This involves a Retrospective analysis of Fehr's clinical and scientific work as the first assistant of Julius Hirschberg's world-famous eye clinic in Berlin; evaluation of Fehr's successful tenure as a chair of Virchow's Eye Hospital; the catastrophic influence of Hitler's seizure of power on the private and professional lives of German-Jewish physicians; and an analysis of Fehr's personal and professional will to continue the practice of medicine in England. Oskar Fehr published >50 articles and was the first to describe the endemic swimming pool conjunctivitis. He was the first to specifically distinguish granular, lattice, and macular corneal dystrophies. Professor Oskar Fehr was the chair of one of the most important eye clinics in Germany for nearly 30 years. The "Anti-Jewish Medical Laws" with their terrible consequences on private and professional lives led to Fehr's emigration from his homeland to England in 1939. He obtained a British medical doctor degree after 4 years of study, and at an advanced age, he demonstrated his determination to practice ophthalmology successfully in London. Oskar Fehr died in London on August 1, 1959.

  9. London through a Biologist's Eyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2004-01-01

    A professor of biology discovered that the people who are in literature rather than science, saw the same readings very differently and were looking for very different things like how nature writings expressed the author's views on nature, or what they communicated about the human experience of the living world. Further he visits London to see the…

  10. Eye casualty services in London

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H B; Daniel, C S; Verma, S

    2013-01-01

    The combined pressures of the European Working Time Directive, 4 h waiting time target, and growing rates of unplanned hospital attendances have forced a major consolidation of eye casualty departments across the country, with the remaining units seeing a rapid increase in demand. We examine the effect of these changes on the provision of emergency eye care in Central London, and see what wider lessons can be learned. We surveyed the managers responsible for each of London's 8 out-of-hours eye casualty services, analysed data on attendance numbers, and conducted detailed interviews with lead clinicians. At London's two largest units, Moorfields Eye Hospital and the Western Eye Hospital, annual attendance numbers have been rising at 7.9% per year (to 76 034 patients in 2010/11) and 9.6% per year (to 31 128 patients in 2010/11), respectively. Using Moorfields as a case study, we discuss methods to increase capacity and efficiency in response to this demand, and also examine some of the unintended consequences of service consolidation including patients travelling long distances to geographically inappropriate units, and confusion over responsibility for out-of-hours inpatient cover. We describe a novel ‘referral pathway' developed to minimise unnecessary travelling and delay for patients, and propose a forum for the strategic planning of London's eye casualty services in the future. PMID:23370420

  11. London's Tutorial Classes; An Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, F. G.

    1970-01-01

    Growth during the 1960s in the number and scope of tutorial classes by the London University Department of Extra-Mural Studies is attributed to considerable help from voluntary personnel, emphasis on written work, and other factors potentially signficant to extension education elsewhere in Britain. (LY)

  12. Teaching about Catholic-Jewish Relationships: Interpreting Jewish Hostility to Jesus in the Gospels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wansbrough, Henry

    2016-01-01

    A recent article in this journal, "Teaching about Catholic--Jewish relations: some guidelines to assist the work of teachers in Catholic schools," by Clare Jardine (Volume 7, no 1, 46-60), includes a page on "A new approach to New Testament studies." There the author points out that "The situations described in the Gospels…

  13. On the Origins and Persistence of the Jewish Identity Industry in Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasner, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    "Jewish identity," which emerged as an analytical term in the 1950s, appealed to a set of needs that American Jews felt in the postwar period, which accounted for its popularity. Identity was the quintessential conundrum for a community on the threshold of acceptance. The work of Kurt Lewin, Erik Erikson, Will Herberg, Marshall Sklare,…

  14. The Geographies of Jewish Life: Building a Home within Which Jewish Education Can Dwell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    This essay reviews the Geographical section of the "International Handbook of Jewish Education" published in 2011. The differences between countries, their unique histories and cultures, are important, but their similarities are arguably more revealing. Indeed, on occasions when similar phenomena are examined in different places by different…

  15. Teaching about Catholic-Jewish Relationships: Interpreting Jewish Hostility to Jesus in the Gospels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wansbrough, Henry

    2016-01-01

    A recent article in this journal, "Teaching about Catholic--Jewish relations: some guidelines to assist the work of teachers in Catholic schools," by Clare Jardine (Volume 7, no 1, 46-60), includes a page on "A new approach to New Testament studies." There the author points out that "The situations described in the Gospels…

  16. On the Origins and Persistence of the Jewish Identity Industry in Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasner, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    "Jewish identity," which emerged as an analytical term in the 1950s, appealed to a set of needs that American Jews felt in the postwar period, which accounted for its popularity. Identity was the quintessential conundrum for a community on the threshold of acceptance. The work of Kurt Lewin, Erik Erikson, Will Herberg, Marshall Sklare,…

  17. [Debates on the "Jewish nurse" within the Jewish communities in Austro-Hungary around 1900].

    PubMed

    Malleier, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The debate about the organisation of nursing became acute during the last decades of the 19th century when big modern Jewish hospitals were built in several cities of the Habsburg Monarchy. This led to an increase in the demand for nurses and to the initiation of a discussion about the professionalisation of Jewish nursing. In these debates different actors with different intentions were involved. While hospitals were looking mainly for inexpensive and unlimited working nurses, middle-class organisations such as B'nai B'rith emphasised the necessity for women to learn a useful profession to be able to support their husbands economically. Furthermore, feminists and women's associations tried to set new standards for female education, emphasising economic independence and improving the working conditions for women. Jewish feminists such as Henriette Weiss in Vienna, Ida Fuerst in Budapest, and Julie Leipen in Prague tried to build up Jewish nursing schools. The different strategies of implementations and the result of their efforts will be the main focus of this paper.

  18. Orthodox etching of HVPE-grown GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Weyher, J.L.; Lazar, S.; Macht, L.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Molnar,R.J.; Muller, S.; Nowak, G.; Grzegory, I.

    2006-08-10

    Orthodox etching of HVPE-grown GaN in molten eutectic of KOH + NaOH (E etch) and in hot sulfuric and phosphoric acids (HH etch) is discussed in detail. Three size grades of pits are formed by the preferential E etching at the outcrops of threading dislocations on the Ga-polar surface of GaN. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as the calibration tool it is shown that the largest pits are formed on screw, intermediate on mixed and the smallest on edge dislocations. This sequence of size does not follow the sequence of the Burgers values (and thus the magnitude of the elastic energy) of corresponding dislocations. This discrepancy is explained taking into account the effect of decoration of dislocations, the degree of which is expected to be different depending on the lattice deformation around the dislocations, i.e. on the edge component of the Burgers vector. It is argued that the large scatter of optimal etching temperatures required for revealing all three types of dislocations in HVPE-grown samples from different sources also depends upon the energetic status of dislocations. The role of kinetics for reliability of etching in both etches is discussed and the way of optimization of the etching parameters is shown.

  19. Nonprofit Groups Offer Genetic Testing for Jewish Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supiano, Beckie

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how nonprofit organizations like Hillel are offering free genetic testing for Jewish college students. A growing number of colleges, including Pittsburgh, Brandeis University, and Columbia University are offering students free or reduced-cost screenings for diseases common to Jewish population. Genetic diseases common to…

  20. 77 FR 26905 - Jewish American Heritage Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... United States of America A Proclamation Three hundred and fifty-eight years ago, a band of 23 Jewish..., BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 2012 as Jewish American Heritage Month...

  1. The Gender Question and the Study of Jewish Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charme, Stuart Z.

    2006-01-01

    Although some researchers argue that a generation of feminist innovations and changes in American Jewish life has produced an egalitarian generation in which gender differences among Jewish children and adolescents are insignificant, this article argues that the salience of gender differences is a factor of the kinds of questions that children are…

  2. Nonprofit Groups Offer Genetic Testing for Jewish Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supiano, Beckie

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how nonprofit organizations like Hillel are offering free genetic testing for Jewish college students. A growing number of colleges, including Pittsburgh, Brandeis University, and Columbia University are offering students free or reduced-cost screenings for diseases common to Jewish population. Genetic diseases common to…

  3. Performing Identities in the Classroom: Teaching Jewish Women's Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Kathie; Rosenberg, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Teaching about intersecting, fluid and historically contingent identities has been taken up extensively within the sociology of race, class and gender and women's studies. Oddly, the case of Jewish women has been virtually left out of this robust literature. This article explores the challenges raised through teaching the course "Jewish Women in…

  4. Programs of Inclusion & Acceptance in the Jewish Faith

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Shelly

    2009-01-01

    The great Jewish sage, Hillel, who lived in the first century BCE wrote: "If I am not for myself, who is for me? If I am for myself, what am I? If not now, when?" Parents of children with disabilities and Jewish educators have translated these words of wisdom into practice for they offer important guidelines toward educating children in…

  5. "Shalom Sesame": Using Media to Promote Jewish Education and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisch, Shalom M.; Lemish, Dafna; Spezia, Elizabeth; Siegel, Deborah; Fisch, Susan R. D.; Aladé, Fashina; Kasdan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    A family survey, ethnographic study, and quasi-experimental study investigated "Shalom Sesame's" potential to enhance understanding of Jewish culture and identity among preschool families. Preschoolers demonstrated significant learning, recognizing that people who looked different could be Jewish, and in knowledge about Hebrew words,…

  6. Exploring 350 Years of Jewish American History on the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berson, Michael J.; Cruz, Barbara C.

    2005-01-01

    The recent Library of Congress exhibition, From Haven to Home: 350 Years of Jewish Life in America, has sparked renewed interest in the history of Jews in the United States. The collection featured more than 200 documents, images, and artifacts that chronicle the Jewish American experience. In exhibit from September through December 2004, From…

  7. Defying Normative Male Identities: The Transgressive Possibilities of Jewish Boyhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichert, Michael C.; Ravitch, Sharon M.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study discovers teenage boys whose connections to Judaism and Jewish life offered them resilience and contextual opportunities for identity development. Those who have active, positive Jewish identities describe adaptations that are more independent of adolescent peer norms and freer, in terms of masculine pressures, than less…

  8. Pedagogic Hermeneutic Orientations in the Teaching of Jewish Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galili-Schachter, Inbar

    2011-01-01

    In this study, twelve expert teachers of Jewish Thought in Israeli high schools were observed and interviewed, in order to examine their ideas regarding the proper way to approach and teach Jewish canonical texts. Using qualitative analysis, I identified a central component of these teachers' Pedagogic Content Knowledge and named it their…

  9. Toward an Understanding of Jewish Identity: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Michelle L.; Friedlander, Myrna L.; Blustein, David L.

    2005-01-01

    To begin mapping the landscape of contemporary Jewish identity from a phenomenological perspective, the authors conducted a qualitative analysis of semistructured interviews of 10 Jewish adults in the northeastern United States. Coding resulted in 6 universal themes (dynamic nature of self-identification, early formative experiences, desire to…

  10. Jewish Arab Activism through Dialogical Encounters: Changing an Israeli Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Tamar; Saba, Tuffaha; Shay, Nava

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a Jewish Arab dialogue model of national encounters which has been developed at Tel Hai College in Upper Galilee in Israel. These planned encounters, which have taken place for eight consecutive years within the framework of a course entitled "A Jewish-Arab dialogue--action research" are recognized as part of the…

  11. Defying Normative Male Identities: The Transgressive Possibilities of Jewish Boyhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichert, Michael C.; Ravitch, Sharon M.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study discovers teenage boys whose connections to Judaism and Jewish life offered them resilience and contextual opportunities for identity development. Those who have active, positive Jewish identities describe adaptations that are more independent of adolescent peer norms and freer, in terms of masculine pressures, than less…

  12. Jewish Arab Activism through Dialogical Encounters: Changing an Israeli Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Tamar; Saba, Tuffaha; Shay, Nava

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a Jewish Arab dialogue model of national encounters which has been developed at Tel Hai College in Upper Galilee in Israel. These planned encounters, which have taken place for eight consecutive years within the framework of a course entitled "A Jewish-Arab dialogue--action research" are recognized as part of the…

  13. Exploring 350 Years of Jewish American History on the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berson, Michael J.; Cruz, Barbara C.

    2005-01-01

    The recent Library of Congress exhibition, From Haven to Home: 350 Years of Jewish Life in America, has sparked renewed interest in the history of Jews in the United States. The collection featured more than 200 documents, images, and artifacts that chronicle the Jewish American experience. In exhibit from September through December 2004, From…

  14. 76 FR 25517 - Jewish American Heritage Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ...#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8660 of April 29, 2011 Jewish American Heritage Month, 2011 By the President of... commitment to building a more just world. This month, we embrace and celebrate the vast contributions Jewish... generations by joining hands with all who seek equality and progress. This month, we remember that the...

  15. New Frontiers: "Milieu" and the Sociology of American Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Bethamie

    2008-01-01

    Over the course of the twentieth century changing circumstances have prompted American Jewish educators to develop new educational strategies to address these needs, and these developments are an important aspect of the sociology of American Jewish education. Using the method of historical sociology, I examine the educational configuration at…

  16. Approaches to Jewish Studies: Teaching a Methods Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochman, Leah

    2005-01-01

    Like religious studies, Jewish studies is an academic exploration of literature, ritual, history, philosophy, and experience across disciplinary boundaries. As with all area studies, Jewish studies balances itself--often precariously--as a bridge across that range of methodological options. The breadth of theories employed by each has complicated…

  17. "Shalom Sesame": Using Media to Promote Jewish Education and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisch, Shalom M.; Lemish, Dafna; Spezia, Elizabeth; Siegel, Deborah; Fisch, Susan R. D.; Aladé, Fashina; Kasdan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    A family survey, ethnographic study, and quasi-experimental study investigated "Shalom Sesame's" potential to enhance understanding of Jewish culture and identity among preschool families. Preschoolers demonstrated significant learning, recognizing that people who looked different could be Jewish, and in knowledge about Hebrew words,…

  18. Embracing Jewish Day School Education in England, 1965-1979

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendelsson, David

    2009-01-01

    Between 1965 and 1979 the demand for places at Jewish day schools in England rose dramatically. In the preceding decades, most parents sent their children to state non-denominational schools, showing little interest in providing their children with a solid Jewish education. Sunday or after-school Hebrew classes, rarely extending beyond Bar/Bat…

  19. Embracing Jewish Day School Education in England, 1965-1979

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendelsson, David

    2009-01-01

    Between 1965 and 1979 the demand for places at Jewish day schools in England rose dramatically. In the preceding decades, most parents sent their children to state non-denominational schools, showing little interest in providing their children with a solid Jewish education. Sunday or after-school Hebrew classes, rarely extending beyond Bar/Bat…

  20. Spiritual Care For Jewish Patients Facing A Life Threatening Illness

    PubMed Central

    Bluman, Rabbi Olga F.; Klein, Linda; Thomas, Jay; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Providing biopsychosocial/spiritual care for patients facing a life threatening illness can be complex, and this complexity can be amplified when a patient identifies as Jewish. A common but incorrect assumption is that a person who identifies him or herself as Jewish abides by the tenets of the Jewish religion. However, many Jews consider themselves Jewish in an ethnic or cultural sense rather than connected to a religion or belief in God. This case report presents an ethnic/cultural Jew with a life threatening illness of advanced lung cancer. Despite evidence of spiritual/existential suffering, this patient declined spiritual care. From an analysis of this case and clinical experience, we suggest exploratory questions that clinicians can use in response to common questions or statements made by such patients. This exploration may lead to a chaplain referral and we highlight interventions that chaplains and clinicians may find helpful as they come alongside Jewish patients. PMID:23614173

  1. Bagels, Schnitzel and McDonald's--"Fuzzy Frontiers" of Jewish Identity in an English Jewish Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholefield, Lynne

    2004-01-01

    Using data gathered during a case study of the "culture" of a Jewish secondary school, this article explores the indeterminate boundaries of Jewish identity. By examining the mechanisms that control what and who comes into the school, and what is approved and disapproved of in the school, a picture emerges of what and who is counted as…

  2. Demystifying a Black Box: A Grounded Theory of How Travel Experiences Impact the Jewish Identity Development of Jewish Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaron, Scott

    2015-01-01

    The positive impact on the Jewish Identity Development of Jewish Emerging Adults of both the 10 day trips to Israel popularly known as Birthright trips and the service learning trips commonly known as Alternative Spring Breaks has been well-documented. However, the mechanics of how this positive impact occurs has not been well-understood. This…

  3. Bagels, Schnitzel and McDonald's--"Fuzzy Frontiers" of Jewish Identity in an English Jewish Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholefield, Lynne

    2004-01-01

    Using data gathered during a case study of the "culture" of a Jewish secondary school, this article explores the indeterminate boundaries of Jewish identity. By examining the mechanisms that control what and who comes into the school, and what is approved and disapproved of in the school, a picture emerges of what and who is counted as…

  4. Demystifying a Black Box: A Grounded Theory of How Travel Experiences Impact the Jewish Identity Development of Jewish Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaron, Scott

    2015-01-01

    The positive impact on the Jewish Identity Development of Jewish Emerging Adults of both the 10 day trips to Israel popularly known as Birthright trips and the service learning trips commonly known as Alternative Spring Breaks has been well-documented. However, the mechanics of how this positive impact occurs has not been well-understood. This…

  5. Jewish Community in Wichita, 1920-1970: Same Wagon, New Horses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Jay M.

    2008-01-01

    The Jewish experience in Wichita, Kansas, highlights the ongoing challenge of being Jewish in the Midwest. Ever since the mid-nineteenth century, Jewish life in the middle part of the country was quite different from that in cities like New York, which contained the largest concentration of Jewish Americans, and which has attracted most of the…

  6. Jewish Community in Wichita, 1920-1970: Same Wagon, New Horses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Jay M.

    2008-01-01

    The Jewish experience in Wichita, Kansas, highlights the ongoing challenge of being Jewish in the Midwest. Ever since the mid-nineteenth century, Jewish life in the middle part of the country was quite different from that in cities like New York, which contained the largest concentration of Jewish Americans, and which has attracted most of the…

  7. Acoustic characteristics of modern Greek Orthodox Church music.

    PubMed

    Delviniotis, Dimitrios S

    2013-09-01

    Some acoustic characteristics of the two types of vocal music of the Greek Orthodox Church Music, the Byzantine chant (BC) and ecclesiastical speech (ES), are studied in relation to the common Greek speech and the Western opera. Vocal samples were obtained, and their acoustic parameters of sound pressure level (SPL), fundamental frequency (F0), and the long-time average spectrum (LTAS) characteristics were analyzed. Twenty chanters, including two chanters-singers of opera, sang (BC) and read (ES) the same hymn of Byzantine music (BM), the two opera singers sang the same aria of opera, and common speech samples were obtained, and all audio were analyzed. The distribution of SPL values showed that the BC and ES have higher SPL by 9 and 12 dB, respectively, than common speech. The average F0 in ES tends to be lower than the common speech, and the smallest standard deviation (SD) of F0 values characterizes its monotonicity. The tone-scale intervals of BC are close enough to the currently accepted theory with SD equal to 0.24 semitones. The rate and extent of vibrato, which is rare in BC, equals 4.1 Hz and 0.6 semitones, respectively. The average LTAS slope is greatest in BC (+4.5 dB) but smaller than in opera (+5.7 dB). In both BC and ES, instead of a singer's formant appearing in an opera voice, a speaker's formant (SPF) was observed around 3300 Hz, with relative levels of +6.3 and +4.6 dB, respectively. The two vocal types of BM, BC, and ES differ both to each other and common Greek speech and opera style regarding SPL, the mean and SD of F0, the LTAS slope, and the relative level of SPF. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Assisted reproductive technology: perspectives in Halakha (Jewish religious law).

    PubMed

    Schenker, Joseph G

    2008-01-01

    The Jewish religion is characterized by a strict association between faith and practical precepts. In principle, Jewish law has two divisions, the Written and the Oral traditions. The foundation of the Written Law and the origin of authority is the Torah, the first five books of the Scripture. This paper presents the attitude of Jewish religion to assisted reproductive therapeutic procedures such as IVF-embryo transfer, spermatozoa, oocytes, embryo donation, cryopreservation of genetic material, surrogacy, posthumous reproduction, gender preselection and reproductive and therapeutic cloning.

  9. A protocol for ovulation delay in women who cannot use estrogen, including Jewish women with Niddah issues and a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rehany, Benjamin S; Dahan, Michael H

    2017-06-24

    Orthodox Jewish women abstain from sexual intercourse from the commencement of menstruation until seven days after the end of menstrual bleeding at which point they can immerse themselves in a ritual bath and recommence relations. For women who ovulate prior to commencing intercourse this results in religious infertility. The traditional treatment for religious infertility is oral estrogens in the early follicular phase to delay ovulation. However, certain groups of women have contraindications to oral estrogens. In this group, no treatment options have existed until now. In this study we proposed a treatment protocol substituting the use of gonadotropin releasing hormone-antagonists in the early follicular phase for the oral estrogens. In a small pilot study, we demonstrate that these two protocols have similar outcomes in terms of ovulation delay (p = 1.0) and likelihood of ongoing pregnancy (p = 1.0). This protocol for ovulation delay also has applications in non-Jewish women who need to delay ovulation due to life constraints.

  10. Contrasting patterns of Y chromosome variation in Ashkenazi Jewish and host non-Jewish European populations.

    PubMed

    Behar, Doron M; Garrigan, Daniel; Kaplan, Matthew E; Mobasher, Zahra; Rosengarten, Dror; Karafet, Tatiana M; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Ostrer, Harry; Skorecki, Karl; Hammer, Michael F

    2004-03-01

    The molecular basis of more than 25 genetic diseases has been described in Ashkenazi Jewish populations. Most of these diseases are characterized by one or two major founder mutations that are present in the Ashkenazi population at elevated frequencies. One explanation for this preponderance of recessive diseases is accentuated genetic drift resulting from a series of dispersals to and within Europe, endogamy, and/or recent rapid population growth. However, a clear picture of the manner in which neutral genetic variation has been affected by such a demographic history has not yet emerged. We have examined a set of 32 binary markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms; SNPs) and 10 microsatellites on the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome (NRY) to investigate the ways in which patterns of variation differ between Ashkenazi Jewish and their non-Jewish host populations in Europe. This set of SNPs defines a total of 20 NRY haplogroups in these populations, at least four of which are likely to have been part of the ancestral Ashkenazi gene pool in the Near East, and at least three of which may have introgressed to some degree into Ashkenazi populations after their dispersal to Europe. It is striking that whereas Ashkenazi populations are genetically more diverse at both the SNP and STR level compared with their European non-Jewish counterparts, they have greatly reduced within-haplogroup STR variability, especially in those founder haplogroups that migrated from the Near East. This contrasting pattern of diversity in Ashkenazi populations is evidence for a reduction in male effective population size, possibly resulting from a series of founder events and high rates of endogamy within Europe. This reduced effective population size may explain the high incidence of founder disease mutations despite overall high levels of NRY diversity.

