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Sample records for longer intestinal persistence

  1. Longer Intestinal Persistence of Enterococcus faecalis Compared to Enterococcus faecium Clones in Intensive-Care-Unit Patients▿

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Garbajosa, Patricia; del Campo, Rosa; Coque, Teresa M.; Asensio, Angel; Bonten, Marc; Willems, Rob; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of intestinal colonization with enterococcal clones in intensive-care-unit (ICU) patients was evaluated. Eight patients admitted directly to the neurosurgical ICU at the Ramón y Cajal University Hospital (Madrid, Spain) from the community and with no overlapping stay during a 10-month period in 2006 were studied. Rectal swab specimens were collected on admission and daily until the patients were discharged. Clonality was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Clonal colonization dynamics were estimated by using two new parameters: the clonal diversity per patient per day (CDPD) and the clonal persistence ratio (CPR). Enterococcus faecalis isolates (n = 123) and Enterococcus faecium isolates (n = 66) were resolved into 13 and 15 clones, respectively. The CDPD of E. faecalis steadily increased during admission, and E. faecalis showed a higher (P = 0.001) CPR value than E. faecium (0.86 and 0.42, respectively). E. faecium, with the exception of an ampicillin-resistant clone belonging to clonal complex 17, frequently appeared as a short-term colonizer, even though the E. faecalis clones had significantly (P = 0.03) more days under antibiotic exposure than E. faecium (77.5 and 65 days/100 colonization days, respectively). E. faecalis had a longer persistence than E. faecium, except for the CC17 ampicillin-resistant clone, and E. faecalis showed a cumulative increase in CDPD, whereas E. faecium did not. CDPD and CPR were useful for measuring the dynamics of intestinal colonization with enterococcal clones. PMID:19052172

  2. Persistence of the intestinal defect in abetalipoproteinaemia after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Braegger, C P; Belli, D C; Mentha, G; Steinmann, B

    1998-07-01

    A 16-year-old girl is described with abetalipoproteinaemia who underwent liver transplantation for hepatic cirrhosis. After this procedure her serum lipoprotein profile was corrected; however, fat malabsorption and steatorrhea persisted because the primary defect, a mutant microsomal triglyceride-transfer protein, remains expressed in the intestine.

  3. Increasing persistency in lay and stabilising egg quality in longer laying cycles. What are the challenges?

    PubMed Central

    Bain, M. M.; Nys, Y.; Dunn, I.C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the past 50 years, selection starting initially at the breed level and then using quantitative genetics coupled with a sophisticated breeding pyramid, has resulted in a very productive hybrid for a variety of traits associated with egg production.One major trait currently being developed further is persistency of lay and the concept of the “long life” layer. Persistency in lay however cannot be achieved without due consideration of how to sustain egg quality and the health and welfare of the birds in longer laying cycles. These multiple goals require knowledge and consideration of the bird’s physiology, nutritional requirements, which vary depending on age and management system, reproductive status and choice of the selection criteria applied.The recent advent of molecular genetics offers considerable hope that these multiple elements can be balanced for the good of all in the industry including the hens.The “long life” layer, which will be capable of producing 500 eggs in a laying cycle of 100 weeks, is therefore on the horizon, bringing with it the benefits of a more efficient utilisation of diminishing resources, including land, water, raw materials for feed as well as a reduction in waste, and an overall reduced carbon footprint. PMID:26982003

  4. Costs and longer-term savings of parenting programmes for the prevention of persistent conduct disorder: a modelling study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Conduct disorders are the most common psychiatric disorders in children and may persist into adulthood in about 50% of cases. The costs to society are high and impact many public sector agencies. Parenting programmes have been shown to positively affect child behaviour, but little is known about their potential long-term cost-effectiveness. We therefore estimate the costs of and longer-term savings from evidence-based parenting programmes for the prevention of persistent conduct disorder. Methods A decision-analytic Markov model compares two scenarios: 1) a 5-year old with clinical conduct disorder receives an evidence-based parenting programme; 2) the same 5-year old does not receive the programme. Cost-savings analysis is performed by comparing the probability that conduct disorder persists over time in each scenario, adopting both a public sector and a societal perspective. If the intervention is successful in reducing persistent conduct disorder, cost savings may arise from reduced use of health services, education support, social care, voluntary agencies and from crimes averted. Results Results strongly suggest that parenting programmes reduce the chance that conduct disorder persists into adulthood and are cost-saving to the public sector within 5-8 years under base case conditions. Total savings to society over 25 years are estimated at £16,435 per family, which compares with an intervention cost in the range of £952-£2,078 (2008/09 prices). Conclusions Effective implementation of evidence-based parenting programmes is likely to yield cost savings to the public sector and society. More research is needed to address evidence gaps regarding the current level of provision, longer-term effectiveness and questions of implementation, engagement and equity. PMID:21999434

  5. Intestinal prolapse through a persistent omphalomesenteric duct causing small-bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Pauleau, Ghislain; Commandeur, Diane; Andro, Christophe; Chapellier, Xavier

    2012-07-11

    Persistent omphalomesenteric duct as a cause of small-bowel obstruction is an exceptional finding. A neonate presented with occlusion due to intestinal prolapse through a persistent omphalomesenteric duct. Remnants of the duct were successfully resected, and the postoperative course was uneventful. We discuss the presentation of omphalomesenteric duct and its management.

  6. HtpG contributes to Salmonella Typhimurium intestinal persistence in pigs.

    PubMed

    Verbrugghe, Elin; Van Parys, Alexander; Leyman, Bregje; Boyen, Filip; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank

    2015-10-14

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella Typhimurium) contamination of pork, is one of the major sources of human salmonellosis. The bacterium is able to persist and hide in asymptomatic carrier animals, generating a reservoir for Salmonella transmission to other animals and humans. Mechanisms involved in Salmonella persistence in pigs remain poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that the Salmonella htpG gene, encoding a homologue of the eukaryotic heat shock protein 90, contributes to Salmonella Typhimurium persistence in intestine-associated tissues of pigs, but not in the tonsils. HtpG does not seem to play an important role during the acute phase of infection. The contribution to persistence was shown to be associated with htpG-dependent Salmonella invasion and survival in porcine enterocytes and macrophages. These results reveal the role of HtpG as a virulence factor contributing to Salmonella persistence in pigs.

  7. Iloprost Use in Patients with Persistent Intestinal Ischemia Unsuitable for Revascularization.

    PubMed

    Nuzzo, Alexandre; Soudan, Damien; Billiauws, Lore; Bataille, Julie; Maggiori, Léon; Ronot, Maxime; Stocco, Jeanick; Bouhnik, Yoram; Castier, Yves; Corcos, Olivier

    2017-07-01

    Persistent or chronic intestinal ischemic injury (i3) can lead to severe malnutrition and acute mesenteric ischemia. Although recommended, revascularization of splanchnic arteries is sometimes unrealizable. We report a case series of iloprost use in consecutive stable patients with persistent i3 unsuitable for revascularization followed in a tertiary care center. The feasibility of revascularization was discussed and ruled out by a multidisciplinary team, and informed consent was obtained prior to consideration of a vasoactive therapy. Therapeutic response was defined at 6 months by a decrease in the use of analgesic and parenteral nutrition, and no need for intestinal resection. Between 2006 and 2015, 6 patients (mean age: 51) were included. Splanchnic vascular insufficiency was due to superior mesenteric artery (SMA) thrombosis (n = 4), dissection of the celiac trunk and SMA (n = 1), or repeated vasospasm resulting in chronic nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia (n = 1). Iloprost was delivered via continuous intravenous perfusion at a maximum dosage of 2 ng/kg/min for 6 hours/day on 4 consecutive days, without severe adverse events. Therapeutic response was observed in 4 patients, 3 of which completely stopped parenteral nutrition and analgesic with no need for intestinal resection. Our results are consistent with findings of a favorable effect of iloprost in patients with persistent splanchnic ischemia that should be confirmed in prospective trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Persistence of a recurrent group of intestinal helminth species in a coyote population from southern Texas.

    PubMed

    Radomski, A A; Pence, D B

    1993-06-01

    The persistence and interrelationships of a recurrent group of intestinal helminth species in a coyote population from southern Texas were determined; data were collected at 4-yr intervals (1979, 1983, and 1987). The a priori expectation was that a defined recurrent group of helminth species persisted over time and that the respective helminth species were stable in terms of their abundances. The Fager index and subsequent recurrent group analysis indicated a small group of taxonomically unrelated recurring species of helminths that always demonstrated affinities with each other and occasionally with certain of the remaining species. Although there were differences across host subpopulations delineated by sex and age, temporal changes reflective of extrinsic environmental variables acting on certain helminth species appeared to have the greatest effect on recurrent group size and structure. Three of the 8 common intestinal helminth species (Ancylostoma caninum, Oncicola canis, and Alaria marcianae) occurred in all recurrent groups. Thus, there was temporal persistence of a small recurrent group of dominant helminth species that formed the basis of the intestinal helminth community in this coyote population.

  9. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) among longer-term prison inmates is a prevalent, persistent and disabling disorder.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Ylva; Hirvikoski, Tatja; Lindefors, Nils

    2010-12-22

    ADHD is a common and disabling disorder, with an increased risk for coexisting disorders, substance abuse and delinquency. In the present study, we aimed at exploring ADHD and criminality. We estimated the prevalence of ADHD among longer-term prison inmates, described symptoms and cognitive functioning, and compared findings with ADHD among psychiatric outpatients and healthy controls. At Norrtälje Prison, we approached 315 male inmates for screening of childhood ADHD by the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS-25) and for present ADHD by the Adult ADHD Self-Report Screener (ASRS-Screener). The response rate was 62%. Further, we assessed 34 inmates for ADHD and coexisting disorders. Finally, we compared findings with 20 adult males with ADHD, assessed at a psychiatric outpatient clinic and 18 healthy controls. The estimated prevalence of adult ADHD among longer-term inmates was 40%. Only 2 out of 30 prison inmates confirmed with ADHD had received a diagnosis of ADHD during childhood, despite most needed health services and educational support. All subjects reported lifetime substance use disorder (SUD) where amphetamine was the most common drug. Mood and anxiety disorders were present among half of subjects; autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among one fourth and psychopathy among one tenth. Personality disorders were common; almost all inmates presented conduct disorder (CD) before antisocial personality disorder (APD). Prison inmates reported more ADHD symptoms during both childhood and adulthood, compared with ADHD psychiatric outpatients. Further, analysis of executive functions after controlling for IQ showed both ADHD groups performed poorer than controls on working memory tests. Besides, on a continuous performance test, the ADHD prison group displayed poorer results compared with both other groups. This study suggested ADHD to be present among 40% of adult male longer-term prison inmates. Further, ADHD and coexisting disorders, such as SUD, ASD, personality

  10. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) among longer-term prison inmates is a prevalent, persistent and disabling disorder

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background ADHD is a common and disabling disorder, with an increased risk for coexisting disorders, substance abuse and delinquency. In the present study, we aimed at exploring ADHD and criminality. We estimated the prevalence of ADHD among longer-term prison inmates, described symptoms and cognitive functioning, and compared findings with ADHD among psychiatric outpatients and healthy controls. Methods At Norrtälje Prison, we approached 315 male inmates for screening of childhood ADHD by the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS-25) and for present ADHD by the Adult ADHD Self-Report Screener (ASRS-Screener). The response rate was 62%. Further, we assessed 34 inmates for ADHD and coexisting disorders. Finally, we compared findings with 20 adult males with ADHD, assessed at a psychiatric outpatient clinic and 18 healthy controls. Results The estimated prevalence of adult ADHD among longer-term inmates was 40%. Only 2 out of 30 prison inmates confirmed with ADHD had received a diagnosis of ADHD during childhood, despite most needed health services and educational support. All subjects reported lifetime substance use disorder (SUD) where amphetamine was the most common drug. Mood and anxiety disorders were present among half of subjects; autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among one fourth and psychopathy among one tenth. Personality disorders were common; almost all inmates presented conduct disorder (CD) before antisocial personality disorder (APD). Prison inmates reported more ADHD symptoms during both childhood and adulthood, compared with ADHD psychiatric outpatients. Further, analysis of executive functions after controlling for IQ showed both ADHD groups performed poorer than controls on working memory tests. Besides, on a continuous performance test, the ADHD prison group displayed poorer results compared with both other groups. Conclusions This study suggested ADHD to be present among 40% of adult male longer-term prison inmates. Further, ADHD and coexisting disorders

  11. Long-term Persistence of Innate Lymphoid Cells in the Gut After Intestinal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Joshua; Zuber, Julien; Shonts, Brittany; Yang, Suxiao; Fu, Jianing; Martinez, Mercedes; Farber, Donna L; Kato, Tomoaki; Sykes, Megan

    2017-10-01

    Little is known about innate lymphoid cell (ILC) populations in the human gut, and the turnover of these cells and their subsets after transplantation has not been described. Intestinal samples were taken from 4 isolated intestine and 3 multivisceral transplant recipients at the time of any operative resection, such as stoma closure or revision. ILCs were isolated and analyzed by flow cytometry. The target population was defined as being negative for lineage markers and double-positive for CD45/CD127. Cells were further stained to define ILC subsets and a donor-specific or recipient-specific HLA marker to analyze chimerism. Donor-derived ILCs were found to persist greater than 8 years after transplantation. Additionally, the percentage of cells thought to be lymphoid tissue inducer cells among donor ILCs was far higher than that among recipient ILCs. Our findings demonstrate that donor-derived ILCs persist long-term after transplantation and support the notion that human lymphoid tissue inducer cells may form in the fetus and persist throughout life, as hypothesized in rodents. Correlation between chimerism and rejection, graft failure, and patient survival requires further study.

  12. Exposure to Heavy Ion Radiation Induces Persistent Oxidative Stress in Mouse Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Kallakury, Bhaskar V. S.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to radiolysis of water molecules and is short lived. Persistent oxidative stress has also been observed after radiation exposure and is implicated in the late effects of radiation. The goal of this study was to determine if long-term oxidative stress in freshly isolated mouse intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) is dependent on radiation quality at a dose relevant to fractionated radiotherapy. Mice (C57BL/6J; 6 to 8 weeks; female) were irradiated with 2 Gy of γ-rays, a low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, and intestinal tissues and IEC were collected 1 year after radiation exposure. Intracellular ROS, mitochondrial function, and antioxidant activity in IEC were studied by flow cytometry and biochemical assays. Oxidative DNA damage, cell death, and mitogenic activity in IEC were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Effects of γ radiation were compared to 56Fe radiation (iso-toxic dose: 1.6 Gy; energy: 1000 MeV/nucleon; LET: 148 keV/µm), we used as representative of high-LET radiation, since it's one of the important sources of high Z and high energy (HZE) radiation in cosmic rays. Radiation quality affected the level of persistent oxidative stress with higher elevation of intracellular ROS and mitochondrial superoxide in high-LET 56Fe radiation compared to unirradiated controls and γ radiation. NADPH oxidase activity, mitochondrial membrane damage, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were greater in 56Fe-irradiated mice. Compared to γ radiation oxidative DNA damage was higher, cell death ratio was unchanged, and mitotic activity was increased after 56Fe radiation. Taken together our results indicate that long-term functional dysregulation of mitochondria and increased NADPH oxidase activity are major contributing factors towards heavy ion radiation-induced persistent oxidative stress in IEC with potential for neoplastic transformation. PMID

  13. Theodore E. Woodward Award: Lactase Persistence SNPs in African Populations Regulate Promoter Activity in Intestinal Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, Eric; Ahn, Jong Kun

    2011-01-01

    Lactase-phlorizin hydrolase, lactase, is the intestinal enzyme responsible for the digestion of the milk sugar lactose. The majority of the world's human population experiences a decline in expression of the lactase gene by late childhood (lactase non-persistence). Individuals with lactase persistence, however, continue to express high levels of the lactase gene throughout adulthood. Lactase persistence is a heritable autosomal dominant condition and has been strongly correlated with several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located ∼14 kb upstream of the lactase gene in different ethnic populations: -13910*T in Europeans and -13907*G, -13915*G, and -14010*C in several African populations. The coincidence of the four SNPs clustering within 100 bp strongly suggests that this region mediates the lactase non-persistence/persistence phenotype. Having previously characterized the European SNP, we aimed to determine whether the African SNPs similarly mediate a functional role in regulating the lactase promoter. Human intestinal Caco-2 cells were transfected with lactase SNP/promoter-reporter constructs and assayed for promoter activity. The -13907*G and -13915*G SNPs result in a significant enhancement of lactase promoter activity relative to the ancestral lactase non-persistence genotype. Such differential regulation by the SNPs is consistent with a causative role in the mechanism specifying the lactase persistence phenotype. PMID:21686221

  14. Theodore E. Woodward Award: lactase persistence SNPs in African populations regulate promoter activity in intestinal cell culture.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Eric; Ahn, Jong Kun

    2011-01-01

    Lactase-phlorizin hydrolase, lactase, is the intestinal enzyme responsible for the digestion of the milk sugar lactose. The majority of the world's human population experiences a decline in expression of the lactase gene by late childhood (lactase non-persistence). Individuals with lactase persistence, however, continue to express high levels of the lactase gene throughout adulthood. Lactase persistence is a heritable autosomal dominant condition and has been strongly correlated with several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located ∼14 kb upstream of the lactase gene in different ethnic populations: -13910*T in Europeans and -13907*G, -13915*G, and -14010*C in several African populations. The coincidence of the four SNPs clustering within 100 bp strongly suggests that this region mediates the lactase non-persistence/persistence phenotype. Having previously characterized the European SNP, we aimed to determine whether the African SNPs similarly mediate a functional role in regulating the lactase promoter. Human intestinal Caco-2 cells were transfected with lactase SNP/promoter-reporter constructs and assayed for promoter activity. The -13907*G and -13915*G SNPs result in a significant enhancement of lactase promoter activity relative to the ancestral lactase non-persistence genotype. Such differential regulation by the SNPs is consistent with a causative role in the mechanism specifying the lactase persistence phenotype.

  15. Longitudinal Analysis of the Intestinal Microbiota in Persistently Stunted Young Children in South India

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Duy M.; Ramadass, Balamurugan; Kattula, Deepthi; Sarkar, Rajiv; Braunstein, Philip; Tai, Albert; Wanke, Christine A.; Hassoun, Soha; Kane, Anne V.; Naumova, Elena N.; Kang, Gagandeep; Ward, Honorine D.

    2016-01-01

    Stunting or reduced linear growth is very prevalent in low-income countries. Recent studies have demonstrated a causal relationship between alterations in the gut microbiome and moderate or severe acute malnutrition in children in these countries. However, there have been no primary longitudinal studies comparing the intestinal microbiota of persistently stunted children to that of non-stunted children in the same community. In this pilot study, we characterized gut microbial community composition and diversity of the fecal microbiota of 10 children with low birth weight and persistent stunting (cases) and 10 children with normal birth weight and no stunting (controls) from a birth cohort every 3 months up to 2 years of age in a slum community in south India. There was an increase in diversity indices (P <0.0001) with increasing age in all children. However, there were no differences in diversity indices or in the rates of their increase with increasing age between cases and controls. The percent relative abundance of the Bacteroidetes phylum was higher in stunted compared to control children at 12 months of age (P = 0.043). There was an increase in the relative abundance of this phylum with increasing age in all children (P = 0.0380) with no difference in the rate of increase between cases and controls. There was a decrease in the relative abundance of Proteobacteria (P = 0.0004) and Actinobacteria (P = 0.0489) with increasing age in cases. The microbiota of control children was enriched in probiotic species Bifidobacterium longum and Lactobacillus mucosae, whereas that of stunted children was enriched in inflammogenic taxa including those in the Desulfovibrio genus and Campylobacterales order. Larger, longitudinal studies on the compositional and functional maturation of the microbiome in children are needed. PMID:27228122

  16. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  17. Spatial and temporal stability of complex fractionated electrograms in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation over longer time periods: relationship to local electrogram cycle length.

    PubMed

    Verma, Atul; Wulffhart, Zaev; Beardsall, Marianne; Whaley, Bonnie; Hill, Carol; Khaykin, Yaariv

    2008-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation guided by complex fractionated electrograms (CFE) has been described, but the spatial and temporal stability of the electrograms (EGMs) has been questioned. The purpose of this study was to prospectively assess the spatial and temporal stability of CFE in patients with persistent AF. Twenty-four patients were studied. For 12 patients, two high-density CFE maps were performed during AF at baseline (0 minute) and 20 minutes later using the EnSite NavX system. Six-second bipolar EGMs were collected throughout the left atrium (LA) using a circular mapping catheter. Automated software measured the time between discrete local EGM deflections yielding a mean local cycle length (CL). EGMs with mean CL <120 ms were considered CFE. The LA was divided into six regions. Spatial distribution of EGMs at 0 and 20 minutes was compared in each region across three different CL ranges (A = 50-120 ms, B = 121-200 ms, C = 200-500 ms). The 0- and 20-minute CFE maps were directly superimposed offline in MATLAB, and the mean CL value for each point that was sampled in both maps was compared in each CL range (A-C). For the other 12 patients, repetitive measurements (1-minute intervals for 5 minutes) of mean CL were obtained at a sample point for each CL range (A-C) in each patient and compared for consistency. A total of 324 +/- 65 points were collected per map. Globally in the LA, the distribution of CLs did not change from 0 to 20 minutes (A: 47.1% vs 45.0%; B: 35.3% vs 36.5%; C: 16.0% vs 16.9%; P = .6). The CL distribution in each of the six regions of the LA also did not change significantly from 0 to 20 minutes. There was no significant change in repetitive CL measures for range A (mean DeltaCL 12 +/- 4 ms, P = .4). However, there was significant variation over 5 minutes for ranges B and C (mean DeltaCL 39 +/- 19 ms and 48 +/- 22 ms, respectively, P <.05 for both). Superimposing maps showed 74.7% point-to-point match for range A, 39.3% for range B

  18. Persistence and Toxin Production by Clostridium difficile within Human Intestinal Organoids Result in Disruption of Epithelial Paracellular Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Jhansi L.; Huang, Sha; Opp, Judith S.; Nagy, Melinda S.; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Young, Vincent B.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of infectious nosocomial diarrhea. The pathogenesis of C. difficile infection (CDI) results from the interactions between the pathogen, intestinal epithelium, host immune system, and gastrointestinal microbiota. Previous studies of the host-pathogen interaction in CDI have utilized either simple cell monolayers or in vivo models. While much has been learned by utilizing these approaches, little is known about the direct interaction of the bacterium with a complex host epithelium. Here, we asked if human intestinal organoids (HIOs), which are derived from pluripotent stem cells and demonstrate small intestinal morphology and physiology, could be used to study the pathogenesis of the obligate anaerobe C. difficile. Vegetative C. difficile, microinjected into the lumen of HIOs, persisted in a viable state for up to 12 h. Upon colonization with C. difficile VPI 10463, the HIO epithelium is markedly disrupted, resulting in the loss of paracellular barrier function. Since similar effects were not observed when HIOs were colonized with the nontoxigenic C. difficile strain F200, we directly tested the role of toxin using TcdA and TcdB purified from VPI 10463. We show that the injection of TcdA replicates the disruption of the epithelial barrier function and structure observed in HIOs colonized with viable C. difficile. PMID:25312952

  19. Persistence and toxin production by Clostridium difficile within human intestinal organoids result in disruption of epithelial paracellular barrier function.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Jhansi L; Huang, Sha; Opp, Judith S; Nagy, Melinda S; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Young, Vincent B; Spence, Jason R

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of infectious nosocomial diarrhea. The pathogenesis of C. difficile infection (CDI) results from the interactions between the pathogen, intestinal epithelium, host immune system, and gastrointestinal microbiota. Previous studies of the host-pathogen interaction in CDI have utilized either simple cell monolayers or in vivo models. While much has been learned by utilizing these approaches, little is known about the direct interaction of the bacterium with a complex host epithelium. Here, we asked if human intestinal organoids (HIOs), which are derived from pluripotent stem cells and demonstrate small intestinal morphology and physiology, could be used to study the pathogenesis of the obligate anaerobe C. difficile. Vegetative C. difficile, microinjected into the lumen of HIOs, persisted in a viable state for up to 12 h. Upon colonization with C. difficile VPI 10463, the HIO epithelium is markedly disrupted, resulting in the loss of paracellular barrier function. Since similar effects were not observed when HIOs were colonized with the nontoxigenic C. difficile strain F200, we directly tested the role of toxin using TcdA and TcdB purified from VPI 10463. We show that the injection of TcdA replicates the disruption of the epithelial barrier function and structure observed in HIOs colonized with viable C. difficile.

  20. Immigrants living in an urban milieu with sanitation in Southern Italy: persistence and transmission of intestinal parasites.

    PubMed

    Gualdieri, Luciano; Piemonte, Monica; Alfano, Settimia; Maffei, Rita; Della Pepa, Maria Elena; Rinaldi, Laura; Galdiero, Marilena; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Cringoli, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    In the current era of globalization, the massive movement of populations to developed countries causes a greater attention to neglected tropical diseases in places where such diseases are considered unusual. The present study was planned to assess the persistence of intestinal parasitosis in immigrants stably living in the urban central area of Naples (Southern Italy) and the spread of infection within households with a lifestyle similar to that of the country of origin. A total of 2150 stool samples were analysed with the FLOTAC dual technique, and 415 subjects (19.3 %) tested positive for pathogenic intestinal parasites. One hundred ninety-six subjects were randomly selected and monitored again after 1 year in order to evaluate the persistence of intestinal parasites in immigrants having access to proper sanitation. No pathogenic parasites were found in these 196 samples. A total of 482 cohabitants of 151 positive subjects were recruited to evaluate the interfamilial spread of the identified parasites. Only in 18 households were there subjects infected with the same parasite. Monitoring of parasites in stool samples of immigrants showed a decrease of almost all pathogenic species over the years. From the analysis of households, it is not possible to assert that there is a familial transmission. Our study provides evidence that the prevalence of parasitic infections in immigrants is likely related to the poor sanitary habits of the country of origin and that acquisition of new sanitary regulations, together with the administration of pharmacological treatment, limits the transmission in the households and in the local population of their destination.

  1. IL-17A contributes to reducing IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio and persistence of Entamoeba histolytica during intestinal amebiasis.

    PubMed

    Deloer, Sharmina; Nakamura, Risa; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Moriyasu, Taeko; Kalenda, Yombo Dan Justin; Mohammed, Eman Sayed; Senba, Masachika; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Yoshida, Hiroki; Hamano, Shinjiro

    2017-09-16

    Amebiasis is an infectious disease caused by Entamoeba histolytica, an anaerobic protozoan parasite, and is a major public health problem worldwide, particularly in areas with inadequate sanitation and poor hygiene. Th1 responses, represented by interferon gamma (IFN-γ), play a protective role by clearing the amebae from the gut, whereas Th2 responses are responsible for chronic infection. Th17 responses preconditioned by vaccination or by modulating the intestinal microbiome protect mice from the settlement of E. histolytica. However, the role of interleukin-17A (IL-17A), which is upregulated during the natural course of intestinal amebiasis, has not been clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of IL-17A during intestinal amebiasis in a mouse model. IL-17A knockout and wild-type CBA/J mice were challenged intracecally with 2×10(6)E. histolytica trophozoites, and their infection, pathology, and immune responses were monitored. Neither the initial settlement of E. histolytica nor the inflammation of the cecum was affected by the absence of IL-17A for week 1, but the infection rate and parasite burden declined in a late stage of infection, accompanied by an increased IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio. Therefore, IL-17A contributes to the persistence of E. histolytica and modulates the immune response, including the IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio, which may be responsible for the reduction of the parasite burden in the IL-17A knockout mice during the chronic phase of intestinal amebiasis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    1998-11-01

    Eudora Welty, the famous writer, was once asked what should be done by society or government to encourage young writers. Her response, which surprised the questioner, and me when I heard it, was "Nothing". Welty contended that a person who was really a writer would be persistent enough to overcome whatever obstacles were in the way, needing no interference or support from others.

  3. Persistent intestinal bleeding due to severe CMV-related thrombocytopenia in a preterm newborn.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Alberto; Spaggiari, Eugenio; Cattelani, Chiara; Roversi, Maria Federica; Pecorari, Monica; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Ferrari, Fabrizio

    2017-04-11

    The optimal threshold for neonatal platelet transfusions in sick newborns is still uncertain. We report a congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in a premature neonate with severe thrombocytopenia who subsequently presented with necrotizing enterocolitis and intestinal bleeding. The baby recovered after platelet transfusions were discontinued and the therapy was switched from intravenous ganciclovir to oral valganciclovir. We discuss both measures, speculating on the key role of platelet transfusions.

  4. Radiation persistently promoted oxidative stress, activated mTOR via PI3K/Akt, and downregulated autophagy pathway in mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Fornace, Albert J

    2014-12-01

    While acute effects of toxic radiation doses on intestine are well established, we are yet to acquire a complete spectrum of sub-lethal radiation-induced chronic intestinal perturbations at the molecular level. We investigated persistent effects of a radiation dose (2 Gy) commonly used as a daily fraction in radiotherapy on oxidants and anti-oxidants, and autophagy pathways, which are interlinked processes affecting intestinal homeostasis. Six to eight weeks old C57BL/6J mice (n=10) were exposed to 2 Gy γ-ray. Mice were euthanized two or twelve months after radiation, intestine surgically removed, and flushed using sterile PBS. Parts of the intestine from jejunal-ilial region were fixed, frozen, or used for intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) isolation. While oxidant levels and mitochondrial status were assessed in isolated IEC, autophagy and oxidative stress related signaling pathways were probed in frozen and fixed samples using PCR-based expression arrays and immunoprobing. Radiation exposure caused significant alterations in the expression level of 26 autophagy and 17 oxidative stress related genes. Immunoblot results showed decreased Beclin1 and LC3-II and increased p62, PI3K/Akt, and mTOR. Flow cytometry data showed increased oxidant production and compromised mitochondrial integrity in irradiated samples. Immunoprobing of intestinal sections showed increased 8-oxo-dG and nuclear PCNA, and decreased autophagosome marker LC3-II in IEC after irradiation. We show that sub-lethal radiation could persistently downregulate anti-oxidants and autophagy signaling, and upregulate oxidant production and proliferative signaling. Radiation-induced promotion of oxidative stress and downregulation of autophagy could work in tandem to alter intestinal functions and have implications for post-radiation chronic gastrointestinal diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Emotional Memory Persists Longer than Event Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuriyama, Kenichi; Soshi, Takahiro; Fujii, Takeshi; Kim, Yoshiharu

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between amygdala-driven and hippocampus-driven activities is expected to explain why emotion enhances episodic memory recognition. However, overwhelming behavioral evidence regarding the emotion-induced enhancement of immediate and delayed episodic memory recognition has not been obtained in humans. We found that the recognition…

  6. Emotional memory persists longer than event memory.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Kenichi; Soshi, Takahiro; Fujii, Takeshi; Kim, Yoshiharu

    2010-03-01

    The interaction between amygdala-driven and hippocampus-driven activities is expected to explain why emotion enhances episodic memory recognition. However, overwhelming behavioral evidence regarding the emotion-induced enhancement of immediate and delayed episodic memory recognition has not been obtained in humans. We found that the recognition performance for event memory differs from that for emotional memory. Although event recognition deteriorated equally for episodes that were or were not emotionally salient, emotional recognition remained high for only stimuli related to emotional episodes. Recognition performance pertaining to delayed emotional memory is an accurate predictor of the context of past episodes.

  7. Emotional Memory Persists Longer than Event Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuriyama, Kenichi; Soshi, Takahiro; Fujii, Takeshi; Kim, Yoshiharu

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between amygdala-driven and hippocampus-driven activities is expected to explain why emotion enhances episodic memory recognition. However, overwhelming behavioral evidence regarding the emotion-induced enhancement of immediate and delayed episodic memory recognition has not been obtained in humans. We found that the recognition…

  8. Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains that persist in feedlot cattle are genetically related and demonstrate an enhanced ability to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Brandon A; Nightingale, Kendra K; Mason, Gary L; Ruby, John R; Choat, W Travis; Loneragan, Guy H; Smith, Gary C; Sofos, John N; Belk, Keith E

    2009-09-01

    A longitudinal study was conducted to investigate the nature of Escherichia coli O157:H7 colonization of feedlot cattle over the final 100 to 110 days of finishing. Rectal fecal grab samples were collected from an initial sample population of 788 steers every 20 to 22 days and microbiologically analyzed to detect E. coli O157:H7. The identities of presumptive colonies were confirmed using a multiplex PCR assay that screened for gene fragments unique to E. coli O157:H7 (rfbE and fliC(h7)) and other key virulence genes (eae, stx(1), and stx(2)). Animals were classified as having persistent shedding (PS), transient shedding (TS), or nonshedding (NS) status if they consecutively shed the same E. coli O157:H7 genotype (based on the multiplex PCR profile), exhibited variable E. coli O157 shedding, or never shed morphologically typical E. coli O157, respectively. Overall, 1.0% and 1.4% of steers were classified as PS and NS animals, respectively. Characterization of 132 E. coli O157:H7 isolates from PS and TS animals by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing yielded 32 unique PFGE types. One predominant PFGE type accounted for 53% of all isolates characterized and persisted in cattle throughout the study. Isolates belonging to this predominant and persistent PFGE type demonstrated an enhanced (P < 0.0001) ability to adhere to Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cells compared to isolates belonging to less common PFGE types but exhibited equal virulence expression. Interestingly, the attachment efficacy decreased as the genetic divergence from the predominant and persistent subtype increased. Our data support the hypothesis that certain E. coli O157:H7 strains persist in feedlot cattle, which may be partially explained by an enhanced ability to colonize the intestinal epithelium.

  9. Better Diet, Longer Life?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_167146.html Better Diet, Longer Life? A large study suggests you're never too ... show that sustained diet changes -- even later in life -- might extend people's lives, the researchers said. "A ...

  10. Low zinc status and absorption exist in infants with jejunostomies or ileostomies which persists after intestinal repair.

    PubMed

    Balay, Kimberly S; Hawthorne, Keli M; Hicks, Penni D; Chen, Zhensheng; Griffin, Ian J; Abrams, Steven A

    2012-09-01

    There is very little data regarding trace mineral nutrition in infants with small intestinal ostomies. Here we evaluated 14 infants with jejunal or ileal ostomies to measure their zinc absorption and retention and biochemical zinc and copper status. Zinc absorption was measured using a dual-tracer stable isotope technique at two different time points when possible. The first study was conducted when the subject was receiving maximal tolerated feeds enterally while the ostomy remained in place. A second study was performed as soon as feasible after full feeds were achieved after intestinal repair. We found biochemical evidence of deficiencies of both zinc and copper in infants with small intestinal ostomies at both time points. Fractional zinc absorption with an ostomy in place was 10.9% ± 5.3%. After reanastamosis, fractional zinc absorption was 9.4% ± 5.7%. Net zinc balance was negative prior to reanastamosis. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that infants with a jejunostomy or ileostomy are at high risk for zinc and copper deficiency before and after intestinal reanastamosis. Additional supplementation, especially of zinc, should be considered during this time period.

  11. Low Zinc Status and Absorption Exist in Infants with Jejunostomies or Ileostomies Which Persists after Intestinal Repair

    PubMed Central

    Balay, Kimberly S.; Hawthorne, Keli M.; Hicks, Penni D.; Chen, Zhensheng; Griffin, Ian J.; Abrams, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    There is very little data regarding trace mineral nutrition in infants with small intestinal ostomies. Here we evaluated 14 infants with jejunal or ileal ostomies to measure their zinc absorption and retention and biochemical zinc and copper status. Zinc absorption was measured using a dual-tracer stable isotope technique at two different time points when possible. The first study was conducted when the subject was receiving maximal tolerated feeds enterally while the ostomy remained in place. A second study was performed as soon as feasible after full feeds were achieved after intestinal repair. We found biochemical evidence of deficiencies of both zinc and copper in infants with small intestinal ostomies at both time points. Fractional zinc absorption with an ostomy in place was 10.9% ± 5.3%. After reanastamosis, fractional zinc absorption was 9.4% ± 5.7%. Net zinc balance was negative prior to reanastamosis. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that infants with a jejunostomy or ileostomy are at high risk for zinc and copper deficiency before and after intestinal reanastamosis. Additional supplementation, especially of zinc, should be considered during this time period. PMID:23112915

  12. Low zinc status and absorption exist in infants with jejunostomies or ileostomies which persists after intestinal repair

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is very little data regarding trace mineral nutrition in infants with small intestinal ostomies. Here we evaluated 14 infants with jejunal or ileal ostomies to measure their zinc absorption and retention and biochemical zinc and copper status. Zinc absorption was measured using a dual-tracer s...

  13. Persistent Pediatric Gastro-Intestinal Myiasis: A Case Report of Fly Larval Infestation with Musca Domestica with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kandi, Venkataramana; Lal, Sandeep Kumar; Akhila; Shruthi; Sandhya, K.; Simar, Harender; Pranuthi, Mispah; Kumar, Moses Vinay; Anand, Kalaskar; Rao, Sanjeev D.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of dipterous fly larvae in human is termed as human myiasis. Human myiasis can be classified based on clinical condition it causes like cutaneous myiasis, ocular myiasis, urogenital myiasis and intestinal myiasis. Based on the need for a particular host, myiasis can be divided as specific myiasis, semi-specific myiasis. Accidental myiasis results when the fly larvae are deposited/ingested by human resulting in infestation, which is also called as pseudomyiasis. Fly larvae may be present on the dead and decaying organic matter and domestic animals like dog and cats which are naturally infested with fly larvae and can be source for infection in children. Very few cases have been retrieved from literature on the occurrence of intestinal myiasis in children throughout the world. We report a case of two siblings in the same family infested with dipterous fly larvae. PMID:24049366

  14. Noodles stay hotter longer.

    PubMed

    Shalom, Avshalom; Bryant, Amy; Smith-Meek, Melissa; Parsons, Lana R; Munster, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    During a 10-year period, a high incidence of burns from prepared noodle soup was noticed at the Baltimore Regional Burn Center. Because of the perceived severity of these burns, we took a more systematic look at the burns resulting from this type of soup to determine its effect on patient hospitalization and also examined the properties of the soup itself. All medical records of pediatric patients admitted to the Center between 1989 and 1999 with scald burns from various types of soup were retrospectively reviewed and divided into the Noodle Soup group, and the Other Soup group. The scald burns were compared as well as the physical properties of prepared noodle soup and tap water. Of 27 pediatric admissions for soup burns, 10 were from noodle soup and 17 from other types. Difference in average age and average total percentage of body surface area affected was not significant for the burns from either type of soup. However, the average length of stay for patients with noodle soup burns was significantly longer than for those with other types of soup burns (P < .010). Also, the cooling curve for noodle soup is much slower than for normal tap water. Noodle soup causes a significantly longer hospital stay than other types of soup. Because the boiling temperature of water and noodle soup is about the same, but the cooling curve of noodle soup is much slower, noodle soup may present a greater danger to children than other types of soup.

  15. Living Longer in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Aguila, Emma; Diaz, Claudia; Fu, Mary Manqing; Kapteyn, Arie; Pierson, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This analysis of aging and income security in Mexico establishes that the older population in Mexico is increasing quickly and that this population is especially vulnerable to poverty. Mexican citizens are living longer and overall have experienced an improvement in the quality of life compared to that of prior generations. However, this study demonstrates that social improvements are not affecting the daily lives of all persons equally. The authors attempt to uncover and highlight those differences. One of the primary challenges facing Mexico is a growing older population. The demographic transition in Mexico combined with the lack of formal sources of income in retirement place many older persons in a state of financial insecurity. The information contained in this study and the proposed policy research areas are intended to enlarge the portfolio of options for older Mexicans. The authors analyze wealth and sources of income during retirement, the relationship between health and wealth, urban and rural disparities, and the impact of migration spells to the United States on wealth accumulation and health insurance in Mexico. PMID:28083208

  16. Loss of Function of Intestinal IL-17 and IL-22 Producing Cells Contributes to Inflammation and Viral Persistence in SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Fromentin, Rémi; Paganini, Sara; McGary, Colleen S.; Easley, Kirk; Chomont, Nicolas; Paiardini, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    In HIV/SIV-infected humans and rhesus macaques (RMs), a severe depletion of intestinal CD4+ T-cells producing interleukin IL-17 and IL-22 associates with loss of mucosal integrity and chronic immune activation. However, little is known about the function of IL-17 and IL-22 producing cells during lentiviral infections. Here, we longitudinally determined the levels and functions of IL-17, IL-22 and IL-17/IL-22 producing CD4+ T-cells in blood, lymph node and colorectum of SIV-infected RMs, as well as how they recover during effective ART and are affected by ART interruption. Intestinal IL-17 and IL-22 producing CD4+ T-cells are polyfunctional in SIV-uninfected RMs, with the large majority of cells producing four or five cytokines. SIV infection induced a severe dysfunction of colorectal IL-17, IL-22 and IL-17/IL-22 producing CD4+ T-cells, the extent of which associated with the levels of immune activation (HLA-DR+CD38+), proliferation (Ki-67+) and CD4+ T-cell counts before and during ART. Additionally, Th17 cell function during ART negatively correlated with residual plasma viremia and levels of sCD163, a soluble marker of inflammation and disease progression. Furthermore, IL-17 and IL-22 producing cell frequency and function at various pre, on, and off-ART experimental points associated with and predicted total SIV-DNA content in the colorectum and blood. While ART restored Th22 cell function to levels similar to pre-infection, it did not fully restore Th17 cell function, and all cell types were rapidly and severely affected—both quantitatively and qualitatively—after ART interruption. In conclusion, intestinal IL-17 producing cell function is severely impaired by SIV infection, not fully normalized despite effective ART, and strongly associates with inflammation as well as SIV persistence off and on ART. As such, strategies able to preserve and/or regenerate the functions of these CD4+ T-cells central for mucosal immunity are critically needed in future HIV cure

  17. Selection and Persistence of CTX-M-Producing Escherichia coli in the Intestinal Flora of Pigs Treated with Amoxicillin, Ceftiofur, or Cefquinome▿

    PubMed Central

    Cavaco, L. M.; Abatih, E.; Aarestrup, F. M.; Guardabassi, L.

    2008-01-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), mainly of the CTX-M family, have been associated with Escherichia coli strains of animal origin in Europe. An in vivo experiment was performed to study the effects of veterinary β-lactam drugs on the selection and persistence of ESBL-producing E. coli in the intestinal flora of pigs. Twenty pigs were randomly allocated into three treatment groups and one control group. All pigs were inoculated intragastrically with 1010 CFU of a nalidixic acid (NAL)-resistant mutant derived from a CTX-M-1-producing E. coli strain of pig origin. Treatment with amoxicillin, ceftiofur, or cefquinome according to the instructions on the product label was initiated immediately after bacterial inoculation. Feces were collected from the rectum before inoculation and on days 4, 8, 15, 22, and 25 after the start of treatment. The total and resistant coliforms were counted on MacConkey agar with and without cefotaxime (CTX). Furthermore, MacConkey agar with CTX and NAL was used to count the number of CFU of the inoculated strain. Significantly higher counts of CTX-resistant coliforms were observed in the three treatment groups than in the control group for up to 22 days after the discontinuation of treatment. Ceftiofur and cefquinome exerted larger selective effects than amoxicillin, and the effects persisted beyond the withdrawal times recommended for these cephalosporins. The inoculated strain was detected in only nine animals on day 25. The increase in the number of CTX-resistant coliforms was mainly due to the proliferation of indigenous CTX-M-producing strains and the possible emergence of strains that acquired CTX-M genes by horizontal transfer. The study provides evidence that the cephalosporins used in pig production select for CTX-M-producing E. coli strains. Their use in animals should be carefully considered in view of the critical importance of cephalosporins and the zoonotic potential of ESBL-producing bacteria. PMID:18644956

  18. [Dynamics of contamination and persistence of Clostridium difficile in intestinal microbiota in newborn infants during antibiotic therapy and use of probiotic strain enterococcus faecium L3].

    PubMed

    Lo Skiavo, L A; Gonchar, N V; Fedorova, M S; Suvorov, A N

    2013-01-01

    Ninety four infants were observed as inpatients. Thirty nine of them were mature neonates and 55 were premature infants with a very low body weight. The majority of the patients were treated with antibiotics. The mature infants were treated with penicillins, aminoglycosides, cephalosporins and the premature neonates were treated in addition with carbapenems, fluoroquinolones, glycopeptides. The mature infants were randomized into 2 groups: the control group (n=18) received the standard therapy and the main group (n=21) in addition received 1 ml of liquid probiotic Enterococcus faecium L3 (with a titer of 5x10(8) CFU/ml) 2 times a day for 10 days. The premature newborn infants were also randomized into 2 groups. The control group (n=26) received the standard therapy. The main group (n=29) additionally received 1 ml of liquid probiotic E.faecium L3 2 times a day for 10 days. The effectiveness of the therapy in the mature neonates was evaluated by the frequency of dyspeptic disorders and in the premature infants by the frequency of infectious complications and the episodes of food intolerance. The intestinal microbiota of the infants was investigated by the real-time PCR and bacteriological analyses of the feces: in the mature infants on admission to the hospital and 10 days after the treatment (periods 1-2), in the premature infants on admission to the hospital and then twice with an interval of 14 days (periods 1-2-3). It was shown that the use of the probiotic strain E.faecium L3 during the antibiotic therapy in the premature infants promoted significant reduction in the frequency of infectious complications. In the mature neonates the probiotic therapy reduced the risk of dyspeptic disorder. The studies showed reduction in persistence of Clostridium difficile in the intestinal microbiota of the newborn infants receiving the antibiotic therapy in combination with probiotic E.faecium L3, that was accompanied by preserving and growth of bifidobacteria and

  19. Persistence of intestinal parasitic infections during the national de-worming campaign in schoolchildren of northwestern Mexico: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Quihui-Cota, Luis; Morales-Figueroa, Gloria Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Background Intestinal parasitism remains a public health challenge in northwestern Mexico even when a twice yearly single dose of albendazole (400 mg) is administered to schoolchildren. We aimed to determine the current prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in schoolchildren of northwestern Mexico. Methods The Faust and Kato Katz techniques were used to detect and identify the intestinal parasite species. One thousand two hundred and seventy eight children from 12 public schools were invited to participate in this study; 312 children participated in September 2003. Results Sixty eight percent of the subjects had intestinal parasites, 63% had protozoan infections, and 29%, 16% and 10% were infected with Giardia duodenalis, Hymenolepsis nana, and Entamoeba histolytica/dispar/moshkovskii respectively. Fifty children excreted eggs of Hymenolepsis nana. Conclusion Educational strategies should be considered to support the national de-worming campaign, because albendazole alone will not sufficiently improve the health conditions of vulnerable populations. PMID:24714136

  20. Even! But No Longer Odd

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaswami, Rama

    2009-01-01

    With hundreds of K-12 schools routinely offering online courses, the idea of a full-time virtual school is no longer as outlandish as it once may have seemed. Thanks to giant improvements in technology and the quality of their academic instruction, most virtual schools now hold a trump card they had not possessed: credibility. "There were…

  1. Even! But No Longer Odd

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaswami, Rama

    2009-01-01

    With hundreds of K-12 schools routinely offering online courses, the idea of a full-time virtual school is no longer as outlandish as it once may have seemed. Thanks to giant improvements in technology and the quality of their academic instruction, most virtual schools now hold a trump card they had not possessed: credibility. "There were…

  2. No Longer an Optional Extra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guest, Graham

    2004-01-01

    People are used to hearing about the rapid pace of technological and organisational change and the fact that there is no longer such a thing as a job for life. It is not so long ago that the main, if not the sole, focus of a person's career was on initial education and training. Too many professionals were lulled into believing that their first…

  3. Intestine Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Intestine Transplant Although it is possible for a living donor to donate an intestine segment, most intestine transplants involve a whole organ ...

  4. Longitudinal Examination of the Intestinal Lamina Propria Cellular Compartment of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques Provides Broader and Deeper Insights into the Link between Aberrant MicroRNA Expression and Persistent Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinay; Torben, Workineh; Kenway, Carys S.; Schiro, Faith R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic immune activation/inflammation driven by factors like microbial translocation is a key determinant of human immunodeficiency virus/simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV/SIV) disease progression. Although extensive research on inflammation has focused on studying protein regulators, increasing evidence suggests a critical role for microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating several aspects of the immune/inflammatory response and immune cell proliferation, differentiation, and activation. To understand their immunoregulatory role, we profiled miRNA expression sequentially in intestinal lamina propria leukocytes (LPLs) of eight macaques before and at 21, 90, and 180 days postinfection (dpi). At 21 dpi, ∼20 and 9 miRNAs were up- and downregulated, respectively. However, at 90 dpi (n = 60) and 180 dpi (n = 44), ≥75% of miRNAs showed decreased expression. Notably, the T-cell activation-associated miR-15b, miR-142-3p, miR-142-5p, and miR-150 expression was significantly downregulated at 90 and 180 dpi. Out of ∼10 downregulated miRNAs predicted to regulate CD69, we confirmed miR-92a to directly target CD69. Interestingly, the SIV-induced miR-190b expression was elevated at all time points. Additionally, elevated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-responsive miR-146b-5p expression at 180 dpi was confirmed in primary intestinal macrophages following LPS treatment in vitro. Further, reporter and overexpression assays validated IRAK1 (interleukin-1 receptor 1 kinase) as a direct miR-150 target. Furthermore, IRAK1 protein levels were markedly elevated in intestinal LPLs and epithelium. Finally, blockade of CD8+ T-cell activation/proliferation with delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) significantly prevented miR-150 downregulation and IRAK1 upregulation. Our findings suggest that miR-150 downregulation during T-cell activation disrupts the translational control of IRAK1, facilitating persistent gastrointestinal (GI) inflammation. Finally, the ability of Δ9-THC to block the mi

  5. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    An intestinal obstruction occurs when food or stool cannot move through the intestines. The obstruction can be complete or partial. ... abdomen Inability to pass gas Constipation A complete intestinal obstruction is a medical emergency. It often requires surgery. ...

  6. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    Paralytic ileus; Intestinal volvulus; Bowel obstruction; Ileus; Pseudo-obstruction - intestinal; Colonic ileus ... objects that are swallowed and block the intestines) Gallstones (rare) Hernias Impacted stool Intussusception (telescoping of 1 ...

  7. Intestinal leiomyoma

    MedlinePlus

    Leiomyoma - intestine ... McLaughlin P, Maher MM. The duodenum and small intestine. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ... Roline CE, Reardon RF. Disorders of the small intestine. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  8. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  9. The allometry of rodent intestines.

    PubMed

    Lovegrove, Barry G

    2010-06-01

    This study examined the allometry of the small intestine, caecum, colon and large intestine of rodents (n = 51) using a phylogenetically informed approach. Strong phylogenetic signal was detected in the data for the caecum, colon and large intestine, but not for the small intestine. Most of the phylogenetic signal could be attributed to clade effects associated with herbivorous versus omnivorous rodents. The herbivorous rodents have longer caecums, colons and large intestines, but their small intestines, with the exception of the desert otomyine rodents, are no different to those of omnivorous rodents. Desert otomyine rodents have significantly shorter small intestines than all other rodents, reflecting a possible habitat effect and providing a partial explanation for the low basal metabolic rates of small desert mammals. However, the desert otomyines do not have shorter colons or large intestines, challenging claims for adaptation to water retention in arid environments. Data for the Arvicolidae revealed significantly larger caecums and colons, and hence longer large intestines, with no compensatory reduction in the length of the small intestine, which may explain how the smallest mammalian herbivores manage to meet the demands of a very high mass-specific metabolic rate. This study provides phylogenetically corrected allometries suitable for future prediction testing.

  10. Space radiation exposure persistently increased leptin and IGF1 in serum and activated leptin-IGF1 signaling axis in mouse intestine

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Fornace, Albert J.; Datta, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Travel into outer space is fraught with risk of exposure to energetic heavy ion radiation such as 56Fe ions, which due to its high linear energy transfer (high-LET) characteristics deposits higher energy per unit volume of tissue traversed and thus more damaging to cells relative to low-LET radiation such as γ rays. However, estimates of human health risk from energetic heavy ion exposure are hampered due to lack of tissue specific in vivo molecular data. We investigated long-term effects of 56Fe radiation on adipokines and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signaling axis in mouse intestine and colon. Six- to eight-week-old C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 1.6 Gy of 56Fe ions. Serum and tissues were collected up to twelve months post-irradiation. Serum was analyzed for leptin, adiponectin, IGF1, and IGF binding protein 3. Receptor expressions and downstream signaling pathway alterations were studied in tissues. Irradiation increased leptin and IGF1 levels in serum, and IGF1R and leptin receptor expression in tissues. When considered along with upregulated Jak2/Stat3 pathways and cell proliferation, our data supports the notion that space radiation exposure is a risk to endocrine alterations with implications for chronic pathophysiologic changes in gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27558773

  11. Space radiation exposure persistently increased leptin and IGF1 in serum and activated leptin-IGF1 signaling axis in mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Fornace, Albert J; Datta, Kamal

    2016-08-25

    Travel into outer space is fraught with risk of exposure to energetic heavy ion radiation such as (56)Fe ions, which due to its high linear energy transfer (high-LET) characteristics deposits higher energy per unit volume of tissue traversed and thus more damaging to cells relative to low-LET radiation such as γ rays. However, estimates of human health risk from energetic heavy ion exposure are hampered due to lack of tissue specific in vivo molecular data. We investigated long-term effects of (56)Fe radiation on adipokines and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signaling axis in mouse intestine and colon. Six- to eight-week-old C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 1.6 Gy of (56)Fe ions. Serum and tissues were collected up to twelve months post-irradiation. Serum was analyzed for leptin, adiponectin, IGF1, and IGF binding protein 3. Receptor expressions and downstream signaling pathway alterations were studied in tissues. Irradiation increased leptin and IGF1 levels in serum, and IGF1R and leptin receptor expression in tissues. When considered along with upregulated Jak2/Stat3 pathways and cell proliferation, our data supports the notion that space radiation exposure is a risk to endocrine alterations with implications for chronic pathophysiologic changes in gastrointestinal tract.

  12. Persistent Changes in Circulating and Intestinal γδ T Cell Subsets, Invariant Natural Killer T Cells and Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells in Children and Adults with Coeliac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, Margaret R.; Elliott, Louise; Hussey, Seamus; Mahmud, Nasir; Kelly, Jacinta; Doherty, Derek G.; Feighery, Conleth F.

    2013-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a chronic small intestinal immune-mediated enteropathy precipitated by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. The only current therapy is a lifelong gluten free diet. While much work has focused on the gliadin-specific adaptive immune response in coeliac disease, little is understood about the involvement of the innate immune system. Here we used multi-colour flow cytometry to determine the number and frequency of γδ T cells (Vδ1, Vδ2 and Vδ3 subsets), natural killer cells, CD56+ T cells, invariant NKT cells, and mucosal associated invariant T cells, in blood and duodenum from adults and children with coeliac disease and healthy matched controls. All circulating innate lymphocyte populations were significantly decreased in adult, but not paediatric coeliac donors, when compared with healthy controls. Within the normal small intestine, we noted that Vδ3 cells were the most abundant γδ T cell type in the adult epithelium and lamina propria, and in the paediatric lamina propria. In contrast, patients with coeliac disease showed skewing toward a predominant Vδ1 profile, observed for both adult and paediatric coeliac disease cohorts, particularly within the gut epithelium. This was concurrent with decreases in all other gut lymphocyte subsets, suggesting a specific involvement of Vδ1 cells in coeliac disease pathogenesis. Further analysis showed that γδ T cells isolated from the coeliac gut display an activated, effector memory phenotype, and retain the ability to rapidly respond to in vitro stimulation. A profound loss of CD56 expression in all lymphocyte populations was noted in the coeliac gut. These findings demonstrate a sustained aberrant innate lymphocyte profile in coeliac disease patients of all ages, persisting even after elimination of gluten from the diet. This may lead to impaired immunity, and could potentially account for the increased incidence of autoimmune co-morbidity. PMID:24124528

  13. Persistent changes in circulating and intestinal γδ T cell subsets, invariant natural killer T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells in children and adults with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Margaret R; Elliott, Louise; Hussey, Seamus; Mahmud, Nasir; Kelly, Jacinta; Doherty, Derek G; Feighery, Conleth F

    2013-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a chronic small intestinal immune-mediated enteropathy precipitated by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. The only current therapy is a lifelong gluten free diet. While much work has focused on the gliadin-specific adaptive immune response in coeliac disease, little is understood about the involvement of the innate immune system. Here we used multi-colour flow cytometry to determine the number and frequency of γδ T cells (Vδ1, Vδ2 and Vδ3 subsets), natural killer cells, CD56(+) T cells, invariant NKT cells, and mucosal associated invariant T cells, in blood and duodenum from adults and children with coeliac disease and healthy matched controls. All circulating innate lymphocyte populations were significantly decreased in adult, but not paediatric coeliac donors, when compared with healthy controls. Within the normal small intestine, we noted that Vδ3 cells were the most abundant γδ T cell type in the adult epithelium and lamina propria, and in the paediatric lamina propria. In contrast, patients with coeliac disease showed skewing toward a predominant Vδ1 profile, observed for both adult and paediatric coeliac disease cohorts, particularly within the gut epithelium. This was concurrent with decreases in all other gut lymphocyte subsets, suggesting a specific involvement of Vδ1 cells in coeliac disease pathogenesis. Further analysis showed that γδ T cells isolated from the coeliac gut display an activated, effector memory phenotype, and retain the ability to rapidly respond to in vitro stimulation. A profound loss of CD56 expression in all lymphocyte populations was noted in the coeliac gut. These findings demonstrate a sustained aberrant innate lymphocyte profile in coeliac disease patients of all ages, persisting even after elimination of gluten from the diet. This may lead to impaired immunity, and could potentially account for the increased incidence of autoimmune co-morbidity.

