Science.gov

Sample records for long-term elevated atmospheric

  1. Effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations on Pinus ponderosa

    SciTech Connect

    Surano, K.A.; Kercher, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    This report details the results from an experiment of the effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) saplings and seedlings. The study began in 1983 as a pilot study designed to explore the feasibility of using open-top chambers for continuous multi-year exposures on sapling-sized trees and to examine possible CO{sub 2} responses so that future research could be adequately designed. however, following the first year of exposure, preliminary results from the study indicated that measurements of CO{sub 2} responses should be intensified. Open-top chambers proved suitable for use in multiyear exposures of mature trees. With respect to the preliminary examination of CO{sub 2} responses, many interesting observations were made. The nature of the preliminary results suggests that future long-term field CO{sub 2} exposures on perennial species may be critical to the understanding and preparation for future environments. Other research reported here attempted to adapt an existing western coniferous forest growth and succession model for use in elevated CO{sub 2} scenarios using differential species responses, and assessed the usefulness of the model in that regard. Seven papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  2. Long-Term Response of High-Elevation Lakes to Changes in Atmospheric Deposition and Air Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, M.; Turk, J. T.; Campbell, D. H.; Clow, D. W.; Ingersoll, G. P.

    2008-12-01

    High-elevation lakes are often sensitive indicators of environmental and climate change. Here we evaluate over two decades of water-quality data from a long-term monitoring network of remote high-mountain lakes in three Colorado wilderness areas. In two of the areas, lake sulfate concentrations have decreased by a factor of 2-3 times since the mid-1980s, which is consistent with declines in precipitation sulfate measured at 11 high-elevation NADP stations in Colorado. The downward trends in lake and precipitation chemistry are likely the result of regional declines in sulfate emissions from power plants and nonferrous metal smelters. By contrast, lake sulfate concentrations increased dramatically in the third wilderness area despite declines in atmospherically deposited sulfate. In lakes in these areas, sulfate is derived primarily from pyrite oxidation in contrast to the other wilderness areas where sulfate is dominated by atmospheric sources. It is hypothesized that the upward trend in sulfate reflects enhanced pyrite weathering caused by an increase in annual air temperature of about 2-degrees Celsius since the mid-1980's. These results indicate the water-quality response of remote lakes to improvements in air quality may be complicated by long-term changes in climate.

  3. Chemistry and long-term decomposition of roots of Douglas-fir grown under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and warming conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Rygiewicz, P T; Johnson, M G; Harmon, M E; Tian, H; Tang, J W

    2008-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentrations and warming may affect the quality of litters of forest plants and their subsequent decomposition in ecosystems, thereby potentially affecting the global carbon cycle. However, few data on root tissues are available to test this feedback to the atmosphere. In this study, we used fine (diameter < or = 2 mm) and small (2-10 mm) roots of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) seedlings that were grown for 4 yr in a 2 x 2 factorial experiment: ambient or elevated (+ 180 ppm) atmospheric CO(2) concentrations, and ambient or elevated (+3.8 degrees C) atmospheric temperature. Exposure to elevated CO(2) significantly increased water-soluble extractives concentration (%WSE), but had little effect on the concentration of N, cellulose, and lignin of roots. Elevated temperature had no effect on substrate quality except for increasing %WSE and decreasing the %lignin content of fine roots. No significant interaction was found between CO(2) and temperature treatments on substrate quality, except for %WSE of the fine roots. Short-term (< or = 9 mo) root decomposition in the field indicated that the roots from the ambient CO(2) and ambient temperature treatment had the slowest rate. However, over a longer period of incubation (9-36 mo) the influence of initial substrate quality on root decomposition diminished. Instead, the location of the field incubation sites exhibited significant control on decomposition. Roots at the warmer, low elevation site decomposed significantly faster than the ones at the cooler, high elevation site. This study indicates that short-term decomposition and long-term responses are not similar. It also suggests that increasing atmospheric CO(2) had little effect on the carbon storage of Douglas-fir old-growth forests of the Pacific Northwest.

  4. Using an optimality model to understand medium and long-term responses of vegetation water use to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Schymanski, Stanislaus J.; Roderick, Michael L.; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation has different adjustable properties for adaptation to its environment. Examples include stomatal conductance at short time scale (minutes), leaf area index and fine root distributions at longer time scales (days–months) and species composition and dominant growth forms at very long time scales (years–decades–centuries). As a result, the overall response of evapotranspiration to changes in environmental forcing may also change at different time scales. The vegetation optimality model simulates optimal adaptation to environmental conditions, based on the assumption that different vegetation properties are optimized to maximize the long-term net carbon profit, allowing for separation of different scales of adaptation, without the need for parametrization with observed responses. This paper discusses model simulations of vegetation responses to today's elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2) at different temporal scales and puts them in context with experimental evidence from free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments. Without any model tuning or calibration, the model reproduced general trends deduced from FACE experiments, but, contrary to the widespread expectation that eCO2 would generally decrease water use due to its leaf-scale effect on stomatal conductance, our results suggest that eCO2 may lead to unchanged or even increased vegetation water use in water-limited climates, accompanied by an increase in perennial vegetation cover. PMID:26019228

  5. Using an optimality model to understand medium and long-term responses of vegetation water use to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

    PubMed

    Schymanski, Stanislaus J; Roderick, Michael L; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2015-05-27

    Vegetation has different adjustable properties for adaptation to its environment. Examples include stomatal conductance at short time scale (minutes), leaf area index and fine root distributions at longer time scales (days-months) and species composition and dominant growth forms at very long time scales (years-decades-centuries). As a result, the overall response of evapotranspiration to changes in environmental forcing may also change at different time scales. The vegetation optimality model simulates optimal adaptation to environmental conditions, based on the assumption that different vegetation properties are optimized to maximize the long-term net carbon profit, allowing for separation of different scales of adaptation, without the need for parametrization with observed responses. This paper discusses model simulations of vegetation responses to today's elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2) at different temporal scales and puts them in context with experimental evidence from free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments. Without any model tuning or calibration, the model reproduced general trends deduced from FACE experiments, but, contrary to the widespread expectation that eCO2 would generally decrease water use due to its leaf-scale effect on stomatal conductance, our results suggest that eCO2 may lead to unchanged or even increased vegetation water use in water-limited climates, accompanied by an increase in perennial vegetation cover.

  6. Chemistry and long-term decomposition of roots from Douglas-fir grown at elevated atmospheric CO2 and warming conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 and warming may affect litter quality of plants and its subsequent decomposition in forested ecosystems. Little data are available to test this potential feedback on root tissues. In this study, we used the fine (diameter ≤ 2 mm) and small (2-10 mm) roo...

  7. Chemistry and Long-Term Decomposition of Roots of Douglas-Fir Grown under Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Warming Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations and warming may affect the quality of litters of forest plants and their subsequent decomposition in ecosystems, thereby potentially affecting the global carbon cycle. However, few data on root tissues are available to test this feedback to...

  8. Long-term memory of atmospheric aerosols over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B, A.

    2014-12-01

    Long-term memory of atmospheric variables is a least understood facet in atmospheric science. The temporal and spatial distribution of atmospheric aerosols depends largely on the atmospheric parameters. Time series analysis using a stochastic model reveals that atmospheric aerosols over India exhibit a long-term memory. Our analysis confirms that by using Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) model we can parsimoniously model the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Indian region with a reasonably good accuracy. This major advantage of this method is that by using past observations we were able to generate forecasts for next 3 years. The forecasts thus generate shows a good fit with the observations. This persistence is due to the presence of temporal dependence between successive observations.

  9. ATMOS: Long term atmospheric measurements for mission to planet Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A long-term, space-based measurement program, together with continued balloon and aircraft-borne investigations, is essential to monitor the predicted effects in the atmosphere, to determine to what extent the concentration measurements agree with current models of stratospheric chemistry, and to determine the condition of the ozone layer. The Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Experiment is currently making comprehensive, global measurements of Earth's atmosphere as part of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS) program on the Space Shuttle. Part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth, ATLAS is a continuing series of missions to study Earth and the Sun and provide a more fundamental understanding of the solar influences on Earth's atmosphere. The ATMOS program, instruments, and science results are presented.

  10. Elevated CO2 promotes long-term nitrogen accumulation only in combination with nitrogen addition.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Melissa A; Megonigal, J Patrick; Langley, J Adam

    2016-01-01

    Biogeochemical models that incorporate nitrogen (N) limitation indicate that N availability will control the magnitude of ecosystem carbon uptake in response to rising CO2 . Some models, however, suggest that elevated CO2 may promote ecosystem N accumulation, a feedback that in the long term could circumvent N limitation of the CO2 response while mitigating N pollution. We tested this prediction using a nine-year CO2 xN experiment in a tidal marsh. Although the effects of CO2 are similar between uplands and wetlands in many respects, this experiment offers a greater likelihood of detecting CO2 effects on N retention on a decadal timescale because tidal marshes have a relatively open N cycle and can accrue soil organic matter rapidly. To determine how elevated CO2 affects N dynamics, we assessed the three primary fates of N in a tidal marsh: (1) retention in plants and soil, (2) denitrification to the atmosphere, and (3) tidal export. We assessed changes in N pools and tracked the fate of a (15) N tracer added to each plot in 2006 to quantify the fraction of added N retained in vegetation and soil, and to estimate lateral N movement. Elevated CO2 alone did not increase plant N mass, soil N mass, or (15) N label retention. Unexpectedly, CO2 and N interacted such that the combined N+CO2 treatment increased ecosystem N accumulation despite the stimulation in N losses indicated by reduced (15) N label retention. These findings suggest that in N-limited ecosystems, elevated CO2 is unlikely to increase long-term N accumulation and circumvent progressive N limitation without additional N inputs, which may relieve plant-microbe competition and allow for increased plant N uptake.

  11. Elevated CO2 promotes long-term nitrogen accumulation only in combination with nitrogen addition.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Melissa A; Megonigal, J Patrick; Langley, J Adam

    2016-01-01

    Biogeochemical models that incorporate nitrogen (N) limitation indicate that N availability will control the magnitude of ecosystem carbon uptake in response to rising CO2 . Some models, however, suggest that elevated CO2 may promote ecosystem N accumulation, a feedback that in the long term could circumvent N limitation of the CO2 response while mitigating N pollution. We tested this prediction using a nine-year CO2 xN experiment in a tidal marsh. Although the effects of CO2 are similar between uplands and wetlands in many respects, this experiment offers a greater likelihood of detecting CO2 effects on N retention on a decadal timescale because tidal marshes have a relatively open N cycle and can accrue soil organic matter rapidly. To determine how elevated CO2 affects N dynamics, we assessed the three primary fates of N in a tidal marsh: (1) retention in plants and soil, (2) denitrification to the atmosphere, and (3) tidal export. We assessed changes in N pools and tracked the fate of a (15) N tracer added to each plot in 2006 to quantify the fraction of added N retained in vegetation and soil, and to estimate lateral N movement. Elevated CO2 alone did not increase plant N mass, soil N mass, or (15) N label retention. Unexpectedly, CO2 and N interacted such that the combined N+CO2 treatment increased ecosystem N accumulation despite the stimulation in N losses indicated by reduced (15) N label retention. These findings suggest that in N-limited ecosystems, elevated CO2 is unlikely to increase long-term N accumulation and circumvent progressive N limitation without additional N inputs, which may relieve plant-microbe competition and allow for increased plant N uptake. PMID:26577708

  12. Relation of perioperative elevation of troponin to long-term mortality after orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Oberweis, Brandon S; Smilowitz, Nathaniel R; Nukala, Swetha; Rosenberg, Andrew; Xu, Jinfeng; Stuchin, Steven; Iorio, Richard; Errico, Thomas; Radford, Martha J; Berger, Jeffrey S

    2015-06-15

    Myocardial necrosis in the perioperative period of noncardiac surgery is associated with short-term mortality, but long-term outcomes have not been characterized. We investigated the association between perioperative troponin elevation and long-term mortality in a retrospective study of consecutive subjects who underwent hip, knee, and spine surgery. Perioperative myocardial necrosis and International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision-coded myocardial infarction (MI) were recorded. Long-term survival was assessed using the Social Security Death Index database. Logistic regression models were used to identify independent predictors of long-term mortality. A total of 3,050 subjects underwent surgery. Mean age was 60.8 years, and 59% were women. Postoperative troponin was measured in 1,055 subjects (34.6%). Myocardial necrosis occurred in 179 cases (5.9%), and MI was coded in 20 (0.7%). Over 9,015 patient-years of follow-up, 111 deaths (3.6%) occurred. Long-term mortality was 16.8% in subjects with myocardial necrosis and 5.8% with a troponin in the normal range. Perioperative troponin elevation (hazard ratio 2.33, 95% confidence interval 1.33 to 4.10) and coded postoperative MI (adjusted hazard ratio 3.51, 95% confidence interval 1.44 to 8.53) were significantly associated with long-term mortality after multivariable adjustment. After excluding patients with coronary artery disease and renal dysfunction, myocardial necrosis remained associated with long-term mortality. In conclusion, postoperative myocardial necrosis is common after orthopedic surgery. Myocardial necrosis is independently associated with long-term mortality at 3 years and may be used to identify patients at higher risk for events who may benefit from aggressive management of cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:25890628

  13. Long-term climate forcing by atmospheric oxygen concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulsen, Christopher J.; Tabor, Clay; White, Joseph D.

    2015-06-01

    The percentage of oxygen in Earth’s atmosphere varied between 10% and 35% throughout the Phanerozoic. These changes have been linked to the evolution, radiation, and size of animals but have not been considered to affect climate. We conducted simulations showing that modulation of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2), as a result of its contribution to atmospheric mass and density, influences the optical depth of the atmosphere. Under low pO2 and a reduced-density atmosphere, shortwave scattering by air molecules and clouds is less frequent, leading to a substantial increase in surface shortwave forcing. Through feedbacks involving latent heat fluxes to the atmosphere and marine stratus clouds, surface shortwave forcing drives increases in atmospheric water vapor and global precipitation, enhances greenhouse forcing, and raises global surface temperature. Our results implicate pO2 as an important factor in climate forcing throughout geologic time.

  14. The long-term carbon cycle, fossil fuels and atmospheric composition.

    PubMed

    Berner, Robert A

    2003-11-20

    The long-term carbon cycle operates over millions of years and involves the exchange of carbon between rocks and the Earth's surface. There are many complex feedback pathways between carbon burial, nutrient cycling, atmospheric carbon dioxide and oxygen, and climate. New calculations of carbon fluxes during the Phanerozoic eon (the past 550 million years) illustrate how the long-term carbon cycle has affected the burial of organic matter and fossil-fuel formation, as well as the evolution of atmospheric composition.

  15. The Atmospheric Radionuclide Transport Model (ARTM) - Validation of a long-term atmospheric dispersion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettrich, Sebastian; Wildermuth, Hans; Strobl, Christopher; Wenig, Mark

    2016-04-01

    In the last couple of years, the Atmospheric Radionuclide Transport Model (ARTM) has been developed by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) and the Society for Plant and Reactor Security (GRS). ARTM is an atmospheric dispersion model for continuous long-term releases of radionuclides into the atmosphere, based on the Lagrangian particle model. This model, developed in the first place as a more realistic replacement for the out-dated Gaussian plume models, is currently being optimised for further scientific purposes to study atmospheric dispersion in short-range scenarios. It includes a diagnostic wind field model, allows for the application of building structures and multiple sources (including linear, 2-and 3-dimensional source geometries), and considers orography and surface roughness. As an output it calculates the activity concentration, dry and wet deposition and can model also the radioactive decay of Rn-222. As such, ARTM requires to undergo an intense validation process. While for short-term and short-range models, which were mainly developed for examining nuclear accidents or explosions, a few measurement data-sets are available for validation, data-sets for validating long-term models are very sparse and the existing ones mostly prove to be not applicable for validation. Here we present a strategy for the validation of long-term Lagrangian particle models based on the work with ARTM. In our validation study, the first part we present is a comprehensive analysis of the model sensitivities on different parameters like e.g. (simulation grid size resolution, starting random number, amount of simulation particles, etc.). This study provides a good estimation for the uncertainties of the simulation results and consequently can be used to generate model outputs comparable to the available measurements data at various distances from the emission source. This comparison between measurement data from selected scenarios and simulation results

  16. Spring leaf flush in aspen (Populus tremuloides) clones is altered by long-term growth at elevated carbon dioxide and elevated ozone concentration.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Justin M; Karnosky, David F; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A

    2010-04-01

    Early spring leaf out is important to the success of deciduous trees competing for light and space in dense forest plantation canopies. In this study, we investigated spring leaf flush and how long-term growth at elevated carbon dioxide concentration ([CO(2)]) and elevated ozone concentration ([O(3)]) altered leaf area index development in a closed Populus tremuloides (aspen) canopy. This work was done at the Aspen FACE experiment where aspen clones have been grown since 1997 in conditions simulating the [CO(2)] and [O(3)] predicted for approximately 2050. The responses of two clones were compared during the first month of spring leaf out when CO(2) fumigation had begun, but O(3) fumigation had not. Trees in elevated [CO(2)] plots showed a stimulation of leaf area index (36%), while trees in elevated [O(3)] plots had lower leaf area index (-20%). While individual leaf area was not significantly affected by elevated [CO(2)], the photosynthetic operating efficiency of aspen leaves was significantly improved (51%). There were no significant differences in the way that the two aspen clones responded to elevated [CO(2)]; however, the two clones responded differently to long-term growth at elevated [O(3)]. The O(3)-sensitive clone, 42E, had reduced individual leaf area when grown at elevated [O(3)] (-32%), while the tolerant clone, 216, had larger mature leaf area at elevated [O(3)] (46%). These results indicate a clear difference between the two clones in their long-term response to elevated [O(3)], which could affect competition between the clones, and result in altered genotypic composition in future atmospheric conditions.

  17. The effects on photosynthetic CO{sub 2} assimilation to long-term elevation of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration: An assessment of the response of Trifolium Repens L. cv. Blanca grown at F.A.C.E.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C.E.

    1994-11-01

    Understanding how photosynthetic capacity acclimates to elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations is vital in predicting the response of important grassland species such as Trifolium repens. Previous studies of acclimatization have been carried out in artificial experimental conditions, such as acrylic greenhouses or controlled environment chambers. The advent of FACE technology has enabled a large area of crop to be fumigated in the field, providing more realistic growing conditions. Pure stands of Trifolium repens L. cv. Blanca grown at either 355 or 600{mu}mol mol{sup -1} CO{sub 2} were examined, and their photosynthetic response to elevated Ca determined via gas exchange studies. Rates of photosynthesis of young, fully expanded leaves were increased between 21 and 36% when grown and measured at elevated CO{sub 2}. This increase in A corresponded to a decrease in g{sub S} of between 18 and 52%. No acclimation effect was observed in the most frequently cut stands, whilst the response of stands clipped only 4 times per year was more variable. When down regulation of V{sub cmax} did occur, this was not nearly as marked as that which occurred in 3 other temperate species (Chrysanthemum leucanthemum, Ranunculus friesianus, Plantago lanceolata (L.) J. & C. Presl.), at similar growth regimes. No acclimation of stomatal frequency, SI or pore length was found to occur in the enriched clover stands.

  18. Wood properties of Populus and Betula in long-term exposure to elevated CO₂ and O₃.

    PubMed

    Kostiainen, Katri; Saranpää, Pekka; Lundqvist, Sven-Olof; Kubiske, Mark E; Vapaavuori, Elina

    2014-06-01

    We studied the interactive effects of elevated concentrations of CO2 and O3 on radial growth and wood properties of four trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) clones and paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.) saplings. The material for the study was collected from the Aspen FACE (free-air CO2 enrichment) experiment in Rhinelander (WI, USA). Trees had been exposed to four treatments [control, elevated CO2 (560 ppm), elevated O3 (1.5 times ambient) and combined CO2 + O3 ] during growing seasons 1998-2008. Most treatment responses were observed in the early phase of experiment. Our results show that the CO2- and O3-exposed aspen trees displayed a differential balance between efficiency and safety of water transport. Under elevated CO2, radial growth was enhanced and the trees had fewer but hydraulically more efficient larger diameter vessels. In contrast, elevated O3 decreased radial growth and the diameters of vessels and fibres. Clone-specific decrease in wood density and cell wall thickness was observed under elevated CO2 . In birch, the treatments had no major impacts on wood anatomy or wood density. Our study indicates that short-term impact studies conducted with young seedlings may not give a realistic view of long-term ecosystem responses.

  19. Long term monitoring system integrated in an elevational gradient in NW Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carilla, J.; Malizia, A.; Osinaga, O.; Blundo, C.; Grau, R.; Malizia, L.; Aráoz, E.

    2013-05-01

    Ecological trends and ranges of variability are poorly known in the tropical and subtropical Andes. Long term studies are powerful tools to detect the response of vegetation dynamics, biodiversity and hydrological cycle to these trends. We present a long term monitoring system in NW Argentinean mountains, including forest permanent plots at different elevations and high elevation grasslands, encompassing more than 3.000 m elevation range. Long term studies include: 1) 66 ha of mountain forest permanent plots along the Yungas elevational gradient from c. 400 to 2500 masl , and latitudinal gradient (22-28S) with 45 plots in mature forests and 28 in secondary forests originated in grazing, agriculture and selective logging. Some of these permanent plots have achieved 20 years of monitoring and all of them are included in the "Red de Bosques Andinos" a network created recently, together with c. 10 institutions and more than 130 (c. 120 ha) forest permanent plots from Argentina to Colombia Andes. 2) Two GLORIA (Global Observation Research Initiative in Alpine Environments) sites, above 4000 masl with more than 170 species recorded, including one re-measurement. This system is included in GLORIA network (www.gloria.ac.at) and in GLORIA Andes (http://www.condesan.org/gloria), and 3) more than 15 satellite monitored high Andean lakes and a wide extension of vegas (75800 ha in Argentinean puna). A digital database is being implemented to organize and provide access to the information generated by these three systems coordinated by the Instituto de Ecología Regional (http://www.iecologia.com.ar). These monitoring data are analyzed together with instrumental and dendrochronological data to describe the dynamics of these ecosystems over an area of 20 million hectares distributed between 22 and 28°S. Some of the most significant results to date include: 1) secondary mountain forests are expanding over grasslands and agriculture lands, and tend to converge toward mature forest

  20. Long-term antithrombotic pharmacotherapy following ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Buccheri, Sergio; Capodanno, Davide

    2016-06-01

    The selection and optimal duration of pharmacological agents to counteract thrombotic processes activated in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) still remain a debated issue in current clinical practice. Recently published trials have highlighted the potential benefits of dual-antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) extended beyond the currently recommended 12-months term. Anticoagulation with non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants in addition to DAPT has also been explored. Importantly, benefits of prolonged antithrombotic management strategies could be offset by harms following bleeding complications, therefore careful assessment of a patient benefit-risk profile must be used to drive individualized medical decisions. Appraising current available evidence is useful to inform clinical practice and to optimize the pharmacological management of patients with STEMI. Accordingly, we provide an overview of the literature focusing on long-term antithrombotic management strategies in patients with a recent or prior myocardial infarction, with a primary focus on STEMI. PMID:26934659

  1. Renal Dysfunction and Elevated Blood Pressure in Long-Term Childhood Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Jaspers, Monique W.; van der Pal, Helena J.; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y.; Bouts, Antonia H.; Lieverst, Jan A.; Bökenkamp, Arend; Koning, Caro C.E.; Oldenburger, Foppe; Wilde, James C.H.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Caron, Huib N.; Kremer, Leontien C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Little is known about renal function and blood pressure (BP) in long-term childhood cancer survivors. This cross-sectional study evaluated prevalence of these outcomes and associated risk factors in long-term childhood cancer survivors at their first visit to a specialized outpatient clinic. Design, Setting, Participants, & Measurements Estimated GFR; percentages of patients with albuminuria, hypomagnesemia, and hypophosphatemia; and BP were assessed in 1442 survivors ≥5 years after diagnosis. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to estimate effect of chemotherapy, nephrectomy, and radiation therapy on the different outcomes. Results At a median age of 19.3 years (interquartile range, 15.6–24.5 years), 28.1% of all survivors had at least one renal adverse effect or elevated BP. The median time since cancer diagnosis was 12.1 years (interquartile range, 7.8–17.5 years). High BP and albuminuria were most prevalent, at 14.8% and 14.5%, respectively. Sixty-two survivors (4.5%) had an estimated GFR <90 ml/min per 1.73 m2. Survivors who had undergone nephrectomy had the highest risk for diminished renal function (odds ratio, 8.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.4–21.4). Combined radiation therapy and nephrectomy increased the odds of having elevated BP (odds ratio, 4.92; 95% CI, 2.63–9.19), as did male sex, higher body mass index, and longer time since cancer treatment. Conclusion Almost 30% of survivors had renal adverse effects or high BP. Therefore, monitoring of renal function in high-risk groups and BP in all survivors may help clinicians detect health problems at an early stage and initiate timely therapy to prevent additional damage. PMID:22822016

  2. Long-term exposure to elevated CO2 and O3 alters aspen foliar chemistry across developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Couture, J J; Holeski, L M; Lindroth, R L

    2014-03-01

    Anthropogenic activities are altering levels of greenhouse gases to the extent that multiple and diverse ecosystem processes are being affected. Two gases that substantially influence forest health are atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and tropospheric ozone (O3 ). Plant chemistry will play an important role in regulating ecosystem processes in future environments, but little information exists about the longitudinal effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on phytochemistry, especially for long-lived species such as trees. To address this need, we analysed foliar chemical data from two genotypes of trembling aspen, Populus tremuloides, collected over 10 years of exposure to levels of CO2 and O3 predicted for the year 2050. Elevated CO2 and O3 altered both primary and secondary chemistry, and the magnitude and direction of the responses varied across developmental stages and between aspen genotypes. Our findings suggest that the effects of CO2 and O3 on phytochemical traits that influence forest processes will vary over tree developmental stages, highlighting the need to continue long-term, experimental atmospheric change research.

  3. Species and tissue type regulate long-term decomposition of brackish marsh plants grown under elevated CO2 conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Joshua A.; Cherry, Julia A.; McKee, Karen L.

    2016-02-01

    Organic matter accumulation, the net effect of plant production and decomposition, contributes to vertical soil accretion in coastal wetlands, thereby playing a key role in whether they keep pace with sea-level rise. Any factor that affects decomposition may affect wetland accretion, including atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Higher CO2 can influence decomposition rates by altering plant tissue chemistry or by causing shifts in plant species composition or biomass partitioning. A combined greenhouse-field experiment examined how elevated CO2 affected plant tissue chemistry and subsequent decomposition of above- and belowground tissues of two common brackish marsh species, Schoenoplectus americanus (C3) and Spartina patens (C4). Both species were grown in monoculture and in mixture under ambient (350-385 μL L-1) or elevated (ambient + 300 μL L-1) atmospheric CO2 conditions, with all other growth conditions held constant, for one growing season. Above- and belowground tissues produced under these treatments were decomposed under ambient field conditions in a brackish marsh in the Mississippi River Delta, USA. Elevated CO2 significantly reduced nitrogen content of S. americanus, but not sufficiently to affect subsequent decomposition. Instead, long-term decomposition (percent mass remaining after 280 d) was controlled by species composition and tissue type. Shoots of S. patens had more mass remaining (41 ± 2%) than those of S. americanus (12 ± 2%). Belowground material decomposed more slowly than that placed aboveground (62 ± 1% vs. 23 ± 3% mass remaining), but rates belowground did not differ between species. Increases in atmospheric CO2 concentration will likely have a greater effect on overall decomposition in this brackish marsh community through shifts in species dominance or biomass allocation than through effects on tissue chemistry. Consequent changes in organic matter accumulation may alter marsh capacity to accommodate sea-level rise through vertical

  4. Long-Term Response of Terrestrial Productivity to Elevated CO2 Remains a Grand Challenge in Terrestrial Biogeochemistry (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finzi, A.

    2013-12-01

    There is large variability in the long-term response of terrestrial net primary production (NPP) to elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 (eCO2). In some ecosystems productivity remains higher under eCO2 compared to aCO2 at the decadal time scale. In other ecosystem productivity under eCO2 increases transiently, returning to levels observed at aCO2 in a few years or less. The diversity of ecosystem responses is as fascinating as it is difficult to understand. A number of scientists, including this one, have postulated that soil water and nutrient supply constrain productivity responses and that in the absence of increases in soil resource uptake productivity must decline because there is little evidence for increases in resource use efficiency, with perhaps the exception of grassland water-use efficiency in some instances. This contention is challenged by the data as they are currently understood. As such there is no unifying explanation for the diversity of these responses and hence models cannot be reasonably expected to accurately predict the timing and magnitude of terrestrial-C sequestration over the next century. Research on the impacts of elevated CO2 has not yet answered a fundamentally important, policy-relevant question in global change science. In this talk I present an analysis of the NPP literature from long-term experiments at eCO2 published to date (>5 years duration) in an effort to stimulate a discussion of why productivity responses to eCO2 vary from ecosystem to ecosystem. Explaining variations in productivity response to eCO2 is a grand challenge in terrestrial biogeochemistry.

  5. Emissions and Atmospheric CO2 Stabilization: Long-Term Limits and Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Kheshgi, Haroon; Smith, Steven J.; Edmonds, James A.

    2005-04-01

    Over the very long term, cumulative CO2 emissions "over all time, by all people" are uniquely related to ultimate atmospheric CO2 concentration level, with limited approximation. A corollary to this relation is that net CO2 emissions must peak and then gradually approach zero over 1,000+ years if a constant CO2 concentration is to be maintained, regardless of the level. The objective of stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations is often envisioned as a monotonic approach to constant concentrations. But, if emissions decline less gradually to zero, the pattern of transient CO2 concentrations changes to one with a maximum CO2 concentration followed by a long-term decline to a lower level. Such emissionsconcentration trajectories spend a finite time at the maximum concentration and could have smaller overall climate impacts than trajectories that maintain the maximum concentration. Climate impacts in response to such trajectories, however, remain to be studied.

  6. Long-Term Trends in Space-Ground Atmospheric Propagation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemba, Michael J.; Morse, Jacquelynne R.; Nessel, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Propagation measurement campaigns are critical to characterizing the atmospheric behavior of a location and efficiently designing space-ground links. However, as global climate change affects weather patterns, the long-term trends of propagation data may be impacted over periods of decades or longer. Particularly, at high microwave frequencies (10 GHz and above), rain plays a dominant role in the attenuation statistics, and it has been observed that rain events over the past 50 years have trended toward increased frequency, intensity, and rain height. In the interest of quantifying the impact of these phenomena on long-term trends in propagation data, this paper compares two 20 GHz measurement campaigns both conducted at NASA's White Sands facility in New Mexico. The first is from the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) propagation campaign from 1994 - 1998, while the second is amplitude data recorded during a site test interferometer (STI) phase characterization campaign from 2009 - 2014.

  7. Long-Term Trends in Space-Ground Atmospheric Propagation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemba, Michael J.; Nessel, James A.; Morse, Jacquelynne R.

    2015-01-01

    Propagation measurement campaigns are critical to characterizing the atmospheric behavior of a location and efficiently designing space-ground links. However, as global climate change affects weather patterns, the long-term trends of propagation data may be impacted over periods of decades or longer. Particularly, at high microwave frequencies (10 GHz and above), rain plays a dominant role in the attenuation statistics, and it has been observed that rain events over the past 50 years have trended toward increased frequency, intensity, and rain height. In the interest of quantifying the impact of these phenomena on long-term trends in propagation data, this paper compares two 20 GHz measurement campaigns both conducted at NASAs White Sands facility in New Mexico. The first is from the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) propagation campaign from 1994 to 1998, while the second is amplitude data recorded during a site test interferometer (STI) phase characterization campaign from 2009 to 2014.

  8. Elevated fluoride levels and periostitis in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients receiving long-term voriconazole.

    PubMed

    Tarlock, Katherine; Johnson, Darren; Cornell, Cathy; Parnell, Shawn; Meshinchi, Soheil; Baker, K Scott; Englund, Janet A

    2015-05-01

    Azole therapy is widely utilized in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients for the treatment of aspergillus. Complications of voriconazole treatment related to its elevated fluoride content have been described in adults, including reports of symptomatic skeletal fluorosis. We review fluoride levels, clinical, and laboratory data in five pediatric HCT recipients on long-term voriconazole therapy, all found to have elevated serum fluoride levels. Two patients had toxic fluoride levels, one infant had symptoms of significant pain with movement and radiographs confirmed skeletal fluorosis. Monitoring fluoride levels in children, especially with skeletal symptoms, should be considered in patients on long-term voriconazole.

  9. An empirical response function for the long-term fate of excess atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, Natalie S.; Ridgwell, Andy; Thorne, Mike. C.; Lunt, Dan. J.

    2015-04-01

    The long-term fate of fossil fuel CO2 emitted to the atmosphere is neutralization by a number of sedimentological and geological processes operating on timescales ranging from thousands to hundreds of thousands of years. However, the response of these carbon cycle processes to increasing total emissions is not known, such as whether saturation of the long-term CO2 sinks might occur or a weakening of the associated feedbacks. This could have important implications for components of the Earth system that are slow to respond to changes in temperature, such as ice sheets and methane hydrates. Here we use a 3D ocean-based Earth system model to assess the relative importance and timescales of these processes for different total emissions. A multi-exponential analysis is performed on an ensemble of 1 Myr duration CO2 decay curves spanning cumulative emissions of up to 20,000 PgC, generating an empirical response function characterizing the long-term (> 1 kyr) fate of CO2. For a realistic time-dependent carbon release, a simple pulse-response description results in large predictive errors early on in the simulation. As a result, we develop a convolution-based description of atmospheric CO2 decay which significantly decreases these initial residuals. Our response function represents a simple and practical tool for rapidly projecting the atmospheric lifetime of a wide range of CO2 emission sizes, and in convolution form, can be used across a large range of rates of release, allowing it to be used in place of more complex models for assessing the long-term atmospheric CO2 perturbation following future anthropogenic emissions. Our analysis also reveals that, as the marine CO2 sinks become saturated, both the fraction of total emissions that are removed from the atmosphere via carbonate weathering and burial and the timescale of removal progressively increase. However, we find that the ultimate CO2 sink - silicate weathering feedback - is approximately invariant with respect to

  10. Fungal communities respond to long-term CO2 elevation by community reassembly.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qichao; Yuan, Mengting; He, Zhili; Deng, Ye; Xue, Kai; Wu, Liyou; Hobbie, Sarah E; Reich, Peter B; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-04-01

    Fungal communities play a major role as decomposers in the Earth's ecosystems. Their community-level responses to elevated CO2 (eCO2), one of the major global change factors impacting ecosystems, are not well understood. Using 28S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and co-occurrence ecological network approaches, we analyzed the response of soil fungal communities in the BioCON (biodiversity, CO2, and N deposition) experimental site in Minnesota, USA, in which a grassland ecosystem has been exposed to eCO2 for 12 years. Long-term eCO2 did not significantly change the overall fungal community structure and species richness, but significantly increased community evenness and diversity. The relative abundances of 119 operational taxonomic units (OTU; ∼27% of the total captured sequences) were changed significantly. Significantly changed OTU under eCO2 were associated with decreased overall relative abundance of Ascomycota, but increased relative abundance of Basidiomycota. Co-occurrence ecological network analysis indicated that eCO2 increased fungal community network complexity, as evidenced by higher intermodular and intramodular connectivity and shorter geodesic distance. In contrast, decreased connections for dominant fungal species were observed in the eCO2 network. Community reassembly of unrelated fungal species into highly connected dense modules was observed. Such changes in the co-occurrence network topology were significantly associated with altered soil and plant properties under eCO2, especially with increased plant biomass and NH4 (+) availability. This study provided novel insights into how eCO2 shapes soil fungal communities in grassland ecosystems. PMID:25616796

  11. Fungal Communities Respond to Long-Term CO2 Elevation by Community Reassembly

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Qichao; Yuan, Mengting; He, Zhili; Deng, Ye; Xue, Kai; Wu, Liyou; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Reich, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal communities play a major role as decomposers in the Earth's ecosystems. Their community-level responses to elevated CO2 (eCO2), one of the major global change factors impacting ecosystems, are not well understood. Using 28S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and co-occurrence ecological network approaches, we analyzed the response of soil fungal communities in the BioCON (biodiversity, CO2, and N deposition) experimental site in Minnesota, USA, in which a grassland ecosystem has been exposed to eCO2 for 12 years. Long-term eCO2 did not significantly change the overall fungal community structure and species richness, but significantly increased community evenness and diversity. The relative abundances of 119 operational taxonomic units (OTU; ∼27% of the total captured sequences) were changed significantly. Significantly changed OTU under eCO2 were associated with decreased overall relative abundance of Ascomycota, but increased relative abundance of Basidiomycota. Co-occurrence ecological network analysis indicated that eCO2 increased fungal community network complexity, as evidenced by higher intermodular and intramodular connectivity and shorter geodesic distance. In contrast, decreased connections for dominant fungal species were observed in the eCO2 network. Community reassembly of unrelated fungal species into highly connected dense modules was observed. Such changes in the co-occurrence network topology were significantly associated with altered soil and plant properties under eCO2, especially with increased plant biomass and NH4+ availability. This study provided novel insights into how eCO2 shapes soil fungal communities in grassland ecosystems. PMID:25616796

  12. Time series analysis of long-term data sets of atmospheric mercury concentrations.

    PubMed

    Temme, Christian; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Einax, Jürgen W; Steffen, Alexandra; Schroeder, William H

    2004-10-01

    Different aspects and techniques of time series analysis were used to investigate long-term data sets of atmospheric mercury in the Northern Hemisphere. Two perennial time series from different latitudes with different seasonal behaviour were chosen: first, Mace Head on the west coast of Ireland (53 degrees 20'N, 9 degrees 54'W), representing Northern Hemispherical background conditions in Europe with no indications for so-called atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs); and second, Alert, Canada (82 degrees 28'N, 62 degrees 30'W), showing strong AMDEs during Arctic springtime. Possible trends were extracted and forecasts were performed by using seasonal decomposition procedures, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) methods and exponential smoothing (ES) techniques. The application of time series analysis to environmental data is shown in respect of atmospheric long-term data sets, and selected advantages are discussed. Both time series have not shown any statistically significant temporal trend in the gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) concentrations since 1995, representing low Northern Hemispherical background concentrations of 1.72+/-0.09 ng m(-3) (Mace Head) and 1.55+/-0.18 ng m(-3) (Alert), respectively. The annual forecasts for the GEM concentrations in 2001 at Alert by two different techniques were in good agreement with the measured concentrations for this year.

  13. Can Long-Term Precipitation Trends Explain Net Annual Carbon Loss From High Elevation Alpine Tundra?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, J. F.; Blanken, P.; Williams, M. W.

    2013-12-01

    Five continuous years of eddy covariance measurements over predominantly snow-free alpine tundra on Niwot Ridge, Colorado show that ecosystem respiration dominates over gross primary productivity on an annual basis, and that this ecosystem is a significant source of carbon to the atmosphere over long periods of time. Long-term data also show that precipitation has increased since the 1960s, in contrast to modeled forecasts that generally predict decreasing precipitation through the 21st century across the Rocky Mountain region. To constrain the specific relationship between precipitation and the alpine tundra carbon cycle, we tested the degree to which precipitation and soil moisture determined respiration fluxes over the course of three years, and across a range of 17 sites, including xeric, mesic, and hydric alpine tundra soils, within the footprint of ongoing eddy covariance measurements. Overall, we found that respiration from this ecosystem was principally moisture-limited. Cumulatively, the highest respiration rates were measured from hydric soils associated with seasonal ice lenses and perched water tables, however, growing season respiration rates peaked in mesic areas when hydric soils were saturated. Respiration from xeric soils increased with soil moisture, but fluxes from these areas were small in magnitude relative to mesic and hydric soils. Changes in precipitation and resultant soil moisture thus invoked a bidirectional response from alpine tundra soils, as moisture and respiration were positively correlated in some areas, but negatively correlated in others, depending on landscape position and prevailing soil moisture regime. Interannually, however, respiration fluxes were highest in wet years, indicating that moisture stimulated respiration from xeric and mesic soils more than it was suppressed from hydric soils. In sum, increased precipitation over the last half-century may be augmenting respiratory fluxes from alpine tundra, but changes in

  14. Is Ecosystem-Atmosphere Observation in Long-Term Networks actually Science?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, H. P. E.

    2015-12-01

    Science uses observations to build knowledge by testable explanations and predictions. The "scientific method" requires controlled systematic observation to examine questions, hypotheses and predictions. Thus, enquiry along the scientific method responds to questions of the type "what if …?" In contrast, long-term observation programs follow a different strategy: we commonly take great care to minimize our influence on the environment of our measurements, with the aim to maximize their external validity. We observe what we think are key variables for ecosystem-atmosphere exchange and ask questions such as "what happens next?" or "how did this happen?" This apparent deviation from the scientific method begs the question whether any explanations we come up with for the phenomena we observe are actually contributing to testable knowledge, or whether their value remains purely anecdotal. Here, we present examples to argue that, under certain conditions, data from long-term observations and observation networks can have equivalent or even higher scientific validity than controlled experiments. Internal validity is particularly enhanced if observations are combined with modeling. Long-term observations of ecosystem-atmosphere fluxes identify trends and temporal scales of variability. Observation networks reveal spatial patterns and variations, and long-term observation networks combine both aspects. A necessary condition for such observations to gain validity beyond the anecdotal is the requirement that the data are comparable: a comparison of two measured values, separated in time or space, must inform us objectively whether (e.g.) one value is larger than the other. In turn, a necessary condition for the comparability of data is the compatibility of the sensors and procedures used to generate them. Compatibility ensures that we compare "apples to apples": that measurements conducted in identical conditions give the same values (within suitable uncertainty intervals

  15. Modelling the soil-atmosphere exchange of POPs: Long-term steady state and diurnal fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Z.; Beckingham, B.; Maier, U.; Haberer, C.; Grathwohl, P.

    2014-12-01

    Soil-atmosphere exchange is an important transport process influencing environmental fate and transport of many persistent organic pollutants (POPs). This study focuses on modelling the gaseous exchange of a semi-volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (phenanthrene) between soil and the atmosphere using the multicomponent reactive transport code MIN3P. MIN3P is typically applied to simulate aqueous and vapor phase subsurface transport and reaction processes. We extended the code to also include an atmospheric boundary layer where eddy diffusion and photodegradation take place. The relevant processes and parameters affecting soil-atmosphere exchange were investigated in several scenarios and at various time scales. We found that phenanthrene is well-mixed in the atmospheric boundary layer under neutral or stable atmospheric conditions due to fast eddy diffusion. Uptake of airborne phenanthrene to soils is limited by the soil properties and initially depends on diffusion in soil gas and sorption to the solids. On the long term seepage water dominates transport into deeper soil layers; biodegradation finally leads to steady-state concentration profiles in the subsurface typically achieved after a few centuries. If concentrations in the atmosphere decrease, e.g. due to environmental legislation, then soils become sources for the POPs for the first two months and function as sinks again for the POPs until new steady state concentrations are reached (after decades to centuries). MIN3P was also used to simulate diurnal soil-atmosphere exchanges of airborne pollutants due to temperature changes and photodegradation, both which cause fluctuations in atmospheric concentrations and therefore affect mass transfer between soil and the atmosphere. The model can further be applied to estimate the environmental fate of other POPs between soil and the atmosphere under different environmental pollution and climate change scenarios.

  16. LOSCAR: Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeebe, R. E.

    2011-06-01

    The LOSCAR model is designed to efficiently compute the partitioning of carbon between ocean, atmosphere, and sediments on time scales ranging from centuries to millions of years. While a variety of computationally inexpensive carbon cycle models are already available, many are missing a critical sediment component, which is indispensable for long-term integrations. One of LOSCAR's strengths is the coupling of ocean-atmosphere routines to a computationally efficient sediment module. This allows, for instance, adequate computation of CaCO3 dissolution, calcite compensation, and long-term carbon cycle fluxes, including weathering of carbonate and silicate rocks. The ocean component includes various biogeochemical tracers such as total carbon, alkalinity, phosphate, oxygen, and stable carbon isotopes. We have previously published applications of the model tackling future projections of ocean chemistry and weathering, pCO2 sensitivity to carbon cycle perturbations throughout the Cenozoic, and carbon/calcium cycling during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. The focus of the present contribution is the detailed description of the model including numerical architecture, processes and parameterizations, tuning, and examples of input and output. Typical CPU integration times of LOSCAR are of order seconds for several thousand model years on current standard desktop machines. The LOSCAR source code in C can be obtained from the author by sending a request to loscar.model@gmail.com.

  17. Long-term response of oceans to CO2 removal from the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathesius, Sabine; Hofmann, Matthias; Caldeira, Ken; Schellnhuber, Hans Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Carbon dioxide removal (CDR) from the atmosphere has been proposed as a measure for mitigating global warming and ocean acidification. To assess the extent to which CDR might eliminate the long-term consequences of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the marine environment, we simulate the effect of two massive CDR interventions with CO2 extraction rates of 5 GtC yr-1 and 25 GtC yr-1, respectively, while CO2 emissions follow the extended RCP8.5 pathway. We falsify two hypotheses: the first being that CDR can restore pre-industrial conditions in the ocean by reducing the atmospheric CO2 concentration back to its pre-industrial level, and the second being that high CO2 emissions rates (RCP8.5) followed by CDR have long-term oceanic consequences that are similar to those of low emissions rates (RCP2.6). Focusing on pH, temperature and dissolved oxygen, we find that even after several centuries of CDR deployment, past CO2 emissions would leave a substantial legacy in the marine environment.

  18. Species and tissue type regulate long-term decomposition of brackish marsh plants grown under elevated CO2 conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Joshua A; Cherry, Julia A; Mckee, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    Organic matter accumulation, the net effect of plant production and decomposition, contributes to vertical soil accretion in coastal wetlands, thereby playing a key role in whether they keep pace with sea-level rise. Any factor that affects decomposition may affect wetland accretion, including atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Higher CO2 can influence decomposition rates by altering plant tissue chemistry or by causing shifts in plant species composition or biomass partitioning. A combined greenhouse-field experiment examined how elevated CO2 affected plant tissue chemistry and subsequent decomposition of above- and belowground tissues of two common brackish marsh species, Schoenoplectus americanus (C3) and Spartina patens (C4). Both species were grown in monoculture and in mixture under ambient (350-385 μL L-1) or elevated (ambient + 300 μL L-1) atmospheric CO2 conditions, with all other growth conditions held constant, for one growing season. Above- and belowground tissues produced under these treatments were decomposed under ambient field conditions in a brackish marsh in the Mississippi River Delta, USA. Elevated CO2 significantly reduced nitrogen content of S. americanus, but not sufficiently to affect subsequent decomposition. Instead, long-term decomposition (percent mass remaining after 280 d) was controlled by species composition and tissue type. Shoots of S. patens had more mass remaining (41 ± 2%) than those of S. americanus (12 ± 2 %). Belowground material decomposed more slowly than that placed aboveground (62 ± 1% vs. 23 ± 3% mass remaining), but rates belowground did not differ between species. Increases in atmospheric CO2concentration will likely have a greater effect on overall decomposition in this brackish marsh community through shifts in species dominance or biomass allocation than through effects on tissue chemistry. Consequent changes in organic matter accumulation may alter marsh capacity to accommodate sea-level rise

  19. Long-term soil water trends across a 1000 m elevation gradient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a general consensus among climate models that the direct influence of increasing temperature on evaporative demand will result in drier soils, reduced water supply and more frequent drought conditions. The data available to evaluate long term soil water trends that may result from climate c...

  20. Study of archaeological artefacts to refine the model of iron long-term indoor atmospheric corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, J.; Legrand, L.; Bellot-Gurlet, L.; Foy, E.; Reguer, S.; Rocca, E.; Dillmann, P.; Neff, D.; Mirambet, F.; Perrin, S.; Guillot, I.

    2008-09-01

    The study of long-term indoor atmospheric corrosion is involved in the field of the interim storage of nuclear wastes. Indeed study of archaeological artefacts is one of the only mean to gather information on very long periods. Concerning ancient items, due to the complexity of the system, it is necessary to couple many analytical techniques from the macro to the microscopic scale. This enables to propose a description of the Amiens cathedral chain rust layers, made of a matrix of goethite, with lepidocrocite and akaganeite locally present and marbling of a poor crystallized phase associated to ferrihydrite. Electrochemical measurements permit to study the reduction capacity of the rust layer and to draw reduction mechanisms of the so-called active phases, by in situ experiments coupled with X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  1. The Long-term Middle Atmospheric Influence of Very Large Solar Proton Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Marsh, Daniel R.; Vitt, Francis M.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Randall, Cora E.; Fleming, Eric L.; Frith, Stacey M.

    2008-01-01

    Long-term variations in ozone have been caused by both natural and humankind related processes. The humankind or anthropogenic influence on ozone originates from the chlorofluorocarbons and halons (chlorine and bromine) and has led to international regulations greatly limiting the release of these substances. Certain natural ozone influences are also important in polar regions and are caused by the impact of solar charged particles on the atmosphere. Such natural variations have been studied in order to better quantify the human influence on polar ozone. Large-scale explosions on the Sun near solar maximum lead to emissions of charged particles (mainly protons and electrons), some of which enter the Earth's magnetosphere and rain down on the polar regions. "Solar proton events" have been used to describe these phenomena since the protons associated with these solar events sometimes create a significant atmospheric disturbance. We have used the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) to study the long-term (> few months) influences of solar proton events from 1963 through 2004 on stratospheric ozone and temperature. There were extremely large solar proton events in 1972, 1989,2000,2001, and 2003. These events caused very distinctive polar changes in layers of the Earth's atmosphere known as the stratosphere (12-50 km; -7-30 miles) and mesosphere (50-90 km; 30-55 miles). The solar protons connected with these events created hydrogen- and nitrogen-containing compounds, which led to the polar ozone destruction. The nitrogen-containing compounds, called odd nitrogen, lasted much longer than the hydrogen-containing compounds and led to long-lived stratospheric impacts. An extremely active period for these events occurred in the five-year period, 2000- 2004, and caused increases in odd nitrogen which lasted for several months after individual events. Associated stratospheric ozone decreases of >lo% were calculated

  2. Long-term Outcomes of Drug-eluting versus Bare-metal stent for ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liping; Wang, Hongyun; Dong, Pingshuan; Li, Zhuanzhen; Wang, Yanyu; Duan, Nana; Zhao, Yuwei; Wang, Shaoxin

    2014-01-01

    Background Long-term outcomes of drug-eluting stents (DES) versus bare-metal stents (BMS) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) remain uncertain. Objective To investigate long-term outcomes of drug-eluting stents (DES) versus bare-metal stents (BMS) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods We performed search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane library, and ISI Web of Science (until February 2013) for randomized trials comparing more than 12-month efficacy or safety of DES with BMS in patients with STEMI. Pooled estimate was presented with risk ratio (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) using random-effects model. Results Ten trials with 7,592 participants with STEMI were included. The overall results showed that there was no significant difference in the incidence of all-cause death and definite/probable stent thrombosis between DES and BMS at long-term follow-up. Patients receiving DES implantation appeared to have a lower 1-year incidence of recurrent myocardial infarction than those receiving BMS (RR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.56 to 1.00, p= 0.05). Moreover, the risk of target vessel revascularization (TVR) after receiving DES was consistently lowered during long-term observation (all p< 0.01). In subgroup analysis, the use of everolimus-eluting stents (EES) was associated with reduced risk of stent thrombosis in STEMI patients (RR = 0.37, p=0.02). Conclusions DES did not increase the risk of stent thrombosis in patients with STEMI compared with BMS. Moreover, the use of DES did lower long-term risk of repeat revascularization and might decrease the occurrence of reinfarction. PMID:25004414

  3. Maintenance of C sinks sustains enhanced C assimilation during long-term exposure to elevated [CO2] in Mojave Desert shrubs.

    PubMed

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Ebbets, Allison L; Evans, R Dave; Tissue, David T; Nogués, Salvador; van Gestel, Natasja; Payton, Paxton; Ebbert, Volker; Adams, Williams W; Nowak, Robert S; Smith, Stanley D

    2011-10-01

    During the first few years of elevated atmospheric [CO(2)] treatment at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility, photosynthetic downregulation was observed in desert shrubs grown under elevated [CO(2)], especially under relatively wet environmental conditions. Nonetheless, those plants maintained increased A (sat) (photosynthetic performance at saturating light and treatment [CO(2)]) under wet conditions, but to a much lesser extent under dry conditions. To determine if plants continued to downregulate during long-term exposure to elevated [CO(2)], responses of photosynthesis to elevated [CO(2)] were examined in two dominant Mojave Desert shrubs, the evergreen Larrea tridentata and the drought-deciduous Ambrosia dumosa, during the eighth full growing season of elevated [CO(2)] treatment at the NDFF. A comprehensive suite of physiological processes were collected. Furthermore, we used C labeling of air to assess carbon allocation and partitioning as measures of C sink activity. Results show that elevated [CO(2)] enhanced photosynthetic performance and plant water status in Larrea, especially during periods of environmental stress, but not in Ambrosia. δ(13)C analyses indicate that Larrea under elevated [CO(2)] allocated a greater proportion of newly assimilated C to C sinks than Ambrosia. Maintenance by Larrea of C sinks during the dry season partially explained the reduced [CO(2)] effect on leaf carbohydrate content during summer, which in turn lessened carbohydrate build-up and feedback inhibition of photosynthesis. δ(13)C results also showed that in a year when plant growth reached the highest rates in 5 years, 4% (Larrea) and 7% (Ambrosia) of C in newly emerging organs were remobilized from C that was assimilated and stored for at least 2 years prior to the current study. Thus, after 8 years of continuous exposure to elevated [CO(2)], both desert perennials maintained their photosynthetic capacities under elevated [CO(2)]. We conclude that C storage, remobilization

  4. Effects of long-term low atmospheric pressure on gas exchange and growth of lettuce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongkang; Guo, Shuangsheng; Dong, Wenping; Qin, Lifeng; Ai, Weidang; Lin, Shan

    2010-09-01

    The objectives of this research were to determine photosynthesis, evapotranspiration and growth of lettuce at long-term low atmospheric pressure. Lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L . cv. Youmaicai) plants were grown at 40 kPa total pressure (8.4 kPa p) or 101 kPa total pressure (20.9 kPa p) from seed to harvest for 35 days. Germination rate of lettuce seeds decreased by 7.6% at low pressure, although this was not significant. There was no significant difference in crop photosynthetic rate between hypobaria and ambient pressure during the 35-day study. The crop evapotranspiration rate was significantly lower at low pressure than that at ambient pressure from 20 to 30 days after planting (DAP), but it had no significant difference before 20 DAP or after 30 DAP. The growth cycle of lettuce plants at low pressure was delayed. At low pressure, lettuce leaves were curly at the seedling stage and this disappeared gradually as the plants grew. Ambient lettuce plants were yellow and had an epinastic growth at harvest. The shoot height, leaf number, leaf length and shoot/root ratio were lower at low pressure than those at ambient pressure, while leaf area and root growth increased. Total biomass of lettuce plants grown at two pressures had no significant difference. Ethylene production at low pressure decreased significantly by 38.8% compared with ambient pressure. There was no significant difference in microelements, nutritional phytochemicals and nitrate concentrations at the two treatments. This research shows that lettuce can be grown at long-term low pressure (40 kPa) without significant adverse effects on seed germination, gas exchange and plant growth. Furthermore, ethylene release was reduced in hypobaria.

  5. Long-term Internal Variability of the Tropical Pacific Atmosphere-Ocean System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi Bordbar, Mohammad; Martin, Thomas; Park, Wonsun; Latif, Mojib

    2016-04-01

    The tropical Pacific has featured some remarkable trends during the recent decades such as an unprecedented strengthening of the Trade Winds, a strong cooling of sea surface temperatures (SST) in the eastern and central part, thereby slowing global warming and strengthening the zonal SST gradient, and highly asymmetric sea level trends with an accelerated rise relative to the global average in the western and a drop in the eastern part. These trends have been linked to an anomalously strong Pacific Walker Circulation, the major zonal atmospheric overturning cell in the tropical Pacific sector, but the origin of the strengthening is controversial. Here we address the question as to whether the recent decadal trends in the tropical Pacific atmosphere-ocean system are within the range of internal variability, as simulated in long unforced integrations of global climate models. We show that the recent trends are still within the range of long-term internal decadal variability. Further, such variability strengthens in response to enhanced greenhouse gas concentrations, which may further hinder detection of anthropogenic climate signals in that region.

  6. Long-term atmospheric oxygen decrease an underestimated factor forcing the Permian-Triassic mass extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidlich, O.; Kiessling, W.; Flügel, E.

    2003-04-01

    The Permian mass extinction encompasses the end-Guadalupian (Middle Permian) and the end-Lopingian (Late Permian) events, which sum up to the most severe Phanerozoic crisis. Berner (2002) evaluated popular hypotheses explaining the Permian mass extinction and suggested a synergistic combination of causes, notably various short-term perturbations of the carbon cycle and its far-reaching reorganization with a shift of the depo-center from the land to the sea. While massive volcanic eruptions, oceanic CO2-poisoning or anoxia, a bolide impact, and methane release have been considered as abrupt killing mechanisms, there has been little interest in how atmospheric oxygen variations affected the metazoan diversities. Differing from contemporary values of 21%, atmospheric oxygen reached maximum concentrations of about 35% during the late Carboniferous, gradually dropped to minimum concentrations possibly as low as 15% by the end of Permian, and increased during the Triassic to modelled values of about 18% (Berner &Canfield 1989). The possible links of these secular fluctuations to macroevolutionary processes are underexplored, but the stratigraphic coincidence of reconstructed atmospheric oxygen concentrations and biospheric perturbations suggest that this relation may be stronger than admitted. Although feedback mechanisms between decreasing atmospheric oxygen content and metazoan evolution have been ruled out, modern oxygen minimum zone inhabitants, directly respond to oxygen deficiency with opportunistic faunas. We analysed 30 million years Middle Permian to Middle Triassic reef distribution, reef carbonate production as well as reef builder extinction/recovery patterns and compared the results with the modeled atmospheric oxygen concentrations and the extinction data from terrestrial and deep-marine ecosystems. We propose that (i) the Permian double reef crisis resulted from long-term atmospheric O2 depletion in conjunction with abrupt killing mechanisms and that (ii

  7. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition and its long-term dynamics in a southeast China coastal area.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nengwang; Hong, Huasheng; Huang, Quanjia; Wu, Jiezhong

    2011-06-01

    Measurements were conducted during 2004-2005 and 2009-2010 to characterize atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition to the Jiulong River Estuary - Xiamen Bay area in southeast China. Isotopic analysis and long-term data (1990-2009) for inorganic N extracted from the national acid deposition dataset were used to determine the dominant source of atmospheric nitrate and N component dynamics. The results showed that the mean dissolved total N concentration in rain water for the three coastal area sites was 2.71 ± 1.58 mg N L(-1) (n = 141) in 2004. The mean dissolved inorganic N at the Xiamen site was 1.62 ± 1.19 mg N L(-1) (n = 46) in 2004-2005 and 1.56 ± 1.39 mg N L(-1) (n = 36) in 2009-2010, although the difference is not significant, nitrate turnover dominates the N component in the latter period. Total deposition flux over Xiamen was 30 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), of which dry and wet deposition contributed 16% and 84%, respectively. Nitrate in wet deposition with low isotopic value (between -3.05 and -7.48‰) was likely to have mostly originated from combustion NO(x) from vehicle exhausts. The inorganic N in acid deposition exhibited a significant increase (mainly for nitrate) since the mid-1990s, which is consistent with the increased gaseous concentrations of NO(x) and expanding number of automobiles in the coastal city (Xiamen). The time series of nitrate anions and ammonium cations as well as pH values during the period 1990-2009 reflected an increasing trend of N emission with potential implication for N-induced acidification.

  8. Polyvascular Disease and Long-term Cardiovascular Outcomes in Older Patients with Non–ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Subherwal, Sumeet; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Li, Shuang; Tracy Y., Wang; Thomas, Laine; Alexander, Karen P.; Patel, Manesh R.; Ohman, E. Magnus; Gibler, W. Brian; Peterson, Eric D.; Roe, Matthew T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The impact of polyvascular disease (peripheral arterial disease [PAD] and/or cerebrovascular disease [CVD]) on long-term cardiovascular outcomes among older patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) has not been well studied. Methods Non–ST-elevation MI (NSTEMI) patients aged ≥65 years from the CRUSADE registry who survived to hospital discharge were linked to longitudinal data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (n=34,205). All patients were presumed to have coronary artery disease (CAD) and were classified into 4 groups: 10.7% had prior CVD (CAD+CVD group); 11.5% had prior PAD (CAD+PAD); 3.1% had prior PAD and CVD (CAD+PAD+CVD); and 74.7% had no polyvascular disease (CAD alone). Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to examine the hazard of long-term mortality and the composite of death, readmission for MI, or readmission for stroke (median follow-up 35 months, IQR 17–49) among the 4 groups. Results Compared with the CAD-alone group, patients with polyvascular disease had a greater comorbidity burden, were less likely to undergo revascularization, and less often received recommended discharge interventions. Three-year mortality rates increased with a greater number of arterial beds involved: 33% for CAD alone, 49% for CAD+PAD, 52% for CAD+CVD, and 59% for CAD+PAD+CVD. Relative to the CAD-alone group, patients with all 3 arterial beds involved had the highest risk of long-term mortality (adjusted HR [95% CI]: 1.49 [1.38–1.61], with a lower risk for those with CAD+CVD, 1.38 [1.31–1.44], and those with CAD+PAD, 1.29 [1.23–1.35]). Similarly, the adjusted risk of long-term composite ischemic events was highest among the CAD+PAD+CVD group. Conclusions Older NSTEMI patients with polyvascular disease have substantially higher long-term risk, such that the 3-year mortality rate is >50%. Future studies targeting greater adherance to secondary prevention strategies and novel therapies are needed to help reduce long-term

  9. Long-term results with different bone substitutes used for sinus floor elevation.

    PubMed

    Velich, Norbert; Németh, Zsolt; Tóth, Christian; Szabó, György

    2004-01-01

    One of the surgical procedures preceding implantation is elevation of the base of the maxillary sinus. Numerous bone substituting materials (grafts) may be used for this purpose, including autogenous bone, heterografts, xenogenous bone, and synthetic materials alone or in combination or mixed with growth factors and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) preparations. A study of the frequencies of the failures (graft material resorption or implant loss) after sinus elevations with various graft materials or their combinations was conducted. In the 5-year period from 1996 through 2001, a follow-up investigation of 810 maxillary sinus augmentations was performed, in which the sinus elevations involved the use of autogenous bone, a calcium carbonate-coated polymer, hydroxylapatite of algal origin, calcium carbonate gel produced from coral or beta-tricalcium phosphate alone, autogenous bone mixed with these bone substitutes, or a combination of beta-tricalcium phosphate and platelet-rich plasma. The incidences of graft resorption and implant loss after the augmentations with various bone substitutes were recorded. Total resorption (disappearance) of the bone substitute material was observed in 2.7% of the cases. An essential difference was not experienced between the various bone substitutes from this aspect, with the exception of the gel-state calcium carbonate, where 40% of the grafts were resorbed. In total, 5.46% of the implants were lost; the differences between the various materials were not significant. PMID:14704560

  10. Very Long-Term Prognostic Role of Admission BNP in Non-ST Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bassan, Fernando; Bassan, Roberto; Esporcatte, Roberto; Santos, Braulio; Tura, Bernardo

    2016-01-01

    Background BNP has been extensively evaluated to determine short- and intermediate-term prognosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome, but its role in long-term mortality is not known. Objective To determine the very long-term prognostic role of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) for all-cause mortality in patients with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTEACS). Methods A cohort of 224 consecutive patients with NSTEACS, prospectively seen in the Emergency Department, had BNP measured on arrival to establish prognosis, and underwent a median 9.34-year follow-up for all-cause mortality. Results Unstable angina was diagnosed in 52.2%, and non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, in 47.8%. Median admission BNP was 81.9 pg/mL (IQ range = 22.2; 225) and mortality rate was correlated with increasing BNP quartiles: 14.3; 16.1; 48.2; and 73.2% (p < 0.0001). ROC curve disclosed 100 pg/mL as the best BNP cut-off value for mortality prediction (area under the curve = 0.789, 95% CI= 0.723-0.854), being a strong predictor of late mortality: BNP < 100 = 17.3% vs. BNP ≥ 100 = 65.0%, RR = 3.76 (95% CI = 2.49-5.63, p < 0.001). On logistic regression analysis, age >72 years (OR = 3.79, 95% CI = 1.62-8.86, p = 0.002), BNP ≥ 100 pg/mL (OR = 6.24, 95% CI = 2.95-13.23, p < 0.001) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (OR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.97-0.99, p = 0.049) were independent late-mortality predictors. Conclusions BNP measured at hospital admission in patients with NSTEACS is a strong, independent predictor of very long-term all-cause mortality. This study allows raising the hypothesis that BNP should be measured in all patients with NSTEACS at the index event for long-term risk stratification. PMID:26840056

  11. Dense lower crust elevates long-term earthquake rates in the New Madrid seismic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levandowski, Will; Boyd, Oliver S.; Ramirez-Guzmán, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge of the local state of stress is critical in appraising intraplate seismic hazard. Inverting earthquake moment tensors, we demonstrate that principal stress directions in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) differ significantly from those in the surrounding region. Faults in the NMSZ that are incompatible with slip in the regional stress field are favorably oriented relative to local stress. We jointly analyze seismic velocity, gravity, and topography to develop a 3-D crustal and upper mantle density model, revealing uniquely dense lower crust beneath the NMSZ. Finite element simulations then estimate the stress tensor due to gravitational body forces, which sums with regional stress. The anomalous lower crust both elevates gravity-derived stress at seismogenic depths in the NMSZ and rotates it to interfere more constructively with far-field stress, producing a regionally maximal deviatoric stress coincident with the highest concentration of modern seismicity. Moreover, predicted principal stress directions mirror variations (observed independently in moment tensors) at the NMSZ and across the region.

  12. Changes in High Elevation Lake Ecosystems of the Sierra Nevada during the 20th Century: Combining Long-term Monitoring with Paleolimnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sickman, J. O.; Heard, A. M.; Rose, N. L.; Bennett, D. M.; Lucero, D. M.; Melack, J. M.; Curtis, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    High mountain lakes of the Sierra Nevada are excellent indicators of anthropogenic global change due to their limited capacity to buffer acid deposition, their sensitivity to changes in snowpack dynamics and their oligotrophic nutrient status. In this presentation, we examine long-term records of hydrochemistry and biological monitoring at the Emerald Lake watershed to assess whether high elevation lakes of the Sierra Nevada are changing in response to climate change or changes in atmospheric deposition of nutrients and acid. To provide a broader context for these changes, we augment these long-term records with results from paleolimnological analysis that examines changes in nutrient status and acid buffering capacity of Sierra Nevada lakes over the past two millennia. Our research suggests that, although atmospheric deposition is the dominant driver of twentieth century ANC trends, aquatic communities in the Sierra Nevada are responding to combined effects from acidification, climate change, and eutrophication. Early in the twentieth century the primary stressor effecting Sierra Nevada lakes was acid deposition driven by SO2 emissions. As the century and industrialization progressed, NOx levels increased adding a eutrophication stressor while simultaneously contributing to acidification. Effects were further complicated by a warming climate in the late twentieth century, as warmer temperatures may have contributed to the recovery of ANC in lakes via increased weathering rates, while simultaneously enhancing eutrophication effects.

  13. Long-term continuous monitoring of mercury in the Russian arctic: winter increase of atmospheric mercury depletion events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, Fidel; Mahura, Alexander; Popov, Valentin; Katz, Oleg

    2014-05-01

    Among pollutants mercury is a major environmental concern due to its ecological hazard. The mercury can reside in the atmosphere for a long time high, and it is a reason of its global propagation in the Northern Hemisphere and elevated mercury concentrations are reported in the Arctic environment. First time, in 1995, the effect of atmospheric mercury depletion in the troposphere was found at the Canadian station Alert. This phenomenon (called the Atmospheric Mercury Depletion Event - AMDE) is observed during April-June, when the Polar sunrise starts till the end of the snowmelt. The same effect was reported for other polar stations situated to the north of 60° N. Long-term continuous monitoring of gaseous elemental mercury in the surface air at the polar station Amderma (69,720N; 61,620E) using the analyzer Tekran 2537A has been conducted from Jun 2001 to date. Individual measurements were collected every thirty minutes. It has been shown, that during eleven years of observations the AMDEs were observed every year, from the end of March till early June. For the winter period (Dec-Feb) these events of the atmospheric mercury depletion were registered from 2010 to 2013, which had not been observed before. A large number of hours during the day, when the concentration of mercury was recorded at level of below 1 ng/m3, was registered during Dec-Feb. The sun declination above the horizon is negative, and solar activity is still not enough to trigger the photochemical reactions. The these last 3 years confirmed a tendency to displacement of AMDEs to the winter season, which leads to an additional factor entry of mercury in various biological objects, due to the additional deposition of various forms of mercury on the snowpack. At the same time, especially during the winter seasons, there is a substantial increase (up to 8 times) of AMDEs, compared with the previous years. In particular, in winter 2013 the maximum number of AMDs reached 31 cases. The explanation can be

  14. Effects of long-term elevated CO2 treatment on the inner and outer bark chemistry of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) trees

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhardt, Thomas L.; Labbé, Nicole; So, Chi-Leung; Kim, Keonhee; Reed, Karen G.; Leduc, Daniel J.; Warren, Jeffrey M.

    2015-07-23

    Long-term exposure of sweetgum trees to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations significantly shifted inner bark (phloem) and outer bark (rhytidome) chemical compositions, having implications for both defense and nutrient cycling. Changes in plant tissue chemistry due to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations have direct implications for tissue resistance to abiotic and biotic stress while living, and soil nutrient cycling when senesced as litter. Although the effects of elevated CO2 concentrations on tree foliar chemistry are well documented, the effects on tree bark chemistry are largely unknown. The objective of our study was to determine the effects of a long-term elevated CO2 treatment on the contents of individual elements, extractives, ash, lignin, and polysaccharide sugars of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) bark. Trees were harvested from sweetgum plots equipped with the Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) apparatus, receiving either elevated or ambient CO2 treatments over a 12-year period. Whole bark sections were partitioned into inner bark (phloem) and outer bark (rhytidome) samples before analysis. Moreover, principal component analysis, coupled with either Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy or pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry data, was also used to screen for differences. Elevated CO2 reduced the N content (0.42 vs. 0.35 %) and increased the C:N ratio (109 vs. 136 %) of the outer bark. For the inner bark, elevated CO2 increased the Mn content (470 vs. 815 mg kg-1), total extractives (13.0 vs. 15.6 %), and residual ash content (8.1 vs. 10.8 %) as compared to ambient CO2; differences were also observed for some hemicellulosic sugars, but not lignin. Shifts in bark chemistry can affect the success of herbivores and pathogens in living trees, and as litter, bark can affect the biogeochemical cycling of

  15. Long-term response of a Mojave Desert winter annual plant community to a whole-ecosystem atmospheric CO2 manipulation (FACE).

    PubMed

    Smith, Stanley D; Charlet, Therese N; Zitzer, Stephen F; Abella, Scott R; Vanier, Cheryl H; Huxman, Travis E

    2014-03-01

    Desert annuals are a critically important component of desert communities and may be particularly responsive to increasing atmospheric (CO2 ) because of their high potential growth rates and flexible phenology. During the 10-year life of the Nevada Desert FACE (free-air CO2 enrichment) Facility, we evaluated the productivity, reproductive allocation, and community structure of annuals in response to long-term elevated (CO2 ) exposure. The dominant forb and grass species exhibited accelerated phenology, increased size, and higher reproduction at elevated (CO2 ) in a wet El Niño year near the beginning of the experiment. However, a multiyear dry cycle resulted in no increases in productivity or reproductive allocation for the remainder of the experiment. At the community level, early indications of increased dominance of the invasive Bromus rubens at elevated (CO2 ) gave way to an absence of Bromus in the community during a drought cycle, with a resurgence late in the experiment in response to higher rainfall and a corresponding high density of Bromus in a final soil seed bank analysis, particularly at elevated (CO2 ). This long-term experiment resulted in two primary conclusions: (i) elevated (CO2 ) does not increase productivity of annuals in most years; and (ii) relative stimulation of invasive grasses will likely depend on future precipitation, with a wetter climate favoring invasive grasses but currently predicted greater aridity favoring native dicots.