  11. The Problems of Eastern Orthodox Church Buildings of Historical Value - Changing Uses over the Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarocka-Mikrut, Aleksandra; Gleń, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    There are many Eastern Orthodox church buildings throughout the Lublin Province. Over the years, these architectural objects have undergone multiple transformations, both in terms of changing religious denominations and rituals and also adaptation to new functions, such as warehousing. This article classifies and presents the transformations carried out in selected Eastern Orthodox churches in the Lublin province. By using comparative analysis of the buildings' primary condition and their current state, it was possible to identify the risks and opportunities arising from the process of adapting these buildings and their rich historical background. Additionally, the article includes a subjective assessment of the adaptation works and their influence on the physical form of the Eastern Orthodox churches examined. To present the adaptation methods currently applied to religious buildings located in Poland, this article focuses on examples of already-transformed properties that used to have a religious function in the past, but that have now been turned into commercial properties.

  12. Greek Christian Orthodox Ecclesiastical lifestyle: could it become a pattern of health-related behavior?

    PubMed

    El Chliaoutakis, Joannes; Drakou, Ismini; Gnardellis, Charalambos; Galariotou, Sofia; Carra, Helene; Chliaoutaki, Myrsini

    2002-04-01

    Although past research has globally supported the salutary impact of religion on health and health-related behaviors, it has not extensively examined the impact of the Christian Orthodox Church's way of living on people's health and health-related behavior. Semistructured personal interviews were used to investigate a stratified sample of 20- to 65-year-old individuals in the greater Athens area. Constructs were compared to single items and indices, which varied across data sets. Multiple-regression analysis specify that persons adopting the Christian Orthodox Church's lifestyle were more likely to behave in ways that enhance their health (e.g., relaxation, life satisfaction, healthful nutrition, personal hygiene, and physical activity), after controlling for a set of socio-demographic factors and their current health status. These results suggest that the Christian Orthodox Church's lifestyle constitutes a pattern of health-related behavior. (C)2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  13. Japan Biotech Forum: London 2010.

    PubMed

    Al-Shamahi, Asma

    2010-11-01

    The Japan Biotech Forum, held in London, included topics covering new licensing developments in the Japanese pharma and biotech industries. This conference report highlights selected presentations on licensing opportunities from several Japanese companies, including CanBas, LivTech, REGiMMUNE, D Western Therapeutics Institute and Chiome Bioscience. Investigational drugs discussed include CBP-501 (CanBas), LIV-2008 (LivTech), RGI-2001 (REGiMMUNE), IVX-214 (D Western Therapeutics Institute/ Nippon Shinyaku) and anti-Sema 3A (Chiome Bioscience).

  14. How orthodox protestant parents decide on the vaccination of their children: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite high vaccination coverage, there have recently been epidemics of vaccine preventable diseases in the Netherlands, largely confined to an orthodox protestant minority with religious objections to vaccination. The orthodox protestant minority consists of various denominations with either low, intermediate or high vaccination coverage. All orthodox protestant denominations leave the final decision to vaccinate or not up to their individual members. Methods To gain insight into how orthodox protestant parents decide on vaccination, what arguments they use, and the consequences of their decisions, we conducted an in-depth interview study of both vaccinating and non-vaccinating orthodox protestant parents selected via purposeful sampling. The interviews were thematically coded by two analysts using the software program Atlas.ti. The initial coding results were reviewed, discussed, and refined by the analysts until consensus was reached. Emerging concepts were assessed for consistency using the constant comparative method from grounded theory. Results After 27 interviews, data saturation was reached. Based on characteristics of the decision-making process (tradition vs. deliberation) and outcome (vaccinate or not), 4 subgroups of parents could be distinguished: traditionally non-vaccinating parents, deliberately non-vaccinating parents, deliberately vaccinating parents, and traditionally vaccinating parents. Except for the traditionally vaccinating parents, all used predominantly religious arguments to justify their vaccination decisions. Also with the exception of the traditionally vaccinating parents, all reported facing fears that they had made the wrong decision. This fear was most tangible among the deliberately vaccinating parents who thought they might be punished immediately by God for vaccinating their children and interpreted any side effects as a sign to stop vaccinating. Conclusions Policy makers and health care professionals should

  15. Autopsy: Traditional Jewish laws and customs "Halacha".

    PubMed

    Goodman, Norman R; Goodman, Jeffrey L; Hofman, Walter I

    2011-09-01

    Judaism has many traditions, customs, rules, and laws, which relate to the proper and ethical disposition of a decedent when a Medical Examiner/ Coroner is involved. In almost all United States jurisdictions, statutes mandate the need to determine the cause and manner of death (Coroners' Act PA Pl. 323, num. 130, section 1237). This article is a review of some religious writings, legal precedents, and forensic authorities, which may help to assist the Medical Examiner/Coroner when confronted with a Jewish decedent. There can be flexibility as to the extent that such forensic studies can and should be performed. The final consent and interpretation of the rules, laws, traditions, and customs will rest with the courts and local rabbinic authority.

  16. Challenges and conflicts in the delivery of mental health services to ultra-orthodox Jews.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, David; Witztum, Eliezer

    2013-02-01

    Ultra-orthodox Jews are a religious group that lives apart, valuing its separateness and ascribing sanctity to its life style. Community members are reticent to seek help from mental health services, especially if provided by professionals from outside the community. Therapeutic interventions should be explained in terms meaningful to the patient's explanatory model. Community members may face stigmatic attitudes of service providers. Situations are presented of the challenges and conflicts that confront ultra-orthodox Jews and mental health service providers concerning seeking help, understanding idioms of distress, providing appropriate rehabilitation services and negotiating arranged matches for marriage (shidduchim). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Low on the London Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.

    2013-09-01

    Until relatively recently, many authors have assumed that if extraterrestrial life is discovered it will be via the discovery of extraterrestrial intelligence: we can best try to detect life by adopting the SETI approach of trying to detect beacons or artefacts. The Rio Scale, proposed by Almár and Tarter in 2000, is a tool for quantifying the potential significance for society of any such reported detection. However, improvements in technology and advances in astrobiology raise the possibility that the discovery of extraterrestrial life will instead be via the detection of atmospheric biosignatures. The London Scale, proposed by Almár in 2010, attempts to quantify the potential significance of the discovery of extraterrestrial life rather than extraterrestrial intelligence. What might be the consequences of the announcement of a discovery that ranks low on the London Scale? In other words, what might be society's reaction if 'first contact' is via the remote sensing of the byproducts of unicellular organisms rather than with the products of high intelligence? Here, I examine some possible reactions to that question; in particular, I discuss how such an announcement might affect our views of life here on Earth and of humanity's place in the universe.

  18. The ethics of using Nazi medical data: a Jewish perspective.

    PubMed

    Weitzman, M

    1990-07-01

    The notorious experiments on concentration camp prisoners conducted by Nazi scientists produced a body of data still referred to by researchers. The Jewish tradition offers resources for deciding on the morality of using this material.

  19. 78 FR 26215 - Jewish American Heritage Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ..., from women's rights to workers' rights to the end of segregation. That story is still unfolding today... 350 years have passed since Jewish refugees first made landfall on American shores. We take this month...

  20. Identifying Sectarian Content for Jewish Early Childhood Educational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Miriam; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The Delphi Method was used to collect data from 154 United States educators on appropriate sectarian content for Jewish early childhood education programs. Content for seven areas of study is discussed. (BG)

  1. Phylogeographic analysis of paternal lineages in NE Portuguese Jewish communities.

    PubMed

    Nogueiro, Inês; Manco, Licínio; Gomes, Verónica; Amorim, António; Gusmão, Leonor

    2010-03-01

    The establishment of Jewish communities in the territory of contemporary Portugal is archaeologically documented since the 3rd century CE, but their settlement in Trás-os-Montes (NE Portugal) has not been proved before the 12th century. The Decree of Expulsion followed by the establishment of the Inquisition, both around the beginning of the 16th century, accounted for a significant exodus, as well as the establishment of crypto-Jewish communities. Previous Y chromosome studies have shown that different Jewish communities share a common origin in the Near East, although they can be quite heterogeneous as a consequence of genetic drift and different levels of admixture with their respective host populations. To characterize the genetic composition of the Portuguese Jewish communities from Trás-os-Montes, we have examined 57 unrelated Jewish males, with a high-resolution Y-chromosome typing strategy, comprising 16 STRs and 23 SNPs. A high lineage diversity was found, at both haplotype and haplogroup levels (98.74 and 82.83%, respectively), demonstrating the absence of either strong drift or founder effects. A deeper and more detailed investigation is required to clarify how these communities avoided the expected inbreeding caused by over four centuries of religious repression. Concerning haplogroup lineages, we detected some admixture with the Western European non-Jewish populations (R1b1b2-M269, approximately 28%), along with a strong ancestral component reflecting their origin in the Middle East [J1(xJ1a-M267), approximately 12%; J2-M172, approximately 25%; T-M70, approximately 16%] and in consequence Trás-os-Montes Jews were found to be more closely related with other Jewish groups, rather than with the Portuguese non-Jewish population.

  2. School Improvement in London: A Global Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAleavy, Tony; Elwick, Alex

    2016-01-01

    This report considers how successful London's schools have been over the past decade and identifies potentially transferable components of the success story. There is much to be learned from the transformation undergone in London that is relevant to policymakers and educationalists worldwide, working in both high-income and low-income countries.…

  3. Jack London: The Paradox of Individualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deane, Paul

    1968-01-01

    Because of their interest in naturalism and socialism, critics often overlook the major intellectual conflict in Jack London's work: the paradox of individualism. London regards society as affecting the individual in two ways: it either promotes individuality or it demands a conformity that undermines individualism. When society fails Buck in…

  4. See you at London Vet Show.

    PubMed

    2016-11-05

    London Vet Show is fast approaching: it takes place from November 17 to 18 and is being held at ExCeL London for the first time. Zoe Davies, marketing manager, highlights some of what BVA is offering at the event. British Veterinary Association.

  5. Jewish Medical Students and Graduates at the Universities of Padua and Leiden: 1617–1740*

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    The first Jewish medical graduates at the University of Padua qualified in the fifteenth century. Indeed, Padua was the only medical school in Europe for most of the medieval period where Jewish students could study freely. Though Jewish students came to Padua from many parts of Europe the main geographical sources of its Jewish students were the Venetian lands. However, the virtual Padua monopoly on Jewish medical education came to an end during the seventeenth century as the reputation of the Dutch medical school in Leiden grew. For aspiring medieval Jewish physicians Padua was, for around three hundred years, the first, simplest, and usually the only choice. PMID:23908853

  6. Effect of Serbian Orthodox Religious Teaching on the Morality of Youth--Eschatological Aspect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kacaric, Ninoslav

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings on the system of values and moral functioning of the youth-- students of religious education, Orthodox Christians, in Serbia (sample of 446 respondents representing the 7th and 8th grades of primary school, and 3rd and 4th grade of secondary schools in the territory of the Diocese of Banat), and it is a part of the…

  7. Ultra-Orthodox Children's Literature in Israel: A Case Study of Sub-Cultural Children's Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yitzhaki, Moshe; Shoham, Snunit

    Scholars of Israeli children's literature have recently noticed an interesting socio-literary phenomenon: the emergence of an entirely new branch in Israeli children's literature, namely ultra-orthodox children's literature. The books belonging to this special category are easily distinguished from "regular" Israeli children's books by…

  8. Thinking about Science and Christian Orthodox Beliefs: A Survey Study of Teacher Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobern, William W.; Loving, Cathleen C.; Davis, Edward B.; Terpstra, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Since its origination in the late 19th Century, the warfare metaphor has been used to characterize the relationship between science and religion, especially orthodox Christianity. Though thoroughly discredited by historians of science, the ideological descendants of Thomas Huxley, who spoke of science in quasi-religious terms, have kept the…

  9. Language and Social Identity Construction: A Study of a Russian Heritage Language Orthodox Christian School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Ekaterina Leonidovna

    2012-01-01

    Grounded in discourse analytic and language socialization paradigms, this dissertation examines issues of language and social identity construction in children attending a Russian Heritage Language Orthodox Christian Saturday School in California. By conducting micro-analysis of naturally-occurring talk-in-interaction combined with longitudinal…

  10. Fundamentals of Orthodox Culture (FOC): A New Subject in Russia's Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willems, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    The question of religious education is one of the most controversial questions in the current discussions on religion and politics in Russia. Most notably a new subject, Fundamentals of Orthodox Culture (FOC), is of interest because it differs markedly from Western European approaches to religious education. Referring to "Culturology"…

  11. "Foundations of Orthodox Culture" in Russia: Confessional or Nonconfessional Religious Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willems, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    In April 2010 a new school subject group called "Foundations of Religious Cultures and Secular Ethics" (FRCSE) was introduced as an experiment in selected regions of Russia. It consists of six subjects, or "modules." One module is "Foundations of Orthodox Culture" (FOC). This article examines FOC within the context of…

  12. The Social and Political Role of the Russian Orthodox Church as Perceived by College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreeva, L. A.; Andreeva, L. K.

    2015-01-01

    The article compares the data from a survey reflecting college students' perception of the social and political role of the Russian Orthodox Church with the results of nationwide Russian surveys for the purpose of determining the degree to which the basic conclusions coincide or differ. [This article was translated by Kim Braithwaite.

  13. A Guidebook to a Program of Adult Education in the Greek Orthodox Church.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of North and South America, New York, NY. Dept. of Laity.

    In this booklet, information and guidelines are presented on educational needs and educational planning among Greek Orthodox adults in the United States. The challenge to update and upgrade religious adult education is briefly discussed in its historical context. Next come suggestions for planning archdiocese laity programs involving young people…

  14. Differences in Math Achievement between Boys and Girls in 4th and 8th Grade in Coeducational Orthodox Jewish Day Schools in the New York Metropolitan Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witty, Emily Amie

    2012-01-01

    Gender differences in mathematics have been of particular interest over the past decades. Research has shown a disparity in mathematical proficiency between boys and girls depending on the area of mathematics tested, the age and grade of the student, and the structure of the test question (i.e., how the question is posed). Although, much of the…

  15. Differences in Math Achievement between Boys and Girls in 4th and 8th Grade in Coeducational Orthodox Jewish Day Schools in the New York Metropolitan Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witty, Emily Amie

    2012-01-01

    Gender differences in mathematics have been of particular interest over the past decades. Research has shown a disparity in mathematical proficiency between boys and girls depending on the area of mathematics tested, the age and grade of the student, and the structure of the test question (i.e., how the question is posed). Although, much of the…

  16. Risky Treatments: A Jewish Medical Ethics Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Avraham

    2015-01-01

    The Jewish principle concerning a decision with regard to a dangerous treatment is as following: A patient who is estimated to die within 12 months because of a fatal illness is permitted to undergo a treatment that on the one hand may extend his life beyond 12 months, but on the other hand may hasten his death. There are, however, several limitations to this ruling related to the chances of success with the proposed treatment, the nature of the treatment, whether it is intended to be curative or merely to postpone the danger and death, whether the treatment is absolutely necessary, and others. One is not obligated to undergo a dangerous treatment, but one is permitted to do so. The permissibility to forfeit a short life expectancy in order to achieve more prolonged life applies only with the patient’s consent. That consent is valid and is not considered a form of attempted suicide. Neither is a refusal to submit to treatment considered an act of suicide; the patient has the right to refuse a dangerous procedure. In all situations where a permissive ruling is granted for a patient to endanger his short life expectancy, the ruling should be arrived at after careful reflection and with the approval of the rabbinic authorities acting on the recommendation of the most expert physicians. PMID:26241221

  17. Pulmonary function of London firemen.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, D B; Douglas, R B; Oakes, D; Scott, G

    1985-01-01

    In a longitudinal study of a sample of firemen in London 1006 firemen were interviewed and examined in 1976 and 895 were seen a second time 12 months later. On each occasion a Medical Research Council respiratory questionnaire was administered and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were measured. The average levels of FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC in both years compared favourably with conventional predicted values. Separate multiple regression analysis for the two years indicated that the FEV1 and FVC fell more rapidly in those aged over 40, and that cigarette smoking had a strong harmful effect on these measures of function. Only among men with over 20 years' service was there possibly any evidence (not statistically significant) of an effect from duration of employment. The comparatively large fall in FEV1 and FVC from 1976 to 1977 was due mainly to instrumental variation. The prevalence of respiratory symptoms was higher in smokers than non-smokers and increased with the number of cigarettes smoked. PMID:3965016

  18. Authenticity, Autonomy, and Authority: Feminist Jewish Learning among Post-Soviet Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Lisa D.

    2008-01-01

    This articles explores how a group of women in the Former Soviet Union grapple with questions of Jewish identity and Jewish "authenticity" as they participate in adult Jewish learning program that employs methods of feminist pedagogy and transformative learning. The study reflects on areas of dissonance between the transformational…

  19. Looking through "Northern Exposure" at Jewish American Identity and the Communication Theory of Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Michael L.; Faulkner, Sandra L.; Meyer, C. R.; Niles, TA; Golden, Doug; Cutler, Melanie

    2002-01-01

    Explores Jewish American identity from a communication theory of identity perspective. Analyzes six episodes of the television program "Northern Exposure" for their representation of Jewish American identity, and explains how the episodes were then shown to 26 Jewish Americans. Notes that the study focused on a communal representation of this…

  20. Adult Jewish Learning: What Do We Know? What Do We Need to Know?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Diane Tickton; Grant, Lisa D.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the emergence of the field of adult Jewish learning and the need for research in this burgeoning aspect of contemporary Jewish life. The authors describe the context in which the upsurge of adult Jewish learning has occurred, drawing attention to the absence of systematic data collection about programs, funding structures,…

  1. Gender Differences in Mathematics among Jewish and Arab Youth in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittelberg, David; Ari, Lilach Lev

    1997-01-01

    Discusses gender differences in mathematics among Jewish and Arab youth in Israel by presenting research done in four Jewish and two Israeli Arab coeducational schools. Examines the factors that have influenced the degree to which high school students in the Jewish and Arab sectors anticipate making use of mathematically based professions in the…

  2. Jewish Education and Identity Formation in the Netherlands after the Holocaust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rietveld-van Wingerden, Marjoke

    2008-01-01

    The subject of this article is Dutch Jewish education since 1945, attended by some 20% of the Jewish children in the region of Amsterdam. I consider the motives of the advocates of Jewish day schools, for whom the Holocaust was an important argument from a psychological, educational, social and cultural perspective in rejecting multi-religious…

  3. Reported Schooling Experiences of Adolescent Jews Attending Non-Jewish Secondary Schools in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulin, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the reported schooling experiences of 28 adolescents attending non-Jewish English secondary schools who self-identified as Jews. Their reported school peer-interactions suggest Jews attending non-Jewish schools may face several challenges from members of non-Jewish peer groups, including anti-Semitism. Their reported…

  4. Authenticity, Autonomy, and Authority: Feminist Jewish Learning among Post-Soviet Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Lisa D.

    2008-01-01

    This articles explores how a group of women in the Former Soviet Union grapple with questions of Jewish identity and Jewish "authenticity" as they participate in adult Jewish learning program that employs methods of feminist pedagogy and transformative learning. The study reflects on areas of dissonance between the transformational…

  5. Looking through "Northern Exposure" at Jewish American Identity and the Communication Theory of Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Michael L.; Faulkner, Sandra L.; Meyer, C. R.; Niles, TA; Golden, Doug; Cutler, Melanie

    2002-01-01

    Explores Jewish American identity from a communication theory of identity perspective. Analyzes six episodes of the television program "Northern Exposure" for their representation of Jewish American identity, and explains how the episodes were then shown to 26 Jewish Americans. Notes that the study focused on a communal representation of this…

  6. Problems and Prospects of Jewish Education for Intelligent Citizenship in a Post-Everything World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Benjamin M.

    2013-01-01

    Judaism, Jewish life, the Jewish people--indeed, almost all facets of the Jewish experience--are in a postmodern, post-denominational, post-ethnic, post-Zionist, post-diaspora, or what may simply be called a "post-everything" age. Studies show that post-everything youth in general are less concerned with national/ethnic/religious identification…

  7. The Role of Education in Jewish Continuity: A Response to Jonathan Sacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Geoffrey

    2005-01-01

    Contrasting explanations of Jewish survival form the backdrop to this article. For Jonathan Sacks (1994) the crucial factor has been the role played by Jewish education; indeed, he claims that the demographic threat currently facing Anglo-Jewry is largely the result of the community having neglected the Jewish education of its children over the…

  8. How Do Teachers Think about Pluralism in a Jewish Community School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conyer, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    Pluralism is a notion that regularly appears in education literature regarding social injustice or teaching for democracy. Over the last decade, a new type of Jewish Day School has emerged, the Jewish Community School. These Jewish Community Schools distinguish themselves by adopting pluralism as one of their core values. What is unclear is how…

  9. Practitioners and Practices in Museum Education: The Case of Three Jewish Museums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moghadam, Yaara Shteinhart

    2011-01-01

    As Jewish museums are witnessing a rapid numerical rise in the United States and beyond, the professional and academic literature on Jewish museum education lags behind. This dissertation is aimed to help narrow this gap by examining how the education departments of Jewish museums in the United States conceptualize, promote, and conduct programs…

  10. City College and the Jewish Poor. Education in New York, 1880-1924.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorelick, Sherry

    The role of the College of the City of New York (CCNY) in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries is described, particularly with regard to early Jewish immigrants. It is suggested that the myth of the "easy marriage" of Jewish values and American opportunities ignores the variety of Jewish culture and the drama of the vast…

  11. The Philosophy and Practice of Adult Jewish Education in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raskas, Adinah W.

    Education has always been a cherished value in the Jewish tradition. For U.S. Jews, until the post-World War II period, the child was the principal focus of educational efforts. With an age shift in the Jewish population in the United States, the need for investigation of Jewish adult educational programs is strong. Most existing programs lack…

  12. Jewish Education and Identity Formation in the Netherlands after the Holocaust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rietveld-van Wingerden, Marjoke

    2008-01-01

    The subject of this article is Dutch Jewish education since 1945, attended by some 20% of the Jewish children in the region of Amsterdam. I consider the motives of the advocates of Jewish day schools, for whom the Holocaust was an important argument from a psychological, educational, social and cultural perspective in rejecting multi-religious…

  13. 3 CFR 8513 - Proclamation 8513 of April 30, 2010. Jewish American Heritage Month, 2010

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the Holocaust. As they have immeasurably enriched our national culture, Jewish Americans have also... 3 The President 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Proclamation 8513 of April 30, 2010. Jewish American... 30, 2010 Proc. 8513 Jewish American Heritage Month, 2010By the President of the United States...