  14. Persistent Persister Misperceptions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun-Seob; Wood, Thomas K.

    2016-01-01

    Persister cells survive antibiotic treatment due to their lack of metabolism, rather than through genetic change, as shown via four seminal experiments conducted by the discoverers of the phenotype (Hobby et al., 1942; Bigger, 1944). Unfortunately, over seven decades of persister cell research, the literature has been populated by misperceptions that do not withstand scrutiny. This opinion piece examines some of those misunderstandings in the literature with the hope that by shining some light on these inaccuracies, the field may be advanced and subsequent manuscripts may be reviewed more critically. PMID:28082974

  15. Systems Analysis of Early Host Gene Expression Provides Clues for Transient Mycobacterium avium ssp avium vs. Persistent Mycobacterium avium ssp paratuberculosis Intestinal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Sangeeta; Drake, Kenneth L.; Lawhon, Sara D.; Nunes, Jairo E. S.; Figueiredo, Josely F.; Rossetti, Carlos A.; Gull, Tamara; Everts, Robin E.; Lewin, Harris. A.; Adams, Leslie Garry

    2016-01-01

    It has long been a quest in ruminants to understand how two very similar mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and Mycobacterium avium ssp. avium (MAA) lead to either a chronic persistent infection or a rapid-transient infection, respectively. Here, we hypothesized that when the host immune response is activated by MAP or MAA, the outcome of the infection depends on the early activation of signaling molecules and host temporal gene expression. To test our hypothesis, ligated jejuno-ileal loops including Peyer’s patches in neonatal calves were inoculated with PBS, MAP, or MAA. A temporal analysis of the host transcriptome profile was conducted at several times post-infection (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 hours). When comparing the transcriptional responses of calves infected with the MAA versus MAP, discordant patterns of mucosal expression were clearly evident, and the numbers of unique transcripts altered were moderately less for MAA-infected tissue than were mucosal tissues infected with the MAP. To interpret these complex data, changes in the gene expression were further analyzed by dynamic Bayesian analysis. Bayesian network modeling identified mechanistic genes, gene-to-gene relationships, pathways and Gene Ontologies (GO) biological processes that are involved in specific cell activation during infection. MAP and MAA had significant different pathway perturbation at 0.5 and 12 hours post inoculation. Inverse processes were observed between MAP and MAA response for epithelial cell proliferation, negative regulation of chemotaxis, cell-cell adhesion mediated by integrin and regulation of cytokine-mediated signaling. MAP inoculated tissue had significantly lower expression of phagocytosis receptors such as mannose receptor and complement receptors. This study reveals that perturbation of genes and cellular pathways during MAP infection resulted in host evasion by mucosal membrane barrier weakening to access entry in the ileum

  16. Systems Analysis of Early Host Gene Expression Provides Clues for Transient Mycobacterium avium ssp avium vs. Persistent Mycobacterium avium ssp paratuberculosis Intestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Khare, Sangeeta; Drake, Kenneth L; Lawhon, Sara D; Nunes, Jairo E S; Figueiredo, Josely F; Rossetti, Carlos A; Gull, Tamara; Everts, Robin E; Lewin, Harris A; Adams, Leslie Garry

    It has long been a quest in ruminants to understand how two very similar mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and Mycobacterium avium ssp. avium (MAA) lead to either a chronic persistent infection or a rapid-transient infection, respectively. Here, we hypothesized that when the host immune response is activated by MAP or MAA, the outcome of the infection depends on the early activation of signaling molecules and host temporal gene expression. To test our hypothesis, ligated jejuno-ileal loops including Peyer's patches in neonatal calves were inoculated with PBS, MAP, or MAA. A temporal analysis of the host transcriptome profile was conducted at several times post-infection (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 hours). When comparing the transcriptional responses of calves infected with the MAA versus MAP, discordant patterns of mucosal expression were clearly evident, and the numbers of unique transcripts altered were moderately less for MAA-infected tissue than were mucosal tissues infected with the MAP. To interpret these complex data, changes in the gene expression were further analyzed by dynamic Bayesian analysis. Bayesian network modeling identified mechanistic genes, gene-to-gene relationships, pathways and Gene Ontologies (GO) biological processes that are involved in specific cell activation during infection. MAP and MAA had significant different pathway perturbation at 0.5 and 12 hours post inoculation. Inverse processes were observed between MAP and MAA response for epithelial cell proliferation, negative regulation of chemotaxis, cell-cell adhesion mediated by integrin and regulation of cytokine-mediated signaling. MAP inoculated tissue had significantly lower expression of phagocytosis receptors such as mannose receptor and complement receptors. This study reveals that perturbation of genes and cellular pathways during MAP infection resulted in host evasion by mucosal membrane barrier weakening to access entry in the ileum

  17. Dual-Color Bioluminescence Imaging for Simultaneous Monitoring of the Intestinal Persistence of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactococcus lactis in Living Mice

    PubMed Central

    Poiret, Sabine; Dennin, Véronique; Boutillier, Denise; Lacorre, Delphine Armelle; Foligné, Benoit; Pot, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are found in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals and have received tremendous attention due to their health-promoting properties. We report the development of two dual-color luciferase-producing Lactobacillus (Lb.) plantarum and Lactococcus (Lc.) lactis strains for noninvasive simultaneous tracking in the mouse gastrointestinal tract. We previously described the functional expression of the red luciferase mutant (CBRluc) from Pyrophorus plagiophthalamus in Lb. plantarum NCIMB8826 and Lc. lactis MG1363 (C. Daniel, S. Poiret, V. Dennin, D. Boutillier, and B. Pot, Appl Environ Microbiol 79:1086–1094, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.03221-12). In this study, we determined that CBRluc is a better-performing luciferase for in vivo localization of both lactic acid bacteria after oral administration than the green click beetle luciferase mutant construct developed in this study. We further established the possibility to simultaneously detect red- and green-emitting lactic acid bacteria by dual-wavelength bioluminescence imaging in combination with spectral unmixing. The difference in spectra of light emission by the red and green click beetle luciferase mutants and dual bioluminescence detection allowed in vitro and in vivo quantification of the red and green emitted signals; thus, it allowed us to monitor the dynamics and fate of the two bacterial populations simultaneously. Persistence and viability of both strains simultaneously administered to mice in different ratios was studied in vivo in anesthetized mice and ex vivo in mouse feces. The application of dual-luciferase-labeled bacteria has considerable potential to simultaneously study the interactions and potential competitions of different targeted bacteria and their hosts. PMID:26025906

  18. Dual-Color Bioluminescence Imaging for Simultaneous Monitoring of the Intestinal Persistence of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactococcus lactis in Living Mice.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Catherine; Poiret, Sabine; Dennin, Véronique; Boutillier, Denise; Lacorre, Delphine Armelle; Foligné, Benoit; Pot, Bruno

    2015-08-15

    Lactic acid bacteria are found in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals and have received tremendous attention due to their health-promoting properties. We report the development of two dual-color luciferase-producing Lactobacillus (Lb.) plantarum and Lactococcus (Lc.) lactis strains for noninvasive simultaneous tracking in the mouse gastrointestinal tract. We previously described the functional expression of the red luciferase mutant (CBRluc) from Pyrophorus plagiophthalamus in Lb. plantarum NCIMB8826 and Lc. lactis MG1363 (C. Daniel, S. Poiret, V. Dennin, D. Boutillier, and B. Pot, Appl Environ Microbiol 79:1086-1094, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.03221-12). In this study, we determined that CBRluc is a better-performing luciferase for in vivo localization of both lactic acid bacteria after oral administration than the green click beetle luciferase mutant construct developed in this study. We further established the possibility to simultaneously detect red- and green-emitting lactic acid bacteria by dual-wavelength bioluminescence imaging in combination with spectral unmixing. The difference in spectra of light emission by the red and green click beetle luciferase mutants and dual bioluminescence detection allowed in vitro and in vivo quantification of the red and green emitted signals; thus, it allowed us to monitor the dynamics and fate of the two bacterial populations simultaneously. Persistence and viability of both strains simultaneously administered to mice in different ratios was studied in vivo in anesthetized mice and ex vivo in mouse feces. The application of dual-luciferase-labeled bacteria has considerable potential to simultaneously study the interactions and potential competitions of different targeted bacteria and their hosts. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Small intestinal ischemia and infarction

    MedlinePlus

    Intestinal necrosis; Ischemic bowel - small intestine; Dead bowel - small intestine; Dead gut - small intestine; Infarcted bowel - small intestine; Atherosclerosis - small intestine; Hardening of the arteries - small intestine

  20. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wall Hernias Inguinal Hernia Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of the Digestive ... Wall Hernias Inguinal Hernia Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of the Digestive ...

  1. Minimum Wage Effects in the Longer Run

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumark, David; Nizalova, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to minimum wages at young ages could lead to adverse longer-run effects via decreased labor market experience and tenure, and diminished education and training, while beneficial longer-run effects could arise if minimum wages increase skill acquisition. Evidence suggests that as individuals reach their late 20s, they earn less the longer…

  2. Minimum Wage Effects in the Longer Run

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumark, David; Nizalova, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to minimum wages at young ages could lead to adverse longer-run effects via decreased labor market experience and tenure, and diminished education and training, while beneficial longer-run effects could arise if minimum wages increase skill acquisition. Evidence suggests that as individuals reach their late 20s, they earn less the longer…

  3. Intestinal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, André; Anderson, David E

    2016-11-01

    A wide variety of disorders affecting the intestinal tract in cattle may require surgery. Among those disorders the more common are: intestinal volvulus, jejunal hemorrhage syndrome and more recently the duodenal sigmoid flexure volvulus. Although general principles of intestinal surgery can be applied, cattle has anatomical and behavior particularities that must be known before invading the abdomen. This article focuses on surgical techniques used to optimize outcomes and discusses specific disorders of small intestine. Diagnoses and surgical techniques presented can be applied in field conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Large-brained mammals live longer.

    PubMed

    González-Lagos, C; Sol, D; Reader, S M

    2010-05-01

    Many mammals have brains substantially larger than expected for their body size, but the reasons for this remain ambiguous. Enlarged brains are metabolically expensive and require elongated developmental periods, and so natural selection should have favoured their evolution only if they provide counterbalancing advantages. One possible advantage is facilitating the construction of behavioural responses to unusual, novel or complex socio-ecological challenges. This buffer effect should increase survival rates and favour a longer reproductive life, thereby compensating for the costs of delayed reproduction. Here, using a global database of 493 species, we provide evidence showing that mammals with enlarged brains (relative to their body size) live longer and have a longer reproductive lifespan. Our analysis supports and extends previous findings, accounting for the possible confounding effects of other life history traits, ecological and dietary factors, and phylogenetic autocorrelation. Thus, these findings provide support for the hypothesis that mammals counterbalance the costs of affording large brains with a longer reproductive life.

  5. Intestinal Parasitoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagardere, Bernard; Dumburgier, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    Intestinal parasites have become a serious public health problem in tropical countries because of the climate and the difficulty of achieving efficient hygiene. The objectives of this journal issue are to increase awareness of the individual and collective repercussions of intestinal parasites, describe the current conditions of contamination and…

  6. Intestinal Ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and hormone medications, such as estrogen Cocaine or methamphetamine use Vigorous exercise, such as long-distance running ... anti-phospholipid syndrome. Illegal drug use. Cocaine and methamphetamine use have been linked to intestinal ischemia. Complications ...

  7. Intestinal Capillariasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    bhIll inenais, the tiny nematode causing Intestinal capillariasis In humans, Is a Iunique parasite. It is one of the newest parasites that has been...Capillariaphilippinensis, the tiny nematode causing intestinal capillariasis in humans, is a unique parasite. It is one of the newest parasites that has been shown to...stichocytes surrounding the oesophagus. The posterior half of the nematode is wider than the anterior half and contains the digestive tract and the

  8. [Persistent diarrhea

    PubMed

    Andrade, J A; Moreira, C; Fagundes Neto, U

    2000-07-01

    INTRODUCTION: Persistent diarrhea has high impact on infantile morbidity and mortality rates in developing countries. Several studies have shown that 3 to 20% of acute diarrheal episodes in children under 5 years of age become persistent. DEFINITION: Persistent diarrhea is defined as an episode that lasts more than 14 days. ETIOLOGY: The most important agents isolated in persistent diarrhea are: Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Salmonella, Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), Klebisiella and Cryptosporidium. CLINICAL ASPECTS: In general, the clinical characteristics of patients with persistent diarrhea do not change with the pathogenic agent. Persistent diarrhea seems to represent the final result of a several insults a infant suffers that predisposes to a more severe episode of diarrhea due to a combination of host factors and high rates of enviromental contamination. Therefore, efforts should be made to promptly treat all episodes of diarrhea with apropriate follow-up. THERAPY: The aim of the treatment is to restore hydroelectrolytic deficits and to replace losses until the diarrheal ceases. It is possible in the majority of the cases, using oral rehydration therapy and erly an appropriate type of diet. PREVENTION: It is imperative that management strategies also focus on preventive aspects. The most effective diarrheal prevention strategy in young infants worldwide is promotion of exclusive breast feeding.

  9. An approach for longer lifetime MCFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Masaru; Tatsumi, Masahiko; Hayano, Takuro

    1996-12-31

    For entering into commercialization of MCFC power plants in the beginning of the 21st century, we will devote to research for increasing lifetime as long as 40,000 hours with cell performance decay rate of 0.25 %/1000hrs as the target in FY 1999. This paper will discuss on our approach for longer lifetime MCFCs through electrolyte-loss management and NiO precipitation management as well as micro-structural control of electrodes and matrix plates. Cell voltage decay rate will be estimated by simulation through series of experiments on accelerated conditions.

  10. Atomic weights: no longer constants of nature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Holden, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    Many of us were taught that the standard atomic weights we found in the back of our chemistry textbooks or on the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements hanging on the wall of our chemistry classroom are constants of nature. This was common knowledge for more than a century and a half, but not anymore. The following text explains how advances in chemical instrumentation and isotopic analysis have changed the way we view atomic weights and why they are no longer constants of nature

  11. A Window into Longer Lasting Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    2016-11-29

    There’s a new tool in the push to engineer rechargeable batteries that last longer and charge more quickly. An X-ray microscopy technique recently developed at Berkeley Lab has given scientists the ability to image nanoscale changes inside lithium-ion battery particles as they charge and discharge. The real-time images provide a new way to learn how batteries work, and how to improve them. The method was developed at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source, a DOE Office of Science User Facility, by a team of researchers from the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Berkeley Lab, Stanford University, and other institutions.

  12. Atomic Weights No Longer Constants of Nature

    SciTech Connect

    Coplen, T.B.; Holden, N.

    2011-03-01

    Many of us grew up being taught that the standard atomic weights we found in the back of our chemistry textbooks or on the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements hanging on the wall of our chemistry classroom are constants of nature. This was common knowledge for more than a century and a half, but not anymore. The following text explains how advances in chemical instrumentation and isotopic analysis has changed the way we view atomic weights and why they are no longer constants of nature.

  13. [Households will no longer have a head].

    PubMed

    Courson, J

    1982-11-01

    A new procedure adopted in France for the 1982 census is described. "In the 1982 census, unlike preceeding ones, the INSEE [Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques] no longer leaves the choice of a head at the discretion of households. The Institute will itself designate a statistical representative [reference person] under the new terminology and according to a systematic rule. This step eliminates a certain inaccuracy which was potentially problematic for certain surveys. The rule for designating the reference person is based on simple criteria and takes into account the main trends observed in the spontaneous declarations of households. If...used in the 1975 census, it would have resulted in the designating of the same representative in 96% of cases." (summary in ENG, SPA) excerpt

  14. Semibiotic Persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prothmann, C.; Zauner, K.-P.

    From observation, we find four different strategies to successfully enable structures to persist over extended periods of time. If functionally relevant features are very large compared to the changes that can be effectuated by entropy, the functional structure itself has a high enough probability to erode only slowly over time. If the functionally relevant features are protected from environmental influence by sacrificial layers that absorb the impinging of the environment, deterioration can be avoided or slowed. Loss of functionality can be delayed, even for complex systems, by keeping alternate options for all required components available. Biological systems also apply information processing to actively counter the impact of entropy by mechanisms such as self-repair. The latter strategy increases the overall persistence of living systems and enables them to maintain a highly complex functional organisation during their lifetime and over generations. In contrast to the other strategies, information processing has only low material overhead. While at present engineered technology is far from achieving the self-repair of evolved systems, the semibiotic combination of biological components with conventionally engineered systems may open a path to long-term persistence of functional devices in harsh environments. We review nature's strategies for persistence, and consider early steps taken in the laboratory to import such capabilities into engineered architectures.

  15. Open appendectomy: no longer an intern case.

    PubMed

    Neville, Angela L; Nemceff, Dennis; Bricker, Scott D; Plurad, David; Bongard, Frederick; Putnam, Brant A

    2012-10-01

    Laparoscopy and work-hour restrictions are altering surgical training. We hypothesized interns were no longer gaining experience in open appendectomy, historically an intern index case. We retrospectively reviewed Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs of postgraduate Year (PGY) 1 general surgery trainees from our academic teaching program for the last 9 years. Number of appendectomies performed (Current Procedural Terminology codes 44950, 44960, and 44970) were recorded and analyzed. The national ACGME database was similarly evaluated for resident experience during junior (PGY-1 to 4) years. Data were available for 47 residents completing internship at our institution between 2003 and 2011. Mean number of appendectomies performed per intern steadily decreased throughout the study period from 22 in 2003 to 5 in 2011 (P=0.0367). Mean percentage of cases done open decreased from 79.5 to 2.4 per cent (P=0.0001). National data found residents graduating in the year 2000 performed an average of 26.6 open appendectomies during junior years, whereas those graduating in 2011 had done only 13.7. Surgical trainees are performing fewer open appendectomies than just several years ago. Open appendectomy traditionally served as an introduction to open surgery. Because outcome differences are small between open and laparoscopic appendectomy, we propose teaching institutions consider performing open appendectomies in select patients to preserve an important educational experience.

  16. Therapeutic Manuka Honey: No Longer So Alternative.

    PubMed

    Carter, Dee A; Blair, Shona E; Cokcetin, Nural N; Bouzo, Daniel; Brooks, Peter; Schothauer, Ralf; Harry, Elizabeth J

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal honey research is undergoing a substantial renaissance. From a folklore remedy largely dismissed by mainstream medicine as "alternative", we now see increased interest by scientists, clinical practitioners and the general public in the therapeutic uses of honey. There are a number of drivers of this interest: first, the rise in antibiotic resistance by many bacterial pathogens has prompted interest in developing and using novel antibacterials; second, an increasing number of reliable studies and case reports have demonstrated that certain honeys are very effective wound treatments; third, therapeutic honey commands a premium price, and the honey industry is actively promoting studies that will allow it to capitalize on this; and finally, the very complex and rather unpredictable nature of honey provides an attractive challenge for laboratory scientists. In this paper we review manuka honey research, from observational studies on its antimicrobial effects through to current experimental and mechanistic work that aims to take honey into mainstream medicine. We outline current gaps and remaining controversies in our knowledge of how honey acts, and suggest new studies that could make honey a no longer "alternative" alternative.

  17. Therapeutic Manuka Honey: No Longer So Alternative

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dee A.; Blair, Shona E.; Cokcetin, Nural N.; Bouzo, Daniel; Brooks, Peter; Schothauer, Ralf; Harry, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal honey research is undergoing a substantial renaissance. From a folklore remedy largely dismissed by mainstream medicine as “alternative”, we now see increased interest by scientists, clinical practitioners and the general public in the therapeutic uses of honey. There are a number of drivers of this interest: first, the rise in antibiotic resistance by many bacterial pathogens has prompted interest in developing and using novel antibacterials; second, an increasing number of reliable studies and case reports have demonstrated that certain honeys are very effective wound treatments; third, therapeutic honey commands a premium price, and the honey industry is actively promoting studies that will allow it to capitalize on this; and finally, the very complex and rather unpredictable nature of honey provides an attractive challenge for laboratory scientists. In this paper we review manuka honey research, from observational studies on its antimicrobial effects through to current experimental and mechanistic work that aims to take honey into mainstream medicine. We outline current gaps and remaining controversies in our knowledge of how honey acts, and suggest new studies that could make honey a no longer “alternative” alternative. PMID:27148246

  18. Antibiotic resistance genes persist longer in soils with subsurface banded poultry litter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to determine the concentration of AR genes for sulfonamide (sulI), tetracycline (tetW), streptomycin (strpB) and for the class one integrase (intI1) gene in soils with subsurface banded PL. Field scale plots were established with triplicate treatments of either no fer...

  19. Giant Intergalactic Gas Stream Longer Than Thought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    A giant stream of gas flowing from neighbor galaxies around our own Milky Way is much longer and older than previously thought, astronomers have discovered. The new revelations provide a fresh insight on what started the gaseous intergalactic streamer. The astronomers used the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to fill important gaps in the picture of gas streaming outward from the Magellanic Clouds. The first evidence of such a flow, named the Magellanic Stream, was discovered more than 30 years ago, and subsequent observations added tantalizing suggestions that there was more. However, the earlier picture showed gaps that left unanswered whether this other gas was part of the same system. "We now have answered that question. The stream is continuous," said David Nidever, of the University of Virginia. "We now have a much more complete map of the Magellanic Stream," he added. The astronomers presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Washington, DC. The Magellanic Clouds are the Milky Way's two nearest neighbor galaxies, about 150,000 to 200,000 light-years distant from the Milky Way. Visible in the Southern Hemisphere, they are much smaller than our Galaxy and may have been distorted by its gravity. Nidever and his colleagues observed the Magellanic Stream for more than 100 hours with the GBT. They then combined their GBT data with that from earlier studies with other radio telescopes, including the Arecibo telescope in Puerto Rico, the Parkes telescope in Australia, and the Westerbork telescope in the Netherlands. The result shows that the stream is more than 40 percent longer than previously known with certainty. One consequence of the added length of the gas stream is that it must be older, the astronomers say. They now estimate the age of the stream at 2.5 billion years. The revised size and age of the Magellanic Stream also provides a new potential explanation for how the flow got started

  20. Living longer, working longer? The impact of subjective life expectancy on retirement intentions and behaviour.

    PubMed

    van Solinge, Hanna; Henkens, Kène

    2010-02-01

    Virtually all Western countries are seeking to bring retirement ages more in line with increases in longevity. The central question in this article is whether individuals choose a retirement age that fits their life expectancy. This would be ideal from a public policy perspective. The present study aims to test empirically whether retirement planning varies with expectations of survival among a sample of older employees in the Netherlands. Two questions are addressed: (i) what are older employees' expectations of their remaining lifetime, and what factors influence this subjective life expectancy? (ii) Are individuals who perceive longer life horizons (high subjective life expectancy) more inclined to retire later than people who expect to live shorter? Using data from a panel study on retirement behaviour in the Netherlands (N = 1621 older employees aged 50-60 years), regression and survival models are estimated to examine the effect of subjective life expectancy on retirement planning and behaviour. The results indicate that subjective life expectancy is a factor that is taken into account in retirement decision making, at least as far as retirement intentions are concerned. Older employees with longer time horizons have a preference for later retirement. When it comes to actual behaviour, however, time horizon does not appear to play a role. The results suggest that particularly employees with a high perceived life expectancy and an intention to work longer do not succeed in carrying their intentions into effect.

  1. [Living longer, working longer? The impact of subjective life expectancy on retirement intentions and behavior].

    PubMed

    van Solinge, H; Henkens, K

    2010-10-01

    Virtually all Western countries are seeking to bring retirement ages more in line with increases in longevity. The central question in this paper is whether individuals choose a retirement age that fits their life expectancy. This would be ideal from a public policy perspective. The present study aims to test empirically whether retirement planning varies with expectations of survival among a sample of older employees in the Netherlands. Two questions are addressed: (1) What are older employees' expectations of their remaining lifetime, and what factors influence this subjective life expectancy? (2) Are individuals who perceive longer life horizons (high subjective life expectancy) more inclined to retire later than people who expect to live shorter? Using data from a panel study on retirement behaviour in the Netherlands (N=1621 older employees aged 50-60), regression and survival models are estimated to examine the effect of subjective life expectancy on retirement planning and behaviour. The results indicate that subjective life expectancy is a factor that is taken into account in retirement decision making, at least as far as retirement intentions are concerned. Older employees with longer time horizons have a preference for later retirement. When it comes to actual behaviour, however, time horizon does not appear to play a role. The results suggest that particularly employees with a high perceived life expectancy and an intention to work longer do not succeed in carrying their intentions into effect.

  2. INTESTINAL CAPILLARIES

    PubMed Central

    Clementi, Francesco; Palade, George E.

    1969-01-01

    Perfusion of the fenestrated capillaries of the intestinal mucosa of the rat with 0.05–0.1 M EDTA removes the diaphragms of the endothelial cells and detaches these cells from one another and from the basement membrane. The latter, even when completely denuded, retains effectively particles of 340 A (average) diameter. Perfusion with histamine (1 µg/ml) results in partial removal of fenestral diaphragms, occasional detachment of the endothelium from the basement membrane, and focal separation of endothelial intercellular junctions. PMID:4979362

  3. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  4. Intestinal capillariasis.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, J H

    1992-01-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt, and Taiwan, but most infections occur in the Philippines and Thailand. As established experimentally, the life cycle involves freshwater fish as intermediate hosts and fish-eating birds as definitive hosts. Embryonated eggs from feces fed to fish hatch and grow as larvae in the fish intestines. Infective larvae fed to monkeys, Mongolian gerbils, and fish-eating birds develop into adults. Larvae become adults in 10 to 11 days, and the first-generation females produce larvae. These larvae develop into males and egg-producing female worms. Eggs pass with the feces, reach water, embryonate, and infect fish. Autoinfection is part of the life cycle and leads to hyperinfection. Humans acquire the infection by eating small freshwater fish raw. The parasite multiplies, and symptoms of diarrhea, borborygmus, abdominal pain, and edema develop. Chronic infections lead to malabsorption and hence to protein and electrolyte loss, and death results from irreversible effects of the infection. Treatment consists of electrolyte replacement and administration of an antidiarrheal agent and mebendazole or albendazole. Capillariasis philippinensis is considered a zoonotic disease of migratory fish-eating birds. The eggs are disseminated along flyways and infect the fish, and when fish are eaten raw, the disease develops. Images PMID:1576584

  5. Intestinal capillariasis.

    PubMed

    Cross, J H

    1992-04-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt, and Taiwan, but most infections occur in the Philippines and Thailand. As established experimentally, the life cycle involves freshwater fish as intermediate hosts and fish-eating birds as definitive hosts. Embryonated eggs from feces fed to fish hatch and grow as larvae in the fish intestines. Infective larvae fed to monkeys, Mongolian gerbils, and fish-eating birds develop into adults. Larvae become adults in 10 to 11 days, and the first-generation females produce larvae. These larvae develop into males and egg-producing female worms. Eggs pass with the feces, reach water, embryonate, and infect fish. Autoinfection is part of the life cycle and leads to hyperinfection. Humans acquire the infection by eating small freshwater fish raw. The parasite multiplies, and symptoms of diarrhea, borborygmus, abdominal pain, and edema develop. Chronic infections lead to malabsorption and hence to protein and electrolyte loss, and death results from irreversible effects of the infection. Treatment consists of electrolyte replacement and administration of an antidiarrheal agent and mebendazole or albendazole. Capillariasis philippinensis is considered a zoonotic disease of migratory fish-eating birds. The eggs are disseminated along flyways and infect the fish, and when fish are eaten raw, the disease develops.

  6. Persistent Diarrhea: A Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    DuPont, Herbert L

    2016-06-28

    Diarrheal disease is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Persistent diarrhea (≥14 days) can be caused by pathogens that differ from those commonly seen in acute illness; proper etiologic diagnosis is important for appropriate therapeutic management. This review provides an overview of the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, and management of persistent diarrhea caused by infectious agents in immunocompetent individuals worldwide. Much of the data on persistent diarrhea comes from studies of residents in or expatriates of developing countries and travelers to these regions where follow-up studies have been performed. Persistent diarrhea occurs in approximately 3% of individuals traveling to developing countries. Schistosoma mansoni (and rarely Schistosoma haematobium) intestinal infection is also not very common and is found only in endemic areas. The microbiologic causes of protracted diarrhea include detectable parasitic (eg, Giardia, Cryptosporidium) and bacterial (eg, enteroaggregative Escherichia coli, Shigella) pathogens. Available diagnostic tests include culture-dependent for bacterial pathogens and culture-independent methods for bacterial, viral, and protozoal infections (eg, polymerase chain reaction [PCR]), including multiplex PCR, as well as and microscopy for protozoal infections. Antimicrobial therapy can be given empirically to patients returning from the undeveloped to the developed world. Otherwise, antibiotics should be given based on the results of laboratory testing. Persistent diarrhea is a poorly recognized syndrome in all populations that requires proper assessment and diagnosis to ensure that affected individuals receive the treatment needed to experience improvement of clinical symptoms.

  7. Octreotide in the treatment of refractory diarrhoea and intestinal fistulae.

    PubMed Central

    Farthing, M J

    1994-01-01

    Persistent, refractory diarrhoea continues to be an important clinical problem. The mechanisms involved are associated with reduced intestinal absorption and increased intestinal secretion. Reduced intestinal absorption can result from small intestinal resection or from disorders in which there is damage to the small intestine. Motility disorders may also impair absorptive function. The rationale for using octreotide in refractory diarrhoea, intestinal motility disorders, and fistulae relates to its ability to promote intestinal absorption and inhibit gastric, pancreatic, and intestinal secretion. Several clinical studies in patients with short bowel syndrome have reported a reduction of intestinal output in patients taking octreotide compared with controls. Additionally, a number of studies have shown that octreotide improves secretory diarrhoea resulting from neuroendocrine tumours, intestinal infections in AIDS patients, and intestinal graft v host disease. Octreotide may be of use in patients suffering from intestinal motility disorders such as those associated with systemic sclerosis. Octreotide may also be of value in promoting closure of gastrointestinal and pancreatic fistulae. PMID:8206397

  8. Intestinal protozoa.

    PubMed

    Juckett, G

    1996-06-01

    Giardia is the best known cause of protozoal gastrointestinal disease in North America, producing significant but not life-threatening gastrointestinal distress and diarrhea. Although diagnosis of giardiasis may be challenging, treatment is usually successful. Entamoeba histolytica poses a rarer but far more difficult clinical challenge. Dysentery caused by E. histolytica may be the most feared intestinal protozoal infection, although Cryptosporidium parvum, Balantidium coli, Isospora belli, Sarcocystis species and other newly described protozoa also may cause diarrhea in healthy individuals and may result in intractable, life-threatening illness in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or other immunosuppressive diseases. Certain protozoa once considered relatively unimportant, such as Cryptosporidium, are now recognized as significant causes of morbidity even in the United States, since transmission readily occurs through contaminated water.

  9. Persistence of a pKPN3-like CTX-M-15-encoding IncFIIK plasmid in a Klebsiella pneumonia ST17 host during two years of intestinal colonization.

    PubMed

    Löhr, Iren Høyland; Hülter, Nils; Bernhoff, Eva; Johnsen, Pål Jarle; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Naseer, Umaer

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the CTX-M-15-encoding plasmid in a Klebsiella pneumoniae ST17 strain, responsible for an outbreak at a Norwegian neonatal intensive care unit and subsequent colonization of affected children for up to two years. To identify plasmid-mediated features relevant for the outbreak dynamics, and to investigate the plasmids capability of horizontal transfer, its segregational stability and plasmid-mediated fitness costs. Plasmid profiling was performed by S1-nuclease PFGE, PCR-based replicon typing and Southern blot-hybridization. The complete sequence of the CTX-M-15-encoding plasmid was obtained by 454 sequencing. Plasmid self-transferability was investigated by broth- and filter mating, segregational stability was explored by serial passage, and plasmid-conferred fitness costs were examined in pairwise head-to-head competitions and by growth rate comparisons. CTX-M-15 was encoded by a ~180 kb IncFIIK plasmid in K. pneumoniae ST17. S1-nuclease PFGE profiles of the first and the last CTX-M-15-producing K. pneumoniae isolates, recovered from the four children colonized the longest, suggested that the plasmid was stably maintained during intestinal carriage of up to two years. The DNA sequence of the pKPN3-like plasmid, pKp848CTX, uncovered a Tn3-like antibiotic resistance region and multiple heavy metal- and thermoresistance determinants. Plasmid pKp848CTX could not be transferred to Escherichia coli in vitro and we found no evidence to support horizontal plasmid transfer in vivo. Segregational plasmid loss ranging from 0.83% to 17.5% was demonstrated in evolved populations in vitro, but only minor fitness costs were associated with plasmid-carriage. Plasmid pKp848CTX encodes phenotypic traits, which may have had an impact on the fitness and survival of the K. pneumoniae ST17 strain in the outbreak setting. The antibiotic resistance plasmid pKp848CTX was stably maintained during two years of intestinal colonization, conferring negligible fitness cost to its

  10. Why Some Kids Take Longer to Recover from Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Why Some Kids Take Longer to Recover From Brain Injury Scans reveal white-matter decline after some ... 15, 2017 WEDNESDAY, March 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Brain scans may reveal which children will take longer ...

  11. B lymphocytes play a limited role in clearance of Campylobacter jejuni from the chicken intestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Lacharme-Lora, Lizeth; Chaloner, Gemma; Gilroy, Rachel; Humphrey, Suzanne; Gibbs, Kirsty; Jopson, Sue; Wright, Elli; Reid, William; Ketley, Julian; Humphrey, Tom; Williams, Nicola; Rushton, Steven; Wigley, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of foodborne bacterial gastroenteritis with contaminated poultry meat its main source. Control of C. jejuni is a priority for the poultry industry but no vaccines are available and their development hampered by poor understanding of the immunobiology of C. jejuni infection. Here we show the functional role of B lymphocytes in response to C. jejuni in the chicken through depletion of the B lymphocyte population (bursectomy) followed by challenge. B lymphocyte depletion has little effect on bacterial numbers in the ceca, the main site of colonisation, where C. jejuni persist to beyond commercial slaughter age, but reduces clearance from the small intestine. In longer-term experiments we show antibody leads to reduction in C. jeuni numbers in the ceca by nine weeks post infection. Whilst we did not examine any protective role to re-challenge, it illustrates the difficulty in producing a vaccine in a young, immunologically naïve host. We believe this is first study of functional immunity to C. jejuni in chicken and shows antibody is ineffective in clearing C. jejuni from the ceca within the production lifetime of chickens, although is involved in clearance from the small intestine and longer-term clearance from the ceca. PMID:28332622

  12. [Intestinal microbiota].

    PubMed

    Perez, Horacio Joaquín; Menezes, Maria Elisabeth; d'Acâmpora, Armando José

    2014-01-01

    There is accumulative evidence on the multiple functions of the intestinal microflora in relation to the homeostasis of the host. At first considered as a simple mutualism, today this relationship proves to be essential to the health and to pathologic processes, particularly metabolic (eg, obesity) and gastrointestinal (eg, inflammatory bowel disease and functional disorders). The first studies were conducted on the microbiota from fecal material cultured anaerobically. With the advent of molecular biology, it has become possible to determine qualitative and quantitatively the dominant, subdominant and transients species. In recent years, there were advances in the understanding of the relationship betwen the microbiota and the host, as well as among the microorganisms in their respective niches. These advances result from translational integration of microbiology with specialities such as molecular biology, cell phisiology, immunology and ecology. There are few studies on the spatial distribution of the microflora in the gut. Unravelling the topography of the microflora in mammals is a way to validate new animal models for the study of microflora.

  13. CDBA-liposome as an effective sunscreen with longer UV protection and longer shelf life.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Geng, Shengyong; Dai, Yanqun; Qin, Geng; Wang, Jin-Ye

    2013-12-05

    Harmful effects caused by the absorption of ultraviolet (UV) light can be reduced by using sunscreens. The long-wavelength UV (UVA) and short-wavelength UV (UVB) protective effects of an azobenzene compound, 4-cholesterocarbonyl-4'-(N,N'-diethylaminobutyloxy) azobenzene (CDBA) liposomal formulation, especially its repeated photo-isomerization were evaluated in the presence of substrates such as propylene glycol and glycerol. It was indicated that periodic UV and visible light irradiation did not affect the photo-isomerization and the structure of CDBA-liposome. The stability and photo-isomerization of CDBA-liposomes were not affected by coexistence of 5% propylene glycol and 5% glycerol. CDBA-liposomes could still perform photo-controlled release of encapsulated active component when mixed with propylene glycol. Moreover, the CDBA-liposome mixed with the cream substrate showed protective function for both UVA and UVB in vitro. The in vivo tests using nude mouse confirmed that the CDBA-liposome could provide a good UV protective efficacy with longer shelf life. Therefore, CDBA-liposomes have the potential using as a new type of commercial sunscreen. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of 4-nitrophenol on expression of the ER-α and AhR signaling pathway-associated genes in the small intestine of rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Juan; Song, Meiyan; Watanabe, Gen; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Rui, Xiaoli; Li, ChunMei

    2016-09-01

    4-Nitrophenol (PNP) is a persistent organic pollutant that was proven to be an environmental endocrine disruptor. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling pathway in regulating the damage response to PNP in the small intestine of rats. Wistar-Imamichi male rats (21 d) were randomly divided into two groups: the control group and PNP group. Each group had three processes that were gavaged with PNP or vehicle daily: single dose (1 d), repeated dose (3 consecutive days) (3 d), and repeated dose with recovery (3 consecutive days and 3 recovery days) (6 d). The weight of the body, the related viscera, and small intestine were examined. Histological parameters of the small intestine and the quantity of mucus proteins secreted by small goblet cells were determined using HE staining and PAS staining. The mRNA expression of AhR, ER-α, CYP1A1, and GST was measured by real-time qPCR. In addition, we also analyzed the AhR, ER-α, and CYP1A1 expression in the small intestine by immunohistochemical staining. The small intestines histologically changed in the PNP-treated rat and the expression of AhR, CYP1A1, and GST was increased. While ER-α was significantly decreased in the small intestine, simultaneously, when rats were exposed to a longer PNP treatment, the damages disappeared. Our results demonstrate that PNP has an effect on the expression of AhR signaling pathway genes, AhR, CYP1A1, and GST, and ER-α in the rat small intestine.

  15. [Adult intestinal malrotation associated with intestinal volvulus].

    PubMed

    Hernando-Almudí, Ernesto; Cerdán-Pascual, Rafael; Vallejo-Bernad, Cristina; Martín-Cuartero, Joaquín; Sánchez-Rubio, María; Casamayor-Franco, Carmen

    2016-06-23

    Intestinal malrotation is a congenital anomaly of the intestinal rotation and fixation, and usually occurs in the neonatal age. Description of a clinical case associated with acute occlusive symptoms. A case of intestinal malrotation is presented in a previously asymptomatic woman of 46 years old with an intestinal obstruction, with radiology and surgical findings showing an absence of intestinal rotation. Intestinal malrotation in adults is often asymptomatic, and is diagnosed as a casual finding during a radiological examination performed for other reasons. Infrequently, it can be diagnosed in adults, associated with an acute abdomen. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of the administration of a third-generation cephalosporin (3GC) to one-day-old chicks on the persistence of 3GC-resistant Escherichia coli in intestinal flora: An in vivo experiment.

    PubMed

    Baron, Sandrine; Jouy, Eric; Touzain, Fabrice; Bougeard, Stéphanie; Larvor, Emeline; de Boisseson, Claire; Amelot, Michel; Keita, Alassane; Kempf, Isabelle

    2016-03-15

    The aim of the experiment was to evaluate under controlled conditions the impact on the excretion of 3GC-resistant Escherichia coli of the injection of one-day-old chicks with ceftiofur, a third-generation cephalosporin (3GC). Three isolators containing specific-pathogen-free chicks were used. In the first one, 20 birds were injected with ceftiofur then ten of them were orally inoculated with a weak inoculum of a 3GC-resistant E. coli field isolate containing an IncI1/ST3 plasmid encoding a blaCTX-M-1 beta-lactamase. The other chicks were kept as contact birds. None of the 20 birds in the second isolator were injected with ceftiofur, but ten of them were similarly inoculated with the 3GC-resistant strain and the others kept as contact birds. A third isolator contained ten non-injected, non-inoculated chicks. Fecal samples were collected regularly over one month and the E. coli isolated on non-supplemented media were characterized by antimicrobial agar dilution, detection of selected resistance genes and determination of phylogenetic group by PCR. The titers of 3GC-resistant E. coli in individual fecal samples were evaluated by culturing on 3GC-supplemented media. Results showed that the inoculated strain rapidly and abundantly colonized the inoculated and contact birds. The ceftiofur injection resulted in significantly higher percentages of 3GC-resistant E. coli isolates among the analyzed E. coli. No transfer of the 3GC-encoding plasmid to other isolates could be evidenced. In conclusion, these results highlight the dramatic capacity of 3GC-resistant E. coli to colonize and persist in chicks, and the selecting pressure imposed by the off-label use of ceftiofur.

  17. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Aya M; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately one-fifth of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here, we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the intestinal lumen, in combination with loss of epithelial barrier function, and dysfunction and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. Transcriptional changes in this environment leading to cell survival, hyperplasia, promotion of angiogenesis, persistent DNA damage, or insufficient repair of DNA damage due to an excess of proinflammatory mediators are then thought to lead to sustained malignant transformation. With

  18. Hirschsprung's disease - Postsurgical intestinal dysmotility

    PubMed Central

    Romaneli, Mariana Tresoldi das Neves; Ribeiro, Antonio Fernando; Bustorff-Silva, Joaquim Murray; de Carvalho, Rita Barbosa; Lomazi, Elizete Aparecida

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe the case of an infant with Hirschsprung's disease presenting as total colonic aganglionosis, which, after surgical resection of the aganglionic segment persisted with irreversible functional intestinal obstruction; discuss the difficulties in managing this form of congenital aganglionosis and discuss a plausible pathogenetic mechanism for this case. Case description: The diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease presenting as total colonic aganglionosis was established in a two-month-old infant, after an episode of enterocolitis, hypovolemic shock and severe malnutrition. After colonic resection, the patient did not recover intestinal motor function that would allow enteral feeding. Postoperative examination of remnant ileum showed the presence of ganglionic plexus and a reduced number of interstitial cells of Cajal in the proximal bowel segments. At 12 months, the patient remains dependent on total parenteral nutrition. Comments: Hirschsprung's disease presenting as total colonic aganglionosis has clinical and surgical characteristics that differentiate it from the classic forms, complicating the diagnosis and the clinical and surgical management. The postoperative course may be associated with permanent morbidity due to intestinal dysmotility. The numerical reduction or alteration of neural connections in the interstitial cells of Cajal may represent a possible physiopathological basis for the condition. PMID:26979103

  19. Disorders of the Small Intestine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders of the Stomach Disorders of the Small Intestine Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal ... Disorders of the Stomach Disorders of the Small Intestine Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the ...

  20. Disorders of the Large Intestine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders of the Stomach Disorders of the Small Intestine Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal ... Disorders of the Stomach Disorders of the Small Intestine Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the ...

  1. Small Intestine Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your small intestine is the longest part of your digestive system - about twenty feet long! It connects your stomach to ... many times to fit inside your abdomen. Your small intestine does most of the digesting of the foods ...

  2. Small intestine (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The small intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of nutrients from food into the ... the duodenum. This short first portion of the small intestine is followed by the jejunum and the ileum. ...

  3. Persistent Identifiers Implementation in EOSDIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K. " Rama"

    2016-01-01

    This presentation provides the motivation for and status of implementation of persistent identifiers in NASA's Earth Observation System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The motivation is provided from the point of view of long-term preservation of datasets such that a number of questions raised by current and future users can be answered easily and precisely. A number of artifacts need to be preserved along with datasets to make this possible, especially when the authors of datasets are no longer available to address users questions. The artifacts and datasets need to be uniquely and persistently identified and linked with each other for full traceability, understandability and scientific reproducibility. Current work in the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project and the Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) in assigning Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) is discussed as well as challenges that remain to be addressed in the future.

  4. Small intestinal ganglioneuromatosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Paris, J K; McCandlish, I A P; Schwarz, T; Simpson, J W; Smith, S H

    2013-05-01

    A 9-year-old female neutered collie-cross dog was presented with a 2-month history of persistent diarrhoea, weight loss and intermittent vomiting. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed one loop of jejunum with a markedly thickened and multifocally hyperechoic wall, without loss of wall layering. Laparotomies were performed for biopsy and resection of affected intestine. Histopathological examination revealed small intestinal ganglioneuromatosis (GN). The dog recovered well from surgery and the diarrhoea resolved. Eleven months later the dog has gained weight and remains asymptomatic. This is the first report of small intestinal GN affecting a mature dog, in which pathology was localized to the mucosal lamina propria and surgical treatment resulted in a successful outcome.

  5. [Intestinal helminthiasis in the Mexican Republic].

    PubMed

    Tay, J; Ruiz, A; Sánchez Vega, J T; Romero-Cabello, R; Robert, L; Becerril, M A

    1995-01-01

    Very few uncertain and not trustworthy reports about the frequency of intestinal helminthiases found in humans have been made in México. However, with the few trustful studies carried out from 1981 to 1992, it is possible in México to verify that ascariasis, trichuriasis, hookworm infection and hymenolepiasis are present with significant percentages of infected people 11.2%, 1.7%, 0.15% and 1.8%, respectively. With the information obtained from the researches analyzed in this article, one can conclude that human infections by intestinal helminths in México, at the present time are almost as frequent as in past decades. Without any doubt, this occurs because still remain the factors that contribute to the persistence and spreading of the intestinal helminths, such as fecalism, poor hygienic and alimentary habits within deficient environmental sanitary conditions.

  6. Establishment of Intestinal Bacteriology

    PubMed Central

    MITSUOKA, Tomotari

    2014-01-01

    Research on intestinal bacteria began around the end of the 19th century. During the last 5 decades of the 20th century, research on the intestinal microbiota made rapid progress. At first, in my work, I first developed a method of comprehensive analysis of the intestinal microbiota, and then I established classification and identification methods for intestinal anaerobes. Using these methods I discovered a number of ecological rules governing the intestinal microbiota and the role of the intestinl microbiota in health and disease. Moreover, using germfree animals, it was proven that the intestinal microbiota has a role in carcinogenesis and aging in the host. Thus, a new interdisciplinary field, “intestinal bacteriology” was established. PMID:25032084

  7. 2. WARHEADING BUILDING, RIGHT SIDE, CENTER OF BERM, NO LONGER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. WARHEADING BUILDING, RIGHT SIDE, CENTER OF BERM, NO LONGER IN EXISTENCE, LOOKING WEST. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Warheading Building, South end of launch area, west of Generator Building No. 3, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  8. 3. WARHEADING BUILDING, REAR SIDE, CENTER OF BERM, NO LONGER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. WARHEADING BUILDING, REAR SIDE, CENTER OF BERM, NO LONGER IN EXISTENCE, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Warheading Building, South end of launch area, west of Generator Building No. 3, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  9. 4. WARHEADING BUILDING, LEFT SIDE, CENTER OF BERM, NO LONGER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. WARHEADING BUILDING, LEFT SIDE, CENTER OF BERM, NO LONGER IN EXISTENCE, LOOKING EAST. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Warheading Building, South end of launch area, west of Generator Building No. 3, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  10. 1. WARHEADING BUILDING, FRONT, CENTER OF BERM, NO LONGER IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. WARHEADING BUILDING, FRONT, CENTER OF BERM, NO LONGER IN EXISTENCE, LOOKING NORTH. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Warheading Building, South end of launch area, west of Generator Building No. 3, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  11. Daily Jolt of Java May Bring Longer Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... Life Two large studies boost potential benefits of coffee, and one looked at consumption in all races ... Here's news to perk up your day: Drinking coffee might help you live a little longer, two ...

  12. Healthy Diet May Mean Longer Life for Kidney Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Diet May Mean Longer Life for Kidney Patients Study found eating lots of fruit, vegetables, fish, ... available evidence to drive clinical decision-making by patients and doctors on whole dietary approaches in chronic ...

  13. Education and Training: Is There Any Longer a Useful Distinction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Paul; Laurent, John

    1990-01-01

    Although education and training were distinct concepts when Taylorism dominated the workplace, it is no longer appropriate to separate them. Today's highly competitive environment requires the education of a flexible, multiskilled workforce, not training for narrowly defined employment tasks. (SK)

  14. Education and Training: Is There Any Longer a Useful Distinction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Paul; Laurent, John

    1990-01-01

    Although education and training were distinct concepts when Taylorism dominated the workplace, it is no longer appropriate to separate them. Today's highly competitive environment requires the education of a flexible, multiskilled workforce, not training for narrowly defined employment tasks. (SK)

  15. More Dreams in Longer Night: United States China Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT MORE DREAMS IN LONGER NIGHT: UNITED STATES CHINA POLICY by Lieutenant Colonel Troy L. Dixon United States Air Force...control number. 1. REPORT DATE 15 MAR 2006 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE More Dreams in Longer Night United States China... UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army War College,Carlisle Barracks,Carlisle,PA,17013-5050 8. PERFORMING

  16. Collagenous colitis associated with small intestinal villous atrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, I; Sanders, S; Hopwood, D; Bouchier, I A

    1986-01-01

    Two patients diagnosed as having small intestinal hyperplastic villous atrophy and being treated with a gluten free diet were investigated because of persistent watery diarrhoea. Both were found to have collagenous colitis. Previous reports of this condition have emphasised the presence of normal small intestinal mucosal architecture and the association of collagenous colitis with intestinal villous atrophy has not previously been reported. Both cases responded to oral steroid therapy, but not to other previously recommended treatment regimens. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:3792923

  17. Honeybee workers with higher reproductive potential live longer lives.

    PubMed

    Kuszewska, Karolina; Miler, Krzysztof; Rojek, Wiktoria; Woyciechowski, Michal

    2017-11-01

    Social insects, especially honeybees, have received much attention in comparative gerontology because of their peculiar and flexible ageing patterns that differ across genetically similar individuals. The longevity of honeybee individuals varies and depends on patterns of gene expression during development; females developing into reproductive individuals (queens) live longer than facultatively sterile workers. Here, we show that rebel workers, which develop under queenless conditions after swarming and have high reproductive potential, live approximately 4days longer in hives and approximately 3days longer in cages than individuals that develop in queenright colonies and have lower reproductive potential; this difference in longevity occurs in both free-flying and caged workers. Moreover, we show that both rebel and normal workers live longer when their ovaries contain more ovarioles. Longer-living rebel workers can benefit the colony because they can fill the generation gap that emerges between workers after queen exchange during swarming. Our findings provide novel evidence that the fecundity of workers in a social insect colony impacts their intrinsic longevity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Intestinal M cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We have an enormous number of commensal bacteria in our intestine, moreover, the foods that we ingest and the water we drink is sometimes contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms. The intestinal epithelium is always exposed to such microbes, friend or foe, so to contain them our gut is equipped with specialized gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), literally the largest peripheral lymphoid tissue in the body. GALT is the intestinal immune inductive site composed of lymphoid follicles such as Peyer’s patches. M cells are a subset of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) residing in the region of the epithelium covering GALT lymphoid follicles. Although the vast majority of IEC function to absorb nutrients from the intestine, M cells are highly specialized to take up intestinal microbial antigens and deliver them to GALT for efficient mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. I will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of M-cell differentiation and functions. PMID:26634447

  19. Survival after total body irradiation: Effects of irradiation of exteriorized small intestine. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Vigneulle, R.M.; Kitto, G.; Pelky, T.; Taylor, P.

    1993-12-31

    Rats receiving lethal irradiation to their exteriorized small intestine with pulsed 18 MVp bremsstrahlung radiation live about 4 days longer than rats receiving a dose of total-body irradiation (TBI) causing intestinal death. The LD50 for intestinal irradiation is approximately 6 Gy higher than the LD50 for intestinal death after TBI. Survival time after exteriorized intestinal irradiation can be decreased, by adding abdominal irradiation. Adding thoracic or pelvic irradiation does not alter survival time. Shielding of large intestine improves survival after irradiation of the rest of the abdomen while the small intestine is also shielded. The kinetics of histological changes in small intestinal tissues implicate the release of humoral factors after irradiation of the abdomen. Radiation injury develops faster in the first (proximal) 40 cm of the small intestine and is expressed predominantly as shortening in villus height. In the last (distal) 40 cm of the small intestine, the most pronounced radiation effect is a decrease in the number of crypts per millimeter. Irradiation (20 Gy) of the proximal small intestine causes 92 % mortality (median survival 10 days). Irradiation (20 Gy) of the distal small intestine causes 27% mortality (median survival > 30 days). In addition to depletion of crypt stem cells in the small intestine, other issues (humoral factors, irradiated subsection of the small intestine and shielding of the large intestine) appear to influence radiation-induced intestinal mortality.

  20. Persistent depressive disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Persistent depressive disorder (PDD) is a chronic (ongoing) type of depression in which a person's moods are regularly low. ... are not as severe as with major depression . Persistent depressive disorder used to be called dysthymia.

  1. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in children

    PubMed Central

    Isa, Hasan M.; Al-Arayedh, Ghadeer G.; Mohamed, Afaf M.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL) is a rare disease characterized by dilatation of intestinal lymphatics. It can be classified as primary or secondary according to the underlying etiology. The clinical presentations of IL are pitting edema, chylous ascites, pleural effusion, acute appendicitis, diarrhea, lymphocytopenia, malabsorption, and intestinal obstruction. The diagnosis is made by intestinal endoscopy and biopsies. Dietary modification is the mainstay in the management of IL with a variable response. Here we report 2 patients with IL in Bahrain who showed positive response to dietary modification. PMID:26837404

  2. Intestinal transplantation: a review.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirag Sureshchandra; Khan, Khalid Mahmood; Girlanda, Raffaele; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2012-09-01

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving therapy for patients with intestinal failure. Intestinal transplantation is now recognized as a treatment for patients who develop complications of parenteral nutrition and in whom attempts at intestinal rehabilitation have failed. Patients with parenteral nutrition related liver disease will require a liver graft typically part of a multivisceral transplant. Isolated intestinal transplants are more commonly performed in adults while multivisceral transplants are most commonly performed in infants. Isolated intestinal transplants have the best short-term outcome, with over 80 % survival at 1 year. Patients requiring multivisceral transplants have a high rate of attrition with a 1 year survival less than 70 %. Prognostic factors for a poor outcome include patient hospitalization at the time of transplant and donor age greater than 40 years while systemic sepsis and acute rejection are the major determinant of early postoperative outcome. For patients surviving the first year the outcome of transplantation of the liver in addition to intestine affords some survival advantage though long-term outcome does not yet match other abdominal organs. Outcomes for intestinal retransplantation are poor as a result of immunology and patient debility. Overall intestinal transplantation continues to develop and is a clear indication with cost and quality of life advantages in patients with intestinal failure that do not remain stable on parenteral nutrition.

  3. Ultrasonographic diagnosis and surgical management of double intestinal intussusception in 3 dogs.

    PubMed

    Atray, Mandeep; Raghunath, Mulinti; Singh, Tarunbir; Saini, Narinder Singh

    2012-08-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of double intestinal intussusception in 3 pups with persistent vomiting, diarrhea, dehydration, anemia, leucocytosis, and electrolyte imbalance are described. Ultrasonography confirmed intussusception and laparotomy revealed double intussusceptions. Intussusceptions were corrected by manual reduction in 1 pup and intestinal resection and anastomosis in 2 pups. Two pups survived and 1 pup died on the 4th day after surgery.

  4. Longer Gestation among Children Born Full Term Influences Cognitive and Motor Development

    PubMed Central

    Espel, Emma V.; Glynn, Laura M.; Sandman, Curt A.; Davis, Elysia Poggi

    2014-01-01

    Children born preterm show persisting impairments in cognitive functioning, school achievement, and brain development. Most research has focused on implications of birth prior to 37 gestational weeks; however, the fetal central nervous system continues to make fundamental changes throughout gestation. Longer gestation is associated with reduced morbidity and mortality even among infants born during the period clinically defined as full term (37–41 gestational weeks). The implications of shortened gestation among term infants for neurodevelopment are poorly understood. The present study prospectively evaluates 232 mothers and their full term infants (50.4% male infants) at three time points across the first postnatal year. We evaluate the association between gestational length and cognitive and motor development. Infants included in the study were full term (born between 37 and 41 weeks gestation). The present study uses the combination of Last Menstrual Period (LMP) and early ultrasound for accurate gestational dating. Hierarchical Linear Regression analyses revealed that longer gestational length is associated with higher scores on the Bayley scales of mental and motor development at 3, 6 and 12 months of age after considering socio-demographic, pregnancy, and infant-level covariates. Findings were identical using revised categories of early, term, and late term proposed by the Working Group for Defining Term Pregnancy. Our findings indicate that longer gestation, even among term infants, benefits both cognitive and motor development. PMID:25423150

  5. Longer gestation among children born full term influences cognitive and motor development.

    PubMed

    Espel, Emma V; Glynn, Laura M; Sandman, Curt A; Davis, Elysia Poggi

    2014-01-01

    Children born preterm show persisting impairments in cognitive functioning, school achievement, and brain development. Most research has focused on implications of birth prior to 37 gestational weeks; however, the fetal central nervous system continues to make fundamental changes throughout gestation. Longer gestation is associated with reduced morbidity and mortality even among infants born during the period clinically defined as full term (37-41 gestational weeks). The implications of shortened gestation among term infants for neurodevelopment are poorly understood. The present study prospectively evaluates 232 mothers and their full term infants (50.4% male infants) at three time points across the first postnatal year. We evaluate the association between gestational length and cognitive and motor development. Infants included in the study were full term (born between 37 and 41 weeks gestation). The present study uses the combination of Last Menstrual Period (LMP) and early ultrasound for accurate gestational dating. Hierarchical Linear Regression analyses revealed that longer gestational length is associated with higher scores on the Bayley scales of mental and motor development at 3, 6 and 12 months of age after considering socio-demographic, pregnancy, and infant-level covariates. Findings were identical using revised categories of early, term, and late term proposed by the Working Group for Defining Term Pregnancy. Our findings indicate that longer gestation, even among term infants, benefits both cognitive and motor development.

  6. Persistence and reactivation of human adenoviruses in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kosulin, K; Geiger, E; Vécsei, A; Huber, W-D; Rauch, M; Brenner, E; Wrba, F; Hammer, K; Innerhofer, A; Pötschger, U; Lawitschka, A; Matthes-Leodolter, S; Fritsch, G; Lion, T

    2016-04-01

    Reactivation of persistent human adenoviruses (HAdVs) is associated with high morbidity and mortality in paediatric haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Although invasive HAdV infections mainly arise from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the specific sites of HAdV persistence are not well characterised. We prospectively screened biopsies from 143 non-HSCT paediatric patients undergoing GI endoscopy and monitored serial stool specimens from 148 paediatric HSCT recipients for the presence of HAdV by real-time PCR. Persistence of HAdV in the GI tract was identified in 31% of children, with the highest prevalence in the terminal ileum. In situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry identified HAdV persistence in lymphoid cells of the lamina propria, whereas biopsies from five transplant recipients revealed high numbers of replicating HAdV in intestinal epithelial cells. The prevalence of HAdV species, the frequencies of persistence in the GI tract and reactivations post transplant indicated a correlation of intestinal HAdV shedding pre-transplant with high risk of invasive infection. HAdV persistence in the GI tract is a likely origin of infectious complications in immunocompromised children. Intestinal lymphocytes represent a reservoir for HAdV persistence and reactivation, whereas the intestinal epithelium is the main site of viral proliferation preceding dissemination. The findings have important implications for assessing the risk of life-threatening invasive HAdV infections. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. We Can No Longer Afford a Monolingual Norm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurer-Pearson, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    In her Keynote Article, Johanne Paradis does a service for the research and the clinical communities with this comprehensive review of the literature encompassing bilingualism and specific language impairment (SLI). Her work and the work of her colleagues for more than a decade have been persistent in bringing these two threads together: using…

  8. Intestinal or bowel obstruction - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000150.htm Intestinal or bowel obstruction - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... your bowel (intestine). This condition is called an intestinal obstruction . The blockage may be partial or total (complete). ...

  9. Stages of Small Intestine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  10. 16. A LONGER VIEW OF THE SAME LAMP STANDARD, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. A LONGER VIEW OF THE SAME LAMP STANDARD, SHOWING THE OCTAGONAL PEBBLE AGGREGATE SHAFT. - County Line Bridge, Spanning St. Joseph River at State Route 219, 0.6 mile south of U.S. Route 20, Osceola, St. Joseph County, IN

  11. Revisiting Academic Capitalism in Canada: No Longer the Exception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalfe, Amy Scott

    2010-01-01

    In "Academic Capitalism: Politics, Policies, and the Entrepreneurial University" (1997), Slaughter and Leslie found that Canada showed signs of resisting academic capitalism. Changes in postsecondary education funding policies and the emergence of new commercialization initiatives are evidence that Canada is certainly no longer, and…

  12. Revisiting Academic Capitalism in Canada: No Longer the Exception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalfe, Amy Scott

    2010-01-01

    In "Academic Capitalism: Politics, Policies, and the Entrepreneurial University" (1997), Slaughter and Leslie found that Canada showed signs of resisting academic capitalism. Changes in postsecondary education funding policies and the emergence of new commercialization initiatives are evidence that Canada is certainly no longer, and…

  13. The longer term experiences of parent training: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Furlong, M; McGilloway, S

    2015-09-01

    Child conduct problems are a major public health priority. Group-based parenting programmes are popular in addressing such problems, but evidence for their longer-term effectiveness is limited. Moreover, process evaluations are rare and little is understood about the key facilitative and inhibitive factors associated with maintaining outcomes in the longer term. This study involved the use of qualitative methods as part of a larger process evaluation to explore the longer-term experiences of parents who participated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of the Incredible Years Parenting Programme (IYPP) in disadvantaged settings in Ireland. A series of one-to-one in-depth interviews was conducted with parents at 12- (n = 20) and 18-month follow-up (n = 8) and analysed using constructivist grounded theory. Most parents reported positive child behaviour despite several challenges, but a substantial subset reported periods of relapse in positive outcomes. A relapse in child behaviour was linked to relinquishing skills in stressful times, the negative influence of an unsupportive environment, and the perceived ineffectiveness of parenting skills. Resilience in implementing skills despite adversity, and the utilization of available social supports, were associated with the maintenance of positive outcomes. Strengthening resilience and social support capacities may be important factors in maintaining positive longer-term outcomes. Those who design, research and deliver parenting programmes might consider the possibility of including a relapse-prevention module and/or the provision of post-intervention supports for more vulnerable families. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Intestinal obstruction repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100116.htm Intestinal obstruction repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Adhesions Intestinal Obstruction A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  15. Intestinal obstruction (pediatric) - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100165.htm Intestinal obstruction (pediatric) - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Intestinal Obstruction A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  16. Intestinal Barrier and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Julio-Pieper, M; Bravo, J A

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal barrier function contributes to gut homeostasis by modulating absorption of water, electrolytes, and nutrients from the lumen into the circulation while restricting the passage of noxious luminal substances and microorganisms. Chronic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and celiac disease are associated to intestinal barrier dysfunction. Here, the hypothesis is that a leaky intestinal wall allowing for indiscriminate passage of intraluminal compounds to the vascular compartment could in turn lead to systemic inflammation. An increasing number of studies are now investigating the association between gut permeability and CNS disorders, under the premise that translocation of intestinal luminal contents could affect CNS function, either directly or indirectly. Still, it is unknown whether disruption of intestinal barrier is a causative agent or a consequence in these situations. Here, we discuss the latest evidence pointing to an association between increased gut permeability and disrupted behavioral responses.

  17. The Relationship between Video Game Use and a Performance-Based Measure of Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ventura, Matthew; Shute, Valerie; Zhao, Weinan

    2013-01-01

    An online performance-based measure of persistence was developed using anagrams and riddles. Persistence was measured by recording the time spent on unsolved anagrams and riddles. Time spent on unsolved problems was correlated to a self-report measure of persistence. Additionally, frequent video game players spent longer times on unsolved problems…

  18. The Relationship between Video Game Use and a Performance-Based Measure of Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ventura, Matthew; Shute, Valerie; Zhao, Weinan

    2013-01-01

    An online performance-based measure of persistence was developed using anagrams and riddles. Persistence was measured by recording the time spent on unsolved anagrams and riddles. Time spent on unsolved problems was correlated to a self-report measure of persistence. Additionally, frequent video game players spent longer times on unsolved problems…

  19. Why we need proper PBPK models to examine intestine and liver oral drug absorption.

    PubMed

    Chow, Edwin C Y; Pang, K Sandy

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal transporters and enzymes are factors that can influence the absorption of orally administrated drugs. Compartmental models are no longer adequate to describe the sequential handling of drugs and metabolites by the intestine and liver during oral drug absorption, especially when intestinal removal is substantial relative to the liver, and when induction/inhibition elicits different extents of change for identical intestinal and hepatic enzymes or transporters. In this review, we described PBPK models for the intestine (with differential flow patterns: traditional model, TM, and segregated flow model, SFM, and QGut model) as well as semi- or whole bodyphysiological- based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to describe the impact of the flow pattern, and the intestinal transporters and enzymes and their attendant heterogeneities on intestinal (FI or FG) and oral (Fsys) bioavailability. The modeling efforts have led to a refinement in providing mechanistic insight on the accurate prediction of drug and metabolite profiles for DDI, pharmacogenomics, age factors and disease conditions.