  16. Comparison of long-term mortality of acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome patients after percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lihui; Ye, Huiming; Wang, Ping; Cui, Yuxia; Cao, Shichang; Lv, Shuzheng

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: This study is to compare the short-term and long-term mortality in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods and results: A total of 266 STEMI patients and 140 NSTE-ACS patients received PCI. Patients were followed up by telephone or at medical record or case statistics center and were followed up for 4 years. Descriptive statistics and multivariate survival analyses were employed to compare the mortality in STEMI and NSTE-ACS. All statistical analyses were performed by SPSS19.0 software package. NSTE-ACS patients had significantly higher clinical and angiographic risk profiles at baseline. During the 4-year follow-up, all-cause mortality in STEMI was significantly higher than that in NSTE-ACS after coronary stent placement (HR 1.496, 95% CI 1.019-2.197). In a landmark analysis no difference was seen in all-cause mortality for both STEMI and NSTE-ACS between 6 month and 4 years of follow-up (HR 1.173, 95% CI 0.758-1.813). Conclusions: Patients with STEMI have a worse long-term prognosis compared to patients with NSTE-ACS after PCI, due to higher short-term mortality. However, NSTE-ACS patients have a worse long-term survival after 6 months. PMID:25664077

  17. Anxiolytic effects of short- and long-term administration of cacao mass on rat elevated T-maze test.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takashi; Yamada, Yasushi; Okano, Yasuyo; Terashima, Takehiko; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2009-12-01

    We demonstrated the effects of short- and long-term administration of cacao mass on anxiety in the elevated T-maze test, which is an animal model of anxiety. In the first study, we administered cacao mass (100 mg/100 g body weight) per os and immediately performed the elevated T-maze test. Short-term cacao mass significantly abolished delayed avoidance latency compared with the control but did not change escape latency. This result suggested that cacao mass administration reduced conditional fear-relating behavior. Short-term cacao mass administration did not affect the concentration of brain monoamines, emotion-related neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine, in the rat brain. In the next study, we fed a cacao mass-containing diet to rats for 2 weeks and performed the elevated T-maze test. Contrary to short-term administration, chronic consumption of cacao mass tended to increase avoidance latency and did not change escape latency. Brain serotonin concentration and its turnover were enhanced by chronic consumption of cacao mass. These results suggested that chronic consumption of cacao did not affect fear-related behavior but was involved in brain monoamine metabolism. In conclusion, we suggest that short-term cacao mass consumption showed an anxiolytic effect but chronic consumption did not.

  18. Effects of long-term elevated CO2 treatment on the inner and outer bark chemistry of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) trees

    DOE PAGES

    Eberhardt, Thomas L.; Labbé, Nicole; So, Chi-Leung; Kim, Keonhee; Reed, Karen G.; Leduc, Daniel J.; Warren, Jeffrey M.

    2015-07-23

    Long-term exposure of sweetgum trees to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations significantly shifted inner bark (phloem) and outer bark (rhytidome) chemical compositions, having implications for both defense and nutrient cycling. Changes in plant tissue chemistry due to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations have direct implications for tissue resistance to abiotic and biotic stress while living, and soil nutrient cycling when senesced as litter. Although the effects of elevated CO2 concentrations on tree foliar chemistry are well documented, the effects on tree bark chemistry are largely unknown. The objective of our study was to determine the effects of a long-term elevatedmore » CO2 treatment on the contents of individual elements, extractives, ash, lignin, and polysaccharide sugars of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) bark. Trees were harvested from sweetgum plots equipped with the Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) apparatus, receiving either elevated or ambient CO2 treatments over a 12-year period. Whole bark sections were partitioned into inner bark (phloem) and outer bark (rhytidome) samples before analysis. Moreover, principal component analysis, coupled with either Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy or pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry data, was also used to screen for differences. Elevated CO2 reduced the N content (0.42 vs. 0.35 %) and increased the C:N ratio (109 vs. 136 %) of the outer bark. For the inner bark, elevated CO2 increased the Mn content (470 vs. 815 mg kg-1), total extractives (13.0 vs. 15.6 %), and residual ash content (8.1 vs. 10.8 %) as compared to ambient CO2; differences were also observed for some hemicellulosic sugars, but not lignin. Shifts in bark chemistry can affect the success of herbivores and pathogens in living trees, and as litter, bark can affect the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients within the forest floor. Our results demonstrate that increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations

  19. Relationships Between Long-term Atmospheric Wet Deposition and Stream Chemistry in Mid-Appalachian Forest Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWalle, D. R.; Boyer, E. W.; Buda, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Improved understanding of the link between atmospheric deposition and surface water quality is critical to assessing the degree to which forested watersheds have recovered from acidification. This presentation draws upon long-term (1982-2013) atmospheric wet deposition and stream chemistry time series to study how changes in atmospheric chemical inputs have been propagated to stream waters. We used autocorrelation and lagged cross-correlation techniques to analyze monthly time series describing variations of chloride, sulfate and inorganic nitrogen concentrations for four pairs of stream/deposition monitoring sites. Autocorrelation analysis revealed that individual atmospheric input time series of sulfate and inorganic nitrogen were strongly seasonal, while chloride inputs exhibited little seasonality. Stream chemistry time series exhibited gradually declining autocorrelation trends with increasing lag times suggesting that atmospheric input signals were variably damped by the forest ecosystems . Lagged cross-correlation between raw atmospheric and stream chemistry time series indicated gradual decreases in correlation within superimposed regular annual cycles of correlation over 10- 15 years of lag time. Pre-whitening of each atmospheric and stream time series using regression or ARIMA models removed the influence of long-term trends, seasonal cycles and other factors and revealed occurrence of relatively few and highly variable lag times with significant correlations. While lagged cross-correlation of raw time series data provided some useful insights into the long-term trend and seasonal nature of the linkages between atmospheric deposition and stream chemistry, cross-correlation of shorter-term residual variations after prewhitening did not produce a consistent pattern of lag times with significant correlations in our monthly time series data.

  20. Inter and intra-specific variation in photosynthetic acclimation response to long term exposure of elevated carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, M. |

    1996-08-01

    The response of intra and interspecific variation in photosynthetic acclimation to growth at elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration (600{micro}mol mol-l) in six important grassland species was investigated. Plants were grown in a background sward of Lolium perenne and measurements were made after four years of growth at elevated C{sub a}. Elevated CO{sub 2} was maintained using a FACE (Free-Air Carbon Enrichment) system. Significant intra and interspecific variation in acclimation response was demonstrated. The response of adaxial and abaxial stomatal conductance to elevated CO{sub 2} was also investigated. The stomatal conductance of both the adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces was found to be reduced by elevated C{sub a}. Significant asymmetric responses in stomatal conductance was demonstrated in D. glomerata and T. pratense. Analysis of stomatal indices and densities indicated that the observed reductions in stomatal conductance were probably the result of changes in stomatal aperture.

  1. The role of abiotic conditions in shaping the long-term patterns of a high-elevation Argentine ant invasion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krushelnycky, P.D.; Joe, S.M.; Medeiros, A.C.; Daehler, C.C.; Loope, L.L.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of long-term patterns of invasion can reveal the importance of abiotic factors in influencing invasion dynamics, and can help predict future patterns of spread. In the case of the invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile), most prior studies have investigated this species' limitations in hot and dry climates. However, spatial and temporal patterns of spread involving two ant populations over the course of 30 years at a high elevation site in Hawaii suggest that cold and wet conditions have influenced both the ant's distribution and its rate of invasion. In Haleakala National Park on Maui, we found that a population invading at lower elevation is limited by increasing rainfall and presumably by associated decreasing temperatures. A second, higher elevation population has spread outward in all directions, but rates of spread in different directions appear to have been strongly influenced by differences in elevation and temperature. Patterns of foraging activity were strongly tied to soil temperatures, supporting the hypothesis that variation in temperature can influence rates of spread. Based on past patterns of spread, we predicted a total potential range that covers nearly 50% of the park and 75% of the park's subalpine habitats. We compared this rough estimate with point predictions derived from a degree-day model for Argentine ant colony reproduction, and found that the two independent predictions match closely when soil temperatures are used in the model. The cold, wet conditions that have influenced Argentine ant invasion at this site are likely to be influential at other locations in this species' current and future worldwide distribution. ?? 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. The effect of regional ocean-atmosphere coupling on the long-term variability in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lin; Wu, Dexing; Lin, Xiaopei; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2010-03-01

    A fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model is applied to highlight the mechanism of the long-term variability (including decadal and longer time scales) in the Pacific Ocean. We are interested in the effect of oceanatmosphere coupling of different regions during these processes. The control run successfully simulates the Pacific long-term variability, whose leading modes are the Pacific (inter) Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the North Pacific mode (NPM). Furthermore, three numerical experiments are conducted, shutting down the ocean-atmosphere coupling in the North Pacific, the tropical Pacific, and the South Pacific, respectively. The results show that regional ocean-atmosphere coupling is not only important to the strength of local long-term SST variability but also has an influence on the variability further afield. In both the tropical Pacific and North Pacific, this local effect is the main control, which is much more obvious in the tropical regions. The existence of the PDO is extremely dependent on the coupling in the tropical Pacific. However, extratropical coupling, in particular that in the North Pacific, is also important to form its spatial pattern and strengthen the variability in some tropical areas. For the NPM, its existence is primarily determined by the coupling in the North Pacific.

  3. Direct and legacy effects of long-term elevated CO₂ on fine root growth and plant-insect interactions.

    PubMed

    Stiling, Peter; Moon, Daniel; Rossi, Anthony; Forkner, Rebecca; Hungate, Bruce A; Day, Frank P; Schroeder, Rachel E; Drake, Bert

    2013-11-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO₂ concentrations alter leaf physiology, with effects that cascade to communities and ecosystems. Yet, responses over cycles of disturbance and recovery are not well known, because most experiments span limited ecological time. We examined the effects of CO₂ on root growth, herbivory and arthropod biodiversity in a woodland from 1996 to 2006, and the legacy of CO₂ enrichment on these processes during the year after the CO₂ treatment ceased. We used minirhizotrons to study root growth, leaf censuses to study herbivory and pitfall traps to determine the effects of elevated CO₂ on arthropod biodiversity. Elevated CO₂ increased fine root biomass, but decreased foliar nitrogen and herbivory on all plant species. Insect biodiversity was unchanged in elevated CO₂. Legacy effects of elevated CO₂ disappeared quickly as fine root growth, foliar nitrogen and herbivory levels recovered in the next growing season following the cessation of elevated CO₂. Although the effects of elevated CO₂ cascade through plants to herbivores, they do not reach other trophic levels, and biodiversity remains unchanged. The legacy of 10 yr of elevated CO₂ on plant-herbivore interactions in this system appear to be minimal, indicating that the effects of elevated CO₂ may not accumulate over cycles of disturbance and recovery.

  4. Elevated temperature prolongs long-term effects of a pesticide on Daphnia spp. due to altered competition in zooplankton communities.

    PubMed

    Knillmann, Saskia; Stampfli, Nathalie C; Noskov, Yury A; Beketov, Mikhail A; Liess, Matthias

    2013-05-01

    Considerable research efforts have been made to predict the influences of climate change on species composition in biological communities. However, little is known about how changing environmental conditions and anthropogenic pollution can affect aquatic communities in combination. We investigated the influence of short warming periods on the response of a zooplankton community to the insecticide esfenvalerate at a range of environmentally realistic concentrations (0.03, 0.3 and 3 μg L(-1) ) in 55 outdoor pond microcosms. Warming periods increased the cumulative water temperature, but did not exceed the maximum temperature measured under ambient conditions. Under warming conditions alone the abundance of some zooplankton taxa increased selectively compared to ambient conditions. This resulted in a shift in the community composition that had not recovered by the end of the experiment, 8 weeks after the last warming period. Regarding the pesticide exposure, short-term effects of esfenvalerate on the community structure and the sensitive taxa Daphnia spp. did not differ between the two temperature regimes. In contrast, long-term effects of esfenvalerate on Daphnia spp., a taxon that did not benefit from elevated temperatures, were observed twice as long under warming than under ambient conditions. This resulted in long-term effects on Daphnia spp. until 4 months after contamination at 3 μg L(-1) esfenvalerate. Under both temperature regimes, we identified strength of interspecific competition as the mechanism determining the time until recovery. However, enhanced interspecific competition under warming conditions was prolonged and explained the delayed recovery of Daphnia spp. from esfenvalerate. These results show that, for realistic prediction of the combined effects of changing environmental factors and toxicants on sensitive taxa, the impacts of stressors on the biotic interactions within the community need to be considered. PMID:23504978

  5. Long-term effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on Mediterranean forest vegetation of Northern-Central Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkson, C.L.; Oechel, W.C.; Miglietta, F.

    1995-06-01

    Carbon dioxide springs offer a unique opportunity to study the effects of long-term CO{sub 2} enrichment on natural ecosystems. A CO{sub 2} spring near Laiatico (Pisa), Italy vents approximately 25 to 40% of pure CO{sub 2} and enriches about one hectare of a 30-35 year-old coppiced forest, forming a CO{sub 2} gradient with distance from the emission. A:Ci curves were measured on the upper canopy leaves of mature trees of Quercus ilex before bud-break and after new leaf production between April and July 1994. Photosynthetic rates of trees under elevated CO{sub 2} (490 to 1190 ppm) reflect 30-56% downward adjustment in April and no downward adjustment in July. Photosynthetic rates measured at respective growth CO{sub 2} concentrations were reduced in April by 41.8% and enhanced in July by 12.8% as growth CO{sub 2} concentration increased. Leaf nitrogen concentrations under higher CO{sub 2} levels were significantly less than those at ambient CO{sub 2} concentration in April (1.17 and 1.44% N {+-} 0.04%, respectively; P = 0.001). The results from this study indicate that new leaves of mature Quercus ilex may provide a metabolically active carbon sink for enhanced photosynthesis under elevated CO{sub 2}, but after one year, the strength of this sink decreases, resulting in reduced photosynthetic rates and leaf nitrogen concentrations.

  6. Response to Comment on "Long-term climate forcing by atmospheric oxygen concentrations".

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Christopher J; Tabor, Clay; White, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    Goldblatt argues that a decrease in pressure broadening of absorption lines in an atmosphere with low oxygen leads to an increase in outgoing longwave radiation and atmospheric cooling. We demonstrate that cloud and water vapor feedbacks in a global climate model compensate for these decreases and lead to atmospheric warming. PMID:27387944

  7. Response to Comment on “Long-term climate forcing by atmospheric oxygen concentrations”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulsen, Christopher J.; Tabor, Clay; White, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    Goldblatt argues that a decrease in pressure broadening of absorption lines in an atmosphere with low oxygen leads to an increase in outgoing longwave radiation and atmospheric cooling. We demonstrate that cloud and water vapor feedbacks in a global climate model compensate for these decreases and lead to atmospheric warming.

  8. The long-term evolutions and the regional characteristics of atmospheric methane concentrations in Nagoya, 1983-1997.

    PubMed

    Ito, A; Takahashi, I; Nagata, Y; Chiba, K; Haraguchi, H

    2000-12-18

    This study provides information on the long-term evolutions of the atmospheric methane (CH4) concentrations in Nagoya City, Japan, which were analyzed by using the continuous monitoring data observed at the eight observatory stations for 1983-1997. The 15-year records of the atmospheric CH4 concentrations were examined by means of a time-series analysis using a fast Fourier transform with a low-pass filter to elucidate the seasonal cycles and the long-term trends. The annual averages of the CH4 concentrations in Nagoya were 1.85 ppmv (parts per million by volume), 1.91 ppmv, and 1.90 ppmv in 1988, 1995 and 1997, respectively. Moreover, the annual average growth rate showed a drastic decrease from 17 ppbv (parts per billion by volume) year(-1) in 1992 to 2 ppbv year(-1) in 1993, and further down to 7 ppbv year(-1) in 1997. Comparison of the atmospheric CH4 records in Nagoya with those in global air of the northern hemisphere observed at Mauna Loa observatory in Hawaii, USA, allows us to estimate the excess concentration of CH4 in the urban atmosphere of Nagoya, which was 0.17 ppmv in 1988 and 0.15 ppmv in 1997. On a local scale, the atmospheric CH4 concentrations in the northern part of Nagoya City increased until 1992 and then gradually decreased from 1993 to 1997, although those in the south-western urban areas constantly increased at the averaged growth rate of 13 ppbv year(-1) for 1988-1997. The variation of the long-term trends of the CH4 concentrations in Nagoya may be ascribed to the emission changes from the CH4 sources due to the human activities such as waste dumping and landfills. PMID:11194161

  9. Stomatal conductance and not stomatal density determines the long-term reduction in leaf transpiration of poplar in elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Tricker, Penny J; Trewin, Harriet; Kull, Olevi; Clarkson, Graham J J; Eensalu, Eve; Tallis, Matthew J; Colella, Alessio; Doncaster, C Patrick; Sabatti, Maurizio; Taylor, Gail

    2005-05-01

    Using a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment, poplar trees (Populus x euramericana clone I214) were exposed to either ambient or elevated [CO2] from planting, for a 5-year period during canopy development, closure, coppice and re-growth. In each year, measurements were taken of stomatal density (SD, number mm(-2)) and stomatal index (SI, the proportion of epidermal cells forming stomata). In year 5, measurements were also taken of leaf stomatal conductance (gs, micromol m(-2) s(-1)), photosynthetic CO2 fixation (A, mmol m(-2) s(-1)), instantaneous water-use efficiency (A/E) and the ratio of intercellular to atmospheric CO2 (Ci:Ca). Elevated [CO2] caused reductions in SI in the first year, and in SD in the first 2 years, when the canopy was largely open. In following years, when the canopy had closed, elevated [CO2] had no detectable effects on stomatal numbers or index. In contrast, even after 5 years of exposure to elevated [CO2], gs was reduced, A/E was stimulated, and Ci:Ca was reduced relative to ambient [CO2]. These outcomes from the long-term realistic field conditions of this forest FACE experiment suggest that stomatal numbers (SD and SI) had no role in determining the improved instantaneous leaf-level efficiency of water use under elevated [CO2]. We propose that altered cuticular development during canopy closure may partially explain the changing response of stomata to elevated [CO2], although the mechanism for this remains obscure.

  10. Glacial ice composition: A potential long-term record of the chemistry of atmospheric deposition, Wind River Range, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Naftz, D.L. ); Rice, J.A. ); Ranville, J.R. )

    1991-06-01

    During a reconnaissance study, ice samples were collected from Knife Point glacier to determine if glaciers in the Wind River Range Could provide a long-term record of the chemical composition of wet deposition. Eight annual ice layers comprising the years 1980-1987 were identified. The concentration of calcium, chloride, and sulfate in the annual-weighted wet deposition samples collected at the National Atmospheric deposition Program (NADP) station near Pinedale, Wyoming, showed a significant, positive correlation to the concentration of the same major ions in composite samples from the annual ice layers. results of the study imply that continuous ice cores reaching to the deeper parts of glaciers in the Wind River Range could provide long-term records of the chemical composition of wet deposition.

  11. Long-term measurements of refractive index structure constant in atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jicha, Otakar; Pechac, Pavel; Zvanovec, Stanislav; Grabner, Martin; Kvicera, Vaclav

    2012-10-01

    Results of long-term measurements of the refractive index structure constant in the boundary layer are introduced. The measurements were made on a 150-meter-high lattice mast equipped by nineteen meteorological sensors and one pressure sensor at the bottom of the mast. The Kolmogorov statistical theory of turbulence was used to calculate the refractive index structure constant C2n, allowing us to present annual cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) and seasonal quantiles. The quantiles of measured height dependence of the refractive index structure constant are also shown and compared with existing models (Hufnagel/Andrews/Phillips, SLC Day and Gurvich). Parameters of a linear model were calculated to fit the measured median height profile of the refractive index structure constant with the uncertainty of measurements also being addressed.

  12. CLIMATE CHANGE. Long-term climate forcing by atmospheric oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Christopher J; Tabor, Clay; White, Joseph D

    2015-06-12

    The percentage of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere varied between 10% and 35% throughout the Phanerozoic. These changes have been linked to the evolution, radiation, and size of animals but have not been considered to affect climate. We conducted simulations showing that modulation of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2), as a result of its contribution to atmospheric mass and density, influences the optical depth of the atmosphere. Under low pO2 and a reduced-density atmosphere, shortwave scattering by air molecules and clouds is less frequent, leading to a substantial increase in surface shortwave forcing. Through feedbacks involving latent heat fluxes to the atmosphere and marine stratus clouds, surface shortwave forcing drives increases in atmospheric water vapor and global precipitation, enhances greenhouse forcing, and raises global surface temperature. Our results implicate pO2 as an important factor in climate forcing throughout geologic time. PMID:26068848

  13. CLIMATE CHANGE. Long-term climate forcing by atmospheric oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Christopher J; Tabor, Clay; White, Joseph D

    2015-06-12

    The percentage of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere varied between 10% and 35% throughout the Phanerozoic. These changes have been linked to the evolution, radiation, and size of animals but have not been considered to affect climate. We conducted simulations showing that modulation of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2), as a result of its contribution to atmospheric mass and density, influences the optical depth of the atmosphere. Under low pO2 and a reduced-density atmosphere, shortwave scattering by air molecules and clouds is less frequent, leading to a substantial increase in surface shortwave forcing. Through feedbacks involving latent heat fluxes to the atmosphere and marine stratus clouds, surface shortwave forcing drives increases in atmospheric water vapor and global precipitation, enhances greenhouse forcing, and raises global surface temperature. Our results implicate pO2 as an important factor in climate forcing throughout geologic time.

  14. Long-term changes in the aerosol optical thickness in moscow and correction under strong atmospheric turbidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbarenko, E. V.; Rublev, A. N.

    2016-03-01

    We have estimated and compensated the error in long-term series of the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) calculated from the data on direct integral solar radiation measured by a standard actinometer at the Meteorological Observatory of the Moscow State University (MO MSU) for strong atmospheric turbidity conditions. The necessary corrections have been obtained by the Monte-Carlo simulation of the actinometry measurements for different atmospheric conditions, taking into account the angular size of the field of view of the instrument; and a special correctional formula has been obtained. This correction formula has been applied for all timed AOT values of above 0.5 observed at the MO MSU for the entire time period from 1955 to 2013. Changes in the long-term average AOT values in Moscow occurred only when the smoky haze from the forest and peat fires affected the aerosol turbidity of the atmosphere. Here, the significant decreasing trend of aerosol optical depth of the atmosphere from 1955 to 2013 has been retained with the same confidence level.

  15. Long-Term Outcomes in Survivors of Early Ventricular Arrhythmias After Acute ST-Elevation and Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction Treated With Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jackson J; Fender, Erin A; Cha, Yong-Mei; Lennon, Ryan J; Prasad, Abhiram; Barsness, Gregory W

    2016-03-01

    Guidelines do not recommend an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) for prevention of sudden death in patients who develop ventricular arrhythmia (VA) within 48 hours of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) if they are successfully revascularized. We aimed to determine long-term survival in a cohort of early VA survivors treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and to determine whether certain high-risk characteristics predicted worse outcomes. This retrospective study included all patients with early VA after AMI treated with PCI at our institution from 2002 to 2012 who survived to hospital discharge. Patients who had an ICD before their index AMI and those who received ICD before hospital discharge were excluded. Overall survival in the early VA survivors was analyzed based on post-MI left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (≥50% vs <50%), MI type (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI] vs non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction [NSTEMI]), and single-vessel versus multivessel disease. Baseline presenting clinical and PCI characteristics plus outcomes were compared with matched controls with PCI-treated AMI but no early VA. Of the 79 early VA survivors treated with PCI, there were no significant differences in long-term overall survival between AMI type (STEMI vs NSTEMI), single-vessel versus multivessel disease, and LVEF at time of MI (>50% vs <50%). Despite having lower presenting LVEF (46% vs 55%, p <0.001) and higher rates of cardiogenic shock (28% vs 4%; p <0.001), survivors of early VA had similar overall survival compared with PCI-treated controls whose post-AMI hospital course was not complicated by early VA (p = 0.61). In conclusion, patients with early VA treated with PCI who survive to discharge were more likely to have STEMI, lower LVEF, and cardiogenic shock. Type of AMI or the presence of systolic dysfunction or multivessel disease did not predict long-term mortality. With early PCI, early VA survivors have

  16. Evidence for long-term changes in base cations in the atmospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, David S.; Espenhahn, Sarah E.; Baker, Steven

    1998-09-01

    Data on concentrations of base cations in air and precipitation are important in calculating the net deposited acidity to ecosystems. Measurements of many trace metals in air have been made at three rural sites in the United Kingdom over the past 20 years. Measurements of the concentrations of the base cations, Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, and Na+ have also been made but not routinely reported nor considered. Some data were missing for Ca2+ for the period between 1985 and 1989, and a large number of "less than" values were present. Despite these uncertainties, these data represent the only long-term record of their kind in the United Kingdom. An examination of the data revealed that concentrations of non-sea-salt Ca2+ in air at these three sites have declined over the past 20 years by between approximately 40 and 60%. Concentrations of Mg2+ and K+ have also declined, and Ca2+, Mg2+, and K+ all show greater variability in earlier years. Concentrations of Na+ in air showed no detectable long-term trend. These declines of base cations in air are similar to those observed in precipitation elsewhere in North America and mainland Europe, and these trends are similar to declines in emissions of sulphur dioxide. The estimated emissions of calcium from particles deriving from fossil fuel combustion was 21 kt in 1991 and 67 kt in 1970, a decline of 67%. Present-day rates of non-sea-salt Ca2+ deposition to the United Kingdom from wet and dry deposition are estimated to be 86 and 27 kt yr-1, respectively. It is clear that these calculated emissions of Ca from fossil fuel combustion alone cannot adequately explain the estimated deposition nor the decline of concentrations in air. The observed decline of scandium, a "crustal" element, provides good evidence that the decline in industrial particle emissions partly explains the decline in base cations in air. It is necessary to consider the possible implications of the trends revealed in this work as the declines in concentrations of base

  17. Dryland biological soil crust cyanobacteria show unexpected decreases in abundance under long-term elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Steven, Blaire; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Yeager, Chris M; Belnap, Jayne; Evans, R David; Kuske, Cheryl R

    2012-12-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) cover soil surfaces in many drylands globally. The impacts of 10 years of elevated atmospheric CO2 on the cyanobacteria in biocrusts of an arid shrubland were examined at a large manipulated experiment in Nevada, USA. Cyanobacteria-specific quantitative PCR surveys of cyanobacteria small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes suggested a reduction in biocrust cyanobacterial biomass in the elevated CO2 treatment relative to the ambient controls. Additionally, SSU rRNA gene libraries and shotgun metagenomes showed reduced representation of cyanobacteria in the total microbial community. Taxonomic composition of the cyanobacteria was similar under ambient and elevated CO2 conditions, indicating the decline was manifest across multiple cyanobacterial lineages. Recruitment of cyanobacteria sequences from replicate shotgun metagenomes to cyanobacterial genomes representing major biocrust orders also suggested decreased abundance of cyanobacteria sequences across the majority of genomes tested. Functional assignment of cyanobacteria-related shotgun metagenome sequences indicated that four subsystem categories, three related to oxidative stress, were differentially abundant in relation to the elevated CO2 treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that elevated CO2 affected a generalized decrease in cyanobacteria in the biocrusts and may have favoured cyanobacteria with altered gene inventories for coping with oxidative stress.

  18. Dryland biological soil crust cyanobacteria show unexpected decreases in abundance under long-term elevated CO2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steven, Blaire; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Yeager, Chris M.; Belnap, Jayne; Evans, R. David; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2012-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) cover soil surfaces in many drylands globally. The impacts of 10 years of elevated atmospheric CO2 on the cyanobacteria in biocrusts of an arid shrubland were examined at a large manipulated experiment in Nevada, USA. Cyanobacteria-specific quantitative PCR surveys of cyanobacteria small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes suggested a reduction in biocrust cyanobacterial biomass in the elevated CO2 treatment relative to the ambient controls. Additionally, SSU rRNA gene libraries and shotgun metagenomes showed reduced representation of cyanobacteria in the total microbial community. Taxonomic composition of the cyanobacteria was similar under ambient and elevated CO2 conditions, indicating the decline was manifest across multiple cyanobacterial lineages. Recruitment of cyanobacteria sequences from replicate shotgun metagenomes to cyanobacterial genomes representing major biocrust orders also suggested decreased abundance of cyanobacteria sequences across the majority of genomes tested. Functional assignment of cyanobacteria-related shotgun metagenome sequences indicated that four subsystem categories, three related to oxidative stress, were differentially abundant in relation to the elevated CO2 treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that elevated CO2 affected a generalized decrease in cyanobacteria in the biocrusts and may have favoured cyanobacteria with altered gene inventories for coping with oxidative stress.

  19. Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Measurements of Tropospheric and Stratospheric Chemistry and Long-Term Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Bernath, Peter; Boone, Chris; Nassar, Ray

    2007-01-01

    We highlight chemistry and trend measurement results from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) which is providing precise middle troposphere to the lower thermosphere measurements with a 0.02/cm resolution Fourier transform spectrometer covering 750-4400/cm

  20. Long-term decline of global atmospheric ethane concentrations and implications for methane.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Isobel J; Sulbaek Andersen, Mads P; Meinardi, Simone; Bruhwiler, Lori; Blake, Nicola J; Helmig, Detlev; Rowland, F Sherwood; Blake, Donald R

    2012-08-23

    After methane, ethane is the most abundant hydrocarbon in the remote atmosphere. It is a precursor to tropospheric ozone and it influences the atmosphere's oxidative capacity through its reaction with the hydroxyl radical, ethane's primary atmospheric sink. Here we present the longest continuous record of global atmospheric ethane levels. We show that global ethane emission rates decreased from 14.3 to 11.3 teragrams per year, or by 21 per cent, from 1984 to 2010. We attribute this to decreasing fugitive emissions from ethane's fossil fuel source--most probably decreased venting and flaring of natural gas in oil fields--rather than a decline in its other major sources, biofuel use and biomass burning. Ethane's major emission sources are shared with methane, and recent studies have disagreed on whether reduced fossil fuel or microbial emissions have caused methane's atmospheric growth rate to slow. Our findings suggest that reduced fugitive fossil fuel emissions account for at least 10-21 teragrams per year (30-70 per cent) of the decrease in methane's global emissions, significantly contributing to methane's slowing atmospheric growth rate since the mid-1980s.

  1. Long-term atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfate in a large oligotrophic lake

    PubMed Central

    Craft, James A.; Stanford, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    We documented significantly increasing trends in atmospheric loading of ammonium (NH4) and nitrate/nitrite (NO2/3) and decreasing trends in total phosphorus (P) and sulfate (SO4) to Flathead Lake, Montana, from 1985 to 2004. Atmospheric loading of NO2/3 and NH4 increased by 48 and 198% and total P and SO4 decreased by 135 and 39%. The molar ratio of TN:TP also increased significantly. Severe air inversions occurred periodically year-round and increased the potential for substantial nutrient loading from even small local sources. Correlations between our loading data and various measures of air quality in the basin (e.g., particulate matter <10 µm in size, aerosol fine soil mass, aerosol nutrient species, aerosol index, hectares burned) suggest that dust and smoke are important sources. Ammonium was the primary form of N in atmospheric deposition, whereas NO3 was the primary N form in tributary inputs. Atmospheric loading of NH4 to Flathead Lake averaged 44% of the total load and on some years exceeded tributary loading. Primary productivity in the lake is colimited by both N and P most of the year; and in years of high atmospheric loading of inorganic N, deposition may account for up to 6.9% of carbon converted to biomass. PMID:25802810

  2. Long-term atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfate in a large oligotrophic lake.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Bonnie K; Craft, James A; Stanford, Jack A

    2015-01-01

    We documented significantly increasing trends in atmospheric loading of ammonium (NH4) and nitrate/nitrite (NO2/3) and decreasing trends in total phosphorus (P) and sulfate (SO4) to Flathead Lake, Montana, from 1985 to 2004. Atmospheric loading of NO2/3 and NH4 increased by 48 and 198% and total P and SO4 decreased by 135 and 39%. The molar ratio of TN:TP also increased significantly. Severe air inversions occurred periodically year-round and increased the potential for substantial nutrient loading from even small local sources. Correlations between our loading data and various measures of air quality in the basin (e.g., particulate matter <10 µm in size, aerosol fine soil mass, aerosol nutrient species, aerosol index, hectares burned) suggest that dust and smoke are important sources. Ammonium was the primary form of N in atmospheric deposition, whereas NO3 was the primary N form in tributary inputs. Atmospheric loading of NH4 to Flathead Lake averaged 44% of the total load and on some years exceeded tributary loading. Primary productivity in the lake is colimited by both N and P most of the year; and in years of high atmospheric loading of inorganic N, deposition may account for up to 6.9% of carbon converted to biomass.

  3. Embryonic response to long-term exposure of the marine crustacean Nephrops norvegicus to ocean acidification and elevated temperature

    PubMed Central

    Styf, Hannah K; Nilsson Sköld, Helen; Eriksson, Susanne P

    2013-01-01

    Due to anthropogenic CO2 emissions, our oceans have gradually become warmer and more acidic. To better understand the consequences of this, there is a need for long-term (months) and multistressor experiments. Earlier research demonstrates that the effects of global climate change are specific to species and life stages. We exposed berried Norway lobsters (Nephrops norvegicus), during 4 months to the combination of six ecologically relevant temperatures (5–18°C) and reduced pH (by 0.4 units). Embryonic responses were investigated by quantifying proxies for development rate and fitness including: % yolk consumption, mean heart rate, rate of oxygen consumption, and oxidative stress. We found no interactions between temperature and pH, and reduced pH only affected the level of oxidative stress significantly, with a higher level of oxidative stress in the controls. Increased temperature and % yolk consumed had positive effects on all parameters except on oxidative stress, which did not change in response to temperature. There was a difference in development rate between the ranges of 5–10°C (Q10: 5.4) and 10–18°C (Q10: 2.9), implicating a thermal break point at 10°C or below. No thermal limit to a further increased development rate was found. The insensitivity of N. norvegicus embryos to low pH might be explained by adaptation to a pH-reduced external habitat and/or internal hypercapnia during incubation. Our results thus indicate that this species would benefit from global warming and be able to withstand the predicted decrease in ocean pH in the next century during their earliest life stages. However, future studies need to combine low pH and elevated temperature treatments with hypoxia as hypoxic events are frequently and increasingly occurring in the habitat of benthic species. PMID:24455136

  4. Long term changes in reflectivity and large scale motions in the atmosphere of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, Reta

    1991-01-01

    An observational study was made that used a CCD camera and multicolor filters with a committed f/40 60 cm telescope to image the temporal changes in Jupiter's and Saturn's atmospheres. The intent was to maintain a continuous data base to assist in relating the Voyager data with that of Galileo and Cassini.

  5. Long-term Simulations of Pluto's Atmosphere and Surface as a Coupled System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalucha, Angela M.

    2015-11-01

    Previous work has modeled either Pluto's atmosphere or surface/subsurface as separate entities. In reality, these two regions should be coupled energetically and physically because of the accumulation, sublimation, and transport of volatiles (here, N2). Simulation results over multi-Pluto years are presented from a general circulation model that has both detailed atmospheric and surface/subsurface modules. As the initial model conditions that will ultimately reproduce the observed surface pressures from New Horizons, stellar occultation data, and spectroscopic observations are not known, by trial and error the model is initialized with different surface pressures and amounts of surface ice (collectively known as the volatile inventory). This “brute force” method is now a viable strategy given the ongoing development of the Pluto general circulation model (based on the MIT general circulation model dynamical core; Zalucha & Michaels 2013) and modern supercomputing power. The coupled atmosphere and surface/subsurface model is run until a yearly repeatable frost cycle occurs (if at all). Surface coverage of volatiles and surface pressure will be presented from the various scenarios. Ancillary variables such temperature (of both the atmosphere and surface/subsurface) and wind direction and magnitude will also be shown for cases of particular interest.

  6. An analytical system enabling consistent and long-term measurement of atmospheric dimethyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Sehyun; Park, Ki-Tae; Lee, Kitack; Suh, Young-Sang

    2016-06-01

    We describe here an analytical system capable of continuous measurement of atmospheric dimethylsulfide (DMS) at pptv levels. The system uses customized devices for detector calibration and for DMS trapping and desorption that are controlled using a data acquisition system (based on Visual Basic 6.0/C 6.0) designed to maximize the efficiency of DMS analysis in a highly sensitive pulsed flame photometric detector housed in a gas chromatograph. The fully integrated system, which can sample approximately 6 L of air during a 1-hr sampling, was used to measure the atmospheric DMS mixing ratio over the Atlantic sector of the Arctic Ocean over 3 full annual growth cycles of phytoplankton in 2010, 2014, and 2015, with minimal routine maintenance and interruptions. During the field campaigns, the measured atmospheric DMS mixing ratio varied over a considerable range, from <1.5 pptv to maximum levels of 298 pptv in 2010, 82 pptv in 2014, and 429 pptv in 2015. The operational period covering the 3 full annual growth cycles of phytoplankton showed that the system is suitable for uninterrupted measurement of atmospheric DMS mixing ratios in extreme environments. Moreover, the findings obtained using the system showed it to be useful in identifying ocean DMS source regions and changes in source strength.

  7. Exploring the long-term response of undisturbed Mediterranean catchments to changes in atmospheric inputs through time series analysis.

    PubMed

    Bernal, S; Belillas, C; Ibáñez, J J; Àvila, A

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to gain insights on the potential hydrological and biogeochemical mechanisms controlling the response of two nested Mediterranean catchments to long-term changes in atmospheric inorganic nitrogen and sulphate deposition. One catchment was steep and fully forested (TM9, 5.9 ha) and the other one had gentler slopes and heathlands in the upper part while side slopes were steep and forested (TM0, 205 ha). Both catchments were highly responsive to the 45% decline in sulphate concentration measured in atmospheric deposition during the 1980s and 1990s, with stream concentrations decreasing by 1.4 to 3.4 μeq L(-1) y(-1). Long-term changes in inorganic nitrogen in both, atmospheric deposition and stream water were small compared to sulphate. The quick response to changes in atmospheric inputs could be explained by the small residence time of water (4-5 months) in these catchments (inferred from chloride time series variance analysis), which was attributed to steep slopes and the role of macropore flow bypassing the soil matrix during wet periods. The estimated residence time for sulphate (1.5-3 months) was substantially lower than for chloride suggesting unaccounted sources of sulphate (i.e., dry deposition, or depletion of soil adsorbed sulphate). In both catchments, inorganic nitrogen concentration in stream water was strongly damped compared to precipitation and its residence time was of the order of decades, indicating that this essential nutrient was strongly retained in these catchments. Inorganic nitrogen concentration tended to be higher at TM0 than at TM9 which was attributed to the presence of nitrogen fixing species in the heathlands. Our results indicate that these Mediterranean catchments react rapidly to environmental changes, which make them especially vulnerable to changes in atmospheric deposition.

  8. On the long-term stability of reference gases for atmospheric O2/N2 and CO2 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeling, Ralph F.; Manning, Andrew C.; Paplawsky, William J.; Cox, Adam C.

    2007-02-01

    Measurements of changes in the atmospheric O2/N2 ratio have typically relied on compressed air derived from high-pressure tanks as the reference material against which atmospheric changes are assessed. The validity of this procedure is examined here in the context of the history of 18 O2/N2 reference tanks compared over a 12-yr time-frame. By considering differences in tank sizes, material types, and by performing additional tests, the long-term stability of the delivered gas is evaluated with respect to surface reactions, leakage, regulator effects, and thermal diffusion and gravimetric fractionation. Results are also reported for the stability of CO2 in these tanks. The results emphasize the importance of orienting tanks horizontally within a thermally insulated enclosure to reduce thermal and gravimetric fractionation of both O2/N2 and CO2 concentrations, and they emphasize the importance of avoiding elastomeric O-rings at the head-valve base. With the procedures documented here, the long-term drift in O2/N2 appears to be zero to within approximately +/-0.4 per meg yr-1, which projects to an uncertainty of +/-0.16 Pg C yr-1 (1σ) in O2-based global carbon budgets.

  9. LOSCAR: Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir Model v2.0.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeebe, R. E.

    2012-01-01

    The LOSCAR model is designed to efficiently compute the partitioning of carbon between ocean, atmosphere, and sediments on time scales ranging from centuries to millions of years. While a variety of computationally inexpensive carbon cycle models are already available, many are missing a critical sediment component, which is indispensable for long-term integrations. One of LOSCAR's strengths is the coupling of ocean-atmosphere routines to a computationally efficient sediment module. This allows, for instance, adequate computation of CaCO3 dissolution, calcite compensation, and long-term carbon cycle fluxes, including weathering of carbonate and silicate rocks. The ocean component includes various biogeochemical tracers such as total carbon, alkalinity, phosphate, oxygen, and stable carbon isotopes. LOSCAR's configuration of ocean geometry is flexible and allows for easy switching between modern and paleo-versions. We have previously published applications of the model tackling future projections of ocean chemistry and weathering, pCO2 sensitivity to carbon cycle perturbations throughout the Cenozoic, and carbon/calcium cycling during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. The focus of the present contribution is the detailed description of the model including numerical architecture, processes and parameterizations, tuning, and examples of input and output. Typical CPU integration times of LOSCAR are of order seconds for several thousand model years on current standard desktop machines. The LOSCAR source code in C can be obtained from the author by sending a request to loscar.model@gmail.com.

  10. Long-Term Corrosion of Copper in Hot and Dry Atmosphere in Turpan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D. C.; Dong, C. F.; Fang, Y. H.; Xiao, K.; Guo, C. Y.; He, G.; Li, X. G.

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric exposure tests were conducted on pure copper exposed to the atmosphere for a four-year period in Turpan, China, a typical hot and dry environment. The experiments included weight-loss tests, morphology observations, composition analyses, and electrochemical techniques. The results indicated that the annual corrosion rate of pure copper was approximately 2.24 g/m2/year, and an uneven distribution of corrosion products was observed by scanning electron microscopy. This was attributed to the dehydration process that occurred during wet-dry and cold-hot cycles. The corrosion products mainly comprised cuprite (Cu2O) and atacamite (Cu2Cl(OH)3). Electrochemical measurements showed that deposits on copper improved its resistance to corrosion, but the protectiveness decreased with increasing temperature.

  11. Long term drift studies of Sandia H{sub 2} sensor in reducing atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    JENKINS,MARK W.; HUGHES,ROBERT C.; PATEL,SANJAY V.

    2000-04-01

    A study of the drift in Pd/Ni alloy hydrogen sensitive resistor and transistor responses is presented. The sensors were monitored for a period of 6 months in a reducing atmosphere of 0.1% H{sub 2} in N{sub 2} with periodic calibration exposures. A comparison of a resistor film with an adhesion layer showed considerable improvement in diminishing the drift.

  12. Long-term air temperature variation in the Karkonosze mountains according to atmospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migała, Krzysztof; Urban, Grzegorz; Tomczyński, Karol

    2016-07-01

    The results of meteorological measurements carried out continuously on Mt Śnieżka in Karkonosze mountains since 1880 well document the warming observed on a global scale. Data analysis indicates warming expressed by an increase in the mean annual air temperature of 0.8 °C/100 years. A much higher temperature increase was recorded in the last two decades at the turn of the twenty-first century. Mean decade air temperatures increased from -0.1 to 1.5 °C. It has been shown that there are relationships between air temperature at Mt Śnieżka and global mechanisms of atmospheric and oceanic circulation. Thermal conditions of the Karkonosze (Mt Śnieżka) accurately reflect global climate trends and impact of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index, macrotypes of atmospheric circulation in Europe (GWL) and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). The increase in air temperature during the 1989-2012 solar magnetic cycle may reveal a synergy effect to which astrophysical effects and atmospheric and oceanic circulation effects contribute, modified by constantly increasing anthropogenic factors.

  13. Long term monitoring of methane in the atmosphere by multiplex gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, Jose R.; Carle, Glenn C.; Phillips, John B.

    1985-01-01

    Methane is of interest in the study of the Earth's atmosphere because of its implication in the future global warming of the surface. This warming is produced by the absorption of infrared energy by trace gases. It has been estimated that in the next 40 to 50 years, methane could contribute 20 to 25 pct. as much atmospheric warming as that expected from carbon dioxide increases. Studies to examine sources, sinks, and cycles of methane will require analytical methods capable of continuous unattended measurement with temporal resolution of an hour or less for weeks at a time. Gas chromatography (GC) is one of the most practical methods available to conduct the analysis of air, but limitations in this technique still exist which can be alleviated with multiplex GC (MGC). MGC is a technique where many samples are pseudo-randomly introduced to the chromatograph without regard to the length of time required for an analysis. The resulting data must then be reduced using computational methods such as cross correlation. In the technique reported, a tube packed with silver oxide was used at the inlet of the GC column to create concentration pulses of methane in a sample stream of air. By using only one carrier, i.e., ambient air, an effective and accurate method to monitor the variations in concentration of methane in the atmosphere over long periods of time was developed. Methane in ambient air was monitored for an eight day period and an interesting temporal variability was found. This work has shown the utility of a relatively simple MGC for the analysis of a real environmental sample.

  14. Long term measurements of atmospheric aerosol optical properties in the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, N.; Bougiatioti, A.; Kouvarakis, G.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2011-11-01

    Optical properties of atmospheric aerosol particles have been recorded at a remote location of the Eastern Mediterranean on a continuous basis since 2000. Measurements of aerosol scattering coefficient (bsp) and absorption coefficient (bap) have been conducted, providing the longest data series of such ground based measurements in the Eastern Mediterranean basin. bsp shows an annual cycle with maximum values observed during summer and minimum during winter. In addition, in periods when mineral dust is transported into the area, high values are observed. It has been shown that both the level and the annual variation of bsp can be well represented if ammonium sulfate (AS) and particulate organic matter (POM) are assumed as the only scattering species in the aerosol phase. bap was measured at three wavelengths using two different instruments and a single wavelength data series was extracted. Maximum values of bap were observed during summer and during periods with extended dust transport to the area. If mineral dust particles are present in the atmosphere they can contribute up to 80% of bap levels at the visible wavelengths.

  15. WRF-HMS, a fully-coupled regional atmospheric-hydrological modeling system for long-term scale applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Sven; Fersch, Benjamin; Yuan, Fei; Yu, Zhongbo; Kunstmann, Harald

    2016-04-01

    Feedback among the atmosphere, land surface and subsurface is important to understand the non-linear connections within the hydrological cycle. Investigations of climate and land-use changes on the regional water balance require fully-coupled atmospheric-hydrological modeling systems, which describe such feedback mechanisms and allow long-term simulations at climate-relevant scales. We have developed such a fully-coupled, meso-scale modeling system extending the atmospheric model WRF-ARW with the hydrological model HMS, which includes lateral water fluxes at the land surface and subsurface. Both models are bound to the Noah land surface model (Noah-LSM) and share compatible water and energy flux formulations. In addition, two-way interaction between the saturated and the unsaturated zone is implemented by replacing the free drainage bottom boundary of the Noah-LSM with two approaches, a Fixed-head boundary condition assuming an equilibrium soil moisture distribution or a Darcy-flux at the boundary assuming a quasi-steady-state moisture profile below the LSM. The comparatively small additional computational demand of this coupled model system allows long-term simulations. A first application of the fully-coupled modeling system was performed for the Poyang Lake basin (160,000 km²) in Southern China for the years 1979-1986. For the WRF model, a double-nesting approach is applied covering East Asia at 30 km resolution and the Poyang Lake basin at 10 km using ERA Interim data as global forcing. The HMS and fully-coupled simulations are performed on the 10 km grid. The performance of the stand-alone and the fully coupled simulations are presented. Furthermore, the impact of groundwater coupling on soil moisture, evapotranspiration, temperature and precipitation is investigated.

  16. Long-term atmospheric visibility, sunshine duration and precipitation trends in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wenhui; Wang, Xuemei; Fan, Qi; Zhou, Shengzhen; Chang, Ming; Wang, Zhimin; Wang, Yu; Tu, Qiulan

    2015-04-01

    The fast industrialization and urbanization in South China have led to increasing concentration of aerosols, which has caused the degradation of atmospheric visibility and substantially impacted on cloud properties and the initiation of precipitation in this region. Therefore, it is valuable to study the spatial and temporal trends of atmospheric visibility, sunshine duration and precipitation in recent years in the region to understand how aerosols affect the environment. In this article, meteorological data of 28 stations in South China were obtained from the China Meteorological Data Sharing Service System and were analyzed using several different statistical methods. The stations were divided into four categories: prefecture, county, neighbor, and remote stations. The data show a decrease of visibility in 93% of the stations during 1980-2012, among which the neighbor stations have recorded the fastest average decrease of -1.8 km/decade. The average visibility for all the stations over the 33 years is 16.8 km and the total average decreasing rate is -1.3 km/decade. The percentages of "high" visibility in prefecture, county and neighbor stations decreased dramatically, while the percentages of "low" visibility in aforementioned stations were much higher than those in the remote stations. As for the sunshine duration, the neighbor stations have recorded the rapidest decrease in the recent 30 years, while the data of the prefecture stations showed the most significant change during 1957-2012. The annual average daily rainfall of rainy days shows a significant increase during 1978-1985 in the dry seasons and 1990-2000 in the wet seasons, respectively. The percentage of rainy days per year had been decreasing linearly during 1980-2010. Light rain days had been decreasing in all the types of stations, though such change is the smallest in remote stations. Meanwhile, torrential rain and rainstorm days have been increasing, especially in the prefecture stations. By

  17. Long-Term Atmospheric Changes Caused by the Very Large Solar Proton Event in July 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, C. H.; Marsh, D. R.; Garcia, R. R.; Vitt, F. M.; Randall, C. E.; Fleming, F. L.; Labow, G. J.

    2007-01-01

    Solar cycle 23 was accompanied by eight very large solar proton events (SPEs) between 2000 and 2005, along with numerous smaller events. The very large SPE in July 2000, which was associated with the well-known 'Bastille Day Solar Storm,' caused very substantial changes in the polar mesosphere and stratosphere. Significant downward transport of the SPE-produced NO(x) from the polar lower mesosphere and upper stratosphere during the Southern Hemisphere winter period resulted in huge enhancements (>100%) in middle stratospheric NO(x) (NO+NO2) during September 2000 in the polar vortex, which were measured by UARS HALOE (C. E. Randall et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 28,2385-2388,2001). We have used the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) to study the longer-term impact of the July 2000 SPE, the third largest SPE period in the past 40 years. This very large SPE provided a wonderful opportunity to study the downward transport of energetic particle precipitation effects in the middle atmosphere. Not surprisingly, the WACCM-simulated polar Northern Hemisphere influences from the July (mid-summer) 2000 SPE were significant for a few months, but the constituent changes were not transported below about 20 hPa. However in the polar Southern Hemisphere (SH) region, the persistent downward transport in the vortex during the months of July-August-September resulted in significant modeled influences for about a year past the SPE. The SH odd nitrogen family, NO(y) (N, NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, BrONO2), was greatly enhanced by this SPE and these increases were transported to the lower stratosphere. The SPE-enhanced polar NO(y) resulted in long-lasting ozone decreases (from catalytic NO(y) destruction of ozone) and ozone increases (from NO(y) interference in the chlorine and bromine catalytic ozone destruction cycles). These ozone changes resulted in simulated SH polar stratospheric temperature decreases (1-2 K) and increases (1-3 K)..

  18. Long Term Atmospheric and Erosional Pollution As Recorded in Lake Sediments from Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, A. L.; Abbott, M. B.; Yu, J.; Bain, D.; Chiou-Peng, T.

    2014-12-01

    Human activities including agriculture, metallurgy (e.g. mining, processing, smelting), and deforestation have altered cycles of erosion and sedimentation in lake environments for thousands of years. In the Yunnan province of southwestern China, where written records are incomplete, it is unclear when, where, and how much disturbance occurred. Lake sediments offer a means to investigate a wide variety of human activities. Here, we present a lake sediment record from Erhai (25°43'N, 100°12'E) based on trace metal concentrations that reveals substantial atmospheric and erosional pollution to the lake environment over the last 4,000 years. Sediments indicate the initiation of copper-based metallurgy at 3,600 years BP, the existence of which has been debated amongst archaeologists. Beginning 2,000 years BP, sedimentation rates increase and concentrations of metals such as aluminum, titanium, lead, and zinc increase. This is likely linked to increased sediment flux to the lake associated with the initiation of terraced agriculture according to historical documents. The most prominent feature of the record is an abrupt and intense increase in lead, silver, cadmium, and zinc beginning at 700 years BP. The peak of this increase occurs at 600 years BP and is consistent with historical records that the Mongols established the first government operated silver mine in Yunnan. Notably, the concentrations of lead during this time are an order of magnitude greater than modern day levels of pollution.

  19. Implications of solar irradiance variability upon long-term changes in the Earth's atmospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III

    1992-01-01

    From 1979 through 1987, it is believed that variability in the incoming solar energy played a significant role in changing the Earth's climate. Using high-precision spacecraft radiometric measurements, the incoming total solar irradiance (total amount of solar power per unit area) and the Earth's mean, global atmospheric temperatures were found to vary in phase with each other. The observed irradiance and temperature changes appeared to be correlated with the 11-year cycle of solar magnetic activity. During the period from 1979 through 1985, both the irradiance and temperature decreased. From 1985 to 1987, they increased. The irradiance changed approximately 0.1 percent, while the temperature varied as much as 0.6 C. During the 1979-1987 period, the temperatures were forecasted to rise linearly because of the anthropogenic build-up of carbon dioxide and the hypothesized 'global warming', 'greenhouse effect', scenarios. Contrary to these scenarios, the temperatures were found to vary in a periodic manner in phase with the solar irradiance changes. The observed correlations between irradiance and temperature variabilily suggest that the mean, global temperature of the Earth may decline between 1990 and 1997 as solar magnetic activity decreases.

  20. The MOPITT instrument as a Prototype for Long-Term Space-Based Atmospheric Measurements in the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, James

    2016-07-01

    One of the major characteristics of the Anthropocene will be changes in all the Earth systems on many timescales. Changes that occur within a generation will be very significant for policy decisions and these will require measurements on corresponding timescales from space-based instruments, but these times are long compared to traditional satellite lifetimes. Whether by luck or by good design there are now a number of satellite missions that are recording data over long time periods. With a single instrument, decadal and longer time series of relevant atmospheric parameters have been achieved and the Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) instrument is one such instrument. Launched on 18th December 1999 on the Terra spacecraft, MOPITT has now completed more than 16 years of operation measuring carbon monoxide (CO) over the planet and the mission continues. It is entirely possible that these measurements will span two decades before completion. MOPITT therefore offers a case study of a very long single-instrument time series, albeit one with challenges because this longevity was not part of the original design criteria: The original design specified about a five year life and this has already been considerably exceeded. MOPITT does enable us to look at long term trends and intermittent phenomena over the planet for an extended period of tie encompassing an entire solar cycle and many cycles of El Niño and other quasi-periodic phenomena. This presentation will consider, with examples, some of the advantages and some of the problems of these long-term space measurements with an eye to the future and the needs of future generations. MOPITT was provided to NASA's Terra spacecraft by the Canadian Space Agency and was built by COMDEV of Cambridge, Ontario. Data processing is performed by the MOPITT team at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO. Instrument control is by the team at the University of Toronto.

  1. Effects of long-term nitrogen fertilization on the uptake kinetics of atmospheric methane in temperate forest soils.

    PubMed

    Gulledge, Jay; Hrywna, Yarek; Cavanaugh, Colleen; Steudler, Paul A

    2004-09-01

    To determine whether repeated, long-term NH(4) (+) fertilization alters the enzymatic function of the atmospheric CH(4) oxidizer community in soil, we examined CH(4) uptake kinetics in temperate pine and hardwood forest soils amended with 150 kg N ha(-1) y(-1) as NH(4)NO(3) for more than a decade. The highest rates of atmospheric CH(4) consumption occurred in the upper 5 cm mineral soil of the control plots. In contrast to the results of several previous studies, surface organic soils in the control plots also exhibited high consumption rates. Fertilization decreased in situ CH(4) consumption in the pine and hardwood sites relative to the control plots by 86% and 49%, respectively. Fertilization increased net N mineralization and relative nitrification rates and decreased CH(4) uptake most dramatically in the organic horizon, which contributed substantially to the overall decrease in field flux rates. In all cases, CH(4) oxidation followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with apparent K(m) (K(m(app))) values typical of high-affinity soil CH(4) oxidizers. Both K(m(app)) and V(max(app)) were significantly lower in fertilized soils than in unfertilized soils. The physiology of the methane consumer community in the fertilized soils was distinct from short-term responses to NH(4) (+) addition. Whereas the immediate response to NH(4) (+) was an increase in K(m(app)), resulting from apparent enzymatic substrate competition, the long-term response to fertilization was a community-level shift to a lower K(m(app)), a possible adaptation to diminish the competitiveness of NH(4) (+) for enzyme active sites.

  2. Effects of long-term nitrogen fertilization on the uptake kinetics of atmospheric methane in temperate forest soils.

    PubMed

    Gulledge, Jay; Hrywna, Yarek; Cavanaugh, Colleen; Steudler, Paul A

    2004-09-01

    To determine whether repeated, long-term NH(4) (+) fertilization alters the enzymatic function of the atmospheric CH(4) oxidizer community in soil, we examined CH(4) uptake kinetics in temperate pine and hardwood forest soils amended with 150 kg N ha(-1) y(-1) as NH(4)NO(3) for more than a decade. The highest rates of atmospheric CH(4) consumption occurred in the upper 5 cm mineral soil of the control plots. In contrast to the results of several previous studies, surface organic soils in the control plots also exhibited high consumption rates. Fertilization decreased in situ CH(4) consumption in the pine and hardwood sites relative to the control plots by 86% and 49%, respectively. Fertilization increased net N mineralization and relative nitrification rates and decreased CH(4) uptake most dramatically in the organic horizon, which contributed substantially to the overall decrease in field flux rates. In all cases, CH(4) oxidation followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with apparent K(m) (K(m(app))) values typical of high-affinity soil CH(4) oxidizers. Both K(m(app)) and V(max(app)) were significantly lower in fertilized soils than in unfertilized soils. The physiology of the methane consumer community in the fertilized soils was distinct from short-term responses to NH(4) (+) addition. Whereas the immediate response to NH(4) (+) was an increase in K(m(app)), resulting from apparent enzymatic substrate competition, the long-term response to fertilization was a community-level shift to a lower K(m(app)), a possible adaptation to diminish the competitiveness of NH(4) (+) for enzyme active sites. PMID:19712289

  3. Effects of plant diversity, N fertilization, and elevated carbon dioxide on grassland soil N cycling in a long-term experiment.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Kevin E; Hobbie, Sarah E; Tilman, David; Reich, Peter B

    2013-04-01

    The effects of global environmental changes on soil nitrogen (N) pools and fluxes have consequences for ecosystem functions such as plant productivity and N retention. In a 13-year grassland experiment, we evaluated how elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ), N fertilization, and plant species richness alter soil N cycling. We focused on soil inorganic N pools, including ammonium and nitrate, and two N fluxes, net N mineralization and net nitrification. In contrast with existing hypotheses, such as progressive N limitation, and with observations from other, often shorter, studies, elevated CO2 had relatively static and small, or insignificant, effects on soil inorganic N pools and fluxes. Nitrogen fertilization had inconsistent effects on soil N transformations, but increased soil nitrate and ammonium concentrations. Plant species richness had increasingly positive effects on soil N transformations over time, likely because in diverse subplots the concentrations of N in roots increased over time. Species richness also had increasingly positive effects on concentrations of ammonium in soil, perhaps because more carbon accumulated in soils of diverse subplots, providing exchange sites for ammonium. By contrast, subplots planted with 16 species had lower soil nitrate concentrations than less diverse subplots, especially when fertilized, probably due to greater N uptake capacity of subplots with 16 species. Monocultures of different plant functional types had distinct effects on N transformations and nitrate concentrations, such that not all monocultures differed from diverse subplots in the same manner. The first few years of data would not have adequately forecast the effects of N fertilization and diversity on soil N cycling in later years; therefore, the dearth of long-term manipulations of plant species richness and N inputs is a hindrance to forecasting the state of the soil N cycle and ecosystem functions in extant plant communities. PMID:23504900

  4. Effects of plant diversity, N fertilization, and elevated carbon dioxide on grassland soil N cycling in a long-term experiment.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Kevin E; Hobbie, Sarah E; Tilman, David; Reich, Peter B

    2013-04-01

    The effects of global environmental changes on soil nitrogen (N) pools and fluxes have consequences for ecosystem functions such as plant productivity and N retention. In a 13-year grassland experiment, we evaluated how elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ), N fertilization, and plant species richness alter soil N cycling. We focused on soil inorganic N pools, including ammonium and nitrate, and two N fluxes, net N mineralization and net nitrification. In contrast with existing hypotheses, such as progressive N limitation, and with observations from other, often shorter, studies, elevated CO2 had relatively static and small, or insignificant, effects on soil inorganic N pools and fluxes. Nitrogen fertilization had inconsistent effects on soil N transformations, but increased soil nitrate and ammonium concentrations. Plant species richness had increasingly positive effects on soil N transformations over time, likely because in diverse subplots the concentrations of N in roots increased over time. Species richness also had increasingly positive effects on concentrations of ammonium in soil, perhaps because more carbon accumulated in soils of diverse subplots, providing exchange sites for ammonium. By contrast, subplots planted with 16 species had lower soil nitrate concentrations than less diverse subplots, especially when fertilized, probably due to greater N uptake capacity of subplots with 16 species. Monocultures of different plant functional types had distinct effects on N transformations and nitrate concentrations, such that not all monocultures differed from diverse subplots in the same manner. The first few years of data would not have adequately forecast the effects of N fertilization and diversity on soil N cycling in later years; therefore, the dearth of long-term manipulations of plant species richness and N inputs is a hindrance to forecasting the state of the soil N cycle and ecosystem functions in extant plant communities.

  5. The middle Pleistocene transition: characteristics, mechanisms, and implications for long-term changes in atmospheric pCO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Peter U.; Archer, David; Pollard, David; Blum, Joel D.; Rial, Jose A.; Brovkin, Victor; Mix, Alan C.; Pisias, Nicklas G.; Roy, Martin

    2006-12-01

    The emergence of low-frequency, high-amplitude, quasi-periodic (˜100-kyr) glacial variability during the middle Pleistocene in the absence of any significant change in orbital forcing indicates a fundamental change internal to the climate system. This middle Pleistocene transition (MPT) began 1250 ka and was complete by 700 ka. Its onset was accompanied by decreases in sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the North Atlantic and tropical-ocean upwelling regions and by an increase in African and Asian aridity and monsoonal intensity. During the MPT, long-term average ice volume gradually increased by ˜50 m sea-level equivalent, whereas low-frequency ice-volume variability experienced a 100-kyr lull centered on 1000 ka followed by its reappearance ˜900 ka, although as a broad band of power rather than a narrow, persistent 100-kyr cycle. Additional changes at 900 ka indicate this to be an important time during the MPT, beginning with an 80-kyr event of extreme SST cooling followed by the partial recovery and subsequent stabilization of long-term North Atlantic and tropical ocean SSTs, increasing Southern Ocean SST variability primarily associated with warmer interglacials, the loss of permanent subpolar sea-ice cover, and the emergence of low-frequency variability in Pacific SSTs and global deep-ocean circulation. Since 900 ka, ice sheets have been the only component of the climate system to exhibit consistent low-frequency variability. With the exception of a near-universal organization of low-frequency power associated with marine isotope stages 11 and 12, all other components show an inconsistent distribution of power in frequency-time space, suggesting a highly nonlinear system response to orbital and ice-sheet forcing. Most hypotheses for the origin of the MPT invoke a response to a long-term cooling, possibly induced by decreasing atmospheric pCO 2. None of these hypotheses, however, accounts for the geological constraint that the earliest Northern Hemisphere

  6. 25 Years of Variability in the Biology of Salix-feeding Beetles and Associated Insects Along a Sierra Nevada Elevation Gradient, California: Are There Long-term Trends?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiley, J. T.; Rank, N. E.; Dahlhoff, E.

    2006-12-01

    We have been studying the ecology, evolution and physiology of the willow leaf beetle, Chrysomela aeneicollis, in the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains, California, since the early 1980's. One principal focus of this long-term study has been analysis of elevation gradient effects to the food web which includes willows (Salix ssp.), C. aeneicollis, and several predators including the hover fly Parasyphus melanderi and the hole-nesting wasp Symmorphus cristatus. We have observed and documented asymmetries along the elevation gradient. At upper elevations, populations confront higher frequencies of lethally cold nighttime temperatures and intensity of storms. When individuals are transplanted among elevations, upper elevation populations grow faster and survive better at upper elevation sites than populations from lower elevations. Our observations suggest that dispersal is sufficiently restricted among elevations to allow genetic differences in ability to respond to stressful climate to emerge. Lower elevation populations are subject to a wider range of predatory insect species, and predation plays a relatively larger role in their reproductive success. We have documented upward shifts in range for some populations of about 300 meters over the 25-year period of the study, although other populations do not show such shifts. We are preparing to document further range shifts along the elevation gradients by monitoring habitats which are currently at or above the upper range limits of the plants, beetles and predators, and looking for recruitment of new populations at those sites.

  7. INTERCOMPARISON STUDY OF ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY MODELS: 2. MODELING RESULTS VS. LONG-TERM OBSERVATIONS AND COMPARISON OF COUNTRY ATMOSPHERIC BALANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five regional scale models with a horizontal domain covering the European continent and its surrounding seas, two hemispheric and one global scale model participated in the atmospheric Hg modelling intercomparison study. The models were compared between each other and with availa...

  8. Long-Term, Autonomous Measurement of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Using an Ormosil Nanocomposite-Based Optical Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kisholoy Goswami

    2005-10-11

    The goal of this project is to construct a prototype carbon dioxide sensor that can be commercialized to offer a low-cost, autonomous instrument for long-term, unattended measurements. Currently, a cost-effective CO2 sensor system is not available that can perform cross-platform measurements (ground-based or airborne platforms such as balloon and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)) for understanding the carbon sequestration phenomenon. The CO2 sensor would support the research objectives of DOE-sponsored programs such as AmeriFlux and the North American Carbon Program (NACP). Global energy consumption is projected to rise 60% over the next 20 years and use of oil is projected to increase by approximately 40%. The combustion of coal, oil, and natural gas has increased carbon emissions globally from 1.6 billion tons in 1950 to 6.3 billion tons in 2000. This figure is expected to reach 10 billon tons by 2020. It is important to understand the fate of this excess CO2 in the global carbon cycle. The overall goal of the project is to develop an accurate and reliable optical sensor for monitoring carbon dioxide autonomously at least for one year at a point remote from the actual CO2 release site. In Phase I of this project, InnoSense LLC (ISL) demonstrated the feasibility of an ormosil-monolith based Autonomous Sensor for Atmospheric CO2 (ASAC) device. All of the Phase I objectives were successfully met.

  9. Chemical and anatomical changes in Liquidambar styraciflua L. xylem after long term exposure to elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keonhee; Labbé, Nicole; Warren, Jeffrey M; Elder, Thomas; Rials, Timothy G

    2015-03-01

    The anatomical and chemical characteristics of sweetgum were studied after 11 years of elevated CO2 (544 ppm, ambient at 391 ppm) exposure. Anatomically, branch xylem cells were larger for elevated CO2 trees, and the cell wall thickness was thinner. Chemically, elevated CO2 exposure did not impact the structural components of the stem wood, but non-structural components were significantly affected. Principal component analysis (PCA) was employed to detect differences between the CO2 treatments by considering numerous structural and chemical variables, as well as tree size, and data from previously published sources (i.e., root biomass, production and turnover). The PCA results indicated a clear separation between trees exposed to ambient and elevated CO2 conditions. Correlation loadings plots of the PCA revealed that stem structural components, ash, Ca, Mg, total phenolics, root biomass, production and turnover were the major responses that contribute to the separation between the elevated and ambient CO2 treated trees. PMID:25603157

  10. Chemical and anatomical changes in Liquidambar styraciflua L. xylem after long term exposure to elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keonhee; Labbé, Nicole; Warren, Jeffrey M; Elder, Thomas; Rials, Timothy G

    2015-03-01

    The anatomical and chemical characteristics of sweetgum were studied after 11 years of elevated CO2 (544 ppm, ambient at 391 ppm) exposure. Anatomically, branch xylem cells were larger for elevated CO2 trees, and the cell wall thickness was thinner. Chemically, elevated CO2 exposure did not impact the structural components of the stem wood, but non-structural components were significantly affected. Principal component analysis (PCA) was employed to detect differences between the CO2 treatments by considering numerous structural and chemical variables, as well as tree size, and data from previously published sources (i.e., root biomass, production and turnover). The PCA results indicated a clear separation between trees exposed to ambient and elevated CO2 conditions. Correlation loadings plots of the PCA revealed that stem structural components, ash, Ca, Mg, total phenolics, root biomass, production and turnover were the major responses that contribute to the separation between the elevated and ambient CO2 treated trees.

  11. Variability in the intraspecific response of Pinus ponderosa seedlings subjected to long-term exposure to elevated CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Houpis, J.L.J.; Anschel, D.J.; Pushnik, J.C.; Anderson, P.D.

    1995-01-01

    The authors are investigating the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and intraspecific variability on Pinus ponderosa. To analyze intraspecific variability, they included seedling source (family) as an additional treatment, using a split-plot experimental design. The three elevated CO{sub 2} treatments were ambient (approx. 350 ppm CO{sub 2}), ambient + 175 ppm CO{sub 2} and ambient +350 ppm CO{sub 2}. Their study uses the source/sink control framework at several key integrating steps, incorporating the long-term effects of elevated CO{sub 2} (insuring sufficient time for the expression of any long-term physiological and biochemical acclimation to occur) and genetics (using multiple species and multiple known genetic sources) in an attempt to ascertain the extent of overall regulation contributed by selected independent regulatory process at the physiological, biochemical and structural level. In order to assess intraspecific variability, this paper reports on the integration of measurements of photosynthesis, chlorophyll fluorescence, pigmentation, RuBPCase, SPSase to quantify the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on the growth response of various families of the same species.

  12. DOES SOIL CO2 EFFLUX ACCLIMATIZETO ELEVATED TEMPERATURE AND CO2 DURING LONG-TERM TREATMENT OF DOUGLAS-FIR SEEDLINGS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the effects of elevated soil temperature and atmospheric CO2 efflux (SCE) during the third an fourth years of study. We hypothesized that elevated temperature would stimulate SCE, and elevated CO2 would also stimulate SCE with the stimulation being greater at hig...

  13. Chemical and anatomical changes in Liquidambar styraciflua L. xylem after long term exposure to elevated CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Keonhee; Labbé, Nicole; Warren, Jeffrey M.; Elder, Thomas; Rials, Timothy G.

    2015-01-17

    The anatomical and chemical characteristics of sweetgum were studied after 11 years of elevated CO2 (544 ppm, ambient at 391 ppm) exposure. Anatomically, branch xylem cells were larger for elevated CO2 trees, and the cell wall thickness was thinner. Chemically, elevated CO2 exposure did not impact the structural components of the stem wood, but non-structural components were significantly affected. Principal component analysis (PCA) was employed to detect differences between the CO2 treatments by considering numerous structural and chemical variables, as well as tree size, and data from previously published sources (for example, root biomass, production and turnover). The PCA results indicated a clear separation between trees exposed to ambient and elevated CO2 conditions. Lastly, correlation loadings plots of the PCA revealed that stem structural components, ash, Ca, Mg, total phenolics, root biomass, production and turnover were the major responses that contribute to the separation between the elevated and ambient CO2 treated trees.