  14. The Theory of Evolution - A Jewish Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Avraham

    2010-01-01

    All possible pro and con arguments regarding the theory of evolution have been discussed and debated in the vast literature—scientific, religious, and lay—in the past 150 years. There is usually great zealotry in all debating parties, with mutual intolerance of ideas and concepts, disrespect toward opposing opinions and positions, and usage of very harsh language. This prejudiced approach usually does not allow for a reasonable debate. It is important to look at the facts, assumptions, and beliefs of the theory of evolution in a more calm and humble way. In this article a comparative analysis is offered between the scientific aspects of the theory of evolution and a Judaic approach to these aspects. The two sets of human thought—religion and science—are fundamentally different in their aims and purposes, in their methods of operation, in their scope of interest and issues, and in their origin and ramifications. Whenever science surpasses its limits, or religion exceeds its boundaries, it actually is a form of an abuse of both. This has happened to the theory of evolution in a more powerful mode than any other interaction between science and religion. The agenda of many scientists who promote the theory of evolution is to achieve the goal of understanding the existence of the universe as a random, purposeless, natural development, evolved slowly over billions of years from a common ancestor by way of natural selection, devoid of any supernatural metaphysical power. Jewish faith perceives the development of the universe in a different way: God created the world, with a purpose known to Him; He established natural laws that govern the world; and He imposed a moral-religious set of requirements upon Man. The discussion and comparative analysis in this article is based upon the current neo-Darwinian theory, although it seems almost certain that even the new and modern assumptions and speculations will continue to be challenged, changed, and revised as new

  15. The theory of evolution - a jewish perspective.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Avraham

    2010-07-01

    All possible pro and con arguments regarding the theory of evolution have been discussed and debated in the vast literature-scientific, religious, and lay-in the past 150 years. There is usually great zealotry in all debating parties, with mutual intolerance of ideas and concepts, disrespect toward opposing opinions and positions, and usage of very harsh language. This prejudiced approach usually does not allow for a reasonable debate. It is important to look at the facts, assumptions, and beliefs of the theory of evolution in a more calm and humble way. In this article a comparative analysis is offered between the scientific aspects of the theory of evolution and a Judaic approach to these aspects. The two sets of human thought-religion and science-are fundamentally different in their aims and purposes, in their methods of operation, in their scope of interest and issues, and in their origin and ramifications. Whenever science surpasses its limits, or religion exceeds its boundaries, it actually is a form of an abuse of both. This has happened to the theory of evolution in a more powerful mode than any other interaction between science and religion. The agenda of many scientists who promote the theory of evolution is to achieve the goal of understanding the existence of the universe as a random, purposeless, natural development, evolved slowly over billions of years from a common ancestor by way of natural selection, devoid of any supernatural metaphysical power. JEWISH FAITH PERCEIVES THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE UNIVERSE IN A DIFFERENT WAY: God created the world, with a purpose known to Him; He established natural laws that govern the world; and He imposed a moral-religious set of requirements upon Man. The discussion and comparative analysis in this article is based upon the current neo-Darwinian theory, although it seems almost certain that even the new and modern assumptions and speculations will continue to be challenged, changed, and revised as new scientific

  16. The German-Jewish soldier: from participant to victim.

    PubMed

    Penslar, Derek

    2011-01-01

    The story of German-Jewish soldiers and veterans of World War I illustrates how, under circumstances of inclusion (even if incomplete) rather than vicious persecution, Jewish suffering in wartime, and with it the forms of collective memory and strategies for commemoration of the dead, could closely parallel, even intersect with, the suffering of Germans as a whole. To be sure, the points of intersection were accompanied by points of deflection. Even when Jews served, fought, suffered and died as German soldiers, their interpretations of the war experience, and their communities’ postwar memory and commemorative practices, differed from those of other Germans. In many ways, however, German-Jewish veterans suffered the aftermath of the war as did other Germans; they shared the prevailing fury over war guilt and reparations, and they retained a strong pride in their military service, a pride through which they interpreted the events of 1933–1945.

  17. Freud's Jewish identity and psychoanalysis as a science.

    PubMed

    Richards, Arnold D

    2014-12-01

    Ludwik Fleck, the Polish philosopher of science, maintained that scientific discovery is influenced by social, political, historical, psychological, and personal factors. The determinants of Freud's Jewish identity are examined from this Fleckian perspective, as is the impact of that complex identity on his creation of psychoanalysis as a science. Three strands contributing to his Jewish identity are identified and explored: his commitment to the ideal of Bildung, the anti-Semitism of the times, and his "godlessness." Finally, the question is addressed of what it means that psychoanalysis was founded by a Jew. For Freud, psychoanalysis was a kind of liberation philosophy, an attempt to break free of his ethnic and religious inheritance. Yet it represented at the same time his ineradicable relationship with that inheritance. It encapsulated both the ambivalence of his Jewish identity and the creativity of his efforts to resolve it. © 2014 by the American Psychoanalytic Association.

  18. London Dispersion Forces and "The Wave"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, C. Jayne

    1998-10-01

    An analogy is presented likening London dispersion forces to "The Wave", a popular ritual performed by fans attending sports events in large stadia. Similarities between people in the stands and electrons in atoms are emphasized.

  19. Career development at London Vet Show.

    PubMed

    2016-09-03

    Are you considering a career change? Perhaps you want help to develop within your current role? Either way, you will find a relevant session in the BVA Career Development stream at the London Vet Show in November. British Veterinary Association.

  20. The Tower of London bomb explosion.

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, K; Lettin, A

    1975-01-01

    After the detonation of a bomb in the Tower of London 37 people were brought to St. Bartholomew's Hospital. The explosion caused numerous severe injuries of a type rarely seen in peacetime. PMID:1148778

  1. Carrier rate of Canavan disease among Ashkenazi Jewish individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Matalon, R.; Kaul, R.; Michals, K.

    1994-09-01

    Canavan Disease (CD) is a severe leukodystrophy prevalent among people of Ashkenazi Jewish extraction. The incidence of CD is unknown although it has been stated to be rare. The human aspartoacylase gene has been cloned and mutation determined in 50 Jewish patients with CD. Four mutations were identified in 99 of 100 alleles. A missense mutation, E285A, accounted for 83% of the alleles; a second mutation, Y231X, was found in 13% of the alleles; two other mutations accounted for 3 alleles. In non-Jewish individuals with CD, 52 alleles were examined and 11 mutations were observed. In order to determine the rate of carriers in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, 2,700 blood specimens from unrelated healthy individuals were studied using a panel of 4 mutations found in Jewish individuals. Genomic DNA was amplified by PCR and analyzed for single strand conformation polymorphism. The mutations identified were confirmed by restriction digestion. Sixty carriers were identified, suggesting a carrier rate of 1:45. Of the 60 carriers, 52 had E285A mutation and 8 had Y231X. The proportion of E285A and Y231X mutations in the Jewish population was 86.7% and 13.3%, respectively, in agreement with the relative distribution seen in patients with CD. These studies are being expanded to a larger sample so that other mutations are identified. Our data suggest higher than expected carrier rate for CD in Ashkenazi Jews. It seems that carrier testing for preventive counseling should be applied in the risk population.

  2. Religion, genetics, and sexual orientation: the Jewish tradition.

    PubMed

    Davis, Dena S

    2008-06-01

    This paper probes the implications of a genetic basis for sexual orientation for traditional branches of Judaism, which are struggling with how accepting to be of noncelibate gays and lesbians in their communities. The paper looks at the current attitudes toward homosexuality across the different branches of Judaism; social and cultural factors that work against acceptance; attitudes toward science in Jewish culture; and the likelihood that scientific evidence that sexual orientation is at least partly genetically determined will influence Jewish scholars' and leaders' thinking on this issue.

  3. A comparison of Israeli Jewish and Arab women's birth perceptions.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Ofra; Sarid, O; Cwikel, J

    2014-07-01

    birth is a normal physiological process, but can also be experienced as a traumatic event. Israeli Jewish and Arab women share Israeli residency, citizenship, and universal access to the Israeli medical system. However, language, religion, values, customs, symbols, and lifestyle differ between the groups. to examine Israeli Arab and Jewish women's perceptions of their birth experience, and to assess the extent to which childbirth details and perceptions predict satisfaction with the birth experience and the extent of assessing the childbirth as traumatic. this study was conducted in two post partum units of two major public hospitals in the northern part of Israel. The sample included 171 respondents, including 115 Jewish Israeli and 56 Arab Israeli women who gave birth to their first (33%) or second (67%) child. Respondents described their childbirth experiences using a self-report questionnaire 24-48 hours after childbirth. the Arab women were much less likely to attend childbirth preparation classes than the Jewish women (5% versus 24%). Forty-three per cent of the respondents reported feeling helpless, and 68% reported feeling lack of control during childbirth. Twenty per cent of the women rated their childbirth experience as traumatic, a rate much lower than the rate of medical indicators of traumatic birth (39%). The rate of self-reported traumatic birth was significantly higher among the Arab women than among the Jewish women (32% versus 14%). A higher percentage of the Arab women reported being afraid during labour (χ(2)=4.97, p<.05), expressed fear for their newborn's safety (χ(2)=12.44, p<.001), and reported that the level of medical intervention was excessive in their opinion, as compared to the Jewish women (χ(2)=5.09, p<.05; χ(2)=7.33, p<.01). However, both the Arab and Jewish women reported similar numbers of medical interventions and levels of satisfaction with their medical treatment. despite universal access to the Israeli health care system

  4. 12. Photo copy of drawing, May 21, 1963. NEW LONDON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photo copy of drawing, May 21, 1963. NEW LONDON LEDGE LIGHT STATION LIGHTING. Drawing no. 03-2730, U.S. Coast Guard Civil Engineering Unit, Warwick, Rhode Island. - New London Ledge Lighthouse, Long Island Sound, East of main harbor channel, New London, New London County, CT

  5. Prolonging life or hindering death? An Orthodox perspective on death, dying and euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Hatzinikolaou, Nikolaos

    2003-01-01

    This article addresses death as a biological event and attempts to approach it as a mystery within the light of the Orthodox Christian theology and tradition. First, the value of the last moments of the life of a human being is analyzed; then the state of living is differentiated from the state of surviving that results, in some extreme cases, from the intrusion of technology in medicine. The article elaborates on the sacred and spiritual character of death which, when viewed within the light of the Christ's resurrection, is transformed into a great blessing. The last part of the article focuses on the newly emerged issue of euthanasia and the reasons behind it. It poses certain vital questions that ought to be answered before legalization gets on its way. Finally, the conclusion summarizes the position of the Orthodox Church of Greece on death, dying and euthanasia.

  6. With Doug: an Eastern Orthodox--Gestalt framework for pastoral psychotherapy in the armed forces.

    PubMed

    Alexander, David

    2013-01-01

    In military behavioral healthcare, a short-term, solutions-focused system often privileges cognitive techniques over existential, affective, or psychodynamic approaches to care. Pastoral psychotherapy, which often privileges existential and person-centered care, has the potential to prove a pivotal complement in treating the whole person. This article offers an existential approach to pastoral psychotherapy in the military using integrated concepts and applications from Gestalt Therapy and Eastern Orthodox pastoral care.

  7. Train up a Child: On the "Maskilic" Attempt to Change the Habitus of Jewish Children and Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shavit, Zohar

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Jewish Enlightenment movement and Jewish financial entrepreneurs undertook an active, conscious project to effect significant transformations in the Jewish habitus in German-speaking areas during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. A symbiotic relationship allowed these groups to disseminate a new vision of Jewish society…

  8. Train up a Child: On the "Maskilic" Attempt to Change the Habitus of Jewish Children and Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shavit, Zohar

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Jewish Enlightenment movement and Jewish financial entrepreneurs undertook an active, conscious project to effect significant transformations in the Jewish habitus in German-speaking areas during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. A symbiotic relationship allowed these groups to disseminate a new vision of Jewish society…

  9. The fate of Hungarian Jewish dermatologists during the Holocaust Part 1: Six refugees who fled.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf, Walter H C; Bock, Julia; Hoenig, Leonard J; Parish, Lawrence Charles

    2016-01-01

    From the times of Moritz Kaposi, Hungarian Jewish physicians have significantly contributed to the development of dermatology. Part 1 of this special report highlights some of the early Jewish dermatologists in Hungary. It also tells the stories of five Hungarian Jewish dermatologists who fled anti-Semitism in Hungary, or other European countries, between 1920 and 1941: Frederick Reiss, Emery Kocsard, Stephen Rothman, Peter Flesch, and George Csonka. A sixth Hungarian dermatologist, Tibor Benedek, was persecuted by the Nazis, because he had a Jewish wife, forcing the couple to flee Germany. Part 2 will focus on the ordeal faced by Hungarian Jewish dermatologists who did not leave their homeland during World War II.

  10. The influence of environmental factors on the development of ultra-orthodox preschool boys in Israel.

    PubMed

    Golos, Anat; Sarid, Miri; Weill, Michal; Yochman, Aviva; Weintraub, Naomi

    2011-09-01

    The study objectives were: (a) to compare the prevalence of children at risk and/or with developmental delay (at risk/delayed) among the Ultra-Orthodox community with the prevalence reported in the literature and (b) to compare the performance of Ultra-Orthodox children in kindergarten versus that of children in preschool. To this end, motor, visual-motor integration and cognitive performance of 203 Ultra-Orthodox boys from low socio-economic status were assessed. We found a higher percentage of children who were at risk/delayed in gross motor and motor-cognitive skills as compared with the percentage reported in the literature. However, as opposed to expected, the results did not show that there was a higher percent of at-risk/delayed children among the kindergarten group as compared with those among the preschool group. Our findings are consistent with the research literature suggesting that children's cultural background and economic constraints can affect their motor and cognitive development. Thus, occupational therapists and other health professionals should be more culturally competent and more aware of the specific values and practices of families of children with whom they work, which can impact their development. However, in this study, it is difficult to distinguish between the influence of the cultural factors and the influence of socio-economic factors. Therefore, it is recommended to repeat this study among children from either low socio-economic status or other cultural backgrounds. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Probabilistic Feasibility of the Reconstruction Process of Russian-Orthodox Churches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhova, M.; Brunn, A.; Stilla, U.

    2016-06-01

    The cultural human heritage is important for the identity of following generations and has to be preserved in a suitable manner. In the course of time a lot of information about former cultural constructions has been lost because some objects were strongly damaged by natural erosion or on account of human work or were even destroyed. It is important to capture still available building parts of former buildings, mostly ruins. This data could be the basis for a virtual reconstruction. Laserscanning offers in principle the possibility to take up extensively surfaces of buildings in its actual status. In this paper we assume a priori given 3d-laserscanner data, 3d point cloud for the partly destroyed church. There are many well known algorithms, that describe different methods of extraction and detection of geometric primitives, which are recognized separately in 3d points clouds. In our work we put them in a common probabilistic framework, which guides the complete reconstruction process of complex buildings, in our case russian-orthodox churches. Churches are modeled with their functional volumetric components, enriched with a priori known probabilities, which are deduced from a database of russian-orthodox churches. Each set of components represents a complete church. The power of the new method is shown for a simulated dataset of 100 russian-orthodox churches.

  12. Does the periodic vegetarianism of Greek Orthodox Christians benefit blood pressure?

    PubMed

    Sarri, Katerina; Linardakis, Manolis; Codrington, Caroline; Kafatos, Anthony

    2007-04-01

    The Greek Orthodox Christian (GOC) diet is a periodic vegetarian-type diet that shares all the characteristics of the Mediterranean diet. No study to date has investigated its impact on blood pressure (BP). Thirty-eight devout Orthodox Christian fasters and 29 matched controls living in Crete, Greece, were followed for 1 year during 2001. BP data were gathered before (pre) and near completion (end) of the three major fasting periods of the Orthodox Christian calendar [Christmas (40 days)-Easter (48 days)-Assumption (15 days)] along with other information on their dietary and lifestyle habits, body measurements and blood samples. Throughout the study fasters had higher mean SBP and DBP than controls. No fasting period had a significant BP lowering effect on fasters. Fasters' prevalence of end-Christmas and end-Lent high-normal BP was significantly higher than that of the controls', while it was reduced during the Assumption and reached the very low levels of controls'. On the whole, compared to controls, fasters increased their fiber, magnesium and fruit and vegetable consumption during the fasting periods and decreased their sodium and calcium intake. BMI and blood lipids were significantly associated with SBP/DBP at almost all measurements. Religious adherence to a periodic vegetarian Mediterranean-style diet does not have an observable effect on BP. Further research is needed in order to establish conclusive evidence.

  13. Human leukocyte antigen frequencies in a selected group of Lebanese Greek Orthodox.

    PubMed

    Malak, R R; Abdelnoor, A M

    1997-01-01

    HLA classes I and II profiles were determined among 45 unrelated Lebanese Greek Orthodox by the complement dependent lymphomicrocytotoxicity assay. HLA epitope frequencies and alleles in linkage disequilibrium were determined; the obtained results were then compared to those reported for other groups. Moreover, possible HLA-disease associations were examined; medical history in relation to diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondilitis was taken for each of the 45 individuals. The results indicated that: 1) There were similarities and differences in HLA frequencies and alleles in linkage disequilibrium in Greek Orthodox as compared to those in other groups. It is worth mentioning the higher frequencies of B35, DR11, and DQ3 and the existence of linkage disequilibrium between DR11 and DR52 and DR4 and DR53 in Greek Orthodox. 2) Preliminary results indicate that there were no significant HLA-disease associations between each of DR4 and rheumatoid arthritis, DR4 and insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), and B27 and ankylosing spondilitis in the group studied. Such associations have been reported in North American Caucasians.

  14. Religious Education and Community Involvement among Jewish Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasson, Uzi; Sasson, Ayelet

    2009-01-01

    Religious Education is one way to increase and maintain community involvement among teenagers. In many Jewish communities across the United States, participation in religious activities and religious youth movements have decreased. As research in this area is limited, this study sets out to identify the curricula that are more effective in…

  15. Inclusion Coordinators at Jewish Summer Camps: Roles and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shefter, Laura; Uhrman, Abigail L.; Tobin, Lisa; Kress, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    As appreciation of the impact of Jewish camping has grown, so have efforts to increase the number of campers able to participate in these settings. Inclusion of campers with disabilities, though not a new phenomenon, has likewise expanded. As more services are provided to campers with disabilities, more camps are hiring an Inclusion Coordinator to…

  16. Cultural Transitioning of Jewish Immigrants: Education, Employment and Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinacore, Ada; Mikhail, Anne-Marie; Kassan, Anusha; Lerner, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the cultural transitioning process that immigrants undergo in order to attain educational, occupational, and social integration within Canadian society. Results of this phenomenological study examining 31 Jewish immigrants from Argentina, Israel, France and the Former Soviet Union, reveal that lack of educational equivalency…

  17. What Research Teaches about the Possibility of Reinventing Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sales, Amy L.

    2012-01-01

    Reinventing Jewish education is not about tinkering at the surface level but at creating deep change, a new paradigm. Superficial change is built on existing models, but deep change dramatically breaks with the past and challenges current models, norms, values, and beliefs. A paradigm shift is a radical move and, as many have discovered, it is…

  18. What Research Teaches about the Possibility of Reinventing Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sales, Amy L.

    2012-01-01

    Reinventing Jewish education is not about tinkering at the surface level but at creating deep change, a new paradigm. Superficial change is built on existing models, but deep change dramatically breaks with the past and challenges current models, norms, values, and beliefs. A paradigm shift is a radical move and, as many have discovered, it is…

  19. A Movie Case Study of Anemic Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, David

    2011-01-01

    "Keeping Up with the Steins" (2006) is the first Hollywood film to focus on the Bar Mitzvah ceremony in its family, congregational, and Jewish community context. The film demonstrates how popular culture reflects community values, but may also shape them. The hero is alienated both from the synagogue service and his mega-Bar Mitzvah party. In line…

  20. Changing Stereotype of Jewish Women in the Popular Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Judith; Mirsky, Norman

    The stereotype of the Jewish woman as presented in the media--either a female who controls through guilt and is overly concerned with food, or a woman who is an exotic, seductive individual torn between devotion to family and pursuit of private romantic goals--is discussed in this paper. Books by Norman Mailer, John Updike, Erica Jong and Philip…

  1. Identity and Inter Religious Understanding in Jewish Schools in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ipgrave, Julia

    2016-01-01

    This article sets up a dialogue between "auto"-referential (looking to self) and "allo"-referential (looking to the other) approaches to religious difference and applies these to education for inter religious understanding in Jewish schools. It begins by arguing that the multiculturalism of the 1980s and 1990s set up a duality…

  2. Cultural Transitioning of Jewish Immigrants: Education, Employment and Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinacore, Ada; Mikhail, Anne-Marie; Kassan, Anusha; Lerner, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the cultural transitioning process that immigrants undergo in order to attain educational, occupational, and social integration within Canadian society. Results of this phenomenological study examining 31 Jewish immigrants from Argentina, Israel, France and the Former Soviet Union, reveal that lack of educational equivalency…

  3. The Origins of Jewish Guilt: Psychological, Theological, and Cultural Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The idea that guilt and Judaism are closely interlinked has a long historical legacy. After discussing recent work on anthropology and emotion focusing on shame and guilt, we examine three theories purporting to account for this link: psychoanalytic, theological, and guilt as a cultural stereotype particularly the notion of the Jewish mother. PMID:26425245

  4. The Learning of Arabic by Israeli Jewish Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Rabia, Salim

    1998-01-01

    Examines the learning of Arabic by Israeli Jewish children. Finds that children displayed negative attitudes toward learning Arabic, but had positive attitudes toward the classroom situation. Also finds that classroom situation was the best predictor of learning success. Suggests that children are influenced more by classroom environment than by…

  5. The Effects of Denomination on Religious Socialization for Jewish Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Anthony G.; Lester, Ashlie M.; Brooks, Greg

    2014-01-01

    The transmission model of religious socialization was tested using a sample of American Jewish parents and adolescents. The authors expected that measures of religiousness among parents would be associated with those among their children. Interaction effects of denominational membership were also tested. Data were collected from a sample of 233…

  6. The Parent Perspective: Disabilities and Jewish Day Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhrman, Abigail L.

    2017-01-01

    The following study describes the experiences of parents with a child with a disability in Jewish day schools. The findings suggest marked differences in the experiences of parents whose child was able to remain in the day school and those who left as a result of their child's disability. In the latter group, the themes of loneliness and…

  7. Media Resource Guide for Jewish Studies & Religious Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN. Film Library.