  20. No Longer Guaranteed...Global Positioning System Alternative Necessary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    enemy position and movement. The military’s use of the global positioning system ( GPS ) has created a sig- nificant military advantage in accurate...2003 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE No Longer Guaranteed... Global positioning system alternative...access, there are now no sufficiently secure, jam-resistant, precision positioning devices or systems . Accordingly, there is a need for a non- GPS

  1. Intestinal permeability, leaky gut, and intestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Hollander, D

    1999-10-01

    A major task of the intestine is to form a defensive barrier to prevent absorption of damaging substances from the external environment. This protective function of the intestinal mucosa is called permeability. Clinicians can use inert, nonmetabolized sugars such as mannitol, rhamnose, or lactulose to measure the permeability barrier or the degree of leakiness of the intestinal mucosa. Ample evidence indicates that permeability is increased in most patients with Crohn's disease and in 10% to 20% of their clinically healthy relatives. The abnormal leakiness of the mucosa in Crohn's patients and their relatives can be greatly amplified by aspirin preadministration. Permeability measurements in Crohn's patients reflect the activity, extent, and distribution of the disease and may allow us to predict the likelihood of recurrence after surgery or medically induced remission. Permeability is also increased in celiac disease and by trauma, burns, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The major determinant of the rate of intestinal permeability is the opening or closure of the tight junctions between enterocytes in the paracellular space. As we broaden our understanding of the mechanisms and agents that control the degree of leakiness of the tight junctions, we will be increasingly able to use permeability measurements to study the etiology and pathogenesis of various disorders and to design or monitor therapies for their management.

  2. Microbial imbalance and intestinal pathologies: connections and contributions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ye; Jobin, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Microbiome analysis has identified a state of microbial imbalance (dysbiosis) in patients with chronic intestinal inflammation and colorectal cancer. The bacterial phylum Proteobacteria is often overrepresented in these individuals, with Escherichia coli being the most prevalent species. It is clear that a complex interplay between the host, bacteria and bacterial genes is implicated in the development of these intestinal diseases. Understanding the basic elements of these interactions could have important implications for disease detection and management. Recent studies have revealed that E. coli utilizes a complex arsenal of virulence factors to colonize and persist in the intestine. Some of these virulence factors, such as the genotoxin colibactin, were found to promote colorectal cancer in experimental models. In this Review, we summarize key features of the dysbiotic states associated with chronic intestinal inflammation and colorectal cancer, and discuss how the dysregulated interplay between host and bacteria could favor the emergence of E. coli with pathological traits implicated in these pathologies. PMID:25256712

  3. Biochemistry of intestinal development.

    PubMed Central

    Henning, S J

    1979-01-01

    In biochemical terms, the rat small intestine is relatively immature at birth and for the first two postnatal weeks. Then during the third week a dramatic array of enzymic changes begins, and by the end of the fourth week the intestine has the digestive and absorptive properties of the adult. Selective examples of these changes are discussed with emphasis on their implications for toxicological studies. The review also includes a detailed consideration of the roles of the dietary change of weaning and of glucocorticoid and thyroid hormones in the regulation of intestinal development. PMID:575507

  4. Intestinal parasitism in Malayan aborigines (Orang Asli)*

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, F. L.

    1972-01-01

    Surveys were conducted in the southern Malay peninsula to assess intestinal parasitism in the aboriginal ethnic minority groups. Faecal specimens from 1 273 persons were examined by the thiomersal—iodine—formol direct-smear technique. Prevalences are reported and, for helminth infections, data on worm burdens. The state of sanitation in each of 9 cultural-ecological groups was assessed by means of a simplified system of scoring for variables. Particular attention was paid to relationships between cultural and ecological factors, sanitation, and observed patterns of intestinal parasitism. The author also discusses the fact that the number of parasitic species diminishes in habitats simplified by man, whereas an increase occurs in the prevalence and intensity of the more adaptable species that persist in ecosystems of low complexity. PMID:4537337

  5. Persistent Structures in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Dan; Chabalko, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Persistent structures in the turbulent boundary layer are located and analyzed. The data are taken from flight experiments on large commercial aircraft. An interval correlation technique is introduced which is able to locate the structures. The Morlet continuous wavelet is shown to not only locates persistent structures but has the added benefit that the pressure data are decomposed in time and frequency. To better understand how power is apportioned among these structures, a discrete Coiflet wavelet is used to decompose the pressure data into orthogonal frequency bands. Results indicate that some structures persist a great deal longer in the TBL than would be expected. These structure contain significant power and may be a primary source of vibration energy in the airframe.

  6. Accumulative effect of food residues on intestinal gas production.

    PubMed

    Mego, M; Accarino, A; Malagelada, J-R; Guarner, F; Azpiroz, F

    2015-11-01

    As mean transit time in the colon is longer than the interval between meals, several consecutive meal loads accumulate, and contribute to colonic biomass. Our aim was to determine the summation effect of fermentable food residues on intestinal gas production. In eight healthy subjects, the volume of endogenous intestinal gas produced in the intestine over a 4-h period was measured by means of a wash-out technique, using an exogenous gas infusion into the jejunum (24 mL/min) and collection of the effluent via a rectal Foley catheter. The exogenous gas infused was labeled (5% SF6 ) to calculate the proportion of endogenous intestinal gas evacuated. In each subject, four experiments were performed ≥1 week apart combining a 1-day high- or low-flatulogenic diet with a test meal or fast. Basal conditions: on the low-flatulogenic diet, intestinal gas production during fasting over the 4-h study period was 609 ± 63 mL. Effect of diet: during fasting, intestinal gas production on the high-flatulogenic diet was 370 ± 146 mL greater than on the low-flatulogenic diet (p = 0.040). Effect of test meal: on the low-flatulogenic diet, intestinal gas production after the test meal was 681 ± 114 mL greater than during fasting (p = 0.001); a similar effect was observed on the high-flatulogenic diet (599 ± 174 mL more intestinal gas production after the test meal than during fasting; p = 0.021). Our data demonstrate temporal summation effects of food residues on intestinal gas production. Hence, intestinal gas production depends on pre-existing and on recent colonic loads of fermentable foodstuffs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Inflammation and Proliferation Act Together to Mediate Intestinal Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Swain, John R.; Wong, Melissa H.

    2009-01-01

    Cell fusion between circulating bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) and non-hematopoietic cells is well documented in various tissues and has recently been suggested to occur in response to injury. Here we illustrate that inflammation within the intestine enhanced the level of BMDC fusion with intestinal progenitors. To identify important microenvironmental factors mediating intestinal epithelial cell fusion, we performed bone marrow transplantation into mouse models of inflammation and stimulated epithelial proliferation. Interestingly, in a non-injury model or in instances where inflammation was suppressed, an appreciable baseline level of fusion persisted. This suggests that additional mediators of cell fusion exist. A rigorous temporal analysis of early post-transplantation cellular dynamics revealed that GFP-expressing donor cells first trafficked to the intestine coincident with a striking increase in epithelial proliferation, advocating for a required fusogenic state of the host partner. Directly supporting this hypothesis, induction of augmented epithelial proliferation resulted in a significant increase in intestinal cell fusion. Here we report that intestinal inflammation and epithelial proliferation act together to promote cell fusion. While the physiologic impact of cell fusion is not yet known, the increased incidence in an inflammatory and proliferative microenvironment suggests a potential role for cell fusion in mediating the progression of intestinal inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:19657387

  8. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... that only affects the colon). LOCAL COMPLICATIONS OF CROHN’S DISEASE INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION The most common complication of Crohn’s disease, obstruction may arise from swelling and the formation ...

  9. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Taking drugs that slow intestinal movements. These include narcotic (pain) medicines and drugs used when you are ... that may have caused the problem (such as narcotic drugs) may help. In severe cases, surgery may ...

  10. Antibiotic treatment for Tuberculosis induces a profound dysbiosis of the microbiome that persists long after therapy is completed.

    PubMed

    Wipperman, Matthew F; Fitzgerald, Daniel W; Juste, Marc Antoine Jean; Taur, Ying; Namasivayam, Sivaranjani; Sher, Alan; Bean, James M; Bucci, Vanni; Glickman, Michael S

    2017-09-07

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of Tuberculosis (TB), infects one third of the world's population and causes substantial mortality worldwide. In its shortest format, treatment of TB requires six months of multidrug therapy with a mixture of broad spectrum and mycobacterial specific antibiotics, and treatment of multidrug resistant TB is longer. The widespread use of this regimen makes this one of the largest exposures of humans to antimicrobials, yet the effects of TB treatment on intestinal microbiome composition and long-term stability are unknown. We compared the microbiome composition, assessed by both 16S rDNA and metagenomic DNA sequencing, of TB cases during antimycobacterial treatment and following cure by 6 months of antibiotics. TB treatment does not perturb overall diversity, but nonetheless dramatically depletes multiple immunologically significant commensal bacteria. The microbiomic perturbation of TB therapy can persist for at least 1.2 years, indicating that the effects of TB treatment are long lasting. These results demonstrate that TB treatment has dramatic effects on the intestinal microbiome and highlight unexpected durable consequences of treatment for the world's most common infection on human ecology.

  11. A longer climate memory carried by soil freeze-thaw processes in Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Shinji; Yamazaki, Koji

    2012-12-01

    The climate memory of a land surface generally persists for only a few months, but analysis of surface meteorological data revealed a longer-term climate memory carried by soil freeze-thaw processes in Siberia. Surface temperature variability during the snowmelt season corresponds reasonably well with that in the summer of the following year, when most stations show a secondary autocorrelation peak. The surface temperature memory is thought to be stored as variations in the amount of snowmelt water held in the soil, and through soil freezing, which emerges as latent heat variations in the near-surface atmosphere during soil thawing approximately one year later. The ground conditions are dry in the longer-term climate memory regions, such as eastern Siberia, where less snow cover (higher surface air temperature) in spring results in less snowmelt water or lower soil moisture in the summer. Consequently, through soil freezing, it will require less latent heat to thaw in the summer of the following year, resulting in higher surface air temperature. In addition to soil moisture and snow cover, soil freeze-thaw processes can also act as agents of climate memory in the near-surface atmosphere.

  12. Effects of Childhood Socioeconomic Circumstances on Persistent Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Jefferis, Barbara J. M. H.; Power, Chris; Graham, Hilary; Manor, Orly

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated whether socioeconomic circumstances at different life stages influence persistent smoking. Methods. We followed a British birth cohort (all births between March 3 and 9, 1958) for 41 years to examine the influence of childhood and adulthood socioeconomic position on persistent smoking in adulthood (n = 6541). Results. Persistent smoking (19% of participants, n = 1216) showed strong social gradients with both childhood and adulthood socioeconomic measures. Among men, the association with childhood socioeconomic circumstances was no longer significant after we adjusted for adulthood socioeconomic circumstances; however, among women, the adjusted odds of persistent smoking increased by 8% for each unit increase across a 16-point childhood score. Conclusions. Childhood socioeconomic circumstances predicted persistent smoking among women in our cohort, a finding that highlights the importance of influences on the development of persistent smoking across the life course. PMID:14759943

  13. Intestinal parasitic infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Suk; Kim, Ki Whang; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Dong Ho

    2008-01-01

    In general, gastrointestinal tract is the primary involvement site of parasites during their life cycle. In this article, we will describe amebiasis, ascariasis, and anisakiasis among the many common intestinal parasitic diseases. We will review the epidemiology, life cycles, clinical manifestations and complications, and illustrate detailed imaging findings of intestinal parasites. Recognizing features of parasitic infection is important to establish an early diagnosis that leads to prompt treatment and helps avoid unnecessary surgery.

  14. Length Is Associated with Pain: Jellyfish with Painful Sting Have Longer Nematocyst Tubules than Harmless Jellyfish

    PubMed Central

    Kitatani, Ryuju; Yamada, Mayu; Kamio, Michiya; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    A large number of humans are stung by jellyfish all over the world. The stings cause acute pain followed by persistent pain and local inflammation. Harmful jellyfish species typically cause strong pain, whereas harmless jellyfish cause subtle or no pain. Jellyfish sting humans by injecting a tubule, contained in the nematocyst, the stinging organ of jellyfish. The tubule penetrates into the skin leading to venom injection. The detailed morphology of the nematocyst tubule and molecular structure of the venom in the nematocyst has been reported; however, the mechanism responsible for the difference in pain that is caused by harmful and harmless jellyfish sting has not yet been explored or explained. Therefore, we hypothesized that differences in the length of the nematocyst tubule leads to different degrees of epithelial damage. The initial acute pain might be generated by penetration of the tubule, which stimulates pain receptor neurons, whilst persistent pain might be caused by injection of venom into the epithelium. To test this hypothesis we compared the lengths of discharged nematocyst tubules from harmful and harmless jellyfish species and evaluated their ability to penetrate human skin. The results showed that the harmful jellyfish species, Chrysaora pacifica, Carybdea brevipedalia, and Chironex yamaguchii, causing moderate to severe pain, have nematocyst tubules longer than 200 μm, compared with a jellyfish species that cause little or no pain, Aurelia aurita. The majority of the tubules of harmful jellyfishes, C. yamaguchii and C. brevipedalia, were sufficiently long to penetrate the human epidermis and physically stimulate the free nerve endings of Aδ pain receptor fibers around plexuses to cause acute pain and inject the venom into the human skin epithelium to cause persistent pain and inflammation. PMID:26309256

  15. Length Is Associated with Pain: Jellyfish with Painful Sting Have Longer Nematocyst Tubules than Harmless Jellyfish.

    PubMed

    Kitatani, Ryuju; Yamada, Mayu; Kamio, Michiya; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    A large number of humans are stung by jellyfish all over the world. The stings cause acute pain followed by persistent pain and local inflammation. Harmful jellyfish species typically cause strong pain, whereas harmless jellyfish cause subtle or no pain. Jellyfish sting humans by injecting a tubule, contained in the nematocyst, the stinging organ of jellyfish. The tubule penetrates into the skin leading to venom injection. The detailed morphology of the nematocyst tubule and molecular structure of the venom in the nematocyst has been reported; however, the mechanism responsible for the difference in pain that is caused by harmful and harmless jellyfish sting has not yet been explored or explained. Therefore, we hypothesized that differences in the length of the nematocyst tubule leads to different degrees of epithelial damage. The initial acute pain might be generated by penetration of the tubule, which stimulates pain receptor neurons, whilst persistent pain might be caused by injection of venom into the epithelium. To test this hypothesis we compared the lengths of discharged nematocyst tubules from harmful and harmless jellyfish species and evaluated their ability to penetrate human skin. The results showed that the harmful jellyfish species, Chrysaora pacifica, Carybdea brevipedalia, and Chironex yamaguchii, causing moderate to severe pain, have nematocyst tubules longer than 200 μm, compared with a jellyfish species that cause little or no pain, Aurelia aurita. The majority of the tubules of harmful jellyfishes, C. yamaguchii and C. brevipedalia, were sufficiently long to penetrate the human epidermis and physically stimulate the free nerve endings of Aδ pain receptor fibers around plexuses to cause acute pain and inject the venom into the human skin epithelium to cause persistent pain and inflammation.

  16. Intestinal adaptation following resection.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, Kelly A

    2014-05-01

    Intestinal adaptation is a natural compensatory process that occurs following extensive intestinal resection, whereby structural and functional changes in the intestine improve nutrient and fluid absorption in the remnant bowel. In animal studies, postresection structural adaptations include bowel lengthening and thickening and increases in villus height and crypt depth. Functional changes include increased nutrient transporter expression, accelerated crypt cell differentiation, and slowed transit time. In adult humans, data regarding adaptive changes are sparse, and the mechanisms underlying intestinal adaptation remain to be fully elucidated. Several factors influence the degree of intestinal adaptation that occurs post resection, including site and extent of resection, luminal stimulation with enteral nutrients, and intestinotrophic factors. Two intestinotrophic growth factors, the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide and recombinant growth hormone (somatropin), are now approved for clinical use in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Both agents enhance fluid absorption and decrease requirements for parenteral nutrition (PN) and/or intravenous fluid. Intestinal adaptation has been thought to be limited to the first 1-2 years following resection in humans. However, recent data suggest that a significant proportion of adult patients with SBS can achieve enteral autonomy, even after many years of PN dependence, particularly with trophic stimulation.

  17. Claudins in intestines

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhe; Ding, Lei; Lu, Qun; Chen, Yan-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Intestines are organs that not only digest food and absorb nutrients, but also provide a defense barrier against pathogens and noxious agents ingested. Tight junctions (TJs) are the most apical component of the junctional complex, providing one form of cell-cell adhesion in enterocytes and playing a critical role in regulating paracellular barrier permeability. Alteration of TJs leads to a number of pathophysiological diseases causing malabsorption of nutrition and intestinal structure disruption, which may even contribute to systemic organ failure. Claudins are the major structural and functional components of TJs with at least 24 members in mammals. Claudins have distinct charge-selectivity, either by tightening the paracellular pathway or functioning as paracellular channels, regulating ions and small molecules passing through the paracellular pathway. In this review, we have discussed the functions of claudin family members, their distribution and localization in the intestinal tract of mammals, their alterations in intestine-related diseases and chemicals/agents that regulate the expression and localization of claudins as well as the intestinal permeability, which provide a therapeutic view for treating intestinal diseases. PMID:24478939

  18. Scalable video compression using longer motion compensated temporal filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golwelkar, Abhijeet V.; Woods, John W.

    2003-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) subband/wavelet coding using a motion compensated temporal filter (MCTF) is emerging as a very effective structure for highly scalable video coding. Most previous work has used two-tap Haar filters for the temporal analysis/synthesis. To make better use of the temporal redundancies, we are proposing an MCTF scheme based on longer biorthogonal filters. We show a lifting based coder capable of subpixel accurate motion compensation. If we retain the fixed size GOP structure of the Haar filter MCTFs, we need to use symmetric extensions at both ends of the GOP. This gives rise to loss of coding efficiency at the GOP boundaries resulting in significant PSNR drops there. This performance can be considerably improved by using a 'sliding window,' in place of the GOP block. We employ the 5/3 filter and its non-orthogonality causes PSNR variation, which can be reduced by employing filter-based weighting coefficients. Overall the longer filters have a higher coding gain than the Haar filters and show significant improvement in average PSNR at high bit rates. However, a doubling in the number of motion vectors to be transmitted, translates to a drop in PSNR at the lower video bit rates.

  19. Risk factors associated with intestinal necrosis in children with failed non-surgical reduction for intussusception.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Ya; Huang, Xiao-Zhong; Han, Yi-Jiang; Zhu, Li-Bin; Huang, Kai-Yu; Lin, Jing; Li, Zhong-Rong

    2017-05-01

    Intestinal necrosis is the most serious complication of intussusception. The risk factors associated with intestinal necrosis in pediatric patients with intussusception have not been well characterized. This study aimed to investigate the risk factors associated with intestinal necrosis in pediatric patients with failed non-surgical reduction for intussusception. Hospitalized patients who failed the air-enema reduction for intussusception in the outpatient department and subsequently underwent surgery were retrospectively reviewed. All cases were categorized into two groups: intestinal necrosis group and non-intestinal necrosis group based on the surgical findings. Demographic and clinical features including the findings from the surgery were recorded and analyzed. Factors associated with intestinal necrosis were analyzed using univariate and multivariate unconditional logistic regression analyses. A total of 728 cases were included. Among them, 171 had intestinal necrosis at the time of surgery. The group with intestinal necrosis had a longer duration of symptom or length of illness (P = 0.000), and younger (P = 0.000) than the non-intestinal necrosis group. Complex/compound type of intussusceptions is more likely to have intestinal necrosis. Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of grossly bloody stool (OR = 2.12; 95% CI 1.19-3.76, P = 0.010) and duration of symptom (OR = 1.07; 95% CI 1.06-1.08, P = 0.000) were independent risk factors for intestinal necrosis in patients hospitalized for surgical reduction for intussusceptions. At time of admission, the presence of bloody stools and duration of symptom are the important risk factors for developing intestinal necrosis for those patients who failed non-surgical reduction. The length of illness has the highest sensitivity and specificity to correlate with intestinal necrosis. This finding may suggest that we should take the intussusception cases that have the longer duration of

  20. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in adults.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James; Nimmo, Michael

    2011-02-15

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia in the adult may be characterized as a disorder with dilated intestinal lacteals causing loss of lymph into the lumen of the small intestine and resultant hypoproteinemia, hypogammaglobulinemia, hypoalbuminemia and reduced number of circulating lymphocytes or lymphopenia. Most often, intestinal lymphangiectasia has been recorded in children, often in neonates, usually with other congenital abnormalities but initial definition in adults including the elderly has become increasingly more common. Shared clinical features with the pediatric population such as bilateral lower limb edema, sometimes with lymphedema, pleural effusion and chylous ascites may occur but these reflect the severe end of the clinical spectrum. In some, diarrhea occurs with steatorrhea along with increased fecal loss of protein, reflected in increased fecal alpha-1-antitrypsin levels, while others may present with iron deficiency anemia, sometimes associated with occult small intestinal bleeding. Most lymphangiectasia in adults detected in recent years, however, appears to have few or no clinical features of malabsorption. Diagnosis remains dependent on endoscopic changes confirmed by small bowel biopsy showing histological evidence of intestinal lymphangiectasia. In some, video capsule endoscopy and enteroscopy have revealed more extensive changes along the length of the small intestine. A critical diagnostic element in adults with lymphangiectasia is the exclusion of entities (e.g. malignancies including lymphoma) that might lead to obstruction of the lymphatic system and "secondary" changes in the small bowel biopsy. In addition, occult infectious (e.g. Whipple's disease from Tropheryma whipplei) or inflammatory disorders (e.g. Crohn's disease) may also present with profound changes in intestinal permeability and protein-losing enteropathy that also require exclusion. Conversely, rare B-cell type lymphomas have also been described even decades following initial

  1. Persistent umbilical discharge in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Mshelbwala, P M; Sabiu, L; Chirdan, L B; Ameh, E A; Nmadu, P T

    2006-06-01

    Umbilical discharge is not an unusual presentation in infants and children. However, the evaluation and management are rarely discussed. A retrospective review of 18 patients presenting with persistent umbilical discharge over a period of 22 years, excluding neonates with omphalitis. The patients' ages ranged between 11 days and 9 years. Presentation was usually discharge of clear, serous or purulent fluid or faecal matter from the umbilicus, sometimes dating back to the neonatal period. Evaluation consisted of bacteriology, fistulogram (one patient) and histopathology. The cause of discharge was patent vitello-intestinal duct in 11 patients, umbilical granuloma in three, umbilical sinus in two and patent urachus and osteomyelitis of the ischium in one each. Definitive treatment was exploration and complete excision of the lesion and antibiotics. Two patients with patent vitello-intestinal duct died, one before surgery from hypokalaemia and sepsis, and the other from anaesthetic complications. There is a need for early referral and treatment in patients with persistent umbilical discharge. Conservative treatment is usually not successful as the common causes would normally require complete excision.

  2. Neonatal and longer term management following substance misuse in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mactier, Helen

    2013-11-01

    Substance misuse in pregnancy is not a new problem, but although impaired foetal growth and the risk of developing neonatal abstinence syndrome are widely appreciated, relatively little attention has been paid to longer term consequences for the infant. Available evidence indicates that prenatal exposure to opioids and other drugs of misuse is detrimental to the developing foetal brain; consistent with this, poor in utero head growth, delayed infant visual maturation and impaired general neurodevelopmental progress independent of social confounders are increasingly being recognised. This review considers current evidence and discusses best practice in the neonatal management and follow-up of affected babies. More studies are required to explore alternatives to methadone maintenance in pregnancy and to define optimal treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome. All infants born to drug-misusing mothers must be considered vulnerable, even if they have not required treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. U32: Vehicle Stability and Dynamics: Longer Combination Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Petrolino, Joseph; Spezia, Tony; Arant, Michael; Broshears, Eric; Chitwood, Caleb; Colbert, Jameson; Hathaway, Richard; Keil, Mitch; LaClair, Tim J; Pape, Doug; Patterson, Jim; Pittro, Collin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the safety and stability of longer combination vehicles (LCVs), in particular a triple trailer combination behind a commercial tractor, which has more complicated dynamics than the more common tractor in combination with a single semitrailer. The goal was to measure and model the behavior of LCVs in simple maneuvers. Example maneuvers tested and modeled were single and double lane changes, a gradual lane change, and a constant radius curve. In addition to test track data collection and a brief highway test, two computer models of LCVs were developed. One model is based on TruckSim , a lumped parameter model widely used for single semitrailer combinations. The other model was built in Adams software, which more explicitly models the geometry of the components of the vehicle, in terms of compliant structural members. Among other results, the models were able to duplicate the experimentally measured rearward amplification behavior that is characteristic of multi-unit combination vehicles.

  4. The intestine is a blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Patricia; Lamarca, Morgan; Kravets, Victoria; Hu, David

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, digestive disease affects 60 to 70 million people and costs over 140 billion annually. Despite the significance of the gastrointestinal tract to human health, the physics of digestion remains poorly understood. In this study, we ask a simple question: what sets the frequency of intestinal contractions? We measure the frequency of intestinal contractions in rats, as a function of distance down the intestine. We find that intestines Contract radially ten times faster than longitudinally. This motion promotes mixing and, in turn, absorption of food products by the intestinal wall. We calculate viscous dissipation in the intestinal fluid to rationalize the relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and the viscosity of the intestinal contents. Our findings may help to understand the evolution of the intestine as an ideal mixer.

  5. The intestine is a blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Patricia; Lamarca, Morgan; Hu, David

    2015-11-01

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, digestive disease affects 60 to 70 million people and costs over 140 billion annually. Despite the significance of the gastrointestinal tract to human health, the physics of digestion remains poorly understood. In this study, we ask a simple question: what sets the frequency of intestinal contractions? We measure the frequency of intestinal contractions in rats, as a function of distance down the intestine. We find that intestines contract radially ten times faster than longitudinally. This motion promotes mixing and, in turn, absorption of food products by the intestinal wall. We calculate viscous dissipation in the intestinal fluid to rationalize the relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and the viscosity of the intestinal contents. Our findings may help to understand the evolution of the intestine as an ideal mixer.

  6. Longer wait times affect future use of VHA primary care.

    PubMed

    Wong, Edwin S; Liu, Chuan-Fen; Hernandez, Susan E; Augustine, Matthew R; Nelson, Karin; Fihn, Stephan D; Hebert, Paul L

    2017-07-29

    Improving access to the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is a high priority, particularly given statutory mandates of the Veterans Access, Choice and Accountability Act. This study examined whether patient-reported wait times for VHA appointments were associated with future reliance on VHA primary care services. This observational study examined 13,595 VHA patients dually enrolled in fee-for-service Medicare. Data sources included VHA administrative data, Medicare claims and the Survey of Healthcare Experiences of Patients (SHEP). Primary care use was defined as the number of face-to-face visits from VHA and Medicare in the 12 months following SHEP completion. VHA reliance was defined as the number of VHA visits divided by total visits (VHA+Medicare). Wait times were derived from SHEP responses measuring the usual number of days to a VHA appointment with patients' primary care provider for those seeking immediate care. We defined appointment wait times categorically: 0 days, 1day, 2-3 days, 4-7 days and >7 days. We used fractional logistic regression to examine the relationship between wait times and reliance. Mean VHA reliance was 88.1% (95% CI = 86.7% to 89.5%) for patients reporting 0day waits. Compared with these patients, reliance over the subsequent year was 1.4 (p = 0.041), 2.8 (p = 0.001) and 1.6 (p = 0.014) percentage points lower for patients waiting 2-3 days, 4-7 days and >7 days, respectively. Patients reporting longer usual wait times for immediate VHA care exhibited lower future reliance on VHA primary care. Longer wait times may reduce care continuity and impact cost shifting across two federal health programs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. In Vivo Persistence of Human Rhinoviruses in Immunosuppressed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Engelmann, Ilka; Dewilde, Anny; Lazrek, Mouna; Batteux, Mathilde; Hamissi, Aminati; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Hober, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Several species of the genus Enterovirus cause persistent infections in humans. Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections are generally self-limiting but occasionally persistent infections have been described. This study aimed to identify persistent HRV infections and investigate the clinical and virologic characteristics of patients with persistent infections. From January 2012 to March 2015, 3714 respiratory specimens from 2608 patients were tested for respiratory viruses by using a multiplex reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. A retrospective study was performed. Patients with at least two specimens positive for HRV/enterovirus taken 45 days or longer apart were identified and the HRV/enteroviruses were typed. Patients with persistent infection were compared to patients with reinfection and patients with cleared infection. Phylogenetic analysis of the viral protein(VP)4/VP2 region was performed. 18 patients with persistent HRV/enterovirus infection were identified. Minimum median duration of persistence was 92 days (range 50–455 days). All but one patients with persistence were immunosuppressed. Immunosuppression and hematologic disorders were more frequent in patients with persistence (n = 18) than in patients with reinfection (n = 33) and with cleared infection (n = 25) (p = 0.003 and p = 0.001, respectively). In conclusion, this retrospective study identified HRV persistence in vivo which occurred mainly in immunosuppressed patients. PMID:28151988

  8. Herbicide Persistence in Seawater Simulation Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Mercurio, Philip; Mueller, Jochen F.; Eaglesham, Geoff; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Herbicides are detected year-round in marine waters, including those of the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef (GBR). The few previous studies that have investigated herbicide persistence in seawater generally reported half-lives in the order of months, and several studies were too short to detect significant degradation. Here we investigated the persistence of eight herbicides commonly detected in the GBR or its catchments in standard OECD simulation flask experiments, but with the aim to mimic natural conditions similar to those found on the GBR (i.e., relatively low herbicide concentrations, typical temperatures, light and microbial communities). Very little degradation was recorded over the standard 60 d period (Experiment 1) so a second experiment was extended to 365 d. Half-lives of PSII herbicides ametryn, atrazine, diuron, hexazinone and tebuthiuron were consistently greater than a year, indicating high persistence. The detection of atrazine and diuron metabolites and longer persistence in mercuric chloride-treated seawater confirmed that biodegradation contributed to the breakdown of herbicides. The shortest half-life recorded was 88 d for growth-regulating herbicide 2,4-D at 31°C in the dark, while the fatty acid-inhibitor metolachlor exhibited a minimum half-life of 281 d. The presence of moderate light and elevated temperatures affected the persistence of most of the herbicides; however, the scale and direction of the differences were not predictable and were likely due to changes in microbial community composition. The persistence estimates here represent some of the first appropriate data for application in risk assessments for herbicide exposure in tropical marine systems. The long persistence of herbicides identified in the present study helps explain detection of herbicides in nearshore waters of the GBR year round. Little degradation of these herbicides would be expected during the wet season with runoff and associated flood plumes

  9. Herbicide Persistence in Seawater Simulation Experiments.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Philip; Mueller, Jochen F; Eaglesham, Geoff; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Herbicides are detected year-round in marine waters, including those of the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef (GBR). The few previous studies that have investigated herbicide persistence in seawater generally reported half-lives in the order of months, and several studies were too short to detect significant degradation. Here we investigated the persistence of eight herbicides commonly detected in the GBR or its catchments in standard OECD simulation flask experiments, but with the aim to mimic natural conditions similar to those found on the GBR (i.e., relatively low herbicide concentrations, typical temperatures, light and microbial communities). Very little degradation was recorded over the standard 60 d period (Experiment 1) so a second experiment was extended to 365 d. Half-lives of PSII herbicides ametryn, atrazine, diuron, hexazinone and tebuthiuron were consistently greater than a year, indicating high persistence. The detection of atrazine and diuron metabolites and longer persistence in mercuric chloride-treated seawater confirmed that biodegradation contributed to the breakdown of herbicides. The shortest half-life recorded was 88 d for growth-regulating herbicide 2,4-D at 31°C in the dark, while the fatty acid-inhibitor metolachlor exhibited a minimum half-life of 281 d. The presence of moderate light and elevated temperatures affected the persistence of most of the herbicides; however, the scale and direction of the differences were not predictable and were likely due to changes in microbial community composition. The persistence estimates here represent some of the first appropriate data for application in risk assessments for herbicide exposure in tropical marine systems. The long persistence of herbicides identified in the present study helps explain detection of herbicides in nearshore waters of the GBR year round. Little degradation of these herbicides would be expected during the wet season with runoff and associated flood plumes

  10. Intestinal and multivisceral transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Meira, Sérgio Paiva; Guardia, Bianca Della; Evangelista, Andréia Silva; Matielo, Celso Eduardo Lourenço; Neves, Douglas Bastos; Pandullo, Fernando Luis; Felga, Guilherme Eduardo Gonçalves; Alves, Jefferson André da Silva; Curvelo, Lilian Amorim; Diaz, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Rusi, Marcela Balbo; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; de Almeida, Marcio Dias; Epstein, Marina Gabrielle; Pedroso, Pamella Tung; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Rocco, Rodrigo Andrey; de Almeida, Samira Scalso; de Rezende, Marcelo Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation has shown exceptional growth over the past 10 years. At the end of the 1990’s, intestinal transplantation moved out of the experimental realm to become a routine practice in treating patients with severe complications related to total parenteral nutrition and intestinal failure. In the last years, several centers reported an increasing improvement in survival outcomes (about 80%), during the first 12 months after surgery, but long-term survival is still a challenge. Several advances led to clinical application of transplants. Immunosuppression involved in intestinal and multivisceral transplantation was the biggest gain for this procedure in the past decade due to tacrolimus, and new inducing drugs, mono- and polyclonal anti-lymphocyte antibodies. Despite the advancement of rigid immunosuppression protocols, rejection is still very frequent in the first 12 months, and can result in long-term graft loss. The future of intestinal transplantation and multivisceral transplantation appears promising. The major challenge is early recognition of acute rejection in order to prevent graft loss, opportunistic infections associated to complications, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease and graft versus host disease; and consequently, improve results in the long run. PMID:25993080

  11. Persistent heap Management library

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-17

    PERM is a C library for persistent heap management and is intended for use with a dynamic-memory allocator (e.g. malloc, free). The PERM memory allocator replaces the standard C dynamic memory allocation functions with compatible versions that provide persistent memory to application programs. Memory allocated with the PERM allocatory will persist between program invocations after a call to a checkpoint function. This function essentially saves the state of the heap and registered global variables to a file which may reside in flash memory or other node local storage. A few other functions are also provided by the library to manage checkpoint files. Global variables in an application can be marked persistent and be included in a checkpoint by using a compiler attribute defined as PERM. The PERM checkpoint methof is not dependent on the programming model ans works with distributed memory or shared memory programs.

  12. Unusually persistent complainants.

    PubMed

    Lester, Grant; Wilson, Beth; Griffin, Lynn; Mullen, Paul E

    2004-04-01

    Querulous paranoia may have disappeared from the psychiatric literature, but is it flourishing in modern complaints organisations and the courts? To investigate the unusually persistent complainants who lay waste to their own lives and place inordinate demands and stress on complaints organisations. Complaints officers completed questionnaires on both unusually persistent complainants and matched controls. Persistent complainants (distinguished by their pursuit of vindication and retribution) consumed time and resources and resorted to both direct and veiled threats. Attempts to distinguish these people from a control group on the basis of the manner in which their claims were initially managed failed. Persistent complainants' pursuit of vindication and retribution fits badly with complaints systems established to deliver reparation and compensation. These complainants damaged the financial and social fabric of their own lives and frightened those dealing with their claims. The study suggests methods of early detection and alternative management strategies.

  13. Glyphosate persistence in seawater.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Philip; Flores, Florita; Mueller, Jochen F; Carter, Steve; Negri, Andrew P

    2014-08-30

    Glyphosate is one of the most widely applied herbicides globally but its persistence in seawater has not been reported. Here we quantify the biodegradation of glyphosate using standard "simulation" flask tests with native bacterial populations and coastal seawater from the Great Barrier Reef. The half-life for glyphosate at 25 °C in low-light was 47 days, extending to 267 days in the dark at 25 °C and 315 days in the dark at 31 °C, which is the longest persistence reported for this herbicide. AMPA, the microbial transformation product of glyphosate, was detected under all conditions, confirming that degradation was mediated by the native microbial community. This study demonstrates glyphosate is moderately persistent in the marine water under low light conditions and is highly persistent in the dark. Little degradation would be expected during flood plumes in the tropics, which could potentially deliver dissolved and sediment-bound glyphosate far from shore.

  14. Effect of longer battery life on small bowel capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ou, George; Shahidi, Neal; Galorport, Cherry; Takach, Oliver; Lee, Terry; Enns, Robert

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine if longer battery life improves capsule endoscopy (CE) completion rates. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed at a tertiary, university-affiliated hospital in Vancouver, Canada. Patients who underwent CE with either PillCam™ SB2 or SB2U between 01/2010 and 12/2013 were considered for inclusion. SB2 and SB2U share identical physical dimensions but differ in their battery lives (8 h vs 12 h). Exclusion criteria included history of gastric or small bowel surgery, endoscopic placement of CE, interrupted view of major landmarks due to technical difficulty or significant amount of debris, and repeat CE using same system. Basic demographics, comorbidities, medications, baseline bowel habits, and previous surgeries were reviewed. Timing of major landmarks in CE were recorded, and used to calculate gastric transit time, small bowel transit time, and total recording time. A complete CE study was defined as visualization of cecum. Transit times and completion rates were compared. RESULTS: Four hundred and eight patients, including 208 (51.0%) males, were included for analysis. The mean age was 55.5 ± 19.3 years. The most common indication for CE was gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 254, 62.3%), followed by inflammatory bowel disease (n = 86, 21.1%). There was no difference in gastric transit times (group difference 0.90, 95%CI: 0.72-1.13, P = 0.352) and small bowel transit times (group difference 1.07, 95%CI: 0.95-1.19, P = 0.261) between SB2U and SB2, but total recording time was about 14% longer in the SB2U group (95%CI: 10%-18%, P < 0.001) and there was a corresponding trend toward higher completion rate (88.2% vs 93.2%, OR = 1.78, 95%CI 0.88-3.63, P = 0.111). There was no statistically significant difference in the rates of positive findings (OR = 0.98, 95%CI: 0.64-1.51, P = 0.918). CONCLUSION: Extending the operating time of CE may be a simple method to improve completion rate although it does not affect the rate of positive findings. PMID

  15. Intestinal anisakidosis (anisakiosis).

    PubMed

    Takei, Hidehiro; Powell, Suzanne Z

    2007-10-01

    A case of intestinal anisakidosis in a 42-year-old man in Japan is presented. His chief complaint was an acute onset of severe abdominal pain. Approximately 12 hours before the onset of this symptom, he had eaten sliced raw mackerel ("sashimi"). Upper endoscopy was unremarkable. At exploratory laparotomy, an edematous, diffusely thickened segment of jejunum was observed, which was resected. The postoperative course was uneventful. The segment of small intestine showed a granular indurated area on the mucosal surface, and microscopically, a helminthic larva penetrating the intestinal wall, which was surrounded by a cuff of numerous neutrophils and eosinophils, as well as diffuse acute serositis. A cross section of the larva revealed the internal structures, pathognomonic of Anisakis simplex. Although anisakidosis is rare in the United States, with the increasing popularity of Japanese cuisine, the incidence is expected to increase, and pathologists should be familiar with this disease.

  16. Small Intestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Munot, Khushboo; Kotler, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Small intestinal infections are extremely common worldwide. They may be bacterial, viral, or parasitic in etiology. Most are foodborne or waterborne, with specific etiologies differing by region and with diverse pathophysiologies. Very young, very old, and immune-deficient individuals are the most vulnerable to morbidity or mortality from small intestinal infections. There have been significant advances in diagnostic sophistication with the development and early application of molecular diagnostic assays, though these tests have not become mainstream. The lack of rapid diagnoses combined with the self-limited nature of small intestinal infections has hampered the development of specific and effective treatments other than oral rehydration. Antibiotics are not indicated in the absence of an etiologic diagnosis, and not at all in the case of some infections.

  17. "I no longer believe": did Freud abandon the seduction theory?

    PubMed

    Ahbel-Rappe, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Recent accounts of the seduction theory and the question of its abandonment have emphasized the continuity of Freud's work before and after the seduction theory, claiming that Freud did not abandon his concern with the event of seduction but rather came to appreciate that an understanding of fantasy was also essential. This claim is challenged. It is shown that Freud did abandon the passionate concerns of his seduction theory for the most part; that he left behind his early interest in reconstructing unconscious infantile incest and focused instead on later, conscious seduction; that he at times clearly reduced apparent paternal incest to fantasy; that he turned away from the phenomenology of incest he had begun to develop; and that he theoretically nullified the value of the difference between real and fantasied seduction. It is also shown that, contrary to a persistent concern in psychoanalytic history, attention to actual seduction need not detract from the essential psychoanalytic concern with fantasy and infantile sexuality. Thinking about incest specifically illuminates the capacity for fantasizing, the core of the Freudian psyche. In this way the intuition of the seduction theory that there is something of distinctive psychoanalytic significance about incest finds support.

  18. Females live longer than males: role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Vina, Jose; Gambini, Juan; Lopez-Grueso, Raul; Abdelaziz, Khira M; Jove, Mariona; Borras, Consuelo

    2011-12-01

    One of the most significant achievements of the twentieth century is the increase in human lifespan. In any period studied, females live longer than males. We showed that mitochondrial oxidative stress is higher in males than females and that the higher levels of estrogens in females protect them against ageing, by up-regulating the expression of antioxidant, longevity-related genes. The chemical structure of estradiol confers antioxidant properties to the molecule. However, the low concentration of estrogens in females makes it unlikely that they exhibit significant antioxidant capacity in the organism. Therefore we studied the mechanisms enabling estradiol to be antioxidant at physiological levels. Our results show that physiological concentrations of estrogens activate estrogen receptors and the MAPK and NFKB pathway. Activation of NFkB by estrogens subsequently activates the expression of Mn-SOD and GPx. Moreover, we have demonstrated that genistein, the most abundant phytoestrogen in soya, reproduces the antioxidant effect of estradiol at nutritionally relevant concentrations by the same mechanism, both in healthy ageing and in Alzheimer's disease. We conclude that estrogens and phytoestrogens up-regulate expression of antioxidant enzymes via the estrogen receptor and MAPK activation, which in turn activate the NFkB signalling pathway, resulting in the up-regulation of the expression of longevity-related genes.

  19. Older adults with higher income or marriage have longer telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Yung-Chieh; Lung, For-Wey

    2013-01-01

    Background: telomere length has been used to represent biological ageing and is found to be associated with various physiological, psychological and social factors. Objective: to explore the effects of income and marriage on leucocyte telomere length in a representative sample of older adults. Design and subjects: cross-sectional analysis among 298 adults, aged 65–74, randomly selected from the community by census. Methods: telomere length was measured by quantitative PCR. Participants provided information on sociodemographics, physical illness and completed questionnaires rating mental state and perceived neighbourhood experience. Results: telomere length was negatively associated with lower income [coefficient −0.141 (95% CI: −0.244 to −0.020), P = 0.021] and positively associated with the marital status [coefficient 0.111 (95% CI: −0.008 to 0.234), P = 0.067] when controlling for gender, age, educational level, physical diseases (including diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, cerebrovascular disease and Parkinson's disease), depressive symptoms, minor mental symptoms, cognitive impairment and perceived neighbourhood experience (including social support, perceived security and public facilities). Conclusions: these results indicate that older adults with higher income or being married have longer telomeres when other sociodemographics, physical diseases, mental status and neighbourhood experience are adjusted. PMID:22951603

  20. IUDs no longer profitable in U.S. market.

    PubMed

    1986-01-01

    Ortho Pharmaceuticals and G.D. Searle & Company have decided to stop supplying IUDs to the US market because it is no longer profitable for them to do so. The Lippes Loop IUD, manufactured by Ortho Pharmaceuticals, and the Copper-7 and Tatum-T IUDs, manufactured by G.D. Searle, continue to have Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. These decisions were not related to issues of safety or effectiveness and will not affect supplies to programs in developing countries. product liability suits such as those brought against Searle are an increasingly common feature of health care product manfacturing in the US. Medical malpractice suits also are increasing dramatically. Searle spent $1.5 million successfully defending the Copper-7 in 4 recent trials initiated by women who claimed Searle's IUDs had caused such problems as pelvic inflammatory disease (FE). Although IUD use has been linked to an increased incidence of PID, the exact nature of that link remains controversial, and not every woman is at higher risk. Long before the Ortho and Searle decisions, the US Agency for International Development began the process of shifting to the Copper-T 380A, which is approved by the FDA and manufactured by Finishing Enterprises in New York but not marketed directly in the US. The primary effect of the Searle and Ortho decisions has been to shift entirely to providing Copper-T 380A IUDs.

  1. Symmetry Lasts Longer Than Random, but Only for Brief Presentations

    PubMed Central

    Makin, Alexis D. J.; Palumbo, Letizia; Bertamini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that explicit emotional content or physical image properties (e.g., luminance, size, and numerosity) alter subjective duration. Palumbo recently demonstrated that the presence or absence of abstract reflectional symmetry also influenced subjective duration. Here, we explored this phenomenon further by varying the type of symmetry (reflection or rotation) and the objective duration of stimulus presentation (less or more than 1 second). Experiment 1 used a verbal estimation task in which participants estimated the presentation duration of reflection, rotation symmetry, or random square-field patterns. Longer estimates were given for reflectional symmetry images than rotation or random, but only when the image was presented for less than 1 second. There was no difference between rotation and random. These findings were confirmed by a second experiment using a paired-comparison task. This temporal distortion could be because reflection has positive valence or because it is processed efficiently be the visual system. The mechanism remains to be determined. We are relatively sure, however, that reflectional patterns can increase subjective duration in the absence of explicit semantic content, and in the absence of changes in the size, luminance, or numerosity in the images. PMID:27895887

  2. Bilateral activation of the abdominal muscles induces longer reaction time.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Henry; Overs, Michelle E; Wu, Jennifer C-Y; Galea, Mary P; Hodges, Paul W

    2008-05-01

    Bilateral deficit is the increase in reaction time during bilateral activation compared to unilateral activation. This has been reported extensively for the limb muscles and is argued to be due to concurrent inhibition through transcallosal pathways. Unlike the limb muscles, the axial muscles are commonly activated bilaterally during functional tasks and have bilateral projections to their motoneurones. Thus it is reasonable to hypothesise that there will be no bilateral deficit for these muscles. Recordings of electromyographic (EMG) activity were made using surface electrodes placed bilaterally over the abdominal muscles in eight healthy right-handed subjects. Subjects performed either right or left pelvic elevation (unilateral abdominal activation), or posterior pelvic tilt (bilateral abdominal activation) "as fast as possible" in response to an auditory tone. Movements were performed as either a simple or choice reaction time task. Bilateral activation induced significantly longer reaction time than unilateral activation, and was observed during both simple and choice reaction time tasks. The results demonstrate that reaction time is delayed during bilateral activation of the abdominal muscles. These findings suggest that bilateral deficit is present for the axial muscles. This could be mediated through inhibition at various levels of the nervous system or variations in postural demand.

  3. [Live longer, suffer more? Trends in life expectancy and health].

    PubMed

    Doblhammer, G; Kreft, D

    2011-08-01

    During the 20th century, life expectancy has been continuously increasing with the majority of the additional years resulting from decreasing mortality among the old and oldest old in the last few decades. Two phases of convergence and divergence in European mortality have been identified, with a possible new phase of divergence taking place among the oldest old. Over this period, women have always been living longer than men. Explanations for this phenomenon include not only biological factors and differences in lifestyle and health care utilization, but also differences in reporting patterns. Trends in health do not follow a clear direction. Reasons are the different dimensions of health as well as inadequate data. In general, the prevalence of morbidity has been increasing, while functional limitations and ADL disabilities have been decreasing. Due to a lack of data, no information exists for trends among the oldest old at age 80 and above. In absolute terms, the number of healthy years has been increasing with increasing life expectancy. In relative terms, they have been stable, probably slightly increasing in some countries. These trends suggest that increasing life expectancy does not result in an increase in morbidity.

  4. Larger Stimuli Require Longer Processing Time for Perception.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Ryota; Dalmaijer, Edwin S; Sherman, Maxine T; Kawakita, Genji; Paffen, Chris L E

    2017-05-01

    The time it takes for a stimulus to reach awareness is often assessed by measuring reaction times (RTs) or by a temporal order judgement (TOJ) task in which perceived timing is compared against a reference stimulus. Dissociations of RT and TOJ have been reported earlier in which increases in stimulus intensity such as luminance intensity results in a decrease of RT, whereas perceived perceptual latency in a TOJ task is affected to a lesser degree. Here, we report that a simple manipulation of stimulus size has stronger effects on perceptual latency measured by TOJ than on motor latency measured by RT tasks. When participants were asked to respond to the appearance of a simple stimulus such as a luminance blob, the perceptual latency measured against a standard reference stimulus was up to 40 ms longer for a larger stimulus. In other words, the smaller stimulus was perceived to occur earlier than the larger one. RT on the other hand was hardly affected by size. The TOJ results were further replicated in a simultaneity judgement task, suggesting that the effects of size are not due to TOJ-specific response biases but more likely reflect an effect on perceived timing.

  5. Symmetry Lasts Longer Than Random, but Only for Brief Presentations.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Ruth; Makin, Alexis D J; Palumbo, Letizia; Bertamini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that explicit emotional content or physical image properties (e.g., luminance, size, and numerosity) alter subjective duration. Palumbo recently demonstrated that the presence or absence of abstract reflectional symmetry also influenced subjective duration. Here, we explored this phenomenon further by varying the type of symmetry (reflection or rotation) and the objective duration of stimulus presentation (less or more than 1 second). Experiment 1 used a verbal estimation task in which participants estimated the presentation duration of reflection, rotation symmetry, or random square-field patterns. Longer estimates were given for reflectional symmetry images than rotation or random, but only when the image was presented for less than 1 second. There was no difference between rotation and random. These findings were confirmed by a second experiment using a paired-comparison task. This temporal distortion could be because reflection has positive valence or because it is processed efficiently be the visual system. The mechanism remains to be determined. We are relatively sure, however, that reflectional patterns can increase subjective duration in the absence of explicit semantic content, and in the absence of changes in the size, luminance, or numerosity in the images.

  6. Mucosal macrophages in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mowat, Allan McI; Bain, Calum C

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal macrophages are essential for local homeostasis and in keeping a balance between commensal microbiota and the host. However, they also play essential roles in inflammation and protective immunity, when they change from peaceful regulators to powerful aggressors. As a result, activated macrophages are important targets for treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease. Until recently, the complexity and heterogeneity of intestinal macrophages have been underestimated and here we review current evidence that there are distinct populations of resident and inflammatory macrophages in the intestine. We describe the mechanisms that ensure macrophages remain partially inert in the healthy gut and cannot promote inflammation despite constant exposure to bacteria and other stimuli. This may be because the local environment 'conditions' macrophage precursors to become unresponsive after they arrive in the gut. Nevertheless, this permits some active, physiological functions to persist. A new population of pro-inflammatory macrophages appears in inflammation and we review the evidence that this involves recruitment of a distinct population of fully responsive monocytes, rather than alterations in the existing cells. A constant balance between these resident and inflammatory macrophages is critical for maintaining the status quo in healthy gut and ensuring protective immunity when required. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Food-borne intestinal trematodiases in humans.

    PubMed

    Fried, Bernard; Graczyk, Thaddeus K; Tamang, Leena

    2004-06-01

    Food-borne trematodiases still remain a public health problem world-wide, despite changes in eating habits, alterations in social and agricultural practices, health education, industrialization, environmental alteration, and broad-spectrum anthelmintics. Food-borne trematodiases usually occur focally, are still persistently endemic in some parts of the world, and are most prevalent in remote rural places among school-age children, low-wage earners, and women of child-bearing age. Intestinal fluke diseases are aggravated by socio-economic factors such as poverty, malnutrition, an explosively growing free-food market, a lack of sufficient food inspection and sanitation, other helminthiases, and declining economic conditions. Control programs implemented for food-borne zoonoses and sustained in endemic areas are not fully successful for intestinal food-borne trematodiases because of centuries-old traditions of eating raw or insufficiently cooked food, widespread zoonotic reservoirs, promiscuous defecation, and the use of "night soil" (human excrement collected from latrines) as fertilizer. This review examines food-borne intestinal trematodiases associated with species in families of the Digenea: Brachylaimidae, Diplostomidae, Echinostomatidae, Fasciolidae, Gastrodiscidae, Gymnophallidae, Heterophyidae, Lecithodendriidae, Microphallidae, Nanophyetidae, Paramphistomatidae, Plagiorchiidae, and Strigeidae. Because most of the implicated species are in the Echinostomatidae and Heterophyidae, emphasis in the review is placed on species in these families.

  8. General Treatment Information for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer A-Z Small Intestine Cancer Treating Small Intestine Cancer General treatment information Depending on the type ... questions about your treatment options. More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  9. Assessment of intestinal malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Nikaki, K; Gupte, G L

    2016-04-01

    Significant efforts have been made in the last decade to either standardize the available tests for intestinal malabsorption or to develop new, more simple and reliable techniques. The quest is still on and, unfortunately, clinical practice has not dramatically changed. The investigation of intestinal malabsorption is directed by the patient's history and baseline tests. Endoscopy and small bowel biopsies play a major role although non-invasive tests are favored and often performed early on the diagnostic algorithm, especially in paediatric and fragile elderly patients. The current clinically available methods and research tools are summarized in this review article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Intestinal microbiocenosis in children with intestinal enzymopathy].

    PubMed

    Kamilova, A T; Akhmedov, N N; Pulatova, D B; Nurmatov, B A

    2001-01-01

    141 children with different kinds of intestinal enzymopathy were examined; of these, 33 had celiac disease, 39--the syndrome of celiac disease, 12--congenital lactase deficiency and 57--the syndrome of disaccharidase insufficiency. In these patients a significant decrease in the average characteristics of the main protective flora and the growth of hemolytic and lactose-negative enterobacteria were established. In all groups of patients increased amounts of Proteus were detected, which was indicative of profound dysbiosis. The content of bifidobacteria was found to be decreased in 89.5-97% of the patients and the content of lactic acid bacteria, in 15.8-33.3%. The decreased content of Escherichia coli with normal enzymatic activity (less than 10(7) colony-forming units) was noted in one-third of the patients with the syndrome of celiac disease and congenital lactase deficiency, in about a half of the patients with the syndrome of disaccharidase insufficiency and least of all in patients with celiac disease (9.1%). The association of opportunistic microbes was detected in 15.6% of the patients, more often in those with celiac disease, the syndrome of celiac disease and congenital lactase deficiency. The severity of disturbances in intestinal eubiosis was found to depend on the gravity of the patients' state.

  11. Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... N Vitamin deficiencies as a result of poor absorption in the intestine N Electrolyte and mineral deficiencies ... N Kidney stones or gallstones due to poor absorption of calcium or bile How is intestinal failure ...

  12. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  13. Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... N Vitamin deficiencies as a result of poor absorption in the intestine N Electrolyte and mineral deficiencies ... N Kidney stones or gallstones due to poor absorption of calcium or bile How is intestinal failure ...

  14. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Small intestine aspirate and culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003731.htm Small intestine aspirate and culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Small intestine aspirate and culture is a lab test to ...

  16. Catalase eliminates reactive oxygen species and influences the intestinal microbiota of shrimp.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui-Ting; Yang, Ming-Chong; Sun, Jie-Jie; Guo, Fang; Lan, Jiang-Feng; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2015-11-01

    Intestinal innate immune response is an important defense mechanism of animals and humans against external pathogens. The mechanism of microbiota homeostasis in host intestines has been well studied in mammals and Drosophila. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antimicrobial peptides have been reported to play important roles in homeostasis. However, how to maintain the microbiota homeostasis in crustacean intestine needs to be elucidated. In this study, we identified a novel catalase (MjCAT) involved in ROS elimination in kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus. MjCAT mRNA was widely distributed in hemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine. After the shrimp were challenged with pathogenic bacteria via oral infection, the expression level of MjCAT was upregulated, and the enzyme activity was increased in the intestine. ROS level was also increased in the intestine at early time after oral infection and recovered rapidly. When MjCAT was knocked down by RNA interference (RNAi), high ROS level maintained longer time, and the number of bacteria number was declined in the shrimp intestinal lumen than those in the control group, but the survival rate of the MjCAT-RNAi shrimp was declined. Further study demonstrated that the intestinal villi protruded from epithelial lining of the intestinal wall were damaged by the high ROS level in MjCAT-knockdown shrimp. These results suggested that MjCAT participated in the intestinal host-microbe homeostasis by regulating ROS level.

  17. A Growing and Expanding Earth is no Longer Questionable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, L. S.

    2008-05-01

    The young age of today's oceans is absolute proof that the Earth has been growing and expanding for the past 250 million years. Today, these young oceans now cover approximately 71% of Earth's surface and have added about 40% to its size. That fact, alone, is proof that Kant's nebular hypothesis is false, and that the Earth has been increasing in size and mass for the past 250 million years. Growth and expansion of the Earth can no longer be refuted. Ocean sediments cored from basaltic basement floors by the Deep Sea Drilling Program (DSDP) and its successors confirm that all of today's oceans are relatively young and could not have been present when the planet was first created, as postulated by Kant's nebular hypothesis (1755), modified by Laplace in 1796, which holds that the Earth and other planets were created approximately 4.6 billion years ago with their present sizes and chemical composition. The nebular hypothesis has no evidence to support it and is easily disproved. This discovery has immense consequences for current scientific beliefs, primarily the concepts of plate tectonics and subduction to maintain a static Earth diameter. Plate tectonics philosophy is basically correct, but its mechanism of subduction will prove to be the most avoidable and egregious error in the history of geophysics. A new cosmological concept called Accreation (creation by accretion) is offered to replace Kant's false philosophy of creation of the Earth and Solar System. Accreation, fundamentally, is based on the known daily influx of large tonnages of meteorites, particles and dust from outer space. An age for the Earth is impossible to estimate because a plausible starting point cannot be determined. Scientists of the world must face up to other erroneous hypotheses generated by Kant's false philosophy and recognize that a paradigm shift equal to that wrought by Copernicus is now in order. The benefits to scientific knowledge are inestimable, and science will henceforth be

  18. Needle Thoracostomy: Clinical Effectiveness is Improved Using a Longer Angiocatheter

    PubMed Central

    Aho, Johnathon M.; Thiels, Cornelius A.; El Khatib, Moustafa M.; Ubl, Dan; Laan, Danuel; Berns, Kathleen S.; Habermann, Elizabeth B.; Zietlow, Scott P.; Zielinski, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background Decompression of tension physiology may be lifesaving, but significant doubts remain regarding ideal needle thoracostomy (NT) catheter length in treatment of tension physiology. We aim to demonstrate increased clinical effectiveness of longer NT angiocatheter length (8cm) compared to current Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) recommendations of 5cm NT length. Methods A retrospective review of all adult trauma patients from 2003–2013 (age >15 years old) transported to a level I trauma center. Patients underwent NT at the 2nd intercostal space, midclavicular line (2nd ICS-MCL), either at the scene of injury, during transport (prehospital) or during initial hospital trauma resuscitation. Before March 2011, both prehospital and hospital trauma team NT equipment routinely had a 5 cm angiocatheter available. After March 2011 prehospital providers were provided an 8 cm angiocatheter. Effectiveness was defined as documented clinical improvement in respiratory, cardiovascular, or general clinical condition. Results There were 91 NT performed on 70 patients (21 bilateral placements) either in the field (prehospital, n=41) or as part of resuscitation in the hospital (hospital, n=29). Effectiveness of NT was 48% until March 2011 (n=24). NT effectiveness was significantly higher in the prehospital setting than hospital (68.3% success rate versus 20.7%, p<0.01). Patients who underwent NT using 8 cm compared to 5 cm were significantly more effective (83% VS 41% respectively, p=0.01). No complications of NT were identified in either group. Conclusion 8 cm angiocatheters are more effective at chest decompression compared to currently recommended 5 cm at the 2nd ICS-MCL Level of Evidence III Retrospective comparative study without negative criteria. PMID:26670108

  19. Needle thoracostomy: Clinical effectiveness is improved using a longer angiocatheter.

    PubMed

    Aho, Johnathon M; Thiels, Cornelius A; El Khatib, Moustafa M; Ubl, Daniel S; Laan, Danuel V; Berns, Kathleen S; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Zietlow, Scott P; Zielinski, Martin D

    2016-02-01

    Decompression of tension physiology may be lifesaving, but significant doubts remain regarding ideal needle thoracostomy (NT) catheter length in the treatment of tension physiology. We aimed to demonstrate increased clinical effectiveness of longer NT angiocatheter (8 cm) compared with current Advanced Trauma Life Support recommendations of 5-cm NT length. This is a retrospective review of all adult trauma patients from 2003 to 2013 (age > 15 years) transported to a Level I trauma center. Patients underwent NT at the second intercostal space midclavicular line, either at the scene of injury, during transport (prehospital), or during initial hospital trauma resuscitation. Before March 2011, both prehospital and hospital trauma team NT equipment routinely had a 5-cm angiocatheter available. After March 2011, prehospital providers were provided an 8-cm angiocatheter. Effectiveness was defined as documented clinical improvement in respiratory, cardiovascular, or general clinical condition. There were 91 NTs performed on 70 patients (21 bilateral placements) either in the field (prehospital, n = 41) or as part of resuscitation in the hospital (hospital, n = 29). Effectiveness of NT was 48% until March 2011 (n = 24). NT effectiveness was significantly higher in the prehospital setting than in the hospital (68.3% success rate vs. 20.7%, p < 0.01). Patients who underwent NT using 8 cm compared with 5 cm were significantly more effective (83% vs. 41%, respectively, p = 0.01). No complications of NT were identified in either group. Eight-centimeter angiocatheters are more effective at chest decompression compared with currently recommended 5 cm at the second intercostal space midclavicular line. Therapeutic study, level IV.

  20. LWIR pupil imaging and longer-term calibration stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeVan, Paul D.; Sakoglu, Ünal

    2016-09-01

    A previous paper described LWIR pupil imaging, and an improved understanding of the behavior of this type of sensor for which the high-sensitivity focal plane array (FPA) operated at higher flux levels includes a reversal in signal integration polarity. We have since considered a candidate methodology for efficient, long-term calibration stability that exploits the following two properties of pupil imaging: (1) a fixed pupil position on the FPA, and (2) signal levels from the scene imposed on significant but fixed LWIR background levels. These two properties serve to keep each pixel operating over a limited dynamic range that corresponds to its location in the pupil and to the signal levels generated at this location by the lower and upper calibration flux levels. Exploiting this property for which each pixel of the Pupil Imager operates over its limited dynamic range, the signal polarity reversal between low and high flux pixels, which occurs for a circular region of pixels near the upper edges of the pupil illumination profile, can be rectified to unipolar integration with a two-level non-uniformity correction (NUC). Images corrected real-time with standard non-uniformity correction (NUC) techniques, are still subject to longer-term drifts in pixel offsets between recalibrations. Long-term calibration stability might then be achieved using either a scene-based non-uniformity correction approach, or with periodic repointing for off-source background estimation and subtraction. Either approach requires dithering of the field of view, by sub-pixel amounts for the first method, or by large off-source motions outside the 0.38 milliradian FOV for the latter method. We report on the results of investigations along both these lines.

  1. Shyness programme: longer term benefits, cost-effectiveness, and acceptability.

    PubMed

    Titov, Nickolai; Andrews, Gavin; Johnston, Luke; Schwencke, Genevieve; Choi, Isabella

    2009-01-01

    In two randomized controlled trials Titov et al. demonstrated significant benefit from an Internet- and email-based treatment programme for social phobia: the Shyness programme. Data are presented about the longer term outcomes (6 months after treatment), cost-effectiveness relative to face-to-face treatment, and the acceptability of the programme to participants. Participants completed outcome and acceptability questionnaires at 6 months after treatment. Repeated measures analyses of variance were calculated using an intention-to-treat design. Cost-effectiveness in years lived with disability averted were calculated based on between-group effect sizes. A total of 59% of treatment group participants completed the 6 month follow-up questionnaires. Between post-treatment and 6 month follow up participants continued to make improvements in symptoms of social phobia, while maintaining improvements in mood, psychological distress, and disability. At 6 month follow up the mean within-group effect size (Cohen's d) for the two social phobia measures increased from 1.2 to 1.4. Cost-effectiveness in years lived with disability (YLD) averted was calculated as one-quarter that of face-to-face group treatment, or $AUD1495 for one YLD gained, compared to $AUD5686/YLD gained. Participants rated the Internet treatment to be as effective and helpful as face-to-face treatment. The present results confirm the reliability of the short-term findings reported in the first two Shyness programmes. The procedure appears to be very cost-effective, and acceptable to participants. These data provide further support for the development of Internet-based virtual clinics for common mental disorders.

  2. Persistent luminescence nanothermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín Rodríguez, Emma; López-Peña, Gabriel; Montes, Eduardo; Lifante, Ginés; García Solé, José; Jaque, Daniel; Diaz-Torres, Luis Armando; Salas, Pedro

    2017-08-01

    Persistent phosphorescence nanoparticles emitting in the red and near-infrared spectral regions are strongly demanded as contrast nanoprobes for autofluorescence free bioimaging and biosensing. In this work, we have developed Sr4Al14O25:Eu2+, Cr3+, Nd3+ nanopowders that produce persistent red phosphorescence peaking at 694 nm generated by Cr3+ ions. This emission displays temperature sensitivity in the physiological temperature range (20-60 °C), which makes these nanoparticles potentially useful as fluorescence (contactless) nanothermometers operating without requiring optical excitation. Nd3+ ions, which act as shallow electron traps for the red Cr3+ persistent emission, also display infrared emission bands, extending the fluorescence imaging capability to the second biological window. This unique combination of properties makes these nanoparticles multifunctional luminescent probes with great potential applications in nanomedicine.

  3. Visual persistence and cinema?

    PubMed

    Galifret, Yves

    2006-01-01

    In Faraday and Plateau's days, both apparent motion and the fusion of intermittent lights, two phenomena that are hardly connected, were explained by retinal persistence. The works of Exner and of the 'Gestalt' psychologists, as well as the modern works on 'sampled' motion and smooth motion, disregarded retinal persistence. One tried, originally, to measure this persistence using intermittent stimulation, but under the pressure of practical concern, what was established in 1902 was the logarithmic relation between fusion frequency and the intensity of the stimulation. One had to wait until the 1950s for the use of harmonic analysis to finally allow a renewal in which many problems that, for decades, had only given rise to discussions that led nowhere and to groundless assertions, were correctly stated and easily solved.

  4. Metabolic Perspectives on Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Travis E.; Wang, Zhe; Jansen, Robert S.; Gardete, Susana; Rhee, Kyu Y.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Accumulating evidence has left little doubt about the importance of persistence or metabolism in the biology and chemotherapy of tuberculosis. However, knowledge of the intersection between these two factors has begun to emerge only recently. Here, we provide a focused review of metabolic characteristics associated with M. tuberculosis persistence. We focus on metabolism because it is the biochemical foundation of all physiologic processes and a distinguishing hallmark of M. tuberculosis’s physiology and pathogenicity. In addition, it serves as the chemical interface between host and pathogen. However, existing knowledge derives largely from physiologic contexts in which replication is the primary biochemical objective. The goal of this review is to reframe existing knowledge of M. tuberculosis metabolism in the context of persistence where quiescence is often a key distinguishing characteristic. Such a perspective may help guide ongoing efforts to develop more efficient cures and inform on novel strategies to break the cycle of transmission sustaining the pandemic. PMID:28155811

  5. Persistence and financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S.

    2007-09-01

    The persistence phenomenon is studied in a financial context by using a novel mapping of the time evolution of the values of shares in a portfolio onto Ising spins. The method is applied to historical data from the London Financial Times Stock Exchange 100 index (FTSE 100) over an arbitrarily chosen period. By following the time dependence of the spins, we find evidence for a power law decay of the proportion of shares that remain either above or below their ‘starting’ values. As a result, we estimate a persistence exponent for the underlying financial market to be ≈0.5. Preliminary results from computer simulations on persistence in the economic dynamics of a toy model appear to reproduce the behaviour observed in real markets.

  6. Intestinal anastomoses after radiation therapy by surgical stapling instruments.

    PubMed

    Photopulos, G J; Delgado, G; Fowler, W C; Walton, L A

    1979-10-01

    The use of automated stapling instruments in 17 patients requiring intestinal surgery following irradiation therapy for gynecologic malignancies has been reviewed. Fifteen of these patients also had other medical problems thought to inhibit optimal anastomotic healing: malnutrition, persistent intraabdominal cancer, uremia, hypoalbuminemia, and recent antineoplastic chemotherapy. Although these conditions severely test a method of intestinal anastomosis, no patient had a complication involving the intestinal anastomosis. The use of these stapling instruments reduced both the operating time and the contamination of the peritoneal surfaces by bowel content, thereby improving the postoperative recovery of these patients. The favorable results and the secure anastomoses justify the continued use of stapling instruments in gynecologic oncology patients with prior irradiation therapy.

  7. [Frequency of intestinal protozoosis in the Mexican Republic].

    PubMed

    Tay, J; Ruiz, A; Schenone, H; Robert, L; Sánchez-Vega, J T; Uribarren, T; Becerril, M A; Romero, R

    1994-01-01

    The reports about the frequency of intestinal protozooses found in humans who live in different localities of the Mexican Republic, are in general uncertain and not trustworthy, possibly because very few and poor epidemiological surveys have been undertaken in the country. However, with the few trustful studies carried out (1981 to 1991), it is possible in Mexico, to verify that amibiasis, giardiasis and criptosporidiosis are present with significant percentages of infection: 30.6, 22.3 and 39.3% respectively. With the summary of the researches analyzed in this article, one can conclude that human infections by intestinal protozoa in the Mexican Republic, at the present time, are almost as frequent as in past decades. This occurs because still remain the factors that contribute to the persistence and spreading of intestinal parasites, such as fecalism, poor hygienic and alimentary habits, within a deficient environmental sanitation.

  8. Observation Impacts for Longer Forecast Lead-Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, R.; Gelaro, R.; Todling, R.

    2013-12-01

    Observation impact on forecasts evaluated using adjoint-based techniques (e.g. Langland and Baker, 2004) are limited by the validity of the assumptions underlying the forecasting model adjoint. Most applications of this approach have focused on deriving observation impacts on short-range forecasts (e.g. 24-hour) in part to stay well within linearization assumptions. The most widely used measure of observation impact relies on the availability of the analysis for verifying the forecasts. As pointed out by Gelaro et al. (2007), and more recently by Todling (2013), this introduces undesirable correlations in the measure that are likely to affect the resulting assessment of the observing system. Stappers and Barkmeijer (2012) introduced a technique that, in principle, allows extending the validity of tangent linear and corresponding adjoint models to longer lead-times, thereby reducing the correlations in the measures used for observation impact assessments. The methodology provides the means to better represent linearized models by making use of Gaussian quadrature relations to handle various underlying non-linear model trajectories. The formulation is exact for particular bi-linear dynamics; it corresponds to an approximation for general-type nonlinearities and must be tested for large atmospheric models. The present work investigates the approach of Stappers and Barkmeijer (2012)in the context of NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System Version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric data assimilation system (ADAS). The goal is to calculate observation impacts in the GEOS-5 ADAS for forecast lead-times of at least 48 hours in order to reduce the potential for undesirable correlations that occur at shorter forecast lead times. References [1]Langland, R. H., and N. L. Baker, 2004: Estimation of observation impact using the NRL atmospheric variational data assimilation adjoint system. Tellus, 56A, 189-201. [2] Gelaro, R., Y. Zhu, and R. M. Errico, 2007: Examination of various

  9. Persistence of Salmonella typhimurium on Fabrics

    PubMed Central

    Wilkoff, Lee J.; Westbrook, Louise; Dixon, Glen J.

    1969-01-01

    The persistence of Salmonella typhimurium (V-31) on wool blanket, wool gabardine, cotton sheeting, cotton knit jersey, cotton terry cloth, and cotton wash-and-wear fabrics was studied. Three methods of exposure were employed to contaminate the fabrics: direct contact, aerosol, and a lyophilized mixture of bacteria and dust having a high content of textile fibers. After contamination, the fabrics were held in 35 or 78% relative humidity at 25 C. The persistence time of S. typhimurium on fabrics held in 35% relative humidity was substantially longer when the fabrics were contaminated by direct contact or by exposure to dust containing bacteria than when contaminated by exposure to aerosolized cultures. Viable bacterial populations persisted for 24 weeks at relatively high population densities on swatches of wool gabardine, cotton sheeting, cotton knit jersey, and cotton terry cloth exposed by direct contact and held in a humidity of 35%. In 78% humidity, bacterial populations persisted on the fabrics for relatively shorter periods of time regardless of the mode of contamination or fabric type. This organism retained its virulence for Swiss mice after being recovered from wool gabardine swatches held 8 weeks in humidities of 35 or 78% and from cotton terry cloth swatches held 6 weeks in the same humidities. Images PMID:4896883

  10. Genetic Variants Related to Longer Telomere Length are Associated with Increased Risk of Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Hofmann, Jonathan N; Carreras-Torres, Robert; Brown, Kevin M; Johansson, Mattias; Wang, Zhaoming; Foll, Matthieu; Li, Peng; Rothman, Nathaniel; Savage, Sharon A; Gaborieau, Valerie; McKay, James D; Ye, Yuanqing; Henrion, Marc; Bruinsma, Fiona; Jordan, Susan; Severi, Gianluca; Hveem, Kristian; Vatten, Lars J; Fletcher, Tony; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Larsson, Susanna C; Wolk, Alicja; Banks, Rosamonde E; Selby, Peter J; Easton, Douglas F; Pharoah, Paul; Andreotti, Gabriella; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Koutros, Stella; Albanes, Demetrius; Mannisto, Satu; Weinstein, Stephanie; Clark, Peter E; Edwards, Todd E; Lipworth, Loren; Gapstur, Susan M; Stevens, Victoria L; Carol, Hallie; Freedman, Matthew L; Pomerantz, Mark M; Cho, Eunyoung; Kraft, Peter; Preston, Mark A; Wilson, Kathryn M; Gaziano, J Michael; Sesso, Howard S; Black, Amanda; Freedman, Neal D; Huang, Wen-Yi; Anema, John G; Kahnoski, Richard J; Lane, Brian R; Noyes, Sabrina L; Petillo, David; Colli, Leandro M; Sampson, Joshua N; Besse, Celine; Blanche, Helene; Boland, Anne; Burdette, Laurie; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Skryabin, Konstantin G; Yeager, Meredith; Mijuskovic, Mirjana; Ognjanovic, Miodrag; Foretova, Lenka; Holcatova, Ivana; Janout, Vladimir; Mates, Dana; Mukeriya, Anush; Rascu, Stefan; Zaridze, David; Bencko, Vladimir; Cybulski, Cezary; Fabianova, Eleonora; Jinga, Viorel; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lubinski, Jan; Navratilova, Marie; Rudnai, Peter; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Benhamou, Simone; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Cussenot, Olivier; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Canzian, Federico; Duell, Eric J; Ljungberg, Börje; Sitaram, Raviprakash T; Peters, Ulrike; White, Emily; Anderson, Garnet L; Johnson, Lisa; Luo, Juhua; Buring, Julie; Lee, I-Min; Chow, Wong-Ho; Moore, Lee E; Wood, Christopher; Eisen, Timothy; Larkin, James; Choueiri, Toni K; Lathrop, G Mark; Teh, Bin Tean; Deleuze, Jean-Francois; Wu, Xifeng; Houlston, Richard S; Brennan, Paul; Chanock, Stephen J; Scelo, Ghislaine; Purdue, Mark P

    2017-08-07

    Relative telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes has been evaluated as a potential biomarker for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk in several studies, with conflicting findings. We performed an analysis of genetic variants associated with leukocyte telomere length to assess the relationship between telomere length and RCC risk using Mendelian randomization, an approach unaffected by biases from temporal variability and reverse causation that might have affected earlier investigations. Genotypes from nine telomere length-associated variants for 10 784 cases and 20 406 cancer-free controls from six genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of RCC were aggregated into a weighted genetic risk score (GRS) predictive of leukocyte telomere length. Odds ratios (ORs) relating the GRS and RCC risk were computed in individual GWAS datasets and combined by meta-analysis. Longer genetically inferred telomere length was associated with an increased risk of RCC (OR=2.07 per predicted kilobase increase, 95% confidence interval [CI]:=1.70-2.53, p<0.0001). As a sensitivity analysis, we excluded two telomere length variants in linkage disequilibrium (R(2)>0.5) with GWAS-identified RCC risk variants (rs10936599 and rs9420907) from the telomere length GRS; despite this exclusion, a statistically significant association between the GRS and RCC risk persisted (OR=1.73, 95% CI=1.36-2.21, p<0.0001). Exploratory analyses for individual histologic subtypes suggested comparable associations with the telomere length GRS for clear cell (N=5573, OR=1.93, 95% CI=1.50-2.49, p<0.0001), papillary (N=573, OR=1.96, 95% CI=1.01-3.81, p=0.046), and chromophobe RCC (N=203, OR=2.37, 95% CI=0.78-7.17, p=0.13). Our investigation adds to the growing body of evidence indicating some aspect of longer telomere length is important for RCC risk. Telomeres are segments of DNA at chromosome ends that maintain chromosomal stability. Our study investigated the relationship between genetic variants associated with

  11. Testing, Modeling, and Monitoring to Enable Simpler, Cheaper, Longer-lived Surface Caps

    SciTech Connect

    Piet, S. J.; Breckenridge, R. P.; Burns, D. E.

    2003-02-25

    Society has and will continue to generate hazardous wastes whose risks must be managed. For exceptionally toxic, long-lived, and feared waste, the solution is deep burial, e.g., deep geological disposal at Yucca Mtn. For some waste, recycle or destruction/treatment is possible. The alternative for other wastes is storage at or near the ground level (in someone's back yard); most of these storage sites include a surface barrier (cap) to prevent downward water migration. Some of the hazards will persist indefinitely. As society and regulators have demanded additional proof that caps are robust against more threats and for longer time periods, the caps have become increasingly complex and expensive. As in other industries, increased complexity will eventually increase the difficulty in estimating performance, in monitoring system/component performance, and in repairing or upgrading barriers as risks are managed. An approach leading to simpler, less expensive, longer-lived, more manageable caps is needed. Our project, which started in April 2002, aims to catalyze a Barrier Improvement Cycle (iterative learning and application) and thus enable Remediation System Performance Management (doing the right maintenance neither too early nor too late). The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions, improve barrier management, and enable improved solutions for future decisions. We believe it will be possible to develop simpler, longer-lived, less expensive caps that are easier to monitor, manage, and repair. The project is planned to: (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms in times shorter than service life; (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics; (c) develop sensor systems to identify early degradation; and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems. This project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated

  12. Testing, Modeling, and Monitoring to Enable Simpler, Cheaper, Longer-Lived Surface Caps

    SciTech Connect

    Piet, Steven James; Breckenridge, Robert Paul; Burns, Douglas Edward

    2003-02-01

    Society has and will continue to generate hazardous wastes whose risks must be managed. For exceptionally toxic, long-lived, and feared waste, the solution is deep burial, e.g., deep geological disposal at Yucca Mtn. For some waste, recycle or destruction/treatment is possible. The alternative for other wastes is storage at or near the ground level (in someone’s back yard); most of these storage sites include a surface barrier (cap) to prevent downward water migration. Some of the hazards will persist indefinitely. As society and regulators have demanded additional proof that caps are robust against more threats and for longer time periods, the caps have become increasingly complex and expensive. As in other industries, increased complexity will eventually increase the difficulty in estimating performance, in monitoring system/component performance, and in repairing or upgrading barriers as risks are managed. An approach leading to simpler, less expensive, longer-lived, more manageable caps is needed. Our project, which started in April 2002, aims to catalyze a Barrier Improvement Cycle (iterative learning and application) and thus enable Remediation System Performance Management (doing the right maintenance neither too early nor too late). The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions, improve barrier management, and enable improved solutions for future decisions. We believe it will be possible to develop simpler, longer-lived, less expensive caps that are easier to monitor, manage, and repair. The project is planned to: a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms in times shorter than service life; b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics; c) develop sensor systems to identify early degradation; and d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems. This project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging

  13. Persistence in financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S.; Buckley, P.

    2006-03-01

    Persistence is studied in a financial context by mapping the time evolution of the values of the shares quoted on the London Financial Times Stock Exchange 100 index (FTSE 100) onto Ising spins. By following the time dependence of the spins, we find evidence for power law decay of the proportion of shares that remain either above or below their 'starting' values. As a result, we estimate a persistence exponent for the underlying financial market to be θf˜0.5.

  14. Increasing summer drying in North American ecosystems in response to longer nonfrozen periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parida, Bikash R.; Buermann, Wolfgang

    2014-08-01

    In snow-dominated northern ecosystems, spring warming is predicted to decrease water availability later in the season and recent findings suggest that corresponding negative impacts on plant productivity and wildfire frequency are already observable. Here we estimate the overall vulnerability of North American ecosystems to warming-related seasonal shifts in hydrology through identifying robust interannual linkages between nonfrozen periods, peak-to-late summer vegetation greenness, and an indicator of drought for 1982-2010. Our results show that longer nonfrozen periods earlier in the year are persistently associated with declines in peak-to-late summer greenness and moisture availability across large portions of North America. Hereby, vulnerabilities increase markedly across the dominant land covers with decreasing annual precipitation rates, lowering contributions of summer rainfall, and increasing altitude. The implications are that in a warmer world, seasonal hydrological shifts may emerge as a leading factor for summer drought in relatively dry temperate-forested ecosystems and across the northern high latitudes.

  15. Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance: when MGUS is no longer undetermined or insignificant.

    PubMed

    Leung, Nelson; Bridoux, Frank; Hutchison, Colin A; Nasr, Samih H; Cockwell, Paul; Fermand, Jean-Paul; Dispenzieri, Angela; Song, Kevin W; Kyle, Robert A

    2012-11-22

    Multiple myeloma is the most frequent monoclonal gammopathy to involve the kidney; however, a growing number of kidney diseases associated with other monoclonal gammopathies are being recognized. Although many histopathologic patterns exist, they are all distinguished by the monoclonal immunoglobulin (or component) deposits. The hematologic disorder in these patients is more consistent with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) than with multiple myeloma. Unfortunately, due to the limitations of the current diagnostic schema, they are frequently diagnosed as MGUS. Because treatment is not recommended for MGUS, appropriate therapy is commonly withheld. In addition to end-stage renal disease, the persistence of the monoclonal gammopathy is associated with high rates of recurrence after kidney transplantation. Preservation and restoration of kidney function are possible with successful treatment targeting the responsible clone. Achievement of hematologic complete response has been shown to prevent recurrence after kidney transplantation. There is a need for a term that properly conveys the pathologic nature of these diseases. We think the term monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance is most helpful to indicate a causal relationship between the monoclonal gammopathy and the renal damage and because the significance of the monoclonal gammopathy is no longer undetermined.

  16. Do more sociable dogs gaze longer to the human face than less sociable ones?

    PubMed

    Jakovcevic, Adriana; Mustaca, Alba; Bentosela, Mariana

    2012-06-01

    Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) are especially skillful in communicating with humans, and they rely on special abilities to do that. One of these skills involves gazing at human faces in cases of uncertainty or when seeking for something out of reach. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between dogs' sociability level and the ability to learn to gaze in a situation with food in sight but out of their reach. Thirty-nine adult dogs were tested in two procedures: (1) a sociability test that involved interacting with an unknown person, and (2) a learning task that consisted of training trials in which gazing at the experimenter's face was food reinforced, followed by extinction trials in which gazing was not followed by food. A significant positive correlation was found between the duration of physical contact with the unknown person in the sociability test and gaze duration during extinction. Moreover, high sociability dogs gazed significantly longer at humans during extinction trials. We discuss the possibility that, more sociable animals, such as those who pay more attention to the person in our sociability test, may be more persistent in their communicative attempts because the presence of the human is intrinsically reinforcing to them. Finally, we comment on the importance of these findings for training purposes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Biological aging is no longer an unsolved problem.

    PubMed

    Hayflick, Leonard

    2007-04-01

    The belief that aging is still an unsolved problem in biology is no longer true. Of the two major classes of theories, the one class that is tenable is derivative of a single common denominator that results in only one fundamental theory of aging. In order to address this complex subject, it is necessary to first define the four phenomena that characterize the finitude of life. These phenomena are aging, the determinants of longevity, age-associated diseases, and death. There are only two fundamental ways in which age changes can occur. Aging occurs either as the result of a purposeful program driven by genes or by events that are not guided by a program but are stochastic or random, accidental events. The weight of evidence indicates that genes do not drive the aging process but the general loss of molecular fidelity does. Potential longevity is determined by the energetics of all molecules present at and after the time of reproductive maturation. Thus, every molecule, including those that compose the machinery involved in turnover, replacement, and repair, becomes the substrate that experiences the thermodynamic instability characteristic of the aging process. However, the determinants of the fidelity of all molecules produced before and after reproductive maturity are the determinants of longevity. This process is governed by the genome. Aging does not happen in a vacuum. Aging must be the result of changes that occur in molecules that have existed at one time with no age changes. It is the state of these pre-existing molecules that governs longevity determination. The distinction between the aging process and age-associated disease is not only based on the molecular definition of aging described above but it is also rooted in several practical observations. Unlike any disease, age changes (a) occur in every multicellular animal that reaches a fixed size at reproductive maturity, (b) cross virtually all species barriers, (c) occur in all members of a species

  18. Probiotic effects on intestinal fermentation patterns in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Jacqueline S; Canale, Kim EK; Gearry, Richard B; Irving, Peter M; Gibson, Peter R

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (Yakult®) can alter small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), as tested by the lactulose breath test, and whether this is associated with changes in symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: 18 patients with IBS (Rome II criteria), who showed an early rise in breath hydrogen with lactulose (ERBHAL), consumed 65 mL of Yakult® daily for 6 wk. Lactulose breath test was repeated at the end of the treatment period. Symptoms were recorded daily using a 10 cm visual analogue scale. RESULTS: 14 patients completed the study, 9 (64%) had reversal of ERBHAL, with the median time of first rise in breath hydrogen increasing from 45 to 75 min (P = 0.03). There was no significant improvement in the symptom score with probiotic therapy, except for wind (P = 0.04). Patients commencing with at least moderate symptoms and who no longer had ERBHAL at the end of treatment, showed improvement in the overall symptoms scores [median final score 5.3 (IQR 3.9-5.9), 55% reduction; n = 6] to a greater extent than those who had had persisting ERBHAL [final score 6.9 (5.0-7.0), 12% reduction; n = 5; P = 0.18]. CONCLUSION: Yakult® is effective in altering fermentation patterns in the small bowel, consistent with reducing SIBO. The loss of ERBHAL was associated with reduced symptoms. The true interpretation of these findings awaits a randomised, controlled trial. PMID:18763284

  19. Transient Supersaturation Supports Drug Absorption from Lipid-Based Formulations for Short Periods of Time, but Ongoing Solubilization Is Required for Longer Absorption Periods.

    PubMed

    Crum, Matthew F; Trevaskis, Natalie L; Pouton, Colin W; Porter, Christopher J H

    2017-02-06

    The current studies sought to explore the impact of drug supersaturation and precipitation during the dispersion and digestion of lipid-based formulations (LBFs), on in vivo absorption using a coupled in vitro digestion-in vivo perfusion absorption model. Fenofibrate absorption was evaluated from a number of LBFs with different solubilization and supersaturation capacities, and conditions at the absorptive membrane manipulated by changing perfusion conditions, intestine segment lengths, and by the conduct of experiments in the presence or absence of suspended/precipitated drug. LBF dispersion and digestion resulted in varying periods of supersaturation across the different formulations. Even fleeting (5-10 min) periods of supersaturation were able to drive flux across a perfused 10 cm intestinal segment for up to 60 min, although over longer infusion periods (60-80 min) flux dropped in the absence of ongoing drug solubilization and supersaturation. In contrast, the presence or absence of precipitated/suspended drug, had little impact on drug flux. When perfused intestinal segment lengths were extended, the role of initial supersaturation was attenuated and ongoing solubilization conditions became the primary driver of absorptive flux. The data suggest that for highly permeable drugs such as fenofibrate, a short period of supersaturation at the absorptive membrane may be sufficient to drive absorptive drug flux in spite of significant drug precipitation on formulation dispersion or digestion in vitro. In contrast, where longer periods of absorption are required, for example, at higher doses, the requirement for ongoing solubilization and supersaturation becomes more apparent.

  20. Intestinal ascariasis in children.

    PubMed

    Wani, Imtiaz; Rather, Muddasir; Naikoo, Ghulam; Amin, Abid; Mushtaq, Syed; Nazir, Mir

    2010-05-01

    Ascariasis is a staggering health problem commonly seen in children of endemic areas. In the abdomen, ascaris lumbricoides can cause a myriad of surgical complications. Intestinal obstruction by ascaris lumbricoides is commonly seen in children. Most cases are managed conservatively. The purpose was to study the clinical presentation and management of symptomatic intestinal ascariasis in children. A 3-year study was performed from April 2006 to April 2009 of pediatric-age patients who had symptomatic intestinal ascariasis. All patients had detailed clinical history, examination, plain X-ray of abdomen, and ultrasonography of abdomen. Peroperative findings were recorded in all patients who had surgical intervention. This prospective study had 360 patients. Male to female ratio was 1.37:1. 187 patients (52%) presented within 2-4 days of duration of illness. Mean +/- standard deviation (SD) age of patients was 6.35 +/- 2.25 years. Age group of 4-7 years (80%) was commonest group affected. Abdominal pain was a leading symptom in 357 patients (99%) with the pain in periumbilical area present in 215 patients (60%). In 227 patients (63%) abdominal distension was seen and was the commonest physical finding. Palpable worm masses were seen in 129 patients (36%); 81 patients (63%) had palpable worm masses in the umbilical quadrant. On X-ray of abdomen, visible worm masses were seen in 83 patients (23%). Abdominal sonography showed interloop fluid in 177 patients (49%) and free fluid in the pelvis of 97 patients (27%). The number of patients who were managed conservatively was 281 (78%), and 79 patients (22%) had surgical intervention. In patients who had surgical intervention, 39 patients (49%) had enterotomy and 7 patients (9%) had kneading of worms. Postoperative complications occurred in 33 patients, and an overall mortality of 1% (1 patient) was seen. Ascaridial intestinal obstruction is common in children in the Kashmir. Abdominal pain is the leading symptom in

  1. Retention and Persistence Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Timothy R.

    Two studies are combined with an introductory section: one is "Persistence to Graduation for Freshmen Entering the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1967-75," by Timothy Sanford, and the second is "Freshman, Transfer, Professional, Masters, and Doctoral Student Retention at the University of North Carolina at Chapel…

  2. A Very Persistent Mistake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, J. A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Articulated bodies with an internal energy source require to be coupled to an external mass in order to accelerate themselves but the typical text book assertion that the net force is provided by the external mass is not correct. Arguments are presented demonstrating that the assertion is incorrect and reasons are suggested for the persistence of…

  3. A Very Persistent Mistake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, J. A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Articulated bodies with an internal energy source require to be coupled to an external mass in order to accelerate themselves but the typical text book assertion that the net force is provided by the external mass is not correct. Arguments are presented demonstrating that the assertion is incorrect and reasons are suggested for the persistence of…

  4. The Persistence of PCBs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Robert H.; Highland, Joseph H.

    1979-01-01

    PCB's are one of the most persistent chemicals ever introduced into the environment by man. From very early in their history of manufacture PCB's were suspected of being hazardous to health, but public awareness of the hazard was slow in coming. (RE)

  5. Persistence to Graduate Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ethington, Corinna A.; Smart, John C.

    1986-01-01

    A study is reported of the relationship of family education and income, high school grades, academic and social self-confidence, undergraduate institutional selectivity and size, academic and social integration, overall college satisfaction, bachelor's degree attainment, and financial aid on students' persistence to graduate school. (MSE)

  6. Bone marrow derived macrophages fuse with intestine stromal cells and contribute to chronic fibrosis after radiation.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ming-Han; Chang, Ya-Hui; Tsai, Yi-Chih; Chen, Su-Liang; Huang, Tze-Sing; Chiu, Jeng-Fong; Ch'ang, Hui-Ju

    2016-05-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC) have been demonstrated to play a critical role in intestine regeneration. However, organ fibrosis was one of the major side effects of bone marrow (BM) transplantation. It warrants further investigation on the mechanisms of BM cell therapy in radiation induced intestine damage. We established three murine models to evaluate BMDC within intestines after radiation, including cre-loxP system of transgenic mice. In vitro co-culture between murine BM with human intestine stromal cells was also performed to measure the level of fusion and fibrosis after treatment with anti-fibrotic agents or after macrophage depletion. Despite complete recovery of epithelial mucosa from radiation damage, we found persistent proliferation and repopulation of BMDC within the lamina propria. Fusion between BM derived monocytic and intestine stromal cells correlated with the level of fibrosis and proliferation index. Depleting macrophages genetically using CD11b-DTR mouse model or pharmacologically using clodronate liposome reduced the level of cell fusion and intestine fibrosis. Fibrotic cues from intestine enhance fusion between BM-derived monocytes/macrophages with intestine stromal cells. The fusion hybrids promote cell cycle re-entry, proliferation and reinforce fibrosis signal. Depleting macrophages interferes with cell fusion and ameliorates radiation-induced intestine fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Recurrent intussusception as initial manifestation of primary intestinal melanoma: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kouladouros, Konstantinos; Gärtner, Daniel; Münch, Steffen; Paul, Mario; Schön, Michael R

    2015-03-14

    Enteric intussusception caused by primary intestinal malignant melanoma is a very rare cause of intestinal obstruction. We herein present a case of a 42-year-old female patient with no prior medical history of malignant melanoma, who was admitted with persistent abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. A computed tomography scan revealed an intestinal obstruction due to ileocolic intussusception. An emergency laparoscopy and subsequent laparotomy revealed multiple small solid tumors across the whole small bowel. An oncologic resection was not feasible due to the insufficient length of the remaining small bowel. Only a small segment of ileum, which included the largest tumors causing the intussusception, was resected. The pathologic examination revealed two intestinal malignant melanoma lesions. A systematic clinical examination, endoscopic procedures, and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan all failed to reveal any indication of cutaneous, anal, or retinal melanoma. Hence, the tumor was classified as a primary intestinal malignant melanoma with multiple intestinal metastases. Since a complete oncologic resection of tumors was not possible, in order to prevent future intestinal obstruction, a surgical resection of the largest lesions was performed with palliative intention. The epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management of primary intestinal malignant melanoma, and intestinal intussusception in adults are discussed along with a review of the current literature.

  8. Recurrent intussusception as initial manifestation of primary intestinal melanoma: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kouladouros, Konstantinos; Gärtner, Daniel; Münch, Steffen; Paul, Mario; Schön, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Enteric intussusception caused by primary intestinal malignant melanoma is a very rare cause of intestinal obstruction. We herein present a case of a 42-year-old female patient with no prior medical history of malignant melanoma, who was admitted with persistent abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. A computed tomography scan revealed an intestinal obstruction due to ileocolic intussusception. An emergency laparoscopy and subsequent laparotomy revealed multiple small solid tumors across the whole small bowel. An oncologic resection was not feasible due to the insufficient length of the remaining small bowel. Only a small segment of ileum, which included the largest tumors causing the intussusception, was resected. The pathologic examination revealed two intestinal malignant melanoma lesions. A systematic clinical examination, endoscopic procedures, and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan all failed to reveal any indication of cutaneous, anal, or retinal melanoma. Hence, the tumor was classified as a primary intestinal malignant melanoma with multiple intestinal metastases. Since a complete oncologic resection of tumors was not possible, in order to prevent future intestinal obstruction, a surgical resection of the largest lesions was performed with palliative intention. The epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management of primary intestinal malignant melanoma, and intestinal intussusception in adults are discussed along with a review of the current literature. PMID:25780313

  9. Persistence of fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis by experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Anderson, Kenneth E

    2015-07-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis can be deposited inside eggs laid by infected hens, so the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial egg-producing flocks is an important risk factor for human illness. Opportunities for the introduction, transmission, and persistence of salmonellae in poultry are potentially influenced by flock housing and management systems. Animal welfare concerns have spurred the development of alternatives to traditional cage-based housing. However, the consequences of poultry housing systems for food safety have not been fully resolved by prior research. The present study assessed the effects of two different housing systems (conventional cages and colony cages enriched with perching and nesting areas) on the persistence of fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis by groups of experimentally infected laying hens. In each of two trials, 136 hens were distributed among cages of both housing systems and orally inoculated with doses of 10(8) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis (phage type 13a in one trial and phage type 4 in the other). At weekly intervals, samples of voided feces were collected from beneath each cage and cultured to detect Salmonella Enteritidis. Fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis was detected for up to 8 wk post-inoculation by hens housed in enriched colony cages and 10 wk by hens housed in conventional cages. For both trials combined, the frequency of positive fecal cultures was significantly (P < 0.05) greater for conventional cages than for enriched colony cages at 1 wk (84.7 vs. 71.5%), 2 wk (54.2 vs. 31.3%), 3 wk (21.5 vs. 7.6%), and 4 wk (9.7 vs. 2.8%) post-inoculation. These results demonstrate that the susceptibility of hens to intestinal colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis can differ between conventional and enriched cage-based production systems, although this effect does not necessarily translate into a corresponding difference in the longer-term persistence of fecal shedding. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  10. Ontogeny, growth and development of the small intestine: Understanding pediatric gastroenterology.

    PubMed

    Drozdowski, Laurie A; Clandinin, Tom; Thomson, Alan B R

    2010-02-21

    Throughout our lifetime, the intestine changes. Some alterations in its form and function may be genetically determined, and some are the result of adaptation to diet, temperature, or stress. The critical period programming of the intestine can be modified, such as from subtle differences in the types and ratios of n3:m6 fatty acids in the diet of the pregnant mother, or in the diet of the weanlings. This early forced adaptation may persist in later life, such as the unwanted increased intestinal absorption of sugars, fatty acids and cholesterol. Thus, the ontogeny, early growth and development of the intestine is important for the adult gastroenterologist to appreciate, because of the potential for these early life events to affect the responsiveness of the intestine to physiological or pathological challenges in later life.

  11. Proteobacteria-specific IgA regulates maturation of the intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Mirpuri, Julie; Raetz, Megan; Sturge, Carolyn R; Wilhelm, Cara L; Benson, Alicia; Savani, Rashmin C; Hooper, Lora V; Yarovinsky, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota changes dynamically from birth to adulthood. In this study we identified γ-Proteobacteria as a dominant phylum present in newborn mice that is suppressed in normal adult microbiota. The transition from a neonatal to a mature microbiota was in part regulated by induction of a γ-Proteobacteria-specific IgA response. Neocolonization experiments in germ-free mice further revealed a dominant Proteobacteria-specific IgA response triggered by the immature microbiota. Finally, a role for B cells in the regulation of microbiota maturation was confirmed in IgA-deficient mice. Mice lacking IgA had persistent intestinal colonization with γ-Proteobacteria that resulted in sustained intestinal inflammation and increased susceptibility to neonatal and adult models of intestinal injury. Collectively, these results identify an IgA-dependent mechanism responsible for the maturation of the intestinal microbiota.

  12. Proteobacteria-specific IgA regulates maturation of the intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Mirpuri, Julie; Raetz, Megan; Sturge, Carolyn R; Wilhelm, Cara L; Benson, Alicia; Savani, Rashmin C; Hooper, Lora V; Yarovinsky, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota changes dynamically from birth to adulthood. In this study we identified γ-Proteobacteria as a dominant phylum present in newborn mice that is suppressed in normal adult microbiota. The transition from a neonatal to a mature microbiota was in part regulated by induction of a γ-Proteobacteria-specific IgA response. Neocolonization experiments in germ-free mice further revealed a dominant Proteobacteria-specific IgA response triggered by the immature microbiota. Finally, a role for B cells in the regulation of microbiota maturation was confirmed in IgA-deficient mice. Mice lacking IgA had persistent intestinal colonization with γ-Proteobacteria that resulted in sustained intestinal inflammation and increased susceptibility to neonatal and adult models of intestinal injury. Collectively, these results identify an IgA-dependent mechanism responsible for the maturation of the intestinal microbiota. PMID:24637807

  13. [Pyometra and persistent hymen in an alpaca].

    PubMed

    Egloff, C; Gerspach, C; Rütten, M; Dettwiler, M; Reichler, I; Bleul, U

    2013-01-01

    A 3-year-old female alpaca was referred to the hospital because of tenesmus. Clinical examination revealed a habitual vaginal prolapse with tenesmus during urination and defecation. On vaginoscopic examination a persistent hymen was detected. Ultrasonography of the caudal abdomen showed an echogenic fluid-filled uterus. A diagnostic laparotomy led to diagnosis of pyometra. Following ovariohysterectomy, the recovery was uneventful. One and a half years later the alpaca was again admitted to the hospital because of colic. Based on the findings, a tentative prognosis was provided and the alpaca was euthanized at the request of the owner. At necropsy, a haemorrhagic infarction of a jejunal loop was found due to incarceration in a fibrous adhesion between the vaginal stump and small intestine.

  14. The Cystic Fibrosis Intestine

    PubMed Central

    De Lisle, Robert C.; Borowitz, Drucy

    2013-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis (CF) result from dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR). The majority of people with CF have a limited life span as a consequence of CFTR dysfunction in the respiratory tract. However, CFTR dysfunction in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract occurs earlier in ontogeny and is present in all patients, regardless of genotype. The same pathophysiologic triad of obstruction, infection, and inflammation that causes disease in the airways also causes disease in the intestines. This article describes the effects of CFTR dysfunction on the intestinal tissues and the intraluminal environment. Mouse models of CF have greatly advanced our understanding of the GI manifestations of CF, which can be directly applied to understanding CF disease in humans. PMID:23788646

  15. Unusual intestinal talcosis.

    PubMed

    Anani, P A; Ribaux, C; Gardiol, D

    1987-11-01

    A case of intestinal talcosis in a 46-year-old man is reported. At the age of 27, the patient was treated for pulmonary tuberculosis with tablets containing talc (183 g talc per 2,670 g total drug intake) over a period of 28 months. Eighteen years later, the patient was hospitalized for abdominal pain that remained refractory to antacids; he subsequently underwent a right hemicolectomy. Light-microscopic examination revealed a prominent fibrosis of the intestinal wall in which birefringent particles were demonstrated by polarized light. Using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, an analysis of these particles showed that they were predominantly composed of silicon and magnesium as well as small amounts of phosphorus, sulphur, calcium, and iron--the spectrum typically associated with talc. We believe that the source of this talc is the tablets ingested by the patient during prior antituberculosis therapy.

  16. Elenoside increases intestinal motility

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, E; Alonso, SJ; Navarro, R; Trujillo, J; Jorge, E

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of elenoside, an arylnaph-thalene lignan from Justicia hyssopifolia, on gastro-intestinal motility in vivo and in vitro in rats. METHODS: Routine in vivo experimental assessments were catharsis index, water percentage of boluses, intestinal transit, and codeine antagonism. The groups included were vehicle control (propylene glycol-ethanol-plant oil-tween 80), elenoside (i.p. 25 and 50 mg/kg), cisapride (i.p. 10 mg/kg), and codeine phosphate (intragastric route, 50 mg/kg). In vitro approaches used isolated rat intestinal tissues (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum). The effects of elenoside at concentrations of 3.2 x 10-4, 6.4 x 10-4 and 1.2 x 10-3 mol/L, and cisapride at 10-6 mol/L were investigated. RESULTS: Elenoside in vivo produced an increase in the catharsis index and water percentage of boluses and in the percentage of distance traveled by a suspension of activated charcoal. Codeine phosphate antagonized the effect of 25 mg/kg of elenoside. In vitro, elenoside in duodenum, jejunum and ileum produced an initial decrease in the contraction force followed by an increase. Elenoside resulted in decreased intestinal frequency in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. The in vitro and in vivo effects of elenoside were similar to those produced by cisapride. CONCLUSION: Elenoside is a lignan with an action similar to that of purgative and prokinetics drugs. Elenoside, could be an alternative to cisapride in treatment of gastrointestinal diseases as well as a preventive therapy for the undesirable gastrointestinal effects produced by opioids used for mild to moderate pain. PMID:17131476

  17. Alcohol and the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sheena; Behara, Rama; Swanson, Garth R.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Robin M.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease and can lead to tissue damage and organ dysfunction in a subset of alcoholics. However, a subset of alcoholics without any of these predisposing factors can develop alcohol-mediated organ injury. The gastrointestinal tract (GI) could be an important source of inflammation in alcohol-mediated organ damage. The purpose of review was to evaluate mechanisms of alcohol-induced endotoxemia (including dysbiosis and gut leakiness), and highlight the predisposing factors for alcohol-induced dysbiosis and gut leakiness to endotoxins. Barriers, including immunologic, physical, and biochemical can regulate the passage of toxins into the portal and systemic circulation. In addition, a host of environmental interactions including those influenced by circadian rhythms can impact alcohol-induced organ pathology. There appears to be a role for therapeutic measures to mitigate alcohol-induced organ damage by normalizing intestinal dysbiosis and/or improving intestinal barrier integrity. Ultimately, the inflammatory process that drives progression into organ damage from alcohol appears to be multifactorial. Understanding the role of the intestine in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can pose further avenues for pathogenic and treatment approaches. PMID:26501334

  18. [Research progress in causes of persistent or chronic diarrhea in children].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Jing; You, Jie-Yu

    2012-08-01

    The disease course of children with persistent or chronic diarrhea lasts from two weeks to two months or over. Diarrhea is a clinical syndrome caused by a group of multiple etiologies. This paper reviews common causes of persistent or chronic diarrhea in children, including intestinal infections, nonspecific inflammatory bowel diseases, food allergy, lactose intolerance, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, neural regulation abnormality, immunodeficiency disease, malnutrition, Celiac disease and zinc deficiency.

  19. Commensal-pathogen interactions in the intestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Lisa A; Smith, Katherine A; Filbey, Kara J; Harcus, Yvonne; Hewitson, James P; Redpath, Stephen A; Valdez, Yanet; Yebra, María J; Finlay, B Brett; Maizels, Rick M

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota are pivotal in determining the developmental, metabolic and immunological status of the mammalian host. However, the intestinal tract may also accommodate pathogenic organisms, including helminth parasites which are highly prevalent in most tropical countries. Both microbes and helminths must evade or manipulate the host immune system to reside in the intestinal environment, yet whether they influence each other’s persistence in the host remains unknown. We now show that abundance of Lactobacillus bacteria correlates positively with infection with the mouse intestinal nematode, Heligmosomoides polygyrus, as well as with heightened regulatory T cell (Treg) and Th17 responses. Moreover, H. polygyrus raises Lactobacillus species abundance in the duodenum of C57BL/6 mice, which are highly susceptible to H. polygyrus infection, but not in BALB/c mice, which are relatively resistant. Sequencing of samples at the bacterial gyrB locus identified the principal Lactobacillus species as L. taiwanensis, a previously characterized rodent commensal. Experimental administration of L. taiwanensis to BALB/c mice elevates regulatory T cell frequencies and results in greater helminth establishment, demonstrating a causal relationship in which commensal bacteria promote infection with an intestinal parasite and implicating a bacterially-induced expansion of Tregs as a mechanism of greater helminth susceptibility. The discovery of this tripartite interaction between host, bacteria and parasite has important implications for both antibiotic and anthelmintic use in endemic human populations. PMID:25144609

  20. Persistent cultural systems.

    PubMed

    Spicer, E H

    1971-11-19

    I have indicated here some features of a kind of entity which I have called a cultural identity system, and I have focused on a variety of this general type-the persistent system. In general terms it is best described as a system of beliefs and sentiments concerning historical events. I suggest using the term "a people" for the human beings who, at any given time, hold beliefs of this kind. These are phenomena with which we have been long familiar, but they have not been systematically studied by any but a few investigators. I have emphasized that a persistent system is a cumulative cultural phenomenon, an open-ended system that defines a course of action for the people believing in it. Such peoples are able to maintain continuity in their experience and their conception of themselves in a wide variety of sociocultural environments. I hold that certain kinds of identifiable conditions give rise to this type of cultural system. These may best be summarized as an oppositional process involving the interactions of individuals in the environment of a state or a similar large-scale organization. The oppositional process frequently produces intense collective consciousness and a high degree of internal solidarity. This is accompanied by a motivation for individuals to continue the kind of experience that is "stored" in the identity system in symbolic form. The persistent identity system is more stable as a cultural structure than are large-scale political organizations. When large-scale states disintegrate, they often appear to decompose into cultural systems of the persistent type. Large-scale organizations also give rise to the kind of environment that can result in the formation of new persistent systems. It is possible that, while being formed, states depend for their impetus on the accumulated energy of persistent peoples. A proposition for consideration is that states tend to dissipate the energy of peoples after transforming that energy into state

  1. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase inhibits the proinflammatory nucleotide uridine diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Moss, Angela K; Hamarneh, Sulaiman R; Mohamed, Mussa M Rafat; Ramasamy, Sundaram; Yammine, Halim; Patel, Palak; Kaliannan, Kanakaraju; Alam, Sayeda N; Muhammad, Nur; Moaven, Omeed; Teshager, Abeba; Malo, Nondita S; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, José Luis; Warren, H Shaw; Hohmann, Elizabeth; Malo, Madhu S; Hodin, Richard A

    2013-03-15

    Uridine diphosphate (UDP) is a proinflammatory nucleotide implicated in inflammatory bowel disease. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) is a gut mucosal defense factor capable of inhibiting intestinal inflammation. We used the malachite green assay to show that IAP dephosphorylates UDP. To study the anti-inflammatory effect of IAP, UDP or other proinflammatory ligands (LPS, flagellin, Pam3Cys, or TNF-α) in the presence or absence of IAP were applied to cell cultures, and IL-8 was measured. UDP caused dose-dependent increase in IL-8 release by immune cells and two gut epithelial cell lines, and IAP treatment abrogated IL-8 release. Costimulation with UDP and other inflammatory ligands resulted in a synergistic increase in IL-8 release, which was prevented by IAP treatment. In vivo, UDP in the presence or absence of IAP was instilled into a small intestinal loop model in wild-type and IAP-knockout mice. Luminal contents were applied to cell culture, and cytokine levels were measured in culture supernatant and intestinal tissue. UDP-treated luminal contents induced more inflammation on target cells, with a greater inflammatory response to contents from IAP-KO mice treated with UDP than from WT mice. Additionally, UDP treatment increased TNF-α levels in intestinal tissue of IAP-KO mice, and cotreatment with IAP reduced inflammation to control levels. Taken together, these studies show that IAP prevents inflammation caused by UDP alone and in combination with other ligands, and the anti-inflammatory effect of IAP against UDP persists in mouse small intestine. The benefits of IAP in intestinal disease may be partly due to inhibition of the proinflammatory activity of UDP.

  2. The impact of an antireflux procedure on intestinal metaplasia of the cardia.

    PubMed Central

    DeMeester, S R; Campos, G M; DeMeester, T R; Bremner, C G; Hagen, J A; Peters, J H; Crookes, P F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether antireflux surgery is more effective in producing loss of intestinal metaplasia located only at the gastroesophageal junction than it has been in patients with intestinal metaplasia extending up into the distal esophagus. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Biopsies of a normal appearing gastroesophageal junction will demonstrate cardiac mucosa containing goblet cells--the hallmark of intestinal metaplasia--in 10% to 15% of patients who are evaluated for symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and cardia is rising faster than any other cancer in America, and most of these cancers are found adjacent to areas of intestinal metaplasia. Antireflux surgery in patients with Barrett's esophagus may provide protection from progression to dysplasia and cancer; however, it does not reliably cause regression of the intestinal metaplasia. Less is known about the potential for intestinal metaplasia limited to the cardia (CIM) to regress. METHODS: Sixty patients with intestinal metaplasia of the esophagus or cardia had antireflux surgery. Patients in the intestinal (CIM) group (n = 15) had no endoscopically visible segment of columnar epithelium. Patients in the Barrett's group (n = 45) had columnar epithelium visible within the esophagus. Median follow-up was 25 months in each group. RESULTS: Postoperative biopsies showed complete loss of intestinal metaplasia in 73% of the patients with CIM compared with 4.4% of the patients with Barrett's. Low-grade dysplasia, present in 10 patients preoperatively, regressed in 7 patients (70%). No patient progressed to high-grade dysplasia or cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Loss of intestinal metaplasia after antireflux surgery is rare in patients with Barrett's, but occurred in most patients with CIM. This suggests that cardiac epithelium is dynamic and that microscopic areas of intestinal metaplasia are able to regress much more frequently than longer

  3. Optimization and Persistence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    and production costs are amplified by first-time applica- tion of high technology , security, and lim- ited production quantities. Alternate can...stred spendmg levels, average fleet age, average " technological advantage" of the fleet, and so forth. (The persistent features we discuss have all...a precise concept when dealing with nonmonetary units, such as technological advantage, but all elastic penalties are usually adjusted by the same

  4. Persistent interface fluid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Richard S; Fine, I Howard; Packer, Mark

    2008-08-01

    We present an unusual case of persistent interface fluid that would not resolve despite normal intraocular pressure and corneal endothelial replacement with Descemet-stripping endothelial keratoplasty. Dissection, elevation, and repositioning of the laser in situ keratomileusis flap were required to resolve the interface fluid. Circumferential corneal graft-host margin scar formation acting as a mechanical strut may have been the cause of the intractable interface fluid.

  5. Persistent Security, Then Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    already been purchased, quite literally, with blood, sweat , and tears. Persistent security is the sufficient condition for stability operations and, in...outposts. 72 July-August 2010  MILITARY REVIEW to the coalition or drinking three cups of tea with a fence-sitting tribal leader turned his tribe to...largest bases demonstrate that there are still ideologically driven men who are willing to fight to the death. Building retaining walls and drinking cups

  6. Persistent benign pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M

    In this narrative review we describe the main aetiologies, clinical characteristics and treatment for patients with benign pleural effusion that characteristically persists over time: chylothorax and cholesterol effusions, nonexpansible lung, rheumatoid pleural effusion, tuberculous empyema, benign asbestos pleural effusion and yellow nail syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  7. Persistent occiput posterior.

    PubMed

    Barth, William H

    2015-03-01

    Persistent occiput posterior (OP) is associated with increased rates of maternal and newborn morbidity. Its diagnosis by physical examination is challenging but is improved with bedside ultrasonography. Occiput posterior discovered in the active phase or early second stage of labor usually resolves spontaneously. When it does not, prophylactic manual rotation may decrease persistent OP and its associated complications. When delivery is indicated for arrest of descent in the setting of persistent OP, a pragmatic approach is suggested. Suspected fetal macrosomia, a biparietal diameter above the pelvic inlet or a maternal pelvis with android features should prompt cesarean delivery. Nonrotational operative vaginal delivery is appropriate when the maternal pelvis has a narrow anterior segment but ample room posteriorly, like with anthropoid features. When all other conditions are met and the fetal head arrests in an OP position in a patient with gynecoid pelvic features and ample room anteriorly, options include cesarean delivery, nonrotational operative vaginal delivery, and rotational procedures, either manual or with the use of rotational forceps. Recent literature suggests that maternal and fetal outcomes with rotational forceps are better than those reported in older series. Although not without significant challenges, a role remains for teaching and practicing selected rotational forceps operations in contemporary obstetrics.

  8. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Bioavailability Regulates Angiogenesis and Intestinal Stem and Progenitor Cell Proliferation during Postnatal Small Intestinal Development.

    PubMed

    Schlieve, Christopher R; Mojica, Salvador Garcia; Holoyda, Kathleen A; Hou, Xiaogang; Fowler, Kathryn L; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly conserved, master regulatory molecule required for endothelial cell proliferation, organization, migration and branching morphogenesis. Podocoryne carnea and drosophila, which lack endothelial cells and a vascular system, express VEGF homologs, indicating potential roles beyond angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. The role of VEGF in the development and homeostasis of the postnatal small intestine is unknown. We hypothesized regulating VEGF bioavailability in the postnatal small intestine would exhibit effects beyond the vasculature and influence epithelial cell stem/progenitor populations. VEGF mutant mice were created that overexpressed VEGF in the brush border of epithelium via the villin promotor following doxycycline treatment. To decrease VEGF bioavailability, sFlt-1 mutant mice were generated that overexpressed the soluble VEGF receptor sFlt-1 upon doxycycline administration in the intestinal epithelium. Mice were analyzed after 21 days of doxycycline administration. Increased VEGF expression was confirmed by RT-qPCR and ELISA in the intestine of the VEGF mutants compared to littermates. The VEGF mutant duodenum demonstrated increased angiogenesis and vascular leak as compared to littermate controls. The VEGF mutant duodenum revealed taller villi and increased Ki-67-positive cells in the transit-amplifying zone with reduced Lgr5 expression. The duodenum of sFlt-1 mutants revealed shorter villi and longer crypts with reduced proliferation in the transit-amplifying zone, reduced expression of Dll1, Bmp4 and VE-cadherin, and increased expression of Sox9 and EphB2. Manipulating VEGF bioavailability leads to profound effects on not only the intestinal vasculature, but epithelial stem and progenitor cells in the intestinal crypt. Elucidation of the crosstalk between VEGF signaling in the vasculature, mesenchyme and epithelial stem/progenitor cell populations may direct future cell therapies for intestinal

  9. How to make an intestine

    PubMed Central

    Wells, James M.; Spence, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    With the high prevalence of gastrointestinal disorders, there is great interest in establishing in vitro models of human intestinal disease and in developing drug-screening platforms that more accurately represent the complex physiology of the intestine. We will review how recent advances in developmental and stem cell biology have made it possible to generate complex, three-dimensional, human intestinal tissues in vitro through directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells. These are currently being used to study human development, genetic forms of disease, intestinal pathogens, metabolic disease and cancer. PMID:24496613

  10. Presynaptic learning and memory with a persistent firing neuron and a habituating synapse: a model of short term persistent habituation.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Kiruthika; Ning, Ning; Dhanasekar, Dhiviya; Li, Guoqi; Shi, Luping; Vadakkepat, Prahlad

    2012-08-01

    Our paper explores the interaction of persistent firing axonal and presynaptic processes in the generation of short term memory for habituation. We first propose a model of a sensory neuron whose axon is able to switch between passive conduction and persistent firing states, thereby triggering short term retention to the stimulus. Then we propose a model of a habituating synapse and explore all nine of the behavioral characteristics of short term habituation in a two neuron circuit. We couple the persistent firing neuron to the habituation synapse and investigate the behavior of short term retention of habituating response. Simulations show that, depending on the amount of synaptic resources, persistent firing either results in continued habituation or maintains the response, both leading to longer recovery times. The effectiveness of the model as an element in a bio-inspired memory system is discussed.

  11. Predicting medication persistence to buprenorphine transdermal system.

    PubMed

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Ben-Joseph, Rami; Chang, Chun-Lan; Hess, Gregory

    2015-02-01

    using these agents. Patients with concomitant use of adjuvant analgesics were 15% less likely to discontinue therapy (P < 0.05) as compared to patients without concomitant use of these agents. Long-term BTDS persistence was also observed in patients who had a dose change or a last dose strength >5 mcg/hour. Sensitivity analyses for those with 30-day prior opioid use and patients with ≥ 2 claims of BTDS confirmed these findings. Prior and concomitant use of adjuvant analgesics, prior use of opioids, and dose adjustments were associated with significantly longer persistence among patients initiating BTDS. The results suggest that patients are less likely to discontinue BTDS early if practitioners account for prior treatment history and dose titration. © 2014 World Institute of Pain.

  12. Immunoglobulin in intestinal secretions.

    PubMed

    Cutropia de Guirao, C

    1977-12-01

    The objective of the present investigation is the study and interpretation of the role played by the immunoglobulins, especially IgA, during acute diarrhea in children. IgA, IGG and IgM values in serum and IgA in intestinal secretions were studied in a group of children (between 3 months and 5 years of age) during diarrhea, convalescence and in normals. The method of simple radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini was employed. IgA is the immunoglobulin which suffers the greastest alteration in acute diarrhea. The precipitation halos (the average values), were lower during the diarrhea than in convalescence and in normals.