  14. Chemical and anatomical changes in Liquidambar styraciflua L. xylem after long term exposure to elevated CO2

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Keonhee; Labbé, Nicole; Warren, Jeffrey M.; Elder, Thomas; Rials, Timothy G.

    2015-01-17

    The anatomical and chemical characteristics of sweetgum were studied after 11 years of elevated CO2 (544 ppm, ambient at 391 ppm) exposure. Anatomically, branch xylem cells were larger for elevated CO2 trees, and the cell wall thickness was thinner. Chemically, elevated CO2 exposure did not impact the structural components of the stem wood, but non-structural components were significantly affected. Principal component analysis (PCA) was employed to detect differences between the CO2 treatments by considering numerous structural and chemical variables, as well as tree size, and data from previously published sources (for example, root biomass, production and turnover). The PCA resultsmore » indicated a clear separation between trees exposed to ambient and elevated CO2 conditions. Lastly, correlation loadings plots of the PCA revealed that stem structural components, ash, Ca, Mg, total phenolics, root biomass, production and turnover were the major responses that contribute to the separation between the elevated and ambient CO2 treated trees.« less

  15. Physiological and phenological bases of decline in growth enhancement after long-term exposure to elevated CO[sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, S.L.; Bazzaa, F.A. )

    1994-06-01

    We addressed the degree to which CO[sub 2]-induced growth enhancement in six temperate deciduous tree species is sustained, the physiological and phenological bases that underlie the growth response, and the effects of naturally occurring resource heterogeneity on seedling and sampling response to CO[sub 2] after three years of growth. At the end of year three, CO[sub 2]-induced growth enhancements decline with different degree among species and resource treatments. Photosynthetic rates as a function of intercellular CO[sub 2] concentrations were greatly influenced by elevated CO[sub 2], nutrients, light, and species. High CO[sub 2] plants, however, showed higher photosynthetic rates than ambient CO[sub 2] plants when both groups were measured in CO[sub 2] concentrations in situ. The photosynthetic enhancement is elevated CO[sub 2] largely resulted from higher intercellular CO[sub 2] levels. In contrast to photosynthesis, stomatal conductance showed little variation. The effect of elevated CO[sub 2] on leaf phenology was species-specific. In gray birch and yellow birch, ambient CO[sub 2] plants had lower leaf bud mortality and a faster rate of leaf bud break than high CO[sub 2] plants. In contrast, in red maple and striped maple, elevated CO[sub 2] plants showed lower leaf bud mortality in some treatments and there was no statistical difference in leaf bud break between ambient and elevated CO[sub 2] plants. These results show that beneficial effects of higher photosynthetic rates on growth in a high CO[sub 2] environment may be negated in some species by changes in other plant traits. Differential responses of species to elevated CO[sub 2] may have important implications for forest regeneration and species composition.

  16. Long-term acclimation to elevated pCO2 alters carbon metabolism and reduces growth in the Antarctic diatom Nitzschia lecointei.

    PubMed

    Torstensson, Anders; Hedblom, Mikael; Mattsdotter Björk, My; Chierici, Melissa; Wulff, Angela

    2015-09-22

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 levels are driving changes in the seawater carbonate system, resulting in higher pCO2 and reduced pH (ocean acidification). Many studies on marine organisms have focused on short-term physiological responses to increased pCO2, and few on slow-growing polar organisms with a relative low adaptation potential. In order to recognize the consequences of climate change in biological systems, acclimation and adaptation to new environments are crucial to address. In this study, physiological responses to long-term acclimation (194 days, approx. 60 asexual generations) of three pCO2 levels (280, 390 and 960 µatm) were investigated in the psychrophilic sea ice diatom Nitzschia lecointei. After 147 days, a small reduction in growth was detected at 960 µatm pCO2. Previous short-term experiments have failed to detect altered growth in N. lecointei at high pCO2, which illustrates the importance of experimental duration in studies of climate change. In addition, carbon metabolism was significantly affected by the long-term treatments, resulting in higher cellular release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). In turn, the release of labile organic carbon stimulated bacterial productivity in this system. We conclude that long-term acclimation to ocean acidification is important for N. lecointei and that carbon overconsumption and DOC exudation may increase in a high-CO2 world.

  17. Long-term acclimation to elevated pCO2 alters carbon metabolism and reduces growth in the Antarctic diatom Nitzschia lecointei

    PubMed Central

    Torstensson, Anders; Hedblom, Mikael; Mattsdotter Björk, My; Chierici, Melissa; Wulff, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 levels are driving changes in the seawater carbonate system, resulting in higher pCO2 and reduced pH (ocean acidification). Many studies on marine organisms have focused on short-term physiological responses to increased pCO2, and few on slow-growing polar organisms with a relative low adaptation potential. In order to recognize the consequences of climate change in biological systems, acclimation and adaptation to new environments are crucial to address. In this study, physiological responses to long-term acclimation (194 days, approx. 60 asexual generations) of three pCO2 levels (280, 390 and 960 µatm) were investigated in the psychrophilic sea ice diatom Nitzschia lecointei. After 147 days, a small reduction in growth was detected at 960 µatm pCO2. Previous short-term experiments have failed to detect altered growth in N. lecointei at high pCO2, which illustrates the importance of experimental duration in studies of climate change. In addition, carbon metabolism was significantly affected by the long-term treatments, resulting in higher cellular release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). In turn, the release of labile organic carbon stimulated bacterial productivity in this system. We conclude that long-term acclimation to ocean acidification is important for N. lecointei and that carbon overconsumption and DOC exudation may increase in a high-CO2 world. PMID:26354939

  18. Effect of mountain climatic elevation gradient and litter origin on decomposition processes: long-term experiment with litter-bags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimek, Beata; Niklińska, Maria; Chodak, Marcin

    2013-04-01

    Temperature is one of the most important factors affecting soil organic matter decomposition. Mountain areas with vertical gradients of temperature and precipitation provide an opportunity to observe climate changes similar to those observed at various latitudes and may serve as an approximation for climatic changes. The aim of the study was to compare the effects of climatic conditions and initial properties of litter on decomposition processes and thermal sensitivity of forest litter. The litter was collected at three altitudes (600, 900, 1200 m a.s.l.) in the Beskidy Mts (southern Poland), put into litter-bags and exposed in the field since autumn 2011. The litter collected at single altitude was exposed at the altitude it was taken and also at the two other altitudes. The litter-bags were laid out on five mountains, treated as replicates. Starting on April 2012, single sets of litter-bags were collected every five weeks. The laboratory measurements included determination of dry mass loss and chemical composition (Corg, Nt, St, Mg, Ca, Na, K, Cu, Zn) of the litter. In the additional litter-bag sets, taken in spring and autumn 2012, microbial properties were measured. To determine the effect of litter properties and climatic conditions of elevation sites on decomposing litter thermal sensitivity the respiration rate of litter was measured at 5°C, 15°C and 25°C and calculated as Q10 L and Q10 H (ratios of respiration rate between 5° and 15°C and between 15°C and 25°C, respectively). The functional diversity of soil microbes was measured with Biolog® ECO plates, structural diversity with phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA). Litter mass lost during first year of incubation was characterized by high variability and mean mass lost ranged up to a 30% of initial mass. After autumn sampling we showed, that mean respiration rate of litter (dry mass) from the 600m a.s.l site exposed on 600m a.s.l. was the highest at each tested temperature. In turn, the lowest mean

  19. Maintenance of C sinks sustains enhanced C assimilation during long-term exposure to elevated [CO2] in Mojave Desert shrubs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the first few years of elevated atmospheric [CO2] treatment at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility, photosynthetic downregulation was observed in desert shrubs grown under elevated [CO2], especially under relatively wet environmental conditions. Nonetheless, those plants maintained increased Asat...

  20. Effects of Long-Term Thermal Exposure on Commercially Pure Titanium Grade 2 Elevated-Temperature Tensile Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated-temperature tensile testing of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) Grade 2 was conducted for as-received commercially produced sheet and following thermal exposure at 550 and 650 K (531 and 711 F) for times up to 5000 h. The tensile testing revealed some statistical differences between the 11 thermal treatments, but most thermal treatments were statistically equivalent. Previous data from room temperature tensile testing was combined with the new data to allow regression and development of mathematical models relating tensile properties to temperature and thermal exposure. The results indicate that thermal exposure temperature has a very small effect, whereas the thermal exposure duration has no statistically significant effects on the tensile properties. These results indicate that CP Ti Grade 2 will be thermally stable and suitable for long-duration space missions.

  1. Climate data by elevation in the Great Smoky Mountains: a database and graphical displays for 1947 - 1950 with comparison to long-term data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busing, Richard T.; Stephens, Luther A.; Clebsch, Edward E.C.

    2004-01-01

    A climate data set is presented for four sites spanning the elevation gradient in the Great Smoky Mountains from Gatlinburg to Clingmans Dome. Monthly mean values for cloud cover, temperature, humidity, precipitation, and soil moisture are included. Stephens (1969) is the source of all summarized mean monthly data. Values are the averages of four years (1947-1950) with moderate to high precipitation. Graphical displays show strong climatic patterns of variation among seasons and elevations. The upper stations had lower temperatures and higher precipitation totals; however, temperature lapse rates and variation in vapor pressure deficits decreased at upper elevations. To examine how well the four-year sample represents the long-term climate, temperature and precipitation for the Gatlinburg (1460 ft elevation at park headquarters) station were compared between the years in the sample and the years in the full record from 1928 to 2003. Trends related to season and elevation are consistent with earlier studies and provide a basis for interpretation of climate dynamics in the southern Appalachian Mountains.

  2. Emiliania huxleyi increases calcification but not expression of calcification-related genes in long-term exposure to elevated temperature and pCO2

    PubMed Central

    Benner, Ina; Diner, Rachel E.; Lefebvre, Stephane C.; Li, Dian; Komada, Tomoko; Carpenter, Edward J.; Stillman, Jonathon H.

    2013-01-01

    Increased atmospheric pCO2 is expected to render future oceans warmer and more acidic than they are at present. Calcifying organisms such as coccolithophores that fix and export carbon into the deep sea provide feedbacks to increasing atmospheric pCO2. Acclimation experiments suggest negative effects of warming and acidification on coccolithophore calcification, but the ability of these organisms to adapt to future environmental conditions is not well understood. Here, we tested the combined effect of pCO2 and temperature on the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi over more than 700 generations. Cells increased inorganic carbon content and calcification rate under warm and acidified conditions compared with ambient conditions, whereas organic carbon content and primary production did not show any change. In contrast to findings from short-term experiments, our results suggest that long-term acclimation or adaptation could change, or even reverse, negative calcification responses in E. huxleyi and its feedback to the global carbon cycle. Genome-wide profiles of gene expression using RNA-seq revealed that genes thought to be essential for calcification are not those that are most strongly differentially expressed under long-term exposure to future ocean conditions. Rather, differentially expressed genes observed here represent new targets to study responses to ocean acidification and warming. PMID:23980248

  3. Emiliania huxleyi increases calcification but not expression of calcification-related genes in long-term exposure to elevated temperature and pCO2.

    PubMed

    Benner, Ina; Diner, Rachel E; Lefebvre, Stephane C; Li, Dian; Komada, Tomoko; Carpenter, Edward J; Stillman, Jonathon H

    2013-01-01

    Increased atmospheric pCO2 is expected to render future oceans warmer and more acidic than they are at present. Calcifying organisms such as coccolithophores that fix and export carbon into the deep sea provide feedbacks to increasing atmospheric pCO2. Acclimation experiments suggest negative effects of warming and acidification on coccolithophore calcification, but the ability of these organisms to adapt to future environmental conditions is not well understood. Here, we tested the combined effect of pCO2 and temperature on the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi over more than 700 generations. Cells increased inorganic carbon content and calcification rate under warm and acidified conditions compared with ambient conditions, whereas organic carbon content and primary production did not show any change. In contrast to findings from short-term experiments, our results suggest that long-term acclimation or adaptation could change, or even reverse, negative calcification responses in E. huxleyi and its feedback to the global carbon cycle. Genome-wide profiles of gene expression using RNA-seq revealed that genes thought to be essential for calcification are not those that are most strongly differentially expressed under long-term exposure to future ocean conditions. Rather, differentially expressed genes observed here represent new targets to study responses to ocean acidification and warming.

  4. Long-term continuous allopregnanolone elevation causes memory decline and hippocampus shrinkage, in female wild-type B6 mice.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Sara K S; Johansson, Maja; Bäckström, Torbjörn

    2016-02-01

    Chronic stress in various forms increases the risk for cognitive dysfunction, dementia and Alzheimer's disease. While the pathogenesis behind these findings is unknown, growing evidence suggests that chronic increase in neurosteroid levels, such as allopregnanolone, is part of the mechanism. We treated wild-type C57BL/6J mice with allopregnanolone for 5months, using osmotic pumps. This treatment led to moderately increased levels of allopregnanolone, equivalent to that of mild chronic stress. After an interval of no treatment for 1month, female mice showed impaired learning and memory function in the Morris water maze (MWM) in combination with diminished hippocampus weight and increased cerebellum weight, both correlating to MWM performance. Male mice showed a minor reduction in memory function and no differences in brain structure. We conclude that chronic allopregnanolone elevation can lead to cognitive dysfunction and negative brain alterations. We suggest that allopregnanolone could play a key role in the pathogenesis of stress-induced cognitive disturbances and perhaps dementia. PMID:26497250

  5. Long-term performance of ceramic matrix composites at elevated temperatures: Modelling of creep and creep rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, W.A.; Fabeny, B.; Ibnabdeljalil, M.; Iyengar, N.; Reifsnider, K.L.

    1996-07-31

    The models developed, contain explicit dependences on constituent material properties and their changes with time, so that composite performance can be predicted. Three critical processes in ceramic composites at elevated temperatures have been modeled: (1) creep deformation of composite vs stress and time-dependent creep of fibers and matrix, and failure of these components; (2) creep deformation of ``interface`` around broken fibers; and (3) lifetime of the composite under conditions of fiber strength loss over time at temperature. In (1), general evolution formulas are derived for relaxation time of matrix stresses and steady-state creep rate of composite; the model is tested against recent data on Ti-MMCs. Calculations on a composite of Hi-Nicalon fibers in a melt-infiltrated SiC matrix are presented. In (2), numerical simulations of composite failure were made to map out time-to-failure vs applied load for several sets of material parameters. In (3), simple approximate relations are obtained between fiber life and composite life that should be useful for fiber developers and testers. Strength degradation data on Hi-Nicalon fibers is used to assess composite lifetime vs fiber lifetime for Hi-Nicalon fiber composites.

  6. Separating long-term deformation cycles and atmospheric signals at Mount St. Helens using PS-InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, M.

    2015-12-01

    Since its eruption in 1980, Mount St. Helens has experienced multiple inflation-deflation cycles associated with dome building eruptions. During the most recent dome-building episode, which spanned 2004 to 2008, GPS recorded the transition from pre-eruptive inflation to co-eruptive deflation and a final transition back to inflation. Such observations provide important constraints on the timing and mechanics of cyclic magma recharge and extrusion. Currently, the subtle surface deformation signal at St Helens is monitored primarily by ground based geodetic techniques like GPS. Satellite-based InSAR has the potential to substantially augment these techniques by providing spatially continuous, precise measurements of surface displacements, and may also reveal other volcanic or surficial processes too localized to be detected by ground based methods. Traditional interferometry is challenging to apply to volcanoes in the Cascades. Widespread phase decorrelation caused by persistent snow cover and dense vegetation, combined with large, elevation dependent atmospheric phase delays, mask or make deformation signals difficult to detect. By applying StaMPS, a Persistent Scatterers (PS) technique, phase decorrelation is mitigated by utilizing only the pixels with the highest, statistically derived, signal to noise ratio. However, atmospheric water vapor, which delays the radar signal, remains problematic, particularly on the volcano edifice. To assess the bias imposed by the atmosphere, we perform a series of sensitivity tests using a suite of methods including several that rely on the linear or power-law correlation of phase delay to topography and knowledge of the spatial scale of the signal. We also apply methods that calculate wet and dry phase delay from atmospheric reanalysis datasets such as ERA-Interim provided by the ECMWF. SAR data from the ERS, Envisat, and ALOS satellites, along with newer datasets, are processed with these tools to create a time series spanning

  7. Is fire a long term sink or source of atmospheric carbon? A comprehensive evaluation of a boreal forest fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santin, C.; Doerr, S. H.; Preston, C.; Bryant, R.

    2012-12-01

    -fire fuel assessment, ii) fire behaviour monitoring and iii) immediate post-fire fuel and PyC inventory. Before the fire, fuel characteristics were established and the site was instrumented with auto-logging thermocouples to provide temperature-duration profiles during burning. Also, different types of PyC were placed on the ground to determine PyC loss during the fire. Immediately after fire, the various post-burn PyC products and stores were sampled. Total PyC was quantified and the chemical recalcitrance of the different PyC forms found was determined. The results obtained will be discussed in the context of PyC production, and its different forms and quantities, with respect to (i) fire characteristics and fuel consumed, and (ii) the long term carbon balance in this boreal forest environment for recurring fire-regrowth cycles under current and predicted future climatic conditions.

  8. Modern and long-term evaporation of central Andes surface waters suggests paleo archives underestimate Neogene elevations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorella, Richard P.; Poulsen, Christopher J.; Pillco Zolá, Ramiro S.; Jeffery, M. Louise; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2015-12-01

    Central Andean paleoelevations reconstructed from stable isotope and paleofloral data imply a large magnitude (>2 km) Miocene-to-modern surface uplift. However, the isotopic relationships between precipitation, surface waters, and soil waters upon which these reconstructions are based remain poorly constrained for both past, and in many cases, modern conditions. We quantify the relationships between central Andean precipitation and surface waters by measuring the isotopic composition of 249 stream water samples (δ18O and δD) collected between April 2009 and October 2012. The isotopic compositions of stream waters match precipitation along the eastern flank. In contrast, Altiplano surface waters possess a lower δD-δ18O slope (4.59 vs ∼8 for meteoric waters) not observed in precipitation, which signals heavy isotope evaporative enrichment in surface waters. Paleoclimate models indicate that highly evaporative conditions have persisted on the plateau throughout Andean uplift, and that conditions may have been more evaporative when the Andes were lower. Thus, more ancient proxy materials may have a greater evaporative bias than previously recognized and paleoelevation reconstructions from stable isotope based central Andean plateau proxy materials likely overstate Miocene-to-present surface uplift. We propose Altiplano paleoelevations of 1-2 km at 24.5 Ma, 1.5-2.9 km by 11.45 Ma, and modern elevations by ∼6 Ma based on the lightest isotopic compositions observed in Altiplano proxy materials, which are least likely to be influenced by evaporation. These constraints limit total late-Miocene-to-modern uplift to <2.2 km, are more consistent with crustal shortening records, and suggest that plateau uplift may have been more spatially uniform than suggested by previous interpretations of stable isotope proxies.

  9. Long-term clinical outcomes of the left ventricular thrombus in patients with ST elevation anterior myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Mahmoud; Fazlinezhad, Afsoon; Alvandi-Azari, Masoomeh; Abdar Esfahani, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study was performed to determine the size of left ventricular thrombus (LVT), risk of systemic embolization and response to medical treatment during 18 months of follow up in the patients with anterior-ST elevation myocardial infarction (aSTEMI). METHODS This cross-sectional study was performed on thirty-five patients with anterior myocardial infarction (MI), in Emam Reza Hospital and Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad, Iran, from August 2008 to January 2011. Warfarin was prescribed for all the patients. Transthoracic echocardiographic study was performed on the 1st, 2nd, 4th, 6th, 12th and 18th months. Outcomes included rate of death, MI, stroke, systemic embolization, major bleeding and change in thrombus size following treatment. RESULTS The resolve rate of clot on the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 12th and 18th months was 64.7, 86.6, 81.4, 81.4 and 100 percent, respectively. In five patients with complete clot resolution, clot reformation occurred after warfarin discontinuation. In these patients, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) improvement was poor. During the study period, five patients died due to severe heart failure. One patient developed hematuria whereas non-experienced thromboembolic events. The mean LVEF at study initiation was 30.8 ± 0.92%, which improved to 42 ± 0.84% (P < 0.05) at the end. CONCLUSION All LVT was resolved with a combination therapy of antiplatelet and warfarin without any thromboembolic event. In patients with a poor improvement in the LV function, due to the risk of LVT reformation, lifelong warfarin therapy was recommended. PMID:26089924

  10. Source portioning of N_{2}O emissions after long term elevation of soil temperature in a permanent grassland soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen-Willems, Anne; Lanigan, Gary; Clough, Timothy; Andresen, Louise; Müller, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Several methods, such as source portioning, have been used to quantify the contributions of individual N pools to N2O emissions. These methods however, assume the absence of hybrid reactions such as co-denitrification, which were previously identified as important. A straight forward method portioning N2O fluxes into four different production processes, including a hybrid reaction, was therefore developed. This method portioned the N2O fluxes in nitrification, denitrification, oxidation of organic matter and co-denitrification, using data on 45R and 46R of the N2O flux and the 15N content of the NO3- and NH4+ in the soil. This newly developed method was used to analyse the N2O emissions from incubated soil, which was previously subjected to 6 years of elevated soil temperature of +0, +1, +2 or +3 ° C. N2O emissions were measured and analysed at four time points in the six days following, NO315NH4 Gly or 15NO3NH4 Gly, label addition. The oxidation of organic N was found to be the main source of N2O fluxes at all sampling dates, comprising between 63 and 85% of the total N2O flux. The percentage contribution made by organic N to N2O fluxes increased over the sampling period, rising from a minimum of 40% in the control treatment, to virtually 100% across all treatments by Day 6. Compared to the control treatment, denitrification contributed less to N2O from soil subjected to +2 and +3 ° C warming (p <0.0001 and p=0.002, respectively). Co-denitrification only contributed to the N2O flux during the first day after substrate addition. The highest amount of N2O produced via co-denitrification was found under the control treatment. From soil subjected to +2 and +3 ° C treatments, the contribution of co-denitrification was minor. However, these differences in co-denitrification were not significant. This research showed the importance of the oxidation of organic N in N2O emissions. It should therefore not be omitted as a potential source in source portioning. Emissions

  11. Source portioning of N_{2}O emissions after long term elevation of soil temperature in a permanent grassland soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen-Willems, Anne; Lanigan, Gary; Clough, Timothy; Andresen, Louise; Müller, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Several methods, such as source portioning, have been used to quantify the contributions of individual N pools to N2O emissions. These methods however, assume the absence of hybrid reactions such as co-denitrification, which were previously identified as important. A straight forward method portioning N2O fluxes into four different production processes, including a hybrid reaction, was therefore developed. This method portioned the N2O fluxes in nitrification, denitrification, oxidation of organic matter and co-denitrification, using data on 45R and 46R of the N2O flux and the 15N content of the NO3‑ and NH4+ in the soil. This newly developed method was used to analyse the N2O emissions from incubated soil, which was previously subjected to 6 years of elevated soil temperature of +0, +1, +2 or +3 ° C. N2O emissions were measured and analysed at four time points in the six days following, NO315NH4 Gly or 15NO3NH4 Gly, label addition. The oxidation of organic N was found to be the main source of N2O fluxes at all sampling dates, comprising between 63 and 85% of the total N2O flux. The percentage contribution made by organic N to N2O fluxes increased over the sampling period, rising from a minimum of 40% in the control treatment, to virtually 100% across all treatments by Day 6. Compared to the control treatment, denitrification contributed less to N2O from soil subjected to +2 and +3 ° C warming (p <0.0001 and p=0.002, respectively). Co-denitrification only contributed to the N2O flux during the first day after substrate addition. The highest amount of N2O produced via co-denitrification was found under the control treatment. From soil subjected to +2 and +3 ° C treatments, the contribution of co-denitrification was minor. However, these differences in co-denitrification were not significant. This research showed the importance of the oxidation of organic N in N2O emissions. It should therefore not be omitted as a potential source in source portioning. Emissions

  12. Long-term clinical results of autologous bone marrow CD 133+ cell transplantation in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirgizova, M. A.; Suslova, T. E.; Markov, V. A.; Karpov, R. S.; Ryabov, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was investigate the long-term results of autologous bone marrow CD 133+ cell transplantation in patients with primary ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI). Methods and results: From 2006 to 2007, 26 patients with primary STEMI were included in an open randomized study. Patients were randomized to two groups: 1st - included patients underwent PCI and transplantation of autologous bone marrow CD 133+ cell (n = 10); 2nd - patients with only PCI (n = 16). Follow-up study was performed 7.70±0.42 years after STEMI and consisted in physical examination, 6-min walking test, Echo exam. Total and cardiovascular mortality in group 1 was lower (20% (n = 2) vs. 44% (n = 7), p = 0.1 and 22% (n = 2) vs. 25% (n = 4), (p=0.53), respectively). Analysis of cardiac volumetric parameters shows significant differences between groups: EDV of 100.7 ± 50.2 mL vs. 144.40±42.7 mL, ESV of 56.3 ± 37.8 mL vs. 89.7 ± 38.7 mL in 1st and 2nd groups, respectively. Data of the study showed positive effects of autologous bone marrow CD 133+ cell transplantation on the long-term survival of patients and structural status of the heart.

  13. Long-Term Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Long-Term Care What Is Long-Term Care? Long-term care involves a variety of services ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) Most Care Provided at Home Long-term care is provided ...

  14. Nitrogen and carbon cycling in a grassland community ecosystem as affected by elevated atmospheric CO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing global atmospheric CO2 concentration has led to concerns regarding its potential effects on terrestrial ecosystem and the long-term storage of C and N in soil. This study examined responses to elevated CO2 in a grass ecosystem invaded with a leguminous shrub Acacia farnesiana (L.) Willd (...

  15. Modeling long-term uptake and re-volatilization of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) across the soil-atmosphere interface.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhongwen; Haberer, Christina; Maier, Uli; Beckingham, Barbara; Amos, Richard T; Grathwohl, Peter

    2015-12-15

    Soil-atmosphere exchange is important for the environmental fate and atmospheric transport of many semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs). This study focuses on modeling the vapor phase exchange of semi-volatile hydrophobic organic pollutants between soil and the atmosphere using the multicomponent reactive transport code MIN3P. MIN3P is typically applied to simulate aqueous and vapor phase transport and reaction processes in the subsurface. We extended the code to also include an atmospheric boundary layer where eddy diffusion takes place. The relevant processes and parameters affecting soil-atmosphere exchange were investigated in several 1-D model scenarios and at various time scales (from years to centuries). Phenanthrene was chosen as a model compound, but results apply for other hydrophobic organic compounds as well. Gaseous phenanthrene was assumed to be constantly supplied to the system during a pollution period and a subsequent regulation period (with a 50% decline in the emission rate). Our results indicate that long-term soil-atmosphere exchange of phenanthrene is controlled by the soil compartment - re-volatilization thus depends on soil properties. A sensitivity analysis showed that accumulation and transport in soils in the short term is dominated by diffusion, whereas in the long term groundwater recharge and biodegradation become relevant. As expected, sorption causes retardation and slows down transport and biodegradation. If atmospheric concentration is reduced (e.g. after environmental regulations), re-volatilization from soil to the atmosphere occurs only for a relatively short time period. Therefore, the model results demonstrate that soils generally are sinks for atmospheric pollutants. The atmospheric boundary layer is only relevant for time scales of less than one month. The extended MIN3P code can also be applied to simulate fluctuating concentrations in the atmosphere, for instance due to temperature changes in the topsoil. PMID:26340582

  16. Modeling long-term uptake and re-volatilization of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) across the soil-atmosphere interface.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhongwen; Haberer, Christina; Maier, Uli; Beckingham, Barbara; Amos, Richard T; Grathwohl, Peter

    2015-12-15

    Soil-atmosphere exchange is important for the environmental fate and atmospheric transport of many semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs). This study focuses on modeling the vapor phase exchange of semi-volatile hydrophobic organic pollutants between soil and the atmosphere using the multicomponent reactive transport code MIN3P. MIN3P is typically applied to simulate aqueous and vapor phase transport and reaction processes in the subsurface. We extended the code to also include an atmospheric boundary layer where eddy diffusion takes place. The relevant processes and parameters affecting soil-atmosphere exchange were investigated in several 1-D model scenarios and at various time scales (from years to centuries). Phenanthrene was chosen as a model compound, but results apply for other hydrophobic organic compounds as well. Gaseous phenanthrene was assumed to be constantly supplied to the system during a pollution period and a subsequent regulation period (with a 50% decline in the emission rate). Our results indicate that long-term soil-atmosphere exchange of phenanthrene is controlled by the soil compartment - re-volatilization thus depends on soil properties. A sensitivity analysis showed that accumulation and transport in soils in the short term is dominated by diffusion, whereas in the long term groundwater recharge and biodegradation become relevant. As expected, sorption causes retardation and slows down transport and biodegradation. If atmospheric concentration is reduced (e.g. after environmental regulations), re-volatilization from soil to the atmosphere occurs only for a relatively short time period. Therefore, the model results demonstrate that soils generally are sinks for atmospheric pollutants. The atmospheric boundary layer is only relevant for time scales of less than one month. The extended MIN3P code can also be applied to simulate fluctuating concentrations in the atmosphere, for instance due to temperature changes in the topsoil.

  17. Long-term variations of atmospheric wave activity in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region over the equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, T.; Yoshida, S.; Isoda, F.; Nakamura, T.; Nuryanto, A.; Manurung, S.; Sobari, O.; Vincent, R. A.; Reid, I. M.

    2002-05-01

    We have analyzed long-term variations of the wind velocity variance of ultra-fast Kelvin (UFK) waves (3.0-3.8d) and gravity waves in two wave period ranges; 30-35h (0.7-0.8c/d) and 8-11h(2.1-2.9c/d), in the equatorial mesosphere and lower thermosphere region using meteor wind radar (MWR) observations in Jakarta (JKT) (6°S107°E) from November 1992 to June 1998, as well as two medium frequency (MF) radars at Christmas Island (2°N157°W) and Pontianak (0.03°N109°E) from January 1996 to July 1997. The long-term variations of the wind variance of these waves at JKT showed enhancements twice a year in 1993-1995, mostly coinciding with the westward wind phase of MSAO or the transition period of MSAO from eastward to westward wind. The activity of both UFK and gravity waves became significantly weak in 1996-1997. In particular, the UFK wave variance became simultaneously smaller at JKT and the two MF radar sites, indicating that this peculiar event had a global scale.

  18. Effects of Long-Term Daily Administration of Prostaglandin-E2 on Maintaining Elevated Proximal Tibial Metaphyseal Cancellous Bone Mass in Male Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ke, Hua Zhu; Jee, Webster S. S.; Mori, Satoshi; Li, Xiao Jian; Kimmel, Donald B.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of long-term prostaglandin E(sub 2) (PGE(sub 2)) on cancellous bone in proximal tibial metaphysis were studied in 7 month old male Sprague-Dawley rats given daily subcutaneous injections of 0, 1, 3, and 6 mg PGE(sub 2)/kg/day and sacrificed after 60, 120, and 180 days. Histomorphometric analyses were performed on double fluorescent-labeled undecalcified bone specimens. After 60 days of treatment, PGE(sub 2) produced diffusely labeled trabecular bone area, increased trabecular bone area, eroded and labeled trabecular perimeter, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate at all dose levels when compared with age-matched controls. In rats given PGE(sub 2) for longer time periods (120 and 180 days), trabecular bone area, diffusely labeled trabecular bone area, labeled perimeter, mineral apposition, and bone formation rates were sustained at the elevated levels achieved earlier at 60-day treatment. The eroded perimeter continued to increase until 120 days, then plateau. The observation that continuous systemic PGE(sub 2) administration to adult male rats elevated metaphyseal cancellous bone mass to 3.5-fold of the control level within 60 days and maintained it for another 120 days indicates that the powerful skeletal anabolic effects of PGE2 can be sustained with continuous administration .

  19. Long-term variation in the upper atmosphere as seen in the geomagnetic solar quiet daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, Atsuki; Koyama, Yukinobu; Nose, Masahito; Hori, Tomoaki; Otsuka, Yuichi; Yatagai, Akiyo

    2014-12-01

    Characteristics of long-term variation in the amplitude of solar quiet (Sq) geomagnetic field daily variation have been investigated using 1-h geomagnetic field data obtained from 69 geomagnetic observation stations within the period of 1947 to 2013. The Sq amplitude observed at these geomagnetic stations showed a clear dependence on the 10- to 12-year solar activity cycle and tended to be enhanced during each solar maximum phase. The Sq amplitude was the smallest around the minimum of solar cycle 23/24 in 2008 to 2009. The relationship between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude was approximately linear but about 53% of geomagnetic stations showed a weak nonlinear relation to the solar F10.7 index. In order to remove the effect of solar activity seen in the long-term variation of the Sq amplitude, we calculated a linear or second-order fitting curve between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude during 1947 to 2013 and examined the residual Sq amplitude, which is defined as the deviation from the fitting curve. As a result, the majority of trends in the residual Sq amplitude that passed through a trend test showed negative values over a wide region. This tendency was relatively strong in Europe, India, the eastern part of Canada, and New Zealand. The relationship between the magnetic field intensity at 100-km altitude and residual Sq amplitude showed an anti-correlation for about 71% of the geomagnetic stations. Furthermore, the residual Sq amplitude at the equatorial station (Addis Ababa) was anti-correlated with the absolute value of the magnetic field inclination. This implies movement of the equatorial electrojet due to the secular variation of the ambient magnetic field.

  20. Rapid and long-term effects of water deficit on gas exchange and hydraulic conductance of silver birch trees grown under varying atmospheric humidity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Effects of water deficit on plant water status, gas exchange and hydraulic conductance were investigated in Betula pendula under artificially manipulated air humidity in Eastern Estonia. The study was aimed to broaden an understanding of the ability of trees to acclimate with the increasing atmospheric humidity predicted for northern Europe. Rapidly-induced water deficit was imposed by dehydrating cut branches in open-air conditions; long-term water deficit was generated by seasonal drought. Results The rapid water deficit quantified by leaf (ΨL) and branch water potentials (ΨB) had a significant (P < 0.001) effect on gas exchange parameters, while inclusion of ΨB in models resulted in a considerably better fit than those including ΨL, which supports the idea that stomatal openness is regulated to prevent stem rather than leaf xylem dysfunction. Under moderate water deficit (ΨL≥-1.55 MPa), leaf conductance to water vapour (gL), transpiration rate and leaf hydraulic conductance (KL) were higher (P < 0.05) and leaf temperature lower in trees grown in elevated air humidity (H treatment) than in control trees (C treatment). Under severe water deficit (ΨL<-1.55 MPa), the treatments showed no difference. The humidification manipulation influenced most of the studied characteristics, while the effect was to a great extent realized through changes in soil water availability, i.e. due to higher soil water potential in H treatment. Two functional characteristics (gL, KL) exhibited higher (P < 0.05) sensitivity to water deficit in trees grown under increased air humidity. Conclusions The experiment supported the hypothesis that physiological traits in trees acclimated to higher air humidity exhibit higher sensitivity to rapid water deficit with respect to two characteristics - leaf conductance to water vapour and leaf hydraulic conductance. Disproportionate changes in sensitivity of stomatal versus leaf hydraulic conductance to water deficit

  1. Gene expression patterns of trembling aspen trees following long-term exposure to interacting elevated CO2 and tropospheric O3.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P; Duplessis, S; White, H; Karnosky, D F; Martin, F; Podila, G K

    2005-07-01

    Expression of 4600 poplar expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was studied over the 2001-2002 growing seasons using trees of the moderately ozone (O(3))-tolerant trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) clone 216 exposed to elevated CO(2) and/or O(3) for their entire 5-yr life history. Based on replication of the experiment in years 2001 and 2002, 238 genes showed qualitatively similar expression in at least one treatment and were retained for analysis. Of these 238 genes, 185 were significantly regulated (1.5-fold) from one year to the other in at least one treatment studied. Less than 1% of the genes were regulated 2-fold or more. In the elevated CO(2) treatment, relatively small numbers of genes were up-regulated, whereas in the O(3) treatment, higher expression of many signaling and defense-related genes and lower expression of several photosynthesis and energy-related genes were observed. Senescence-associated genes (SAGs) and genes involved in the flavonoid pathway were also up-regulated under O(3), with or without CO(2) treatment. Interestingly, the combined treatment of CO(2) plus O(3) resulted in the differential expression of genes that were not up-regulated with individual gas treatments. This study represents the first investigation into gene expression following long-term exposure of trees to the interacting effects of elevated CO(2) and O(3) under field conditions. Patterns of gene-specific regulation described in this study correlated with previously published physiological responses of aspen clone 216.

  2. Response of a southeastern U.S. bahiagrass pasture to elevated atmospheric CO2 and N fertilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the Southeastern US both managed and unmanaged pasture systems remain understudied agro-ecosystems in terms of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration. Therefore, we initiated a long-term study of bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flüggé) response to elevated CO2 using open top field cha...

  3. Long-term visibility variation in Athens (1931-2013): a proxy for local and regional atmospheric aerosol loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Founda, Dimitra; Kazadzis, Stelios; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos; Lianou, Maria; Raptis, Panagiotis I.

    2016-09-01

    This study explores the interdecadal variability and trends of surface horizontal visibility at the urban area of Athens from 1931 to 2013, using the historical archives of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA). A prominent deterioration of visibility in the city was detected, with the long-term linear trend amounting to -2.8 km decade-1 (p < 0.001), over the entire study period. This was not accompanied by any significant trend in relative humidity or precipitation over the same period. A slight recovery of visibility levels seems to be established in the recent decade (2004-2013). It was found that very good visibility (> 20 km) occurred at a frequency of 34 % before the 1950s, while this percentage drops to just 2 % during the decade 2004-2013. The rapid impairment of the visual air quality in Athens around the 1950s points to the increased levels of air pollution on a local and/or regional scale, related to high urbanization rates and/or increased anthropogenic emissions on a global scale at that period. Visibility was found to be negatively/positively correlated with relative humidity/wind speed, the correlation being statistically valid at certain periods. Wind regime and mainly wind direction and corresponding air mass origin were found to highly control visibility levels in Athens. The comparison of visibility variation in Athens and at a non-urban reference site on Crete island revealed similar negative trends over the common period of observations. This suggests that apart local sources, visibility in Athens is highly determined by aerosol load of regional origin. AVHRR and MODIS satellite-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals over Athens and surface measurements of PM10 confirmed the relation of visibility to aerosol load.

  4. Using box models to calculate emissions from long-term observations of the background global atmosphere for nitrous oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins, J. W.; Dutton, G. S.; Nance, J. D.; Hall, B. D.; Mondeel, D. J.; Butler, J. H.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important ozone-depleting gas that continues to rise in concentration even as CFC emissions have virtually ceased. It is also a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential of 298 times that of carbon dioxide with 100 years time horizon. NOAA has been monitoring background concentrations of N2O from weekly flask samples since 1977, starting with five remote stations over a broad latitudinal coverage from Pt. Barrow, Alaska to South Pole. This network has expanded to thirteen flask sampling sites and six in situ instrument sites. We have combined data from the collocated, ground-based sites using three different independent instruments all linked to the WMO N2O calibration scale, primarily to assist in quantifying the global burden of atmospheric N2O for international assessments of the state of the science in climate and stratospheric ozone depletion. The growth rate of atmospheric N2O has been essentially constant at 0.78×0.01(3s) parts per billion (ppb) per year over this period, but with important deviations related to ENSO, transport, and changes in patterns of emissions. We will use top down box models to generate emissions and examine the budget of global atmospheric N2O. Global history of atmospheric N2O (in ppb) from the NOAA GMD background sites.

  5. Does long-term elevation of CO{sub 2} concentration increase photosynthesis in forest floor vegetation? Indiana strawberry in a Maryland forest

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, C.P.; Long, S.P.; Drake, B.G.

    1997-05-01

    As the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) in the atmosphere rises, photorespiratory loss of carbon in C, photosynthesis will diminish and the net efficiency of light-limited photosynthetic carbon uptake should rise. Indiana strawberry (Duchesnea indica) growing on a Maryland forest floor was tested. Open-top chambers were used to elevate the pCO{sub 2} of a forest floor habitat to 67 Pa and were paired with control chambers with an ambient pCO{sub 2} of 38 Pa. After 3.5 years, D. indica leaves in the elevated pCO{sub 2} showed a significantly greater maximum quantum efficiency of net photosynthesis (by 22%) and a lower light compensation point (by 42%) than leaves in the control chambers. The quantum efficiency to minimize photorespiration was the same for controls and plants grown at elevated pCO{sub 2}, showing the maximum efficiency of light-energy transduction into assimilated carbon was not altered by acclimation and the increase in light-limited photosynthesis at elevated pCO{sub 2} was a function of the decrease in photorespiration. Acclimation did decrease the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and light-harvesting chlorophyll protein content of the leaf by more than 30%. These changes were associated with a decreased capacity for light-saturated, but not light-limited, photosynthesis. Leaves of D. indica grown and measured at elevated pCO{sub 2} showed greater light-saturated photosynthetic rates than leaves grown and measured at the current atmospheric pCO{sub 2}. In situ measurements under natural lighting showed large increases in leaf photosynthesis at elevated pCO{sub 2}, relative to controls, in both summer and fall. The increase in efficiency of light-limited photosynthesis with elevated pCO{sub 2} allowed positive net photosynthetic carbon uptake on days and at locations on the forest floor that light fluxes were insufficient for positive net photosynthesis in the current atmospheric pCO{sub 2}. 33 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. A Multicentre Prospective Evaluation of the Impact of Renal Insufficiency on In-hospital and Long-term Mortality of Patients with Acute ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Hu, Dayi; Shi, Xubo; Li, Li; Yang, Jingang; Song, Li; Ma, Changsheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Numerous previous studies have shown that renal insufficiency (RI) in patients with acute coronary syndrome is associated with poor cardiovascular outcomes. These studies do not well address the impact of RI on the long-term outcome of patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in China. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of admission RI and inhospital and long-term mortality of patients with acute STEMI. Methods: This was a multicenter, observational, prospective-cohort study. 718 consecutive patients were admitted to 19 hospitals in Beijing within 24 hours of onset of STEMI, between January 1,2006 and December 31,2006. Estimation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the modified abbreviated modification of diet in renal disease equation-based on the Chinese chronic kidney disease patients. The patients were categorized according to eGFR, as normal renal dysfunction (eGFR ≥ 90 ml∙min-1∙1.73 m-2), mild RI (60 ml∙min-1∙1.73 m-2 ≤ eGFR < 90 ml∙min-1∙1.73 m-2) and moderate or severe RI (eGFR < 60 ml∙min-1∙1.73 m-2). The association between RI and inhospital and 6-year mortality of was evaluated. Results: Seven hundred and eighteen patients with STEMI were evaluated. There were 551 men and 167 women with a mean age of 61.0 ± 13.0 years. Two hundred and eighty patients (39.0%) had RI, in which 61 patients (8.5%) reached the level of moderate or severe RI. Patients with RI were more often female, elderly, hypertensive, and more patients had heart failure and stroke with higher killip class. Patients with RI were less likely to present with chest pain. The inhospital mortality (1.4% vs. 5.9% vs. 22.9%, P < 0.001), 6-year all-cause mortality (9.5% vs. 19.8 vs. 45.2%, P < 0.001) and 6-year cardiac mortality (2.9% vs. 12.2% vs. 23.8%, P < 0.001) were markedly increased in patients with RI. After adjusting for other confounding factors, classification of admission renal function

  7. Multi-decade Measurements of the Long-Term Trends of Atmospheric Species by High-Spectral-Resolution Infrared Solar Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Chiou, Linda; Goldman, Aaron; Hannigan, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Solar absorption spectra were recorded for the first time in 5 years with the McMath Fourier transform spectrometer at the US National solar Observatory on Kitt Peak in southern Arizona, USA (31.91 N latitude, 111.61 W longitude, 2.09 km altitude). The solar absorption spectra cover 750-1300 and 1850-5000 cm(sup -1) and were recorded on 20 days during March-June 2009. The measurements mark the continuation of a long-term record of atmospheric chemical composition measurements that have been used to quantify seasonal cycles and long-term trends of both tropospheric and stratospheric species from observations that began i 1977. Fits to the measured spectra have been performed, and they indicate the spectra obtained since return to operational status are nearly free of channeling and the instrument line shape function is well reproduced taking into account the measurement parameters. We report updated time series measurements of total columns for six atmospheric species and their analysis for seasonal cycles and long-term trends. An sn example, the time series fit shows a decrease in the annual increase rate i Montreal-Protocol-regulated chlorofluorocarbon CCL2F2 from 1.51 plus or minus 0.38% yr(sup -1) at the beginning of the time span to -1.54 plus or minus 1.28 yr(sup -1) at the end of the time span, 1 sigma, and hence provides evidence for the impact of those regulations on the trend.

  8. Building long-term and high spatio-temporal resolution precipitation and air temperature reanalyses by mixing local observations and global atmospheric reanalyses: the ANATEM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathevet, T.; Gailhard, J.; Kuentz, A.; Hingray, B.

    2015-12-01

    Efforts to improve the understanding of past climatic or hydrologic variability have received a great deal of attention in various fields of geosciences such as glaciology, dendrochronology, sedimentology and hydrology. Based on different proxies, each research community produces different kinds of climatic or hydrologic reanalyses at different spatio-temporal scales and resolutions. When considering climate or hydrology, many studies have been devoted to characterising variability, trends or breaks using observed time series representing different regions or climates of the world. However, in hydrology, these studies have usually been limited to short temporal scales (mainly a few decades and more rarely a century) because they require observed time series (which suffer from a limited spatio-temporal density). This paper introduces ANATEM, a method that combines local observations and large-scale climatic information (such as the 20CR Reanalysis) to build long-term probabilistic air temperature and precipitation time series with a high spatio-temporal resolution (1 day and a few km2). ANATEM was tested on the reconstruction of air temperature and precipitation time series of 22 watersheds situated in the Durance River basin, in the French Alps. Based on a multi-criteria and multi-scale diagnosis, the results show that ANATEM improves the performance of classical statistical models - especially concerning spatial homogeneity - while providing an original representation of uncertainties which are conditioned by atmospheric circulation patterns. The ANATEM model has been also evaluated for the regional scale against independent long-term time series and was able to capture regional low-frequency variability over more than a century (1883-2010). Citation: Kuentz, A., Mathevet, T., Gailhard, J., and Hingray, B.: Building long-term and high spatio-temporal resolution precipitation and air temperature reanalyses by mixing local observations and global atmospheric

  9. Long-term measurements of atmospheric trace gases (CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6, CO, H2), O2, and δ13CH4 isotopes at Weybourne Atmospheric Observatory, UK: past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Andrew C.; Forster, Grant L.; Oram, David E.; Reeves, Claire E.; Pickers, Penelope A.; Barningham, S. Thomas; Sturges, William T.; Bandy, Brian; Nisbet, Euan G.; Lowry, David; Fisher, Rebecca; Fleming, Zoe

    2016-04-01

    The Weybourne Atmospheric Observatory (WAO) is situated on the north Norfolk Coast (52.95°N, 1.13°E) in the United Kingdom and is run by the University of East Anglia (UEA), with support from the UK National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS). In 2016, the WAO became a UK-ICOS (Integrated Carbon Observing System) monitoring station. Since 2008, we have been collecting high-precision long-term in situ measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), carbon monoxide (CO) and molecular hydrogen (H2), as well as regular bag sampling for δ13CH4. In early 2013, the measurement of atmospheric methane (CH4) commenced, and nitrous oxide (N2O) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) began in 2014. We summarise the CO2, O2, CH4, N2O, SF6, CO, H2 and δ13CH4 measurements made to date and highlight some key features observed (e.g. seasonal cycles, long-term trends, pollution events and deposition events). We summarise how the long-term measurements fit into other broader projects which have helped to support the long term time-series at WAO over the years, and highlight how we contribute to broader global atmospheric observation networks.

  10. Short- and long-term prognostic significance of ST-segment elevation in lead aVR in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Taglieri, Nevio; Marzocchi, Antonio; Saia, Francesco; Marrozzini, Cinzia; Palmerini, Tullio; Ortolani, Paolo; Cinti, Laura; Rosmini, Stefania; Vagnarelli, Fabio; Alessi, Laura; Villani, Caterina; Scaramuzzino, Giuseppe; Gallelli, Ilaria; Melandri, Giovanni; Branzi, Angelo; Rapezzi, Claudio

    2011-07-01

    We sought to evaluate the prognostic significance of ST-segment elevation (STE) in lead aVR in unselected patients with non-STE acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS). We enrolled 1,042 consecutive patients with NSTE-ACS. Patients were divided into 5 groups according to the following electrocardiographic (ECG) patterns on admission: (1) normal electrocardiogram or no significant ST-T changes, (2) inverted T waves, (3) isolated ST deviation (ST depression [STD] without STE in lead aVR or transient STE), (4) STD plus STE in lead aVR, and (5) ECG confounders (pacing, right or left bundle branch block). The main angiographic end point was left main coronary artery (LM) disease as the culprit artery. Clinical end points were in-hospital and 1-year cardiovascular death defined as the composite of cardiac death, fatal stroke, and fatal bleeding. Prevalence of STD plus STE in lead aVR was 13.4%. Rates of culprit LM disease and in-hospital cardiovascular death were 8.1% and 3.8%, respectively. On multivariable analysis, patients with STD plus STE in lead aVR (group 4) showed an increased risk of culprit LM disease (odds ratio 4.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.31 to 9.64, p <0.001) and in-hospital cardiovascular mortality (odds ratio 5.58, 95% CI 2.35 to 13.24, p <0.001) compared to patients without any ST deviation (pooled groups 1, 2, and 5), whereas patients with isolated ST deviation (group 3) did not. At 1-year follow-up 127 patients (12.2%) died from cardiovascular causes. On multivariable analysis, STD plus STE in lead aVR was a stronger independent predictor of cardiovascular death (hazard ratio 2.29, 95% CI 1.44 to 3.64, p <0.001) than isolated ST deviation (hazard ratio 1.52, 95% CI 0.98 to 2.36, p = 0.06). In conclusion, STD plus STE in lead aVR is associated with high-risk coronary lesions and predicts in-hospital and 1-year cardiovascular deaths in patients with NSTE-ACS. Therefore, this promptly available ECG pattern could be useful to improve risk

  11. Atmospheric deposition to high-elevation forests

    SciTech Connect

    Lovett, G.M.; Weathers, K.C.; Lindberg, S.E. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1994-06-01

    Three important phenomena characterize atmospheric deposition to high-elevation forests: (1) multiple deposition mechanisms (wet, dry, and cloud deposition), (2) high rates of deposition, and (3) high spatial variability. The high rates of deposition are caused by changes in meteorological conditions with elevation, especially increasing wind speed and cloud immersion frequency. The high spatial variability of deposition is a result of the regulation of cloud and dry deposition rates by microclimatic and canopy structure conditions, which can be extremely heterogeneous in mountain landscapes. Spruce-fir forests are often [open quotes]hot spots[close quotes] of deposition when viewed in a landscape or regional context because of their elevation, exposure, and evergreen canopy. In this talk we will consider atmospheric depositions to high-elevation forests in both the northeastern and southeastern U.S., using field data and geographic information systems to illustrate deposition patterns.

  12. Impact of Clinical Presentation (Stable Angina Pectoris vs Unstable Angina Pectoris or Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction vs ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction) on Long-Term Outcomes in Women Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention With Drug-Eluting Stents.

    PubMed

    Giustino, Gennaro; Baber, Usman; Stefanini, Giulio Giuseppe; Aquino, Melissa; Stone, Gregg W; Sartori, Samantha; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Wijns, William; Smits, Pieter C; Jeger, Raban V; Leon, Martin B; Windecker, Stephan; Serruys, Patrick W; Morice, Marie-Claude; Camenzind, Edoardo; Weisz, Giora; Kandzari, David; Dangas, George D; Mastoris, Ioannis; Von Birgelen, Clemens; Galatius, Soren; Kimura, Takeshi; Mikhail, Ghada; Itchhaporia, Dipti; Mehta, Laxmi; Ortega, Rebecca; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Valgimigli, Marco; Kastrati, Adnan; Chieffo, Alaide; Mehran, Roxana

    2015-09-15

    The long-term risk associated with different coronary artery disease (CAD) presentations in women undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stents (DES) is poorly characterized. We pooled patient-level data for women enrolled in 26 randomized clinical trials. Of 11,577 women included in the pooled database, 10,133 with known clinical presentation received a DES. Of them, 5,760 (57%) had stable angina pectoris (SAP), 3,594 (35%) had unstable angina pectoris (UAP) or non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), and 779 (8%) had ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) as clinical presentation. A stepwise increase in 3-year crude cumulative mortality was observed in the transition from SAP to STEMI (4.9% vs 6.1% vs 9.4%; p <0.01). Conversely, no differences in crude mortality rates were observed between 1 and 3 years across clinical presentations. After multivariable adjustment, STEMI was independently associated with greater risk of 3-year mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 3.45; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.99 to 5.98; p <0.01), whereas no differences were observed between UAP or NSTEMI and SAP (HR 0.99; 95% CI 0.73 to 1.34; p = 0.94). In women with ACS, use of new-generation DES was associated with reduced risk of major adverse cardiac events (HR 0.58; 95% CI 0.34 to 0.98). The magnitude and direction of the effect with new-generation DES was uniform between women with or without ACS (pinteraction = 0.66). In conclusion, in women across the clinical spectrum of CAD, STEMI was associated with a greater risk of long-term mortality. Conversely, the adjusted risk of mortality between UAP or NSTEMI and SAP was similar. New-generation DESs provide improved long-term clinical outcomes irrespective of the clinical presentation in women.

  13. Our changing atmosphere: evidence based on long-term infrared solar observations at the Jungfraujoch since 1950.

    PubMed

    Zander, R; Mahieu, E; Demoulin, P; Duchatelet, P; Roland, G; Servais, C; De Mazière, M; Reimann, S; Rinsland, C P

    2008-03-01

    The Institute of Astrophysics of the University of Liège has been present at the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch, Switzerland, since the late 1940s, to perform spectrometric solar observations under dry and weakly polluted high-mountain conditions. Several solar atlases of photometric quality, extending altogether from the near-ultra-violet to the middle-infrared, were produced between 1956 and 1994, first with grating spectrometers then with Fourier transform instruments. During the early 1970s, scientific concerns emerged about atmospheric composition changes likely to set in as a consequence of the growing usage of nitrogen-containing agricultural fertilisers and the industrial production of chlorine-bearing compounds such as the chlorofluorocarbons and hydro-chlorofluorocarbons. Resulting releases to the atmosphere with ensuing photolysis in the stratosphere and catalytic depletion of the protective ozone layer prompted a worldwide consortium of chemical manufacturing companies to solicit the Liège group to help in clarifying these concerns by undertaking specific observations with its existing Jungfraujoch instrumentation. The following pages evoke the main steps that led from quasi full sun-oriented studies to priority investigations of the Earth's atmosphere, in support of both the Montreal and the Kyoto Protocols.

  14. Seasonal and Day-to-day Variations of Thermospheric Tides and Dynamo Fields Studied with a Long-term Whole Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupled Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, H.; Miyoshi, Y.; Fujiwara, H.; Shinagawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    Day-to-day and longer variations of ionospheric electron density, which affect various space weather applications, are caused originally from the solar activity variations and the rotation of the sun as well as the lower atmospheric activity. For the latter source, atmospheric waves such as tides and planetary waves are generated in the moist convection, which propagate through the middle atmosphere affected by various dynamical processes such as their interactions with the mean zonal wind and other waves, and reach the lower thermosphere where they induce dynamo electric fields. According to the recent satellite and ground-based observations, the characteristics of tides and planetary waves in the lower thermosphere are becoming known more clearly, such as the seasonal and latitude variations of major tides, planetary wave-like oscillations, and irregular variations during stratospheric sudden warming, and so on. In this paper, we use a whole atmosphere-ionosphere coupled model called GAIA, and have carried out a simulation from 1996 to 2013 with realistic forcing from the lower atmosphere by nudging the meteorological reanalysis (JRA) into the model. By analyzing the long-term model data, we investigate how the tidal variability and planetary waves in the lower thermosphere produce the seasonal and day-to-day variations in the dynamo electric field as well as the origin of the variations in the lower and middle atmospheres.

  15. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide effects on cotton plant residue decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Torbert, H.A.; Prior, S.A.; Rogers, H.H.

    1995-09-01

    Assessing the impact of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration on the global environment is hampered due to a lack of understanding of global C cycling. Carbon fixed within plant biomass ultimately enters the soil via plant residues, but the effects of elevated-CO{sub 2}-grown plant material on decomposition rates and long-term soil C storage are unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the decomposition rate of plant residues grown under an elevated CO{sub 2} environment as affected by soil type. Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. `Delta Pine 77`) samples were collected from a free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (550 {mu}L L{sup -1}) experiment. The plant residues were incubated under ambient CO{sub 2} conditions to determine decomposition rates of leaves, stems, and roots and potential N and P mineralization-immobilization in three soil series. No significant difference was observed between plant residue grown under CO{sub 2} enrichment vs. ambient CO{sub 2} conditions for soil respiration or P mineralization-immobilization. Significantly greater net N immobilization was observed during the incubation in all soil types for plant residue grown at elevated CO{sub 2}. These results indicate that while decomposition of plant residue may not be reduced by CO{sub 2} enrichment, N dynamics may be markedly changed. 32 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Effect of climate change on C:N pools in a fringe boreal watershed: Will it complement long-term atmospheric N inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Stottlemyer, R. )

    1993-06-01

    The objective of this ongoing study is to assess if Possible changes in the nitrogen cycle, as predicted from global climate scenarios for temperature and moisture, might complement long-term inorganic precipitation nitrogen (N) inputs to boreal forests of Isle Royale. Change in ecosystem C is dependant on nutrient status especially N. Present atmospheric contaminant inputs of N (>6 kg ha[sup [minus]1] yr[sup [minus]1]) exceed the ecological requirements of major boreal forest species. A decade of boreal watershed level study shows strong N retention (92%). Large organic (21 % of above ground biomass) and N reservoirs (>550 kg ha[sup [minus]1]) in the forest floor suggest higher content of recalcitrant compounds and high inputs could reduce C:N ratios and accelerate N mineralization. This would accentuate atmospheric N inputs likely favoring conifers and possibly leading to N saturation.

  17. Hyperglycemia, acute insulin resistance, and renal dysfunction in the early phase of ST-elevation myocardial infarction without previously known diabetes: impact on long-term prognosis.

    PubMed

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Valente, Serafina; Chiostri, Marco; Attanà, Paola; Mattesini, Alessio; Nesti, Martina; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated the relationship between admission renal function (as assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)), hyperglycemia, and acute insulin resistance, indicated by the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) index, and their impact on long-term prognosis in 825 consecutive patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) without previously known diabetes who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Admission eGFR showed a significant indirect correlation with admission glycemia (Spearman's ρ -0.23, P < 0.001) and insulin values (Spearman's ρ -0.11, P = 0.002). The incidence of patients with admission glycemia ≥140 mg/dl was significantly higher in patients with eGFR <60 ml/min/m(2) (P < 0.001) as well as the incidence of HOMA positivity (P = 0.002). According to our data, a relationship between renal function and glucose values and acute insulin resistance in the early phase of STEMI was detectable, since a significant, indirect correlation between eGFR, insulin values, and glycemia was observed. Patients with renal dysfunction (eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) exhibited higher glucose values and a higher incidence of acute insulin resistance (as assessed by HOMA index) than those with normal renal function (eGFR ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)). The prognostic role of glucose values for 1-year mortality was confined to patients with eGFR ≥60 ml/min/m(2), who represent the large part of our population and are thought to be at lower risk. In these patients, an independent relationship between 1-year mortality and glucose values was detectable not only for admission glycemia but also for glucose values measured at discharge.

  18. Atmospheric direct uptake and long-term fate of radiocesium in trees after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Mahara, Yasunori; Ohta, Tomoko; Ogawa, Hideki; Kumata, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Large areas of forests were radioactively contaminated by the Fukushima nuclear accident of 2011, and forest decontamination is now an important problem in Japan. However, whether trees absorb radioactive fallout from soil via the roots or directly from the atmosphere through the bark and leaves is unclear. We measured the uptake of radiocesium by trees in forests heavily contaminated by the Fukushima nuclear accident. The radiocesium concentrations in sapwood of two tree species, the deciduous broadleaved konara (Quercus serrata) and the evergreen coniferous sugi (Cryptomeria japonica), were higher than that in heartwood. The concentration profiles showed anomalous directionality in konara and non-directionality in sugi, indicating that most radiocesium in the tree rings was directly absorbed from the atmosphere via bark and leaves rather than via roots. Numerical modelling shows that the maximum (137)Cs concentration in the xylem of konara will be achieved 28 years after the accident. Conversely, the values for sugi will monotonously decrease because of the small transfer factor in this species. Overall, xylem (137)Cs concentrations will not be affected by root uptake if active root systems occur 10 cm below the soil. PMID:25409781

  19. Atmospheric direct uptake and long-term fate of radiocesium in trees after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Mahara, Yasunori; Ohta, Tomoko; Ogawa, Hideki; Kumata, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Large areas of forests were radioactively contaminated by the Fukushima nuclear accident of 2011, and forest decontamination is now an important problem in Japan. However, whether trees absorb radioactive fallout from soil via the roots or directly from the atmosphere through the bark and leaves is unclear. We measured the uptake of radiocesium by trees in forests heavily contaminated by the Fukushima nuclear accident. The radiocesium concentrations in sapwood of two tree species, the deciduous broadleaved konara (Quercus serrata) and the evergreen coniferous sugi (Cryptomeria japonica), were higher than that in heartwood. The concentration profiles showed anomalous directionality in konara and non-directionality in sugi, indicating that most radiocesium in the tree rings was directly absorbed from the atmosphere via bark and leaves rather than via roots. Numerical modelling shows that the maximum (137)Cs concentration in the xylem of konara will be achieved 28 years after the accident. Conversely, the values for sugi will monotonously decrease because of the small transfer factor in this species. Overall, xylem (137)Cs concentrations will not be affected by root uptake if active root systems occur 10 cm below the soil.

  20. On the Sensitivity of Atmospheric Ensembles to Cloud Microphysics in Long-Term Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeng, Xiping; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen; Hou, Arthur Y.; Zhang, Minghua; Simpson, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Month-long large-scale forcing data from two field campaigns are used to drive a cloud-resolving model (CRM) and produce ensemble simulations of clouds and precipitation. Observational data are then used to evaluate the model results. To improve the model results, a new parameterization of the Bergeron process is proposed that incorporates the number concentration of ice nuclei (IN). Numerical simulations reveal that atmospheric ensembles are sensitive to IN concentration and ice crystal multiplication. Two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) simulations are carried out to address the sensitivity of atmospheric ensembles to model dimensionality. It is found that the ensembles with high IN concentration are more sensitive to dimensionality than those with low IN concentration. Both the analytic solutions of linear dry models and the CRM output show that there are more convective cores with stronger updrafts in 3D simulations than in 2D, which explains the differing sensitivity of the ensembles to dimensionality at different IN concentrations.

  1. Permian-Triassic boundary interval as a model for forcing marine ecosystem collapse by long-term atmospheric oxygen drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidlich, O.; Kiessling, W.; Flügel, E.

    2003-11-01

    Ecological traits of reefs across the Permian-Triassic boundary interval coincide with a modeled decline of atmospheric oxygen throughout the Permian Period. Selective extinction and recovery patterns within the reef system are observed both at the end of the middle Permian (end-Guadalupian) and at the Permian-Triassic boundary. The end-Guadalupian event selectively affected corals and broke down the cool-water carbonate factory. Sponges, however, were largely unaffected and bloomed in reefs toward the end of the Permian. The end-Permian total destruction of the metazoan reef system only left behind poorly diverse microbial communities. The temporal reef patterns are thus similar to spatial patterns of modern benthic communities approaching oxygen minimum zones. This observation suggests that a decline in oxygen concentrations was at least partly involved in the destruction of reefs, even where there is no direct evidence of oceanic anoxia.

  2. Long-term trends in atmospheric concentrations of sulfate, total sulfur, and trace elements in the northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Liaquat; Parekh, Pravin P.; Dutkiewicz, Vincent A.; Khan, Adil R.; Yang, Karl; Swami, Kamal

    2004-09-01

    Concentrations of K, Sc, Mn, Fe, Zn, As, Se, Sb, Hg, and Pb were determined in quarterly composites of daily aerosol samples collected at Mayville, and 530 km downwind at Whiteface Mountain (1.5 km altitude), New York, for ˜20 years. SO4 concentrations [SO4] were determined in individual daily samples. Continuous hourly SO2 data are also available for much of the period. [SO4] at Mayville were twice that at Whiteface Mountain, and total S (S as SO2 + SO4) burden was fourfold higher at Mayville. From 1979 through 2002, [SO4] decreased by 59% at Whiteface Mountain, and at Mayville the decrease was 30% from 1984 to 2002. From 1979 to 2002, SO2 emissions in eight states upwind of and contiguous with New York State (Ohio, Pennsylvania, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Kentucky, West Virginia, and Ontario, Canada) decreased by 49%. A linear relationship was observed between atmospheric [SO4] and [total S] burden at the two sites with the cumulative SO2 emissions. These observations suggest that any further reductions in SO2 emissions would result in a proportional decrease in [SO4] and [total S] across New York State and possibly across the northeastern United States. The data at Whiteface Mountain suggest that beginning in 1997, the decrease in [SO4] and [total S], relative to SO2 emissions, may be faster than the earlier period. Like [SO4] and [total S], the trace element concentrations were twofold to fivefold higher at Mayville than at Whiteface Mountain. The concentrations at both sites showed an unmistakable decrease over time. The largest decreases were observed for Hg (16%/year at Whiteface Mountain and 10%/year at Mayville) and Pb (14%/year at Whiteface Mountain and 10%/year at Mayville). The remaining elements (except Sb), including the crustal elements K, Mn, Sc, and Fe, showed a decreases of 3-5%/year. Trends for Sb at Whiteface Mountain and for Mn at Mayville could not be accurately discerned, apparently due to some nearby emissions. Apparently, the reductions

  3. Long-term trends of continental-scale PCB patterns studied using a global atmosphere-ocean general circulation model.

    PubMed

    Stemmler, Irene; Lammel, Gerhard

    2012-07-01

    Continental-scale distribution and inter-continental transport of four polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners (28, 101, 153, 180) from 1950 to 2010 were studied using the global multicompartment chemistry transport model MPI-MCTM. Following identical primary emissions for all PCB congeners into air, most of the burden is stored in terrestrial (soil and vegetation) compartments. Thereby, PCB-28, PCB-101 and PCB-153 show a shift of the soil burden maxima from source to remote regions. This shift is downwind with regard to the westerlies for Eurasia and upwind for North America and more prominent for the lighter PCBs than for PCB-153 or PCB-180. In meridional direction, all congeners' distributions underwent a northward migration in Eurasia and North America since the 1950s. Inter-continental transport from Eurasian sources accounts largely for contamination of Alaska and British Columbia and determines the migration of the PCB distribution in soil in North America. Trans-Pacific transport occurs mainly in the gas phase in boreal winter (December-January-February) at 3-4 km altitude and is on a multi-year time scale strongly linked to the atmospheric pressure systems over the Pacific. Inter-continental transport of the lighter, more volatile PCBs is more efficient than for the heavier PCBs.

  4. Long-term records of fire occurrence and their implications for gaseous and particulate emissions to the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.S.; Stocks, B.J. Forestry Canada, Sault Ste, Marie, Ontario )

    1993-06-01

    Changing climate and land use appear to importantly affect the biosphere by way of impacts on fire regimes. Feedback effects on climate and air quality are likely through emissions of trace gases, aerosols, and particulates that affect radiation budgets, stability of the troposphere, and biogeochemical and hydrologic cycles. Paleorecords of biomass burning are available in the form of stratigraphic charcoal in lake and mire deposits and fire scars on trees. When taken together with recent emissions data from experimental bums and wildland fires they hold promise for estimation of how changing fire regimes may be affecting atmospheric composition. We synthesize existing evidence for effects of global change on fire regimes for each of the major biomes. Fire regimes vary in their sensitivities to changing climate, with woodland/savanna types and boreal forest among the most sensitive. Emissions have greatly increased with changing human influences in some vegetation types (temperate and some low-latitude biomes) and decreased in others (temperate pine forests). Some biomes, including boreal forests, hold promise for rather detailed reconstructions of past emissions. We recommend that future efforts focus on those regions where the importance of fire and availability of paleodata are greatest.

  5. X-rays absorption study on medieval corrosion layers for the understanding of very long-term indoor atmospheric iron corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, J.; Réguer, S.; Vantelon, D.; Dillmann, P.; Neff, D.; Guillot, I.

    2010-05-01

    The study and prediction of very long-term atmospheric corrosion behaviour of ferrous alloys is of great importance in different fields. First the conservation of metallic artefacts in museum and the corrosion diagnosis on ferrous reinforcement used in ancient monuments since medieval times needs reliable data to understand the mechanisms. Second, in the frame of the interim storage of nuclear waste in France, it is necessary to model the long-term corrosion of low alloy steel overcontainer. The nature of phases and elements constituting the corrosion layers can greatly influence the corrosion mechanisms. On the one hand, it is crucial to precisely determine the nature of microscopic phases that can be highly reactive. On the other hand, some elements as P and S could modify this reactivity. To clarify this point and complementary to other studies using Raman micro spectroscopy technique, X-rays Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) under synchrotron radiation plays a crucial role. It allows one to precisely identify the reactive phases in the corrosion layers. Micro-XAS was required in order to refine the spatial variation, at micrometer scale, of the predominant Fe oxidation state and to characterise the corresponding corrosion products. Moreover, the role of minor elements on phase’s stability and the chemical form of these elements in the rust layer, especially phosphorus and sulphur, was investigated.

  6. Relevance of long term time - Series of atmospheric parameters at a mountain observatory to models for climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kancírová, M.; Kudela, K.; Erlykin, A. D.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2016-10-01

    A detailed analysis has been made based on annual meteorological and cosmic ray data from the Lomnicky stit mountain observatory (LS, 2634 masl; 49.40°N, 20.22°E; vertical cut-off rigidity 3.85 GV), from the standpoint of looking for possible solar cycle (including cosmic ray) manifestations. A comparison of the mountain data with the Global average for the cloud cover in general shows no correlation but there is a possible small correlation for low clouds (LCC in the Global satellite data). However, whereas it cannot be claimed that cloud cover observed at Lomnicky stit (LSCC) can be used directly as a proxy for the Global LCC, its examination has value because it is an independent estimate of cloud cover and one that has a different altitude weighting to that adopted in the satellite-derived LCC. This statement is derived from satellite data (http://isccp.giss.nasa.gov/climanal7.html) which shows the time series for the period 1983-2010 for 9 cloud regimes. There is a significant correlation only between cosmic ray (CR) intensity (and sunspot number (SSN)) and the cloud cover of the types cirrus and stratus. This effect is mainly confined to the CR intensity minimum during the epoch around 1990, when the SSN was at its maximum. This fact, together with the present study of the correlation of LSCC with our measured CR intensity, shows that there is no firm evidence for a significant contribution of CR induced ionization to the local (or, indeed, Global) cloud cover. Pressure effects are the preferred cause of the cloud cover changes. A consequence is that there is no evidence favouring a contribution of CR to the Global Warming problem. Our analysis shows that the LS data are consistent with the Gas Laws for a stable mass of atmosphere.

  7. Long-term changes and trends in total ozone over the northern mid-latitudes: Influence of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry and contribution from extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Ribatet, M.; di Rocco, S.; Frossard, L.; Jancso, L. M.; Peter, T.; Davison, A. C.