    This annotated bibliography is a compilation of audio/visual materials related to Jewish and religious studies that are held by the Film Library of Purdue University (West Lafayette, Indiana). A subject index is followed by an alphabetical listing by title of 206 items. Included in the annotations are: (1) format indications; (2) rental cost; (3)…

  8. Holocaust Education in Jewish Schools in Israel: Goals, Dilemmas, Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Zehavit

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown the Holocaust to be the primary component of Jewish identity (Farago in Yahadut Zmanenu 5:259-285, 1989; Gross in Influence of the trip to Poland within the framework of the Ministry of Education on the working through of the Holocaust. Unpublished M.A. thesis, Ben-Gurion University, Beer Sheva, 2000; "Herman in Jewish…

  9. The Effects of Denomination on Religious Socialization for Jewish Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Anthony G.; Lester, Ashlie M.; Brooks, Greg

    2014-01-01

    The transmission model of religious socialization was tested using a sample of American Jewish parents and adolescents. The authors expected that measures of religiousness among parents would be associated with those among their children. Interaction effects of denominational membership were also tested. Data were collected from a sample of 233…

  10. An Emergent Research Agenda for the Field of Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomberg, Linda Dale

    2007-01-01

    This article provides a qualitative analysis of the chapters of the forthcoming "What We NOW Know About Jewish Education" (to be published by Torah Aura, Spring 2008). The findings of this analysis outline an agenda for further research by highlighting a number of emergent themes pertaining to the practical and conceptual challenges that lie…

  11. Porcine and bovine surgical products: Jewish, Muslim, and Hindu perspectives.

    PubMed

    Easterbrook, Catherine; Maddern, Guy

    2008-04-01

    To determine the acceptability of porcine and bovine surgical implants among persons of Jewish, Muslim, and Hindu faiths whose beliefs prohibit them from consuming porcine and bovine products. An evaluation of current literature concerning religious beliefs among persons of Jewish, Muslim, and Hindu faiths was undertaken to determine if animal-derived surgical implants are permitted for use in these religions. Because of the limited published literature about this topic, the opinions of religious leaders in Australia were sought. Religious and cultural beliefs can conflict with and limit treatment options, especially in surgery. Approximately 81 porcine and bovine surgical implants are regularly used in Australia. It is deemed acceptable for members of the Jewish faith to undergo surgery using porcine products. In dire situations and only after all other options have been exhausted, followers of the Muslim faith are permitted to use porcine surgical products. Hindu religious leaders did not accept the use of bovine surgical implants. Australia comprises a multicultural society; therefore, it is necessary to consider religious beliefs of all patients. As part of a surgeon's duty of care, the informed consent process should include a discussion about animal-derived surgical implants to avoid religious distress and possible litigation. A greater understanding of religious views would enhance the medical care of persons of Jewish, Muslim, and Hindu faiths.

  12. Identity and Inter Religious Understanding in Jewish Schools in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ipgrave, Julia

    2016-01-01

    This article sets up a dialogue between "auto"-referential (looking to self) and "allo"-referential (looking to the other) approaches to religious difference and applies these to education for inter religious understanding in Jewish schools. It begins by arguing that the multiculturalism of the 1980s and 1990s set up a duality…

  13. An Emergent Research Agenda for the Field of Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomberg, Linda Dale

    2007-01-01

    This article provides a qualitative analysis of the chapters of the forthcoming "What We NOW Know About Jewish Education" (to be published by Torah Aura, Spring 2008). The findings of this analysis outline an agenda for further research by highlighting a number of emergent themes pertaining to the practical and conceptual challenges that lie…

  14. Holocaust Education in Jewish Schools in Israel: Goals, Dilemmas, Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Zehavit

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown the Holocaust to be the primary component of Jewish identity (Farago in Yahadut Zmanenu 5:259-285, 1989; Gross in Influence of the trip to Poland within the framework of the Ministry of Education on the working through of the Holocaust. Unpublished M.A. thesis, Ben-Gurion University, Beer Sheva, 2000; "Herman in Jewish…

  15. Extraordinary Evil or Common Malevolence? Evaluating the Jewish Holocaust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lackey, Douglas P.

    1986-01-01

    Considers and rejects the hypothesis of Frackenheim, Wiesel and others that the Jewish Holocaust contains some qualitative or quantitatively distinct moral evil. It argues that the intentions and vices of mass murderers are qualitatively indistinguishable from those of the common murderer, and that the evils of six million individual murders are…

  16. A Movie Case Study of Anemic Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, David

    2011-01-01

    "Keeping Up with the Steins" (2006) is the first Hollywood film to focus on the Bar Mitzvah ceremony in its family, congregational, and Jewish community context. The film demonstrates how popular culture reflects community values, but may also shape them. The hero is alienated both from the synagogue service and his mega-Bar Mitzvah party. In line…

  17. Distancing in Encompassing Education Settings: Lessons from Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kress, Jeffrey S.; Elias, Maurice J.

    2008-01-01

    Irving Sigel's distancing theory and his cognitive and educational research has led to an understanding of the importance of ''encompassing'' educational settings and the promotion of positive developmental outcomes in the area of Jewish education. This paper describes how distancing theory provides a basis for understanding the effects of…

  18. Discovering Jewish Studies Collections in Academic Libraries: A Practical Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taler, Izabella

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. colleges and universities offering non-sectarian educational programs in Jewish Studies rely on the support of their academic libraries for research materials and library services. For college libraries which use Library of Congress Classification scheme, it is a common practice to integrate "studies" resources into their…

  19. The exhumation of a World War II Jewish grave.

    PubMed

    Chagowski, W; Madro, R

    1999-01-01

    The results of the exhumation of a mass grave from the time of the World War II are presented. In the course of exhumation it was established that the subjects were 190 individuals (men, women and children) of Jewish origin. All had died a violent death due to gunshot or mechanical injury.

  20. Jewish medical ethics: monetary compensation for donating kidneys.

    PubMed

    Grazi, Richard V; Wolowelsky, Joel B

    2004-03-01

    The Israel Health Ministry is preparing legislation that would allow a person to receive monetary compensation in exchange for donating a kidney for a lifesaving transplant. Such a bill would be the first of its kind, and would seem to establish a policy that is in contrast with both existing international professional ethics and major Christian and Islamic religious ethics. In an attempt to investigate the extent to which such a bill would be consistent with traditional Jewish ethics, we reviewed the opinions of major traditional Jewish ethicists/halakhists, with emphasis on contemporary opinions, and found that compensating an organ donor for his or her time, discomfort, inconvenience, and recovery is fully consistent with traditional Jewish law and ethics. While non-altruistic sale of kidneys might be theoretically ethical from a Jewish perspective, ultimately its ethical status is inextricably connected to solving a series of pragmatic issues, such as creating a system that insures that potential vendors/donors are properly informed and not exploited, controlling and supervising medical screening and support of the donors to insure that their health is not permanently endangered, protecting minors and incompetents, and regulating payments so that they reasonably reflect compensation for pain and suffering.

  1. Reinventing Religion: Jewish Religion Textbooks in Russian Gymnasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Eliyana R.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines 10 textbooks used in Jewish religion classes in Russian high schools in the final decades of the 19th century. The textbooks reveal an expectation of a low level of Hebrew background, an interest in promoting the practice of prayer, and two distinct approaches to teaching Judaism. While some of the books introduce students to…

  2. Community Based Adult Jewish Learning Program Issues and Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flexner, Paul A.

    Adult learning in the Jewish community finds its roots in history, and has received renewed attention. Learning within the religious tradition encompasses a level of thought and activity which goes far beyond the typical adult education format. The purpose of the experience is to develop structures of meaning which aid individuals in relating…

  3. Jewish Holocaust Histories and the Work of Chronological Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, Jordana

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the ways that, in Holocaust education in Jewish schools in Melbourne and New York at the beginning of the 21st century, knowledge of the Holocaust is transferred to students in chronological form. It begins by asking: What work do chronological narratives do within the Holocaust historical narratives offered within Jewish…

  4. Extraordinary Evil or Common Malevolence? Evaluating the Jewish Holocaust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lackey, Douglas P.

    1986-01-01

    Considers and rejects the hypothesis of Frackenheim, Wiesel and others that the Jewish Holocaust contains some qualitative or quantitatively distinct moral evil. It argues that the intentions and vices of mass murderers are qualitatively indistinguishable from those of the common murderer, and that the evils of six million individual murders are…

  5. American Jewish Year Book, 1982: A Record of Events and Trends in American and World Jewish Life. Volume 82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himmelfarb, Milton, Ed.; And Others

    This 1982 yearbook reviews developments in areas of concern to Jews around the world. The volume features an essay that provides a comprehensive chronicle of American Jews from the perspectives of both Jewish history and American history. Developments in the United States are examined in articles that discuss civil and political issues that affect…

  6. Fritz London's Legacy at Duke University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Horst

    2006-03-01

    When 3He became available in small quantities after WWII Fritz London, Professor at Duke University since 1939, became very interested in its properties in the liquid and solid phases, as contrasted with those of 4He. His influence and that of his colleague Walter Gordy led to the appointment of William Fairbank in 1952, who was able to verify experimentally the prediction on the Fermi degeneracy of liquid 3He below 1K, a few weeks before London's death in 1954. With his students and associates, Fairbank carried out a number of important experiments which became classics, several of which will be described. At Duke he also started planning other experiments inspired by London's predictions. After W. Fairbank's departure for Stanford in 1959, further research on liquid and solid 3He and 3He-4He mixtures was carried out by his successors at Duke University and some of the results in the sixties will be briefly described.

  7. Affordances and Constraints in Social Studies Curriculum-Making: The Case of "Jewish Social Studies" in the Early 20th Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Benjamin M.

    2009-01-01

    This document-based historical study explores the nature of the Jewish social studies curriculum in American Jewish schools in the early 20th century (c.1910-1940), a period of significant growth and reform in the modern American Jewish education enterprise. "Jewish social studies" refers to school programs in which Jewish history, Jewish…

  8. Suicide on the London Underground System.

    PubMed

    Farmer, R; O'Donnell, I; Tranah, T

    1991-09-01

    Over the past 50 years there has been an increase in the numbers of people jumping/falling in front of trains on the London Underground system. Case-fatality rates have fallen from 70% in the 1950s to 55% today. The proportion certified as suicide has fallen while the proportions certified as accidents or open verdicts have risen. There is unusual clustering of events at some stations which are adjacent to psychiatric units. The hypothesis that ease of access to London Underground stations may sometimes be a determinant of suicide is investigated.

  9. Genomic microsatellites identify shared Jewish ancestry intermediate between Middle Eastern and European populations

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Genetic studies have often produced conflicting results on the question of whether distant Jewish populations in different geographic locations share greater genetic similarity to each other or instead, to nearby non-Jewish populations. We perform a genome-wide population-genetic study of Jewish populations, analyzing 678 autosomal microsatellite loci in 78 individuals from four Jewish groups together with similar data on 321 individuals from 12 non-Jewish Middle Eastern and European populations. Results We find that the Jewish populations show a high level of genetic similarity to each other, clustering together in several types of analysis of population structure. Further, Bayesian clustering, neighbor-joining trees, and multidimensional scaling place the Jewish populations as intermediate between the non-Jewish Middle Eastern and European populations. Conclusion These results support the view that the Jewish populations largely share a common Middle Eastern ancestry and that over their history they have undergone varying degrees of admixture with non-Jewish populations of European descent. PMID:19995433

  10. Teaching Approaches of Beginning Teachers for Jewish Studies in Israeli "Mamlachti" Schools: A Case Study of a Jewish Education Teachers' Training Program for Outstanding Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzin, Ori

    2015-01-01

    This article presents findings from a longitudinal qualitative study that examined teaching approaches of neophyte teachers in Israel during their 4-year exclusive teachers' training program for teaching Jewish subjects and first two years of teaching. The program wanted to promote change in secular pupils' attitudes toward Jewish subjects. We…

  11. Teaching Approaches of Beginning Teachers for Jewish Studies in Israeli "Mamlachti" Schools: A Case Study of a Jewish Education Teachers' Training Program for Outstanding Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzin, Ori

    2015-01-01

    This article presents findings from a longitudinal qualitative study that examined teaching approaches of neophyte teachers in Israel during their 4-year exclusive teachers' training program for teaching Jewish subjects and first two years of teaching. The program wanted to promote change in secular pupils' attitudes toward Jewish subjects. We…

  12. Greek Orthodox fasting rituals: a hidden characteristic of the Mediterranean diet of Crete.

    PubMed

    Sarri, Katerina O; Linardakis, Manolis K; Bervanaki, Frosso N; Tzanakis, Nikolaos E; Kafatos, Anthony G

    2004-08-01

    The longevity and excellent health status of the population of Crete has been attributed to its lifestyle and dietary habits. The impact of Greek Orthodox Christian Church fasting on these dietary habits has never been studied. One hundred and twenty Greek Orthodox Christians living in Crete participated in a 1-year prospective study. One half of the subjects, who fasted regularly (fasters), and sixty non-faster controls were followed longitudinally for the three main fasting periods over 1 year; Christmas (40 d), Lent (48 d) and the Assumption (15 d). Pre- and end-holy days measurements were performed in each fasting period including: 24 h dietary recall, blood collection and anthropometric measurements. Based on the 24 h recall, fasters as compared with controls had lower intakes of end-holy days dietary cholesterol, total fat, saturated fatty acids, trans-fatty acids and protein (P < 0.001). Fasters presented a decrease of 753 kJ (180 kcal) in end-holy days energy intake (P < 0.05) compared with an increase of 573 kJ (137 kcal) in the controls (P < 0.05). Fasters had a decrease in end-holy days Ca intake (P < 0.001) and an increase in end-holy days total dietary fibre (P < 0.001) and folate (P < 0.05), attributed to their higher consumption of fruit and vegetables in end-holy periods (P < 0.001). There were no differences for other vitamins or minerals between pre- and end-holy periods in both groups except for vitamin B2. The Orthodox Christian dietary regulations are an important component of the Mediterranean diet of Crete characterised by low levels of dietary saturated fatty acids, high levels of fibre and folate, and a high consumption of fruit, vegetables and legumes.

  13. Is religious fasting related to iron status in Greek Orthodox Christians?

    PubMed

    Sarri, Katerina O; Kafatos, Anthony G; Higgins, Siobhan

    2005-08-01

    The Orthodox Christian diet is unique in regularly interchanging from an omnivore to a vegetarian-type diet, and no study to date has focused on the impact of this on Fe status. Thirty-five Greek Orthodox Christian strict fasters (n 17 male, n 18 female; mean age 43.6+/-13.2 years) and twenty-four controls (n 11 male, n 13 female; mean age 39.8+/-7.6 years) were studied before (pre) and near completion (end) of the Christmas fasting (CF) period (40 d), during which meat and dairy products are prohibited. Fe status was assessed using standard haematological parameters, and Fe deficiency was determined via serum ferritin levels (<12 ng/ml) and the tri-index model. While fasters had marginally poorer pre haematological indicators, values were well above the cut-off levels, suggesting that intermittent fasting for a mean of 22.5+/-15.5 years did not have any substantial adverse effects on Fe status. During the CF period the changes in Fe status indices were more beneficial for fasters than for control subjects. In particular, fasters increased their ferritin levels (P = 0.02) and decreased their total Fe-binding capacity (P < 0.001). Compared with males, the effect of CF was more pronounced in female fasters. No subjects were detected with Fe deficiency at the end of the CF period. End dietary Fe and fibre intake were significantly higher in the fasters as compared with the control group (P = 0.038 and P = 0.001, respectively). Adherence to the Orthodox Christian dietary guidelines does not have a major impact on Fe status and is not associated with a significantly greater degree of Fe deficiency.

  14. The use of metal threads and decorations in Byzantine-Greek Orthodox ecclesiastical textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatzani, Anna; Rehren, Thilo

    2006-05-01

    Gold threads, like silk, are luxury materials engated in the manufacture of the finest and most expensive fabrics. While the use of metal threads in European and Near-Eastern fabrics has been the subject of detailed analytical investigation, few studies have focused on the nature of Byzantine-Greek metal threads. The aim of this research is to identify the morphological and technological characteristics of the metal threads used for the decoration of Greek Orthodox ecclesiastical textiles between the 13th and the 19th centuries.

  15. Jack London and the San Francisco earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sachs, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    After it was over, it seemed to many, and especially to eyewitnesses like Jack London, that the earthquake and fire had devastated San Francisco. However people were confident that, like the phoeniz, San Francisco would rise from the ashes and regain her palce as the "Imperial City of the West." 

  16. Stage Voice Training in the London Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Lucille S.

    This report is the result of a six-week study in which the voice training offerings at four schools of drama in London were examined using interviews of teachers and directors, observation of voice classes, and attendance at studio presentations and public performances. The report covers such topics as: textbooks and references being used; courses…

  17. Knives and Other Weapons in London Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neill, S. R. St. J.

    2005-01-01

    London schools operate in an area where crime rates, including violent crime, is statistically more frequent than the average for the whole of England and Wales (Moore and Yeo 2004). Violent crime in the capital increased (though not to a statistically significant extent) between 2002/3 and 2003/4 (Moore and Yeo 2004b). This has led to a…

  18. Preventing suicide on the London Underground.

    PubMed

    Clarke, R V; Poyner, B

    1994-02-01

    A field study was carried out to investigate the possibility of preventing suicide on the London Underground. Four groups of potentially valuable measures were identified with the objectives of: (i) reducing public access to the tracks; (ii) improving surveillance by station staff; (iii) facilitating emergency stops; and (iv) reducing injury. These strategies are discussed.

  19. E. B. Nicholson and the London Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manley, K. A.

    1973-01-01

    This article provides a history of the London Institution from 1805 to 1912, with special emphasis on E. B. Nicholson's term of office. The last years of the Institution are considered, its financial difficulties being traced back to the terms of its original foundation, and to the changing situation of its members. (47 references) (Author/SJ)

  20. A resilient NHS for London 2012.

    PubMed

    Wapling, Andy; Mooney, Tom

    2011-02-01

    London will host the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2012. Hosting the Games brings with it both opportunities and challenges for the capital and country. The National Health Service (NHS) in London has a crucial role to play in the delivery of a safe and secure Games. It must also protect its business as usual services and be prepared to respond to any enhanced or additional threats and hazards that may be created by the presence of the Games. NHS London leads a programme of work to ensure that the NHS fulfils its responsibilities during the Games. The programme's Health Resilience workstream has adopted a structured planning process to assess risks, identify gaps in the capability of the NHS, and ensure those gaps are addressed prior to the Games. It acknowledges that training, exercising and testing play vital roles in capability. This work aims to ensure that London's health services will respond in a timely, proportionate and appropriate manner to any incident during the Games. This paper gives an overview of the Olympic context within which this resilience work is taking place, and details the planning processes and relationships employed in planning for such a major event.

  1. Michael Fisher at King's College London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domb, Cyril

    Michael Fisher spent the first 16 years of his academic life in the Physics Department of King's College, London, starting as an undergraduate and ending as a full professor. A survey is undertaken of his activities and achievements during the various periods of this phase of his career.

  2. Knives and Other Weapons in London Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neill, S. R. St. J.

    2005-01-01

    London schools operate in an area where crime rates, including violent crime, is statistically more frequent than the average for the whole of England and Wales (Moore and Yeo 2004). Violent crime in the capital increased (though not to a statistically significant extent) between 2002/3 and 2003/4 (Moore and Yeo 2004b). This has led to a…

  3. Movement and Character. Lecture, London, 1946

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montesorri, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Montessori's words from the 1946 London Lectures describe principles of intelligence and character, the work of the hand, and movement with a purpose as being integral to self-construction. The perfection of movement is spiritual, says Dr. Montessori. Repetition of practical life exercises are exercises in movement with the dignity of human…

  4. Black Pupils' Achievement in Inner London.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabey, Christine

    1986-01-01

    This paper looks at the relationship between reading attainment and examination achievement of Black Afro-Caribbean students who formed part of a cohort of inner London schoolchildren included in a longitudinal study. The findings of the research are discussed in terms of policy implications for education. (Author/CT)

  5. Ensuring equine biosecurity at London 2012.

    PubMed

    Slater, Josh

    2013-02-02

    The London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Equestrian Games were the highest profile event in the 2012 equestrian calendar and were the culmination of four years of detailed and meticulous biosecurity planning to ensure that all horses arrived, competed and returned home safely and in good health. Josh Slater, Anthony Greenleaves and Andy Paterson describe how this was achieved.

  6. Reflections on Palliative Care from the Jewish and Islamic Tradition

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Michael; Baddarni, Kassim; Bar-Sela, Gil

    2012-01-01

    Spiritual care is a vital part of holistic patient care. Awareness of common patient beliefs will facilitate discussions about spirituality. Such conversations are inherently good for the patient, deepen the caring staff-patient-family relationship, and enhance understanding of how beliefs influence care decisions. All healthcare providers are likely to encounter Muslim patients, yet many lack basic knowledge of the Muslim faith and of the applications of Islamic teachings to palliative care. Similarly, some of the concepts underlying positive Jewish approaches to palliative care are not well known. We outline Jewish and Islamic attitudes toward suffering, treatment, and the end of life. We discuss our religions' approaches to treatments deemed unnecessary by medical staff, and consider some of the cultural reasons that patients and family members might object to palliative care, concluding with specific suggestions for the medical team. PMID:22203878

  7. Jewish Israeli social workers' responses to ethnic health inequality.

    PubMed

    Baum, Nehami

    2013-04-01

    In this study I explored the perceptions and responses of Jewish Israeli social workers to the health inequalities facing their Arab clients. Findings drawn from face-to-face, in-depth interviews with 26 Jewish Israeli social workers employed in the health field show that they were highly aware of the health inequalities. Although they uniformly insisted that there was no discrimination in the hospitals where they were employed, they observed extensive structural and individual discrimination outside the hospital and linguistic and sociocultural impediments to health equality within it. The discrimination provoked feelings of anger and moral outrage, guilt, and shame. Both the discrimination and the linguistic and sociocultural impediments filled them with frustration and led them, both individually and in concert with colleagues, to try to alleviate, circumvent, correct, or compensate for the impediments. Suggestions are made for practice and further research.

  8. 32. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONN. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONN. OCTOBER 3, 1932. COMPLETION OF ERECTION OF STEELWORK FOR ELEVATOR. LOOKING NORTH. CONTRACT NO. Y-1539-ELEVATOR, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TANK.' - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  9. 30. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONNECTICUT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONNECTICUT. 2 JUNE 1930. SUBMARINE TRAINING TANK - STEELWORK 98% COMPLETE; BRICKWORK 95% COMPLETE, PIPING 10% IN PLACE. LOOKING NORTH. CONTRACT NO. Y-1539-ELEVATOR, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TANK.' - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  10. Recognising and Developing Urban Teachers: Chartered London Teacher Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bubb, Sara; Porritt, Vivienne

    2008-01-01

    Chartered London Teacher (CLT) status is a unique scheme designed by London Challenge to recognise and reward teachers' achievements and provide a framework for professional development. As well as having the prestige of being a Chartered London Teacher for life, educators receive a one-time payment of 1,000 British pounds from the school budget…

  11. 113. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    113. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London Station. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 123.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  12. 114. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    114. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London Station. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 123.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  13. 33 CFR 110.147 - New London Harbor, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New London Harbor, Conn. 110.147... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.147 New London Harbor, Conn. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... Thames River southward of New London, bounded by lines connecting points which are the following bearings...