  13. Teleost intestinal immunology.

    PubMed

    Rombout, Jan H W M; Abelli, Luigi; Picchietti, Simona; Scapigliati, Giuseppe; Kiron, Viswanath

    2011-11-01

    Teleosts clearly have a more diffuse gut associated lymphoid system, which is morphological and functional clearly different from the mammalian GALT. All immune cells necessary for a local immune response are abundantly present in the gut mucosa of the species studied and local immune responses can be monitored after intestinal immunization. Fish do not produce IgA, but a special mucosal IgM isotype seems to be secreted and may (partly) be the recently described IgZ/IgT. Fish produce a pIgR in their mucosal tissues but it is smaller (2 ILD) than the 4-5 ILD pIgR of higher vertebrates. Whether teleost pIgR is transcytosed and cleaved off in the same way needs further investigation, especially because a secretory component (SC) is only reported in one species. Teleosts also have high numbers of IEL, most of them are CD3-ɛ+/CD8-α+ and have cytotoxic and/or regulatory function. Possibly many of these cells are TCRγδ cells and they may be involved in the oral tolerance induction observed in fish. Innate immune cells can be observed in the teleost gut from first feeding onwards, but B cells appear much later in mucosal compartments compared to systemic sites. Conspicuous is the very early presence of putative T cells or their precursors in the fish gut, which together with the rag-1 expression of intestinal lymphoid cells may be an indication for an extra-thymic development of certain T cells. Teleosts can develop enteritis in their antigen transporting second gut segment and epithelial cells, IEL and eosinophils/basophils seem to play a crucial role in this intestinal inflammation model. Teleost intestine can be exploited for oral vaccination strategies and probiotic immune stimulation. A variety of encapsulation methods, to protect vaccines against degradation in the foregut, are reported with promising results but in most cases they appear not to be cost effective yet. Microbiota in fish are clearly different from terrestrial animals. In the past decade a fast

  14. Common flora and intestine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kepeng; Karin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Commensal microflora engages in a symbiotic relationship with their host, and plays an important role in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Pathogenic bacteria promote chronic intestinal inflammation and accelerate tumorigenesis. In sporadic CRC, loss of an effective epithelial barrier occurs at early stage of CRC development. As a result, non-pathogenic bacteria and/or their products infiltrate tumor stroma, drive “tumor-elicited inflammation” and promote CRC progression by activating tumor-associated myeloid and immune cells that produce IL-23 and IL-17. In this article we will summarize the recent advances in understanding the relationship between gut flora and CRC. PMID:24516778

  15. Cytomegalovirus Infection After Intestinal Transplantation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Javier; Green, Michael; Kocoshis, Samuel; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Ahu-Elmagd, Kareem; Yunis, Eduardo; Irish, William; Todo, Satoru; Reyes, Jorge; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Sixteen episodes of cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease occurred in 10 of 41 children undergoing intestinal transplantation from 1990 to 1995. Stratification of CMV disease by donor (D)/recipient (R) serological status was as follows: 3 of 8, D+/R−; 3 of 9, D+/R+; 4 of 9, D−/R+; and 0 of 15, D−/R−. Treatment resulted in resolution of CMV disease in 93.3% of episodes. No deaths attributable to CMV disease occurred in this series. CMV in D+/R− children resulted in more extensive and persistent disease. However, patient and graft survival rates were similar in the different D/R subgroups and between children with and without CMV disease. Cumulative dose of steroid boluses (relative risk [RR]. 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]. 1.14–2.21) and history of steroid recycles (RR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.21–6.13) were associated with CMV disease. These results suggest that although CMV-associated morbidity in pediatric intestinal transplant recipients was substantial, it was not associated with an increased rate of mortality or graft loss, even among high-risk D+/R− patients. PMID:9402361

  16. Synthetic Small Intestinal Scaffolds for Improved Studies of Intestinal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Cait M.; Hongpeng, Jia; Shaffiey, Shahab; Yu, Jiajie; Jain, Nina K.; Hackam, David

    2014-01-01

    In vitro intestinal models can provide new insights into small intestinal function, including cellular growth and proliferation mechanisms, drug absorption capabilities, and host-microbial interactions. These models are typically formed with cells cultured on 2D scaffolds or transwell inserts, but it is widely understood that epithelial cells cultured in 3D environments exhibit different phenotypes that are more reflective of native tissue. Our focus was to develop a porous, synthetic 3D tissue scaffold with villous features that could support the culture of epithelial cell types to mimic the natural microenvironment of the small intestine. We demonstrated that our scaffold could support the co-culture of Caco-2 cells with a mucus-producing cell line, HT29-MTX, as well as small intestinal crypts from mice for extended periods. By recreating the surface topography with accurately sized intestinal villi, we enable cellular differentiation along the villous axis in a similar manner to native intestines. In addition, we show that the biochemical microenvironments of the intestine can be further simulated via a combination of apical and basolateral feeding of intestinal cell types cultured on the 3D models. PMID:24390638

  17. Learning's "Weak" Link to Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolniak, Gregory C.; Mayhew, Matthew J.; Engberg, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    This study advances the understanding of college persistence by examining five dimensions of student learning in relation to second-year persistence. Two of the five dimensions of learning were found to be significant predictors of persistence, and each was moderated by social integration. (Contains 5 tables and 1 figure.)

  18. The Initial Rate of C Substrate Utilization and Longer-Term Soil C Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeff L.; Bell, Jennifer M.; Bolton, Harvey; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2007-12-01

    Increasing soil C storage is viewed as a legitimate mechanism to offset current increases in atmospheric CO2 from anthropogenic sources. However, microbial transformation and turnover of soil carbon inputs will influence the magnitude of net soil C storage. The purpose of this study was to investigate several simple model C compounds to determine their decomposition rates in soil and the relationship between their initial decomposition rate and longer-term C sequestration. Pure 14C compounds of glucose, acetate, arginine, oxalate, phenylalanine and urea were incubated in soil for 125 days at 24 and 34oC. Respired 14CO2 and specific activity was quantitatively measured every day for 15 days and residual soil 14C after 125 days. At both temperatures, the percent 14C remaining in the soil after 125 days of incubation was positively and significantly correlated with the percent substrate utilized in the first day. For the two temperatures, the correlation of total 14CO2 and specific activity was significant (R2=.86,.78) as was the percent remaining after 125 days (C34oC = 0.75 x C24oC, R2 = 0.90). The 14C in the microbial biomass ranged from 4-15% after 15 days and declined through day 125 contributing significantly to the 14C evolved. Priming of 12C SOM was negative at day 3 but became positive, reaching a maximum on day 12, the total increase in soil C from substrates was greater than the primed C. The data support the concept that the more rapidly a substrate is initially mineralized the more persistent it will be in the soil.

  19. Persistence and transport potential of chemicals in a multimedia environment

    SciTech Connect

    van de Meent, D.; McKone, T.E.; Parkerton, T.; Matthies, M.; Scheringer, M.; Wania, F.; Purdy, R.; Bennett, D.H.

    2000-02-01

    Persistence in the environment and potential for long-range transport are related since time in the environment is required for transport. A persistent chemical will travel longer distances than a reactive chemical that shares similar chemical properties. Scheringer (1997) has demonstrated the correlation between persistence and transport distance for different organic chemicals. However, this correlation is not sufficiently robust to predict one property from the other. Specific chemicals that are persistent mayor may not exhibit long-range transport potential. Persistence and long-range transport also present different societal concerns. Persistence concerns relate to the undesired possibility that chemicals produced and used now may somehow negatively affect future generations. Long-range transport concerns relate to the undesired presence of chemicals in areas where these compounds have not been used. Environmental policy decisions can be based on either or both considerations depending on the aim of the regulatory program. In this chapter, definitions and methods for quantifying persistence and transport potential of organic chemicals are proposed which will assist in the development of sound regulatory frameworks.

  20. General Information about Small Intestine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Small Intestine Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  2. How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Staged? Staging is a process that tells ... distant m etastasis (M). T categories for small intestine adenocarcinoma T categories of small intestine cancer describe ...

  3. Lactase persistence genotypes and malaria susceptibility in Fulani of Mali.

    PubMed

    Lokki, A Inkeri; Järvelä, Irma; Israelsson, Elisabeth; Maiga, Bakary; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Dolo, Amagana; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Meri, Seppo; Holmberg, Ville

    2011-01-14

    Fulani are a widely spread African ethnic group characterized by lower susceptibility to Plasmodium falciparum, clinical malaria morbidity and higher rate of lactase persistence compared to sympatric tribes. Lactase non-persistence, often called lactose intolerance, is the normal condition where lactase activity in the intestinal wall declines after weaning. Lactase persistence, common in Europe, and in certain African people with traditions of raising cattle, is caused by polymorphisms in the enhancer region approximately 14 kb upstream of the lactase gene. To evaluate the relationship between malaria and lactase persistence genotypes, a 400 bp region surrounding the main European C/T-13910 polymorphism upstream of the lactase gene was sequenced. DNA samples used in the study originated from 162 Fulani and 79 Dogon individuals from Mali. Among 79 Dogon only one heterozygote of the lactase enhancer polymorphism was detected, whereas all others were homozygous for the ancestral C allele. Among the Fulani, the main European polymorphism at locus C/T-13910 was by far the most common polymorphism, with an allele frequency of 37%. Three other single-nucleotide polymorphisms were found with allele frequencies of 3.7%, 1.9% and 0.6% each. The novel DNA polymorphism T/C-13906 was seen in six heterozygous Fulani. Among the Fulani with lactase non-persistence CC genotypes at the C/T-13910 locus, 24% had malaria parasites detectable by microscopy compared to 18% for lactase persistent genotypes (P = 0.29). Pooling the lactase enhancer polymorphisms to a common presumptive genotype gave 28% microscopy positives for non-persistent and 17% for others (P = 0.11). Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia in asymptomatic Fulani is more common in individuals with lactase non-persistence genotypes, but this difference is not statistically significant. The potential immunoprotective properties of dietary cow milk as a reason for the partial malaria resistance of Fulani warrant further

  4. Lactase persistence genotypes and malaria susceptibility in Fulani of Mali

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fulani are a widely spread African ethnic group characterized by lower susceptibility to Plasmodium falciparum, clinical malaria morbidity and higher rate of lactase persistence compared to sympatric tribes. Lactase non-persistence, often called lactose intolerance, is the normal condition where lactase activity in the intestinal wall declines after weaning. Lactase persistence, common in Europe, and in certain African people with traditions of raising cattle, is caused by polymorphisms in the enhancer region approximately 14 kb upstream of the lactase gene. Methods To evaluate the relationship between malaria and lactase persistence genotypes, a 400 bp region surrounding the main European C/T-13910 polymorphism upstream of the lactase gene was sequenced. DNA samples used in the study originated from 162 Fulani and 79 Dogon individuals from Mali. Results Among 79 Dogon only one heterozygote of the lactase enhancer polymorphism was detected, whereas all others were homozygous for the ancestral C allele. Among the Fulani, the main European polymorphism at locus C/T-13910 was by far the most common polymorphism, with an allele frequency of 37%. Three other single-nucleotide polymorphisms were found with allele frequencies of 3.7%, 1.9% and 0.6% each. The novel DNA polymorphism T/C-13906 was seen in six heterozygous Fulani. Among the Fulani with lactase non-persistence CC genotypes at the C/T-13910 locus, 24% had malaria parasites detectable by microscopy compared to 18% for lactase persistent genotypes (P = 0.29). Pooling the lactase enhancer polymorphisms to a common presumptive genotype gave 28% microscopy positives for non-persistent and 17% for others (P = 0.11). Conclusions Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia in asymptomatic Fulani is more common in individuals with lactase non-persistence genotypes, but this difference is not statistically significant. The potential immunoprotective properties of dietary cow milk as a reason for the partial malaria

  5. Intestinal microbiota and obesity.

    PubMed

    Blaut, Michael; Klaus, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    The human gut harbors a highly diverse microbial ecosystem of approximately 400 different species, which is characterized by a high interindividual variability. The intestinal microbiota has recently been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Transplantation of gut microbiota from obese mice to nonobese, germ-free mice resulted in transfer of metabolic syndrome-associated features from the donor to the recipient. Proposed mechanisms for the role of gut microbiota include the provision of additional energy by the conversion of dietary fiber to short-chain fatty acids, effects on gut-hormone production, and increased intestinal permeability causing elevated systemic levels of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). This metabolic endotoxemia is suggested to contribute to low-grade inflammation, a characteristic trait of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Finally, activation of the endocannabinoid system by LPS and/or high-fat diets is discussed as another causal factor. In conclusion, there is ample evidence for a role of gut microbiota in the development of obesity in rodents. However, the magnitude of its contribution to human obesity is still unknown.

  6. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction in patients with systemic sclerosis: an analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Antonia; Li, Shufeng; Becker, Laren; Fernandez-Becker, Nielsen; Khanna, Dinesh; Nguyen, Linda; Chung, Lorinda

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a rare gastrointestinal complication in patients with SSc without large studies examining its prevalence or outcomes. We aimed to compare outcomes in SSc patients with intestinal pseudo-obstruction to patients with intestinal pseudo-obstruction secondary to other causes, and SSc patients without intestinal pseudo-obstruction. This is a case-control study using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample for the period 2002-2011. We included patients with the previously validated International Classification of Diseases-Clinical Modification-9 code 710.1 for SSc in combination with codes for intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and determined length of hospitalization and the risks for surgical procedures, use of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and in-hospital mortality. A total of 193 610 SSc hospitalizations occurred in the USA between 2002 and 2011, of which 5.4% (n = 10 386) were associated with a concurrent intestinal pseudo-obstruction diagnosis (cases). In-hospital mortality was 7.3%. In multivariate analyses, cases were more likely to die during the inpatient stay and to receive TPN than patients with idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (control group 1), patients with intestinal pseudo-obstruction and diabetes (control group 2), and SSc patients without intestinal pseudo-obstruction (control group 3). Cases had longer in-hospital stay than control groups 2 and 3, and were less likely to undergo surgical procedures than control groups 1 and 2. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a rare cause of hospitalization in patients with SSc, but is associated with high in-hospital mortality in comparison with other SSc patients and those with intestinal pseudo-obstruction secondary to other causes. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  7. Persistence of airline accidents.

    PubMed

    Barros, Carlos Pestana; Faria, Joao Ricardo; Gil-Alana, Luis Alberiko

    2010-10-01

    This paper expands on air travel accident research by examining the relationship between air travel accidents and airline traffic or volume in the period from 1927-2006. The theoretical model is based on a representative airline company that aims to maximise its profits, and it utilises a fractional integration approach in order to determine whether there is a persistent pattern over time with respect to air accidents and air traffic. Furthermore, the paper analyses how airline accidents are related to traffic using a fractional cointegration approach. It finds that airline accidents are persistent and that a (non-stationary) fractional cointegration relationship exists between total airline accidents and airline passengers, airline miles and airline revenues, with shocks that affect the long-run equilibrium disappearing in the very long term. Moreover, this relation is negative, which might be due to the fact that air travel is becoming safer and there is greater competition in the airline industry. Policy implications are derived for countering accident events, based on competition and regulation. © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © Overseas Development Institute, 2010.

  8. Diabetes medication persistence, different medications have different persistence rates.

    PubMed

    Shani, Michal; Lustman, Alex; Vinker, Shlomo

    2017-08-01

    To assess the persistence of diabetic patients to oral medications. The study included all type 2 diabetic patients over 40 years, members of one District of Clalit Health Services Israel, who were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus before 2008 and who filled at least one prescription per year during 2008-2010, for the following medications: metformin, glibenclamide, acarbose, statins, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs). Purchase of at least 9 monthly prescriptions during 2009 was considered "good medication persistence". We compared HbA1c and LDL levels, according to medication persistence, for each medication; and cross persistence rates between medications. 21,357 patients were included. Average age was 67.0±11.0years, 48.9% were men, and 35.8% were from low SES. Good medication persistence rates for ARBs were 78.8%, ACEI 69.0%, statins 66.6%, acarbose 67.8%, metformin 58.6%, and glibenclamide 55.3%. Good persistence to any of the medications tested was associated with a higher rate of good persistence to other medications. Patients who took more medications had better persistence rates. Different oral medications used by diabetic patients have different persistence rates. Good persistence for any one medication is an indicator of good persistence to other medications. Investment in enhancing medication persistence in persons with diabetes may improve persistence to other medications, as well as improve glycemic control. Copyright © 2017 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Symptoms and patient factors associated with longer time to diagnosis for colorectal cancer: results from a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Fiona M; Emery, Jon D; Mendonca, Silvia; Hall, Nicola; Morris, Helen C; Mills, Katie; Dobson, Christina; Bankhead, Clare; Johnson, Margaret; Abel, Gary A; Rutter, Matthew D; Hamilton, William; Rubin, Greg P

    2016-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study is to investigate symptoms, clinical factors and socio-demographic factors associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis and time to diagnosis. Methods: Prospective cohort study of participants referred for suspicion of CRC in two English regions. Data were collected using a patient questionnaire, primary care and hospital records. Descriptive and regression analyses examined associations between symptoms and patient factors with total diagnostic interval (TDI), patient interval (PI), health system interval (HSI) and stage. Results: A total of 2677 (22%) participants responded; after exclusions, 2507 remained. Participants were diagnosed with CRC (6.1%, 56% late stage), other cancers (2.0%) or no cancer (91.9%). Half the cohort had a solitary first symptom (1332, 53.1%); multiple first symptoms were common. In this referred population, rectal bleeding was the only initial symptom more frequent among cancer than non-cancer cases (34.2% vs 23.9%, P=0.004). There was no evidence of differences in TDI, PI or HSI for those with cancer vs non-cancer diagnoses (median TDI CRC 124 vs non-cancer 138 days, P=0.142). First symptoms associated with shorter TDIs were rectal bleeding, change in bowel habit, ‘feeling different' and fatigue/tiredness. Anxiety, depression and gastro-intestinal co-morbidities were associated with longer HSIs and TDIs. Symptom duration-dependent effects were found for rectal bleeding and change in bowel habit. Conclusions: Doctors and patients respond less promptly to some symptoms of CRC than others. Healthcare professionals should be vigilant to the possibility of CRC in patients with relevant symptoms and mental health or gastro-intestinal comorbidities. PMID:27490803

  10. Outcomes of Patients with Intestinal Failure after the Development and Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Team.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Sabrina; Ahmed, Najma; Forget, Sylviane; Sant'Anna, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Aim. A multidisciplinary team was created in our institution to manage patients with intestinal failure (INFANT: INtestinal Failure Advanced Nutrition Team). We aimed to evaluate the impact of the implementation of the team on the outcomes of this patient population. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients with intestinal failure over a 6-year period was performed. Outcomes of patients followed up by INFANT (2010-2012) were compared to a historical cohort (2007-2009). Results. Twenty-eight patients with intestinal failure were followed up by INFANT while the historical cohort was formed by 27 patients. There was no difference between the groups regarding remaining length of small and large bowel, presence of ICV, or number of infants who reached full enteral feeds. Patients followed up by INFANT took longer to attain full enteral feeds and had longer duration of PN, probably reflecting more complex cases. Overall mortality (14.8%/7.1%) was lower than other centers, probably illustrating our population of "early" intestinal failure patients. Conclusions. Our data demonstrates that the creation and implementation of a multidisciplinary program in a tertiary center without an intestinal and liver transplant program can lead to improvement in many aspects of their care.

  11. Outcomes of Patients with Intestinal Failure after the Development and Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Team

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Sabrina; Ahmed, Najma; Forget, Sylviane; Sant'Anna, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Aim. A multidisciplinary team was created in our institution to manage patients with intestinal failure (INFANT: INtestinal Failure Advanced Nutrition Team). We aimed to evaluate the impact of the implementation of the team on the outcomes of this patient population. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients with intestinal failure over a 6-year period was performed. Outcomes of patients followed up by INFANT (2010–2012) were compared to a historical cohort (2007–2009). Results. Twenty-eight patients with intestinal failure were followed up by INFANT while the historical cohort was formed by 27 patients. There was no difference between the groups regarding remaining length of small and large bowel, presence of ICV, or number of infants who reached full enteral feeds. Patients followed up by INFANT took longer to attain full enteral feeds and had longer duration of PN, probably reflecting more complex cases. Overall mortality (14.8%/7.1%) was lower than other centers, probably illustrating our population of “early” intestinal failure patients. Conclusions. Our data demonstrates that the creation and implementation of a multidisciplinary program in a tertiary center without an intestinal and liver transplant program can lead to improvement in many aspects of their care. PMID:27446876

  12. What Happens After Treatment for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? For some people with small intestine cancer, ... Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Stops Working More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  13. Bacterial persistence by RNA endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Maisonneuve, Etienne; Shakespeare, Lana J.; Jørgensen, Mikkel Girke; Gerdes, Kenn

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria form persisters, individual cells that are highly tolerant to different types of antibiotics. Persister cells are genetically identical to nontolerant kin but have entered a dormant state in which they are recalcitrant to the killing activity of the antibiotics. The molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial persistence are unknown. Here, we show that the ubiquitous Lon (Long Form Filament) protease and mRNA endonucleases (mRNases) encoded by toxin-antitoxin (TA) loci are required for persistence in Escherichia coli. Successive deletion of the 10 mRNase-encoding TA loci of E. coli progressively reduced the level of persisters, showing that persistence is a phenotype common to TA loci. In all cases tested, the antitoxins, which control the activities of the mRNases, are Lon substrates. Consistently, cells lacking lon generated a highly reduced level of persisters. Moreover, Lon overproduction dramatically increased the levels of persisters in wild-type cells but not in cells lacking the 10 mRNases. These results support a simple model according to which mRNases encoded by TA loci are activated in a small fraction of growing cells by Lon-mediated degradation of the antitoxins. Activation of the mRNases, in turn, inhibits global cellular translation, and thereby induces dormancy and persistence. Many pathogenic bacteria known to enter dormant states have a plethora of TA genes. Therefore, in the future, the discoveries described here may lead to a mechanistic understanding of the persistence phenomenon in pathogenic bacteria. PMID:21788497

  14. Caliber-Persistent Artery

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sabrina Araújo Pinho; Ruiz, Marcelo Martinson; Kaba, Shajadi Pardo; Florezi, Giovanna Piacenza; Lemos Júnior, Celso Augusto; Witzel, Andréa Lusvarghi

    2015-01-01

    Caliber-persistent artery (CPLA) of the lip is a common vascular anomaly in which a main arterial branch extends to the surface of the mucous tissue with no reduction in its diameter. It usually manifests as pulsatile papule, is easily misdiagnosed, and is observed more frequently among older people, suggesting that its development may involve a degenerative process associated with aging; CPLA is also characterized by the loss of tone of the adjacent supporting connective tissue. Although the diagnosis is clinical, high-resolution Doppler ultrasound is a useful noninvasive tool for evaluating the lesion. This report describes the case of a 58-year-old male patient who complained of a lesion of the lower lip with bleeding and recurrent ulceration. The patient was successfully treated in our hospital after a diagnosis of CPLA and is currently undergoing a clinical outpatient follow-up with no complaints. PMID:26448884

  15. New daily persistent headache.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Alok

    2012-08-01

    New daily persistent headache (NDPH) is a chronic headache developing in a person who does not have a past history of headaches. The headache begins acutely and reaches its peak within 3 days. It is important to exclude secondary causes, particularly headaches due to alterations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure and volume. A significant proportion of NDPH sufferers may have intractable headaches that are refractory to treatment. The condition is best viewed as a syndrome rather than a diagnosis. The headache can mimic chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headache, and it is also important to exclude secondary causes, particularly headaches due to alterations in CSF pressure and volume. A large proportion of NDPH sufferers have migrainous features to their headache and should be managed with treatments used for treating migraine. A small group of NDPH sufferers may have intractable headaches that are refractory to treatment.

  16. Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Aswath, Manju; Pandit, Lakshmi V.; Kashyap, Karthik; Ramnath, Raguram

    2016-01-01

    Persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD) is a phenomenon, in which afflicted women experience spontaneous genital arousal, unresolved by orgasms and triggered by sexual or nonsexual stimuli, eliciting stress. The current case is a 40-year-old female who experienced such orgasms for about a month. Physical examination, investigations, and psychological testing were noncontributory. Carbamazepine (600 mg) was discontinued due to a lack of response. She improved significantly with supportive therapy. Various neuropsychological conditions, pelvic pathology, medications, etc., have been associated with this disorder. Pharmacologic strategies have included the use of antidepressants, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and analgesics. Validation, psycho-education, identifying triggers, distraction techniques, and pelvic massage have been tried. Living with PGAD is very demanding. There is a lack of understanding of the problem, shame, and hesitation to seek help. The syndrome has been recently described, and understanding is still evolving. PMID:27570347

  17. Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder.

    PubMed

    Aswath, Manju; Pandit, Lakshmi V; Kashyap, Karthik; Ramnath, Raguram

    2016-01-01

    Persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD) is a phenomenon, in which afflicted women experience spontaneous genital arousal, unresolved by orgasms and triggered by sexual or nonsexual stimuli, eliciting stress. The current case is a 40-year-old female who experienced such orgasms for about a month. Physical examination, investigations, and psychological testing were noncontributory. Carbamazepine (600 mg) was discontinued due to a lack of response. She improved significantly with supportive therapy. Various neuropsychological conditions, pelvic pathology, medications, etc., have been associated with this disorder. Pharmacologic strategies have included the use of antidepressants, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and analgesics. Validation, psycho-education, identifying triggers, distraction techniques, and pelvic massage have been tried. Living with PGAD is very demanding. There is a lack of understanding of the problem, shame, and hesitation to seek help. The syndrome has been recently described, and understanding is still evolving.

  18. Persistent Temporal Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilley, David; Ramachandran, Umakishore

    Distributed continuous live stream analysis applications are increasingly common. Video-based surveillance, emergency response, disaster recovery, and critical infrastructure protection are all examples of such applications. They are characterized by a variety of high- and low-bandwidth streams as well as a need for analyzing both live and archived streams. We present a system called Persistent Temporal Streams (PTS) that supports a higher-level, domain-targeted programming abstraction for such applications. PTS provides a simple but expressive stream abstraction encompassing transport, manipulation and storage of streaming data. In this paper, we present a system architecture for implementing PTS. We provide an experimental evaluation which shows the system-level primitives can be implemented in a lightweight and high-performance manner, and an application-based evaluation designed to show that a representative high-bandwidth stream analysis application can be implemented relatively simply and with good performance.

  19. Intestinal protozoa are hypothesized to stimulate immunosurveillance against colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Juckett, David A; Aylsworth, Charles F; Quensen, Janet Murphy

    2008-01-01

    Colon cancer in humans results in considerable morbidity and mortality throughout most of the world. During the twentieth century, there was a rapid rise in colon cancer within modernizing countries that has not been adequately explained, although the role of diet has been widely explored. Previously, we showed that the presence of the endemic Eimeria spp. protozoan in intestinal tissues is associated with regions of low tumorigenesis in the large and small bovine intestine and that an Eimeria surface protein is a potent activator of dendritic cells and a useful immunomodulator, with anti-cancer and anti-viral properties. Therefore, we hypothesize that the persistent presence of such an intestinal protozoan enhances immunosurveillance by elevating the intestinal alert status and that the loss of these organisms could lead to a higher incidence of colon cancer. Preliminary support of this hypothesis derives from the observations that domestic animals, known to maintain this protozoan, have very low colon cancer incidence. We propose that this also may occur in human populations that use human excrement (night soil) as a fertilizer, a practice that serves to complete the life cycle of this type of microbe. We examine some evidence for this hypothesis in Japan's mortality patterns, where we show that colon cancer increased after the cessation of night soil use, but before the change to a western diet. We conclude that this hypothesis, a variation of the hygiene hypothesis, is worth further consideration and continued elaboration.

  20. Intestinal colonization of neonatal animals by Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni.

    PubMed Central

    Field, L H; Underwood, J L; Pope, L M; Berry, L J

    1981-01-01

    Neonatal mice (2.3 to 2.8 g) were inoculated intragastrically with different human isolates of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni. At weekly intervals thereafter, mice were sacrificed and dilution plate counts were performed on segments of the gastrointestinal tract. Mice were uniformly colonized by some strains for 2 weeks, whereas other strains were being cleared at that time. One strain (BO216) persisted in some mice for 3 weeks. The greatest number of organisms (10(7)) was recovered from the cecum and large intestine. The small intestine had from 10(2) to 10(5) colony-forming units. Colonization of the stomach was not found consistently. One strain killed 13% of the infected mice. Deaths occurred between 1 and 5 days postinfection. Two other strains killed a smaller percentage of challenged animals, and two additional strains killed none. Retarded weight gain was noticed in some, but not all, of the infected mice. The intestines of neonatal rats and rabbits were colonized much the same as those of mice, whereas hamsters were resistant to colonization. Preweanling mice, up to about 6.5 to 7.0 g, could be colonized with C. fetus subsp. jejuni after intragastric challenge, but weanling mice of larger weight (9.8 g) and young adult mice (18.3 g) could not. Scanning electron photomicrographs of the lower ileum showed campylobacters in and below the dried mucous gel that lines the intestines. The use of this model for additional studies is discussed. Images PMID:7287188

  1. [Microbial ecology of the intestines in health and in pathology].

    PubMed

    Goncharova, G I; Dorofeĭchuk, V G; Smolianskaia, A Z; Sokolova, K Ia

    1989-06-01

    Bifidoflora constitute 85--95 per cent of the large intestine microbiocenosis in children under 1 year of age. Bacteroides are not specific of children under 6 months of age. Lactobacilli, lactic acid streptococci, colon bacilli, enterococci and staphylococci (saprophytic, epidermal) constitute not more than 15 per cent. The predominating group peculiar of eubiosis in adults includes bifidobacteria and bacteroides. Changes in human autoflora are often induced by such factors as impaired ecology, stress, uncontrolled use of antibacterial drugs, radio- and chemotherapy, etc. Dysbacteriosis (first of all lower quantitative contents of bifidoflora) has an unfavourable effect on the intestine secretory function, absorption and certain indices of protein, lipid and mineral metabolism, vitamin synthesizing and fermentative functions and leads to disfunction of the gastrointestinal tract. It is a cause of persisting and relapsing infections in children and adults. High and optimal levels of bifidoflora in the intestine usually prevent the pathogenic action of pathogens. Lysozyme of digestive secretion and secretory immunity with immunoglobulin A prevalence also play an important role in the complicated mechanism of the protective barrier. The use of bacterial preparations such as bifidumbacterin, lactobacterin or bifilact for stabilization and recovery of high bifidoflora levels is indicated in all the cases with impaired microbiocenosis of the intestine.

  2. The Intestinal Microbiome and Health

    PubMed Central

    Tuddenham, Susan; Sears, Cynthia L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review A diverse array of microbes colonizes the human intestine. In this review we seek to outline the current state of knowledge on what characterizes a “healthy” or “normal” intestinal microbiome, what factors modify the intestinal microbiome in the healthy state and how the intestinal microbiome affects normal host physiology Recent Findings What constitutes a “normal” or “healthy” intestinal microbiome is an area of active research, but key characteristics may include diversity, richness and a microbial community’s resilience and ability to resist change. A number of factors, including age, the host immune system, host genetics, diet and antibiotic use appear to modify the intestinal microbiome in the normal state. New research shows that the microbiome likely plays a critical role in the healthy human immune system and metabolism. Summary It is clear that there is a complicated bi-directional relationship between the intestinal microbiota and host which is vital to health. An enhanced understanding of this relationship will be critical not only to maximize and maintain human health but also to shape our understanding of disease and to foster new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26237547

  3. Intestinal flora, probiotics, and cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero Hernández, Ignacio; Torre Delgadillo, Aldo; Vargas Vorackova, Florencia; Uribe, Misael

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal microflora constitutes a symbiotic ecosystem in permanent equilibrium, composed mainly of anaerobic bacteria. However, such equilibrium may be altered by daily conditions as drug use or pathologies interfering with intestinal physiology, generating an unfavorable environment for the organism. Besides, there are factors which may cause alterations in the intestinal wall, creating the conditions for translocation or permeation of substances or bacteria. In cirrhotic patients, there are many conditions that combine to alter the amount and populations of intestinal bacteria, as well as the functional capacity of the intestinal wall to prevent the permeation of substances and bacteria. Nowadays, numerous complications associated with cirrhosis have been identified, where such mechanisms could play an important role. There is evidence that some probiotic microorganisms could restore the microbiologic and immunologic equilibrium in the intestinal wall in cirrhotic patients and help in the treatment of complications due to cirrhosis. This article has the objective to review the interactions between intestinal flora, gut permeability, and the actual role of probiotics in the field of cirrhotic patients.

  4. Black bears with longer disuse (hibernation) periods have lower femoral osteon population density and greater mineralization and intracortical porosity.

    PubMed

    Wojda, Samantha J; Weyland, David R; Gray, Sarah K; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Drummer, Thomas D; Donahue, Seth W

    2013-08-01

    Intracortical bone remodeling is persistent throughout life, leading to age related increases in osteon population density (OPD). Intracortical porosity also increases with age in many mammals including humans, contributing to bone fragility and fracture risk. Unbalanced bone resorption and formation during disuse (e.g., physical inactivity) also increases intracortical porosity. In contrast, hibernating bears are a naturally occurring model for the prevention of both age-related and disuse osteoporoses. Intracortical bone remodeling is decreased during hibernation, but resorption and formation remain balanced. Black bears spend 0.25-7 months in hibernation annually depending on climate and food availability. We found longer hibernating bears demonstrate lower OPD and higher cortical bone mineralization than bears with shorter hibernation durations, but we surprisingly found longer hibernating bears had higher intracortical porosity. However, bears from three different latitudes showed age-related decreases in intracortical porosity, indicating that regardless of hibernation duration, black bears do not show the disuse- or age-related increases in intracortical porosity which is typical of other animals. This ability to prevent increases in intracortical porosity likely contributes to their ability to maintain bone strength during prolonged periods of physical inactivity and throughout life. Improving our understanding of the unique bone metabolism in hibernating bears will potentially increase our ability to develop treatments for age- and disuse-related osteoporoses in humans.

  5. (abstract) Effects of Radiation and Oxidative Stress on Development and Morphology of Intestinal Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, Shuji; Nelson, Gregory; Schubert, Wayne

    1993-01-01

    Intestinal cells when subjected to oxidative stress or radiation exhibit abnormal nuclear divisions observed as: 1) supernumerary cell divisions in anterior intestinal cells or 2) incomplete nuclear division and the persistence of anaphase bridges between daughter nuclei. Two oxygen sensitive mutants, mev-1 and rad-8 were observed to exhibit spontaneous supernumerary nuclear divisions at low frequency. N2 can be induced to undergo these divisions by treatment with the superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibitor diethyl dithicarbamate or with the free radical generator methyl viologen. By contrast, the free radical generator bleomycin produces anaphase bridges in N2 intestinal nuclei at high frequency. Intestinal anaphase bridges can be induced by ionizing radiation and their formation is dependent on dose and radiation type.

  6. Intestinal nematodes: biology and control.

    PubMed

    Epe, Christian

    2009-11-01

    A variety of nematodes occur in dogs and cats. Several nematode species inhabit the small and large intestines. Important species that live in the small intestine are roundworms of the genus Toxocara (T canis, T cati) and Toxascaris (ie, T leonina), and hookworms of the genus Ancylostoma (A caninum, A braziliense, A tubaeforme) or Uncinaria (U stenocephala). Parasites of the large intestine are nematodes of the genus Trichuris (ie, whipworms, T vulpis). After a comprehensive description of their life cycle and biology, which are indispensable for understanding and justifying their control, current recommendations for nematode control are presented and discussed thereafter.

  7. Greater sympathoadrenal activation with longer preventilation intervals after immediate cord clamping increases hemodynamic lability at birth in preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Smolich, Joseph J; Kenna, Kelly R; Esler, Murray D; Phillips, Sarah E; Lambert, Gavin W

    2017-06-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that varying degrees of hemodynamic fluctuations seen after birth following immediate cord clamping were related to development of asphyxia with longer cord clamp-to-ventilation intervals, resulting in higher perinatal circulating levels of the catecholamines norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (Epi), and thus increased heart rate, blood pressures, and cardiac contractility after birth. Anesthetized preterm fetal lambs were instrumented with 1) aortic (AoT) and pulmonary trunk (PT) micromanometers to obtain pressures and the maximal rate of pressure rise (dP/dtmax) as a surrogate measure of ventricular contractility, and 2) an AoT catheter to obtain samples for blood gas and catecholamine analyses. After delivery, immediate cord clamping was followed by ventilation ∼40 s (n = 7), ∼60 s (n = 8), ∼90 s (n = 9), or ∼120 s later (n = 8), with frequent blood sampling performed before and after ventilation. AoT O2 content fell rapidly after immediate cord clamping (P < 0.001), with an asphyxial state evident at ≥60 s. Plasma NE and Epi levels increased progressively with longer cord clamp-to-ventilation intervals, with an exponential relation between falling AoT O2 content and rising catecholamines (R(2) = 0.64-0.67). Elevated circulating catecholamines persisted for some minutes after ventilation onset, with postbirth surges in heart rate, AoT and PT pressures, and AoT and PT dP/dtmax linearly related to loge of catecholamine levels (R(2) = 0.41-0.54, all P < 0.001). These findings suggest that 1) a greater degree of asphyxia-induced sympathoadrenal activation (reflected in elevated circulating catecholamine levels) occurs with longer intervals between immediate cord clamping and subsequent ventilation, and 2) this activation is a major determinant of hemodynamic fluctuations evident with birth. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Emerging insights on intestinal dysbiosis during bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tu Anh N; Lawley, Trevor D

    2014-02-01

    Infection of the gastrointestinal tract is commonly linked to pathological imbalances of the resident microbiota, termed dysbiosis. In recent years, advanced high-throughput genomic approaches have allowed us to examine the microbiota in an unprecedented manner, revealing novel biological insights about infection-associated dysbiosis at the community and individual species levels. A dysbiotic microbiota is typically reduced in taxonomic diversity and metabolic function, and can harbour pathobionts that exacerbate intestinal inflammation or manifest systemic disease. Dysbiosis can also promote pathogen genome evolution, while allowing the pathogens to persist at high density and transmit to new hosts. A deeper understanding of bacterial pathogenicity in the context of the intestinal microbiota should unveil new approaches for developing diagnostics and therapies for enteropathogens.

  9. Epigenetic regulation of persistent pain

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Guang; Ren, Ke; Dubner, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Persistent or chronic pain is tightly associated with various environmental changes and linked to abnormal gene expression within cells processing nociceptive signaling. Epigenetic regulation governs gene expression in response to environmental cues. Recent animal model and clinical studies indicate that epigenetic regulation plays an important role in the development/maintenance of persistent pain and, possibly the transition of acute pain to chronic pain, thus shedding light in a direction for development of new therapeutics for persistent pain. PMID:24948399

  10. Fetal intestinal graft is the best source for intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lopes, M F; Cabrita, A M; Patrício, J A

    2000-01-01

    Adult intestinal allografts have demonstrated high immunogenicity in human transplantation, making the search for new and more favorable grafts an actual problem. Accepting that fetal and newborn immune systems are relatively immature, their intestines could be ideal sources for organ donation. The purpose of this study was to compare the immunogenicity of fetal, newborn, and adult intestine for selection of the least antigenic. Using a bidirectional rat model for immunologic responses, 116 small-bowel transplantations were done: 36 fetal, 40 newborn, and 40 adult grafts. Two histocompatibility barriers and different immunosuppression regimes were used. For fetal and newborn intestines, free grafts into the omentum of adult recipients were done; for adult intestines, accessory grafts in adult recipients of the same age, using vascular anastomoses. The diagnosis of graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was based on histology of hematoxylin and eosin-stained biopsies from target organs. Recipients of fetal and newborn grafts did not show signs of GVHD, while 12% of the adult group did (P < 0.05). Rejection was less severe in fetal and adult (P > 0.05) than in newborn (P < 0.05) intestinal transplantation. Treatment with 10 mg/kg per day cyclosporine prevented rejection in 70% of fetal and 75% of adult grafts, while all newborn grafts were rejected. Under no immunosuppression, or with low doses of cyclosporine (2 mg/kg per day), all groups showed histologic signs of rejection in almost all cases, the fetal intestine being the least affected. Concerning histocompatibility barriers, grafts were usually less damaged in the weaker transplantation subgroups. Our data indicate that fetal intestine is the least immunogenic of the three grafts studied, suggesting that it will be the most suitable tissue for organ donation.

  11. Degradation of intestinal mRNA: a matter of treatment.

    PubMed

    Heumüller-Klug, Sabine; Sticht, Carsten; Kaiser, Karin; Wink, Elvira; Hagl, Cornelia; Wessel, Lucas; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert

    2015-03-28

    To characterize the influence of location, species and treatment upon RNA degradation in tissue samples from the gastrointestinal tract. The intestinal samples were stored in different medium for different times under varying conditions: different species (human and rat), varying temperature (storage on crushed ice or room temperature), time point of dissection of the submucous-mucous layer from the smooth muscle (before or after storage), different rinsing methods (rinsing with Medium, PBS, RNALater or without rinsing at all) and different regions of the gut (proximal and distal small intestine, caecum, colon and rectum). The total RNA from different parts of the gut (rat: proximal and distal small intestine, caecum, colon and rectum, human: colon and rectum) and individual gut layers (muscle and submucosal/mucosal) was extracted. The quality of the RNA was assessed by micro capillary electrophoresis. The RNA quality was expressed by the RNA integrity number which is calculated from the relative height and area of the 18 S and 28 S RNA peaks. From rat distal small intestine qPCR was performed for neuronal and glial markers. RNA obtained from smooth muscle tissue is much longer stable than those from submucosal/mucosal tissue. At RT muscle RNA degrades after one day, on ice it is stable at least three days. Cleaning and separation of gut layers before storage and use of RNALater, maintains the stability of muscle RNA at RT for much longer periods. Different parts of the gut show varying degradation periods. RNA obtained from the submucosal/mucosal layer always showed a much worse amplification rate than RNA from muscle tissue. In general RNA harvested from rat tissue, either smooth muscle layer or submucosal/mucosal layer is much longer stable than RNA from human gut tissue, and RNA obtained from smooth muscle tissue shows an increased stability compared to RNA from submucosal/mucosal tissue. At RT muscle RNA degrades after one day, while the stability on ice lasts

  12. Heterogeneity of Persistence of Salmonella enterica Serotype Senftenberg Strains Could Explain the Emergence of this Serotype in Poultry Flocks

    PubMed Central

    Boumart, Zineb; Roche, Sylvie M.; Lalande, Françoise; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Hennequet-Antier, Christelle; Menanteau, Pierrette; Gabriel, Irène; Weill, François-Xavier; Velge, Philippe; Chemaly, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Senftenberg (S. Senftenberg) has recently become more frequent in poultry flocks. Moreover some strains have been implicated in severe clinical cases. To explain the causes of this emergence in farm animals, 134 S. Senftenberg isolates from hatcheries, poultry farms and human clinical cases were analyzed. Persistent and non-persistent strains were identified in chicks. The non-persistent strains disappeared from ceca a few weeks post inoculation. This lack of persistence could be related to the disappearance of this serotype from poultry farms in the past. In contrast, persistent S. Senftenberg strains induced an intestinal asymptomatic carrier state in chicks similar to S. Enteritidis, but a weaker systemic infection than S. Enteritidis in chicks and mice. An in vitro analysis showed that the low infectivity of S. Senftenberg is in part related to its low capacity to invade enterocytes and thus to translocate the intestinal barrier. The higher capacity of persistent than non-persistent strains to colonize and persist in the ceca of chickens could explain the increased persistence of S. Senftenberg in poultry flocks. This trait might thus present a human health risk as these bacteria could be present in animals before slaughter and during food processing. PMID:22545136

  13. Dopamine controls persistence of long-term memory storage.

    PubMed

    Rossato, Janine I; Bevilaqua, Lia R M; Izquierdo, Iván; Medina, Jorge H; Cammarota, Martín

    2009-08-21

    The paradigmatic feature of long-term memory (LTM) is its persistence. However, little is known about the mechanisms that make some LTMs last longer than others. In rats, a long-lasting fear LTM vanished rapidly when the D1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390 was injected into the dorsal hippocampus 12 hours, but not immediately or 9 hours, after the fearful experience. Conversely, intrahippocampal application of the D1 agonist SK38393 at the same critical post-training time converted a rapidly decaying fear LTM into a persistent one. This effect was mediated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor and regulated by the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Thus, the persistence of LTM depends on activation of VTA/hippocampus dopaminergic connections and can be specifically modulated by manipulating this system at definite post-learning time points.

  14. Learning To Persist-Persisting To Learn. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Bessie C.

    This guide to improving student persistence is the first part of a four-part series addressing the essential characteristics of effective instruction that have a positive impact on the academic achievement of Black and Hispanic students. Persistence is learned behavior, and lower-class students are more likely than middle-class students to observe…

  15. [DETECTION OF DEGREE OF MICROECOLOGICAL DISTURBANCE OF INTESTINE BASED ON CALCULATION OF LOCAL ANTIOXIDANT INDEX].

    PubMed

    Gapon, M N; Ternovskaya, L N

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of dysbiotic condition of intestine based on determination of local antioxidant index (LAI). 155 patients with bacteriologically confirmed intestine dysbacteriosis were examined: 20 individuals with normobiocenosis of the intestine served as control. Feces dilution 10⁻² was used for biochemical study. Catalase, superoxide-dismutase activity and level of malonic dialdehyde was evaluated photometrically by the value of optical density of the samples. Microbial landscape of feces was studied by a bacteriologic method with parallel determination in samples of coprofiltrates of activity of the indicated enzymes and content of malonic dialdehyde. Evaluation of disturbances of microecology of the intestine was carried out by a biochemical method by calculating local antioxidant index in juxtaposition with microbial map data. LAI parameter was significantly higher than 20 in coprofiltrates of people with intestine normobiocenosis. In patients with detected intestine dysbacteriosis, depending on its degree, LAI parameter, changes were registered in the range from negative to 20. Dysbacteriosis in a part of patients had a prolonged character, LAI was lower than 14, that reflected the presence of a persistent inflammation. A tendency of normalization of microbial ecology and growth of LAI was observed during administration of a probiotic preparation. A screening criteria is proposed, that differentiates the degree of severity of intestine dysbacteriosis based on calculation of local antioxidant index.

  16. Persistence of the rotavirus A genome in mesenteric lymph nodes of cattle raised on farms.

    PubMed

    Mitake, Hiromichi; Ito, Naoto; Okadera, Kota; Okada, Kazuma; Nakagawa, Kento; Tanaka, Tomomi; Katsuragi, Kiyohito; Kasahara, Kasumi; Nihongi, Toshihide; Sakurai, Shoji; Tsunemitsu, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Makoto

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies revealed that rotavirus A (RVA) is present in not only the small intestine but also various organs. It was reported that RVA persisted in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) in experimental models. However, there have been no reports focused on RVA in MLNs of animals under natural conditions. In this study, in order to investigate the persistence of the RVA genome in MLNs in cattle under natural conditions, reverse transcription-semi-nested PCR was carried out to detect RVA genomes in the MLNs from 17 calves that had been subjected to autopsy examinations. RVA genomes were detected in MLNs from 10 (˜60  %) of the 17 autopsied calves. MLNs from 170 healthy adult cattle that had been slaughtered were also examined; 15 (∼10  %) of the 170 cattle had RVA genomes in their MLNs, indicating that RNA genomes are found frequently in MLNs of cattle under natural conditions. Genetic analyses revealed that RVAs in MLNs were classified as G and/or P genotypes generally prevalent in bovines. Basically, the strains in intestinal contents were genetically identical to those in MLNs from individual cattle, suggesting that bovine RVAs have the ability to spread from the intestine to MLNs. Furthermore, amongst RVA-positive cattle, six of 10 autopsied calves and 12 of 15 healthy adult cattle were negative for the virus in the intestinal contents, indicating that bovine RVA genomes can persist in MLNs after viral clearance in the digestive tract.

  17. Ileocolonic transfer of solid chyme in small intestinal neuropathies and myopathies

    SciTech Connect

    Greydanus, M.P.; Camilleri, M.; Colemont, L.J.; Phillips, S.F.; Brown, M.L.; Thomforde, G.M. )

    1990-07-01

    The aims of this study were to assess gastric emptying, small bowel transit and colonic filling in patients with motility disorders, with particular attention to the patterns of colonic filling. Gastrointestinal transit was assessed using a previously validated radiolabeled mixed meal. Fourteen patients with clinical and manometric features of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction classified as intestinal neuropathy and 6 as intestinal myopathy, were studied. The results were compared with those from 10 healthy controls studied similarly. Gastric emptying and small bowel transit of solids were significantly slower in both groups of patients than in healthy controls (P less than 0.05). In health, the ileocolonic transit of solid chyme was characterized by intermittent bolus transfers. The mean size of boluses transferred to the colon (expressed as a percentage of ingested radiolabel) was significantly less (P less than 0.05) in patients with intestinal myopathy (10% +/- 4% (SEM)) than in healthy controls (25% +/- 4%) or in patients with intestinal neuropathy (25% +/- 4%). The intervals between bolus transfer of solids (plateaus in the colonic filling curve) were longer (P less than 0.05) in myopathies (212 +/- 89 minutes) than in health (45 +/- 7 minutes) or neuropathies (53 +/- 11 minutes). Thus, gastric emptying and small bowel transit were delayed in small bowel neuropathies and myopathies. Bolus filling of the colon was less frequent and less effective in patients with myopathic intestinal pseudoobstruction, whereas bolus transfer was preserved in patients with neuropathic intestinal pseudoobstruction.

  18. In vitro patterning of pluripotent stem cell-derived intestine recapitulates in vivo human development

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Nattiv, Roy; Dedhia, Priya H.; Nagy, Melinda S.; Chin, Alana M.; Thomson, Matthew; Klein, Ophir D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The intestine plays a central role in digestion, nutrient absorption and metabolism, with individual regions of the intestine having distinct functional roles. Many examples of region-specific gene expression in the adult intestine are known, but how intestinal regional identity is established during development is a largely unresolved issue. Here, we have identified several genes that are expressed in a region-specific manner in the developing human intestine. Using human embryonic stem cell-derived intestinal organoids, we demonstrate that the duration of exposure to active FGF and WNT signaling controls regional identity. Short-term exposure to FGF4 and CHIR99021 (a GSK3β inhibitor that stabilizes β-catenin) resulted in organoids with gene expression patterns similar to developing human duodenum, whereas longer exposure resulted in organoids similar to ileum. When region-specific organoids were transplanted into immunocompromised mice, duodenum-like organoids and ileum-like organoids retained their regional identity, demonstrating that regional identity of organoids is stable after initial patterning occurs. This work provides insights into the mechanisms that control regional specification of the developing human intestine and provides new tools for basic and translational research. PMID:27927684

  19. In vitro patterning of pluripotent stem cell-derived intestine recapitulates in vivo human development.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Nattiv, Roy; Dedhia, Priya H; Nagy, Melinda S; Chin, Alana M; Thomson, Matthew; Klein, Ophir D; Spence, Jason R

    2017-03-15

    The intestine plays a central role in digestion, nutrient absorption and metabolism, with individual regions of the intestine having distinct functional roles. Many examples of region-specific gene expression in the adult intestine are known, but how intestinal regional identity is established during development is a largely unresolved issue. Here, we have identified several genes that are expressed in a region-specific manner in the developing human intestine. Using human embryonic stem cell-derived intestinal organoids, we demonstrate that the duration of exposure to active FGF and WNT signaling controls regional identity. Short-term exposure to FGF4 and CHIR99021 (a GSK3β inhibitor that stabilizes β-catenin) resulted in organoids with gene expression patterns similar to developing human duodenum, whereas longer exposure resulted in organoids similar to ileum. When region-specific organoids were transplanted into immunocompromised mice, duodenum-like organoids and ileum-like organoids retained their regional identity, demonstrating that regional identity of organoids is stable after initial patterning occurs. This work provides insights into the mechanisms that control regional specification of the developing human intestine and provides new tools for basic and translational research.

  20. Intestinal Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Flannigan, Kyle L.; Geem, Duke; Harusato, Akihito; Denning, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    The microbiota that populate the mammalian intestine are critical for proper host physiology, yet simultaneously pose a potential danger. Intestinal antigen-presenting cells, namely macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are integral components of the mucosal innate immune system that maintain co-existence with the microbiota in face of this constant threat. Intestinal macrophages and DCs integrate signals from the microenvironment to orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses that ultimately lead to durable tolerance of the microbiota. Tolerance is not a default response, however, because macrophages and DCs remain poised to vigorously respond to pathogens that breach the epithelial barrier. In this review, we summarize the salient features of macrophages and DCs in the healthy and inflamed intestine and discuss how signals from the microbiota can influence their function. PMID:25976247

  1. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Alexandra; Fronzoni, Lucia; Cogliandro, Laura; Cogliandro, Rosanna F; Caputo, Carla; Giorgio, Roberto De; Pallotti, Francesca; Barbara, Giovanni; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a severe digestive syndrome characterized by derangement of gut propulsive motility which resembles mechanical obstruction, in the absence of any obstructive process. Although uncommon in clinical practice, this syndrome represents one of the main causes of intestinal failure and is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. It may be idiopathic or secondary to a variety of diseases. Most cases are sporadic, even though familial forms with either dominant or recessive autosomal inheritance have been described. Based on histological features intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be classified into three main categories: neuropathies, mesenchymopathies, and myopathies, according on the predominant involvement of enteric neurones, interstitial cells of Cajal or smooth muscle cells, respectively. Treatment of intestinal pseudo-obstruction involves nutritional, pharmacological and surgical therapies, but it is often unsatisfactory and the long-term outcome is generally poor in the majority of cases. PMID:18494042

  2. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Alexandra; Fronzoni, Lucia; Cogliandro, Laura; Cogliandro, Rosanna-F; Caputo, Carla; De Giorgio, Roberto; Pallotti, Francesca; Barbara, Giovanni; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2008-05-21

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a severe digestive syndrome characterized by derangement of gut propulsive motility which resembles mechanical obstruction, in the absence of any obstructive process. Although uncommon in clinical practice, this syndrome represents one of the main causes of intestinal failure and is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. It may be idiopathic or secondary to a variety of diseases. Most cases are sporadic, even though familial forms with either dominant or recessive autosomal inheritance have been described. Based on histological features intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be classified into three main categories: neuropathies, mesenchymopathies, and myopathies, according on the predominant involvement of enteric neurones, interstitial cells of Cajal or smooth muscle cells, respectively. Treatment of intestinal pseudo-obstruction involves nutritional, pharmacological and surgical therapies, but it is often unsatisfactory and the long-term outcome is generally poor in the majority of cases.

  3. Fishborne Zoonotic Intestinal Trematodes, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Dung, Do Trung; Van De, Nguyen; Waikagul, Jitra; Dalsgaard, Anders; Chai, Jong-Yil; Sohn, Woon-Mok

    2007-01-01

    Although fishborne zoonotic trematodes that infect the liver are well documented in Vietnam, intestinal fishborne zoonotic trematodes are unreported. Recent discoveries of the metacercarial stage of these flukes in wild and farmed fish prompted an assessment of their risk to a community that eats raw fish. A fecal survey of 615 persons showed a trematode egg prevalence of 64.9%. Infected persons were treated to expel liver and intestinal parasites for specific identification. The liver trematode Clonorchis sinensis was recovered from 51.5%, but >1 of 4 intestinal species of the family Heterophyidae was recovered from 100%. The most numerous were Haplorchis spp. (90.4% of all worms recovered). These results demonstrate that fishborne intestinal parasites are an unrecognized food safety risk in a country whose people have a strong tradition of eating raw fish. PMID:18258031

  4. Management of persistent vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Nyirjesy, Paul

    2014-12-01

    With vaginitis remaining a common condition that leads women to seek care, it is not surprising that some women develop chronic vulvovaginal problems that are difficult to diagnose and treat. With a differential diagnosis that encompasses vulvar disorders and infectious and noninfectious causes of vaginitis, accurate diagnosis is the cornerstone of choosing effective therapy. Evaluation should include a symptom-specific history, careful vulvar and vaginal examination, and office-based tests (vaginal pH, amine test, saline and 10% potassium hydroxide microscopy). Ancillary tests, especially yeast culture with speciation, are frequently crucial to obtaining a correct diagnosis. A heavy but normal physiologic discharge can be determined by excluding other causes. With vulvovaginal candidiasis, differentiating between Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida infection has important treatment ramifications. Most patients with C albicans infections can be successfully treated with maintenance antifungal therapy, usually with fluconazole. Although many non-albicans Candida, particularly Candida glabrata, may at times be innocent bystanders, vaginal boric acid therapy is an effective first choice for many true non-albicans Candida infections. Recurrent bacterial vaginosis, a difficult therapeutic challenge, can often be controlled with maintenance therapy. Multiple options, especially high-dose tinidazole, have been used for metronidazole-resistant trichomoniasis. With the aging of the U.S. population, atrophic vaginitis and desquamative inflammatory vaginitis, both associated with hypoestrogenism, are encountered frequently in women with persistent vaginitis.

  5. Isolated persistent hypermethioninemia.

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, S H; Levy, H L; Tangerman, A; Boujet, C; Buist, N; Davidson-Mundt, A; Hudgins, L; Oyanagi, K; Nagao, M; Wilson, W G

    1995-01-01

    New information has been obtained on 30 patients with isolated persistent hypermethioninemia, most of them previously unreported. Biopsies to confirm the presumptive diagnosis of partially deficient activity of ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase (MAT; E.C.2.5.1.6) in liver were not performed on most of these patients. However, none showed the clinical findings or the extreme elevations of serum folate previously described in other patients with isolated hypermethioninemia considered not to have hepatic MAT deficiency. Patients ascertained on biochemical grounds had no neurological abnormalities, and 27/30 had IQs or Bayley development-index scores within normal limits or were judged to have normal mental development. Methionine transamination metabolites accumulated abnormally only when plasma methionine concentrations exceeded 300-350 microM and did so more markedly after 0.9 years of age. Data were obtained on urinary organic acids as well as plasma creatinine concentrations. Patterns of inheritance of isolated hypermethioninemia were variable. Considerations as to the optimal management of this group of patients are discussed. PMID:7573050

  6. Environmental Persistence Influences Infection Dynamics for a Butterfly Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Satterfield, Dara A; Altizer, Sonia; Williams, Mary-Kate; Hall, Richard J

    2017-01-01

    Many pathogens, including those infecting insects, are transmitted via dormant stages shed into the environment, where they must persist until encountering a susceptible host. Understanding how abiotic conditions influence environmental persistence and how these factors influence pathogen spread are crucial for predicting patterns of infection risk. Here, we explored the consequences of environmental transmission for infection dynamics of a debilitating protozoan parasite (Ophryocystis elektroscirrha) that infects monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus). We first conducted an experiment to observe the persistence of protozoan spores exposed to natural conditions. Experimental results showed that, contrary to our expectations, pathogen doses maintained high infectivity even after 16 days in the environment, although pathogens did yield infections with lower parasite loads after environmental exposure. Because pathogen longevity exceeded the time span of our experiment, we developed a mechanistic model to better explore environmental persistence for this host-pathogen system. Model analysis showed that, in general, longer spore persistence led to higher infection prevalence and slightly smaller monarch population sizes. The model indicated that typical parasite doses shed onto milkweed plants must remain viable for a minimum of 3 weeks for prevalence to increase during the summer-breeding season, and for 11 weeks or longer to match levels of infection commonly reported from the wild, assuming moderate values for parasite shedding rate. Our findings showed that transmission stages of this butterfly pathogen are long-lived and indicated that this is a necessary condition for the protozoan to persist in local monarch populations. This study provides a modeling framework for future work examining the dynamics of an ecologically important pathogen in an iconic insect.

  7. Environmental Persistence Influences Infection Dynamics for a Butterfly Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Altizer, Sonia; Williams, Mary-Kate; Hall, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    Many pathogens, including those infecting insects, are transmitted via dormant stages shed into the environment, where they must persist until encountering a susceptible host. Understanding how abiotic conditions influence environmental persistence and how these factors influence pathogen spread are crucial for predicting patterns of infection risk. Here, we explored the consequences of environmental transmission for infection dynamics of a debilitating protozoan parasite (Ophryocystis elektroscirrha) that infects monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus). We first conducted an experiment to observe the persistence of protozoan spores exposed to natural conditions. Experimental results showed that, contrary to our expectations, pathogen doses maintained high infectivity even after 16 days in the environment, although pathogens did yield infections with lower parasite loads after environmental exposure. Because pathogen longevity exceeded the time span of our experiment, we developed a mechanistic model to better explore environmental persistence for this host-pathogen system. Model analysis showed that, in general, longer spore persistence led to higher infection prevalence and slightly smaller monarch population sizes. The model indicated that typical parasite doses shed onto milkweed plants must remain viable for a minimum of 3 weeks for prevalence to increase during the summer-breeding season, and for 11 weeks or longer to match levels of infection commonly reported from the wild, assuming moderate values for parasite shedding rate. Our findings showed that transmission stages of this butterfly pathogen are long-lived and indicated that this is a necessary condition for the protozoan to persist in local monarch populations. This study provides a modeling framework for future work examining the dynamics of an ecologically important pathogen in an iconic insect. PMID:28099501

  8. Intestinal angioedema mimicking Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, A; Prather, C M

    1999-10-18

    Angioedema usually presents as episodic attacks of swelling of the face, airway and extremities, but it may also involve visceral tissues. A 58-year-old woman with repeated episodes of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting had two laparotomies and was treated for Crohn's disease for two years before a diagnosis of acquired intestinal angioedema was made. This case provides important insights into the presentation of intestinal angioedema.

  9. Sonographic detection of intestinal pneumatosis.

    PubMed

    Danse, E M; Van Beers BE; Gilles, A; Jacquet, L

    2000-06-01

    Intestinal pneumatosis is an uncommon affection characterized by the presence of gas in the wall of the gastro-intestinal tract. The prognosis of this condition, observed in benign or severe diseases, is based on the outcome of the underlying affection. The diagnosis of pneumatosis intestinalis is unusually made with sonography. We report a case of pneumatosis intestinalis due to small bowel necrosis, initially suggested with sonography and further confirmed with computed tomography (CT) and pathology.

  10. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bures, Jan; Cyrany, Jiri; Kohoutova, Darina; Förstl, Miroslav; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Kvetina, Jaroslav; Vorisek, Viktor; Kopacova, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymicrobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO). SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastrointestinal tract. There are several endogenous defence mechanisms for preventing bacterial overgrowth: gastric acid secretion, intestinal motility, intact ileo-caecal valve, immunoglobulins within intestinal secretion and bacteriostatic properties of pancreatic and biliary secretion. Aetiology of SIBO is usually complex, associated with disorders of protective antibacterial mechanisms (e.g. achlorhydria, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, immunodeficiency syndromes), anatomical abnormalities (e.g. small intestinal obstruction, diverticula, fistulae, surgical blind loop, previous ileo-caecal resections) and/or motility disorders (e.g. scleroderma, autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus, post-radiation enteropathy, small intestinal pseudo-obstruction). In some patients more than one factor may be involved. Symptoms related to SIBO are bloating, diarrhoea, malabsorption, weight loss and malnutrition. The gold standard for diagnosing SIBO is still microbial investigation of jejunal aspirates. Non-invasive hydrogen and methane breath tests are most commonly used for the diagnosis of SIBO using glucose or lactulose. Therapy for SIBO must be complex, addressing all causes, symptoms and complications, and fully individualised. It should include treatment of the underlying disease, nutritional support and cyclical gastro-intestinal selective antibiotics. Prognosis is usually serious, determined mostly by the underlying disease that led to SIBO. PMID:20572300

  11. The Role of Rewarding and Novel Events in Facilitating Memory Persistence in a Separate Spatial Memory Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvetti, Beatrice; Morris, Richard G. M.; Wang, Szu-Han

    2014-01-01

    Many insignificant events in our daily life are forgotten quickly but can be remembered for longer when other memory-modulating events occur before or after them. This phenomenon has been investigated in animal models in a protocol in which weak memories persist longer if exploration in a novel context is introduced around the time of memory…

  12. The Role of Rewarding and Novel Events in Facilitating Memory Persistence in a Separate Spatial Memory Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvetti, Beatrice; Morris, Richard G. M.; Wang, Szu-Han

    2014-01-01

    Many insignificant events in our daily life are forgotten quickly but can be remembered for longer when other memory-modulating events occur before or after them. This phenomenon has been investigated in animal models in a protocol in which weak memories persist longer if exploration in a novel context is introduced around the time of memory…

  13. Persistent Identifiers for Dutch cultural heritage institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ras, Marcel; Kruithof, Gijsbert

    2016-04-01

    Over the past years, more and more collections belonging to archives, libraries, media, museums, and knowledge institutes are being digitised and made available online. These are exciting times for ALM institutions. They are realising that, in the information society, their collections are goldmines. Unfortunately most heritage institutions in the Netherlands do not yet meet the basic preconditions for long-term availability of their collections. The digital objects often have no long lasting fixed reference yet. URL's and web addresses change. Some digital objects that were referenced in Europeana and other portals can no longer be found. References in scientific articles have a very short life span, which is damaging for scholarly research. In 2015, the Dutch Digital Heritage Network (NDE) has started a two-year work program to co-ordinate existing initiatives in order to improve the (long-term) accessibility of the Dutch digital heritage for a wide range of users, anytime, anyplace. The Digital Heritage Network is a partnership established on the initiative of the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science. The members of the NDE are large, national institutions that strive to professionally preserve and manage digital data, e.g. the National Library, The Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision, the Netherlands Cultural Heritage Agency, the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Archive of the Netherlands and the DEN Foundation, and a growing number of associations and individuals both within and outside the heritage sector. By means of three work programmes the goals of the Network should be accomplished and improve the visibility, the usability and the sustainability of digital heritage. Each programme contains of a set of projects. Within the sustainability program a project on creating a model for persistent identifiers is taking place. The main goals of the project are (1) raise awareness among cultural heritage institutions on the

  14. Intestinal microflora and metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Serino, M; Luche, E; Chabo, C; Amar, J; Burcelin, R

    2009-09-01

    Recent advances in molecular sequencing technology have allowed researchers to answer major questions regarding the relationship between a vast genomic diversity-such as found in the intestinal microflora-and host physiology. Over the past few years, it has been established that, in obesity, type 1 diabetes and Crohn's disease-to cite but a few-the intestinal microflora play a pathophysiological role and can induce, transfer or prevent the outcome of such conditions. A few of the molecular vectors responsible for this regulatory role have been determined. Some are related to control of the immune, vascular, endocrine and nervous systems located in the intestines. However, more important is the fact that the intestinal microflora-to-host relationship is bidirectional, with evidence of an impact of the host genome on the intestinal microbiome. This means that the ecology shared by the host and gut microflora should now be considered a new player that can be manipulated, using pharmacological and nutritional approaches, to control physiological functions and pathological outcomes. What now remains is to demonstrate the molecular connection between the intestinal microflora and metabolic diseases. We propose here that the proinflammatory lipopolysaccharides play a causal role in the onset of metabolic disorders.

  15. Opposing Dopaminergic and GABAergic Neurons Control the Duration and Persistence of Copulation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Crickmore, Michael A.; Vosshall, Leslie B.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Behavioral persistence is a major factor in determiningwhen and under which circumstances animals will terminate their current activity and transition into more profitable, appropriate, or urgent behavior. We show that, for the first 5 min of copulation in Drosophila, stressful stimuli do not interrupt mating, whereas 10 min later, even minor perturbations are sufficient to terminate copulation. This decline in persistence occurs as the probability of successful mating increases and is promoted by approximately eight sexually dimorphic, GABAergic interneurons of the male abdominal ganglion. When these interneurons were silenced, persistence increased and males copulated far longer than required for successful mating. When these interneurons were stimulated, persistence decreased and copulations were shortened. In contrast, dopaminergic neurons of the ventral nerve cord promote copulation persistence and extend copulation duration. Thus, copulation duration in Drosophila is a product of gradually declining persistence controlled by opposing neuronal populations using conserved neurotransmission systems. PMID:24209625

  16. An assessment of the intestinal lumen as a site for intervention in reducing body burdens of organochlorine compounds.

    PubMed

    Jandacek, Ronald J; Genuis, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Many individuals maintain a persistent body burden of organochlorine compounds (OCs) as well as other lipophilic compounds, largely as a result of airborne and dietary exposures. Ingested OCs are typically absorbed from the small intestine along with dietary lipids. Once in the body, stored OCs can mobilize from adipose tissue storage sites and, along with circulating OCs, are delivered into the small intestine via hepatic processing and biliary transport. Retained OCs are also transported into both the large and small intestinal lumen via non-biliary mechanisms involving both secretion and desquamation from enterocytes. OCs and some other toxicants can be reabsorbed from the intestine, however, they take part in enterohepatic circulation(EHC). While dietary fat facilitates the absorption of OCs from the small intestine, it has little effect on OCs within the large intestine. Non-absorbable dietary fats and fat absorption inhibitors, however, can reduce the re-absorption of OCs and other lipophiles involved in EHC and may enhance the secretion of these compounds into the large intestine--thereby hastening their elimination. Clinical studies are currently underway to determine the efficacy of using non-absorbable fats and inhibitors of fat absorption in facilitating the elimination of persistent body burdens of OCs and other lipophilic human contaminants.

  17. [Intestinal gas explosion during operation: a case report].

    PubMed

    Bouhours, G; Tesson, B; De Bourmont, S; Lorimier, G; Granry, J-C

    2003-04-01

    A case of intestinal gas explosion during the course of carcinologic surgery in a 51-year-old patient is reported. This accident, often dramatic, has become exceptional since the use of mannitol for colonic preparation has disappeared. This incident occurred during the course of a total pelvic exenteration performed under general anaesthesia with inhalation of both a mixture oxygen-nitrous oxide and volatile agents. The colon incision with an electrocautery was contemporaneous with a violent deflagration accountable for organic lesions. This case report reminds us that the risk of a dangerous explosion persists in relation with surgical, anaesthetic and individual risk factors.

  18. Intestinal malrotation in a patient with Pfeiffer syndrome type 2.

    PubMed

    Zarate, Yuri A; Putnam, Philip E; Saal, Howard M

    2010-11-01

    Pfeiffer syndrome is a pleiotropic disorder characterized by multiple suture craniosynostosis, broad and medially deviated thumbs and great toes, and variable cutaneous syndactyly. We present the case of a 16-month-old boy with Pfeiffer syndrome type 2 who presented with intestinal malrotation for which the diagnosis was delayed. This is a rare complication of Pfeiffer syndrome, with few reported cases in the literature. This case illustrates the importance of recognizing gastrointestinal malrotation as a possible cause of feeding intolerance and persistent vomiting in patients with the severe forms of Pfeiffer syndrome.

  19. [Malaria and intestinal protozoa].

    PubMed

    Rojo-Marcos, Gerardo; Cuadros-González, Juan

    2016-03-01

    Malaria is life threatening and requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. Incidence and mortality are being reduced in endemic areas. Clinical features are unspecific so in imported cases it is vital the history of staying in a malarious area. The first line treatments for Plasmodium falciparum are artemisinin combination therapies, chloroquine in most non-falciparum and intravenous artesunate if any severity criteria. Human infections with intestinal protozoa are distributed worldwide with a high global morbid-mortality. They cause diarrhea and sometimes invasive disease, although most are asymptomatic. In our environment populations at higher risk are children, including adopted abroad, immune-suppressed, travelers, immigrants, people in contact with animals or who engage in oral-anal sex. Diagnostic microscopic examination has low sensitivity improving with antigen detection or molecular methods. Antiparasitic resistances are emerging lately. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  20. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia: Minireview

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Sachin B; Hinge (Ingle), Chitra R

    2014-01-01

    Primary idiopathic intestinal lymphangiectasia is an unusual disease featured by the presence of dilated lymphatic channels which are located in the mucosa, submucosa or subserosa leading to protein loosing enteropathy.Most often affected were children and generally diagnosed before third year of life but may be rarely seen in adults too. Bilateral pitting oedema of lower limb is the main clinical manifestation mimicking the systemic disease and posing a real diagnostic dilemma to the clinicians to differentiate it from other common systemic diseases like Congestive cardiac failure, Nephrotic Syndrome, Protein Energy Malnutrition, etc. Diagnosis can be made on capsule endoscopy which can localise the lesion but unable to take biopsy samples. Thus, recently double-balloon enteroscopy and biopsy in combination can be used as an effective diagnostic tool to hit the correct diagnosis. Patients respond dramatically to diet constituting low long chain triglycerides and high protein content with supplements of medium chain triglyceride. So early diagnosis is important to prevent untoward complications related to disease or treatment for the sake of accurate pathological diagnosis. PMID:25325063

  1. Multidimensional persistence in biomolecular data.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-07-30

    Persistent homology has emerged as a popular technique for the topological simplification of big data, including biomolecular data. Multidimensional persistence bears considerable promise to bridge the gap between geometry and topology. However, its practical and robust construction has been a challenge. We introduce two families of multidimensional persistence, namely pseudomultidimensional persistence and multiscale multidimensional persistence. The former is generated via the repeated applications of persistent homology filtration to high-dimensional data, such as results from molecular dynamics or partial differential equations. The latter is constructed via isotropic and anisotropic scales that create new simiplicial complexes and associated topological spaces. The utility, robustness, and efficiency of the proposed topological methods are demonstrated via protein folding, protein flexibility analysis, the topological denoising of cryoelectron microscopy data, and the scale dependence of nanoparticles. Topological transition between partial folded and unfolded proteins has been observed in multidimensional persistence. The separation between noise topological signatures and molecular topological fingerprints is achieved by the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The multiscale multidimensional persistent homology reveals relative local features in Betti-0 invariants and the relatively global characteristics of Betti-1 and Betti-2 invariants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Multidimensional persistence in biomolecular data

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Persistent homology has emerged as a popular technique for the topological simplification of big data, including biomolecular data. Multidimensional persistence bears considerable promise to bridge the gap between geometry and topology. However, its practical and robust construction has been a challenge. We introduce two families of multidimensional persistence, namely pseudo-multidimensional persistence and multiscale multidimensional persistence. The former is generated via the repeated applications of persistent homology filtration to high dimensional data, such as results from molecular dynamics or partial differential equations. The latter is constructed via isotropic and anisotropic scales that create new simiplicial complexes and associated topological spaces. The utility, robustness and efficiency of the proposed topological methods are demonstrated via protein folding, protein flexibility analysis, the topological denoising of cryo-electron microscopy data, and the scale dependence of nano particles. Topological transition between partial folded and unfolded proteins has been observed in multidimensional persistence. The separation between noise topological signatures and molecular topological fingerprints is achieved by the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The multiscale multidimensional persistent homology reveals relative local features in Betti-0 invariants and the relatively global characteristics of Betti-1 and Betti-2 invariants. PMID:26032339

  3. Radiological Contaminant Persistence and Decontamination ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report The objective of this study was to use the Pipe Decontamination Experimental Design Protocol (PDEDP) to evaluate the persistence of cesium, cobalt, and strontium on concrete and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and explore possible decontamination approaches. The PDEDP is an approach for evaluating the persistence characteristics of contaminants on drinking water pipe materials and various decontamination approaches.

  4. Metabolic aspects of bacterial persisters

    PubMed Central

    Prax, Marcel; Bertram, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Persister cells form a multi-drug tolerant subpopulation within an isogenic culture of bacteria that are genetically susceptible to antibiotics. Studies with different Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria have identified a large number of genes associated with the persister state. In contrast, the revelation of persister metabolism has only been addressed recently. We here summarize metabolic aspects of persisters, which includes an overview about the bifunctional role of selected carbohydrates as both triggers for the exit from the drug tolerant state and metabolites which persisters feed on. Also alarmones as indicators for starvation have been shown to influence persister levels via different signaling cascades involving the activation of toxin-antitoxin systems and other regulatory factors. Finally, recent data obtained by 13C-isotopolog profiling demonstrated an active amino acid anabolism in Staphylococcus aureus cultures challenged with high drug concentrations. Understanding the metabolism of persister cells poses challenges but also paves the way for the development of anti-persister compounds. PMID:25374846

  5. Persistence. Snapshot Report, Fall 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Today's college student is not your '60s drop-out. In 2010, college students tended to stay enrolled (i.e., persist), even if it was in a different school, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. For a student enrolled in the fall, persistence is defined as either continued enrollment during the next term after the fall or…

  6. Persistent Criminality and Career Length

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haapanen, Rudy; Britton, Lee; Croisdale, Tim

    2007-01-01

    This study is an examination of persistent offending and its implications for the understanding and investigation of desistance and career length. Persistence, especially as it is operationalized using official measures, is characterized as fundamentally a measure of resistance to formal social control: continued crime in the face of increasingly…

  7. Economic benefits associated with beta blocker persistence in the treatment of hypertension: a retrospective database analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Stephanie; Swallow, Elyse; Li, Nanxin; Faust, Elizabeth; Kelley, Caroline; Xie, Jipan; Wu, Eric

    2015-04-01

    To assess the association between medical costs and persistence with beta blockers among hypertensive patients, and to quantify persistence related medical cost differences with nebivolol, which is associated with improved tolerability, versus other beta blockers. Adults who initiated hypertension treatment with a beta blocker were identified from the MarketScan * claims database (2008-2012). Patients were classified based on their first beta blocker use: nebivolol, atenolol, carvedilol, metoprolol, and other beta blockers. Patients with compelling indications for atenolol, carvedilol or metoprolol (acute coronary syndrome and congestive heart failure) were excluded. Patients enrolled in health maintenance organization or capitated point of service insurance plans were also excluded. Persistence was defined as continuous use of the index drug (<60 day gap). The average effect of persistence on medical costs (2012 USD) was estimated using generalized linear models (GLMs). Regression estimates were used to predict medical cost differences associated with persistence between nebivolol and the other cohorts. A total of 587,424 hypertensive patients met the inclusion criteria. Each additional month of persistence with any one beta blocker was associated with $152.51 in all-cause medical cost savings; continuous treatment for 1 year was associated with $1585.98 in all-cause medical cost savings. Patients treated with nebivolol had longer persistence during the 1 year study period (median: 315 days) than all other beta blockers (median: 156-292 days). Longer persistence with nebivolol translated into $305.74 all-cause medical cost savings relative to all other beta blockers. The results may not be generalizable to hypertensive patients with acute coronary syndrome or congestive heart failure. Longer persistence with beta blockers for the treatment of hypertension was associated with lower medical costs. There may be greater cost savings due to better persistence with

  8. Pathogenic characteristics of persistent feline enteric coronavirus infection in cats.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Liesbeth; Van der Lubben, Mariken; te Lintelo, Eddie G; Bekker, Cornelis P J; Geerts, Tamara; Schuijff, Leontine S; Grinwis, Guy C M; Egberink, Herman F; Rottier, Peter J M

    2010-01-01

    Feline coronaviruses (FCoV) comprise two biotypes: feline enteric coronaviruses (FECV) and feline infectious peritonitis viruses (FIPV). FECV is associated with asymptomatic persistent enteric infections, while FIPV causes feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a usually fatal systemic disease in domestic cats and some wild Felidae. FIPV arises from FECV by mutation. FCoV also occur in two serotypes, I and II, of which the serotype I viruses are by far the most prevalent in the field. Yet, most of our knowledge about FCoV infections relates to serotype II viruses, particularly about the FIPV, mainly because type I viruses grow poorly in cell culture. Hence, the aim of the present work was the detailed study of the epidemiologically most relevant viruses, the avirulent serotype I viruses. Kittens were inoculated oronasally with different doses of two independent FECV field strains, UCD and RM. Persistent infection could be reproducibly established. The patterns of clinical symptoms, faecal virus shedding and seroconversion were monitored for up to 10 weeks revealing subtle but reproducible differences between the two viruses. Faecal virus, i.e. genomic RNA, was detected during persistent FECV infection only in the large intestine, downstream of the appendix, and could occasionally be observed also in the blood. The implications of our results, particularly our insights into the persistently infected state, are discussed.

  9. Pathogenic characteristics of persistent feline enteric coronavirus infection in cats

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Liesbeth; Van der Lubben, Mariken; Te Lintelo, Eddie G.; Bekker, Cornelis P.J.; Geerts, Tamara; Schuijff, Leontine S.; Grinwis, Guy C.M.; Egberink, Herman F.; Rottier, Peter J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Feline coronaviruses (FCoV) comprise two biotypes: feline enteric coronaviruses (FECV) and feline infectious peritonitis viruses (FIPV). FECV is associated with asymptomatic persistent enteric infections, while FIPV causes feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a usually fatal systemic disease in domestic cats and some wild Felidae. FIPV arises from FECV by mutation. FCoV also occur in two serotypes, I and II, of which the serotype I viruses are by far the most prevalent in the field. Yet, most of our knowledge about FCoV infections relates to serotype II viruses, particularly about the FIPV, mainly because type I viruses grow poorly in cell culture. Hence, the aim of the present work was the detailed study of the epidemiologically most relevant viruses, the avirulent serotype I viruses. Kittens were inoculated oronasally with different doses of two independent FECV field strains, UCD and RM. Persistent infection could be reproducibly established. The patterns of clinical symptoms, faecal virus shedding and seroconversion were monitored for up to 10 weeks revealing subtle but reproducible differences between the two viruses. Faecal virus, i.e. genomic RNA, was detected during persistent FECV infection only in the large intestine, downstream of the appendix, and could occasionally be observed also in the blood. The implications of our results, particularly our insights into the persistently infected state, are discussed. PMID:20663472

  10. Review article: the human intestinal virome in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Carding, S R; Davis, N; Hoyles, L

    2017-09-04

    The human virome consists of animal-cell viruses causing transient infections, bacteriophage (phage) predators of bacteria and archaea, endogenous retroviruses and viruses causing persistent and latent infections. High-throughput, inexpensive, sensitive sequencing methods and metagenomics now make it possible to study the contribution dsDNA, ssDNA and RNA virus-like particles make to the human virome, and in particular the intestinal virome. To review and evaluate the pioneering studies that have attempted to characterise the human virome and generated an increased interest in understanding how the intestinal virome might contribute to maintaining health, and the pathogenesis of chronic diseases. Relevant virome-related articles were selected for review following extensive language- and date-unrestricted, electronic searches of the literature. The human intestinal virome is personalised and stable, and dominated by phages. It develops soon after birth in parallel with prokaryotic communities of the microbiota, becoming established during the first few years of life. By infecting specific populations of bacteria, phages can alter microbiota structure by killing host cells or altering their phenotype, enabling phages to contribute to maintaining intestinal homeostasis or microbial imbalance (dysbiosis), and the development of chronic infectious and autoimmune diseases including HIV infection and Crohn's disease, respectively. Our understanding of the intestinal virome is fragmented and requires standardised methods for virus isolation and sequencing to provide a more complete picture of the virome, which is key to explaining the basis of virome-disease associations, and how enteric viruses can contribute to disease aetiologies and be rationalised as targets for interventions. © 2017 The Authors. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Implications of longer term rest from grazing in the sagebrush steppe

    Treesearch

    K.W. Davies; M. Vavra; B. Schultz; N. Rimbey

    2014-01-01

    Longer term grazing rest has occurred or been proposed in large portions of the sagebrush steppe based on the assumption that it will improve ecosystem properties. However, information regarding the influence of longer term rest from grazing is limited and has not been summarized. We synthesized the scientific literature on long-term rest in the sagebrush steppe to...

  12. Implications of longer term rest from grazing in the sagebrush steppe

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Longer term grazing rest has occurred or been proposed in large portions of the sagebrush steppe based on the assumption that it will improve ecosystem properties. However, information regarding the influence of longer term rest is limited and has not been summarized. We synthesized the literature o...

  13. Pathogenesis of intestinal cryptosporidiosis in conventional and gnotobiotic piglets.

    PubMed

    Vítovec, J; Koudela, B

    1992-06-01

    The pathogenesis of intestinal cryptosporidiosis was studied in 52 conventionally reared and 20 gnotobiotically reared piglets by inoculation with different doses of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. The prepatent period of C. parvum in both groups of animals were variable, depending on the number of oocysts administered. The patent period of C. parvum in conventionally reared piglets was 8 or 9 days; in gnotobiotic piglets cryptosporidia were found in feces until Day post infection (DPI) 16, when the last piglet was necropsied. Cryptosporidiosis in conventionally reared piglets is a self-limited diarrheal disease associated with morphological changes within the intestine. The most severe lesion was seen in the posterior jejunum and ileum from DPI 3 to DPI 7, and consisted of villous atrophy, crypt hyperplasia and inflammatory infiltration in the lamina propria. In gnotobiotic piglets cryptosporidia induced severe enterocolitis which occurred at least until DPI 16. The characteristics of enteric lesions were similar to those found in conventionally reared piglets. Intestinal cryptosporidiosis in both groups of animals shifted in the course of infection in the caudal direction and terminated in the large intestine. Examination by scanning electron microscope showed that infected absorptive cells had thicker and longer microvilli than those on non-infected cells; neighboring non-infected cells were hypertrophic, bulbously protuberant with minute microvilli with no distinct intercellular borders. Numerous cryptosporidia in the heterotopic glandular epithelium in the submucosa of cecum and colon on DPI 9 and 10 were found. No differences in the location and degree of cryptosporidial infection between colostrum-fed and colostrum-deprived conventionally reared piglets were found. Sow's colostrum does not appear to protect piglets from C. parvum infection. The role of intestinal microflora in the pathogenesis of cryptosporidiosis in piglets is discussed.

  14. Murine intestinal antibody response to heterologous rotavirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, A A; Groene, W S; Cheng, E H; Shaw, R D

    1991-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most important worldwide cause of severe gastroenteritis. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the design of a vaccine that will prevent disease, but development of a more effective vaccine strategy may require progress in the understanding of the mucosal immune response to replicating viral antigens. In this article, we report the characterization of the intestinal antibody response of a murine model to heterologous infection with the rhesus rotavirus vaccine strain. We have adapted the enzyme-linked immunospot assay to measure this response without the difficulties associated with measurement of antibodies in intestinal contents or the artifacts associated with culturing of lymphocytes. The predominant response in terms of antibody-secreting cells (ASC) is seen in the small intestine lamina propria, which can be measured within 4 days of infection, peaks 3 weeks after infection, and remains near that level for longer than 8 weeks. The magnitude of the immunoglobulin A (IgA) cell response is approximately 10 times greater than the intestinal IgG cell response, and IgM cells are rare. Virus-specific ASC constitute approximately 50% of all ASC in the gut at the peak of the virus-specific response. This response is considerably greater than responses to nonreplicating mucosal antigens measured by similar techniques. Enteral infection engenders minimal virus-specific ASC response in the spleen. Rhesus rotavirus-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and neutralization assays of serum and intestinal contents did not correlate with virus-specific ASC response. Images PMID:1761691

  15. PATTERNS OF PERSISTENT GENITAL HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTION AMONG WOMEN WORLDWIDE: A LITERATURE REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Rositch, Anne F.; Koshiol, Jill; Hudgens, Michael; Razzaghi, Hilda; Backes, Danielle M.; Pimenta, Jeanne M.; Franco, Eduardo L.; Poole, Charles; Smith, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    Persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection is the strongest risk factor for high-grade cervical precancer. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of HPV persistence patterns worldwide. Medline and ISI Web of Science were searched through January 1, 2010 for articles estimating HPV persistence or duration of detection. Descriptive and meta-regression techniques were used to summarize variability and the influence of study definitions and characteristics on duration and persistence of cervical HPV infections in women. Among 86 studies providing data on over 100,000 women, 73% defined persistence as HPV positivity at a minimum of two time points. Persistence varied notably across studies and was largely mediated by study region and HPV type, with HPV-16, 31, 33 and 52 being most persistent. Weighted median duration of any-HPV detection was 9.8 months. HR-HPV (9.3 months) persisted longer than low-risk HPV (8.4 months), and HPV-16 (12.4 months) persisted longer than HPV-18 (9.8 months). Among populations of HPV positive women with normal cytology, the median duration of any-HPV detection was 11.5 and HR-HPV detection was10.9 months. In conclusion, we estimated that approximately half of HPV infections persist past 6–12 months. Repeat HPV testing at 12 month intervals could identify women at increased risk of high-grade cervical precancer due to persistent HPV infections. PMID:22961444

  16. Pulmonary exposure of mice to engineered pseudomonads influences intestinal microbiota populations

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.E.; Kohan, M.J.; Creason, J.P.; Claxton, L.D. . Health Effects Research Lab.)

    1993-09-01

    In this study, a mouse model was used to evaluate indirect effects of pulmonary exposure to representative biotechnology agents (Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain AC869 and Pseudomonas cepacia strain AC1100) selected for their ability to degrade hazardous chemicals. CD-1[reg sign] mice were challenged intranasally with approximately 10[sup 3] or 10[sup 7] colony-forming units (cfu) of strain AC869 or 10[sup 8] cfu of strain AC1100. At time intervals, clearance of the microorganisms and effects on resident microbiota were determined. When the low (10[sup 3] cfu) dose was administered, strain AC869 was not recovered from the small intestine but was detectable in the cecum and lungs 3 h after treatment and persisted in the nasal cavity intermittently for 14 d. Treatment of animals with 10[sup 7] cfu of strain AC869 resulted in detection 14 d following treatment. Strain AC869 challenge modified the small intestinal anaerobe count and cecal obligately anaerobic gram-negative rods (OAGNR) and lactobacilli. Following exposure, Pseudomonas cepacia strain AC1100 persisted in the lungs for 7 d and was recovered from the small intestine, cecum, and nasal cavity 2 d following treatment. Strain AC1100 treatment impacted the small intestinal anaerobe count, OAGNR counts, and reduced lactobacilli numbers. Strain AC1100 also altered the cecal OAGNR and lactobacilli. Therefore, pulmonary treatment of mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa or cepacia affects the balance of the protective intestinal microbiota, which may cause further negative health effects.

  17. Impact of Intestinal Microbiota on Intestinal Luminal Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Kibe, Ryoko; Ooga, Takushi; Aiba, Yuji; Kurihara, Shin; Sawaki, Emiko; Koga, Yasuhiro; Benno, Yoshimi

    2012-01-01

    Low–molecular-weight metabolites produced by intestinal microbiota play a direct role in health and disease. In this study, we analyzed the colonic luminal metabolome using capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry with time-of-flight (CE-TOFMS) —a novel technique for analyzing and differentially displaying metabolic profiles— in order to clarify the metabolite profiles in the intestinal lumen. CE-TOFMS identified 179 metabolites from the colonic luminal metabolome and 48 metabolites were present in significantly higher concentrations and/or incidence in the germ-free (GF) mice than in the Ex-GF mice (p < 0.05), 77 metabolites were present in significantly lower concentrations and/or incidence in the GF mice than in the Ex-GF mice (p < 0.05), and 56 metabolites showed no differences in the concentration or incidence between GF and Ex-GF mice. These indicate that intestinal microbiota highly influenced the colonic luminal metabolome and a comprehensive understanding of intestinal luminal metabolome is critical for clarifying host-intestinal bacterial interactions. PMID:22724057

  18. Intestinal microbiota and overweight.

    PubMed

    Lyra, A; Lahtinen, S; Tiihonen, K; Ouwehand, A C

    2010-11-01

    The microbes in our gut can influence our weight by providing us with energy through the degradation of nondigestable carbohydrates and by affecting the cellular energy status of liver and muscle cells and the accumulation of lipids in adipose tissue. Thus, it is not surprising that in several studies the gastrointestinal microbiota of overweight and obese subjects has been found to differ from that of lean subjects. The initial findings linked obesity with proportionally decreased levels of the phylum Bacteroidetes and increased levels of the phylum Firmicutes. Later, several studies have assessed the association between overweight or obesity and the gastrointestinal microbiota, applying an array of molecular methods targeting the microbiota as a whole or specific bacterial groups or species within. However, at present it is difficult to draw conclusions on which of the observed microbiota alterations are relevant; essentially all of the bacterial groups that have been studied in more than one trial have given contradictory results in regard to their association with weight. Some of these discrepancies can result from methodological issues and some from the nature of the gastrointestinal microbiota, which is an extremely complex and dynamic microbial ecosystem with high subject specificity. In addition, selecting subjects purely based on weight may result in a largely heterogeneous group with several potentially confounding factors. While it may be premature to conclude which specific groups of bacteria are prominent in the intestinal tract of overweight and obese subjects, it appears clear that microbes contribute to weight gain and related health issues, such as the metabolic syndrome and type II diabetes. Therefore, it is important to continue to search for common microbial markers and predictors of obesity, and to study how these may be modulated with probiotics and prebiotics to promote health.

  19. Persistence, resistance, resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsadka, Maayan

    form of musical consumption and experience. The three pieces draw lines connecting different aspects of persistence, resistance, and resonance.

  20. Rotavirus Infection Increases Intestinal Motility but Not Permeability at the Onset of Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Istrate, Claudia; Hagbom, Marie; Vikström, Elena; Magnusson, Karl-Eric

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The disease mechanisms associated with onset and secondary effects of rotavirus (RV) diarrhea remain to be determined and may not be identical. In this study, we investigated whether onset of RV diarrhea is associated with increased intestinal permeability and/or motility. To study the transit time, fluorescent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran was given to RV-infected adult and infant mice. Intestinal motility was also studied with an opioid receptor agonist (loperamide) and a muscarinic receptor antagonist (atropine). To investigate whether RV increases permeability at the onset of diarrhea, fluorescent 4- and 10-kDa dextran doses were given to infected and noninfected mice, and fluorescence intensity was measured subsequently in serum. RV increased transit time in infant mice. Increased motility was detected at 24 h postinfection (h p.i.) and persisted up to 72 h p.i in pups. Both loperamide and atropine decreased intestinal motility and attenuated diarrhea. Analysis of passage of fluorescent dextran from the intestine into serum indicated unaffected intestinal permeability at the onset of diarrhea (24 to 48 h p.i.). We show that RV-induced diarrhea is associated with increased intestinal motility via an activation of the myenteric nerve plexus, which in turn stimulates muscarinic receptors on intestinal smooth muscles. IMPORTANCE We show that RV-infected mice have increased intestinal motility at the onset of diarrhea, and that this is not associated with increased intestinal permeability. These new observations will contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in RV diarrhea. PMID:24371070

  1. Energy landscapes and persistent minima

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Joanne M.; Wales, David J.; Mazauric, Dorian; Cazals, Frédéric

    2016-02-07

    We consider a coarse-graining of high-dimensional potential energy landscapes based upon persistences, which correspond to lowest barrier heights to lower-energy minima. Persistences can be calculated efficiently for local minima in kinetic transition networks that are based on stationary points of the prevailing energy landscape. The networks studied here represent peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, an atomic cluster, and a glassy system. Minima with high persistence values are likely to represent some form of alternative structural morphology, which, if appreciably populated at the prevailing temperature, could compete with the global minimum (defined as infinitely persistent). Threshold values on persistences (and in some cases equilibrium occupation probabilities) have therefore been used in this work to select subsets of minima, which were then analysed to see how well they can represent features of the full network. Simplified disconnectivity graphs showing only the selected minima can convey the funnelling (including any multiple-funnel) characteristics of the corresponding full graphs. The effect of the choice of persistence threshold on the reduced disconnectivity graphs was considered for a system with a hierarchical, glassy landscape. Sets of persistent minima were also found to be useful in comparing networks for the same system sampled under different conditions, using minimum oriented spanning forests.

  2. Is apolipoprotein A-IV rate limiting in the intestinal transport and absorption of triglyceride?

    PubMed

    Kohan, Alison B; Wang, Fei; Li, Xiaoming; Vandersall, Abbey E; Huesman, Sarah; Xu, Min; Yang, Qing; Lou, Danwen; Tso, Patrick

    2013-06-15

    Apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA-IV) is synthesized by the intestine and secreted when dietary fat is absorbed and transported into lymph associated with chylomicrons. We have recently demonstrated that loss of apoA-IV increases chylomicron size and delays its clearance from the blood. There is still uncertainty, however, about the precise role of apoA-IV on the transport of dietary fat from the intestine into the lymph. ApoA-IV knockout (KO) mice do not have a gross defect in dietary lipid absorption, as measured by oral fat tolerance and fecal fat measurements. Here, using the in vivo lymph fistula mouse model, we show that the cumulative secretion of triglyceride (TG) into lymph in apoA-IV KO mice is very similar to that of wild-type (WT) mice. However, the apoA-IV KO mice do have subtle changes in TG accumulation in the intestinal mucosa during a 6-h continuous, but not bolus, infusion of lipid. There are no changes in the ratio of esterified to free fatty acids in the intestinal mucosa of the apoA-IV KO, however. When we extended these findings, by giving a higher dose of lipid (6 μmol/h) and for a longer infusion period (8 h), we found no effect of apoA-IV KO on intestinal TG absorption. This higher lipid infusion most certainly stresses the intestine, as we see a drastically lower absorption of TG (in both WT and KO mice); however, the loss of A-IV does not exacerbate this effect. This supports our hypothesis that apoA-IV is not required for TG absorption in the intestine. Our data suggest that the mechanisms by which the apoA-IV KO intestine responds to intestinal lipid may not be different from their WT counterparts. We conclude that apoA-IV is not required for normal lymphatic transport of TG.

  3. Incidence and Risk Factors of Persistent Hyperparathyroidism After Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nakai, K; Fujii, H; Ishimura, T; Fujisawa, M; Nishi, S

    Persistent hyperparathyroidism after kidney transplantation is related to graft function, but pre-transplantation risk factors of persistent hyperparathyroidism have not been evaluated in detail. We enrolled 86 patients who had undergone kidney transplantation between 2008 and 2014. Nine patients showed persistent hyperparathyroidism characterized by the following: 1) serum parathyroid hormone levels >65 pg/mL and serum calcium levels >10.5 mg/dL at 1 year after kidney transplantation; 2) parathyroidectomy after kidney transplantation; and 3) reintroduction of cinacalcet after kidney transplantation. Compared with other patients, these 9 patients had significantly longer duration of dialysis therapy (186 ± 74 mo vs 57 ± 78 mo) and more frequent treatment with cinacalcet during dialysis (89% vs 12%). Multivariate analysis showed that dialysis vintage, calcium phosphate products, and cinacalcet use before kidney transplantation were independent risk factors of persistent hyperparathyroidism after kidney transplantation. A receiver operating characteristic curve showed 72 months as the cutoff value of dialysis vintage and 55 as the cutoff value of calcium phosphate products. In conclusion, dialysis vintage >6 years, calcium phosphate products >55 (mg/dL)(2), and cinacalcet use before kidney transplantation are strong predictors of persistent hyperparathyroidism. High-risk patients should be evaluated for parathyroid enlargement, and parathyroidectomy must be considered before kidney transplantation.

  4. No Evidence for Prolonged Visible Persistence in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Grimsen, Cathleen; Brand, Andreas; Fahle, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Background Temporal visual processing is strongly deteriorated in patients with schizophrenia. For example, the interval required between a visual stimulus and a subsequent mask has to be much longer in schizophrenic patients than in healthy controls. We investigated whether this deficit in temporal resolution is accompanied by prolonged visual persistence and/or deficient temporal precision (temporal asynchrony perception). Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated visual persistence in three experiments. In the first, measuring temporal processing by so-called backward masking, prolonged visible persistence is supposed to decrease performance. In the second experiment, requiring temporal integration, prolonged persistence is supposed to improve performance. In the third experiment, we investigated asynchrony detection, as another measure of temporal resolution. Eighteen patients with schizophrenia and 15 healthy controls participated. Asynchrony detection was intact in the patients. However, patients' performance was inferior compared to healthy controls in the first two experiments. Hence, temporal processing in schizophrenic patients is indeed significantly impaired but this impairment is not caused by prolonged temporal integration. Conclusions/Significance Our results argue against a generally prolonged visual persistence in patients with schizophrenia. Together with the preserved ability of patients, to detect temporal asynchronies in permanently presented stimuli, the results indicate a more specific deficit in temporal processing of schizophrenic patients. PMID:23536838

  5. The persistence of human scalp hair on clothing fabrics.

    PubMed

    Dachs, J; McNaught, I J; Robertson, J

    2003-12-17

    This study reports the persistence behaviour of human scalp hairs under a number of different circumstances. The effects of artificial dyeing of hairs, the presence or absence of roots and different types of fabrics on the persistence of hair on a variety of garments were investigated. The garments were made from cotton, polycotton, cotton/acrylic, polyester and wool. The results indicated that neither artificial dyes nor the presence or absence of roots had statistically significant effects on the persistence of hair. In contrast, the type of fabric had a major impact and it was found that, generally, hairs persist longer on rougher fabrics. The rate of loss of hairs from non-woollen fabrics during normal wear was found to follow an exponential decay curve. In contrast, the rate of loss from the woollen garments was quite linear, indicating a constant, even loss, and thus suggests that a different process is involved in the persistence of hairs on woollen garments from that on non-woollen garments. The speed at which hair was lost from fabrics decreased in the order polyester, cotton/acrylic, polycotton, cotton, smooth wool, rough wool, so that wool gives the best chance of recovering samples of hair. Due to the uniqueness of each case, it is advised that caution be used when making any interpretations and before drawing any conclusions.

  6. [MOLECULAR ASPECTS OF BRUCELLA PERSISTENCE].

    PubMed

    Kulakov Yu K

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a dangerous zoonotic disease of animals and humans caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella, which are able to survive, multiply, and persist in host cells. The review is devoted to the Brucella species persistence connected to the molecular mechanisms of escape from innate and adaptive immunity of the host and active interaction of effector proteins of the type IV secretion system with the host's signaling pathways. Understanding of the molecular mechanisms used by Brucella for the intracellular persistence in the host organism can allow us to develop new and effective means for the prevention and treatment of chronic brucellosis infection.

  7. Small intestinal physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Sarna, S K; Otterson, M F

    1989-06-01

    The small intestine, like the rest of the gastrointestinal tract, is an intelligent organ. It generates a wide variety of motor patterns to meet motility requirements in different situations. Its basic motor function after a meal is to mix the chyme with exocrine and intestinal secretions, agitate its contents to uniformly and evenly expose them to the mucosal surface, and to propel them distally at a rate that allows optimal absorption of food components, and reabsorption of bile. Most of these functions are performed by individual phasic contractions. In humans, the phasic contractions are largely disorganized in time and space. These contractions may cause mixing and agitation of luminal contents with slow distal propulsion. Occasionally, an individual contraction of large amplitude and long duration migrates over several centimeters and may rapidly propel the contents over this distance. In general, the spatial and temporal relationships of individual phasic contractions become less organized distally, resulting in a slower propulsion rate in the distal small intestine than in the proximal small intestine. The migrating clustered contractions generated after a meal may also be propulsive, but because of their unpredictable and irregular occurrence, their precise role in postprandial propulsion is incompletely understood. Rapidly migrating contractions may occur when the electrical control activity is obliterated by pharmacologic agents or during parasitic infections. Their effects on motility are not known yet. Between meals, when digestion is complete, the small intestine generates migrating motor complexes that help keep the small intestine clean by dislodging debris from the villi and dumping them into the colon. This may prevent decay of these materials in the small intestine and limit their contribution to bacterial overgrowth. Giant migrating contractions may perform a similar function in the distal small intestine as well as return any refluxed fecal

  8. Intestinal dysfunction associated with acute thoracolumbar fractures.

    PubMed

    Peschiera, J L; Beerman, S P

    1990-03-01

    The frequency of intestinal dysfunction, particularly intestinal ileus, among patients with acute thoracolumbar fractures and no neurologic compromise was assessed. We reviewed the medical records of 70 patients who met specific criteria. Only four (6%) of these patients developed intestinal dysfunction, manifested by vomiting, abdominal distention, diminished bowel sounds, or an intestinal ileus documented by an abdominal roentgenogram. Conservative initial nutritional management of the patients did not reduce the incidence of intestinal dysfunction. This study suggests that patients with acute thoracolumbar fractures and no neurologic compromise are not at substantial risk of intestinal dysfunction and that nasogastric suction and restriction of oral intake are unnecessary in the initial management of these patients.

  9. Intestinal ischemia in neonates and children.

    PubMed

    Jeican, Ionuţ Isaia; Ichim, Gabriela; Gheban, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the intestinal ischemia theme on newborn and children. The intestinal ischemia may be either acute - intestinal infarction (by vascular obstruction or by reduced mesenteric blood flow besides the occlusive mechanism), either chronic. In neonates, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by aortic thrombosis, volvulus or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. In children, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by fibromuscular dysplasia, volvulus, abdominal compartment syndrome, Burkitt lymphoma, dermatomyositis (by vascular obstruction) or familial dysautonomia, Addison's disease, situs inversus abdominus (intraoperative), burns, chemotherapy administration (by nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia). Chronic intestinal ischemia is a rare condition in pediatrics and can be seen in abdominal aortic coarctation or hypoplasia, idiopathic infantile arterial calcinosis.

  10. [Intestinal carcinoid tumour: Case report].

    PubMed

    Mussan-Chelminsky, Gil; Vidal-González, Pablo; Núñez-García, Edgar; Valencia-García, Luis César; Márquez-Ugalde, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoid of the small intestine, is a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor that rarely presents with clinical signs. This tumour can be associated with other conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, presenting a wide range of symptoms. In some cases they have an aggressive and highly symptomatic behaviour; thus, clinical suspicion must be high to make an early diagnosis. A 60 year-old male patient with Crohn's disease and gastrointestinal symptoms attributed to this disease within the last year. He presented with intestinal obstruction initially treated with conservative management with no improvement. Exploratory laparotomy was performed finding a mesenteric tumour that caused the bowel obstruction. Bowel resection with primary anastomosis was performed. The pathology report showed an intestinal carcinoid tumour with lymph node metastases. The patient recovered well, and was discharged without complications to continue medical treatment and follow-up by the Oncology department. In almost 42% of the cases, the most common site of carcinoid tumours is the small intestine, and of these, 41% are presented as locoregional disease. Patients with Crohn's disease present a higher incidence. In these cases, the most common presentation is an acute intestinal obstruction (90%). Surgery is usually curative, and follow up is important as the symptoms of Crohn's disease can hide any recurrence. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Claudin-related intestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Barmeyer, Christian; Schulzke, Jörg D; Fromm, Michael

    2015-06-01

    With up to 200 m(2) the human intestine is the organ with the largest absorptive surface of the body. It is lined by a single layer of epithelial cells that separates the host from the environment. The intestinal epithelium provides both, selective absorption of nutrients, ions, and water but also a highly effective barrier function which includes the first line of defense against environmental antigens. The paracellular part of this barrier function is provided by tight junction (TJ) proteins, especially the large family of claudins. Changes in abundance or molecular structure of claudins can generally result in three typical effects, (i) decreased absorptive passage, (ii) increased secretory passage of small solutes and water causing leak flux diarrhea and (iii) increased absorptive passage of macromolecules which may induce inflammatory processes. Several intestinal diseases are associated with such changes that can result in intestinal inflammation and symptoms like weight loss, abdominal pain or diarrhea. This review summarizes our current knowledge on barrier dysfunction and claudin dysregulation in several intestinal diseases gastroenterologists are often faced with, like inflammatory bowel disease, microscopic colitis, celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, gallstones and infectious diseases like HIV enteropathy, Campylobacter jejuni and Clostridium perfringens infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Therapeutic modulation of intestinal dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Alan W; Lawley, Trevor D

    2013-03-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract is home to an extremely numerous and diverse collection of microbes, collectively termed the "intestinal microbiota". This microbiota is considered to play a number of key roles in the maintenance of host health, including aiding digestion of otherwise indigestible dietary compounds, synthesis of vitamins and other beneficial metabolites, immune system regulation and enhanced resistance against colonisation by pathogenic microorganisms. Conversely, the intestinal microbiota is also a potent source of antigens and potentially harmful compounds. In health, humans can therefore be considered to exist in a state of natural balance with their microbial inhabitants. A shift in the balance of microbiota composition such that it may become deleterious to host health is termed "dysbiosis". Dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been implicated in numerous disorders, ranging from intestinal maladies such as inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer to disorders with more systemic effects such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome and atopy. Given the far reaching influence of the intestinal microbiota on human health a clear future goal must be to develop reliable means to alter the composition of the microbiota and restore a healthy balance of microbial species. While it is clear that much fundamental research remains to be done, potentially important therapeutic options include narrow spectrum antibiotics, novel probiotics, dietary interventions and more radical techniques such as faecal transplantation, all of which aim to suppress clinical dysbiosis, restore intestinal microbiota diversity and improve host health.

  13. Acquired causes of intestinal malabsorption.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, F

    2016-04-01

    This review focuses on the acquired causes, diagnosis, and treatment of intestinal malabsorption. Intestinal absorption is a complex process that depends on many variables, including the digestion of nutrients within the intestinal lumen, the absorptive surface of the small intestine, the membrane transport systems, and the epithelial absorptive enzymes. Acquired causes of malabsorption are classified by focussing on the three phases of digestion and absorption: 1) luminal/digestive phase, 2) mucosal/absorptive phase, and 3) transport phase. Most acquired diseases affect the luminal/digestive phase. These include short bowel syndrome, extensive small bowel inflammation, motility disorders, and deficiencies of digestive enzymes or bile salts. Diagnosis depends on symptoms, physical examination, and blood and stool tests. There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of malabsorption. Further testing should be based on the specific clinical context and the suspected underlying disease. Therapy is directed at nutritional support by enteral or parenteral feeding and screening for and supplementation of deficiencies in vitamins and minerals. Early enteral feeding is important for intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome. Medicinal treatment options for diarrhoea in malabsorption include loperamide, codeine, cholestyramine, or antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Intestinal Microbiota Metabolism and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tian-Xing; Niu, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Shu-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This review aimed to summarize the relationship between intestinal microbiota metabolism and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to propose a novel CVD therapeutic target. Data Sources: This study was based on data obtained from PubMed and EMBASE up to June 30, 2015. Articles were selected using the following search terms: “Intestinal microbiota”, “trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)”, “trimethylamine (TMA)”, “cardiovascular”, and “atherosclerosis”. Study Selection: Studies were eligible if they present information on intestinal microbiota metabolism and atherosclerosis. Studies on TMA-containing nutrients were also included. Results: A new CVD risk factor, TMAO, was recently identified. It has been observed that several TMA-containing compounds may be catabolized by specific intestinal microbiota, resulting in TMA release. TMA is subsequently converted to TMAO in the liver. Several preliminary studies have linked TMAO to CVD, particularly atherosclerosis; however, the details of this relationship remain unclear. Conclusions: Intestinal microbiota metabolism is associated with atherosclerosis and may represent a promising therapeutic target with respect to CVD management. PMID:26481750

  15. Human intestinal capillariasis in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Saichua, Prasert; Nithikathkul, Choosak; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt and Taiwan; major outbreaks have occurred in the Philippines and Thailand. This article reviews the epidemiology, history and sources of C. philippinensis infection in Thailand. The annual epidemiological surveillance reports indicated that 82 accumulated cases of intestinal capillariasis were found in Thailand from 1994-2006. That made Thailand a Capillaria-prevalent area. Sisaket, in northeast Thailand, was the first province which has reported intestinal capillariasis. Moreover, Buri Ram presented a high prevalence of intestinal capillariasis, totaling 24 cases from 1994-2006. About half of all cases have consumed raw or undercooked fish. However, even if the numbers of the intestinal capillariasis cases in Thailand is reduced, C. philippinensis infection cases are still reported. The improvement of personal hygiene, specifically avoiding consumption of undercooked fish and promoting a health education campaign are required. These strategies may minimize or eliminate C. philippinensis infection in Thailand. PMID:18203280

  16. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction].

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M T; Solís Herruzo, J A

    2007-02-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a syndrome characterized by the presence of recurrent episodes of clinical intestinal obstruction in the absence of obstructive lesions. Although this syndrome is rare, it causes a high morbidity. It is caused by a disturbance of the intestinal motility, that results in a failure of the progression of the intestinal content. Basically, the failure of the intestinal motility is a consequence of muscular disorder, neurological disorder or both. Usually, CIPO is secondary to other systemic disease; however, in the last years, many cases of primary CIPO have been described. The use of new manometric tecniques and specific histological procedures have allowed to clarify the pathogenesis of some of these entities including mitochondrial diseases and paraneoplasic syndromes. Clinical manifestations of CIPO are diverse, depending on the location and extension of the motility disorder. As the diagnosis of this disease is usually not an easy task, patients frecuently undergo unnecesary surgical interventions, are diagnosed of psyquiatric disorders, or the correct diagnosis is delayed several years after the first symptoms arise. The aims of the treatment are to maintain the nutritional condition and to improve symptoms using nutritional measures, drugs or, eventually, endoscopical or surgical procedures.

  17. Intestinal circulation during inhalation anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Tverskoy, M.; Gelman, S.; Fowler, K.C.; Bradley, E.L.

    1985-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of inhalational agents on the intestinal circulation in an isolated loop preparation. Sixty dogs were studied, using three intestinal segments from each dog. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mmHg. A mixture of /sub 86/Rb and 9-microns spheres labeled with /sup 141/Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A very strong and significant correlation was found between rubidium clearance and microsphere entrapment (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001). Nitrous oxide anesthesia was accompanied by a higher vascular resistance (VR), lower flow (F), rubidium clearance (Cl-Rb), and microspheres entrapment (Cl-Sph) than pentobarbital anesthesia, indicating that the vascular bed in the intestinal segment was constricted and flow (total and nutritive) decreased. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane anesthesia were accompanied by a much lower arteriovenous oxygen content difference (AVDO/sub 2/) and oxygen uptake than pentobarbital or nitrous oxide. Compared with pentobarbital, enflurane anesthesia was not accompanied by marked differences in VR, F, Cl-Rb, and Cl-Sph; halothane at 2 MAC decreased VR and increased F and Cl-Rb while isoflurane increased VR and decreased F. alpha-Adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine (1 mg . kg-1) abolished isoflurane-induced vasoconstriction, suggesting that the increase in VR was mediated via circulating catecholamines.

  18. Prebiotics in Chronic Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Looijer–van Langen, Mirjam A.C.; Dieleman, Levinus A.

    2016-01-01

    Prebiotics are nondigestible fermentable fibers that are reported to have health benefits for the host. Older as well as more recent studies show beneficial effects in experimental colitis and lately also in human inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and chronic pouchitis. In this review we give an overview of the benefits of prebiotics in rodent IBD models and in IBD patients and discuss their possible protective mechanisms. Commensal intestinal bacteria induce and perpetuate chronic intestinal inflammation, whereas others are protective. However, most of the current medications are directed against the exaggerated proinflammatory immune response of the host, some of them toxic and costly. Feeding prebiotics changes the composition of the intestinal microflora toward more protective intestinal bacteria and alters systemic and mucosal immune responses of the host. Therapy for IBD targeting intestinal bacteria and their function is just emerging. Prebiotics have the promise to be relatively safe, inexpensive, and easy to administer. Unraveling their protective mechanisms will help to develop rational applications of prebiotics. However, the initial promising results with dietary prebiotics in preclinical trials as well as small studies in human IBD will need to be confirmed in large randomized controlled clinical trials. PMID:18831524

  19. Mechanisms of intestinal inflammation and development of associated cancers: Lessons learned from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Westbrook, Aya M.; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately 1/5th of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the intestinal lumen, in combination with loss of epithelial barrier function, and dysfunction and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. Transcriptional changes in this environment leading to cell survival, hyperplasia, promotion of angiogenesis, persistent DNA damage, or insufficient repair of DNA damage due to an excess of proinflammatory mediators are then thought to lead to sustained malignant transformation. With regards

  20. Chronic intestinal ischaemia: measurement of the total splanchnic blood flow.

    PubMed

    Zacho, Helle D

    2013-04-01

    A redundant collateral network between the intestinal arteries is present at all times. In case of ischaemia in the gastrointestinal tract, the collateral blood supply can develop further, thus accommodating the demand for oxygen even in the presence of significant stenosis or occlusion of the intestinal arteries without clinical symptoms of intestinal ischaemia. Symptoms of ischemia develop when the genuine and collateral blood supply no longer can accommodate the need for oxygen. Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of obliteration in the intestinal arteries. In chronic intestinal ischaemia (CII), the fasting splanchnic blood flow (SBF) is sufficient, but the postprandial increase in SBF is inadequate and abdominal pain will therefore develop in relation to food intake causing the patient to eat smaller meals at larger intervals with a resulting weight loss. Traditionally, the CII-diagnosis has exclusively been based upon morphology (angiography) of the intestinal arteries; however, substantial discrepancies between CII-symptoms and the presence of atherosclerosis/stenosis in the intestinal arteries have been described repeatedly in the literature impeding the diagnosis of CII. This PhD thesis explores a method to determine the total SBF and its potential use as a diagnostic tool in patients suspected to suffer from CII. The SBF can be measured using a continuous infusion of a tracer and catheterisation of a hepatic vein and an artery. By measuring the SBF before and after a standard meal it is possible to assess the ability or inability to enhance the SBF and thereby diagnosing CII. In Study I, measurement of SBF was tested against angiography in a group of patients suspected to suffer from CII due to pain and weight loss. A very good agreement between the postprandial increase in SBF and angiography was found. The method was validated against a well-established method independent of the hepatic extraction of tracer using pAH in a porcine model (study II

  1. Management of persistent anal canal carcinoma after combined-modality therapy: a clinical review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Anal canal carcinoma is a rare gastro-intestinal cancer. Radiochemotherapy is the recommended primary treatment for patients with non-metastatic carcinoma; surgery is generally reserved for persistent or recurrent disease. Follow-up and surveillance after primary treatment is paramount to classify patients in those with complete remission, persistent or progressive disease. Locally persistent disease represents a clinically significant problem and its management remains subject of some controversy. The aim of this systematic review is to summarise recommendations for the primary treatment of anal canal carcinoma, to focus on the optimal time to consider residual disease as genuine persistence to proceed with salvage treatment, and to discern how this analysis might inform future clinical trials in management in this class of patients. PMID:24472223

  2. Prenatal diagnosis of persistent cloaca.

    PubMed

    Suzumori, Nobuhiro; Obayashi, Shintaro; Hattori, Yukio; Kaneko, Saori; Suzuki, Yoshikatsu; Sugiura-Ogasawara, Mayumi

    2009-09-01

    We report four cases of persistent cloaca diagnosed at 32-33 weeks of gestation. In cases of persistent cloaca, serial prenatal ultrasonography shows transient fetal ascites, enlarged cystic structures arising from the fetal pelvis. Our four cases of persistent cloaca were diagnosed prenatally. Persistent cloaca should be considered in any female fetus presenting with hydronephrosis and a large cystic lesion arising from the pelvis as assessed by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Neither pulmonary hypoplasia nor severe oligohydramnios were found in any of our four cases, and they each had a good prognosis. Prenatal diagnosis allows time for parental counseling and delivery planning at a tertiary care center for neonatal intensive care and pediatric surgery.

  3. Immunomodulation by Persistent Organic Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are widely distnbuted in the environment, are resistant to degradation, and increase in concentration (biomagnify) in the food chain. Concentrations in apical predators may be tens to hundreds of times greater than concentrations in their pref...

  4. Immunomodulation by Persistent Organic Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are widely distnbuted in the environment, are resistant to degradation, and increase in concentration (biomagnify) in the food chain. Concentrations in apical predators may be tens to hundreds of times greater than concentrations in their pref...

  5. Object-oriented Persistent Homology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-15

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  6. Object-oriented Persistent Homology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  7. Object-oriented persistent homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  8. Intestinal mycoplasma in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Roediger, W E W

    2004-01-01

    Intestinal diversion with reconnection in active Crohn's disease (CD) indicates that luminal contents or bacteria contribute to the formation of CD lesions. Fluorescent staining for mycoplasma in freshly resected Crohn's tissue and electron microscopy reveal intracellular organisms akin to mycoplasma. Historically, tissue culture of CD has shown mycoplasma described as contaminants. Mycoplasma are surface epithelial parasites requiring exogenous cholesterol for membrane stability and cell entry. PCR of intestinal tissue has shown Mycoplasma pneumoniae to be detectable more significantly in CD. Oral M. iowae in experimental poultry localizes to the distal small bowel and colon. Hypothetically, lipopeptides of mycoplasmal membranes are proposed to cause chronicity and stronger immune responses than by other bacteria. 'Intestinal' mycoplasmas, from a number of observations, deserve consideration as organisms mediating inflammation of acute and chronic CD.

  9. The Intestinal Absorption of Folates

    PubMed Central

    Visentin, Michele; Diop-Bove, Ndeye; Zhao, Rongbao; Goldman, I. David

    2014-01-01

    The properties of intestinal folate absorption were documented decades ago. However, it was only recently that the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) was identified and its critical role in folate transport across the apical brush-border membrane of the proximal small intestine established by the loss-of-function mutations identified in the PCFT gene in subjects with hereditary folate malabsorption and, more recently, by the Pcft-null mouse. This article reviews the current understanding of the properties of PCFT-mediated transport and how they differ from those of the reduced folate carrier. Other processes that contribute to the transport of folates across the enterocyte, along with the contribution of the enterohepatic circulation, are considered. Important unresolved issues are addressed, including the mechanism of intestinal folate absorption in the absence of PCFT and regulation of PCFT gene expression. The impact of a variety of ions, organic molecules, and drugs on PCFT-mediated folate transport is described. PMID:24512081

  10. [Intestinal cystic duplication. Case report].

    PubMed

    Herranz Barbero, Ana; Prat Ortells, Jordi; Muñoz Fernández, M Elena; Castañón García-Alix, Montserrat; Figueras Aloy, Josep

    2017-08-01

    Intestinal cystic duplications are rare congenital anomalies, with an estimated incidence of approximately 1:4500 autopsies. The etiopathogenesis is uncertain. These duplications are cystic, tubular or diverticular structures lined with gastrointestinal mucosa. They share a common smooth muscle wall with the gastrointestinal tract but usually their lumens do not communicate with each other. Gastric duplication cysts represent 7-9% of the gastrointestinal tract duplication. They can be diagnosed prenatally by fetal ultrasound; magnetic resonance imaging characterizes the cyst and excludes other malformations. Postnatal ultrasound shows a characteristic double walled cyst. Newborns are usually asymptomatic, although nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms, intestinal obstruction due to mass effect, volvulus or infection are described. In asymptomatic patients, clinical follow-up and periodic image controls are recommended. Elective surgical resection is the treatment of choice, using minimally invasive technique whenever possible. A case of prenatally suspected intestinal cystic duplication is presented. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  11. Characterization of moose intestinal glycosphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Miralda Madar; Dedic, Benjamin; Lundholm, Klara; Branzell, Filip Berner; Barone, Angela; Benktander, John; Teneberg, Susann

    2015-08-01

    As a part of a systematic investigation of the species-specific expression of glycosphingolipids, acid and non-acid glycosphingolipids were isolated from three small intestines and one large intestine of the moose (Alces alces). The glycosphingolipids were characterized by binding of monoclonal antibodies, lectins and bacteria in chromatogram binding assays, and by mass spectrometry. The non-acid fractions were complex mixtures, and all had glycosphingolipids belonging to the lacto- and neolactoseries (lactotriaosylceramide, lactotetraosylceramide, neolactotetraosylceramide, Galα3-Le(x) hexaosylceramide, and lacto-neolactohexaosylceramide), globo-series (globotriaosylceramide and globotetraosylceramide), and isogloboseries (isoglobotriaosylceramide). Penta- and heptaglycosylceramides with terminal Galili determinants were also characterized. Furthermore, glycosphingolipids with terminal blood group O determinants (H triaosylceramide, H type 2 pentaosylceramide, H type 1 penta- and heptaosylceramide) were characterized in two of the moose small intestines, and in the one large intestine, while the third small intestine had glycosphingolipids with terminal blood group A determinants (A tetraosylceramide, A type 1 hexa- and octaosylceramide, A dodecaosylceramide). The acid glycosphingolipid fractions of moose small and large intestine contained sulfatide, and the gangliosides GM3, GD3, GD1a, GD1b, and also NeuGc and NeuAc variants of the Sd(a) ganglioside and the sialyl-globopenta/SSEA-4 ganglioside. In humans, the NeuAc-globopenta/SSEA-4 ganglioside is a marker of embryonic and adult stem cells, and is also expressed in several human cancers. This is the first time sialyl-globopentaosylceramide/SSEA-4 has been characterized in a fully differentiated normal tissue, and also the first time NeuGc-globopentaosylceramide has been characterized.

  12. Risk factors for persistent diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Shahid, N S; Sack, D A; Rahman, M; Alam, A N; Rahman, N

    1988-10-22

    With a systematically sampled population of children aged under 5 attending this centre for diarrhoeal disease research during 1983-5 a retrospective analysis of persistent diarrhoea (defined as greater than 14 days' duration) was performed to identify the possible risk factors for this syndrome. Of the 4155 children included in the analysis, 410 (10%) gave a history of persistent diarrhoea. A comparison with children with acute diarrhoea matched for age showed that 11 factors were correlated with persistent diarrhoea, and strongly associated factors were stools with blood or mucus, or both, lower respiratory tract infection, malnutrition, vitamin A deficiency, and antibiotic use before presentation. The peak age was 2 years, and there was no sex difference. Deaths occurred more often in the group with persistent diarrhoea. Although Shigella spp, Campylobacter jejuni, and Giardia lamblia were frequently identified, their rates of isolation were not significantly higher among patients with persistent diarrhoea. No seasonal variation was observed in the rates of persistent diarrhoea. Although the introduction of family food to the diet was associated with higher rates, this factor was difficult to separate from the age dependent risks.