    2010-12-01

    Downward trends in global stratospheric ozone during recent decades have been shown to be directly linked to increasing surface UV-radiation. In the past, long-term ozone trends were determined from homogenized data series by fitting with multiple linear regression models, in which suitable independent variables (so-called explanatory variables) were used to represent atmospheric variability, such as the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO), the 11-year solar cycle, and a linear trend attributed to anthropogenic ozone depletion. Previous studies have identified a number of other processes influencing total ozone at mid-latitudes, such as synoptic-scale meteorological variability, decadal or long-term climate variability, described e.g. by the Northern Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the Arctic Oscillation (AO), atmospheric circulation indices ENSO, temperature at the 470-K isentrope level, and volcanic eruptions. Due to the successful implementation of the Montreal Protocol the discussion about a recovery or possible “super recovery” started within the scientific community. Here we address long-term changes and trends in a different framework. As statistical analysis showed that previously used concepts assuming a Gaussian distribution of total ozone data do not address the internal data structure concerning extremes adequately methods from extreme value theory are applied on local (various long-term ground based total ozone records) and regional (high resolution homogenized satellite data) scale. Within the extreme value theory framework days with extreme low (ELOs) and high (EHOs) total ozone are analyzed and their frequency is linked to changes in atmospheric chemistry and dynamics. The results show: (i) an increase in ELOs and (ii) a decrease in EHOs during the last decades and (iii) that the overall trend during the 1970s and 1980s in total ozone is strongly dominated by changes in these extreme events. After removing the extremes, the different time series show a

  8. Searching for a Relationship Between Forest Water Use and Increasing Atmospheric CO2 Concentration with Long-Term Hydrologic Data from the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Amthor, J.S.

    1998-11-01

    Increases in atmospheric C02 concentration from mid-1956 through mid-1997 were compared with hydrologic records from five forested, gaged watersheds in the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) in New Hampshire, U.S.A. The purpose of the comparison was to assess whether a relationship between increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and whole-ecosystem evapotranspiration (ET) could be determined. The HBEF is particularly well suited to this type of study because of the length of the hydrologic record and the physical properties of the watersheds. This analysis is based on HBEF water years (which begin 1 June and end the following 31 May) rather than calendar years. Hydrologic records from individual watersheds used in this analysis ranged from 28 to 41 water years. During the full 41-water-year period, it is estimated that water-year mean atmospheric CO2 concentration increased more than 15% (from about 314 to 363 ppm). In one south-facing watershed (i.e., HBEF watershed 3), there was a statistically significant negative relationship between atmospheric C02 concentration and ET. This translated into a nearly 77 rnndyear reduction in ET as a result of a 50 ppm increase in atmospheric C02 concentration, a result of practical significance. Evapotranspiration from the other watersheds was also negatively related to atmospheric CO2 concentration, but with smaller (and statistically insignificant) magnitudes. Evapotranspiration from the three south-facing (but not the two north-facing) watersheds included in the analysis was "abnormally" low during the most recent 2 years (i.e., water years beginning in 1995 and 1996), and this affected the trends in ET. This recent and abrupt, reduction in ET deserves further analysis, most importantly by an extension of the hydrologic record through continued long-term monitoring in the HBEF (which is ongoing). If ET remains relatively low during the coming years in south-facing watersheds, studies of the physical and/or biological

  9. Evidence of long-term change in fluvial DOC composition - why is fluvial DOC increasing and is it having more impact on the atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, F.; Burt, T. P.

    2009-12-01

    Long term increases in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and are now a commonly reported phenomenon across the Northern Hemisphere. Hypotheses proposed to explain the observed increases have implications for changes in DOC composition as well as concentration. This study examines the records of BOD,Colour and DOC from the UK’s Harmonised Monitoring Scheme database from 1974 to 2005 and covers 196 rivers over that period.. The records show that: i) there is a significant decline in the BOD:DOC ratio that is not due to changes in flow; changes in BOD or DOC concentration. ii) the trend in the BOD/DOC ratio represents a change to more refractory organic matter. However, the decline in degradability over the period of study is less than the increase in DOC flux implying that losses of CO2 to the atmosphere from rivers would still increase. iii) The analysis showed that there was a significant trend over time in the colour:DOC ratio These changes are not explained by variation in flow or by changes in DOC concentrations at the individual sampling sites. iv) The decline in the colour: DOC ratio declined to a minimum from 1974 to 1989 and has since risen but not returned to 1974 values. v) A change in the DOC-colour ratio that is independent of DOC and flow and that reaches a minimum in 1989 could be explained by changes in soil source water chemistry, but long term declines are more readily explained by changes in air temperature of atmospheric CO2.

  10. Long-term aerosol-mediated changes in cloud radiative forcing of deep clouds at the top and bottom of the atmosphere over the Southern Great Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hongru; Li, Zhanqing; Huang, Jianping; Cribb, Maureen; Liu, Jianjun

    2014-02-01

    Aerosols can alter the macro- and micro-physical properties of deep convective clouds (DCC) and their radiative forcing (CRF). This study presents what is arguably the first long-term estimate of the aerosol-mediated changes in CRF (AMCRF) for deep cloud systems derived from decade-long continuous ground-based and satellite observations, model simulations and reanalysis data. Measurements were made at the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Satellite retrievals are from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). Increases in aerosol loading were accompanied by the thickening of DCC cores and the expansion and thinning of anvils, due presumably to the aerosol invigoration effect (AIV) and the aerosol microphysical effect (AME). Meteorological variables dictating these cloud processes were investigated. Consistent with previous findings, the AIV is most significant when the atmosphere is moist and unstable with weak wind shear. Such aerosol-mediated systematic changes in DCC core thickness and anvil size alter CRF at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface. Using extensive observations, ~300 DCC systems were identified over a 10 yr period at the SGP site (2000-2011) and analyzed. Daily mean AMCRF at the TOA and at the surface are 29.3 W m-2 and 22.2 W m-2, respectively. This net warming effect due to changes in DCC microphysics offsets the cooling resulting from the first aerosol indirect effect.

  11. Long-term aerosol-mediated changes in cloud radiative forcing of deep clouds at the top and bottom of the atmosphere over the Southern Great Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hongru; Li, Zhanqing; Huang, Jianping; Cribb, Maureen; Liu, Jianjun

    2014-07-01

    Aerosols can alter the macro- and micro-physical properties of deep convective clouds (DCCs) and their radiative forcing (CRF). This study presents what is arguably the first long-term estimate of the aerosol-mediated changes in CRF (AMCRF) for deep cloud systems derived from decade-long continuous ground-based and satellite observations, model simulations, and reanalysis data. Measurements were made at the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Satellite retrievals are from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite. Increases in aerosol loading were accompanied by the thickening of DCC cores and the expansion and thinning of anvils, due presumably to the aerosol invigoration effect (AIV) and the aerosol microphysical effect. Meteorological variables dictating these cloud processes were investigated. Consistent with previous findings, the AIV is most significant when the atmosphere is moist and unstable with weak wind shear. Such aerosol-mediated systematic changes in DCC core thickness and anvil size alter CRF at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface. Using extensive observations, ~300 DCC systems were identified over a 10 years period at the SGP site (2000-2011) and analyzed. Daily mean AMCRF at the TOA and at the surface are 29.3 W m-2 and 22.2 W m-2, respectively. This net warming effect due to changes in DCC microphysics offsets the cooling resulting from the first aerosol indirect effect.

  12. The Long Term Effects of Social Skills Training in Elevating Overall Academic Grade Point Average, School Attendance, Health Level, and Resistance to Drug Use and Peer Pressure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Nancy; Smith, Manuel J.

    Project STAR (Social Thinking and Reasoning Program) is a classroom-based social skills program for students in grades 5-8. To assess the long-term effectiveness of this program, students participated in the project (N=331) were compared with control students (N=191) during 1980-83. The hypothesis that there are significant differences in current…

  13. Effects of long-term pH elevation on the sulfate-reducing and methanogenic activities of anaerobic sewer biofilms.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Oriol; Park, Donghee; Sharma, Keshab Raj; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2009-05-01

    The dosage of alkali is often applied by the wastewater industry to reduce the transfer of hydrogen sulfide from wastewater to the sewer atmosphere. In this paper the activities of Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) and Methanogenic Archaea (MA) under elevated pH conditions (8.6 and 9.0) were evaluated in a laboratory scale anaerobic sewer reactor. Compared to those in a control reactor without pH control (pH 7.6+/-0.1), the SRB activity was reduced by 30% and 50%, respectively, at pH 8.6 and pH 9.0. When normal pH was resumed, it took approximately 1 month for the SRB activity to fully recover. Methanogenic activities developed in the control reactor in 3 months after the reactor start-up, while no significant methanogenic activities were detected in the experimental reactor until normal pH was resumed. The results suggest that elevated pH at 8.6-9.0 suppressed the growth of methanogens. These experimental results clearly showed that, in addition to its well-known effect of reducing H(2)S transfer from the liquid to the gas phase, pH elevation considerably reduces sulfide and methane production by anaerobic sewer biofilms. These findings are significant for the optimal use of alkali addition to sewers for the control of H(2)S and CH(4) emissions. A model-based study showed that, by adding the alkali at the beginning rather than towards the end of a rising main, substantial savings in chemicals can be achieved while achieving the same level of sulfide emission control, and complete methane emission control.

  14. Tracing changes in N transformations in a permanent grassland under elevated atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Gerald; Gorenflo, André; Brenzinger, Kristof; Keidel, Lisa; Elias, Dafydd; McNamara, Niall; Maček, Irena; Vodnik, Dominik; Braker, Gesche; Schimmelpfennig, Sonja; Gerstner, Judith; Müller, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Long-term observations (> 14 years) within the Giessen Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (Giessen FACE) study on permanent grassland showed that the carbon fertilization caused significant changes in the ecosystem nitrogen cycle. The goal of this study is to understand the long-term effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and carbon input on the soil N transformations and plant N uptake in the Giessen FACE study. A pulse labelling with 15N tracing of 15NH4+ and 15NO3- was carried out in situ. Different fractions of soil organic matter (recalcitrant, labile SOM) and the various mineral N pools in the soil (NH4+, NO3-), simultaneous gross N transformation rates, N species dependent plant N uptake have been quantified. The quantification of the gross N transformations are based on the turnover of NH4+, NO3- and shall illuminate the interaction between carbon fertilization and changes in nitrogen cycle in this grassland ecosystem. Under elevated atmospheric CO2, results shortly after N fertilization differed from long-term results and are in line with the long-term trace gas record of the site. In particular the ammonia oxidation, the mineralisation-immobilisation turnover, as well as dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA) and N plant uptake were affected. To further elucidate the microbial dynamics, the microbial communities and in particular the activity of the denitrifiers were evaluated.

  15. Long-term variations in abundance and distribution of sulfuric acid vapor in the Venus atmosphere inferred from Pioneer Venus and Magellan radio occultation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.; Steffes, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    Radio occultation experiments have been used to study various properties of planetary atmospheres, including pressure and temperature profiles, and the abundance profiles of absorbing constituents in those planetary atmospheres. However, the reduction of amplitude data from such experiments to determine abundance profiles requires the application of the inverse Abel transform (IAT) and numerical differentiation of experimental data. These two operations preferentially amplify measurement errors above the true signal underlying the data. A new technique for processing radio occultation data has been developed that greatly reduces the errors in the derived absorptivity and abundance profiles. This technique has been applied to datasets acquired from Pioneer Venus Orbiter radio occultation studies and more recently to experiments conducted with the Magellan spacecraft. While primarily designed for radar studies of the Venus surface, the high radiated power (EIRP) from the Magellan spacecraft makes it an ideal transmitter for measuring the refractivity and absorptivity of the Venus atmosphere by such experiments. The longevity of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter has made it possible to study long-term changes in the abundance and distribution of sulfuric acid vapor, H2SO4(g), in the Venus atmosphere between 1979 and 1992. The abundance of H2SO4(g) can be inferred from vertical profiles of 13-cm absorptivity profiles retrieved from radio occultation experiments. Data from 1979 and 1986-87 suggest that the abundance of H2SO4(g) at latitudes northward of 70 deg decreased over this time period. This change may be due to a period of active volcanism in the late 1970s followed by a relative quiescent period, or some other dynamic process in the Venus atmosphere. While the cause is not certain, such changes must be incorporated into dynamic models of the Venus atmosphere. Potentially, the Magellan spacecraft will extend the results of Pioneer Venus Orbiter and allow the continued

  16. Building long-term and high spatio-temporal resolution precipitation and air temperature reanalyses by mixing local observations and global atmospheric reanalyses: the ANATEM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuentz, A.; Mathevet, T.; Gailhard, J.; Hingray, B.

    2015-06-01

    Efforts to improve the understanding of past climatic or hydrologic variability have received a great deal of attention in various fields of geosciences such as glaciology, dendrochronology, sedimentology and hydrology. Based on different proxies, each research community produces different kinds of climatic or hydrologic reanalyses at different spatio-temporal scales and resolutions. When considering climate or hydrology, many studies have been devoted to characterising variability, trends or breaks using observed time series representing different regions or climates of the world. However, in hydrology, these studies have usually been limited to short temporal scales (mainly a few decades and more rarely a century) because they require observed time series (which suffer from a limited spatio-temporal density). This paper introduces ANATEM, a method that combines local observations and large-scale climatic information (such as the 20CR Reanalysis) to build long-term probabilistic air temperature and precipitation time series with a high spatio-temporal resolution (1 day and a few km2). ANATEM was tested on the reconstruction of air temperature and precipitation time series of 22 watersheds situated in the Durance River basin, in the French Alps. Based on a multi-criteria and multi-scale diagnosis, the results show that ANATEM improves the performance of classical statistical models - especially concerning spatial homogeneity - while providing an original representation of uncertainties which are conditioned by atmospheric circulation patterns. The ANATEM model has been also evaluated for the regional scale against independent long-term time series and was able to capture regional low-frequency variability over more than a century (1883-2010).

  17. Mobility particle size spectrometers: harmonization of technical standards and data structure to facilitate high quality long-term observations of atmospheric particle number size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedensohler, A.; Birmili, W.; Nowak, A.; Sonntag, A.; Weinhold, K.; Merkel, M.; Wehner, B.; Tuch, T.; Pfeifer, S.; Fiebig, M.; Fjäraa, A. M.; Asmi, E.; Sellegri, K.; Depuy, R.; Venzac, H.; Villani, P.; Laj, P.; Aalto, P.; Ogren, J. A.; Swietlicki, E.; Williams, P.; Roldin, P.; Quincey, P.; Hüglin, C.; Fierz-Schmidhauser, R.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, S.; Grüning, C.; Faloon, K.; Beddows, D.; Harrison, R.; Monahan, C.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Marinoni, A.; Horn, H.-G.; Keck, L.; Jiang, J.; Scheckman, J.; McMurry, P. H.; Deng, Z.; Zhao, C. S.; Moerman, M.; Henzing, B.; de Leeuw, G.; Löschau, G.; Bastian, S.

    2012-03-01

    Mobility particle size spectrometers often referred to as DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizers) or SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers) have found a wide range of applications in atmospheric aerosol research. However, comparability of measurements conducted world-wide is hampered by lack of generally accepted technical standards and guidelines with respect to the instrumental set-up, measurement mode, data evaluation as well as quality control. Technical standards were developed for a minimum requirement of mobility size spectrometry to perform long-term atmospheric aerosol measurements. Technical recommendations include continuous monitoring of flow rates, temperature, pressure, and relative humidity for the sheath and sample air in the differential mobility analyzer. We compared commercial and custom-made inversion routines to calculate the particle number size distributions from the measured electrical mobility distribution. All inversion routines are comparable within few per cent uncertainty for a given set of raw data. Furthermore, this work summarizes the results from several instrument intercomparison workshops conducted within the European infrastructure project EUSAAR (European Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research) and ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network) to determine present uncertainties especially of custom-built mobility particle size spectrometers. Under controlled laboratory conditions, the particle number size distributions from 20 to 200 nm determined by mobility particle size spectrometers of different design are within an uncertainty range of around ±10% after correcting internal particle losses, while below and above this size range the discrepancies increased. For particles larger than 200 nm, the uncertainty range increased to 30%, which could not be explained. The network reference mobility spectrometers with identical design agreed within ±4% in the peak particle number concentration

  18. Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term and Elevated Temperature Irradiation: Modeling and Experimental Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, Brian; Morgan, Dane; Kaoumi, Djamel; Motta, Arthur

    2013-12-01

    irradiation. This project will focus on modeling microstructural and microchemical evolution of irradiated alloys by performing detailed modeling of such microstructure evolution processes coupled with well-designed in situ experiments that can provide validation and benchmarking to the computer codes. The broad scientific and technical objectives of this proposal are to evaluate the microstructure and microchemical evolution in advanced ferritic/martensitic and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys for cladding and duct reactor materials under long-term and elevated temperature irradiation, leading to improved ability to model structural materials performance and lifetime. Specifically, we propose four research thrusts, namely Thrust 1: Identify the formation mechanism and evolution for dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a<100> and determine whether the defect microstructure (predominately dislocation loop/dislocation density) saturates at high dose. Thrust 2: Identify whether a threshold irradiation temperature or dose exists for the nucleation of growing voids that mark the beginning of irradiation-induced swelling, and begin to probe the limits of thermal stability of the tempered Martensitic structure under irradiation. Thrust 3: Evaluate the stability of nanometer sized Y- Ti-O based oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) particles at high fluence/temperature. Thrust 4: Evaluate the extent to which precipitates form and/or dissolve as a function of irradiation temperature and dose, and how these changes are driven by radiation induced segregation and microchemical evolutions and determined by the initial microstructure.

  19. Particle mobility size spectrometers: harmonization of technical standards and data structure to facilitate high quality long-term observations of atmospheric particle number size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedensohler, A.; Birmili, W.; Nowak, A.; Sonntag, A.; Weinhold, K.; Merkel, M.; Wehner, B.; Tuch, T.; Pfeifer, S.; Fiebig, M.; Fjäraa, A. M.; Asmi, E.; Sellegri, K.; Depuy, R.; Venzac, H.; Villani, P.; Laj, P.; Aalto, P.; Ogren, J. A.; Swietlicki, E.; Roldin, P.; Williams, P.; Quincey, P.; Hüglin, C.; Fierz-Schmidhauser, R.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, S.; Grüning, C.; Faloon, K.; Beddows, D.; Harrison, R. M.; Monahan, C.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Marinoni, A.; Horn, H.-G.; Keck, L.; Jiang, J.; Scheckman, J.; McMurry, P. H.; Deng, Z.; Zhao, C. S.; Moerman, M.; Henzing, B.; de Leeuw, G.

    2010-12-01

    Particle mobility size spectrometers often referred to as DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizers) or SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers) have found a wide application in atmospheric aerosol research. However, comparability of measurements conducted world-wide is hampered by lack of generally accepted technical standards with respect to the instrumental set-up, measurement mode, data evaluation as well as quality control. This article results from several instrument intercomparison workshops conducted within the European infrastructure project EUSAAR (European Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research). Under controlled laboratory conditions, the number size distribution from 20 to 200 nm determined by mobility size spectrometers of different design are within an uncertainty range of ±10% after correcting internal particle losses, while below and above this size range the discrepancies increased. Instruments with identical design agreed within ±3% in the peak number concentration when all settings were done carefully. Technical standards were developed for a minimum requirement of mobility size spectrometry for atmospheric aerosol measurements. Technical recommendations are given for atmospheric measurements including continuous monitoring of flow rates, temperature, pressure, and relative humidity for the sheath and sample air in the differential mobility analyser. In cooperation with EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Program), a new uniform data structure was introduced for saving and disseminating the data within EMEP. This structure contains three levels: raw data, processed data, and final particle size distributions. Importantly, we recommend reporting raw measurements including all relevant instrument parameters as well as a complete documentation on all data transformation and correction steps. These technical and data structure standards aim to enhance the quality of long-term size distribution measurements, their comparability between

  20. Atmospheric and terrestrial water budgets: sensitivity and performance of configurations and global driving data for long term continental scale WRF simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fersch, Benjamin; Kunstmann, Harald

    2014-05-01

    Driving data and physical parametrizations can significantly impact the performance of regional dynamical atmospheric models in reproducing hydrometeorologically relevant variables. Our study addresses the water budget sensitivity of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model System WRF (WRF-ARW) with respect to two cumulus parametrizations (Kain-Fritsch, Betts-Miller-Janjić), two global driving reanalyses (ECMWF ERA-INTERIM and NCAR/NCEP NNRP), time variant and invariant sea surface temperature and optional gridded nudging. The skill of global and downscaled models is evaluated against different gridded observations for precipitation, 2 m-temperature, evapotranspiration, and against measured discharge time-series on a monthly basis. Multi-year spatial deviation patterns and basin aggregated time series are examined for four globally distributed regions with different climatic characteristics: Siberia, Northern and Western Africa, the Central Australian Plane, and the Amazonian tropics. The simulations cover the period from 2003 to 2006 with a horizontal mesh of 30 km. The results suggest a high sensitivity of the physical parametrizations and the driving data on the water budgets of the regional atmospheric simulations. While the global reanalyses tend to underestimate 2 m-temperature by 0.2-2 K, the regional simulations are typically 0.5-3 K warmer than observed. Many configurations show difficulties in reproducing the water budget terms, e.g. with long-term mean precipitation biases of 150 mm month-1 and higher. Nevertheless, with the water budget analysis viable setups can be deduced for all four study regions.

  1. Ice Shelf Elevation Changes due to Atmospheric Pressure Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padman, L.; King, M.; Fricker, H. A.

    2002-12-01

    Floating ice shelves undergo vertical motion as a result of the response of the underlying ocean to changes in atmospheric pressure (Pair). This response is known as the inverse barometer effect (IBE). Open-ocean measurements of Pair and sea level agree with the theoretical response of 1 cm per millibar for low frequency variability of Pair. Here we demonstrate, using simultaneous records of Pair and GPS measurements of surface elevation (hIS) from several ice shelves, that shelves experience a response of similar magnitude. A simple correction for the IBE is justified for ice shelf response to low-frequency (ω <0.5 cycles per day) of Pair. At higher frequencies the IBE becomes weaker. The IBE contribution to hIS can exceed 50 cm, with typical magnitudes of 10-20 cm. Although the IBE is usually smaller than the tidal contribution to hIS, the tide can be removed with current Antarctic tide models with an accuracy similar to the IBE. Global atmospheric models, however, do not presently predict Pair with sufficient accuracy to be used to correct measured variability of hIS. Thus, in the absence of concurrent in situ Pair data, the IBE is a major source of error in correcting ice shelf heights for tasks such as deriving mean ice flow rates from SAR imagery, and measuring long-term trends in ice shelf height from satellite altimeters.

  2. On the role of atmosphere-ocean interactions in the expected long-term changes of the Earth's ozone layer caused by greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadorozhny, Alexander; Dyominov, Igor

    It is well known that anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere produce a global warming of the troposphere and a global cooling of the stratosphere. The expected stratospheric cooling essentially influences the ozone layer via increased polar stratospheric cloud formation and via temperature dependences of the gas phase reaction rates. One more mechanism of how greenhouse gases influences the ozone layer is enhanced water evaporation from the oceans into the atmosphere because of increasing temperatures of the ocean surface due to greenhouse effect. The subject of this paper is a study of the influence of anthropogenic pollution of the atmosphere by the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4, N2O and ozone-depleting chlorine and bromine compounds on the expected long-term changes of the ozone layer with taking into account an increase of water vapour content in the atmosphere due to greenhouse effect. The study based on 2-D zonally averaged interactive dynamical radiative-photochemical model of the troposphere and stratosphere. The model allows to self-consistently calculating diabatic circulation, temperature, gaseous composition of the troposphere and stratosphere at latitudes from the South to North Poles, as well as distribution of sulphate aerosol particles and polar stratospheric clouds of two types. It was supposed in the model that an increase of the ocean surface temperature caused by greenhouse effect is similar to calculated increase of atmospheric surface temperature. Evaporation rate from the ocean surface was computed in dependence of latitude. The model time-dependent runs were made for the period from 1975 to 2100 using two IPCC scenarios depicting maximum and average expected increases of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The model calculations show that anthropogenic increasing of water vapour abundance in the atmosphere due to heating of the ocean surface caused by greenhouse effect gives a sensible contribution to the expected ozone

  3. Effects of Long-Term CO2 Enrichment on Soil-Atmosphere CH4 Fluxes and the Spatial Micro-Distribution of Methanotrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Karbin, Saeed; Guillet, Cécile; Kammann, Claudia I.; Niklaus, Pascal A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on plant growth and associated C cycling have intensively been studied, but less is known about effects on the fluxes of radiatively active trace gases other than CO2. Net soil-atmosphere CH4 fluxes are determined by the balance of soil microbially-driven methane (CH4) oxidation and methanogenesis, and both might change under elevated CO2. Methods and Results Here, we studied CH4 dynamics in a permanent grassland exposed to elevated CO2 for 14 years. Soil-atmosphere fluxes of CH4 were measured using large static chambers, over a period of four years. The ecosystem was a net sink for atmospheric CH4 for most of the time except summer to fall when net CH4 emissions occurred. We did not detect any elevated CO2 effects on CH4 fluxes, but emissions were difficult to quantify due to their discontinuous nature, most likely because of ebullition from the saturated zone. Potential methanotrophic activity, determined by incubation of fresh sieved soil under standardized conditions, also did not reveal any effect of the CO2 treatment. Finally, we determined the spatial micro-distribution of methanotrophic activity at less than 5× atmospheric (10 ppm) and elevated (10000 ppm) CH4 concentrations, using a novel auto-radiographic technique. These analyses indicated that domains of net CH4 assimilation were distributed throughout the analyzed top 15 cm of soils, with no dependence on CH4 concentration or CO2 treatment. Conclusions Our investigations suggest that elevated CO2 exerts no or only minor effects on CH4 fluxes in the type of ecosystem we studied, at least as long as soil moisture differences are small or absent as was the case here. The autoradiographic analyses further indicate that the spatial niche of CH4 oxidation does not shift in response to CO2 enrichment or CH4 concentration, and that the same type of methanotrophs may oxidize CH4 from atmospheric and soil-internal sources. PMID:26147694

  4. Long-term temperature variations in the stratosphere and troposphere caused by changes in gas and aerosol composition of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyominov, I.; Zadorozhny, A.

    A numerical 2-D zonally averaged interactive dynamical radiative-photochemical model of the troposphere and stratosphere including aerosol physics is used for investigation of long-term temperature changes caused by anthropogenic pollution of the atmosphere by CO2 , CH4, N2O, CFCs, HCFCs, HFCs, CH 3CCl 3 and CCl4 as well as by discharges to the atmosphere of sulphate species during the Pinatubo eruption. The model allows calculating self-consistently diabatic circulation, temperature, gaseous composition of the troposphere and stratosphere at latitudes from the South to North Poles, as well as distribution of sulphate aerosol particles and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) of types I and II. The scenarios of expected changes of the anthropogenic pollutants for the period from 1990 through 2050 are taken from Climate Change 1995. The calculations of the long-term temperature variations due to anthropogenic emission s show that the greatest temperature changes are observed in the Southern Hemisphere in winter/spring periods. For example, the temperature changes at a height of 40 km at 45°S in December 2050 are about -4.85 K, 0.89 K, -2.21 K, and -4.32 K respectively for anthropogenic discharges of CO2, CH4, N2O, and chlorine species. The changes in the Northern Hemisphere are smaller. They are equal to about -4.5 K, 0.68 K, -1.46 K, and -3.17 K at 45°N. The temperature changes in the stratosphere are caused by the corresponding ozone variations and temperature feedbacks. In the troposphere, the temperature changes are determined by the greenhouse effect caused by optically active pollutants. For example, temperature increases near the Earth's surface at 45 °N in December of 2050 due to anthropogenic discharges of CO2, CH4, N2O, and chlorine species are about 0.87 K, 0.19 K, 0.14 K, and 0.32 K, respectively. The calculations show that short -term megaton discharges of sulphate species to the atmosphere during the Pinatubo eruption led to significant long-term

  5. Atmospheric drivers that compromise the assumed long-term stationarity between δ18O-based proxy records and NAO, winter air temperature and winter precipitation amount.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comas Bru, Laia; McDermott, Frank; Werner, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The control exerted by large scale atmospheric circulation modes on the oxygen isotopic composition of precipitation (δ18Op) has been utilised to infer past atmospheric circulation states using proxies that capture δ18Op at a wide range of locations. Such reconstructions typically rely on the oxygen isotopic composition of terrestrial archives such as ice-cores, tree rings, speleothems and lacustrine carbonates and are underpinned by assumptions about a long term stationarity of the influence of the atmospheric teleconnection pattern of interest on δ18Op. However, such reconstructions should also consider the uncertainties that arise from non-stationarities in the δ18Op-NAO relationship during the instrumental period. Here, new insights into the causes of these temporal non-stationarities are presented for the European region using both observations (GNIP database) and the output of an isotope-enabled general circulation model (ECHAM5-wiso). The results show that, although the East Atlantic (EA) pattern is generally uncorrelated to δ18Op during the instrumental period, its polarity affects the strength of the δ18Op-NAO relationship in some European locations. Non-stationarities in this relationship can be rationalised through changes in the sea-level pressure structure in the N. Atlantic region as a result of the concomitant states of the NAO and EA patterns, which affect the trajectories of the air-masses carrying moisture onto Europe and ultimately the δ18Op signal. These shifts are consistent with those reported previously for NAO-winter climate variables and the resulting non-stationarities mean that δ18O-based NAO reconstructions could be compromised if the balance of positive and negative NAO/EA states differs substantially in a calibration period compared with the period of interest in the past. The same approach has been followed to assess the relationships between δ18Op and both winter total precipitation and winter mean surface air temperature

  6. Influence of wildfires on atmospheric composition and carbon uptake of forest ecosystems in Central Siberia: the establishing of a long-term post-fire monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, Alexey; Chi, Xuguang; Winderlich, Jan; Prokushkin, Anatoly; Bryukhanov, Alexander; Korets, Mikhail; Ponomarev, Evgenii; Timokhina, Anastasya; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Heimann, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Calculations of direct emissions of greenhouse gases from boreal wildfires remain uncertain due to problems with emission factors, available carbon, and imprecise estimates of burned areas. Even more varied and sparse are accurate in situ calculations of temporal changes in boreal forest carbon dynamics following fire. Linking simultaneous instrumental atmospheric observations, GIS-based estimates of burned areas, and ecosystem carbon uptake calculations is vital to fill this knowledge gap. Since 2006 the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO; www.zottoproject.org) a research platform for large-scale climatic observations is operational in Central Siberia (60°48'N, 89°21'E). The data of ongoing greenhouse gases measurements at the tower are used in atmospheric inversions studies to infer the distribution of carbon sinks and sources over central Northern Eurasia. We present our contribution to reducing uncertainties in estimates of fire influence on atmospheric composition and post-fire ecosystem carbon uptake deduced from the large-scale fires that happened in 2012 in the tall tower footprint area. The burned areas were estimated from Landsat ETM 5,8 satellite images, while fires were detected from Terra/Aqua MODIS satellite data. The magnitude of ecological change caused by fires ("burn severity") was measured and mapped with a Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) index and further calibrated by a complementary field based Composite Burn Index (CBI). Measures of fire radiative power (FRP) index provided information on fire heat release intensity and on the amount and completeness of biomass combustion. Based on the analyzed GIS data, the system of study plots was established in the 5 dominating ecosystem types for a long-term post-fire monitoring. On the plots the comprehensive estimation of ecosystem parameters and carbon pools and their mapping was organized with a laser-based field instrumentation system. The work was supported financially by ISTC Project # 2757p

  7. Changes of gill and hemocyte-related bio-indicators during long term maintenance of the vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus held in aquaria at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Bettencourt, Raul; Dando, Paul; Rosa, Domitília; Riou, Virginie; Colaço, Ana; Sarrazin, Jozée; Sarradin, Pierre-Marie; Santos, Ricardo Serrão

    2008-05-01

    The deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus has been the subject of several studies aimed at understanding the physiological adaptations that vent animals have developed in order to cope with the particular physical and chemical conditions of hydrothermal environments. In spite of reports describing successful procedures to maintain vent mussels under laboratory conditions at atmospheric pressure, few studies have described the mussel's physiological state after a long period in aquaria. In the present study, we investigate changes in mucocytes and hemocytes in B. azoricus over the course of several months after deep-sea retrieval. The visualization of granules of mucopolysaccharide or glycoprotein was made possible through their inherent auto-fluorescent property and the Alcian blue-Periodic Acid Schiff staining method. The density and distribution of droplets of mucus-like granules was observed at the ventral end of lamellae during acclimatization period. The mucus-like granules were greatly reduced after 3 months and nearly absent after 6 months of aquarium conditions. Additionally, we examined the depletion of endosymbiont bacteria from gill tissues, which typically occurs within a few weeks in sea water under laboratory conditions. The physiological state of B. azoricus after 6 months of acclimatization was also examined by means of phagocytosis assays using hemocytes. Hemocytes from mussels held in aquaria up to 6 months were still capable of phagocytosis but to a lesser extent when compared to the number of ingested yeast particles per phagocytic hemocytes from freshly collected vent mussels. We suggest that the changes in gill mucopolysaccharides and hemocyte glycoproteins, the endosymbiont abundance in gill tissues and phagocytosis are useful health criteria to assess long term maintenance of B. azoricus in aquaria. Furthermore, the laboratory set up to which vent mussels were acclimatized is an applicable system to study physiological

  8. Representative Atmospheric Plume Development for Elevated Releases

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Prichard, Andrew W.

    2014-02-01

    An atmospheric explosion of a low-yield nuclear device will produce a large number of radioactive isotopes, some of which can be measured with airborne detection systems. However, properly equipped aircraft may not arrive in the region where an explosion occurred for a number of hours after the event. Atmospheric conditions will have caused the radioactive plume to move and diffuse before the aircraft arrives. The science behind predicting atmospheric plume movement has advanced enough that the location of the maximum concentrations in the plume can be determined reasonably accurately in real time, or near real time. Given the assumption that an aircraft can follow a plume, this study addresses the amount of atmospheric dilution expected to occur in a representative plume as a function of time past the release event. The approach models atmospheric transport of hypothetical releases from a single location for every day in a year using the publically available HYSPLIT code. The effective dilution factors for the point of maximum concentration in an elevated plume based on a release of a non-decaying, non-depositing tracer can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the day of the release, even for the same number of hours after the release event. However, the median of the dilution factors based on releases for 365 consecutive days at one site follows a power law relationship in time, as shown in Figure S-1. The relationship is good enough to provide a general rule of thumb for estimating typical future dilution factors in a plume starting at the same point. However, the coefficients of the power law function may vary for different release point locations. Radioactive decay causes the effective dilution factors to decrease more quickly with the time past the release event than the dilution factors based on a non-decaying tracer. An analytical expression for the dilution factors of isotopes with different half-lives can be developed given the power law expression

  9. Long-term variabilities and tendencies in zonal mean TIMED-SABER ozone and temperature in the middle atmosphere at 10-15°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Oindrila; Sridharan, S.

    2014-12-01

    Long-term variabilities and trends of middle atmospheric (20-100 km) ozone volume mixing ratio (OVMR) and temperature and their responses towards quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), solar cycle (SC) and El Niño-southern oscillation (ENSO) have been investigated using monthly averaged zonal mean Sounding of Atmosphere by Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) observations at 10-15°N for the years 2002-2012. Composite monthly mean of OVMR shows semi-annual oscillation (SAO) predominantly in the lower stratosphere (20-30 km) and in the upper mesosphere (above 90 km), whereas that of temperature shows SAO in the upper stratosphere (45-55 km) and lower mesosphere (60-75 km). Amplitudes of SAO and annual oscillation (AO) in OVMR show enhancement above 80 km and 90 km respectively in the mesosphere and both show maximum around 30 km in the stratosphere. The amplitudes of SAO and AO in temperature show maxima just below and above 80 km in the mesosphere, whereas in the stratosphere, they show maxima around 40 km and 20 km respectively. The phase profiles of SAO and AO in temperature show downward progressions below 80 km, whereas the phase profile of SAO in OVMR shows downward progression only below 40 km and the phase remains constant above 80 km. Regression analysis of OVMR shows increasing trend at 23 km, and small decreasing trend at 30 km, 34 km and above 80 km. Above 92 km, the trend sharply decreases. OVMR response to QBO winds at 30 hPa shows negative maxima at 30 km and 91 km, positive maximum at 26 km and is insignificant at other heights. The OVMR response to SC is positive in the middle stratosphere peaking at 31 km and in the upper mesosphere peaking at 95 km. The OVMR response to ENSO shows mixed behavior in stratosphere and positive in the upper mesosphere. It is positive in the lower height region 20-27 km with maximum at 25 km. The response to ENSO is insignificant up to 70 km and it is positive above 80 km with two maxima at 87 km and 97 km. Regression

  10. Long-term observations of 14C-based atmospheric fossil fuel CO2 (FFCO2) and the CO/FFCO2 ratio in the Heidelberg urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Ingeborg; Hammer, Samuel; Kromer, Bernd

    2013-04-01

    smaller contribution of traffic to the emissions. Our results clearly show that statistical emissions inventories, or at least the ratios of emissions and their changes, can be reliably verified on the local to regional scale by careful long term atmospheric observations. A temporal change of the CO/FFCO2 emission ratio has, however, also implications for the use of CO as surrogate tracer for high-resolution fossil fuel CO2 estimates (e.g. Levin & Karstens, Tellus 59B, 2007): Without ongoing 14C calibration of the CO/FFCO2 ratio, decadal trends in CO-based fossil fuel CO2 estimates can be largely biased by up to 20-30%. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Sixth and Seventh Framework Programs in the CarboEurope-IP (GOCE-CT-2003-505572) and ICOS Preparatory Phase (211574) projects.

  11. Long-term exposure to elevated CO2 enhances plant community stability by suppressing dominant plant species in a mixed-grass prairie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelikova, Tamara Jane; Blumenthal, Dana M.; Williams, David G.; Souza, Lara; LeCain, Daniel R.; Morgan, Jack; Pendall, Elise

    2014-10-01

    Climate controls vegetation distribution across the globe, and some vegetation types are more vulnerable to climate change, whereas others are more resistant. Because resistance and resilience can influence ecosystem stability and determine how communities and ecosystems respond to climate change, we need to evaluate the potential for resistance as we predict future ecosystem function. In a mixed-grass prairie in the northern Great Plains, we used a large field experiment to test the effects of elevated CO2, warming, and summer irrigation on plant community structure and productivity, linking changes in both to stability in plant community composition and biomass production. We show that the independent effects of CO2 and warming on community composition and productivity depend on interannual variation in precipitation and that the effects of elevated CO2 are not limited to water saving because they differ from those of irrigation. We also show that production in this mixed-grass prairie ecosystem is not only relatively resistant to interannual variation in precipitation, but also rendered more stable under elevated CO2 conditions. This increase in production stability is the result of altered community dominance patterns: Community evenness increases as dominant species decrease in biomass under elevated CO2. In many grasslands that serve as rangelands, the economic value of the ecosystem is largely dependent on plant community composition and the relative abundance of key forage species. Thus, our results have implications for how we manage native grasslands in the face of changing climate.

  12. Long-term exposure to elevated CO2 enhances plant community stability by suppressing dominant plant species in a mixed-grass prairie

    PubMed Central

    Zelikova, Tamara Jane; Blumenthal, Dana M.; Williams, David G.; Souza, Lara; LeCain, Daniel R.; Morgan, Jack; Pendall, Elise

    2014-01-01

    Climate controls vegetation distribution across the globe, and some vegetation types are more vulnerable to climate change, whereas others are more resistant. Because resistance and resilience can influence ecosystem stability and determine how communities and ecosystems respond to climate change, we need to evaluate the potential for resistance as we predict future ecosystem function. In a mixed-grass prairie in the northern Great Plains, we used a large field experiment to test the effects of elevated CO2, warming, and summer irrigation on plant community structure and productivity, linking changes in both to stability in plant community composition and biomass production. We show that the independent effects of CO2 and warming on community composition and productivity depend on interannual variation in precipitation and that the effects of elevated CO2 are not limited to water saving because they differ from those of irrigation. We also show that production in this mixed-grass prairie ecosystem is not only relatively resistant to interannual variation in precipitation, but also rendered more stable under elevated CO2 conditions. This increase in production stability is the result of altered community dominance patterns: Community evenness increases as dominant species decrease in biomass under elevated CO2. In many grasslands that serve as rangelands, the economic value of the ecosystem is largely dependent on plant community composition and the relative abundance of key forage species. Thus, our results have implications for how we manage native grasslands in the face of changing climate. PMID:25313034

  13. Steeper increases in body mass index during childhood correlate with blood pressure elevation in adolescence: a long-term follow-up study in a Japanese community.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Erika; Asakura, Keiko; Nishiwaki, Yuji; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Nakazawa, Akemi; Ushiku, Hideo; Maejima, Fumio; Nishigaki, Yoshio; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Okamura, Tomonori; Takebayashi, Toru

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between long-term changes in body mass index (BMI) during childhood and adolescent blood-pressure levels in a general Japanese population. We used health report data from 900 Japanese children between 1983 and 2007. After adjusting for baseline BMI and other confounding factors multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to examine the relationship between changes in BMI (ΔBMI) over a 6-year period (6-12 years) and blood pressure once children reached ages 14 or 15. Sub-group analyses were also performed to ascertain the relationship between ΔBMI and blood pressure at 9th grade for children who had been in the bottom BMI tertile at 1st grade. Endpoint blood-pressure levels in boys (systolic and diastolic) and girls (systolic) from the group whose BMIs increased the most were significantly higher than those from the group whose BMIs increased the least (P<0.05, analysis of variance). After adjustment for baseline BMI and school-entrance year, the former group showed higher blood pressure at the endpoint than the latter (P<0.05, multiple regression analysis). Further adjustment for baseline blood pressure also showed similar results in a combined-sex analysis (n=592). Higher ΔBMI was associated with higher SBP9 even in children whose BMI was in the lowest tertile at baseline after adjustment for sex and school-entrance year (P=0.02, multiple regression analysis). Steeper BMI increases during primary school lead to adolescent increases in blood pressure even if baseline BMI is low. Growth during childhood should be carefully managed. PMID:24026043

  14. Long-term stability of peneplains and landscape evolution in southern Tibet inferred from field data, cosmogenic nuclides, and digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobl, M.; Hetzel, R.; Ding, L.; Zhang, L.

    2010-05-01

    Peneplains constitute a widespread and well developed geomorphic element on the Tibetan Plateau, nevertheless little is known about their formation and the subsequent landscape evolution. In southern Tibet, north of Nam Co (~31° 20'N, 90° E), a particularly well-preserved peneplain occurs at an elevation of ~5350 m in Cretaceous granitoids. The main planation surface has been incised by small streams that formed additional small low-relief surfaces at lower elevations. Fluvial incision of the main peneplain has generated a local relief of up to ~700 m. The progressive incision has led to hillslope gradients that increase with decreasing elevation, i.e. from the main peneplain at ~5350 m down to the current base level at ~4650 m, as revealed by field observations and the analysis of digital elevation model. In order to quantify the landscape evolution of the peneplain region we determined local and catchment-wide erosion rates from the concentration of in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be. Local erosion rates on the main peneplain and the low-relief bedrock surfaces at lower elevation range from 6 to 12 m Ma-1 and indicate that the geomorphic surfaces are stable over long periods of time. Spatially integrated erosion rates of small river systems that are incising and eroding headwards into the main peneplain are only slightly higher and range from 11 to 18 m Ma-1. Even if river incision has proceeded at a rate that is 2-4 times higher than the catchment-wide erosion rates, i.e. at 30 to 60 m Ma-1, it would take about 10 to 20 Ma to generate the local relief of ~700 m observed today. This demonstrates that the major peneplain is a very stable geomorphic element with a minimum age of 10 to 20 Ma and that the landscape in the region has barely been modified by erosion in the last millions of years.

  15. Platelet/lymphocyte ratio was associated with impaired myocardial perfusion and both in-hospital and long-term adverse outcome in patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction undergoing primary coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Tabakci, Mehmet M.; Simsek, Zeki; Arslantas, Ugur; Durmus, Halil I.; Ocal, Lutfi; Demirel, Muhittin; Ozturkeri, Burak; Ozal, Ender; Kargin, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) has been shown to be an inflammatory and thrombotic biomarker for coronary heart disease, but its prognostic value in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has not been fully investigated. Aim To investigate the relationship between PLR and no-reflow, along with the in-hospital and long-term outcomes in patients with STEMI. Material and methods In the present study, we included 304 consecutive patients suffering from STEMI who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (p-PCI). Patients were stratified according to PLR tertiles based on the blood samples obtained in the emergency room upon admission. No-reflow after p-PCI was defined as a coronary thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) flow grade ≤ 2 after vessel recanalization, or TIMI flow grade 3 together with a final myocardial blush grade (MBG) < 2. Results The mean follow-up period was 24 months (range: 22–26 months). The number of patients characterized with no-reflow was counted to depict increments throughout successive PLR tertiles (14% vs. 20% vs. 45%, p < 0.001). In-hospital major adverse cardiovascular events and death increased as the PLR increased (p < 0.001, p < 0.001). Long-term MACE and death also increased as the PLR increased (p < 0.001, p < 0.001). Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that PLR remained an independent predictor for both in-hospital (OR = 1.01, 95% CI: 1.00–1.01; p = 0.002) and major long-term (OR = 1.01, 95% CI: 1.00–1.01; p < 0.001) adverse cardiac events. Conclusions Platelet/lymphocyte ratio on admission is a strong and independent predictor of both the no-reflow phenomenon and long-term prognosis following p-PCI in patients with STEMI. PMID:26677378

  16. Impacts of elevated atmospheric CO(2) on forest trees and forest ecosystems: knowledge gaps.

    PubMed

    Karnosky, David F

    2003-06-01

    Atmospheric CO(2) is rising rapidly, and options for slowing the CO(2) rise are politically charged as they largely require reductions in industrial CO(2) emissions for most developed countries. As forests cover some 43% of the Earth's surface, account for some 70% of terrestrial net primary production (NPP), and are being bartered for carbon mitigation, it is critically important that we continue to reduce the uncertainties about the impacts of elevated atmospheric CO(2) on forest tree growth, productivity, and forest ecosystem function. In this paper, I review knowledge gaps and research needs on the effects of elevated atmospheric CO(2) on forest above- and below-ground growth and productivity, carbon sequestration, nutrient cycling, water relations, wood quality, phenology, community dynamics and biodiversity, antioxidants and stress tolerance, interactions with air pollutants, heterotrophic interactions, and ecosystem functioning. Finally, I discuss research needs regarding modeling of the impacts of elevated atmospheric CO(2) on forests.Even though there has been a tremendous amount of research done with elevated CO(2) and forest trees, it remains difficult to predict future forest growth and productivity under elevated atmospheric CO(2). Likewise, it is not easy to predict how forest ecosystem processes will respond to enriched CO(2). The more we study the impacts of increasing CO(2), the more we realize that tree and forest responses are yet largely uncertain due to differences in responsiveness by species, genotype, and functional group, and the complex interactions of elevated atmospheric CO(2) with soil fertility, drought, pests, and co-occurring atmospheric pollutants such as nitrogen deposition and O(3). Furthermore, it is impossible to predict ecosystem-level responses based on short-term studies of young trees grown without interacting stresses and in small spaces without the element of competition. Long-term studies using free-air CO(2) enrichment

  17. Impacts of elevated atmospheric CO(2) on forest trees and forest ecosystems: knowledge gaps.

    PubMed

    Karnosky, David F

    2003-06-01

    Atmospheric CO(2) is rising rapidly, and options for slowing the CO(2) rise are politically charged as they largely require reductions in industrial CO(2) emissions for most developed countries. As forests cover some 43% of the Earth's surface, account for some 70% of terrestrial net primary production (NPP), and are being bartered for carbon mitigation, it is critically important that we continue to reduce the uncertainties about the impacts of elevated atmospheric CO(2) on forest tree growth, productivity, and forest ecosystem function. In this paper, I review knowledge gaps and research needs on the effects of elevated atmospheric CO(2) on forest above- and below-ground growth and productivity, carbon sequestration, nutrient cycling, water relations, wood quality, phenology, community dynamics and biodiversity, antioxidants and stress tolerance, interactions with air pollutants, heterotrophic interactions, and ecosystem functioning. Finally, I discuss research needs regarding modeling of the impacts of elevated atmospheric CO(2) on forests.Even though there has been a tremendous amount of research done with elevated CO(2) and forest trees, it remains difficult to predict future forest growth and productivity under elevated atmospheric CO(2). Likewise, it is not easy to predict how forest ecosystem processes will respond to enriched CO(2). The more we study the impacts of increasing CO(2), the more we realize that tree and forest responses are yet largely uncertain due to differences in responsiveness by species, genotype, and functional group, and the complex interactions of elevated atmospheric CO(2) with soil fertility, drought, pests, and co-occurring atmospheric pollutants such as nitrogen deposition and O(3). Furthermore, it is impossible to predict ecosystem-level responses based on short-term studies of young trees grown without interacting stresses and in small spaces without the element of competition. Long-term studies using free-air CO(2) enrichment

  18. The elevated T-maze task as an animal model to simultaneously investigate the effects of drugs on long-term memory and anxiety in mice.

    PubMed

    Asth, Laila; Lobão-Soares, Bruno; André, Eunice; Soares, Vanessa de Paula; Gavioli, Elaine Cristina

    2012-04-10

    The elevated T-maze (ETM) is an apparatus derived from the elevated plus-maze test, which is used to evaluate anxiety. Because anxiety is a biasing factor in models of memory, this study proposed the ETM as a task for the simultaneous assessment of memory and anxiety in mice. The ETM consists of one enclosed and two open arms. The procedure is based on the avoidance of open spaces learned during training session, in which mice were exposed to the enclosed arm as many times as needed to stay 300s. In the test session, memory is assessed by re-exposing the mouse to the enclosed arm and the latency to enter an open arm was recorded. The anxiolytic diazepam (DZP; 1 or 2mg/kg) and the amnestic biperiden (BPR; 0.5, 1 or 3mg/kg) were injected at three distinct times: pre-training, post-training, and pre-test. Pre-training administration of BPR 1 and DZP 2 increased the number of trials needed to reach the avoidance criterion, suggesting a passive avoidance learning impairment. However, BPR induced hyperlocomotion, which could bias the interpretation of any BPR-induced effects during the training session. Pre-training injection of BPR did not affect the spontaneous increase in the latency to enter an open arm between trials, while DZP reduced latencies in the first three trials suggesting anxiolysis. In the test session, pre-training injection of BPR 1 and DZP 2 reduced latencies to enter an open arm, indicating memory impairment. Post-training and pre-test injection of DZP or BPR did not affect memory. In conclusion, the proposed ETM task is practical for the detection of the anxiolytic and amnesic effects of drugs.

  19. Long-term Academic and Career Impacts of Undergraduate Research: Diverse Pathways to Geoscience Careers Following a Summer Atmospheric Science Research Internship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trott, C. D.; Sample McMeeking, L. B.; Boyd, K.; Bowker, C.

    2015-12-01

    Research experiences for undergraduates (REU) have been shown to support the success of STEM undergraduates through improving their research skills, ability to synthesize knowledge, and personal and professional development, all while socializing them into the nature of science. REUs are further intended to support STEM career choice and professional advancement, and have thus played a key role in diversity efforts. Recruiting and retaining diverse students in STEM through REUs is of particular importance in the geosciences, where women and ethnic minorities continue to be significantly underrepresented. However, few studies have examined the long-term impacts of these REUs on students' academic and career trajectories. Further, those that do exist primarily study the experiences of current graduate students, scientists, and faculty members—that is, those who have already persisted—which overlooks the multiple academic and career paths REU students might follow and may preclude a thorough examination of REUs' diversity impacts. In this long-term retrospective study of the academic and career impacts of a REU program at a large Western U.S. research university, we interviewed 17 former REU participants on their expectations prior to their REU participation, their experiences during the REU, the immediate outcomes from the experience, and its long-term impacts on their academic and career choices. To address gaps in the existing literature on REU impacts, we purposively sampled students who have taken a variety of educational and career paths, including those not engaged in science research. Despite varied trajectories, the majority of the students we interviewed have persisted in the geosciences and attest to the REU's profound impact on their career-related opportunities and choices. This presentation describes students' diverse STEM pathways and discusses how students' REU expectations, experiences, and immediate outcomes continued to make an impact long-term.

  20. Long-term increases in snow pack elevate leaf N and photosynthesis in Salix arctica: responses to a snow fence experiment in the High Arctic of NW Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leffler, A. Joshua; Welker, Jeffery M.

    2013-06-01

    We examine the influence of altered winter precipitation on a High Arctic landscape with continuous permafrost. Gas exchange, leaf tissue element and isotopic composition (N, δ13C, δ15N), and plant water sources derived from stem and soil water δ18O were examined in Salix arctica (arctic willow) following a decade of snow-fence-enhanced snow pack in NW Greenland. Study plots in ambient and +snow conditions were sampled in summer 2012. Plants experiencing enhanced snow conditions for 10 years had higher leaf [N], photosynthetic rate, and more enriched leaf δ15N. Enhanced snow did not influence stomatal conductance or depth of plant water use. We attribute the higher photosynthetic rate in S. arctica exposed to deeper snow pack to altered biogeochemical cycles which yielded higher leaf [N] rather than to enhanced water availability. These data demonstrate the complexity of High Arctic plant responses to changes in winter conditions. Furthermore, our data depict the intricate linkages between winter and summer conditions as they regulate processes such as leaf gas exchange that may control water vapor and CO2 feedbacks between arctic tundra and the surrounding atmosphere.

  1. Reactive oxygen species elevation and recovery in Drosophila bodies and ovaries following short-term and long-term exposure to DECT base EMF.

    PubMed

    Manta, Areti K; Stravopodis, Dimitrios J; Papassideri, Issidora S; Margaritis, Lukas H

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to approach the basic mechanism(s) underlying reported ovarian apoptotic cell death and fecundity decrease induced by nonionizing radiation (NIR) in Drosophila melanogaster. ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) levels were measured in the bodies and the ovaries of (sexually mature) 4-day-old flies, following exposure for 0.5, 1, 6, 24 and 96 h to a wireless DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless Telephone) base radiation (1.88-1.90 GHz). Electrical field intensity was 2.7 V/m, measured within the fly vials and calculated SAR (Specific Absorption Rate) value = 0.009 W/Kg. Male and female bodies showed twofold increase in ROS levels (p < 0.001) after 6 h of exposure, slightly increasing with more irradiation (24 and 96 h). Ovaries of exposed females had a quick response in ROS increase after 0.5 h (1.5-fold, p < 0.001), reaching 2.5-fold after 1 h with no elevation thereafter at 6, 24 and 96 h. ROS levels returned to normal, in the male and the female bodies 24 h after 6 h of exposure of the flies (p < 0.05) and in the ovaries 4 h after 1 h exposure of the females (p < 0.05). It is postulated that the pulsed (at 100 Hz rate and 0.08 ms duration) idle state of the DECT base radiation is capable of inducing free radical formation albeit the very low SAR, leading rapidly to accumulation of ROS in a level-saturation manner under continuous exposure, or in a recovery manner after interruption of radiation, possibly due to activation of the antioxidant machinery of the organism.

  2. Plant diversity effects on soil food webs are stronger than those of elevated CO2 and N deposition in a long-term grassland experiment.

    PubMed

    Eisenhauer, Nico; Dobies, Tomasz; Cesarz, Simone; Hobbie, Sarah E; Meyer, Ross J; Worm, Kally; Reich, Peter B

    2013-04-23

    Recent metaanalyses suggest biodiversity loss affects the functioning of ecosystems to a similar extent as other global environmental change agents. However, the abundance and functioning of soil organisms have been hypothesized to be much less responsive to such changes, particularly in plant diversity, than aboveground variables, although tests of this hypothesis are extremely rare. We examined the responses of soil food webs (soil microorganisms, nematodes, microarthropods) to 13-y manipulation of multiple environmental factors that are changing at global scales--specifically plant species richness, atmospheric CO2, and N deposition--in a grassland experiment in Minnesota. Plant diversity was a strong driver of the structure and functioning of soil food webs through several bottom-up (resource control) effects, whereas CO2 and N only had modest effects. We found few interactions between plant diversity and CO2 and N, likely because of weak interactive effects of those factors on resource availability (e.g., root biomass). Plant diversity effects likely were large because high plant diversity promoted the accumulation of soil organic matter in the site's sandy, organic matter-poor soils. Plant diversity effects were not explained by the presence of certain plant functional groups. Our results underline the prime importance of plant diversity loss cascading to soil food webs (density and diversity of soil organisms) and functions. Because the present results suggest prevailing plant diversity effects and few interactions with other global change drivers, protecting plant diversity may be of high priority to maintain the biodiversity and functioning of soils in a changing world.

  3. Initial Examination of the Long Term Thermosphere Changes As Seen in the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model - eXtended (WACCM-X) J. M. McInerney, L. Qian, and H.-L Liu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, J. M.; Qian, L.; Liu, H.

    2013-12-01

    It has been over two decades since the projection that, not only will the human induced increase in atmospheric CO2 produce a warming in the troposphere, it will also produce a cooling in the middle to upper atmosphere into the 21st century with significant consequences. The thermospheric density decrease associated with this projected upper atmosphere cooling due to greenhouse gases has been confirmed by observations, in particular satellite drag measurements, and by various modeling studies. Recent studies also suggest potential impacts from the lower atmosphere on thermosphere dynamics such as atmospheric thermal tides and gravity waves. With the current advance of whole atmosphere climate models which extend from the ground through the thermosphere, it is now possible to include effects of these and other lower atmosphere processes in modeling studies of long term thermospheric changes. One such whole atmosphere model under development at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) is the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model - eXtended (WACCM-X). WACCM-X is a self consistent climate model extending from the ground to approximately 500 kilometers and is based on the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) / Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Although an interactive ionosphere module is not complete, the globally averaged structure of thermosphere temperature and neutral species from WACCM-X are reasonable compared with the NCAR global mean model. In this study, we will examine a transient WACCM-X simulation from 1955 to 2005 with realistic tropospheric CO2 input and solar and geomagnetic forcing. The preliminary study will focus on the long term changes in the thermosphere from this simulation, in particular the secular changes of thermosphere neutral density and temperature due to anthropogenic forcing.

  4. Building long-term and high spatio-temporal resolution precipitation and air temperature reanalyses by mixing local observations and global atmospheric reanalyses: the ANATEM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuentz, A.; Mathevet, T.; Gailhard, J.; Hingray, B.

    2015-01-01

    Improving the understanding of past climatic or hydrologic variability has received a large attention in different fields of geosciences, such as glaciology, dendrochronology, sedimentology or hydrology. Based on different proxies, each research community produces different kind of climatic or hydrologic reanalyses, at different spatio-temporal scales and resolution. When considering climate or hydrology, numerous studies aim at characterising variability, trends or breaks using observed time-series of different regions or climate of world. However, in hydrology, these studies are usually limited to reduced temporal scale (mainly few decades, seldomly a century) because they are limited to observed time-series, that suffers from a limited spatio-temporal density. This paper introduces a new model, ANATEM, based on a combination of local observations and large scale climatic informations (such as 20CR Reanalysis). This model allow to build long-term air temperature and precipitation time-series, with a high spatio-temporal resolution (daily time-step, few km2). ANATEM was tested on the air temperature and precipitation time-series of 22 watersheds situated on the Durance watershed, in the french Alps. Based on a multi-criteria and multi-scale diagnostic, the results show that ANATEM improves the performances of classical statistical models. ANATEM model have been validated on a regional level, improving spatial homogeneity of performances and on independent long-term time-series, being able to capture the regional low-frequency variabilities over more than a century (1883-2010).

  5. Warming reduces carbon losses from grassland exposed to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Pendall, Elise; Heisler-White, Jana L; Williams, David G; Dijkstra, Feike A; Carrillo, Yolima; Morgan, Jack A; Lecain, Daniel R

    2013-01-01

    The flux of carbon dioxide (CO2) between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere may ameliorate or exacerbate climate change, depending on the relative responses of ecosystem photosynthesis and respiration to warming temperatures, rising atmospheric CO2, and altered precipitation. The combined effect of these global change factors is especially uncertain because of their potential for interactions and indirectly mediated conditions such as soil moisture. Here, we present observations of CO2 fluxes from a multi-factor experiment in semi-arid grassland that suggests a potentially strong climate - carbon cycle feedback under combined elevated [CO2] and warming. Elevated [CO2] alone, and in combination with warming, enhanced ecosystem respiration to a greater extent than photosynthesis, resulting in net C loss over four years. The effect of warming was to reduce respiration especially during years of below-average precipitation, by partially offsetting the effect of elevated [CO2] on soil moisture and C cycling. Carbon losses were explained partly by stimulated decomposition of soil organic matter with elevated [CO2]. The climate - carbon cycle feedback observed in this semiarid grassland was mediated by soil water content, which was reduced by warming and increased by elevated [CO2]. Ecosystem models should incorporate direct and indirect effects of climate change on soil water content in order to accurately predict terrestrial feedbacks and long-term storage of C in soil.

  6. Warming reduces carbon losses from grassland exposed to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Pendall, Elise; Heisler-White, Jana L; Williams, David G; Dijkstra, Feike A; Carrillo, Yolima; Morgan, Jack A; Lecain, Daniel R

    2013-01-01

    The flux of carbon dioxide (CO2) between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere may ameliorate or exacerbate climate change, depending on the relative responses of ecosystem photosynthesis and respiration to warming temperatures, rising atmospheric CO2, and altered precipitation. The combined effect of these global change factors is especially uncertain because of their potential for interactions and indirectly mediated conditions such as soil moisture. Here, we present observations of CO2 fluxes from a multi-factor experiment in semi-arid grassland that suggests a potentially strong climate - carbon cycle feedback under combined elevated [CO2] and warming. Elevated [CO2] alone, and in combination with warming, enhanced ecosystem respiration to a greater extent than photosynthesis, resulting in net C loss over four years. The effect of warming was to reduce respiration especially during years of below-average precipitation, by partially offsetting the effect of elevated [CO2] on soil moisture and C cycling. Carbon losses were explained partly by stimulated decomposition of soil organic matter with elevated [CO2]. The climate - carbon cycle feedback observed in this semiarid grassland was mediated by soil water content, which was reduced by warming and increased by elevated [CO2]. Ecosystem models should incorporate direct and indirect effects of climate change on soil water content in order to accurately predict terrestrial feedbacks and long-term storage of C in soil. PMID:23977180

  7. Warming Reduces Carbon Losses from Grassland Exposed to Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Pendall, Elise; Heisler-White, Jana L.; Williams, David G.; Dijkstra, Feike A.; Carrillo, Yolima; Morgan, Jack A.; LeCain, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    The flux of carbon dioxide (CO2) between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere may ameliorate or exacerbate climate change, depending on the relative responses of ecosystem photosynthesis and respiration to warming temperatures, rising atmospheric CO2, and altered precipitation. The combined effect of these global change factors is especially uncertain because of their potential for interactions and indirectly mediated conditions such as soil moisture. Here, we present observations of CO2 fluxes from a multi-factor experiment in semi-arid grassland that suggests a potentially strong climate – carbon cycle feedback under combined elevated [CO2] and warming. Elevated [CO2] alone, and in combination with warming, enhanced ecosystem respiration to a greater extent than photosynthesis, resulting in net C loss over four years. The effect of warming was to reduce respiration especially during years of below-average precipitation, by partially offsetting the effect of elevated [CO2] on soil moisture and C cycling. Carbon losses were explained partly by stimulated decomposition of soil organic matter with elevated [CO2]. The climate – carbon cycle feedback observed in this semiarid grassland was mediated by soil water content, which was reduced by warming and increased by elevated [CO2]. Ecosystem models should incorporate direct and indirect effects of climate change on soil water content in order to accurately predict terrestrial feedbacks and long-term storage of C in soil. PMID:23977180

  8. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide increases soil carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Norby, Richard J; Jastrow, Julie D; Miller, Michael R; Matamala, Roser; Boutton, Thomas W; Rice, Charles W; Owensby, Clenton E

    2005-01-01

    In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, researchers from Argonne and Oak Ridge National Laboratories and Kansas State and Texas A&M Universities evaluated the collective results of earlier studies by using a statistical procedure called meta-analysis. They found that on average elevated CO2 increased soil carbon by 5.6 percent over a two to nine year period. They also measured comparable increases in soil carbon for Tennessee deciduous forest and Kansas grassland after five to eight years of experimental exposure to elevated CO2.

  9. Impacts of Elevated Atmospheric CO 2 and O 3 on Paper Birch ( Betula papyrifera ): Reproductive Fitness

    DOE PAGES

    Darbah, Joseph N. T.; Kubiske, Mark E.; Nelson, Neil; Oksanen, Elina; Vaapavuori, Elina; Karnosky, David F.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric CO 2 and tropospheric O 3 are rising in many regions of the world. Little is known about how these two commonly co-occurring gases will affect reproductive fitness of important forest tree species. Here, we report on the long-term effects of CO 3 and O 3 for paper birch seedlings exposed for nearly their entire life history at the Aspen FACE (Free Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment) site in Rhinelander, WI. Elevated CO 2 increased both male and female flower production, while elevated O 3 increased female flower production compared to trees in control rings. Interestingly, very little floweringmore » has yet occurred in combined treatment. Elevated CO 2 had significant positive effect on birch catkin size, weight, and germination success rate (elevated CO 2 increased germination rate of birch by 110% compared to ambient CO 2 concentrations, decreased seedling mortality by 73%, increased seed weight by 17%, increased root length by 59%, and root-to-shoot ratio was significantly decreased, all at 3 weeks after germination), while the opposite was true of elevated O 3 (elevated O 3 decreased the germination rate of birch by 62%, decreased seed weight by 25%, and increased root length by 15%). Under elevated CO 2 , plant dry mass increased by 9 and 78% at the end of 3 and 14 weeks, respectively. Also, the root and shoot lengths, as well as the biomass of the seedlings, were increased for seeds produced under elevated CO 2 , while the reverse was true for seedlings from seeds produced under the elevated O 3 . Similar trends in treatment differences were observed in seed characteristics, germination, and seedling development for seeds collected in both 2004 and 2005. Our results suggest that elevated CO 2 and O 3 can dramatically affect flowering, seed production, and seed quality of paper birch, affecting reproductive fitness of this species.« less

  10. Model-Based Analysis of the Effect of Long-term Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition on Nitrogen and Carbon Dynamics in Northern Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Blodau, C.

    2011-12-01

    Peatlands as a unique biological community that provide important ecological, economic and protective functions are highly threatened by climate change and nitrogen deposition. A process based model has been developed to simulate short term and long term changes in peatlands biogeochemistry and ecology. The model contains three modules: Hydrothermal generates daily water table and soil temperature as environmental inputs for other modules; Plant dynamics simulates the competition of plants in natural nutrient poor condition and the potential shifting of ecosystem under high nutrient input and climate change; Soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics simulates the decomposition of SOM into mineralized carbon and nitrogen and their transformation and translocation within the peat and efflux. This model especially focuses on nitrogen dynamics both in plant and soil and the coupling of nitrogen cycle to carbon cycle for peatland. Water table is modeled as a bucket model that calculates real time water storage from precipitation, evapotranspiration and runoff, which in turn generates water table level and soil moisture profile in soil. Soil temperature along depth is calculated from soil thermal conductivity features and air temperature. Plant carbon and nitrogen dynamics are modeled for 3 plant functional types (moss, graminoids and shrubs) with different tolerant levels to temperate, moisture, light and nutrients. SOM decomposition is simulated in a layer structure with 5cm resolution. Within each layer one labile and one recalcitrant organic carbon and nitrogen pool are decomposed simultaneously on rates controlled by SOM quality, nitrogen availability and environment. Simulation for water table, Temperature, plant dynamics, carbon nitrogen budget and fluxes and peat initiation for Mer Bleue bog (Ottawa Canada, Fluxnet data) shows good correlation with field data. SOM decomposition simulation reveals that the extremely low decomposition rate of SOM in saturated zone plays

  11. Long-term environmental stewardship.

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Michael David

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this Supplemental Information Source Document is to effectively describe Long-Term Environmental Stewardship (LTES) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). More specifically, this document describes the LTES and Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Programs, distinguishes between the LTES and LTS Programs, and summarizes the current status of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project.

  12. Presynaptic long-term plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Calakos, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Long-term synaptic plasticity is a major cellular substrate for learning, memory, and behavioral adaptation. Although early examples of long-term synaptic plasticity described a mechanism by which postsynaptic signal transduction was potentiated, it is now apparent that there is a vast array of mechanisms for long-term synaptic plasticity that involve modifications to either or both the presynaptic terminal and postsynaptic site. In this article, we discuss current and evolving approaches to identify presynaptic mechanisms as well as discuss their limitations. We next provide examples of the diverse circuits in which presynaptic forms of long-term synaptic plasticity have been described and discuss the potential contribution this form of plasticity might add to circuit function. Finally, we examine the present evidence for the molecular pathways and cellular events underlying presynaptic long-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:24146648

  13. Long-term decrease of atmospheric test {sup 137}Cs in the soil-prairie plant-milk pathway in southern Chile

    SciTech Connect

    Schuller, P. Ellies, A.; Handl, J.

    1998-07-01

    The time dependency of nuclear test {sup 137}Cs in soil, prairie plants, and milk was observed on pastures of seven dairy farms in the 10th Region, Chile, from 1982 to 1997, without any appreciable deposition of radioactive fallout after 1983. Whereas the {sup 137}Cs concentration in the soil decreased at a rate close to that of the radionuclide`s physical decay during the whole observation period, the rate of decrease of the {sup 137}Cs concentration in the prairie plants and in the milk, having been very rapid between 1982--1990, became slower between 1991--1997. The effective half-lives of the concentration in plants were found to be 5.6 y and 12 y during the first and second observation periods, respectively. Similar half-lives of 5.5 y and 13 y were found for the concentration decline in milk during each period. These data clearly demonstrate a reduction in the long-term decrease of the {sup 137}Cs plant uptake, and consequently in the decrease of the {sup 137}Cs concentration in milk, resulting from a decline of {sup 137}Cs availability for prairie plants in the Hapludand soils over the whole 15-y observation period.

  14. Statistical analysis of long-term monitoring data for persistent organic pollutants in the atmosphere at 20 monitoring stations broadly indicates declining concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kong, Deguo; MacLeod, Matthew; Hung, Hayley; Cousins, Ian T

    2014-11-01

    During recent decades concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the atmosphere have been monitored at multiple stations worldwide. We used three statistical methods to analyze a total of 748 time series of selected POPs in the atmosphere to determine if there are statistically significant reductions in levels of POPs that have had control actions enacted to restrict or eliminate manufacture, use and emissions. Significant decreasing trends were identified in 560 (75%) of the 748 time series collected from the Arctic, North America, and Europe, indicating that the atmospheric concentrations of these POPs are generally decreasing, consistent with the overall effectiveness of emission control actions. Statistically significant trends in synthetic time series could be reliably identified with the improved Mann-Kendall (iMK) test and the digital filtration (DF) technique in time series longer than 5 years. The temporal trends of new (or emerging) POPs in the atmosphere are often unclear because time series are too short. A statistical detrending method based on the iMK test was not able to identify abrupt changes in the rates of decline of atmospheric POP concentrations encoded into synthetic time series.