  14. 112. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    112. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London Station. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 123.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  15. Alcohol and Substance Use in the Jewish Community: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Baruch, Melanie; Benarroch, Abraham; Rockman, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    Awareness of addictions in the Jewish community is becoming increasingly prevalent, and yet, a gap exists in the literature regarding addictions in this community. Knowledge about the prevalence of addictions within Jewish communities is limited; some believe that Jews cannot be affected by addictions. To address this gap, a pilot study was conducted to gather preliminary evidence relating to addictions and substance use in the Jewish community. Results indicate that a significant portion of the Jewish community knows someone affected by an addiction and that over 20% have a family history of addiction. Future research needs are discussed. PMID:26161279

  16. The Ashkenazic Jewish Bloom syndrome mutation blmAsh is present in non-Jewish Americans of Spanish ancestry.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, N A; Ciocci, S; Proytcheva, M; Lennon, D; Groden, J; German, J

    1998-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is more frequent in the Ashkenazic Jewish population than in any other. There the predominant mutation, referred to as "blmAsh," is a 6-bp deletion and 7-bp insertion at nucleotide position 2281 in the BLM cDNA. Using a convenient PCR assay, we have identified blmAsh on 58 of 60 chromosomes transmitted by Ashkenazic parents to persons with BS. In contrast, in 91 unrelated non-Ashkenazic persons with BS whom we examined, blmAsh was identified only in 5, these coming from Spanish-speaking Christian families from the southwestern United States, Mexico, or El Salvador. These data, along with haplotype analyses, show that blmAsh was independently established through a founder effect in Ashkenazic Jews and in immigrants to formerly Spanish colonies. This striking observation underscores the complexity of Jewish history and demonstrates the importance of migration and genetic drift in the formation of human populations. PMID:9837821

  17. Health-related religious rituals of the Greek Orthodox Church: their uptake and meanings.

    PubMed

    Fouka, Georgia; Plakas, Sotirios; Taket, Ann; Boudioni, Markella; Dandoulakis, Michael

    2012-12-01

    To examine the uptake of religious rituals of the Greek Orthodox Church by relatives of patients in critical condition in Greece and to explore their symbolic representations and spiritual meanings. Patients and their relatives want to be treated with respect and be supported for their beliefs, practices, customs and rituals. However nurses may not be ready to meet the spiritual needs of relatives of patients, while the health-related religious beliefs, practices and rituals of the Greek Orthodox Christian denomination have not been explored. This study was part of a large study encompassing 19 interviews with 25 informants, relatives of patients in intensive care units of three large hospitals in Athens, Greece, between 2000 and 2005. In this paper data were derived from personal accounts of religious rituals given by six participants. Relatives used a series of religious rituals, namely blessed oil and holy water, use of relics of saints, holy icons, offering names for pleas and pilgrimage. Through the rituals, relatives experience a sense of connectedness with the divine and use the sacred powers to promote healing of their patients. Nurse managers should recognize, respect and facilitate the expression of spirituality through the practice of religious rituals by patients and their relatives. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Effects of Greek Orthodox Christian Church fasting on serum lipids and obesity.

    PubMed

    Sarri, Katerina O; Tzanakis, Nikolaos E; Linardakis, Manolis K; Mamalakis, George D; Kafatos, Anthony G

    2003-05-16

    No study to date has focused on the impact of Greek Orthodox Christian fasting on serum lipoproteins and obesity yet. 120 Greek adults were followed longitudinally for one year. Sixty fasted regularly in all fasting periods (fasters) and 60 did not fast at all (controls). The three major fasting periods under study were: Christmas (40 days), Lent (48 days) and Assumption (August, 15 days). A total of 6 measurements were made during one year including pre- and end-fasting blood collection, serum lipoprotein analyses and anthropometric measurements. Statistically significant end-fasting total and LDL cholesterol differences were found in fasters. Fasters compared to controls presented 12.5% lower end-total cholesterol (p < 0.001), 15.9% lower end-LDL cholesterol (p < 0.001) and 1.5% lower end-BMI (p < 0.001). The end- LDL/HDL ratio was lower in fasters (6.5%, p < 0.05) while the change in end- HDL cholesterol in fasters (4.6% decline) was not significant. Similar results were found when the pre- and end-fasting values of fasters were compared. No change was found in control subjects. Adherence to Greek Orthodox fasting periods contributes to a reduction in the blood lipid profile including a non-significant reduction in HDL cholesterol and possible impact on obesity.

  19. Schism and heresy in the development of orthodox medicine: the threat to medical hegemony.

    PubMed

    Jones, R Kenneth

    2004-02-01

    Medical and scientific knowledge is not intrinsically different from other kinds of knowledge and has gone through the same processes in terms of its development. As a profession, medicine achieved its dominance in the 19th century and has subsequently consolidated its power base. A socio-historical perspective shows us that medicine has no more and no less fraud, heresy, schism, and relative knowledge than any other equivalent forms of knowledge. Orthodox medicine emerged from a number of healing systems in the 19th century by claiming the superiority and consequent authority of the biomedical model and its special relationship to laboratory science. This process has been seen by some to resemble the growth of religious orthodoxy and the emergence of alternative beliefs with the dissenting medical systems, based on different paradigms, becoming analogous to religious sects. An increasing body of opinion rejects the notion of "objective" knowledge and sees medical knowledge and practice as "socially constructed". An examination of HIV/AIDS measurement and 19th century craniology and contagion and anti-contagion theories indicates processes which are "contextual" rather than "objective". Heresy and schism are natural concomitants of socially constructed knowledge, functioning as providers of impetus and change and, as such, are to be welcomed as non-orthodox challenges.

  20. Effects of Greek orthodox christian church fasting on serum lipids and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Sarri, Katerina O; Tzanakis, Nikolaos E; Linardakis, Manolis K; Mamalakis, George D; Kafatos, Anthony G

    2003-01-01

    Background No study to date has focused on the impact of Greek Orthodox Christian fasting on serum lipoproteins and obesity yet. Methods 120 Greek adults were followed longitudinally for one year. Sixty fasted regularly in all fasting periods (fasters) and 60 did not fast at all (controls). The three major fasting periods under study were: Christmas (40 days), Lent (48 days) and Assumption (August, 15 days). A total of 6 measurements were made during one year including pre- and end-fasting blood collection, serum lipoprotein analyses and anthropometric measurements. Results Statistically significant end-fasting total and LDL cholesterol differences were found in fasters. Fasters compared to controls presented 12.5% lower end-total cholesterol (p < 0.001), 15.9% lower end-LDL cholesterol (p < 0.001) and 1.5% lower end-BMI (p < 0.001). The end- LDL/HDL ratio was lower in fasters (6.5%, p < 0.05) while the change in end- HDL cholesterol in fasters (4.6% decline) was not significant. Similar results were found when the pre- and end-fasting values of fasters were compared. No change was found in control subjects. Conclusions Adherence to Greek Orthodox fasting periods contributes to a reduction in the blood lipid profile including a non-significant reduction in HDL cholesterol and possible impact on obesity. PMID:12753698

  1. HLA polymorphism in a Majorcan population of Jewish descent: comparison with Majorca, Minorca, Ibiza (Balearic Islands) and other Jewish communities.

    PubMed

    Crespí, C; Milà, J; Martínez-Pomar, N; Etxagibel, A; Muñoz-Saa, I; Priego, D; Luque, A; Pons, J; Picornell, A; Ramon, M; Castro, J A; Matamoros, N

    2002-10-01

    'Chueta' was the name given to the Catholic descendants of Jewish victims of the last Spanish Inquisition process in Majorca Island in the western Mediterranean. We have studied the allele distribution of HLA-A, -B, -Cw, -DRB1 and -DQB1 loci of 103 random, healthy, unrelated individuals belonging to the ancient Majorcan Jewish community, known locally as Chuetas, and 589 individuals from the Balearic population selected because of their typical Balearic - Majorca, Minorca or Ibiza - lineages and according to their ancestor's place of birth. Our aim was to establish the genetic relationship between Majorcan Chuetas, and Balearic and other Jewish and Mediterranean populations. Our results have shown that, to a remarkable extent, they have retained their biological identity, with a unique pattern, in terms of gene and haplotype frequencies, separate from the other populations of Majorca. The Chuetas were found to be more related to Moroccan and Libyan Jews than other Majorcans. Characteristic Jewish haplotypes, A26-B38-DRB1*13, A24-B38-DRB1*11, A1-B52-DRB1*15/16, were found in our study. Some peculiarities were observed in the distribution of common haplotypes among the three main Balearic Islands. The Ibizan population was genetically different from the other Balearic populations, with a high frequency of some haplotypes, for example, A29-Cw*16-B44-DRB1*07-DQB1*03; A1-Cw*07-B8-DRB1*03-DQB1*02. We also found a new haplotype, A25-Cw*12-B39-DRB1*11-DQB1*03(3.5%), in Ibizans and a more limited variability in the HLA alleles that were expressed, perhaps because of genetic isolation. The genetic diversity of the populations from Majorca and Minorca were similar and more related to the mainland Spanish population.

  2. Founding Mothers of Jewish Communities: Geographically Separated Jewish Groups Were Independently Founded by Very Few Female Ancestors

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Mark G.; Weale, Michael E.; Jones, Abigail L.; Richards, Martin; Smith, Alice; Redhead, Nicola; Torroni, Antonio; Scozzari, Rosaria; Gratrix, Fiona; Tarekegn, Ayele; Wilson, James F.; Capelli, Cristian; Bradman, Neil; Goldstein, David B.

    2002-01-01

    We have analyzed the maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA from each of nine geographically separated Jewish groups, eight non-Jewish host populations, and an Israeli Arab/Palestinian population, and we have compared the differences found in Jews and non-Jews with those found using Y-chromosome data that were obtained, in most cases, from the same population samples. The results suggest that most Jewish communities were founded by relatively few women, that the founding process was independent in different geographic areas, and that subsequent genetic input from surrounding populations was limited on the female side. In sharp contrast to this, the paternally inherited Y chromosome shows diversity similar to that of neighboring populations and shows no evidence of founder effects. These sex-specific differences demonstrate an important role for culture in shaping patterns of genetic variation and are likely to have significant epidemiological implications for studies involving these populations. We illustrate this by presenting data from a panel of X-chromosome microsatellites, which indicates that, in the case of the Georgian Jews, the female-specific founder event appears to have resulted in elevated levels of linkage disequilibrium. PMID:11992249

  3. Are Londoners Prepared for an Emergency? A Longitudinal Study Following the London Bombings

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, James; Amlôt, Richard; Simpson, John; Wessely, Simon

    2008-01-01

    The UK government sees increasing individual preparedness as a priority, but the level of preparedness of people in the UK for a large-scale emergency is not known. The London bombings of July 7, 2005, affected many Londoners and may have altered their sense of vulnerability to a future terrorist attack. We used a longitudinal study design to assess individual preparedness within the same sample of Londoners at 2 points in time: immediately after the bombings (T1) and 7 to 8 months later (T2). A demographically representative sample of 1,010 Londoners participated in a phone interview at T1. Subsequently, at T2, 574 of the same people participated in a follow-up phone interview. At T1 51% of Londoners had made 4 or more relevant emergency plans; 48% had gathered 4 or more relevant supplies in case of emergency. There was evidence of increased preparedness at T2, by which time 90% had made 4 or more emergency plans. Ethnicity, low social status, and having felt a sense of threat during the bombings predicted increased preparedness between T1 and T2. Women in general, and women of low social status in particular, perceived themselves to be unprepared in the event of a future terrorist attack. In summary, Londoners show moderate levels of emergency preparedness, which increased following the London bombings. Although we cannot know whether this association is causal, the prospective nature of the study increases the likelihood that it is. However, preparedness is still patchy, and there are important demographic associations with levels of preparedness and perception of vulnerability. These findings have implications for future development of individual and community emergency preparedness policy. PMID:19117430

  4. Launch of the London Centre for Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Aeppli, Gabriel; Pankhurst, Quentin

    2006-12-01

    Is nanomedicine an area with the promise that its proponents claim? Professors Gabriel Aeppli and Quentin Pankhurst explore the issues in light of the new London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN)--a joint enterprise between Imperial College and University College London--opened on November 7, 2006. The center is a multidisciplinary research initiative that aims to bridge the physical, engineering and biomedical sciences. In this interview, Professor Gabriel Aeppli, LCN co-Director, and Deputy Director Professor Quentin Pankhurst discuss the advent and future role of the LCN with Nanomedicine's Morag Robertson. Professor Aeppli was formerly with NEC, Bell Laboratories and MIT and has more than 15 years' experience in the computer and telecommunications industry. Professor Pankhurst is a physicist with more than 20 years' experience of working with magnetic materials and nanoparticles, who now works closely with clinicians and medics on innovative healthcare applications. He also recently formed the new start-up company Endomagnetics Inc.

  5. The 2015 Pregnancy Summit, London, UK.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Cherynne

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy Summit, Cineworld, The O2, London, UK, 29 September to 1 October 2015 The 2015 Pregnancy Summit was held over 3 days from 29 September to 1 October at Cineworld, The O2, London, UK. The event brings together a multidisciplinary faculty of international researchers and clinicians to discuss both scientific and clinical aspects of pregnancy-related issues in an informal setting. The goal of the meeting was to provide delegates with an update of recent advances in management of pregnancy-related conditions, to present research data and to discuss the current attitudes and practices in relevant topics. An extensive range of topics were discussed, from preeclampsia and treatment of hypertension, to the psychological impact of termination of pregnancy and feticide. This report will summarize a selection of the lectures presented.

  6. Extermination of the Jewish mentally-ill during the Nazi era--the "doubly cursed".

    PubMed

    Strous, Rael

    2008-01-01

    In Nazi Germany, physicians initiated a program of sterilization and euthanasia directed at the mentally-ill and physically disabled. Relatively little is known regarding the fate of the Jewish mentally-ill. Jewish mentally-ill were definitely included and targeted and were among the first who fell victim. They were systematically murdered following transfer as a specialized group, as well as killed in the general euthanasia program along with non-Jewish mentally ill. Their murder constituted an important link between euthanasia and the Final Solution. The targeting of the Jewish mentally-ill was comprised of four processes including public assistance withdrawal, hospital treatment limitations, sterilization and murder. Jewish "patients" became indiscriminate victims not only on the basis of psychiatric diagnosis, but also on the basis of race. The killing was efficiently coordinated with assembly in collection centers prior to being transferred to their deaths. The process included deceiving Jewish patients' family members and caregivers in order to extract financial support long after patients had been killed. Jewish patients were targeted since they were helpless and considered the embodiment of evil. Since nobody stood up for the Jews, the Nazis could treat the Jewish patients as they saw fit. Several differences existed between euthanasia of Jews and non-Jews, among which the Jewish mentally-ill were killed regardless of work ability, hospitalization length or illness severity. Furthermore, there was discrimination in the process leading up to killing (overcrowding, less food). For the Nazis, Jewish mentally-ill patients were unique among victims in that they embodied both "hazardous genes" and "racial toxins." For many years there has been silence relating to the fate of the Jewish mentally-ill. This deserves to be corrected.

  7. Mortality and temperature in Sofia and London

    PubMed Central

    Pattenden, S; Nikiforov, B; Armstrong, B

    2003-01-01

    Study objective: Heat and cold have been associated with increased mortality, independently of seasonal trends, but details are little known. This study explores associations between mortality and temperature in two European capitals—Sofia and London—using four years of daily deaths, air pollution, and weather data. Design: Generalised additive models were used to permit non-linear modelling of confounders such as season and humidity, and to show the shape of mortality-temperature relations—using both two day and two week average temperatures separately. Models with linear terms for heat and cold were used to estimate lags of effect, linear effects, and attributable fractions. Participants: 44 701 all age all cause deaths in Sofia (1996–1999) and 256 464 in London (1993–1996). Main results: In London, for each degree of extreme cold (below the 10th centile of the two week mean temperature), mortality increased by 4.2% (95% CI 3.4 to 5.1), and in Sofia by 1.8% (0.6 to 3.9). For each degree rise above the 95th centile of the two day mean, mortality increased by 1.9% (1.4 to 2.4) in London, and 3.5% (2.2 to 4.8) in Sofia. Cold effects appeared after lags of around three days and lasted—particularly in London—at least two weeks. Main heat effects occurred more promptly. There were inverse associations at later lags for heat and cold in Sofia. Conclusions: Average temperatures over short periods do not adequately model cold, and may be inadequate for heat if they ignore harvesting effects. Cold temperatures in London, particularly, seem to harm the general population and the effects are not concentrated among persons close to death. PMID:12883072

  8. Investigating Inter-Christian and Intercultural Couples Associated with the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America: A Qualitative Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joanides, Charles; Mayhew, Mick; Mamalakis, Philip M.

    2002-01-01

    An attempt was made to determine the challenges that may be encountered by intermarried couples who worship in a Greek Orthodox Church. Some couples described unresolved disagreements linked to their religious and cultural differences. Clinical implications suggest that intermarried couples' different religious and cultural backgrounds may be…

  9. `One Church, One People, One Emperor’ - Strategic Challenges for the Serbian Orthodox Church in Post-Milosevic Serbian Society

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    Brief Historical Note Regarding the Ecumenical Patriarchate,” Ecumenical Patriarchate website  (n.d atr.gr/patrdisplay.php? lang =en&id=5.), http...other elements of Russian society. See Serge Chapnin, “The Orthodox C 41 o been expressions of sympathy for the traditio ergone attacks. For

  10. Calling Integration into Question: A Discourse Analysis of English and "Humash" Classes at a Modern Orthodox Yeshiva High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Devra

    2008-01-01

    Drawing on discourse analysis and critical literacy, this study calls into question prevailing assumptions about integration by examining talk in English and "Humash" classrooms as windows into the two worlds of a Modern Orthodox high school. The study found that the two subjects presented very different models of teaching and learning. "Humash"…

  11. Dynamics of Isolation and Integration in Ultra-Orthodox Schools: The Epistemological Implications of Using Rabbeim as Secular Studies Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krakowski, Moshe

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the complex dynamics that take place in ultra-Orthodox schools as they attempt to maintain a contra-acculturative stance toward secular knowledge, while providing students with the necessary tools to become functioning members of society. Using two case studies, this article looks at how the recent practice of using Rabbeim…

  12. Calling Integration into Question: A Discourse Analysis of English and "Humash" Classes at a Modern Orthodox Yeshiva High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Devra

    2008-01-01

    Drawing on discourse analysis and critical literacy, this study calls into question prevailing assumptions about integration by examining talk in English and "Humash" classrooms as windows into the two worlds of a Modern Orthodox high school. The study found that the two subjects presented very different models of teaching and learning. "Humash"…

  13. Limits of desiccation tolerance in developing embryos of Pritchardia remota (Arecaceae): the orthodox-recalcitrant seed paradigm

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Orthodox and recalcitrant seeds are distinguished by the ability of embryos to survive desiccation. Seeds of many palm species do not conform to the dichotomous classification and storage physiology is considered intermediate or ambiguous. We studied the acquisition of desiccation tolerance in embr...

  14. Holding the Center: How One Jewish Day School Negotiates Differences in a Pluralistic Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selis, Allen Harold

    2010-01-01

    This study centers on the experiences of students and religious study faculty in the high school division of "CDS," a successful Kindergarten through Twelfth grade Jewish day school that defines itself as a "community" institution. The school affirms a high-profile commitment to including "the widest spectrum of Jewish practice and belief" in its…

  15. Patterns of Intellectual Ability in Jewish and Arab Children in Israel: II. Urban Matched Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieblich, Amia; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Arab and Jewish children living in a city in northern Israel were matched as closely as possible for school grade, age and SES, and tested on the Wechsler Preschool Primary Scale of Intelligence. Results indicated little if any difference between Jewish and Arab children in level or pattern of the intellectual abilities as elicited by the WPPSI…

  16. Palestinian and Jewish Israeli-Born Immigrants in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Yinon; Tyree, Andrea

    1994-01-01

    Focuses on Arab and Jewish immigration to the United States from Israel, the West Bank, and the Gaza Strip. It explains how Jewish and Arab immigrants from these areas were identified and compares the socioeconomic characteristics of the two immigrant populations. (GLR)

  17. The Study of Poverty in the Jewish Community, City of New York.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenshein, Joel; Ribner, Sol

    Poverty in New York City has been studied but never the specific problem of the Jewish minority groupings. The present study was geared towards presenting the incidences of poverty within the Jewish population in New York City and in presenting the beginning sociological picture of poverty among Jews. The study went through three phases. A first…

  18. Attitudes toward Dating Violence among Jewish and Arab Youth in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherer, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to assess the attitudes toward dating violence among Jewish and Arab male and female adolescents in Israel. The random sample consisted of 1,357 participants from among 9th to 12th grade pupils enrolled in eight Arab and eight Jewish junior and senior high schools. The study assessed attitudes toward…

  19. Factors Contributing to the Academic Excellence of American Jewish and Asian Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fejgin, Naomi

    1995-01-01

    Examines factors that contribute to the academic excellence of Jewish and Asian students. Finds that traditional socioeconomic measures explain some of the advantage of Jewish and Asian students over other ethnic groups but that parent and student attitudes toward education is also an important factor. (ACM)

  20. Jewish and secular medical ethics share themes but diverge on issues such as heroic measures

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, L

    1997-01-01

    An american expert on Jewish medical ethics explained the nuances of these rules during a recent address in Ottawa. Although Jewish and secular rules concerning medical ethics often coincide, they diverge in several important areas, including the subject of patient autonomy. PMID:9371074

  1. Teaching "Teacha!" An Exploration of Culturally Responsive Pedagogy in Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    This case study examines the contours of culturally relevant pedagogy in an undergraduate preservice teacher education program for Jewish women. The case describes how the assigned reading of Albarelli's (2000) narrative of teaching in a Hasidic Jewish school, "Teacha! Stories from a Yeshiva", disrupts the classroom community,…

  2. Team-Based Simulation: Toward Developing Ethical Guidelines among American and Israeli Teachers in Jewish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapira-Lishchinsky, Orly; Glanz, Jeffrey; Shaer, Anat

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to explore Israeli and American teachers' perceptions based on their ethical dilemmas in Jewish schools. A cross-national study was undertaken in Jewish schools, examining fifty teachers from Israel and fifty-one teachers from the United States. Designed with team-based simulations, this study revealed strong similarities…

  3. Examining Social Perceptions between Arab and Jewish Children through Human Figure Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yedidia, Tova; Lipschitz-Elchawi, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This study examined social perceptions among 191 Arab and Jewish children who live in mixed neighborhoods in Israel. Human Figure Drawing assessment was used to examine the children's social perceptions. The drawings that the Jewish Israeli children created portrayed Arabs as the enemy, whereas the Arab Israeli children expressed a more positive…

  4. Introducing a Brief Measure of Cultural and Religious Identification in American Jewish Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Myrna L.; Friedman, Michelle L.; Miller, Matthew J.; Ellis, Michael V.; Friedlander, Lee K.; Mikhaylov, Vadim G.