  13. Risk factors for persistent diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, N. S.; Sack, D. A.; Rahman, M.; Alam, A. N.; Rahman, N.

    1988-01-01

    With a systematically sampled population of children aged under 5 attending this centre for diarrhoeal disease research during 1983-5 a retrospective analysis of persistent diarrhoea (defined as greater than 14 days' duration) was performed to identify the possible risk factors for this syndrome. Of the 4155 children included in the analysis, 410 (10%) gave a history of persistent diarrhoea. A comparison with children with acute diarrhoea matched for age showed that 11 factors were correlated with persistent diarrhoea, and strongly associated factors were stools with blood or mucus, or both, lower respiratory tract infection, malnutrition, vitamin A deficiency, and antibiotic use before presentation. The peak age was 2 years, and there was no sex difference. Deaths occurred more often in the group with persistent diarrhoea. Although Shigella spp, Campylobacter jejuni, and Giardia lamblia were frequently identified, their rates of isolation were not significantly higher among patients with persistent diarrhoea. No seasonal variation was observed in the rates of persistent diarrhoea. Although the introduction of family food to the diet was associated with higher rates, this factor was difficult to separate from the age dependent risks. PMID:3142603

  14. Modulation of Intestinal Functions Following Mycotoxin Ingestion: Meta-Analysis of Published Experiments in Animals

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Bertrand; Applegate, Todd J.

    2013-01-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of fungi that can cause serious health problems in animals, and may result in severe economic losses. Deleterious effects of these feed contaminants in animals are well documented, ranging from growth impairment, decreased resistance to pathogens, hepato- and nephrotoxicity to death. By contrast, data with regard to their impact on intestinal functions are more limited. However, intestinal cells are the first cells to be exposed to mycotoxins, and often at higher concentrations than other tissues. In addition, mycotoxins specifically target high protein turnover- and activated-cells, which are predominant in gut epithelium. Therefore, intestinal investigations have gained significant interest over the last decade, and some publications have demonstrated that mycotoxins are able to compromise several key functions of the gastrointestinal tract, including decreased surface area available for nutrient absorption, modulation of nutrient transporters, or loss of barrier function. In addition some mycotoxins facilitate persistence of intestinal pathogens and potentiate intestinal inflammation. By contrast, the effect of these fungal metabolites on the intestinal microbiota is largely unknown. This review focuses on mycotoxins which are of concern in terms of occurrence and toxicity, namely: aflatoxins, ochratoxin A and Fusarium toxins. Results from nearly 100 published experiments (in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo) were analyzed with a special attention to the doses used. PMID:23430606

  15. Modulation of intestinal functions following mycotoxin ingestion: meta-analysis of published experiments in animals.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Bertrand; Applegate, Todd J

    2013-02-21

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of fungi that can cause serious health problems in animals, and may result in severe economic losses. Deleterious effects of these feed contaminants in animals are well documented, ranging from growth impairment, decreased resistance to pathogens, hepato- and nephrotoxicity to death. By contrast, data with regard to their impact on intestinal functions are more limited. However, intestinal cells are the first cells to be exposed to mycotoxins, and often at higher concentrations than other tissues. In addition, mycotoxins specifically target high protein turnover- and activated-cells, which are predominant in gut epithelium. Therefore, intestinal investigations have gained significant interest over the last decade, and some publications have demonstrated that mycotoxins are able to compromise several key functions of the gastrointestinal tract, including decreased surface area available for nutrient absorption, modulation of nutrient transporters, or loss of barrier function. In addition some mycotoxins facilitate persistence of intestinal pathogens and potentiate intestinal inflammation. By contrast, the effect of these fungal metabolites on the intestinal microbiota is largely unknown. This review focuses on mycotoxins which are of concern in terms of occurrence and toxicity, namely: aflatoxins, ochratoxin A and Fusarium toxins. Results from nearly 100 published experiments (in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo) were analyzed with a special attention to the doses used.

  16. Impaired contractility of colonic muscle cells in a patient with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Guarino, M P L; Carotti, S; Cogliandro, R; Stanghellini, V; De Giorgio, R; Barbara, G; Alloni, R; Altomare, A; Tarquini, E; Coppola, R; Corinaldesi, R; Cicala, M

    2008-03-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction represents a cause of persistent functional intestinal failure either "secondary" to specific conditions or "chronic intestinal idiopathic pseudo-obstruction" in origin. The diagnosis is mainly clinical, supported by radiological and/or endoscopic findings excluding any mechanical cause of intestinal obstruction. We reported a case of a 39-year-old woman with chronic intestinal idiopathic pseudo-obstruction, who underwent colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis; histological examination of the surgical specimen did not reveal myogenic or neurogenic defects or other pathological abnormalities indicative of an underlying neuromuscular impairment. Because of the apparent integrity of the gut neuromuscular layer, we tested whether a functional impairment affected colonic single smooth muscle cells. Muscle cells were isolated from the right colon and their contractile response to a receptor-dependent agonist evaluated in comparison to that obtained from controls. The cell contraction induced by acetylcholine in a dose response manner was markedly decreased in the patient affected by chronic intestinal idiopathic pseudo-obstruction compared with cells from controls (percentage of cell shortening with maximal dose of acetylcholine [10(-6)M]: 10.7+/-3% versus 34.2+/-4%, respectively). The present findings indicate a specific defect of colonic smooth muscle cells likely related to an ineffective response to acetylcholine.

  17. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug-induced intestinal inflammation in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Bjarnason, I.; Zanelli, G.; Smith, T.; Prouse, P.; Williams, P.; Smethurst, P.; Delacey, G.; Gumpel, M.J.; Levi, A.J.

    1987-09-01

    This study examines the effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on the small intestine in humans. Using an /sup 111/In-leukocyte technique in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n = 90) and osteoarthritis (n = 7), it appears that nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs cause small intestinal inflammation in two-thirds of patients on long-term treatment and on discontinuation, the inflammation may persist for up to 16 mo. The prevalence and magnitude of the intestinal inflammation was unrelated to the type and dose of nonsteroidal drugs and previous or concomitant second-line drug treatment. There was a significant inverse correlation (r = -0.29, p less than 0.05) between fecal /sup 111/In excretion and hemoglobin levels in patients treated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. The kinetics of fecal indium 111 excretion in patients treated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs was almost identical to that of patients with small bowel Crohn's disease. Eighteen patients on nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs underwent a radiologic examination of the small bowel and 3 were found to have asymptomatic ileal disease with ulceration and strictures. Nineteen patients on nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, 20 healthy controls, and 13 patients with Crohn's ileitis underwent a dual radioisotopic ileal function test with tauro 23 (/sup 75/Se) selena-25-homocholic acid and cobalt 58-labeled cyanocobalamine. On day 4, more than half of the patients with rheumatoid arthritis had evidence of bile acid malabsorption, but the ileal dysfunction was much milder than seen in patients with Crohn's ileitis.

  18. Adhesion Properties of Lactic Acid Bacteria on Intestinal Mucin

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Keita; Sugiyama, Makoto; Mukai, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are Gram-positive bacteria that are natural inhabitants of the gastrointestinal (GI) tracts of mammals, including humans. Since Mechnikov first proposed that yogurt could prevent intestinal putrefaction and aging, the beneficial effects of LAB have been widely demonstrated. The region between the duodenum and the terminal of the ileum is the primary region colonized by LAB, particularly the Lactobacillus species, and this region is covered by a mucus layer composed mainly of mucin-type glycoproteins. The mucus layer plays a role in protecting the intestinal epithelial cells against damage, but is also considered to be critical for the adhesion of Lactobacillus in the GI tract. Consequently, the adhesion exhibited by lactobacilli on mucin has attracted attention as one of the critical factors contributing to the persistent beneficial effects of Lactobacillus in a constantly changing intestinal environment. Thus, understanding the interactions between Lactobacillus and mucin is crucial for elucidating the survival strategies of LAB in the GI tract. This review highlights the properties of the interactions between Lactobacillus and mucin, while concomitantly considering the structure of the GI tract from a histochemical perspective. PMID:27681930

  19. Chronic Trichuris muris Infection Decreases Diversity of the Intestinal Microbiota and Concomitantly Increases the Abundance of Lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jacob Bak; Sorobetea, Daniel; Kiilerich, Pia; Ramayo-Caldas, Yuliaxis; Estellé, Jordi; Ma, Tao; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Svensson-Frej, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is vital for shaping the local intestinal environment as well as host immunity and metabolism. At the same time, epidemiological and experimental evidence suggest an important role for parasitic worm infections in maintaining the inflammatory and regulatory balance of the immune system. In line with this, the prevalence of persistent worm infections is inversely correlated with the incidence of immune-associated diseases, prompting the use of controlled parasite infections for therapeutic purposes. Despite this, the impact of parasite infection on the intestinal microbiota, as well as potential downstream effects on the immune system, remain largely unknown. We have assessed the influence of chronic infection with the large-intestinal nematode Trichuris muris, a close relative of the human pathogen Trichuris trichiura, on the composition of the murine intestinal microbiota by 16S ribosomal-RNA gene-based sequencing. Our results demonstrate that persistent T. muris infection dramatically affects the large-intestinal microbiota, most notably with a drop in the diversity of bacterial communities, as well as a marked increase in the relative abundance of the Lactobacillus genus. In parallel, chronic T. muris infection resulted in a significant shift in the balance between regulatory and inflammatory T cells in the intestinal adaptive immune system, in favour of inflammatory cells. Together, these data demonstrate that chronic parasite infection strongly influences the intestinal microbiota and the adaptive immune system. Our results illustrate the complex interactions between these factors in the intestinal tract, and contribute to furthering the understanding of this interplay, which is of crucial importance considering that 500 million people globally are suffering from these infections and their potential use for therapeutic purposes.

  20. Chronic Trichuris muris Infection Decreases Diversity of the Intestinal Microbiota and Concomitantly Increases the Abundance of Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Kiilerich, Pia; Ramayo-Caldas, Yuliaxis; Estellé, Jordi; Ma, Tao; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Svensson-Frej, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is vital for shaping the local intestinal environment as well as host immunity and metabolism. At the same time, epidemiological and experimental evidence suggest an important role for parasitic worm infections in maintaining the inflammatory and regulatory balance of the immune system. In line with this, the prevalence of persistent worm infections is inversely correlated with the incidence of immune-associated diseases, prompting the use of controlled parasite infections for therapeutic purposes. Despite this, the impact of parasite infection on the intestinal microbiota, as well as potential downstream effects on the immune system, remain largely unknown. We have assessed the influence of chronic infection with the large-intestinal nematode Trichuris muris, a close relative of the human pathogen Trichuris trichiura, on the composition of the murine intestinal microbiota by 16S ribosomal-RNA gene-based sequencing. Our results demonstrate that persistent T. muris infection dramatically affects the large-intestinal microbiota, most notably with a drop in the diversity of bacterial communities, as well as a marked increase in the relative abundance of the Lactobacillus genus. In parallel, chronic T. muris infection resulted in a significant shift in the balance between regulatory and inflammatory T cells in the intestinal adaptive immune system, in favour of inflammatory cells. Together, these data demonstrate that chronic parasite infection strongly influences the intestinal microbiota and the adaptive immune system. Our results illustrate the complex interactions between these factors in the intestinal tract, and contribute to furthering the understanding of this interplay, which is of crucial importance considering that 500 million people globally are suffering from these infections and their potential use for therapeutic purposes. PMID:25942314

  1. 27 CFR 11.34 - Products which may no longer be lawfully sold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... where, due to a change in regulation or administrative procedure over which the trade buyer or an affiliate of the trade buyer has no control, a particular size or brand is no longer permitted to be sold....

  2. More U.S. Women Living Longer with Advanced Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... html More U.S. Women Living Longer With Advanced Breast Cancer Better treatments, aging population may explain promising trend, ... women living with the most advanced stage of breast cancer has been rising since the 1990s, a new ...

  3. Science 101: Why Does It Take Longer to Boil Potatoes at High Altitudes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2017-01-01

    Why Does It Take Longer to Boil Potatoes at High Altitudes? This column provides background science information for elementary teachers. This month's issue looks at why water boils at different temperatures at different altitudes.

  4. What Are the Risk Factors for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? A risk factor is anything that changes ... Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Be Prevented? More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  5. What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? It’s important to have honest, open discussions ... Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  6. Regulation of intestinal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Matheson, P J; Wilson, M A; Garrison, R N

    2000-09-01

    The gastrointestinal system anatomically is positioned to perform two distinct functions: to digest and absorb ingested nutrients and to sustain barrier function to prevent transepithelial migration of bacteria and antigens. Alterations in these basic functions contribute to a variety of clinical scenarios. These primary functions intrinsically require splanchnic blood flow at both the macrovascular and microvascular levels of perfusion. Therefore, a greater understanding of the mechanisms that regulate intestinal vascular perfusion in the normal state and during pathophysiological conditions would be beneficial. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current understanding regarding the regulatory mechanisms of intestinal blood flow in fasted and fed conditions and during pathological stress.

  7. Radiation-induced intestinal pseudoobstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Perino, L.E.; Schuffler, M.D.; Mehta, S.J.; Everson, G.T.

    1986-10-01

    A case of intestinal pseudoobstruction occurring 30 yr after radiation therapy is described. Mechanical causes of obstruction were excluded by laparotomy. Histology of full-thickness sections of the small bowel revealed vascular ectasia and sclerosis, serosal fibrosis, neuronal proliferation within the submucosa, and degeneration of the muscle fibers of the circular layer of the muscularis propria. On the basis of the clinical and histologic findings we conclude that, in this patient, intestinal pseudoobstruction was due to muscular and neuronal injury from abdominal irradiation.

  8. Protein Tyrosine Kinase 6 Negatively Regulates Growth and Promotes Enterocyte Differentiation in the Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Haegebarth, Andrea; Bie, Wenjun; Yang, Ruyan; Crawford, Susan E.; Vasioukhin, Valeri; Fuchs, Elaine; Tyner, Angela L.

    2006-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) (also called Brk or Sik) is an intracellular tyrosine kinase that is expressed in breast cancer and normal epithelial linings. In adult mice, PTK6 expression is high in villus epithelial cells of the small intestine. To explore functions of PTK6, we disrupted the mouse Ptk6 gene. We detected longer villi, an expanded zone of PCNA expression, and increased bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in the PTK6-deficient small intestine. Although differentiation of major epithelial cell types occurred, there was a marked delay in expression of intestinal fatty acid binding protein, suggesting a role for PTK6 in enterocyte differentiation. However, fat absorption was comparable in wild-type and Ptk6−/− mice. It was previously shown that the serine threonine kinase Akt is a substrate of PTK6 and that PTK6-mediated phosphorylation of Akt on tyrosine resulted in inhibition of Akt activity. Consistent with these findings, we detected increased Akt activity and nuclear β-catenin in intestines of PTK6-deficient mice and decreased nuclear localization of the Akt substrate FoxO1 in villus epithelial cells. PTK6 contributes to maintenance of tissue homeostasis through negative regulation of Akt in the small intestine and is associated with cell cycle exit and differentiation in normal intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:16782882

  9. Cold exposure increases intestinal paracellular permeability to nutrients in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Price, Edwin R; Ruff, Lisa J; Guerra, Alberto; Karasov, William H

    2013-11-01

    In situations of increased energy demand and food intake, animals can often acclimate within several days. The intestine generally responds to elevated digestive demand by increasing in size. However, there is likely a limit to how quickly the intestine can grow to meet the new demand. We investigated the immediate and longer-term changes to intestinal properties of the mouse when suddenly exposed to 4°C. We hypothesized that paracellular permeability to nutrients would increase as part of an immediate response to elevated absorptive demand. We measured absorption of l-arabinose, intestinal size and gene expression of several tight junction proteins (claudin-2, claudin-4, claudin-15 and ZO-1) at three time points: pre-exposure, and after 1 day and 2 weeks of cold exposure. Cold exposure increased food intake by 62% after 2 weeks but intake was not significantly increased after 1 day. Intestinal wet mass was elevated after 1 day and throughout the experiment. Absorption of arabinose rose by 20% after 1 day in the cold and was 33% higher after 2 weeks. Expression of claudin-2 increased after 1 day of cold exposure, but there were no changes in expression of any claudin genes when normalized to ZO-1 expression. Our results indicate that intestinal mass can respond rapidly to increased energy demand and that increased paracellular permeability is also part of that response. Increased paracellular permeability may be a consequence of enterocyte hyperplasia, resulting in more tight junctions across which molecules can absorb.

  10. Polydatin Alleviates Small Intestine Injury during Hemorrhagic Shock as a SIRT1 Activator

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhenhua; Chen, Zhongqing; Xu, Siqi; Song, Rui; Yang, Hong; Zhao, Ke-seng

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the role of SIRT1 in small intestine damage following severe hemorrhagic shock and to investigate whether polydatin (PD) can activate SIRT1 in shock treatment. Research Design and Methods. The severe hemorrhagic shock model was reproduced in Sprague Dawley rats. Main Outcome Measures. Two hours after drug administration, half of the rats were assessed for survival time evaluation and the remainder were used for small intestinal tissue sample collection. Results. Bleeding and swelling appeared in the small intestine with epithelial apoptosis and gut barrier disturbance during hemorrhagic shock. SIRT1 activity and PGC-1α protein expression of the small intestine were decreased, which led to an increase in acetylated SOD2 and decreases in the expression and activity of SOD2, resulting in severe oxidative stress. The decreased SIRT1 activity and expression were partially restored in the PD administration group, which showed reduced intestine injury and longer survival time. Notably, the effect of PD was abolished after the addition of Ex527, a selective inhibitor of SIRT1. Conclusions. The results collectively suggest a role for the SIRT1-PGC-1α-SOD2 axis in small intestine injury following severe hemorrhagic shock and that PD is an effective SIRT1 activator for the shock treatment. PMID:26301045

  11. Persistent fat malabsorption in cystic fibrosis; lessons from patients and mice.

    PubMed

    Wouthuyzen-Bakker, M; Bodewes, F A J A; Verkade, H J

    2011-05-01

    Fat malabsorption in pancreatic insufficient cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is classically treated with pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT). Despite PERT, intestinal fat absorption remains insufficient in most CF patients. Several factors have been suggested to contribute to the persistent fat malabsorption in CF (CFPFM). We reviewed the current insights concerning the proposed causes of CFPFM and the corresponding intervention studies. Most data are obtained from studies in CF patients and CF mice. Based on the reviewed literature, we conclude that alterations in intestinal pH and intestinal mucosal abnormalities are most likely to contribute to CFPFM. The presently available data indicate that acid suppressive drugs and broad spectrum antibiotics could be helpful in individual CF patients for optimizing fat absorption and/or nutritional status. Copyright © 2011 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Immediate and Longer-Term Stressors and the Mental Health of Hurricane Ike Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Sarah R.; Tracy, Melissa; Cerdá, Magdalena; Norris, Fran H.; Galea, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has documented that individuals exposed to more stressors during disasters and their immediate aftermath (immediate stressors) are at risk of experiencing longer-term postdisaster stressors. Longer-term stressors, in turn, have been found to play a key role in shaping postdisaster psychological functioning. Few studies have simultaneously explored the links from immediate to longer-term stressors, and from longer-term stressors to psychological functioning, however. Additionally, studies have inadequately explored whether postdisaster psychological symptoms influence longer-term stressors. In the current study, we aimed to fill these gaps. Participants (N = 448) were from population-based study of Hurricane Ike survivors and completed assessments 2–5 months (Wave 1), 5–9 months (Wave 2) and 14–18 months (Wave 3) postdisaster. Through path analysis, we found that immediate stressors, assessed at Wave 1, were positively associated with Wave 2 and Wave 3 stressors, which in turn were positively associated with Wave 2 and Wave 3 posttraumatic stress and depressive symptoms. Wave 2 posttraumatic stress symptoms were positively associated with Wave 3 stressors, and Wave 1 depressive symptoms were positively associated with Wave 2 stressors. The findings suggest that policies and interventions can reduce the impact of disasters on mental health by preventing and alleviating both immediate and longer-term postdisaster stressors. PMID:24343752

  13. Immediate and longer-term stressors and the mental health of Hurricane Ike survivors.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Sarah R; Tracy, Melissa; Cerdá, Magdalena; Norris, Fran H; Galea, Sandro

    2013-12-01

    Previous research has documented that individuals exposed to more stressors during disasters and their immediate aftermath (immediate stressors) are at risk of experiencing longer-term postdisaster stressors. Longer-term stressors, in turn, have been found to play a key role in shaping postdisaster psychological functioning. Few studies have simultaneously explored the links from immediate to longer-term stressors, and from longer-term stressors to psychological functioning, however. Additionally, studies have inadequately explored whether postdisaster psychological symptoms influence longer-term stressors. In the current study, we aimed to fill these gaps. Participants (N = 448) were from population-based study of Hurricane Ike survivors and completed assessments 2-5 months (Wave 1), 5-9 months (Wave 2) and 14-18 months (Wave 3) postdisaster. Through path analysis, we found that immediate stressors, assessed at Wave 1, were positively associated with Wave 2 and Wave 3 stressors, which in turn were positively associated with Wave 2 and Wave 3 posttraumatic stress and depressive symptoms. Wave 2 posttraumatic stress symptoms were positively associated with Wave 3 stressors, and Wave 1 depressive symptoms were positively associated with Wave 2 stressors. The findings suggest that policies and interventions can reduce the impact of disasters on mental health by preventing and alleviating both immediate and longer-term postdisaster stressors.

  14. An Assessment of the Intestinal Lumen as a Site for Intervention in Reducing Body Burdens of Organochlorine Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Jandacek, Ronald J.; Genuis, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Many individuals maintain a persistent body burden of organochlorine compounds (OCs) as well as other lipophilic compounds, largely as a result of airborne and dietary exposures. Ingested OCs are typically absorbed from the small intestine along with dietary lipids. Once in the body, stored OCs can mobilize from adipose tissue storage sites and, along with circulating OCs, are delivered into the small intestine via hepatic processing and biliary transport. Retained OCs are also transported into both the large and small intestinal lumen via non-biliary mechanisms involving both secretion and desquamation from enterocytes. OCs and some other toxicants can be reabsorbed from the intestine, however, they take part in enterohepatic circulation(EHC). While dietary fat facilitates the absorption of OCs from the small intestine, it has little effect on OCs within the large intestine. Non-absorbable dietary fats and fat absorption inhibitors, however, can reduce the re-absorption of OCs and other lipophiles involved in EHC and may enhance the secretion of these compounds into the large intestine—thereby hastening their elimination. Clinical studies are currently underway to determine the efficacy of using non-absorbable fats and inhibitors of fat absorption in facilitating the elimination of persistent body burdens of OCs and other lipophilic human contaminants. PMID:23476122

  15. Human Enteroids/Colonoids and Intestinal Organoids Functionally Recapitulate Normal Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Zachos, Nicholas C; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; In, Julie; Blutt, Sarah E; de Jonge, Hugo R; Estes, Mary K; Donowitz, Mark

    2016-02-19

    Identification of Lgr5 as the intestinal stem cell marker as well as the growth factors necessary to replicate adult intestinal stem cell division has led to the establishment of the methods to generate "indefinite" ex vivo primary intestinal epithelial cultures, termed "mini-intestines." Primary cultures developed from isolated intestinal crypts or stem cells (termed enteroids/colonoids) and from inducible pluripotent stem cells (termed intestinal organoids) are being applied to study human intestinal physiology and pathophysiology with great expectations for translational applications, including regenerative medicine. Here we discuss the physiologic properties of these cultures, their current use in understanding diarrhea-causing host-pathogen interactions, and potential future applications.

  16. The acbH gene of Actinoplanes sp. encodes a solute receptor with binding activities for acarbose and longer homologs.

    PubMed

    Brunkhorst, Claudia; Wehmeier, Udo F; Piepersberg, Wolfgang; Schneider, Erwin

    2005-04-01

    Acarbose, a pseudomaltotetraose, is produced by strains of the genus Actinoplanes and is a potent inhibitor of alpha-glucosidases, including those from the human intestine. Therefore, it is used in the treatment of patients suffering from type 2 diabetes. The benefits of acarbose for the producer are not known; however, besides acting as an inhibitor of alpha-amylases secreted by competitors, a role as a 'carbophor' has been proposed. This would require a transport system mediating its uptake into the cytoplasm of Actinoplanes sp. A putative sugar ATP binding cassette (ABC) transport system, the genes of which are included within the biosynthetic gene cluster for acarbose, was suggested to be a possible candidate. The genes acbHFG encode a possible sugar binding protein (AcbH) and two membrane integral subunits (AcbFG). A gene coding for an ATPase component is missing. Since Actinoplanes sp. cannot yet be genetically manipulated we performed experiments to identify the substrate(s) of the putative transporter by assessing the substrate specificity of AcbH. The protein was overproduced in Escherichia coli as His10-fusion protein, purified under denaturating conditions and renatured. Refolding was verified by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Surface plasmon resonance studies revealed that AcbH binds acarbose and longer derivatives, but not maltodextrins, maltose or sucrose. Immunoblot analysis revealed the association of AcbH with the membrane fraction of Actinoplanes cells that were grown in the presence of maltose, maltodextrins or acarbose. Together, these findings suggest that the AcbHFG complex might be involved in the uptake of acarbose and are consistent with a role for acarbose as a 'carbophor'.

  17. Intestinal disaccharidase activities in the chick

    PubMed Central

    Siddons, R. C.

    1969-01-01

    1. Disaccharidase activities of the small and large intestines of the chick were studied. 2. Homogenates of the small intestine readily hydrolysed maltose, sucrose and palatinose (6-O-α-d-glucopyranosyl-d-fructose), hydrolysed lactose slowly and did not hydrolyse trehalose and cellobiose. 3. Within the small intestine the disaccharidases were located mainly in the intestinal wall; the activity in the contents accounted for less than 5% of the total activity. 4. The disaccharidases were non-uniformly distributed along the small intestine, the activities being greatest in the middle section. 5. The disaccharidase activities increased with age between 1 and 43 days. 6. Homogenates of the large intestine and contents readily hydrolysed maltose, sucrose, palatinose and lactose and hydrolysed cellobiose and trehalose slowly. 7. The large-intestinal disaccharidases were located mainly in the contents. 8. Similar Km and pH optimum values were found for the maltase, sucrase and palatinase activities of the large and small intestines. 9. The lactase activity of the large intestine was markedly affected by diet and had different Km and pH values from the small intestinal lactase. 10. Low activities of intestinal disaccharidase were found in 12-day-old embryos and marked increases in the intestinal disaccharidases of the developing embryo occurred 2–3 days before hatching. PMID:5774506

  18. Short- and longer-term effects of fire and herbivory on sagebrush communities in south-central Montana.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Fred; Darragh, Jeffrey A

    2006-09-01

    To better understand the role of herbivory and fire as potential disturbance processes in sagebrush communities, we examined responses of a grazing ungulate, elk (Cervus elaphus), following prescribed burning of sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. vaseyana) in south-central Montana (USA.) with concurrent monitoring of changes in plant production, nutritional quality, and community diversity from 1989-1999. Burning transformed low-diversity, sagebrush-dominated communities into high-diversity, graminoid-forb communities that persisted for 10 years without significant reestablishment of sagebrush. Elk increased use of burned sites one year after burning, but elk use returned to pre-burn levels over the next two to nine years. Forage biomass and nutritional quality declined after initial increases that coincided with increased elk use. Increases in elk use appeared to be influenced by increases in combined graminoid and forb production and changes in structural vegetation characteristics that permitted greater foraging efficiency. Declines in use were associated with loss of nutritional enhancement and declines in combined graminoid and forb production. Managers may observe only short-term responses from grazing ungulates to prescribed fire in sagebrush communities, but can expect longer-term increases in plant diversity and establishment of graminoid-forb communities.

  19. Circadian Disorganization Alters Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Green, Stefan J.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24848969

  20. Intestinal fistula after magnets ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Maurício; Velhote, Manoel Carlos Prieto; Maschietto, Rafael Forti; Waksman, Renata Dejtiar

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accidental ingestion of magnetic foreign bodies has become more common due to increased availability of objects and toys with magnetic elements. The majority of them traverse the gastrointestinal system spontaneously without complication. However, ingestion of multiple magnets may require surgical resolution. The case of an 18-month girl who developed an intestinal fistula after ingestion of two magnets is reported. PMID:23843068

  1. Glutamine and intestinal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Wu, Guoyao; Zhou, Zhigang; Dai, Zhaolai; Sun, Yuli; Ji, Yun; Li, Wei; Wang, Weiwei; Liu, Chuang; Han, Feng; Wu, Zhenlong

    2015-10-01

    The intestinal barrier integrity is essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Dysfunction of the mucosal barrier is associated with increased gut permeability and development of multiple gastrointestinal diseases. Recent studies highlighted a critical role for glutamine, which had been traditionally considered as a nutritionally non-essential amino acid, in activating the mammalian target of rapamycin cell signaling in enterocytes. In addition, glutamine has been reported to enhance intestinal and whole-body growth, to promote enterocyte proliferation and survival, and to regulate intestinal barrier function in injury, infection, weaning stress, and other catabolic conditions. Mechanistically, these effects were mediated by maintaining the intracellular redox status and regulating expression of genes associated with various signaling pathways. Furthermore, glutamine stimulates growth of the small intestinal mucosa in young animals and also enhances ion transport by the gut in neonates and adults. Growing evidence supports the notion that glutamine is a nutritionally essential amino acid for neonates and a conditionally essential amino acid for adults. Thus, as a functional amino acid with multiple key physiological roles, glutamine holds great promise in protecting the gut from atrophy and injury under various stress conditions in mammals and other animals.

  2. Environmental contaminants and intestinal function

    PubMed Central

    Banwell, John G.

    1979-01-01

    The environmental contaminants which have their major effects on the small intestine may be classified into five major categories: (1) bacterial, viral, and parasitic agents, (2) food and plant substances, (3) environmental and industrial products, (4) pharmaceutical agents, and (5) toxic agents whose metabolic effects are dependent on interreaction with intestinal bacterial flora, other physical agents (detergents), human intestinal enzyme deficiency states, and the nutritional state of the host. Bacterial, viral, and parasitic agents are the most important of all such agents, being responsible for significant mortality and morbidity in association with diarrheal diseases of adults and children. Several plant substances ingested as foods have unique effects on the small bowel as well as from contaminants such as fungi on poorly preserved grains and cereals. Environmental and industrial products, in spite of their widespread prevalence in industrial societies as contaminants, are less important unless unexpectedly intense exposure occurs to the intestinal tract. Pharmaceutical agents of several types interreact with the small bowel mucosa causing impairment of transport processes for fluid and electrolytes, amino acid, lipid and sugars as well as vitamins. These interreactions may be dependent on bacterial metabolic activity, association with detergents, mucosal enzyme deficiency state (disaccharidases), and the state of nutrition of the subject. PMID:540611

  3. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-08-01

    In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed.

  4. Intestinal surgery of adult cattle.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David E; Ewoldt, Jennifer M Ivany

    2005-03-01

    Surgical disorders of the gastrointestinal tract of cattle occur occasionally, and veterinarians are challenged to determine an accurate diagnosis and treatment for these conditions. Although surgical diseases most commonly occur in the forestomachs (dislocated abomasum, reticuloperitonitis) and the colons (cecal dilation), this article focuses n lesions in the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, ileum).

  5. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction].

    PubMed

    Joly, Francisca; Amiot, Aurélien; Coffin, Benoît; Lavergne-Slove, Anne; Messing, Bernard; Bouhnik, Yoram

    2006-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a disease characterized by episodes resembling mechanical obstruction in the absence of organic, systemic, or metabolic disorders. Pseudo-obstruction is an uncommon condition and can result from primary (40%) or secondary (60%) causes. The most common symptoms are nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, abdominal pain and constipation or diarrhea. These symptoms are usually present many years before CIPO diagnosis. They can lead to severe electrolyte disorders and malnutrition. Principles for management of patients with CIPO are: to establish a correct clinical diagnosis in excluding mechanical obstruction; to perform a symptomatic and physiologic assessment of the gastrointestinal tract involved; to look for extra-intestinal manifestations, especially for myopathy and neuropathy; to discuss in some cases a surgery for full-thickness intestinal biopsies, and/or a neuromuscular biopsy in case of mitochondrial cytopathy suspicion. The management is primarily focused on symptom control and nutritional support to prevent weight loss and malnutrition. Treatment of CIPO includes prokinetic agents which may help to reduce gastrointestinal symptoms Courses of antibiotics may be needed in patients with symptoms suggestive of bacterial overgrowth. When necessary, enteral nutrition is preferred. In carefully selected patients, feeding jejunostomy with or without decompression gastrostomy may be tried. Long term parenteral nutrition should be reserved for patients who can not tolerate enteral nutrition. Intestinal transplantation can be discussed in selected patients.

  6. Lactase persistence versus lactose intolerance: Is there an intermediate phenotype?

    PubMed

    Dzialanski, Zbigniew; Barany, Michael; Engfeldt, Peter; Magnuson, Anders; Olsson, Lovisa A; Nilsson, Torbjörn K

    2016-02-01

    According to the prevailing theory about the genetic background to lactose intolerance, there are three genotypes but only two adult physiological phenotypes: lactase persistence in individuals with the CT and TT genotypes and lactase non-persistence in individuals with the CC genotype. However, analysis of lactase activity from intestinal biopsies has revealed three distinct levels of activity, suggesting that an intermediate physiological phenotype may exist. To assess possible disparities between different genotypes with regard to biomarkers of lactase activity and physical symptoms during an oral lactose load test. A retrospective study using an oral lactose load test (n=487). Concentrations of hydrogen in exhaled air and blood glucose were measured. Afterwards, subjects were asked to provide oral mucosa samples for genotyping and answer a questionnaire (participation rate 56%, n=274). Mean hydrogen levels in exhaled air at 120min were significantly higher in the CT genotype than in the TT genotype. There was no significant difference in blood glucose levels between the two groups. Reported symptoms, with the possible exception of abdominal pain, were equally prevalent in both groups. Subjects with the CT and TT genotypes, hitherto classified as lactase-persistent, differ in their physiological response to lactose intake, indicating differences in phenotype which could have clinical significance. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Predicting outcome of procedures to slow intestinal transit.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J S; Sudan, D A; Gilroy, R

    2006-01-01

    Procedures designed to slow intestinal transit in patients with the short-bowel syndrome (SBS) have unpredictable outcomes. Our aim was to evaluate the outcome and predictive factors for this complication in SBS patients. Ten patients (37-61 years) underwent reversed segment (n = 9) or nipple valve creation (n = 1). All patients had remnant lengths over 90 cm and rapid intestinal transit times. All subjects had benign diseases, including Crohn's (n = 3). Six patients had a colon remnant. SBS had been present for 8 to 150 months. Nine (90%) required parental nutrition (PN) preoperatively. A procedure was performed either alone (n = 5) or concurrently with an ostomy closure (n = 3), an ostomy revision (n = 1), or a fundoplication (n = 1). There was one postoperative complication (urinary tract infection) and no deaths. Two patients developed bacterial overgrowth. One required repair of an ileocolonic stricture. One reversed segment was taken down 12 months later. Five (50%) patients improved (off PN), five remained on PN or had persistent diarrhea. Patients with a successful outcome were more likely to have had ostomy takedown (60% vs 0%). The duration of SBS; presence of Crohn's disease, a colon remnant, or type 1 anatomy; and the transit times were similar in both groups. Adjusted remnant length (small intestine +30 cm for type 2 anatomy and +60 cm for type 3) was similar (136 +/- 20 vs 154 +/- 25 cm). Procedures may benefit half of selected SBS patients with adequate remnant length and rapid transit. Successful patients are more likely to have an ostomy takedown, but the outcome is less determined by transit time or intestinal length if over 90 cm.

  8. Maternal prenatal stress is associated with the infant intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Zijlmans, Maartje A C; Korpela, Katri; Riksen-Walraven, J Marianne; de Vos, Willem M; de Weerth, Carolina

    2015-03-01

    Maternal prenatal stress has been often associated with infant physical development and health, as well as psychological functioning and behavior. However, the mechanisms underlying these relations remain elusive. The goal of the present study was to prospectively investigate the development of the intestinal microbiota as a potential pathway linking maternal prenatal stress and infant health. The development of the infant intestinal microbiota was followed over the first 110 days after birth in a healthy cohort of 56 vaginally born Dutch infants. Additionally, the relation between infant intestinal microbiota and gastrointestinal and allergic symptoms was examined. Results showed that maternal prenatal stress, i.e., either reported stress or elevated basal maternal salivary cortisol concentrations or both, was strongly and persistently associated with the infants' microbiota composition as determined by a phylogenetic microarray. Infants of mothers with high cumulative stress (i.e., high reported stress and high cortisol concentrations) during pregnancy had significantly higher relative abundances of Proteobacterial groups known to contain pathogens (related to Escherichia, Serratia, and Enterobacter), and lower relative abundances of lactic acid bacteria (i.e., Lactobacillus, Lactoccus, Aerococcus) and Bifidobacteria, altogether characteristics of a potentially increased level of inflammation. Furthermore, this aberrant colonization pattern was related to more maternally reported infant gastrointestinal symptoms and allergic reactions. In conclusion, clear links were found between maternal prenatal stress and the infant intestinal microbiota and health. Although causality cannot be concluded, the results suggest a possible mechanism by which maternal prenatal stress influences the offspring development. These results suggest a potential for bacterial interventions to enhance offspring health and development in pregnant women with stress.

  9. Adenoviruses in Lymphocytes of the Human Gastro-Intestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Soumitra; Calcedo, Roberto; Medina-Jaszek, Angelica; Keough, Martin; Peng, Hui; Wilson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Persistent adenoviral shedding in stools is known to occur past convalescence following acute adenoviral infections. We wished to establish the frequency with which adenoviruses may colonize the gut in normal human subjects. Methods The presence of adenoviral DNA in intestinal specimens obtained at surgery or autopsy was tested using a nested PCR method. The amplified adenoviral DNA sequences were compared to each other and to known adenoviral species. Lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs) were isolated from the specimens and the adenoviral copy numbers in the CD4+ and CD8+ fractions were determined by quantitative PCR. Adenoviral gene expression was tested by amplification of adenoviral mRNA. Results Intestinal tissue from 21 of 58 donors and LPLs from 21 of 24 donors were positive for the presence of adenoviral DNA. The majority of the sequences could be assigned to adenoviral species E, although species B and C sequences were also common. Multiple sequences were often present in the same sample. Forty-one non-identical sequences were identified from 39 different tissue donors. Quantitative PCR for adenoviral DNA in CD4+ and CD8+ fractions of LPLs showed adenoviral DNA to be present in both cell types and ranged from a few hundred to several million copies per million cells on average. Active adenoviral gene expression as evidenced by the presence of adenoviral messenger RNA in intestinal lymphocytes was demonstrated in 9 of the 11 donors tested. Conclusion Adenoviral DNA is highly prevalent in lymphocytes from the gastro-intestinal tract indicating that adenoviruses may be part of the normal gut flora. PMID:21980361

  10. The human lactase persistence-associated SNP −13910*T enables in vivo functional persistence of lactase promoter-reporter transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lin; Ahn, Jong Kun; Wodziak, Dariusz; Sibley, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Lactase is the intestinal enzyme responsible for digestion of the milk sugar lactose. Lactase gene expression declines dramatically upon weaning in mammals and during early childhood in humans (lactase nonpersistence). In various ethnic groups, however, lactase persists in high levels throughout adulthood (lactase persistence). Genetic association studies have identified that lactase persistence in Northern Europeans is strongly associated with a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located 14 kb upstream of the lactase gene: −13910*C/T. To determine whether the −13910*T SNP can function in vivo to mediate lactase persistence, we generated transgenic mice harboring human DNA fragments with the −13910*T SNP or the ancestral −13910*C SNP cloned upstream of a 2 kb rat lactase gene promoter in a luciferase reporter construct. We previously reported that the 2 kb rat lactase promoter directs a post-weaning decline of luciferase transgene expression similar to that of the endogenous lactase gene. In the present study, the post-weaning decline directed by the rat lactase promoter is impeded by addition of the −13910*T SNP human DNA fragment, but not by addition of the −13910*C ancestral SNP fragment. Persistence of transgene expression associated with the −13910*T SNP represents the first in vivo data in support of a functional role for the −13910*T SNP in mediating the human lactase persistence phenotype. PMID:22258180

  11. The human lactase persistence-associated SNP -13910*T enables in vivo functional persistence of lactase promoter-reporter transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lin; Ahn, Jong Kun; Wodziak, Dariusz; Sibley, Eric

    2012-07-01

    Lactase is the intestinal enzyme responsible for digestion of the milk sugar lactose. Lactase gene expression declines dramatically upon weaning in mammals and during early childhood in humans (lactase nonpersistence). In various ethnic groups, however, lactase persists in high levels throughout adulthood (lactase persistence). Genetic association studies have identified that lactase persistence in northern Europeans is strongly associated with a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located 14 kb upstream of the lactase gene: -13910*C/T. To determine whether the -13910*T SNP can function in vivo to mediate lactase persistence, we generated transgenic mice harboring human DNA fragments with the -13910*T SNP or the ancestral -13910*C SNP cloned upstream of a 2-kb rat lactase gene promoter in a luciferase reporter construct. We previously reported that the 2-kb rat lactase promoter directs a post-weaning decline of luciferase transgene expression similar to that of the endogenous lactase gene. In the present study, the post-weaning decline directed by the rat lactase promoter is impeded by addition of the -13910*T SNP human DNA fragment, but not by addition of the -13910*C ancestral SNP fragment. Persistence of transgene expression associated with the -13910*T SNP represents the first in vivo data in support of a functional role for the -13910*T SNP in mediating the human lactase persistence phenotype.

  12. EFFECTS OF HELIUM PRECONDITIONING ON INTESTINAL ISCHEMIA AND REPERFUSION INJURY IN RATS.

    PubMed

    Du, Lei; Zhang, Rongjia; Luo, Tianhang; Nie, Mingming; Bi, Jianwei

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury can occur in clinical settings such as organ transplantation, cardiopulmonary bypass and trauma. The noble gas helium attenuates I/R injury in a number of animal organs and thus may offer a strategy for reducing I/R-induced intestinal injury in clinical settings. In the present study, we used four different helium preconditioning (HPC) profiles to investigate the potential beneficial effect of HPC on I/R-induced intestinal injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with three cycles of air breathing for 5 min combined with three cycles of breathing a 70% helium:30% oxygen mixture for either 2, 5, 10, or 15 min, after which they were subjected to 60-min intestinal ischemia and 60-min reperfusion. Sixty minutes after reperfusion, the intestinal tissues of the variously treated rats were analyzed using histology, immunohistochemistry, terminal dUTP nick-end labeling staining, myeloperoxidase activity assay, Western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for tumor necrosis factor α and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α. Intestinal permeability was assayed by measuring fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran release in blood samples. The results showed that the HPC profile consisting of three cycles of 10 or 15 min of helium breathing and three cycles of 5 min of air breathing reduced I/R-induced intestinal injury, cell apoptosis, and the inflammatory response. However, the 2- or 5-min helium breathing did not confer any protective effects. It seems that longer helium episodes should be used in HPC profiles designed to attenuate intestinal I/R injury.

  13. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction].

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Hidenori; Inoh, Yumi; Fuyuki, Akiko; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2015-05-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction(CIPO) is a rare severe digestive disease in which clinical symptoms of intestinal obstruction appear without any mechanical cause. Pathophysiologically, CIPO shows ineffective intestinal propulsion due to an impairment of intestinal smooth muscle, enteric nervous system, and interstitial cells of Cajal(ICC). Sustained increased intra-bowel pressure often causes small intestinal malabsorption and bacterial translocation, and leads to malnutrition and blood stream infection (sepsis). Key points of the medical approach for CIPO are to improve nutritional status and reduce abdominal symptoms. Dietary cure and defecation control are the main options in mild cases, whereas home-parenteral-nutrition(HPN) and decompression therapy are often needed in severe cases. Stimulant laxatives, prokinetics and herbal medicine are usually used but often in fail. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrojejunostomy(PEG-J) tube may be burdenless compared to conventional ileus tube. Most important points in the management of this disease are to make a correct diagnosis as early as possible and avoid unnecessary surgery. However, no clear diagnostic criteria have been established so far. Manometry, scintigraphy, and full-thickness biopsy are the major examination for the CIPO diagnosis in the Western countries; however these specialized examinations are not popular in Japan. Therefore the Research Group(chief investigator, Atsushi Nakajima) proposed Japanese diagnostic criteria in 2009 to facilitate the diagnosis of this rare disease by the general physician. In 2013, we have reported that cine-MRI is a non-invasive diagnostic method for CIPO. Although further data are eagerly awaited, it can become a promising diagnostic tool in CIPO patients. Furthermore the Japanese criteria have been revised, and in 2014, the comprehensive criteria from a child to an adult have been devised. In 2015, CIPO is newly certified as Specified Rare and Intractable Disease which is

  14. Laboratory findings in four cases of adult botulism suggest colonization of the intestinal tract.

    PubMed Central

    McCroskey, L M; Hatheway, C L

    1988-01-01

    There was laboratory evidence of intestinal colonization in four cases of adult botulism confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control. No performed toxin was detected in available foods, but Clostridium botulinum was isolated from foods in two instances. Botulinal toxin was detected in the sera of all four patients, in one case at 47 days after ingestion of suspected food. C. botulinum was demonstrated in the stool of all four patients and persisted for 119 days after the onset of illness in one patient. Two patients had surgical alterations of the gastrointestinal tract, which may have promoted the colonization. The apparent lack of ingestion of performed toxin in these cases and the persistence of botulinal toxin or C. botulinum, or both, for long periods in three of the patients suggest that colonization of the intestinal tract occurred. PMID:3290234

  15. Cohabitation in the Intestine: Interactions among Helminth Parasites, Bacterial Microbiota, and Host Immunity.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Lisa A; Finlay, B Brett; Maizels, Rick M

    2015-11-01

    Both intestinal helminth parasites and certain bacterial microbiota species have been credited with strong immunomodulatory effects. Recent studies reported that the presence of helminth infection alters the composition of the bacterial intestinal microbiota and, conversely, that the presence and composition of the bacterial microbiota affect helminth colonization and persistence within mammalian hosts. This article reviews recent findings on these reciprocal relationships, in both human populations and mouse models, at the level of potential mechanistic pathways and the implications these bear for immunomodulatory effects on allergic and autoimmune disorders. Understanding the multidirectional complex interactions among intestinal microbes, helminth parasites, and the host immune system allows for a more holistic approach when using probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, antibiotics, and anthelmintics, as well as when designing treatments for autoimmune and allergic conditions.

  16. Profile and Stability of Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of the Newborn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Joseph P.; Hendricks-Munoz, Karen

    1991-01-01

    This study found that 19 of 51 infants with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn were diagnosed with sensorineural hearing loss, an incidence 25 times greater than that of intensive care unit infants in general. Treatment durations with mechanical ventilation were significantly longer for the hearing-impaired group compared to the…

  17. Profile and Stability of Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of the Newborn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Joseph P.; Hendricks-Munoz, Karen

    1991-01-01

    This study found that 19 of 51 infants with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn were diagnosed with sensorineural hearing loss, an incidence 25 times greater than that of intensive care unit infants in general. Treatment durations with mechanical ventilation were significantly longer for the hearing-impaired group compared to the…

  18. Screening of variants for lactase persistence/non-persistence in populations from South Africa and Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Torniainen, Suvi; Parker, M Iqbal; Holmberg, Ville; Lahtela, Elisa; Dandara, Collet; Jarvela, Irma

    2009-01-01

    Background Lactase non-persistence is a condition where lactase activity is decreased in the intestinal wall after weaning. In European derived populations a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) C/T-13910 residing 13.9 kb upstream from the lactase gene has been shown to define lactase activity, and several other single nucleotide polymorphisms (G/C-14010 T/G-13915, C/G-13907 and T/C-13913) in the same region have been identified in African and Middle East populations. Results The T-13910 allele most common in European populations was present in 21.8% mixed ancestry (N = 62) individuals and it was absent in the Xhosa (N = 109) and Ghana (N = 196) subjects. Five other substitutions were also found in the region covering the previously reported variants in African and Middle East populations. These included the G/C-14010 variant common in Kenyan and Tanzanian populations, which was present in 12.8% of Xhosa population and in 8.1% of mixed ancestry subjects. Two novel substitutions (C/T-14091 and A/C-14176) and one previously reported substitution G/A-13937 (rs4988234) were less common and present only in the Xhosa population. One novel substitution G/A-14107 was present in the Xhosa and Ghanaian populations. None of the other previously reported variants were identified. Conclusion Identification of the G/C-14010 variant in the Xhosa population, further confirms their genetic relatedness to other nomadic populations members that belong to the Bantu linguistic group in Tanzania and Kenya. Further studies are needed to confirm the possible relationship of the novel substitutions to the lactase persistence trait. PMID:19575818

  19. Determinants of longer duration of endotracheal intubation after adult cardiac operations.

    PubMed

    Bando, K; Sun, K; Binford, R S; Sharp, T G

    1997-04-01

    Poor pulmonary reserve is a risk factor that is used to exclude some patients from major operations. However, the value of routine spirometry in patients undergoing cardiac operations has not been widely evaluated. The outcomes of 586 consecutive adult patients undergoing cardiac operations were reviewed retrospectively to assess predictors of longer duration of endotracheal intubation. By univariate analysis, congestive failure (p < 0.001), cardiomegaly (p = 0.002), recent myocardial infarction (p = 0.039), priority of operation (p = 0.005), previous cardiac operation (p < 0.001), and renal insufficiency (p = 0.002) increased the risk of longer endotracheal intubation. Spirometry (forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume at 1 second, the ratio of forced expiratory volume at 1 second to forced vital capacity) did not correlate with longer endotracheal intubation. Perioperative complications, such as myocardial infarction (p < 0.001), coma, reexploration for bleeding, and reduced cardiac output (p < 0.001 each), correlated with longer duration of intubation. By multiple regression, priority of operation (p = 0.03), congestive failure (p = 0.02), and previous cardiac operation (p = 0.005) among preoperative risks and bleeding, reduced cardiac output, stroke, coma, and MB fraction of creatine kinase released postoperatively (p < 0.001 each) predicted longer duration of endotracheal intubation. Postoperative cardiac function and the occurrence of complications are more significant than preoperative pulmonary function in determining the duration of endotracheal intubation after cardiac operation. Routine spirometry is probably unnecessary for most adult cardiac patients.

  20. Persistence of the Intuitive Conception of Living Things in Adolescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babai, Reuven; Sekal, Rachel; Stavy, Ruth

    2010-02-01

    This study investigated whether intuitive, naive conceptions of "living things" based on objects' mobility (movement = alive) persist into adolescence and affect 10th graders' accuracy of responses and reaction times during object classification. Most of the 58 students classified the test objects correctly as living/nonliving, yet they demonstrated significantly longer reaction times for classifying plants compared to animals and for classifying dynamic objects compared to static inanimate objects. Findings indicated that, despite prior learning in biology, the intuitive conception of living things persists up to age 15-16 years, affecting related reasoning processes. Consideration of these findings may help educators in their decisions about the nature of examples they use in their classrooms.

  1. Persistence of the ring current, 1958--1984

    SciTech Connect

    Wrenn, G.L. )

    1989-08-01

    Statistical evidence for a solar cycle modulation in storm-time ring current particle lifetimes is presented. Linear regression of Dst with respect to a{sub p}({tau}), and an optimization of {tau} to maximize correlation, gives characteristic persistence times for each year through 2.5 solar cycles. These average persistences vary between less than 10 h at solar maximum (1962, 1975) to greater than 16 h at solar maximum (1970, 1981). The analysis is biased toward the later stages of recovery when the rate of decay has reduced, but the result is not a function of mean current strength or frequency of large storms. Increased abundance of O{sup +} is postulated as the most probable explanation of longer particle lifetimes at solar maximum, this strongly supports the proposition that a large fraction of the ring current is of ionospheric origin, and underlines the importance of dynamic coupling between the ionosphere and magnetosphere during disturbed periods.

  2. Persistence of polar stratospheric clouds in the southern polar region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Trepte, C. R.; Pitts, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of Antarctic polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were examined using the 1-micron aerosol extinction ratio data from the SAM II satellite experiment for the years 1979-1982 and 1984-1987. PSCs were sighted between 10 and 25 km and were usually first observed by mid-June. Clouds disappeared earlier at higher altitudes (late August near 24 km, in most cases) and later at lower altitudes (late September or October near 16 km). It was found that PSCs persisted longer in 1985 and 1987 at 18 km and were more frequently observed in September and October 1987 than the other years. Inference of likely PSC formation regions from National Meteorological Center temperature data indicated that clouds would begin forming in late May and usually disappear in September. This analysis confirmed the persistence of colder conditions during the spring of 1987.

  3. Intestinal lesions are associated with altered intestinal microbiome and are more frequent in children and young adults with cystic fibrosis and cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Flass, Thomas; Tong, Suhong; Frank, Daniel N; Wagner, Brandie D; Robertson, Charles E; Kotter, Cassandra Vogel; Sokol, Ronald J; Zemanick, Edith; Accurso, Frank; Hoffenberg, Edward J; Narkewicz, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Cirrhosis (CIR) occurs in 5-7% of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We hypothesized that alterations in intestinal function in CF contribute to the development of CIR. Determine the frequency of macroscopic intestinal lesions, intestinal inflammation, intestinal permeability and characterize fecal microbiome in CF CIR subjects and CF subjects with no liver disease (CFnoLIV). 11 subjects with CFCIR (6 M, 12.8 yrs ± 3.8) and 19 matched with CFnoLIV (10 M, 12.6 yrs ± 3.4) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, intestinal permeability testing by urinary lactulose: mannitol excretion ratio, fecal calprotectin determination and fecal microbiome characterization. CFCIR and CFnoLIV did not differ in key demographics or CF complications. CFCIR had higher GGT (59±51 U/L vs 17±4 p = 0.02) and lower platelet count (187±126 vs 283±60 p = 0.04) and weight (-0.86 ± 1.0 vs 0.30 ± 0.9 p = 0.002) z scores. CFCIR had more severe intestinal mucosal lesions on capsule endoscopy (score ≥4, 4/11 vs 0/19 p = 0.01). Fecal calprotectin was similar between CFCIR and CFnoLIV (166 μg/g ±175 vs 136 ± 193 p = 0.58, nl <120). Lactulose:mannitol ratio was elevated in 27/28 subjects and was slightly lower in CFCIR vs CFnoLIV (0.08±0.02 vs 0.11±0.05, p = 0.04, nl ≤0.03). Small bowel transit time was longer in CFCIR vs CFnoLIV (195±42 min vs 167±68 p<0.001, nl 274 ± 41). Bacteroides were decreased in relative abundance in CFCIR and were associated with lower capsule endoscopy score whereas Clostridium were more abundant in CFCIR and associated with higher capsule endoscopy score. CFCIR is associated with increased intestinal mucosal lesions, slower small bowel transit time and alterations in fecal microbiome. Abnormal intestinal permeability and elevated fecal calprotectin are common in all CF subjects. Disturbances in intestinal function in CF combined with changes in the microbiome may contribute to the development of hepatic fibrosis and intestinal lesions.

  4. Intestinal Lesions Are Associated with Altered Intestinal Microbiome and Are More Frequent in Children and Young Adults with Cystic Fibrosis and Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Flass, Thomas; Tong, Suhong; Frank, Daniel N.; Wagner, Brandie D.; Robertson, Charles E.; Kotter, Cassandra Vogel; Sokol, Ronald J.; Zemanick, Edith; Accurso, Frank; Hoffenberg, Edward J.; Narkewicz, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Cirrhosis (CIR) occurs in 5–7% of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We hypothesized that alterations in intestinal function in CF contribute to the development of CIR. Aims: Determine the frequency of macroscopic intestinal lesions, intestinal inflammation, intestinal permeability and characterize fecal microbiome in CF CIR subjects and CF subjects with no liver disease (CFnoLIV). Methods 11 subjects with CFCIR (6 M, 12.8 yrs ± 3.8) and 19 matched with CFnoLIV (10 M, 12.6 yrs ± 3.4) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, intestinal permeability testing by urinary lactulose: mannitol excretion ratio, fecal calprotectin determination and fecal microbiome characterization. Results CFCIR and CFnoLIV did not differ in key demographics or CF complications. CFCIR had higher GGT (59±51 U/L vs 17±4 p = 0.02) and lower platelet count (187±126 vs 283±60 p = 0.04) and weight (-0.86 ± 1.0 vs 0.30 ± 0.9 p = 0.002) z scores. CFCIR had more severe intestinal mucosal lesions on capsule endoscopy (score ≥4, 4/11 vs 0/19 p = 0.01). Fecal calprotectin was similar between CFCIR and CFnoLIV (166 μg/g ±175 vs 136 ± 193 p = 0.58, nl <120). Lactulose:mannitol ratio was elevated in 27/28 subjects and was slightly lower in CFCIR vs CFnoLIV (0.08±0.02 vs 0.11±0.05, p = 0.04, nl ≤0.03). Small bowel transit time was longer in CFCIR vs CFnoLIV (195±42 min vs 167±68 p<0.001, nl 274 ± 41). Bacteroides were decreased in relative abundance in CFCIR and were associated with lower capsule endoscopy score whereas Clostridium were more abundant in CFCIR and associated with higher capsule endoscopy score. Conclusions CFCIR is associated with increased intestinal mucosal lesions, slower small bowel transit time and alterations in fecal microbiome. Abnormal intestinal permeability and elevated fecal calprotectin are common in all CF subjects. Disturbances in intestinal function in CF combined with changes in the microbiome may contribute to the development of

  5. Persistence of Klebsiella pneumoniae on simulated biofilm in a model drinking water system.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Jeffrey G; Rice, Eugene W; Bishop, Paul L

    2006-08-15

    Persistence of Klebsiella pneumoniae on corroded iron surfaces in drinking water was studied using biofilm annular reactors operated under oligotrophic conditions. Reactors were inoculated with K. pneumoniae, and persistence was monitored in the bulk and biofilm phases. Initial cell concentration of 10(6) MPN/mL in the bulkwater phase resulted in significantly longer adhesion than initial concentrations 1 and 2 orders of magnitude lower. K. pneumoniae cultured in low nutrient growth medium persisted longer in dechlorinated tap water than those cultured in full strength medium. Cell surface charge was more negative under low nutrient conditions, and this influenced electrostatic attraction between the cells and the oxidized iron surface. Cells grown in full strength media persisted longer in water with both low (<0.2 mg/L) and high (>0.5 mg/L) free chlorine residuals. Growth media injected with the cells dechlorinated the water allowing adhesion without inactivation. Microelectrode measurements showed a 40-70% drop in free chlorine from the bulk to the coupon surface, which decreased disinfectant potency against adhered cells. Growth and injection conditions clearly influenced cell adhesion and persistence, but permanent colonization of the corroded iron surface by K. pneumoniae was not observed.

  6. [Risk factors for persistent and relapsed childhood-onset asthma].

    PubMed

    Tsukioka, Kazuharu; Toyabe, Shin-ichi; Akazawa, Kouhei

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors responsible for childhood-onset persistent asthma and childhood-onset asthma relapsing in adulthood. We compared a number of potential risk factors for asthma among 608 patients with childhood-onset persistent asthma (onset at 15 years of age or younger) and 286 patients with childhood-onset asthma (onset at 20 years or younger) that had relapsed after a period of remission longer than 2 years. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the factors associated with childhood-onset persistent asthma were a past or present history of allergic rhinitis (p=0.001) and high serum total IgE concentration (> or =300 IU/ml; p=0.007). The factors associated with relapse of childhood-onset asthma were female sex (p=0.001), younger onset age (p=0.036), and smoking (current or former; p<0.001). Our findings indicate that a past or present history of allergic rhinitis and high serum IgE level are significant risk factors for childhood-onset persistent asthma, and that female sex and a history of smoking are risk factors for relapse of childhood-onset asthma. Fortunately, exposure to tobacco smoke is a controllable risk factor.

  7. Persistent asymmetrical priority effects in a California grassland restoration experiment.

    PubMed

    Werner, Chhaya M; Vaughn, Kurt J; Stuble, Katharine L; Wolf, Kristina; Young, Truman P

    2016-09-01

    The order of species arrival can dramatically alter the trajectory of community development. While there is experimental evidence that priority effects can be important drivers of community structure early on, the persistence and duration of these effects is unclear. Here we report on a community assembly experiment in which a mix of four native grasses and a mix of four native forbs were planted on their own, together, or with one-year priority over the other guild. We found positive effects of priority for both grasses and forbs in the initial years of the experiment. However, 6-8 yr after planting, the effectiveness of priority treatments were mixed. Some species became rare, persisting only in treatments in which they had been given priority; others continued to maintain high cover and exhibit a strong positive signal of priority effects; still others remained common but no longer showed a signature of the initial priority effects; and finally, some species became locally extinct across all experimental plots. Grass priority over forbs was strong and persistent, but not forb priority over grasses. Our results demonstrate that the long-term benefits of temporal priority can persist for at least 8 yr for some, but not all species, and these continued effects result in distinct community composition. Manipulating the trajectory of community assembly through priority in seeding has potential as a useful tool for restoration. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  8. Long persistence of rigor mortis at constant low temperature.

    PubMed

    Varetto, Lorenzo; Curto, Ombretta

    2005-01-06

    We studied the persistence of rigor mortis by using physical manipulation. We tested the mobility of the knee on 146 corpses kept under refrigeration at Torino's city mortuary at a constant temperature of +4 degrees C. We found a persistence of complete rigor lasting for 10 days in all the cadavers we kept under observation; and in one case, rigor lasted for 16 days. Between the 11th and the 17th days, a progressively increasing number of corpses showed a change from complete into partial rigor (characterized by partial bending of the articulation). After the 17th day, all the remaining corpses showed partial rigor and in the two cadavers that were kept under observation "à outrance" we found the absolute resolution of rigor mortis occurred on the 28th day. Our results prove that it is possible to find a persistence of rigor mortis that is much longer than the expected when environmental conditions resemble average outdoor winter temperatures in temperate zones. Therefore, this datum must be considered when a corpse is found in those environmental conditions so that when estimating the time of death, we are not misled by the long persistence of rigor mortis.

  9. Factors Affecting the Persistence of Staphylococcus aureus on Fabrics

    PubMed Central

    Wilkoff, Lee J.; Westbrook, Louise; Dixon, Glen J.

    1969-01-01

    The persistence of Staphylococcus aureus (Smith) on wool blanket, wool gabardine, cotton sheeting, cotton knit jersey, cotton terry cloth, and cotton wash-and-wear fabrics was studied. The fabrics were exposed to bacterial populations by three methods: direct contact, aerosol, and a lyophilized mixture of bacteria and dust having a high content of textile fibers. The contaminated fabrics were held in 35 or 78% relative humidities at 25 C. In general, the persistence time of S. aureus populations on fabrics held in 35% relative humidity was substantially longer when the fabrics were contaminated by exposure to aerosolized cultures or to dust containing bacteria than when contaminated by direct contact. In a 78% relative humidity, bacterial populations on the fabrics persisted for substantially shorter periods of time regardless of the mode of contamination or fabric type. Cotton wash-and-wear fabric (treated with a modified triazone resin) was the material on which populations of S. aureus persisted for the shortest time. This organism retained its virulence for Swiss mice after being recovered from wool gabardine swatches held 4 weeks in 35% relative humidity and 6 weeks in 78% relative humidity. Images PMID:5775911

  10. Persistence of Upper Blepharoptosis After Cosmetic Botulinum Toxin Type A.

    PubMed

    Steinsapir, Kenneth D; Groth, Michael J; Boxrud, Cynthia A

    2015-07-01

    Upper eyelid ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin is generally considered short-lived and responsive to apraclonidine ophthalmic drops. The authors present a series with persistent ptosis. To report a series of patients with persistent upper eyelid ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin. A retrospective case review series of 7 patients referred for management after developing visually significant upper eyelid ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin type A treatment. Patients in this series experienced persistent visually significant ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin lasting from 6 weeks to 13 months. Six of the 7 patients were treated with apraclonidine ophthalmic solution. Apraclonidine drops appeared to be clinically effective within 4 to 6 weeks of the resolution of ptosis. Upper eyelid ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin can persist for many months after treatment. Based on this series, the authors propose that apraclonidine drops can be used at the time of initial assessment to predict the relative longevity of ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin treatment (Level 4 evidence recommendation). After a 1-week trial, responders can be advised that ptosis is likely to resolve in 4 to 6 weeks. Nonresponders should be counseled that resolution may take longer than 6 weeks.

  11. Volcanoes and climate: Krakatoa's signature persists in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Gleckler, P J; Wigley, T M L; Santer, B D; Gregory, J M; Achutarao, K; Taylor, K E

    2006-02-09

    We have analysed a suite of 12 state-of-the-art climate models and show that ocean warming and sea-level rise in the twentieth century were substantially reduced by the colossal eruption in 1883 of the volcano Krakatoa in the Sunda strait, Indonesia. Volcanically induced cooling of the ocean surface penetrated into deeper layers, where it persisted for decades after the event. This remarkable effect on oceanic thermal structure is longer lasting than has previously been suspected and is sufficient to offset a large fraction of ocean warming and sea-level rise caused by anthropogenic influences.

  12. [Effect of various coumarins on the intestinal absorption of galactose in vivo (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ruano, M J; Bolufer, J; Larralde, J; Lluch, M

    1975-06-01

    The effect of various coumarins on the active transport of galactose by small intestine in chick and rat was studied, using the in vivo technique of sucessive absorptions. A 10(-4) M concentration of the different coumarins inhibits the absorption of galactose in the chick. This effect persists in successive absorptions without coumarin. In rat, inhibition of galactose active transport by coumarins was observed at 10(-3) M concentration.

  13. Energy Savings Lifetimes and Persistence

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Ian M.; Schiller, Steven R.; Todd, Annika; Billingsley, Megan A.; Goldman, Charles A.; Schwartz, Lisa C.

    2016-02-01

    This technical brief explains the concepts of energy savings lifetimes and savings persistence and discusses how program administrators use these factors to calculate savings for efficiency measures, programs and portfolios. Savings lifetime is the length of time that one or more energy efficiency measures or activities save energy, and savings persistence is the change in savings throughout the functional life of a given efficiency measure or activity. Savings lifetimes are essential for assessing the lifecycle benefits and cost effectiveness of efficiency activities and for forecasting loads in resource planning. The brief also provides estimates of savings lifetimes derived from a national collection of costs and savings for electric efficiency programs and portfolios.

  14. Josephson persistent-current qubit

    PubMed

    Mooij; Orlando; Levitov; Tian; van der Wal CH; Lloyd

    1999-08-13

    A qubit was designed that can be fabricated with conventional electron beam lithography and is suited for integration into a large quantum computer. The qubit consists of a micrometer-sized loop with three or four Josephson junctions; the two qubit states have persistent currents of opposite direction. Quantum superpositions of these states are obtained by pulsed microwave modulation of the enclosed magnetic flux by currents in control lines. A superconducting flux transporter allows for controlled transfer between qubits of the flux that is generated by the persistent currents, leading to entanglement of qubit information.

  15. Persistence to antihypertensive drug classes

    PubMed Central

    Qvarnström, Miriam; Kahan, Thomas; Kieler, Helle; Brandt, Lena; Hasselström, Jan; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Manhem, Karin; Hjerpe, Per; Wettermark, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim was to study persistence to, and switching between, antihypertensive drug classes and to determine factors associated with poor persistence. This was an observational cohort study. The Swedish Primary Care Cardiovascular Database includes data from medical records, socioeconomic data, filled prescriptions, and hospitalizations from national registries for 75,000 patients with hypertension. Patients included in the study were initiated on antihypertensive drug treatment in primary healthcare in 2006 to 2007. We defined class persistence as the proportion remaining on the initial drug class, including 30 days of gap. Patients with a filled prescription of another antihypertensive drug class after discontinuation of the initial drug, including 30 days of gap, were classified as switchers. Persistence to the various drug classes were compared with that for diuretics. We identified 4997 patients (mean age 60 ± 12 years in men and 63 ± 13 years in women). Out of these, 95 (2%) filled their first prescription for fixed combination therapy and 4902 (98%) for monotherapy, including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (37%), angiotensin receptor blockers (4%), beta blockers (21%), calcium channel blockers (8%), and diuretics (28%). Persistence to the initial drug class was 57% after 1 year and 43% after 2 years. There were no differences in persistence between diuretics and any of the other antihypertensive drug classes, after adjustment for confounders. Discontinuation (all adjusted) was more common in men (P = 0.004), younger patients (P < 0.001), those with mild systolic blood pressure elevation (P < 0.001), and patients born outside the Nordic countries (P < 0.001). Among 1295 patients who switched drug class after their first prescription, only 21% had a blood pressure recorded before the switch occurred; and out them 69% still had high blood pressures. In conclusion, there appears to be no difference in drug class

  16. Stability and activity of an Enterobacter aerogenes-specific bacteriophage under simulated gastro-intestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Verthé, K; Possemiers, S; Boon, N; Vaneechoutte, M; Verstraete, W

    2004-09-01

    A bacteriophage, designated UZ1 and showing lytic activity against a clinically important strain (BE1) of Enterobacter aerogenes was isolated from hospital sewage. The stability and lytic activity against this strain under simulated gastro-intestinal conditions was evaluated. After addition of bacteriophage UZ1 to a liquid feed at gastric pH 2, the phage was immediately inactivated and could not be recovered. However, by use of an antacid to neutralize stomach acidity, no significant changes in phage titer were observed after 2 h incubation at 37 degrees C. After supplementing pancreatic juice and further incubation for 4 h, the phage titer remained stable. The persistence of UZ1 in a mixed microbial ecosystem that was representative for the large intestine was monitored using an in vitro simulation of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem. A pulse administration of bacteriophage UZ1 at a concentration of 10(5) plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml to reactor 3 (which simulates the ascending colon) showed that, in the absence of the host, bacteriophage UZ1 persisted for 13 days in the simulated colon, while the theoretical washout was calculated at 16 days. To assess its lytic activity in an intestinal microbial ecosystem, a green fluorescent protein (gfp)-labeled E. aerogenes BE1 strain was constructed and gfp-specific primers were designed in order to quantify the host strain using real-time PCR. It was observed that bacteriophage UZ1 was able to replicate and showed lytic activity against E. aerogenes BE1/ gfp in an intestinal microbial ecosystem. Indeed, after 17 h a 2 log unit reduction of E. aerogenes BE1/ gfp was measured as compared with the assay without bacteriophage UZ1, while the phage titer increased by 2 log units at an initial multiplicity of infection of 0.07 PFU/colony-forming unit. This is the first report of an in vitro model to study bacteriophage activity in the complex intestinal microbial community.

  17. Persistent digestive disorders in the tropics: causative infectious pathogens and reference diagnostic tests

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistent digestive disorders account for considerable disease burden in the tropics. Despite advances in understanding acute gastrointestinal infections, important issues concerning epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and control of most persistent digestive symptomatologies remain to be elucidated. Helminths and intestinal protozoa are considered to play major roles, but the full extent of the aetiologic spectrum is still unclear. We provide an overview of pathogens causing digestive disorders in the tropics and evaluate available reference tests. Methods We searched the literature to identify pathogens that might give rise to persistent diarrhoea, chronic abdominal pain and/or blood in the stool. We reviewed existing laboratory diagnostic methods for each pathogen and stratified them by (i) microscopy; (ii) culture techniques; (iii) immunological tests; and (iv) molecular methods. Pathogen-specific reference tests providing highest diagnostic accuracy are described in greater detail. Results Over 30 pathogens may cause persistent digestive disorders. Bacteria, viruses and parasites are important aetiologic agents of acute and long-lasting symptomatologies. An integrated approach, consisting of stool culture, microscopy and/or specific immunological techniques for toxin, antigen and antibody detection, is required for accurate diagnosis of bacteria and parasites. Molecular techniques are essential for sensitive diagnosis of many viruses, bacteria and intestinal protozoa, and are increasingly utilised as adjuncts for helminth identification. Conclusions Diagnosis of the broad spectrum of intestinal pathogens is often cumbersome. There is a need for rapid diagnostic tests that are simple and affordable for resource-constrained settings, so that the management of patients suffering from persistent digestive disorders can be improved. PMID:23347408

  18. Accumulation of persistent organic pollutants in parasites.

    PubMed

    Yen Le, T T; Rijsdijk, Laurie; Sures, Bern; Hendriks, A Jan

    2014-08-01

    Organisms are simultaneously exposed to various stressors, including parasites and pollutants, that may interact with each other. Research on the accumulation of organic compounds in host-parasite systems is scant compared to studies on parasite-metal interactions and mainly focuses on intestinal endoparasites. We reviewed factors that determine the accumulation of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in host-parasite systems. The wet/dry weight-based concentration of POPs in these parasites is usually lower than that in host tissues because of lower lipid contents in the parasites. However, the fractionation of the pollutants into parasites and their hosts may vary, depending on developmental stages in the life cycle of the parasites. Developmental stages determine the trophic relationship and the taxon of the parasite in the host-parasite systems because of different feeding strategies between the stages. Lipid-corrected concentrations of organic chemicals in the host are usually higher than those in the endoparasites studied. This phenomenon is attributed to a number of physiological and behavioural processes, such as feeding selectivity and strategy and excretion. Moreover, no significant relationship was found between the accumulation factor (i.e. the ratio between the lipid-corrected concentrations in parasites and in their hosts) for polychlorinated biphenyls and either hydrophobicity or molecular size. At the intermediate hydrophobicity, larger and more lipophilic compounds are accumulated at higher levels in both parasites and the host than smaller and less lipophilic compounds. The bioaccumulation of POPs in parasites is affected by some other abiotic, e.g. temperature, and biotic factors, e.g. the number of host species infected by parasites.

  19. Membrane sphingolipids as essential molecular signals for Bacteroides survival in the intestine

    PubMed Central

    An, Dingding; Na, Chongzheng; Bielawski, Jacek; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Kasper, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    As predominant intestinal symbiotic bacteria, Bacteroides are essential in maintaining the health of the normal mammalian host; in return, the host provides a niche with plentiful nutrients for the symbionts. However, the intestinal environment is replete with chemical, physical, and biological challenges that require mechanisms for prompt and adept sensing of and responses to stress if the bacteria are to survive. Herein we propose that to persist in the intestine Bacteroides take advantage of their unusual bacterial sphingolipids to mediate signaling pathways previously known to be available only to higher organisms. Sphingolipids convey diverse signal transduction and stress response pathways and have profound physiological impacts demonstrated in a variety of eukaryotic cell types. We propose a mechanism by which the formation of specific sphingolipid membrane microdomains initiates signaling cascades that facilitate survival strategies within the bacteria. Our preliminary data suggest that sphingolipid signaling plays an important role in Bacteroides physiology, enabling these bacteria to persist in the intestine and to perform other functions related to symbiosis. PMID:20855611

  20. Intestinal Epithelial Sirtuin 1 Regulates Intestinal Inflammation During Aging in Mice by Altering the Intestinal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wellman, Alicia S; Metukuri, Mallikarjuna R; Kazgan, Nevzat; Xu, Xiaojiang; Xu, Qing; Ren, Natalie S X; Czopik, Agnieszka; Shanahan, Michael T; Kang, Ashley; Chen, Willa; Azcarate-Peril, M Andrea; Gulati, Ajay S; Fargo, David C; Guarente, Leonard; Li, Xiaoling

    2017-09-01

    Intestinal epithelial homeostasis is maintained by complex interactions among epithelial cells, commensal gut microorganisms, and immune cells. Disruption of this homeostasis is associated with disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but the mechanisms of this process are not clear. We investigated how Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a conserved mammalian NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase, senses environmental stress to alter intestinal integrity. We performed studies of mice with disruption of Sirt1 specifically in the intestinal epithelium (SIRT1 iKO, villin-Cre+, Sirt1(flox/flox) mice) and control mice (villin-Cre-, Sirt1(flox/flox)) on a C57BL/6 background. Acute colitis was induced in some mice by addition of 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate to drinking water for 5-9 consecutive days. Some mice were given antibiotics via their drinking water for 4 weeks to deplete their microbiota. Some mice were fed with a cholestyramine-containing diet for 7 days to sequester their bile acids. Feces were collected and proportions of microbiota were analyzed by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and quantitative PCR. Intestines were collected from mice and gene expression profiles were compared by microarray and quantitative PCR analyses. We compared levels of specific mRNAs between colon tissues from age-matched patients with ulcerative colitis (n=10) vs without IBD (n=8, controls). Mice with intestinal deletion of SIRT1 (SIRT1 iKO) had abnormal activation of Paneth cells starting at the age of 5-8 months, with increased activation of NF-κB, stress pathways, and spontaneous inflammation at 22-24 months of age, compared with control mice. SIRT1 iKO mice also had altered fecal microbiota starting at 4-6 months of age compared with control mice, in part because of altered bile acid metabolism. Moreover, SIRT1 iKO mice with defective gut microbiota developed more severe colitis than control mice. Intestinal tissues from patients with ulcerative colitis expressed significantly lower

  1. Regulation of intestinal IgA responses

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Na; Hu, Shaomin

    2015-01-01

    The intestine harbors enormous numbers of commensal bacteria and is under frequent attack from food-borne pathogens and toxins. A properly regulated immune response is critical for homeostatic maintenance of commensals and for protection against infection and toxins in the intestine. IgA isotype antibodies function specifically in mucosal sites such as the intestines to help maintain intestinal health by binding to and regulating commensal microbiota, pathogens and toxins. IgA antibodies are produced by intestinal IgA antibody-secreting plasma cells generated in gut-associated lymphoid tissues from naïve B cells in response to stimulations of the intestinal bacteria and components. Research on generation, migration, and maintenance of IgA-secreting cells is important in our effort to understand the biology of IgA responses and to help better design vaccines against intestinal infections. PMID:25837997

  2. The use of lanreotide autogel® in the treatment of intestinal obstruction in a patient with adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lybaert, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal obstruction is a common complication in patients with advanced abdominal or pelvic cancer. The synthetic somatostatin analogue octreotide can help relieve nausea, vomiting and pain in patients with inoperable obstruction. Here, we report a case of recurrent intestinal obstruction in a patient with adenocarcinoma. Although the obstruction was resolved after 3 days of treatment with octreotide, new episodes of obstruction occurred, resulting in a delay of the chemotherapy treatment. After 3 episodes of obstruction, we initiated treatment with a longer-acting somatostatin analogue, lanreotide Autogel® 120 mg, administered once every 4 weeks. The treatment with lanreotide Autogel is being continued, allowing for continuation of the chemotherapy without further episodes of intestinal subocclusion or obstruction. Until November 2013, the patient received eighteen 4-weekly injections of lanreotide Autogel and did not report side effects. This case report demonstrates the successful treatment of intestinal obstruction with lanreotide Autogel in a patient with adenocarcinoma.

  3. Non-Persisting Student Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Lynn H.

    A survey was conducted to determine the characteristics and opinions of the non-persisting students at Moraine Valley Community College. A random sample of 500 non-persisting students was selected, with equal numbers of full-time and part-time ex-students. Separate questionnaires were used for non-persisting full-time and non-persisting part-time…

  4. Longer treatment time and slower ultrafiltration in hemodialysis: associations with reduced mortality in the DOPPS.

    PubMed

    Saran, R; Bragg-Gresham, J L; Levin, N W; Twardowski, Z J; Wizemann, V; Saito, A; Kimata, N; Gillespie, B W; Combe, C; Bommer, J; Akiba, T; Mapes, D L; Young, E W; Port, F K

    2006-04-01

    Longer treatment time (TT) and slower ultrafiltration rate (UFR) are considered advantageous for hemodialysis (HD) patients. The study included 22,000 HD patients from seven countries in the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS). Logistic regression was used to study predictors of TT > 240 min and UFR > 10 ml/h/kg bodyweight. Cox regression was used for survival analyses. Statistical adjustments were made for patient demographics, comorbidities, dose of dialysis (Kt/V), and body size. Europe and Japan had significantly longer (P < 0.0001) average TT than the US (232 and 244 min vs 211 in DOPPS I; 235 and 240 min vs 221 in DOPPS II). Kt/V increased concomitantly with TT in all three regions with the largest absolute difference observed in Japan. TT > 240 min was independently associated with significantly lower relative risk (RR) of mortality (RR = 0.81; P = 0.0005). Every 30 min longer on HD was associated with a 7% lower RR of mortality (RR = 0.93; P < 0.0001). The RR reduction with longer TT was greatest in Japan. A synergistic interaction occurred between Kt/V and TT (P = 0.007) toward mortality reduction. UFR > 10 ml/h/kg was associated with higher odds of intradialytic hypotension (odds ratio = 1.30; P = 0.045) and a higher risk of mortality (RR = 1.09; P = 0.02). Longer TT and higher Kt/V were independently as well as synergistically associated with lower mortality. Rapid UFR during HD was also associated with higher mortality risk. These results warrant a randomized clinical trial of longer dialysis sessions in thrice-weekly HD.

  5. Making web annotations persistent over time

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, Robert; Van De Sompel, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    As Digital Libraries (DL) become more aligned with the web architecture, their functional components need to be fundamentally rethought in terms of URIs and HTTP. Annotation, a core scholarly activity enabled by many DL solutions, exhibits a clearly unacceptable characteristic when existing models are applied to the web: due to the representations of web resources changing over time, an annotation made about a web resource today may no longer be relevant to the representation that is served from that same resource tomorrow. We assume the existence of archived versions of resources, and combine the temporal features of the emerging Open Annotation data model with the capability offered by the Memento framework that allows seamless navigation from the URI of a resource to archived versions of that resource, and arrive at a solution that provides guarantees regarding the persistence of web annotations over time. More specifically, we provide theoretical solutions and proof-of-concept experimental evaluations for two problems: reconstructing an existing annotation so that the correct archived version is displayed for all resources involved in the annotation, and retrieving all annotations that involve a given archived version of a web resource.

  6. Food web persistence in fragmented landscapes.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jinbao; Bearup, Daniel; Blasius, Bernd

    2017-07-26

    Habitat destruction, characterized by patch loss and fragmentation, is a key driver of biodiversity loss. There has been some progress in the theory of spatial food webs; however, to date, practically nothing is known about how patch configurational fragmentation influences multi-trophic food web dynamics. We develop a spatially extended patch-dynamic model for different food webs by linking patch connectivity with trophic-dependent dispersal (i.e. higher trophic levels displaying longer-range dispersal). Using this model, we find that species display different sensitivities to patch loss and fragmentation, depending on their trophic position and the overall food web structure. Relative to other food webs, omnivory structure significantly increases system robustness to habitat destruction, as feeding on different trophic levels increases the omnivore's persistence. Additionally, in food webs with a dispersal-competition trade-off between species, intermediate levels of habitat destruction can enhance biodiversity by creating refuges for the weaker competitor. This demonstrates that maximizing patch connectivity is not always effective for biodiversity maintenance, as in food webs containing indirect competition, doing so may lead to further species loss. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Segmental Absence of Intestinal Musculature in a 64-Year-Old Female: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Nawar, Nariman A.; Sawyer, Phyllis R.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 64 Final Diagnosis: Segmental absence of intestinal musculature Symptoms: Abdominal discomfort Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Colectomy Specialty: Diagnostics, Laboratory Objective: Rare disease Background: Segmental absence of intestinal musculature is a well described entity in premature infants. It presents with peritonitis, bowel perforation, and obstruction. The diagnosis is based on pathologic observation of absence of intestinal musculature. Researchers hypothesized that this entity is a result of a vascular accident during embryogenesis. However, segmental absence of intestinal musculature is no longer limited to the pediatric population. Recently, a few cases have been described in adults with and without significant vascular diseases. This change in the age of the affected population with segmental absence of intestinal musculature makes the understanding of the pathogenesis of this entity even more challenging. Case Report: Here, we report a case of segmental absence of intestinal musculature in a 64-year-old female. The patient presented to the emergency room with sudden onset of abdominal pain and signs of peritonitis. Abdominal computed tomography showed free air in the abdomen. Laparotomy was performed, and a perforation involving the descending colon was identified. Left hemicolectomy was performed. Pathologic examination of the resected colon showed segmental absence of intestinal musculature. Conclusions: Although the pathologic diagnosis of segmental absence of intestinal musculature is straightforward, the assumption that this condition is limited to the pediatric population is a major player in overlooking this diagnosis in adults. Pathologists should be aware that this condition can present in adults and is segmental. Gross and microscopic examination of perforated intestine is required to reach the correct diagnosis. To our knowledge, twelve cases of this entity have been described in adults. Here we present the

  8. Persistence of atopic dermatitis (AD): A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jooho P; Chao, Lucy X; Simpson, Eric L; Silverberg, Jonathan I

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies found conflicting results about whether childhood atopic dermatitis (AD) persists into adulthood. We sought to determine persistence rates and clinical factors associated with prolonged AD. A systematic review was performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, GREAT, LILACS, Web of Science, Academic Search Complete, and Cochrane Library. Meta-analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier plots and random-effects proportional hazards regression. In total, 45 studies including 110,651 subjects spanning 434,992 patient-years from 15 countries were included. In pooled analysis, 80% of childhood AD did not persist by 8 years and less than 5% persisted by 20 years after diagnosis (mean ± SE: 6.1 ± 0.02 years). Children with AD that persisted already for more than 10 years (8.3 ± 0.08 years) had longer persistence than those with 3 (3.2 ± 0.02 years) or 5 (6.8 ± 0.06 years) years of persistence. Children who developed AD by age 2 years had less persistent disease (P < .0001). Persistence was greater in studies using patient-/caregiver-assessed versus physician-assessed outcomes, female versus male patients (P ≤ .0006), but not in those with sensitivity to allergens (P = .90). Three studies found prolonged persistence with more severe AD. Some studies did not capture recurrences later in life. Most childhood AD remitted by adulthood. However, children with already persistent disease, later onset, and/or more severe disease have increased persistence. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Diagnosis of intestinal ischemia in the rat using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, A; Towner, R A; Langer, J C

    1993-01-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis of persistent ischemia after intestinal revascularization has remained an elusive goal. Because magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect changes in tissue water, we studied its efficacy in differentiating ischemic from perfused intestine in an animal model. Six-week-old rats were subjected to (1) 30-min superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion and reperfusion, (2) permanent SMA ligation, or (3) sham operation, and were then imaged for 90 min using a small-animal MRI scanner with T1 weighting (TR = 1000 msec, TE = 25 msec). In an additional group of rats, the experiment was repeated using a new contrast technique consisting of oral ferrite to decrease luminal signal and intravenous gadolinium to increase bowel wall signal. Mean abdominal intensity over the scanning period was calculated for each animal (n = 5 rats per experimental group). Definition of individual bowel loops was subjectively improved in animals scanned with intravenous and oral contrast. Mean abdominal intensity was significantly lower in ligated vs sham rats (43.90 +/- 8 vs 59.63 +/- 6 and 46.19 +/- 6 vs 54.26 +/- 6, with and without contrast, respectively). There was no significant difference in intensity between reperfused and sham animals. MRI differentiated persistently ischemic bowel from viable bowel in this model, both with and without the use of contrast. These data suggest that MRI may have a potential role in the noninvasive diagnosis of persistent intestinal ischemia.

  10. [Intestinal-brain axis. Neuronal and immune-inflammatory mechanisms of brain and intestine pathology].

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, V M; Riabichenko, E V

    2013-01-01

    Mutually directed connections between intestine and brain are implemented by endocrine, neural and immune systems and nonspecific natural immunity. Intestine micro flora as an active participant of intestine-brain axis not only influences intestine functions but also stimulates the development of CNS in perinatal period and interacts with higher nervous centers causing depression and cognitive disorders in pathology. A special role belongs to intestine microglia. Apart from mechanic (protective) and trophic functions for intestine neurons, glia implements neurotransmitter, immunologic, barrier and motoric functions in the intestine. An interconnection between intestine barrier function and hematoencephalic barrier regulation exists. Chronic endotoxinemia as a result of intestine barrier dysfunction forms sustained inflammation state in periventricular zone of the brain with consequent destabilization of hematoencephalic barriers and spread oF inflammation to other parts of the brain resulting in neurodegradation development.

  11. The Contributions of Human Mini-Intestines to the Study of Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huimin; Hasan, Nesrin M; In, Julie G; Estes, Mary K; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Zachos, Nicholas C; Donowitz, Mark

    2017-02-10

    The lack of accessibility to normal and diseased human intestine and the inability to separate the different functional compartments of the intestine even when tissue could be obtained have held back the understanding of human intestinal physiology. Clevers and his associates identified intestinal stem cells and established conditions to grow "mini-intestines" ex vivo in differentiated and undifferentiated conditions. This pioneering work has made a new model of the human intestine available and has begun making contributions to the understanding of human intestinal transport in normal physiologic conditions and the pathophysiology of intestinal diseases. However, this model is reductionist and lacks many of the complexities of normal intestine. Consequently, it is not yet possible to predict how great the advances using this model will be for understanding human physiology and pathophysiology, nor how the model will be modified to include multiple other intestinal cell types and physical forces necessary to more closely approximate normal intestine. This review describes recent studies using mini-intestines, which have readdressed previously established models of normal intestinal transport physiology and newly examined intestinal pathophysiology. The emphasis is on studies with human enteroids grown either as three-dimensional spheroids or two-dimensional monolayers. In addition, comments are provided on mouse studies in cases when human studies have not yet been described.

  12. Persistent papillomatosis associated with immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Duncan, J R; Corbeil, L B; Davies, D H; Schultz, R D; Whitlock, R H

    1975-04-01

    A case report of a young bull with persistent papillomatosis associated with immunodeficiency is presented. Humoral immune responses were normal but cell mediated immunity was deficient. The possible significance of the findings to pathogenesis and therapy of the disease is discussed.

  13. Toward a Persistent Object Base.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    toward Improving the practice of software engineering. Such environments provide support for software development, management, and maintenance. There...standardization can all contribute to the openness, In actual practice , of an environment. Integration means that the components of the environment work together...In a persistent obed base, data abstraction should be practiced so that logical concepts are decoupled from physical representations; richer

  14. Persistence Length of Stable Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Taviare; Mirigian, Matthew; Yasar, M. Selcuk; Ross, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    Microtubules are a vital component of the cytoskeleton. As the most rigid of the cytoskeleton filaments, they give shape and support to the cell. They are also essential for intracellular traffic by providing the roadways onto which organelles are transported, and they are required to reorganize during cellular division. To perform its function in the cell, the microtubule must be rigid yet dynamic. We are interested in how the mechanical properties of stable microtubules change over time. Some ``stable'' microtubules of the cell are recycled after days, such as in the axons of neurons or the cilia and flagella. We measured the persistence length of freely fluctuating taxol-stabilized microtubules over the span of a week and analyzed them via Fourier decomposition. As measured on a daily basis, the persistence length is independent of the contour length. Although measured over the span of the week, the accuracy of the measurement and the persistence length varies. We also studied how fluorescently-labeling the microtubule affects the persistence length and observed that a higher labeling ratio corresponded to greater flexibility. National Science Foundation Grant No: 0928540 to JLR.

  15. Visual Persistence and Adult Dyslexia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Roberta L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Visual persistence was investigated in adults with and without dyslexia in order to determine whether dyslexic adults demonstrate problems similar to those found in childhood dyslexia. Results showed that sensitivity of dyslexic adults was impaired when parts of a test stimulus were presented to adjacent retinal areas, suggesting that under…

  16. Rhinophototherapy in persistent allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Bella, Zsolt; Kiricsi, Ágnes; Viharosné, Éva Dósa-Rácz; Dallos, Attila; Perényi, Ádám; Kiss, Mária; Koreck, Andrea; Kemény, Lajos; Jóri, József; Rovó, László; Kadocsa, Edit

    2017-03-01

    Previous published results have revealed that Rhinolight(®) intranasal phototherapy is safe and effective in intermittent allergic rhinitis. The present objective was to assess whether phototherapy is also safe and effective in persistent allergic rhinitis. Thirty-four patients with persistent allergic rhinitis were randomized into two groups; twenty-five subjects completed the study. The Rhinolight(®) group was treated with a combination of UV-B, UV-A, and high-intensity visible light, while the placebo group received low-intensity visible white light intranasal phototherapy on a total of 13 occasions in 6 weeks. The assessment was based on the diary of symptoms, nasal inspiratory peak flow, quantitative smell threshold, mucociliary transport function, and ICAM-1 expression of the epithelial cells. All nasal symptom scores and nasal inspiratory peak flow measurements improved significantly in the Rhinolight(®) group relative to the placebo group and this finding persisted after 4 weeks of follow-up. The smell and mucociliary functions did not change significantly in either group. The number of ICAM-1 positive cells decreased non-significantly in the Rhinolight(®) group. No severe side-effects were reported during the treatment period. These results suggest that Rhinolight(®) treatment is safe and effective in persistent allergic rhinitis.

  17. Retrospection and Persistent School Absenteeism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ken

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses data based on the perceptions of 128 persistent school absentees on their initial and continued reasons for missing school. The findings suggest that a greater proportion of the students were inclined to blame their institutions, rather than social or psychological factors, for their behavior. (SSH)

  18. Patterns and predictors of persistent opioid use following hip or knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kim, S C; Choudhry, N; Franklin, J M; Bykov, K; Eikermann, M; Lii, J; Fischer, M A; Bateman, B T

    2017-09-01

    The relationship between arthroplasty and long-term opioid use in patients with knee or hip osteoarthritis is not well studied. We examined the prevalence, patterns and predictors of persistent opioid use after hip or knee arthroplasty. Using claims data (2004-2013) from a US commercial health plan, we identified adults who underwent hip or knee arthroplasty and filled ≥1 opioid prescription within 30 days after the surgery. We defined persistent opioid users as patients who filled ≥1 opioid prescription every month during the 1-year postoperative period based on group-based trajectory models. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine preoperative predictors of persistent opioid use after surgery. We identified 57,545 patients who underwent hip or knee arthroplasty. The mean ± SD age was 61.5 ± 7.8 years and 87.1% had any opioid use preoperatively. Overall, 7.6% persistently used opioids after the surgery. Among patients who used opioids in 80% of the time for ≥4 months preoperatively (n = 3023), 72.1% became persistent users. In multivariable analysis, knee arthroplasty vs hip, a longer hospitalization stay, discharge to a rehabilitation facility, preoperative opioid use (e.g., a longer duration and greater dosage and frequency), a higher comorbidity score, back pain, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, migraine and smoking, and benzodiazepine use at baseline were strong predictors for persistent opioid use (C-statistic = 0.917). Over 7% of patients persistently used opioids in the year after hip or knee arthroplasty. Given the adverse health effects of persistent opioid use, strategies need to be developed to prevent persistent opioid use after this common surgery. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of persistence of human papillomavirus infection in men evaluated by sampling multiple genital sites.

    PubMed

    Capra, G; Nyitray, A G; Lu, B; Perino, A; Marci, R; Schillaci, R; Matranga, D; Firenze, A; Caleca, M; Bellavia, C; Guarneri, F; Giuliano, A; Giovannelli, L

    2015-11-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been studied extensively in women, data on male infection are limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate persistence of HPV infection at multiple genital sites in men and to define potential associations with socio-behavioural characteristics. Penile, urethral and seminal specimens were tested by the INNO-LiPA HPV system (Innogenetics) and a PCR assay. Persistence was defined as the detection of same HPV type at ≥ 2 consecutive visits. The Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test were applied to estimate the likelihood of persistence. A total of 50 men (median age: 33 years) were followed for a median of 14.7 months. Altogether, 49%, 36%, 26% and 11% of baseline HPV-positive men had 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-month persistent infection with any HPV type, respectively. The 6-, 12- and 18- month persistence was more common for oncogenic HPV infections; 24-month persistence was similar. The median duration of persistence was 21.7 months for any HPV. The median duration of persistence for any HPV type was significantly longer in the penile sample (22.5 months, 95% CI: 18.3-26.7) than the semen sample (15.3 months, 95% CI: 14.5-16.1). Over a third of type-specific HPV infections in men remained persistent over a 24-month period. The median duration of HPV infection was longer in penile samples compared to seminal samples. As being increasing the attention of HPV vaccination as a potential preventive approach also for men, it is imperative to obtain additional insight on natural history of HPV infection in men, particularly as far as incidence and duration are concerned.

  20. Warming and elevated CO2 lead to longer growing season in temperate grassland

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Observational data over time suggest that as climate has warmed the growing season has lengthened, although experimental warming shortens early-growing species’ life cycles. Are other plant species living longer? We found that experimental warming in a temperate, semi-arid grassland led to earlier l...

  1. Perceptions of Committed Marriages in African American Heterosexual Couples Married 25 Years and Longer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddox, Moshae

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions and provide insight into meanings and factors that contribute to healthy committed marriages among African American heterosexual married couples. This study explored the experiences of couples who had been married for 25 years and longer. This qualitative study was conducted using a…

  2. Perceptions of Committed Marriages in African American Heterosexual Couples Married 25 Years and Longer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddox, Moshae

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions and provide insight into meanings and factors that contribute to healthy committed marriages among African American heterosexual married couples. This study explored the experiences of couples who had been married for 25 years and longer. This qualitative study was conducted using a…

  3. Longer duration of asthma is significantly associated with increased RV/TLC ratio.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Anupama; Rahman, Kazi; Abejie, Belayneh; Jain, Vipul V; Vempilly, Jose Joseph

    2017-03-01

    Although FEV1/FVC ratio has been shown to be negatively associated with longer duration of asthma; an association between RV/TLC ratio and longer duration of asthma has not been explored. Patients with established asthma for more than a year and met inclusion and exclusion criteria were recruited. Data obtained by questionnaire after informed consent was obtained, Pulmonary function tests and laboratory results were collected through chart review. Correlation and multiple linear regressions were used to analyze the data. Among the 93 subjects, 61 were women. The mean age of patients was 58 ± 15 years, and the mean duration of asthma was 21 ± 18 years. The ethnic composition included: Caucasians 64%, Hispanics 28% and other groups 8%. The FEV1/FVC ratio was not significantly associated with duration of asthma (R2 = 0.15, p = 0.05). However, the RV/TLC ratio was significantly associated with duration of asthma (R2 = 0.46, p < 0.001). RV/TLC ratio may be a better indicator than FEV1/FVC ratio to detect airway obstruction related to longer duration of asthma. Lung volume measurements should be done in addition to spirometry to detect changes related to airway obstruction in patients with longer duration of asthma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Can longer forest harvest intervals increase summer streamflow for salmon recovery?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mashel Streamflow Modeling Project in the Mashel River Basin, Washington, is using a watershed-scale ecohydrological model to assess whether longer forest harvest intervals can remediate summer low flow conditions that have contributed to sharply reduced runs of spawning Chin...

  5. Longer Food Chains in Pelagic Ecosystems: Trophic Energetics of Animal Body Size and Metabolic Efficiency.

    PubMed

    McGarvey, Richard; Dowling, Natalie; Cohen, Joel E

    2016-07-01

    Factors constraining the structure of food webs can be investigated by comparing classes of ecosystems. We find that pelagic ecosystems, those based on one-celled primary producers, have longer food chains than terrestrial ecosystems. Yet pelagic ecosystems have lower primary productivity, contrary to the hypothesis that greater energy flows permit higher trophic levels. We hypothesize that longer food chain length in pelagic ecosystems, compared with terrestrial ecosystems, is associated with smaller pelagic animal body size permitting more rapid trophic energy transfer. Assuming negative allometric dependence of biomass production rate on body mass at each trophic level, the lowest three pelagic animal trophic levels are estimated to add biomass more rapidly than their terrestrial counterparts by factors of 12, 4.8, and 2.6. Pelagic animals consequently transport primary production to a fifth trophic level 50-190 times more rapidly than animals in terrestrial webs. This difference overcomes the approximately fivefold slower pelagic basal productivity, energetically explaining longer pelagic food chains. In addition, ectotherms, dominant at lower pelagic animal trophic levels, have high metabolic efficiency, also favoring higher rates of trophic energy transfer in pelagic ecosystems. These two animal trophic flow mechanisms imply longer pelagic food chains, reestablishing an important role for energetics in food web structure.

  6. Assessing Some of the Properties of Longer Blocks in the 1992 NAEP Reading Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donoghue, John R.; Mazzeo, John

    At grades 8 and 12, the 1992 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reading assessment contained a small number of 50-minute blocks in addition to the usual 25-minute blocks. To determine whether to incorporate the 50-minute blocks into the operational scaling, this study sought to determine whether the longer blocks measured a…

  7. 5 CFR 890.1008 - Mandatory debarment for longer than the minimum length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mandatory debarment for longer than the minimum length. 890.1008 Section 890.1008 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... Sanctions Imposed Against Health Care Providers Mandatory Debarments § 890.1008 Mandatory debarment...

  8. 5 CFR 890.1008 - Mandatory debarment for longer than the minimum length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mandatory debarment for longer than the minimum length. 890.1008 Section 890.1008 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... Sanctions Imposed Against Health Care Providers Mandatory Debarments § 890.1008 Mandatory debarment...

  9. Economic comparisons of haul road construction versus forwarding versus longer skid distances

    Treesearch

    Michael D. Erickson; Curt C. Hassler; Chris B. LeDoux

    1992-01-01

    There currently exists no set of basic guidelines for Appalachian loggers to use in the decision making process for selecting the best way to harvest a tract of timber. Specifically, guidelines are needed for deciding between the alternatives of constructing truck haul roads to access an area or other alternatives such as skidding or forwarding timber longer distances...

  10. Economic feasibility of longer management regimes in the Douglas-fir region.

    Treesearch

    Richard. Haynes

    2005-01-01

    The financial returns associated with extended management regimes have been the subject of recurring debate in the Pacific Northwest. Proponents argue that the amount and value of higher quality timber associated with older trees will offset the costs associated with longer management regimes. Land managers and owners express concerns about diminished financial returns...

  11. Why Are Written Picture Naming Latencies (Not) Longer than Spoken Naming?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perret, Cyril; Laganaro, Marina

    2013-01-01

    The comparison between spoken and handwritten production in picture naming tasks represents an important source of information for building models of cognitive processes involved in writing. Studies using this methodology systematically reported longer latencies for handwritten than for spoken production. To uncover the origin of this difference…

  12. Dissemination of English Culture in Chinua Achebe's "No Longer at Ease"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarrinjooee, Bahman; Khatar, Shahla

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with Chinua Achebe's (1930-2013) "No Longer at Ease" (1960) which depicts the dissemination of English culture in Nigeria and its effects on the life and identity of Obi Okonkwo, the Western educated male protagonist. The focus of this paper is on the dissemination of English culture and submission of Nigerian culture in…

  13. The Future Is More than Just Tomorrow: Higher Education, the Economy and the Longer Term

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossick, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    In this commentary the author reflects on longer-term issues facing higher education in the context of recession and crisis in public finance. The views expressed are written from a personal perspective with the aim of stimulating and encouraging a wider and ongoing debate around the themes presented. The author draws upon the findings of three…

  14. No Longer Separate, Not Yet Equal: Race and Class in Elite College Admission and Campus Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espenshade, Thomas J.; Radford, Alexandria Walton

    2009-01-01

    Against the backdrop of today's increasingly multicultural society, are America's elite colleges admitting and successfully educating a diverse student body? "No Longer Separate, Not Yet Equal" pulls back the curtain on the selective college experience and takes a rigorous and comprehensive look at how race and social class impact each stage--from…

  15. Longer-Term Outcomes for Individuals Completing Vocational Education and Training Qualifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Chris

    The longer-term employment and training outcomes of enrollment in vocational education and training (VET) were examined. The study analyzed data from the 1993 "Survey of Training and Education Experience" (STE) and the 1997 "Survey of Education and Training Experience" (SET) which were conducted by the Australian Bureau of…

  16. Fruit flies with additional expression of the elongation factor EF-1 alpha live longer.

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, J C; Walldorf, U; Hug, P; Gehring, W J

    1989-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the decrease in protein synthesis that accompanies aging is preceded by a decrease in elongation factor EF-1 alpha protein and mRNA. Here we show that Drosophila transformed with a P-element vector containing an EF-1 alpha gene under control of hsp70 regulatory sequences have a longer life-span than control flies. Images PMID:2508089

  17. Can longer forest harvest intervals increase summer streamflow for salmon recovery?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mashel Streamflow Modeling Project in the Mashel River Basin, Washington, is using a watershed-scale ecohydrological model to assess whether longer forest harvest intervals can remediate summer low flow conditions that have contributed to sharply reduced runs of spawning Chin...

  18. 36 CFR 14.52 - Termination of right-of-way no longer needed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Termination of right-of-way no longer needed. 14.52 Section 14.52 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RIGHTS-OF-WAY Under Title 23, U.S.C. (Interstate and Defense Highway System) § 14...

  19. 36 CFR 14.52 - Termination of right-of-way no longer needed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Termination of right-of-way no longer needed. 14.52 Section 14.52 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RIGHTS-OF-WAY Under Title 23, U.S.C. (Interstate and Defense Highway System) § 14...

  20. 36 CFR 14.52 - Termination of right-of-way no longer needed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Termination of right-of-way no longer needed. 14.52 Section 14.52 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RIGHTS-OF-WAY Under Title 23, U.S.C. (Interstate and Defense Highway System) § 14...

  1. 36 CFR 14.52 - Termination of right-of-way no longer needed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Termination of right-of-way no longer needed. 14.52 Section 14.52 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RIGHTS-OF-WAY Under Title 23, U.S.C. (Interstate and Defense Highway System) § 14...

  2. 36 CFR 14.52 - Termination of right-of-way no longer needed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Termination of right-of-way no longer needed. 14.52 Section 14.52 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RIGHTS-OF-WAY Under Title 23, U.S.C. (Interstate and Defense Highway System) § 14...

  3. The Future Is More than Just Tomorrow: Higher Education, the Economy and the Longer Term

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossick, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    In this commentary the author reflects on longer-term issues facing higher education in the context of recession and crisis in public finance. The views expressed are written from a personal perspective with the aim of stimulating and encouraging a wider and ongoing debate around the themes presented. The author draws upon the findings of three…

  4. 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene No Longer Regulated as a Volatile Organic Compound

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Protection Agency has issued a final rule that identified 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (also known as HFO-1234yf) as a chemical compound that will no longer be regulated as a VOC under the Clean Air Act.

  5. Looking beyond Enrollment: The Causal Effect of Need-Based Grants on College Access, Persistence, and Graduation. An NCPR Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castleman, Benjamin L.; Long, Bridget Terry

    2013-01-01

    Gaps in average college success among students of differing backgrounds have persisted in the United States for decades. One of the primary ways governments have attempted to ameliorate such gaps is by providing need-based grants, but little evidence exists on the impacts of such aid on longer term outcomes such as college persistence and degree…

  6. Looking beyond Enrollment: The Causal Effect of Need-Based Grants on College Access, Persistence, and Graduation. NBER Working Paper No. 19306

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castleman, Benjamin L.; Long, Bridget Terry

    2013-01-01

    Gaps in average college success among students of differing backgrounds have persisted in the United States for decades. One of the primary ways governments have attempted to ameliorate such gaps is by providing need-based grants, but little evidence exists on the impacts of such aid on longer-term outcomes such as college persistence and degree…

  7. Looking beyond Enrollment: The Causal Effect of Need-Based Grants on College Access, Persistence, and Graduation. NBER Working Paper No. 19306

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castleman, Benjamin L.; Long, Bridget Terry

    2013-01-01

    Gaps in average college success among students of differing backgrounds have persisted in the United States for decades. One of the primary ways governments have attempted to ameliorate such gaps is by providing need-based grants, but little evidence exists on the impacts of such aid on longer-term outcomes such as college persistence and degree…

  8. Lactase non-persistence is directed by DNA variation-dependent epigenetic aging

    PubMed Central

    Labrie, Viviane; Buske, Orion J; Oh, Edward; Jeremian, Richie; Ptak, Carolyn; Gasiūnas, Giedrius; Maleckas, Almantas; Petereit, Rūta; Žvirbliene, Aida; Adamonis, Kęstutis; Kriukienė, Edita; Koncevičius, Karolis; Gordevičius, Juozas; Nair, Akhil; Zhang, Aiping; Ebrahimi, Sasha; Oh, Gabriel; Šikšnys, Virginijus; Kupčinskas, Limas; Brudno, Michael; Petronis, Arturas

    2016-01-01

    Inability to digest lactose due to lactase non-persistence is a common trait in adult mammals, with the exception of certain human populations that exhibit lactase persistence. It is not clear how the lactase gene can be dramatically downregulated with age in most individuals, but remains active in some. We performed a comprehensive epigenetic study of the human and mouse intestine using chromosome-wide DNA modification profiling and targeted bisulfite sequencing. Epigenetically-controlled regulatory elements were found to account for the differences in lactase mRNA levels between individuals, intestinal cell types and species. The importance of these regulatory elements in modulating lactase mRNA levels was confirmed by CRISPR-Cas9-induced deletions. Genetic factors contribute to epigenetic changes occurring with age at the regulatory elements, as lactase persistence- and non-persistence-DNA haplotypes demonstrated markedly different epigenetic aging. Thus, genetic factors facilitate a gradual accumulation of epigenetic changes with age to affect phenotypic outcome. PMID:27159559

  9. Early Persistent Blood Eosinophilia in Necrotizing Enterocolitis is a Predictor of Late Complications

    PubMed Central

    Wahidi, Lila S.; Sherman, Jan; Miller, Mindy M.; Zaghouani, Habib; Sherman, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Eosinophils infiltrate into intestinal tissue during necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and adult bowel diseases. We theorized that epithelial damage causes eosinophilic activation and recruitment during NEC onset. Objective We studied the relationship between persistent blood eosinophilia and medical or surgical complications during NEC. Methods NEC cases and controls at MU Children's Hospital (2008 - 2013) underwent review. A Likert scale measured the severity of NEC severity. We utilized a SPSS database for statistical analyses. Results Among 50 cases with NEC, Group 1 infants (n = 15) had eosinophilia at less than two days after onset; Group 2 had NEC but no persistent eosinophilia (n = 25). Control infants without NEC were matched for birth weight and gestational age (Group 3, n = 46). Group 4 included four preterm infants with infection and ≤ 5 days of eosinophilia. Hematologic assessment defined persistent eosinophilia as ≥ 5% eosinophils for ≥ 5 days after NEC onset. Absolute eosinophil counts were 2 times as high in Group 1 versus Group 2 (p = .002). Group 1 had a mean duration of eosinophilia of 8 days versus one day in Group 2 (p<.001). A Likert score of NEC severity was 3-fold higher in Group 1 versus Group 2 (p<.001). Compared to Group 2, Group 1 infants were 8 times more likely to have hepatic fibrosis or intestinal strictures. Conclusions Early persistent blood eosinophilia is not currently a predictor of complications after the onset of NEC. This biomarker identifies immature infants at high risk for adverse outcomes during NEC convalescence. PMID:26159186

  10. Surgical Aspects of Intestinal Ascariasis

    PubMed Central

    Ajao, Oluwole G.; Solanke, Toriola F.

    1977-01-01

    At the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, a common differential diagnosis of acute abdomen is intestinal ascariasis. This condition mimics many causes of acute abdomen so that accurate pre-operative diagnosis depends mainly on a high index of suspicion. The purpose of this paper is to call attention to this condition which is prevalent in tropical countries, where preventive and social medicine have not reached their peak, and to review the pathological processes resulting from this disease. PMID:875064

  11. [Water and intestinal parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Romanenko, N A; Belova, E G; Baburina, L V; Novosil'tsev, G I; Chernyshenko, A I

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents data on the rates of Lamblia cyst dissemination of surface water sources in foreign countries, the Russian Federation, Moscow, and the Moscow Region. It shows a role of drinking water in the spread of intestinal parasitic diseases. In accordance with parasitological parameters, specific data on improvement of methodological control of water quality are presented. The dosages of ultraviolet radiation are given in relation to water decontamination of parasitic disease germs.

  12. Glycoprotein biosynthesis in small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young S.; Perdomo, Jose

    1972-01-01

    Rat small intestinal mucosa was examined for ability to produce mucins with human blood group A, B, and H activity. Blood group activity of the mucins was compared to antigenic activity of red blood cells in individual rats and the enzymatic basis for differences was investigated. Red cells in all the rats examined contained human blood group A and B antigens. All rats synthesized intestinal mucins having B and H antigenic activity but 57% failed to produce mucins with blood group A activity (A-); the remaining 43% (A+) produced A substance. The activities of five glycosyltransferases including α(1→2) fucosyltransferase, the determinant of human secretor status, were measured in the intestine of A+ and A- rats. Four enzymes were the same in both groups, while the fifth, N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase, was present only in A+ rats. The specificity of this latter enzyme, as found in the rat, appeared similar to that in humans, since it catalyzed addition of N-acetyl-D-galactosamine only to acceptors which had the H determinant structure. In the presence of the enzyme, A- mucin could be converted to A+ mucin; this was shown both by hemagglutination inhibition and immunoprecipitin studies of the products of incubation of A- mucin with UDP-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine and the enzyme. These studies indicate that the difference between A+ and A- rats is due to the apparent absence of N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase in the intestinal mucosa of A- rats. These rats may provide experimental models for studies on the effect of ABO and secretor status on susceptibility to ulceration and carcinogenesis. Images PMID:4112001

  13. How to Sync to the Beat of a Persistent Fractal Metronome without Falling Off the Treadmill?

    PubMed Central

    Roerdink, Melvyn; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Marmelat, Vivien; Beek, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    In rehabilitation, rhythmic acoustic cues are often used to improve gait. However, stride-time fluctuations become anti-persistent with such pacing, thereby deviating from the characteristic persistent long-range correlations in stride times of self-paced walking healthy adults. Recent studies therefore experimented with metronomes with persistence in interbeat intervals and successfully evoked persistent stride-time fluctuations. The objective of this study was to examine how participants couple their gait to a persistent metronome, evoking persistently longer or shorter stride times over multiple consecutive strides, without wandering off the treadmill. Twelve healthy participants walked on a treadmill in self-paced, isochronously paced and non-isochronously paced conditions, the latter with anti-persistent, uncorrelated and persistent correlations in interbeat intervals. Stride-to-stride fluctuations of stride times, stride lengths and stride speeds were assessed with detrended fluctuation analysis, in conjunction with an examination of the coupling between stride times and stride lengths. Stride-speed fluctuations were anti-persistent for all conditions. Stride-time and stride-length fluctuations were persistent for self-paced walking and anti-persistent for isochronous pacing. Both stride times and stride lengths changed from anti-persistence to persistence over the four non-isochronous metronome conditions, accompanied by an increasingly stronger coupling between these gait parameters, with peak values for the persistent metronomes. These results revealed that participants were able to follow the beat of a persistent metronome without falling off the treadmill by strongly coupling stride-length fluctuations to the stride-time fluctuations elicited by persistent metronomes, so as to prevent large positional displacements along the treadmill. For self-paced walking, in contrast, this coupling was very weak. In combination, these results challenge the premise

  14. [Chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia].

    PubMed

    Castillo, T; Navarrete, J; Celestina, A

    1989-01-01

    Much has been written about gastric mucosae behavior and the occurrence of intestinal metaplasia. The aim of this paper is to learn something more about these matters in peruvian population. We selected 100 patients with endoscopically no localized lesions between 30 to 70 years of age. We took 8 samples of gastric mucosae in each patient which were carefully examined for the presence of inflammatory changes, settle the line type between antral and fundic mucosae and the frequency of intestinal metaplasia finding. The results showed disagreement between endoscopic and histological findings, so we conclude it is better to diagnose chronic gastritis on the basis of histological parameters. The line between antral and fundic mucosae was of the close type one found in 87% of all cases and it advanced proximally with increasing age. Intestinal metaplasia was present in 46% of the whole number of patients and the rate of occurrence increased in 50% over 50 years age. These findings will let us compare future investigations of gastric mucosae behavior with localized benign or malign lesions.

  15. Management of acute intestinal failure.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Keith R

    2011-08-01

    Intestinal failure (IF) occurs when intestinal absorptive function is inadequate to maintain hydration and nutrition without enteral or parenteral supplements. It has been classified into three types depending on duration of nutrition support and reversibility. Type 1 IF is commonly seen in the peri-operative period as ileus and usually spontaneously resolves within 14 d. Type 2 IF is uncommon and is often associated with an intra-abdominal catastrophe, intestinal resection, sepsis, metabolic disturbances and undernutrition. Type 3 IF is a chronic condition in a metabolically stable patient, which usually requires long-term parenteral nutrition. This paper focuses on Types 1 and 2 IF (or acute IF) that are usually found in surgical wards. The objectives of this paper are to review the incidence, aetiology, prevention, management principles and outcome of acute IF. The paper discusses the resources necessary to manage acute IF, the indications for inter-hospital transfer and the practicalities of how to transfer and receive a patient with acute IF.

  16. Redox biology of the intestine

    PubMed Central

    Circu, Magdalena L.; Aw, Tak Yee

    2011-01-01

    The intestinal tract, known for its capability for self-renew, represents the first barrier of defense between the organism and its luminal environment. The thiol/disulfide redox systems comprising the glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG), cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS) and reduced and oxidized thioredoxin (Trx/TrxSS) redox couples play important roles in preserving tissue redox homeostasis, metabolic functions, and cellular integrity. Control of the thiol-disulfide status at the luminal surface is essential for maintaining mucus fluidity and absorption of nutrients, and protection against chemical-induced oxidant injury. Within intestinal cells, these redox couples preserve an environment that supports physiological processes and orchestrates networks of enzymatic reactions against oxidative stress. In this review, we focus on the intestinal redox and antioxidant systems, their subcellular compartmentation, redox signaling and epithelial turnover, and contribution of luminal microbiota, key aspects that are relevant to understanding redox-dependent processes in gut biology with implications for degenerative digestive disorders, such as inflammation and cancer. PMID:21831010

  17. Protozoon infections and intestinal permeability.

    PubMed

    Dagci, Hande; Ustun, Sebnem; Taner, Memduh S; Ersoz, Galip; Karacasu, Ferit; Budak, Seza

    2002-01-01

    Intestinal permeability (IP) studies using some macromolecules have been assumed to demonstrate the intactness of intestinal mucosa. The aim of the present study is to determine the changes in IP among patients with protozoan infections. Thirty nine patients with protozoan infections and ten healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Protozoa were diagnosed by Native-lugol, Richie and Trichrome staining of faeces. IP was evaluated by diethyl triamine penta acetic acid labeled with 99m Technetium (99mTc labeled DTPA) assay. The IP was found to have increased in patients with protozoan infections compared with control patients (7.20+/-5.52 vs. 4.47+/-0.65%, P=0.0017). The IP values were 9.91+/-10.05% in Giardia intestinalis group, 6.81+/-2.25% in Blastocystis hominis group, 5.78+/-2.84% in Entamoeba coli group. In comparison with the control group, the IP was significantly higher in G. intestinalis and B. hominis patients (P=0.0025, P=0.00037, respectively), but not in E. coli patients. In conclusion, the IP increases in patients with G. intestinalis and B. hominis but not with E. coli infection. This finding supports the view that IP increases during the course of protozoan infections which cause damage to the intestinal wall while non-pathogenic protozoan infections have no effect on IP. The increase in IP in patients with B. hominis brings forth the idea that B. hominis can be a pathogenic protozoan.

  18. INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA IN DIGESTIVE DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Passos, Maria do Carmo Friche; Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, especially after the development of sophisticated metagenomic studies, research on the intestinal microbiota has increased, radically transforming our knowledge about the microbiome and its association with health maintenance and disease development in humans. Increasing evidence has shown that a permanent alteration in microbiota composition or function (dysbiosis) can alter immune responses, metabolism, intestinal permeability, and digestive motility, thereby promoting a proinflammatory state. Such alterations can mainly impair the host's immune and metabolic functions, thus favoring the onset of diseases such as diabetes, obesity, digestive, neurological, autoimmune, and neoplastic diseases. This comprehensive review is a compilation of the available literature on the formation of the complex intestinal ecosystem and its impact on the incidence of diseases such as obesity, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and digestive neoplasms. Alterations in the composition and function of the gastrointestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) have a direct impact on human health and seem to have an important role in the pathogenesis of several gastrointestinal diseases, whether inflammatory, metabolic, or neoplastic ones.

  19. Th17 Cells Coordinate with Th22 Cells in Maintaining Homeostasis of Intestinal Tissues and both are Depleted in SIV-Infected Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    Th17 and Th22 cells are thought to function as innate regulators of mucosal antimicrobial responses, tissue inflammation and mucosal integrity, yet their role in persistent SIV infection is still unclear. Here we compared Th17 and Th22 cells in their phenotype, effector/cytokine function, and frequency in blood and intestinal mucosal tissues, and correlate levels with mucosal damage in SIV-infected rhesus macaques. We found that Th17/Th22 cells share similar features in that both highly produce TNF-α and IL-2 and express CCR5 in intestinal tissues; yet very few show cytotoxic functions, as evidenced by lack of IFN-γ and granzyme B production. Further, Th17/Th22 cells display distinct tissue-specific distributions. Both Th17 and Th22 cells and cytokine secretion were significantly depleted in both blood and intestine in chronically SIV-infected macaques. The frequency of Th17 and Th22 cells in the intestine positively correlated with percentages of intestinal CD4+ T cells and negatively with damage to intestinal mucosa, and plasma viral loads in SIV infection. These findings indicate Th17 and Th22 cells share considerable functions, and may coordinate in innate mucosal immune responses, and their regional loss in the intestine may be associated with local mucosal immune dysfunction in persistent HIV/SIV infection. PMID:25364618

  20. Th17 Cells Coordinate with Th22 Cells in Maintaining Homeostasis of Intestinal Tissues and both are Depleted in SIV-Infected Macaques.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Veazey, Ronald S

    2014-05-01

    Th17 and Th22 cells are thought to function as innate regulators of mucosal antimicrobial responses, tissue inflammation and mucosal integrity, yet their role in persistent SIV infection is still unclear. Here we compared Th17 and Th22 cells in their phenotype, effector/cytokine function, and frequency in blood and intestinal mucosal tissues, and correlate levels with mucosal damage in SIV-infected rhesus macaques. We found that Th17/Th22 cells share similar features in that both highly produce TNF-α and IL-2 and express CCR5 in intestinal tissues; yet very few show cytotoxic functions, as evidenced by lack of IFN-γ and granzyme B production. Further, Th17/Th22 cells display distinct tissue-specific distributions. Both Th17 and Th22 cells and cytokine secretion were significantly depleted in both blood and intestine in chronically SIV-infected macaques. The frequency of Th17 and Th22 cells in the intestine positively correlated with percentages of intestinal CD4+ T cells and negatively with damage to intestinal mucosa, and plasma viral loads in SIV infection. These findings indicate Th17 and Th22 cells share considerable functions, and may coordinate in innate mucosal immune responses, and their regional loss in the intestine may be associated with local mucosal immune dysfunction in persistent HIV/SIV infection.