  15. Soil-atmosphere fluxes of the greenhouse gases N2O, CO2 and CH4 from a long term compost experiment in Austria.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, Caroline; Spiegel, Heide; Kitzler, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    The application of composts as fertilizers is becoming increasingly important to achieve a closed-loop economy. However, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, especially N2O, from agricultural fields may increase as well. In this study different compost types and N amounts were investigated, especially in terms of their GHG fluxes. We used the closed chamber method to estimate GHG flux rates over one vegetation period from an agricultural soil fertilized with different compost types. The study was conducted on a long term compost experiment site near Linz (Austria) with a crop rotation. The soil is a loamy silt and in 2015 maize was planted. Six different compost treatments were investigated. Organic waste compost (OWC) and farmyard manure compost (FMC) was applied with nitrogen concentrations of 175 (OWC1, FYC1) and 525 kg N ha-1 (OWC3, FYC3). Two compost treatments were fertilized additionally with 80 kg N ha.1 mineral fertilizer (OWC2, FYC2). One treatment (TN) was fertilized only with mineral fertilizer (120 kg N ha-1) and one treatment was not fertilized at all (C). Additionally to the GHG flux rates, ammonium and nitrate content, microbial biomass C and N and different enzyme activities were analysed in the top soil. Nitrous oxide (N2O) was emitted over the entire vegetation period with highest fluxes from April until June, until the plants have been established sufficiently. Overall, at the FMC treatments (FYC2, FYC3) highest fluxes were measured. Compared to FMC, lower N2O emissions were measured from the OWC treatments. The combination of compost and mineral N fertilization resulted in the highest N2O emissions, especially after precipitation events. The treatments OWC1 and FYC1 were not different from the control. Methane (CH4) was mainly taken up at all treatments, but uptake rates were lower at the high N input sites (OWC3, FYC3) with no differences between the compost types. No significant differences were found in the soil respiration rates.

  16. Long term complications of diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000327.htm Long term complications of diabetes To use the sharing ... sores and infections. If it goes on too long, your toes, foot, or leg may need to ...

  17. Abdominal Pain, Long-Term

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Abdominal Pain, Long-term See complete list of charts. Ongoing or recurrent abdominal pain, also called chronic pain, may be difficult to diagnose, causing frustration for ...

  18. Long-term biomass research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Some of DOE's long term R and D programs for biomass are summarized in this article. These include research efforts in the fields of anaerobic digestion, energy farming, short rotation cultivation and aquatic farming. (DMC)

  19. Fully coupled atmospheric-hydrological modeling at regional and long-term scales: Development, application, and analysis of WRF-HMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Sven; Fersch, Benjamin; Yuan, Fei; Yu, Zhongbo; Kunstmann, Harald

    2016-04-01

    A closed description of the regional water balance requires hydro-meteorological modeling systems which represent the atmosphere, land surface, and subsurface. We developed such a mesoscale modeling system, extending the atmospheric model WRF with the distributed hydrological model HMS in a fully coupled way. It includes explicit lateral groundwater and land surface flow parameterization schemes and two-way groundwater-unsaturated zone interaction by replacing the free drainage bottom boundary of WRF's Noah-LSM with a Fixed-head or Darcy-flux boundary condition. The system is exemplarily applied for the Poyang Lake basin (160,000 km2) and the period 1979-1986 using a two-nest approach covering East Asia (30 km) and the Poyang Lake basin (10 km) driven by ERA Interim. Stand-alone WRF effectively simulates temperature (bias 0.5°C) and precipitation (bias 21-26%). Stand-alone HMS simulations provide reasonable streamflow estimates. A significant impact on the regional water balance was found if groundwater-unsaturated zone interaction is considered. But the differences between the two groundwater coupling approaches are minor. For the fully coupled model system, streamflow results strongly depend on the simulation quality for precipitation. Two-way interaction results in net upward water fluxes in up to 25% of the basin area after the rainy season. In total, two-way interaction increases basin averaged recharge amounts. The evaluation with CPC and GLEAM indicates a better performance of the fully coupled simulation. The impact of groundwater coupling on LSM and atmospheric variables differs. Largest differences occur for the variable recharge (26%), whereas for atmospheric variables, the basin-averaged impact is minor (<1%). But locally, a spatial redistribution up to ±5% occurs for precipitation.

  20. Response of lake chemistry to changes in atmospheric deposition and climate in three high-elevation wilderness areas of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mast, M. Alisa; Turk, John T.; Clow, David W.; Campbell, Donald D.

    2011-01-01

    Trends in precipitation chemistry and hydrologic and climatic data were examined as drivers of long-term changes in the chemical composition of high-elevation lakes in three wilderness areas in Colorado during 1985-2008. Sulfate concentrations in precipitation decreased at a rate of -0.15 to -0.55 μeq/l/year at 10 high-elevation National Atmospheric Deposition Program stations in the state during 1987-2008 reflecting regional reductions in SO2 emissions. In lakes where sulfate is primarily derived from atmospheric inputs, sulfate concentrations also decreased although the rates generally were less, ranging from -0.12 to -0.27 μeq/l/year. The similarity in timing and sulfur isotopic data support the hypothesis that decreases in atmospheric deposition are driving the response of high-elevation lakes in some areas of the state. By contrast, in lakes where sulfate is derived primarily from watershed weathering sources, sulfate concentrations showed sharp increases during 1985-2008. Analysis of long-term climate records indicates that annual air temperatures have increased between 0.45 and 0.93°C per decade throughout most mountainous areas of Colorado, suggesting climate as a factor. Isotopic data reveal that sulfate in these lakes is largely derived from pyrite, which may indicate climate warming is preferentially affecting the rate of pyrite weathering.

  1. Response of lake chemistry to changes in atmospheric deposition and climate in three high-elevation wilderness areas of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mast, M.A.; Turk, J.T.; Clow, D.W.; Campbell, D.H.

    2011-01-01

    Trends in precipitation chemistry and hydrologic and climatic data were examined as drivers of long-term changes in the chemical composition of high-elevation lakes in three wilderness areas in Colorado during 1985-2008. Sulfate concentrations in precipitation decreased at a rate of -0.15 to -0.55 ??eq/l/year at 10 high-elevation National Atmospheric Deposition Program stations in the state during 1987-2008 reflecting regional reductions in SO2 emissions. In lakes where sulfate is primarily derived from atmospheric inputs, sulfate concentrations also decreased although the rates generally were less, ranging from -0.12 to -0.27 ??eq/l/year. The similarity in timing and sulfur isotopic data support the hypothesis that decreases in atmospheric deposition are driving the response of high-elevation lakes in some areas of the state. By contrast, in lakes where sulfate is derived primarily from watershed weathering sources, sulfate concentrations showed sharp increases during 1985-2008. Analysis of long-term climate records indicates that annual air temperatures have increased between 0.45 and 0.93??C per decade throughout most mountainous areas of Colorado, suggesting climate as a factor. Isotopic data reveal that sulfate in these lakes is largely derived from pyrite, which may indicate climate warming is preferentially affecting the rate of pyrite weathering. ?? 2010 US Government.

  2. Effect of the long-term elevation of CO sub 2 concentration in the field on the quantum yield of photosynthesis of the C sub 3 sedge, Scirpus olneyi

    SciTech Connect

    Long, S.P. ); Drake, B.G. )

    1991-05-01

    CO{sub 2} concentration was elevated throughout 3 years around stands of the C{sub 3} sedge Scirpus olneyi on a tidal marsh of the Chesapeake Bay. The hypothesis that tissues developed in an elevated CO{sub 2} atmosphere will show an acclimatory decrease in photosynthetic capacity under light-limiting conditions was examined. The absorbed light quantum yield of CO{sub 2} uptake ({phi}{sub abs}) and the efficiency of photosystem II photochemistry were determined for plants which had developed in open top chambers with CO{sub 2} concentrations in air of 680 micromoles per mole, and of 351 micromoles per mole as controls. When measured in an atmosphere with 10 millimoles per mole O{sub 2} to suppress photorespiration, shoots showed a {phi}{sub abs} of 0.093 {plus minus} 0.003, with no statistically significant difference between shoots grown in elevated or control CO{sub 2} concentration. Efficiency of photosystem II photochemistry was also unchanged by development in an elevated CO{sub 2} atmosphere. Shoots grown and measured in 680 micromoles per mole of CO{sub 2} in air showed a {phi}{sub abs} of 0.078 {plus minus} 0.004 compared with 0.065 {plus minus} for leaves grown and measured in 351 micromoles per mole CO{sub 2} in air; a highly significant increase. In accordance with the change in {phi}{sub abs}, the light compensation point of photosynthesis decreased from 51 {plus minus} 3 to 31 {plus minus} 3 micromoles per square meter per second for stems grown and measured in 351 and 680 micromoles per mole of CO{sub 2} in air, respectively.

  3. Effects of dynamic controlled atmosphere by respiratory quotient on some quality parameters and volatile profile of 'Royal Gala' apple after long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Both, Vanderlei; Thewes, Fabio Rodrigo; Brackmann, Auri; de Oliveira Anese, Rogerio; de Freitas Ferreira, Daniele; Wagner, Roger

    2017-01-15

    The effects of dynamic controlled atmosphere (DCA) storage based on chlorophyll fluorescence (DCA-CF) and respiratory quotient (DCA-RQ) on the quality and volatile profile of 'Royal Gala' apple were evaluated. DCA storage reduces ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate) oxidase activity, ethylene production and respiration rate of apples stored for 9months at 1.0°C plus 7days at 20°C, resulting in higher flesh firmness, titratable acidity and lesser physiological disorders, and provided a higher proportion of healthy fruit. Storage in a regular controlled atmosphere gave higher levels of key volatiles (butyl acetate, 2-methylbutyl acetate and hexyl acetate), as compared to fruit stored under DCA-CF, but fruit stored under DCA-RQ 1.5 and RQ 2.0 also showed higher amounts of key volatile compounds, with increment in ethanol and ethyl acetate, but far below the odour threshold. Storage in DCA-CF reduces fruit ester production, especially 2-methylbutyl acetate, which is the most important component of 'Royal Gala' apple flavour. PMID:27542502

  4. Effects of dynamic controlled atmosphere by respiratory quotient on some quality parameters and volatile profile of 'Royal Gala' apple after long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Both, Vanderlei; Thewes, Fabio Rodrigo; Brackmann, Auri; de Oliveira Anese, Rogerio; de Freitas Ferreira, Daniele; Wagner, Roger

    2017-01-15

    The effects of dynamic controlled atmosphere (DCA) storage based on chlorophyll fluorescence (DCA-CF) and respiratory quotient (DCA-RQ) on the quality and volatile profile of 'Royal Gala' apple were evaluated. DCA storage reduces ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate) oxidase activity, ethylene production and respiration rate of apples stored for 9months at 1.0°C plus 7days at 20°C, resulting in higher flesh firmness, titratable acidity and lesser physiological disorders, and provided a higher proportion of healthy fruit. Storage in a regular controlled atmosphere gave higher levels of key volatiles (butyl acetate, 2-methylbutyl acetate and hexyl acetate), as compared to fruit stored under DCA-CF, but fruit stored under DCA-RQ 1.5 and RQ 2.0 also showed higher amounts of key volatile compounds, with increment in ethanol and ethyl acetate, but far below the odour threshold. Storage in DCA-CF reduces fruit ester production, especially 2-methylbutyl acetate, which is the most important component of 'Royal Gala' apple flavour.

  5. Using environmental and growth characteristics of plants to detect long-term changes in response to atmospheric pollution: some examples from British beechwoods.

    PubMed

    Ling, K A

    2003-07-01

    This study uses the Ellenberg system of plant indicator values, along with Grime et al.'s plant growth strategy values, to investigate the nature of temporal changes in the composition of ground flora in two beechwoods in the Cotswolds region of the UK, currently receiving atmospheric inputs of nitrogen in excess of critical loads. The woods, first surveyed in the early 1960s, were resurveyed in 1998 using the original sampling protocol. Temporal changes in the abundance of individual species at Blackstable West Wood indicate changes in light over time, although decreases in sun species, and both increases and decreases in shade species suggest that this change has been patchy. Analysis of changes in plant community as represented by weighted and unweighted quadrat Ellenberg and CSR scores have yielded more significant results. Blackstable West Wood shows increases in nitrophilic, moist-soil and competitive species accompanied by a decline in stress-tolerant species. In Buckholt Top Wood there has been an increase in sun and moist-soil species, a decrease in competitive species and, when weighted Ellenberg scores are considered, an increase in acid-tolerant species. These changes indicate both the impact of woodland management by selective felling and an underlying influence of enhanced atmospheric deposition especially of nitrogen pollutants. It is concluded that quadrat mean scores are a useful tool especially where few individual species have undergone large temporal changes in abundance. However, lack of correlations between quadrat Ellenberg scores for pH and light on one hand, and their equivalents measured in the field, i.e. soil pH and surrogates for light, such as distance to the nearest tree and tree density, suggest that this approach may not be sensitive enough to pick up small-scale, within site variations. Although harder to interpret, plant strategy scores were found to be a useful additional descriptor, encapsulating a plant's response to a range of

  6. A two-dimensional ocean model for long-term climatic simulations: Stability and coupling to atmospheric and sea ice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, L. D. Danny

    1992-06-01

    and the horizontal diffusion coefficient in the mixed layer are not too large. Globally averaged atmospheric temperature changes of 2 K are driven by oscillations in the heat flux into or out of the deep ocean, with the sudden onset of a heat flux out of the deep ocean associated with the rapid onset of thermohaline overturning after a quiescent period, and the sudden onset of a heat flux into the deep ocean associated with the collapse of thermohaline overturning. When the coupled model is run with prescribed parameters (such as land-sea fraction and precipitation) varying with latitude based on observations, the model does not oscillate and produces a reasonable deep ocean temperature field but a completely unrealistic salinity field. Resetting the mixed layer salinity to observations on each time step (equivalent to the "flux correction" method used in atmosphere-ocean general circulation models) is sufficient to give a realistic salinity field throughout the ocean depth, but dramatically alters the flow field and associated heat transport. Although the model is highly idealized, the finding that the maximum perturbation in globally averaged heat flux from the deep ocean to the surface over a 100-year period is 1.4 W m-2 suggests that effect of continuing greenhouse gas increases, which could result in a heating perturbation of 10 W m-2 by the end of the next century, will swamp possible surface heating perturbations due to changes in oceanic circulation. On the other hand, the extreme sensitivity of the oceanic flow field to variations in precipitation and evaporation suggests that it will not be possible to produce accurate projections of regional climatic change in the near term, if at all.

  7. Extreme events in total ozone over Arosa - Part 2: Fingerprints of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry and effects on mean values and long-term changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Peter, T.; Ribatet, M.; Davison, A. C.; Stübi, R.; Weihs, P.; Holawe, F.

    2010-10-01

    In this study the frequency of days with extreme low (termed ELOs) and extreme high (termed EHOs) total ozone values and their influence on mean values and trends are analyzed for the world's longest total ozone record (Arosa, Switzerland). The results show (i) an increase in ELOs and (ii) a decrease in EHOs during the last decades and (iii) that the overall trend during the 1970s and 1980s in total ozone is strongly dominated by changes in these extreme events. After removing the extremes, the time series shows a strongly reduced trend (reduction by a factor of 2.5 for trend in annual mean). Excursions in the frequency of extreme events reveal "fingerprints" of dynamical factors such as ENSO or NAO, and chemical factors, such as cold Arctic vortex ozone losses, as well as major volcanic eruptions of the 20th century (Gunung Agung, El Chichón, Mt. Pinatubo). Furthermore, atmospheric loading of ozone depleting substances leads to a continuous modification of column ozone in the Northern Hemisphere also with respect to extreme values (partly again in connection with polar vortex contributions). Application of extreme value theory allows the identification of many more such "fingerprints" than conventional time series analysis of annual and seasonal mean values. The analysis shows in particular the strong influence of dynamics, revealing that even moderate ENSO and NAO events have a discernible effect on total ozone. Overall the approach to extremal modelling provides new information on time series properties, variability, trends and the influence of dynamics and chemistry, complementing earlier analyses focusing only on monthly (or annual) mean values.

  8. Extreme events in total ozone over Arosa - Part 2: Fingerprints of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry and effects on mean values and long-term changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Peter, T.; Ribatet, M.; Davison, A. C.; Stübi, R.; Weihs, P.; Holawe, F.

    2010-05-01

    In this study the frequency of days with extreme low (termed ELOs) and extreme high (termed EHOs) total ozone values and their influence on mean values and trends are analyzed for the world's longest total ozone record (Arosa, Switzerland). The results show (a) an increase in ELOs and (b) a decrease in EHOs during the last decades and (c) that the overall trend during the 1970s and 1980s in total ozone is strongly dominated by changes in these extreme events. After removing the extremes, the time series shows a strongly reduced trend (reduction by a factor of 2.5 for trend in annual mean). Excursions in the frequency of extreme events reveal "fingerprints" of dynamical factors such as ENSO or NAO, and chemical factors, such as cold Arctic vortex ozone losses, as well as major volcanic eruptions of the 20th century (Gunung Agung, El Chichón, Mt. Pinatubo). Furthermore, atmospheric loading of ozone depleting substances leads to a continuous modification of column ozone in the Northern Hemisphere also with respect to extreme values (partly again in connection with polar vortex contributions). Application of extreme value theory allows the identification of many more such "fingerprints" than conventional time series analysis of annual and seasonal mean values. The analysis shows in particular the strong influence of dynamics, revealing that even moderate ENSO and NAO events have a discernible effect on total ozone. Overall the approach to extremal modelling provides new information on time series properties, variability, trends and the influence of dynamics and chemistry, complementing earlier analyses focusing only on monthly (or annual) mean values.

  9. Response of potato to discontinuous exposures of atmospheric ethylene: results of a long-term experiment in open-top chambers and crop growth modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueck, Th. A.; Van Dijk, C. J.; Grashoff, C.; Groenwold, J.; Schapendonk, A. H. C. M.; Tonneijck, A. E. G.

    A field experiment in open-top chambers (OTCs) was performed to quantitatively assess the growth and yield response of potato to discontinuous exposures to atmospheric ethylene (200, 400 and 800 ppb, applied twice weekly and 200 and 400 ppb applied 4 times weekly, each for 3 h/event). To evaluate the effect of ethylene on potato tuber yield, a module was developed for an existing crop growth simulation model by incorporating the effects of ethylene on epinasty and photosynthesis. Explorations with the model showed that in a worst case scenario, ethylene-induced epinasty had only a marginal effect on tuber yield. Short-term exposures to ethylene under laboratory conditions inhibited photosynthesis, but it recovered within 48 h. When exposed to ethylene for longer than 12 h, irreversible damage of the photosynthesis apparatus occurred. Exposure to ethylene in the OTCs resulted in epinasty and reduced flowering. The number of flowers on potato decreased with increasing concentrations of ethylene, irrespective of the exposure frequency. Calculations showed that the number of flowers was significantly reduced at ca. 170 ppb ethylene, averaged over the hours of exposure. Ethylene concentrations up to 800 ppb, administered 4 times weekly for 3 h during the growing season, did not affect vegetative growth and yield in fumigated potatoes. Under these experimental conditions, the modified simulation model incorporating the effects of ethylene on epinasty and photosynthesis forecasts a 5% effect on tuber yield at concentrations of 1600 ppb. All results indicate that ethylene concentrations higher than 800 ppb are required to adversely affect tuber yield of potato.

  10. Elevated atmospheric sulfur levels off the Peruvian coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltzman, E. S.; Savoie, D. L.; Prospero, J. M.; Zika, R. G.; Mosher, B.

    1986-06-01

    Elevated levels of non-sea-salt sulfate and SO2 in samples collected off the west coast of South America indicate that there is a major source of atmospheric sulfur in the region of southern Peru and northern Chile. During a 1983 cruise, observed concentrations of non-sea-salt sulfur, SO2, selenium, arsenic, and antimony were comparable to levels reported for moderately polluted urban air. In contrast, methanesulfonic acid levels were typical of coastal marine air. Clearly, the elevated atmospheric sulfur levels in this region cannot be ascribed to oceanic organosulfur emissions. The major inputs are tentatively attributed to the smelting of sulfide ores which is a major industry in this region. The transport of smelter derived aerosols to this region may have a number of consequences for the atmospheric and oceanic chemistry of the Peruvian upwelling area.

  11. Long-term parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Ladefoged, Karin; Jarnum, Stig

    1978-01-01

    Nineteen patients (11 women and eight men) aged 20-68 received long-term parenteral nutrition, mostly at home, for six to 63 months (mean 19 months). Indications for LTPN were extensive, active Crohn's disease in three patients, intestinocutaneous fistulas in three, and short-bowel syndrome in the remaining 13 patients. Subclavian or intra-atrial (Broviac) catheters were most commonly used, for which the average life was four and seven months respectively. Complications of long-term parenteral nutrition included pneumothorax in four out of 48 subclavian vein punctures. Catheter-induced thrombosis of central veins was shown by phlebography 17 times in nine patients, and eight episodes of total occlusion occurred. Two of these patients had pulmonary infarction. Nineteen episodes of catheter sepsis occurred in 11 patients, but only one was fatal. Complications related to intestinal disease included intra-abdominal abscesses and intestinal fistulas, and disturbances of liver function. Five patients died, though in only two was death related to long-term parenteral nutrition. One of these patients died from catheter sepsis, the other had subdural haematoma possibly caused by anticoagulant treatment. Eight of the 14 surviving patients still needed parenteral nutrition. All received a disability pension, but six had an acceptable quality of life with almost normal social activities. Despite problems such as difficulties in maintaining standardised infusion programmes, it was concluded that long-term parenteral nutrition at home is practicable and consistent with an acceptable quality of life. ImagesFIG 2 PMID:98199

  12. Long-term data archiving

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David Steven

    2009-01-01

    Long term data archiving has much value for chemists, not only to retain access to research and product development records, but also to enable new developments and new discoveries. There are some recent regulatory requirements (e.g., FDA 21 CFR Part 11), but good science and good business both benefit regardless. A particular example of the benefits of and need for long term data archiving is the management of data from spectroscopic laboratory instruments. The sheer amount of spectroscopic data is increasing at a scary rate, and the pressures to archive come from the expense to create the data (or recreate it if it is lost) as well as its high information content. The goal of long-term data archiving is to save and organize instrument data files as well as any needed meta data (such as sample ID, LIMS information, operator, date, time, instrument conditions, sample type, excitation details, environmental parameters, etc.). This editorial explores the issues involved in long-term data archiving using the example of Raman spectral databases. There are at present several such databases, including common data format libraries and proprietary libraries. However, such databases and libraries should ultimately satisfy stringent criteria for long term data archiving, including readability for long times into the future, robustness to changes in computer hardware and operating systems, and use of public domain data formats. The latter criterion implies the data format should be platform independent and the tools to create the data format should be easily and publicly obtainable or developable. Several examples of attempts at spectral libraries exist, such as the ASTM ANDI format, and the JCAMP-DX format. On the other hand, proprietary library spectra can be exchanged and manipulated using proprietary tools. As the above examples have deficiencies according to the three long term data archiving criteria, Extensible Markup Language (XML; a product of the World Wide Web

  13. Digital elevation model visibility including Earth's curvature and atmosphere refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santossilva, Ewerton; Vieiradias, Luiz Alberto

    1990-03-01

    There are some instances in which the Earth's curvature and the atmospheric refraction, optical or electronic, are important factors when digital elevation models are used for visibility calculations. This work deals with this subject, suggesting a practical approach to solve this problem. Some examples, from real terrain data, are presented. The equipment used was an IBM-PC like computer with a SITIM graphic card.

  14. Development of a real time monitor and multivariate method for long term diagnostics of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges: Application to He, He/N2, and He/O2 discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, N.; Milosavljević, V.; Daniels, S.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper we present the development and application of a real time atmospheric pressure discharge monitoring diagnostic. The software based diagnostic is designed to extract latent electrical and optical information associated with the operation of an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (APDBD) over long time scales. Given that little is known about long term temporal effects in such discharges, the diagnostic methodology is applied to the monitoring of an APDBD in helium and helium with both 0.1% nitrogen and 0.1% oxygen gas admixtures over periods of tens of minutes. Given the large datasets associated with the experiments, it is shown that this process is much expedited through the novel application of multivariate correlations between the electrical and optical parameters of the corresponding chemistries which, in turn, facilitates comparisons between each individual chemistry also. The results of these studies show that the electrical and optical parameters of the discharge in helium and upon the addition of gas admixtures evolve over time scales far longer than the gas residence time and have been compared to current modelling works. It is envisaged that the diagnostic together with the application of multivariate correlations will be applied to rapid system identification and prototyping in both experimental and industrial APDBD systems in the future.

  15. Responses of soil cellulolytic fungal communities to elevated atmospheric CO2 are complex and variableacross five ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Carolyn F; Zak, Donald R; Hungate, Bruce; Jackson, Robert B; Vilgalys, Rytas; Evans, R David; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Megonigal, J. Patrick; Kuske, Cheryl R

    2011-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO(2) generally increases plant productivity and subsequently increases the availability of cellulose in soil to microbial decomposers. As key cellulose degraders, soil fungi are likely to be one of the most impacted and responsive microbial groups to elevated atmospheric CO(2) . To investigate the impacts of ecosystem type and elevated atmospheric CO(2) on cellulolytic fungal communities, we sequenced 10 677 cbhI gene fragments encoding the catalytic subunit of cellobiohydrolase I, across five distinct terrestrial ecosystem experiments after a decade of exposure to elevated CO(2) . The cbhI composition of each ecosystem was distinct, as supported by weighted Unifrac analyses (all P-values; < 0.001), with few operational taxonomic units (OTUs) being shared across ecosystems. Using a 114-member cbhI sequence database compiled from known fungi, less than 1% of the environmental sequences could be classified at the family level indicating that cellulolytic fungi in situ are likely dominated by novel fungi or known fungi that are not yet recognized as cellulose degraders. Shifts in fungal cbhI composition and richness that were correlated with elevated CO(2) exposure varied across the ecosystems. In aspen plantation and desert creosote bush soils, cbhI gene richness was significantly higher after exposure to elevated CO(2) (550 mol mol(-1) ) than under ambient CO(2) (360 mol mol(-1) CO(2) ). In contrast, while the richness was not altered, the relative abundance of dominant OTUs in desert soil crusts was significantly shifted. This suggests that responses are complex, vary across different ecosystems and, in at least one case, are OTU-specific. Collectively, our results document the complexity of cellulolytic fungal communities in multiple terrestrial ecosystems and the variability of their responses to long-term exposure to elevated atmospheric CO(2) .

  16. Brodie's abscess. A long-term review.

    PubMed

    Stephens, M M; MacAuley, P

    1988-09-01

    In 20 patients with 21 Brodie's abscesses, a long-term review revealed that 13 occurred in the second decade of life. All had local symptoms for six weeks or more. The tibia was involved in 11 cases and seven of these were in the proximal metaphysis. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was elevated in only six cases. When the ESR was more than 40 mm per hour, recurrence was more likely. Staphylococcus aureus was cultured from 11 abscesses. Curettage and antibiotics for six weeks were adequate for treatment in most cases. However, lesions larger than 3 cm in diameter should be grafted, and patients with an elevated ESR require more aggressive decompression and prolonged antibiotic therapy. Lesions within the neck of the femur pose particular anatomic problems and should not be approached laterally. All cases were followed to full bone maturity. No significant leg length inequality was clinically or roentgenologically apparent. If an abscess was juxtaphyseal, deformity of the epiphysis could develop.

  17. Tracing changes of N2O emission pathways in a permanent grassland under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenflo, Andre; Moser, Gerald; Brenzinger, Kristof; Elias, Dafydd; McNamara, Neill; Clough, Tim; Maček, Irena; Vodnik, Dominik; Braker, Gesche; Schimmelpfennig, Sonja; Gerstner, Judith; Müller, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    The increase of greenhouse gases (GHG) in the atmosphere is of concern due to its effect on global temperatures. Nitrous oxide (N2O) with a Global Warming Potential of 298 over a 100 year period is of particular concern because strong feedback effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on N2O emissions have been observed. However, so far the changes in processes which are responsible for such a feedback effect are only poorly understood. Our study was carried out in situ in a long-term Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE) study on permanent grassland at atmospheric CO2 concentrations 20% above ambient which expected at the middle of this century. We performed an in situ 15N tracing with differentially labelled NH4NO3 to trace the main N2O emission pathways. Over a period of more than one year we monitored at least weakly the N2O emissions with the closed chamber technique and analyzed the 15N signature of the N2O. The observed gaseous emissions under ambient and elevated atmospheric CO2 were associated with the observed gross N transformations and the microbial activities to identify the main emission pathways under ambient and elevated CO2.

  18. Elevated atmospheric CO2 increases microbial growth rates and enzymes activity in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatsky, Sergey; Dorodnikov, Maxim; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2010-05-01

    Increasing the belowground translocation of assimilated carbon by plants grown under elevated CO2 can cause a shift in the structure and activity of the microbial community responsible for the turnover of organic matter in soil. We investigated the long-term effect of elevated CO2 in the atmosphere on microbial biomass and specific growth rates in root-free and rhizosphere soil. The experiments were conducted under two free air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) systems: in Hohenheim and Braunschweig, as well as in the intensively managed forest mesocosm of the Biosphere 2 Laboratory (B2L) in Oracle, AZ. Specific microbial growth rates (μ) were determined using the substrate-induced respiration response after glucose and/or yeast extract addition to the soil. We evaluated the effect of elevated CO2 on b-glucosidase, chitinase, phosphatase, and sulfatase to estimate the potential enzyme activity after soil amendment with glucose and nutrients. For B2L and both FACE systems, up to 58% higher μ were observed under elevated vs. ambient CO2, depending on site, plant species and N fertilization. The μ-values increased linearly with atmospheric CO2 concentration at all three sites. The effect of elevated CO2 on rhizosphere microorganisms was plant dependent and increased for: Brassica napus=Triticum aestivumelevated CO2 was smoothed on rich vs. simple substrate. So, the r/K strategies ratio can be better revealed by studying growth on simple (glucose) than on rich substrate mixtures (yeast extract). After adding glucose, enzyme activities under elevated CO2 were

  19. Long-term Ecosystem Experiments, Data Assimilation, and Meta-Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hungate, B. A.; Van Groenigen, K. J.; Osenberg, C. W.; van Gestel, N.

    2015-12-01

    Land ecosystems affect climate and the atmosphere, and climate and atmospheric change affects ecosystems. Syntheses of ecosystem experiments investigating their responses to environmental change holds promise for understanding how to model these interactions, and thereby gain insight into Earth's future biosphere, atmosphere, and climate. Long-term experiments examining ecosystem responses are thought to be especially important in this effort, for their potential to reveal cumulative and progressive effects, subtle effects initially undetectable experimentally, but manifest more clearly over time, often with stronger implications for modeled responses than the more dramatic, short-term experimental responses. Here, we present new analyses of long-term experiments manipulating temperature, CO2 concentration, and precipitation, testing the general hypothesis that there are common temporal patterns of responses that reveal general biogeochemical characterizing ecosystem responses to these environmental changes. For example, we show that increased carbon input with elevated CO2 stimulates emissions of nitrous oxide and methane, important greenhouse gases, and that effects show no signs of diminishing over the duration of experiments that have documented responses. At the same time, we show that the temporal resolution for this response is limited, pointing to a potential limitation in the ability of experiments to address clearly long-term hypotheses. We also show that warming tends to have limited cumulative effects on total soil carbon stocks in long-term experiments, and explore the mechanisms underlying this response. Finally, we discuss the implications of these findings for models used to simulate long-term ecosystem responses to these environmental forcings, as well as the implications of these findings for the next generation of terrestrial ecosystem experiments.

  20. Impacts of 3 years of elevated atmospheric CO2 on rhizosphere carbon flow and microbial community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Drigo, Barbara; Kowalchuk, George A; Knapp, Brigitte A; Pijl, Agata S; Boschker, Henricus T S; van Veen, Johannes A

    2013-02-01

    Carbon (C) uptake by terrestrial ecosystems represents an important option for partially mitigating anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Short-term atmospheric elevated CO2 exposure has been shown to create major shifts in C flow routes and diversity of the active soil-borne microbial community. Long-term increases in CO2 have been hypothesized to have subtle effects due to the potential adaptation of soil microorganism to the increased flow of organic C. Here, we studied the effects of prolonged elevated atmospheric CO2 exposure on microbial C flow and microbial communities in the rhizosphere. Carex arenaria (a nonmycorrhizal plant species) and Festuca rubra (a mycorrhizal plant species) were grown at defined atmospheric conditions differing in CO2 concentration (350 and 700 ppm) for 3 years. During this period, C flow was assessed repeatedly (after 6 months, 1, 2, and 3 years) by (13) C pulse-chase experiments, and label was tracked through the rhizosphere bacterial, general fungal, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) communities. Fatty acid biomarker analyses and RNA-stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP), in combination with real-time PCR and PCR-DGGE, were used to examine microbial community dynamics and abundance. Throughout the experiment the influence of elevated CO2 was highly plant dependent, with the mycorrhizal plant exerting a greater influence on both bacterial and fungal communities. Biomarker data confirmed that rhizodeposited C was first processed by AMF and subsequently transferred to bacterial and fungal communities in the rhizosphere soil. Over the course of 3 years, elevated CO2 caused a continuous increase in the (13) C enrichment retained in AMF and an increasing delay in the transfer of C to the bacterial community. These results show that, not only do elevated atmospheric CO2 conditions induce changes in rhizosphere C flow and dynamics but also continue to develop over multiple seasons, thereby affecting terrestrial ecosystems C utilization processes.

  1. Long Term Surface Salinity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Raymond W.; Brown, Neil L.

    2005-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to establish a reliable system for monitoring surface salinity around the global ocean. Salinity is a strong indicator of the freshwater cycle and has a great influence on upper ocean stratification. Global salinity measurements have potential to improve climate forecasts if an observation system can be developed. This project is developing a new internal field conductivity cell that can be protected from biological fouling for two years. Combined with a temperature sensor, this foul-proof cell can be deployed widely on surface drifters. A reliable in-situ network of surface salinity sensors will be an important adjunct to the salinity sensing satellite AQUARIUS to be deployed by NASA in 2009. A new internal-field conductivity cell has been developed by N Brown, along with new electronics. This sensor system has been combined with a temperature sensor to make a conductivity - temperature (UT) sensor suitable for deployment on drifters. The basic sensor concepts have been proven on a high resolution CTD. A simpler (lower cost) circuit has been built for this application. A protection mechanism for the conductivity cell that includes antifouling protection has also been designed and built. Mr. A.Walsh of our commercial partner E-Paint has designed and delivered time-release formulations of antifoulants for our application. Mr. G. Williams of partner Clearwater Instrumentation advised on power and communication issues and supplied surface drifters for testing.

  2. Long-term equilibrium tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, John A.; Cerveny, Randall S.

    1998-08-01

    Extreme equilibrium tides, or ``hypertides,'' are computed in a new equilibrium tidal model combining algorithms of a version of the Chapront ELP-2000/82 Lunar Theory with the BER78 Milankovitch astronomical expansions. For the recent past, a high correspondence exists between computed semidiurnal tide levels and a record of coastal flooding demonstrating that astronomical alignment is a potential influence on such flooding. For the Holocene and near future, maximum tides demonstrate cyclic variations with peaks at near 5000 B.P. and 4000 A.P. On the late Quaternary timescale, variations in maximum equilibrium tide level display oscillations with periods of approximately 10,000, 100,000 and 400,000 years, because of precessional shifts in tidal maxima between vernal and autumnal equinoxes. While flooding occurs under the combined effects of tides and storms via ``storm surges,'' the most extensive flooding will occur with the coincidence of storms and the rarer hypertides and is thus primarily influenced by hypertides. Therefore we suggest that astronomical alignment's relationship to coastal flooding is probabilistic rather than deterministic. Data derived from this model are applicable to (1) archaeological and paleoclimatic coastal reconstructions, (2) long-term planning, for example, radioactive waste site selection, (3) sealevel change and paleoestuarine studies or (4) ocean-meteorological interactions.

  3. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide in agroecosystems affects groundwater quality

    SciTech Connect

    Torbert, H.A.; Prior, S.A.; Rogers, H.H.; Schlesinger, W.H.; Mullins, G.L.; Runion, G.B.

    1996-07-01

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentration has led to concerns about global changes to the environment. One area of global change that has not been addressed is the effect of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on groundwater quality below agroecosystems. Elevated CO{sub 2} concentration alterations of plant growth and C/N ratios may modify C and N cycling in soil and affect nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) leaching to groundwater. This study was conducted to examine the effects of a legume (soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]) and a nonlegume (grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]) CO{sub 2}-enriched agroecosystems on NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} movement below the root zone in a Blanton loamy sand (loamy siliceous, thermic, Grossarenic Paleudults). The study was a split-plot design replicated three times with plant species (soybean and grain sorghum) as the main plots and CO{sub 2} concentration ({approximately}360 and {approximately}720 {mu}L L{sup {minus}1} CO{sub 2}) as subplots using open-top field chambers. Fertilizer application was made with {sup 15}N-depleted NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} to act as a fertilizer tracer. Soil solution samples were collected weekly at 90-cm depth for a 2-yr period and monitored for NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N concentrations. Isotope analysis of soil solution indicated that the decomposition of organic matter was the primary source of No{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N in soil solution below the root zone through most of the monitoring period. Significant differences were observed for NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N concentrations between soybean and grain sorghum, with soybean having the higher NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N concentration. Elevated CO{sub 2} increased total dry weight, total N content, and C/N ratio of residue returned to soil in both years. Elevated CO{sub 2} significantly decreased NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N concentrations below the root zone in both soybean and grain sorghum. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Long-Term Planning in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    This report presents the concepts and issues discussed at a Regional Symposium on Long-term Planning in Higher Education held in Dhaka, Bangladesh, September 21-30, 1986. Chapter 1 explores some fundamental issues about the rationale for the objectives of long-term planning. It defines long-term planning in higher education, considers its…

  5. Long term effects of elevated CO sub 2 on photosynthesis and dark respiration of C3 and C4 salt marsh species in the field. [Scirpus olneyi; Spartina patens

    SciTech Connect

    Ziska, L.; Chamberlain, S.; Drake, B. )

    1989-04-01

    Mono specific stands of the C3 sedge, Scirpus olneyi, and the C4 grass, Spartina patens, were exposed to normal ambient or elevated CO2 (normal ambient + 340 ul/l) in open top chambers throughout two growing seasons. Photosynthesis in the C3 sedge measured in elevated CO2 or low O2 (air with 1% O2) was greater at all light levels than photosynthesis measured in normal ambient CO2. Plants grown in ambient or ambient + 340 ul/l CO2 showed an identical photosynthetic response when tested at elevated CO2 with no evidence of acclimation to elevated CO2. No differences in the photosynthetic response to light were noted for the C4 species at any of the gas mixtures tested. However, nighttime dark respiration rates decreased in both the C3 and C4 species when grown in elevated CO2.

  6. Uncertainties and Challenges in Long-term d13C Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 at Canadian Baseline Stations: Can Human induced CO2 Detected & Quantified at Regional Scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Chivulescu, A.; Ernst, D.

    2009-04-01

    imperative to ensure that the primary standard, NBS19 is stable with an annual change rate less than 0.02 permil, in another words, to assess the uncertainty of NBS19 pure CO2 productions. How precise can the δ13C of NBS19 pure CO2 be produced? How well do we know the uncertainty anchoring each individual δ13C measurement in atmospheric CO2 to the primary standard? In this work, the long-term CO2 isotope measurements (~ 10 years) at a Canadian baseline site (i.e., Alert/GAW station), the annual calibration records (i.e., secondary carbonate standards directly by NBS19CO2) over 7 - 10 years and the measurements for air standards over 5 years will be presented. The annual changes/drifts for the related standards will be determined. The principle and a method for deriving the uncertainty for anchoring individual δ13C measurements in flask-air CO2 to the primary standard will be illustrated and discussed using those data. Even though taking account of the uncertainty of the traceability, it is likely that the annual mean changes of δ13C measurements at Canadian baseline stations can be detected and attributed. An example using the detected annual mean changes (both CO2 and δ13C) to apportion the human-induced and natural contributions at a regional scale level will be discussed.

  7. GRACE Score among Six Risk Scoring Systems (CADILLAC, PAMI, TIMI, Dynamic TIMI, Zwolle) Demonstrated the Best Predictive Value for Prediction of Long-Term Mortality in Patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Littnerova, Simona; Kala, Petr; Jarkovsky, Jiri; Kubkova, Lenka; Prymusova, Krystyna; Kubena, Petr; Tesak, Martin; Toman, Ondrej; Poloczek, Martin; Spinar, Jindrich; Dusek, Ladislav; Parenica, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Aim To compare the prognostic accuracy of six scoring models for up to three-year mortality and rates of hospitalisation due to acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) in STEMI patients. Methods and Results A total of 593 patients treated with primary PCI were evaluated. Prospective follow-up of patients was ≥3 years. Thirty-day, one-year, two-year, and three-year mortality rates were 4.0%, 7.3%, 8.9%, and 10.6%, respectively. Six risk scores—the TIMI score and derived dynamic TIMI, CADILLAC, PAMI, Zwolle, and GRACE—showed a high predictive accuracy for six- and 12-month mortality with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values of 0.73–0.85. The best predictive values for long-term mortality were obtained by GRACE. The next best-performing scores were CADILLAC, Zwolle, and Dynamic TIMI. All risk scores had a lower prediction accuracy for repeat hospitalisation due to ADHF, except Zwolle with the discriminatory capacity for hospitalisation up to two years (AUC, 0.80–0.83). Conclusions All tested models showed a high predictive value for the estimation of one-year mortality, but GRACE appears to be the most suitable for the prediction for a longer follow-up period. The tested models exhibited an ability to predict the risk of ADHF, especially the Zwolle model. PMID:25893501

  8. Spatial and temporal trends of gas and particle phase atmospheric DDT and metabolites in Michigan: Evidence of long-term persistence and atmospheric emission in a high-DDT-use fruit orchard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanson, Mark H.; Moss, Daren J.; Monosmith, Carrie L.; Keeler, Gerald J.

    2007-02-01

    Michigan was among the top three apple producing states in the United States from the 1940s to 1969 when DDT was heavily used on its fruit orchards. More than 2 decades after Michigan banned DDT use in 1969, we collected air samples from four sites around the state to measure concentrations of six DDT-related compounds in the atmosphere. At South Haven, an apple producing area, average gas phase concentrations of DDT and DDE compounds were at least 10 times greater than the other sites including Pellston in the north, Deckerville in the east, and Dexter in south-central. Concentrations at South Haven showed a very strong seasonal cycle, an effect of higher air temperatures on moving these residues into the gas phase from a local source. We calculated ΔH values for all six compounds from the South Haven data which showed that p,p'-DDE was the highest at 108 kJ mol-1. The ΔH values for all compounds at South Haven had a high correlation with Henry's Law Constant (HLC) (r = 0.7), verifying that HLC is a good indicator of tendency for compound conversion to the gas phase. South Haven was the only site with significant atmospheric particle-associated DDT. Particle/gas ratios there for p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE also had a predictable seasonal variation. Overall, these results show that agricultural sites with similar DDT use history will be continuous sources of atmospheric DDT for decades after application.

  9. Long-term solar-terrestrial observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The results of an 18-month study of the requirements for long-term monitoring and archiving of solar-terrestrial data is presented. The value of long-term solar-terrestrial observations is discussed together with parameters, associated measurements, and observational problem areas in each of the solar-terrestrial links (the sun, the interplanetary medium, the magnetosphere, and the thermosphere-ionosphere). Some recommendations are offered for coordinated planning for long-term solar-terrestrial observations.

  10. Long-Term Ecological Research and Network-Level Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Scott L.; Childers, Daniel L.

    2014-08-01

    With every passing year, the effects of global environmental change are becoming more pervasive and are occurring at a more accelerated pace. Climate change, land use change, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, ocean acidification and sea level rise, loss of biodiversity, and homogenization of Earth's ecosystems are all manifestations of human activities. These short- and long-term effects of environmental changes continue to mount.

  11. Global, long-term surface reflectance records from Landsat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global, long-term monitoring of changes in Earth’s land surface requires quantitative comparisons of satellite images acquired under widely varying atmospheric conditions. Although physically based estimates of surface reflectance (SR) ultimately provide the most accurate representation of Earth’s s...

  12. Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. [Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Oechel, W.C.

    1989-12-31

    Predicting the response of northern ecosystems to increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} and associated climatic change is important for several reasons, including the fact that northern ecosystems contain large stores of carbon, most of which is below ground and because northern ecosystems could conceivably be either sources or sinks for CO{sub 2} under future climatic and atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The carbon in northern ecosystems is equal to about 20% of the world`s terrestrial carbon and about 70% of the carbon currently in the atmosphere. Eighty-three percent of this carbon is below ground in the seasonally-thawed upper soil layers and in the permanently frozen zone, the permafrost. Because of bogs and permafrost, northern ecosystems are unusual in that they can potentially store significant amounts of carbon over long time periods. Most other mature ecosystems have little capacity for long- term carbon storage. Given the right conditions, northern ecosystems can also release a significant amount of carbon. A substantial amount of the carbon stored in northern ecosystems, and much of the future storage potential, is in the tundra regions. These systems could conceivably act as sources or sinks depending on developing climatic and atmospheric conditions. Our recent work indicates that elevated CO{sub 2} alone will have little effect on carbon storage in the tundra. However, the combination of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} (+ 340 ppm) and air temperature (+4{degrees}C) in the absence of any change in soil water table or soil moisture content, should result in significant increases in carbon sequestering in the tundra. However, if changing climate results in a decrease in the water table and soil moisture levels, this may lead to sizeable losses of carbon from the tundra soils.

  13. Long-term treatment outcome in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Holdaway, I M; Rajasoorya, C R; Gamble, G D; Stewart, A W

    2003-08-01

    A number of groups have developed guidelines to indicate whether an individual with acromegaly has been cured by treatment. However, studies to date do not provide a robust definition of biochemical remission of the disorder based on correlation with long-term outcome. Available data suggest that those with a random serum growth hormone (GH) level of <2.5 microg/l, or a glucose-suppressed GH level of <1 microg/l following treatment have mortality figures indistinguishable from the general population. However, the confidence limits for these mortality estimates are quite wide. It remains possible that growth hormone levels lower than 1 microg/l for random samples, or even lower when using ultrasensitive GH assays, may indicate superior outcome, but this remains to be confirmed. There are limited data relating serum insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels to outcome, although normalisation of serum IGF-I clearly improves outcome compared with continued elevation of measurements after treatment. Current evidence suggests that a post-treatment random serum GH <2.5 microg/l and a normal serum IGF-I value defines biochemical cure. Available data suggest that achieving similar growth hormone levels after treatment also reduces the prevalence of chronic complications of the disorder, which is subsequently reflected in improved mortality. PMID:12914751

  14. Wnt signaling is required for long-term memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ying; Yu, Dinghui; Busto, Germain U.; Wilson, Curtis; Davis, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Wnt signaling regulates synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis in the adult nervous system, suggesting a potential role in behavioral processes. Here, we probed the requirement for Wnt signaling during olfactory memory formation in Drosophila using an inducible RNA interference approach. Interfering with β-catenin expression in the adult mushroom body neurons specifically impaired long-term memory without altering short-term memory. The impairment was reversible, rescued with expression of a wild-type β-catenin transgene, and correlated with a disruption of a cellular long-term memory trace. Inhibition of wingless, a Wnt ligand, and arrow, a Wnt co-receptor, also impaired long-term memory. Wingless expression in wild type flies was transiently elevated in the brain after long-term memory conditioning. Thus, inhibiting three key components of the Wnt signaling pathway in the adult mushroom bodies impairs long-term memory, collectively indicating that this pathway mechanistically underlies this specific form of memory. PMID:24035392

  15. Financing long-term care in Canada.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P; Mills, C; Hollander, M

    1997-06-01

    Financial policies relating to long-term care in Canada are changing rapidly in response to demands for health care reform. This chapter focuses on the financial structure of institutional care, primarily nursing homes, in the western provinces of Alberta and British Columbia. Community-based long-term care is discussed briefly.

  16. Virtual Models of Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phenice, Lillian A.; Griffore, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing homes, assisted living facilities and home-care organizations, use web sites to describe their services to potential consumers. This virtual ethnographic study developed models representing how potential consumers may understand this information using data from web sites of 69 long-term-care providers. The content of long-term-care web…

  17. Long-term preservation of Anammox bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deposit of useful microorganisms in culture collections requires long-term preservation and successful reactivation techniques. The goal of this study was to develop a simple preservation protocol for the long-term storage and reactivation of the anammox biomass. To achieve this, anammox biomass w...

  18. Paying for long-term care.

    PubMed Central

    Estes, C L; Bodenheimer, T

    1994-01-01

    Everyone agrees that insurance for long-term care is inadequate in the United States. Disagreement exists, however, on whether such insurance should be provided through the private or public sector. Private insurance generally uses the experience-rating principle that persons with higher risk of illness are charged higher premiums. For private insurance for long-term care, this principle creates a dilemma. Most policies will be purchased by the elderly; yet, because the elderly have a high risk of needing long-term care, only about 20% of them can afford the cost of premiums. A public-private partnership by which the government partially subsidizes private long-term-care insurance is unlikely to resolve this dilemma. Only a social insurance program for long-term care can provide universal, affordable, and equitable coverage. PMID:8128712

  19. Long-term changes in Saturn's troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trafton, L.

    1985-09-01

    The author reports the results of monitoring Saturn's H2 quadrupole and CH4 band absorptions outside of the equatorial zone over one-half of Saturn's year. This interval covers most of the perihelion half of Saturn's elliptical orbit, which happens to be approximately bounded by the equinoxes. Marked long-term changes occur in the CH4 absorption accompanied by weakly opposite changes in the H2 absorption. Around the 1980 equinox, the H2 and CH4 absorptions in the northern hemisphere appear to be discontinuous with those in the southern hemisphere. This discontinuity and the temporal variation of the absorptions are evidence for seasonal changes. The absorption variations can be attributed to a variable haze in Saturn's troposphere, responding to changes in temperature and insolation through the processes of sublimation and freezing. The author models the vertical haze distribution of Saturn's south temperate latitudes during 1971 - 1977 in terms of a distribution having a particle scale height equal to a fraction of the atmospheric scale height. He also reports spatial measurements of the absorption in the 6450 Å NH3 band made annually since the 1980 equinox.

  20. Long term prediction of flood occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Cristina; Montanari, Alberto; José Polo, María

    2016-05-01

    How long a river remembers its past is still an open question. Perturbations occurring in large catchments may impact the flow regime for several weeks and months, therefore providing a physical explanation for the occasional tendency of floods to occur in clusters. The research question explored in this paper may be stated as follows: can higher than usual river discharges in the low flow season be associated to a higher probability of floods in the subsequent high flow season? The physical explanation for such association may be related to the presence of higher soil moisture storage at the beginning of the high flow season, which may induce lower infiltration rates and therefore higher river runoff. Another possible explanation is persistence of climate, due to presence of long-term properties in atmospheric circulation. We focus on the Po River at Pontelagoscuro, whose catchment area amounts to 71 000 km2. We look at the stochastic connection between average river flows in the pre-flood season and the peak flows in the flood season by using a bivariate probability distribution. We found that the shape of the flood frequency distribution is significantly impacted by the river flow regime in the low flow season. The proposed technique, which can be classified as a data assimilation approach, may allow one to reduce the uncertainty associated to the estimation of the flood probability.

  1. Common Calibration Source for Monitoring Long-term Ozone Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalewski, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Accurate long-term satellite measurements are crucial for monitoring the recovery of the ozone layer. The slow pace of the recovery and limited lifetimes of satellite monitoring instruments demands that datasets from multiple observation systems be combined to provide the long-term accuracy needed. A fundamental component of accurately monitoring long-term trends is the calibration of these various instruments. NASA s Radiometric Calibration and Development Facility at the Goddard Space Flight Center has provided resources to minimize calibration biases between multiple instruments through the use of a common calibration source and standardized procedures traceable to national standards. The Facility s 50 cm barium sulfate integrating sphere has been used as a common calibration source for both US and international satellite instruments, including the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet 2 (SBUV/2) instruments, Shuttle SBUV (SSBUV), Ozone Mapping Instrument (OMI), Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) (ESA), Scanning Imaging SpectroMeter for Atmospheric ChartographY (SCIAMACHY) (ESA), and others. We will discuss the advantages of using a common calibration source and its effects on long-term ozone data sets. In addition, sphere calibration results from various instruments will be presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the long-term characterization of the source itself.

  2. Long-term elevated air [CO2 ] strengthens photosynthetic functioning and mitigates the impact of supra-optimal temperatures in tropical Coffea arabica and C. canephora species.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Weverton P; Martins, Madlles Q; Fortunato, Ana S; Rodrigues, Ana P; Semedo, José N; Simões-Costa, Maria C; Pais, Isabel P; Leitão, António E; Colwell, Filipe; Goulao, Luis; Máguas, Cristina; Maia, Rodrigo; Partelli, Fábio L; Campostrini, Eliemar; Scotti-Campos, Paula; Ribeiro-Barros, Ana I; Lidon, Fernando C; DaMatta, Fábio M; Ramalho, José C

    2016-01-01

    The tropical coffee crop has been predicted to be threatened by future climate changes and global warming. However, the real biological effects of such changes remain unknown. Therefore, this work aims to link the physiological and biochemical responses of photosynthesis to elevated air [CO2 ] and temperature in cultivated genotypes of Coffea arabica L. (cv. Icatu and IPR108) and Coffea canephora cv. Conilon CL153. Plants were grown for ca. 10 months at 25/20°C (day/night) and 380 or 700 μl CO2 l(-1) and then subjected to temperature increase (0.5°C day(-1) ) to 42/34°C. Leaf impacts related to stomatal traits, gas exchanges, C isotope composition, fluorescence parameters, thylakoid electron transport and enzyme activities were assessed at 25/20, 31/25, 37/30 and 42/34°C. The results showed that (1) both species were remarkably heat tolerant up to 37/30°C, but at 42/34°C a threshold for irreversible nonstomatal deleterious effects was reached. Impairments were greater in C. arabica (especially in Icatu) and under normal [CO2 ]. Photosystems and thylakoid electron transport were shown to be quite heat tolerant, contrasting to the enzymes related to energy metabolism, including RuBisCO, which were the most sensitive components. (2) Significant stomatal trait modifications were promoted almost exclusively by temperature and were species dependent. Elevated [CO2 ], (3) strongly mitigated the impact of temperature on both species, particularly at 42/34°C, modifying the response to supra-optimal temperatures, (4) promoted higher water-use efficiency under moderately higher temperature (31/25°C) and (5) did not provoke photosynthetic downregulation. Instead, enhancements in [CO2 ] strengthened photosynthetic photochemical efficiency, energy use and biochemical functioning at all temperatures. Our novel findings demonstrate a relevant heat resilience of coffee species and that elevated [CO2 ] remarkably mitigated the impact of heat on coffee physiology, therefore

  3. Robotics for Long-Term Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Shahin, Sarkis; Duran, Celso

    2002-07-01

    While long-term monitoring and stewardship means many things to many people, DOE has defined it as The physical controls, institutions, information, and other mechanisms needed to ensure protection of people and the environment at sites where DOE has completed or plans to complete cleanup (e.g., landfill closures, remedial actions, and facility stabilization). Across the United States, there are thousands of contaminated sites with multiple contaminants released from multiple sources where contaminants have transported and commingled. The U.S. government and U.S. industry are responsible for most of the contamination and are landowners of many of these contaminated properties. These sites must be surveyed periodically for various criteria including structural deterioration, water intrusion, integrity of storage containers, atmospheric conditions, and hazardous substance release. The surveys, however, are intrusive, time-consuming, and expensive and expose survey personnel to radioactive contamination. In long-term monitoring, there's a need for an automated system that will gather and report data from sensors without costly human labor. In most cases, a SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) unit is used to collect and report data from a remote location. A SCADA unit consists of an embedded computer with data acquisition capabilities. The unit can be configured with various sensors placed in different areas of the site to be monitored. A system of this type is static, i.e., the sensors, once placed, cannot be moved to other locations within the site. For those applications where the number of sampling locations would require too many sensors, or where exact location of future problems is unknown, a mobile sensing platform is an ideal solution. In many facilities that undergo regular inspections, the number of video cameras and air monitors required to eliminate the need for human inspections is very large and far too costly. HCET's remote harsh

  4. Extreme events in total ozone over Arosa: Application of extreme value theory and fingerprints of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry and their effects on mean values and long-term changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Harald E.; Staehelin, Johannes; Maeder, Jörg A.; Peter, Thomas; Ribatet, Mathieu; Davison, Anthony C.; Stübi, Rene; Weihs, Philipp; Holawe, Franz

    2010-05-01

    ón, Mt. Pinatubo). Furthermore, atmospheric loading in ozone depleting substances lead to a continuous modification of column ozone in the northern hemisphere also with respect to extreme values (partly again in connection with polar vortex contributions). It is shown that application of extreme value theory allows the identification of many more such fingerprints than conventional time series analysis of annual and seasonal mean values. Especially, the analysis shows the strong influence of dynamics, revealing that even moderate ENSO and NAO events have a discernible effect on total ozone (Rieder et al., 2010b). Overall the presented new extremes concept provides new information on time series properties, variability, trends and the influence of dynamics and chemistry, complementing earlier analyses focusing only on monthly (or annual) mean values. References: Coles, S.: An Introduction to Statistical Modeling of Extreme Values, Springer Series in Statistics, ISBN:1852334592, Springer, Berlin, 2001. Ribatet, M.: POT: Modelling peaks over a threshold, R News, 7, 34-36, 2007. Rieder ,H.E., Staehelin, J., Maeder, J.A., Ribatet, M., Stübi, R., Weihs, P., Holawe, F., Peter, T., and A.D., Davison (2010): Extreme events in total ozone over Arosa - Part I: Application of extreme value theory, to be submitted to ACPD. Rieder, H.E., Staehelin, J., Maeder, J.A., Ribatet, M., Stübi, R., Weihs, P., Holawe, F., Peter, T., and A.D., Davison (2010): Extreme events in total ozone over Arosa - Part II: Fingerprints of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry and effects on mean values and long-term changes, to be submitted to ACPD. Staehelin, J., Renaud, A., Bader, J., McPeters, R., Viatte, P., Hoegger, B., Bugnion, V., Giroud, M., and Schill, H.: Total ozone series at Arosa (Switzerland): Homogenization and data comparison, J. Geophys. Res., 103(D5), 5827-5842, doi:10.1029/97JD02402, 1998a. Staehelin, J., Kegel, R., and Harris, N. R.: Trend analysis of the homogenized total ozone series of

  5. Measurements of Humidity in the Atmosphere: Validation Experiments (MOHAVE I and MOHAVE II). Results Overview and Implication for the Long-Term Lidar Monitoring of Water Vapor in the UT/LS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, I. S.; Vomel, H.; Whiteman, D.; Twigg, Larry; McGee, T. G.

    2008-01-01

    1. MOHAVE+MOHAVE II = very successful. 2. MOHAVE -> Fluorescence was found to be inherent to all three participating lidars. 3. MOHAVE II -> Fluorescence was removed and agreement with CFH was extremely good up to 16-18 km altitude. 4. MOHAVE II -> Calibration tests revealed unsuspected shortfalls of widely used techniques, with important implications for their applicability to longterm measurements. 5. A factor of 5 in future lidar signal-to-noise ratio is reasonably achievable. When this level is achieved water vapor Raman lidar will become a key instrument for the long-term monitoring of water vapor in the UT/LS

  6. Long term low latitude and high elevation cosmogenic 3He production rate inferred from a 107 ka-old lava flow in northern Chile; 22°S-3400 m a.s.l.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delunel, Romain; Blard, Pierre-Henri; Martin, Léo C. P.; Nomade, Sébastien; Schlunegger, Fritz

    2016-07-01

    Available geological calibration sites used to estimate the rate at which cosmogenic 3He is produced at the Earth's surface are mostly clustered in medium to high latitudes. Moreover, most of them have exposure histories shorter than tens of thousands of years. This lack of sites prevents a qualitative assessment of available production models used to convert cosmogenic 3He concentrations into exposure ages and/or denudation rates. It thus limits our ability to take into account the atmospheric, geomagnetic and solar modulation conditions that might have affected the production of cosmogenic nuclides in the past for longer exposure histories and in low latitude regions. We present the cosmogenic 3He production rate inferred from a new geological calibration site located in northern Chile. Five samples were collected on the surface of the largest and best-preserved lava flow of the San Pedro volcano (21.934°S-68.510°W-3390 m a.s.l.), which displays pristine crease-structure features. 40Ar/39Ar dating yields a reliable plateau age of 107 ± 12 ka for the eruption of this lava flow. Eight pyroxene aliquots separated from the surface samples yield a weighted average cosmogenic 3He concentration of 99.3 ± 1.2 Mat g-1 from which a local cosmogenic 3He production rate of 928 ± 101 at g-1 yr-1 is calculated. The local production rate is then scaled to a sea level high latitude (SLHL) reference position using different combinations of geographic spatialization schemes, atmosphere models and geomagnetic field reconstructions, yielding SLHL production rates between 103 ± 11 and 130 ± 14 at g-1 yr-1 consistent with the most recent estimates available from the literature. Finally, we use the same scaling frameworks to re-evaluate the mean global-scale cosmogenic 3He production rate in olivine and pyroxene minerals at 120 ± 16 at g-1 yr-1 from the compilation of previously published calibration datasets.

  7. Long-term global observations of UV-absorbing aerosols from ERS-2/GOME data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, M.; Stammes, P.

    2003-04-01

    Absorbing aerosols are important in the Earth's climate system, as they absorb solar radiation in the Earth's atmosphere. The main species of UV-absorbing aerosols are desert dust and biomass burning aerosols. Their lifetimes in the atmosphere are usually short, in the order of days to weeks, resulting in strong temporal and spatial variations in aerosol concentrations with peak concentrations near the source, creating a necessity for long-term global observations of aerosol properties and concentrations. Global distributions of UV-absorbing aerosols are obtained using the absorbing aerosol index (AAI), which measures the departure of the observed spectral contrast at 340 nm and 380 nm from that of a molecular atmosphere. It is a measure for the presence of elevated absorbing aerosols in the Earth's atmosphere using space-borne sensors operating in the UV, like TOMS, and recently GOME and SCIAMACHY. The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) on board the ERS-2 satellite has been observing the atmosphere continuously since 1995. It is a nadir-looking spectrometer measuring from about 240 to 790 nm, with a resolution of 0.2 nm in the UV range. The basic quantities observed by GOME are the spectral irradiance of the Sun and the spectral radiance of the Earth at the Top Of Atmosphere (TOA). These data were used to create a long-term data set of global AAI distributions, ranging from 1995 to 2002. Sensitivity studies have shown that polarisation has a considerable effect on the AAI computation. Therefore, the molecular atmosphere radiation is calculated with the Doubling-Adding KNMI (DAK) radiative transfer code in which polarisation effects are included. Here the results of the data set are presented.

  8. Long Term Effects of Food Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop chronic arthritis. Brain and nerve damage A Listeria infection can lead to meningitis, an inflammation of ... brain. If a newborn infant is infected with Listeria , long-term consequences may include mental retardation, seizures, ...

  9. Asthma Medicines: Long-Term Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Asthma Medicines: Long-term Control Page Content Article Body Corticosteroids Synthetic ... and sprinkle forms are available for young children. Long-Acting Beta2-Agonists Medications in the beta 2 - ...

  10. Is guava phenolic metabolism influenced by elevated atmospheric CO2?

    PubMed

    Mendes de Rezende, Fernanda; Pereira de Souza, Amanda; Silveira Buckeridge, Marcos; Maria Furlan, Cláudia

    2015-01-01

    Seedlings of Psidium guajava cv. Pedro Sato were distributed into four open-top chambers: two with ambient CO(2) (∼390 ppm) and two with elevated CO(2) (∼780 ppm). Monthly, five individuals of each chamber were collected, separated into root, stem and leaves and immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen. Chemical parameters were analyzed to investigate how guava invests the surplus carbon. For all classes of phenolic compounds analyzed only tannins showed significant increase in plants at elevated CO(2) after 90 days. There was no significant difference in dry biomass, but the leaves showed high accumulation of starch under elevated CO(2). Results suggest that elevated CO(2) seems to be favorable to seedlings of P. guajava, due to accumulation of starch and tannins, the latter being an important anti-herbivore substance. PMID:25129845

  11. Is guava phenolic metabolism influenced by elevated atmospheric CO2?

    PubMed

    Mendes de Rezende, Fernanda; Pereira de Souza, Amanda; Silveira Buckeridge, Marcos; Maria Furlan, Cláudia

    2015-01-01

    Seedlings of Psidium guajava cv. Pedro Sato were distributed into four open-top chambers: two with ambient CO(2) (∼390 ppm) and two with elevated CO(2) (∼780 ppm). Monthly, five individuals of each chamber were collected, separated into root, stem and leaves and immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen. Chemical parameters were analyzed to investigate how guava invests the surplus carbon. For all classes of phenolic compounds analyzed only tannins showed significant increase in plants at elevated CO(2) after 90 days. There was no significant difference in dry biomass, but the leaves showed high accumulation of starch under elevated CO(2). Results suggest that elevated CO(2) seems to be favorable to seedlings of P. guajava, due to accumulation of starch and tannins, the latter being an important anti-herbivore substance.

  12. Long Term Outcomes after Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Long term outcomes after liver transplantation are major determinants of quality of life and of the value of this heroic treatment. As short term outcomes are excellent, our community is turning to take a harder look at long term outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to review these outcomes, and highlight proposed treatments, as well as pressing topics needing to be studied. A systemic review of the English literature was carried in PubMed, covering all papers addressing long term outcomes in pediatric liver transplant from 2000-2013. Late outcomes after pediatric liver transplant affect the liver graft in the form of chronic liver dysfunction. The causes include rejection particularly humoral rejection, but also de novo autoimmune hepatitis, and recurrent disease. The metabolic syndrome is a major factor in long term cardiovascular complication risk. Secondary infections, kidney dysfunction and malignancy remain a reality of those patients. There is growing evidence of late cognitive and executive function delays affecting daily life productivity as well as likely adherence. Finally, despite a good health status, quality of life measures are comparable to those of children with chronic diseases. Long term outcomes are the new frontier in pediatric liver transplantation. Much is needed to improve graft survival, but also to avoid systemic morbidities from long term immunosuppression. Quality of life is a new inclusive measure that will require interventions and innovative approaches respectful not only on the patients but also of their social circle. PMID:24511516

  13. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations and water stress on field-grown maize

    SciTech Connect

    Surano, K.A.; Kercher, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations are continuing to increase and will probably double during the next century. The effects of such an increase are of global concern. Carbon dioxide-induced climate changes may result in reduced precipitation in major agricultural areas. The potential therefore exists for severe CO{sub 2}-induced water-stress effects on agriculture. This set of studies determined the effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations and severe water stress on biomass production, evapotranspiration, water-use efficiency (WUE), water potential, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, morphology and phenology of maize grown under field conditions. Plants were grown at one of four daytime mean CO{sub 2} concentrations (348, 431, 506 or 656 {mu}LL{sup {minus}1}) in open-top field exposure chambers and at one of two levels of available water (well-watered or 50% of well-watered). This report is organized into 4 chapters followed by appendices. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the four chapters: (1) biomass production and water-use efficiency, (2) gas exchange and water potential, (3) morphology and phenology, and (4) and elemental analyses. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. Experimental protocols and preparations to study respiratory long term facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Mateika, Jason H.; Sandhu, Kulraj S.

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory long-term facilitation is a form of neuronal plasticity that is induced following exposure to intermittent hypoxia. Long-term facilitation is characterized by a progressive increase in respiratory motor output during normoxic periods that separate hypoxic episodes and by a sustained elevation in respiratory activity for up to 90 min after exposure to intermittent hypoxia. This phenomenon is associated with increases in phrenic, hypoglossal or carotid sinus nerve inspiratory-modulated discharge. The examination of long-term facilitation has been steadily ongoing for approximately 3 decades. During this period of time a variety of animal models (e.g. cats, rats and humans), experimental preparations and intermittent hypoxia protocols have been used to study long-term facilitation. This review is designed to summarize the strengths and weaknesses of the models, preparations and protocols that have been used to study LTF over the past 30 years. The review is divided into two primary sections. Initially, the models and protocols used to study LTF in animals other than humans will be discussed, followed by a section specifically focused on human studies. Each section will begin with a discussion of various factors that must be considered when selecting an experimental preparation and intermittent hypoxia protocol to examine LTF. Model and protocol design recommendations will follow, with the goal of presenting a prevailing model and protocol that will ultimately ensure standardized comparisons across studies. PMID:21292044

  15. Long-term aridity changes in the western United States.

    PubMed

    Cook, Edward R; Woodhouse, Connie A; Eakin, C Mark; Meko, David M; Stahle, David W

    2004-11-01

    The western United States is experiencing a severe multiyear drought that is unprecedented in some hydroclimatic records. Using gridded drought reconstructions that cover most of the western United States over the past 1200 years, we show that this drought pales in comparison to an earlier period of elevated aridity and epic drought in AD 900 to 1300, an interval broadly consistent with the Medieval Warm Period. If elevated aridity in the western United States is a natural response to climate warming, then any trend toward warmer temperatures in the future could lead to a serious long-term increase in aridity over western North America.

  16. Long-term home care research.

    PubMed

    Green, J H

    1989-11-01

    The population of seniors is growing and health service reimbursement is shrinking. Long-term home health care services were developed with an assumption that the services would decrease costs. This assumption has not been validated. What has been recognized is that long-term home health care targets a new and growing population of frail seniors who need services but are probably not at risk for institutionalization. The impact of long-term home care services on the health status and quality of life of seniors and caregivers has been limited by outcome measurement problems. There are indications that the services improved life satisfaction and reduced services needs, but further evaluations need to replicate the outcomes. In effect, long-term outcomes have not been sufficiently explored. Further research also needs to assist us in identifying outcomes for certain services with precise target populations. Public policy questions are ahead. Should a program that can increase costs, has demonstrated some but not dramatic impacts on quality of life and health status, and has the possibility of expansion, be funded? The question is obviously debatable. From a nursing perspective of health promotion and prevention, the answer is "yes." Funding should be continued in conjunction with increased research on the program impacts. In Kane's (1988) analysis of the Channeling experiments, she summarized the situation effectively: Knowing these facts, we are now in a position to reformulate public policies to design a system of long-term care that satisfies the preferences of consumers and protects them from catastrophic long-term expenses, while promoting the triple virtues of acceptable, quality, equitable access, and defensible costs. . . Nothing in the Channeling results should prevent us from going ahead and trying to develop both community based and institutionally based long-term services in which this country can take pride.

  17. Characteristics of long-term variation in the amlitude of the geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) daily variation using the Inter-university Upper atmosphere Gobal Observation NETwork (IUGONET) data analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, A.; Koyama, Y.; Nose, M.; Hori, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Yatagai, A. I.

    2014-12-01

    Characteristics of long-term variation in the amplitude of solar quiet geomagnetic field daily variation (Sq) have been investigated using 1-hour geomagnetic field data obtained from 69 geomagnetic stations in a period of 1947-2013. In the present data analysis, we took advantage of the IUGONET data analysis system. The Sq amplitude clearly showed a 10-12 year solar activity dependence and it tended to enhance during each solar maximum. During the minimum of solar cycle 23/24 in 2008-2009, the Sq amplitude became the smallest in the investigated period. The relationship between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude is approximately linear but 64 percent of geomagnetic stations show a weak nonlinear dependence on the solar F10.7 index. In order to remove the effect of solar activity seen in the long-term variation of the Sq amplitude, we calculated a linear or second order fitting curve between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude during 1947-2013, and examined the residual Sq amplitude, which is defined as the deviation from the fitting curve. As a result, a majority of the trends in the residual Sq amplitude that passed through a trend test showed a negative value in a wide region. This tendency was relatively strong in Europe, India, the eastern part of Canada, and New Zealand. The relationship between the magnetic field intensity and residual Sq amplitude showed an anti-correlation for about 71 percent of geomagnetic stations. On the other hand, the residual Sq amplitude in the equatorial station (Addis Ababa) was anti-correlated with the absolute value of the magnetic field inclination. This implies the movement of the equatorial electrojet due to the secular variation of the ambient magnetic field.