    2010-01-01

    The authors conducted 3 studies to develop and investigate the psychometric properties of the American Jewish Identity Scales (AJIS), a brief self-report measure that assesses cultural identification and religious identification. Study 1 assessed the content validity of the item pool using an expert panel. In Study 2, 1,884 Jewish adults completed…

  5. 3 CFR 8966 - Proclamation 8966 of April 30, 2013. Jewish American Heritage Month, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Proclamation 8966 of April 30, 2013. Jewish American... 30, 2013 Proc. 8966 Jewish American Heritage Month, 2013By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation In his second year in office, President George Washington wrote a letter to the...

  6. 3 CFR 8379 - Proclamation 8379 of May 12, 2009. Jewish American Heritage Month, 2009

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Proclamation 8379 of May 12, 2009. Jewish American... 12, 2009 Proc. 8379 Jewish American Heritage Month, 2009By the President of the United States of...’s diversity enriches and strengthens us all. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the...

  7. Achievement of Jewish and Arab Students Who Studied Inquiry Oriented Curriculum for Several Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamir, Pinchas

    The study compares the achievement of Jewish and Arab students in the high school biology matriculation examinations in Israel with special reference to differences between boys and girls. While Jewish and Arab students follow the same syllabus and take identical matriculation examinations, significant differences exist in learning and achievement…

  8. Attitudes toward Dating Violence among Jewish and Arab Youth in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherer, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to assess the attitudes toward dating violence among Jewish and Arab male and female adolescents in Israel. The random sample consisted of 1,357 participants from among 9th to 12th grade pupils enrolled in eight Arab and eight Jewish junior and senior high schools. The study assessed attitudes toward…

  9. Preparing Jewish Educators: The Research We Have, the Research We Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feiman-Nemser, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the research we have and the research we need in both general and Jewish teacher education. First, I discuss three recent efforts to synthesize and assess existing research in teacher education and to identify needed research. Next I review a handful of recent studies in Jewish teacher education which illustrate various…

  10. Teaching "Teacha!" An Exploration of Culturally Responsive Pedagogy in Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    This case study examines the contours of culturally relevant pedagogy in an undergraduate preservice teacher education program for Jewish women. The case describes how the assigned reading of Albarelli's (2000) narrative of teaching in a Hasidic Jewish school, "Teacha! Stories from a Yeshiva", disrupts the classroom community,…

  11. Return of the Pink Rabbit? A Visit to a Jewish School in Berlin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodden, John

    1996-01-01

    Describes a day in the life of teachers and students at a Jewish elementary school in Berlin, Germany. On this 1994 mid-October morning, the school is under tight security, since skinheads began defacing Jewish graves, neo-Nazis started chanting in the streets, and Palestinian radicals began attacking German Jews. Education toward faith is the…

  12. The Challenge of Ethical Liberalism to Jewish Education in the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Hanan

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to "Reinventing Jewish Education for the 21st Century" by Jonathan Woocher. The author agrees with Jonathan Woocher that American Jewish education in the 21st century requires change no less comprehensive than that initiated by Samson Benderly and his students around a century ago, and that this should…

  13. Joint Jewish-Christian worship: a concern for clinical pastoral education.

    PubMed

    Silberman, J M

    1989-01-01

    Lists twelve sensitive issues to be considered relative to Jewish-Christian worship when made part of the Clinical Pastoral Education experience. Concludes that a definitive solution for joint Jewish-Christian worship is neither possible nor necessary and that the real learning value rests in students becoming aware of different religious heritages.

  14. The Challenge of Ethical Liberalism to Jewish Education in the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Hanan

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to "Reinventing Jewish Education for the 21st Century" by Jonathan Woocher. The author agrees with Jonathan Woocher that American Jewish education in the 21st century requires change no less comprehensive than that initiated by Samson Benderly and his students around a century ago, and that this should…

  15. Parental Coping with Developmental Disorders in Adolescents within the Ultraorthodox Jewish Community in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manor-Binyamini, Iris

    2012-01-01

    This preliminary study compares the coping strategies used by 100 ultraorthodox Jewish parents and 100 secular Jewish parents for dealing with adolescent children with developmental disorders. The parents completed two questionnaires on the sense of stress-related personal growth and the sense of coherence. The ultraorthodox parents reported a…

  16. Introduction to the Hebrew Edition of "Visions of Jewish Education--Medabrim Chazon" (Talking Vision)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzman, Avi; Marom, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The following is a translation of the introduction to "Medabrim Chazon" (Jerusalem: Keter, 2006), the Hebrew translation of "Visions of Jewish Education," edited by Seymour Fox, Israel Scheffler, and Daniel Marom (Cambridge, 2003). "Visions of Jewish Education" is an effort by leading scholars to improve the quality…

  17. Bibliography on the Jewish Woman: A Comprehensive and Annotated Listing of Works Published 1900-1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantor, Aviva, Comp.

    This bibliography presents over 600 references to books, articles, essays, and journals which explore the history, values, problems, literature, and current life of Jewish women. The bibliography is designed to be used by researchers and teachers in Jewish and women's studies, sociology, history, and literature; by directors, workers, and members…

  18. Theorizing Psychosocial Processes in Canadian, Middle-Class, Jewish Mothers' School Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine-Rasky, Cynthia; Ringrose, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a psychosocial analysis of interview data of three Canadian, middle-class, Jewish mothers engaged in processes and practices of "school choice". We consider how middle-class, white identity intersects with Jewish ethnicity. We also examine how commitments to Canadian ideals of multiculturalism sit in contradiction…

  19. Examining Social Perceptions between Arab and Jewish Children through Human Figure Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yedidia, Tova; Lipschitz-Elchawi, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This study examined social perceptions among 191 Arab and Jewish children who live in mixed neighborhoods in Israel. Human Figure Drawing assessment was used to examine the children's social perceptions. The drawings that the Jewish Israeli children created portrayed Arabs as the enemy, whereas the Arab Israeli children expressed a more positive…

  20. Moral Courage from the Perspective of Arab Teachers in Jewish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratz, Lea

    2016-01-01

    The current study aims to call attention to the phenomenon of female Muslim Arab teachers teaching in Israeli Jewish schools. The study examined the manner in which these female Muslim Arab teachers perceived their integration into the milieu of the Jewish schools, based on their descriptions of the various processes they experience when dealing…

  1. The Study of Poverty in the Jewish Community, City of New York.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenshein, Joel; Ribner, Sol

    Poverty in New York City has been studied but never the specific problem of the Jewish minority groupings. The present study was geared towards presenting the incidences of poverty within the Jewish population in New York City and in presenting the beginning sociological picture of poverty among Jews. The study went through three phases. A first…

  2. Introduction to the Hebrew Edition of "Visions of Jewish Education--Medabrim Chazon" (Talking Vision)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzman, Avi; Marom, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The following is a translation of the introduction to "Medabrim Chazon" (Jerusalem: Keter, 2006), the Hebrew translation of "Visions of Jewish Education," edited by Seymour Fox, Israel Scheffler, and Daniel Marom (Cambridge, 2003). "Visions of Jewish Education" is an effort by leading scholars to improve the quality…

  3. "A Dream Not Quite Come True:" Reassessing the Benderly Era in Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Miriam Heller

    2004-01-01

    "What is Jewish education [?] I have been trying for 32 years to find out what it is, but I am still looking." In 1931 these were humble words from the mouth of Samson Benderly, one of the leading thinkers and actors in American Jewish education of his time and of the twentieth century overall--someone whom one might presume had all of…

  4. Self-Concept in Young Adults with a Learning Disability from the Jewish Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunning, Karen; Steel, Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    A small pilot study was conducted to explore the self-concept of young people with a learning disability from a Jewish community in an inner city area. Four young people participated in the project. All attended a college dedicated to the further education of people with special needs from the Jewish community. Semi-structured interviews were…

  5. Building a Community of Young Leaders: Experiential Learning in Jewish Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lough, Benjamin J.; Thomas, Margaret M. C.

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses whether more frequent participation in Jewish activist learning events is associated with higher levels of engagement in social justice-related activities and conceptions of Jewish identity. The study design was cross-sectional and comparative. An online survey was completed by 165 participants in an activist learning program.…

  6. Team-Based Simulation: Toward Developing Ethical Guidelines among American and Israeli Teachers in Jewish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapira-Lishchinsky, Orly; Glanz, Jeffrey; Shaer, Anat

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to explore Israeli and American teachers' perceptions based on their ethical dilemmas in Jewish schools. A cross-national study was undertaken in Jewish schools, examining fifty teachers from Israel and fifty-one teachers from the United States. Designed with team-based simulations, this study revealed strong similarities…

  7. Values in Tension: Israel Education at a U.S. Jewish Day School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakai, Sivan

    2011-01-01

    The Naphtali Herz Imber Jewish Day School proudly proclaimed its commitment to Israel, yet many of its students experienced profound ambivalence toward the Jewish State. Why? The school was committed to a series of contradictory values which surfaced in its approach to Israel education. This article outlines three distinct yet interrelated…

  8. Case Studies of North American Jewish Educators: Attitudes Regarding Israel and Israel Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell-Kligler, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    The role of Israel in the identity of North American Jews is of concern and interest to community leaders, philosophers of Jewish education, and most important, practitioners in the field. Although there is an awareness of the need to help emerging Jewish educators grapple with the complex questions surrounding Israel engagement, little research…

  9. Self-Concept in Young Adults with a Learning Disability from the Jewish Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunning, Karen; Steel, Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    A small pilot study was conducted to explore the self-concept of young people with a learning disability from a Jewish community in an inner city area. Four young people participated in the project. All attended a college dedicated to the further education of people with special needs from the Jewish community. Semi-structured interviews were…

  10. "It Planted the Seeds:" A Retrospective Study of Jewish Family Education's Impact on Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shevitz, Susan; Koren, Annette

    2004-01-01

    Since 1993, Boston's Jewish community has supported "Sh'arim," a regional initiative in Jewish family education (JFE). This paper examines parents' perceptions of the impact of that initiative on their children, themselves and their families as a whole over the past 10 years. After briefly describing the initiative's original goals,…

  11. Designing a Curriculum Model for the Teaching of the Bible in UK Jewish Secondary Schools: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Eli

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the process of designing a curriculum model for Bible teaching in UK Jewish secondary schools. This model was designed over the period 2008-2010 by a team of curriculum specialists from the Jewish Curriculum Partnership UK in collaboration with a group of teachers from Jewish secondary schools. The paper first outlines the…

  12. Designing a Curriculum Model for the Teaching of the Bible in UK Jewish Secondary Schools: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Eli

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the process of designing a curriculum model for Bible teaching in UK Jewish secondary schools. This model was designed over the period 2008-2010 by a team of curriculum specialists from the Jewish Curriculum Partnership UK in collaboration with a group of teachers from Jewish secondary schools. The paper first outlines the…

  13. March of the living, a holocaust educational tour: effect on adolescent Jewish identity.

    PubMed

    Nager, Alan L; Pham, Phung; Gold, Jeffrey I

    2013-12-01

    March of the Living (MOTL) is a worldwide two-week trip for high school seniors to learn about the Holocaust by traveling to sites of concentration/death camps and Jewish historical sites in Poland and Israel. The mission statement of MOTL International states that participants will be able to "bolster their Jewish identity by acquainting them with the rich Jewish heritage in pre-war Eastern Europe." However, this claim has never been studied quantitatively. Therefore, 152 adolescents who participated in MOTL voluntarily completed an initial background questionnaire, a Jewish Identity Survey and a Global Domains Survey pre-MOTL, end-Poland and end-Israel. Results suggest that Jewish identity did not substantially increase overall or from one time period to the next.

  14. The mass campaign to eradicate ringworm among the Jewish community in Eastern Europe, 1921-1938.

    PubMed

    Shvarts, Shifra; Romem, Pnina; Romem, Yitzhak; Shani, Mordechai

    2013-04-01

    Between the years 1921 and 1938, 27,600 children were irradiated during a mass campaign to eradicate ringworm among the Jewish community in East Europe. The ringworm campaign was the initiative of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee together with the Jewish health maintenance organization OZE (The Society for the Protection of Jewish Health). We describe this campaign that used x-rays to eradicate ringworm and its mission to enhance public health among Jewish communities in Eastern Europe during the period between the world wars. We discuss the concepts behind the campaign, the primary health agents that participated in it, and the latent medical ramifications that were found among children treated for ringworm, many years after treatment--pathologies that can be linked to the irradiation they received as children. Our research is based on historical archival materials in the United States, Europe, and Israel.

  15. The Mass Campaign to Eradicate Ringworm Among the Jewish Community in Eastern Europe, 1921–1938

    PubMed Central

    Romem, Pnina; Romem, Yitzhak; Shani, Mordechai

    2013-01-01

    Between the years 1921 and 1938, 27 600 children were irradiated during a mass campaign to eradicate ringworm among the Jewish community in East Europe. The ringworm campaign was the initiative of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee together with the Jewish health maintenance organization OZE (The Society for the Protection of Jewish Health). We describe this campaign that used x-rays to eradicate ringworm and its mission to enhance public health among Jewish communities in Eastern Europe during the period between the world wars. We discuss the concepts behind the campaign, the primary health agents that participated in it, and the latent medical ramifications that were found among children treated for ringworm, many years after treatment—pathologies that can be linked to the irradiation they received as children. Our research is based on historical archival materials in the United States, Europe, and Israel. PMID:23409897

  16. Paracelsianism and the orthodox lutheran rejection of vital philosophy in early seventeenth-century Denmark.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, Jole

    2003-01-01

    Paracelsian medicine and natural philosophy was formed during the Radical Reformation and incorporated metaphysical propositions that were incompatible with the Lutheran confession as codified in the Confessio Augustana and elaborated in the ultra-orthodox Formula of Concord. Although Paracelsian ideas and practices were endorsed by important philosophers and physicians in late-sixteenth century Denmark without raising serious alarm, the imposition of strict Lutheran orthodoxy in the Danish Church and a concomitant resurgence of Aristotelian philosophy drew attention to the religious heterodoxies inherent in Paracelsianism. Unacceptable theological and religious propositions, which reached Denmark in Rosicrucian texts and were implicit in certain medical and philosophical treatises, were in many cases inseparable from core Paracelsian concepts, with the result that Danish academic philosophers, physicians, and theologians rejected Paracelsian ideas except where they could be accommodated to acceptable Galenic and Aristotelian interpretations. When this was done, such ideas are arguably no longer Paracelsian in any meaningful way.

  17. Sense of Coherence (SOC) in Christian Orthodox Monks and Nuns in Greece.

    PubMed

    Merakou, Kyriakoula; Taki, Stavroula; Barbouni, Anastasia; Antoniadou, Eleni; Theodoridis, Dimitrios; Karageorgos, Georgios; Kourea-Kremastinou, Jeny

    2017-04-01

    This paper aims to investigate the stress management skills of Christian Orthodox monks and nuns, as measured by Antonovsky's scale sense of coherence (SOC). A case-control study was designed to test the hypotheses whether monks and nuns have higher SOC than secular people. The study population consisted of 193 individuals, 96 monks and nuns (study group) and 97 secular men and women (control group). SOC score was higher in monks and nuns as compared to the secular population (p = 0.002), men as compared to women (p = 0.012) and persons of older age (p = 0.004) as compared to younger individuals.

  18. Probabilistic Reconstruction of Orthodox Churches from Precision Point Clouds Using Bayesian Networks and Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhova, M.; Korovin, D.; Gurianov, A.; Brodovskii, M.; Brunn, A.; Stilla, U.; Luhmann, T.

    2017-02-01

    The point cloud interpretation and reconstruction of 3d-buildings from point clouds has already been treated for a few decades. There are many articles which consider the different methods and workows of the automatic detection and reconstruction of geometrical objects from point clouds. Each method is suitable for the special geometry type of object or sensor. General approaches are rare. In our work we present an algorithm which develops the optimal process sequence of the automatic search, detection and reconstruction of buildings and building components from a point cloud. It can be used for the detection of the set of geometric objects to be reconstructed, independent of its destruction. In a simulated example we reconstruct a complete Russian-orthodox church starting from the set of detected structural components and reconstruct missing components with high probability.

  19. Nurse practitioner challenges to the orthodox structure of health care delivery: regulation and restraints on trade.

    PubMed

    Kelly, K

    1985-01-01

    Until recently, physicians have been the primary health care providers in the United States. In response to the rising health care costs and public demand of the past decade, allied health care providers have challenged this orthodox structure of health care delivery. Among these allied health care providers are nurse practitioners, who have attempted to expand traditional roles of the registered nurse. This article focuses on the legal issues raised by several major obstacles to the expansion of nurse practitioner services: licensing restrictions, third party reimbursement policies, and denial of access to medical facilities and physician back-up services. The successful judicial challenges to discriminatory practices against other allied health care providers will be explored as a solution to the nurse practitioners' dilemma.

  20. Observance of the laws of family purity in modern-orthodox Judaism.

    PubMed

    Guterman, Mark A

    2008-04-01

    This research is a follow-up to a previous study measuring the observance of the ritually unclean period (Niddah) among Modern-Orthodox Jews. A total of 267 participants completed an online questionnaire comprised of a list of 16 "strict" and "lenient" forbidden behaviors. Participants reported whether they had engaged in these behaviors during Week 1 (the actual menstrual period) and during Week 2 (the "clean days" following the cessation of bleeding). Results showed that laws were being violated, with more transgressions during the second week than the first week. Additionally, more "lenient" laws were being broken than "strict" ones. Level of religious observance was significantly negatively correlated to the number of transgressions. However, there was no significant correlation between the number of transgressions and the age at marriage, sex, or how long one had been married.

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Major Phytochemicals in Orthodox tea (Camellia sinensis), Oxidized under Compressed Air Environment.

    PubMed

    Panda, Brajesh Kumar; Datta, Ashis Kumar

    2016-04-01

    This study describes major changes in phytochemical composition of orthodox tea (Camellia sinensis var. Assamica) oxidized under compressed air (CA). The experiments for oxidation were conducted under air pressure (101, 202, and 303 kPa) for 150 min. Relative change in the concentrations of caffeine, catechins, theaflavins (TF), and thearubigins (TR) were analyzed. Effect of CA pressure was found to be nonsignificant in regulating caffeine concentration during oxidation. But degradation in different catechins as well as formation of different TF was significantly affected by CA pressure. At high CA pressure, TF showed highest peak value. TR was found to have slower rate of formation during initial phase of oxidation than TF. Even though the rate of TR formation was significantly influenced by CA, a portion of catechins remained unoxidized at end of oxidation. Except caffeine, the percent change in rate of formation or degradation were more prominent at 202 kPa. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  2. Age heterogamy and longevity: evidence from Jewish and Christian cemeteries.

    PubMed

    Abel, Ernest L; Kruger, Michael L

    2008-01-01

    In most marriages, husbands are older than wives at the time of marriage. The extent of this age difference is referred to as age heterogamy. Studies of age heterogamous marriages have found men and women married to younger spouses live longer than those married to spouses that are the same age at time of marriage. In this study we examined the role of a religious affiliation as a factor in this age heterogamy effect, by comparing Jewish and Christian husbands and wives. While we confirmed the age heterogamy effect on longevity, we did not find any evidence that it was affected by religion.

  3. Religiosity and its relation to quality of life in Christian Orthodox cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Assimakopoulos, Konstantinos; Karaivazoglou, Katerina; Ifanti, Amalia A; Gerolymos, Miltiadis K; Kalofonos, Haralabos P; Iconomou, Gregoris

    2009-03-01

    The first objective of the current observational study was to assess the levels of religiosity in Greek Christian Orthodox cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. The second objective was to evaluate the associations between religiosity and quality of life (QoL), an endpoint of considerable importance in clinical cancer research and practice. One hundred eighteen adult outpatients with solid tumors, who consented to participate, were administered the Systems of Belief Inventory (SBI-15R) and the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQ-C30) questionnaire. The analysis revealed high scores on religiosity, especially among female patients, who reported significantly higher levels of religious beliefs and practices as well as perceived social support provided by the religious community than did their male counterparts. Of all EORTC QOL-C30 subscales, only global QoL was found to be significantly associated with the SBI-15R religious beliefs subscale. The analysis revealed no significant correlations between the SBI-15R social support subscale and all QoL subscales. The current study reported high levels of religiosity among Greek Christian Orthodox cancer patients. However, levels of religiosity were only weakly associated with patients' QoL. The SBI-15R appeared to be a well-accepted and reliable tool, potentially useful for future research in Greek settings. Wide-scale studies from the same and diverse religious and cultural backgrounds are needed to clarify further the connections between religiosity, QoL, coping, and other health outcomes with the aim to devise appropriate multicomponent interventions to enhance patients' QoL.

  4. QA (Quality Assurance) role in advanced energy activities: Towards an /open quotes/orthodox/close quotes/ Quality Program: Canonizing the traditions at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bodnarczuk, M.W.

    1988-02-01

    After a brief description of the goal of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) this paper poses and answers three questions related to Quality Assurance (QA) at the Laboratory. First, what is the difference between 'orthodox' and 'unorthodox' QA and is there a place for 'orthodox' QA at a laboratory like Fermilab. Second, are the deeper philosophical and cultural frameworks of high-energy physics acommodating or antagonistic to an 'orthodox' QA Program. Finally, faced with the task of developing an institutional QA program for Fermilab where does one begin. The paper is based on experience with the on-going development and implementation of an institutional QA Program at Fermilab. 10 refs.

  5. Goiter in portraits of Judith the Jewish heroine

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Davide; Castello, Manuel Francisco; Lippi, Donatella; Weisz, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Judith was a legendary Hebrew heroine who beheaded the general Holofernes and saved the children of Israel from destruction by the Assyrian army. In the Book of Judith, which is still present in the Catholic and Orthodox Christian Bibles, Judith is presented as an illustrious woman who defeated the enemy using her virtue and fortitude. The present investigation has revealed 24 portraits in which Judith has been depicted with variable grades of thyroid gland enlargement on the scene where she decapitates Holofernes. There is no doubt that the integration of a slight thyroid enlargement in the paintings is a stylistic hallmark that portrays an idealized female beauty with a balanced neck and graceful body. The large extended goiter was probably depicted by the artists as a symbol of a powerful masculine body and her courage, and at the same time, it probably also reflects better anatomic accuracy and knowledge of artists from that period. PMID:26904480

  6. Presence of Legionella in London's water supplies.

    PubMed

    Colbourne, J S; Trew, R M

    1986-09-01

    Legionella occurs frequently (52 to 54%) in domestic water and cooling water inside commercial, industrial and health care buildings, and these types of water systems are now regarded as a normal habitat for Legionella. The factors that predispose a particular water system to colonization by these organisms are ill-defined, although it is fairly certain that biological and physicochemical environmental factors play an important role in allowing Legionella to multiply in the circulating water. It has been postulated that the organism may gain access to water systems inside buildings by one of three routes: contact with air through open points such as uncovered storage tanks or vents, ingress of soil or surface water during construction or repair, or intermittent seeding with organisms present in low numbers in the public water supply. Three studies in the USA have found Legionella in 0.4 to 8.8% of drinking-water samples, but these were not representative of the public supply network as a whole. The aim of this study was to determine, over a period of 1 year, the frequency of Legionella in London's drinking water--from the treatment plant through to the consumer's tap. To date, Legionella has not been isolated from raw river water entering London's treatment works or from treated water entering the distribution network. Sixty-two monitoring taps in buildings located in 21 supply areas have been sampled twice for Legionella; only 2 (2.4%) have proved positive during the autumn and winter of 1985/86. The strain found was L. pneumophila serotype 1, subgroup Olda, and the numbers ranged from 10(2) to 10(4)/l. Although the survey is incomplete, it is already clear that the public water supplies in London are not a source of strains of Legionella associated with disease.

  7. Parasuicide in central London 1984-1988.

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, G N; Rea, A J; Payne, J F; Lant, A F

    1989-01-01

    Experience of a central London unit dedicated to the care of patients following parasuicide between 1984 and 1988 is reviewed. There were 1160 admissions, which accounted for 11% of all acute adult medical admissions. The female to male ratio was 1.3, with a peak rate for females below 25 years and for males between 20 and 35. Unemployment was found to be a risk factor for parasuicide in men. Benzodiazepines were the most frequently used drug in parasuicide (35%), followed by paracetamol (13%) and aspirin (9%). PMID:2574238

  8. Delivering bad news: an approach according to jewish scriptures.

    PubMed

    Naimer, Sody A; Prero, Moshe

    2014-07-01

    Despite a preoccupation in the medical literature with developing an effective approach for breaking bad news, the sources are based on personal opinion alone and only in some instances on qualitative research. Recognizing the gravity of this topic coupled with respect for the wisdom of the written and oral Jewish scriptures, this work is an attempt to delve into the diverse ancient writings to draw conclusions regarding a recommended methodology to guide and inform this task. It is interesting to learn that most elements related to this topic have previously been raised in various forms in the scriptures. The issues range from where, when, and how the bearer of bad news should undertake this duty, to details such as the environment, the format, the speed, and depth of the details to be disclosed. The essence of this paper is to enrich the reader using both positive and negative examples found in the Jewish heritage. Adopting these principles will hopefully provide an effective method for performing this unpleasant obligation, with the goal of limiting harmful consequences as much as possible.

  9. Delivering Bad News: An Approach According to Jewish Scriptures

    PubMed Central

    Naimer, Sody A.; Prero, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Despite a preoccupation in the medical literature with developing an effective approach for breaking bad news, the sources are based on personal opinion alone and only in some instances on qualitative research. Recognizing the gravity of this topic coupled with respect for the wisdom of the written and oral Jewish scriptures, this work is an attempt to delve into the diverse ancient writings to draw conclusions regarding a recommended methodology to guide and inform this task. It is interesting to learn that most elements related to this topic have previously been raised in various forms in the scriptures. The issues range from where, when, and how the bearer of bad news should undertake this duty, to details such as the environment, the format, the speed, and depth of the details to be disclosed. The essence of this paper is to enrich the reader using both positive and negative examples found in the Jewish heritage. Adopting these principles will hopefully provide an effective method for performing this unpleasant obligation, with the goal of limiting harmful consequences as much as possible. PMID:25120920

  10. Shyness and social phobia in Israeli Jewish vs Arab students.

    PubMed

    Iancu, Iulian; Sarel, Amiram; Avital, Avi; Abdo, Basheer; Joubran, Samia; Ram, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) has been repeatedly shown to be very prevalent in the Western society with prevalence rates of 10% or above. However, very few studies have been performed in the Middle East and in Arab countries. A total of 300 Israeli students participated in our study and were administered the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), the Cheek and Buss Shyness Questionnaire (CBSQ), and a sociodemographic questionnaire. A total of 153 Jewish and 147 Arab students participated in the survey. Social anxiety disorder was found in 12.33% of the sample, according to the LSAS cutoff score of more than 60. The 2 subsamples had similar LSAS and CBSQ scores and similar SAD-positive rates (LSAS >60). Females had higher scores on the LSAS, as were those without a spouse and those who had been in psychological treatment. Based on a regression analysis, the significant predictors of the LSAS score were the CBSQ score and female sex. A very high correlation was found between the LSAS and the CBSQ scores. Although our sample is not representative of the whole Israeli population, we conclude that SAD and shyness were similarly prevalent in Jewish and Arab students in Israel. Social anxiety disorder scores were higher among females, those without a spouse, and those who received psychological treatment. Further studies on the clinical and cultural characteristics of SAD in Israeli subcultures would add to the growing body of knowledge on SAD in various cultures. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Skin lighteners, Black consumers and Jewish entrepreneurs in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lynn M

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the rise and decline of South Africa's lucrative and controversial skin-lighteners market through examination of the business history of the largest manufacturers, Abraham and Solomon Krok, and their evolving personas as millionaires and philanthropists. Such examination reveals how the country's skin-lighteners trade emerged as part of the broader growth of a black consumer market after the Second World War and how elements of that market became the target of anti-apartheid protests in subsequent decades. It also demonstrates how the Kroks' experiences as second-generation Jewish immigrants shaped their involvement in the trade and how, later, their self-identification as Jewish philanthropists informed their efforts to rehabilitate their reputations following South Africa's 1990 ban on all skin lighteners. Such efforts include the building of Johannesburg's highly acclaimed Apartheid Museum, modelled after the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. This article explores the profound ironies that some South Africans see in the fact that a museum dedicated to commemorating those who suffered under and, ultimately, triumphed against state racism was financed by a family fortune generated through the sale of skin lighteners to black consumers.

  12. Experiential Approaches to the Global City: London as Social Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gristwood, Anthony; Woolf, Michael

    2011-01-01

    London is the paramount example of a city that is not bounded by its geography and cannot be grasped in isolation. The U.K.'s national capital and the prime focus for business, finance and creative industries, London also transcends the U.K.'s borders as a hub of the world economy. This paper argues that London, a city riddled by the socioeconomic…

  13. Digital London: Creating a Searchable Web of Interlinked Sources on Eighteenth Century London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoemaker, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To outline the conceptual and technical difficulties encountered, as well as the opportunities created, when developing an interlinked collection of web-based digitised primary sources on eighteenth century London. Design/methodology/approach: As a pilot study for a larger project, a variety of primary sources, including the "Old…

  14. Digital London: Creating a Searchable Web of Interlinked Sources on Eighteenth Century London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoemaker, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To outline the conceptual and technical difficulties encountered, as well as the opportunities created, when developing an interlinked collection of web-based digitised primary sources on eighteenth century London. Design/methodology/approach: As a pilot study for a larger project, a variety of primary sources, including the "Old…

  15. Optical legacy of Imperial College London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidger Webb-Moore, Tina E.

    2016-10-01

    The Industrial Revolution, beginning primarily in the UK, generated an increasing need for highly skilled technical people. Throughout the 19th century, technical instruction increased dramatically and the formation of schools specializing in science and technology grew quickly. In England, there was much motivation in favour of a national prestige center for science and technology centered in London. Central among the motivating forces was Queen Victoria's husband, Prince Albert. Although there were already existing specialist science and technology institutions in major English cities, the growth of superior institutions in other countries within Europe, especially Germany and the Charlottenburg area of Berlin (e.g., the Berlin Technical High School), encouraged important English dignitaries to become more competitive with continental Europe. As a result of this strong continental motivation, several science and technology institutions were built in the south Kensington part of London during the latter half of the 19th century. Imperial College, founded at the start of the 20th century, was a culmination and consolidation of several of these 19th century English institutions. Optical science and technology was an early beneficiary of the founding of Imperial College. This paper will attempt to provide the reader with an understanding of how great was the influence of the optical section of Imperial College in the further development of the world's optical science and technology.

  16. The London low emission zone baseline study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Frank; Armstrong, Ben; Atkinson, Richard; Anderson, H Ross; Barratt, Ben; Beevers, Sean; Cook, Derek; Green, Dave; Derwent, Dick; Mudway, Ian; Wilkinson, Paul

    2011-11-01

    On February 4, 2008, the world's largest low emission zone (LEZ) was established. At 2644 km2, the zone encompasses most of Greater London. It restricts the entry of the oldest and most polluting diesel vehicles, including heavy-goods vehicles (haulage trucks), buses and coaches, larger vans, and minibuses. It does not apply to cars or motorcycles. The LEZ scheme will introduce increasingly stringent Euro emissions standards over time. The creation of this zone presented a unique opportunity to estimate the effects of a stepwise reduction in vehicle emissions on air quality and health. Before undertaking such an investigation, robust baseline data were gathered on air quality and the oxidative activity and metal content of particulate matter (PM) from air pollution monitors located in Greater London. In addition, methods were developed for using databases of electronic primary-care records in order to evaluate the zone's health effects. Our study began in 2007, using information about the planned restrictions in an agreed-upon LEZ scenario and year-on-year changes in the vehicle fleet in models to predict air pollution concentrations in London for the years 2005, 2008, and 2010. Based on this detailed emissions and air pollution modeling, the areas in London were then identified that were expected to show the greatest changes in air pollution concentrations and population exposures after the implementation of the LEZ. Using these predictions, the best placement of a pollution monitoring network was determined and the feasibility of evaluating the health effects using electronic primary-care records was assessed. To measure baseline pollutant concentrations before the implementation of the LEZ, a comprehensive monitoring network was established close to major roadways and intersections. Output-difference plots from statistical modeling for 2010 indicated seven key areas likely to experience the greatest change in concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) (at least 3

  17. Social psychological origins of conspiracy theories: the case of the jewish conspiracy theory in malaysia.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren

    2012-01-01

    Two studies examined correlates of belief in a Jewish conspiracy theory among Malays in Malaysia, a culture in which state-directed conspiracism as a means of dealing with perceived external and internal threats is widespread. In Study 1, 368 participants from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, completed a novel measure of belief in a Jewish conspiracy theory, along with measures of general conspiracist ideation, and anomie. Initial analysis showed that the novel scale factorially reduced to a single dimension. Further analysis showed that belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory was only significantly associated with general conspiracist ideation, but the strength of the association was weak. In Study 2, 314 participants completed the measure of belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory, along with measures of general conspiracist ideation, and ideological attitudes. Results showed that belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory was associated with anti-Israeli attitudes, modern racism directed at the Chinese, right-wing authoritarianism, and social dominance orientation. General conspiracist ideation did not emerge as a significant predictor once other variables had been accounted for. These results suggest that there may be specific cultural and social psychological forces that drive belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory within the Malaysian context. Specifically, belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory among Malaysian Malays appears to serve ideological needs and as a mask for anti-Chinese sentiment, which may in turn reaffirm their perceived ability to shape socio-political processes.

  18. Ritual encounters of the queer kind: a political analysis of jewish lesbian ritual innovation.

    PubMed

    Brettschneider, Marla

    2003-01-01

    SUMMARY Jewish feminist and queer engagement in Jewish life and Judaism are transforming the practices and foundational orientations of traditional modes. Jewish feminist, queer ritual innovation in particular is inspired by an array of secular and radical critical theories as much as it is by the historic concrete experiences of a diversity of Jews in different Jewish communities. It is important to hold all of us who are involved in religious ritual innovation responsible to the knowledges we have developed and learned in critical theory or we risk, even with the best of intentions and creativity, re-inscribing some of the very problems of traditional ontological norms that we might have originally sought to disrupt and subvert. This article looks specifically at examples of new "coming out" rituals for Jewish queers explored over time in the Jewish Queer Think Tank: honoring them as well as offering tools from secular critical theory to assist our work in keeping them accountable to our aspirations to both love and fundamentally transform Jewishness. Here I redefine the function of religious ritual itself in political terms as an identity-producing performance. As such I utilize social constructionist queer theories (i.e., Shane Phelan and Judith Butler), anarchists (i.e., Emma Goldman), and those involved in radical theatre (i.e., Augusto Boal) to articulate the revolutionary potential of ritual innovation.

  19. Social Psychological Origins of Conspiracy Theories: The Case of the Jewish Conspiracy Theory in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Swami, Viren

    2012-01-01

    Two studies examined correlates of belief in a Jewish conspiracy theory among Malays in Malaysia, a culture in which state-directed conspiracism as a means of dealing with perceived external and internal threats is widespread. In Study 1, 368 participants from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, completed a novel measure of belief in a Jewish conspiracy theory, along with measures of general conspiracist ideation, and anomie. Initial analysis showed that the novel scale factorially reduced to a single dimension. Further analysis showed that belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory was only significantly associated with general conspiracist ideation, but the strength of the association was weak. In Study 2, 314 participants completed the measure of belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory, along with measures of general conspiracist ideation, and ideological attitudes. Results showed that belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory was associated with anti-Israeli attitudes, modern racism directed at the Chinese, right-wing authoritarianism, and social dominance orientation. General conspiracist ideation did not emerge as a significant predictor once other variables had been accounted for. These results suggest that there may be specific cultural and social psychological forces that drive belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory within the Malaysian context. Specifically, belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory among Malaysian Malays appears to serve ideological needs and as a mask for anti-Chinese sentiment, which may in turn reaffirm their perceived ability to shape socio-political processes. PMID:22888323

  20. Patient-centered Bedside Education and Traditional Jewish Law and Ethics.

    PubMed

    Shafran, Yigal; Wolowelsky, Joel B

    2012-01-01

    Bedside rounds have long been a time-honored component of medical education. Recently, there have been various recommendations that residency-training programs further incorporate bedside teaching into clinical curricula. To compare these current attitudes regarding bedside education with the position of traditional Jewish law and ethics. Relevant medical journal articles and traditional Jewish sources were reviewed. Halacha (the corpus of traditional Jewish law and ethics) gives greater focus to a patient-centered rather than student-centered bedside education experience. Residency training programs should give greater consideration to the importance of a patient-centered bedside education experience.

  1. The Jewish heritage of Ludwig Wittgenstein: its influence on his life and work.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch, Henry; Prince, Raymond

    2006-12-01

    This article discusses two aspects of Wittgenstein's Jewish heritage. First, we try to show that Wittgenstein was acutely aware of his own Jewish heritage and especially concerned about its potential influence on his work. Second, we suggest that the form of his work, specifically, his method of inquiry and the peculiar literary character of his work, bear a striking resemblance to that of Hebrew Talmud. Like other assimilated Jews of Central Europe, Wittgenstein may have been directly or indirectly exposed to Hebraic culture and Talmudic logic. An understanding of Wittgenstein's Jewish heritage provides an important and neglected perspective on his work.

  2. The interactions between an orthodox Christian worldview and environmental attitudes and beliefs; for the purpose of developing better instructional practice in support of environmental/ecological attitudes and knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keys, Robert S.

    Students bring with them to the classroom a wide variety of beliefs and attitudes about the environment and its associated issues. One worldview belief structure prominently discussed in ecological discussions is the worldview of orthodox Christianity. This study uses both quantitative and qualitative measures to analyze the degree to which the orthodox Christian worldview of students influences their environmental attitudes and beliefs. Surveys were conducted with 281 undergraduate pre-service elementary teaching students enrolled in a science methods course to determine the degree to which orthodox Christian worldviews and ecological worldviews interact with one another. From this pool of students, 16 students representing both positive and neutral-negative orthodox Christian worldviews and ecological worldviews were interviewed to determine how orthodox Christian students may differ from non-orthodox Christian students in their attitudes and beliefs about the environment. Analysis revealed that students with orthodox Christian worldview beliefs do not as a general rule use their orthodox Christian worldview beliefs in the discussion of their environmental beliefs and attitudes. Exceptions to this may occur when environmental issues touch on orthodox Christian worldview beliefs which have a bearing on matters of origin, life purpose, or destiny. These interactions between ecological and orthodox Christian worldviews have implications for the teaching of environmental issues to students in that the orthodox Christian worldview of students is not likely to hinder the appropriation of concepts associated with environmental issues. However, moving students with an orthodox Christian worldview to a view where they become actively involved in environmental issue resolution may require educators to situate curriculum in such a way as to invoke the students' orthodox Christian worldview beliefs.

  3. Studies on quality of orthodox teas made from anthocyanin-rich tea clones growing in Kangra valley, India.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Robin; Rana, Ajay; Gulati, Ashu

    2015-06-01

    Recently anthocyanin-rich purple tea varieties have been developed. The quality of these new purple tea varieties developed in Kangra valley was assessed, and compared with the quality of tea from standard Kangra clone. Purple tea shoots (PL) recorded higher amount of polyphenols compared to standard green tea shoot (GL) while epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) recorded higher levels in GL. Higher levels of theaflavins were recorded in orthodox black tea from purple shoots (BTP) compared to black tea (BT) made from green shoots. Both theanine and caffeine recorded higher levels in GL. Volatile flavour profiles of these teas showed qualitative and quantitative differences. Aroma extract dilution assay showed higher dilution factors in BTP than BT. Orthodox teas from purple shoots exhibited higher antioxidant activity compared to standard black tea. Strong correlation of total quality scores with aroma and infusion colour was observed. Tea from anthocyanin-rich cultivars can become specialty teas with high antioxidant activity.

  4. On a Resolution Concept Concerning the Calendar Reform submitted to the Pan-Orthodox Congress in Constantinople in 1923

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trajkovska, V.; Ninkovic, S.

    2008-10-01

    The present paper deals with a document concerning the calendar reform which was addressed to the Pan-Orthodox Conference in Constantinople in 1923. The document was written in German using the Gothic letters and the author's name is Gustav Baron Bedeus from Hermannstadt (today Sibiu, Romania). Independently of the proposal he considers that the task of calendar regulating belongs to a state and for this reason a world conference gathering all states and churches aimed at calendar reform could be organized.

  5. 33 CFR 110.147 - New London Harbor, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emergencies, vessels shall not anchor in New London Harbor or the approaches thereto outside the anchorages... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New London Harbor, Conn. 110.147 Section 110.147 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...

  6. Alternative Spaces of Learning in East London: Opportunities and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sneddon, Raymonde; Martin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This article emerges from an ongoing exploration into how British minority ethnic communities in the London area create spaces in community-based programs to maintain or develop their languages and literacies. In London, more than one-third of the 850,000 school children speak a language other than English at home (Baker & Eversley, 2000).…

  7. RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT THE NEW LONDON HARBOR FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A radiological survey done to assess levels of environmental radioactivity in and around navy harbor facilities located on the Thames River near New London, Connecticut. These facilities include the New London Submarine Base at Groton, the Electric Boat Company at Groton, Sound ...

  8. RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT THE NEW LONDON HARBOR FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A radiological survey done to assess levels of environmental radioactivity in and around navy harbor facilities located on the Thames River near New London, Connecticut. These facilities include the New London Submarine Base at Groton, the Electric Boat Company at Groton, Sound ...

  9. Alternative Spaces of Learning in East London: Opportunities and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sneddon, Raymonde; Martin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This article emerges from an ongoing exploration into how British minority ethnic communities in the London area create spaces in community-based programs to maintain or develop their languages and literacies. In London, more than one-third of the 850,000 school children speak a language other than English at home (Baker & Eversley, 2000).…

  10. London air quality: a real world experiment in progress.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Frank J; Kelly, Julia

    2009-07-01

    London currently has the highest nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentration recorded for any European city and for particulate matter (PM) it has some of the worst hot spots. Therefore overall, for these two pollutants, London is the worst in the UK and amongst the worst in Europe. Exposure to elevated concentrations of air pollutants such as PM and NO2 has well-established heath effects and most countries now have strict guidelines for air quality. London's air quality problems are driven largely by traffic. This, along with the high density of people in an urban area results in air quality guidelines being exceeded on a regular basis and large numbers of people being affected. In an attempt to combat London's air quality problems the Mayor of London introduced a series of measures to decrease traffic emissions. These included both a restriction on the number of vehicles entering central London each day--the Congestions Charging Scheme (CCS), and the discouragement of the most polluting heavy goods vehicles from entering--the London Low Emission Zone (LEZ). Together, it is hoped that these measures will lead to an improvement in air quality and provide a direct health benefit to Londoners. Research underway is charting the progress of this real world experiment.