  18. Long-term evolution of anthropogenic heat fluxes into a subsurface urban heat island.

    PubMed

    Menberg, Kathrin; Blum, Philipp; Schaffitel, Axel; Bayer, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Anthropogenic alterations in urban areas influence the thermal environment causing elevated atmospheric and subsurface temperatures. The subsurface urban heat island effect is observed in several cities. Often shallow urban aquifers exist with thermal anomalies that spread laterally and vertically, resulting in the long-term accumulation of heat. In this study, we develop an analytical heat flux model to investigate possible drivers such as increased ground surface temperatures (GSTs) at artificial surfaces and heat losses from basements of buildings, sewage systems, subsurface district heating networks, and reinjection of thermal wastewater. By modeling the anthropogenic heat flux into the subsurface of the city of Karlsruhe, Germany, in 1977 and 2011, we evaluate long-term trends in the heat flux processes. It revealed that elevated GST and heat loss from basements are dominant factors in the heat anomalies. The average total urban heat flux into the shallow aquifer in Karlsruhe was found to be ∼759 ± 89 mW/m(2) in 1977 and 828 ± 143 mW/m(2) in 2011, which represents an annual energy gain of around 1.0 × 10(15) J. However, the amount of thermal energy originating from the individual heat flux processes has changed significantly over the past three decades.

  19. Long-term outcomes of autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ikeura, Tsukasa; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Shimatani, Masaaki; Uchida, Kazushige; Takaoka, Makoto; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2016-09-14

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been considered a favorable-prognosis disease; however, currently, there is limited information on natural course of AIP during long-term follow-up. Recently published studies regarding the long-term outcomes of AIP has demonstrated the developments of pancreatic stone formation, exocrine insufficiency, and endocrine insufficiency are observed in 5%-41%, 34%-82%, and 38%-57% of patients having the disease. Furthermore, the incidence rate of developing pancreatic cancer ranges from 0% to 4.8% during the long-term follow-up. The event of death from AIP-related complications other than accompanying cancer is likely to be rare. During follow-up of AIP patients, careful surveillance for not only relapse of the disease but also development of complications at regular intervals is needed. PMID:27678359

  20. Long-term outcomes of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ikeura, Tsukasa; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Shimatani, Masaaki; Uchida, Kazushige; Takaoka, Makoto; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been considered a favorable-prognosis disease; however, currently, there is limited information on natural course of AIP during long-term follow-up. Recently published studies regarding the long-term outcomes of AIP has demonstrated the developments of pancreatic stone formation, exocrine insufficiency, and endocrine insufficiency are observed in 5%-41%, 34%-82%, and 38%-57% of patients having the disease. Furthermore, the incidence rate of developing pancreatic cancer ranges from 0% to 4.8% during the long-term follow-up. The event of death from AIP-related complications other than accompanying cancer is likely to be rare. During follow-up of AIP patients, careful surveillance for not only relapse of the disease but also development of complications at regular intervals is needed. PMID:27678359

  1. Long-term outcomes of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ikeura, Tsukasa; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Shimatani, Masaaki; Uchida, Kazushige; Takaoka, Makoto; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been considered a favorable-prognosis disease; however, currently, there is limited information on natural course of AIP during long-term follow-up. Recently published studies regarding the long-term outcomes of AIP has demonstrated the developments of pancreatic stone formation, exocrine insufficiency, and endocrine insufficiency are observed in 5%-41%, 34%-82%, and 38%-57% of patients having the disease. Furthermore, the incidence rate of developing pancreatic cancer ranges from 0% to 4.8% during the long-term follow-up. The event of death from AIP-related complications other than accompanying cancer is likely to be rare. During follow-up of AIP patients, careful surveillance for not only relapse of the disease but also development of complications at regular intervals is needed.

  2. Regional and temporal differences in nitrate trends discerned from long-term water quality monitoring data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stets, Edward G.; Kelly, Valerie J.; Crawford, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    Riverine nitrate (NO3) is a well-documented driver of eutrophication and hypoxia in coastal areas. The development of the elevated river NO3 concentration is linked to anthropogenic inputs from municipal, agricultural, and atmospheric sources. The intensity of these sources has varied regionally, through time, and in response to multiple causes such as economic drivers and policy responses. This study uses long-term water quality, land use, and other ancillary data to further describe the evolution of river NO3 concentrations at 22 monitoring stations in the United States (U.S.). The stations were selected for long-term data availability and to represent a range of climate and land-use conditions. We examined NO3 at the monitoring stations, using a flow-weighting scheme meant to account for interannual flow variability allowing greater focus on river chemical conditions. River NO3 concentration increased strongly during 1945-1980 at most of the stations and have remained elevated, but stopped increasing during 1981-2008. NO3 increased to a greater extent at monitoring stations in the Midwest U.S. and less so at those in the Eastern and Western U.S. We discuss 20th Century agricultural development in the U.S. and demonstrate that regional differences in NO3 concentration patterns were strongly related to an agricultural index developed using principal components analysis. This unique century-scale dataset adds to our understanding of long-term NO3 patterns in the U.S.

  3. Long-Term Use of Benzodiazepines

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Nicholas L.S.; Krishnan, K. Ranga R.

    1992-01-01

    Problems associated with physical dependence and abuse of benzodiazepines by a small percentage of patients have reduced their popularity from the most commonly prescribed psychoactive drug in the 1970s to being prescribed for mainly short periods. Patients who benefit from long-term benzodiazepine use are nearly ignored by the medical community as a whole. This article details what patient population can improve from long-term benzodiazepine therapy, the risks and benefits of treatment, and how to select appropriate candidates. PMID:21229127

  4. Long-term outcomes after severe shock.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Cristina M; Hirshberg, Eliotte L; Jones, Jason P; Kuttler, Kathryn G; Lanspa, Michael J; Wilson, Emily L; Hopkins, Ramona O; Brown, Samuel M

    2015-02-01

    Severe shock is a life-threatening condition with very high short-term mortality. Whether the long-term outcomes among survivors of severe shock are similar to long-term outcomes of other critical illness survivors is unknown. We therefore sought to assess long-term survival and functional outcomes among 90-day survivors of severe shock and determine whether clinical predictors were associated with outcomes. Seventy-six patients who were alive 90 days after severe shock (received ≥1 μg/kg per minute of norepinephrine equivalent) were eligible for the study. We measured 3-year survival and long-term functional outcomes using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, the EuroQOL 5-D-3L, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, and an employment instrument. We also assessed the relationship between in-hospital predictors and long-term outcomes. The mean long-term survival was 5.1 years; 82% (62 of 76) of patients survived, of whom 49 were eligible for follow-up. Patients who died were older than patients who survived. Thirty-six patients completed a telephone interview a mean of 5 years after hospital admission. The patients' Physical Functioning scores were below U.S. population norms (P < 0.001), whereas mental health scores were similar to population norms. Nineteen percent of the patients had symptoms of depression, 39% had symptoms of anxiety, and 8% had symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. Thirty-six percent were disabled, and 17% were working full-time. Early survivors of severe shock had a high 3-year survival rate. Patients' long-term physical and psychological outcomes were similar to those reported for cohorts of less severely ill intensive care unit survivors. Anxiety and depression were relatively common, but only a few patients had symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. This study supports the observation that acute illness severity does not determine long-term outcomes. Even extremely

  5. Scenarios for long-term analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbers, Stephen; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Data Preservation and Long-Term Analysis of High Energy Physics (HEP) Experiments data is described and summarized in this talk. The summary covers information presented at the First Workshop on Data Preservation and Long-Term Analysis. Experiments representing e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions (LEP, B Factories and CLEO), ep collisions (H1 and ZEUS), p{bar p} collisions (CDF and D0) and others presented interesting information related to utilizing the large datasets collected over many years at these HEP facilities. Many questions and issues remain to be explored.

  6. Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Oechel, W.C.

    1992-04-01

    Northern ecosystems contain up to 455 Gt of C in the soil active layer and upper permafrost. The soil carbon in these layers is equivalent to approximately 60% of the carbon currently in the atmosphere as CO{sub 2}. Much of this carbon is stored in the soil as dead organic matter. Its fate is subject to the net effects of global change on the plant and soil systems of northern ecosystems. The arctic alone contains about 60 Gt C, 90% of which is present in the soil active layer and upper permafrost. The arctic is assumed to have been a sink for CO{sub 2} during the historic and recent geologic past. The arctic has the potential to be a very large, long-term source or sink of CO{sub 2} with respect to the atmosphere. In situ experimental manipulations of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, indicated that there is little effect of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on leaf level photosynthesis or whole-ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux over the course of weeks to years, respectively. However, there may be longer- term ecosystem responses to elevated CO{sub 2} that could ultimately affect ecosystem CO{sub 2} balance. In addition to atmospheric CO{sub 2}, climate may affect net ecosystem carbon balance. Recent results indicate that the arctic has become a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. This change coincides with recent climatic variation in the arctic, and suggests a positive feedback of arctic ecosystems on atmospheric CO{sub 2} and global change. The research proposed in this application has four principal aspects: (A) Long-term response of arctic plants and ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}; (B) Circumpolar patterns of net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux; (C) In situ controls by temperature and moisture on net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux; (D) Scaling of CO{sub 2} flux from plot, to landscape, to regional scales (In conjunction with research proposed for NSF support).

  7. Long-term trends of particulate mutagenic activity in the atmosphere of Sapporo. 1: Determination of mutagenic activity by the conventional tester strains TA98 and TA100 during an 18-year period (1974--1992)

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Yutaka; Sakai, Shigekatsu; Kato, Takunori; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Satoh, Hiroshi

    1998-09-15

    The Ames Salmonella mutagenicity bioassay using strains TA98 and TA100 of airborne particulates from Sapporo, Japan, was studied over an 18-year period starting in 1974. Measurements of mutagenicity and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), as well as other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were performed on organic extracts which were prepared from seasonal particulate composites of high-volume filter samples for each year. The average contribution of BaP to total indirect-acting mutagenic activity was 1.8% for strain TA98 and 3.5% for strain TA100. During the measurement period, BaP concentrations showed a large decline, while indirect-acting mutagenic activity showed a moderate decline and direct-acting mutagenic activity did not show any clear increase or decrease. This clearly indicates that there was almost no change in the amount of exposure to mutagenic substances as a whole. A qualitative change was clearly seen in mutagens, being indicated by the continuous increase in the ratio of direct-acting to indirect-acting mutagenic activity during the sampling period. Furthermore, these results suggest that, in the long term, BaP may not always be an appropriate indicator of the effect of air pollution on human health.

  8. Atmospheric deposition and watershed nitrogen export along an elevational gradient in the Catskill Mountains, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; Lovett, Gary M.; Baevsky, Y.H.

    2000-01-01

    Cumulative effects of atmospheric N deposition may increase N export from watersheds and contribute to the acidification of surface waters, but natural factors (such as forest productivity and soil drainage) that affect forest N cycling can also control watershed N export. To identify factors that are related to stream-water export of N, elevational gradients in atmospheric deposition and natural processes were evaluated in a steep, first-order watershed in the Catskill Mountains of New York, from 1991 to 1994. Atmospheric deposition of SO4/2-, and probably N, increased with increasing elevation within this watershed. Stream-water concentrations of SO4/2- increased with increasing elevation throughout the year, whereas stream-water concentrations of NO3/- decreased with increasing elevation during the winter and spring snowmelt period, and showed no relation with elevation during the growing season or the fall. Annual export of N in stream water for the overall watershed equaled 12% to 17% of the total atmospheric input on the basis of two methods of estimation. This percentage decreased with increasing elevation, from about 25% in the lowest subwatershed to 7% in the highest subwatershed; a probable result of an upslope increase in the thickness of the surface organic horizon, attributable to an elevational gradient in temperature that slows decomposition rates at upper elevations. Balsam fir stands, more prevalent at upper elevations than lower elevations, may also affect the gradient of subwatershed N export by altering nitrification rates in the soil. Variations in climate and vegetation must be considered to determine how future trends in atmospheric deposition will effect watershed export of nitrogen.

  9. Characteristics of Long-Term First Marriages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenell, David L.

    1993-01-01

    Investigated characteristics of long-term first marriages (over 20 years). Findings from 147 couples revealed: lifetime commitment to marriage, loyalty to spouse, strong moral values, respect for spouse as best friend, commitment to sexual fidelity, desire to be good parent, faith in God, desire to please and support spouse, good companion to…

  10. Long Term Transfer Effect of Metaphoric Allusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, David A.; Mateja, John A.

    A study was conducted to investigate the long term transfer effect of metaphoric allusion used to clarify unfamiliar subject matter. Forty-nine high school students were given unfamiliar prose materials variously augmented by metaphoric allusion. The subjects' immediate performance on a transfer task was compared to their performance on an…

  11. Long-Term Stability of Social Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyyppa, Markku T.; Maki, Juhani; Alanen, Erkki; Impivaara, Olli; Aromaa, Arpo

    2008-01-01

    The long-term stability of social participation was investigated in a representative urban population of 415 men and 579 women who had taken part in the nationwide Mini-Finland Health Survey in the years 1978-1980 and were re-examined 20 years later. Stability was assessed by means of the following tracking coefficients: kappa, proportion of…

  12. Evaluating Long-Term Disability Insurance Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Jan

    1992-01-01

    This report analyzes the factors involved in reviewing benefits and services of employer-sponsored group long-term disability plans for higher education institutions. Opening sections describe the evolution of disability insurance and its shape today. Further sections looks at the complex nature of "value" within a plan, relationship between plan…

  13. The long term characteristics of greenschist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Bo-An

    2016-04-01

    The greenschist in the Jinping II Hydropower Station in southwest China exhibits continuous creep behaviour because of the geological conditions in the region. This phenomenon illustrates the time-dependent deformation and progressive damage that occurs after excavation. In this study, the responses of greenschist to stress over time were determined in a series of laboratory tests on samples collected from the access tunnel walls at the construction site. The results showed that the greenschist presented time-dependent behaviour under long-term loading. The samples generally experienced two stages: transient creep and steady creep, but no accelerating creep. The periods of transient creep and steady creep increased with increasing stress levels. The long-term strength of the greenschist was identified based on the variation of creep strain and creep rate. The ratio of long-term strength to conventional strength was around 80% and did not vary much with confining pressures. A quantitative method for predicting the failure period of greenschist, based on analysis of the stress-strain curve, is presented and implemented. At a confining pressure of 40 MPa, greenschist was predicted to fail in 5000 days under a stress of 290 MPa and to fail in 85 days under the stress of 320 MPa, indicating that the long-term strength identified by the creep rate and creep strain is a reliable estimate.

  14. LONG TERM HYDROLOGICAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT (LTHIA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    LTHIA is a universal Urban Sprawl analysis tool that is available to all at no charge through the Internet. It estimates impacts on runoff, recharge and nonpoint source pollution resulting from past or proposed land use changes. It gives long-term average annual runoff for a lan...

  15. Long-Term Memory and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossland, John

    2011-01-01

    The English National Curriculum Programmes of Study emphasise the importance of knowledge, understanding and skills, and teachers are well versed in structuring learning in those terms. Research outcomes into how long-term memory is stored and retrieved provide support for structuring learning in this way. Four further messages are added to the…

  16. Who Recommends Long-Term Care Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Bershadsky, Boris; Bershadsky, Julie

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Making good consumer decisions requires having good information. This study compared long-term-care recommendations among various types of health professionals. Design and Methods: We gave randomly varied scenarios to a convenience national sample of 211 professionals from varying disciplines and work locations. For each scenario, we…

  17. Long-term lysimeter data on evapotranspiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long term crop evapotranspiration (ET) data measured using large weighing lysimeters have only been gathered in a few places in the world, yet are of great importance for ground truthing of many models of plant water use, mesoscale climate, remote sensing estimation of ET, climate change and climate...

  18. Professionalism in Long-Term Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubinski, Rosemary

    2006-01-01

    Speech-language pathologists who serve elders in a variety of long-term care settings have a variety of professional skills and responsibilities. Fundamental to quality service is knowledge of aging and communication changes and disorders associated with this process, institutional alternatives, and the changing nature of today's elders in…

  19. Plutonium packaging and long-term storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Jane A.; Wedman, Douglas E.

    2000-07-01

    It has been demonstrated that the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) packaging line at Los Alamos National Laboratory can successfully package plutonium to meet DOE requirements for safe long-term storage. The ARIES system has just completed the disassembly and conversion of its first cores ("pits") for nuclear weapons.

  20. Long-Term Sequelae of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Teasell, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    Scant attention has been paid to the long-term consequences and complications resulting from a stroke. Many stroke survivors go on to develop a variety of medical, musculoskeletal, and psychosocial complications, years after the acute stroke. The family physician is regularly called upon to deal with these problems, but is often hampered by a lack of resources. PMID:21221264

  1. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide: Effects on tritrophic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, S.K.; Lindroth, R.L. )

    1994-06-01

    We examined how CO[sub 2]-mediated changes in tree chemistry affect performance of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) and its suitability as a host for the parasitoid Cotesia melanoscelus. Four species of deciduous trees were grown under ambient or elevated CO[sub 2] conditions, and foliage was fed to gypsy moths in two separate bioassays. In the first, we measured performance (i.e., growth rates) of control and parasitized gypsy moth larvae for the duration of the third stadium. In the second, we assessed parasitoid performance in relation to quality of the host larvae. We found that parasitized gypsy moth larvae on all diets grew more slowly and suffered reduced food processing efficiencies relative to control larvae. The magnitude of growth suppression was greater under elevated CO[sub 2] conditions. Parasitoid performance varied in relation to host plant species but not in relation to CO[sub 2] environment. These results will be interpreted in relation to tree chemistry.

  2. Relationship between short- and long-term memory and short- and long-term extinction.

    PubMed

    Cammarota, Martín; Bevilaqua, Lia R M; Rossato, Janine I; Ramirez, Maria; Medina, Jorge H; Izquierdo, Iván

    2005-07-01

    Both the acquisition and the extinction of memories leave short- and long-term mnemonic traces. Here, we show that in male Wistar rats, the short-term memory for a step-down inhibitory avoidance task (IA) is resistant to extinction, and that its expression does not influence retrieval or extinction of long-term memory. It has been known for some time that short- and long-term inhibitory avoidance memory involve separate and parallel processes. Here we show that, instead, short-term extinction of IA long-term memory is the first step towards its long-term extinction, and that this link requires functional NMDA receptors and protein synthesis in the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus at the time of the first CS-no US presentation.

  3. On the relationship between total ozone and atmospheric dynamics and chemistry at mid-latitudes - Part 2: The effects of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation, volcanic eruptions and contributions of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry to long-term total ozone changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Frossard, L.; Ribatet, M.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Di Rocco, S.; Davison, A. C.; Peter, T.; Weihs, P.; Holawe, F.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first spatial analysis of "fingerprints" of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and atmospheric aerosol load after major volcanic eruptions (El Chichón and Mt. Pinatubo) in extreme low and high (termed ELOs and EHOs, respectively) and mean values of total ozone for the northern and southern mid-latitudes (defined as the region between 30° and 60° north and south, respectively). Significant influence on ozone extremes was found for the warm ENSO phase in both hemispheres during spring, especially towards low latitudes, indicating the enhanced ozone transport from the tropics to the extra-tropics. Further, the results confirm findings of recent work on the connection between the ENSO phase and the strength and extent of the southern ozone "collar". For the volcanic eruptions the analysis confirms findings of earlier studies for the northern mid-latitudes and gives new insights for the Southern Hemisphere. The results provide evidence that the negative effect of the eruption of El Chichón might be partly compensated by a strong warm ENSO phase in 1982-1983 at southern mid-latitudes. The strong west-east gradient in the coefficient estimates for the Mt. Pinatubo eruption and the analysis of the relationship between the AAO and ENSO phase, the extent and the position of the southern ozone "collar" and the polar vortex structure provide clear evidence for a dynamical "masking" of the volcanic signal at southern mid-latitudes. The paper also analyses the contribution of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry to long-term total ozone changes. Here, quite heterogeneous results have been found on spatial scales. In general the results show that EESC and the 11-yr solar cycle can be identified as major contributors to long-term ozone changes. However, a strong contribution of dynamical features (El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Antarctic Oscillation (AAO), Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO)) to ozone variability and

  4. On the relationship between total ozone and atmospheric dynamics and chemistry at mid-latitudes - Part 2: The effects of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation, volcanic eruptions and contributions of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry to long-term total ozone changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Frossard, L.; Ribatet, M.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Di Rocco, S.; Davison, A. C.; Peter, T.; Weihs, P.; Holawe, F.

    2012-05-01

    We present the first spatial analysis of "fingerprints" of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and atmospheric aerosol load after major volcanic eruptions (El Chichón and Mt. Pinatubo) in extreme low and high (termed ELOs and EHOs, respectively) and mean values of total ozone for the northern and southern mid-latitudes (defined as the region between 30° and 60° north and south, respectively). Significant influence on ozone extremes was found for the warm ENSO phase in both hemispheres during spring, especially towards low latitudes, indicating the enhanced ozone transport from the tropics to the extra-tropics. Further, the results confirm findings of recent work on the connection between the ENSO phase and the strength and extent of the southern ozone "collar". For the volcanic eruptions the analysis confirms findings of earlier studies for the northern mid-latitudes and gives new insights for the Southern Hemisphere. The results provide evidence that the negative effect of the eruption of El Chichón might be partly compensated by a strong warm ENSO phase in 1982-83 at southern mid-latitudes. The strong west-east gradient in the coefficient estimates for the Mt. Pinatubo eruption and the analysis of the relationship between the AAO and ENSO phase, the extent and the position of the southern ozone "collar" and the polar vortex structure provide clear evidence for a dynamical "masking" of the volcanic signal at southern mid-latitudes. The paper also analyses the contribution of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry to long-term total ozone changes. Here, quite heterogeneous results have been found on spatial scales. In general the results show that EESC and the 11-yr solar cycle can be identified as major contributors to long-term ozone changes. However, a strong contribution of dynamical features (El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Antarctic Oscillation (AAO), Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO)) to ozone variability and

  5. Long-term changes in Saturn's troposphere

    SciTech Connect

    Trafton, L.

    1985-09-01

    Attention is given to the results of a long term monitoring study of Saturn's H/sub 2/ quadrupole and CH/sub 4/ band absorptions outside the equatorial zone, over an interval of half a Saturn year that covers most of the perihelion half of Saturn's elliptical orbit (which is approximately bounded by the equinoxes). Marked long term changes are noted in the CH/sub 4/ absorption, accompanied by weakly opposite changes in the H/sub 2/ absorption. Seasonal changes are inferred on the basis of temporal variations in absorption. Spatial measurements have also been made in the 6450 A NH/sub 3/ band since the 1980 equinox. 42 references.

  6. Long-term reinforced fixed provisional restorations.

    PubMed

    Galindo, D; Soltys, J L; Graser, G N

    1998-06-01

    Extensive prosthodontic treatment often requires fabrication of long-term provisional restorations. Numerous materials and techniques have been described for prolonged insertion of interim restorations. This article describes a procedure for fabrication of long-term reinforced heat-processed provisional restorations based on a diagnostic wax-up. Reinforced heat-processed provisional restorations reduced flexure, which minimizes progressive loss of cement and diminished the possibility of recurrent decay. Occlusal stability and vertical dimension were maintained because of greater wear resistance. Occlusion, tooth contours, and pontic design developed in the provisional restoration were duplicated in the definitive restoration. The use of a matrix from a diagnostic wax-up facilitated fabrication of the prosthesis, and made the procedure less time-consuming and more predictable.

  7. [Taiwan long-term care insurance and the evolution of long-term care in Japan].

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Wen; Liu, Shu-Hui; Pai, Yu-Chu

    2010-08-01

    The proportion of elderly (65 years of age and older) in Taiwan has exceeded 10% since 2008. With more elderly, the number of patients suffering from dementia and disabilities has also been rapidly increasing. Japan also has been facing increasing demand for long-term care due to an aging society. Prior to 2000, social welfare programs in Japan, working to cope with changing needs, typically provided insufficient services, and geriatric patients were hospitalized unnecessarily, wasting medical resources and causing undue patient hardship. In response, Japan launched its long-term care insurance program in April 2000. Under the program, city, town and village-based organizations should take responsibility for providing care to the elderly in their place of residence. The program significantly improved previous financial shortfalls and long-term care supply and demand has been met by existing social welfare organization resources. In Taiwan, the provision of long-term care by county / city authorities has proven inconsistent, with performance deemed poor after its first decade of long-term care operations. Service was found to be affected by differences in available resources and insufficient long-term care administration. The cultures of Taiwan and Japan are similar. The authors visited the Japan Long-Term Care Insurance Institute in August 2009. Main issues involved in the implementation and evolution of the Japan long-term Care Insurance are reported on in this paper. We hope such may be useful information to those working to develop long-term care programs in Taiwan. PMID:20661859

  8. Assessing the Hydrochemical Response of High Elevation Forest Watersheds to Climate Change and Atmospheric Deposition Using a Biogeochemical Model (PnET- BGC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourmokhtarian, A.; Driscoll, C.; Campbell, J.; Hayhoe, K.

    2009-05-01

    Climate is an important regulator of the hydrology and biogeochemistry of forest watersheds. To assess the potential impacts of climate change, a multi-faceted approach is required that is capable of resolving multiple climatic and other anthropogenic stressors likely to simultaneously affect ecosystems over the coming decades. The ecological responses to climate change have been assessed by observational, gradient, laboratory and field studies; however, models are the only practical approach to investigate how future changes in climate are likely to interact with other drivers of global change such as atmospheric deposition and land disturbance over broad regions. Biogeochemical watershed models are an important tool to help to understand the long-term effects of climate change on ecosystems. In this study, we are using the biogeochemical model (PnET-BGC) coupled with long-term measurements to evaluate the effects of potential future changes in temperature, precipitation, solar radiation and atmospheric CO2 on pools and fluxes of major elements at 14 diverse, intensively studied, high-elevation watersheds. Future emissions scenarios were developed from monthly output from three atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs; HadCM3, PCM, GFDL) in conjunction with potential lower and upper bounds of projected atmospheric CO2 (550 and 970 ppm by 2099, respectively). Here we report on long-term site measurements and PnET-BGC predictions for the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBR) in the White Mountains, New Hampshire, and Huntington Wildlife Forest (HWF) in the Adirondack Mountains, New York (two of the 14 sites), indicating a broad range of hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to changing climate. AOGCM results over the 21st century indicate an average increase in temperature ranging from 1.9 to 6.9°C and 1.9 to 7.0°C with simultaneous increases in precipitation ranging from 12.5 to 13.9% and 11.9 to 12.2% above the long term mean (1970-1999) for HBR

  9. Cutaneous oxalosis after long-term hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, J G; Schwartz, S T; Reginato, A J

    1992-07-01

    A 27-year-old woman undergoing long-term hemodialysis developed cutaneous calcifications on her fingers. A skin biopsy specimen showed that the deposits were calcium oxalate. To our knowledge, only one previous article has reported pathologic and crystallographic studies on calcifications of the skin resulting from dialysis oxalosis. We speculate that vitamin C supplements, liberal tea consumption, an increased serum ionized calcium concentration, and the long duration of hemodialysis contributed to the production of these deposits.

  10. Long-term course of opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Evans, Elizabeth; Grella, Christine; Ling, Walter; Anglin, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Opioid addiction is associated with excess mortality, morbidities, and other adverse conditions. Guided by a life-course framework, we review the literature on the long-term course of opioid addiction in terms of use trajectories, transitions, and turning points, as well as other factors that facilitate recovery from addiction. Most long-term follow-up studies are based on heroin addicts recruited from treatment settings (mostly methadone maintenance treatment), many of whom are referred by the criminal justice system. Cumulative evidence indicates that opioid addiction is a chronic disorder with frequent relapses. Longer treatment retention is associated with a greater likelihood of abstinence, whereas incarceration is negatively related to subsequent abstinence. Over the long term, the mortality rate of opioid addicts (overdose being the most common cause) is about 6 to 20 times greater than that of the general population; among those who remain alive, the prevalence of stable abstinence from opioid use is low (less than 30% after 10-30 years of observation), and many continue to use alcohol and other drugs after ceasing to use opioids. Histories of sexual or physical abuse and comorbid mental disorders are associated with the persistence of opioid use, whereas family and social support, as well as employment, facilitates recovery. Maintaining opioid abstinence for at least five years substantially increases the likelihood of future stable abstinence. Recent advances in pharmacological treatment options (buprenorphine and naltrexone) include depot formulations offering longer duration of medication; their impact on the long-term course of opioid addiction remains to be assessed.

  11. Consequences of long-term hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Graal, M B; Wolffenbuttel, B H

    1998-07-01

    We describe a young woman with long-term untreated hyperparathyroidism with a superimposed vitamin D deficiency and an extremely decreased bone mineral density that was complicated by a vertebral fracture. Despite pretreatment with intravenous pamidronate and short-term vitamin D supplementation, severe and long-standing hypocalcaemia ('hungry bone syndrome') developed after parathyroidectomy. We discuss the consequences of hyperparathyroidism, especially the effects on bone, the complications of parathyroidectomy and the possibilities of preoperative treatment with bisphosphonates.

  12. Long-term consequences of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Meczekalski, Blazej; Podfigurna-Stopa, Agnieszka; Katulski, Krzysztof

    2013-07-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disorder that occurs mainly in female adolescents and young women. The obsessive fear of weight gain, critically limited food intake and neuroendocrine aberrations characteristic of AN have both short- and long-term consequences for the reproductive, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and skeletal systems. Neuroendocrine changes include impairment of gonadotropin releasing-hormone (GnRH) pulsatile secretion and changes in neuropeptide activity at the hypothalamic level, which cause profound hypoestrogenism. AN is related to a decrease in bone mass density, which can lead to osteopenia and osteoporosis and a significant increase in fracture risk in later life. Rates of birth complications and low birth weight may be higher in women with previous AN. The condition is associated with fertility problems, unplanned pregnancies and generally negative attitudes to pregnancy. During pregnancy, women with the condition have higher rates of hyperemesis gravidarum, anaemia and obstetric complications, as well as impaired weight gain and compromised intrauterine foetal growth. It is reported that 80% of AN patients are affected by a cardiac complications such as sinus bradycardia, a prolonged QT interval on electrocardiography, arrythmias, myocardial mass modification and hypotension. A decrease in bone mineral density (BMD) is one of the most important medical consequences of AN. Reduced BMD may subsequently lead to a three- to seven-fold increased risk of spontaneous fractures. Untreated AN is associated with a significant increase in the risk of death. Better detection and sophisticated therapy should prevent the long-term consequences of this disorder. The aims of treatment are not only recovery but also prophylaxis and relief of the long-term effects of this disorder. Further investigations of the long-term disease risk are needed. PMID:23706279

  13. Long-Term Environmental Research Programs - Evolving Capacity for Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, F. J.

    2008-12-01

    Long-term forestry, watershed, and ecological research sites have become critical, productive nodes for environmental science research and in some cases for work in the social sciences and humanities. The Forest Service's century-old Experimental Forests and Ranges and the National Science Foundation's 28- year-old Long-Term Ecological Research program have been remarkably productive in both basic and applied sciences, including characterization of acid rain and old-growth ecosystems and development of forest, watershed, and range management systems for commercial and other land use objectives. A review of recent developments suggests steps to enhance the function of collections of long-term research sites as interactive science networks. The programs at these sites have evolved greatly, especially over the past few decades, as the questions addressed, disciplines engaged, and degree of science integration have grown. This is well displayed by small, experimental watershed studies, which first were used for applied hydrology studies then more fundamental biogeochemical studies and now examination of complex ecosystem processes; all capitalizing on the legacy of intensive studies and environmental monitoring spanning decades. In very modest ways these collections of initially independent sites have functioned increasingly as integrated research networks addressing inter-site questions by using common experimental designs, being part of a single experiment, and examining long-term data in a common analytical framework. The network aspects include data sharing via publicly-accessible data-harvester systems for climate and streamflow data. The layering of one research or environmental monitoring network upon another facilitates synergies. Changing climate and atmospheric chemistry highlight a need to use these networks as continental-scale observatory systems for assessing the impacts of environmental change on ecological services. To better capitalize on long-term

  14. Electrodes for long-term esophageal electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Niederhauser, Thomas; Haeberlin, Andreas; Marisa, Thanks; Jungo, Michael; Goette, Josef; Jacomet, Marcel; Abacherli, Roger; Vogel, Rolf

    2013-09-01

    The emerging application of long-term and high-quality ECG recording requires alternative electrodes to improve the signal quality and recording capability of surface skin electrodes. The esophageal ECG has the potential to overcome these limitations but necessitates novel recorder and lead designs. The electrode material is of particular interest, since the material has to ensure conflicting requirements like excellent biopotential recording properties and inertness. To this end, novel electrode materials like PEDOT and silver-PDMS as well as established electrode materials such as stainless steel, platinum, gold, iridium oxide, titanium nitride, and glassy carbon were investigated by long-term electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and model-based signal analysis using the derived in vitro interfacial properties in conjunction with a dedicated ECG amplifier. The results of this novel approach show that titanium nitride and iridium oxide featuring microstructured surfaces did not degrade when exposed to artificial acidic saliva. These materials provide low electrode potential drifts and insignificant signal distortion superior to surface skin electrodes making them compatible with accepted standards for ambulatory ECG. They are superior to the noble and polarizable metals such as platinum, silver, and gold that induced more signal distortions and are superior to esophageal stainless steel electrodes that corrode in artificial saliva. The study provides rigorous criteria for the selection of electrode materials for prolonged ECG recording by combining long-term in vitro electrode material properties with ECG signal quality assessment.

  15. [Long-term survival after severe trauma].

    PubMed

    Mutschler, W; Mutschler, M; Graw, M; Lefering, R

    2016-07-01

    Long-term survival after severe trauma is rarely addressed in German trauma journals although knowledge of life expectancy and identification of factors contributing to increased mortality are important for lifetime care management, development of service models, and targeting health promotion and prevention interventions. As reliable data in Germany are lacking, we compiled data mainly from the USA and Australia to describe life expectancy, risk factors, and predictors of outcome in patients experiencing traumatic spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, and polytrauma. Two years after trauma, life expectancy in all three categories was significantly lower than that of the general population. It depends strongly on severity of disability, age, and gender and is quantifiable. Whereas improvements in medical care have led to a marked decline in short-term mortality, surprisingly long-term survival in severe trauma has not changed over the past 30 years. Therefore, there is need to intensify long-term trauma patient care and to find new strategies to limit primary damage. PMID:27342106

  16. Titanium for long-term tritium storage

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.

    1994-12-01

    Due to the reduction of nuclear weapon stockpile, there will be an excess of tritium returned from the field. The excess tritium needs to be stored for future use, which might be several years away. A safe and cost effective means for long term storage of tritium is needed. Storing tritium in a solid metal tritide is preferred to storing tritium as a gas, because a metal tritide can store tritium in a compact form and the stored tritium will not be released until heat is applied to increase its temperature to several hundred degrees centigrade. Storing tritium as a tritide is safer and more cost effective than as a gas. Several candidate metal hydride materials have been evaluated for long term tritium storage. They include uranium, La-Ni-Al alloys, zirconium and titanium. The criteria used include material cost, radioactivity, stability to air, storage capacity, storage pressure, loading and unloading conditions, and helium retention. Titanium has the best combination of properties and is recommended for long term tritium storage.

  17. Long-term EEG in children.

    PubMed

    Montavont, A; Kaminska, A; Soufflet, C; Taussig, D

    2015-03-01

    Long-term video-EEG corresponds to a recording ranging from 1 to 24 h or even longer. It is indicated in the following situations: diagnosis of epileptic syndromes or unclassified epilepsy, pre-surgical evaluation for drug-resistant epilepsy, follow-up of epilepsy or in cases of paroxysmal symptoms whose etiology remains uncertain. There are some specificities related to paediatric care: a dedicated pediatric unit; continuous monitoring covering at least a full 24-hour period, especially in the context of pre-surgical evaluation; the requirement of presence by the parents, technician or nurse; and stronger attachment of electrodes (cup electrodes), the number of which is adapted to the age of the child. The chosen duration of the monitoring also depends on the frequency of seizures or paroxysmal events. The polygraphy must be adapted to the type and topography of movements. It is essential to have at least an electrocardiography (ECG) channel, respiratory sensor and electromyography (EMG) on both deltoids. There is no age limit for performing long-term video-EEG even in newborns and infants; nevertheless because of scalp fragility, strict surveillance of the baby's skin condition is required. In the specific context of pre-surgical evaluation, long-term video-EEG must record all types of seizures observed in the child. This monitoring is essential in order to develop hypotheses regarding the seizure onset zone, based on electroclinical correlations, which should be adapted to the child's age and the psychomotor development.

  18. Infective endocarditis: determinants of long term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Netzer, R O M; Altwegg, S C; Zollinger, E; Täuber, M; Carrel, T; Seiler, C

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate predictors of long term prognosis in infective endocarditis. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting: Tertiary care centre. Patients: 212 consecutive patients with infective endocarditis between 1980 and 1995 Main outcome measures: Overall and cardiac mortality; event-free survival; and the following events: recurrence, need for late valve surgery, bleeding and embolic complications, cerebral dysfunction, congestive heart failure. Results: During a mean follow up period of 89 months (range 1–244 months), 56% of patients died. In 180 hospital survivors, overall and cardiac mortality amounted to 45% and 24%, respectively. By multivariate analysis, early surgical treatment, infection by streptococci, age < 55 years, absence of congestive heart failure, and > 6 symptoms or signs of endocarditis during active infection were predictive of improved overall long term survival. Independent determinants of event-free survival were infection by streptococci and age < 55 years. Event-free survival was 17% at the end of follow up both in medically–surgically treated patients and in medically treated patients. Conclusions: Long term survival following infective endocarditis is 50% after 10 years and is predicted by early surgical treatment, age < 55 years, lack of congestive heart failure, and the initial presence of more symptoms of endocarditis. PMID:12067947

  19. Multi-factor long-term global change impacts on grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, K.; Chiariell0, N.; Tobeck, T.; Fukami, T.; Field, C. B.

    2015-12-01

    Global change is intrinsically multi-factor, critically interacting with changes in the composition of the atmosphere, land use, nitrogen deposition, and the abundance of invasives. Global change also occurs against a background of ecosystem dynamics over the long term. We followed ecosystem production of an annual grassland in California to all possible combinations of experimentally warming (+80 W/m2), added precipitation (+50%), elevated CO2 (+300 ppm), nitrogen deposition (+7 g/m2), and fire disturbances over 17 years. We examined ecosystem-level net primary production (NPP) and its aboveground (ANPP) and belowground components (BNPP), by integrating both the temporal and experimental dimensions as a modulator of responses and as a way to transform treatments from categorical to continuous scales. We developed a model-based approach to investigate these high-dimensional spatial-temporal data. Across the experiment, we found that main effects of the four long-term treatment factors were substantial, increasing or decreasing production by up to 20%. Temperature had negative effects; precipitation had a positive effect on BNPP, but a negative effect on ANPP; CO2 had a positive effect on ANPP, a slight negative effect on BNPP; and nitrogen had positive effects. Relative to their main effects, most interactions among these four global change factors were small, particularly for ANPP and NPP, indicating that most responses to the global change factors were additive. As single factor effects, the 2003 wildfire and 2011 prescribed burn were similar, with strong positive effects on ecosystem productivity in the following growing season by up to 40%, especially for ANPP. All these multi-factor long-term ecosystem productivity results provide a starting point and a foundation to understand ecosystem performance in a wide range of future global change scenarios.

  20. The long-term prediction of artificial satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cefola, P. J.; Long, A. C.; Holloway, G., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Survey of averaging and multirevolution methods for long-term orbit prediction. A technical approach with the following features is recommended: (1) averaged variation-of-parameter equations, (2) analytical expressions for oblateness and third-body effects, (3) definite integrals for atmospheric drag and lunar effects (for long-period orbits), (4) nonsingular equinoctial element formulation, (5) multistep numerical integration processes, and (6) precise osculating-to-mean element transformation. Several orbital predictions illustrate the contribution of this technical approach to overall accuracy and efficiency. Future development of the analytical averaging method in nonsingular coordinates by automated manipulation of literal series is discussed.

  1. Martian particle size based on thermal inertia corrected for elevation-dependent atmospheric properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal inertia is commonly used to derive physical properties of the Martian surface. If the surface is composed of loosely consolidated grains, then the thermal conductivity derived from the inertia can theoretically be used to compute the particle size. However, one persistent difficulty associated with the interpretation of thermal inertia and the derivation of particle size from it has been the degree to which atmospheric properties affect both the radiation balance at the surface and the gas conductivity. These factors vary with atmospheric pressure so that derived thermal inertias and particle sizes are a function of elevation. By utilizing currently available thermal models and laboratory information, a fine component thermal inertia map was convolved with digital topography to produce particle size maps of the Martian surface corrected for these elevation-dependent effects. Such an approach is especially applicable for the highest elevations on Mars, where atmospheric back radiation and gas conductivity are low.

  2. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil microbial biomass, activity, and diversity in a chaparral ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Lipson, David A; Wilson, Richard F; Oechel, Walter C

    2005-12-01

    This study reports the effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO2 on root production and microbial activity, biomass, and diversity in a chaparral ecosystem in southern California. The free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) ring was located in a stand dominated by the woody shrub Adenostoma fasciculatum. Between 1995 and 2003, the FACE ring maintained an average daytime atmospheric CO2 concentration of 550 ppm. During the last two years of operation, observations were made on soil cores collected from the FACE ring and adjacent areas of chaparral with ambient CO2 levels. Root biomass roughly doubled in the FACE plot. Microbial biomass and activity were related to soil organic matter (OM) content, and so analysis of covariance was used to detect CO2 effects while controlling for variation across the landscape. Extracellular enzymatic activity (cellulase and amylase) and microbial biomass C (chloroform fumigation-extraction) increased more rapidly with OM in the FACE plot than in controls, but glucose substrate-induced respiration (SIR) rates did not. The metabolic quotient (field respiration over potential respiration) was significantly higher in FACE samples, possibly indicating that microbial respiration was less C limited under high CO2. The treatments also differed in the ratio of SIR to microbial biomass C, indicating a metabolic difference between the microbial communities. Bacterial diversity, described by 16S rRNA clone libraries, was unaffected by the CO2 treatment, but fungal biomass was stimulated. Furthermore, fungal biomass was correlated with cellulase and amylase activities, indicating that fungi were responsible for the stimulation of enzymatic activity in the FACE treatment.

  3. [Plant responses to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and transmission to other trophic levels]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, D.E.

    1995-10-01

    This program investigated how host plant responses to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide may be transmitted to other trophic levels, especially leaf eating insects, and alter consumption of leaves and impare their function. Study results included the following findings: increased carbon dioxide to plants alters feeding by insect herbivores; leaves produced under higher carbon conditions contain proportionally less nitrogen; insect herbivores may have decreased reproduction under elevated carbon dioxide.

  4. The effects of long-term sleep deprivation on the long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus and brain oxidation status in rats.

    PubMed

    Süer, Cem; Dolu, Nazan; Artis, A Seda; Sahin, Leyla; Yilmaz, Alpaslan; Cetin, Aysun

    2011-05-01

    Some evidence suggests that sleep deprivation might impair synaptic plasticity and produce oxidative stress in the hippocampus. However it is not clear whether impairment of long-term potentiation depends on the oxidative stress evoked by sleep deprivation protocol. In this study we aimed to investigate the effects of a 21-day sleep deprivation period on long-term plasticity taking into account the stressful effect of sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation was carried out using the multiple platforms method on adult male Wistar rats. Long-term potentiation was studied in the medial perforant pathway-dentate gyrus synapses. Elevated T test was applied, and blood corticosterone levels were measured. Lipid peroxidation products in whole brain and hippocampus were determined. No significant difference was found between the sleep deprived, pedestal and cage control groups at the end of the 21-day period when corticosterone levels were compared. The results of the elevated T test indicated that sleep deprivation did not change the anxiety-like behavior of the animals. When compared with cage or pedestal control groups, sleep deprived rats displayed elevated malondialdehyde levels, and decreased superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities together with impaired long-term potentiation maintenance. It can be argued that 21-day SD may impair the maintenance of long-term potentiation evoked in the dentate gyrus, and the balance between oxidant and antioxidant defenses of the hippocampus. PMID:21256900

  5. Long-term trends in dissolved iron and DOC concentration linked to nitrate depletion in riparian soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musolff, Andreas; Selle, Benny; Fleckenstein, Jan H.; Oosterwoud, Marieke R.; Tittel, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The instream concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are rising in many catchments of the northern hemisphere. Elevated concentrations of DOC, mainly in the form of colored humic components, increase efforts and costs of drinking water purification. In this study, we evaluated a long-term dataset of 110 catchments draining into German drinking water reservoirs in order to assess sources of DOC and drivers of a potential long-term change. The average DOC concentrations across the wide range of different catchments were found to be well explained by the catchment's topographic wetness index. Higher wetness indices were connected to higher average DOC concentrations, which implies that catchments with shallow topography and pronounced riparian wetlands mobilize more DOC. Overall, 37% of the investigated catchments showed a significant long-term increase in DOC concentrations, while 22% exhibited significant negative trends. Moreover, we found that increasing trends in DOC were positively correlated to trends in dissolved iron concentrations at pH≤6 due to remobilization of DOC previously sorbed to iron minerals. Both, increasing trends in DOC and dissolve iron were found to be connected to decreasing trends and low concentrations of nitrate (below ~6 mg/L). This was especially observed in forested catchments where atmospheric N-depositions were the major source for nitrate availability. In these catchments, we also found long-term increases of phosphate concentrations. Therefore, we argue that dissolved iron, DOC and phosphate were jointly released under iron-reducing conditions when nitrate as a competing electron acceptor was too low in concentrations to prevent the microbial iron reduction. In contrast, we could not explain the observed increasing trends in DOC, iron and phosphate concentrations by the long-term trends of pH, sulfate or precipitation. Altogether this study gives strong evidence that both, source and long-term increases in DOC are

  6. Long-term EARLINET dust observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Amiridis, Vassilis; Amodeo, Aldo; Binietoglou, Ioannis; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Schwarz, Anja; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Papayannis, Alexandros; Sicard, Michael; Comeron, Adolfo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2015-04-01

    Systematic observations of Saharan dust events over Europe are performed from May 2000 by EARLINET, the European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork. EARLINET is a coordinated network of stations that make use of advanced lidar methods for the vertical profiling of aerosols. The backbone of EARLINET network is a common schedule for performing the measurements and the quality assurance of instruments/data. Particular attention is paid to monitoring the Saharan dust intrusions over the European continent. The geographical distribution of the EARLINET stations is particularly appealing for the dust observation, with stations located all around the Mediterranean and in the center of the Mediterranean (Italian stations) where dust intrusions are frequent, and with several stations in the central Europe where dust penetrates occasionally. All aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles related to observations collected during these alerts are grouped in the devoted "Saharan dust" category of the EARLINET database. This category consists of about 4700 files (as of December 2013). Case studies involving several stations around Europe selected from this long-term database have been provided the opportunity to investigate dust modification processes during transport over the continent. More important, the long term EARLINET dust monitoring allows the investigation of the horizontal and vertical extent of dust outbreaks over Europe and the climatological analysis of dust optical intensive and extensive properties at continental scale. This long-term database is also a unique tool for a systematic comparison with dust model outputs and satellite-derived dust products. Because of the relevance for both dust modeling and satellite retrievals improvement, results about desert dust layers extensive properties as a function of season and source regions are investigated and will be presented at the conference. First comparisons with models outputs and CALIPSO dust products will be

  7. Human Behaviour in Long-Term Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session WP1, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Psychological Support for International Space Station Mission; Psycho-social Training for Man in Space; Study of the Physiological Adaptation of the Crew During A 135-Day Space Simulation; Interpersonal Relationships in Space Simulation, The Long-Term Bed Rest in Head-Down Tilt Position; Psychological Adaptation in Groups of Varying Sizes and Environments; Deviance Among Expeditioners, Defining the Off-Nominal Act in Space and Polar Field Analogs; Getting Effective Sleep in the Space-Station Environment; Human Sleep and Circadian Rhythms are Altered During Spaceflight; and Methodological Approach to Study of Cosmonauts Errors and Its Instrumental Support.

  8. Long Term Analysis for the BAM device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonino, D.; Gardiol, D.

    2011-02-01

    Algorithms aimed at the evaluation of critical quantities are based on models with many parameters, which values are estimated from data. The knowledge, with high accuracy, of these values and the control of their temporal evolution are important features. In this work, we focus on the latter subject, and we show a proposed pipeline for the BAM (Basic Angle Monitoring) Long Term Analysis, aimed at the study of the calibration parameters of the BAM device and of the Basic Angle variation, searching for unwanted trends, cyclic features, or other potential unexpected behaviours.

  9. Long-term outcomes in multiple gestations.

    PubMed

    Rand, Larry; Eddleman, Keith A; Stone, Joanne

    2005-06-01

    Children born from a multiple gestation are at increased risk for cerebral palsy, learning disability, and language and neurobehavioral deficits. With the increased incidence of multiple pregnancies and use of assisted reproductive technology (ART), these issues are more commonly affecting parents. Long-term outcomes are a critical part of preconceptual and early pregnancy counseling for parents faced with a multiple gestation or considering ART, and the provider should be well versed on issues surrounding zygosity, gestational age, higher-order multiples, and the effects of options such as multifetal pregnancy reduction. PMID:15922795

  10. Long-Term Wind Power Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory started collecting wind power data from large commercial wind power plants (WPPs) in southwest Minnesota with dedicated dataloggers and communication links in the spring of 2000. Over the years, additional WPPs in other areas were added to and removed from the data collection effort. The longest data stream of actual wind plant output is more than 10 years. The resulting data have been used to analyze wind power fluctuations, frequency distribution of changes, the effects of spatial diversity, and wind power ancillary services. This report uses the multi-year wind power data to examine long-term wind power variability.

  11. Long-term effects of sibling incest.

    PubMed

    Daie, N; Witztum, E; Eleff, M

    1989-11-01

    Although sexual abuse of children is recognized as a serious problem, sibling incest has received relatively little attention. A distinction has been made between power-oriented sibling incest and nurturance-oriented incest. The authors review the relevant literature and present four clinical examples. The cases illustrate the broad range of sibling incest and demonstrate its effects, including the long-term consequences for the perpetrator. Lasting difficulties in establishing and maintaining close relationships, especially sexual ones, are prominent features of each case. Without denying the occurrences of benign sex-play between siblings, the authors emphasize exploitation and abuse as pathogenic aspects of sibling incest.

  12. Performance considerations in long-term spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, F. R.

    1979-01-01

    Maintenance of skilled performance during extended space flight is of critical importance to both the health and safety of crew members and to the overall success of mission goals. An examination of long term effects and performance requirements is therefore a factor of immense importance to the planning of future missions. Factors that were investigated include: definition of performance categories to be investigated; methods for assessing and predicting performance levels; in-flight factors which can affect performance; and factors pertinent to the maintenance of skilled performance.

  13. Long-term space flights - personal impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, V. V.

    During a final 4-month stage of a 1-year space flight of cosmonauts Titov and Manarov, a physician, Valery Polyakov was included on a crew for the purpose of evaluating their health, correcting physical status to prepare for the spacecraft reentry and landing operations. The complex program of scientific investigations and experiments performed by the physician included an evaluation of adaptation reactions of the human body at different stages of space mission using clinicophysiological and biochemical methods; testing of alternative regimes of exercise and new countermeasures to prevent an unfavourable effect of long-term weightlessness.

  14. The effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on gross nitrogen and carbon dynamics in a permanent grassland: A field pulse-labeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Gerald; Gorenflo, André; Keidel, Lisa; Brenzinger, Kristof; Elias, Dafydd; McNamara, Niall; Maček, Irena; Vodnik, Dominik; Braker, Gesche; Schimmelpfennig, Sonja; Gerstner, Judith; Müller, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    To predict ecosystem reactions to elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2) it is essential to understand the interactions between plant carbon input, microbial community composition and activity and associated nutrient dynamics. Long-term observations (> 14 years) within the Giessen Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (Giessen FACE) study on permanent grassland showed next to an enhanced biomass production an unexpected strong positive feedback effect on ecosystem respiration and nitrous oxide (N2O) production. The overall goal of this study is to understand the long-term effects of eCO2 and carbon input on microbial community composition and activity as well as the associated nitrogen dynamics, N2O production and plant N uptake in the Giessen FACE study on permanent grassland. A combination of 13CO2 pulse labelling with 15N tracing of 15NH4+ and 15NO3- was carried out in situ. Different fractions of soil organic matter (recalcitrant, labile SOM) and the various mineral N pools in the soil (NH4+, NO3-), gross N transformation rates, pool size dependent N2O and N2 emissions as well as N species dependent plant N uptake rates and the origin of the CO2 respiration have been quantified. Microbial analyses include exploring changes in the composition of microbial communities involved in the turnover of NH4+, NO3-, N2O and N2, i.e. ammonia oxidizing, denitrifying, and microbial communities involved in dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA). mRNA based analyses will be employed to comparably evaluate the long-term effects of eCO2 on the structure and abundance of these communities, while transcripts of these genes will be used to target the fractions of the communities which actively contribute to N transformations. We quantified the contribution of mycorrhizae on N2O emissions and observed the phenological development of the mycorrhizae after the labeling.

  15. 17 CFR 256.224 - Other long-term debt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Other long-term debt. 256.224... COMPANY ACT OF 1935 6. Long-Term Debt § 256.224 Other long-term debt. This account shall include all long-term debt to nonassociates and not subject to current settlement. Note: Subaccounts shall be...

  16. 17 CFR 256.224 - Other long-term debt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other long-term debt. 256.224... COMPANY ACT OF 1935 6. Long-Term Debt § 256.224 Other long-term debt. This account shall include all long-term debt to nonassociates and not subject to current settlement. Note: Subaccounts shall be...

  17. 47 CFR 54.303 - Long term support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Long term support. 54.303 Section 54.303... SERVICE Universal Service Support for High Cost Areas § 54.303 Long term support. (a) Beginning January 1... shall receive Long Term Support. Beginning July 1, 2004, no carrier shall receive Long Term Support....

  18. 47 CFR 54.303 - Long term support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Long term support. 54.303 Section 54.303... SERVICE Universal Service Support for High Cost Areas § 54.303 Long term support. (a) Beginning January 1... shall receive Long Term Support. Beginning July 1, 2004, no carrier shall receive Long Term Support....

  19. Long-term weather predictability: Ural case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubyshen, Alexander; Shopin, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    proved the efficiency of the method for forecasting the following meteorological parameters: ­- air temperature (minimum, maximum, daily mean, diurnal variation, last spring and first autumn freeze); - periods of winds with speeds of >5m/s and the maximal expected wind speed; - precipitation periods and amount of precipitations; -­ relative humidity; - atmospheric pressure. Atmospheric events (thunderstorms, fog) and hydrometeors also occupy the appropriate positions at the sequence diagrams that provides a possibility of long-term forecasting also for these events. Accuracy of forecasts was tested in 2006-2009 years. The difference between the forecasted monthly mean temperature and actual values was <0.5°C in 40.9% of cases, between 0.5°C and 1°C in 18.2% of cases, between 1°C and 1.5°C in 18.2% of cases, <2°C in 86% of cases. The RAMES method provides the toolkit to successfully forecast the weather conditions in advance of several years. 1. A.F. Kubyshen, "RAMES method: revealing the periodicity of meteorological processes and it usage for long-term forecast [Metodika «RAMES»: vyjavlenie periodichnosti meteorologicheskih processov i ee ispol'zovanie dlja dolgosrochnogo prognozirovanija]", in A.E. Fedorov (ed.), Sistema «Planeta Zemlja»: 200 let so dnja rozhdenija Izmaila Ivanovicha Sreznevskogo. 100 let so dnja izdanija ego slovarja drevnerusskogo jazyka. LENAND. Moscow. pp. 305-311. (In Russian)

  20. Influence of "Island-Like" Oxides in the Bond-Coat on the Stress and Failure Patterns of the Thermal-Barrier Coatings Fabricated by Atmospheric Plasma Spraying During Long-Term High Temperature Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Zhao, Y. X.; Zhong, X. H.; Tao, S. Y.; Zhang, W.; Wang, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs) are very important ceramic-coating materials due to their excellent performance at high temperature. The inner zone of the bond-coat is often easily endured oxidized (internal oxidation) in the process of thermal spraying and the long-time exposure to the high temperature, and the "island-like" oxides can be formed. Especially, when the bond-coat was fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), this trend is more evident. In this paper, the stress distribution around the thermally grown oxide (TGO) has been calculated by the finite element method when the "island-like" oxides have been considered. The simulation results indicate that the maximum tensile stress and compressive stress existed in the TGO, and the existence of the "island-like" oxides will further decrease the maximum tensile stress level in the TGO. While the "island-like" oxides in the bond-coat will decrease the effective thickness of the TGO at the metallic layer/ceramic layer interface due to the oxidation of the metallic elements in the bond-coat. The crack propagation equation has been established and the failure mechanism of the TBC due to the formation and growth of the TGO has also been discussed in detail. The lifetime of the TBCs which have experienced high temperature oxidation has been predicted and the theoretical results agreed well with the experimental data.

  1. Toward a comprehensive long term nicotine policy

    PubMed Central

    Gray, N; Henningfield, J; Benowitz, N; Connolly, G; Dresler, C; Fagerstrom, K; Jarvis, M; Boyle, P

    2005-01-01

    Global tobacco deaths are high and rising. Tobacco use is primarily driven by nicotine addiction. Overall tobacco control policy is relatively well agreed upon but a long term nicotine policy has been less well considered and requires further debate. Reaching consensus is important because a nicotine policy is integral to the target of reducing tobacco caused disease, and the contentious issues need to be resolved before the necessary political changes can be sought. A long term and comprehensive nicotine policy is proposed here. It envisages both reducing the attractiveness and addictiveness of existing tobacco based nicotine delivery systems as well as providing alternative sources of acceptable clean nicotine as competition for tobacco. Clean nicotine is defined as nicotine free enough of tobacco toxicants to pass regulatory approval. A three phase policy is proposed. The initial phase requires regulatory capture of cigarette and smoke constituents liberalising the market for clean nicotine; regulating all nicotine sources from the same agency; and research into nicotine absorption and the role of tobacco additives in this process. The second phase anticipates clean nicotine overtaking tobacco as the primary source of the drug (facilitated by use of regulatory and taxation measures); simplification of tobacco products by limitation of additives which make tobacco attractive and easier to smoke (but tobacco would still be able to provide a satisfying dose of nicotine). The third phase includes a progressive reduction in the nicotine content of cigarettes, with clean nicotine freely available to take the place of tobacco as society's main nicotine source. PMID:15923465

  2. Long term changes in the polar vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2015-04-01

    As the amount of halogens in the stratosphere is slowly declining and the ozone layer slowly recovers it is of interest to see how the meteorological conditions in the vortex develop over the long term since such changes might alter the foreseen ozone recovery. In conjunction with the publication of the WMO Antarctic and Arctic Ozone Bulletins, WMO has acquired the ERA Interim global reanalysis data set for several meteorological parameters. This data set goes from 1979 - present. These long time series of data can be used for several useful studies of the long term development of the polar vortices. Several "environmental indicators" for vortex change have been calculated, and a climatology, as well as trends, for these parameters will be presented. These indicators can act as yardsticks and will be useful for understanding past and future changes in the polar vortices and how these changes affect polar ozone depletion. Examples of indicators are: vortex mean temperature, vortex minimum temperature, vortex mean PV, vortex "importance" (PV*area), vortex break-up time, mean and maximum wind speed. Data for both the north and south polar vortices have been analysed at several isentropic levels from 350 to 850 K. A possible link between changes in PV and sudden stratospheric warmings will be investigated, and the results presented.

  3. Long-Term Care Policy: Singapore's Experience.

    PubMed

    Chin, Chee Wei Winston; Phua, Kai-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Singapore, like many developed countries, is facing the challenge of a rapidly aging population and the increasing need to provide long-term care (LTC) services for elderly in the community. The Singapore government's philosophy on care for the elderly is that the family should be the first line of support, and it has relied on voluntary welfare organizations (VWOs) or charities for the bulk of LTC service provision. For LTC financing, it has emphasized the principles of co-payment and targeting of state support to the low-income population through means-tested government subsidies. It has also instituted ElderShield, a national severe disability insurance scheme. This paper discusses some of the challenges facing LTC policy in Singapore, particularly the presence of perverse financial incentives for hospitalization, the pitfalls of over-reliance on VWOs, and the challenges facing informal family caregivers. It discusses the role of private LTC insurance in LTC financing, bearing in mind demand- and supply-side failures that have plagued the private LTC insurance market. It suggests the need for more standardized needs assessment and portable LTC benefits, with reference to the Japanese Long-Term Care Insurance program, and also discusses the need to provide more support to informal family caregivers. PMID:26808468

  4. Long-term anticoagulation. Indications and management.

    PubMed Central

    Stults, B M; Dere, W H; Caine, T H

    1989-01-01

    Each year half a million persons in the United States receive long-term anticoagulant therapy to prevent venous and arterial thromboembolism. Unfortunately, the relative benefits and risks of anticoagulant therapy have not been adequately quantified for many thromboembolic disorders, and the decisions as to whether, for how long, and how intensely to administer anticoagulation are often complex and controversial. Several expert panels have published recommendations for anticoagulant therapy for different thromboembolic disorders; the primary area of disagreement among these panels concerns the optimal intensity of anticoagulation. Recent research and analytic reviews have helped to clarify both the risk factors for and the appropriate diagnostic evaluation of anticoagulant-induced hemorrhage. Clinicians must be aware of the nonhemorrhagic complications of anticoagulant therapy, particularly during pregnancy. The administration of anticoagulants is difficult both in relation to dosing and long-term monitoring. Knowledge of the pharmacology of the anticoagulants, an organized approach to ongoing monitoring, and thorough patient education may facilitate the safe and effective use of these drugs. PMID:2686173

  5. Long-term outcome in personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Stone, M H

    1993-03-01

    Personality disorders meeting DSM or ICD criteria represent the severe end of the broad spectrum of personality configurations involving maladaptive traits. The literature regarding long-term outcome of personality disorders is sparse. Most attention is devoted to formerly institutionalised patients with borderline, antisocial, or schizotypal disorders. Borderline patients at 10-25-year follow-up have a wide range of outcomes, from clinical recovery (50-60%) to suicide (3-9%). Certain factors (e.g. artistic talent) conduce to higher recovery rates, others (e.g. parental cruelty) to lower rates. Schizoid and schizotypal patients tend to remain isolated, and to lead marginal lives. The long-term outcome in antisocial persons is bleak if psychopathic traits are prominent. Personality traits and their corresponding disorders are egosyntonic, harden into habit, and are both slow to change and hard to modify. There is no one treatment of choice. Psychoanalysis and related methods work best within the anxious/inhibited group; cognitive/behavioural techniques are well suited to the disorders requiring limit setting and the amelioration of maladaptive habits. PMID:8453424

  6. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Raja, Waseem K; Wang, Rebecca Y; Stinson, Jordan A; Glettig, Dean L; Burke, Kelly A; Kaplan, David L

    2015-08-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogenesis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight. PMID:25843606

  7. Long Term Changes in the Polar Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2016-04-01

    As the amount of halogens in the stratosphere is slowly declining and the ozone layer slowly recovers it is of interest to see how the meteorological conditions in the vortex develop over the long term since such changes might alter the foreseen ozone recovery. In conjunction with the publication of the WMO Antarctic and Arctic Ozone Bulletins, WMO has acquired the ERA Interim global reanalysis data set for several meteorological parameters. This data set goes from 1979 - present. These long time series of data can be used for several useful studies of the long term development of the polar vortices. Several "environmental indicators" for vortex change have been calculated, and a climatology, as well as trends, for these parameters will be presented. These indicators can act as yardsticks and will be useful for understanding past and future changes in the polar vortices and how these changes affect polar ozone depletion. Examples of indicators are: vortex mean temperature, vortex minimum temperature, vortex mean PV, vortex "importance" (PV*area), vortex break-up time, mean and maximum wind speed. Data for both the north and south polar vortices have been analysed at several isentropic levels from 350 to 850 K. A possible link between changes in PV and sudden stratospheric warmings will be investigated, and the results presented. The unusual meteorological conditions of the 2015 south polar vortex and the 2010/11 and 2015/16 north polar vortices will be compared to other recent years.

  8. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Rosalyn D.; Raja, Waseem K.; Wang, Rebecca Y.; Stinson, Jordan A.; Glettig, Dean L.; Burke, Kelly A.; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogensis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight. PMID:25843606

  9. Long-term mechanical ventilation and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Ambrosino, Nicolino; Clini, Enrico

    2004-05-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) in chronic situations is commonly used, either delivered invasively or by means of non-invasive interfaces, to control hypoventilation in patients with chest wall, neuromuscular or obstructive lung diseases (either in adulthood or childhood). The global prevalence of ventilator-assisted individuals (VAI) in Europe ranges from 2 to 30 per 100000 population according to different countries. Nutrition is a common problem to face with in patients with chronic respiratory diseases: nonetheless, it is a key component in the long-term management of underweight COPD patients whose muscular disfunction may rapidly turn to peripheral muscle waste. Since long-term mechanical ventilation (LTMV) is usually prescribed in end-stage respiratory diseases with poor nutritional status, nutrition and dietary intake related problems need to be carefully assessed and corrected in these patients. This paper aims to review the most recent innovations in the field of nutritional status and food intake-related problems of VAI (both in adulthood and in childhood).

  10. Toward a comprehensive long term nicotine policy.

    PubMed

    Gray, N; Henningfield, J E; Benowitz, N L; Connolly, G N; Dresler, C; Fagerstrom, K; Jarvis, M J; Boyle, P

    2005-06-01

    Global tobacco deaths are high and rising. Tobacco use is primarily driven by nicotine addiction. Overall tobacco control policy is relatively well agreed upon but a long term nicotine policy has been less well considered and requires further debate. Reaching consensus is important because a nicotine policy is integral to the target of reducing tobacco caused disease, and the contentious issues need to be resolved before the necessary political changes can be sought. A long term and comprehensive nicotine policy is proposed here. It envisages both reducing the attractiveness and addictiveness of existing tobacco based nicotine delivery systems as well as providing alternative sources of acceptable clean nicotine as competition for tobacco. Clean nicotine is defined as nicotine free enough of tobacco toxicants to pass regulatory approval. A three phase policy is proposed. The initial phase requires regulatory capture of cigarette and smoke constituents liberalising the market for clean nicotine; regulating all nicotine sources from the same agency; and research into nicotine absorption and the role of tobacco additives in this process. The second phase anticipates clean nicotine overtaking tobacco as the primary source of the drug (facilitated by use of regulatory and taxation measures); simplification of tobacco products by limitation of additives which make tobacco attractive and easier to smoke (but tobacco would still be able to provide a satisfying dose of nicotine). The third phase includes a progressive reduction in the nicotine content of cigarettes, with clean nicotine freely available to take the place of tobacco as society's main nicotine source. PMID:15923465

  11. Long-term Trend of Sunspot Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, P. X.

    2016-10-01

    Using the Hilbert–Huang Transform method, we investigate the long-term trend of yearly mean total sunspot numbers in the time interval of 1700–2015, which come from the World Data Center—the sunspot Index and long-term solar observations. The main findings of this study are summarized below. (1) From the adaptive trend, which is extracted from the yearly mean total sunspot numbers, we can find that the value gradually increases during the time period 1700–1975, then decreases gradually from 1975 to 2015. (2) The Centennial Gleissberg Cycle is extracted from the yearly mean total sunspot numbers and confirms that a new grand minimum is in progress; the Dalton Minimum, the Gleissberg Minimum, and low level of solar activity during solar cycle 24 (the part of the new grand minimum) all can be understood as minima of the Centennial Gleissberg Cycle. (3) Based on the adaptive (overall) trend, and the 100-year and longer timescale trend of yearly mean total sunspot numbers, we can infer that the level of solar activity during the new grand minimum may be close to that during the Gleissberg Minimum, slightly higher than that during the Dalton Minimum, and significantly higher than that during the Maunder Minimum. Our results do not support the suggestion that a new grand minimum, somewhat resembling the Maunder Minimum, is in progress.

  12. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Raja, Waseem K; Wang, Rebecca Y; Stinson, Jordan A; Glettig, Dean L; Burke, Kelly A; Kaplan, David L

    2015-08-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogenesis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight.

  13. Long-term decline of the Amazon carbon sink.

    PubMed

    Brienen, R J W; Phillips, O L; Feldpausch, T R; Gloor, E; Baker, T R; Lloyd, J; Lopez-Gonzalez, G; Monteagudo-Mendoza, A; Malhi, Y; Lewis, S L; Vásquez Martinez, R; Alexiades, M; Álvarez Dávila, E; Alvarez-Loayza, P; Andrade, A; Aragão, L E O C; Araujo-Murakami, A; Arets, E J M M; Arroyo, L; Aymard C, G A; Bánki, O S; Baraloto, C; Barroso, J; Bonal, D; Boot, R G A; Camargo, J L C; Castilho, C V; Chama, V; Chao, K J; Chave, J; Comiskey, J A; Cornejo Valverde, F; da Costa, L; de Oliveira, E A; Di Fiore, A; Erwin, T L; Fauset, S; Forsthofer, M; Galbraith, D R; Grahame, E S; Groot, N; Hérault, B; Higuchi, N; Honorio Coronado, E N; Keeling, H; Killeen, T J; Laurance, W F; Laurance, S; Licona, J; Magnussen, W E; Marimon, B S; Marimon-Junior, B H; Mendoza, C; Neill, D A; Nogueira, E M; Núñez, P; Pallqui Camacho, N C; Parada, A; Pardo-Molina, G; Peacock, J; Peña-Claros, M; Pickavance, G C; Pitman, N C A; Poorter, L; Prieto, A; Quesada, C A; Ramírez, F; Ramírez-Angulo, H; Restrepo, Z; Roopsind, A; Rudas, A; Salomão, R P; Schwarz, M; Silva, N; Silva-Espejo, J E; Silveira, M; Stropp, J; Talbot, J; ter Steege, H; Teran-Aguilar, J; Terborgh, J; Thomas-Caesar, R; Toledo, M; Torello-Raventos, M; Umetsu, R K; van der Heijden, G M F; van der Hout, P; Guimarães Vieira, I C; Vieira, S A; Vilanova, E; Vos, V A; Zagt, R J

    2015-03-19

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide records indicate that the land surface has acted as a strong global carbon sink over recent decades, with a substantial fraction of this sink probably located in the tropics, particularly in the Amazon. Nevertheless, it is unclear how the terrestrial carbon sink will evolve as climate and atmospheric composition continue to change. Here we analyse the historical evolution of the biomass dynamics of the Amazon rainforest over three decades using a distributed network of 321 plots. While this analysis confirms that Amazon forests have acted as a long-term net biomass sink, we find a long-term decreasing trend of carbon accumulation. Rates of net increase in above-ground biomass declined by one-third during the past decade compared to the 1990s. This is a consequence of growth rate increases levelling off recently, while biomass mortality persistently increased throughout, leading to a shortening of carbon residence times. Potential drivers for the mortality increase include greater climate variability, and feedbacks of faster growth on mortality, resulting in shortened tree longevity. The observed decline of the Amazon sink diverges markedly from the recent increase in terrestrial carbon uptake at the global scale, and is contrary to expectations based on models.

  14. Long-term decline of the Amazon carbon sink.

    PubMed

    Brienen, R J W; Phillips, O L; Feldpausch, T R; Gloor, E; Baker, T R; Lloyd, J; Lopez-Gonzalez, G; Monteagudo-Mendoza, A; Malhi, Y; Lewis, S L; Vásquez Martinez, R; Alexiades, M; Álvarez Dávila, E; Alvarez-Loayza, P; Andrade, A; Aragão, L E O C; Araujo-Murakami, A; Arets, E J M M; Arroyo, L; Aymard C, G A; Bánki, O S; Baraloto, C; Barroso, J; Bonal, D; Boot, R G A; Camargo, J L C; Castilho, C V; Chama, V; Chao, K J; Chave, J; Comiskey, J A; Cornejo Valverde, F; da Costa, L; de Oliveira, E A; Di Fiore, A; Erwin, T L; Fauset, S; Forsthofer, M; Galbraith, D R; Grahame, E S; Groot, N; Hérault, B; Higuchi, N; Honorio Coronado, E N; Keeling, H; Killeen, T J; Laurance, W F; Laurance, S; Licona, J; Magnussen, W E; Marimon, B S; Marimon-Junior, B H; Mendoza, C; Neill, D A; Nogueira, E M; Núñez, P; Pallqui Camacho, N C; Parada, A; Pardo-Molina, G; Peacock, J; Peña-Claros, M; Pickavance, G C; Pitman, N C A; Poorter, L; Prieto, A; Quesada, C A; Ramírez, F; Ramírez-Angulo, H; Restrepo, Z; Roopsind, A; Rudas, A; Salomão, R P; Schwarz, M; Silva, N; Silva-Espejo, J E; Silveira, M; Stropp, J; Talbot, J; ter Steege, H; Teran-Aguilar, J; Terborgh, J; Thomas-Caesar, R; Toledo, M; Torello-Raventos, M; Umetsu, R K; van der Heijden, G M F; van der Hout, P; Guimarães Vieira, I C; Vieira, S A; Vilanova, E; Vos, V A; Zagt, R J

    2015-03-19

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide records indicate that the land surface has acted as a strong global carbon sink over recent decades, with a substantial fraction of this sink probably located in the tropics, particularly in the Amazon. Nevertheless, it is unclear how the terrestrial carbon sink will evolve as climate and atmospheric composition continue to change. Here we analyse the historical evolution of the biomass dynamics of the Amazon rainforest over three decades using a distributed network of 321 plots. While this analysis confirms that Amazon forests have acted as a long-term net biomass sink, we find a long-term decreasing trend of carbon accumulation. Rates of net increase in above-ground biomass declined by one-third during the past decade compared to the 1990s. This is a consequence of growth rate increases levelling off recently, while biomass mortality persistently increased throughout, leading to a shortening of carbon residence times. Potential drivers for the mortality increase include greater climate variability, and feedbacks of faster growth on mortality, resulting in shortened tree longevity. The observed decline of the Amazon sink diverges markedly from the recent increase in terrestrial carbon uptake at the global scale, and is contrary to expectations based on models. PMID:25788097

  15. Comparison of Arctic clouds between European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts simulations and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility long-term observations at the North Slope of Alaska Barrow site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming; Wang, Zhien

    2010-12-01

    This study evaluated the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model-simulated clouds and boundary layer (BL) properties based upon Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility observations at the North Slope of Alaska site during 1999-2007. The ECMWF model-simulated near-surface humidity had seasonal dependent biases as large as 20%, while also experiencing difficulty representing BL temperature inversion height and strength during the transition seasons. Although the ECMWF model captured the seasonal variation of surface heat fluxes, it had sensible heat flux biases over 20 W m-2 in most of the cold months. Furthermore, even though the model captured the general seasonal variations of low-level cloud fraction (LCF) and liquid water path (LWP), it still overestimated the LCF by 20% or more and underestimated the LWP over 50% in the cold season. On average, the ECMWF model underestimated LWP by ˜30 g m-2 but more accurately predicted ice water path for BL clouds. For BL mixed-phase clouds, the model predicted water-ice mass partition was significantly lower than the observations, largely due to the temperature dependence of water-ice mass partition used in the model. The ECMWF model captured the general response of cloud fraction and LWP on large-scale vertical motion changes but overpredicted the magnitude of the difference, especially for LWP. The new cloud and BL schemes of the ECMWF model that were implemented after 2003 only resulted in minor improvements in BL cloud simulations in summer. These results indicate that significant improvements in cold season BL and mixed-phase cloud processes in the model are needed.

  16. Using Tree Rings, CO2 Fluxes, and Long-Term Measurements to Understand Carbon Dynamics in an Alaskan Boreal Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Anderson, C.; Crump, A.; Stegen, J.

    2015-12-01

    Decadal and centennial processes are usually poorly constrained by data, but many opportunities exist to combine disparate data sources such as tree rings, greenhouse gas fluxes from the soil to atmosphere, and long-term tree inventories. At high northern latitudes, permafrost (and its current degradation across large scales) is presumed to exert a strong control on long-term ecosystem carbon uptake and storage. We integrate a variety of data from both Canada and Alaska, focusing on two years of observations across a permafrost gradient in a black spruce Alaskan watershed (the Caribou/Poker Creek Research Watershed ~50 km northeast of Fairbanks, AK, USA). Permafrost depth changes were strongly associated with changes in vegetation and leaf morphology, as well as soil greenhouse fluxes (0.1-2.0 μmol/m2/s, with strong spatial dependencies) and aboveground net primary production (60-550 gC/m2/yr). We use tree-ring data covering the last century to examine how tree response to climate variability changes with elevation and permafrost depth, both along small-scale transects and across the entire 104 km2 watershed. A weakness is that these results are from a single site and point in successional time; we quantify potential variability in this area using 16 years of observations from a Canadian boreal chronosequence. We emphasize that both short and long term observations and experiments, using multiple approaches, are necessary to constrain ecosystem carbon uptake and storage.

  17. Long-term sedimentary recycling of rare sulphur isotope anomalies.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Christopher T; Planavsky, Noah J; Lyons, Timothy W

    2013-05-01

    The accumulation of substantial quantities of O2 in the atmosphere has come to control the chemistry and ecological structure of Earth's surface. Non-mass-dependent (NMD) sulphur isotope anomalies in the rock record are the central tool used to reconstruct the redox history of the early atmosphere. The generation and initial delivery of these anomalies to marine sediments requires low partial pressures of atmospheric O2 (p(O2); refs 2, 3), and the disappearance of NMD anomalies from the rock record 2.32 billion years ago is thought to have signalled a departure from persistently low atmospheric oxygen levels (less than about 10(-5) times the present atmospheric level) during approximately the first two billion years of Earth's history. Here we present a model study designed to describe the long-term surface recycling of crustal NMD anomalies, and show that the record of this geochemical signal is likely to display a 'crustal memory effect' following increases in atmospheric p(O2) above this threshold. Once NMD anomalies have been buried in the upper crust they are extremely resistant to removal, and can be erased only through successive cycles of weathering, dilution and burial on an oxygenated Earth surface. This recycling results in the residual incorporation of NMD anomalies into the sedimentary record long after synchronous atmospheric generation of the isotopic signal has ceased, with dynamic and measurable signals probably surviving for as long as 10-100 million years subsequent to an increase in atmospheric p(O2) to more than 10(-5) times the present atmospheric level. Our results can reconcile geochemical evidence for oxygen production and transient accumulation with the maintenance of NMD anomalies on the early Earth, and suggest that future work should investigate the notion that temporally continuous generation of new NMD sulphur isotope anomalies in the atmosphere was likely to have ceased long before their ultimate disappearance from the rock record.

  18. Response of tundra ecosystems to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide. [Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Oechel, W.C.; Grulke, N.E.

    1988-12-31

    Our past research shows that arctic tussock tundra responds to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} with marked increases in net ecosystem carbon flux and photosynthetic rates. However, at ambient temperatures and nutrient availabilities, homeostatic adjustments result in net ecosystem flux rates dropping to those found a contemporary CO{sub 2} levels within three years. Evidence for ecosystem-level acclimation in the first season of elevated CO{sub 2} exposure was found in 1987. Photosynthetic rates of Eriophorum vaginatum, the dominant species, adjusts to elevated CO{sub 2} within three weeks. Past research also indicates other changes potentially important to ecosystem structure and function. Elevated CO{sub 2} treatment apparently delays senescence and increases the period of positive photosynthetic activity. Recent results from the 1987 field season verify the results obtained in the 1983--1986 field seasons: Elevated CO{sub 2} resulted in increased ecosystem-level flux rates. Regressions fitted to the seasonal flux rates indicate an apparent 10 d extension of positive CO{sub 2} uptake reflecting a delay of the onset of plant dormancy. This delay in senescence could increase the frost sensitivity of the system. Major end points proposed for this research include the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and the interaction of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} with elevated soil temperature and increased nutrient availability on: (1) Net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux; (2) Net photosynthetic rates; (3) Patterns and resource controls on homeostatic adjustment in the above processes to elevated CO{sub 2}; (4) Plant-nutrient status, litter quality, and forage quality; (5) Soil-nutrient status; (6) Plant-growth pattern and shoot demography.

  19. The Effects of Long Term Nitrogen Fertilization on Soil Respiration in Rocky Mountain National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J.; Denning, S.; Baron, J.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic activities contribute to increased levels of nitrogen deposition and elevated CO2 concentrations in terrestrial ecosystems. The role that soils play in biogeochemical cycles is an important area of uncertainty in ecosystem ecology. One of the main reasons for this uncertainty is that we have limited understanding of belowground microbial activity and how this activity is linked to soil processes. In particular, elevated CO2 may influence soil nitrogen processes that regulate nitrogen availability to plants. Warming and nitrogen fertilization may both contribute to loss of stored carbon from mountain ecosystems, because they contribute to microbial decomposition of organic matter. To study the effects of long-term nitrogen fertilization on soil respiration, we analyzed results from a 25-year field experiment in Rocky Mountain National Park. Field treatments are in old growth Engelmann spruce forests. Soil respiration responses to the effects of nitrogen fertilization on soil carbon cycling, via respiration, were investigated during the 2013 growing season. Soil moisture, temperature, and respiration rates were measured in six 30 x 30 m plots, of the six plots three are fertilized with 25 kg N ha-1 yr-1 as ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) pellets and three receives ambient atmospheric nitrogen deposition (1-6 kg N/ha/yr) in Rocky Mountain National Park. We found that respirations rates in the fertilized plots were not significantly higher than respiration rates in the unfertilized plots. We speculate that acclimation to long-term fertilization and relatively high levels of nitrogen deposition in the control plots both contribute to the insensitivity of soil respiration to fertilization at this site.

  20. Long-term performance of filtration layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radfar, A.; Rockaway, T. D.

    2013-12-01

    Permeable pavements are commonly employed to capture and divert stormwater before it enters the stormwater or sewer conveyance systems. During a storm event, runoff water passes through the permeable pavement surface, enters a storage gallery and finally exfiltrates into the surrounding soil. Thus, the ability of the system to store an appropriate volume of runoff water is an important consideration for stormwater control design. Traditionally, crushed stone or other porous material has been used to provide the necessary interstitial void space to store the runoff water. Unfortunately, over time the available void space within the storage gallery is reduced due to settlement, biological growth and sediment accumulation. This gradual reduction in void space reduces the long-term effectiveness of these stormwater controls by limiting its ability to store and pass runoff water. This study examined the long-term performance of the storage gallery layer with respect to its ability to both store and pass runoff water. As the porosity within the storage gallery decreased, it was anticipated that volumetric water content within the gallery would increase and that time necessary to drain the gallery would increase as well. The effects of the gallery porosity were assessed over a one-year study using both laboratory experimentation and monitoring data from naturally occurring rain events. Changes in gallery porosity were first assessed by correlating monitoring piezometer data with surface infiltration testing; building a relation between know volume of poured water being used for the test and the associated pressure head at the base of the gallery. As a known volume of water enters the system, volume change in the gallery directly correlate to increases in pressure head. Second, the time required for water to permeate through pavers and gallery layer to trigger the TDRs in the filtration layer and the time to drain it from the crushed stone were calculated and compared by

  1. Managing soils for long-term productivity

    PubMed Central

    Syers, J. K.

    1997-01-01

    Meeting the goal of long-term agricultural productivity requires that soil degradation be halted and reversed. Soil fertility decline is a key factor in soil degradation and is probably the major cause of declining crop yields. There is evidence that the contribution of declining soil fertility to soil degradation has been underestimated.
    Sensitivity to soil degradation is implicit in the assessment of the sustainability of land management practices, with wide recognition of the fact that soils vary in their ability to resist change and recover subsequent to stress. The concept of resilience in relation to sustainability requires further elaboration and evaluation.
    In the context of soil degradation, a decline in soil fertility is primarily interpreted as the depletion of organic matter and plant nutrients. Despite a higher turnover rate of organic matter in the tropics there is no intrinsic difference between the organic matter content of soils from tropical and temperate regions. The level of organic matter in a soil is closely related to the above and below ground inputs. In the absence of adequate organic material inputs and where cultivation is continuous, soil organic matter declines progressively. Maintaining the quantity and quality of soil organic matter should be a guiding principle in developing management practices.
    Soil microbial biomass serves as an important reservoir of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and sulphur (S), and regulates the cycling of organic matter and nutrients. Because of its high turnover rate, microbial biomass reacts quickly to changes in management and is a sensitive indicator for monitoring and predicting changes in soil organic matter. Modelling techniques have been reasonably successful in predicting changes in soil organic matter with different organic material inputs, but there is little information from the tropics.
    Nutrient depletion through harvested crop components and residue removal, and by leaching and soil

  2. Impacts of elevated atmospheric CO2 and O3 on forests: phytochemistry, trophic interactions, and ecosystem dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lindroth, Richard L

    2010-01-01

    from this and related reviews is that the effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on plant chemistry and ecological interactions are highly context- and species-specific, thus frustrating attempts to identify general, global patterns. Many of the interactions that govern above- and below-ground community and ecosystem processes are chemically mediated, ultimately influencing terrestrial carbon sequestration and feeding back to influence atmospheric composition. Thus, the discipline of chemical ecology is fundamentally important for elucidating the impacts of humans on the health and sustainability of forest ecosystems. Future research should seek to increase the diversity of natural products, species, and biomes studied; incorporate long-term, multi-factor experiments; and employ a comprehensive “genes to ecosystems” perspective that couples genetic/genomic tools with the approaches of evolutionary and ecosystem ecology.

  3. Long-term measurements of trace gaseous pollutants over Beijing using Mini-MAX-DOAS instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianzhong; Jin, Junli; Shaiganfar, Reza; Wagner, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Air quality in Beijing megacity has been of great concern in the atmospheric and environmental science community as well as public media. In addition to in situ measurements of ambient concentrations of air pollutants (e.g. NO2, SO2) near the ground, satellite data have also been used to analyze the long-term variation trend of urban pollution as well as the special emission control effect. However, the emission sources of pollutants in a megacity like Beijing are diverse and heterogeneously distributed in the urban canopy. Therefore, in situ surface measurement results may be quite different from one site to another depending on the representativeness of the chosen sites. Satellite measurements are found to have large biases in monitoring the air pollutant levels in a city due to both grid-smoothing and aerosol shielding effects. Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) is a passive remote sensing technology, which retrieves atmospheric trace gases by using scattered sun light from various elevation angles. Ground-based measurements by MAX-DOAS are especially sensitive to the tropospheric part of trace gas column, and can be used effectively to validate the satellite products for the troposphere. We have performed ground Mini-MAX-DOAS measurements at an urban site (39.95N, 116.32E) in Beijing since August 2008. The diurnal and seasonal variations of tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities were retrieved by analyzing the MAX-DOAS spectra obtained at this site. Such dataset were also used to validate the SCIMACHY and OMI satellite NO2 products for the period 2008-2009. Analyses of these MAX-DOAS spectra for SO2 and HCHO will be done in the near future to investigate the long-term variations of pollution level and character in Beijing over the past years.

  4. Emotional behavior in long-term marriage.

    PubMed

    Carstensen, L L; Gottman, J M; Levenson, R W

    1995-03-01

    In exploring the emotional climate of long-term marriages, this study used an observational coding system to identify specific emotional behaviors expressed by middle-aged and older spouses during discussions of a marital problem. One hundred and fifty-six couples differing in age and marital satisfaction were studied. Emotional behaviors expressed by couples differed as a function of age, gender, and marital satisfaction. In older couples, the resolution of conflict was less emotionally negative and more affectionate than in middle-aged marriages. Differences between husbands and wives and between happy and unhappy marriages were also found. Wives were more affectively negative than husbands, whereas husbands were more defensive than wives, and unhappy marriages involved greater exchange of negative affect than happy marriages.

  5. Long-term monitoring for closed sites

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Sedlet, J.; Veluri, V.R.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure is presented for planning and implementing a long-term environmental monitoring program for closed low-level radioactive waste disposal sites. The initial task in this procedure is to collect the available information on the legal/regulatory requirements, site and area characteristics, source term, pathway analysis, and prior monitoring results. This information is coupled with parameters such as half-life and retardation factors to develop a monitoring program. As examples, programs are presented for a site that has had little or no waste migration, and for sites where waste has been moved by suface water, by ground water, and by air. Sampling techniques and practices are discussed relative to how a current program would be structured and projections are made on techniques and practices expected to be available in the future. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Long term evolution of comet Halleys orbit.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, R.; Kribbel, J.

    1987-03-01

    The aim of the paper is to study the long term evolution of comet Halleys orbit taking into account small errors in the initial conditions. Recent papers deal with mapping methods to model cometary dynamics; (e.g. Petrosky and Broucke, 1987 and Chirikov and Vecheslavov, 1986). They will be discussed critically and compared with our own results. We then tested the model using numerical integration methods. For the moment we limited our calculation to 2.105 years, but a 106 year integration is still in progress. We show the expected dynamical evolution of Hallyes orbit taking into account also smaller and larger errors of the initial conditions (nongravitational effects are only roughly estimated). Finally we discuss alsothe controversal opinions concerning the role of the planets (especially the earth).

  7. Long-term control of root growth

    DOEpatents

    Burton, Frederick G.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Cline, John F.; Skiens, W. Eugene

    1992-05-26

    A method and system for long-term control of root growth without killing the plants bearing those roots involves incorporating a 2,6-dinitroaniline in a polymer and disposing the polymer in an area in which root control is desired. This results in controlled release of the substituted aniline herbicide over a period of many years. Herbicides of this class have the property of preventing root elongation without translocating into other parts of the plant. The herbicide may be encapsulated in the polymer or mixed with it. The polymer-herbicide mixture may be formed into pellets, sheets, pipe gaskets, pipes for carrying water, or various other forms. The invention may be applied to other protection of buried hazardous wastes, protection of underground pipes, prevention of root intrusion beneath slabs, the dwarfing of trees or shrubs and other applications. The preferred herbicide is 4-difluoromethyl-N,N-dipropyl-2,6-dinitro-aniline, commonly known as trifluralin.

  8. Energy medicine for long-term disabilities.

    PubMed

    Trieschmann, R B

    1999-01-01

    Energy medicine techniques derive from traditional Chinese medicine and are based upon the concept that health and healing are dependent upon a balance of vital energy, a still mind, and controlled emotions. Physical dysfunctions result from disordered patterns of energy of long standing and reversal of the physical problem requires a return to balanced and ordered energy. Qi Gong (Chi Kung) is a system which teaches an individual to live in a state of energy balance. Shen Qi is a sophisticated form of Qi Gong which relies on no external physical interventions but rather relies on mind control to prevent illness, heal existing physical and emotional problems, and promote health and happiness. This paper will describe the use of these techniques with people who have long-term physical disabilities.

  9. [Enteral nutrition through long-term jejunostomy].

    PubMed

    Fernández, T; Neira, P; Enríquez, C

    2008-01-01

    We present the case of a female patient suffering a peritonitis episode after subtotal gastrectomy due to gastric neoplasm in relation to lesser curvature necrosis extending to the anterior esophageal wall. This an uncommon andsevere complication that made mandatory further aggressive surgery: transection of the abdominal esophagus, transection of the gastric stump, and cervical esophagostomy with creation of a jejunostomy with a needle catheter for feeding. This digestive tube access technique is generally used during major abdominal post-surgery until oral intake is reestablished. Our patient has been 187 days with this therapy since reconstruction of the GI tract was ruled out due to tumoral infiltration of the colon and tumor recurrence at the gastrohepatic omentum. To date, there has been no complication from permanence and/or long-term use of this technique.

  10. Radiation risk during long-term spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. M.

    Cosmonauts` exposure to cosmic rays during long-term spaceflight can cause unfavorable effects in health and risk for the crew members` lives. All unfavorable effects induced by exposure should be taken into consideration for the risk estimation. They should include both the acute deterministic effects and delayed effects called stochastic. On the ground the limitation of unfavorable consequences of acute exposure is achieved by means of establishing dose limits. But in space applications this approach can't be acceptable. Establishing a fixed dose limit is adequate to introducing indefinite reserve coefficient and therefore ineffective usage of spacecraft resource. The method of radiation risk calculation caused by acute and delayed effects of cosmonauts' exposure is discussed and substantiated in the report. Peculiarities of the impact of permanent radiation sources (galactic cosmic rays and trapped radiation) and the variable one (solar cosmic rays) are taken into consideration.

  11. Long-term control of root growth

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, F.G.; Cataldo, D.A.; Cline, J.F.; Skiens, W.E.

    1992-05-26

    A method and system for long-term control of root growth without killing the plants bearing those roots involves incorporating a 2,6-dinitroaniline in a polymer and disposing the polymer in an area in which root control is desired. This results in controlled release of the substituted aniline herbicide over a period of many years. Herbicides of this class have the property of preventing root elongation without translocating into other parts of the plant. The herbicide may be encapsulated in the polymer or mixed with it. The polymer-herbicide mixture may be formed into pellets, sheets, pipe gaskets, pipes for carrying water, or various other forms. The invention may be applied to other protection of buried hazardous wastes, protection of underground pipes, prevention of root intrusion beneath slabs, the dwarfing of trees or shrubs and other applications. The preferred herbicide is 4-difluoromethyl-N,N-dipropyl-2,6-dinitro-aniline, commonly known as trifluralin. 7 figs.

  12. Reducing long-term reservoir performance uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.

    1988-04-01

    Reservoir performance is one of the key issues that have to be addressed before going ahead with the development of a geothermal field. In order to select the type and size of the power plant and design other surface installations, it is necessary to know the characteristics of the production wells and of the produced fluids, and to predict the changes over a 10--30 year period. This is not a straightforward task, as in most cases the calculations have to be made on the basis of data collected before significant fluid volumes have been extracted from the reservoir. The paper describes the methodology used in predicting the long-term performance of hydrothermal systems, as well as DOE/GTD-sponsored research aimed at reducing the uncertainties associated with these predictions. 27 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Radiation risk during long-term spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Petrov, V M

    2002-01-01

    Cosmonauts' exposure to cosmic rays during long-term spaceflight can cause unfavorable effects in health and risk for the crew members' lives. All unfavorable effects induced by exposure should be taken into consideration for the risk estimation. They should include both the acute deterministic effects and delayed effects called stochastic. On the ground the limitation of unfavorable consequences of acute exposure is achieved by means of establishing dose limits. But in space applications this approach can't be acceptable. Establishing a fixed dose limit is adequate to introducing indefinite reserve coefficient and therefore ineffective usage of spacecraft resource. The method of radiation risk calculation caused by acute and delayed effects of cosmonauts' exposure is discussed and substantiated in the report. Peculiarities of the impact of permanent radiation sources (galactic cosmic rays and trapped radiation) and the variable one (solar cosmic rays) are taken into consideration. PMID:12539775

  14. Safety of long-term PPI therapy.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Christina

    2013-06-01

    Proton pump inhibitors have become the mainstay of medical treatment of acid-related disorders. Long-term use is becoming increasingly common, in some cases without a proper indication. A large number of mainly observational studies on a very wide range of possible associations have been published in the past decade and are critically reviewed in this article and the existing evidence is evaluated and translated into possible clinical consequences. Based on the existing evidence the benefits of PPI treatment seem to outweigh potential risks in the large majority of patients especially if PPI use is based on a relevant indication. The concern for complications should primarily be directed at elderly, malnourished with significant co-morbidity. In this population an increased risk for enteric infections, fractures and nutritional deficiencies might have clinical consequences and should lead to a careful evaluation of the indication for PPI treatment. PMID:23998981

  15. Long term performance of radon mitigation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Prill, R.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-03-01

    Researchers installed radon mitigation systems in 12 houses in Spokane, Washington and Coeur d'Alene, Idaho during the heating season 1985--1986 and continued to monitor indoor radon quarterly and annually for ten years. The mitigation systems included active sub-slab ventilation, basement over-pressurization, and crawlspace isolation and ventilation. The occupants reported various operational problems with these early mitigation systems. The long-term radon measurements were essential to track the effectiveness of the mitigation systems over time. All 12 homes were visited during the second year of the study, while a second set 5 homes was visited during the fifth year to determine the cause(s) of increased radon in the homes. During these visits, the mitigation systems were inspected and measurements of system performance were made. Maintenance and modifications were performed to improve system performance in these homes.

  16. Advanced long term cryogenic storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Norman S.

    1987-01-01

    Long term, cryogenic fluid storage facilities will be required to support future space programs such as the space-based Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), Telescopes, and Laser Systems. An orbital liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen storage system with an initial capacity of approximately 200,000 lb will be required. The storage facility tank design must have the capability of fluid acquisition in microgravity and limit cryogen boiloff due to environmental heating. Cryogenic boiloff management features, minimizing Earth-to-orbit transportation costs, will include advanced thick multilayer insulation/integrated vapor cooled shield concepts, low conductance support structures, and refrigeration/reliquefaction systems. Contracted study efforts are under way to develop storage system designs, technology plans, test article hardware designs, and develop plans for ground/flight testing.

  17. Managing Records for the Long Term - 12363

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, John V.; Gueretta, Jeanie

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for managing vast amounts of information documenting historical and current operations. This information is critical to the operations of the DOE Office of Legacy Management. Managing legacy records and information is challenging in terms of accessibility and changing technology. The Office of Legacy Management is meeting these challenges by making records and information management an organizational priority. The Office of Legacy Management mission is to manage DOE post-closure responsibilities at former Cold War weapons sites to ensure the future protection of human health and the environment. These responsibilities include environmental stewardship and long-term preservation and management of operational and environmental cleanup records associated with each site. A primary organizational goal for the Office of Legacy Management is to 'Preserve, Protect, and Share Records and Information'. Managing records for long-term preservation is an important responsibility. Adequate and dedicated resources and management support are required to perform this responsibility successfully. Records tell the story of an organization and may be required to defend an organization in court, provide historical information, identify lessons learned, or provide valuable information for researchers. Loss of records or the inability to retrieve records because of poor records management processes can have serious consequences and even lead to an organisation's downfall. Organizations must invest time and resources to establish a good records management program because of its significance to the organization as a whole. The Office of Legacy Management will continue to research and apply innovative ways of doing business to ensure that the organization stays at the forefront of effective records and information management. DOE is committed to preserving records that document our nation's Cold War legacy, and the Office of Legacy

  18. Long-term dynamics of Typha populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grace, J.B.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1998-01-01

    The zonation of Typha populations in an experimental pond in Michigan was re-examined 15 years after the original sampling to gain insight into the long-term dynamics. Current distributions of Typha populations were also examined in additional experimental ponds at the site that have been maintained for 23 years. The zonation between T. latifolia and T. angustifolia in the previously studied pond 15 years after the initial sampling revealed that the density and distribution of shoots had not changed significantly. Thus, it appears that previously reported results (based on 7- year old populations) have remained consistent over time. Additional insight into the interaction between these two taxa was sought by comparing mixed and monoculture stands in five experimental ponds that have remained undisturbed for their 23-year history. The maximum depth of T. latifolia, the shallow- water species, was not significantly reduced when growing in the presence of the more flood tolerant T. angustifolia. In contrast, the minimum depth of T. angustifolia was reduced from 0 to 37 cm when in the presence of T. latifolia. When total populations were compared between monoculture and mixed stands, the average density of T. angustifolia shoots was 59.4 percent lower in mixed stands while the density of T. latifolia was 32 percent lower, with T. angustifolia most affected at shallow depths (reduced by 92 percent) and T. latifolia most affected at the deepest depths (reduced by 60 percent). These long-term observations indicate that competitive displacement between Typha taxa has remained stable over time.

  19. Long-term effects of dynamic aortomyoplasty.

    PubMed

    Chachques, J C; Haab, F; Cron, C; Fischer, E C; Grandjean, P; Bruneval, P; Acar, C; Jebara, V A; Fontaliran, F; Carpentier, A F

    1994-07-01

    Aortomyoplasty consists of wrapping the latissimus dorsi muscle (LDM) around the ascending aorta and electrostimulating it during diastole. The ascending aorta will act as an ectopic neo-ventricle compressed during diastole, thus reproducing the effects of long-term diastolic counterpulsation. In 5 goats, the right LDM was transferred to the thoracic cavity after removal of the second rib. The ascending aorta was enlarged by a pericardial patch and wrapped with the LDM. Postoperative electrostimulation was delivered in a counterpulsating manner. Hemodynamic studies were performed at 12 and 24 months postoperatively. Percent increase in the subendocardial viability index (diastolic pressure-time index/systolic tension-time index) was calculated using unassisted and assisted cardiac cycles with the stimulator off versus the stimulator on at a 1:1 ratio in the basal state and after acute heart failure was induced by the administration of high doses of propranolol hydrochloride. Diastolic counterpulsation of the ascending aorta resulted in significant improvement in the subendocardial viability index long term, both in basal state conditions and after induced cardiac failure. During heart failure, aortomyoplasty increased the cardiac output and decreased systemic vascular resistance. Histopathologic studies up to 24 months showed preservation of the histologic structure of the aortic wall and no evidence of thromboembolism. Tight adhesions developed between the aortic wall (including the pericardial patch) and the LDM. The diameters of the enlarged aortas showed no significant differences compared with diameters immediately postoperatively. In conclusion, aortomyoplasty produces chronic diastolic augmentation with preservation of aortic structure. After induction of heart failure, aortomyoplasty offers efficient circulatory support.

  20. Short- and Long-Term Propagation of Spacecraft Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, John C., Jr.; Sweetser, Theodore; Chung, Min-Kun; Yen, Chen-Wan L.; Roncoli, Ralph B.; Kwok, Johnny H.; Vincent, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    The Planetary Observer Planning Software (POPS) comprises four computer programs for use in designing orbits of spacecraft about planets. These programs are the Planetary Observer High Precision Orbit Propagator (POHOP), the Planetary Observer Long-Term Orbit Predictor (POLOP), the Planetary Observer Post Processor (POPP), and the Planetary Observer Plotting (POPLOT) program. POHOP and POLOP integrate the equations of motion to propagate an initial set of classical orbit elements to a future epoch. POHOP models shortterm (one revolution) orbital motion; POLOP averages out the short-term behavior but requires far less processing time than do older programs that perform long-term orbit propagations. POPP postprocesses the spacecraft ephemeris created by POHOP or POLOP (or optionally can use a less accurate internal ephemeris) to search for trajectory-related geometric events including, for example, rising or setting of a spacecraft as observed from a ground site. For each such event, POPP puts out such user-specified data as the time, elevation, and azimuth. POPLOT is a graphics program that plots data generated by POPP. POPLOT can plot orbit ground tracks on a world map and can produce a variety of summaries and generic ordinate-vs.-abscissa plots of any POPP data.

  1. Preeclampsia: long-term consequences for vascular health

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Lorena M; Cunningham, Mark W; Cornelius, Denise C; LaMarca, Babbette

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific syndrome and one of the leading causes of preterm birth, neonatal and maternal morbidity and mortality. This disease is characterized by new onset hypertension usually in the third trimester of pregnancy and is sometimes associated with proteinuria, although proteinuria is not a requirement for the diagnosis of PE. In developing countries, women have a higher risk of death due to PE than more affluent countries and one of the most frequent causes of death is high blood pressure and stroke. Although PE only affects approximately 2%–8% of pregnancies worldwide it is associated with severe complications such as eclampsia, hemorrhagic stroke, hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets (HELLP syndrome), renal failure and pulmonary edema. Importantly, there is no “cure” for the disease except for early delivery of the baby and placenta, leaving PE a health care risk for babies born from PE moms. In addition, PE is linked to the development of cardiovascular disease and stroke in women after reproductive age, leaving PE a risk factor for long-term health in women. This review will highlight factors implicated in the pathophysiology of PE that may contribute to long-term effects in women with preeclamptic pregnancies. PMID:26203257

  2. Preeclampsia: long-term consequences for vascular health.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Lorena M; Cunningham, Mark W; Cornelius, Denise C; LaMarca, Babbette

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific syndrome and one of the leading causes of preterm birth, neonatal and maternal morbidity and mortality. This disease is characterized by new onset hypertension usually in the third trimester of pregnancy and is sometimes associated with proteinuria, although proteinuria is not a requirement for the diagnosis of PE. In developing countries, women have a higher risk of death due to PE than more affluent countries and one of the most frequent causes of death is high blood pressure and stroke. Although PE only affects approximately 2%-8% of pregnancies worldwide it is associated with severe complications such as eclampsia, hemorrhagic stroke, hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets (HELLP syndrome), renal failure and pulmonary edema. Importantly, there is no "cure" for the disease except for early delivery of the baby and placenta, leaving PE a health care risk for babies born from PE moms. In addition, PE is linked to the development of cardiovascular disease and stroke in women after reproductive age, leaving PE a risk factor for long-term health in women. This review will highlight factors implicated in the pathophysiology of PE that may contribute to long-term effects in women with preeclamptic pregnancies. PMID:26203257

  3. Financing Long Term Care. Selected Topics in Long Term Care. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Jay; Doth, David

    This document, one in a series developed to provide technical assistance to 22 Long-Term Care Gerontology Centers, is designed to be a financial resource guide. Current major funding sources are detailed, followed by an examination of the issues and problems associated with current financing systems. Programmatic issues associated with Medicare…

  4. Long-term potentiation and long-term depression: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Timothy V.P.; Cooke, Sam F

    2011-01-01

    Long-term potentiation and long-term depression are enduring changes in synaptic strength, induced by specific patterns of synaptic activity, that have received much attention as cellular models of information storage in the central nervous system. Work in a number of brain regions, from the spinal cord to the cerebral cortex, and in many animal species, ranging from invertebrates to humans, has demonstrated a reliable capacity for chemical synapses to undergo lasting changes in efficacy in response to a variety of induction protocols. In addition to their physiological relevance, long-term potentiation and depression may have important clinical applications. A growing insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes, and technological advances in non-invasive manipulation of brain activity, now puts us at the threshold of harnessing long-term potentiation and depression and other forms of synaptic, cellular and circuit plasticity to manipulate synaptic strength in the human nervous system. Drugs may be used to erase or treat pathological synaptic states and non-invasive stimulation devices may be used to artificially induce synaptic plasticity to ameliorate conditions arising from disrupted synaptic drive. These approaches hold promise for the treatment of a variety of neurological conditions, including neuropathic pain, epilepsy, depression, amblyopia, tinnitus and stroke. PMID:21779718

  5. Composition and decomposition of soybean and sorghum tissues grown under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, F.P.; Wood, C.W.; Rogers, H.H.; Runion, G.B.; Prior, S.A.

    1996-07-01

    It has been hypothesized that changes in both quantity and quality of plant residue inputs to soils as atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentration increases may alter carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) turnover rates and pool sizes. We determined the effect of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on plant tissue quality, and how modifications in tissue quality affect C and N mineralization. Soybean and sorghum were grown under elevated (704.96 {plus_minus} 0.33 {mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup {minus}1}) and ambient (357.44 {plus_minus} 0.12 {mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup {minus}1}) atmospheric CO{sub 2} in open-top chambers. Leaf and stem tissues were separated form harvested plants and analyzed for C,N, lignin, and cellulose. Tissues were applied to Norfolk loamy sand (fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic Typic Kandiudult) and aerobically incubated for 70-d to determine C and N mineralization, C turnover, relative N mineralization, and C/N mineralized. Elevated CO{sub 2} had no effect on plant residue C concentration, but N concentration of soybean leaves and stems and sorghum stems was reduced; however, CO{sub 2} enrichment increased C/N ratio and lignin concentration for only sorghum stems and soybean leaves, respectively. Source of plant residue (i.e., produced under either elevated or ambient CO{sub 2}) had no impact on soil C turnover, relative N mineralization, cumulative C and N mineralization, and C/N mineralized. These data suggest that increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} will have little effect on composition or decomposition of field crop residues. Thus, since CO{sub 2} enrichment results in increased photosynthetic C fixation, the possibility exists for increased soil C storage under field crops in an elevated CO{sub 2} world. 29 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and leaf litter chemistry: Influences on microbial respiration and net nitrogen mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Randlett, D.L.; Zak, D.R.; Pregitzer, K.S.; Curtis, P.S.

    1996-09-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} has the potential to influence rates of C and N cycling in terrestrial ecosystems by altering plant litter chemistry and slowing rates of organic matter decomposition. We tested the hypothesis that the chemistry of leaf litter produced at elevated CO{sub 2} would slow C and N transformations in soil. Soils were amended with Populus leaf produced under two levels of atmospheric CO{sub 2} (ambient and twice-ambient) and soil N availability (low and high). Kinetic parameters for microbial respiration and net N mineralization were determined on soil with and without litter during a 32-wk lab incubation. Product accumulation curves for CO{sub 2}-C and inorganic N were fit to a first order rate equation [y=A(1-e{sup -kt})] using nonlinear regression analyses. Although CO{sub 2} treatment affected soluble sugar concentration in leaf litter (ambient =120 g kg{sup -1}, elevated =130 g kg{sup -1}), it did not affect starch concentration or C/N ratio. Microbial respiration, microbial biomass, and leaf litter C/N ratio were affected by soil N availability but not by atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Net N mineralization was a linear function of time and was not significantly different for leaves grown at ambient (50 mg N kg{sup -1}) and elevated CO{sub 2} (35 mg N kg{sup -1}). Consequently, we found no evidence for the hypothesis that leaf litter produced at elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} will dampen the rates of C and N cycling in soil. 35 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. The Geomagnetic Control Concept of The Ionospheric Long- Term Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, A. V.

    The geomagnetic control concept has been developed to explain long-term trends of the electron concentration in the F2 and E ionospheric regions. Periods with negative and positive foF2, hmF2 and foE trends correspond to the periods of increasing or decreasing geomagnetic activity with the turning points around the end of 1950s, 1960s, and 1980s where trends change their signs. Strong latitudinal and diurnal variations revealed for the foF2 and hmF2 trends can be explained by neutral composition, temperature and thermospheric wind changes. Particle precipitation is important in the auroral zone. The newly proposed concept proceeds from a natural origin of the F2-layer trends rather than an artificial one related to the greenhouse effect. Using the proposed method a very long-term foF2 and foE trends related with general increase of geomagnetic activity in the 20th century has been revealed for the first time. The firstly revealed relationship of the foE trends with geomagnetic activity is due to nitric oxide variations at the E-region heights. This "natural" relationship of the foE trends with geomagnetic activity breaks down around 1970 on many stations presumably due to chemical polution of the upper atmosphere. The increasing rate of rocket and satellite launchings in the late 1960s is considered as a reason.

  8. Long-term observations of tropospheric NO2 from satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Andreas; Hilboll, Andreas; Noguchi, Katsuyuki; Leitao, Joana; Burrows, John P.

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2 ) are key species in atmospheric chemistry. Together with volatile organic compounds they determine the amount of ozone present in the troposphere. Through the formation of nitric acid they are involved in acid rain formation and in addition they contribute to radiative forcing both directly and indirectly. As nitrogen dioxide adversely affects human health it is also regulated by environmental laws. While ground-based networks provide long-term data of surface concentrations of nitrogen oxides at high temporal resolution in many countries, truly global observations can only be performed from space. By using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method on spectrally resolved UV/vis measurements of scattered sunlight, column amounts of NO2 can be determined from nadir satellite observations. With additional assumptions on stratospheric NO2 and the radiative transfer, the tropospheric NO2 amounts can be retrieved. In this work, satellite observations of NO2 from several sensors (GOME, SCIAMACHY, OMI, and GOME-2) are used to study the long-term evolution of tropospheric NO2 amounts on a global scale. A particular focus is on the comparison of results retrieved from the different sensors in times of overlapping measurements and the degree of consistency achieved in regions of both large and small pollution signals. The effects of sampling statistics, time of overpass and spatial resolution are discussed as well as the influence of clouds.

  9. Global Horizontal Irradiance Anomalies in Long Term Series Over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cony, Marco; Liria, Juan; Weisenberg, Ralf; Serrano, Enrique

    2014-05-01

    India has a high potential for solar energy applications due to its geographic position within the Sun Belt and the large number of cloudless days in many regions of the country. However, certain regions of India, particularly those largely populated, can exhibit large aerosol loading in the atmosphere as a consequence of anthropogenic emissions that could have a negative feedback in the solar resource potential. This effect, named as solar dimming, has already been observed in India, and in some other regions in the world, by some authors using ground data from the last two decades. The recent interest in the promotion of solar energy applications in India highlights the need of extending and improving the knowledge of the solar radiation resources in this country, since most of the long term measurements available correspond to global horizontal radiation (GHI) and most of them are also located big cities or highly populated areas. In addition, accurate knowledge on the aerosol column quantification and on its dynamical behavior with high spatial resolution is particularly important in the case of India, due to their impact on direct normal irradiation. Long term studies of solar irradiation over India can be performed using monthly means of GHI measurements from the Indian Meteorological Department. Ground data are available from 1964 till today through the World Radiation Data Centre that publish these values in the web. This work shows a long term analysis of GHI using anomalies techniques over ten different sites over India. Besides, techniques of linear trends have been applied for to show the evolution over this period. The analysis of anomalies has also found two periods of different behavior. From 1964 till 1988 the anomalies observed were positive and the last 20 years seems to be a period of negative anomalies. The results exhibit a decreasing trend and negative anomalies confirming thus the darkening effect already reported by solar dimming studies

  10. Sodium tetraphenylborate solution stability: A long term study

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.

    1992-06-11

    Sodium tetraphenylborata (NaTPB) is a specialty chemical required for the In Tank Precipitation Process (ITP). It precipitates cesium, aiding in the decontamination of high level radioactive waste solutions. Long term stability of aqueous alkaline solutions of NATPB has been investigated. The focus of the investigation is on the relative stabilities of NATPB solutions exposed to varying temperatures and copper concentrations over an extended period of time. Additionally, vendor-supplied samples, incubated at 40{degree}C, were stored for more than a year without decomposing. Collected data demonstrates that in the absence of elevated copper concentrations, NATPB solutions will remain stable for periods of 1 to 2 years (at a minimum) at maximum expected operating conditions (<40{degree}C). Additionally, biuret, (H{sub 2}NCO){sub 2}NH, was tested as an additive to prevent copper-induced decomposition without success.

  11. Sodium tetraphenylborate solution stability: A long term study

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.

    1992-06-11

    Sodium tetraphenylborata (NaTPB) is a specialty chemical required for the In Tank Precipitation Process (ITP). It precipitates cesium, aiding in the decontamination of high level radioactive waste solutions. Long term stability of aqueous alkaline solutions of NATPB has been investigated. The focus of the investigation is on the relative stabilities of NATPB solutions exposed to varying temperatures and copper concentrations over an extended period of time. Additionally, vendor-supplied samples, incubated at 40[degree]C, were stored for more than a year without decomposing. Collected data demonstrates that in the absence of elevated copper concentrations, NATPB solutions will remain stable for periods of 1 to 2 years (at a minimum) at maximum expected operating conditions (<40[degree]C). Additionally, biuret, (H[sub 2]NCO)[sub 2]NH, was tested as an additive to prevent copper-induced decomposition without success.

  12. LONG-TERM MONITORING SENSOR NETWORK

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen P. Farrington; John W. Haas; Neal Van Wyck

    2003-10-16

    Long-term monitoring (LTM) associated with subsurface contamination sites is a key element of Long Term Stewardship and Legacy Management across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. However, both within the DOE and elsewhere, LTM is an expensive endeavor, often exceeding the costs of the remediation phase of a clean-up project. The primary contributors to LTM costs are associated with labor. Sample collection, storage, preparation, analysis, and reporting can add a significant financial burden to project expense when extended over many years. Development of unattended, in situ monitoring networks capable of providing quantitative data satisfactory to regulatory concerns has the potential to significantly reduce LTM costs. But survival and dependable operation in a difficult environment is a common obstacle to widespread use across the DOE complex or elsewhere. Deploying almost any sensor in the subsurface for extended periods of time will expose it to chemical and microbial degradation. Over the time-scales required for in situ LTM, even the most advanced sensor systems may be rendered useless. Frequent replacement or servicing (cleaning) of sensors is expensive and labor intensive, offsetting most, if not all, of the cost savings realized with unattended, in situ sensors. To enable facile, remote monitoring of contaminants and other subsurface parameters over prolonged periods, Applied Research Associates, Inc has been working to develop an advanced LTM sensor network consisting of three key elements: (1) an anti-fouling sensor chamber that can accommodate a variety of chemical and physical measurement devices based on electrochemical, optical and other techniques; (2) two rapid, cost effective, and gentle means of emplacing sensor packages either at precise locations directly in the subsurface or in pre-existing monitoring wells; and (3) a web browser-based data acquisition and control system (WebDACS) utilizing field-networked microprocessor-controlled smart

  13. Treatment for childhood cancer -- long-term risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000849.htm Treatment for childhood cancer - long-term risks To use the sharing features on ... has. Being aware of your child's risk of long-term health problems can help you follow-up ...

  14. Effect of elevated atmospheric CO/sub 2/ on plant communities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bazzaz, F.A.

    1984-10-01

    We have studied the effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide on communities of colonizing annual plants, crop plants, and deciduous forest trees. We observe differential effects on different species with regard to growth, biomass, phenology, resource allocation, photosynthesis, water-use efficiency, flowering, and fruiting. We conclude that competitive relations among plants are likely to change as global atmospheric CO/sub 2/ increases, and that therefore there will be longterm changes in the composition of natural communities. More research will be necessary before any but the very broadest conclusions can be made about what direction these community changes are likely to take. 10 references, 9 figures.

  15. Short-term cognitive-behavioral therapy for binge eating disorder: long-term efficacy and predictors of long-term treatment success.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sophia; Meyer, Andrea H; Dremmel, Daniela; Schlup, Barbara; Munsch, Simone

    2014-07-01

    The present study evaluates the long-term efficacy (four years after treatment) of a short-term Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment (CBT) of Binge Eating Disorder (BED). We examined patient characteristics, mostly measured at the end of treatment, for their predictive value of long-term success. Forty-one BED-patients between 18 and 70 years took part in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) for a short-term treatment and were evaluated until 4 years after treatment. Assessments comprised structured interviews on comorbid mental disorder/eating disorder pathology and questionnaires on eating disorder pathology/general psychopathology. BED core symptoms and associated psychopathology improved substantially during treatment phase and further improved or at least remained stable during the follow-up period. End of treatment predictors for long term success were elevated weight and eating concern and higher frequency of objective binges. Tailoring additional interventions to patients' individual needs could further improve treatment efficacy.

  16. Intermediate- and long-term earthquake prediction.

    PubMed

    Sykes, L R

    1996-04-30

    Progress in long- and intermediate-term earthquake prediction is reviewed emphasizing results from California. Earthquake prediction as a scientific discipline is still in its infancy. Probabilistic estimates that segments of several faults in California will be the sites of large shocks in the next 30 years are now generally accepted and widely used. Several examples are presented of changes in rates of moderate-size earthquakes and seismic moment release on time scales of a few to 30 years that occurred prior to large shocks. A distinction is made between large earthquakes that rupture the entire downdip width of the outer brittle part of the earth's crust and small shocks that do not. Large events occur quasi-periodically in time along a fault segment and happen much more often than predicted from the rates of small shocks along that segment. I am moderately optimistic about improving predictions of large events for time scales of a few to 30 years although little work of that type is currently underway in the United States. Precursory effects, like the changes in stress they reflect, should be examined from a tensorial rather than a scalar perspective. A broad pattern of increased numbers of moderate-size shocks in southern California since 1986 resembles the pattern in the 25 years before the great 1906 earthquake. Since it may be a long-term precursor to a great event on the southern San Andreas fault, that area deserves detailed intensified study.

  17. Transuranic waste: long-term planning

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.C.

    1985-07-01

    Societal concerns for the safe handling and disposal of toxic waste are behind many of the regulations and the control measures in effect today. Transuranic waste, a specific category of toxic (radioactive) waste, serves as a good example of how regulations and controls impact changes in waste processing - and vice versa. As problems would arise with waste processing, changes would be instituted. These changes improved techniques for handling and disposal of transuranic waste, reduced the risk of breached containment, and were usually linked with regulatory changes. Today, however, we face a greater public awareness of and concern for toxic waste control; thus, we must anticipate potential problems and work on resolving them before they can become real problems. System safety analyses are valuable aids in long-term planning for operations involving transuranic as well as other toxic materials. Examples of specific system safety analytical methods demonstrate how problems can be anticipated and resolution initiated in a timely manner having minimal impacts upon allocation of resource and operational goals. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Long-term data storage in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Dhomkar, Siddharth; Henshaw, Jacob; Jayakumar, Harishankar; Meriles, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen vacancy (NV−) center in diamond is the focus of widespread attention for applications ranging from quantum information processing to nanoscale metrology. Although most work so far has focused on the NV− optical and spin properties, control of the charge state promises complementary opportunities. One intriguing possibility is the long-term storage of information, a notion we hereby introduce using NV-rich, type 1b diamond. As a proof of principle, we use multicolor optical microscopy to read, write, and reset arbitrary data sets with two-dimensional (2D) binary bit density comparable to present digital-video-disk (DVD) technology. Leveraging on the singular dynamics of NV− ionization, we encode information on different planes of the diamond crystal with no cross-talk, hence extending the storage capacity to three dimensions. Furthermore, we correlate the center’s charge state and the nuclear spin polarization of the nitrogen host and show that the latter is robust to a cycle of NV− ionization and recharge. In combination with super-resolution microscopy techniques, these observations provide a route toward subdiffraction NV charge control, a regime where the storage capacity could exceed present technologies.

  19. Long-term adequacy of metal resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Although the earth's crust contains vast quantities of metals, extraction technologies and associated costs are inextricably bound to three fundamental geological factors - the amount of metal available in the earth's crust in each range of grades, the mineralogical form and chemical state of the metal, and the spatial distribution of the metal. The energy required to recover a given amount of metal increases substantially as grade declines. Most metal is produced from sulphide or oxide minerals, whereas most metal in the crust may be locked in the structures of the more refractory silicates. Recovery from silicate minerals could require orders of magnitude more energy than that used at present as also could exploitation of small, widely scattered or thin, deeply buried deposits. Although specific information on the fundamental factors is not available, each factor must in turn tend to further restrict exploitation. Independence of average grade and tonnage for many deposit types further reduces the availability of rock as a source of metal. In the long term, effects of these factors will be large increases in price for many metals. ?? 1977.

  20. Intermediate- and long-term earthquake prediction.

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, L R

    1996-01-01

    Progress in long- and intermediate-term earthquake prediction is reviewed emphasizing results from California. Earthquake prediction as a scientific discipline is still in its infancy. Probabilistic estimates that segments of several faults in California will be the sites of large shocks in the next 30 years are now generally accepted and widely used. Several examples are presented of changes in rates of moderate-size earthquakes and seismic moment release on time scales of a few to 30 years that occurred prior to large shocks. A distinction is made between large earthquakes that rupture the entire downdip width of the outer brittle part of the earth's crust and small shocks that do not. Large events occur quasi-periodically in time along a fault segment and happen much more often than predicted from the rates of small shocks along that segment. I am moderately optimistic about improving predictions of large events for time scales of a few to 30 years although little work of that type is currently underway in the United States. Precursory effects, like the changes in stress they reflect, should be examined from a tensorial rather than a scalar perspective. A broad pattern of increased numbers of moderate-size shocks in southern California since 1986 resembles the pattern in the 25 years before the great 1906 earthquake. Since it may be a long-term precursor to a great event on the southern San Andreas fault, that area deserves detailed intensified study. Images Fig. 1 PMID:11607658

  1. Long-term corrosion testing pan.

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R.

    2008-08-01

    This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing needs. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to meet all future testing needs, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2007-7027 to address DOE comments and add a series of tests to address NWTRB recommendations.

  2. Long-term corrosion testing plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R.

    2009-02-01

    This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing program. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to accommodate all future testing, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2008-4922 to address DOE comments.

  3. Long-term plutonium storage: Design concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkey, D.D.; Wood, W.T.; Guenther, C.D.

    1994-08-01

    An important part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Weapons Complex Reconfiguration (WCR) Program is the development of facilities for long-term storage of plutonium. The WCR design goals are to provide storage for metals, oxides, pits, and fuel-grade plutonium, including material being held as part of the Strategic Reserve and excess material. Major activities associated with plutonium storage are sorting the plutonium inventory, material handling and storage support, shipping and receiving, and surveillance of material in storage for both safety evaluations and safeguards and security. A variety of methods for plutonium storage have been used, both within the DOE weapons complex and by external organizations. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of proposed storage concepts based upon functional criteria. The concepts discussed include floor wells, vertical and horizontal sleeves, warehouse storage on vertical racks, and modular storage units. Issues/factors considered in determining a preferred design include operational efficiency, maintenance and repair, environmental impact, radiation and criticality safety, safeguards and security, heat removal, waste minimization, international inspection requirements, and construction and operational costs.

  4. Long-term predictions using natural analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    One of the unique and scientifically most challenging aspects of nuclear waste isolation is the extrapolation of short-term laboratory data (hours to years) to the long time periods (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} years) required by regulatory agencies for performance assessment. The direct validation of these extrapolations is not possible, but methods must be developed to demonstrate compliance with government regulations and to satisfy the lay public that there is a demonstrable and reasonable basis for accepting the long-term extrapolations. Natural systems (e.g., {open_quotes}natural analogues{close_quotes}) provide perhaps the only means of partial {open_quotes}validation,{close_quotes} as well as data that may be used directly in the models that are used in the extrapolation. Natural systems provide data on very large spatial (nm to km) and temporal (10{sup 3}-10{sup 8} years) scales and in highly complex terranes in which unknown synergisms may affect radionuclide migration. This paper reviews the application (and most importantly, the limitations) of data from natural analogue systems to the {open_quotes}validation{close_quotes} of performance assessments.

  5. The long-term variability of Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkovskaya, V.; Plachinda, S.; Valyavin, G.; Baklanova, D.; Lee, B.-C.

    2011-12-01

    Over the time of 60 years Vega (α Lyrae = HD 172167, A0V) has been generally accepted as a standard star in the near-infrared, optical, and ultraviolet regions. But is the spectrophotometric standard Vega really non-variable star? Researchers give very different answers to this question. We aim to search a periodicity in our results of spectropolarimetric study of Vega, namely periodic variations in equivalent width of the spectral lines and longitudinal magnetic field measurements. High-accuracy spectropolarimetric observations of Vega have been performed during 26 nights from 1997 to 2010 using the Coudé spectrograph of the 2.6-m Shain reflector at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (CrAO, Ukraine) and during 4 nights in 2007 and 2008 using the echelle spectrograph BOES at the Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (BOAO, South Korea). The long-term (year-to-year) variability of Vega was confirmed. It was concluded that this variability does not have magnetic nature. The paper is dedicated to the memory of V.P. Merezhin.

  6. Long-term potentiation: peeling the onion.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, Roger A; Roche, Katherine W

    2013-11-01

    Since the discovery of long-term potentiation (LTP), thousands of papers have been published on this phenomenon. With this massive amount of information, it is often difficult, especially for someone not directly involved in the field, not to be overwhelmed. The goal of this review is to peel away as many layers as possible, and probe the core properties of LTP. We would argue that the many dozens of proteins that have been implicated in the phenomenon are not essential, but rather modulate, often in indirect ways, the threshold and/or magnitude of LTP. What is required is NMDA receptor activation followed by CaMKII activation. The consequence of CaMKII activation is the rapid recruitment of AMPA receptors to the synapse. This recruitment is independent of AMPA receptor subunit type, but absolutely requires an adequate pool of surface receptors. An important unresolved issue is how exactly CaMKII activation leads to modifications in the PSD to allow rapid enrichment. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Glutamate Receptor-Dependent Synaptic Plasticity'. PMID:23439383

  7. Long-term observations of siamang behaviour.

    PubMed

    Chivers, D J; Raemaekers, J J; Aldrich-Blake, F P

    1975-01-01

    Long-term observations are presented on the behaviour of the siamang ape, Symphalangus syndactylus, in the lowland forest of central Malaya. The data were collected during two dry and three fruiting seasons between 1969 and 1973 inclusive on two groups with adjacent ranges; comparisons are made within and between sample periods, and between groups. The influence of weather on daily activities is considered. Food intake is analysed in terms of number of food trees, number of visits to these trees, and the cumulative time spent feeding on various food categories. Ranging behaviour is investigated in terms of distance travelled, area covered, and distribution of time and of food trees about the range. The occurrence of calling is described and compared with that of the white-handed gibbon in the same area. A discussion ensues on each of these aspects of behaviour in turn. Emphasis is laid on the similarity of behaviour of the two groups at any one time, and on the degree of their response to the fluctuations of environment variables. Finally, the application to siamang of ranging concepts currently used in animal behaviour is considered briefly.

  8. Long-Term Consequences of Neonatal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The maturation of the central nervous system’s (CNS’s) sensory connectivity is driven by modality-specific sensory input in early life. For the somatosensory system, this input is the physical, tactile interaction with the environment. Nociceptive circuitry is functioning at the time of birth; however, there is still considerable organization and refinement of this circuitry that occurs postnatally, before full discrimination of tactile and noxious input is possible. This fine-tuning involves separation of tactile and nociceptive afferent input to the spinal cord’s dorsal horn and the maturation of local and descending inhibitory circuitry. Disruption of that input in early postnatal life (for example, by tissue injury or other noxious stimulus), can have a profound influence on subsequent development, and consequently the mature functioning of pain systems. In this review, the impact of neonatal surgical incision on nociceptive circuitry is discussed in terms of the underlying developmental neurobiology. The changes are complex, occurring at multiple anatomical sites within the CNS, and including both neuronal and glial cell populations. The altered sensory input from neonatal injury selectively modulates neuronal excitability within the spinal cord, disrupts inhibitory control, and primes the immune system, all of which contribute to the adverse long-term consequences of early pain exposure. PMID:26174217

  9. Long-term outcome in aqueductal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Villani, R; Tomei, G; Gaini, S M; Grimoldi, N; Spagnoli, D; Bello, L

    1995-03-01

    In this study, 78 patients with aqueductal stenosis were submitted to detailed neurodevelopmental assessment with a follow-up of 5-25 years. Sixty-eight percent of patients were categorized as normal; they either attended normal school courses or had regular jobs. Among these, 34% had some motor abnormalities (ataxia, mild hemiparesis, visual disturbances). Twenty-four percent (19 cases) were moderately disabled (trainable retardation) and 8% (6 cases) were severely handicapped. Epilepsy was observed in 13% of the cases. Incidence of recurrent and generalized seizures paralleled neurodevelopmental outcome (5% in normal, 16% in moderately disabled and 50% in severely disabled patients). Endocrine dysfunctions were evident in 28% of the cases and were characterized by precocious or delayed puberty, amenorrhea and somatic underdevelopment. No patient with ventricular enlargement and a cortical mantle width below 20 mm showed a good outcome. Large ventricles were compatible with normal mental development when compensated with a corresponding cranial vault enlargement. In patients with normal mental status and motor abnormalities, long-term CT scan findings revealed the presence of focal brain abnormalities (poroencephaly, brain atrophy, calcifications, extracerebral collections). PMID:7773981

  10. Long-term oxygen therapy: battling breathlessness.

    PubMed

    Wick, Jeannette Y

    2012-12-01

    Approximately 1 million of the 1.4 million Americans (71%) receiving long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) are Medicare beneficiaries, confirming that LTOT is most often prescribed for individuals 65 years of age or older. Although several conditions create a need for supplemental oxygen, the majority of patients have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). People with healthy lungs can extract the oxygen from air, while those with damaged lungs need higher oxygen concentrations. They can supplement their oxygen using one of three options: high-pressure oxygen tanks, liquid oxygen, or oxygen concentrators. The multicenter Nocturnal Oxygen Therapy Trial and the smaller Medical Research Council study identified LTOT as an intervention that improved survival in patients with COPD or chronic respiratory failure, approximately doubling survival at 19 months in patients who were adherent to oxygen. Despite its advantages, LTOT is plagued with problems: compliance with clinical guidelines, patient adherence, and cost. Fires associated with smoking in the vicinity of supplemental oxygen are the leading cause of residential fire deaths in the United States.

  11. Neurological long term consequences of deep diving.

    PubMed

    Todnem, K; Nyland, H; Skeidsvoll, H; Svihus, R; Rinck, P; Kambestad, B K; Riise, T; Aarli, J A

    1991-04-01

    Forty commercial saturation divers, mean age 34.9 (range 24-49) years, were examined one to seven years after their last deep dive (190-500 metres of seawater). Four had by then lost their divers' licence because of neurological problems. Twenty seven (68%) had been selected by neurological examination and electroencephalography before the deep dives. The control group consisted of 100 men, mean age 34.0 (range 22-48) years. The divers reported significantly more symptoms from the nervous system. Concentration difficulties and paraesthesia in feet and hands were common. They had more abnormal neurological findings by neurological examination compatible with dysfunction in the lumbar spinal cord or roots. They also had a larger proportion of abnormal electroencephalograms than the controls. The neurological symptoms and findings were highly significantly correlated with exposure to deep diving (depth included), but even more significantly correlated to air and saturation diving and prevalence of decompression sickness. Visual evoked potentials, brainstem auditory evoked potentials, and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain did not show more abnormal findings in the divers. Four (10%) divers had had episodes of cerebral dysfunction during or after the dives; two had had seizures, one had had transitory cerebral ischaemia and one had had transitory global amnesia. It is concluded that deep diving may have a long term effect on the nervous system of the divers.

  12. Long Term Storage of Lyophilized Liposomal Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Payton, N.M.; Wempe, M.F.; Xu, Y.; Anchordoquy, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Because aqueous liposomal formulations containing multiply unsaturated lipids are susceptible to chemical degradation, these formulations are often lyophilized. Despite their limited chemical stability, interest in the use of multiply unsaturated lipids to promote intracellular delivery has increased considerably in recent years. The goal of the current study was to examine the long term storage stability of lyophilized formulations containing lipids with increasing levels of unsaturation, and various strategies which can be employed to improve stability. Aqueous lipid-trehalose formulations containing 1,2-dilinolenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC), 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLinPC) or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) were lyophilized and stored at temperatures ranging from 4°C to 60°C. We observed that the lipid degradation rate increased as the storage temperature and unsaturation level were increased. Even the cleanest sugars which are available commercially contain iron contaminants, and it was observed that the chelation of these iron contaminants significantly improved the stability of DLPC during storage. However, the glass transition temperature of the sugar which was included in the formulation, the reduction of the oxygen in the aqueous sample prior to lyophilization, the inclusion of helper lipids (i.e., cholesterol), and the rate of freezing did not significantly improve stability. PMID:25308534

  13. Long-term behavior of ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Anson, D.; Ramesh, K.S.

    1992-02-19

    This topical report has been prepared in response to the need to address the question of long term durability of high-strength structural ceramic materials. In a new project to demonstrate the use of such materials as replacements for metals in the hot gas path of industrial gas turbines, the longest projected test bed run will be 1000 hours. Creep in ceramic materials seldom exceeds one percent strain before failure, but the strain takes place almost entirely in the intergranular regions, which can be severely weakened by accumulated damage as creep occurs. In this report, we discuss the nature of creep in silicon nitride and silicon carbide ceramic materials, the method of evaluating creep, and the interpretation of data obtained under various creep test conditions. A review of creep data illustrates the importance of intergranular phases and of the history of the material. Also, in most cases, the histories applying to laboratory investigations are different from those that will apply to engineering situations in which measurable creep will be generally unacceptable. Fatigue in ceramic materials usually is assessed in static fatigue tests, which are dependent on the same types of grain boundary damage as those occurring in creep, but over shorter time periods. Corrosion of silicon-based ceramics by oxygen and water vapor results in the formation of protective SiO{sub 2} under gas turbine operating conditions.

  14. Effects of Elevated Atmospheric CO(2) on Rhizosphere Soil Microbial Communities in a Mojave Desert Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, L M; Buttner, M P; Cruz, P; Smith, S D; Robleto, E A

    2011-10-01

    The effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide [CO(2)] on microbial communities in arid rhizosphere soils beneath Larrea tridentata were examined. Roots of Larrea were harvested from plots fumigated with elevated or ambient levels of [CO(2)] using Free-Air CO(2) Enrichment (FACE) technology. Twelve bacterial and fungal rRNA gene libraries were constructed, sequenced and categorized into operational taxonomical units (OTUs). There was a significant decrease in OTUs within the Firmicutes (bacteria) in elevated [CO(2)], and increase in Basiomycota (fungi) in rhizosphere soils of plots exposed to ambient [CO(2)]. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that OTUs belonged to a wide range of bacterial and fungal taxa. To further study changes in bacterial communities, Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (QPCR) was used to quantify populations of bacteria in rhizosphere soil. The concentration of total bacteria 16S rDNA was similar in conditions of enriched and ambient [CO(2)]. However, QPCR of Gram-positive microorganisms showed a 43% decrease in the population in elevated [CO(2)]. The decrease in representation of Gram positives and the similar values for total bacterial DNA suggest that the representation of other bacterial taxa was promoted by elevated [CO(2)]. These results indicate that elevated [CO(2)] changes structure and representation of microorganisms associated with roots of desert plants.

  15. Effects of Elevated Atmospheric CO2 on Rhizosphere Soil Microbial Communities in a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, L.M.; Buttner, M.P.; Cruz, P.; Smith, S.D.; Robleto, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide [CO2] on microbial communities in arid rhizosphere soils beneath Larrea tridentata were examined. Roots of Larrea were harvested from plots fumigated with elevated or ambient levels of [CO2] using Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) technology. Twelve bacterial and fungal rRNA gene libraries were constructed, sequenced and categorized into operational taxonomical units (OTUs). There was a significant decrease in OTUs within the Firmicutes (bacteria) in elevated [CO2], and increase in Basiomycota (fungi) in rhizosphere soils of plots exposed to ambient [CO2]. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that OTUs belonged to a wide range of bacterial and fungal taxa. To further study changes in bacterial communities, Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (QPCR) was used to quantify populations of bacteria in rhizosphere soil. The concentration of total bacteria 16S rDNA was similar in conditions of enriched and ambient [CO2]. However, QPCR of Gram-positive microorganisms showed a 43% decrease in the population in elevated [CO2]. The decrease in representation of Gram positives and the similar values for total bacterial DNA suggest that the representation of other bacterial taxa was promoted by elevated [CO2]. These results indicate that elevated [CO2] changes structure and representation of microorganisms associated with roots of desert plants. PMID:21779135

  16. Elevated atmospheric CO2 levels affect community structure of rice root-associated bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Takashi; Liu, Dongyan; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Ikeda, Seishi; Asakawa, Susumu; Tokida, Takeshi; Tago, Kanako; Hayatsu, Masahito; Aoki, Naohiro; Ishimaru, Ken; Ujiie, Kazuhiro; Usui, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Hayashi, Kentaro; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that elevated atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) affects rice yields and grain quality. However, the responses of root-associated bacteria to [CO2] elevation have not been characterized in a large-scale field study. We conducted a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment (ambient + 200 μmol.mol−1) using three rice cultivars (Akita 63, Takanari, and Koshihikari) and two experimental lines of Koshihikari [chromosome segment substitution and near-isogenic lines (NILs)] to determine the effects of [CO2] elevation on the community structure of rice root-associated bacteria. Microbial DNA was extracted from rice roots at the panicle formation stage and analyzed by pyrosequencing the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to characterize the members of the bacterial community. Principal coordinate analysis of a weighted UniFrac distance matrix revealed that the community structure was clearly affected by elevated [CO2]. The predominant community members at class level were Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria in the control (ambient) and FACE plots. The relative abundance of Methylocystaceae, the major methane-oxidizing bacteria in rice roots, tended to decrease with increasing [CO2] levels. Quantitative PCR revealed a decreased copy number of the methane monooxygenase (pmoA) gene and increased methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) in elevated [CO2]. These results suggest elevated [CO2] suppresses methane oxidation and promotes methanogenesis in rice roots; this process affects the carbon cycle in rice paddy fields. PMID:25750640

  17. 22 CFR 228.12 - Long-term leases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Long-term leases. 228.12 Section 228.12 Foreign... Transactions for USAID Financing § 228.12 Long-term leases. Any commodity obtained under a long-term lease..., a long-term lease is defined as a single lease of more than 180 days, or repetitive or...

  18. 22 CFR 228.12 - Long-term leases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Long-term leases. 228.12 Section 228.12 Foreign... Transactions for USAID Financing § 228.12 Long-term leases. Any commodity obtained under a long-term lease..., a long-term lease is defined as a single lease of more than 180 days, or repetitive or...

  19. Longleaf pine photosynthetic response to soil resource availability and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Runion, G.B.; Mitchell, R.J.; Green, T.H.; Prior, S.A.; Rogers, H.H.; Gjerstad, D.H.

    1999-05-01

    Gas exchange responses during a drought cycle were studied in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) seedlings after prolonged exposure to varying levels of atmospheric CO{sub 2} soil N and water. Elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration increased photosynthesis, tended to decrease stomatal conductance, and increased water-use efficiency (WUE). Although soil resource availability influences gas exchange measurements, it generally did not affect the magnitude or direction of the response to CO{sub 2} concentration. However, significant interactions among treatment variables were observed for plant xylem pressure potential. In seedlings grown with high N, a positive growth response to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} increased whole-plant water use resulting in more severe plant water stress, despite increased leaf-level WUE; however, under low N conditions the lack of a growth response to elevated CO{sub 2} reduced whole-plant water use, decreased water stress severity, and increased WUE. Photosynthetic response to CO{sub 2} was greatest in the high N treatment at the beginning of the drought cycle, but diminished as water stress increased; however, plants grown with low N showed greater photosynthetic responses to CO{sub 2} later in the drought cycle. Therefore, plant gas exchange rates interact with growth response in determining the severity of water stress under drought and, thus, the ability of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} to ameliorate the effects of drought and allow plants to maintain increased rates of photosynthesis may be influenced by the availability of other resources, such as N and water.

  20. Legislation on Long-Term Care Insurance. Report No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Legislative Council, Madison.

    This report presents Wisconsin state legislation on long-term care insurance. Part I summarizes key provisions of six 1987 assembly bills concerned with long-term care insurance. Part II describes activities of the Wisconsin State Legislative Council's Special Committee on Long-Term Health Care Insurance. Part III provides background information…

  1. 22 CFR 228.18 - Long-term leases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Long-term leases. 228.18 Section 228.18 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT RULES FOR PROCUREMENT OF COMMODITIES AND SERVICES FINANCED BY... USAID Financing § 228.18 Long-term leases. Any commodity obtained under a long-term lease agreement...

  2. 22 CFR 228.18 - Long-term leases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Long-term leases. 228.18 Section 228.18 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT RULES FOR PROCUREMENT OF COMMODITIES AND SERVICES FINANCED BY... USAID Financing § 228.18 Long-term leases. Any commodity obtained under a long-term lease agreement...

  3. 22 CFR 228.18 - Long-term leases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Long-term leases. 228.18 Section 228.18 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT RULES FOR PROCUREMENT OF COMMODITIES AND SERVICES FINANCED BY... USAID Financing § 228.18 Long-term leases. Any commodity obtained under a long-term lease agreement...

  4. Summary of Terra and Aqua MODIS Long-Term Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong (Jack); Wenny, Brian N.; Angal, Amit; Barnes, William; Salomonson, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Since launch in December 1999, the MODIS ProtoFlight Model (PFM) onboard the Terra spacecraft has successfully operated for more than 11 years. Its Flight Model (FM) onboard the Aqua spacecraft, launched in May 2002, has also successfully operated for over 9 years. MODIS observations are made in 36 spectral bands at three nadir spatial resolutions and are calibrated and characterized regularly by a set of on-board calibrators (OBC). Nearly 40 science products, supporting a variety of land, ocean, and atmospheric applications, are continuously derived from the calibrated reflectances and radiances of each MODIS instrument and widely distributed to the world-wide user community. Following an overview of MODIS instrument operation and calibration activities, this paper provides a summary of both Terra and Aqua MODIS long-term performance. Special considerations that are critical to maintaining MODIS data quality and beneficial for future missions are also discussed.

  5. Long Term Evolution of the Terrestrial Planets' Spin Axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, J.

    2004-05-01

    The long term evolution of the spin axis of the terrestrial planets strongly depends on the gravitational perturbations from all the planets of the Solar System that create a large chaotic zone for their obliquity. Over the age of the Solar System, it is also necessary to take into account various dissipative effects that are usually not very well known (body and atmospheric tides, core-mantle friction), and that can change in a large amount the spin rate and orientation of the planet. In this talk, I will review the recent studies that we conducted on all Terrestrial planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars), in order to better understand their spin evolution over the age of the Solar System. Acknowledgement: This study benefited from support from PNP-CNRS, IDRIS-CNRS, and CS, Paris Observatory.

  6. Atmospheric mercury inputs in montane soils increase with elevation: evidence from mercury isotope signatures

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Yin, Run-sheng; Feng, Xin-bin; Sommar, Jonas; Anderson, Christopher W. N.; Sapkota, Atindra; Fu, Xue-wu; Larssen, Thorjørn

    2013-01-01

    The influence of topography on the biogeochemical cycle of mercury (Hg) has received relatively little attention. Here, we report the measurement of Hg species and their corresponding isotope composition in soil sampled along an elevational gradient transect on Mt. Leigong in subtropical southwestern China. The data are used to explain orography-related effects on the fate and behaviour of Hg species in montane environments. The total- and methyl-Hg concentrations in topsoil samples show a positive correlation with elevation. However, a negative elevation dependence was observed in the mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass-independent fractionation (MIF) signatures of Hg isotopes. Both a MIF (Δ199Hg) binary mixing approach and the traditional inert element method indicate that the content of Hg derived from the atmosphere distinctly increases with altitude. PMID:24270081

  7. Elevated atmospheric CO2 affects soil microbial diversity associated with trembling aspen.

    PubMed

    Lesaulnier, Celine; Papamichail, Dimitris; McCorkle, Sean; Ollivier, Bernard; Skiena, Steven; Taghavi, Safiyh; Zak, Donald; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    The effects of elevated atmospheric CO(2) (560 p.p.m.) and subsequent plant responses on the soil microbial community composition associated with trembling aspen was assessed through the classification of 6996 complete ribosomal DNA sequences amplified from the Rhinelander WI free-air CO(2) and O(3) enrichment (FACE) experiments microbial community metagenome. This in-depth comparative analysis provides an unprecedented, detailed and deep branching profile of population changes incurred as a response to this environmental perturbation. Total bacterial and eukaryotic abundance does not change; however, an increase in heterotrophic decomposers and ectomycorrhizal fungi is observed. Nitrate reducers of the domain bacteria and archaea, of the phylum Crenarchaea, potentially implicated in ammonium oxidation, significantly decreased with elevated CO(2). These changes in soil biota are evidence for altered interactions between trembling aspen and the microorganisms in its surrounding soil, and support the theory that greater plant detritus production under elevated CO(2) significantly alters soil microbial community composition.

  8. Shifting carbon flow from roots into associated microbial communities in response to elevated atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    Drigo, Barbara; Pijl, Agata S; Duyts, Henk; Kielak, Anna M; Gamper, Hannes A; Houtekamer, Marco J; Boschker, Henricus T S; Bodelier, Paul L E; Whiteley, Andrew S; van Veen, Johannes A; Kowalchuk, George A

    2010-06-15

    Rising atmospheric CO(2) levels are predicted to have major consequences on carbon cycling and the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. Increased photosynthetic activity is expected, especially for C-3 plants, thereby influencing vegetation dynamics; however, little is known about the path of fixed carbon into soil-borne communities and resulting feedbacks on ecosystem function. Here, we examine how arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) act as a major conduit in the transfer of carbon between plants and soil and how elevated atmospheric CO(2) modulates the belowground translocation pathway of plant-fixed carbon. Shifts in active AMF species under elevated atmospheric CO(2) conditions are coupled to changes within active rhizosphere bacterial and fungal communities. Thus, as opposed to simply increasing the activity of soil-borne microbes through enhanced rhizodeposition, elevated atmospheric CO(2) clearly evokes the emergence of distinct opportunistic plant-associated microbial communities. Analyses involving RNA-based stable isotope probing, neutral/phosphate lipid fatty acids stable isotope probing, community fingerprinting, and real-time PCR allowed us to trace plant-fixed carbon to the affected soil-borne microorganisms. Based on our data, we present a conceptual model in which plant-assimilated carbon is rapidly transferred to AMF, followed by a slower release from AMF to the bacterial and fungal populations well-adapted to the prevailing (myco-)rhizosphere conditions. This model provides a general framework for reappraising carbon-flow paths in soils, facilitating predictions of future interactions between rising atmospheric CO(2) concentrations and terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:20534474

  9. Scientific Understanding from Long Term Observations: Insights from the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosz, J.

    2001-12-01

    The network dedicated to Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) in the United States has grown to 24 sites since it was formed in 1980. Long-term research and monitoring are performed on parameters thatare basic to all ecosystems and are required to understand patterns, processes, and relationship to change. Collectively, the sites in the LTER Network provide opportunities to contrast marine, coastal, and continental regions, the full range of climatic gradients existing in North America, and aquatic and terrestrial habitats in a range of ecosystem types. The combination of common core areas and long-term research and monitoring in many habitats have allowed unprecedented abilities to understand and compare complex temporal and spatial dynamics associated with issues like climate change, effects of pollution, biodiversity and landuse. For example, McMurdo Dry Valley in the Antarctic has demonstrated an increase in glacier mass since 1993 which coincides with a period of cooler than normal summers and more than average snowfall. In contrast, the Bonanza Creek and Toolik Lake sites in Alaska have recorded a warming period unprecedented in the past 200 years. Nitrogen deposition effects have been identified through long-term watershed studies on biogeochemical cycles, especially at Coweeta Hydrological Lab, Harvard Forest, and the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest. In aquatic systems, such as the Northern Temperate Lakes site, long-term data revealed time lags in effects of invaders and disturbance on lake communities. Biological recovery from an effect such as lake acidification was shown to lag behind chemical recovery. The long-term changes documented over 2 decades have been instrumental in influencing management practices in many of the LTER areas. In Puerto Rico, the Luquillo LTER demonstrated that dams obstruct migrations of fish and freshwater shrimp and water abstraction at low flows can completely obliterate downstream migration of juveniles and damage

  10. The neuronal response at extended timescales: long-term correlations without long-term memory

    PubMed Central

    Soudry, Daniel; Meir, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Long term temporal correlations frequently appear at many levels of neural activity. We show that when such correlations appear in isolated neurons, they indicate the existence of slow underlying processes and lead to explicit conditions on the dynamics of these processes. Moreover, although these slow processes can potentially store information for long times, we demonstrate that this does not imply that the neuron possesses a long memory of its input, even if these processes are bidirectionally coupled with neuronal response. We derive these results for a broad class of biophysical neuron models, and then fit a specific model to recent experiments. The model reproduces the experimental results, exhibiting long term (days-long) correlations due to the interaction between slow variables and internal fluctuations. However, its memory of the input decays on a timescale of minutes. We suggest experiments to test these predictions directly. PMID:24744724

  11. Long-term results from an urban CO2 monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehleringer, J.; Pataki, D. E.; Lai, C.; Schauer, A.

    2009-12-01

    High-precision atmospheric CO2 has been monitored in several locations through the Salt Lake Valley metropolitan region of northern Utah over the past nine years. Many parts of this semi-arid grassland have transitioned into dense urban forests, supported totally by extensive homeowner irrigation practices. Diurnal changes in fossil-fuel energy uses and photosynthesis-respiration processes have resulted in significant spatial and temporal variations in atmospheric CO2. Here we present an analysis of the long-term patterns and trends in midday and nighttime CO2 values for four sites: a midvalley residential neighborhood, a midvalley non-residential neighborhood, an undeveloped valley-edge area transitioning from agriculture, and a developed valley-edge neighborhood with mixed residential and commercial activities; the neighborhoods span an elevation gradient within the valley of ~100 m. Patterns in CO2 concentrations among neighborhoods were examined relative to each other and relative to the NOAA background station, a desert site in Wendover, Utah. Four specific analyses are considered. First, we present a statistical analysis of weekday versus weekend CO2 patterns in the winter, spring, summer, and fall seasons. Second, we present a statistical analysis of the influences of high-pressure systems on the elevation of atmospheric CO2 above background levels in the winter versus summer seasons. Third, we present an analysis of the nighttime CO2 values through the year, relating these patterns to observed changes in the carbon isotope ratios of atmospheric CO2. Lastly, we examine the rate of increase in midday urban CO2 over time relative to regional and global CO2 averages to determine if the amplification of urban energy use is statistically detectable from atmospheric trace gas measurements over the past decade. These results show two important patterns. First, there is a strong weekday-weekend effect of vehicle emissions in contrast to the temperature

  12. Long-term infrared photometry of Seyferts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, I. S.

    2004-05-01

    Long-term (up to 10 000 d) monitoring has been undertaken for 41 Seyferts in the near-infrared (1.25-3.45 μm). All but two showed variability, with amplitudes at K in the range <0.1 to >1.1 mag. The time-scale for detectable change is from about one week to a few years. Where contemporary observations of variability in X-rays, ultraviolet (UV) or visible light exist, it is found that the near-infrared varies in a similar way, though in some cases the shorter-wavelength infrared (IR) bands are diluted by underlying galaxy radiation. A simple cross-correlation study indicates that there is evidence for delays of up to several hundred d between the variations seen at the shortest wavelengths (U or J) and the longest (L) in many galaxies. In particular, the data for Fairall 9 now extend to twice the interval covered in earlier publications and the delay between its UV and IR outputs is seen to persist. An analysis of the fluxes shows that, for any given galaxy, the colours of the variable component of its nucleus are usually independent of the level of activity. The state of activity of the galaxy can be parameterized. Taken over the whole sample, the colours of the variable components fall within moderately narrow ranges. In particular, the H-K colour is appropriate to a blackbody of temperature 1600 K. The H-K excess for a heavily reddened nucleus can be determined and used to find EB-V, which can be compared to the values found from the visible region broad line ratios. Using flux-flux diagrams, the flux within the aperture from the underlying galaxies can often be determined without the need for model surface brightness profiles. In many galaxies it is apparent that there must be an additional constant contribution from warm dust.

  13. LONG TERM IN SITU DISPOSAL ENGINEERING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS; CARLSON; BROCKMAN

    2003-07-23

    Patent application pulled per Ken Norris (FH General Counsel). The objective of this study is to devise methods, produce conceptual designs, examine and select alternatives, and estimate costs for the demonstration of long-term (300-year) in situ disposal of an existing waste disposal site. The demonstration site selected is the 216-A-24 Crib near the 200 East Area. The site contains a fission product inventory and has experienced plant, animal, and inadvertent than intrusion. Of the potential intrusive events and transport pathways at the site, potential human intrusion has been given primary consideration in barrier design. Intrusion by wind, plants, and animals has been given secondary consideration. Groundwater modeling for a number of barrier configurations has been carried out to help select a barrier that will minimize water infiltration and waste/water contact time. The estimated effective lifetime and cost of 20 barrier schemes, using a variety of materials, have been evaluated. The schemes studied include single component surface barriers, multicomponent barriers, and massively injected grout barriers. Five barriers with high estimated effective lifetimes and relatively low costs have been selected for detailed evaluation. They are basalt riprap barriers, massive soil barriers, salt basin barriers, multi-component fine/coarse barriers, and cemented basalt barriers. A variety of materials and configurations for marking the site have also been considered. A decision analysis was completed to select a barrier scheme for demonstration. The analysis indicated that the basalt riprap alternative would be the preferred choice for a full-scale demonstration. The recommended approach is to demonstrate the basalt riprap barrier at the 216-A-24 Crib as soon as possible. Methods and costs of assessing effectiveness of the demonstration are also described. Preliminary design modifications and costs for applying the five selected barrier schemes to other site types are

  14. Hormonal changes during long-term isolation.

    PubMed

    Custaud, M A; Belin de Chantemele, E; Larina, I M; Nichiporuk, I A; Grigoriev, A; Duvareille, M; Gharib, C; Gauquelin-Koch, G

    2004-05-01

    Confinement and inactivity induce considerable psychological and physiological modifications through social and sensory deprivation. The aim of the SFINCSS-99 experiment was to determine the cardiovascular and hormonal pattern of blood volume regulation during long-term isolation and confinement. Simulation experiments were performed in pressurized chambers similar in size to the volumes of modern space vehicles. Group I consisted of four Russian male volunteers, who spent 240 days in a 100-m(3 )chamber. Group II included four males (one German and three Russians) who spent 110 days in isolation (200-m(3) module). The blood samples, taken before, during and after the isolation period, were used to determine haematocrit (Ht), growth hormone (GH), active renin, aldosterone, and osmolality levels. From the urine samples, electrolytes, osmolality, nitrites, nitrates, cortisol, antidiuretic hormone (ADH), aldosterone, normetanephrine and metanephrine levels were determined. The increase in plasma volume (PV) that is associated with a tendency for a decrease in plasma active renin is likely to be due to decreased sympathetic activity, and concords with the changes in urinary catecholamine levels during confinement. Urinary catecholamine levels were significantly higher during the recovery period than during confinement. This suggests that the sympathoadrenal system was activated, and concords with the increase in heart rate. Vascular resistance is determined by not only the vasoconstrictor but also vasodilator systems. The ratio of nitrite/nitrate in urine, as an indicator of nitric oxide release, did not reveal any significant changes. Analysis of data suggests that the duration of the isolation was a main factor involved in the regulation of hormones.

  15. Long term cultivation of larger benthic Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöger, Julia; Eder, Wolfgang; Kinoshita, Shunichi; Antonino, Briguglio; Carles, Ferrandes-Cañadell; Hohenegger, Johann

    2015-04-01

    Benthic Foraminifera are used in a variety of applications employing numerous different methods, i.e. ecological monitoring, studying the effects of ocean acidification, reconstructing palaeo-bathymetry or investigating palaeo-salinity and palaeo-temperature to name only a few. To refine our understanding of ecological influences on larger benthic foraminiferal biology and to review inferences from field observations, culture experiments have become an indispensable tool. While culture experiments on smaller benthic foraminifera have become increasingly frequent in the past century, reports of the cultivation of symbiont bearing larger Foraminifera are rare. Generally, cultivation experiments can be divided into two groups: Culturing of populations and cultivation of single specimens allowing individual investigation. The latter differ form the former by several restrictions resulting from the need to limit individual motility without abridging microenvironmental conditions in the Foraminiferans artificial habitat, necessary to enable the individual to development as unfettered as possible. In this study we present first experiences and preliminary results of the long-term cultivation of larger benthic Foraminifera conducted at the 'Tropical Biosphere Research Station Sesoko Island, University of the Ryukyus', Japan, trying to reproduce natural conditions as closely as possible. Individuals of three species of larger benthic Foraminifera (Heterostegina depressa, Palaeonummulites venosus and Operculina complanata) have been cultured since April 2014. At the time of the general assembly the cultivation experiments will have been going on for more than one year, with the aim to investigate growth rates, longevities and reproduction strategies for comparison with results statistically inferred from application of the of the 'natural laboratory' method. The most important factor influencing foraminiferal health and development was found to be light intensity and light

  16. A new long-term care manifesto.

    PubMed

    Kane, Robert L

    2015-04-01

    This article argues for a fresh look at how we provide long-term care (LTC) for older persons. Essentially, LTC offers a compensatory service that responds to frailty. Policy debate around LTC centers on costs, but we are paying for something we really don't want. Building societal enthusiasm (or even support) for LTC will require re-inventing and re-branding. LTC has three basic components: personal care, housing, and health care (primarily chronic disease management). They can be delivered in a variety of settings. It is rare to find all three done well simultaneously. Personal care (PC) needs to be both competent and compassionate. Housing must provide at least minimal amenities and foster autonomy; when travel time for PC raises costs dramatically, some form of clustered housing may be needed. Health care must be proactive, aimed at preventing exacerbations of chronic disease and resultant hospitalizations. Enhancing preferences means allowing taking informed risks. Payment incentives should reward both quality of care and quality of life, but positive outcomes must be defined as slowing decline. Paying for services but not for housing under Medicaid would automatically level the playing field between nursing homes (NH) and community-based services. Regulations should achieve greater parity between NH and community care and include both positive and negative feedback. Providing post-acute care should be separate from LTC. Using the tripartite LTC framework, we can create innovative flexible approaches to providing needed services for frail older persons in formats that are both desirable and affordable. Such care will be more socially desirable and hence worth paying for.

  17. Soil respiration in northern forests exposed to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and ozone.

    PubMed

    Pregitzer, Kurt; Loya, Wendy; Kubiske, Mark; Zak, Donald

    2006-06-01

    The aspen free-air CO2 and O3 enrichment (FACTS II-FACE) study in Rhinelander, Wisconsin, USA, is designed to understand the mechanisms by which young northern deciduous forest ecosystems respond to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and elevated tropospheric ozone (O3) in a replicated, factorial, field experiment. Soil respiration is the second largest flux of carbon (C) in these ecosystems, and the objective of this study was to understand how soil respiration responded to the experimental treatments as these fast-growing stands of pure aspen and birch + aspen approached maximum leaf area. Rates of soil respiration were typically lowest in the elevated O3 treatment. Elevated CO2 significantly stimulated soil respiration (8-26%) compared to the control treatment in both community types over all three growing seasons. In years 6-7 of the experiment, the greatest rates of soil respiration occurred in the interaction treatment (CO2 + O3), and rates of soil respiration were 15-25% greater in this treatment than in the elevated CO2 treatment, depending on year and community type. Two of the treatments, elevated CO2 and elevated CO2 + O3, were fumigated with 13C-depleted CO2, and in these two treatments we used standard isotope mixing models to understand the proportions of new and old C in soil respiration. During the peak of the growing season, C fixed since the initiation of the experiment in 1998 (new C) accounted for 60-80% of total soil respiration. The isotope measurements independently confirmed that more new C was respired from the interaction treatment compared to the elevated CO2 treatment. A period of low soil moisture late in the 2003 growing season resulted in soil respiration with an isotopic signature 4-6 per thousand enriched in 13C compared to sample dates when the percentage soil moisture was higher. In 2004, an extended period of low soil moisture during August and early September, punctuated by a significant rainfall event, resulted in soil

  18. Soil respiration in northern forests exposed to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and ozone.

    PubMed

    Pregitzer, Kurt; Loya, Wendy; Kubiske, Mark; Zak, Donald

    2006-06-01

    The aspen free-air CO2 and O3 enrichment (FACTS II-FACE) study in Rhinelander, Wisconsin, USA, is designed to understand the mechanisms by which young northern deciduous forest ecosystems respond to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and elevated tropospheric ozone (O3) in a replicated, factorial, field experiment. Soil respiration is the second largest flux of carbon (C) in these ecosystems, and the objective of this study was to understand how soil respiration responded to the experimental treatments as these fast-growing stands of pure aspen and birch + aspen approached maximum leaf area. Rates of soil respiration were typically lowest in the elevated O3 treatment. Elevated CO2 significantly stimulated soil respiration (8-26%) compared to the control treatment in both community types over all three growing seasons. In years 6-7 of the experiment, the greatest rates of soil respiration occurred in the interaction treatment (CO2 + O3), and rates of soil respiration were 15-25% greater in this treatment than in the elevated CO2 treatment, depending on year and community type. Two of the treatments, elevated CO2 and elevated CO2 + O3, were fumigated with 13C-depleted CO2, and in these two treatments we used standard isotope mixing models to understand the proportions of new and old C in soil respiration. During the peak of the growing season, C fixed since the initiation of the experiment in 1998 (new C) accounted for 60-80% of total soil respiration. The isotope measurements independently confirmed that more new C was respired from the interaction treatment compared to the elevated CO2 treatment. A period of low soil moisture late in the 2003 growing season resulted in soil respiration with an isotopic signature 4-6 per thousand enriched in 13C compared to sample dates when the percentage soil moisture was higher. In 2004, an extended period of low soil moisture during August and early September, punctuated by a significant rainfall event, resulted in soil

  19. Subalpine Forest Carbon Cycling Short- and Long-Term Influence ofClimate and Species

    SciTech Connect

    Kueppers, L.; Harte, J.

    2005-08-23

    Ecosystem carbon cycle feedbacks to climate change comprise one of the largest remaining sources of uncertainty in global model predictions of future climate. Both direct climate effects on carbon cycling and indirect effects via climate-induced shifts in species composition may alter ecosystem carbon balance over the long term. In the short term, climate effects on carbon cycling may be mediated by ecosystem species composition. We used an elevational climate and tree species composition gradient in Rocky Mountain subalpine forest to quantify the sensitivity of all major ecosystem carbon stocks and fluxes to these factors. The climate sensitivities of carbon fluxes were species-specific in the cases of relative above ground productivity and litter decomposition, whereas the climate sensitivity of dead wood decay did not differ between species, and total annual soil CO2 flux showed no strong climate trend. Lodge pole pine relative productivity increased with warmer temperatures and earlier snowmelt, while Engelmann spruce relative productivity was insensitive to climate variables. Engelmann spruce needle decomposition decreased linearly with increasing temperature(decreasing litter moisture), while lodgepole pine and subalpine fir needle decay showed a hump-shaped temperature response. We also found that total ecosystem carbon declined by 50 percent with a 2.88C increase in mean annual temperature and a concurrent 63 percent decrease ingrowing season soil moisture, primarily due to large declines in mineral soil and dead wood carbon. We detected no independent effect of species composition on ecosystem C stocks. Overall, our carbon flux results suggest that, in the short term, any change in subalpine forest net carbon balance will depend on the specific climate scenario and spatial distribution of tree species. Over the long term, our carbon stock results suggest that with regional warming and drying, Rocky Mountain subalpine forest will be a net source of carbon

  20. Phytochemical changes in leaves of subtropical grasses and fynbos shrubs at elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattas, D.; Stock, W. D.; Mabusela, W. T.; Green, I. R.

    2005-07-01

    The effects of elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentrations on plant polyphenolic, tannin, nitrogen, phosphorus and total nonstructural carbohydrate concentrations were investigated in leaves of subtropical grass and fynbos shrub species. The hypothesis tested was that carbon-based secondary compounds would increase when carbon gain is in excess of growth requirements. This premise was tested in two ecosystems involving plants with different photosynthetic mechanisms and growth strategies. The first ecosystem comprised grasses from a C 4-dominated, subtropical grassland, where three plots were subjected to three different free air CO 2 enrichment treatments, i.e., elevated (600 to 800 μmol mol -1), intermediate (400 μmol mol -1) and ambient atmospheric CO 2. One of the seven grass species, Alloteropsis semialata, had a C 3 photosynthetic pathway while the other grasses were all C 4. The second ecosystem was simulated in a microcosm experiment where three fynbos species were grown in open-top chambers at ambient and 700 μmol mol -1 atmospheric CO 2 in low nutrient acid sands typical of south western coastal and mountain fynbos ecosystems. Results showed that polyphenolics and tannins did not increase in the grass species under elevated CO 2 and only in Leucadendron laureolum among the fynbos species. Similarly, foliar nitrogen content of grasses was largely unaffected by elevated CO 2, and among the fynbos species, only L. laureolum and Leucadendron xanthoconus showed changes in foliar nitrogen content under elevated CO 2, but these were of different magnitude. The overall decrease in nitrogen and phosphorus and consequent increase in C:N and C:P ratio in both ecosystems, along with the increase in polyphenolics and tannins in L. laureolum in the fynbos ecosystem, may negatively affect forage quality and decomposition rates. It is concluded that fast growing grasses do not experience sink limitation and invest extra carbon into growth rather than polyphenolics and

  1. Long-term macronutrient stoichiometry of UK ombrotrophic peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillereff, Daniel; Boyle, John; Toberman, Hannah; Adams, Jessica; Tipping, Ed

    2016-04-01

    Ombrotrophic peatlands across northern latitudes represent a globally-important store for carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) through the Holocene. A key characteristic of ombrotrophic bogs is that N, P and other elements vital to their biogeochemical functioning are almost exclusively supplied by hydrological and biological inputs from the atmosphere. While different mechanisms regulating the atmospheric supply of N and P and their limiting effects on bog productivity have been widely studied, limited attention has been paid to the long-term patterns of, and controls on, macronutrient accumulation, cycling and stoichiometry in ombrotrophic peatlands. Indeed there is a dearth of C, N and P stoichiometric data from the UK despite decades of peatland research. Using data from 15 sites, we report the first estimates of millennial-scale macronutrient concentrations and accumulation rates in UK ombrotrophic peats. Carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were measured on cores from five ombrotrophic blanket mires, spanning 4000-10000 years to present, and integrated with existing nutrient profiles from ten Scottish sites. Long-term C, N and P concentrations for the UK are 55.1, 1.55 and 0.037 wt%, similar to the few existing northern and tropical comparable sites worldwide. The uppermost peat (0 - 0.2 m) is more enriched in P and N (51.0, 1.86, and 0.070 wt%), while the deeper peat (0.5 - 1.25 m) is more depleted (56.6, 1.39, and 0.028 wt%). Long-term average (whole core) accumulation rates of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus are 25.3±2.2 gC m-2 yr-1, 0.70±0.09 gN m-2 yr-1 and 0.018±0.004 gP m-2 yr-1, again similar to values reported elsewhere in the world. A number of significant findings can be drawn from our results: i) N and P concentrations in ombrotrophic peat are strongly associated, such that a regression model of N concentration on P concentration and mean annual precipitation, based on global meta data for surface peat samples, can explain 54

  2. Long-term macronutrient stoichiometry of UK ombrotrophic peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillereff, Daniel; Boyle, John; Toberman, Hannah; Adams, Jessica; Tipping, Ed

    2016-04-01

    Ombrotrophic peatlands across northern latitudes represent a globally-important store for carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) through the Holocene. A key characteristic of ombrotrophic bogs is that N, P and other elements vital to their biogeochemical functioning are almost exclusively supplied by hydrological and biological inputs from the atmosphere. While different mechanisms regulating the atmospheric supply of N and P and their limiting effects on bog productivity have been widely studied, limited attention has been paid to the long-term patterns of, and controls on, macronutrient accumulation, cycling and stoichiometry in ombrotrophic peatlands. Indeed there is a dearth of C, N and P stoichiometric data from the UK despite decades of peatland research. Using data from 15 sites, we report the first estimates of millennial-scale macronutrient concentrations and accumulation rates in UK ombrotrophic peats. Carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were measured on cores from five ombrotrophic blanket mires, spanning 4000-10000 years to present, and integrated with existing nutrient profiles from ten Scottish sites. Long-term C, N and P concentrations for the UK are 55.1, 1.55 and 0.037 wt%, similar to the few existing northern and tropical comparable sites worldwide. The uppermost peat (0 - 0.2 m) is more enriched in P and N (51.0, 1.86, and 0.070 wt%), while the deeper peat (0.5 - 1.25 m) is more depleted (56.6, 1.39, and 0.028 wt%). Long-term average (whole core) accumulation rates of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus are 25.3±2.2 gC m‑2 yr‑1, 0.70±0.09 gN m‑2 yr‑1 and 0.018±0.004 gP m‑2 yr‑1, again similar to values reported elsewhere in the world. A number of significant findings can be drawn from our results: i) N and P concentrations in ombrotrophic peat are strongly associated, such that a regression model of N concentration on P concentration and mean annual precipitation, based on global meta data for surface peat samples, can

  3. Are microbial N transformation rates in a permanent grassland soil after 17 years of elevated atmospheric CO2 sensitive to soil temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Gerald; Gorenflo, André; Brenzinger, Kristof; Clough, Tim; Braker, Gesche; Müller, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Long-term observations (17 years) within the Giessen Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (Giessen FACE) study on permanent grassland showed that the carbon fertilization caused significant changes in the ecosystem nitrogen cycle. These changes are responsible for a doubling of annual N2O emissions under elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2) caused by increased emissions during the plant growing season. The goal of this lab study was to understand how soil temperature influences the long-term effects of eCO2 and plant carbon input on microbial N transformations in the Giessen FACE. Therefore, a pulse labelling study with 15N tracing of 15NH4+ and 15NO3- was carried out with incubated soil samples from elevated and ambient CO2 FACE rings in climate chambers at two different temperatures (10°C and 19°C), while water filled pore space of the samples was adjusted to the same level. The various N pools in the soil (NH4+, NO3-, NO2-, soil organic matter), N2O emissions and simultaneous gross N transformation rates were quantified. The quantification of the gross N transformations are based on the turnover of 15NH4+, 15NO3-, 15NO2- and shall illuminate the interaction between carbon fertilization, temperature and changes in nitrogen cycle in this grassland soil. While the soil respiration after labelling was significantly increased at 19°C compared to 10°C, N2O emissions showed no significant differences. There were also no significant differences of N2O emissions between soil samples from control and elevated CO2 rings within each temperature level. As the soil temperature (within the range of 10-19°C) had no significant effects on N transformations responsible for the observed doubling of N2O emissions under eCO2, it seems most likely that other factors like direct carbon input by plants and/or soil moisture differences between ambient and elevated rings in the field are responsible for the observed increase in N2O emissions under eCO2.

  4. Are microbial N transformation rates in a permanent grassland soil after 17 years of elevated atmospheric CO2 sensitive to soil temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Gerald; Gorenflo, André; Brenzinger, Kristof; Clough, Tim; Braker, Gesche; Müller, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Long-term observations (17 years) within the Giessen Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (Giessen FACE) study on permanent grassland showed that the carbon fertilization caused significant changes in the ecosystem nitrogen cycle. These changes are responsible for a doubling of annual N2O emissions under elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2) caused by increased emissions during the plant growing season. The goal of this lab study was to understand how soil temperature influences the long-term effects of eCO2 and plant carbon input on microbial N transformations in the Giessen FACE. Therefore, a pulse labelling study with 15N tracing of 15NH4+ and 15NO3‑ was carried out with incubated soil samples from elevated and ambient CO2 FACE rings in climate chambers at two different temperatures (10°C and 19°C), while water filled pore space of the samples was adjusted to the same level. The various N pools in the soil (NH4+, NO3‑, NO2‑, soil organic matter), N2O emissions and simultaneous gross N transformation rates were quantified. The quantification of the gross N transformations are based on the turnover of 15NH4+, 15NO3‑, 15NO2‑ and shall illuminate the interaction between carbon fertilization, temperature and changes in nitrogen cycle in this grassland soil. While the soil respiration after labelling was significantly increased at 19°C compared to 10°C, N2O emissions showed no significant differences. There were also no significant differences of N2O emissions between soil samples from control and elevated CO2 rings within each temperature level. As the soil temperature (within the range of 10-19°C) had no significant effects on N transformations responsible for the observed doubling of N2O emissions under eCO2, it seems most likely that other factors like direct carbon input by plants and/or soil moisture differences between ambient and elevated rings in the field are responsible for the observed increase in N2O emissions under eCO2.

  5. Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration enhances salinity tolerance in Aster tripolium L.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Nicole; Hussin, Sayed; Koyro, Hans-Werner

    2010-02-01

    Our study aimed at investigating the influence of elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration on the salinity tolerance of the cash crop halophyte Aster tripolium L., thereby focussing on protein expression and enzyme activities. The plants were grown in hydroponics using a nutrient solution with or without addition of NaCl (75% seawater salinity), under ambient (380 ppm) and elevated (520 ppm) CO(2). Under ambient CO(2) concentration enhanced expressions and activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, and glutathione-S-transferase in the salt-treatments were recorded as a reaction to oxidative stress. Elevated CO(2) led to significantly higher enzyme expressions and activities in the salt-treatments, so that reactive oxygen species could be detoxified more effectively. Furthermore, the expression of a protective heat shock protein (class 20) increased under salinity and was even further enhanced under elevated CO(2) concentration. Additional energy had to be provided for the mechanisms mentioned above, which was indicated by the increased expression of a beta ATPase subunit and higher v-, p- and f-ATPase activities under salinity. The higher ATPase expression and activities also enable a more efficient ion transport and compartmentation for the maintenance of ion homeostasis. We conclude that elevated CO(2) concentration is able to improve the survival of A. tripolium under salinity because more energy is provided for the synthesis and enhanced activity of enzymes and proteins which enable a more efficient ROS detoxification and ion compartmentation/transport.

  6. Long Term TOA - M Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-30

    ... concerted efforts to observe the ERB since1984 through two projects: ERBE and CERES, that span nearly 30 years to date.   The ... by this project will be available from the Atmospheric Science Data Center.   Format: HDF5 or NetCDF SCAR-B ...

  7. Long term property prediction of polyethylene nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaito, Ali Al-Abed

    properties of the nanocomposites was analyzed by examining tensile and creep-recovery behavior of the films at temperatures in the range of 25 to -100°C. Within the measured temperature range, the materials showed a nonlinear temperature dependent response. The time-temperature superposition principle was successfully used to predict the long term behavior of LLDPE nanocomposites.

  8. Long-Term Space Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowark, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report for our Long-Term Space Astrophysics Program (NRA 94-OSS-12) grant NAG 5-3225. The proposal is entitled 'Spectral and Temporal Properties of Black Hole Candidates', and began funding in May 1995, and ran through 31 Aug 2000. The project summary from the original proposal was as follows: 'We will study the spectral and temporal properties of black hole candidates (BHC) by using data from archival sources (e.g., EXOSAT, Ginga, ROSAT) and proposed follow-up observations with modern instruments (e.g., ASCA, XTE). Our spectral studies will focus on identifying the basic characteristics and luminosities of the emission components in the various 'states' of BHC. We hope to understand and quantify the global energetics of these states. Our temporal studies will focus on expanding and classifying our knowledge of BHC variability properties in each state. We will explore the nature of quasi-periodic oscillations in BHC. We will combine our spectral and temporal studies by analyzing time lags and variability coherence between energy channels. In addition, we will investigate ways of correlating observed variability behavior with specific emission components.' We have accomplished many of these goals laid out within the original proposal. As originally proposed, we have utilized both archival and proprietary satellite data. In terms of archival data, we have utilized data from the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), ROSAT, and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). We also obtained proprietary data from ASCA, RXTE, and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE). In terms of sources, we have examined a wide variety of both galactic black hole candidates and extra-galactic black holes. For the galactic black holes we have observed and analyzed both the low/hard state and the high/soft state. We have performed both spectral and timing analyses on all of these objects. In addition, we have also examined a number of neutron stars or

  9. Long term prognosis of reactive salmonella arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Leirisalo-Repo, M; Helenius, P; Hannu, T; Lehtinen, A; Kreula, J; Taavitsainen, M; Koskimies, S

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Reactive joint complications triggered by salmonella gastroenteritis are increasingly reported, but the outcome and long term prognosis of the patients is incompletely known. This study looked at the prognosis of salmonella arthritis in patients hospitalised in 1970-1986.
METHODS—Hospital records from two hospitals in southern Finland were screened for patients with the discharge diagnosis of salmonellosis or reactive, postinfectious arthritis or Reiter's disease. For the patients with confirmed diagnosis of reactive salmonella arthritis, data about the acute disease were collected from the hospital records. A follow up study was performed.
RESULTS—There were 63 patients (28 women, 35 men, mean age 36.5 years) with salmonella arthritis. Urethritis occurred in 27%, eye inflammation in 13%, and low back pain in 44% of the patients. HLA-B27 was present in 88%. More men than women were HLA-B27 positive. HLA-B27 positive patients had higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (mean 80.9 v 46.5 mm 1st h, p = 0.0180). Also, extra-articular features and radiological sacroiliitis were seen only in HLA-B27 positive patients. A follow up study was performed on 50 patients mean 11.0 (range 5-22 years) later. Twenty patients had recovered completely. Ten patients had mild joint symptoms, 11 patients had had a new acute transient arthritis, and five acute iritis. Eight patients had developed chronic spondyloarthropathy. Radiological sacroiliitis was seen in six of 44 patients, more frequently in male than in female patients (32% v 0%; p = 0.0289). Recurrent or chronic arthritis, iritis or radiological sacroiliitis developed only in HLA-B27 positive patients.
CONCLUSION—Joint symptoms are common after reactive salmonella arthritis. HLA-B27 contributes to the severity of acute disease and to the late prognosis.

 PMID:9370874

  10. [The effects of long-term sedation on intestinal function].

    PubMed

    Zielmann, S; Grote, R

    1995-12-01

    Gastrointestinal integrity with intact function are of main importance in critically ill patients, and not only as a route of nutritional support. Drugs used for long-term sedation can lead to disordered gastrointestinal motility. In this study we compared the influence of different combinations of analgesics and sedatives on the intestinal function in mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients. METHODS. A total of 190 patients were evaluated retrospectively. All patients required controlled mechanical ventilation and deep sedation (Ramsay Score 5-6) for 7 days or more due to acute respiratory failure or elevated intracranial pressure. In none of these patients was enteric tube feeding contraindicated. Intact intestinal function was assumed when full enteric tube feeding was achieved on days 5 and 6 of the treatment period. Furthermore, other gastrointestinal motility disorders (e.g. constipation) had to be absent. In all patients the feeding tube was placed in the stomach by the nasogastric route. Corresponding to different combinations of analgesics and sedatives, the 190 patients were divided into 11 groups. The following combinations were used: group 1 (n = 20), fentanyl+flunitrazepam; group 2 (n = 20), fentanyl+midazolam; group 3 (n = 20), fentanyl+thiopentone; group 4 (n = 20) piritramide+midazolam; group 5 (n = 20), piritramide and continuous epidural administration of bupivacaine+midazolam; group 6 (n = 20), piritramide+gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA); group 7 (n = 20), ketamine+midazolam; group 8 (n = 10), ketamin+methohexitone; group 9 (n = 20), ketamine+propofol; group 10 (n = 10), ketamine+midazolam and GABA; group 11 (n = 10), sufentail+midazolam and methohexitone. Patients in groups 3, 8, 9, 10, and 11 all had severe head injury and elevated intracranial pressure. Group 6 was made up exclusively of elderly patients (> 65 years) without head trauma. RESULTS. The patients in groups 1, 2, and 3 received fentanyl for analgesia and were completely fed

  11. Long-term observations of tropospheric ozone: GAW Measurement Guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasova, Oksana; Galbally, Ian E.; Schultz, Martin G.

    2013-04-01

    The Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Programme of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) coordinates long-term observations of the chemical composition and physical properties of the atmosphere which are relevant for understanding of atmospheric chemistry and climate change. Atmospheric observations of reactive gases (tropospheric ozone, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides) coordinated by the GAW Programme complement local and regional scale air quality monitoring efforts. As part of the GAW quality assurance (QA) system detailed measurement guidelines for atmospheric trace species are developed by international expert teams at irregular intervals. The most recent report focuses on continuous in-situ measurements of ozone in the troposphere, performed in particular at continental or island sites with altitudes ranging from sea level to mountain tops. Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) are defined for different applications of the data (e.g. trend analysis and verification of global model forecasts). These DQOs include a thorough discussion of the tolerable level of measurement uncertainty and data completeness. The guidelines present the best practices and practical arrangements adopted by the GAW Programme in order to enable the GAW station network to approach or achieve the defined tropospheric ozone DQOs. The document includes information on the selection of station and measurement locations, required skills and training of staff, recommendations on the measurement technique and the necessary equipment to perform highest quality measurements, rules for conducting the measurements, preparing the data and archiving them, and more. Much emphasis is given to discussions about how to ensure the quality of the data through tracing calibrations back to primary standards, proper calibration and data analysis, etc. In the GAW Programme the QA system is implemented through Central Facilities (Central Calibration Laboratories, World and Regional

  12. Long Term Gait Deviations in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructed Females

    PubMed Central

    Noehren, Brian; Wilson, Hilary; Miller, Casey; Lattermann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Little is known of the potential long term gait alterations that occur after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. In particular, variables such as impact loading which have been previously associated with joint deterioration have not been studied in walking and running after an ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to define the alterations in impact forces, loading rates, and the accompanying sagittal plane kinematic and kinetic mechanics at the time of impact between the ACL reconstructed group and a healthy control group. Methods 40 females (20 ACL reconstruction, 20 controls) participated in the study. An instrumented gait analysis was performed on all subjects. Between group and limb comparisons were made for initial vertical impact force, loading rate, sagittal plane knee and hip angles as well as moments. Results During walking and running the ACL cohort had significantly greater initial vertical impact force (p=0.002 and p= 0.001), and loading rates (p=0.03 and p= 0.01), as well as a smaller knee extensor moment and hip angle during walking (p=0.000 and p=0.01). There was a trend towards a smaller knee moment and hip angle during running (p=0.08 and p=0.06) as well as a larger hip extensor moment during walking (p=0.06) in the ACL group. No differences were found for hip extensor moment during running, knee angles between groups during walking or running. Lastly, no between limb differences were found for any variable. Conclusion Gait deviations such as elevated impact loading and loading rates do not resolve long term after the individual has resumed previous activity levels and may contribute to the greater risk of early joint degeneration in this population. PMID:23568090

  13. Long-term treatment of pulmonary hypertension with aerosolized iloprost.

    PubMed

    Machherndl, S; Kneussl, M; Baumgartner, H; Schneider, B; Petkov, V; Schenk, P; Lang, I M

    2001-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), defined as elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance, is an end-point of a variety of conditions. The only therapy that has been shown to improve both quality of life and survival is intravenous prostacyclin (prostaglandin I2 (PGI2), epoprostenol). The effect of long-term aerosolized iloprost (Ilomedin, Schering, Berlin, Germany and Vienna, Austria), a stable prostacyclin analogue and potent vasodilator, on haemodynamics and functional status was investigated in 12 patients with severe pulmonary hypertension. Haemodynamic measurements and vasodilator testing by right heart catheterization were performed prior to and after long-term iloprost inhalation therapy. Haemodynamic improvement or increased exercise tolerance was not observed in any of the patients. After a mean+/-SD treatment period of 10+/-5 months, mean+/-SD pulmonary vascular resistance had increased from 11+/-3 Wood Units (mmHg.L(-1).min) to 13+/-4 Wood Units, with unchanged arterial oxygen saturation (92+/-4%, versus 91+/-4%). Within the study period, three patients went into right heart failure and had to be placed on intravenous epoprostenol. The authors conclude that inhaled iloprost in addition to conventional therapy in the presently recommended dose of 100 microg.day(-1) delivered in 8-10 2 h portions, is not an efficient vasodilator therapy in severe pulmonary hypertension. It remains to be shown whether dose increases and/or combination protocols will be effective, or whether inhalation of iloprost may be safe for selected cases of pulmonary hypertension.

  14. Finite element modeling of long-term fluid-structure interaction problems in geological media

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    A model is developed to predict long-term thermal creep and creep rupture in geological structures under multiaxial stress states and under elevated temperature conditions. An example of the method is given showing the behavior of the crust and mantle while undergoing intrusion by a low density diaper. (ACR)

  15. Potential effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) on coastal wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the atmosphere has steadily increased from 280 parts per million (ppm) in preindustrial times to 381 ppm today and is predicted by some models to double within the next century. Some of the important pathways whereby changes in atmospheric CO2 may impact coastal wetlands include changes in temperature, rainfall, and hurricane intensity (fig. 1). Increases in CO2 can contribute to global warming, which may (1) accelerate sea-level rise through melting of polar ice fields and steric expansion of oceans, (2) alter rainfall patterns and salinity regimes, and (3) change the intensity and frequency of tropical storms and hurricanes. Sea-level rise combined with changes in storm activity may affect erosion and sedimentation rates and patterns in coastal wetlands and maintenance of soil elevations.Feedback loops between plant growth and hydroedaphic conditions also contribute to maintenance of marsh elevations through accumulation of organic matter. Although increasing CO2 concentration may contribute to global warming and climate changes, it may also have a direct impact on plant growth and development by stimulating photosynthesis or improving water use efficiency. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey are examining responses of wetland plants to elevated CO2 concentration and other factors. This research will lead to a better understanding of future changes in marsh species composition, successional rates and patterns, ecological functioning, and vulnerability to sea-level rise and other global change factors.

  16. Nitrogen-mediated effects of elevated CO2 on intra-aggregate soil pore structure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While previous elevated atmospheric CO2 research has addressed changes in belowground processes, its effects on soil structure remain virtually undescribed. This study examined the long-term effects of elevated CO2 and N fertilization on soil structural changes in a bahiagrass pasture grown on a san...

  17. Mineral nutrition and plant responses to elevated levels of atmospheric CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, A.

    1996-08-01

    The atmospheric concentration of CO{sub 2}, a radiatively-active ({open_quotes}green-house{close_quotes}) gas, is increasing. This increase is considered a post-industrial phenomenon attributable to increasing rates of fossil fuel combustion and changing land use practices, particularly deforestation. Climate changes resulting from such elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels, in addition to the direct effects of increased CO{sub 2}, are expected to modify the productivity of forests and alter species distributions. Elevated levels of CO{sub 2} have been shown, in some cases, to lead to enhanced growth rates in plants, particularly those with C{sub 3} metabolism - indicating that plant growth is CO{sub 2}-limited in these situations. Since the major process underlying growth is CO{sub 2} assimilation via photosynthesis in leaves, plant growth represents a potential for sequestering atmospheric carbon into biomass, but this potential could be hampered by plant carbon sink size. Carbon sinks are utilization sites for assimilated carbon, enabling carbon assimilation to proceed without potential inhibition from the accumulation of assimilate (photosynthate). Plant growth provides new sinks for assimilated carbon which permits greater uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide. However, sinks are, on the whole, reduced in size by stress events due to the adverse effects of stress on photosynthetic rates and therefore growth. This document reviews some of the literature on plant responses to increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide and to inadequate nutrient supply rates, and with this background, the potential for nutrient-limited plants to respond to increasing carbon dioxide is addressed. Conclusions from the literature review are then tested experimentally by means of a case study exploring carbon-nitrogen interactions in seedlings of loblolly pine.

  18. Habitable Planets: Interior Dynamics and Long-Term Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, Paul J.; Ammann, Michael M.; Brodholt, John P.; Dobson, David P.; Valencia, Diana

    2014-04-01

    Here, the state of our knowledge regarding the interior dynamics and evolution of habitable terrestrial planets including Earth and super-Earths is reviewed, and illustrated using state-of-the-art numerical models. Convection of the rocky mantle is the key process that drives the evolution of the interior: it causes plate tectonics, controls heat loss from the metallic core (which generates the magnetic field) and drives long-term volatile cycling between the atmosphere/ocean and interior. Geoscientists have been studying the dynamics and evolution of Earth's interior since the discovery of plate tectonics in the late 1960s and on many topics our understanding is very good, yet many first-order questions remain. It is commonly thought that plate tectonics is necessary for planetary habitability because of its role in long-term volatile cycles that regulate the surface environment. Plate tectonics is the surface manifestation of convection in the 2900-km deep rocky mantle, yet exactly how plate tectonics arises is still quite uncertain; other terrestrial planets like Venus and Mars instead have a stagnant lithosphere- essentially a single plate covering the entire planet. Nevertheless, simple scalings as well as more complex models indicate that plate tectonics should be easier on larger planets (super-Earths), other things being equal. The dynamics of terrestrial planets, both their surface tectonics and deep mantle dynamics, change over billions of years as a planet cools. Partial melting is a key process influencing solid planet evolution. Due to the very high pressure inside super-Earths' mantles the viscosity would normally be expected to be very high, as is also indicated by our density function theory (DFT) calculations. Feedback between internal heating, temperature and viscosity leads to a superadiabatic temperature profile and self-regulation of the mantle viscosity such that sluggish convection still occurs.

  19. Elevated atmospheric CO2 alters the arthropod community in a forest understory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Jason; Zangerl, Arthur R.; Berenbaum, May R.; Sparks, Jed P.; Elich, Lauren; Eisenstein, Alissa; DeLucia, Evan H.

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which overall population sizes and community composition of arthropods in a naturally occurring forest understory are altered by elevated CO2. The Free Air Concentration Enrichment (FACE) method was used to fumigate large, replicated plots in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, USA to achieve the CO2 concentration predicted for 2050 (˜580 μl l-1). In addition, the extent to which unrestricted herbivorous arthropods were spatially delimited in their resource acquisition was determined. Stable isotope data for spiders (δ13C and δ15N) were collected in ambient and elevated CO2 plots and analyzed to determine whether their prey species moved among plots. Elevated CO2 had no effect on total arthropod numbers but had a large effect on the composition of the arthropod community. Insects collected in our samples were identified to a level that allowed for an assignment of trophic classification (generally to family). For the groups of insects sensitive to atmospheric gas composition, there was an increase in the numbers of individuals collected in primarily predaceous orders (Araneae and Hymenoptera; from 60% to more than 150%) under elevated CO2 and a decrease in the numbers in primarily herbivorous orders (Lepidoptera and Coleoptera; from -30 to -45%). Isotopic data gave no indication that the treatment plots represented a "boundary" to the movement of insects or that there were distinct and independent insect populations inside and outside the treatment plots. A simple two-ended mixing model estimates 55% of the carbon and nitrogen in spider biomass originated external to the elevated CO2 plots. In addition to changes in insect performance, decreases in herbivorous arthropods and increases in predaceous arthropods may also be factors involved in reduced herbivory under elevated CO2 in this forest.

  20. Long-term Nicotine Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schnoll, Robert A.; Goelz, Patricia M.; Veluz-Wilkins, Anna; Blazekovic, Sonja; Powers, Lindsay; Leone, Frank T.; Gariti, Peter; Wileyto, E. Paul; Hitsman, Brian

    2015-01-01

    and extended treatment arms (20.3% vs 23.8%; OR, 1.17 [95% CI, 0.69-1.98]; P = .57). Similarly, we found no difference in week 52 abstinence rates between participants in the extended and standard treatment arms (26.0% vs 21.7%; OR, 1.33 [95% CI, 0.72-2.45]; P = .36). Treatment duration was not associated with any adverse effects or adherence to the counseling regimen, but participants in the maintenance treatment arm reported lower adherence to the nicotine patch regimen compared with those in the standard and extended treatment arms (mean [SD], 3.94 [2.5], 4.61 [2.0], and 4.7 [2.4] patches/wk, respectively; F2,522 = 6.03; P = .003). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The findings support the safety of long-term use of nicotine patch treatment, although they do not support efficacy beyond 24 weeks of treatment in a broad group of smokers. TRIAL REGISTRATION clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01047527 PMID:25705872

  1. Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Oechel, W.C.

    1993-02-01

    Northern ecosystems contain up to 455 Gt of C in the soil active layer and upper permafrost, which is equivalent to approximately 60% of the carbon currently in the atmosphere as CO{sub 2}. Much of this carbon is stored in the soil as dead organic matter. Its fate is subject to the net effects of global change on the plant and soil systems of northern ecosystems. The arctic alone contains about 60 Gt C, 90% of which is present in the soil active layer and upper permafrost, and is assumed to have been a sink for CO{sub 2} during the historic and recent geologic past. Depending on the nature, rate, and magnitude of global environmental change, the arctic may have a positive or negative feedback on global change. Results from the DOE- funded research efforts of 1990 and 1991 indicate that the arctic has become a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Measurements made in the Barrow, Alaska region during 1992 support these results. This change coincides with recent climatic variation in the arctic, and suggests a positive feedback of arctic ecosystems on atmospheric CO{sub 2} and global change. There are obvious potential errors in scaling plot level measurements to landscape, mesoscale, and global spatial scales. In light of the results from the recent DOE-funded research, and the remaining uncertainties regarding the change in arctic ecosystem function due to high latitude warming, a revised set of research goals is proposed for the 1993--94 year. The research proposed in this application has four principal aspects: (A) Long- term response of arctic plants and ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}. (B) Circumpolar patterns of net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux. (C) In situ controls by temperature and moisture on net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux. (D) Scaling of CO{sub 2} flux from plot, to landscape, to regional scales.

  2. Grassland biodiversity bounces back from long-term nitrogen addition.

    PubMed

    Storkey, J; Macdonald, A J; Poulton, P R; Scott, T; Köhler, I H; Schnyder, H; Goulding, K W T; Crawley, M J

    2015-12-17

    The negative effect of increasing atmospheric nitrogen (N) pollution on grassland biodiversity is now incontrovertible. However, the recent introduction of cleaner technologies in the UK has led to reductions in the emissions of nitrogen oxides, with concomitant decreases in N deposition. The degree to which grassland biodiversity can be expected to 'bounce back' in response to these improvements in air quality is uncertain, with a suggestion that long-term chronic N addition may lead to an alternative low biodiversity state. Here we present evidence from the 160-year-old Park Grass Experiment at Rothamsted Research, UK, that shows a positive response of biodiversity to reducing N addition from either atmospheric pollution or fertilizers. The proportion of legumes, species richness and diversity increased across the experiment between 1991 and 2012 as both wet and dry N deposition declined. Plots that stopped receiving inorganic N fertilizer in 1989 recovered much of the diversity that had been lost, especially if limed. There was no evidence that chronic N addition has resulted in an alternative low biodiversity state on the Park Grass plots, except where there has been extreme acidification, although it is likely that the recovery of plant communities has been facilitated by the twice-yearly mowing and removal of biomass. This may also explain why a comparable response of plant communities to reduced N inputs has yet to be observed in the wider landscape.

  3. Grassland biodiversity bounces back from long-term nitrogen addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storkey, J.; MacDonald, A. J.; Poulton, P. R.; Scott, T.; Köhler, I. H.; Schnyder, H.; Goulding, K. W. T.; Crawley, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The negative effect of increasing atmospheric nitrogen (N) pollution on grassland biodiversity is now incontrovertible. However, the recent introduction of cleaner technologies in the UK has led to reductions in the emissions of nitrogen oxides, with concomitant decreases in N deposition. The degree to which grassland biodiversity can be expected to ‘bounce back’ in response to these improvements in air quality is uncertain, with a suggestion that long-term chronic N addition may lead to an alternative low biodiversity state. Here we present evidence from the 160-year-old Park Grass Experiment at Rothamsted Research, UK, that shows a positive response of biodiversity to reducing N addition from either atmospheric pollution or fertilizers. The proportion of legumes, species richness and diversity increased across the experiment between 1991 and 2012 as both wet and dry N deposition declined. Plots that stopped receiving inorganic N fertilizer in 1989 recovered much of the diversity that had been lost, especially if limed. There was no evidence that chronic N addition has resulted in an alternative low biodiversity state on the Park Grass plots, except where there has been extreme acidification, although it is likely that the recovery of plant communities has been facilitated by the twice-yearly mowing and removal of biomass. This may also explain why a comparable response of plant communities to reduced N inputs has yet to be observed in the wider landscape.

  4. Long-term stability of the Earth's climate.

    PubMed

    Kasting, J F

    1989-01-01

    Earth's climate has remained reasonably temperate for at least the last 3.5 billion years, despite a large increase in solar luminosity with time. The increase in solar flux has probably been offset by a decrease in atmospheric CO2 concentration caused by a negative feedback in the carbonate-silicate geochemical cycle. The same feedback mechanism implies that an Earth-like planet could remain habitable (i.e. possess liquid water) out to a least the orbit of Mars. The initial atmospheric CO2 concentration may have been much higher than the amount required to offset the lower solar output, in which case the Earth may have originally been much hotter than it is today. However, once the initial accretion period was over, Earth should have been stable against either a runaway greenhouse, that is, complete evaporation of the oceans, or against rapid loss of water. Long-term climatic evolution has thus far been studied only with one-dimensional, globally-averaged climate models. Although such models can provide a qualitative understanding of climate history, they rely on a number of assumptions that may not have been valid in the past. Some problems that deserve to be investigated with more sophisticated climate models are discussed. PMID:11539789

  5. Stochastic Induction of Long-Term Potentiation and Long-Term Depression.

    PubMed

    Antunes, G; Roque, A C; Simoes-de-Souza, F M

    2016-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP) of granule-Purkinje cell synapses are persistent synaptic alterations induced by high and low rises of the intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca(2+)]), respectively. The occurrence of LTD involves the activation of a positive feedback loop formed by protein kinase C, phospholipase A2, and the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase pathway, and its expression comprises the reduction of the population of synaptic AMPA receptors. Recently, a stochastic computational model of these signalling processes demonstrated that, in single synapses, LTD is probabilistic and bistable. Here, we expanded this model to simulate LTP, which requires protein phosphatases and the increase in the population of synaptic AMPA receptors. Our results indicated that, in single synapses, while LTD is bistable, LTP is gradual. Ca(2+) induced both processes stochastically. The magnitudes of the Ca(2+) signals and the states of the signalling network regulated the likelihood of LTP and LTD and defined dynamic macroscopic Ca(2+) thresholds for the synaptic modifications in populations of synapses according to an inverse Bienenstock, Cooper and Munro (BCM) rule or a sigmoidal function. In conclusion, our model presents a unifying mechanism that explains the macroscopic properties of LTP and LTD from their dynamics in single synapses. PMID:27485552

  6. Stochastic Induction of Long-Term Potentiation and Long-Term Depression

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, G.; Roque, A. C.; Simoes-de-Souza, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP) of granule-Purkinje cell synapses are persistent synaptic alterations induced by high and low rises of the intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]), respectively. The occurrence of LTD involves the activation of a positive feedback loop formed by protein kinase C, phospholipase A2, and the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase pathway, and its expression comprises the reduction of the population of synaptic AMPA receptors. Recently, a stochastic computational model of these signalling processes demonstrated that, in single synapses, LTD is probabilistic and bistable. Here, we expanded this model to simulate LTP, which requires protein phosphatases and the increase in the population of synaptic AMPA receptors. Our results indicated that, in single synapses, while LTD is bistable, LTP is gradual. Ca2+ induced both processes stochastically. The magnitudes of the Ca2+ signals and the states of the signalling network regulated the likelihood of LTP and LTD and defined dynamic macroscopic Ca2+ thresholds for the synaptic modifications in populations of synapses according to an inverse Bienenstock, Cooper and Munro (BCM) rule or a sigmoidal function. In conclusion, our model presents a unifying mechanism that explains the macroscopic properties of LTP and LTD from their dynamics in single synapses. PMID:27485552

  7. Reforming long-term care financing through insurance

    PubMed Central

    Meiners, Mark R.

    1988-01-01

    Until recently, insurance for long-term care was not viewed as feasible. This perception has changed dramatically in the past few years. Several models of long-term care insurance have begun to be tested. Although the application of insurance principles to long-term care is still new, the emergence of private market interest in developing long-term care insurance has been a catalyst to renewed public-policy support for reforming the way we pay for long-term care. States, in particular, have become interested in developing public-private partnerships to support the emergence of long-term care insurance that could help relieve the mounting pressure on Medicaid budgets. PMID:10312962

  8. Spatial Patterns of Atmospherically Deposited Organic Contaminants at High Elevation in the Southern Sierra Nevada Mountains, California

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospherically deposited contaminants in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California have been implicated as adversely affecting amphibians and fish, yet the distributions of contaminants within the mountains are poorly known, particularly at high elevation. We tested the hypothe...

  9. Long-term change detection from historical photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, T.; Schenk, T.

    2006-12-01

    There is an increasing awareness in the science community about the potential of utilizing old photography and derived products together with new data for change detection and for extending the timeline as far back as possible. For example recent observations have revealed dramatic changes in the behavior of many ice streams and outlet glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica, ranging from complete shutdown of ice streams to manifold increases in velocity. Most observations are typically from the comparatively short time period since the beginning of the civilian satellite imagery (1980s), with most quantitative measurements starting only 10-15 years ago. To evaluate whether ongoing observed changes are climatically significant, changes must be determined over longer time frames. Earlier terrestrial and aerial photography and maps indeed exist and the objective of the project to disseminate these historical data and to develop techniques and tools for combining (fusing) old and new data in order to compile long-term time series of changes in the polar regions, for example in ice extent, velocity and surface elevations. The presentation focuses on new methodologies and interdisciplinary approaches that greatly facilitate the use of old photography for quantitative studies in the polar regions. An absolute prerequisite for the successful use of old photography is a rigorous registration, either with other sensory input data or with respect to 3D reference systems. Recent advances in digital photogrammetry allow registration with linear features, such as lines, curves and free-form lines without the need for identifying identical points. The concept of sensor invariant features was developed to register such disparate data sets as aerial imagery and 3D laser point clouds, originating from satellite laser altimetry or airborne laser scanning systems. Examples illustrating these concepts are shown from the Transantarctic Mountains, including the registration of aerial

  10. Highly elevated atmospheric levels of volatile organic compounds in the Uintah Basin, Utah.

    PubMed

    Helmig, D; Thompson, C R; Evans, J; Boylan, P; Hueber, J; Park, J-H

    2014-05-01

    Oil and natural gas production in the Western United States has grown rapidly in recent years, and with this industrial expansion, growing environmental concerns have arisen regarding impacts on water supplies and air quality. Recent studies have revealed highly enhanced atmospheric levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from primary emissions in regions of heavy oil and gas development and associated rapid photochemical production of ozone during winter. Here, we present surface and vertical profile observations of VOC from the Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Studies conducted in January-February of 2012 and 2013. These measurements identify highly elevated levels of atmospheric alkane hydrocarbons with enhanced rates of C2-C5 nonmethane hydrocarbon (NMHC) mean mole fractions during temperature inversion events in 2013 at 200-300 times above the regional and seasonal background. Elevated atmospheric NMHC mole fractions coincided with build-up of ambient 1-h ozone to levels exceeding 150 ppbv (parts per billion by volume). The total annual mass flux of C2-C7 VOC was estimated at 194 ± 56 × 10(6) kg yr(-1), equivalent to the annual VOC emissions of a fleet of ∼100 million automobiles. Total annual fugitive emission of the aromatic compounds benzene and toluene, considered air toxics, were estimated at 1.6 ± 0.4 × 10(6) and 2.0 ± 0.5 × 10(6) kg yr(-1), respectively. These observations reveal a strong causal link between oil and gas emissions, accumulation of air toxics, and significant production of ozone in the atmospheric surface layer.

  11. Effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 on carbon allocation patterns in Eriphorum vaginatum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, L.

    2013-12-01

    Greenhouse gases of particular importance to the human induced greenhouse effect are, e.g., CO2 and CH4. Natural and agricultural wetlands together contribute with over 40 % of the annual atmospheric emissions of CH4 and are, therefore, considered to be the largest single contributor of this gas to the troposphere. There is a growing concern that increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 will stimulate CH4 production and emission from wetland ecosystems, resulting in feedback mechanisms that in future will increase the radiative forcing of these ecosystems. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 on fluxes of CO2 and CH4, biomass allocation patterns and amount of labile substrates (i.e. low molecular weight organic acids, OAs) for CH4 production in the root vicinity of Eriophorum vaginatum. Eriophorum cores and plants were collected at Fäjemyr, a temperate ombrotrophic bog situated in the south of Sweden. These were cultivated under controlled environmental conditions in an atmosphere of 390 or 800 ppm of CO2 (n=5 per treatment). After a one month development period gas fluxes were measured twice per week over one month using a Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (Gasmet Dx-4030) and OAs using a liquid chromatography-ionspray tandem mass spectrometry system (Dionex ICS-2500 and Applied Biosystems 2000 Q-Trap triple quadrupole MS). The results clearly show that elevated CO2 significantly affects all measured parts of the carbon cycle. Greenhouse gas fluxes were significantly (repeated measures test) higher under elevated CO2 conditions, NEE p < 0.0001, Reco p = 0.005, GPP p = 0.012 and CH4 p = 0.022. As were biomass of leaves, roots and concentration of OAs around the roots of plants, p = 0.045, p = 0 = 0.045 and p = 0.045 respectively (Kruskal wallis 1-way anova). The study shows higher CH4 emissions under elevated CO2 and that this may be due to a priming effect, due to input of fresh labile-C via living roots and

  12. Long-Term Monitoring of Global Climate Forcings and Feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, J. (Editor); Rossow, W. (Editor); Fung, I. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    A workshop on Long-Term Monitoring of Global Climate Forcings and Feedbacks was held February 3-4, 1992, at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies to discuss the measurements required to interpret long-term global temperature changes, to critique the proposed contributions of a series of small satellites (Climsat), and to identify needed complementary monitoring. The workshop concluded that long-term (several decades) of continuous monitoring of the major climate forcings and feedbacks is essential for understanding long-term climate change.

  13. Information exchange between short term and long term operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijs, Steven

    2016-04-01

    This research focuses on the interactions between optimal short term and long term operations of managed water systems. Stochastic Dynamic Programming is used as a framework to find and analyze optimal operations. When considering optimal operations under uncertainty, the short term operations are influenced by the long term optimal policy through the value function of the end-state at the short term horizon. Conversely, the optimal long-term operations are influenced by the value of future decisions, which is partly determined by the short term operations. This leads to a two-way information flow between short and long term operations. The implications of this information flow are discussed.

  14. Long-Term Monitoring of Global Climate Forcings and Feedbacks

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.; Rossow, W.; Fung, I.

    1993-09-01

    A workshop on Long-Term Monitoring of Global Climate Forcings and Feedbacks was held February 3-4, 1992, at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies to discuss the measurements required to interpret long-term global temperature changes, to critique the proposed contributions of a series of small satellites (Climsat), and to identify needed complementary monitoring. The workshop concluded that long-term (several decades) of continuous monitoring of the major climate forcings and feedbacks is essential for understanding long-term climate change. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  15. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and N fertilization on bahiagrass pastures in the Southeastern U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on pasture systems remain understudied in the Southeastern US. A 10-year study of bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flüggé) response to elevated CO2 was established in 2005 using open top field chambers on a Blanton loamy sand (loamy siliceous, thermic, Grossarenic...

  16. Long-term nitrogen deposition linked to reduced water use efficiency in forests with low phosphorus availability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiqun; Liu, Bao; Davis, Murray; Sardans, Jordi; Peñuelas, Josep; Billings, Sharon

    2016-04-01

    The impact of long-term nitrogen (N) deposition is under-studied in phosphorus (P)-limited subtropical forests. We exploited historically collected herbarium specimens to investigate potential physiological responses of trees in three subtropical forests representing an urban-to-rural gradient, across which N deposition has probably varied over the past six decades. We measured foliar [N] and [P] and stable carbon (δ(13) C), oxygen (δ(18) O) and nitrogen (δ(15) N) isotopic compositions in tissue from herbarium specimens of plant species collected from 1947 to 2014. Foliar [N] and N : P increased, and δ(15) N and [P] decreased in the two forests close to urban centers. Consistent with recent studies demonstrating that N deposition in the region is (15) N-depleted, these data suggest that the increased foliar [N] and N : P, and decreased [P], may be attributable to atmospheric deposition and associated enhancement of P limitation. Estimates of intrinsic water use efficiency calculated from foliar δ(13) C decreased by c. 30% from the 1950s to 2014, contrasting with multiple studies investigating similar parameters in N-limited forests. This effect may reflect decreased photosynthesis, as suggested by a conceptual model of foliar δ(13) C and δ(18) O. Long-term N deposition may exacerbate P limitation and mitigate projected increases in carbon stocks driven by elevated CO2 in forests on P-limited soils. PMID:26661404

  17. Impacts of elevated atmospheric CO2 on nutrient content of important food crops

    PubMed Central

    Dietterich, Lee H.; Zanobetti, Antonella; Kloog, Itai; Huybers, Peter; Leakey, Andrew D. B.; Bloom, Arnold J.; Carlisle, Eli; Fernando, Nimesha; Fitzgerald, Glenn; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Holbrook, N. Michele; Nelson, Randall L.; Norton, Robert; Ottman, Michael J.; Raboy, Victor; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Sartor, Karla A.; Schwartz, Joel; Seneweera, Saman; Usui, Yasuhiro; Yoshinaga, Satoshi; Myers, Samuel S.

    2015-01-01

    One of the many ways that climate change may affect human health is by altering the nutrient content of food crops. However, previous attempts to study the effects of increased atmospheric CO2 on crop nutrition have been limited by small sample sizes and/or artificial growing conditions. Here we present data from a meta-analysis of the nutritional contents of the edible portions of 41 cultivars of six major crop species grown using free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) technology to expose crops to ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations in otherwise normal field cultivation conditions. This data, collected across three continents, represents over ten times more data on the nutrient content of crops grown in FACE experiments than was previously available. We expect it to be deeply useful to future studies, such as efforts to understand the impacts of elevated atmospheric CO2 on crop macro- and micronutrient concentrations, or attempts to alleviate harmful effects of these changes for the billions of people who depend on these crops for essential nutrients. PMID:26217490

  18. [Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on endogenous hormones in gingko leaves].

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Mei; He, Xing-Yuan; Chen, Wei; Fu, Shi-Lei; Zhang, Li-Hong

    2007-07-01

    With top-opened chamber system, this paper studied the responses of endogenous hormones abscisic acid (ABA), indoleacetic acid (IAA), zeatin riboside (ZR) and gibberellins (GA3) in gingko leaves to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (ambient + 350 micromol x mol(-1), EC). The results showed that EC could decrease the ABA content. After treated with EC for 120 days, the ABA content could be decreased by 63.0%, in comparing with the control. EC could also decrease the contents of IAA and ZR, and the decrement could reach significant with the extension of the treatment. The IAA content was 2 times higher after 100 days treatment, and ZR content was 2.5 times higher after 80 days treatment than those of CK. Under EC, the peak of GA3 appeared earlier. The (IAA + GA3 + ZR)/ABA ratio decreased gradually with the growth of gingko, and was obviously higher than the control at later stage (after 40-60 days treatment), indicating that elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration could promote the growth and development of gingko.

  19. Impacts of elevated atmospheric CO₂ on nutrient content of important food crops.

    PubMed

    Dietterich, Lee H; Zanobetti, Antonella; Kloog, Itai; Huybers, Peter; Leakey, Andrew D B; Bloom, Arnold J; Carlisle, Eli; Fernando, Nimesha; Fitzgerald, Glenn; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Holbrook, N Michele; Nelson, Randall L; Norton, Robert; Ottman, Michael J; Raboy, Victor; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Sartor, Karla A; Schwartz, Joel; Seneweera, Saman; Usui, Yasuhiro; Yoshinaga, Satoshi; Myers, Samuel S

    2015-01-01

    One of the many ways that climate change may affect human health is by altering the nutrient content of food crops. However, previous attempts to study the effects of increased atmospheric CO2 on crop nutrition have been limited by small sample sizes and/or artificial growing conditions. Here we present data from a meta-analysis of the nutritional contents of the edible portions of 41 cultivars of six major crop species grown using free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) technology to expose crops to ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations in otherwise normal field cultivation conditions. This data, collected across three continents, represents over ten times more data on the nutrient content of crops grown in FACE experiments than was previously available. We expect it to be deeply useful to future studies, such as efforts to understand the impacts of elevated atmospheric CO2 on crop macro- and micronutrient concentrations, or attempts to alleviate harmful effects of these changes for the billions of people who depend on these crops for essential nutrients.

  20. Observations of the uptake of carbonyl sulfide (COS) by trees under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval-Soto, L.; Kesselmeier, M.; Schmitt, V.; Wild, A.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2012-02-01

    Global change affects ecosystems to adapt to elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2). We understand that carbonyl sulfide (COS), a trace gas which is involved in building up the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer, is taken up by vegetation with the same triad of the enzmyes which are metabolizing the CO2, i.e. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase-Oxygenase (Rubisco), Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase (PEP-Co) and carbonic anhydrase (CA). Therefore, we discuss a physiological/biochemical adaptation of these enzymes to affect the sink strength of vegetation for COS. We investigated the adaption of two European tree species, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus ilex, grown inside chambers under elevated CO2 and determined the exchange characteristics and the content of CA after a 1-2 yr period of adaption from 350 ppm to 800 ppm CO2. We could demonstrate that the COS compensation point, the CA activity and the deposition velocities may change and cause a decrease of the COS uptake by plant ecosystems. As a consequence, the atmospheric COS level may rise leading to higher input of this trace gas into the stratosphere and causing a higher energy reflection by the stratospheric sulfur aerosol into space, thus counteracting the direct radiative forcing by the tropospheric COS.