  11. Practicing Reflexivity in the Study of Italian Migrants in London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seganti, Francesca Romana

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the centrality of reflexivity in qualitative research through examples from my study on the role new media play in the lives of Italians in London. My hypothesis was that Italians were "in transit" in London and they were using new media to build "temporary" communities. I conducted in-depth interviews…

  12. Education in a Global City: Essays from London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brighouse, Tim, Ed.; Fullick, Leisha, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This collection of essays by academic and policy experts brings together a wide range of data to offer a clear picture of London's changing education scene. Its mapping of new and developing strategies for successful urban education will be useful to educators and policymakers not only in London but also in other cities operating in similar…

  13. Education in a Global City: Essays from London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brighouse, Tim, Ed.; Fullick, Leisha, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This collection of essays by academic and policy experts brings together a wide range of data to offer a clear picture of London's changing education scene. Its mapping of new and developing strategies for successful urban education will be useful to educators and policymakers not only in London but also in other cities operating in similar…

  14. Changing the Subject: English in London, 1945-1967

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yandell, John

    2014-01-01

    Two recent books, "English Teachers in a Postwar Democracy: Emerging Choice in London Schools, 1945-1965" and "The London Association for the Teaching of English, 1947-67: A History," explore an important period in the development of English as a school subject and in the remaking of the professional identity of English…

  15. Changing the Subject: English in London, 1945-1967

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yandell, John

    2014-01-01

    Two recent books, "English Teachers in a Postwar Democracy: Emerging Choice in London Schools, 1945-1965" and "The London Association for the Teaching of English, 1947-67: A History," explore an important period in the development of English as a school subject and in the remaking of the professional identity of English…

  16. London in Space and Time: Peter Ackroyd and Will Self

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the treatment of London by two authors who are profoundly influenced by the concept of the power of place and the nature of urban space. The works of Peter Ackroyd, whose writings embody, according to Onega (1997, p. 208) "[a] yearning for mythical closure" where London is "a mystic centre of…

  17. Teacher Perceptions about the Importance of Parental Involvement for Included Students with Learning Disabilities in New York Metropolitan Area Orthodox Yeshivas and Day Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Goldie Eichorn

    2010-01-01

    The population of students attending Jewish day schools includes an increasing number of students with exceptional needs. How Jewish schools meet the needs of these students is an important question. Inclusive education is a service model predicated on legal and philosophical mores as well as pedagogical and psychological findings. The quality of…

  18. Multiple sclerosis among immigrants in Greater London.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, G; McLoughlin, H; Brady, R; Adelstein, A M; Tallett-Williams, J

    1976-01-01

    Among immigrants resident in greater London from Europe, Ireland, the USSR, the old Commonwealth countries of Australia, Canada, and New Zealand, North and South America, Egypt, Turkey, and Iran the incidence of admission to hospital for probable multiple sclerosis (MS) between 1960 and 1972 was high or moderately high. The incidence was the same order as that found in those born in the United Kingdom. Immigrants from India, Pakistan, and other Asian countries and from new Commonwealth Africa and America, which includes the West Indies, had a low incidence of hospital admission for MS. Immigrants from countries where the risk of MS is low whose parents were born in Europe had a reduced incidence of admission to hospital but not the very low incidence found in those parents were also born in these countries. Emigrating to England from low risk parts of the world did not seem to increase the risk of developing MS. PMID:1260384

  19. London Trusts proud to describe their work.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    'Waste not, Want not' was the title of a recent IHEEM seminar which examined some of the key issues for those responsible for dealing with healthcare waste--from regulatory compliance and correct segregation of waste streams, to the opportunities for more on-site processing. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, reports on the joint presentations given by key environmental and sustainability personnel at two of London's largest NHS Trusts, and their private sector waste management partners. These discussed some of the key initiatives that each Trust and its 'partner' have taken to not only significantly reduce the amount of waste generated on their estate, but also to dispose of it in an environmentally responsible way. These initiatives, the speakers explained, were all part of their organisations' journey on the road to achieving 'Deep Green', a 'nirvana'-like state where their activities have a zero net impact on the environment.

  20. Canadian-Jewish seniors: marriage/cohabitation after age 65.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Rachel Aber; Schlesinger, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    This is an exploratory qualitative study of 10 seniors (5 men and 5 women), who remarried or lived together after the age of 65. They were all Jewish, lived in Toronto, Canada, and had been married previously. The subjects were interviewed in their own homes, using a questionnaire. The study attempts to explore the pathways to recoupling, how the partners met, the differences between the first and second partners, and the major issues faced by the subjects in moving into a new relationship. The results in this article are significantly presented through the words of the respondents. This gives the reader the flavor of what is involved in senior relationships. The conclusions summarize the major findings of the study, and make suggestions for further research. We focus on implications for health and wellbeing from our findings.

  1. To clone or not to clone--a Jewish perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Lipschutz, J H

    1999-01-01

    Many new reproductive methods such as artificial insemination, in vitro fertilisation, freezing of human embryos, and surrogate motherhood were at first widely condemned but are now seen in Western society as not just ethically and morally acceptable, but beneficial in that they allow otherwise infertile couples to have children. The idea of human cloning was also quickly condemned but debate is now emerging. This article examines cloning from a Jewish perspective and finds evidence to support the view that there is nothing inherently wrong with the idea of human cloning. A hypothesis is also advanced suggesting that even if a body was cloned, the brain, which is the essence of humanity, would remain unique. This author suggests that the debate should be changed from "Is cloning wrong?" to "When is cloning wrong?". PMID:10226913

  2. Spontaneous generation in medieval Jewish philosophy and theology.

    PubMed

    Gaziel, Ahuva

    2012-01-01

    The concept of life forms emerging from inanimate matter--spontaneous generation--was widely accepted until the nineteenth century. Several medieval Jewish scholars acknowledged this scientific theory in their philosophical and religious contemplations. Quite interestingly, it served to reinforce diverse, or even opposite, theological conclusions. One approach excluded spontaneously-generated living beings form the biblical account of creation or the story of the Deluge. Underlying this view is an understanding that organisms that generate spontaneously evolve continuously in nature and, therefore, do not require divine intervention in their formation or survival during disastrous events. This naturalistic position reduces the miraculous dimension of reality. Others were of the opinion that spontaneous generation is one of the extraordinary marvels exhibited in this world and, accordingly, this interpretation served to accentuate the divine aspect of nature. References to spontaneous generation also appear in legal writings, influencing practical applications such as dietary laws and actions forbidden on the Sabbath.

  3. [The organization of Jewish dentists in pre-Israel Palestine].

    PubMed

    Keren-Kratz, M

    2016-04-01

    The first modern dental institutes were established in Europe and in the USA during the 1840s. At that period there wasn't a single qualified doctor in Palestine, not to mention a professional dentist. A couple of decades later, as the number of Christian pilgrims grew, some modern hospitals were established and a few non-Jewish dentists opened their clinics in Jerusalem, which was then and in the following decades, the region's largest city. In Europe, dentistry became a popular profession among Jews in general and among Jewish women in particular. The first Jewish dentist settled in Jerusalem in the mid-1880s. Other dentists were slow to arrive and their number began to grow only after the turn of the 20th century. Their professional education varied from those who were trained as apprentices by other dentists to those which studied a couple of years in an academic dental school. The devastation caused by WWI prompted American-Zionist organizations to send a special medical unit to Palestine in 1918. Along medical supplies it also brought a small group of doctors and dentists. The two American dentists that decided to remain in Palestine took upon themselves to spread their medical and scientific knowledge. They also organized the dentists, whose number grew considerably during the 1920s, and called the authorities to regulate the dental profession. In 1926 the British authorities issued a decree regulating all medical professions. It demanded that dental practitioners will be licensed after proving their previous studies and professional knowledge. In 1931, local dentists' organizations decided to establish the Palestine Dental Association. Five years later it was accepted as a member by the International Dental Federation (FDI) and was recognized by the local authorities. Since the 1930s, prominent Jewish dentists from abroad were invited to come to Palestine to lecture, and local dentists participated in international conferences. This prompted the first

  4. 3 CFR 8660 - Proclamation 8660 of April 29, 2011. Jewish American Heritage Month, 2011

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... centuries ago, to a place called New Amsterdam. Hundreds of years later, as Holocaust survivors and families... New Amsterdam, Jewish Americans have dedicated their innovation, creativity, and hearts to the...

  5. The fate of Hungarian Jewish dermatologists during the Holocaust: Part 2: Under Nazi rule.

    PubMed

    Bock, Julia; Burgdorf, Walter H C; Hoenig, Leonard J; Parish, Lawrence Charles

    At least 564,500 Hungarian Jews perished during the Holocaust, including many physicians. Exactly how many Jewish dermatologists were killed is not known. We have identified 62 Hungarian Jewish dermatologists from this period: 19 of these dermatologists died in concentration camps or were shot in Hungary, 3 committed suicide, and 1 died shortly after the Holocaust, exhausted by the War. Fortunately, many Hungarian Jewish dermatologists survived the Holocaust. Some had fled Europe before the Nazi takeover, as was described in Part 1 of this contribution. Two Holocaust survivors, Ferenc Földvári and Ödön Rajka, became presidents of the Hungarian Dermatologic Society and helped rebuild the profession of dermatology in Hungary after the War. This contribution provides one of the first accounts of the fate of Hungarian Jewish dermatologists during the Holocaust and serves as a remembrance of their suffering and ordeal. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Culturally sensitive therapy with ultra-orthodox patients: the strategic employment of religious idioms of distress.

    PubMed

    Bilu, Y; Witztum, E

    1994-01-01

    The article deals with the problem of administering therapy in multicultural settings where the therapist and the patient hold divergent explanatory models in regard to the patient's symptoms. Different conceptualizations of the universal structure of symbolic healing stress the importance of therapist-patient compatibility for therapeutic success. In order to reach this compatibility, strategic therapists seek to join the patients' explanatory models and employ metaphors and symbols derived from their cultural world. From a psychodynamic perspective, strategic techniques are often presented as superficial treatments limited to the symptomatic level. In order to deal with this argument, we present a case study of an ultra-orthodox patient with a major depressive episode and describe the treatment which was based on a strategic, culturally sensitive approach. We use the case to discuss theoretical issues arising in the context of multicultural therapy such as the translatability of culturally divergent idioms of distress and the possibility to bring about significant, nonsymptomatic changes through strategic employment of culturally congruent metaphors and symbols.

  7. Mitochondrial and Y chromosome haplotype motifs as diagnostic markers of Jewish ancestry: a reconsideration.

    PubMed

    Tofanelli, Sergio; Taglioli, Luca; Bertoncini, Stefania; Francalacci, Paolo; Klyosov, Anatole; Pagani, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Several authors have proposed haplotype motifs based on site variants at the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) and the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome (NRY) to trace the genealogies of Jewish people. Here, we analyzed their main approaches and test the feasibility of adopting motifs as ancestry markers through construction of a large database of mtDNA and NRY haplotypes from public genetic genealogical repositories. We verified the reliability of Jewish ancestry prediction based on the Cohen and Levite Modal Haplotypes in their "classical" 6 STR marker format or in the "extended" 12 STR format, as well as four founder mtDNA lineages (HVS-I segments) accounting for about 40% of the current population of Ashkenazi Jews. For this purpose we compared haplotype composition in individuals of self-reported Jewish ancestry with the rest of European, African or Middle Eastern samples, to test for non-random association of ethno-geographic groups and haplotypes. Overall, NRY and mtDNA based motifs, previously reported to differentiate between groups, were found to be more represented in Jewish compared to non-Jewish groups. However, this seems to stem from common ancestors of Jewish lineages being rather recent respect to ancestors of non-Jewish lineages with the same "haplotype signatures." Moreover, the polyphyly of haplotypes which contain the proposed motifs and the misuse of constant mutation rates heavily affected previous attempts to correctly dating the origin of common ancestries. Accordingly, our results stress the limitations of using the above haplotype motifs as reliable Jewish ancestry predictors and show its inadequacy for forensic or genealogical purposes.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA reveals distinct evolutionary histories for Jewish populations in Yemen and Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Non, Amy L; Al-Meeri, Ali; Raaum, Ryan L; Sanchez, Luisa F; Mulligan, Connie J

    2011-01-01

    Southern Arabia and the Horn of Africa are important geographic centers for the study of human population history because a great deal of migration has characterized these regions since the first emergence of humans out of Africa. Analysis of Jewish groups provides a unique opportunity to investigate more recent population histories in this area. Mitochondrial DNA is used to investigate the maternal evolutionary history and can be combined with historical and linguistic data to test various population histories. In this study, we assay mitochondrial control region DNA sequence and diagnostic coding variants in Yemenite (n = 45) and Ethiopian (n = 41) Jewish populations, as well as in neighboring non-Jewish Yemeni (n = 50) and Ethiopian (previously published Semitic speakers) populations. We investigate their population histories through a comparison of haplogroup distributions and phylogenetic networks. A high frequency of sub-Saharan African L haplogroups was found in both Jewish populations, indicating a significant African maternal contribution unlike other Jewish Diaspora populations. However, no identical haplotypes were shared between the Yemenite and Ethiopian Jewish populations, suggesting very little gene flow between the populations and potentially distinct maternal population histories. These new data are also used to investigate alternate population histories in the context of historical and linguistic data. Specifically, Yemenite Jewish mitochondrial diversity reflects potential descent from ancient Israeli exiles and shared African and Middle Eastern ancestry with little evidence for large-scale conversion of local Yemeni. In contrast, the Ethiopian Jewish population appears to be a subset of the larger Ethiopian population suggesting descent primarily through conversion of local women.

  9. Comparison of safety equipment between London underground and Beijing subway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T.; Zhang, S. Y.; Zhao, L. Z.; Xia, J. J.; Fu, X. C.; Bao, Z. M.; Chen, Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Wang, R. J.; Hu, C.; Jing, L. S.; Wang, Y.

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this paper was to improve the safety equipment’s effectiveness through the comparison. Firstly, the history and safety accident of London Underground and Beijing Subway were shown. Secondly, fire equipment between these two cities was compared including station’s hardware installations and carriage’s hardware installations. Thirdly, the relative software installations were also compared such as emergency drills. The results showed that Beijing Subway’s hardware installations were better than London. However, London Underground’s some installations were more effective than Beijing. Both cities would pay more attention on anti-terrorist in tunnel.

  10. Lidar Observations of Pollution Transport From London to Rural Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, Hugo; Vaughan, Geraint; Wareing, David

    2016-06-01

    The Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) Project took place in and around London, United Kingdom. The aim of the project was to learn how both atmospheric dynamics and chemistry affect air pollution in the south east of England. During the winter and summer of 2012 many different types of instrument including lidars were deployed throughout London city centre, suburbs and into rural areas. Amongst these instruments was the Boundary Layer Aerosol/Ozone Lidar owned by the National Centre for Atmospheric Sciences (NCAS) in the United Kingdom. Ozone and aerosol data are presented from data collected during July and August 2012 and compared to back trajectories to identify their origins.

  11. Teaching the History of Astronomy On Site in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2016-01-01

    In the autumn of 2014, the author had the opportunity to teach a class on the history of astronomy in England as part of a study abroad experience for students at Illinois Wesleyan University. The philosophy of the program is to use the rich cultural environment of London as a setting for active learning. In the classroom, students read and discussed selected works by Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, and Herschel. We visited Stonehenge, the Royal Greenwich Observatory, the London Science Museum, the London Monument, and the library of the Royal Astronomical Society. Lessons learned from the experience will be shared.

  12. To reflex or not: additional BRCA1/2 testing in Ashkenazi Jewish individuals without founder mutations.

    PubMed

    Petrucelli, Nancie; Mange, Sarah; Fulbright, Jennifer L; Dohany, Lindsay; Zakalik, Dana; Duquette, Debra

    2015-04-01

    This study determined the prevalence of non-Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1/2 mutations in the Ashkenazi Jewish population in the state of Michigan, current provider testing practices, and the use of mutation probability models in determining which Ashkenazi Jewish individuals should be offered further analysis following negative BRCA1/2 founder testing. Testing patterns, mutation probabilities, and testing results were assessed for 327 Ashkenazi Jewish individuals seen for BRCA1/2 counseling in the state of Michigan who underwent testing for the Ashkenazi Jewish founder mutations. Only one (0.6 %) Ashkenazi Jewish individual with sequencing after negative founder analysis was found to have a non-founder mutation; no rearrangements were identified. Testing patterns varied by clinic, with the proportion of Ashkenazi Jewish individuals undergoing additional sequencing ranging from 22.2 to 92.9 %. In Ashkenazi Jewish individuals with a pre-test BRCAPRO risk calculation, the mean risk was significantly higher in those with follow-up sequencing compared to those who did not pursue additional testing. The low prevalence of non-founder BRCA1/2 mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish individuals does not warrant automatically reflexing to full analysis after negative mutation testing. Increased use of mutation probability models may aid in determining which cases warrant additional testing.

  13. The mental health benefits and costs of Sabbath observance among Orthodox Jews.

    PubMed

    Dein, Simon; Loewenthal, Kate M

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to examine the perceived psychological costs and benefits of Sabbath (Shabbos) observance among 13 practising Jews, 9 UK residents and 4 US residents. Emerging themes were as follows: Shabbos as a special day, giving time to contemplate on profound issues, withdrawal and rest from mundane concerns, and deepening relationships. These aspects can potentially improve feelings of mental well-being, and were indeed often said to do so. Some difficulties were described: some found they were prone to worry more on Shabbos because of the freedom from distractions, and there were reports of the difficulties of explaining to non-Jewish work colleagues the religious need to be free from work commitments. These findings were related to the literature on religious ritual observance and generally accord with other work in anthropology and psychology of religion examining the psychological impact of ritual. Work on the mental health implications of ritual observance needs to be expanded. It has received only limited attention, and understanding has been constrained by a misleading confusion between ritual and obsessionality. Other impacts of religion on mental health are better documented and understood, and religious ritual and its impact needs further documentation and attention.

  14. Counting the founders: the matrilineal genetic ancestry of the Jewish Diaspora.

    PubMed

    Behar, Doron M; Metspalu, Ene; Kivisild, Toomas; Rosset, Saharon; Tzur, Shay; Hadid, Yarin; Yudkovsky, Guennady; Rosengarten, Dror; Pereira, Luisa; Amorim, Antonio; Kutuev, Ildus; Gurwitz, David; Bonne-Tamir, Batsheva; Villems, Richard; Skorecki, Karl

    2008-04-30

    The history of the Jewish Diaspora dates back to the Assyrian and Babylonian conquests in the Levant, followed by complex demographic and migratory trajectories over the ensuing millennia which pose a serious challenge to unraveling population genetic patterns. Here we ask whether phylogenetic analysis, based on highly resolved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogenies can discern among maternal ancestries of the Diaspora. Accordingly, 1,142 samples from 14 different non-Ashkenazi Jewish communities were analyzed. A list of complete mtDNA sequences was established for all variants present at high frequency in the communities studied, along with high-resolution genotyping of all samples. Unlike the previously reported pattern observed among Ashkenazi Jews, the numerically major portion of the non-Ashkenazi Jews, currently estimated at 5 million people and comprised of the Moroccan, Iraqi, Iranian and Iberian Exile Jewish communities showed no evidence for a narrow founder effect, which did however characterize the smaller and more remote Belmonte, Indian and the two Caucasus communities. The Indian and Ethiopian Jewish sample sets suggested local female introgression, while mtDNAs in all other communities studied belong to a well-characterized West Eurasian pool of maternal lineages. Absence of sub-Saharan African mtDNA lineages among the North African Jewish communities suggests negligible or low level of admixture with females of the host populations among whom the African haplogroup (Hg) L0-L3 sub-clades variants are common. In contrast, the North African and Iberian Exile Jewish communities show influence of putative Iberian admixture as documented by mtDNA Hg HV0 variants. These findings highlight striking differences in the demographic history of the widespread Jewish Diaspora.

  15. Implications for health and disease in the genetic signature of the Ashkenazi Jewish population

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Relatively small, reproductively isolated populations with reduced genetic diversity may have advantages for genomewide association mapping in disease genetics. The Ashkenazi Jewish population represents a unique population for study based on its recent (< 1,000 year) history of a limited number of founders, population bottlenecks and tradition of marriage within the community. We genotyped more than 1,300 Ashkenazi Jewish healthy volunteers from the Hebrew University Genetic Resource with the Illumina HumanOmni1-Quad platform. Comparison of the genotyping data with that of neighboring European and Asian populations enabled the Ashkenazi Jewish-specific component of the variance to be characterized with respect to disease-relevant alleles and pathways. Results Using clustering, principal components, and pairwise genetic distance as converging approaches, we identified an Ashkenazi Jewish-specific genetic signature that differentiated these subjects from both European and Middle Eastern samples. Most notably, gene ontology analysis of the Ashkenazi Jewish genetic signature revealed an enrichment of genes functioning in transepithelial chloride transport, such as CFTR, and in equilibrioception, potentially shedding light on cystic fibrosis, Usher syndrome and other diseases over-represented in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Results also impact risk profiles for autoimmune and metabolic disorders in this population. Finally, residual intra-Ashkenazi population structure was minimal, primarily determined by class 1 MHC alleles, and not related to host country of origin. Conclusions The Ashkenazi Jewish population is of potential utility in disease-mapping studies due to its relative homogeneity and distinct genomic signature. Results suggest that Ashkenazi-associated disease genes may be components of population-specific genomic differences in key functional pathways. PMID:22277159

  16. Counting the Founders: The Matrilineal Genetic Ancestry of the Jewish Diaspora

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Doron M.; Metspalu, Ene; Kivisild, Toomas; Rosset, Saharon; Tzur, Shay; Hadid, Yarin; Yudkovsky, Guennady; Rosengarten, Dror; Pereira, Luisa; Amorim, Antonio; Kutuev, Ildus; Gurwitz, David; Bonne-Tamir, Batsheva; Villems, Richard; Skorecki, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The history of the Jewish Diaspora dates back to the Assyrian and Babylonian conquests in the Levant, followed by complex demographic and migratory trajectories over the ensuing millennia which pose a serious challenge to unraveling population genetic patterns. Here we ask whether phylogenetic analysis, based on highly resolved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogenies can discern among maternal ancestries of the Diaspora. Accordingly, 1,142 samples from 14 different non-Ashkenazi Jewish communities were analyzed. A list of complete mtDNA sequences was established for all variants present at high frequency in the communities studied, along with high-resolution genotyping of all samples. Unlike the previously reported pattern observed among Ashkenazi Jews, the numerically major portion of the non-Ashkenazi Jews, currently estimated at 5 million people and comprised of the Moroccan, Iraqi, Iranian and Iberian Exile Jewish communities showed no evidence for a narrow founder effect, which did however characterize the smaller and more remote Belmonte, Indian and the two Caucasus communities. The Indian and Ethiopian Jewish sample sets suggested local female introgression, while mtDNAs in all other communities studied belong to a well-characterized West Eurasian pool of maternal lineages. Absence of sub-Saharan African mtDNA lineages among the North African Jewish communities suggests negligible or low level of admixture with females of the host populations among whom the African haplogroup (Hg) L0-L3 sub-clades variants are common. In contrast, the North African and Iberian Exile Jewish communities show influence of putative Iberian admixture as documented by mtDNA Hg HV0 variants. These findings highlight striking differences in the demographic history of the widespread Jewish Diaspora. PMID:18446216

  17. The Making of Two Readers: Agatha Christie and Jack London.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baghban, Marcia

    1990-01-01

    Looks at the lives of two well-known writers to explore how diverse experiences produce literate adults. Discusses Agatha Christie and Jack London who used reading and writing to earn a living and to gain international reputations. (MG)

  18. The Making of Two Readers: Agatha Christie and Jack London.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baghban, Marcia

    1990-01-01

    Looks at the lives of two well-known writers to explore how diverse experiences produce literate adults. Discusses Agatha Christie and Jack London who used reading and writing to earn a living and to gain international reputations. (MG)

  19. 106. Niantic River Bridge. Niantic, New London Co., CT. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    106. Niantic River Bridge. Niantic, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 116.74. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  20. 109. Niantic River Bridge. Niantic, New London Co., CT. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    109. Niantic River Bridge. Niantic, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 116.74. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT