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Sample records for longin domain regulates

  1. Comparative analysis of plant genomes allows the definition of the "Phytolongins": a novel non-SNARE longin domain protein family

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Subcellular trafficking is a hallmark of eukaryotic cells. Because of their pivotal role in the process, a great deal of attention has been paid to the SNARE proteins. Most R-SNAREs, or "longins", however, also possess a highly conserved, N-terminal fold. This "longin domain" is known to play multiple roles in regulating SNARE activity and targeting via interaction with other trafficking proteins. However, the diversity and complement of longins in eukaryotes is poorly understood. Results Our comparative genome survey identified a novel family of longin-related proteins, dubbed the "Phytolongins" because they are specific to land plants. Phytolongins share with longins the N-terminal longin domain and the C-terminal transmembrane domain; however, in the central region, the SNARE motif is replaced by a novel region. Phylogenetic analysis pinpoints the Phytolongins as a derivative of the plant specific VAMP72 longin sub-family and allows elucidation of Phytolongin evolution. Conclusion "Longins" have been defined as R-SNAREs composed of both a longin domain and a SNARE motif. However, expressed gene isoforms and splice variants of longins are examples of non-SNARE motif containing longins. The discovery of Phytolongins, a family of non-SNARE longin domain proteins, together with recent evidence on the conservation of the longin-like fold in proteins involved in both vesicle fusion (e.g. the Trs20 tether) and vesicle formation (e.g. σ and μ adaptin) highlight the importance of the longin-like domain in protein trafficking and suggest that it was one of the primordial building blocks of the eukaryotic membrane-trafficking machinery. PMID:19889231

  2. Longins: a new evolutionary conserved VAMP family sharing a novel SNARE domain.

    PubMed

    Filippini, F; Rossi, V; Galli, T; Budillon, A; D'Urso, M; D'Esposito, M

    2001-07-01

    This article describes the discovery of a novel SNARE domain that might be involved in the regulation of membrane fusion. This domain is shared by a novel family of VAMPs called long VAMPs or longins. Members of this family are more conserved among eukaryotes than are classical VAMPs, possibly because of their underlying basic SNARE function.

  3. Longin and GAF domains: structural evolution and adaptation to the subcellular trafficking machinery.

    PubMed

    De Franceschi, Nicola; Wild, Klemens; Schlacht, Alexander; Dacks, Joel B; Sinning, Irmgard; Filippini, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Endomembrane trafficking is one of the most prominent cytological features of eukaryotes. Given their widespread distribution and specialization, coiled-coil domains, coatomer domains, small GTPases and Longin domains are considered primordial 'building blocks' of the membrane trafficking machineries. Longin domains are conserved across eukaryotes and were likely to be present in the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor. The Longin fold is based on the α-β-α sandwich architecture and a unique topology, possibly accounting for the special adaptation to the eukaryotic trafficking machinery. The ancient Per ARNT Sim (PAS) and cGMP-specific phosphodiesterases, Adenylyl cyclases and FhlA (GAF) family domains show a similar architecture, and the identification of prokaryotic counterparts of GAF domains involved in trafficking provides an additional connection for the endomembrane system back into the pre-eukaryotic world. Proteome-wide, comparative bioinformatic analyses of the domains reveal three binding regions (A, B and C) mediating either specific or conserved protein-protein interactions. While the A region mediates intra- and inter-molecular interactions, the B region is involved in binding small GTPases, thus providing an evolutionary connection among major building blocks in the endomembrane system. Finally, we propose that the peculiar interaction surface of the C region of the Longin domain allowed it to extensively integrate into the endomembrane trafficking machinery in the earliest stages of building the eukaryotic cell.

  4. Alternative splicing of the human gene SYBL1 modulates protein domain architecture of longin VAMP7/TI-VAMP, showing both non-SNARE and synaptobrevin-like isoforms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The control of intracellular vesicle trafficking is an ideal target to weigh the role of alternative splicing in shaping genomes to make cells. Alternative splicing has been reported for several Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor Attachment protein REceptors of the vesicle (v-SNAREs) or of the target membrane (t-SNARES), which are crucial to intracellular membrane fusion and protein and lipid traffic in Eukaryotes. However, splicing has not yet been investigated in Longins, i.e. the most widespread v-SNAREs. Longins are essential in Eukaryotes and prototyped by VAMP7, Sec22b and Ykt6, sharing a conserved N-terminal Longin domain which regulates membrane fusion and subcellular targeting. Human VAMP7/TI-VAMP, encoded by gene SYBL1, is involved in multiple cell pathways, including control of neurite outgrowth. Results Alternative splicing of SYBL1 by exon skipping events results in the production of a number of VAMP7 isoforms. In-frame or frameshift coding sequence modifications modulate domain architecture of VAMP7 isoforms, which can lack whole domains or domain fragments and show variant or extra domains. Intriguingly, two main types of VAMP7 isoforms either share the inhibitory Longin domain and lack the fusion-promoting SNARE motif, or vice versa. Expression analysis in different tissues and cell lines, quantitative real time RT-PCR and confocal microscopy analysis of fluorescent protein-tagged isoforms demonstrate that VAMP7 variants have different tissue specificities and subcellular localizations. Moreover, design and use of isoform-specific antibodies provided preliminary evidence for the existence of splice variants at the protein level. Conclusions Previous evidence on VAMP7 suggests inhibitory functions for the Longin domain and fusion/growth promoting activity for the Δ-longin molecule. Thus, non-SNARE isoforms with Longin domain and non-longin SNARE isoforms might have somehow opposite regulatory functions. When considering splice

  5. δ-COP contains a helix C-terminal to its longin domain key to COPI dynamics and function

    PubMed Central

    Arakel, Eric C.; Richter, Kora P.; Clancy, Anne; Schwappach, Blanche

    2016-01-01

    Membrane recruitment of coatomer and formation of coat protein I (COPI)-coated vesicles is crucial to homeostasis in the early secretory pathway. The conformational dynamics of COPI during cargo capture and vesicle formation is incompletely understood. By scanning the length of δ-COP via functional complementation in yeast, we dissect the domains of the δ-COP subunit. We show that the μ-homology domain is dispensable for COPI function in the early secretory pathway, whereas the N-terminal longin domain is essential. We map a previously uncharacterized helix, C-terminal to the longin domain, that is specifically required for the retrieval of HDEL-bearing endoplasmic reticulum-luminal residents. It is positionally analogous to an unstructured linker that becomes helical and membrane-facing in the open form of the AP2 clathrin adaptor complex. Based on the amphipathic nature of the critical helix it may probe the membrane for lipid packing defects or mediate interaction with cargo and thus contribute to stabilizing membrane-associated coatomer. PMID:27298352

  6. Increased activity of the Vesicular Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide-sensitive Factor Attachment Protein Receptor TI-VAMP/VAMP7 by Tyrosine Phosphorylation in the Longin Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Burgo, Andrea; Casano, Alessandra M.; Kuster, Aurelia; Arold, Stefan T.; Wang, Guan; Nola, Sébastien; Verraes, Agathe; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Galli, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular (v)- and target (t)-SNAREs play essential roles in intracellular membrane fusion through the formation of cytoplasmic α-helical bundles. Several v-SNAREs have a Longin N-terminal extension that, by promoting a closed conformation, plays an autoinhibitory function and decreases SNARE complex formation and membrane fusion efficiency. The molecular mechanism leading to Longin v-SNARE activation is largely unknown. Here we find that exocytosis mediated by the Longin v-SNARE TI-VAMP/VAMP7 is activated by tonic treatment with insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 but not by depolarization and intracellular calcium rise. In search of a potential downstream mechanism, we found that TI-VAMP is phosphorylated in vitro by c-Src kinase on tyrosine 45 of the Longin domain. Accordingly, a mutation of tyrosine 45 into glutamate, but not phenylalanine, activates both t-SNARE binding and exocytosis. Activation of TI-VAMP-mediated exocytosis thus relies on tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:23471971

  7. Increased activity of the vesicular soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor TI-VAMP/VAMP7 by tyrosine phosphorylation in the Longin domain.

    PubMed

    Burgo, Andrea; Casano, Alessandra M; Kuster, Aurelia; Arold, Stefan T; Wang, Guan; Nola, Sébastien; Verraes, Agathe; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Galli, Thierry

    2013-04-26

    Vesicular (v)- and target (t)-SNAREs play essential roles in intracellular membrane fusion through the formation of cytoplasmic α-helical bundles. Several v-SNAREs have a Longin N-terminal extension that, by promoting a closed conformation, plays an autoinhibitory function and decreases SNARE complex formation and membrane fusion efficiency. The molecular mechanism leading to Longin v-SNARE activation is largely unknown. Here we find that exocytosis mediated by the Longin v-SNARE TI-VAMP/VAMP7 is activated by tonic treatment with insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 but not by depolarization and intracellular calcium rise. In search of a potential downstream mechanism, we found that TI-VAMP is phosphorylated in vitro by c-Src kinase on tyrosine 45 of the Longin domain. Accordingly, a mutation of tyrosine 45 into glutamate, but not phenylalanine, activates both t-SNARE binding and exocytosis. Activation of TI-VAMP-mediated exocytosis thus relies on tyrosine phosphorylation.

  8. The longin SNARE VAMP7/TI-VAMP adopts a closed conformation.

    PubMed

    Vivona, Sandro; Liu, Corey W; Strop, Pavel; Rossi, Valeria; Filippini, Francesco; Brunger, Axel T

    2010-06-01

    SNARE protein complexes are key mediators of exocytosis by juxtaposing opposing membranes, leading to membrane fusion. SNAREs generally consist of one or two core domains that can form a four-helix bundle with other SNARE core domains. Some SNAREs, such as syntaxin target-SNAREs and longin vesicular-SNAREs, have independent, folded N-terminal domains that can interact with their respective SNARE core domains and thereby affect the kinetics of SNARE complex formation. This autoinhibition mechanism is believed to regulate the role of the longin VAMP7/TI-VAMP in neuronal morphogenesis. Here we use nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to study the longin-SNARE core domain interaction for VAMP7. Using complete backbone resonance assignments, chemical shift perturbations analysis, and hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments, we conclusively show that VAMP7 adopts a preferentially closed conformation in solution. Taken together, the closed conformation of longins is conserved, in contrast to the syntaxin family of SNAREs for which mixtures of open and closed states have been observed. This may indicate different regulatory mechanisms for SNARE complexes containing syntaxins and longins, respectively.

  9. The Longin SNARE VAMP7/TI-VAMP Adopts a Closed Conformation*

    PubMed Central

    Vivona, Sandro; Liu, Corey W.; Strop, Pavel; Rossi, Valeria; Filippini, Francesco; Brunger, Axel T.

    2010-01-01

    SNARE protein complexes are key mediators of exocytosis by juxtaposing opposing membranes, leading to membrane fusion. SNAREs generally consist of one or two core domains that can form a four-helix bundle with other SNARE core domains. Some SNAREs, such as syntaxin target-SNAREs and longin vesicular-SNAREs, have independent, folded N-terminal domains that can interact with their respective SNARE core domains and thereby affect the kinetics of SNARE complex formation. This autoinhibition mechanism is believed to regulate the role of the longin VAMP7/TI-VAMP in neuronal morphogenesis. Here we use nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to study the longin-SNARE core domain interaction for VAMP7. Using complete backbone resonance assignments, chemical shift perturbations analysis, and hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments, we conclusively show that VAMP7 adopts a preferentially closed conformation in solution. Taken together, the closed conformation of longins is conserved, in contrast to the syntaxin family of SNAREs for which mixtures of open and closed states have been observed. This may indicate different regulatory mechanisms for SNARE complexes containing syntaxins and longins, respectively. PMID:20378544

  10. Subcellular localization and trafficking of phytolongins (non-SNARE longins) in the plant secretory pathway

    PubMed Central

    de Marcos Lousa, Carine; Soubeyrand, Eric; Bolognese, Paolo; Wattelet-Boyer, Valerie; Bouyssou, Guillaume; Marais, Claireline; Boutté, Yohann; Filippini, Francesco; Moreau, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    SNARE proteins are central elements of the machinery involved in membrane fusion of eukaryotic cells. In animals and plants, SNAREs have diversified to sustain a variety of specific functions. In animals, R-SNARE proteins called brevins have diversified; in contrast, in plants, the R-SNARE proteins named longins have diversified. Recently, a new subfamily of four longins named ‘phytolongins’ (Phyl) was discovered. One intriguing aspect of Phyl proteins is the lack of the typical SNARE motif, which is replaced by another domain termed the ‘Phyl domain’. Phytolongins have a rather ubiquitous tissue expression in Arabidopsis but still await intracellular characterization. In this study, we found that the four phytolongins are distributed along the secretory pathway. While Phyl2.1 and Phyl2.2 are strictly located at the endoplasmic reticulum network, Phyl1.2 associates with the Golgi bodies, and Phyl1.1 locates mainly at the plasma membrane and partially in the Golgi bodies and post-Golgi compartments. Our results show that export of Phyl1.1 from the endoplasmic reticulum depends on the GTPase Sar1, the Sar1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor Sec12, and the SNAREs Sec22 and Memb11. In addition, we have identified the Y48F49 motif as being critical for the exit of Phyl1.1 from the endoplasmic reticulum. Our results provide the first characterization of the subcellular localization of the phytolongins, and we discuss their potential role in regulating the secretory pathway. PMID:26962210

  11. Lipid Regulated Intramolecular Conformational Dynamics of SNARE-Protein Ykt6

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yawei; Seeger, Markus; Weng, Jingwei; Song, Song; Wang, Wenning; Tan, Yan-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Cellular informational and metabolic processes are propagated with specific membrane fusions governed by soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNARE). SNARE protein Ykt6 is highly expressed in brain neurons and plays a critical role in the membrane-trafficking process. Studies suggested that Ykt6 undergoes a conformational change at the interface between its longin domain and the SNARE core. In this work, we study the conformational state distributions and dynamics of rat Ykt6 by means of single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET) and Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy (FCCS). We observed that intramolecular conformational dynamics between longin domain and SNARE core occurred at the timescale ~200 μs. Furthermore, this dynamics can be regulated and even eliminated by the presence of lipid dodecylphoshpocholine (DPC). Our molecular dynamic (MD) simulations have shown that, the SNARE core exhibits a flexible structure while the longin domain retains relatively stable in apo state. Combining single molecule experiments and theoretical MD simulations, we are the first to provide a quantitative dynamics of Ykt6 and explain the functional conformational change from a qualitative point of view. PMID:27493064

  12. Lipid Regulated Intramolecular Conformational Dynamics of SNARE-Protein Ykt6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yawei; Seeger, Markus; Weng, Jingwei; Song, Song; Wang, Wenning; Tan, Yan-Wen

    2016-08-01

    Cellular informational and metabolic processes are propagated with specific membrane fusions governed by soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNARE). SNARE protein Ykt6 is highly expressed in brain neurons and plays a critical role in the membrane-trafficking process. Studies suggested that Ykt6 undergoes a conformational change at the interface between its longin domain and the SNARE core. In this work, we study the conformational state distributions and dynamics of rat Ykt6 by means of single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET) and Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy (FCCS). We observed that intramolecular conformational dynamics between longin domain and SNARE core occurred at the timescale ~200 μs. Furthermore, this dynamics can be regulated and even eliminated by the presence of lipid dodecylphoshpocholine (DPC). Our molecular dynamic (MD) simulations have shown that, the SNARE core exhibits a flexible structure while the longin domain retains relatively stable in apo state. Combining single molecule experiments and theoretical MD simulations, we are the first to provide a quantitative dynamics of Ykt6 and explain the functional conformational change from a qualitative point of view.

  13. A role for chromatin topology in imprinted domain regulation.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, William A; Sachani, Saqib S; White, Carlee R; Mann, Mellissa R W

    2016-02-01

    Recently, many advancements in genome-wide chromatin topology and nuclear architecture have unveiled the complex and hidden world of the nucleus, where chromatin is organized into discrete neighbourhoods with coordinated gene expression. This includes the active and inactive X chromosomes. Using X chromosome inactivation as a working model, we utilized publicly available datasets together with a literature review to gain insight into topologically associated domains, lamin-associated domains, nucleolar-associating domains, scaffold/matrix attachment regions, and nucleoporin-associated chromatin and their role in regulating monoallelic expression. Furthermore, we comprehensively review for the first time the role of chromatin topology and nuclear architecture in the regulation of genomic imprinting. We propose that chromatin topology and nuclear architecture are important regulatory mechanisms for directing gene expression within imprinted domains. Furthermore, we predict that dynamic changes in chromatin topology and nuclear architecture play roles in tissue-specific imprint domain regulation during early development and differentiation.

  14. The Capping Domain in RalF Regulates Effector Functions

    PubMed Central

    Alix, Eric; Chesnel, Laurent; Bowzard, Brad J.; Tucker, Aimee M.; Delprato, Anna; Cherfils, Jacqueline; Wood, David O.; Kahn, Richard A.; Roy, Craig R.

    2012-01-01

    The Legionella pneumophila effector protein RalF functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that activates the host small GTPase protein ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf), and recruits this host protein to the vacuoles in which this pathogen resides. GEF activity is conferred by the Sec7 domain located in the N-terminal region of RalF. Structural studies indicate that the C-terminal region of RalF makes contacts with residues in the Sec7 domain important for Arf interactions. Theoretically, the C-terminal region of RalF could prevent nucleotide exchange activity by blocking the ability of Arf to interact with the Sec7 domain. For this reason, the C-terminal region of RalF has been termed a capping domain. Here, the role of the RalF capping domain was investigated by comparing biochemical and effector activities mediated by this domain in both the Legionella RalF protein (LpRalF) and in a RalF ortholog isolated from the unrelated intracellular pathogen Rickettsia prowazekii (RpRalF). These data indicate that both RalF proteins contain a functional Sec7 domain and that the capping domain regulates RalF GEF activity. The capping domain has intrinsic determinants that mediate localization of the RalF protein inside of host cells and confer distinct effector activities. Localization mediated by the capping domain of LpRalF enables the GEF to modulate membrane transport in the secretory pathway, whereas, the capping domain of RpRalF enables this bacterial GEF to modulate actin dynamics occurring near the plasma membrane. Thus, these data reveal that divergence in the function of the C-terminal capping domain alters the in vivo functions of the RalF proteins. PMID:23166491

  15. Structural basis of Smoothened regulation by its extracellular domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Eamon F. X.; Sircar, Ria; Miller, Paul S.; Hedger, George; Luchetti, Giovanni; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Tully, Mark D.; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F.; Rambo, Robert P.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Newstead, Simon; Rohatgi, Rajat; Siebold, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Developmental signals of the Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt families are transduced across the membrane by Frizzled-class G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of both a heptahelical transmembrane domain (TMD) and an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). How the large extracellular domains of GPCRs regulate signalling by the TMD is unknown. We present crystal structures of the Hh signal transducer and oncoprotein Smoothened, a GPCR that contains two distinct ligand-binding sites: one in its TMD and one in the CRD. The CRD is stacked atop the TMD, separated by an intervening wedge-like linker domain. Structure-guided mutations show that the interface between the CRD, linker domain and TMD stabilizes the inactive state of Smoothened. Unexpectedly, we find a cholesterol molecule bound to Smoothened in the CRD binding site. Mutations predicted to prevent cholesterol binding impair the ability of Smoothened to transmit native Hh signals. Binding of a clinically used antagonist, vismodegib, to the TMD induces a conformational change that is propagated to the CRD, resulting in loss of cholesterol from the CRD-linker domain-TMD interface. Our results clarify the structural mechanism by which the activity of a GPCR is controlled by ligand-regulated interactions between its extracellular and transmembrane domains.

  16. Structural basis of Smoothened regulation by its extracellular domains.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Eamon F X; Sircar, Ria; Miller, Paul S; Hedger, George; Luchetti, Giovanni; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Tully, Mark D; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F; Rambo, Robert P; Sansom, Mark S P; Newstead, Simon; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2016-07-28

    Developmental signals of the Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt families are transduced across the membrane by Frizzledclass G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of both a heptahelical transmembrane domain (TMD) and an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). How the large extracellular domains of GPCRs regulate signalling by the TMD is unknown. We present crystal structures of the Hh signal transducer and oncoprotein Smoothened, a GPCR that contains two distinct ligand-binding sites: one in its TMD and one in the CRD. The CRD is stacked a top the TMD, separated by an intervening wedge-like linker domain. Structure-guided mutations show that the interface between the CRD, linker domain and TMD stabilizes the inactive state of Smoothened. Unexpectedly, we find a cholesterol molecule bound to Smoothened in the CRD binding site. Mutations predicted to prevent cholesterol binding impair the ability of Smoothened to transmit native Hh signals. Binding of a clinically used antagonist, vismodegib, to the TMD induces a conformational change that is propagated to the CRD, resulting in loss of cholesterol from the CRD-linker domain-TMD interface. Our results clarify the structural mechanism by which the activity of a GPCR is controlled by ligand-regulated interactions between its extracellular and transmembrane domains. PMID:27437577

  17. Structural basis for the regulation of enzymatic activity of Regnase-1 by domain-domain interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yokogawa, Mariko; Tsushima, Takashi; Noda, Nobuo N.; Kumeta, Hiroyuki; Enokizono, Yoshiaki; Yamashita, Kazuo; Standley, Daron M.; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Regnase-1 is an RNase that directly cleaves mRNAs of inflammatory genes such as IL-6 and IL-12p40, and negatively regulates cellular inflammatory responses. Here, we report the structures of four domains of Regnase-1 from Mus musculus—the N-terminal domain (NTD), PilT N-terminus like (PIN) domain, zinc finger (ZF) domain and C-terminal domain (CTD). The PIN domain harbors the RNase catalytic center; however, it is insufficient for enzymatic activity. We found that the NTD associates with the PIN domain and significantly enhances its RNase activity. The PIN domain forms a head-to-tail oligomer and the dimer interface overlaps with the NTD binding site. Interestingly, mutations blocking PIN oligomerization had no RNase activity, indicating that both oligomerization and NTD binding are crucial for RNase activity in vitro. These results suggest that Regnase-1 RNase activity is tightly controlled by both intramolecular (NTD-PIN) and intermolecular (PIN-PIN) interactions. PMID:26927947

  18. Structural basis of Smoothened regulation by its extracellular domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Eamon F. X.; Sircar, Ria; Miller, Paul S.; Hedger, George; Luchetti, Giovanni; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Tully, Mark D.; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F.; Rambo, Robert P.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Newstead, Simon; Rohatgi, Rajat; Siebold, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Developmental signals of the Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt families are transduced across the membrane by Frizzled-class G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of both a heptahelical transmembrane domain (TMD) and an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). How the large extracellular domains of GPCRs regulate signalling by the TMD is unknown. We present crystal structures of the Hh signal transducer and oncoprotein Smoothened, a GPCR that contains two distinct ligand-binding sites: one in its TMD and one in the CRD. The CRD is stacked atop the TMD, separated by an intervening wedge-like linker domain. Structure-guided mutations show that the interface between the CRD, linker domain and TMD stabilizes the inactive state of Smoothened. Unexpectedly, we find a cholesterol molecule bound to Smoothened in the CRD binding site. Mutations predicted to prevent cholesterol binding impair the ability of Smoothened to transmit native Hh signals. Binding of a clinically used antagonist, vismodegib, to the TMD induces a conformational change that is propagated to the CRD, resulting in loss of cholesterol from the CRD–linker domain–TMD interface. Our results clarify the structural mechanism by which the activity of a GPCR is controlled by ligand-regulated interactions between its extracellular and transmembrane domains.

  19. Polyunsaturated Lipids Regulate Membrane Domain Stability by Tuning Membrane Order.

    PubMed

    Levental, Kandice R; Lorent, Joseph H; Lin, Xubo; Skinkle, Allison D; Surma, Michal A; Stockenbojer, Emily A; Gorfe, Alemayehu A; Levental, Ilya

    2016-04-26

    The plasma membrane (PM) serves as the functional interface between a cell and its environment, hosting extracellular signal transduction and nutrient transport among a variety of other processes. To support this extensive functionality, PMs are organized into lateral domains, including ordered, lipid-driven assemblies termed lipid rafts. Although the general requirements for ordered domain formation are well established, how these domains are regulated by cell-endogenous mechanisms or exogenous perturbations has not been widely addressed. In this context, an intriguing possibility is that dietary fats can incorporate into membrane lipids to regulate the properties and physiology of raft domains. Here, we investigate the effects of polyunsaturated fats on the organization of membrane domains across a spectrum of membrane models, including computer simulations, synthetic lipid membranes, and intact PMs isolated from mammalian cells. We observe that the ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid is robustly incorporated into membrane lipids, and this incorporation leads to significant remodeling of the PM lipidome. Across model systems, docosahexaenoic acid-containing lipids enhance the stability of ordered raft domains by increasing the order difference between them and coexisting nonraft domains. The relationship between interdomain order disparity and the stability of phase separation holds for a spectrum of different perturbations, including manipulation of cholesterol levels and high concentrations of exogenous amphiphiles, suggesting it as a general feature of the organization of biological membranes. These results demonstrate that polyunsaturated fats affect the composition and organization of biological membranes, suggesting a potential mechanism for the extensive effects of dietary fat on health and disease.

  20. CUB and Sushi multiple domains 3 regulates dendrite development.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Tomoharu; Kohno, Takao; Hattori, Mitsuharu

    2016-09-01

    CUB and Sushi multiple domains 3 (CSMD3) is a large protein expressed in fetal and adult brain. Recently, mutations of the CSMD3 gene were identified in schizophrenia and autism patients. However, biochemical properties and functions of the CSMD3 protein remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CSMD3 is an oligomeric type I transmembrane protein localized in the apical dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons in the postnatal brain. In cultured hippocampal neurons, CSMD3 is expressed only after 7 days in vitro. Overexpression of CSMD3 induced dendritic branching in hippocampal neurons. Regulation of dendritic morphology by CSMD3 depended on the presence of its extracellular region, while CSMD3 intracellular region was dispensable for this activity. These results suggest that CSMD3 acts as a co-receptor of an unidentified membrane protein to regulate dendrite development. Therefore, malfunctions of CSMD3 may be one of the factors in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders.

  1. CUB and Sushi multiple domains 3 regulates dendrite development.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Tomoharu; Kohno, Takao; Hattori, Mitsuharu

    2016-09-01

    CUB and Sushi multiple domains 3 (CSMD3) is a large protein expressed in fetal and adult brain. Recently, mutations of the CSMD3 gene were identified in schizophrenia and autism patients. However, biochemical properties and functions of the CSMD3 protein remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CSMD3 is an oligomeric type I transmembrane protein localized in the apical dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons in the postnatal brain. In cultured hippocampal neurons, CSMD3 is expressed only after 7 days in vitro. Overexpression of CSMD3 induced dendritic branching in hippocampal neurons. Regulation of dendritic morphology by CSMD3 depended on the presence of its extracellular region, while CSMD3 intracellular region was dispensable for this activity. These results suggest that CSMD3 acts as a co-receptor of an unidentified membrane protein to regulate dendrite development. Therefore, malfunctions of CSMD3 may be one of the factors in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. PMID:27033969

  2. Regulation of the electric charge in phosphatidic acid domains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjie; Anderson, Nathaniel A; Travesset, Alex; Vaknin, David

    2012-06-21

    Although a minor component of the lipidome, phosphatidic acid (PA) plays a crucial role in nearly all signaling pathways involving cell membranes, in part because of its variable electrical charge in response to environmental conditions. To investigate how charge is regulated in domains of PA, we applied surface-sensitive X-ray reflectivity and fluorescence near-total-reflection techniques to determine the binding of divalent ions (Ca(2+) at various pH values) to 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (DMPA) and to the simpler lipid dihexadecyl phosphate (DHDP) spread as monolayers at the air/water interface. We found that the protonation state of PA is controlled not only by the pK(a) and local pH but also by the strong affinity to PA driven by electrostatic correlations from divalent ions and the cooperative effect of the two dissociable protons, which dramatically enhance the surface charge. A precise theoretical model is presented providing a general framework to predict the protonation state of PA. Implications for recent experiments on charge regulation by hydrogen bonding and the role of pH in PA signaling are discussed in detail.

  3. Endothelial Caveolar Subcellular Domain Regulation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ramadoss, Jayanth; Pastore, Mayra B.; Magness, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Complex regulatory processes alter the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) leading to nitric oxide (NO) production by endothelial cells under various physiological states. These complex processes require specific sub-cellular eNOS partitioning between plasma membrane caveolar domains and non-caveolar compartments.eNOS translocation from the plasma membrane to intracellular compartments is important for eNOS activation and subsequent NO biosynthesis. We present data reviewing and interpreting information: 1) the coupling of endothelial plasma membrane receptor systems in the caveolar structure relative to eNOS trafficking; 2) how eNOS trafficking relates to specific protein-protein interaction for inactivation and activation of eNOS; and 3) how these complex mechanisms confer specific subcellular location relative to eNOS multi-site phosphorylation and signaling.Dysfunction in regulation of eNOS activation may contribute to several disease states; in particular gestational endothelial abnormalities (preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, etc) that have life-long deleterious health consequences that predispose the offspring to develop hypertensive disease, type II diabetes and adiposity.1 PMID:23745825

  4. Regulation of Chk1 by Its C-terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Kosoy, Ana

    2008-01-01

    Chk1 is a protein kinase that is the effector molecule in the G2 DNA damage checkpoint. Chk1 homologues have an N-terminal kinase domain, and a C-terminal domain of ∼200 amino acids that contains activating phosphorylation sites for the ATM/R kinases, though the mechanism of activation remains unknown. Structural studies of the human Chk1 kinase domain show an open conformation; the activity of the kinase domain alone is substantially higher in vitro than full-length Chk1, and coimmunoprecipitation studies suggest the C-terminal domain may contain an autoinhibitory activity. However, we show that truncation of the C-terminal domain inactivates Chk1 in vivo. We identify additional mutations within the C-terminal domain that activate ectopically expressed Chk1 without the need for activating phosphorylation. When expressed from the endogenous locus, activated alleles show a temperature-sensitive loss of function, suggesting these mutations confer a semiactive state to the protein. Intragenic suppressors of these activated alleles cluster to regions in the catalytic domain on the face of the protein that interacts with substrate, suggesting these are the regions that interact with the C-terminal domain. Thus, rather than being an autoinhibitory domain, the C-terminus of Chk1 also contains domains critical for adopting an active configuration. PMID:18716058

  5. The MLLE Domain of the Ubiquitin Ligase UBR5 Binds to Its Catalytic Domain to Regulate Substrate Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Escobar, Juliana; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Kozlov, Guennadi; Gehring, Kalle

    2015-01-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2-conjugating enzyme to a substrate. UBR5, homologous to the E6AP C terminus (HECT)-type E3 ligase, mediates the ubiquitination of proteins involved in translation regulation, DNA damage response, and gluconeogenesis. In addition, UBR5 functions in a ligase-independent manner by prompting protein/protein interactions without ubiquitination of the binding partner. Despite recent functional studies, the mechanisms involved in substrate recognition and selective ubiquitination of its binding partners remain elusive. The C terminus of UBR5 harbors the HECT catalytic domain and an adjacent MLLE domain. MLLE domains mediate protein/protein interactions through the binding of a conserved peptide motif, termed PAM2. Here, we characterize the binding properties of the UBR5 MLLE domain to PAM2 peptides from Paip1 and GW182. The crystal structure with a Paip1 PAM2 peptide reveals the network of hydrophobic and ionic interactions that drive binding. In addition, we identify a novel interaction of the MLLE domain with the adjacent HECT domain mediated by a PAM2-like sequence. Our results confirm the role of the MLLE domain of UBR5 in substrate recruitment and suggest a potential role in regulating UBR5 ligase activity. PMID:26224628

  6. The MLLE domain of the ubiquitin ligase UBR5 binds to its catalytic domain to regulate substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Escobar, Juliana; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Kozlov, Guennadi; Gehring, Kalle

    2015-09-11

    E3 ubiquitin ligases catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2-conjugating enzyme to a substrate. UBR5, homologous to the E6AP C terminus (HECT)-type E3 ligase, mediates the ubiquitination of proteins involved in translation regulation, DNA damage response, and gluconeogenesis. In addition, UBR5 functions in a ligase-independent manner by prompting protein/protein interactions without ubiquitination of the binding partner. Despite recent functional studies, the mechanisms involved in substrate recognition and selective ubiquitination of its binding partners remain elusive. The C terminus of UBR5 harbors the HECT catalytic domain and an adjacent MLLE domain. MLLE domains mediate protein/protein interactions through the binding of a conserved peptide motif, termed PAM2. Here, we characterize the binding properties of the UBR5 MLLE domain to PAM2 peptides from Paip1 and GW182. The crystal structure with a Paip1 PAM2 peptide reveals the network of hydrophobic and ionic interactions that drive binding. In addition, we identify a novel interaction of the MLLE domain with the adjacent HECT domain mediated by a PAM2-like sequence. Our results confirm the role of the MLLE domain of UBR5 in substrate recruitment and suggest a potential role in regulating UBR5 ligase activity.

  7. Contribution of the CR domain to P-selectin lectin domain allostery by regulating the orientation of the EGF domain.

    PubMed

    Lü, Shouqin; Chen, Shenbao; Mao, Debin; Zhang, Yan; Long, Mian

    2015-01-01

    The allostery of P-selectin has been studied extensively with a focus on the Lec and EGF domains, whereas the contribution of the CR domain remains unclear. Here, molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) combined with homology modeling were preformed to investigate the impact of the CR domain on P-selectin allostery. The results indicated that the CR domain plays a role in the allosteric dynamics of P-selectin in two ways. First, the CR1 domain tends to stabilize the low affinity of P-selectin during the equilibration processes with the transition inhibition from the S1 to S1' state by restraining the extension of the bent EGF orientation, or with the relaxation acceleration of the S2 state by promoting the bending of the extended EGF orientation. Second, the existence of CR domain increases intramolecular extension prior to complex separation, increasing the time available for the allosteric shift during forced dissociation with a prolonged bond duration. These findings further our understanding of the structure-function relationship of P-selectin with the enriched micro-structural bases of the CR domain.

  8. Ubiquitin binds to and regulates a subset of SH3 domains

    PubMed Central

    Stamenova, Svetoslava D.; French, Michael E.; He, Yuan; Francis, Smitha A.; Kramer, Zachary B.; Hicke, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Summary SH3 domains are modules of 50-70 amino acids that promote interactions among proteins, often participating in the assembly of large dynamic complexes. These domains bind to peptide ligands, which usually contain a core Pro-X-X-Pro (PXXP) sequence. Here we identify a class of SH3 domains that binds to ubiquitin. The yeast endocytic protein Sla1, as well as the mammalian proteins CIN85 and amphiphysin, carry ubiquitin-binding SH3 domains. Ubiquitin and peptide ligands bind to the same hydrophobic groove on the SH3 domain surface, and ubiquitin and a PXXP-containing protein fragment compete for binding to SH3 domains. We conclude that a subset of SH3 domains constitutes a distinct type of ubiquitin-binding domain, and that ubiquitin-binding can negatively regulate interaction of SH3 domains with canonical proline-rich ligands. PMID:17244534

  9. Molecular basis for histone acetyltransferase regulation by binding partners, associated domains, and autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Cheryl E.; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation is a post-translational modification (PTM) that regulates chromatin dynamics and function. Dysregulation of acetylation or acetyltransferase activity has been correlated with several human diseases. Many, if not all histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are regulated in part through tethered domains, association with binding partners or post-translational modification, including predominantly acetylation. This review focuses on what is currently understood at the molecular level of HAT regulation as it occurs via binding partners, associated domains, and autoacetylation. PMID:26555232

  10. Functional domains of the floral regulator AGAMOUS: characterization of the DNA binding domain and analysis of dominant negative mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Mizukami, Y; Huang, H; Tudor, M; Hu, Y; Ma, H

    1996-01-01

    The Arabidopsis MADS box gene AGAMOUS (AG) controls reproductive organ identity and floral meristem determinacy. The AG protein binds in vitro to DNA sequences similar to the targets of known MADS domain transcription factors. Whereas most plant MADS domain proteins begin with the MADS domain, AG and its orthologs contain a region N-terminal to the MADS domain. All plant MADS domain proteins share another region with moderate sequence similarity called the K domain. Neither the region (I region) that lies between the MADS and K domains nor the C-terminal region is conserved. We show here that the AG MADS domain and the I region are necessary and sufficient for DNA binding in vitro and that AG binds to DNA as a dimer. To investigate the in vivo function of the regions of AG not required for in vitro DNA binding, we introduced several AG constructs into wild-type plants and characterized their floral phenotypes. We show that transgenic Arabidopsis plants with a 35S-AG construct encoding an AG protein lacking the N-terminal region produced apetala 2 (ap2)-like flowers similar to those ectopically expressing AG proteins retaining the N-terminal region. This result suggests that the N-terminal region is not required to produce the ap2-like phenotype. In addition, transformants with a 35S-AG construct encoding an AG protein lacking the C-terminal region produced ag-like flowers, indicating that this truncated AG protein inhibits normal AG function. Finally, transformants with a 35S-AG construct encoding an AG protein lacking both K and C regions produced flowers with more stamens and carpels. The phenotypes of the AG transformants demonstrate that both the K domain and the C-terminal region have important and distinct in vivo functions. We discuss possible mechanisms through which AG may regulate downstream genes. PMID:8672883

  11. The structural mechanism of KCNH-channel regulation by the eag domain

    PubMed Central

    Haitin, Yoni; Carlson, Anne E.; Zagotta, William N.

    2013-01-01

    The KCNH voltage-dependent potassium channels (ether-á-go-go, EAG; EAG-related gene, ERG; EAG-like channels, ELK) are important regulators of cellular excitability1-3 and have key roles in diseases such as cardiac long QT syndrome type 2 (LQT2)4, epilepsy5, schizophrenia6 and cancer7. The intracellular domains of KCNH channels are structurally distinct from other voltage-gated channels. The amino-terminal region contains an eag domain, which is comprised of a Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain and a PAS-cap domain8, while the carboxy-terminal region contains a cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain (CNBHD) which is connected to the pore through a C-linker domain. Many disease-causing mutations localize to these specialized intracellular domains, which underlie the unique gating and regulation of KCNH channels9. It has been suggested that the eag domain may regulate the channel by interacting with either the S4-S5 linker or the CNBHD8,10. Here we present a 2-Å resolution crystal structure of the eag domain-CNBHD complex of the mouse EAG1 (mEAG1) channel. It displays extensive interactions between the eag domain and the CNBHD, indicating that the regulatory mechanism of the eag domain involves primarily the CNBHD. Surprisingly, the structure reveals that a number of LQT2 mutations at homologous positions in hERG, and cancer-associated mutations in EAG channels, localize to the eag domain-CNBHD interface. Furthermore, mutations at the interface produced dramatic effects on channel gating demonstrating the important physiological role of the eag domain-CNBHD interaction. Our structure of the eag domain-CNBHD complex of mEAG1 provides unique insights into the physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms of KCNH channels. PMID:23975098

  12. Self-Regulated Learning with Hypermedia: The Role of Prior Domain Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moos, Daniel C.; Azevedo, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Think-aloud and pre-test data were collected from 49 undergraduates with varying levels of prior domain knowledge to examine the relationship between prior domain knowledge and self-regulated learning with hypermedia. During the experimental session, each participant individually completed a pretest on the circulatory system, and then one 40-min…

  13. Crystal Structure of the SPOC Domain of the Arabidopsis Flowering Regulator FPA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinglu; Rataj, Katarzyna; Simpson, Gordon G; Tong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis protein FPA controls flowering time by regulating the alternative 3'-end processing of the FLOWERING LOCUS (FLC) antisense RNA. FPA belongs to the split ends (SPEN) family of proteins, which contain N-terminal RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a SPEN paralog and ortholog C-terminal (SPOC) domain. The SPOC domain is highly conserved among FPA homologs in plants, but the conservation with the domain in other SPEN proteins is much lower. We have determined the crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana FPA SPOC domain at 2.7 Å resolution. The overall structure is similar to that of the SPOC domain in human SMRT/HDAC1 Associated Repressor Protein (SHARP), although there are also substantial conformational differences between them. Structural and sequence analyses identify a surface patch that is conserved among plant FPA homologs. Mutations of two residues in this surface patch did not disrupt FPA functions, suggesting that either the SPOC domain is not required for the role of FPA in regulating RNA 3'-end formation or the functions of the FPA SPOC domain cannot be disrupted by the combination of mutations, in contrast to observations with the SHARP SPOC domain. PMID:27513867

  14. Crystal Structure of the SPOC Domain of the Arabidopsis Flowering Regulator FPA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yinglu; Rataj, Katarzyna; Simpson, Gordon G.; Tong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis protein FPA controls flowering time by regulating the alternative 3′-end processing of the FLOWERING LOCUS (FLC) antisense RNA. FPA belongs to the split ends (SPEN) family of proteins, which contain N-terminal RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a SPEN paralog and ortholog C-terminal (SPOC) domain. The SPOC domain is highly conserved among FPA homologs in plants, but the conservation with the domain in other SPEN proteins is much lower. We have determined the crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana FPA SPOC domain at 2.7 Å resolution. The overall structure is similar to that of the SPOC domain in human SMRT/HDAC1 Associated Repressor Protein (SHARP), although there are also substantial conformational differences between them. Structural and sequence analyses identify a surface patch that is conserved among plant FPA homologs. Mutations of two residues in this surface patch did not disrupt FPA functions, suggesting that either the SPOC domain is not required for the role of FPA in regulating RNA 3′-end formation or the functions of the FPA SPOC domain cannot be disrupted by the combination of mutations, in contrast to observations with the SHARP SPOC domain. PMID:27513867

  15. Eukaryotic cold shock domain proteins: highly versatile regulators of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mihailovich, Marija; Militti, Cristina; Gabaldón, Toni; Gebauer, Fátima

    2010-02-01

    Cold shock domain (CSD)-containing proteins have been found in all three domains of life and function in a variety of processes that are related, for the most part, to post-transcriptional gene regulation. The CSD is an ancient beta-barrel fold that serves to bind nucleic acids. The CSD is structurally and functionally similar to the S1 domain, a fold with otherwise unrelated primary sequence. The flexibility of the CSD/S1 domain for RNA recognition confers an enormous functional versatility to the proteins that contain them. This review summarizes the current knowledge on eukaryotic CSD/S1 domain-containing proteins with a special emphasis on UNR (upstream of N-ras), a member of this family with multiple copies of the CSD.

  16. The first propeller domain of LRP6 regulates sensitivity to DKK1.

    PubMed

    Binnerts, Minke E; Tomasevic, Nenad; Bright, Jessica M; Leung, John; Ahn, Victoria E; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Zhan, Xiaoming; Liu, Shouchun; Yonkovich, Shirlee; Williams, Jason; Zhou, Mei; Gros, Delphine; Dixon, Melissa; Korver, Wouter; Weis, William I; Abo, Arie

    2009-08-01

    The Wnt coreceptor LRP6 is required for canonical Wnt signaling. To understand the molecular regulation of LRP6 function, we generated a series of monoclonal antibodies against the extra cellular domain (ECD) of LRP6 and selected a high-affinity mAb (mAb135) that recognizes cell surface expression of endogenous LRP6. mAb135 enhanced Wnt dependent TCF reporter activation and antagonized DKK1 dependent inhibition of Wnt3A signaling, suggesting a role in modulation of LRP6 function. Detailed analysis of LRP6 domain mutants identified Ser 243 in the first propeller domain of LRP6 as a critical residue for mAb135 binding, implicating this domain in regulating the sensitivity of LRP6 to DKK1. In agreement with this notion, mAb135 directly disrupted the interaction of DKK1 with recombinant ECD LRP6 and a truncated form of the LRP6 ECD containing only repeats 1 and 2. Finally, we found that mAb135 completely protected LRP6 from DKK1 dependent internalization. Together, these results identify the first propeller domain as a novel regulatory domain for DKK1 binding to LRP6 and show that mAb against the first propeller domain of LRP6 can be used to modulate this interaction. PMID:19477926

  17. Domain-wide regulation of gene expression in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Gierman, Hinco J.; Indemans, Mireille H.G.; Koster, Jan; Goetze, Sandra; Seppen, Jurgen; Geerts, Dirk; van Driel, Roel; Versteeg, Rogier

    2007-01-01

    Transcription factor complexes bind to regulatory sequences of genes, providing a system of individual expression regulation. Targets of distinct transcription factors usually map throughout the genome, without clustering. Nevertheless, highly and weakly expressed genes do cluster in separate chromosomal domains with an average size of 80–90 genes. We therefore asked whether, besides transcription factors, an additional level of gene expression regulation exists that acts on chromosomal domains. Here we show that identical green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter constructs integrated at 90 different chromosomal positions obtain expression levels that correspond to the activity of the domains of integration. These domains are up to 80 genes long and can exert an eightfold effect on the expression levels of integrated genes. 3D-FISH shows that active domains of integration have a more open chromatin structure than integration domains with weak activity. These results reveal a novel domain-wide regulatory mechanism that, together with transcription factors, exerts a dual control over gene transcription. PMID:17693573

  18. Crystal structure of the BTB domain from the LRF/ZBTB7 transcriptional regulator.

    PubMed

    Stogios, Peter J; Chen, Lu; Privé, Gilbert G

    2007-02-01

    BTB-zinc finger (BTB-ZF) proteins are transcription regulators with roles in development, differentiation, and oncogenesis. In these proteins, the BTB domain (also known as the POZ domain) is a protein-protein interaction motif that contains a dimerization interface, a possible oligomerization surface, and surfaces for interactions with other factors, including nuclear co-repressors and histone deacetylases. The BTB-ZF protein LRF (also known as ZBTB7, FBI-1, OCZF, and Pokemon) is a master regulator of oncogenesis, and represses the transcription of a variety of important genes, including the ARF, c-fos, and c-myc oncogenes and extracellular matrix genes. We determined the crystal structure of the BTB domain from human LRF to 2.1 A and observed the canonical BTB homodimer fold. However, novel features are apparent on the surface of the homodimer, including differences in the lateral groove and charged pocket regions. The residues that line the lateral groove have little similarity with the equivalent residues from the BCL6 BTB domain, and we show that the 17-residue BCL6 Binding Domain (BBD) from the SMRT co-repressor does not bind to the LRF BTB domain. PMID:17189472

  19. Inherent regulation of EAL domain-catalyzed hydrolysis of second messenger cyclic di-GMP.

    PubMed

    Sundriyal, Amit; Massa, Claudia; Samoray, Dietrich; Zehender, Fabian; Sharpe, Timothy; Jenal, Urs; Schirmer, Tilman

    2014-03-01

    The universal second messenger cyclic di-GMP (cdG) is involved in the regulation of a diverse range of cellular processes in bacteria. The intracellular concentration of the dinucleotide is determined by the opposing actions of diguanylate cyclases and cdG-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Whereas most PDEs have accessory domains that are involved in the regulation of their activity, the regulatory mechanism of this class of enzymes has remained unclear. Here, we use biophysical and functional analyses to show that the isolated EAL domain of a PDE from Escherichia coli (YahA) is in a fast thermodynamic monomer-dimer equilibrium, and that the domain is active only in its dimeric state. Furthermore, our data indicate thermodynamic coupling between substrate binding and EAL dimerization with the dimerization affinity being increased about 100-fold upon substrate binding. Crystal structures of the YahA-EAL domain determined under various conditions (apo, Mg(2+), cdG·Ca(2+) complex) confirm structural coupling between the dimer interface and the catalytic center. The built-in regulatory properties of the EAL domain probably facilitate its modular, functional combination with the diverse repertoire of accessory domains.

  20. Crystal structure of the BTB domain from the LRF/ZBTB7 transcriptional regulator.

    PubMed

    Stogios, Peter J; Chen, Lu; Privé, Gilbert G

    2007-02-01

    BTB-zinc finger (BTB-ZF) proteins are transcription regulators with roles in development, differentiation, and oncogenesis. In these proteins, the BTB domain (also known as the POZ domain) is a protein-protein interaction motif that contains a dimerization interface, a possible oligomerization surface, and surfaces for interactions with other factors, including nuclear co-repressors and histone deacetylases. The BTB-ZF protein LRF (also known as ZBTB7, FBI-1, OCZF, and Pokemon) is a master regulator of oncogenesis, and represses the transcription of a variety of important genes, including the ARF, c-fos, and c-myc oncogenes and extracellular matrix genes. We determined the crystal structure of the BTB domain from human LRF to 2.1 A and observed the canonical BTB homodimer fold. However, novel features are apparent on the surface of the homodimer, including differences in the lateral groove and charged pocket regions. The residues that line the lateral groove have little similarity with the equivalent residues from the BCL6 BTB domain, and we show that the 17-residue BCL6 Binding Domain (BBD) from the SMRT co-repressor does not bind to the LRF BTB domain.

  1. Neurofilament subunit (NFL) head domain phosphorylation regulates axonal transport of neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Yates, Darran M; Manser, Catherine; De Vos, Kurt J; Shaw, Christopher E; McLoughlin, Declan M; Miller, Christopher C J

    2009-04-01

    Neurofilaments are the intermediate filaments of neurons and are synthesised in neuronal cell bodies and then transported through axons. Neurofilament light chain (NFL) is a principal component of neurofilaments, and phosphorylation of NFL head domain is believed to regulate the assembly of neurofilaments. However, the role that NFL phosphorylation has on transport of neurofilaments is poorly understood. To address this issue, we monitored axonal transport of phosphorylation mutants of NFL. We mutated four known phosphorylation sites in NFL head domain to either preclude phosphorylation, or mimic permanent phosphorylation. Mutation to preclude phosphorylation had no effect on transport but mutation of three sites to mimic permanent phosphorylation inhibited transport. Mutation of all four sites together to mimic permanent phosphorylation proved especially potent at inhibiting transport and also disrupted neurofilament assembly. Our results suggest that NFL head domain phosphorylation is a regulator of neurofilament axonal transport.

  2. The SPX domain of the yeast low-affinity phosphate transporter Pho90 regulates transport activity

    PubMed Central

    Hürlimann, Hans Caspar; Pinson, Benoît; Stadler-Waibel, Martha; Zeeman, Samuel C; Freimoser, Florian M

    2009-01-01

    Yeast has two phosphate-uptake systems that complement each other: the high-affinity transporters (Pho84 and Pho89) are active under phosphate starvation, whereas Pho87 and Pho90 are low-affinity transporters that function when phosphate is abundant. Here, we report new regulatory functions of the amino-terminal SPX domain of Pho87 and Pho90. By studying truncated versions of Pho87 and Pho90, we show that the SPX domain limits the phosphate-uptake velocity, suppresses phosphate efflux and affects the regulation of the phosphate signal transduction pathway. Furthermore, split-ubiquitin assays and co-immunoprecipitation suggest that the SPX domain of both Pho90 and Pho87 interacts physically with the regulatory protein Spl2. This work suggests that the SPX domain inhibits low-affinity phosphate transport through a physical interaction with Spl2. PMID:19590579

  3. Components of Self-Regulation during Within- and Between-Domain Problem-Solving Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phye, Gary D.

    Self-regulation components linked to academic problem-solving were studied. Cognitive process instruction on analogy problems was given to 63 undergraduates on a Monday. On Wednesday, problem-solving performance within the inductive reasoning domain was assessed with 30 Remote Associate Test (RAT) problems. On Friday, problem-solving performance…

  4. Crescerin uses a TOG domain array to regulate microtubules in the primary cilium

    PubMed Central

    Das, Alakananda; Dickinson, Daniel J.; Wood, Cameron C.; Goldstein, Bob; Slep, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cilia are cell-surface projections critical for sensing the extracellular environment. Defects in cilia structure and function result in a broad range of developmental and sensory disorders. However, mechanisms that regulate the microtubule (MT)-based scaffold forming the cilia core are poorly understood. TOG domain array–containing proteins ch-TOG and CLASP are key regulators of cytoplasmic MTs. Whether TOG array proteins also regulate ciliary MTs is unknown. Here we identify the conserved Crescerin protein family as a cilia-specific, TOG array-containing MT regulator. We present the crystal structure of mammalian Crescerin1 TOG2, revealing a canonical TOG fold with conserved tubulin-binding determinants. Crescerin1's TOG domains possess inherent MT-binding activity and promote MT polymerization in vitro. Using Cas9-triggered homologous recombination in Caenorhabditis elegans, we demonstrate that the worm Crescerin family member CHE-12 requires TOG domain–dependent tubulin-binding activity for sensory cilia development. Thus, Crescerin expands the TOG domain array–based MT regulatory paradigm beyond ch-TOG and CLASP, representing a distinct regulator of cilia structure. PMID:26378256

  5. Differential function of the two nucleotide binding domains on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Nagel, G

    1999-12-01

    The genetic disease cystic fibrosis is caused by defects in the chloride channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR belongs to the family of ABC transporters. In contrast to most other members of this family which transport substrates actively across a membrane, the main function of CFTR is to regulate passive flux of substrates across the plasma membrane. Chloride channel activity of CFTR is dependent on protein phosphorylation and presence of nucleoside triphosphates. From electrophysiological studies of CFTR detailed models of its regulation by phosphorylation and nucleotide interaction have evolved. These investigations provide ample evidence that ATP hydrolysis is crucial for CFTR gating. It becomes apparent that the two nucleotide binding domains on CFTR not only diverge strongly in sequence, but also in function. Based on previous models and taking into account new data from pre-steady-state experiments, a refined model for the action of nucleotides at two nucleotide binding domains was recently proposed.

  6. The physical size of transcription factors is key to transcriptional regulation in chromatin domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Kaizu, Kazunari; Tamura, Sachiko; Nozaki, Tadasu; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-02-01

    Genetic information, which is stored in the long strand of genomic DNA as chromatin, must be scanned and read out by various transcription factors. First, gene-specific transcription factors, which are relatively small (˜50 kDa), scan the genome and bind regulatory elements. Such factors then recruit general transcription factors, Mediators, RNA polymerases, nucleosome remodellers, and histone modifiers, most of which are large protein complexes of 1-3 MDa in size. Here, we propose a new model for the functional significance of the size of transcription factors (or complexes) for gene regulation of chromatin domains. Recent findings suggest that chromatin consists of irregularly folded nucleosome fibres (10 nm fibres) and forms numerous condensed domains (e.g., topologically associating domains). Although the flexibility and dynamics of chromatin allow repositioning of genes within the condensed domains, the size exclusion effect of the domain may limit accessibility of DNA sequences by transcription factors. We used Monte Carlo computer simulations to determine the physical size limit of transcription factors that can enter condensed chromatin domains. Small gene-specific transcription factors can penetrate into the chromatin domains and search their target sequences, whereas large transcription complexes cannot enter the domain. Due to this property, once a large complex binds its target site via gene-specific factors it can act as a ‘buoy’ to keep the target region on the surface of the condensed domain and maintain transcriptional competency. This size-dependent specialization of target-scanning and surface-tethering functions could provide novel insight into the mechanisms of various DNA transactions, such as DNA replication and repair/recombination.

  7. The epigenetic regulator Smchd1 contains a functional GHKL-type ATPase domain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelan; Dobson, Renwick C J; Lucet, Isabelle S; Young, Samuel N; Pearce, F Grant; Blewitt, Marnie E; Murphy, James M

    2016-06-15

    Structural maintenance of chromosomes flexible hinge domain containing 1 (Smchd1) is an epigenetic regulator that plays critical roles in gene regulation during development. Mutations in SMCHD1 were recently implicated in the pathogenesis of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), although the mechanistic basis remains of outstanding interest. We have previously shown that Smchd1 associates with chromatin via its homodimeric C-terminal hinge domain, yet little is known about the function of the putative GHKL (gyrase, Hsp90, histidine kinase, MutL)-type ATPase domain at its N-terminus. To formally assess the structure and function of Smchd1's ATPase domain, we have generated recombinant proteins encompassing the predicted ATPase domain and the adjacent region. Here, we show that the Smchd1 N-terminal region exists as a monomer and adopts a conformation resembling that of monomeric full-length heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) protein in solution, even though the two proteins share only ∼8% overall sequence identity. Despite being monomeric, the N-terminal region of Smchd1 exhibits ATPase activity, which can be antagonized by the reaction product, ADP, or the Hsp90 inhibitor, radicicol, at a nanomolar concentration. Interestingly, introduction of an analogous mutation to that identified in SMCHD1 of an FSHD patient compromised protein stability, suggesting a possible molecular basis for loss of protein function and pathogenesis. Together, these results reveal important structure-function characteristics of Smchd1 that may underpin its mechanistic action at the chromatin level. PMID:27059856

  8. Cell-Cycle Control of Bivalent Epigenetic Domains Regulates the Exit from Pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amar M.; Sun, Yuhua; Li, Li; Zhang, Wenjuan; Wu, Tianming; Zhao, Shaying; Qin, Zhaohui; Dalton, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Summary Here we show that bivalent domains and chromosome architecture for bivalent genes are dynamically regulated during the cell cycle in human pluripotent cells. Central to this is the transient increase in H3K4-trimethylation at developmental genes during G1, thereby creating a “window of opportunity” for cell-fate specification. This mechanism is controlled by CDK2-dependent phosphorylation of the MLL2 (KMT2B) histone methyl-transferase, which facilitates its recruitment to developmental genes in G1. MLL2 binding is required for changes in chromosome architecture around developmental genes and establishes promoter-enhancer looping interactions in a cell-cycle-dependent manner. These cell-cycle-regulated loops are shown to be essential for activation of bivalent genes and pluripotency exit. These findings demonstrate that bivalent domains are established to control the cell-cycle-dependent activation of developmental genes so that differentiation initiates from the G1 phase. PMID:26278042

  9. Cell-Cycle Control of Bivalent Epigenetic Domains Regulates the Exit from Pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amar M; Sun, Yuhua; Li, Li; Zhang, Wenjuan; Wu, Tianming; Zhao, Shaying; Qin, Zhaohui; Dalton, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    Here we show that bivalent domains and chromosome architecture for bivalent genes are dynamically regulated during the cell cycle in human pluripotent cells. Central to this is the transient increase in H3K4-trimethylation at developmental genes during G1, thereby creating a "window of opportunity" for cell-fate specification. This mechanism is controlled by CDK2-dependent phosphorylation of the MLL2 (KMT2B) histone methyl-transferase, which facilitates its recruitment to developmental genes in G1. MLL2 binding is required for changes in chromosome architecture around developmental genes and establishes promoter-enhancer looping interactions in a cell-cycle-dependent manner. These cell-cycle-regulated loops are shown to be essential for activation of bivalent genes and pluripotency exit. These findings demonstrate that bivalent domains are established to control the cell-cycle-dependent activation of developmental genes so that differentiation initiates from the G1 phase. PMID:26278042

  10. Structure-Function Analysis of the Mcl-1 Protein Identifies a Novel Senescence-regulating Domain.

    PubMed

    Demelash, Abeba; Pfannenstiel, Lukas W; Tannenbaum, Charles S; Li, Xiaoxia; Kalady, Matthew F; DeVecchio, Jennifer; Gastman, Brian R

    2015-09-01

    Unlike other antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members, Mcl-1 also mediates resistance to cancer therapy by uniquely inhibiting chemotherapy-induced senescence (CIS). In general, Bcl-2 family members regulate apoptosis at the level of the mitochondria through a common prosurvival binding groove. Through mutagenesis, we determined that Mcl-1 can inhibit CIS even in the absence of its apoptotically important mitochondrion-localizing domains. This finding prompted us to generate a series of Mcl-1 deletion mutants from both the N and C termini of the protein, including one that contained a deletion of all of the Bcl-2 homology domains, none of which impacted anti-CIS capabilities. Through subsequent structure-function analyses of Mcl-1, we identified a previously uncharacterized loop domain responsible for the anti-CIS activity of Mcl-1. The importance of the loop domain was confirmed in multiple tumor types, two in vivo models of senescence, and by demonstrating that a peptide mimetic of the loop domain can effectively inhibit the anti-CIS function of Mcl-1. The results from our studies appear to be highly translatable because we discerned an inverse relationship between the expression of Mcl-1 and of various senescence markers in cancerous human tissues. In summary, our findings regarding the unique structural properties of Mcl-1 provide new approaches for targeted cancer therapy. PMID:26205817

  11. Cholesterol segregates into submicrometric domains at the living erythrocyte membrane: evidence and regulation.

    PubMed

    Carquin, Mélanie; Conrard, Louise; Pollet, Hélène; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; Cominelli, Antoine; Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Courtoy, Pierre J; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2015-12-01

    Although cholesterol is essential for membrane fluidity and deformability, the level of its lateral heterogeneity at the plasma membrane of living cells is poorly understood due to lack of appropriate probe. We here report on the usefulness of the D4 fragment of Clostridium perfringens toxin fused to mCherry (theta*), as specific, non-toxic, sensitive and quantitative cholesterol-labeling tool, using erythrocyte flat membrane. By confocal microscopy, theta* labels cholesterol-enriched submicrometric domains in coverslip-spread but also gel-suspended (non-stretched) fresh erythrocytes, suggesting in vivo relevance. Cholesterol domains on spread erythrocytes are stable in time and space, restricted by membrane:spectrin anchorage via 4.1R complexes, and depend on temperature and sphingomyelin, indicating combined regulation by extrinsic membrane:cytoskeleton interaction and by intrinsic lipid packing. Cholesterol domains partially co-localize with BODIPY-sphingomyelin-enriched domains. In conclusion, we show that theta* is a useful vital probe to study cholesterol organization and demonstrate that cholesterol forms submicrometric domains in living cells.

  12. Regulation of Protein Levels in Subcellular Domains through mRNA Transport and Localized Translation*

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Dianna E.; Twiss, Jeffery L.

    2010-01-01

    Localized protein synthesis is increasingly recognized as a means for polarized cells to modulate protein levels in subcellular regions and the distal reaches of their cytoplasm. The axonal and dendritic processes of neurons represent functional domains of cytoplasm that can be separated from their cell body by vast distances. This separation provides a biological setting where the cell uses locally synthesized proteins to both autonomously respond to stimuli and to retrogradely signal the cell body of events occurring is this distal environment. Other cell types undoubtedly take advantage of this localized mechanism, but these have not proven as amenable for isolation of functional subcellular domains. Consequently, neurons have provided an appealing experimental platform for study of mRNA transport and localized protein synthesis. Molecular biology approaches have shown both the population of mRNAs that can localize into axons and dendrites and an unexpectedly complex regulation of their transport into these processes. Several lines of evidence point to similar complexities and specificity for regulation of mRNA translation at subcellular sites. Proteomics studies are beginning to provide a comprehensive view of the protein constituents of subcellular domains in neurons and other cell types. However, these have currently fallen short of dissecting temporal regulation of new protein synthesis in subcellular sites and mechanisms used to ferry mRNAs to these sites. PMID:20167945

  13. The coiled-coil domain of zebrafish TRPM7 regulates Mg·nucleotide sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Chad; Sahni, Jaya; Suzuki, Sayuri; Horgen, F David; Penner, Reinhold; Fleig, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TRPM7 is a member of the Transient-Receptor-Potential Melastatin ion channel family. TRPM7 is a unique fusion protein of an ion channel and an α-kinase. Although mammalian TRPM7 is well characterized biophysically and its pivotal role in cancer, ischemia and cardiovascular disease is becoming increasingly evident, the study of TRPM7 in mouse models has been hampered by embryonic lethality of transgenic ablations. In zebrafish, functional loss of TRPM7 (drTRPM7) manifests itself in an array of non-lethal physiological malfunctions. Here, we investigate the regulation of wild type drTRPM7 and multiple C-terminal truncation mutants. We find that the biophysical properties of drTRPM7 are very similar to mammalian TRPM7. However, pharmacological profiling reveals that drTRPM7 is facilitated rather than inhibited by 2-APB, and that the TRPM7 inhibitor waixenicin A has no effect. This is reminiscent of the pharmacological profile of human TRPM6, the sister channel kinase of TRPM7. Furthermore, using truncation mutations, we show that the coiled-coil domain of drTRPM7 is involved in the channel's regulation by magnesium (Mg) and Mg·adenosine triphosphate (Mg·ATP). We propose that drTRPM7 has two protein domains that regulate inhibition by intracellular magnesium and nucleotides, and one domain that is concerned with sensing magnesium only. PMID:27628598

  14. The coiled-coil domain of zebrafish TRPM7 regulates Mg·nucleotide sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Chad; Sahni, Jaya; Suzuki, Sayuri; Horgen, F. David; Penner, Reinhold; Fleig, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TRPM7 is a member of the Transient-Receptor-Potential Melastatin ion channel family. TRPM7 is a unique fusion protein of an ion channel and an α-kinase. Although mammalian TRPM7 is well characterized biophysically and its pivotal role in cancer, ischemia and cardiovascular disease is becoming increasingly evident, the study of TRPM7 in mouse models has been hampered by embryonic lethality of transgenic ablations. In zebrafish, functional loss of TRPM7 (drTRPM7) manifests itself in an array of non-lethal physiological malfunctions. Here, we investigate the regulation of wild type drTRPM7 and multiple C-terminal truncation mutants. We find that the biophysical properties of drTRPM7 are very similar to mammalian TRPM7. However, pharmacological profiling reveals that drTRPM7 is facilitated rather than inhibited by 2-APB, and that the TRPM7 inhibitor waixenicin A has no effect. This is reminiscent of the pharmacological profile of human TRPM6, the sister channel kinase of TRPM7. Furthermore, using truncation mutations, we show that the coiled-coil domain of drTRPM7 is involved in the channel’s regulation by magnesium (Mg) and Mg·adenosine triphosphate (Mg·ATP). We propose that drTRPM7 has two protein domains that regulate inhibition by intracellular magnesium and nucleotides, and one domain that is concerned with sensing magnesium only. PMID:27628598

  15. Dynamics of chromatin accessibility and gene regulation by MADS-domain transcription factors in flower development

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of eukaryotic organisms is controlled by transcription factors that trigger specific and global changes in gene expression programs. In plants, MADS-domain transcription factors act as master regulators of developmental switches and organ specification. However, the mechanisms by which these factors dynamically regulate the expression of their target genes at different developmental stages are still poorly understood. Results We characterized the relationship of chromatin accessibility, gene expression, and DNA binding of two MADS-domain proteins at different stages of Arabidopsis flower development. Dynamic changes in APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3 DNA binding correlated with changes in gene expression, and many of the target genes could be associated with the developmental stage in which they are transcriptionally controlled. We also observe dynamic changes in chromatin accessibility during flower development. Remarkably, DNA binding of APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3 is largely independent of the accessibility status of their binding regions and it can precede increases in DNA accessibility. These results suggest that APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3 may modulate chromatin accessibility, thereby facilitating access of other transcriptional regulators to their target genes. Conclusions Our findings indicate that different homeotic factors regulate partly overlapping, yet also distinctive sets of target genes in a partly stage-specific fashion. By combining the information from DNA-binding and gene expression data, we are able to propose models of stage-specific regulatory interactions, thereby addressing dynamics of regulatory networks throughout flower development. Furthermore, MADS-domain TFs may regulate gene expression by alternative strategies, one of which is modulation of chromatin accessibility. PMID:24581456

  16. A NAC domain protein family contributing to the regulation of wood formation in poplar.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Misato; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Xu, Bo; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Goué, Nadia; Shi, Fusun; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Demura, Taku

    2011-08-01

    Wood harvested from trees is one of the most widely utilized natural materials on our planet. Recent environmental issues have prompted an increase in the demand for wood, especially as a cost-effective and renewable resource for industry and energy, so it is important to understand the process of wood formation. In the present study, we focused on poplar (Populus trichocarpa) NAC domain protein genes which are homologous to well-known Arabidopsis transcription factors regulating the differentiation of xylem vessels and fiber cells. From phylogenetic analysis, we isolated 16 poplar NAC domain protein genes, and named them PtVNS (VND-, NST/SND- and SMB-related proteins) genes. Expression analysis revealed that 12 PtVNS (also called PtrWND) genes including both VND and NST groups were expressed in developing xylem tissue and phloem fiber, whereas in primary xylem vessels, only PtVNS/PtrWND genes of the VND group were expressed. By using the post-translational induction system of Arabidopsis VND7, a master regulator of xylem vessel element differentiation, many poplar genes functioning in xylem vessel differentiation downstream from NAC domain protein genes were identified. Transient expression assays showed the variation in PtVNS/PtrWND transactivation activity toward downstream genes, even between duplicate gene pairs. Furthermore, overexpression of PtVNS/PtrWND genes induced ectopic secondary wall thickening in poplar leaves as well as in Arabidopsis seedlings with different levels of induction efficiency according to the gene. These results suggest that wood formation in poplar is regulated by cooperative functions of the NAC domain proteins.

  17. A unique insertion in STARD9's motor domain regulates its stability.

    PubMed

    Senese, Silvia; Cheung, Keith; Lo, Yu-Chen; Gholkar, Ankur A; Xia, Xiaoyu; Wohlschlegel, James A; Torres, Jorge Z

    2015-02-01

    STARD9 is a largely uncharacterized mitotic kinesin and putative cancer target that is critical for regulating pericentriolar material cohesion during bipolar spindle assembly. To begin to understand the mechanisms regulating STARD9 function and their importance to cell division, we took a multidisciplinary approach to define the cis and trans factors that regulate the stability of the STARD9 motor domain. We show that, unlike the other ∼50 mammalian kinesins, STARD9 contains an insertion in loop 12 of its motor domain (MD). Working with the STARD9-MD, we show that it is phosphorylated in mitosis by mitotic kinases that include Plk1. These phosphorylation events are important for targeting a pool of STARD9-MD for ubiquitination by the SCFβ-TrCP ubiquitin ligase and proteasome-dependent degradation. Of interest, overexpression of nonphosphorylatable/nondegradable STARD9-MD mutants leads to spindle assembly defects. Our results with STARD9-MD imply that in vivo the protein levels of full-length STARD9 could be regulated by Plk1 and SCFβ-TrCP to promote proper mitotic spindle assembly.

  18. A unique insertion in STARD9's motor domain regulates its stability

    PubMed Central

    Senese, Silvia; Cheung, Keith; Lo, Yu-Chen; Gholkar, Ankur A.; Xia, Xiaoyu; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Torres, Jorge Z.

    2015-01-01

    STARD9 is a largely uncharacterized mitotic kinesin and putative cancer target that is critical for regulating pericentriolar material cohesion during bipolar spindle assembly. To begin to understand the mechanisms regulating STARD9 function and their importance to cell division, we took a multidisciplinary approach to define the cis and trans factors that regulate the stability of the STARD9 motor domain. We show that, unlike the other ∼50 mammalian kinesins, STARD9 contains an insertion in loop 12 of its motor domain (MD). Working with the STARD9-MD, we show that it is phosphorylated in mitosis by mitotic kinases that include Plk1. These phosphorylation events are important for targeting a pool of STARD9-MD for ubiquitination by the SCFβ-TrCP ubiquitin ligase and proteasome-dependent degradation. Of interest, overexpression of nonphosphorylatable/nondegradable STARD9-MD mutants leads to spindle assembly defects. Our results with STARD9-MD imply that in vivo the protein levels of full-length STARD9 could be regulated by Plk1 and SCFβ-TrCP to promote proper mitotic spindle assembly. PMID:25501367

  19. A staphylococcal GGDEF domain protein regulates biofilm formation independently of cyclic dimeric GMP.

    PubMed

    Holland, Linda M; O'Donnell, Sinéad T; Ryjenkov, Dmitri A; Gomelsky, Larissa; Slater, Shawn R; Fey, Paul D; Gomelsky, Mark; O'Gara, James P

    2008-08-01

    Cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) is an important biofilm regulator that allosterically activates enzymes of exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Proteobacterial genomes usually encode multiple GGDEF domain-containing diguanylate cyclases responsible for c-di-GMP synthesis. In contrast, only one conserved GGDEF domain protein, GdpS (for GGDEF domain protein from Staphylococcus), and a second protein with a highly modified GGDEF domain, GdpP, are present in the sequenced staphylococcal genomes. Here, we investigated the role of GdpS in biofilm formation in Staphylococcus epidermidis. Inactivation of gdpS impaired biofilm formation in medium supplemented with NaCl under static and flow-cell conditions, whereas gdpS overexpression complemented the mutation and enhanced wild-type biofilm development. GdpS increased production of the icaADBC-encoded exopolysaccharide, poly-N-acetyl-glucosamine, by elevating icaADBC mRNA levels. Unexpectedly, c-di-GMP synthesis was found to be irrelevant for the ability of GdpS to elevate icaADBC expression. Mutagenesis of the GGEEF motif essential for diguanylate cyclase activity did not impair GdpS, and the N-terminal fragment of GdpS lacking the GGDEF domain partially complemented the gdpS mutation. Furthermore, heterologous diguanylate cyclases expressed in trans failed to complement the gdpS mutation, and the purified GGDEF domain from GdpS possessed no diguanylate cyclase activity in vitro. The gdpS gene from Staphylococcus aureus exhibited similar characteristics to its S. epidermidis ortholog, suggesting that the GdpS-mediated signal transduction is conserved in staphylococci. Therefore, GdpS affects biofilm formation through a novel c-di-GMP-independent mechanism involving increased icaADBC mRNA levels and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Our data raise the possibility that staphylococci cannot synthesize c-di-GMP and have only remnants of a c-di-GMP signaling pathway.

  20. A staphylococcal GGDEF domain protein regulates biofilm formation independently of cyclic dimeric GMP.

    PubMed

    Holland, Linda M; O'Donnell, Sinéad T; Ryjenkov, Dmitri A; Gomelsky, Larissa; Slater, Shawn R; Fey, Paul D; Gomelsky, Mark; O'Gara, James P

    2008-08-01

    Cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) is an important biofilm regulator that allosterically activates enzymes of exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Proteobacterial genomes usually encode multiple GGDEF domain-containing diguanylate cyclases responsible for c-di-GMP synthesis. In contrast, only one conserved GGDEF domain protein, GdpS (for GGDEF domain protein from Staphylococcus), and a second protein with a highly modified GGDEF domain, GdpP, are present in the sequenced staphylococcal genomes. Here, we investigated the role of GdpS in biofilm formation in Staphylococcus epidermidis. Inactivation of gdpS impaired biofilm formation in medium supplemented with NaCl under static and flow-cell conditions, whereas gdpS overexpression complemented the mutation and enhanced wild-type biofilm development. GdpS increased production of the icaADBC-encoded exopolysaccharide, poly-N-acetyl-glucosamine, by elevating icaADBC mRNA levels. Unexpectedly, c-di-GMP synthesis was found to be irrelevant for the ability of GdpS to elevate icaADBC expression. Mutagenesis of the GGEEF motif essential for diguanylate cyclase activity did not impair GdpS, and the N-terminal fragment of GdpS lacking the GGDEF domain partially complemented the gdpS mutation. Furthermore, heterologous diguanylate cyclases expressed in trans failed to complement the gdpS mutation, and the purified GGDEF domain from GdpS possessed no diguanylate cyclase activity in vitro. The gdpS gene from Staphylococcus aureus exhibited similar characteristics to its S. epidermidis ortholog, suggesting that the GdpS-mediated signal transduction is conserved in staphylococci. Therefore, GdpS affects biofilm formation through a novel c-di-GMP-independent mechanism involving increased icaADBC mRNA levels and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Our data raise the possibility that staphylococci cannot synthesize c-di-GMP and have only remnants of a c-di-GMP signaling pathway. PMID:18502872

  1. Functional domains of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase: regulation by autoinhibitory and visinin-like domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandiran, S.; Takezawa, D.; Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1997-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) with a catalytic domain, calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like domain was cloned and characterized from plants [Patil et al., (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 4797-4801; Takezawa et al. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 8126-8132]. The mechanisms of CCaMK activation by calcium and calcium/calmodulin were investigated using various deletion mutants. The use of deletion mutants of CCaMK lacking either one, two, or all three calcium-binding EF hands indicated that all three calcium-binding sites in the visinin-like domain were crucial for the full calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity. As each calcium-binding EF hand was deleted, there was a gradual reduction in calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity from 100 to 4%. Another mutant (amino acids 1-322) which lacks both the visinin-like domain containing three EF hands and the calmodulin-binding domain was constitutively active, indicating the presence of an autoinhibitory domain around the calmodulin-binding domain. By using various synthetic peptides and the constitutively active mutant, we have shown that CCaMK contains an autoinhibitory domain within the residues 322-340 which overlaps its calmodulin-binding domain. Kinetic studies with both ATP and the GS peptide substrate suggest that the autoinhibitory domain of CCaMK interacts only with the peptide substrate binding motif of the catalytic domain, but not with the ATP-binding motif.

  2. Enzymatic regulation of pattern: BMP4 binds CUB domains of Tolloids and inhibits proteinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hojoon X.; Mendes, Fabio A.; Plouhinec, Jean-Louis; De Robertis, Edward M.

    2009-01-01

    In Xenopus embryos, a dorsal–ventral patterning gradient is generated by diffusing Chordin/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) complexes cleaved by BMP1/Tolloid metalloproteinases in the ventral side. We developed a new BMP1/Tolloid assay using a fluorogenic Chordin peptide substrate and identified an unexpected negative feedback loop for BMP4, in which BMP4 inhibits Tolloid enzyme activity noncompetitively. BMP4 binds directly to the CUB (Complement 1r/s, Uegf [a sea urchin embryonic protein] and BMP1) domains of BMP1 and Drosophila Tolloid with high affinity. Binding to CUB domains inhibits BMP4 signaling. These findings provide a molecular explanation for a long-standing genetical puzzle in which antimorphic Drosophila tolloid mutant alleles displayed anti-BMP effects. The extensive Drosophila genetics available supports the relevance of the interaction described here at endogenous physiological levels. Many extracellular proteins contain CUB domains; the binding of CUB domains to BMP4 suggests a possible general function in binding transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily members. Mathematical modeling indicates that feedback inhibition by BMP ligands acts on the ventral side, while on the dorsal side the main regulator of BMP1/Tolloid enzymatic activity is the binding to its substrate, Chordin. PMID:19884260

  3. A Conserved Myc Protein Domain, MBIV, Regulates DNA Binding, Apoptosis, Transformation, and G2 Arrest†

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Victoria H.; Chandriani, Sanjay; Whitfield, Michael L.; Cole, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    The myc family of oncogenes is well conserved throughout evolution. Here we present the characterization of a domain conserved in c-, N-, and L-Myc from fish to humans, N-Myc317-337, designated Myc box IV (MBIV). A deletion of this domain leads to a defect in Myc-induced apoptosis and in some transformation assays but not in cell proliferation. Unlike other Myc mutants, MycΔMBIV is not a simple loss-of-function mutant because it is hyperactive for G2 arrest in primary cells. Microarray analysis of genes regulated by N-MycΔMBIV reveals that it is weakened for transactivation and repression but not nearly as defective as N-MycΔMBII. Although the mutated region is not part of the previously defined DNA binding domain, we find that N-MycΔMBIV has a significantly lower affinity for DNA than the wild-type protein in vitro. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation shows reduced binding of N-MycΔMBIV to some target genes in vivo, which correlates with the defect in transactivation. Thus, this conserved domain has an unexpected role in Myc DNA binding activity. These data also provide a novel separation of Myc functions linked to the modulation of DNA binding activity. PMID:16705173

  4. A conserved polybasic domain mediates plasma membrane targeting of Lgl and its regulation by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wei; Zhang, Xuejing; Liu, Weijie; Chen, Yi-jiun; Huang, Juan; Austin, Erin; Celotto, Alicia M; Jiang, Wendy Z; Palladino, Michael J; Jiang, Yu; Hammond, Gerald R V; Hong, Yang

    2015-10-26

    Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) plays essential and conserved functions in regulating both cell polarity and tumorigenesis in Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrates. It is well recognized that plasma membrane (PM) or cell cortex localization is crucial for Lgl function in vivo, but its membrane-targeting mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we discovered that hypoxia acutely and reversibly inhibits Lgl PM targeting through a posttranslational mechanism that is independent of the well-characterized atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) or Aurora kinase-mediated phosphorylations. Instead, we identified an evolutionarily conserved polybasic (PB) domain that targets Lgl to the PM via electrostatic binding to membrane phosphatidylinositol phosphates. Such PB domain-mediated PM targeting is inhibited by hypoxia, which reduces inositol phospholipid levels on the PM through adenosine triphosphate depletion. Moreover, Lgl PB domain contains all the identified phosphorylation sites of aPKC and Aurora kinases, providing a molecular mechanism by which phosphorylations neutralize the positive charges on the PB domain to inhibit Lgl PM targeting. PMID:26483556

  5. Multivalent Chromatin Engagement and Inter-domain Crosstalk Regulate MORC3 ATPase.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Forest H; Tong, Qiong; Sullivan, Kelly D; Cornett, Evan M; Zhang, Yi; Ali, Muzaffar; Ahn, JaeWoo; Pandey, Ahway; Guo, Angela H; Strahl, Brian D; Costello, James C; Espinosa, Joaquin M; Rothbart, Scott B; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2016-09-20

    MORC3 is linked to inflammatory myopathies and cancer; however, the precise role of MORC3 in normal cell physiology and disease remains poorly understood. Here, we present detailed genetic, biochemical, and structural analyses of MORC3. We demonstrate that MORC3 is significantly upregulated in Down syndrome and that genetic abnormalities in MORC3 are associated with cancer. The CW domain of MORC3 binds to the methylated histone H3K4 tail, and this interaction is essential for recruitment of MORC3 to chromatin and accumulation in nuclear bodies. We show that MORC3 possesses intrinsic ATPase activity that requires DNA, but it is negatively regulated by the CW domain, which interacts with the ATPase domain. Natively linked CW impedes binding of the ATPase domain to DNA, resulting in a decrease in the DNA-stimulated enzymatic activity. Collectively, our studies provide a molecular framework detailing MORC3 functions and suggest that its modulation may contribute to human disease. PMID:27653685

  6. Structural Basis for Regulation of GPR56/ADGRG1 by Its Alternatively Spliced Extracellular Domains.

    PubMed

    Salzman, Gabriel S; Ackerman, Sarah D; Ding, Chen; Koide, Akiko; Leon, Katherine; Luo, Rong; Stoveken, Hannah M; Fernandez, Celia G; Tall, Gregory G; Piao, Xianhua; Monk, Kelly R; Koide, Shohei; Araç, Demet

    2016-09-21

    Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) play critical roles in diverse neurobiological processes including brain development, synaptogenesis, and myelination. aGPCRs have large alternatively spliced extracellular regions (ECRs) that likely mediate intercellular signaling; however, the precise roles of ECRs remain unclear. The aGPCR GPR56/ADGRG1 regulates both oligodendrocyte and cortical development. Accordingly, human GPR56 mutations cause myelination defects and brain malformations. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the GPR56 ECR, the first structure of any complete aGPCR ECR, in complex with an inverse-agonist monobody, revealing a GPCR-Autoproteolysis-Inducing domain and a previously unidentified domain that we term Pentraxin/Laminin/neurexin/sex-hormone-binding-globulin-Like (PLL). Strikingly, PLL domain deletion caused increased signaling and characterizes a GPR56 splice variant. Finally, we show that an evolutionarily conserved residue in the PLL domain is critical for oligodendrocyte development in vivo. Thus, our results suggest that the GPR56 ECR has unique and multifaceted regulatory functions, providing novel insights into aGPCR roles in neurobiology. PMID:27657451

  7. Allosteric regulation and substrate channeling in multifunctional pyrimidine biosynthetic complexes: analysis of isolated domains and yeast-mammalian chimeric proteins.

    PubMed

    Serre, V; Guy, H; Liu, X; Penverne, B; Hervé, G; Evans, D

    1998-08-14

    The initial steps of pyrimidine biosynthesis in yeast and mammals are catalyzed by large multifunctional proteins of similar size, sequence and domain structure, but appreciable functional differences. The mammalian protein, CAD, has carbamyl phosphate synthetase (CPSase), aspartate transcarbamylase (ATCase) and dihydroorotase (DHOase) activities. The yeast protein, ura2, catalyzes the first two reactions and has a domain, called pDHO, which is homologous to mammalian DHOase, but is inactive. In CAD, only CPSase is regulated, whereas both CPSase and ATCase in the yeast protein are inhibited by UTP. These functional differences were explored by constructing a series of mammalian yeast chimeras. The isolated ATCase domain is catalytically active, but is not regulated. The inclusion of the yeast sequences homologous to the mammalian regulatory domain (B3) and the intervening pDHO domain did not confer regulation. Chimeric proteins in which the homologous regions of the mammalian protein were replaced by the corresponding domains of ura2 exhibited full catalytic activity, as well regulation of the CPSase, but not the ATCase, activities. The yeast B3 subdomain confers UTP sensitivity on the mammalian CPSase, suggesting that it is the locus of CPSase regulation in ura2. Taken together, these results indicate that there are regulatory site(s) in ura2. Channeling is impaired in all the chimeric complexes and completely abolished in the chimera in which the pDHO domain of yeast is replaced by the mammalian DHO domain. PMID:9698553

  8. An essential single domain response regulator required for normal cell division and differentiation in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, G B; Lane, T; Ohta, N; Sommer, J M; Newton, A

    1995-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways mediated by sensor histidine kinases and cognate response regulators control a variety of physiological processes in response to environmental conditions. Here we show that in Caulobacter crescentus these systems also play essential roles in the regulation of polar morphogenesis and cell division. Previous studies have implicated histidine kinase genes pleC and divJ in the regulation of these developmental events. We now report that divK encodes an essential, cell cycle-regulated homolog of the CheY/Spo0F subfamily and present evidence that this protein is a cognate response regulator of the histidine kinase PleC. The purified kinase domain of PleC, like that of DivJ, can serve as an efficient phosphodonor to DivK and as a phospho-DivK phosphatase. Based on these and earlier genetic results we propose that PleC and DivK are members of a signal transduction pathway that couples motility and stalk formation to completion of a late cell division cycle event. Gene disruption experiments and the filamentous phenotype of the conditional divK341 mutant reveal that DivK also functions in an essential signal transduction pathway required for cell division, apparently in response to another histidine kinase. We suggest that phosphotransfer mediated by these two-component signal transduction systems may represent a general mechanism regulating cell differentiation and cell division in response to successive cell cycle checkpoints. Images PMID:7664732

  9. Blau syndrome polymorphisms in NOD2 identify nucleotide hydrolysis and helical domain 1 as signalling regulators.

    PubMed

    Parkhouse, Rhiannon; Boyle, Joseph P; Monie, Tom P

    2014-09-17

    Understanding how single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) lead to disease at a molecular level provides a starting point for improved therapeutic intervention. SNPs in the innate immune receptor nucleotide oligomerisation domain 2 (NOD2) can cause the inflammatory disorders Blau Syndrome (BS) and early onset sarcoidosis (EOS) through receptor hyperactivation. Here, we show that these polymorphisms cluster into two primary locations: the ATP/Mg(2+)-binding site and helical domain 1. Polymorphisms in these two locations may consequently dysregulate ATP hydrolysis and NOD2 autoinhibition, respectively. Complementary mutations in NOD1 did not mirror the NOD2 phenotype, which indicates that NOD1 and NOD2 are activated and regulated by distinct methods. PMID:25093298

  10. Structure of the Response Regulator PhoP from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reveals a Dimer Through the Receiver Domain

    SciTech Connect

    S Menon; S Wang

    2011-12-31

    The PhoP protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a response regulator of the OmpR/PhoB subfamily, whose structure consists of an N-terminal receiver domain and a C-terminal DNA-binding domain. How the DNA-binding activities are regulated by phosphorylation of the receiver domain remains unclear due to a lack of structural information on the full-length proteins. Here we report the crystal structure of the full-length PhoP of M. tuberculosis. Unlike other known structures of full-length proteins of the same subfamily, PhoP forms a dimer through its receiver domain with the dimer interface involving {alpha}4-{beta}5-{alpha}5, a common interface for activated receiver domain dimers. However, the switch residues, Thr99 and Tyr118, are in a conformation resembling those of nonactivated receiver domains. The Tyr118 side chain is involved in the dimer interface interactions. The receiver domain is tethered to the DNA-binding domain through a flexible linker and does not impose structural constraints on the DNA-binding domain. This structure suggests that phosphorylation likely facilitates/stabilizes receiver domain dimerization, bringing the DNA-binding domains to close proximity, thereby increasing their binding affinity for direct repeat DNA sequences.

  11. The N-terminal domain allosterically regulates cleavage and activation of the epithelial sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Kota, Pradeep; Buchner, Ginka; Chakraborty, Hirak; Dang, Yan L; He, Hong; Garcia, Guilherme J M; Kubelka, Jan; Gentzsch, Martina; Stutts, M Jackson; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2014-08-15

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is activated upon endoproteolytic cleavage of specific segments in the extracellular domains of the α- and γ-subunits. Cleavage is accomplished by intracellular proteases prior to membrane insertion and by surface-expressed or extracellular soluble proteases once ENaC resides at the cell surface. These cleavage events are partially regulated by intracellular signaling through an unknown allosteric mechanism. Here, using a combination of computational and experimental techniques, we show that the intracellular N terminus of γ-ENaC undergoes secondary structural transitions upon interaction with phosphoinositides. From ab initio folding simulations of the N termini in the presence and absence of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), we found that PIP2 increases α-helical propensity in the N terminus of γ-ENaC. Electrophysiology and mutation experiments revealed that a highly conserved cluster of lysines in the γ-ENaC N terminus regulates accessibility of extracellular cleavage sites in γ-ENaC. We also show that conditions that decrease PIP2 or enhance ubiquitination sharply limit access of the γ-ENaC extracellular domain to proteases. Further, the efficiency of allosteric control of ENaC proteolysis is dependent on Tyr(370) in γ-ENaC. Our findings provide an allosteric mechanism for ENaC activation regulated by the N termini and sheds light on a potential general mechanism of channel and receptor activation.

  12. The N-terminal Domain Allosterically Regulates Cleavage and Activation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Pradeep; Buchner, Ginka; Chakraborty, Hirak; Dang, Yan L.; He, Hong; Garcia, Guilherme J. M.; Kubelka, Jan; Gentzsch, Martina; Stutts, M. Jackson; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2014-01-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is activated upon endoproteolytic cleavage of specific segments in the extracellular domains of the α- and γ-subunits. Cleavage is accomplished by intracellular proteases prior to membrane insertion and by surface-expressed or extracellular soluble proteases once ENaC resides at the cell surface. These cleavage events are partially regulated by intracellular signaling through an unknown allosteric mechanism. Here, using a combination of computational and experimental techniques, we show that the intracellular N terminus of γ-ENaC undergoes secondary structural transitions upon interaction with phosphoinositides. From ab initio folding simulations of the N termini in the presence and absence of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), we found that PIP2 increases α-helical propensity in the N terminus of γ-ENaC. Electrophysiology and mutation experiments revealed that a highly conserved cluster of lysines in the γ-ENaC N terminus regulates accessibility of extracellular cleavage sites in γ-ENaC. We also show that conditions that decrease PIP2 or enhance ubiquitination sharply limit access of the γ-ENaC extracellular domain to proteases. Further, the efficiency of allosteric control of ENaC proteolysis is dependent on Tyr370 in γ-ENaC. Our findings provide an allosteric mechanism for ENaC activation regulated by the N termini and sheds light on a potential general mechanism of channel and receptor activation. PMID:24973914

  13. Regulation of membrane-shape transitions induced by I-BAR domains.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiming; Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2015-07-21

    I-BAR proteins are well-known actin-cytoskeleton adaptors and have been observed to be involved in the formation of plasma membrane protrusions (filopodia). I-BAR proteins contain an all-helical, crescent-shaped IRSp53-MIM domain (IMD) dimer that is believed to be able to couple with a membrane shape. This coupling could involve the sensing and even the generation of negative plasma membrane curvature. Indeed, the in vitro studies have shown that IMDs can induce inward tubulation of liposomes. While N-BAR domains, which generate positive membrane curvature, have received a considerable amount of attention from both theory and experiments, the mechanisms of curvature coupling through IMDs are comparatively less studied and understood. Here we used a membrane-shape stability assay developed recently in our lab to quantitatively characterize IMD-induced membrane-shape transitions. We determined a membrane-shape stability diagram for IMDs that reveals how membrane tension and protein density can comodulate the generation of IMD-induced membrane protrusions. From comparison to analytical theory, we determine three key parameters that characterize the curvature coupling of IMD. We find that the curvature generation capacity of IMDs is significantly stronger compared to that of endophilin, an N-BAR protein known to be involved in plasma membrane shape transitions. Contrary to N-BAR domains, where amphipathic helix insertion is known to promote its membrane curvature generation, for IMDs we find that amphipathic helices inhibit membrane shape transitions, consistent with the inverse curvature that IMDs generate. Importantly, in both of these types of BAR domains, electrostatic interactions affect membrane-binding capacity, but do not appear to affect the curvature generation capacity of the protein. These two types of BAR domain proteins show qualitatively similar membrane shape stability diagrams, suggesting an underlying ubiquitous mechanism by which peripheral proteins

  14. Protein domain analysis of genomic sequence data reveals regulation of LRR related domains in plant transpiration in Ficus.

    PubMed

    Lang, Tiange; Yin, Kangquan; Liu, Jinyu; Cao, Kunfang; Cannon, Charles H; Du, Fang K

    2014-01-01

    Predicting protein domains is essential for understanding a protein's function at the molecular level. However, up till now, there has been no direct and straightforward method for predicting protein domains in species without a reference genome sequence. In this study, we developed a functionality with a set of programs that can predict protein domains directly from genomic sequence data without a reference genome. Using whole genome sequence data, the programming functionality mainly comprised DNA assembly in combination with next-generation sequencing (NGS) assembly methods and traditional methods, peptide prediction and protein domain prediction. The proposed new functionality avoids problems associated with de novo assembly due to micro reads and small single repeats. Furthermore, we applied our functionality for the prediction of leucine rich repeat (LRR) domains in four species of Ficus with no reference genome, based on NGS genomic data. We found that the LRRNT_2 and LRR_8 domains are related to plant transpiration efficiency, as indicated by the stomata index, in the four species of Ficus. The programming functionality established in this study provides new insights for protein domain prediction, which is particularly timely in the current age of NGS data expansion.

  15. The role of mammalian PPR domain proteins in the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rackham, Oliver; Filipovska, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) domain proteins are a large family of RNA-binding proteins that are involved in the maturation and translation of organelle transcripts in eukaryotes. They were first identified in plant organelles and their important role in mammalian mitochondrial gene regulation is now emerging. Mammalian PPR proteins, like their plant counterparts, have diverse roles in mitochondrial transcription, RNA metabolism and translation and consequently are important for mitochondrial function and cell health. Here we discuss the current knowledge about the seven mammalian PPR proteins identified to date and their roles in the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression. Furthermore we discuss the mitochondrial RNA targets of the mammalian PPR proteins and methods to investigate the RNA targets of these mitochondrial RNA-binding proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Gene Expression.

  16. An E3 ligase complex regulates SET-domain polycomb group protein activity in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Cheol Woong; Roh, Hyungmin; Dang, Tuong Vi; Choi, Yang Do; Fischer, Robert L.; Lee, Jong Seob; Choi, Yeonhee

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional repression via methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) by the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is conserved in higher eukaryotes. The Arabidopsis PRC2 controls homeotic gene expression, flowering time, and gene imprinting. Although downstream target genes and the regulatory mechanism of PRC2 are well understood, much less is known about the significance of posttranslational regulation of PRC2 protein activity. Here, we show the posttranslational regulation of CURLY LEAF (CLF) SET-domain polycomb group (PcG) protein by the F-box protein, UPWARD CURLY LEAF1 (UCL1). Overexpression of UCL1 generates mutant phenotypes similar to those observed in plants with a loss-of-function mutation in the CLF gene. Leaf curling and early flowering phenotypes of UCL1 overexpression mutants, like clf mutants, are rescued by mutations in the AGAMOUS and FLOWERING LOCUS T genes, which is consistent with UCL1 and CLF functioning in the same genetic pathway. Overexpression of UCL1 reduces the level of CLF protein and alters expression and H3K27 methylation of CLF-target genes in transgenic plants, suggesting that UCL1 negatively regulates CLF. Interaction of UCL1 with CLF was detected in plant nuclei and in the yeast two-hybrid system. The UCL1 F-box binds in vivo to components of the E3 ligase complex, which ubiquitylate proteins that are subsequently degraded via the ubiquitin-26S proteasome pathway. Taken together, these results demonstrate the posttranslational regulation of the CLF SET-domain PcG activity by the UCL1 F-box protein in the E3 ligase complex. PMID:21518870

  17. A conserved polybasic domain mediates plasma membrane targeting of Lgl and its regulation by hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wei; Zhang, Xuejing; Liu, Weijie; Chen, Yi-jiun; Huang, Juan; Austin, Erin; Celotto, Alicia M.; Jiang, Wendy Z.; Palladino, Michael J.; Jiang, Yu; Hammond, Gerald R.V.

    2015-01-01

    Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) plays essential and conserved functions in regulating both cell polarity and tumorigenesis in Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrates. It is well recognized that plasma membrane (PM) or cell cortex localization is crucial for Lgl function in vivo, but its membrane-targeting mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we discovered that hypoxia acutely and reversibly inhibits Lgl PM targeting through a posttranslational mechanism that is independent of the well-characterized atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) or Aurora kinase–mediated phosphorylations. Instead, we identified an evolutionarily conserved polybasic (PB) domain that targets Lgl to the PM via electrostatic binding to membrane phosphatidylinositol phosphates. Such PB domain–mediated PM targeting is inhibited by hypoxia, which reduces inositol phospholipid levels on the PM through adenosine triphosphate depletion. Moreover, Lgl PB domain contains all the identified phosphorylation sites of aPKC and Aurora kinases, providing a molecular mechanism by which phosphorylations neutralize the positive charges on the PB domain to inhibit Lgl PM targeting. PMID:26483556

  18. Topological Domains, Metagenes, and the Emergence of Pleiotropic Regulations at Hox Loci.

    PubMed

    Darbellay, Fabrice; Duboule, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Hox gene clusters of jaw vertebrates display a tight genomic organization, which has no equivalent in any other bilateria genomes sequenced thus far. It was previously argued that such a topological consolidation toward a condensed, metagenic structure was due to the accumulation of long-range regulations flanking Hox loci, a phenomenon made possible by the successive genome duplications that occurred at the root of the vertebrate lineage, similar to gene neofunctionalization but applied to a coordinated multigenic system. Here, we propose that the emergence of such large vertebrate regulatory landscapes containing a range of global enhancers was greatly facilitated by the presence of topologically associating domains (TADs). These chromatin domains, mostly constitutive, may have been used as genomic niches where novel regulations could evolve due to both the preexistence of a structural backbone poised to integrate novel regulatory inputs, and a highly adaptive transcriptional readout. We propose a scenario for the coevolution of such TADs and the emergence of pleiotropy at ancestral vertebrate Hox loci. PMID:26970625

  19. The Dentin Sialoprotein (DSP) Domain Regulates Dental Mesenchymal Cell Differentiation through a Novel Surface Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Chunyan; Yuan, Guohua; Luo, Daoshu; Zhang, Lu; Lin, Heng; Liu, Huan; Chen, Lei; Yang, Guobin; Chen, Shuo; Chen, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is a dentin extracellular matrix protein that is processed into dentin sialoprotein (DSP), dentin glycoprotein (DGP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). DSP is mainly expressed in odontoblasts. We hypothesized that DSP interacts with cell surface receptors and subsequently activates intracellular signaling. Using DSP as bait for screening a protein library, we demonstrate that DSP acts as a ligand and binds to integrin β6. The 36 amino acid residues of DSP are sufficient to bind to integrin β6. This peptide promoted cell attachment, migration, differentiation and mineralization of dental mesenchymal cells. In addition, DSP aa183-219 stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and P38 kinases. This activation was inhibited by an anti-integrin β6 antibody and siRNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this DSP fragment induces SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation via ERK1/2 and P38 signaling. SMAD1/5/8 binds to SMAD binding elements (SBEs) in the DSPP gene promoter. SBE mutations result in a decrease in DSPP transcriptional activity. Endogenous DSPP expression was up-regulated by DSP aa183-219 in dental mesenchymal cells. The data in the current study demonstrate for the first time that this DSP domain acts as a ligand in a RGD-independent manner and is involved in intracellular signaling via interacting with integrin β6. The DSP domain regulates DSPP expression and odontoblast homeostasis via a positive feedback loop. PMID:27430624

  20. The SH2 domain of Abl kinases regulates kinase autophosphorylation by controlling activation loop accessibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontanara, Allan Joaquim; Georgeon, Sandrine; Tria, Giancarlo; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Hantschel, Oliver

    2014-11-01

    The activity of protein kinases is regulated by multiple molecular mechanisms, and their disruption is a common driver of oncogenesis. A central and almost universal control element of protein kinase activity is the activation loop that utilizes both conformation and phosphorylation status to determine substrate access. In this study, we use recombinant Abl tyrosine kinases and conformation-specific kinase inhibitors to quantitatively analyse structural changes that occur after Abl activation. Allosteric SH2-kinase domain interactions were previously shown to be essential for the leukemogenesis caused by the Bcr-Abl oncoprotein. We find that these allosteric interactions switch the Abl activation loop from a closed to a fully open conformation. This enables the trans-autophosphorylation of the activation loop and requires prior phosphorylation of the SH2-kinase linker. Disruption of the SH2-kinase interaction abolishes activation loop phosphorylation. Our analysis provides a molecular mechanism for the SH2 domain-dependent activation of Abl that may also regulate other tyrosine kinases.

  1. A PAS domain-containing regulator controls flagella-flagella interactions in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Mark; Periago, Paula M.; Mulholland, Francis; Brown, Helen L.; van Vliet, Arnoud H. M.

    2015-01-01

    The bipolar flagella of the foodborne bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni confer motility, which is essential for virulence. The flagella of C. jejuni are post-translationally modified, but how this process is controlled is not well understood. In this work, we have identified a novel PAS-domain containing regulatory system, which modulates flagella-flagella interactions in C. jejuni. Inactivation of the cj1387c gene, encoding a YheO-like PAS6 domain linked to a helix-turn-helix domain, resulted in the generation of a tightly associated “cell-train” morphotype, where up to four cells were connected by their flagella. The morphotype was fully motile, resistant to vortexing, accompanied by increased autoagglutination, and was not observed in aflagellated cells. The Δcj1387c mutant displayed increased expression of the adjacent Cj1388 protein, which comprises of a single endoribonuclease L-PSP domain. Comparative genomics showed that cj1387c (yheO) orthologs in bacterial genomes are commonly linked to an adjacent cj1388 ortholog, with some bacteria, including C. jejuni, containing another cj1388-like gene (cj0327). Inactivation of the cj1388 and cj0327 genes resulted in decreased autoagglutination in Tween-20-supplemented media. The Δcj1388 and Δcj0327 mutants were also attenuated in a Galleria larvae-based infection model. Finally, substituting the sole cysteine in Cj1388 for serine prevented Cj1388 dimerization in non-reducing conditions, and resulted in decreased autoagglutination in the presence of Tween-20. We hypothesize that Cj1388 and Cj0327 modulate post-translational modification of the flagella through yet unidentified mechanisms, and propose naming Cj1387 the Campylobacter Flagella Interaction Regulator CfiR, and the Cj1388 and Cj0327 protein as CfiP and CfiQ, respectively. PMID:26284050

  2. Role of prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins in the regulation of insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mei; Paglialunga, Sabina; Wong, Julia M-K; Hoang, Monica; Pillai, Renjitha; Joseph, Jamie W

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with impaired nutrient-regulated anaplerosis and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. One key anaplerotic substrate that may be involved in regulating insulin release is α-ketoglutarate (αKG). Since prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs) can metabolize cytosolic αKG, we sought to explore the role of this enzyme in the regulation of β-cell function. The oxygen-sensing PHDs regulate the stability of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) as well as other proline-containing proteins by catalyzing the hydroxylation of proline residues. This reaction is dependent on sufficient levels of oxygen, iron, and αKG. In the present study, we utilized both pharmacological and genetic approaches to assess the impact of inhibiting PHD activity on β-cell function. We demonstrate that ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (EDHB), a PHD inhibitor, significantly blunted glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from 832/13 clonal cells, rat, and human islets. EDHB reduced glucose utilization, ATP/ADP ratio, and key TCA cycle intermediates such as pyruvate, citrate, fumarate, and malate. siRNA-mediated knockdown of PHD1 and PHD3 inhibited GSIS, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of PHD2 had no effect on GSIS. Taken together, the current results demonstrate an important role for PHDs as mediators of islet insulin secretion. PMID:26997627

  3. Transformation/Transcription Domain-Associated Protein (TRRAP)-Mediated Regulation of Wee1

    PubMed Central

    Calonge, Teresa M.; Eshaghi, Majid; Liu, Jianhua; Ronai, Ze'ev; O'Connell, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    The G2 DNA damage checkpoint inhibits Cdc2 and mitotic entry through the dual regulation of Wee1 and Cdc25 by the Chk1 effector kinase. Upregulation of Chk1 by mutation or overexpression bypasses the requirement for upstream regulators or DNA damage to promote a G2 cell cycle arrest. We screened in fission yeast for mutations that rendered cells resistant to overexpressed chk1+. We identified a mutation in tra1, which encodes one of two homologs of transformation/transcription domain-associated protein (TRRAP), an ATM/R-related pseudokinase that scaffolds several histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes. Inhibition of histone deacetylases reverts the resistance to overexpressed chk1+, suggesting this phenotype is due to a HAT activity, although expression of checkpoint and cell cycle genes is not greatly affected. Cells with mutant or deleted tra1 activate Chk1 normally and are checkpoint proficient. However, these cells are semi-wee even when overexpressing chk1+ and accumulate inactive Wee1 protein. The changed division response (Cdr) kinases Cdr1 and Cdr2 are negative regulators of Wee1, and we show that they are required for the Tra1-dependent alterations to Wee1 function. This identifies Tra1 as another component controlling the timing of entry into mitosis via Cdc2 activation. PMID:20194963

  4. Functional Domains of Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Modulate INS-VNTR Transcription in Human Thymic Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Avis E; Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S

    2016-05-20

    INS-VNTR (insulin-variable number of tandem repeats) and AIRE (autoimmune regulator) have been associated with the modulation of insulin gene expression in thymus, which is essential to induce either insulin tolerance or the development of insulin autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. We sought to analyze whether each functional domain of AIRE is critical for the activation of INS-VNTR in human thymic epithelial cells. Twelve missense or nonsense mutations in AIRE and two chimeric AIRE constructs were generated. A luciferase reporter assay and a pulldown assay using biotinylated INS-class I VNTR probe were performed to examine the transactivation and binding activities of WT, mutant, and chimeric AIREs on the INS-VNTR promoter. Confocal microscopy analysis was performed for WT or mutant AIRE cellular localization. We found that all of the AIRE mutations resulted in loss of transcriptional activation of INS-VNTR except mutant P252L. Using WT/mutant AIRE heterozygous forms to modulate the INS-VNTR target revealed five mutations (R257X, G228W, C311fsX376, L397fsX478, and R433fsX502) that functioned in a dominant negative fashion. The LXXLL-3 motif is identified for the first time to be essential for DNA binding to INS-VNTR, whereas the intact PHD1, PHD2, LXXLL-3, and LXXLL-4 motifs were important for successful transcriptional activation. AIRE nuclear localization in the human thymic epithelial cell line was disrupted by mutations in the homogenously staining region domain and the R257X mutation in the PHD1 domain. This study supports the notion that AIRE mutation could specifically affect human insulin gene expression in thymic epithelial cells through INS-VNTR and subsequently induce either insulin tolerance or autoimmunity. PMID:27048654

  5. Functional Domains of Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Modulate INS-VNTR Transcription in Human Thymic Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Avis E; Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S

    2016-05-20

    INS-VNTR (insulin-variable number of tandem repeats) and AIRE (autoimmune regulator) have been associated with the modulation of insulin gene expression in thymus, which is essential to induce either insulin tolerance or the development of insulin autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. We sought to analyze whether each functional domain of AIRE is critical for the activation of INS-VNTR in human thymic epithelial cells. Twelve missense or nonsense mutations in AIRE and two chimeric AIRE constructs were generated. A luciferase reporter assay and a pulldown assay using biotinylated INS-class I VNTR probe were performed to examine the transactivation and binding activities of WT, mutant, and chimeric AIREs on the INS-VNTR promoter. Confocal microscopy analysis was performed for WT or mutant AIRE cellular localization. We found that all of the AIRE mutations resulted in loss of transcriptional activation of INS-VNTR except mutant P252L. Using WT/mutant AIRE heterozygous forms to modulate the INS-VNTR target revealed five mutations (R257X, G228W, C311fsX376, L397fsX478, and R433fsX502) that functioned in a dominant negative fashion. The LXXLL-3 motif is identified for the first time to be essential for DNA binding to INS-VNTR, whereas the intact PHD1, PHD2, LXXLL-3, and LXXLL-4 motifs were important for successful transcriptional activation. AIRE nuclear localization in the human thymic epithelial cell line was disrupted by mutations in the homogenously staining region domain and the R257X mutation in the PHD1 domain. This study supports the notion that AIRE mutation could specifically affect human insulin gene expression in thymic epithelial cells through INS-VNTR and subsequently induce either insulin tolerance or autoimmunity.

  6. A novel putative insect chitinase with multiple catalytic domains: hormonal regulation during metamorphosis.

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Véronique; Fraichard, Stéphane; Bouhin, Hervé

    2002-01-01

    We have used differential display to identify genes that are regulated by juvenile hormone in the epidermis of the beetle Tenebrio molitor. One of the genes encodes T. molitor chitinase 5 (TmChit5), a chitinase possessing an unusual structure. Sequence analysis of TmChit5 identified five 'chitinase units' of approx. 480 amino acids with similarity to chitinase family 18. These units are separated by less conserved regions containing putative PEST (rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine and threonine) sequences, putative chitin-binding domains and mucin domains. Northern-blot analysis identified a single transcript of approx. 9 kb, whose abundance correlated with that of 20-hydroxyecdysone during metamorphosis. Injection of pupae with 20-hydroxyecdysone alone, or in combination with cycloheximide, indicated that TmChit5 expression is directly induced by the hormone. Further experiments indicated that methoprene (a juvenile hormone analogue) indirectly induced TmChit5 mRNA expression. On the basis of the present results and previous studies, we propose a molecular mechanism for cuticle digestion during the moulting process. PMID:12059786

  7. Gene regulation during development in the light of topologically associating domains.

    PubMed

    Remeseiro, Silvia; Hörnblad, Andreas; Spitz, François

    2016-01-01

    During embryonic development, complex transcriptional programs govern the precision of gene expression. Many key developmental genes are regulated via cis-regulatory elements that are located far away in the linear genome. How sequences located hundreds of kilobases away from a promoter can influence its activity has been the subject of numerous speculations, which all underline the importance of the 3D-organization of the genome. The recent advent of chromosome conformation capture techniques has put into focus the subdivision of the genome into topologically associating domains (TADs). TADs may influence regulatory activities on multiple levels. The relative invariance of TAD limits across cell types suggests that they may form fixed structural domains that could facilitate and/or confine long-range regulatory interactions. However, most recent studies suggest that interactions within TADs are more variable and dynamic than initially described. Hence, different models are emerging regarding how TADs shape the complex 3D conformations, and thereafter influence the networks of cis-interactions that govern gene expression during development. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26558551

  8. A novel putative insect chitinase with multiple catalytic domains: hormonal regulation during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Royer, Véronique; Fraichard, Stéphane; Bouhin, Hervé

    2002-09-15

    We have used differential display to identify genes that are regulated by juvenile hormone in the epidermis of the beetle Tenebrio molitor. One of the genes encodes T. molitor chitinase 5 (TmChit5), a chitinase possessing an unusual structure. Sequence analysis of TmChit5 identified five 'chitinase units' of approx. 480 amino acids with similarity to chitinase family 18. These units are separated by less conserved regions containing putative PEST (rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine and threonine) sequences, putative chitin-binding domains and mucin domains. Northern-blot analysis identified a single transcript of approx. 9 kb, whose abundance correlated with that of 20-hydroxyecdysone during metamorphosis. Injection of pupae with 20-hydroxyecdysone alone, or in combination with cycloheximide, indicated that TmChit5 expression is directly induced by the hormone. Further experiments indicated that methoprene (a juvenile hormone analogue) indirectly induced TmChit5 mRNA expression. On the basis of the present results and previous studies, we propose a molecular mechanism for cuticle digestion during the moulting process.

  9. Post-translational regulation of expression and conformation of an immunoglobulin domain in yeast surface display.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Ranganath; Subramanian, Shyamsundar; Boder, Eric T; Discher, Dennis E

    2006-01-01

    Display of heterologous proteins on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is increasingly being exploited for directed evolution because of straightforward cell screens. However, yeast post-translationally modifies proteins in ways that must be factored into library engineering and refinement. Here, we express the extracellular immunoglobulin domain of an ubiquitous mammalian membrane protein, CD47, which is implicated in cancer, immunocompatibility, and motility. CD47 has multiple sites of glycosylation and a core disulfide bond. We assess the effects of both of these post-translational modifications on expression and antibody binding. CD47's extracellular domain is fused to the yeast mating protein Aga2p on the cell wall, and the resulting fusion protein binds several key antibodies, including a conformation-sensitive antibody. Site-by-site mutagenesis of CD47's five N-linked glycosylation sites progressively decreases expression levels on yeast, but folding appears stable. Cysteine mutations disrupt the expected core disulfide, and also decrease protein expression levels, though not to the extent seen with complete deglycosylation. However, with the core disulfide mutants, antibody binding proves to be lower than expected from expression levels and glycosylation is clearly reduced compared to wild-type. The results indicate that glycosylation regulates heterologous display on yeast more than core disulfides do and thus suggest bounds on directed evolution by post-translational processing.

  10. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) regulates proliferation of endochondral cells in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Ikuma; Hisaki, Tomoka; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko; Kano, Kiyoshi

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We produced in vitro and in vivo model to better understand the role of DDR2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DDR2 might play an inhibitory role in the proliferation of chondrocyte. -- Abstract: Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated by fibrillar collagens. DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. The decrement of endogenous DDR2 represses osteoblastic marker gene expression and osteogenic differentiation in murine preosteoblastic cells, but the functions of DDR2 in chondrogenic cellular proliferation remain unclear. To better understand the role of DDR2 signaling in cellular proliferation in endochondral ossification, we inhibited Ddr2 expression via the inhibitory effect of miRNA on Ddr2 mRNA (miDdr2) and analyzed the cellular proliferation and differentiation in the prechondrocyte ATDC5 cell lines. To investigate DDR2's molecular role in endochondral cellular proliferation in vivo, we also produced transgenic mice in which the expression of truncated, kinase dead (KD) DDR2 protein is induced, and evaluated the DDR2 function in cellular proliferation in chondrocytes. Although the miDdr2-transfected ATDC5 cell lines retained normal differentiation ability, DDR2 reduction finally promoted cellular proliferation in proportion to the decreasing ratio of Ddr2 expression, and it also promoted earlier differentiation to cartilage cells by insulin induction. The layer of hypertrophic chondrocytes in KD Ddr2 transgenic mice was not significantly thicker than that of normal littermates, but the layer of proliferative chondrocytes in KD-Ddr2 transgenic mice was significantly thicker than that of normal littermates

  11. Extensive domain shuffling in transcription regulators of DNA viruses and implications for the origin of fungal APSES transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Koonin, Eugene V; Aravind, L

    2002-01-01

    Background Viral DNA-binding proteins have served as good models to study the biochemistry of transcription regulation and chromatin dynamics. Computational analysis of viral DNA-binding regulatory proteins and identification of their previously undetected homologs encoded by cellular genomes might lead to a better understanding of their function and evolution in both viral and cellular systems. Results The phyletic range and the conserved DNA-binding domains of the viral regulatory proteins of the poxvirus D6R/N1R and baculoviral Bro protein families have not been previously defined. Using computational analysis, we show that the amino-terminal module of the D6R/N1R proteins defines a novel, conserved DNA-binding domain (the KilA-N domain) that is found in a wide range of proteins of large bacterial and eukaryotic DNA viruses. The KilA-N domain is suggested to be homologous to the fungal DNA-binding APSES domain. We provide evidence for the KilA-N and APSES domains sharing a common fold with the nucleic acid-binding modules of the LAGLIDADG nucleases and the amino-terminal domains of the tRNA endonuclease. The amino-terminal module of the Bro proteins is another, distinct DNA-binding domain (the Bro-N domain) that is present in proteins whose domain architectures parallel those of the KilA-N domain-containing proteins. A detailed analysis of the KilA-N and Bro-N domains and the associated domains points to extensive domain shuffling and lineage-specific gene family expansion within DNA virus genomes. Conclusions We define a large class of novel viral DNA-binding proteins and their cellular homologs and identify their domain architectures. On the basis of phyletic pattern analysis we present evidence for a probable viral origin of the fungus-specific cell-cycle regulatory transcription factors containing the APSES DNA-binding domain. We also demonstrate the extensive role of lineage-specific gene expansion and domain shuffling, within a limited set of approximately

  12. Regulation of Abiotic Stress Signalling by Arabidopsis C-Terminal Domain Phosphatase-Like 1 Requires Interaction with a K-Homology Domain-Containing Protein

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, In Sil; Fukudome, Akihito; Aksoy, Emre; Bang, Woo Young; Kim, Sewon; Guan, Qingmei; Bahk, Jeong Dong; May, Kimberly A.; Russell, William K.; Zhu, Jianhua; Koiwa, Hisashi

    2013-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana CARBOXYL-TERMINAL DOMAIN (CTD) PHOSPHATASE-LIKE 1 (CPL1) regulates plant transcriptional responses to diverse stress signals. Unlike typical CTD phosphatases, CPL1 contains two double-stranded (ds) RNA binding motifs (dsRBMs) at its C-terminus. Some dsRBMs can bind to dsRNA and/or other proteins, but the function of the CPL1 dsRBMs has remained obscure. Here, we report identification of REGULATOR OF CBF GENE EXPRESSION 3 (RCF3) as a CPL1-interacting protein. RCF3 co-purified with tandem-affinity-tagged CPL1 from cultured Arabidopsis cells and contains multiple K-homology (KH) domains, which were predicted to be important for binding to single-stranded DNA/RNA. Yeast two-hybrid, luciferase complementation imaging, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses established that CPL1 and RCF3 strongly associate in vivo, an interaction mediated by the dsRBM1 of CPL1 and the KH3/KH4 domains of RCF3. Mapping of functional regions of CPL1 indicated that CPL1 in vivo function requires the dsRBM1, catalytic activity, and nuclear targeting of CPL1. Gene expression profiles of rcf3 and cpl1 mutants were similar during iron deficiency, but were distinct during the cold response. These results suggest that tethering CPL1 to RCF3 via dsRBM1 is part of the mechanism that confers specificity to CPL1-mediated transcriptional regulation. PMID:24303021

  13. Analysis of DBC1 and its homologs suggests a potential mechanism for regulation of Sirtuin domain deacetylases by NAD metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Anantharaman, Vivek; Aravind, L.

    2008-01-01

    Deleted in Breast Cancer-1 (DBC1) and its paralog CARP-1 are large multi-domain proteins, with a nuclear or perinuclear localization, and a role in promoting apoptosis upon processing by caspases. Recent studies on human DBC1 show that it is a specific inhibitor of the sirtuin-type deacetylase, Sirt1, which deacetylates histones and p53. Using sensitive sequence profile searches and HMM-HMM comparisons we show that the central conserved globular domain present in the DBC1 and it homologs from diverse eukaryotes is a catalytically inactive version of the Nudix hydrolase (MutT) domain. Given that Nudix domains are known to bind nucleoside diphosphate sugars and NAD, we predict that this domain in DBC1 and its homologs binds NAD metabolites such as ADP-ribose. Hence, we propose that DBC1 and its homologs are likely to regulate the activity of SIRT1 or related deacetylases by sensing the soluble products or substrates of the NAD-dependent deacetylation reaction. The complex domain architectures of the members of the DBC1 family, which include fusions to the RNA-binding S1-like domain, the DNA-binding SAP domain and EF-hand domains, suggest that they are likely to function as integrators of distinct regulatory signals including chromatin protein modification, soluble compounds in NAD metabolism, apoptotic stimuli and RNA recognition. PMID:18418069

  14. Conformational change-induced repeat domain expansion regulates Rap phosphatase quorum-sensing signal receptors.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Vijay; Jeffrey, Philip D; Neiditch, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    The large family of Gram-positive quorum-sensing receptors known as the RNPP proteins consists of receptors homologous to the Rap, NprR, PlcR, and PrgX proteins that are regulated by imported oligopeptide autoinducers. Rap proteins are phosphatases and transcriptional anti-activators, and NprR, PlcR, and PrgX proteins are DNA binding transcription factors. Despite their obvious importance, the mechanistic basis of oligopeptide receptor regulation is largely unknown. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the Bacillus subtilis quorum-sensing receptor RapJ in complex with the centrally important oligopeptide autoinducer competence and sporulation factor (CSF, also termed PhrC), a member of the Phr family of quorum-sensing signals. Furthermore, we present the crystal structure of RapI. Comparison of the RapJ-PhrC, RapI, RapH-Spo0F, and RapF-ComA(C) crystal structures reveals the mechanistic basis of Phr activity. More specifically, when complexed with target proteins, Rap proteins consist of a C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain connected by a flexible helix-containing linker to an N-terminal 3-helix bundle. In the absence of a target protein or regulatory peptide, the Rap protein 3-helix bundle adopts different conformations. However, in the peptide-bound conformation, the Rap protein N-terminal 3-helix bundle and linker undergo a radical conformational change, form TPR-like folds, and merge with the existing C-terminal TPR domain. To our knowledge, this is the first example of conformational change-induced repeat domain expansion. Furthermore, upon Phr binding, the entire Rap protein is compressed along the TPR superhelical axis, generating new intramolecular contacts that lock the Rap protein in an inactive state. The fact that Rap proteins are conformationally flexible is surprising considering that it is accepted dogma that TPR proteins do not undergo large conformational changes. Repeat proteins are widely used as scaffolds for the

  15. Regulation of enzyme localization by polymerization: polymer formation by the SAM domain of diacylglycerol kinase delta1.

    PubMed

    Harada, Bryan T; Knight, Mary Jane; Imai, Shin-Ichi; Qiao, Feng; Ramachander, Ranjini; Sawaya, Michael R; Gingery, Mari; Sakane, Fumio; Bowie, James U

    2008-03-01

    The diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) enzymes function as regulators of intracellular signaling by altering the levels of the second messengers, diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. The DGK delta and eta isozymes possess a common protein-protein interaction module known as a sterile alpha-motif (SAM) domain. In DGK delta, SAM domain self-association inhibits the translocation of DGK delta to the plasma membrane. Here we show that DGK delta SAM forms a polymer and map the polymeric interface by a genetic selection for soluble mutants. A crystal structure reveals that DGKSAM forms helical polymers through a head-to-tail interaction similar to other SAM domain polymers. Disrupting polymerization by polymer interface mutations constitutively localizes DGK delta to the plasma membrane. Thus, polymerization of DGK delta regulates the activity of the enzyme by sequestering DGK delta in an inactive cellular location. Regulation by dynamic polymerization is an emerging theme in signal transduction.

  16. The Vesicle Priming Factor CAPS Functions as a Homodimer via C2 Domain Interactions to Promote Regulated Vesicle Exocytosis*

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Matt; Esquibel, Joseph; Maciuba, Stephanie; Takahashi, Hirohide

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitters and peptide hormones are secreted by regulated vesicle exocytosis. CAPS (also known as CADPS) is a 145-kDa cytosolic and peripheral membrane protein required for vesicle docking and priming steps that precede Ca2+-triggered vesicle exocytosis. CAPS binds phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) and SNARE proteins and is proposed to promote SNARE protein complex assembly for vesicle docking and priming. We characterized purified soluble CAPS as mainly monomer in equilibrium with small amounts of dimer. However, the active form of CAPS bound to PC12 cell membranes or to liposomes containing PI(4,5)P2 and Q-SNARE proteins was mainly dimer. CAPS dimer formation required its C2 domain based on mutation or deletion studies. Moreover, C2 domain mutations or deletions resulted in a loss of CAPS function in regulated vesicle exocytosis, indicating that dimerization is essential for CAPS function. Comparison of the CAPS C2 domain to a structurally defined Munc13-1 C2A domain dimer revealed conserved residues involved in CAPS dimerization. We conclude that CAPS functions as a C2 domain-mediated dimer in regulated vesicle exocytosis. The unique tandem C2-PH domain of CAPS may serve as a PI(4,5)P2-triggered switch for dimerization. CAPS dimerization may be coupled to oligomeric SNARE complex assembly for vesicle docking and priming. PMID:27528604

  17. Inhibitory PAS domain protein is a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Yuichi; Cao, Renhai; Svensson, Kristian; Bertilsson, Göran; Asman, Mikael; Tanaka, Hirotoshi; Cao, Yihai; Berkenstam, Anders; Poellinger, Lorenz

    2001-11-01

    Alteration of gene expression is a crucial component of adaptive responses to hypoxia. These responses are mediated by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). Here we describe an inhibitory PAS (Per/Arnt/Sim) domain protein, IPAS, which is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)/PAS protein structurally related to HIFs. IPAS contains no endogenous transactivation function but demonstrates dominant negative regulation of HIF-mediated control of gene expression. Ectopic expression of IPAS in hepatoma cells selectively impairs induction of genes involved in adaptation to a hypoxic environment, notably the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene, and results in retarded tumour growth and tumour vascular density in vivo. In mice, IPAS was predominantly expressed in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and in corneal epithelium of the eye. Expression of IPAS in the cornea correlates with low levels of expression of the VEGF gene under hypoxic conditions. Application of an IPAS antisense oligonucleotide to the mouse cornea induced angiogenesis under normal oxygen conditions, and demonstrated hypoxia-dependent induction of VEGF gene expression in hypoxic corneal cells. These results indicate a previously unknown mechanism for negative regulation of angiogenesis and maintenance of an avascular phenotype.

  18. Soluble CLEC2 Extracellular Domain Improves Glucose and Lipid Homeostasis by Regulating Liver Kupffer Cell Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinle; Zhang, Jun; Ge, Hongfei; Gupte, Jamila; Baribault, Helene; Lee, Ki Jeong; Lemon, Bryan; Coberly, Suzanne; Gong, Yan; Pan, Zheng; Rulifson, Ingrid C.; Gardner, Jonitha; Richards, William G.; Li, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The polarization of tissue resident macrophages toward the alternatively activated, anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype is believed to positively impact obesity and insulin resistance. Here we show that the soluble form of the extracellular domain (ECD) of C-type lectin-like receptor 2, CLEC2, regulates Kupffer cell polarization in the liver and improves glucose and lipid parameters in diabetic animal models. Over-expression of Fc-CLEC2(ECD) in mice via in vivo gene delivery, or injection of recombinant Fc-CLEC2(ECD) protein, results in a reduction of blood glucose and liver triglyceride levels and improves glucose tolerance. Furthermore, Fc-CLEC2(ECD) treatment improves cytokine profiles and increases both the M2 macrophage population and the genes involved in the oxidation of lipid metabolism in the liver. These data reveal a previously unidentified role for CLEC2 as a regulator of macrophage polarity, and establish CLEC2 as a promising therapeutic target for treatment of diabetes and liver disease. PMID:26151067

  19. The activity-dependent transcription factor NPAS4 regulates domain-specific inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bloodgood, Brenda L.; Sharma, Nikhil; Browne, Heidi Adlman; Trepman, Alissa Z.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    A heterogeneous population of inhibitory neurons controls the flow of information through a neural circuit1–3. Inhibitory synapses that form on pyramidal neuron dendrites modulate the summation of excitatory synaptic potentials4–6 and prevent the generation of dendritic calcium spikes7,8. Precisely timed somatic inhibition limits both the number of action potentials and the time window during which firing can occur8,9. The activity-dependent transcription factor NPAS4 regulates inhibitory synapse number and function in cell culture10, but how this transcription factor affects the inhibitory inputs that form on distinct domains of a neuron in vivo was unclear. Here we show that in the mouse hippocampus behaviourally driven expression of NPAS4 coordinates the redistribution of inhibitory synapses made onto a CA1 pyramidal neuron, simultaneously increasing inhibitory synapse number on the cell body while decreasing the number of inhibitory synapses on the apical dendrites. This rearrangement of inhibition is mediated in part by the NPAS4 target gene brain derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf), which specifically regulates somatic, and not dendritic, inhibition. These findings indicate that sensory stimuli, by inducing NPAS4 and its target genes, differentially control spatial features of neuronal inhibition in a way that restricts the output of the neuron while creating a dendritic environment that is permissive for plasticity. PMID:24201284

  20. Regulation of Stat1 protein expression by phenylalanine 172 in the coiled-coil domain

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, Akemi; Fleur, Shella Saint; Fujii, Hodaka . E-mail: hodaka@med.nyu.edu

    2006-08-04

    Stat1 plays an essential role in signal transduction and gene expression of various cytokines including interferons (IFNs). Although the mechanism of cytokine-induced activation of Stat1 and transcriptional regulation of Stat1 gene expression have been established, post-transcriptional regulation of Stat1 protein expression is not fully understood. Here, we report identification of a mutant of Stat1 that has decreased expression levels by using inducible translocation trap (ITT), a reporter gene-based detection system of nuclear translocation. The substitution of serine for phenylalanine 172 (F172S) in the coiled-coil domain causes marked decrease in Stat1 protein expression in various cell lines without decreasing its mRNA levels. Our results suggest that the decrease is caused by translational/post-translational mechanisms independent of proteasome machinery. These results suggest a novel potential mechanism of determination of specificity of Stat proteins and showed that the ITT system is a powerful technique to identify mutants of nuclear translocating signal transducers.

  1. A novel role for fibronectin type I domain in the regulation of human hematopoietic cell adhesiveness through binding to follistatin domains of FLRG and follistatin.

    PubMed

    Maguer-Satta, Véronique; Forissier, Stéphanie; Bartholin, Laurent; Martel, Sylvie; Jeanpierre, Sandrine; Bachelard, Elodie; Rimokh, Ruth

    2006-02-15

    FLRG and follistatin belong to the family of follistatin proteins involved in the regulation of various biological effects, such as hematopoiesis, mediated by their binding to activin and BMP, both members of the TGFbeta family. To further characterize the function of FLRG, we searched for other possible functional partners using a yeast two-hybrid screen. We identified human fibronectin as a new partner for both FLRG and follistatin. We also demonstrated that their physical interaction is mediated by type I motifs of fibronectin and follistatin domains. We then analyzed the biological consequences of these protein interactions on the regulation of hematopoiesis. For the first time, we associated a biological effect with the regulation of human hematopoietic cell adhesiveness of both the type I motifs of fibronectin and the follistatin domains of FLRG and follistatin. Indeed, we observed a significant and specific dose-dependent increase of cell adhesion to fibronectin in the presence of FLRG or follistatin, using either a human hematopoietic cell line or primary cells. In particular, we observed a significantly increased adhesion of immature hematopoietic precursors (CFC, LTC-IC). Altogether these results highlight a new mechanism by which FLRG and follistatin regulate human hematopoiesis.

  2. Glycosylation at Asn211 Regulates the Activation State of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1)*

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hsueh-Liang; Valiathan, Rajeshwari R.; Payne, Leo; Kumarasiri, Malika; Mahasenan, Kiran V.; Mobashery, Shahriar; Huang, Paul; Fridman, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) belongs to a unique family of receptor tyrosine kinases that signal in response to collagens. DDR1 undergoes autophosphorylation in response to collagen binding with a slow and sustained kinetics that is unique among members of the receptor tyrosine kinase family. DDR1 dimerization precedes receptor activation suggesting a structural inhibitory mechanism to prevent unwarranted phosphorylation. However, the mechanism(s) that maintains the autoinhibitory state of the DDR1 dimers is unknown. Here, we report that N-glycosylation at the Asn211 residue plays a unique role in the control of DDR1 dimerization and autophosphorylation. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we found that mutations that disrupt the conserved 211NDS N-glycosylation motif, but not other N-glycosylation sites (Asn260, Asn371, and Asn394), result in collagen I-independent constitutive phosphorylation. Mass spectrometry revealed that the N211Q mutant undergoes phosphorylation at Tyr484, Tyr520, Tyr792, and Tyr797. The N211Q traffics to the cell surface, and its ectodomain displays collagen I binding with an affinity similar to that of the wild-type DDR1 ectodomain. However, unlike the wild-type receptor, the N211Q mutant exhibits enhanced receptor dimerization and sustained activation upon ligand withdrawal. Taken together, these data suggest that N-glycosylation at the highly conserved 211NDS motif evolved to act as a negative repressor of DDR1 phosphorylation in the absence of ligand. The presence of glycan moieties at that site may help to lock the collagen-binding domain in the inactive state and prevent unwarranted signaling by receptor dimers. These studies provide a novel insight into the structural mechanisms that regulate DDR activation. PMID:24509848

  3. Regulation of LIM-Domain-Binding 1 Protein Expression by Ubiquitination of Lysine-134

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Paul W.; Jue, Shall F.; Ransom, David G.; Maurer, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis LIM-domain-binding 1 (LDB1) is a cofactor that participates in formation of transcriptional regulatory complexes involving transcription factors containing LIM domains as well as other factors. The amount of LDB1 protein in cells has previously been shown to be modulated by RNF12. RNF12 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that can target LDB1 for poly-ubiquitination and degradation via the proteasome. We find that in HEK293 cells expression of RNF12 leads to mono-ubiquitination of LDB1 and increased levels of LDB1 protein. Mutagenesis studies identified Lys-134 of LDB1 as the residue that is mono-ubiquitinated by RNF12. Mutation of Lys-134 of LDB1 to Arg blocks the formation of mono-ubiquitinated LDB1 and surprisingly also increases LDB1 protein expression in HEK293 cells. This leads to a model in which Lys-134 of LDB1 can be either mono-ubiquitinated leading to stabilization or poly-ubiquitinated, leading to degradation by the proteasome pathway. We also find that ubiquitin-LDB1 fusion proteins are stabilized in HEK293 cells offering further evidence that mono-ubiquitination stabilizes LDB1 in these cells. Expression in Xenopus laevis embryos of an LDB1 protein in which Lys-134 is replaced with Arg, leads to enhanced expression of the mutant protein as compared to the wild type protein. These findings provide evidence that modification of Lys-134 can play a major role in regulating LDB1 expression. PMID:20423330

  4. YES oncogenic activity is specified by its SH4 domain and regulates RAS/MAPK signaling in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Fanny; Leroy, Cédric; Simon, Valérie; Benistant, Christine; Roche, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Members of the SRC family of tyrosine kinases (SFK) display important functions in human cancer, but their specific role in tumorigenesis remains unclear. We previously demonstrated that YES regulates a unique oncogenic signaling important for colorectal cancer (CRC) progression that is not shared with SRC. Here, we addressed the underlying mechanism involved in this process. We show that YES oncogenic signaling relies on palmitoylation of its SH4 domain that controls YES localization in cholesterol-enriched membrane micro-domains. Specifically, deletion of the palmitoylation site compromised YES transforming activity, while addition of a palmitoylation site in the SH4 domain of SRC was sufficient for SRC to restore the transforming properties of cells in which YES had been silenced. Subsequently, SILAC phosphoproteomic analysis revealed that micro-domain-associated cell adhesive components and receptor tyrosine kinases are major YES substrates. YES also phosphorylates upstream regulators of RAS/MAPK signaling, including EGFR, SHC and SHP2, which were not targeted by SRC due to the absence of palmitoylation. Accordingly, EGFR-induced MAPK activity was attenuated by YES down-regulation, while increased RAS activity significantly restored cell transformation that was lost upon YES silencing. Collectively, these results uncover a critical role for the SH4 domain in the specification of SFK oncogenic activity and a selective role for YES in the induction of RAS/MAPK signaling in CRC cells.

  5. Impact of the [delta]F508 Mutation in First Nucleotide-binding Domain of Human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator on Domain Folding and Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Hal A.; Zhao, Xun; Wang, Chi; Sauder, J. Michael; Rooney, Isabelle; Noland, Brian W.; Lorimer, Don; Kearins, Margaret C.; Conners, Kris; Condon, Brad; Maloney, Peter C.; Guggino, William B.; Hunt, John F.; Emtage, Spencer

    2010-07-19

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), commonly the deletion of residue Phe-508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), which results in a severe reduction in the population of functional channels at the epithelial cell surface. Previous studies employing incomplete NBD1 domains have attributed this to aberrant folding of DeltaF508 NBD1. We report structural and biophysical studies on complete human NBD1 domains, which fail to demonstrate significant changes of in vitro stability or folding kinetics in the presence or absence of the DeltaF508 mutation. Crystal structures show minimal changes in protein conformation but substantial changes in local surface topography at the site of the mutation, which is located in the region of NBD1 believed to interact with the first membrane spanning domain of CFTR. These results raise the possibility that the primary effect of DeltaF508 is a disruption of proper interdomain interactions at this site in CFTR rather than interference with the folding of NBD1. Interestingly, increases in the stability of NBD1 constructs are observed upon introduction of second-site mutations that suppress the trafficking defect caused by the DeltaF508 mutation, suggesting that these suppressors might function indirectly by improving the folding efficiency of NBD1 in the context of the full-length protein. The human NBD1 structures also solidify the understanding of CFTR regulation by showing that its two protein segments that can be phosphorylated both adopt multiple conformations that modulate access to the ATPase active site and functional interdomain interfaces.

  6. A unique phenylalanine in the transmembrane domain strengthens homodimerization of the syndecan-2 transmembrane domain and functionally regulates syndecan-2.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Mi-Jung; Choi, Youngsil; Yun, Ji-Hye; Lee, Weontae; Han, Inn-Oc; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2015-02-27

    The syndecans are a type of cell surface adhesion receptor that initiates intracellular signaling events through receptor clustering mediated by their highly conserved transmembrane domains (TMDs). However, the exact function of the syndecan TMD is not yet fully understood. Here, we investigated the specific regulatory role of the syndecan-2 TMD. We found that syndecan-2 mutants in which the TMD had been replaced with that of syndecan-4 were defective in syndecan-2-mediated functions, suggesting that the TMD of syndecan-2 plays one or more specific roles. Interestingly, syndecan-2 has a stronger tendency to form sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-resistant homodimers than syndecan-4. Our structural studies showed that a unique phenylalanine residue (Phe(167)) enables an additional molecular interaction between the TMDs of the syndecan-2 homodimer. The presence of Phe(167) was correlated with a higher tendency toward oligomerization, and its replacement with isoleucine significantly reduced the SDS-resistant dimer formation and cellular functions of syndecan-2 (e.g. cell migration). Conversely, replacement of isoleucine with phenylalanine at this position in the syndecan-4 TMD rescued the defects observed in a mutant syndecan-2 harboring the syndecan-4 TMD. Taken together, these data suggest that Phe(167) in the TMD of syndecan-2 endows the protein with specific functions. Our work offers new insights into the signaling mediated by the TMD of syndecan family members.

  7. Regulation of adherence and virulence by the Entamoeba histolytica lectin cytoplasmic domain, which contains a beta2 integrin motif.

    PubMed

    Vines, R R; Ramakrishnan, G; Rogers, J B; Lockhart, L A; Mann, B J; Petri, W A

    1998-08-01

    Killing of human cells by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica requires adherence via an amebic cell surface lectin. Lectin activity in the parasite is regulated by inside-out signaling. The lectin cytoplasmic domain has sequence identity with a region of the beta2 integrin cytoplasmic tail implicated in regulation of integrin-mediated adhesion. Intracellular expression of a fusion protein containing the cytoplasmic domain of the lectin has a dominant negative effect on extracellular lectin-mediated cell adherence. Mutation of the integrin-like sequence abrogates the dominant negative effect. Amebae expressing the dominant negative mutant are less virulent in an animal model of amebiasis. These results suggest that inside-out signaling via the lectin cytoplasmic domain may control the extracellular adhesive activity of the amebic lectin and provide in vivo demonstration of the lectin's role in virulence.

  8. Biochemical and functional characterization of the ROC domain of DAPK establishes a new paradigm of GTP regulation in ROCO proteins.

    PubMed

    Bialik, Shani; Kimchi, Adi

    2012-10-01

    DAPK (death-associated protein kinase) is a newly recognized member of the mammalian family of ROCO proteins, characterized by common ROC (Ras of complex proteins) and COR (C-terminal of ROC) domains. In the present paper, we review our recent work showing that DAPK is functionally a ROCO protein; its ROC domain binds and hydrolyses GTP. Furthermore, GTP binding regulates DAPK catalytic activity in a novel manner by enhancing autophosphorylation on inhibitory Ser308, thereby promoting the kinase 'off' state. This is a novel mechanism for in cis regulation of kinase activity by the distal ROC domain. The functional similarities between DAPK and the Parkinson's disease-associated protein LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat protein kinase 2), another member of the ROCO family, are also discussed.

  9. Regulation of Telomere Length Requires a Conserved N-Terminal Domain of Rif2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kaizer, Hannah; Connelly, Carla J; Bettridge, Kelsey; Viggiani, Christopher; Greider, Carol W

    2015-10-01

    The regulation of telomere length equilibrium is essential for cell growth and survival since critically short telomeres signal DNA damage and cell cycle arrest. While the broad principles of length regulation are well established, the molecular mechanism of how these steps occur is not fully understood. We mutagenized the RIF2 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to understand how this protein blocks excess telomere elongation. We identified an N-terminal domain in Rif2 that is essential for length regulation, which we have termed BAT domain for Blocks Addition of Telomeres. Tethering this BAT domain to Rap1 blocked telomere elongation not only in rif2Δ mutants but also in rif1Δ and rap1C-terminal deletion mutants. Mutation of a single amino acid in the BAT domain, phenylalanine at position 8 to alanine, recapitulated the rif2Δ mutant phenotype. Substitution of F8 with tryptophan mimicked the wild-type phenylalanine, suggesting the aromatic amino acid represents a protein interaction site that is essential for telomere length regulation.

  10. Crystal structure of the sugar binding domain of the archaeal transcriptional regulator TrmB.

    PubMed

    Krug, Michael; Lee, Sung-Jae; Diederichs, Kay; Boos, Winfried; Welte, Wolfram

    2006-04-21

    TrmB is an alpha-glucoside-sensing transcriptional regulator controlling two operons encoding maltose/trehalose and maltodextrin ABC transporters of Pyrococcus furiosus. The crystal structure of an N-terminal truncated derivative of TrmB (amino acids 2-109 deleted; TrmB(delta2-109)) was solved at 1.5 A resolution. This protein has lost its DNA binding domain but has retained its sugar recognition site. The structure represents a novel sugar-binding fold. TrmB(delta2-109) bound maltose, glucose, sucrose, and maltotriose, exhibiting Kd values of 6.8, 25, 34, and 160 microM, respectively. TrmB(delta2-109) behaved as a monomer in dilute buffer solution in contrast to the full-length protein, which is a dimer. Co-crystallization with bound maltose identified a binding site involving seven amino acid residues: Ser229, Asn305, Gly320, Met321, Val324, Ile325, and Glu326. Six of these residues interact with the nonreducing glucosyl residue of maltose. The nonreducing glucosyl residue is shared by all substrates bound to TrmB, suggesting it as a common recognition motif.

  11. Lrp4 Domains Differentially Regulate Limb/Brain Development and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Pohlkamp, Theresa; Durakoglugil, Murat; Lane-Donovan, Courtney; Xian, Xunde; Johnson, Eric B.; Hammer, Robert E.; Herz, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype is the strongest predictor of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) risk. ApoE is a cholesterol transport protein that binds to members of the Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor family, which includes LDL Receptor Related Protein 4 (Lrp4). Lrp4, together with one of its ligands Agrin and its co-receptors Muscle Specific Kinase (MuSK) and Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP), regulates neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation. All four proteins are also expressed in the adult brain, and APP, MuSK, and Agrin are required for normal synapse function in the CNS. Here, we show that Lrp4 is also required for normal hippocampal plasticity. In contrast to the closely related Lrp8/Apoer2, the intracellular domain of Lrp4 does not appear to be necessary for normal expression and maintenance of long-term potentiation at central synapses or for the formation and maintenance of peripheral NMJs. However, it does play a role in limb development. PMID:25688974

  12. Lrp4 domains differentially regulate limb/brain development and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Pohlkamp, Theresa; Durakoglugil, Murat; Lane-Donovan, Courtney; Xian, Xunde; Johnson, Eric B; Hammer, Robert E; Herz, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype is the strongest predictor of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) risk. ApoE is a cholesterol transport protein that binds to members of the Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor family, which includes LDL Receptor Related Protein 4 (Lrp4). Lrp4, together with one of its ligands Agrin and its co-receptors Muscle Specific Kinase (MuSK) and Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP), regulates neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation. All four proteins are also expressed in the adult brain, and APP, MuSK, and Agrin are required for normal synapse function in the CNS. Here, we show that Lrp4 is also required for normal hippocampal plasticity. In contrast to the closely related Lrp8/Apoer2, the intracellular domain of Lrp4 does not appear to be necessary for normal expression and maintenance of long-term potentiation at central synapses or for the formation and maintenance of peripheral NMJs. However, it does play a role in limb development. PMID:25688974

  13. Divalent cations crosslink vimentin intermediate filament tail domains to regulate network mechanics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Chia; Broedersz, Chase P; Rowat, Amy C; Wedig, Tatjana; Herrmann, Harald; Mackintosh, Frederick C; Weitz, David A

    2010-06-18

    Intermediate filament networks in the cytoplasm and nucleus are critical for the mechanical integrity of metazoan cells. However, the mechanism of crosslinking in these networks and the origins of their mechanical properties are not understood. Here, we study the elastic behavior of in vitro networks of the intermediate filament protein vimentin. Rheological experiments reveal that vimentin networks stiffen with increasing concentrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), showing that divalent cations act as crosslinkers. We quantitatively describe the elastic response of vimentin networks over five decades of applied stress using a theory that treats the divalent cations as crosslinkers: at low stress, the behavior is entropic in origin, and increasing stress pulls out thermal fluctuations from single filaments, giving rise to a nonlinear response; at high stress, enthalpic stretching of individual filaments significantly modifies the nonlinearity. We investigate the elastic properties of networks formed by a series of protein variants with stepwise tail truncations and find that the last 11 amino acids of the C-terminal tail domain mediate crosslinking by divalent ions. We determined the single-filament persistence length, l(P) approximately 0.5 mum, and Young's modulus, Y approximately 9 MPa; both are consistent with literature values. Our results provide insight into a crosslinking mechanism for vimentin networks and suggest that divalent ions may help regulate the cytoskeletal structure and mechanical properties of cells.

  14. Molecular basis for TPR domain-mediated regulation of protein phosphatase 5.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Roe, S Mark; Cliff, Matthew J; Williams, Mark A; Ladbury, John E; Cohen, Patricia T W; Barford, David

    2005-01-12

    Protein phosphatase 5 (Ppp5) is a serine/threonine protein phosphatase comprising a regulatory tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain N-terminal to its phosphatase domain. Ppp5 functions in signalling pathways that control cellular responses to stress, glucocorticoids and DNA damage. Its phosphatase activity is suppressed by an autoinhibited conformation maintained by the TPR domain and a C-terminal subdomain. By interacting with the TPR domain, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and fatty acids including arachidonic acid stimulate phosphatase activity. Here, we describe the structure of the autoinhibited state of Ppp5, revealing mechanisms of TPR-mediated phosphatase inhibition and Hsp90- and arachidonic acid-induced stimulation of phosphatase activity. The TPR domain engages with the catalytic channel of the phosphatase domain, restricting access to the catalytic site. This autoinhibited conformation of Ppp5 is stabilised by the C-terminal alphaJ helix that contacts a region of the Hsp90-binding groove on the TPR domain. Hsp90 activates Ppp5 by disrupting TPR-phosphatase domain interactions, permitting substrate access to the constitutively active phosphatase domain, whereas arachidonic acid prompts an alternate conformation of the TPR domain, destabilising the TPR-phosphatase domain interface.

  15. Crystal structure of the three tandem FF domains of the transcription elongation regulator CA150.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming; Yang, Jun; Ren, Zhiyong; Sabui, Subir; Espejo, Alexsandra; Bedford, Mark T; Jacobson, Raymond H; Jeruzalmi, David; McMurray, John S; Chen, Xiaomin

    2009-10-23

    FF domains are small protein-protein interaction modules that have two flanking conserved phenylalanine residues. They are present in proteins involved in transcription, RNA splicing, and signal transduction, and often exist in tandem arrays. Although several individual FF domain structures have been determined by NMR, the tandem nature of most FF domains has not been revealed. Here we report the 2.7-A-resolution crystal structure of the first three FF domains of the human transcription elongation factor CA150. Each FF domain is composed of three alpha-helices and a 3(10) helix between alpha-helix 2 and alpha-helix 3. The most striking feature of the structure is that an FF domain is connected to the next by an alpha-helix that continues from helix 3 to helix 1 of the next. The consequent elongated arrangement allows exposure of many charged residues within the region that can be engaged in interaction with other molecules. Binding studies using a peptide ligand suggest that a specific conformation of the FF domains might be required to achieve higher-affinity binding. Additionally, we explore potential DNA binding of the FF construct used in this study. Overall, we provide the first crystal structure of an FF domain and insights into the tandem nature of the FF domains and suggest that, in addition to protein binding, FF domains might be involved in DNA binding.

  16. Two-pore domain K⁺ channels regulate membrane potential of isolated human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robert B; Kondo, Colleen; Belke, Darrell D; Giles, Wayne R

    2011-11-01

    Potassium channels that regulate resting membrane potential (RMP) of human articular chondrocytes (HACs) of the tibial joint maintained in short-term (0-3 days) non-confluent cell culture were studied using patch-clamp techniques. Quantitative PCR showed that transcripts of genes for two-pore domain K(+) channels (KCNK1, KCNK5 and KCNK6), and 'BK' Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (KCNMA1) were abundantly expressed. Immunocytological methods detected α-subunits for BK and K(2p)5.1 (TASK-2) K(+) channels. Electrophysiological recordings identified three distinct K(+) currents in isolated HACs: (i) a voltage- and time-dependent 'delayed rectifier', blocked by 100 nM α-dendrotoxin, (ii) a large 'noisy' voltage-dependent current that was blocked by low concentrations of tetraethylammonium (TEA; 50% blocking dose = 0.15 mM) and iberiotoxin (52% block, 100 nM) and (iii) a voltage-independent 'background' K(+) current that was blocked by acidic pH (5.5-6), was increased by alkaline pH (8.5), and was not blocked by TEA, but was blocked by the local anaesthetic bupivacaine (0.25 mM). The RMP of isolated HACs was very slightly affected by 5 mM TEA, which was sufficient to block both voltage-dependent K(+) currents, suggesting that these currents probably contributed little to maintaining RMP under 'resting' conditions (i.e. low internal [Ca(2+)]). Increases in external K(+) concentration depolarized HACs by 30 mV in response to a 10-fold increase in [K(+)], indicating a significant but not exclusive role for K(+) current in determining RMP. Increases in external [K(+)] in voltage-clamped HACs revealed a voltage-independent K(+) current whose inward current magnitude increased with external [K(+)]. Block of this current by bupivacaine (0.25-1 mM) in 5 and 25 mM external [K(+)] resulted in a large (8-25 mV) depolarization of RMP. The biophysical and pharmacological properties of the background K(+) current, together with expression of mRNA and α-subunit protein for TASK-2

  17. Adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper (APPL1) regulates the protein level of EGFR by modulating its trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Rin; Hahn, Hwa-Sun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Nguyen, Hong-Hoa; Yang, Jun-Mo; Kang, Jong-Sun; Hahn, Myong-Joon

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer APPL1 regulates the protein level of EGFR in response to EGF stimulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of APPL1 accelerates the movement of EGF/EGFR from the cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of APPL1 enhances the activity of Rab5. -- Abstract: The EGFR-mediated signaling pathway regulates multiple biological processes such as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Previously APPL1 (adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper 1) has been reported to function as a downstream effector of EGF-initiated signaling. Here we demonstrate that APPL1 regulates EGFR protein levels in response to EGF stimulation. Overexpression of APPL1 enhances EGFR stabilization while APPL1 depletion by siRNA reduces EGFR protein levels. APPL1 depletion accelerates EGFR internalization and movement of EGF/EGFR from cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF treatment. Conversely, overexpression of APPL1 decelerates EGFR internalization and translocation of EGF/EGFR to the perinuclear region. Furthermore, APPL1 depletion enhances the activity of Rab5 which is involved in internalization and trafficking of EGFR and inhibition of Rab5 in APPL1-depleted cells restored EGFR levels. Consistently, APPL1 depletion reduced activation of Akt, the downstream signaling effector of EGFR and this is restored by inhibition of Rab5. These findings suggest that APPL1 is required for EGFR signaling by regulation of EGFR stabilities through inhibition of Rab5.

  18. Plant homologs of mammalian MBT-domain protein-regulated KDM1 histone lysine demethylases do not interact with plant Tudor/PWWP/MBT-domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, Irfan; Keren, Ido; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2016-02-19

    Histone lysine demethylases of the LSD1/KDM1 family play important roles in epigenetic regulation of eukaryotic chromatin, and they are conserved between plants and animals. Mammalian LSD1 is thought to be targeted to its substrates, i.e., methylated histones, by an MBT-domain protein SFMBT1 that represents a component of the LSD1-based repressor complex and binds methylated histones. Because MBT-domain proteins are conserved between different organisms, from animals to plants, we examined whether the KDM1-type histone lysine demethylases KDM1C and FLD of Arabidopsis interact with the Arabidopsis Tudor/PWWP/MBT-domain SFMBT1-like proteins SL1, SL2, SL3, and SL4. No such interaction was detected using the bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in living plant cells. Thus, plants most likely direct their KDM1 chromatin-modifying enzymes to methylated histones of the target chromatin by a mechanism different from that employed by the mammalian cells.

  19. Activities of the Cytoplasmic Domains of Patched-1 Modulate but Are Not Essential for the Regulation of Canonical Hedgehog Signaling.

    PubMed

    Fleet, Andrew; Lee, Jennifer P Y; Tamachi, Aaliya; Javeed, Imaan; Hamel, Paul A

    2016-08-19

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is a highly conserved signaling cascade crucial for cell fate determination during embryogenesis. Response to the Hh ligands is mediated by the receptor Patched-1 (Ptch1), a 12-pass transmembrane glycoprotein. Despite its essential role in Hh signaling and its activity as a tumor suppressor, Ptch1 remains largely uncharacterized. We demonstrate here that Ptch1 binds to itself to form oligomeric structures. Oligomerization is mediated by two distinct, structurally disordered, intracellular domains spanning amino acids 584-734 ("middle loop") and 1162-1432 (C terminus). However, oligomerization is not required for Ptch1-dependent regulation of the canonical Hh pathway operating through Smo. Expression of a mutant protein that deletes both regions represses the Hh pathway and responds to the addition of Hh ligand independent of its inability to bind other factors such as Smurf2. Additionally, deletion of the cytoplasmic middle loop domain generates a Ptch1 mutant that, despite binding to Hh ligand, constitutively suppresses Hh signaling and increases the length of primary cilia. Constitutive activity because of deletion of this region is reversed by further deletion of specific sequences in the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain. These data reveal an interaction between the cytoplasmic domains of Ptch1 and that these domains modulate Ptch1 activity but are not essential for regulation of the Hh pathway. PMID:27325696

  20. Dimerization of doublesex is mediated by a cryptic ubiquitin-associated domain fold: implications for sex-specific gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Bayrer, James R; Zhang, Wei; Weiss, Michael A

    2005-09-23

    Male- and female-specific isoforms of the Doublesex (DSX) transcription factor regulate somatic sexual differentiation in Drosophila. The isoforms (DSX(M) and DSX(F)) share an N-terminal DNA binding domain (the DM motif), broadly conserved among metazoan sex-determining pathways. DM-DNA recognition is enhanced by a C-terminal dimerization domain. The crystal structure of this domain, determined at a resolution of 1.6 A, reveals a novel dimeric arrangement of ubiquitin-associated (UBA) folds. Although this alpha-helical motif is well characterized in pathways of DNA repair and subcellular trafficking, to our knowledge this is its first report in a transcription factor. Dimerization is mediated by a non-canonical hydrophobic interface extrinsic to the putative ubiquitin binding surface. Key side chains at this interface, identified by alanine scanning mutagenesis, are conserved among DSX homologs. The mechanism of dimerization is thus unrelated to the low affinity domain swapping observed among ubiquitin-associated CUE domains. The unexpected observation of a ubiquitin-associated fold in DSX extends the repertoire of alpha-helical dimerization elements in transcription factors. The possibility that the ubiquitination machinery participates in the regulation of sexual dimorphism is discussed. PMID:16049008

  1. Activities of the Cytoplasmic Domains of Patched-1 Modulate but Are Not Essential for the Regulation of Canonical Hedgehog Signaling.

    PubMed

    Fleet, Andrew; Lee, Jennifer P Y; Tamachi, Aaliya; Javeed, Imaan; Hamel, Paul A

    2016-08-19

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is a highly conserved signaling cascade crucial for cell fate determination during embryogenesis. Response to the Hh ligands is mediated by the receptor Patched-1 (Ptch1), a 12-pass transmembrane glycoprotein. Despite its essential role in Hh signaling and its activity as a tumor suppressor, Ptch1 remains largely uncharacterized. We demonstrate here that Ptch1 binds to itself to form oligomeric structures. Oligomerization is mediated by two distinct, structurally disordered, intracellular domains spanning amino acids 584-734 ("middle loop") and 1162-1432 (C terminus). However, oligomerization is not required for Ptch1-dependent regulation of the canonical Hh pathway operating through Smo. Expression of a mutant protein that deletes both regions represses the Hh pathway and responds to the addition of Hh ligand independent of its inability to bind other factors such as Smurf2. Additionally, deletion of the cytoplasmic middle loop domain generates a Ptch1 mutant that, despite binding to Hh ligand, constitutively suppresses Hh signaling and increases the length of primary cilia. Constitutive activity because of deletion of this region is reversed by further deletion of specific sequences in the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain. These data reveal an interaction between the cytoplasmic domains of Ptch1 and that these domains modulate Ptch1 activity but are not essential for regulation of the Hh pathway.

  2. Phosphorylation of the Bin, Amphiphysin, and RSV161/167 (BAR) domain of ACAP4 regulates membrane tubulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuannv; Wang, Dongmei; Liu, Xing; Liu, Lifang; Song, Zhenwei; Zhu, Tongge; Adams, Gregory; Gao, Xinjiao; Tian, Ruijun; Huang, Yuejia; Chen, Runhua; Wang, Fengsong; Liu, Dong; Yu, Xue; Chen, Yong; Chen, Zhengjun; Teng, Maikun; Ding, Xia; Yao, Xuebiao

    2013-07-01

    ArfGAP With Coiled-Coil, Ankyrin Repeat And PH Domains 4 (ACAP4) is an ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) GTPase-activating protein essential for EGF-elicited cell migration. However, how ACAP4 regulates membrane dynamics and curvature in response to EGF stimulation is unknown. Here, we show that phosphorylation of the N-terminal region of ACAP4, named the Bin, Amphiphysin, and RSV161/167 (BAR) domain, at Tyr34 is necessary for EGF-elicited membrane remodeling. Domain structure analysis demonstrates that the BAR domain regulates membrane curvature. EGF stimulation of cells causes phosphorylation of ACAP4 at Tyr34, which subsequently promotes ACAP4 homodimer curvature. The phospho-mimicking mutant of ACAP4 demonstrates lipid-binding activity and tubulation in vitro, and ARF6 enrichment at the membrane is associated with ruffles of EGF-stimulated cells. Expression of the phospho-mimicking ACAP4 mutant promotes ARF6-dependent cell migration. Thus, the results present a previously undefined mechanism by which EGF-elicited phosphorylation of the BAR domain controls ACAP4 molecular plasticity and plasma membrane dynamics during cell migration. PMID:23776207

  3. The juxtamembrane domain in ETV6/FLT3 is critical for PIM-1 up-regulation and cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Hoang Anh; Xinh, Phan Thi; Kano, Yasuhiko; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Sato, Yuko

    2009-06-05

    We recently reported that the ETV6/FLT3 fusion protein conferred interleukin-3-independent growth on Ba/F3 cells. The present study has been conducted to assess role of the juxtamembrane domain of FLT3 for signal transduction and cell transformation. The wild-type ETV6/FLT3 fusion protein in transfected cells was a constitutively activated tyrosine kinase that led to up-regulation of PIM-1 and activations of STAT5, AKT, and MAPK. Deletion of the juxtamembrane domain abrogated interleukin-3-independent growth of the transfected cells and PIM-1 up-regulation, whereas it retained compatible levels of phosphorylations of STAT5, AKT, and MAPK. Further deletion of N-terminal region of the tyrosine kinase I domain of FLT3 completely abolished these phosphorylations. Our data indicate that the juxtamembrane domain of FLT3 in ETV6/FLT3 fusion protein is critical for cell proliferation and PIM-1 up-regulation that might be independent of a requirement for signaling through STAT5, MAPK, and AKT pathways.

  4. Domain-Specific Identity, Epistemic Regulation, and Intellectual Ability as Predictors of Belief-Biased Reasoning: A Dual-Process Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaczynski, Paul A.; Lavallee, Kristen L.

    2005-01-01

    To explore the hypothesis that domain-specific identity development predicts reasoning biases, adolescents and young adults completed measures of domain-general and domain-specific identity, epistemic regulation, and intellectual ability and evaluated arguments that either supported or threatened their occupational goals. Biases were defined as…

  5. Contactin-1 regulates myelination and nodal/paranodal domain organization in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Çolakoğlu, Gülsen; Bergstrom-Tyrberg, Ulrika; Berglund, Erik O.; Ranscht, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Myelin, a multilayered membrane sheath formed by oligodendrocytes around axons in the CNS, enables rapid nerve impulse conduction and sustains neuronal health. The signals exchanged between axons and oligodendrocytes in myelin remain to be fully elucidated. Here we provide genetic evidence for multiple and critical functions of Contactin-1 in central myelin. We document dynamic Contactin-1 expression on oligodendrocytes in vivo, and progressive accumulation at nodes of Ranvier and paranodes during postnatal mouse development. Nodal and paranodal expression stabilized in mature myelin, but overall membranous expression diminished. Contactin-1–deficiency disrupted paranodal junction formation as evidenced by loss of Caspr, mislocalized potassium Kv1.2 channels, and abnormal myelin terminal loops. Reduced numbers and impaired maturation of sodium channel clusters accompanied this phenotype. Histological, electron microscopic, and biochemical analyses uncovered significant hypomyelination in Contactin-1–deficient central nerves, with up to 60% myelin loss. Oligodendrocytes were present in normal numbers, albeit a minor population of neuronal/glial antigen 2-positive (NG2+) progenitors lagged in maturation by postnatal day 18, when the mouse null mutation was lethal. Major contributing factors to hypomyelination were defects in the generation and organization of myelin membranes, as judged by electron microscopy and quantitative analysis of oligodendrocyte processes labeled by GFP transgenically expressed from the proteolipid protein promoter. These data reveal that Contactin-1 regulates both myelin formation and organization of nodal and paranodal domains in the CNS. These multiple roles distinguish central Contactin-1 functions from its specific role at paranodes in the periphery, and emphasize mechanistic differences in central and peripheral myelination. PMID:24385581

  6. Estrogen-dependent sushi domain containing 3 regulates cytoskeleton organization and migration in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Moy, I; Todorović, V; Dubash, A D; Coon, J S; Parker, J B; Buranapramest, M; Huang, C C; Zhao, H; Green, K J; Bulun, S E

    2015-01-15

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the standard endocrine therapy for postmenopausal breast cancer; however, currently used biomarkers, such as, estrogen receptor-alpha/progesterone receptor (ERα/PR), predict only slightly more than half of the potential responders to AI treatment. To identify novel markers of AI responsiveness, a genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using primary breast tumor samples from 50 postmenopausal women who later developed metastatic breast cancer. Sushi domain containing 3 (SUSD3) is a significantly differentially expressed gene, with 3.38-fold higher mRNA levels in AI-responsive breast tumors vs non-responders (P<0.001). SUSD3 was highly expressed in ERα-positive breast tumors and treatment with estradiol increased SUSD3 expression in ERα-positive breast cancer cells. Treatment with an antiestrogen or ERα knockdown abolished basal and estradiol-dependent SUSD3 expression. Recruitment of ERα upstream of the transcription start site of SUSD3 was demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR. Flow cytometric analysis of SUSD3-knockdown cells revealed blunted estradiol effects on progression into S and M phases. SUSD3 was localized to the plasma membrane of breast cancer cells. SUSD3 knockdown decreased the appearance of actin-rich protrusions, stress fibers and large basal focal adhesions, while increasing the presence of cortical actin concomitant with a decrease in Rho and focal adhesion kinase activity. SUSD3-deficient cells demonstrated diminished cell spreading, cell-cell adhesion and motility. In conclusion, SUSD3 is a novel promoter of estrogen-dependent cell proliferation and regulator of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions and migration in breast cancer. It may serve as a novel predictor of response to endocrine therapy and potential therapeutic target.

  7. Estrogen-dependent sushi domain containing 3 regulates cytoskeleton organization and migration in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Moy, I; Todorović, V; Dubash, A D; Coon, J S; Parker, J B; Buranapramest, M; Huang, C C; Zhao, H; Green, K J; Bulun, S E

    2015-01-15

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the standard endocrine therapy for postmenopausal breast cancer; however, currently used biomarkers, such as, estrogen receptor-alpha/progesterone receptor (ERα/PR), predict only slightly more than half of the potential responders to AI treatment. To identify novel markers of AI responsiveness, a genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using primary breast tumor samples from 50 postmenopausal women who later developed metastatic breast cancer. Sushi domain containing 3 (SUSD3) is a significantly differentially expressed gene, with 3.38-fold higher mRNA levels in AI-responsive breast tumors vs non-responders (P<0.001). SUSD3 was highly expressed in ERα-positive breast tumors and treatment with estradiol increased SUSD3 expression in ERα-positive breast cancer cells. Treatment with an antiestrogen or ERα knockdown abolished basal and estradiol-dependent SUSD3 expression. Recruitment of ERα upstream of the transcription start site of SUSD3 was demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR. Flow cytometric analysis of SUSD3-knockdown cells revealed blunted estradiol effects on progression into S and M phases. SUSD3 was localized to the plasma membrane of breast cancer cells. SUSD3 knockdown decreased the appearance of actin-rich protrusions, stress fibers and large basal focal adhesions, while increasing the presence of cortical actin concomitant with a decrease in Rho and focal adhesion kinase activity. SUSD3-deficient cells demonstrated diminished cell spreading, cell-cell adhesion and motility. In conclusion, SUSD3 is a novel promoter of estrogen-dependent cell proliferation and regulator of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions and migration in breast cancer. It may serve as a novel predictor of response to endocrine therapy and potential therapeutic target. PMID:24413080

  8. Tight intramolecular regulation of the human Upf1 helicase by its N- and C-terminal domains

    PubMed Central

    Fiorini, Francesca; Boudvillain, Marc; Le Hir, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    The RNA helicase Upf1 is a multifaceted eukaryotic enzyme involved in DNA replication, telomere metabolism and several mRNA degradation pathways. Upf1 plays a central role in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), a surveillance process in which it links premature translation termination to mRNA degradation with its conserved partners Upf2 and Upf3. In human, both the ATP-dependent RNA helicase activity and the phosphorylation of Upf1 are essential for NMD. Upf1 activation occurs when Upf2 binds its N-terminal domain, switching the enzyme to the active form. Here, we uncovered that the C-terminal domain of Upf1, conserved in higher eukaryotes and containing several essential phosphorylation sites, also inhibits the flanking helicase domain. With different biochemical approaches we show that this domain, named SQ, directly interacts with the helicase domain to impede ATP hydrolysis and RNA unwinding. The phosphorylation sites in the distal half of the SQ domain are not directly involved in this inhibition. Therefore, in the absence of multiple binding partners, Upf1 is securely maintained in an inactive state by two intramolecular inhibition mechanisms. This study underlines the tight and intricate regulation pathways required to activate multifunctional RNA helicases like Upf1. PMID:23275559

  9. The Velvet Family of Fungal Regulators Contains a DNA-Binding Domain Structurally Similar to NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Bayram, Özgür; Neumann, Piotr; Ni, Min; Dickmanns, Achim; Kim, Sun Chang; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Braus, Gerhard H.; Ficner, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Morphological development of fungi and their combined production of secondary metabolites are both acting in defence and protection. These processes are mainly coordinated by velvet regulators, which contain a yet functionally and structurally uncharacterized velvet domain. Here we demonstrate that the velvet domain of VosA is a novel DNA-binding motif that specifically recognizes an 11-nucleotide consensus sequence consisting of two motifs in the promoters of key developmental regulatory genes. The crystal structure analysis of the VosA velvet domain revealed an unforeseen structural similarity with the Rel homology domain (RHD) of the mammalian transcription factor NF-κB. Based on this structural similarity several conserved amino acid residues present in all velvet domains have been identified and shown to be essential for the DNA binding ability of VosA. The velvet domain is also involved in dimer formation as seen in the solved crystal structures of the VosA homodimer and the VosA-VelB heterodimer. These findings suggest that defence mechanisms of both fungi and animals might be governed by structurally related DNA-binding transcription factors. PMID:24391470

  10. Structures of the NLRP14 pyrin domain reveal a conformational switch mechanism regulating its molecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Eibl, Clarissa; Hessenberger, Manuel; Wenger, Julia; Brandstetter, Hans

    2014-07-01

    Pyrin domains (PYDs) recruit downstream effector molecules in NLR signalling. A specific charge-relay system suggests a the formation of a signalling complex involving a PYD dimer. The cytosolic tripartite NLR receptors serve as important signalling platforms in innate immunity. While the C-terminal domains act as sensor and activation modules, the N-terminal death-like domain, e.g. the CARD or pyrin domain, is thought to recruit downstream effector molecules by homotypic interactions. Such homotypic complexes have been determined for all members of the death-domain superfamily except for pyrin domains. Here, crystal structures of human NLRP14 pyrin-domain variants are reported. The wild-type protein as well as the clinical D86V mutant reveal an unexpected rearrangement of the C-terminal helix α6, resulting in an extended α5/6 stem-helix. This reordering mediates a novel symmetric pyrin-domain dimerization mode. The conformational switching is controlled by a charge-relay system with a drastic impact on protein stability. How the identified charge relay allows classification of NLRP receptors with respect to distinct recruitment mechanisms is discussed.

  11. Regulation of the human. beta. -actin promoter by upstream and intron domains

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Sunyu )); Gunning, P.; Kedes, L. ); Liu, Shuhui National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu ); Leavitt, J. )

    1989-01-25

    The authors have identified three regulatory domains of the complex human {beta}-actin gene promoter. They span a region of about 3,000 bases, from not more than {minus}2,011 bases upstream of the mRNA cap site to within the 5{prime} intron (832 bases long). A distal upstream domain contains at least one enhancer-like element. A proximal upstream domain, with a CArG (for CC(A+T rich){sub 6}GG) motif found in all known mammalian actin genes, seems to confer serum, but not growth factor, inducibility. The third domain is within the evolutionarily conserved 3{prime} region of the first intron and contains a 13 base-pair sequence, identical to the upstream sequence with the CArG motif. This domain also contains sequences that are both serum and fibroblast growth inducible.

  12. Multiple domains in the Crumbs Homolog 2a (Crb2a) protein are required for regulating rod photoreceptor size

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Vertebrate retinal photoreceptors are morphologically complex cells that have two apical regions, the inner segment and the outer segment. The outer segment is a modified cilium and is continuously regenerated throughout life. The molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie vertebrate photoreceptor morphogenesis and the maintenance of the outer segment are largely unknown. The Crumbs (Crb) complex is a key regulator of apical membrane identity and size in epithelia and in Drosophila photoreceptors. Mutations in the human gene CRUMBS HOMOLOG 1 (CRB1) are associated with early and severe vision loss. Drosophila Crumbs and vertebrate Crb1 and Crumbs homolog 2 (Crb2) proteins are structurally similar, all are single pass transmembrane proteins with a large extracellular domain containing multiple laminin- and EGF-like repeats and a small intracellular domain containing a FERM-binding domain and a PDZ-binding domain. In order to begin to understand the role of the Crb family of proteins in vertebrate photoreceptors we generated stable transgenic zebrafish in which rod photoreceptors overexpress full-length Crb2a protein and several other Crb2a constructs engineered to lack specific domains. Results We examined the localization of Crb2a constructs and their effects on rod morphology. We found that only the full-length Crb2a protein approximated the normal localization of Crb2a protein apical to adherens junctions in the photoreceptor inner segment. Several Crb2a construct proteins localized abnormally to the outer segment and one construct localized abnormally to the cell body. Overexpression of full-length Crb2a greatly increased inner segment size while expression of several other constructs increased outer segment size. Conclusions Our observations suggest that particular domains in Crb2a regulate its localization and thus may regulate its regionalized function. Our results also suggest that the PDZ-binding domain in Crb2a might bring a protein(s) into

  13. The Activity of Escherichia coli Chaperone SurA Is Regulated by Conformational Changes Involving a Parvulin Domain

    PubMed Central

    Soltes, Garner R.; Schwalm, Jaclyn; Ricci, Dante P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The periplasmic chaperone SurA is critical for the biogenesis of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and, thus, the maintenance of membrane integrity in Escherichia coli. The activity of this modular chaperone has been attributed to a core chaperone module, with only minor importance assigned to the two SurA peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) domains. In this work, we used synthetic phenotypes and covalent tethering to demonstrate that the activity of SurA is regulated by its PPIase domains and, furthermore, that its activity is correlated with the conformational state of the chaperone. When combined with mutations in the β-barrel assembly machine (BAM), SurA mutations resulting in deletion of the second parvulin domain (P2) inhibit OMP assembly, suggesting that P2 is involved in the regulation of SurA. The first parvulin domain (P1) potentiates this autoinhibition, as mutations that covalently tether the P1 domain to the core chaperone module severely impair OMP assembly. Furthermore, these inhibitory mutations negate the suppression of and biochemically stabilize the protein specified by a well-characterized gain-of-function mutation in P1, demonstrating that SurA cycles between distinct conformational and functional states during the OMP assembly process. IMPORTANCE This work reveals the reversible autoinhibition of the SurA chaperone imposed by a heretofore underappreciated parvulin domain. Many β-barrel-associated outer membrane (OM) virulence factors, including the P-pilus and type I fimbriae, rely on SurA for proper assembly; thus, a mechanistic understanding of SurA function and inhibition may facilitate antibiotic intervention against Gram-negative pathogens, such as uropathogenic Escherichia coli, E. coli O157:H7, Shigella, and Salmonella. In addition, SurA is important for the assembly of critical OM biogenesis factors, such as the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) transport machine, suggesting that specific targeting of SurA may provide a useful means to

  14. The catalytic region and PEST domain of PTPN18 distinctly regulate the HER2 phosphorylation and ubiquitination barcodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Mei; Xu, Yun-Fei; Ning, Shang-Lei; Yang, Du-Xiao; Li, Yi; Du, Yu-Jie; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Ya; Liang, Nan; Yao, Wei; Zhang, Ling-Li; Gu, Li-Chuan; Gao, Cheng-Jiang; Pang, Qi; Chen, Yu-Xin; Xiao, Kun-Hong; Ma, Rong; Yu, Xiao; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2014-09-01

    The tyrosine phosphorylation barcode encoded in C-terminus of HER2 and its ubiquitination regulate diverse HER2 functions. PTPN18 was reported as a HER2 phosphatase; however, the exact mechanism by which it defines HER2 signaling is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that PTPN18 regulates HER2-mediated cellular functions through defining both its phosphorylation and ubiquitination barcodes. Enzymologic characterization and three crystal structures of PTPN18 in complex with HER2 phospho-peptides revealed the molecular basis for the recognition between PTPN18 and specific HER2 phosphorylation sites, which assumes two distinct conformations. Unique structural properties of PTPN18 contribute to the regulation of sub-cellular phosphorylation networks downstream of HER2, which are required for inhibition of HER2-mediated cell growth and migration. Whereas the catalytic domain of PTPN18 blocks lysosomal routing and delays the degradation of HER2 by dephosphorylation of HER2 on pY(1112), the PEST domain of PTPN18 promotes K48-linked HER2 ubiquitination and its rapid destruction via the proteasome pathway and an HER2 negative feedback loop. In agreement with the negative regulatory role of PTPN18 in HER2 signaling, the HER2/PTPN18 ratio was correlated with breast cancer stage. Taken together, our study presents a structural basis for selective HER2 dephosphorylation, a previously uncharacterized mechanism for HER2 degradation and a novel function for the PTPN18 PEST domain. The new regulatory role of the PEST domain in the ubiquitination pathway will broaden our understanding of the functions of other important PEST domain-containing phosphatases, such as LYP and PTPN12. PMID:25081058

  15. Drosophila KASH-domain protein Klarsicht regulates microtubule stability and integrin receptor localization during collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Myat, M M; Rashmi, R N; Manna, D; Xu, N; Patel, U; Galiano, M; Zielinski, K; Lam, A; Welte, M A

    2015-11-01

    During collective migration of the Drosophila embryonic salivary gland, cells rearrange to form a tube of a distinct shape and size. Here, we report a novel role for the Drosophila Klarsicht-Anc-Syne Homology (KASH) domain protein Klarsicht (Klar) in the regulation of microtubule (MT) stability and integrin receptor localization during salivary gland migration. In wild-type salivary glands, MTs became progressively stabilized as gland migration progressed. In embryos specifically lacking the KASH domain containing isoforms of Klar, salivary gland cells failed to rearrange and migrate, and these defects were accompanied by decreased MT stability and altered integrin receptor localization. In muscles and photoreceptors, KASH isoforms of Klar work together with Klaroid (Koi), a SUN domain protein, to position nuclei; however, loss of Koi had no effect on salivary gland migration, suggesting that Klar controls gland migration through novel interactors. The disrupted cell rearrangement and integrin localization observed in klar mutants could be mimicked by overexpressing Spastin (Spas), a MT severing protein, in otherwise wild-type salivary glands. In turn, promoting MT stability by reducing spas gene dosage in klar mutant embryos rescued the integrin localization, cell rearrangement and gland migration defects. Klar genetically interacts with the Rho1 small GTPase in salivary gland migration and is required for the subcellular localization of Rho1. We also show that Klar binds tubulin directly in vitro. Our studies provide the first evidence that a KASH-domain protein regulates the MT cytoskeleton and integrin localization during collective cell migration.

  16. Cytoplasmic Ig-Domain Proteins: Cytoskeletal Regulators with a Role in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Otey, Carol A.; Dixon, Richard; Stack, Christianna; Goicoechea, Silvia M.

    2009-01-01

    Immunoglobulin domains are found in a wide variety of functionally diverse transmembrane proteins, and also in a smaller number of cytoplasmic proteins. Members of this latter group are usually associated with the actin cytoskeleton, and most of them bind directly to either actin or myosin, or both. Recently, studies of inherited human disorders have identified disease-causing mutations in five cytoplasmic Ig-domain proteins: myosin-binding protein C, titin, myotilin, palladin, and myopalladin. Together with results obtained from cultured cells and mouse models, these clinical studies have yielded novel insights into the unexpected roles of Ig domain proteins in mechanotransduction and signaling to the nucleus. An emerging theme in this field is that cytoskeleton-associated Ig domain proteins are more than structural elements of the cell, and may have evolved to fill different needs in different cellular compartments. PMID:19466753

  17. Histone demethylase KDM5A is regulated by its reader domain through a positive-feedback mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Idelisse Ortiz; Kuchenbecker, Kristopher M.; Nnadi, Chimno I.; Fletterick, Robert J.; Kelly, Mark J.S.; Fujimori, Danica Galonić

    2016-01-01

    The retinoblastoma binding protein KDM5A removes methyl marks from lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4). Misregulation of KDM5A contributes to the pathogenesis of lung and gastric cancers. In addition to its catalytic jumonji C domain, KDM5A contains three PHD reader domains, commonly recognized as chromatin recruitment modules. It is unknown whether any of these domains in KDM5A have functions beyond recruitment and whether they regulate the catalytic activity of the demethylase. Here using biochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based structural studies, we show that the PHD1 preferentially recognizes unmethylated H3K4 histone tail, product of KDM5A-mediated demethylation of tri-methylated H3K4 (H3K4me3). Binding of unmodified H3 peptide to the PHD1 stimulates catalytic domain-mediated removal of methyl marks from H3K4me3 peptide and nucleosome substrates. This positive-feedback mechanism—enabled by the functional coupling between a reader and a catalytic domain in KDM5A—suggests a model for the spread of demethylation on chromatin. PMID:25686748

  18. Androgen regulation of the human FERM domain encoding gene EHM2 in a cell model of steroid-induced differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Sanjay; Pandey, Ritu; Way, Jeffrey F.; Sroka, Thomas C.; Demetriou, Manolis C.; Kunz, Susan; Cress, Anne E.; Mount, David W.; Miesfeld, Roger L.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a cell model to investigate steroid control of differentiation using a subline of HT1080 cells (HT-AR1) that have been engineered to express the human androgen receptor. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment of HT-AR1 cells induced growth arrest and cytoskeletal reorganization that was associated with the expression of fibronectin and the neuroendocrine markers chromogranin A and neuron-specific enolase. Expression profiling analysis identified the human FERM domain-encoding gene EHM2 as uniquely induced in HT-AR1 cells as compared to 16 other FERM domain containing genes. Since FERM domain proteins control cytoskeletal functions in differentiating cells, and the human EHM2 gene has not been characterized, we investigated EHM2 steroid-regulation, genomic organization, and sequence conservation. We found that DHT, but not dexamethasone, induced the expression of a 3.8 kb transcript in HT-AR1 cells encoding a 504 amino acid protein, and moreover, that human brain tissue contains a 5.8 kb transcript encoding a 913 amino acid isoform. Construction of an unrooted phylogenetic tree using 98 FERM domain proteins revealed that the human EHM2 gene is a member of a distinct subfamily consisting of nine members, all of which contain a highly conserved 325 amino acid FERM domain. PMID:14521927

  19. Histone demethylase KDM5A is regulated by its reader domain through a positive-feedback mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Idelisse Ortiz; Kuchenbecker, Kristopher M.; Nnadi, Chimno I.; Fletterick, Robert J.; Kelly, Mark J. S.; Fujimori, Danica Galonić

    2015-02-01

    The retinoblastoma binding protein KDM5A removes methyl marks from lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4). Misregulation of KDM5A contributes to the pathogenesis of lung and gastric cancers. In addition to its catalytic jumonji C domain, KDM5A contains three PHD reader domains, commonly recognized as chromatin recruitment modules. It is unknown whether any of these domains in KDM5A have functions beyond recruitment and whether they regulate the catalytic activity of the demethylase. Here using biochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based structural studies, we show that the PHD1 preferentially recognizes unmethylated H3K4 histone tail, product of KDM5A-mediated demethylation of tri-methylated H3K4 (H3K4me3). Binding of unmodified H3 peptide to the PHD1 stimulates catalytic domain-mediated removal of methyl marks from H3K4me3 peptide and nucleosome substrates. This positive-feedback mechanism—enabled by the functional coupling between a reader and a catalytic domain in KDM5A—suggests a model for the spread of demethylation on chromatin.

  20. Phosphoinositide binding by the SNX27 FERM domain regulates its localization at the immune synapse of activated T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghai, Rajesh; Tello-Lafoz, Maria; Norwood, Suzanne J.; Yang, Zhe; Clairfeuille, Thomas; Teasdale, Rohan D.; Mérida, Isabel; Collins, Brett M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sorting nexin 27 (SNX27) controls the endosomal-to-cell-surface recycling of diverse transmembrane protein cargos. Crucial to this function is the recruitment of SNX27 to endosomes which is mediated by the binding of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) by its phox homology (PX) domain. In T-cells, SNX27 localizes to the immunological synapse in an activation-dependent manner, but the molecular mechanisms underlying SNX27 translocation remain to be clarified. Here, we examined the phosphoinositide-lipid-binding capabilities of full-length SNX27, and discovered a new PtdInsP-binding site within the C-terminal 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM) domain. This binding site showed a clear preference for bi- and tri-phosphorylated phophoinositides, and the interaction was confirmed through biophysical, mutagenesis and modeling approaches. At the immunological synapse of activated T-cells, cell signaling regulates phosphoinositide dynamics, and we find that perturbing phosphoinositide binding by the SNX27 FERM domain alters the SNX27 distribution in both endosomal recycling compartments and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-enriched domains of the plasma membrane during synapse formation. Our results suggest that SNX27 undergoes dynamic partitioning between different membrane domains during immunological synapse assembly, and underscore the contribution of unique lipid interactions for SNX27 orchestration of cargo trafficking. PMID:25472716

  1. The purine repressor of Bacillus subtilis: a novel combination of domains adapted for transcription regulation.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sangita C; Krahn, Joseph; Shin, Byung Sik; Tomchick, Diana R; Zalkin, Howard; Smith, Janet L

    2003-07-01

    The purine repressor from Bacillus subtilis, PurR, represses transcription from a number of genes with functions in the synthesis, transport, and metabolism of purines. The 2.2-A crystal structure of PurR reveals a two-domain protein organized as a dimer. The larger C-terminal domain belongs to the PRT structural family, in accord with a sequence motif for binding the inducer phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). The PRT domain is fused to a smaller N-terminal domain that belongs to the winged-helix family of DNA binding proteins. A positively charged surface on the winged-helix domain likely binds specific DNA sequences in the recognition site. A second positively charged surface surrounds the PRPP site at the opposite end of the PurR dimer. Conserved amino acids in the sequences of PurR homologs in 21 gram-positive bacteria cluster on the proposed recognition surface of the winged-helix domain and around the PRPP binding site at the opposite end of the molecule, supporting a common function of DNA and PRPP binding for all of the proteins. The structure supports a binding mechanism in which extended regions of DNA interact with extensive protein surface. Unlike most PRT proteins, which are phosphoribosyltransferases (PRTases), PurR lacks catalytic activity. This is explained by a tyrosine side chain that blocks the site for a nucleophile cosubstrate in PRTases. Thus, B. subtilis has adapted an enzyme fold to serve as an effector-binding domain and has used it in a novel combination with the DNA-binding winged-helix domain as a repressor of purine genes.

  2. Calmodulin Regulates Human Ether à Go-Go 1 (hEAG1) Potassium Channels through Interactions of the Eag Domain with the Cyclic Nucleotide Binding Homology Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Lörinczi, Eva; Helliwell, Matthew; Finch, Alina; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Davies, Noel W.; Mahaut-Smith, Martyn; Muskett, Frederick W.; Mitcheson, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The ether à go-go family of voltage-gated potassium channels is structurally distinct. The N terminus contains an eag domain (eagD) that contains a Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain that is preceded by a conserved sequence of 25–27 amino acids known as the PAS-cap. The C terminus contains a region with homology to cyclic nucleotide binding domains (cNBHD), which is directly linked to the channel pore. The human EAG1 (hEAG1) channel is remarkably sensitive to inhibition by intracellular calcium (Ca2+i) through binding of Ca2+-calmodulin to three sites adjacent to the eagD and cNBHD. Here, we show that the eagD and cNBHD interact to modulate Ca2+-calmodulin as well as voltage-dependent gating. Sustained elevation of Ca2+i resulted in an initial profound inhibition of hEAG1 currents, which was followed by a phase when current amplitudes partially recovered, but activation gating was slowed and shifted to depolarized potentials. Deletion of either the eagD or cNBHD abolished the inhibition by Ca2+i. However, deletion of just the PAS-cap resulted in a >15-fold potentiation in response to elevated Ca2+i. Mutations of residues at the interface between the eagD and cNBHD have been linked to human cancer. Glu-600 on the cNBHD, when substituted with residues with a larger volume, resulted in hEAG1 currents that were profoundly potentiated by Ca2+i in a manner similar to the ΔPAS-cap mutant. These findings provide the first evidence that eagD and cNBHD interactions are regulating Ca2+-dependent gating and indicate that the binding of the PAS-cap with the cNBHD is required for the closure of the channels upon CaM binding. PMID:27325704

  3. Nitric oxide synthase domain interfaces regulate electron transfer and calmodulin activation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian C; Underbakke, Eric S; Kulp, Daniel W; Schief, William R; Marletta, Michael A

    2013-09-17

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by NO synthase (NOS) participates in diverse physiological processes such as vasodilation, neurotransmission, and the innate immune response. Mammalian NOS isoforms are homodimers composed of two domains connected by an intervening calmodulin-binding region. The N-terminal oxidase domain binds heme and tetrahydrobiopterin and the arginine substrate. The C-terminal reductase domain binds FAD and FMN and the cosubstrate NADPH. Although several high-resolution structures of individual NOS domains have been reported, a structure of a NOS holoenzyme has remained elusive. Determination of the higher-order domain architecture of NOS is essential to elucidate the molecular underpinnings of NO formation. In particular, the pathway of electron transfer from FMN to heme, and the mechanism through which calmodulin activates this electron transfer, are largely unknown. In this report, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry was used to map critical NOS interaction surfaces. Direct interactions between the heme domain, the FMN subdomain, and calmodulin were observed. These interaction surfaces were confirmed by kinetic studies of site-specific interface mutants. Integration of the hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results with computational docking resulted in models of the NOS heme and FMN subdomain bound to calmodulin. These models suggest a pathway for electron transfer from FMN to heme and a mechanism for calmodulin activation of this critical step.

  4. Nitric oxide synthase domain interfaces regulate electron transfer and calmodulin activation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brian C.; Underbakke, Eric S.; Kulp, Daniel W.; Schief, William R.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by NO synthase (NOS) participates in diverse physiological processes such as vasodilation, neurotransmission, and the innate immune response. Mammalian NOS isoforms are homodimers composed of two domains connected by an intervening calmodulin-binding region. The N-terminal oxidase domain binds heme and tetrahydrobiopterin and the arginine substrate. The C-terminal reductase domain binds FAD and FMN and the cosubstrate NADPH. Although several high-resolution structures of individual NOS domains have been reported, a structure of a NOS holoenzyme has remained elusive. Determination of the higher-order domain architecture of NOS is essential to elucidate the molecular underpinnings of NO formation. In particular, the pathway of electron transfer from FMN to heme, and the mechanism through which calmodulin activates this electron transfer, are largely unknown. In this report, hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass spectrometry was used to map critical NOS interaction surfaces. Direct interactions between the heme domain, the FMN subdomain, and calmodulin were observed. These interaction surfaces were confirmed by kinetic studies of site-specific interface mutants. Integration of the hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results with computational docking resulted in models of the NOS heme and FMN subdomain bound to calmodulin. These models suggest a pathway for electron transfer from FMN to heme and a mechanism for calmodulin activation of this critical step. PMID:24003111

  5. Topologically associating domains are stable units of replication-timing regulation.

    PubMed

    Pope, Benjamin D; Ryba, Tyrone; Dileep, Vishnu; Yue, Feng; Wu, Weisheng; Denas, Olgert; Vera, Daniel L; Wang, Yanli; Hansen, R Scott; Canfield, Theresa K; Thurman, Robert E; Cheng, Yong; Gülsoy, Günhan; Dennis, Jonathan H; Snyder, Michael P; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Taylor, James; Hardison, Ross C; Kahveci, Tamer; Ren, Bing; Gilbert, David M

    2014-11-20

    Eukaryotic chromosomes replicate in a temporal order known as the replication-timing program. In mammals, replication timing is cell-type-specific with at least half the genome switching replication timing during development, primarily in units of 400-800 kilobases ('replication domains'), whose positions are preserved in different cell types, conserved between species, and appear to confine long-range effects of chromosome rearrangements. Early and late replication correlate, respectively, with open and closed three-dimensional chromatin compartments identified by high-resolution chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C), and, to a lesser extent, late replication correlates with lamina-associated domains (LADs). Recent Hi-C mapping has unveiled substructure within chromatin compartments called topologically associating domains (TADs) that are largely conserved in their positions between cell types and are similar in size to replication domains. However, TADs can be further sub-stratified into smaller domains, challenging the significance of structures at any particular scale. Moreover, attempts to reconcile TADs and LADs to replication-timing data have not revealed a common, underlying domain structure. Here we localize boundaries of replication domains to the early-replicating border of replication-timing transitions and map their positions in 18 human and 13 mouse cell types. We demonstrate that, collectively, replication domain boundaries share a near one-to-one correlation with TAD boundaries, whereas within a cell type, adjacent TADs that replicate at similar times obscure replication domain boundaries, largely accounting for the previously reported lack of alignment. Moreover, cell-type-specific replication timing of TADs partitions the genome into two large-scale sub-nuclear compartments revealing that replication-timing transitions are indistinguishable from late-replicating regions in chromatin composition and lamina association and accounting for the

  6. Identification of TSG101 functional domains and p21 loci required for TSG101-mediated p21 gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Shiuan; Chen, Yin-Ju; Cohen, Stanley N; Cheng, Tzu-Hao

    2013-01-01

    TSG101 (tumor susceptibility gene 101) is a multi-domain protein known to act in the cell nucleus, cytoplasm, and periplasmic membrane. Remarkably, TSG101, whose location within cells varies with the stage of the cell cycle, affects biological events as diverse as cell growth and proliferation, gene expression, cytokinesis, and endosomal trafficking. The functions of TSG101 additionally are recruited for viral and microvesicle budding and for intracellular survival of invading bacteria. Here we report that the TSG101 protein also interacts with and down-regulates the promoter of the p21 (CIP1/WAF1) tumor suppressor gene, and identify a p21 locus and TSG101 domains that mediate this interaction. TSG101 deficiency in Saos-2 human osteosarcoma cells was accompanied by an increased abundance of p21 mRNA and protein and the retardation of cell proliferation. A cis-acting element in the p21 promoter that interacts with TSG101 and is required for promoter repression was located using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis and p21-driven luciferase reporter gene expression, respectively. Additional analysis of TSG101 deletion mutants lacking specific domains established the role of the central TSG101 domains in binding to the p21 promoter and demonstrated the additional essentiality of the TSG101 C-terminal steadiness box (SB) in the repression of p21 promoter activity. Neither binding of TSG101 to the p21 promoter nor repression of this promoter required the TSG101 N-terminal UEV domain, which mediates the ubiquitin-recognition functions of TSG101 and its actions as a member of ESCRT endocytic trafficking complexes, indicating that regulation of the p21 promoter by TSG101 is independent of its role in such trafficking.

  7. Dynamin GTPase Regulation is Altered by PH Domain Mutations Found in Centronuclear Myopathy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kenniston, J.; Lemmon, M

    2010-01-01

    The large GTPase dynamin has an important membrane scission function in receptor-mediated endocytosis and other cellular processes. Self-assembly on phosphoinositide-containing membranes stimulates dynamin GTPase activity, which is crucial for its function. Although the pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain is known to mediate phosphoinositide binding by dynamin, it remains unclear how this promotes activation. Here, we describe studies of dynamin PH domain mutations found in centronuclear myopathy (CNM) that increase dynamin's GTPase activity without altering phosphoinositide binding. CNM mutations in the PH domain C-terminal {alpha}-helix appear to cause conformational changes in dynamin that alter control of the GTP hydrolysis cycle. These mutations either 'sensitize' dynamin to lipid stimulation or elevate basal GTPase rates by promoting self-assembly and thus rendering dynamin no longer lipid responsive. We also describe a low-resolution structure of dimeric dynamin from small-angle X-ray scattering that reveals conformational changes induced by CNM mutations, and defines requirements for domain rearrangement upon dynamin self-assembly at membrane surfaces. Our data suggest that changes in the PH domain may couple lipid binding to dynamin GTPase activation at sites of vesicle invagination.

  8. The Bel1 protein of human foamy virus contains one positive and two negative control regions which regulate a distinct activation domain of 30 amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C W; Chang, J; Lee, K J; Sung, Y C

    1994-01-01

    The Bel1 transactivator is essential for the replication of human foamy virus (HFV). To define the functional domains of HFV Bel1, we generated random missense mutations throughout the entire coding sequence of Bel1. Functional analyses of 24 missense mutations have revealed the presence of at least two functional domains in Bel1. One domain corresponds to a basic amino acid-rich motif which acts as a bipartite nuclear targeting sequence. A second, central domain corresponds to a presumed effector region which, when mutated, leads to dominant-negative mutants and/or lacks transactivating ability. In addition, deletion analyses and domain-swapping experiments further showed that Bel1 protein contains a strong carboxy-terminal activation domain. The activating region is also capable of functioning as a transcription-activating domain in yeast cells, although it does not bear any significant sequence homology to the well-characterized acidic activation domain which is known to function only in yeast and mammalian cells. We also demonstrated that the regions of Bel1 from residues 1 to 76 and from residues 153 to 225 repressed transcriptional activation exerted by the Bel1 activation domain. In contrast, the region from residues 82 to 150 appears to overcome an inhibitory effect. These results indicate that Bel1 contains one positive and two negative regulatory domains that modulate a distinct activation domain of Bel1. These regulatory domains of Bel1 cannot affect the function of the VP16 activation domain, suggesting that these domains specifically regulate the activation domain of Bel1. Furthermore, in vivo competition experiments showed that the positive regulatory domain acts in trans. Thus, our results demonstrate that Bel1-mediated transactivation appears to undergo a complex regulatory pathway which provides a novel mode of regulation for a transcriptional activation domain. Images PMID:8139046

  9. Reversible interactions between smooth domains of the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria are regulated by physiological cytosolic Ca2+ levels.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Jacky G; Genty, Hélène; St-Pierre, Pascal; Dang, Thao; Joshi, Bharat; Sauvé, Rémy; Vogl, Wayne; Nabi, Ivan R

    2007-10-15

    The 3F3A monoclonal antibody to autocrine motility factor receptor (AMFR) labels mitochondria-associated smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER) tubules. siRNA down-regulation of AMFR expression reduces mitochondria-associated 3F3A labelling. The 3F3A-labelled ER domain does not overlap with reticulon-labelled ER tubules, the nuclear membrane or perinuclear ER markers and only partially overlaps with the translocon component Sec61alpha. Upon overexpression of FLAG-tagged AMFR, 3F3A labelling is mitochondria associated, excluded from the perinuclear ER and co-distributes with reticulon. 3F3A labelling therefore defines a distinct mitochondria-associated ER domain. Elevation of free cytosolic Ca(2+) levels with ionomycin promotes dissociation of 3F3A-labelled tubules from mitochondria and, judged by electron microscopy, disrupts close contacts (<50 nm) between smooth ER tubules and mitochondria. The ER tubule-mitochondria association is similarly disrupted upon thapsigargin-induced release of ER Ca(2+) stores or purinergic receptor stimulation by ATP. The inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P(3)] receptor (IP3R) colocalises to 3F3A-labelled mitochondria-associated ER tubules, and conditions that induce ER tubule-mitochondria dissociation disrupt continuity between 3F3A- and IP3R-labelled ER domains. RAS-transformed NIH-3T3 cells have increased basal cytosolic Ca(2+) levels and show dissociation of the 3F3A-labelled, but not IP3R-labelled, ER from mitochondria. Our data indicate that regulation of the ER-mitochondria association by free cytosolic Ca(2+) is a characteristic of smooth ER domains and that multiple mechanisms regulate the interaction between these organelles.

  10. Investigating the Allosteric Regulation of YfiN from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Clues from the Structure of the Catalytic Domain

    PubMed Central

    Fernicola, Silvia; Franceschini, Stefano; Rinaldo, Serena; Stelitano, Valentina; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is responsible for a plethora of biofilm mediated chronic infections among which cystic fibrosis pneumonia is the most frightening. The long-term survival strategy of P. aeruginosa in the patients lungs is based on a fine balance of virulence vs dormant states and on genetic adaptation, in order to select persistent phenotypes as the small colony variants (SCVs), which strongly correlate with antibiotic resistance and poor lung function. Recent studies have coupled SCV with increased levels of the signaling molecule cyclic di-GMP, and demonstrated the central role of the diguanylate cyclase YfiN, part of the tripartite signaling module YifBNR, in c-di-GMP dependent SCV regulation. YfiN, also called TpbB, is a multi-domain membrane enzyme connecting periplasmic stimuli to cytosolic c-di-GMP production by an allosteric inside-out signaling mechanism that, due to the lack of structural data, is still largely hypothetical. We have solved the crystal structure of the catalytic domain (GGDEF), and measured the enzymatic activity of the cytosolic portion in real-time by means of a newly developed method. Based on these results we demonstrate that, unlike other diguanylate cyclase, YfiN does not undergo product feedback inhibition, and that the presence of the HAMP domain is required for dimerization and catalysis. Coupling our structural and kinetic data with an in silico study we are now able to propose a model for the allosteric regulation of YfiN. PMID:24278422

  11. Topological Layers in the HIV-1 gp120 Inner Domain Regulate gp41 Interaction and CD4-Triggered Conformational Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Finzi, Andrés; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Pacheco, Beatriz; Wang, Liping; Haight, Jessica; Kassa, Aemro; Danek, Brenda; Pancera, Marie; Kwong, Peter D.; Sodroski, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) into cells is initiated by binding of the gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein to the receptor, CD4. How does CD4 binding trigger conformational changes in gp120 that allow the gp41 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein to mediate viral-cell membrane fusion? The transition from the unliganded to the CD4-bound state is regulated by two potentially flexible topological layers (“Layers 1 and 2”) in the gp120 inner domain. Both layers apparently contribute to the non-covalent association of unliganded gp120 with gp41. After CD4 makes initial contact with the gp120 outer domain, Layer 1-Layer 2 interactions strengthen gp120-CD4 binding by reducing the off-rate. Layer 1-Layer 2 interactions also destabilize the activated state induced on HIV-1 by treatment with soluble CD4. Thus, despite lack of contact with CD4, the gp120 inner domain layers govern CD4 triggering by participating in conformational transitions within gp120 and regulating the interaction with gp41. PMID:20227370

  12. Virulence and prodigiosin antibiotic biosynthesis in Serratia are regulated pleiotropically by the GGDEF/EAL domain protein, PigX.

    PubMed

    Fineran, Peter C; Williamson, Neil R; Lilley, Kathryn S; Salmond, George P C

    2007-11-01

    Gram-negative bacteria of the genus Serratia are opportunistic human, plant, and insect pathogens. Serratia sp. strain ATCC 39006 secretes pectinases and cellulases and produces the secondary metabolites carbapenem and prodigiosin. Mutation of a gene (pigX) resulted in an extremely pleiotropic phenotype: prodigiosin antibiotic biosynthesis, plant virulence, and pectinase production were all elevated. PigX controlled secondary metabolism by repressing the transcription of the target prodigiosin biosynthetic operon (pigA-pigO). The transcriptional start site of pigX was determined, and pigX expression occurred in parallel with Pig production. Detailed quantitative intracellular proteome analyses enabled the identification of numerous downstream targets of PigX, including OpgG, mutation of which reduced the production of the plant cell wall-degrading enzymes and virulence. The highly pleiotropic PigX regulator contains GGDEF and EAL domains with noncanonical motifs and is predicted to be membrane associated. Genetic evidence suggests that PigX might function as a cyclic dimeric GMP phosphodiesterase. This is the first characterization of a GGDEF and EAL domain protein in Serratia and the first example of the regulation of antibiotic production by a GGDEF/EAL domain protein.

  13. Dictyostelium calcium-binding protein 4a interacts with nucleomorphin, a BRCT-domain protein that regulates nuclear number.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2004-09-17

    Nucleomorphin from Dictyostelium discoideum is a nuclear calmodulin-binding protein that is a member of the BRCT-domain containing cell cycle checkpoint proteins. Two differentially expressed isoforms, NumA and NumB, share an extensive acidic domain (DEED) that when deleted produces highly multinucleated cells. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen of a Dictyostelium cDNA library using NumA as bait. Here we show that nucleomorphin interacts with calcium-binding protein 4a (CBP4a) in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Further deletion analysis suggests this interaction requires residues found within the DEED domain. NumA and CBP4a mRNAs are expressed at the same stages of development. CBP4a belongs to a large family of Dictyostelium CBPs, for which no cellular or developmental functions had previously been determined. Since the interaction of CBP4a with nucleomorphin requires the DEED domain, this suggests that CBP4a may respond to Ca(2+)-signalling through modulating factors that might function in concert to regulate nuclear number. PMID:15325281

  14. The N-terminal domains of TRF1 and TRF2 regulate their ability to condense telomeric DNA

    PubMed Central

    Poulet, Anaïs; Pisano, Sabrina; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine; Pei, Bei; Tauran, Yannick; Haftek-Terreau, Zofia; Brunet, Frédéric; Le Bihan, Yann-Vaï; Ledu, Marie-Hélène; Montel, Fabien; Hugo, Nicolas; Amiard, Simon; Argoul, Françoise; Chaboud, Annie; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe

    2012-01-01

    TRF1 and TRF2 are key proteins in human telomeres, which, despite their similarities, have different behaviors upon DNA binding. Previous work has shown that unlike TRF1, TRF2 condenses telomeric, thus creating consequential negative torsion on the adjacent DNA, a property that is thought to lead to the stimulation of single-strand invasion and was proposed to favor telomeric DNA looping. In this report, we show that these activities, originating from the central TRFH domain of TRF2, are also displayed by the TRFH domain of TRF1 but are repressed in the full-length protein by the presence of an acidic domain at the N-terminus. Strikingly, a similar repression is observed on TRF2 through the binding of a TERRA-like RNA molecule to the N-terminus of TRF2. Phylogenetic and biochemical studies suggest that the N-terminal domains of TRF proteins originate from a gradual extension of the coding sequences of a duplicated ancestral gene with a consequential progressive alteration of the biochemical properties of these proteins. Overall, these data suggest that the N-termini of TRF1 and TRF2 have evolved to finely regulate their ability to condense DNA. PMID:22139926

  15. Novel topology of a zinc-binding domain from a protein involved in regulating early Xenopus development.

    PubMed Central

    Borden, K L; Lally, J M; Martin, S R; O'Reilly, N J; Etkin, L D; Freemont, P S

    1995-01-01

    Xenopus nuclear factor XNF7, a maternally expressed protein, functions in patterning of the embryo. XNF7 contains a number of defined protein domains implicated in the regulation of some developmental processes. Among these is a tripartite motif comprising a zinc-binding RING finger and B-box domain next to a predicted alpha-helical coiled-coil domain. Interestingly, this motif is found in a variety of protein including several proto-oncoproteins. Here we describe the solution structure of the XNF7 B-box zinc-binding domain determined at physiological pH by 1H NMR methods. The B-box structure represents the first three-dimensional structure of this new motif and comprises a monomer have two beta-strands, two helical turns and three extended loop regions packed in a novel topology. The r.m.s. deviation for the best 18 structures is 1.15 A for backbone atoms and 1.94 A for all atoms. Structure calculations and biochemical data shows one zinc atom ligated in a Cys2-His2 tetrahedral arrangement. We have used mutant peptides to determine the metal ligation scheme which surprisingly shows that not all of the seven conserved cysteines/histidines in the B-box motif are involved in metal ligation. The B-box structure is not similar in tertiary fold to any other known zinc-binding motif. Images PMID:8846787

  16. Mutations in Mtr4 Structural Domains Reveal Their Important Role in Regulating tRNAiMet Turnover in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Mtr4p Enzymatic Activities In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Burclaff, Joseph; Anderson, James T

    2016-01-01

    RNA processing and turnover play important roles in the maturation, metabolism and quality control of a large variety of RNAs thereby contributing to gene expression and cellular health. The TRAMP complex, composed of Air2p, Trf4p and Mtr4p, stimulates nuclear exosome-dependent RNA processing and degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Mtr4 protein structure is composed of a helicase core and a novel so-called arch domain, which protrudes from the core. The helicase core contains highly conserved helicase domains RecA-1 and 2, and two structural domains of unclear functions, winged helix domain (WH) and ratchet domain. How the structural domains (arch, WH and ratchet domain) coordinate with the helicase domains and what roles they are playing in regulating Mtr4p helicase activity are unknown. We created a library of Mtr4p structural domain mutants for the first time and screened for those defective in the turnover of TRAMP and exosome substrate, hypomodified tRNAiMet. We found these domains regulate Mtr4p enzymatic activities differently through characterizing the arch domain mutants K700N and P731S, WH mutant K904N, and ratchet domain mutant R1030G. Arch domain mutants greatly reduced Mtr4p RNA binding, which surprisingly did not lead to significant defects on either in vivo tRNAiMet turnover, or in vitro unwinding activities. WH mutant K904N and Ratchet domain mutant R1030G showed decreased tRNAiMet turnover in vivo, as well as reduced RNA binding, ATPase and unwinding activities of Mtr4p in vitro. Particularly, K904 was found to be very important for steady protein levels in vivo. Overall, we conclude that arch domain plays a role in RNA binding but is largely dispensable for Mtr4p enzymatic activities, however the structural domains in the helicase core significantly contribute to Mtr4p ATPase and unwinding activities.

  17. Evolutionarily conserved roles of the dicer helicase domain in regulating RNA interference processing.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, Mary Anne; Chan, Jessica M; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-10-10

    The enzyme Dicer generates 21-25 nucleotide RNAs that target specific mRNAs for silencing during RNA interference and related pathways. Although their active sites and RNA binding regions are functionally conserved, the helicase domains have distinct activities in the context of different Dicer enzymes. To examine the evolutionary origins of Dicer helicase functions, we investigated two related Dicer enzymes from the thermophilic fungus Sporotrichum thermophile. RNA cleavage assays showed that S. thermophile Dicer-1 (StDicer-1) can process hairpin precursor microRNAs, whereas StDicer-2 can only cleave linear double-stranded RNAs. Furthermore, only StDicer-2 possesses robust ATP hydrolytic activity in the presence of double-stranded RNA. Deletion of the StDicer-2 helicase domain increases both StDicer-2 cleavage activity and affinity for hairpin RNA. Notably, both StDicer-1 and StDicer-2 could complement the distantly related yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe lacking its endogenous Dicer gene but only in their full-length forms, underscoring the importance of the helicase domain. These results suggest an in vivo regulatory function for the helicase domain that may be conserved from fungi to humans. PMID:25135636

  18. Evolutionarily Conserved Roles of the Dicer Helicase Domain in Regulating RNA Interference Processing*

    PubMed Central

    Kidwell, Mary Anne; Chan, Jessica M.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme Dicer generates 21–25 nucleotide RNAs that target specific mRNAs for silencing during RNA interference and related pathways. Although their active sites and RNA binding regions are functionally conserved, the helicase domains have distinct activities in the context of different Dicer enzymes. To examine the evolutionary origins of Dicer helicase functions, we investigated two related Dicer enzymes from the thermophilic fungus Sporotrichum thermophile. RNA cleavage assays showed that S. thermophile Dicer-1 (StDicer-1) can process hairpin precursor microRNAs, whereas StDicer-2 can only cleave linear double-stranded RNAs. Furthermore, only StDicer-2 possesses robust ATP hydrolytic activity in the presence of double-stranded RNA. Deletion of the StDicer-2 helicase domain increases both StDicer-2 cleavage activity and affinity for hairpin RNA. Notably, both StDicer-1 and StDicer-2 could complement the distantly related yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe lacking its endogenous Dicer gene but only in their full-length forms, underscoring the importance of the helicase domain. These results suggest an in vivo regulatory function for the helicase domain that may be conserved from fungi to humans. PMID:25135636

  19. Gene trap lines define domains of gene regulation in Arabidopsis petals and stamens.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Naomi; Arroyo, Juana M; Simorowski, Joseph; May, Bruce; Martienssen, Robert; Irish, Vivian F

    2005-09-01

    To identify genes involved in Arabidopsis thaliana petal and stamen organogenesis, we used a gene trap approach to examine the patterns of reporter expression at each stage of flower development of 1765 gene trap lines. In 80 lines, the reporter gene showed petal- and/or stamen-specific expression or lack of expression, or expression in distinct patterns within the petals and/or the stamens, including distinct suborgan domains of expression, such as tissue-specific lines marking epidermis and vasculature, as well as lines demarcating the proximodistal or abaxial/adaxial axes of the organs. Interestingly, reporter gene expression was typically restricted along the proximodistal axis of petals and stamens, indicating the importance of this developmental axis in patterning of gene expression domains in these organs. We identified novel domains of gene expression along the axis marking the midregion of the petals and apical and basal parts of the anthers. Most of the genes tagged in these 80 lines were identified, and their possible functions in petal and/or stamen differentiation are discussed. We also scored the floral phenotypes of the 1765 gene trap lines and recovered two mutants affecting previously uncharacterized genes. In addition to revealing common domains of gene expression, the gene trap lines reported here provide both useful markers and valuable starting points for reverse genetic analyses of the differentiation pathways in petal and stamen development. PMID:16055634

  20. A coiled-coil domain acts as a molecular ruler in LPS chain length regulation

    PubMed Central

    Tuukkanen, Anne; Danciu, Iulia; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Hussain, Rohanah; Liu, Huanting; Whitfield, Chris; Naismith, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Long-chain bacterial polysaccharides play important roles in pathogenicity. In Escherichia coli O9a, a model for ABC transporter dependent polysaccharide assembly, a large extracellular carbohydrate with a narrow distribution of size is polymerized from monosaccharides by a complex of two proteins, WbdA (polymerase) and WbdD (terminating protein). Such careful control of polymerization is recurring theme in biology. Combining crystallography and small angle X-ray scattering, we show that the C-terminal domain of WbdD contains an extended coiled-coil that physically separates WbdA from the catalytic domain of WbdD. The effects of insertions and deletions within the coiled-coil region were analyzed in vivo, revealing that polymer size is controlled by varying the length of the coiled-coil domain. Thus, the coiled-coil domain of WbdD functions as a molecular ruler that, along with WbdA:WbdD stoichiometry, controls the chain length of a model bacterial polysaccharide. PMID:25504321

  1. A novel mechanism involving four-and-a-half LIM domain protein-1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-2 regulates titin phosphorylation and mechanics.

    PubMed

    Raskin, Anna; Lange, Stephan; Banares, Katherine; Lyon, Robert C; Zieseniss, Anke; Lee, Leonard K; Yamazaki, Katrina G; Granzier, Henk L; Gregorio, Carol C; McCulloch, Andrew D; Omens, Jeffrey H; Sheikh, Farah

    2012-08-24

    Understanding mechanisms underlying titin regulation in cardiac muscle function is of critical importance given recent compelling evidence that highlight titin mutations as major determinants of human cardiomyopathy. We previously identified a cardiac biomechanical stress-regulated complex at the cardiac-specific N2B region of titin that includes four-and-a-half LIM domain protein-1 (Fhl1) and components of the mitogen-activated protein signaling cascade, which impacted muscle compliance in Fhl1 knock-out cardiac muscle. However, direct regulation of these molecular components in mediating titin N2B function remained unresolved. Here we identify Fhl1 as a novel negative regulator of titin N2B levels and phosphorylation-mediated mechanics. We specifically identify titin N2B as a novel substrate of extracellular signal regulated-kinase-2 (Erk2) and demonstrate that Fhl1 directly interferes with Erk2-mediated titin-N2B phosphorylation. We highlight the critical region in titin-N2B that interacts with Fhl1 and residues that are dependent on Erk2-mediated phosphorylation in situ. We also propose a potential mechanism for a known titin-N2B cardiomyopathy-causing mutation that involves this regulatory complex. These studies shed light on a novel mechanism regulating titin-N2B mechano-signaling as well as suggest that dysfunction of these pathways could be important in cardiac disease states affecting muscle compliance.

  2. Membrane Restructuring by Phospholipase A2 Is Regulated by the Presence of Lipid Domains

    PubMed Central

    Leidy, Chad; Ocampo, Jackson; Duelund, Lars; Mouritsen, Ole G.; Jørgensen, Kent; Peters, Günther H.

    2011-01-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) catalyzes the hydrolysis of glycerophospholipids. This enzyme is sensitive to membrane structure, and its activity has been shown to increase in the presence of liquid-crystalline/gel (Lα/Lβ) lipid domains. In this work, we explore whether lipid domains can also direct the activity of the enzyme by inducing hydrolysis of certain lipid components due to preferential activity of the enzyme toward lipid domains susceptible to sPLA2. Specifically, we show that the presence of Lα/Lβ and Lα/Pβ′ phase coexistence in a 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)/1,2 distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) system results in the preferential hydrolysis of the shorter-chained lipid component in the mixture, leading to an enrichment in the longer-chained component. The restructuring process is monitored by atomic force microscopy on supported single and double bilayers formed by vesicle fusion. We observe that during preferential hydrolysis of the DMPC-rich Lα regions, the Lβ and Pβ′ regions grow and reseal, maintaining membrane integrity. This result indicates that a sharp reorganization of the membrane structure can occur during sPLA2 hydrolysis without necessarily destroying the membrane. We confirm by high-performance liquid chromatography the preferential hydrolysis of DMPC within the phase coexistence region of the DMPC/DSPC phase diagram, showing that this preferential hydrolysis is accentuated close to the solidus phase boundary. Differential scanning calorimetry results show that this preferential hydrolysis in the presence of lipid domains leads to a membrane system with a higher-temperature melting profile due to enrichment in DSPC. Together, these results show that the presence of lipid domains can induce specificity in the hydrolytic activity of the enzyme, resulting in marked differences in the physical properties of the membrane end-product. PMID:21723818

  3. Energetic modeling and single-molecule verification of dynamic regulation on receptor complexes by actin corrals and lipid raft domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chien Y.; Huang, Jung Y.; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-12-01

    We developed an energetic model by integrating the generalized Langevin equation with the Cahn-Hilliard equation to simulate the diffusive behaviors of receptor proteins in the plasma membrane of a living cell. Simulation results are presented to elaborate the confinement effects from actin corrals and protein-induced lipid domains. Single-molecule tracking data of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) acquired on live HeLa cells agree with the simulation results and the mechanism that controls the diffusion of single-molecule receptors is clarified. We discovered that after ligand binding, EGFR molecules move into lipid nanodomains. The transition rates between different diffusion states of liganded EGFR molecules are regulated by the lipid domains. Our method successfully captures dynamic interactions of receptors at the single-molecule level and provides insight into the functional architecture of both the diffusing EGFR molecules and their local cellular environment.

  4. Energetic modeling and single-molecule verification of dynamic regulation on receptor complexes by actin corrals and lipid raft domains.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien Y; Huang, Jung Y; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-12-01

    We developed an energetic model by integrating the generalized Langevin equation with the Cahn-Hilliard equation to simulate the diffusive behaviors of receptor proteins in the plasma membrane of a living cell. Simulation results are presented to elaborate the confinement effects from actin corrals and protein-induced lipid domains. Single-molecule tracking data of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) acquired on live HeLa cells agree with the simulation results and the mechanism that controls the diffusion of single-molecule receptors is clarified. We discovered that after ligand binding, EGFR molecules move into lipid nanodomains. The transition rates between different diffusion states of liganded EGFR molecules are regulated by the lipid domains. Our method successfully captures dynamic interactions of receptors at the single-molecule level and provides insight into the functional architecture of both the diffusing EGFR molecules and their local cellular environment. PMID:25481171

  5. Structural insights into the regulation and the recognition of histone marks by the SET domain of NSD1

    SciTech Connect

    Morishita, Masayo; Di Luccio, Eric

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} NSD1, NSD2/MMSET/WHSC1, and NSD3/WHSC1L1 are histone methyltransferases linked to numerous cancers. {yields} Little is known about the NSD pathways and HMTase inhibitors are sorely needed in the epigenetic therapy of cancers. {yields} We investigate the regulation and the recognition of histone marks by the SET domain of NSD1. {yields} A unique and key mechanism is driven by a loop at the interface of the SET and postSET region. {yields} Implications for developing specific and selective HMTase inhibitors are presented. -- Abstract: The development of epigenetic therapies fuels cancer hope. DNA-methylation inhibitors, histone-deacetylase and histone-methyltransferase (HMTase) inhibitors are being developed as the utilization of epigenetic targets is emerging as an effective and valuable approach to chemotherapy as well as chemoprevention of cancer. The nuclear receptor binding SET domain (NSD) protein is a family of three HMTases, NSD1, NSD2/MMSET/WHSC1, and NSD3/WHSC1L1 that are critical in maintaining the chromatin integrity. A growing number of studies have reported alterations or amplifications of NSD1, NSD2, or NSD3 in numerous carcinogenic events. Reducing NSDs activity through specific lysine-HMTase inhibitors appears promising to help suppressing cancer growth. However, little is known about the NSD pathways and our understanding of the histone lysine-HMTase mechanism is partial. To shed some light on both the recognition and the regulation of epigenetic marks by the SET domain of the NSD family, we investigate the structural mechanisms of the docking of the histone-H4 tail on the SET domain of NSD1. Our finding exposes a key regulatory and recognition mechanism driven by the flexibility of a loop at the interface of the SET and postSET region. Finally, we prospect the special value of this regulatory region for developing specific and selective NSD inhibitors for the epigenetic therapy of cancers.

  6. JFK, a Kelch domain-containing F-box protein, links the SCF complex to p53 regulation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Luyang; Shi, Lei; Li, Wenqian; Yu, Wenhua; Liang, Jing; Zhang, Hua; Yang, Xiaohan; Wang, Yan; Li, Ruifang; Yao, Xingrong; Yi, Xia; Shang, Yongfeng

    2009-06-23

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a central role in integrating cellular responses to various stresses. Tight regulation of p53 is thus essential for the maintenance of genome integrity and normal cell proliferation. Currently, several ubiquitin ligases, including the single-subunit RING-finger types--MDM2, Pirh2, and COP1--and the HECT-domain type--ARF-BP1--have been reported to target p53 for degradation. Here, we report the identification of a human Kelch domain-containing F-box protein, JFK. We showed that JFK promotes ubiquitination and degradation of p53. But unlike MDM2, Pirh2, COP1, and ARF-BP1, all of which possess an intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity, JFK destabilizes p53 through the assembly of a Skp1-Cul1-F-box complex. Significantly, JFK inhibits p53-dependent transcription, and depletion of JFK stabilizes p53, promotes cell apoptosis, arrests cells in the G(1) phase, and sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation-induced cell death. These data indicate that JFK is a critical negative regulator of p53 and represents a pathway for the maintenance of p53 levels in unstressed cells. Our experiments link the Skp1-Cul1-F-box system to p53 regulation.

  7. Shugoshin forms a specialized chromatin domain at subtelomeres that regulates transcription and replication timing

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Sanki; Handa, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Atsushi; Ban, Takuto; Takigawa, Toru; Miyasato, Kazumi; Ishii, Kojiro; Kugou, Kazuto; Ohta, Kunihiro; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Masukata, Hisao; Kanoh, Junko

    2016-01-01

    A chromosome is composed of structurally and functionally distinct domains. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of chromatin structure and the function of subtelomeres, the telomere-adjacent regions, remain obscure. Here we report the roles of the conserved centromeric protein Shugoshin 2 (Sgo2) in defining chromatin structure and functions of the subtelomeres in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that Sgo2 localizes at the subtelomeres preferentially during G2 phase and is essential for the formation of a highly condensed subtelomeric chromatin body ‘knob'. Furthermore, the absence of Sgo2 leads to the derepression of the subtelomeric genes and premature DNA replication at the subtelomeric late origins. Thus, the subtelomeric specialized chromatin domain organized by Sgo2 represses both transcription and replication to ensure proper gene expression and replication timing. PMID:26804021

  8. Calcium binding by the PKD1 domain regulates interdomain flexibility in Vibrio cholerae metalloprotease PrtV☆

    PubMed Central

    Edwin, Aaron; Rompikuntal, Pramod; Björn, Erik; Stier, Gunter; Wai, Sun N.; Sauer-Eriksson, A. Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, releases several virulence factors including secreted proteases when it infects its host. These factors attack host cell proteins and break down tissue barriers and cellular matrix components such as collagen, laminin, fibronectin, keratin, elastin, and they induce necrotic tissue damage. The secreted protease PrtV constitutes one virulence factors of V. cholerae. It is a metalloprotease belonging to the M6 peptidase family. The protein is expressed as an inactive, multidomain, 102 kDa pre-pro-protein that undergoes several N- and C-terminal modifications after which it is secreted as an intermediate variant of 81 kDa. After secretion from the bacteria, additional proteolytic steps occur to produce the 55 kDa active M6 metalloprotease. The domain arrangement of PrtV is likely to play an important role in these maturation steps, which are known to be regulated by calcium. However, the molecular mechanism by which calcium controls proteolysis is unknown. In this study, we report the atomic resolution crystal structure of the PKD1 domain from V. cholera PrtV (residues 755–838) determined at 1.1 Å. The structure reveals a previously uncharacterized Ca2+-binding site located near linker regions between domains. Conformational changes in the Ca2+-free and Ca2+-bound forms suggest that Ca2+-binding at the PKD1 domain controls domain linker flexibility, and plays an important structural role, providing stability to the PrtV protein. PMID:23905008

  9. Nuclear Localization of the Autism Candidate Gene Neurobeachin and Functional Interaction with the NOTCH1 Intracellular Domain Indicate a Role in Regulating Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tuand, Krizia; Stijnen, Pieter; Volders, Karolien; Declercq, Jeroen; Nuytens, Kim; Meulemans, Sandra; Creemers, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Neurobeachin (NBEA) is an autism spectrum disorders (ASD) candidate gene. NBEA deficiency affects regulated secretion, receptor trafficking, synaptic architecture and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation. NBEA is a large multidomain scaffolding protein. From N- to C-terminus, NBEA has a concanavalin A-like lectin domain flanked by armadillo repeats (ACA), an A-kinase anchoring protein domain that can bind to PKA, a domain of unknown function (DUF1088) and a BEACH domain, preceded by a pleckstrin homology-like domain and followed by WD40 repeats (PBW). Although most of these domains mediate protein-protein interactions, no interaction screen has yet been performed. Methods Yeast two-hybrid screens with the ACA and PBW domain modules of NBEA gave a list of interaction partners, which were analyzed for Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment. Neuro-2a cells were used for confocal microscopy and nuclear extraction analysis. NOTCH-mediated transcription was studied with luciferase reporter assays and qRT-PCR, combined with NBEA knockdown or overexpression. Results Both domain modules showed a GO enrichment for the nucleus. PBW almost exclusively interacted with transcription regulators, while ACA interacted with a number of PKA substrates. NBEA was partially localized in the nucleus of Neuro-2a cells, albeit much less than in the cytoplasm. A nuclear localization signal was found in the DUF1088 domain, which was shown to contribute to the nuclear localization of an EGFP-DPBW fusion protein. Yeast two-hybrid identified the Notch1 intracellular domain as a physical interactor of the PBW domain and a role for NBEA as a negative regulator in Notch-mediated transcription was demonstrated. Conclusion Defining novel interaction partners of conserved NBEA domain modules identified a role for NBEA as transcriptional regulator in the nucleus. The physical interaction of NBEA with NOTCH1 is most relevant for ASD pathogenesis because NOTCH signaling is essential for

  10. Domain organization, genomic structure, evolution, and regulation of expression of the aggrecan gene family.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, N B; Pirok, E W; Mensch, J R; Domowicz, M S

    1999-01-01

    Proteoglycans are complex macromolecules, consisting of a polypeptide backbone to which are covalently attached one or more glycosaminoglycan chains. Molecular cloning has allowed identification of the genes encoding the core proteins of various proteoglycans, leading to a better understanding of the diversity of proteoglycan structure and function, as well as to the evolution of a classification of proteoglycans on the basis of emerging gene families that encode the different core proteins. One such family includes several proteoglycans that have been grouped with aggrecan, the large aggregating chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan of cartilage, based on a high number of sequence similarities within the N- and C-terminal domains. Thus far these proteoglycans include versican, neurocan, and brevican. It is now apparent that these proteins, as a group, are truly a gene family with shared structural motifs on the protein and nucleotide (mRNA) levels, and with nearly identical genomic organizations. Clearly a common ancestral origin is indicated for the members of the aggrecan family of proteoglycans. However, differing patterns of amplification and divergence have also occurred within certain exons across species and family members, leading to the class-characteristic protein motifs in the central carbohydrate-rich region exclusively. Thus the overall domain organization strongly suggests that sequence conservation in the terminal globular domains underlies common functions, whereas differences in the central portions of the genes account for functional specialization among the members of this gene family.

  11. Size Regulation in the Segmentation of Drosophila: Interacting Interfaces between Localized Domains of Gene Expression Ensure Robust Spatial Patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakulenko, Sergei; Manu; Reinitz, John; Radulescu, Ovidiu

    2009-10-01

    We propose a new mechanism for robust biological patterning. The mechanism bears analogy to interface dynamics in condensed media. We apply this method to study how gene networks control segmentation of Drosophila. The proposed model is minimal involving only 4 genes and a morphogen gradient. We discuss experimental data for which developmental genes are expressed within domains spatially limited by kinks (interfaces) and the gene interaction scheme contains both weak and strong repulsion. We show how kink-kink interactions can be calculated from the gene interactions and how the gene interaction scheme ensures the control of proportions (size regulation).

  12. The Indeterminate Domain Protein ROC1 Regulates Chilling Tolerance via Activation of DREB1B/CBF1 in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Mingzhu; Cheng, Shuai; Zhao, Baotian; Xuan, Yuanhu; Shao, Minglong

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stress, including salinity, drought and cold, severely affect diverse aspects of plant development and production. Rice is an important crop that does not acclimate to cold; therefore, it is relatively sensitive to low temperature stress. Dehydration-responsive element-binding protein 1s (DREB1s)/C-repeat binding factors (CBFs) are well known for their function in cold tolerance, but the transcriptional regulation of CBFs remains elusive, especially in rice. Here, we performed a yeast one-hybrid assay using the promoter of CBF1, a cold-induced gene, to isolate transcriptional regulators of CBF1. Among the seven candidates identified, an indeterminate domain (IDD) protein named ROC1 (a regulator of CBF1) was further analyzed. The ROC1 transcript was induced by exogenously-treated auxin, while it was not altered by cold or ABA stimuli. ROC1-GFP was localized at the nucleus, and ROC1 showed trans-activation activity in yeast. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and ChIP analyses revealed that ROC1 directly bound to the promoter of CBF1. Furthermore, ROC1 mutants exhibited chilling-sensitive symptoms and inhibited cold-mediated induction of CBF1 and CBF3, indicating that ROC1 is a positive regulator of cold stress responses. Taken together, this study identified the CBF1 regulator, and the results are important for rice plant adaptation to chilling stress. PMID:26927068

  13. Paracrine regulation of growth factor signaling by shed leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains 1

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Wei; Holmlund, Camilla; Nilsson, Jonas; Inui, Shigeki; Lei, Ting; Itami, Satoshi; Henriksson, Roger; Hedman, Hakan

    2011-02-15

    Leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains 1 (LRIG1) is a recently discovered negative regulator of growth factor signaling. The LRIG1 integral membrane protein has been demonstrated to regulate various oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases, including epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR), by cell-autonomous mechanisms. Here, we investigated whether LRIG1 ectodomains were shed, and if LRIG1 could regulate cell proliferation and EGF signaling in a paracrine manner. Cells constitutively shed LRIG1 ectodomains in vitro, and shedding was modulated by known regulators of metalloproteases, including the ADAM17 specific inhibitor TAPI-2. Furthermore, shedding was enhanced by ectopic expression of Adam17. LRIG1 ectodomains appeared to be shed in vivo, as well, as demonstrated by immunoblotting of mouse and human tissue lysates. Ectopic expression of LRIG1 in lymphocytes suppressed EGF signaling in co-cultured fibroblastoid cells, demonstrating that shed LRIG1 ectodomains can function in a paracrine fashion. Purified LRIG1 ectodomains suppressed EGF signaling without any apparent downregulation of EGFR levels. Taken together, the results show that the LRIG1 ectodomain can be proteolytically shed and can function as a non-cell-autonomous regulator of growth factor signaling. Thus, LRIG1 or its ectodomain could have therapeutic potential in the treatment of growth factor receptor-dependent cancers.

  14. Regulation of the Ppr histidine kinase by light-induced interactions between its photoactive yellow protein and bacteriophytochrome domains.

    PubMed

    Kyndt, John A; Fitch, John C; Seibeck, Sven; Borucki, Berthold; Heyn, Maarten P; Meyer, Terry E; Cusanovich, Michael A

    2010-03-01

    Ppr is a unique bacteriophytochrome that bleaches rather than forming a far-red-shifted Pfr state upon red light activation. Ppr is also unusual in that it has a blue light photoreceptor domain, PYP, which is N-terminally fused to the bacteriophytochrome domain (Bph). When both photoreceptors are activated by light, the fast phase of Bph recovery (1 min lifetime) corresponds to the formation of an intramolecular long-lived complex between the activated PYP domain and the Bph domain (lifetime of 2-3 days). Since this state is unusually long-lived as compared to other intermediates in the photocycle of both PYP and Bph, we interpret this as formation of a metastable complex between activated PYP and Bph domains that takes days to relax. In the metastable complex, the PYP domain is locked in its activated UV absorbing state and the Bph domain is in a slightly red-shifted state (from 701 to 702 nm), which is photochemically inactive to red or white light. The amount of metastable complex formed increases with the degree of prior activation of PYP, reaching a maximum of 50% when PYP is fully activated compared to 0% when no PYP is activated. The saturation of complex formation at 50% is believed to be due to light-induced heterogeneity within the Ppr dimer. UV irradiation (365 nm) of the metastable complex state photoreverses the activated PYP and the red-shifted Bph to the initial dark state within seconds. We therefore postulate that Ppr functions as a UV-red light sensor and describe the different Ppr states that can be obtained depending on the light quality. Both red and white light upregulate the autokinase activity, while it is downregulated in the dark. The physiological state of Ppr is most likely a mixture of three different states, dark, metastable complex, and red light-activated, with fractional populations whose amounts depend on the light quality of the environment and that regulate the extent of phosphorylation by the kinase.

  15. The PYRIN domain-only protein POP3 inhibits ALR inflammasomes and regulates responses to infection with DNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Khare, Sonal; Ratsimandresy, Rojo A; de Almeida, Lúcia; Cuda, Carla M; Rellick, Stephanie L; Misharin, Alexander V; Wallin, Melissa C; Gangopadhyay, Anu; Forte, Eleonora; Gottwein, Eva; Perlman, Harris; Reed, John C; Greaves, David R; Dorfleutner, Andrea; Stehlik, Christian

    2014-04-01

    The innate immune system responds to infection and tissue damage by activating cytosolic sensory complexes called 'inflammasomes'. Cytosolic DNA is sensed by AIM2-like receptors (ALRs) during bacterial and viral infections and in autoimmune diseases. Subsequently, recruitment of the inflammasome adaptor ASC links ALRs to the activation of caspase-1. A controlled immune response is crucial for maintaining homeostasis, but the regulation of ALR inflammasomes is poorly understood. Here we identified the PYRIN domain (PYD)-only protein POP3, which competes with ASC for recruitment to ALRs, as an inhibitor of DNA virus-induced activation of ALR inflammasomes in vivo. Data obtained with a mouse model with macrophage-specific POP3 expression emphasize the importance of the regulation of ALR inflammasomes in monocytes and macrophages. PMID:24531343

  16. A Kelch Domain-Containing F-Box Coding Gene Negatively Regulates Flavonoid Accumulation in Muskmelon1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Feder, Ari; Burger, Joseph; Gao, Shan; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Katzir, Nurit; Schaffer, Arthur A.; Meir, Ayala; Davidovich-Rikanati, Rachel; Portnoy, Vitaly; Gal-On, Amit; Fei, Zhangjun; Kashi, Yechezkel; Tadmor, Yaakov

    2015-01-01

    The flavonoids are phenylpropanoid-derived metabolites that are ubiquitous in plants, playing many roles in growth and development. Recently, we observed that fruit rinds of yellow casaba muskmelons (Cucumis melo ‘Inodorous Group’) accumulate naringenin chalcone, a yellow flavonoid pigment. With RNA-sequencing analysis of bulked segregants representing the tails of a population segregating for naringenin chalcone accumulation followed by fine mapping and genetic transformation, we identified a Kelch domain-containing F-box protein coding (CmKFB) gene that, when expressed, negatively regulates naringenin chalcone accumulation. Additional metabolite analysis indicated that downstream flavonoids are accumulated together with naringenin chalcone, whereas CmKFB expression diverts the biochemical flux toward coumarins and general phenylpropanoids. These results show that CmKFB functions as a posttranscriptional regulator that diverts flavonoid metabolic flux. PMID:26358418

  17. Self-renewal and Differentiation of Muscle Satellite Cells Are Regulated by the Fas-associated Death Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wei; Wang, Lu; Yang, Bingya; Zhang, Rong; Yao, Chun; He, Liangqiang; Liu, Zexu; Du, Pan; Hammache, Kahina; Wen, Juan; Li, Huang; Xu, Qiang; Hua, Zichun

    2014-01-01

    Making the decision between self-renewal and differentiation of adult stem cells is critical for tissue repair and homeostasis. Here we show that the apoptotic adaptor Fas-associated death domain (FADD) regulates the fate decisions of muscle satellite cells (SCs). FADD phosphorylation was specifically induced in cycling SCs, which was high in metaphase and declined in later anaphase. Furthermore, phosphorylated FADD at Ser-191 accumulated in the uncommitted cycling SCs and was asymmetrically localized in the self-renewing daughter SCs. SCs containing a phosphoryl-mimicking mutation at Ser-191 of FADD (FADD-D) expressed higher levels of stem-like markers and reduced commitment-associated markers. Moreover, a phosphoryl-mimicking mutation at Ser-191 of FADD suppressed SC activation and differentiation, which promoted the cycling SCs into a reversible quiescent state. Therefore, these data indicate that FADD regulates the fate determination of cycling SCs. PMID:24375410

  18. Importance of domain closure for the catalysis and regulation of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase.

    PubMed

    Macol, Christine P; Tsuruta, Hiro; Kantrowitz, Evan R

    2002-07-26

    Two hybrid versions of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase were studied to determine the influence of domain closure on the homotropic and heterotropic properties of the enzyme. Each hybrid holoenzyme had one wild-type and one inactive catalytic subunit. In the first case the inactive catalytic subunit had Arg-54 replaced by alanine. The holoenzyme with this mutation in all six catalytic chains exhibits a 17,000-fold reduction in activity, no loss in substrate affinity, and an R state structurally identical to that of the wild-type enzyme. In the second case, the inactive catalytic subunit had Arg-105 replaced by alanine. The holoenzyme with this mutation in all six catalytic chains exhibits a 1,100-fold reduction in activity, substantial loss in substrate affinity, and loss of the ability to be converted to the R state. Thus, the R54A substitution results in a holoenzyme that can undergo closure of the catalytic chain domains to form the high activity, high affinity active site and to undergo the allosteric transition, whereas the R105A substitution results in a holoenzyme that can neither undergo domain closure nor the allosteric transition. The hybrid holoenzyme with one wild-type and one R54A catalytic subunit exhibited the same maximal velocity per active site as the wild-type holoenzyme, reduced cooperativity, and normal heterotropic interactions. The hybrid with one wild-type and one R105A catalytic subunit exhibited significantly reduced maximal velocity per active site as compared with the wild-type holoenzyme, reduced cooperativity, and substantially reduced heterotropic interactions. Small angle x-ray scattered was used to verify that the R105A-containing hybrid could attain an R state structure. These results indicate the global nature of the conformational changes associated with the allosteric transition in the enzyme. If one catalytic subunit cannot undergo domain closure to create the active sites, then the entire molecule cannot attain the

  19. Androgen receptor regulates nuclear trafficking and nuclear domain residency of corepressor HDAC7 in a ligand-dependent fashion

    SciTech Connect

    Karvonen, Ulla; Jaenne, Olli A.; Palvimo, Jorma J. . E-mail: jorma.palvimo@uku.fi

    2006-10-01

    In addition to chromosomal proteins, histone deacetylases (HDACs) target transcription factors in transcriptional repression. Here, we show that the class II HDAC family member HDAC7 is an efficient corepressor of the androgen receptor (AR). HDAC7 resided in the cytoplasm in the absence of AR or a cognate ligand, but hormone-occupancy of AR induced nuclear transfer of HDAC7. Nuclear colocalization pattern of AR and HDAC7 was dependent on the nature of the ligand. In the presence of testosterone, a portion of HDAC7 localized to pearl-like nuclear domains, whereas AR occupied with antagonistic ligands cyproterone acetate- or casodex (bicalutamide) recruited HDAC7 from these domains to colocalize with the receptor in speckles and nucleoplasm in a more complete fashion. Ectopic expression of PML-3 relieved the repressive effect of HDAC7 on AR function by sequestering HDAC7 to PML-3 domains. AR acetylation at Lys630/632/633 was not the target of HDAC7 repression, since repression of AR function was independent of these acetylation sites. Moreover, the deacetylase activity of HDAC7 was in part dispensable in the repression of AR function. In sum, our results identify HDAC7 as a novel AR corepressor whose subcellular and subnuclear compartmentalization can be regulated in an androgen-selective manner.

  20. Roles of the N domain of the AAA+ Lon protease in substrate recognition, allosteric regulation and chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Wohlever, Matthew L; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Degron binding regulates the activities of the AAA+ Lon protease in addition to targeting proteins for degradation. The sul20 degron from the cell-division inhibitor SulA is shown here to bind to the N domain of Escherichia coli Lon, and the recognition site is identified by cross-linking and scanning for mutations that prevent sul20-peptide binding. These N-domain mutations limit the rates of proteolysis of model sul20-tagged substrates and ATP hydrolysis by an allosteric mechanism. Lon inactivation of SulA in vivo requires binding to the N domain and robust ATP hydrolysis but does not require degradation or translocation into the proteolytic chamber. Lon-mediated relief of proteotoxic stress and protein aggregation in vivo can also occur without degradation but is not dependent on robust ATP hydrolysis. In combination, these results demonstrate that Lon can function as a protease or a chaperone and reveal that some of its ATP-dependent biological activities do not require translocation.

  1. A fraction of Crm1 locates at centrosomes by its CRIME domain and regulates the centrosomal localization of pericentrin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qinying; Jiang, Qing; Zhang, Chuanmao

    2009-07-03

    Crm1 plays a role in exporting proteins containing nuclear export signals (NESs) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Some proteins that are capable of interacting with Ran/Crm1 were reported to be localized at centrosomes and to function as centrosome checkpoints. But it remains unclear how Crm1 locates at centrosomes. In this study, we found that a fraction of Crm1 is located at centrosomes through its N-terminal CRM1, importin {beta} etc. (CRIME) domain, which is responsible for interacting with RanGTP, suggesting that Crm1 might target to centrosomes through binding centrosomal RanGTP. Moreover, overexpression of the CRIME domain, which is free of NES binding domain, resulted in the dissociation of pericentrin and {gamma}-tubulin complex from centrosomes and the disruption of microtubule nucleation. Deficiency of Crm1 provoked by RNAi also decreased the spindle poles localization of pericentrin and {gamma}-tubulin complex, coupled with mitotic defects. Since pericentrin was sensitive to Crm1 specific inhibitor leptomycin B, we propose that the centrosomal Crm1 might interact with pericentrin and regulate the localization and function of pericentrin at centrosomes.

  2. Human CHD2 Is a Chromatin Assembly ATPase Regulated by Its Chromo- and DNA-binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jessica C.; Ferreira, Catarina G.; Yusufzai, Timur

    2015-01-01

    Chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 2 (CHD2) is an ATPase and a member of the SNF2-like family of helicase-related enzymes. Although deletions of CHD2 have been linked to developmental defects in mice and epileptic disorders in humans, little is known about its biochemical and cellular activities. In this study, we investigate the ATP-dependent activity of CHD2 and show that CHD2 catalyzes the assembly of chromatin into periodic arrays. We also show that the N-terminal region of CHD2, which contains tandem chromodomains, serves an auto-inhibitory role in both the DNA-binding and ATPase activities of CHD2. While loss of the N-terminal region leads to enhanced chromatin-stimulated ATPase activity, the N-terminal region is required for ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by CHD2. In contrast, the C-terminal region, which contains a putative DNA-binding domain, selectively senses double-stranded DNA of at least 40 base pairs in length and enhances the ATPase and chromatin remodeling activities of CHD2. Our study shows that the accessory domains of CHD2 play central roles in both regulating the ATPase domain and conferring selectivity to chromatin substrates. PMID:25384982

  3. Plant chimeric Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. Role of the neural visinin-like domain in regulating autophosphorylation and calmodulin affinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Cremo, C. R.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is characterized by a serine-threonine kinase domain, an autoinhibitory domain, a calmodulin-binding domain and a neural visinin-like domain with three EF-hands. The neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain at the C-terminal end of the CaM-binding domain makes CCaMK unique among all the known calmodulin-dependent kinases. Biological functions of the plant visinin-like proteins or visinin-like domains in plant proteins are not well known. Using EF-hand deletions in the visinin-like domain, we found that the visinin-like domain regulated Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation of CCaMK. To investigate the effects of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation on the interaction with calmodulin, the equilibrium binding constants of CCaMK were measured by fluorescence emission anisotropy using dansylated calmodulin. Binding was 8-fold tighter after Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation. This shift in affinity did not occur in CCaMK deletion mutants lacking Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation. A variable calmodulin affinity regulated by Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation mediated through the visinin-like domain is a new regulatory mechanism for CCaMK activation and calmodulin-dependent protein kinases. Our experiments demonstrate the existence of two functional molecular switches in a protein kinase regulating the kinase activity, namely a visinin-like domain acting as a Ca(2+)-triggered switch and a CaM-binding domain acting as an autophosphorylation-triggered molecular switch.

  4. A heme-binding domain controls regulation of ATP-dependent potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Burton, Mark J; Kapetanaki, Sofia M; Chernova, Tatyana; Jamieson, Andrew G; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme; Moody, Peter C E; Mitcheson, John S; Davies, Noel W; Schmid, Ralf; Raven, Emma L; Storey, Nina M

    2016-04-01

    Heme iron has many and varied roles in biology. Most commonly it binds as a prosthetic group to proteins, and it has been widely supposed and amply demonstrated that subtle variations in the protein structure around the heme, including the heme ligands, are used to control the reactivity of the metal ion. However, the role of heme in biology now appears to also include a regulatory responsibility in the cell; this includes regulation of ion channel function. In this work, we show that cardiac KATP channels are regulated by heme. We identify a cytoplasmic heme-binding CXXHX16H motif on the sulphonylurea receptor subunit of the channel, and mutagenesis together with quantitative and spectroscopic analyses of heme-binding and single channel experiments identified Cys628 and His648 as important for heme binding. We discuss the wider implications of these findings and we use the information to present hypotheses for mechanisms of heme-dependent regulation across other ion channels.

  5. Cold shock domain protein 3 regulates freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Sasaki, Kentaro; Imai, Ryozo

    2009-08-28

    In response to cold, Escherichia coli produces cold shock proteins (CSPs) that have essential roles in cold adaptation as RNA chaperones. Here, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis cold shock domain protein 3 (AtCSP3), which shares a cold shock domain with bacterial CSPs, is involved in the acquisition of freezing tolerance in plants. AtCSP3 complemented a cold-sensitive phenotype of the E. coli CSP quadruple mutant and displayed nucleic acid duplex melting activity, suggesting that AtCSP3 also functions as an RNA chaperone. Promoter-GUS transgenic plants revealed tissue-specific expression of AtCSP3 in shoot and root apical regions. When exposed to low temperature, GUS activity was extensively induced in a broader region of the roots. In transgenic plants expressing an AtCSP3-GFP fusion, GFP signals were detected in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. An AtCSP3 knock-out mutant (atcsp3-2) was sensitive to freezing compared with wild-type plants under non-acclimated and cold-acclimated conditions, whereas expression of C-repeat-binding factors and their downstream genes during cold acclimation was not altered in the atcsp3-2 mutant. Overexpression of AtCSP3 in transgenic plants conferred enhanced freezing tolerance over wild-type plants. Together, the data demonstrated an essential role of RNA chaperones for cold adaptation in higher plants.

  6. Regulation of apoptosis by p53-inducible transmembrane protein containing sushi domain.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongyan; Kamino, Hiroki; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Kitamura, Noriaki; Miyamoto, Takafumi; Shinogi, Daisuke; Goda, Olga; Arakara, Hirofumi; Futamura, Manabu

    2010-11-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a transcription factor that induces the transcription of various target genes in response to DNA damage and it protects the cells from malignant transformation. In this study, we performed cDNA microarray analysis and found that the transmembrane protein containing sushi domain (TMPS) gene, which encodes a putative type I transmembrane protein, is a novel p53-target gene. TMPS contains a sushi domain in the extracellular region, which is associated with protein-protein interaction. TMPS expression is induced by endogenous p53 under genotoxic stress in several cancer cell lines. Reporter assay revealed p53-dependent transactivation of the p53 binding-sites (BSs) located in the intron 1 of TMPS. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay showed that p53 binds to these BSs in vivo. Overexpression of TMPS induced apoptosis through the activation of caspase-3, 8, and 9 in various cancer cell lines. Moreover, γ-irradiation induced the expression of TMPS mRNA in the spleen and colon of p53+/+ mice but not in those of p53-/- mice. These data indicate that TMPS may play a role in p53-dependent apoptosis under DNA damage condition.

  7. Intrinsic regulation of FIC-domain AMP-transferases by oligomerization and automodification

    PubMed Central

    Stanger, Frédéric V.; Harms, Alexander; Aragão, Hugo; Mazur, Adam; Sharpe, Timothy; Dehio, Christoph; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    Filamentation induced by cyclic AMP (FIC)-domain enzymes catalyze adenylylation or other posttranslational modifications of target proteins to control their function. Recently, we have shown that Fic enzymes are autoinhibited by an α-helix (αinh) that partly obstructs the active site. For the single-domain class III Fic proteins, the αinh is located at the C terminus and its deletion relieves autoinhibition. However, it has remained unclear how activation occurs naturally. Here, we show by structural, biophysical, and enzymatic analyses combined with in vivo data that the class III Fic protein NmFic from Neisseria meningitidis gets autoadenylylated in cis, thereby autonomously relieving autoinhibition and thus allowing subsequent adenylylation of its target, the DNA gyrase subunit GyrB. Furthermore, we show that NmFic activation is antagonized by tetramerization. The combination of autoadenylylation and tetramerization results in nonmonotonic concentration dependence of NmFic activity and a pronounced lag phase in the progress of target adenylylation. Bioinformatic analyses indicate that this elaborate dual-control mechanism is conserved throughout class III Fic proteins. PMID:26787847

  8. Loose Plant Architecture1, an INDETERMINATE DOMAIN Protein Involved in Shoot Gravitropism, Regulates Plant Architecture in Rice1[W

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinru; Tang, Ding; Li, Ming; Wang, Kejian; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2013-01-01

    Tiller angle and leaf angle are two important components of rice (Oryza sativa) plant architecture that play a crucial role in determining grain yield. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of the Loose Plant Architecture1 (LPA1) gene in rice, the functional ortholog of the AtIDD15/SHOOT GRAVITROPISM5 (SGR5) gene in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). LPA1 regulates tiller angle and leaf angle by controlling the adaxial growth of tiller node and lamina joint. LPA1 was also found to affect shoot gravitropism. Expression pattern analysis suggested that LPA1 influences plant architecture by affecting the gravitropism of leaf sheath pulvinus and lamina joint. However, LPA1 only influences gravity perception or signal transduction in coleoptile gravitropism by regulating the sedimentation rate of amyloplasts, distinct from the actions of LAZY1. LPA1 encodes a plant-specific INDETERMINATE DOMAIN protein and defines a novel subfamily of 28 INDETERMINATE DOMAIN proteins with several unique conserved features. LPA1 is localized in the nucleus and functions as an active transcriptional repressor, an activity mainly conferred by a conserved ethylene response factor-associated amphiphilic repression-like motif. Further analysis suggests that LPA1 participates in a complicated transcriptional and protein interaction network and has evolved novel functions distinct from SGR5. This study not only facilitates the understanding of gravitropism mechanisms but also generates a useful genetic material for rice breeding. PMID:23124325

  9. Binding of Drosophila Polo kinase to its regulator Matrimony is noncanonical and involves two separate functional domains

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Amanda M.; Hughes, Stacie E.; Chisholm, Jennifer A.; Smith, S. Kendall; Slaughter, Brian D.; Unruh, Jay R.; Collins, Kimberly A.; Friederichs, Jennifer M.; Florens, Laurence; Swanson, Selene K.; Pelot, Marissa C.; Miller, Danny E.; Washburn, Michael P.; Jaspersen, Sue L.; Hawley, R. Scott

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster Polo kinase physically interacts with, and is repressed by, the Matrimony (Mtrm) protein during oogenesis. Females heterozygous for a deletion of the mtrm gene display defects in chromosome segregation at meiosis I. However, a complete absence of Mtrm results in both meiotic catastrophe and female sterility. We show that three phosphorylated residues in an N-terminal region in Mtrm are required for Mtrm::Polo binding. However, this binding is noncanonical; it does not require either a complete S-pS/pT-P motif in Mtrm or key residues in the Polo-box domain of Polo that allow Polo to bind phosphorylated substrates. By using fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy to characterize the Mtrm::Polo interaction in vivo, we show that a sterile α-motif (SAM) domain located at the C terminus of Mtrm increases the stability of Mtrm::Polo binding. Although Mtrm’s C-terminal SAM domain is not required to rescue the chromosome segregation defects observed in mtrm/+ females, it is essential to prevent both meiotic catastrophe and the female sterility observed in mtrm/mtrm females. We propose that Polo’s interaction with the cluster of phosphorylated residues alone is sufficient to rescue the meiosis I defect. However, the strengthening of Mtrm::Polo binding mediated by the SAM domain is necessary to prevent meiotic catastrophe and ensure female fertility. Characterization of the Mtrm::Polo interaction, as well as that of other Polo regulators, may assist in the design of a new class of Polo inhibitors to be used as targeted anticancer therapeutic agents. PMID:23479640

  10. Multiple Domain Associations within the Arabidopsis Immune Receptor RPP1 Regulate the Activation of Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Karl J.; Bentham, Adam; Williams, Simon J.; Kobe, Bostjan; Staskawicz, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Upon recognition of pathogen virulence effectors, plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins induce defense responses including localized host cell death. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms leading to this response, we examined the Arabidopsis thaliana NLR protein RECOGNITION OF PERONOSPORA PARASITICA1 (RPP1), which recognizes the Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis effector ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA RECOGNIZED1 (ATR1). Expression of the N-terminus of RPP1, including the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain (“N-TIR”), elicited an effector-independent cell death response, and we used allelic variation in TIR domain sequences to define the key residues that contribute to this phenotype. Further biochemical characterization indicated that cell death induction was correlated with N-TIR domain self-association. In addition, we demonstrated that the nucleotide-binding (NB)-ARC1 region of RPP1 self-associates and plays a critical role in cell death activation, likely by facilitating TIR:TIR interactions. Structural homology modeling of the NB subdomain allowed us to identify a putative oligomerization interface that was shown to influence NB-ARC1 self-association. Significantly, full-length RPP1 exhibited effector-dependent oligomerization and, although mutations at the NB-ARC1 oligomerization interface eliminated cell death induction, RPP1 self-association was unaffected, suggesting that additional regions contribute to oligomerization. Indeed, the leucine-rich repeat domain of RPP1 also self-associates, indicating that multiple interaction interfaces exist within activated RPP1 oligomers. Finally, we observed numerous intramolecular interactions that likely function to negatively regulate RPP1, and present a model describing the transition to an active NLR protein. PMID:27427964

  11. LLM-Domain Containing B-GATA Factors Control Different Aspects of Cytokinin-Regulated Development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ranftl, Quirin L; Bastakis, Emmanouil; Klermund, Carina; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2016-04-01

    Leu-Leu-Met (LLM)-domain B-GATAs are a subfamily of the 30-membered GATA transcription factor family from Arabidopsis. Only two of the six Arabidopsis LLM-domain B-GATAs, i.e. GATA, NITRATE-INDUCIBLE, CARBON METABOLISM-INVOLVED (GNC) and its paralog GNC-LIKE/CYTOKININ-RESPONSIVE GATA FACTOR1 (GNL), have already been analyzed with regard to their biological function. Together, GNC and GNL control germination, greening, flowering time, and senescence downstream from auxin, cytokinin (CK), gibberellin (GA), and light signaling. Whereas overexpression and complementation analyses suggest a redundant biochemical function between GNC and GNL, nothing is known about the biological role of the four other LLM-domain B-GATAs, GATA15, GATA16, GATA17, and GATA17L (GATA17-LIKE), based on loss-of-function mutant phenotypes. Here, we examine insertion mutants of the six Arabidopsis B-GATA genes and reveal the role of these genes in the control of greening, hypocotyl elongation, phyllotaxy, floral organ initiation, accessory meristem formation, flowering time, and senescence. Several of these phenotypes had previously not been described for the gnc and gnl mutants or were enhanced in the more complex mutants when compared to gnc gnl mutants. Some of the respective responses may be mediated by CK signaling, which activates the expression of all six GATA genes. CK-induced gene expression is partially compromised in LLM-domain B-GATA mutants, suggesting that B-GATA genes play a role in CK responses. We furthermore provide evidence for a transcriptional cross regulation between these GATAs that may, in at least some cases, be at the basis of their apparent functional redundancy. PMID:26829982

  12. Regulating the size and stabilization of lipid raft-like domains and using calcium ions as their probe.

    PubMed

    Szekely, Or; Schilt, Yaelle; Steiner, Ariel; Raviv, Uri

    2011-12-20

    We apply a means to probe, stabilize, and control the size of lipid raft-like domains in vitro. In biomembranes the size of lipid rafts is ca. 10-30 nm. In vitro, mixing saturated and unsaturated lipids results in microdomains, which are unstable and coalesce. This inconsistency is puzzling. It has been hypothesized that biological line-active surfactants reduce the line tension between saturated and unsaturated lipids and stabilize small domains in vivo. Using solution X-ray scattering, we studied the structure of binary and ternary lipid mixtures in the presence of calcium ions. Three lipids were used: saturated, unsaturated, and a hybrid (1-saturated-2-unsaturated) lipid that is predominant in the phospholipids of cellular membranes. Only membranes composed of the saturated lipid can adsorb calcium ions, become charged, and therefore considerably swell. The selective calcium affinity was used to show that binary mixtures, containing the saturated lipid, phase separated into large-scale domains. Our data suggests that by introducing the hybrid lipid to a mixture of the saturated and unsaturated lipids, the size of the domains decreased with the concentration of the hybrid lipid, until the three lipids could completely mix. We attribute this behavior to the tendency of the hybrid lipid to act as a line-active cosurfactant that can easily reside at the interface between the saturated and the unsaturated lipids and reduce the line tension between them. These findings are consistent with a recent theory and provide insight into the self-organization of lipid rafts, their stabilization, and size regulation in biomembranes.

  13. Refined molecular hinge between allosteric and catalytic domain determines allosteric regulation and stability of fungal chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Helmstaedt, Kerstin; Heinrich, Gabriele; Lipscomb, William N; Braus, Gerhard H

    2002-05-14

    The yeast chorismate mutase is regulated by tyrosine as feedback inhibitor and tryptophan as crosspathway activator. The monomer consists of a catalytic and a regulatory domain covalently linked by the loop L220s (212-226), which functions as a molecular hinge. Two monomers form the active dimeric enzyme stabilized by hydrophobic interactions in the vicinity of loop L220s. The role of loop L220s and its environment for enzyme regulation, dimerization, and stability was analyzed. Substitution of yeast loop L220s in place of the homologous loop from the corresponding and similarly regulated Aspergillus enzyme (and the reverse substitution) changed tyrosine inhibition to activation. Yeast loop L220s substituted into the Aspergillus enzyme resulted in a tryptophan-inhibitable enzyme. Monomeric yeast chorismate mutases could be generated by substituting two hydrophobic residues in and near the hinge region. The resulting Thr-212-->Asp-Phe-28-->Asp enzyme was as stable as wild type, but lost allosteric regulation and showed reduced catalytic activity. These results underline the crucial role of this molecular hinge for inhibition, activation, quaternary structure, and stability of yeast chorismate mutase.

  14. Analysis of wide-domain transcriptional regulation in solid-state cultures of Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Shauna M; Murphy, Richard A

    2010-05-01

    Many filamentous fungi secrete considerable quantities of enzymes including protease, cellulase and xylanase, which are of major industrial importance. Over the past few decades, many of these fungal enzymes have been isolated and their relevant genes characterised. Solid-state fermentation (SSF), an ancient technique described as a fermentation process performed on non-soluble material whereby the material acts as a physical support and as a source of nutrients, is widely employed in the production of industrially important enzymes. Control mechanisms governing gene expression in SSF however, have been rarely studied. The influence of carbon and nitrogen sources on the production and transcriptional regulation of hydrolase enzymes secreted by an Aspergillus strain was investigated with the hope of expanding on the relatively small amount of knowledge regarding cellular control of gene expression. This study involved screening a collection of fungal strains for protease, cellulase and xylanase production under SSF conditions. From this, one fungal strain was then chosen for further analysis. Factors affecting the secretion of the hydrolase enzymes were optimised, and following this, the influence of nutritional supplementation on the production and transcriptional regulation of the enzymes was investigated. Real-time PCR techniques were used to assess the relative expression levels of genes encoding hydrolase activities and of the genes encoding regulatory elements such as AreA, PacC and CreA in an effort to identify possible transcriptional regulation mechanisms. The complexity of gene regulation under SSF conditions became apparent during the study, as other factors such as post-transcriptional regulation appeared to play a far greater role than previously imagined.

  15. Analysis of wide-domain transcriptional regulation in solid-state cultures of Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Shauna M; Murphy, Richard A

    2010-05-01

    Many filamentous fungi secrete considerable quantities of enzymes including protease, cellulase and xylanase, which are of major industrial importance. Over the past few decades, many of these fungal enzymes have been isolated and their relevant genes characterised. Solid-state fermentation (SSF), an ancient technique described as a fermentation process performed on non-soluble material whereby the material acts as a physical support and as a source of nutrients, is widely employed in the production of industrially important enzymes. Control mechanisms governing gene expression in SSF however, have been rarely studied. The influence of carbon and nitrogen sources on the production and transcriptional regulation of hydrolase enzymes secreted by an Aspergillus strain was investigated with the hope of expanding on the relatively small amount of knowledge regarding cellular control of gene expression. This study involved screening a collection of fungal strains for protease, cellulase and xylanase production under SSF conditions. From this, one fungal strain was then chosen for further analysis. Factors affecting the secretion of the hydrolase enzymes were optimised, and following this, the influence of nutritional supplementation on the production and transcriptional regulation of the enzymes was investigated. Real-time PCR techniques were used to assess the relative expression levels of genes encoding hydrolase activities and of the genes encoding regulatory elements such as AreA, PacC and CreA in an effort to identify possible transcriptional regulation mechanisms. The complexity of gene regulation under SSF conditions became apparent during the study, as other factors such as post-transcriptional regulation appeared to play a far greater role than previously imagined. PMID:20145973

  16. A structural model of anti-anti-[sigma] inhibition by a two-component receiver domain: the PhyR stress response regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Herrou, Julien; Foreman, Robert; Fiebig, Aretha; Crosson, Sean

    2012-05-09

    PhyR is a hybrid stress regulator conserved in {alpha}-proteobacteria that contains an N-terminal {sigma}-like (SL) domain and a C-terminal receiver domain. Phosphorylation of the receiver domain is known to promote binding of the SL domain to an anti-{sigma} factor. PhyR thus functions as an anti-anti-{sigma} factor in its phosphorylated state. We present genetic evidence that Caulobacter crescentus PhyR is a phosphorylation-dependent stress regulator that functions in the same pathway as {sigma}{sup T} and its anti-{sigma} factor, NepR. Additionally, we report the X-ray crystal structure of PhyR at 1.25 {angstrom} resolution, which provides insight into the mechanism of anti-anti-{sigma} regulation. Direct intramolecular contact between the PhyR receiver and SL domains spans regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4}, likely serving to stabilize the SL domain in a closed conformation. The molecular surface of the receiver domain contacting the SL domain is the structural equivalent of {alpha}4-{beta}5-{alpha}5, which is known to undergo dynamic conformational change upon phosphorylation in a diverse range of receiver proteins. We propose a structural model of PhyR regulation in which receiver phosphorylation destabilizes the intramolecular interaction between SL and receiver domains, thereby permitting regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4} in the SL domain to open about a flexible connector loop and bind anti-{sigma} factor.

  17. A structural model of anti-anti-[sigma];#963; inhibition by a two-component receiver domain: the PhyR stress response regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Herrou, Julien; Foreman, Robert; Fiebig, Aretha; Crosson, Sean

    2012-03-30

    PhyR is a hybrid stress regulator conserved in {alpha}-proteobacteria that contains an N-terminal {sigma}-like (SL) domain and a C-terminal receiver domain. Phosphorylation of the receiver domain is known to promote binding of the SL domain to an anti-{sigma} factor. PhyR thus functions as an anti-anti-{sigma} factor in its phosphorylated state. We present genetic evidence that Caulobacter crescentus PhyR is a phosphorylation-dependent stress regulator that functions in the same pathway as {sigma}{sup T} and its anti-{sigma} factor, NepR. Additionally, we report the X-ray crystal structure of PhyR at 1.25 {angstrom} resolution, which provides insight into the mechanism of anti-anti-{sigma} regulation. Direct intramolecular contact between the PhyR receiver and SL domains spans regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4}, likely serving to stabilize the SL domain in a closed conformation. The molecular surface of the receiver domain contacting the SL domain is the structural equivalent of {alpha}4-{beta}5-{alpha}5, which is known to undergo dynamic conformational change upon phosphorylation in a diverse range of receiver proteins. We propose a structural model of PhyR regulation in which receiver phosphorylation destabilizes the intramolecular interaction between SL and receiver domains, thereby permitting regions {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 4} in the SL domain to open about a flexible connector loop and bind anti-{sigma} factor.

  18. The Replication Domain Model: regulating replicon firing in the context of large-scale chromosome architecture

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Benjamin D.; Gilbert, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The “Replicon Theory” of Jacob, Brenner and Cuzin has reliably served as the paradigm for regulating the sites where individual replicons initiate replication. Concurrent with the replicon model was Taylor’s demonstration that plant and animal chromosomes replicate segmentally in a defined temporal sequence, via cytologically defined units too large to be accounted for by a single replicon. Instead, there seemed to be a program to choreograph when chromosome units replicate during S phase, executed by inititation at clusters of individual replicons within each segment. Here, we summarize recent molecular evidence for the existence of such units, now known as “replication domains”, and discuss how the organization of large chromosomes into structural units has added additional layers of regulation to the original replicon model. PMID:23603017

  19. Structure of the DNA-Binding Domain of the Response Regulator PhoP from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,S.; Engohang-Ndong, J.; Smith, I.

    2007-01-01

    The PhoP-PhoR two-component signaling system from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is essential for the virulence of the tubercle bacillus. The response regulator, PhoP, regulates expression of over 110 genes. In order to elucidate the regulatory mechanism of PhoP, we determined the crystal structure of its DNA-binding domain (PhoPC). PhoPC exhibits a typical fold of the winged helix-turn-helix subfamily of response regulators. The structure starts with a four-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet, followed by a three-helical bundle of a-helices, and then a C-terminal {beta}-hairpin, which together with a short {beta}-strand between the first and second helices forms a three-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet. Structural elements are packed through a hydrophobic core, with the first helix providing a scaffold for the rest of the domain to pack. The second and third helices and the long, flexible loop between them form the helix-turn-helix motif, with the third helix being the recognition helix. The C-terminal {beta}-hairpin turn forms the wing motif. The molecular surfaces around the recognition helix and the wing residues show strong positive electrostatic potential, consistent with their roles in DNA binding and nucleotide sequence recognition. The crystal packing of PhoPC gives a hexamer ring, with neighboring molecules interacting in a head-to-tail fashion. This packing interface suggests that PhoPC could bind DNA in a tandem association. However, this mode of DNA binding is likely to be nonspecific because the recognition helix is partially blocked and would be prevented from inserting into the major groove of DNA. Detailed structural analysis and implications with respect to DNA binding are discussed.

  20. Regulation of TGFβ superfamily signaling by two separable domains of glypican LON-2 in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Taneja-Bageshwar, Suparna; Gumienny, Tina L

    2013-07-01

    Regulated intercellular signaling is critical for the normal development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Glypicans have been shown to regulate signaling by TGFβs, hedgehogs and Wnts, in several cellular contexts. Glypicans comprise a conserved family of heparan sulfated, glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked extracellular proteins. The structural complexity of glypicans may underlie their functional complexity. In a recent study(31), we built on previous findings that one of the two C. elegans glypicans, LON-2, specifically inhibits signaling by the TGFβ superfamily member DBL-1. We tested the functional requirements of LON-2 protein core components and post-translational modifications for LON-2 activity. We provide the first evidence that two parts of a glypican can independently regulate TGFβ superfamily signaling in vivo: the N-terminal furin protease product and a C-terminal region containing heparan sulfate attachment sites. Furthermore, we show a protein-protein interaction motif is crucial for LON-2 activity in the N-terminal protein core, suggesting that LON-2 acts by serving as a scaffold for DBL-1 and an RGD-binding protein. In addition, we demonstrate specificity of glypican function by showing C. elegans GPN-1 does not functionally substitute for LON-2. This work reveals a molecular foundation for understanding the complexity and specificity of glypican function.

  1. A heme-binding domain controls regulation of ATP-dependent potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Mark J.; Kapetanaki, Sofia M.; Chernova, Tatyana; Jamieson, Andrew G.; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme; Mitcheson, John S.; Davies, Noel W.; Schmid, Ralf; Raven, Emma L.; Storey, Nina M.

    2016-01-01

    Heme iron has many and varied roles in biology. Most commonly it binds as a prosthetic group to proteins, and it has been widely supposed and amply demonstrated that subtle variations in the protein structure around the heme, including the heme ligands, are used to control the reactivity of the metal ion. However, the role of heme in biology now appears to also include a regulatory responsibility in the cell; this includes regulation of ion channel function. In this work, we show that cardiac KATP channels are regulated by heme. We identify a cytoplasmic heme-binding CXXHX16H motif on the sulphonylurea receptor subunit of the channel, and mutagenesis together with quantitative and spectroscopic analyses of heme-binding and single channel experiments identified Cys628 and His648 as important for heme binding. We discuss the wider implications of these findings and we use the information to present hypotheses for mechanisms of heme-dependent regulation across other ion channels. PMID:27006498

  2. A C-terminal acidic domain regulates degradation of the transcriptional coactivator Bob1.

    PubMed

    Lindner, John M; Wong, Christina S F; Möller, Andreas; Nielsen, Peter J

    2013-12-01

    Bob1 (Obf-1 or OCA-B) is a 34-kDa transcriptional coactivator encoded by the Pou2af1 gene that is essential for normal B-cell development and immune responses in mice. During lymphocyte activation, Bob1 protein levels dramatically increase independently of mRNA levels, suggesting that the stability of Bob1 is regulated. We used a fluorescent protein-based reporter system to analyze protein stability in response to genetic and physiological perturbations and show that, while Bob1 degradation is proteasome mediated, it does not require ubiquitination of Bob1. Furthermore, degradation of Bob1 in B cells appears to be largely independent of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Siah. We propose a novel mechanism of Bob1 turnover in B cells, whereby an acidic region in the C terminus of Bob1 regulates the activity of degron signals elsewhere in the protein. Changes that make the C terminus more acidic, including tyrosine phosphorylation-mimetic mutations, stabilize the instable murine Bob1 protein, indicating that B cells may regulate Bob1 stability and activity via signaling pathways. Finally, we show that expressing a stable Bob1 mutant in B cells suppresses cell proliferation and induces changes in surface marker expression commonly seen during B-cell differentiation.

  3. Two flagellar BAR domain proteins in Trypanosoma brucei with stage-specific regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cicova, Zdenka; Dejung, Mario; Skalicky, Tomas; Eisenhuth, Nicole; Hanselmann, Steffen; Morriswood, Brooke; Figueiredo, Luisa M.; Butter, Falk; Janzen, Christian J.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomes are masters of adaptation to different host environments during their complex life cycle. Large-scale proteomic approaches provide information on changes at the cellular level, and in a systematic way. However, detailed work on single components is necessary to understand the adaptation mechanisms on a molecular level. Here, we have performed a detailed characterization of a bloodstream form (BSF) stage-specific putative flagellar host adaptation factor Tb927.11.2400, identified previously in a SILAC-based comparative proteome study. Tb927.11.2400 shares 38% amino acid identity with TbFlabarin (Tb927.11.2410), a procyclic form (PCF) stage-specific flagellar BAR domain protein. We named Tb927.11.2400 TbFlabarin-like (TbFlabarinL), and demonstrate that it originates from a gene duplication event, which occurred in the African trypanosomes. TbFlabarinL is not essential for the growth of the parasites under cell culture conditions and it is dispensable for developmental differentiation from BSF to the PCF in vitro. We generated TbFlabarinL-specific antibodies, and showed that it localizes in the flagellum. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments together with a biochemical cell fractionation suggest a dual association of TbFlabarinL with the flagellar membrane and the components of the paraflagellar rod. PMID:27779220

  4. Domain- and nucleotide-specific Rev response element regulation of feline immunodeficiency virus production

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hong; Huisman, Willem; Ellestad, Kristofor K.; Phillips, Tom R.; Power, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Computational analysis of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) RNA sequences indicated that common FIV strains contain a rev response element (RRE) defined by a long unbranched hairpin with 6 stem-loop sub-domains, termed stem-loop A (SLA). To examine the role of the RNA secondary structure of the RRE, mutational analyses were performed in both an infectious FIV molecular clone and a FIV CAT-RRE reporter system. These studies disclosed that the stems within SLA (SA1, 2, 3, 4, and 5) of the RRE were critical but SA6 was not essential for FIV replication and CAT expression. These studies also revealed that the secondary structure rather than an antisense protein (ASP) mediates virus expression and replication in vitro. In addition, a single synonymous mutation within the FIV-RRE, SA3/45, reduced viral reverse transcriptase activity and p24 expression after transfection but in addition also showed a marked reduction in viral expression and production following infection. PMID:20570310

  5. Dynein's C-terminal Domain Plays a Novel Role in Regulating Force Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennerich, Arne; Nicholas, Matthew; Brenner, Sibylle; Lazar, Caitlin; Weil, Sarah; Vallee, Richard; Hook, Peter; Gennerich Lab Collaboration; Vallee Lab Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a microtubule motor involved in a wide range of low and high force requiring functions in metazoans. In contrast, yeast dynein is involved in a single, nonessential function, nuclear positioning. Interestingly, the single-molecule function of yeast dynein is also unique: whereas mammalian dyneins generate forces of 1-2 pN, S. cerevisiae dynein stalls at 5-7 pN. The basis for this functional difference is unknown. However, the major structural difference between mammalian and yeast dyneins is a ~30 kDa C-terminal extension (CT) present in higher eukaryotic dyneins, but missing in yeast. To test whether the CT accounts for the differences in function, we produced recombinant rat dynein motor domains (MD) with (WT-MD) and without (ΔCT-MD) the CT, using baculovirus expression. To define motor function, we performed single-molecule optical trapping studies. Dimerized WT-MD stalls at ~1 pN and detaches from microtubules after brief stalls, in agreement with previous studies on native mammalian dynein. In sharp contrast, but similar to yeast dynein, ΔCT-MD stalls at ~6 pN, with stall durations up to minutes. These results identify the CT as a new regulatory element for controlling dynein force generation. Supported by NIH GM094415 (A.G.) and GM102347 (R.B.V.)

  6. Acetylation of the p53 DNA binding domain regulates apoptosis induction.

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Stephen M.; Mellert, Hestia S.; Holbert, Marc A.; Li, Keqin; Marmorstein, Ronen; Lane, William S.; McMahon, Steven B.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability of p53 to induce apoptosis plays an important role in tumor suppression. Here we describe a previously unknown post-translational modification of the DNA-binding domain of p53. This modification, acetylation of lysine 120, occurs rapidly after DNA damage and is catalyzed by the MYST family acetyltransferases hMOF and TIP60. Mutation of lysine 120 to arginine, as occurs in human cancer, debilitates K120 acetylation and diminishes p53-mediated apoptosis without affecting cell-cycle arrest. The K120R mutation selectively blocks the transcription of pro-apoptotic target genes such as BAX and PUMA while the non-apoptotic targets p21 and hMDM2 remain unaffected. Consistent with this, depletion of hMOF and/or TIP60 inhibits the ability of p53 to activate BAX and PUMA transcription. Furthermore, the acetyl-lysine 120 form of p53 specifically accumulates at pro-apoptotic target genes. These data suggest that K120 acetylation may help distinguish the cell cycle arrest and apoptotic functions of p53. PMID:17189187

  7. The oncogenic BRD4-NUT chromatin regulator drives aberrant transcription within large topological domains

    PubMed Central

    Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; Walsh, Erica M.; Wang, Xin; Grayson, Adlai R.; Hsi, Peter T.; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Kuroda, Mitzi I.; French, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    NUT midline carcinoma (NMC), a subtype of squamous cell cancer, is one of the most aggressive human solid malignancies known. NMC is driven by the creation of a translocation oncoprotein, BRD4-NUT, which blocks differentiation and drives growth of NMC cells. BRD4-NUT forms distinctive nuclear foci in patient tumors, which we found correlate with ∼100 unprecedented, hyperacetylated expanses of chromatin that reach up to 2 Mb in size. These “megadomains” appear to be the result of aberrant, feed-forward loops of acetylation and binding of acetylated histones that drive transcription of underlying DNA in NMC patient cells and naïve cells induced to express BRD4-NUT. Megadomain locations are typically cell lineage-specific; however, the cMYC and TP63 regions are targeted in all NMCs tested and play functional roles in tumor growth. Megadomains appear to originate from select pre-existing enhancers that progressively broaden but are ultimately delimited by topologically associating domain (TAD) boundaries. Therefore, our findings establish a basis for understanding the powerful role played by large-scale chromatin organization in normal and aberrant lineage-specific gene transcription. PMID:26220994

  8. ARGONAUTE PIWI domain and microRNA duplex structure regulate small RNA sorting in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Niu, DongDong; Carbonell, Alberto; Wang, Airong; Lee, Angel; Tun, Vinnary; Wang, Zonghua; Carrington, James C.; Chang, Chia-en A.; Jin, Hailing

    2014-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) are loaded into ARGONAUTE (AGO) proteins to induce gene silencing. In plants, the 5′-terminal nucleotide is important for sRNA sorting into different AGOs. Here, we show that miRNA duplex structure also contributes to miRNA sorting. Base-pairing at the 15th nucleotide of a miRNA duplex is important for miRNA sorting in both Arabidopsis AGO1 and AGO2. AGO2 favors miRNA duplexes with no middle mismatches, whereas AGO1 tolerates, or prefers, duplexes with central mismatches. AGO structure modeling and mutational analyses reveal that the QF-V motif within the conserved PIWI domain contributes to recognition of base-pairing at the 15th nucleotide of a duplex, while the DDDE catalytic core of AtAGO2 is important for recognition of the central nucleotides. Finally, we rescued the adaxialized phenotype of ago1-12, which is largely due to miR165 loss-of-function, by changing miR165 duplex structure which we predict redirects it to AGO2. PMID:25406978

  9. Methyl-CpG binding domain protein acts to regulate the repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers on rice DNA

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Changxun; Chen, Weisi; Li, Chengxun; Jian, Xin; Li, Yingzhe; Lin, Hongmei; Lin, Wenxiong

    2016-01-01

    UVB radiation causes cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) to form on the DNA of living organisms. This study found that overexpression of the silicon absorbance gene Lsi1 reduced the accumulation of CPDs in rice, which profited from the reactivation by photolyase. The transcript abundance of deoxyribodipyrimidine photolyase (Os10g0167600) was generally correlated with the silicon content of the rice, and the up-regulation of Os10g0167600 was found to be highest in the UVB-treated Lsi1-overexpressed (Lsi1-OX) rice. A trans-acting factor, methyl-CpG binding domain protein (OsMeCP), was found to interact with the cis-element of Os10g0167600. The nucleic location of OsMeCP effectively enabled the transcriptional regulation. Compared with the WT, the level of OsMeCP was lower in the Lsi1-OX rice but higher in the Lsi1-RNAi line. Rice cultured in a high silicate-concentration solution also exhibited less OsMeCP abundance. Overexpression of OsMeCP led to lower Os10g0167600 transcript levels and a higher CPD content than in the WT, but the reverse was true in the OsMeCP-RNAi line. These findings indicate that OsMeCP acts as a negative regulator of silicon, and can mediate the repression of the transcription from Os10g0167600, which inhibits the photoreactivation of the photolyase involved in the repair of CPDs. PMID:27694845

  10. The regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domain of G protein–coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5) regulates plasma membrane localization and function

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hua; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Shen, Ke; Fischer, Christopher C.; Wedegaertner, Philip B.

    2014-01-01

    The G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated GPCRs at the plasma membrane (PM). Here GRK5/GRK4 chimeras and point mutations in GRK5 identify a short sequence within the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domain in GRK5 that is critical for GRK5 PM localization. This region of the RGS domain of GRK5 coincides with a region of GRK6 and GRK1 shown to form a hydrophobic dimeric interface (HDI) in crystal structures. Coimmunoprecipitation (coIP) and acceptor photobleaching fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays show that expressed GRK5 self-associates in cells, whereas GRK5-M165E/F166E (GRK5-EE), containing hydrophilic mutations in the HDI region of the RGS domain, displays greatly decreased coIP interactions. Both forcing dimerization of GRK5-EE, via fusion to leucine zipper motifs, and appending an extra C-terminal membrane-binding region to GRK5-EE (GRK5-EE-CT) recover PM localization. In addition, GRK5-EE displays a decreased ability to inhibit PAR1-induced calcium release compared with GRK5 wild type (wt). In contrast, PM-localized GRK5-EE-CaaX (appending a C-terminal prenylation and polybasic motif from K-ras) or GRK5-EE-CT shows comparable ability to GRK5 wt to inhibit PAR1-induced calcium release. The results suggest a novel model in which GRK5 dimerization is important for its plasma membrane localization and function. PMID:24807909

  11. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) phosphorylation sites and docking domain on the nuclear pore complex protein Tpr cooperatively regulate ERK2-Tpr interaction.

    PubMed

    Vomastek, Tomás; Iwanicki, Marcin P; Burack, W Richard; Tiwari, Divya; Kumar, Devanand; Parsons, J Thomas; Weber, Michael J; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar

    2008-11-01

    Identifying direct substrates of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and understanding how those substrates are selected is central to understanding how these ubiquitously activated enzymes generate diverse biological responses. In previous work, we identified several new candidate substrates for the MAPK ERK2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2), including the nuclear pore complex protein Tpr (translocated promoter region). In this report, we identify sites on Tpr for ERK2 phosphorylation and binding and demonstrate their functional interaction. ERK2 phosphorylation and dimerization are necessary for ERK2-Tpr binding, and this occurs through a DEF (docking site for ERK2, FXF) domain on Tpr. Surprisingly, the DEF domain and the phosphorylation sites displayed positive cooperativity to promote ERK2 binding to Tpr, in contrast to substrates where phosphorylation reduces binding. Ectopic expression or depletion of Tpr resulted in decreased movement of activated ERK2 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, implying a role for Tpr in ERK2 translocation. Collectively, the data provide direct evidence that a component of the nuclear pore complex is a bona fide substrate of ERK2 in vivo and that activated ERK2 stably associates with this substrate after phosphorylation, where it could play a continuing role in nuclear pore function. We propose that Tpr is both a substrate and a scaffold for activated ERKs.

  12. The 4.1B cytoskeletal protein regulates the domain organization and sheath thickness of myelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Einheber, Steven; Meng, Xiaosong; Rubin, Marina; Lam, Isabel; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Shrager, Peter; Kissil, Joseph; Maurel, Patrice; Salzer, James L

    2013-02-01

    Myelinated axons are organized into specialized domains critical to their function in saltatory conduction, i.e., nodes, paranodes, juxtaparanodes, and internodes. Here, we describe the distribution and role of the 4.1B protein in this organization. 4.1B is expressed by neurons, and at lower levels by Schwann cells, which also robustly express 4.1G. Immunofluorescence and immuno-EM demonstrates 4.1B is expressed subjacent to the axon membrane in all domains except the nodes. Mice deficient in 4.1B have preserved paranodes, based on marker staining and EM in contrast to the juxtaparanodes, which are substantially affected in both the PNS and CNS. The juxtaparanodal defect is evident in developing and adult nerves and is neuron-autonomous based on myelinating cocultures in which wt Schwann cells were grown with 4.1B-deficient neurons. Despite the juxtaparanodal defect, nerve conduction velocity is unaffected. Preservation of paranodal markers in 4.1B deficient mice is associated with, but not dependent on an increase of 4.1R at the axonal paranodes. Loss of 4.1B in the axon is also associated with reduced levels of the internodal proteins, Necl-1 and Necl-2, and of alpha-2 spectrin. Mutant nerves are modestly hypermyelinated and have increased numbers of Schmidt-Lanterman incisures, increased expression of 4.1G, and express a residual, truncated isoform of 4.1B. These results demonstrate that 4.1B is a key cytoskeletal scaffold for axonal adhesion molecules expressed in the juxtaparanodal and internodal domains that unexpectedly regulates myelin sheath thickness.

  13. Disintegrin-like domain of glycoprotein B regulates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection of cells.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lia R; Hussein, Hosni A M; Akula, Shaw M

    2014-08-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) glycoprotein B (gB) is a lytic structural protein expressed on the envelope of mature virions and on the membrane of cells supporting lytic infection. In addition to this viral glycoprotein's interaction with integrins via its RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) motif, KSHV gB possesses a disintegrin-like domain (DLD), which binds integrins as well. Prior to this study, there has been minimal research involving the less common integrin-binding motif, DLD, of gB as it pertains to herpesvirus infection. By using phage display peptide library screening and molecular biology techniques, the DLD of KSHV gB was shown to interact specifically with non-RGD binding α9β1 integrins. Similarly, monitoring wild-type infection confirmed α9β1:DLD interactions to be critical to successful KSHV infection of human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-d) compared with 293 cells. To further demonstrate the importance of the DLD of gB in KSHV infection, two recombinant virus constructs were generated using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system harbouring the KSHV genome (BAC36): BAC36ΔD-KSHV (lacking a functionally intact DLD of gB and containing an introduced tetracycline cassette) and BAC36.T-KSHV (containing an intact DLD sequence and an introduced tetracycline cassette). Accordingly, BAC36ΔD-KSHV presented significantly lower infection rates in HFF and HMVEC-d cells compared with the comparable infection rates achieved by wild-type BAC36-KSHV and BAC36.T-KSHV. Thus, the present report has delineated a critical role for the DLD of gB in KSHV infection, which may lead to a broader knowledge regarding the sophisticated mechanisms utilized by virus-encoded structural proteins in KSHV entry and infection.

  14. Effect of the amino acid substitution in the DNA-binding domain of the Fur regulator on production of pyoverdine.

    PubMed

    Valešová, Renáta; Palyzová, Andrea; Marešová, Helena; Stěpánek, Václav; Babiak, Peter; Kyslík, Pavel

    2013-07-01

    The ferric uptake regulator gene (fur), its promoter region and Fur box of pvdS gene involved in siderophore-mediated iron uptake system were sequenced in the parent strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and in the fur mutant FPA121 derived from the strain PAO1. We identified the gene fur 179 bearing a novel, single-point mutation that changed the amino acid residue Gln60Pro in the DNA-binding domain of the Fur protein. The synthesis of pyoverdine was studied in cultures of the strains PAO1 and FPA121 grown in iron-deplete and iron-replete (60 μmol/L FeIII) medium. The amino acid replacement in the regulatory Fur protein is responsible for the overproduction of pyoverdine in iron-deplete and iron-replete medium. No mutation was identified in the Fur box of the gene pvdS.

  15. The Q-rich/PST domain of the AHR regulates both ligand-induced nuclear transport and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling

    PubMed Central

    Tkachenko, Anna; Henkler, Frank; Brinkmann, Joep; Sowada, Juliane; Genkinger, Doris; Kern, Christian; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) shuttles continuously between cytoplasm and nucleus, unless ligand-binding triggers association with the AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT) and subsequent binding to cognate DNA motifs. We have now identified Val 647 as mandatory residue for export from the nucleus and AHR-function. This residue prevents inactivation of the receptor as a consequence of nuclear sequestration via constitutive import. Concomitantly mutants lacking this residue are exclusively localised in the nucleus. Although ligands accelerate nuclear import transiently, stable nuclear transition depends on a motif adjacent to Val 647 that comprises residues 650–661. Together, this defined region within the Q-rich domain regulates intracellular trafficking of the AHR in context of both nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and receptor activation. Nuclear export therefore depends on the previously characterised N-terminal NES and the newly identified motif that includes V647. Nucleocytoplasmic distribution of full-length human AHR is further affected by a section of the PST domain that shows sequence similarities with nuclear export signals. In concert, these motifs maintain a predominant cytoplasmic compartmentalisation, receptive for ligand binding. PMID:27535013

  16. Identification of a calmodulin-binding domain in Sema4D that regulates its exodomain shedding in platelets

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Peipei; Zeng, Zhao; Li, Qiang; Liu, Xiaohui; Xin, Xiaoran; Wannemacher, Kenneth M.; Ruan, Changgeng; Li, Renhao; Brass, Lawrence F.

    2013-01-01

    Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) is a transmembrane protein that supports contact-dependent amplification of platelet activation by collagen before being gradually cleaved by the metalloprotease ADAM17, as we have previously shown. Cleavage releases a soluble 120-kDa exodomain fragment for which receptors exist on platelets and endothelial cells. Here we have examined the mechanism that regulates Sema4D exodomain cleavage. The results show that the membrane-proximal cytoplasmic domain of Sema4D contains a binding site for calmodulin within the polybasic region Arg762-Lys779. Coprecipitation studies show that Sema4D and calmodulin are associated in resting platelets, forming a complex that dissociates upon platelet activation by the agonists that trigger Sema4D cleavage. Inhibiting calmodulin with W7 or introducing a membrane-permeable peptide corresponding to the calmodulin-binding site is sufficient to trigger the dissociation of Sema4D from calmodulin and initiate cleavage. Conversely, deletion of the calmodulin-binding site causes constitutive shedding of Sema4D. These results show that (1) Sema4D is a calmodulin-binding protein with a site of interaction in its membrane-proximal cytoplasmic domain, (2) platelet agonists cause dissociation of the calmodulin–Sema4D complex, and (3) dissociation of the complex is sufficient to trigger ADAM17-dependent cleavage of Sema4D, releasing a bioactive fragment. PMID:23564909

  17. Regulation of Active DNA Demethylation by a Methyl-CpG-Binding Domain Protein in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Han; Zeng, Jun; Cao, Zhendong; Li, Yan; Qian, Weiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Active DNA demethylation plays crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression in both plants and animals. In Arabidopsis thaliana, active DNA demethylation is initiated by the ROS1 subfamily of 5-methylcytosine-specific DNA glycosylases via a base excision repair mechanism. Recently, IDM1 and IDM2 were shown to be required for the recruitment of ROS1 to some of its target loci. However, the mechanism(s) by which IDM1 is targeted to specific genomic loci remains to be determined. Affinity purification of IDM1- and IDM2- associating proteins demonstrated that IDM1 and IDM2 copurify together with two novel components, methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 7 (MBD7) and IDM2-like protein 1 (IDL1). IDL1 encodes an α-crystallin domain protein that shows high sequence similarity with IDM2. MBD7 interacts with IDM2 and IDL1 in vitro and in vivo and they form a protein complex associating with IDM1 in vivo. MBD7 directly binds to the target loci and is required for the H3K18 and H3K23 acetylation in planta. MBD7 dysfunction causes DNA hypermethylation and silencing of reporter genes and a subset of endogenous genes. Our results suggest that a histone acetyltransferase complex functions in active DNA demethylation and in suppression of gene silencing at some loci in Arabidopsis. PMID:25933434

  18. Reversible phosphorylation as a molecular switch to regulate plasma membrane targeting of acylated SH4 domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Tournaviti, Stella; Pietro, Enrica San; Terjung, Stefan; Schafmeier, Tobias; Wegehingel, Sabine; Ritzerfeld, Julia; Schulz, Juliane; Smith, Deborah F; Pepperkok, Rainer; Nickel, Walter

    2009-08-01

    Acylated SH4 domains represent N-terminal targeting signals that anchor peripheral membrane proteins such as Src kinases in the inner leaflet of plasma membranes. Here we provide evidence for a novel regulatory mechanism that may control the levels of SH4 proteins being associated with plasma membranes. Using a fusion protein of the SH4 domain of Leishmania HASPB and GFP as a model system, we demonstrate that threonine 6 is a substrate for phosphorylation. Substitution of threonine 6 by glutamate (to mimic a phosphothreonine residue) resulted in a dramatic redistribution from plasma membranes to intracellular sites with a particular accumulation in a perinuclear region. As shown by both pharmacological inhibition and RNAi-mediated down-regulation of the threonine/ serine-specific phosphatases PP1 and PP2A, recycling back to the plasma membrane required dephosphorylation of threonine 6. We provide evidence that a cycle of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation may also be involved in intracellular targeting of other SH4 proteins such as the Src kinase Yes. PMID:19453972

  19. The Q-rich/PST domain of the AHR regulates both ligand-induced nuclear transport and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling.

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, Anna; Henkler, Frank; Brinkmann, Joep; Sowada, Juliane; Genkinger, Doris; Kern, Christian; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) shuttles continuously between cytoplasm and nucleus, unless ligand-binding triggers association with the AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT) and subsequent binding to cognate DNA motifs. We have now identified Val 647 as mandatory residue for export from the nucleus and AHR-function. This residue prevents inactivation of the receptor as a consequence of nuclear sequestration via constitutive import. Concomitantly mutants lacking this residue are exclusively localised in the nucleus. Although ligands accelerate nuclear import transiently, stable nuclear transition depends on a motif adjacent to Val 647 that comprises residues 650-661. Together, this defined region within the Q-rich domain regulates intracellular trafficking of the AHR in context of both nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and receptor activation. Nuclear export therefore depends on the previously characterised N-terminal NES and the newly identified motif that includes V647. Nucleocytoplasmic distribution of full-length human AHR is further affected by a section of the PST domain that shows sequence similarities with nuclear export signals. In concert, these motifs maintain a predominant cytoplasmic compartmentalisation, receptive for ligand binding. PMID:27535013

  20. Characterization of Functional Domains in NME1L Regulation of NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    You, Dong-Joo; Park, Cho Rong; Mander, Sunam; Ahn, Curie; Seong, Jae Young; Hwang, Jong-Ik

    2016-01-01

    NME1 is a well-known metastasis suppressor which has been reported to be downregulated in some highly aggressive cancer cells. Although most studies have focused on NME1, the NME1 gene also encodes the protein (NME1L) containing N-terminal 25 extra amino acids by alternative splicing. According to previous studies, NME1L has potent anti-metastatic activity, in comparison with NME1, by interacting with IKKβ and regulating its activity. In the present study, we tried to define the role of the N-terminal 25 amino acids of NME1L in NF-κB activation signaling. Unfortunately, the sequence itself did not interact with IKKβ, suggesting that it may be not enough to constitute the functional structure. Further construction of NME1L fragments and biochemical analysis revealed that N-terminal 84 residues constitute minimal structure for homodimerization, IKKβ interaction and regulation of NF-κB signaling. The inhibitory effect of the fragment on cancer cell migration and NF-κB-stimulated gene expression was equivalent to that of whole NME1L. The data suggest that the N-terminal 84 residues may be a core region for the anti-metastatic activity of NME1L. Based on this result, further structural analysis of the binding between NME1L and IKKβ may help in understanding the anti-metastatic activity of NME1L and provide direction to NME1L and IKKβ-related anti-cancer drug design. PMID:27094059

  1. Identifying domains of EFHC1 involved in ciliary localization, ciliogenesis, and the regulation of Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Shi, Jianli; Winey, Mark; Klymkowsky, Michael W

    2016-03-15

    EFHC1 encodes a ciliary protein that has been linked to Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy. In ectodermal explants, derived from Xenopus laevis embryos, the morpholino-mediated down-regulation of EFHC1b inhibited multiciliated cell formation. In those ciliated cells that did form, axoneme but not basal body formation was inhibited. EFHC1b morphant embryos displayed defects in central nervous system (CNS) and neural crest patterning that were rescued by a EFHC1b-GFP chimera. EFHC1b-GFP localized to ciliary axonemes in epidermal, gastrocoele roof plate, and neural tube cells. In X. laevis there is a link between Wnt signaling and multiciliated cell formation. While down-regulation of EFHC1b led to a ~2-fold increase in the activity of the β-catenin/Wnt-responsive TOPFLASH reporter, EFHC1b-GFP did not inhibit β-catenin activation of TOPFLASH. Wnt8a RNA levels were increased in EFHC1b morphant ectodermal explants and intact embryos, analyzed prior to the on-set of ciliogenesis. Rescue of the EFHC1b MO's ciliary axonemal phenotypes required the entire protein; in contrast, the EFHC1b morpholino's Wnt8a, CNS, and neural crest phenotypes were rescued by a truncated form of EFHC1b. The EFHC1b morpholino's Wnt8a phenotype was also rescued by the injection of RNAs encoding secreted Wnt inhibitors, suggesting that these phenotypes are due to effects on Wnt signaling, rather than the loss of cilia, an observation of potential relevance to understanding EFHC1's role in human neural development.

  2. A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase Domain 17 Regulates Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Chemosensitivity Via Notch1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Ye, Xiangcang; Bhattacharya, Rajat; Boulbes, Delphine R; Fan, Fan; Xia, Ling; Ellis, Lee M

    2016-03-01

    Evidence is accumulating for the role of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in mediating chemoresistance in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). A disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain 17 (ADAM17; also known as tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme [TACE]) was shown to be overexpressed and to mediate cell proliferation and chemoresistance in CRC cells. However, its role in mediating the CSC phenotype in CRC has not been well-characterized. The objective of the present study was to determine whether ADAM17 regulates the CSC phenotype in CRC and to elucidate the downstream signaling mechanism that mediates cancer stemness. We treated established CRC cell lines and a newly established human CRC cell line HCP-1 with ADAM17-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) or the synthetic peptide inhibitor TAPI-2. The effects of ADAM17 inhibition on the CSC phenotype and chemosensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in CRC cells were examined. siRNA knockdown and TAPI-2 decreased the protein levels of cleaved Notch1 (Notch1 intracellular domain) and HES-1 in CRC cells. A decrease in the CSC phenotype was determined by sphere formation and ALDEFLUOR assays. Moreover, TAPI-2 sensitized CRC cells to 5-FU by decreasing cell viability and the median lethal dose of 5-FU and increasing apoptosis. We also showed the cleavage and release of soluble Jagged-1 and -2 by ADAM17 in CRC cells. Our studies have elucidated a role of ADAM17 in regulating the CSC phenotype and chemoresistance in CRC cells. The use of drugs that inhibit ADAM17 activity might increase the therapeutic benefit to patients with mCRC and, potentially, those with other solid malignancies.

  3. FlnA binding to PACSIN2 F-BAR domain regulates membrane tubulation in megakaryocytes and platelets

    PubMed Central

    Begonja, Antonija Jurak; Pluthero, Fred G.; Suphamungmee, Worawit; Giannini, Silvia; Christensen, Hilary; Leung, Richard; Lo, Richard W.; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Lehman, William; Plomann, Markus; Hoffmeister, Karin M.; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Hartwig, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) and Fes-CIP4 homology BAR (F-BAR) proteins generate tubular membrane invaginations reminiscent of the megakaryocyte (MK) demarcation membrane system (DMS), which provides membranes necessary for future platelets. The F-BAR protein PACSIN2 is one of the most abundant BAR/F-BAR proteins in platelets and the only one reported to interact with the cytoskeletal and scaffold protein filamin A (FlnA), an essential regulator of platelet formation and function. The FlnA-PACSIN2 interaction was therefore investigated in MKs and platelets. PACSIN2 associated with FlnA in human platelets. The interaction required FlnA immunoglobulin-like repeat 20 and the tip of PACSIN2 F-BAR domain and enhanced PACSIN2 F-BAR domain membrane tubulation in vitro. Most human and wild-type mouse platelets had 1 to 2 distinct PACSIN2 foci associated with cell membrane GPIbα, whereas Flna-null platelets had 0 to 4 or more foci. Endogenous PACSIN2 and transfected enhanced green fluorescent protein-PACSIN2 were concentrated in midstage wild-type mouse MKs in a well-defined invagination of the plasma membrane reminiscent of the initiating DMS and dispersed in the absence of FlnA binding. The DMS appeared less well defined, and platelet territories were not readily visualized in Flna-null MKs. We conclude that the FlnA-PACSIN2 interaction regulates membrane tubulation in MKs and platelets and likely contributes to DMS formation. PMID:25838348

  4. Transcriptional activity of Sp1 is regulated by molecular interactions between the zinc finger DNA binding domain and the inhibitory domain with corepressors, and this interaction is modulated by MEK.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Ahn; Suh, Dong-Chul; Kang, Jae-Eun; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Park, Hyejin; Lee, Min-Nyung; Kim, Jung-Min; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Roh, Hee-Eun; Yu, Mi-Young; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Kyu Yeun; Hur, Man-Wook

    2005-07-29

    Sp1 activates the transcription of many cellular and viral genes with the GC-box in either the proximal promoter or the enhancer. Sp1 is composed of several functional domains, such as the inhibitory domain (ID), two serine/threonine-rich domains, two glutamine-rich domains, three C2H2-type zinc finger DNA binding domains (ZFDBD), and a C-terminal D domain. The ZDDBD is the most highly conserved domain among the Sp-family transcription factors and plays a critical role in GC-box recognition. In this study, we investigated the protein-protein interactions occurring at the Sp1ZFDBD and the Sp1ID, and the molecular mechanisms controlling the interaction. Our results found that Sp1ZFDBD and Sp1ID repressed transcription once they were targeted to the proximal promoter of the pGal4 UAS reporter fusion gene system, suggesting molecular interaction with the repressor molecules. Indeed, mammalian two-hybrid assays, GST fusion protein pull-down assays, and co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that Sp1ZFDBD and Sp1ID are able to interact with corepressor proteins such as SMRT, NcoR, and BCoR. The molecular interactions appear to be regulated by MAP kinase/Erk kinase kinase (MEK). The molecular interactions between Sp1ID and the corepressor might explain the role of Sp1 as a repressor under certain circumstances. The siRNA-induced degradation of the corepressors resulted in an up-regulation of Sp1-dependent transcription. The cellular context of the corepressors and the regulation of molecular interaction between corepressors and Sp1ZFDBD or Sp1ID might be important in controlling Sp1 activity. PMID:15878880

  5. Neprilysin and Aβ Clearance: Impact of the APP Intracellular Domain in NEP Regulation and Implications in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Marcus O. W.; Mett, Janine; Stahlmann, Christoph P.; Haupenthal, Viola J.; Zimmer, Valerie C.; Hartmann, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    One of the characteristic hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) leading to plaque formation and toxic oligomeric Aβ complexes. Besides the de novo synthesis of Aβ caused by amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), Aβ levels are also highly dependent on Aβ degradation. Several enzymes are described to cleave Aβ. In this review we focus on one of the most prominent Aβ degrading enzymes, the zinc-metalloprotease Neprilysin (NEP). In the first part of the review we discuss beside the general role of NEP in Aβ degradation the alterations of the enzyme observed during normal aging and the progression of AD. In vivo and cell culture experiments reveal that a decreased NEP level results in an increased Aβ level and vice versa. In a pathological situation like AD, it has been reported that NEP levels and activity are decreased and it has been suggested that certain polymorphisms in the NEP gene result in an increased risk for AD. Conversely, increasing NEP activity in AD mouse models revealed an improvement in some behavioral tests. Therefore it has been suggested that increasing NEP might be an interesting potential target to treat or to be protective for AD making it indispensable to understand the regulation of NEP. Interestingly, it is discussed that the APP intracellular domain (AICD), one of the cleavage products of APP processing, which has high similarities to Notch receptor processing, might be involved in the transcriptional regulation of NEP. However, the mechanisms of NEP regulation by AICD, which might be helpful to develop new therapeutic strategies, are up to now controversially discussed and summarized in the second part of this review. In addition, we review the impact of AICD not only in the transcriptional regulation of NEP but also of further genes. PMID:24391587

  6. Mechanism of USP7/HAUSP activation by its C-terminal ubiquitin-like domain and allosteric regulation by GMP-synthetase.

    PubMed

    Faesen, Alex C; Dirac, Annette M G; Shanmugham, Anitha; Ovaa, Huib; Perrakis, Anastassis; Sixma, Titia K

    2011-10-01

    The ubiquitin-specific protease USP7/HAUSP regulates p53 and MDM2 levels, and cellular localization of FOXO4 and PTEN, and hence is critically important for their role in cellular processes. Here we show how the 64 kDa C-terminal region of USP7 can positively regulate deubiquitinating activity. We present the crystal structure of this USP7/HAUSP ubiquitin-like domain (HUBL) comprised of five ubiquitin-like (Ubl) domains organized in 2-1-2 Ubl units. The last di-Ubl unit, HUBL-45, is sufficient to activate USP7, through binding to a "switching" loop in the catalytic domain, which promotes ubiquitin binding and increases activity 100-fold. This activation can be enhanced allosterically by the metabolic enzyme GMPS. It binds to the first three Ubl domains (HUBL-123) and hyperactivates USP7 by stabilization of the HUBL-45-dependent active state. PMID:21981925

  7. The SH2 domain regulates c-Abl kinase activation by a cyclin-like mechanism and remodulation of the hinge motion.

    PubMed

    Dölker, Nicole; Górna, Maria W; Sutto, Ludovico; Torralba, Antonio S; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Gervasio, Francesco L

    2014-10-01

    Regulation of the c-Abl (ABL1) tyrosine kinase is important because of its role in cellular signaling, and its relevance in the leukemiogenic counterpart (BCR-ABL). Both auto-inhibition and full activation of c-Abl are regulated by the interaction of the catalytic domain with the Src Homology 2 (SH2) domain. The mechanism by which this interaction enhances catalysis is not known. We combined computational simulations with mutagenesis and functional analysis to find that the SH2 domain conveys both local and global effects on the dynamics of the catalytic domain. Locally, it regulates the flexibility of the αC helix in a fashion reminiscent of cyclins in cyclin-dependent kinases, reorienting catalytically important motifs. At a more global level, SH2 binding redirects the hinge motion of the N and C lobes and changes the conformational equilibrium of the activation loop. The complex network of subtle structural shifts that link the SH2 domain with the activation loop and the active site may be partially conserved with other SH2-domain containing kinases and therefore offer additional parameters for the design of conformation-specific inhibitors.

  8. Crystal structure of the Escherichia coli regulator of σ70, Rsd, in complex with σ70 domain 4

    PubMed Central

    Patikoglou, Georgia A.; Westblade, Lars F.; Campbell, Elizabeth A.; Lamour, Valérie; Lane, William J.; Darst, Seth A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The Escherichia coli Rsd protein binds tightly and specifically to the RNA polymerase (RNAP) σ70 factor. Rsd plays a role in alternative σ factor-dependent transcription by biasing the competition between σ70 and alternative σ factors for the available core RNAP. Here, we determined the 2.6 Å-resolution X-ray crystal structure of Rsd bound to σ70 domain 4 (σ704), the primary determinant for Rsd binding within σ70. The structure reveals that Rsd binding interferes with the two primary functions of σ704, core RNAP binding and promoter –35 element binding. Interestingly, the most highly conserved Rsd residues form a network of interactions through the middle of the Rsd structure that connect the σ704-binding surface with three cavities exposed on distant surfaces of Rsd, suggesting functional coupling between σ704 binding and other binding surfaces of Rsd, either for other proteins or for as yet unknown small molecule effectors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding the role of Rsd, as well as its ortholog, AlgQ, a positive regulator of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence, in transcription regulation. PMID:17681541

  9. Two cell-cycle regulated SET-domain proteins interact with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, Cécile; Sozzani, Rosangela; Glab, Nathalie; Domenichini, Séverine; Perennes, Claudette; Cella, Rino; Kondorosi, Eva; Bergounioux, Catherine

    2006-08-01

    The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) functions as a sliding clamp for DNA polymerase, and is thus a key actor in DNA replication. It is also involved in DNA repair, maintenance of heterochromatic regions throughout replication, cell cycle regulation and programmed cell death. Identification of PCNA partners is therefore necessary for understanding these processes. Here we identify two Arabidopsis SET-domain proteins that interact with PCNA: ATXR5 and ATXR6. A truncated ATXR5Deltaex2, incapable of interacting with PCNA, also occurs in planta. ATXR6, upregulated during the S phase, is upregulated by AtE2F transcription factors, suggesting that it is required for S-phase progression. The two proteins differ in their subcellular localization: ATXR5 has a dual localization in plastids and in the nucleus, whereas ATXR6 is solely nuclear. This indicates that the two proteins may play different roles in plant cells. However, overexpression of either ATXR5 or ATXR6 causes male sterility because of the degeneration of defined cell types. Taken together, our results suggest that both proteins may play a role in the cell cycle or DNA replication, and that the activity of ATXR5 may be regulated via its subcellular localization.

  10. Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain-Containing Protein 2 (Phd2) Regulates Chondrocyte Differentiation and Secondary Ossification in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shaohong; Aghajanian, Patrick; Pourteymoor, Sheila; Alarcon, Catrina; Mohan, Subburaman

    2016-01-01

    Endochondral ossification plays an important role in the formation of the primary ossification centers (POCs) and secondary ossification centers (SOCs) of mammalian long bones. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate POC and SOC formation are different. We recently demonstrated that Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain-containing Protein 2 (Phd2) is a key mediator of vitamin C effects on bone. We investigated the role of Phd2 on endochondral ossification of the epiphyses by conditionally deleting the Phd2 gene in osteoblasts and chondrocytes. We found that the deletion of Phd2 in osteoblasts did not cause changes in bone parameters in the proximal tibial epiphyses in 5 week old mice. In contrast, deletion of Phd2 in chondrocytes resulted in increased bone mass and bone formation rate (normalized to tissue volume) in long bone epiphyses, indicating that Phd2 expressed in chondrocytes, but not osteoblasts, negatively regulates secondary ossification of epiphyses. Phd2 deletion in chondrocytes elevated mRNA expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) signaling molecules including Hif-1α, Hif-2α, Vegfa, Vegfb, and Epo, as well as markers for chondrocyte hypertrophy and mineralization such as Col10, osterix, alkaline phosphatase, and bone sialoprotein. These data suggest that Phd2 expressed in chondrocytes inhibits endochondral ossification at the epiphysis by suppressing HIF signaling pathways. PMID:27775044

  11. Nucleotides regulate the mechanical hierarchy between subdomains of the nucleotide binding domain of the Hsp70 chaperone DnaK.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Daniela; Merz, Dale R; Pelz, Benjamin; Theisen, Kelly E; Yacyshyn, Gail; Mokranjac, Dejana; Dima, Ruxandra I; Rief, Matthias; Žoldák, Gabriel

    2015-08-18

    The regulation of protein function through ligand-induced conformational changes is crucial for many signal transduction processes. The binding of a ligand alters the delicate energy balance within the protein structure, eventually leading to such conformational changes. In this study, we elucidate the energetic and mechanical changes within the subdomains of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of the heat shock protein of 70 kDa (Hsp70) chaperone DnaK upon nucleotide binding. In an integrated approach using single molecule optical tweezer experiments, loop insertions, and steered coarse-grained molecular simulations, we find that the C-terminal helix of the NBD is the major determinant of mechanical stability, acting as a glue between the two lobes. After helix unraveling, the relative stability of the two separated lobes is regulated by ATP/ADP binding. We find that the nucleotide stays strongly bound to lobe II, thus reversing the mechanical hierarchy between the two lobes. Our results offer general insights into the nucleotide-induced signal transduction within members of the actin/sugar kinase superfamily. PMID:26240360

  12. The Ubiquitin-associated (UBA) Domain of SCCRO/DCUN1D1 Protein Serves as a Feedback Regulator of Biochemical and Oncogenic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guochang; Towe, Christopher W.; Choi, Lydia; Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Bommeljé, Claire C.; Bains, Sarina; Rechler, Willi; Hao, Bing; Ramanathan, Yegnanarayana; Singh, Bhuvanesh

    2015-01-01

    Amplification of squamous cell carcinoma-related oncogene (SCCRO) activates its function as an oncogene in a wide range of human cancers. The oncogenic activity of SCCRO requires its potentiating neddylation domain, which regulates its E3 activity for neddylation. The contribution of the N-terminal ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain to SCCRO function remains to be defined. We found that the UBA domain of SCCRO preferentially binds to polyubiquitin chains in a linkage-independent manner. Binding of polyubiquitin chains to the UBA domain inhibits the neddylation activity of SCCRO in vivo by inhibiting SCCRO-promoted nuclear translocation of neddylation components and results in a corresponding decrease in cullin-RING-ligase-promoted ubiquitination. The results of colony formation and xenograft assays showed a mutation in the UBA domain of SCCRO that reduces binding to polyubiquitin chains, significantly enhancing its oncogenic activity. Analysis of 47 lung and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas identified a case with a frameshift mutation in SCCRO that putatively codes for a protein that lacks a UBA domain. Analysis of data from The Cancer Genome Atlas showed that recurrent mutations cluster in the UBA domains of SCCRO, lose the ability to bind to polyubiquitinated proteins, and have increased neddylation and transformation activities. Combined, these data suggest that the UBA domain functions as a negative regulator of SCCRO function. Mutations in the UBA domain lead to loss of inhibitory control, which results in increased biochemical and oncogenic activity. The clustering of mutations in the UBA domain of SCCRO suggests that mutations may be a mechanism of oncogene activation in human cancers. PMID:25411243

  13. The MprB Extracytoplasmic Domain Negatively Regulates Activation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis MprAB Two-Component System

    PubMed Central

    Bretl, Daniel J.; Bigley, Tarin M.; Terhune, Scott S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an acid-fast pathogen of humans and the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB). It is estimated that one-third of the world's population is latently (persistently) infected with M. tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis persistence is regulated, in part, by the MprAB two-component signal transduction system, which is activated by and mediates resistance to cell envelope stress. Here we identify MprAB as part of an evolutionarily conserved cell envelope stress response network and demonstrate that MprAB-mediated signal transduction is negatively regulated by the MprB extracytoplasmic domain (ECD). In particular, we report that deregulated production of the MprB sensor kinase, or of derivatives of this protein, negatively impacts M. tuberculosis growth. The observed growth attenuation is dependent on MprAB-mediated signal transduction and is exacerbated in strains of M. tuberculosis producing an MprB variant lacking its ECD. Interestingly, full-length MprB, and the ECD of MprB specifically, immunoprecipitates the Hsp70 chaperone DnaK in vivo, while overexpression of dnaK inhibits MprAB-mediated signal transduction in M. tuberculosis grown in the absence or presence of cell envelope stress. We propose that under nonstress conditions, or under conditions in which proteins present in the extracytoplasmic space are properly folded, signaling through the MprAB system is inhibited by the MprB ECD. Following exposure to cell envelope stress, proteins present in the extracytoplasmic space become unfolded or misfolded, leading to removal of the ECD-mediated negative regulation of MprB and subsequent activation of MprAB. PMID:24187094

  14. SUMOylation of the C-terminal domain of DNA topoisomerase IIα regulates the centromeric localization of Claspin

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyunju; Yoshida, Makoto M; Sridharan, Vinidhra; Kumagai, Akiko; Dunphy, William G; Dasso, Mary; Azuma, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase II (TopoII) regulates DNA topology by its strand passaging reaction, which is required for genome maintenance by resolving tangled genomic DNA. In addition, TopoII contributes to the structural integrity of mitotic chromosomes and to the activation of cell cycle checkpoints in mitosis. Post-translational modification of TopoII is one of the key mechanisms by which its broad functions are regulated during mitosis. SUMOylation of TopoII is conserved in eukaryotes and plays a critical role in chromosome segregation. Using Xenopus laevis egg extract, we demonstrated previously that TopoIIα is modified by SUMO on mitotic chromosomes and that its activity is modulated via SUMOylation of its lysine at 660. However, both biochemical and genetic analyses indicated that TopoII has multiple SUMOylation sites in addition to Lys660, and the functions of the other SUMOylation sites were not clearly determined. In this study, we identified the SUMOylation sites on the C-terminal domain (CTD) of TopoIIα. CTD SUMOylation did not affect TopoIIα activity, indicating that its function is distinct from that of Lys660 SUMOylation. We found that CTD SUMOylation promotes protein binding and that Claspin, a well-established cell cycle checkpoint mediator, is one of the SUMOylation-dependent binding proteins. Claspin harbors 2 SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs), and its robust association to mitotic chromosomes requires both the SIMs and TopoIIα-CTD SUMOylation. Claspin localizes to the mitotic centromeres depending on mitotic SUMOylation, suggesting that TopoIIα-CTD SUMOylation regulates the centromeric localization of Claspin. Our findings provide a novel mechanistic insight regarding how TopoIIα-CTD SUMOylation contributes to mitotic centromere activity. PMID:26131587

  15. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei; Satoh, Ryosuke; Fujiwara, Toshinobu; Ito, Yutaka; Sugiura, Reiko; Mishima, Masaki

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed.

  16. NMR Study Reveals the Receiver Domain of Arabidopsis ETHYLENE RESPONSE1 Ethylene Receptor as an Atypical Type Response Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Zong; Wen, Chi-Kuang; Sue, Shih-Che

    2016-01-01

    The gaseous plant hormone ethylene, recognized by plant ethylene receptors, plays a pivotal role in various aspects of plant growth and development. ETHYLENE RESPONSE1 (ETR1) is an ethylene receptor isolated from Arabidopsis and has a structure characteristic of prokaryotic two-component histidine kinase (HK) and receiver domain (RD), where the RD structurally resembles bacteria response regulators (RRs). The ETR1 HK domain has autophosphorylation activity, and little is known if the HK can transfer the phosphoryl group to the RD for receptor signaling. Unveiling the correlation of the receptor structure and phosphorylation status would advance the studies towards the underlying mechanisms of ETR1 receptor signaling. In this study, using the nuclear magnetic resonance technique, our data suggested that the ETR1-RD is monomeric in solution and the rigid structure of the RD prevents the conserved aspartate residue phosphorylation. Comparing the backbone dynamics with other RRs, we propose that backbone flexibility is critical to the RR phosphorylation. Besides the limited flexibility, ETR1-RD has a unique γ loop conformation of opposite orientation, which makes ETR1-RD unfavorable for phosphorylation. These two features explain why ETR1-RD cannot be phosphorylated and is classified as an atypical type RR. As a control, phosphorylation of the ETR1-RD was also impaired when the sequence was swapped to the fragment of the bacterial typical type RR, CheY. Here, we suggest a molecule insight that the ETR1-RD already exists as an active formation and executes its function through binding with the downstream factors without phosphorylation. PMID:27486797

  17. Cytoplasmic dynein regulates its attachment to microtubules via nucleotide state-switched mechanosensing at multiple AAA domains.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Matthew P; Berger, Florian; Rao, Lu; Brenner, Sibylle; Cho, Carol; Gennerich, Arne

    2015-05-19

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a homodimeric microtubule (MT) motor protein responsible for most MT minus-end-directed motility. Dynein contains four AAA+ ATPases (AAA: ATPase associated with various cellular activities) per motor domain (AAA1-4). The main site of ATP hydrolysis, AAA1, is the only site considered by most dynein motility models. However, it remains unclear how ATPase activity and MT binding are coordinated within and between dynein's motor domains. Using optical tweezers, we characterize the MT-binding strength of recombinant dynein monomers as a function of mechanical tension and nucleotide state. Dynein responds anisotropically to tension, binding tighter to MTs when pulled toward the MT plus end. We provide evidence that this behavior results from an asymmetrical bond that acts as a slip bond under forward tension and a slip-ideal bond under backward tension. ATP weakens MT binding and reduces bond strength anisotropy, and unexpectedly, so does ADP. Using nucleotide binding and hydrolysis mutants, we show that, although ATP exerts its effects via binding AAA1, ADP effects are mediated by AAA3. Finally, we demonstrate "gating" of AAA1 function by AAA3. When tension is absent or applied via dynein's C terminus, ATP binding to AAA1 induces MT release only if AAA3 is in the posthydrolysis state. However, when tension is applied to the linker, ATP binding to AAA3 is sufficient to "open" the gate. These results elucidate the mechanisms of dynein-MT interactions, identify regulatory roles for AAA3, and help define the interplay between mechanical tension and nucleotide state in regulating dynein motility.

  18. NMR Study Reveals the Receiver Domain of Arabidopsis ETHYLENE RESPONSE1 Ethylene Receptor as an Atypical Type Response Regulator.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yi-Lin; Jiang, Ingjye; Lee, Yi-Zong; Wen, Chi-Kuang; Sue, Shih-Che

    2016-01-01

    The gaseous plant hormone ethylene, recognized by plant ethylene receptors, plays a pivotal role in various aspects of plant growth and development. ETHYLENE RESPONSE1 (ETR1) is an ethylene receptor isolated from Arabidopsis and has a structure characteristic of prokaryotic two-component histidine kinase (HK) and receiver domain (RD), where the RD structurally resembles bacteria response regulators (RRs). The ETR1 HK domain has autophosphorylation activity, and little is known if the HK can transfer the phosphoryl group to the RD for receptor signaling. Unveiling the correlation of the receptor structure and phosphorylation status would advance the studies towards the underlying mechanisms of ETR1 receptor signaling. In this study, using the nuclear magnetic resonance technique, our data suggested that the ETR1-RD is monomeric in solution and the rigid structure of the RD prevents the conserved aspartate residue phosphorylation. Comparing the backbone dynamics with other RRs, we propose that backbone flexibility is critical to the RR phosphorylation. Besides the limited flexibility, ETR1-RD has a unique γ loop conformation of opposite orientation, which makes ETR1-RD unfavorable for phosphorylation. These two features explain why ETR1-RD cannot be phosphorylated and is classified as an atypical type RR. As a control, phosphorylation of the ETR1-RD was also impaired when the sequence was swapped to the fragment of the bacterial typical type RR, CheY. Here, we suggest a molecule insight that the ETR1-RD already exists as an active formation and executes its function through binding with the downstream factors without phosphorylation. PMID:27486797

  19. The Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PilZ Domain Proteins Function Differentially in Cyclic di-GMP Binding and Regulation of Virulence and Motility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fenghuan; Tian, Fang; Chen, Huamin; Hutchins, William; Yang, Ching-Hong; He, Chenyang

    2015-07-01

    The PilZ domain proteins have been demonstrated to be one of the major types of receptors mediating cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling pathways in several pathogenic bacteria. However, little is known about the function of PilZ domain proteins in c-di-GMP regulation of virulence in the bacterial blight pathogen of rice Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. Here, the roles of PilZ domain proteins PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 in c-di-GMP binding, regulation of virulence and motility, and subcellular localization were characterized in comparison with PXO_02715, identified previously as an interactor with the c-di-GMP receptor Filp to regulate virulence. The c-di-GMP binding motifs in the PilZ domains were conserved in PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 but were less well conserved in PXO_02715. PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 but not PXO_02715 proteins bound to c-di-GMP with high affinity in vitro, and the R(141) and R(10) residues in the PilZ domains of PXO_00049 and PXO_02374, respectively, were crucial for c-di-GMP binding. Gene deletion of PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 resulted in significant increases in virulence and hrp gene transcription, indicating their negative regulation of virulence via type III secretion system expression. All mutants showed significant changes in sliding motility but not exopolysaccharide production and biofilm formation. In trans expression of the full-length open reading frame (ORF) of each gene in the relevant mutants led to restoration of the phenotype to wild-type levels. Moreover, PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 displayed mainly multisite subcellular localizations, whereas PXO_02715 showed nonpolar distributions in the X. oryzae pv. oryzae cells. Therefore, this study demonstrated the different functions of the PilZ domain proteins in mediation of c-di-GMP regulation of virulence and motility in X. oryzae pv. oryzae.

  20. Intramolecular Interactions and Regulation of Cofactor Binding by the Four Repressive Elements in the Caspase Recruitment Domain-containing Protein 11 (CARD11) Inhibitory Domain.

    PubMed

    Jattani, Rakhi P; Tritapoe, Julia M; Pomerantz, Joel L

    2016-04-15

    The CARD11 signaling scaffold transmits signaling between antigen receptors on B and T lymphocytes and the transcription factor NF-κB during the adaptive immune response. CARD11 activity is controlled by an inhibitory domain (ID), which participates in intramolecular interactions and prevents cofactor binding prior to receptor triggering. Oncogenic CARD11 mutations associated with the activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma somehow perturb ID-mediated autoinhibition to confer CARD11 with the dysregulated spontaneous signaling to NF-κB that is required for the proliferation and survival of the lymphoma. Here, we investigate how the four repressive elements (REs) we have discovered in the CARD11 ID function to inhibit CARD11 activity with cooperativity and redundancy. We find that each RE contributes to the maintenance of the closed inactive state of CARD11 that predominates in the absence of receptor engagement. Each RE also contributes to the prevention of Bcl10 binding in the basal unstimulated state. RE1, RE2, and RE3 participate in intramolecular interactions with other CARD11 domains and share domain targets for binding. Remarkably, diffuse large B cell lymphoma-associated gain-of-function mutations in the caspase recruitment domain, LATCH, or coiled coil can perturb intramolecular interactions mediated by multiple REs, suggesting how single amino acid oncogenic CARD11 mutations can perturb or bypass the action of redundant inhibitory REs to achieve the level of hyperactive CARD11 signaling required to support lymphoma growth.

  1. Measurement techniques for the characterization in the frequency domain of regulated energy-storage DC-to-DC converters. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahler, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    Procedures are presented for obtaining valid frequency-domain transfer functions of regulated reactor energy-storage dc-to-dc converters. These procedures are for measuring loop gain, closed loop gain, output impedance, and audio susceptibility. The applications of these measurements are discussed.

  2. Identification of two-pore domain potassium channels as potent modulators of osmotic volume regulation in human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Andronic, Joseph; Bobak, Nicole; Bittner, Stefan; Ehling, Petra; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Herrmann, Alexander M; Zimmermann, Heiko; Sauer, Markus; Wiendl, Heinz; Budde, Thomas; Meuth, Sven G; Sukhorukov, Vladimir L

    2013-02-01

    Many functions of T lymphocytes are closely related to cell volume homeostasis and regulation, which utilize a complex network of membrane channels for anions and cations. Among the various potassium channels, the voltage-gated K(V)1.3 is well known to contribute greatly to the osmoregulation and particularly to the potassium release during the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) of T cells faced with hypotonic environment. Here we address a putative role of the newly identified two-pore domain (K(2P)) channels in the RVD of human CD4(+) T lymphocytes, using a series of potent well known channel blockers. In the present study, the pharmacological profiles of RVD inhibition revealed K(2P)5.1 and K(2P)18.1 as the most important K(2P) channels involved in the RVD of both naïve and stimulated T cells. The impact of chemical inhibition of K(2P)5.1 and K(2P)18.1 on the RVD was comparable to that of K(V)1.3. K(2P)9.1 also notably contributed to the RVD of T cells but the extent of this contribution and its dependence on the activation status could not be unambiguously resolved. In summary, our data provide first evidence that the RVD-related potassium efflux from human T lymphocytes relies on K(2P) channels. PMID:23041580

  3. Regulated splicing of the α6 integrin cytoplasmic domain determines the fate of breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Gritsko, Tatiana; Pursell, Bryan; Chang, Cheng; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; Norum, Jens Henrik; Toftgard, Rune; Shaw, Leslie M; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2014-05-01

    Although the α6β1 integrin has been implicated in the function of breast and other cancer stem cells (CSCs), little is known about its regulation and relationship to mechanisms involved in the genesis of CSCs. We report that a CD44(high)/CD24(low) population, enriched for CSCs, is comprised of distinct epithelial and mesenchymal populations that differ in expression of the two α6 cytoplasmic domain splice variants: α6A and α6B. α6Bβ1 expression defines the mesenchymal population and is necessary for CSC function, a function that cannot be executed by α6A integrins. The generation of α6Bβ1 is tightly controlled and occurs as a consequence of an autocrine vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling that culminates in the transcriptional repression of a key RNA-splicing factor. These data alter our understanding of how α6β1 contributes to breast cancer, and they resolve ambiguities regarding the use of total α6 (CD49f) expression as a biomarker for CSCs.

  4. Negative regulation of prophenoloxidase (proPO) activation by a clip-domain serine proteinase homolog (SPH) from endoparasitoid venom.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangmei; Lu, Zhi-Qiang; Jiang, Haobo; Asgari, Sassan

    2004-05-01

    Most parasitic wasps inject maternal factors into the host hemocoel to suppress the host immune system and ensure successful development of their progeny. Melanization is one of the insect defence mechanisms against intruding pathogens or parasites. We previously isolated from the venom of Cotesia rubecula a 50 kDa protein that blocked melanization in the hemolymph of its host, Pieris rapae [Insect Biochem. Mol. Biol. 33 (2003) 1017]. This protein, designated Vn50, is a serine proteinase homolog (SPH) containing an amino-terminal clip domain. In this work, we demonstrated that recombinant Vn50 bound P. rapae hemolymph components that were recognized by antisera to Tenebrio molitor prophenoloxidase (proPO) and Manduca sexta proPO-activating proteinase (PAP). Vn50 is stable in the host hemolymph-it remained intact for at least 72 h after parasitization. Using M. sexta as a model system, we found that Vn50 efficiently down-regulated proPO activation mediated by M. sexta PAP-1, SPH-1, and SPH-2. Vn50 did not inhibit active phenoloxidase (PO) or PAP-1, but it significantly reduced the proteolysis of proPO. If recombinant Vn50 binds P. rapae proPO and PAP (as suggested by the antibody reactions), it is likely that the molecular interactions among M. sexta proPO, PAP-1, and SPHs were impaired by this venom protein. A similar strategy might be employed by C. rubecula to negatively impact the proPO activation reaction in its natural host.

  5. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of Methyl CpG Binding Domain Protein 2 Regulates Chromatin Structure.

    PubMed

    Becker, Annette; Zhang, Peng; Allmann, Lena; Meilinger, Daniela; Bertulat, Bianca; Eck, Daniel; Hofstaetter, Maria; Bartolomei, Giody; Hottiger, Michael O; Schreiber, Valérie; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2016-03-01

    The epigenetic information encoded in the genomic DNA methylation pattern is translated by methylcytosine binding proteins like MeCP2 into chromatin topology and structure and gene activity states. We have shown previously that the MeCP2 level increases during differentiation and that it causes large-scale chromatin reorganization, which is disturbed by MeCP2 Rett syndrome mutations. Phosphorylation and other posttranslational modifications of MeCP2 have been described recently to modulate its function. Here we show poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of endogenous MeCP2 in mouse brain tissue. Consequently, we found that MeCP2 induced aggregation of pericentric heterochromatin and that its chromatin accumulation was enhanced in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1(-/-) compared with wild-type cells. We mapped the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation domains and engineered MeCP2 mutation constructs to further analyze potential effects on DNA binding affinity and large-scale chromatin remodeling. Single or double deletion of the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated regions and PARP inhibition increased the heterochromatin clustering ability of MeCP2. Increased chromatin clustering may reflect increased binding affinity. In agreement with this hypothesis, we found that PARP-1 deficiency significantly increased the chromatin binding affinity of MeCP2 in vivo. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into the regulation of MeCP2-mediated, higher-order chromatin architecture and suggest therapeutic opportunities to manipulate MeCP2 function.

  6. Crystal structure of the kinase domain of serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 in complex with AMP–PNP

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Baoguang; Lehr, Ruth; Smallwood, Angela M.; Ho, Thau F.; Maley, Kathleen; Randall, Tanya; Head, Martha S.; Koretke, Kristin K.; Schnackenberg, Christine G.

    2007-01-01

    Serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (SGK1) is a serine/threonine protein kinase of the AGC family which participates in the control of epithelial ion transport and is implicated in proliferation and apoptosis. We report here the 1.9 Å crystal structure of the catalytic domain of inactive human SGK1 in complex with AMP–PNP. SGK1 exists as a dimer formed by two intermolecular disulfide bonds between Cys258 in the activation loop and Cys193. Although most of the SGK1 structure closely resembles the common protein kinase fold, the structure around the active site is unique when compared to most protein kinases. The αC helix is not present in this inactive form of SGK1 crystal structure; instead, the segment corresponding to the C helix forms a β-strand that is stabilized by the N-terminal segment of the activation loop through a short antiparallel β-sheet. Since the differences from other kinases occur around the ATP binding site, this structure can provide valuable insight into the design of selective and highly potent ATP-competitive inhibitors of SGK1 kinase. PMID:17965184

  7. Crystal structure of the kinase domain of serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 in complex with AMP-PNP

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Baoguang; Lehr, Ruth; Smallwood, Angela M; Ho, Thau F; Maley, Kathleen; Randall, Tanya; Head, Martha S; Koretke, Kristin K; Schnackenberg, Christine G

    2008-06-30

    Serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (SGK1) is a serine/threonine protein kinase of the AGC family which participates in the control of epithelial ion transport and is implicated in proliferation and apoptosis. We report here the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of the catalytic domain of inactive human SGK1 in complex with AMP-PNP. SGK1 exists as a dimer formed by two intermolecular disulfide bonds between Cys258 in the activation loop and Cys193. Although most of the SGK1 structure closely resembles the common protein kinase fold, the structure around the active site is unique when compared to most protein kinases. The {alpha}C helix is not present in this inactive form of SGK1 crystal structure; instead, the segment corresponding to the C helix forms a {beta}-strand that is stabilized by the N-terminal segment of the activation loop through a short antiparallel {beta}-sheet. Since the differences from other kinases occur around the ATP binding site, this structure can provide valuable insight into the design of selective and highly potent ATP-competitive inhibitors of SGK1 kinase.

  8. Four-and-a-half LIM domains proteins are novel regulators of the protein kinase D pathway in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulou, Konstantina; Cuello, Friederike; Candasamy, Alexandra J; Kemp, Elizabeth M; Ehler, Elisabeth; Haworth, Robert S; Avkiran, Metin

    2014-02-01

    PKD (protein kinase D) is a serine/threonine kinase implicated in multiple cardiac roles, including the phosphorylation of the class II HDAC5 (histone deacetylase isoform 5) and thereby de-repression of MEF2 (myocyte enhancer factor 2) transcription factor activity. In the present study we identify FHL1 (four-and-a-half LIM domains protein 1) and FHL2 as novel binding partners for PKD in cardiac myocytes. This was confirmed by pull-down assays using recombinant GST-fused proteins and heterologously or endogenously expressed PKD in adult rat ventricular myocytes or NRVMs (neonatal rat ventricular myocytes) respectively, and by co-immunoprecipitation of FHL1 and FHL2 with GFP-PKD1 fusion protein expressed in NRVMs. In vitro kinase assays showed that neither FHL1 nor FHL2 is a PKD1 substrate. Selective knockdown of FHL1 expression in NRVMs significantly inhibited PKD activation and HDAC5 phosphorylation in response to endothelin 1, but not to the α₁-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. In contrast, selective knockdown of FHL2 expression caused a significant reduction in PKD activation and HDAC5 phosphorylation in response to both stimuli. Interestingly, neither intervention affected MEF2 activation by endothelin 1 or phenylephrine. We conclude that FHL1 and FHL2 are novel cardiac PKD partners, which differentially facilitate PKD activation and HDAC5 phosphorylation by distinct neurohormonal stimuli, but are unlikely to regulate MEF2-driven transcriptional reprogramming.

  9. The interaction between the pleckstrin homology domain of ceramide kinase and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate regulates the plasma membrane targeting and ceramide 1-phosphate levels

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tack-Joong; Mitsutake, Susumu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki . E-mail: yigarash@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp

    2006-04-07

    Ceramide kinase (CERK) converts ceramide to ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P), which has recently emerged as a new bioactive molecule capable of regulating diverse cellular functions. The N-terminus of the CERK protein encompasses a sequence motif known as a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. Although the PH domain was previously demonstrated to be an important domain for the subcellular localization of CERK, the precise properties of this domain remained unclear. In this study, we reveal that the PH domain of CERK exhibits high affinity for phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P{sub 2}), among other lipids. Furthermore, in COS7 cells, GFP-fused CERK translocated rapidly from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane in response to hyper-osmotic stress, which is known to increase the intracellular PI(4,5)P{sub 2} levels, whereas a PH domain deletion mutant did not. Additionally, in [{sup 32}P]orthophosphate-labeled COS7 cells, the translocation of CERK to the plasma membrane induced a 2.8-fold increase in C1P levels. The study presented here provides insight into the crucial role of the CERK-PH domain in plasma membrane targeting, through its binding to PI(4,5)P{sub 2}, and subsequent induction of C1P production in the vicinity of the membrane.

  10. The linker domain of the Ha-Ras hypervariable region regulates interactions with exchange factors, Raf-1 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Jaumot, Montserrat; Yan, Jun; Clyde-Smith, Jodi; Sluimer, Judith; Hancock, John F

    2002-01-01

    Ha-Ras and Ki-Ras have different distributions across plasma membrane microdomains. The Ras C-terminal anchors are primarily responsible for membrane micro-localization, but recent work has shown that the interaction of Ha-Ras with lipid rafts is modulated by GTP loading via a mechanism that requires the hypervariable region (HVR). We have now identified two regions in the HVR linker domain that regulate Ha-Ras raft association. Release of activated Ha-Ras from lipid rafts is blocked by deleting amino acids 173-179 or 166-172. Alanine replacement of amino acids 173-179 but not 166-172 restores wild type micro-localization, indicating that specific N-terminal sequences of the linker domain operate in concert with a more C-terminal spacer domain to regulate Ha-Ras raft association. Mutations in the linker domain that confine activated Ha-RasG12V to lipid rafts abrogate Raf-1, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and Akt activation and inhibit PC12 cell differentiation. N-Myristoylation also prevents the release of activated Ha-Ras from lipid rafts and inhibits Raf-1 activation. These results demonstrate that the correct modulation of Ha-Ras lateral segregation is critical for downstream signaling. Mutations in the linker domain also suppress the dominant negative phenotype of Ha-RasS17N, indicating that HVR sequences are essential for efficient interaction of Ha-Ras with exchange factors in intact cells.

  11. The REC domain mediated dimerization is critical for FleQ from Pseudomonas aeruginosa to function as a c-di-GMP receptor and flagella gene regulator.

    PubMed

    Su, Tiantian; Liu, Shiheng; Wang, Kang; Chi, Kaikai; Zhu, Deyu; Wei, Tiandi; Huang, Yan; Guo, Liming; Hu, Wei; Xu, Sujuan; Lin, Zong; Gu, Lichuan

    2015-10-01

    FleQ is an AAA+ ATPase enhancer-binding protein that regulates both flagella and biofilm formation in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. FleQ belongs to the NtrC subfamily of response regulators, but lacks the corresponding aspartic acid for phosphorylation in the REC domain (FleQ(R), also named FleQ domain). Here, we show that the atypical REC domain of FleQ is essential for the function of FleQ. Crystal structure of FleQ(R) at 2.3Å reveals that the structure of FleQ(R) is significantly different from the REC domain of NtrC1 which regulates gene expression in a phosphorylation dependent manner. FleQ(R) forms a novel active dimer (transverse dimer), and mediates the dimerization of full-length FleQ in an unusual manner. Point mutations that affect the dimerization of FleQ lead to loss of function of the protein. Moreover, a c-di-GMP binding site deviating from the previous reported one is identified through structure analysis and point mutations.

  12. Human I-mfa domain proteins specifically interact with KSHV LANA and affect its regulation of Wnt signaling-dependent transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Kusano, Shuichi; Eizuru, Yoshito

    2010-06-04

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV)-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) protein has been reported to interact with glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) and to negatively regulate its activity, leading to stimulation of GSK-3{beta}-dependent {beta}-catenin degradation. We show here that the I-mfa domain proteins, HIC (human I-mfa domain-containing protein) and I-mfa (inhibitor of MyoD family a), interacted in vivo with LANA through their C-terminal I-mfa domains. This interaction affected the intracellular localization of HIC, inhibited the LANA-dependent transactivation of a {beta}-catenin-regulated reporter construct, and decreased the level of the LANA.GSK-3{beta} complex. These data reveal for the first time that I-mfa domain proteins interact with LANA and negatively regulate LANA-mediated activation of Wnt signaling-dependent transcription by inhibiting the formation of the LANA.GSK-3{beta} complex.

  13. Functional analysis of the zinc cluster domain of the CYP1 (HAP1) complex regulator in heme-sufficient and heme-deficient yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Defranoux, N; Gaisne, M; Verdière, J

    1994-03-01

    CYP1 determines the expression of several genes whose transcription is heme-dependent in yeast. It exerts regulatory functions even in the absence of heme, usually considered to be its effector. It mediates both positive and negative effects, depending on the target gene and on the redox state of the cell. In the presence of heme, it binds through a cysteine-rich domain in which a histidine residue occupies the position of the sixth and essential cysteine of the otherwise classical zinc cluster DNA-binding domain exemplified by GAL4. We constructed specific missense mutations in the potential CYP1 zinc cluster domain by site-directed mutagenesis and looked for regulatory effects of the mutated proteins under specific physiological conditions. We show that CYP1 does belong to the zinc cluster regulatory family since a sixth essential cysteine residue is indeed present, albeit at a modified position when compared to the consensus sequence. We also show that the amino acid preceding the first cysteine residue of the DNA-binding domain critically affects the efficiency of regulation both in the presence and in the absence of heme: mutations known to affect DNA binding under heme-sufficient conditions also affect regulation under heme-deficient conditions. We therefore surmise that regulation under heme-deficient conditions is dependent upon DNA binding. PMID:8152420

  14. Chemical shift assignments and secondary structure prediction of the C-terminal domain of the response regulator BfmR from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Olson, Andrew L; Thompson, Richele J; Melander, Christian; Cavanagh, John

    2014-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for severe nocosomial infections by forming biofilms in healthcare environments. The two-domain response regulator BfmR has been shown to be the master controller for biofilm formation. Inactivation of BfmR resulted in an abolition of pili production and consequently biofilm creation. Here we report backbone and sidechain resonance assignments and secondary structure prediction for the C-terminal domain of BfmR (residues 130-238) from A. baumannii.

  15. Side-chain interactions in the regulatory domain of human glutamate dehydrogenase determine basal activity and regulation.

    PubMed

    Mastorodemos, Vasileios; Kanavouras, Konstantinos; Sundaram, Shobana; Providaki, Maria; Petraki, Zoe; Kokkinidis, Michael; Zaganas, Ioannis; Logothetis, Diomedes E; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) is central to the metabolism of glutamate, a major excitatory transmitter in mammalian central nervous system (CNS). hGDH1 is activated by ADP and L-leucine and powerfully inhibited by GTP. Besides this housekeeping hGDH1, duplication led to an hGDH2 isoform that is expressed in the human brain dissociating its function from GTP control. The novel enzyme has reduced basal activity (4-6% of capacity) while remaining remarkably responsive to ADP/L-leucine activation. While the molecular basis of this evolutionary adaptation remains unclear, substitution of Ser for Arg443 in hGDH1 is shown to diminish basal activity (< 2% of capacity) and abrogate L-leucine activation. To explore whether the Arg443Ser mutation disrupts hydrogen bonding between Arg443 and Ser409 of adjacent monomers in the regulatory domain ('antenna'), we replaced Ser409 by Arg or Asp in hGDH1. The Ser409Arg-1 change essentially replicated the Arg443Ser-1 mutation effects. Molecular dynamics simulation predicted that Ser409 and Arg443 of neighboring monomers come in close proximity in the open conformation and that introduction of Ser443-1 or Arg409-1 causes them to separate with the swap mutation (Arg409/Ser443) reinstating their proximity. A swapped Ser409Arg/Arg443Ser-1 mutant protein, obtained in recombinant form, regained most of the wild-type hGDH1 properties. Also, when Ser443 was replaced by Arg443 in hGDH2 (as occurs in hGDH1), the Ser443Arg-2 mutant acquired most of the hGDH1 properties. Hence, side-chain interactions between 409 and 443 positions in the 'antenna' region of hGDHs are crucial for basal catalytic activity, allosteric regulation, and relative resistance to thermal inactivation. PMID:25620628

  16. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of Methyl CpG Binding Domain Protein 2 Regulates Chromatin Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Annette; Zhang, Peng; Allmann, Lena; Meilinger, Daniela; Bertulat, Bianca; Eck, Daniel; Hofstaetter, Maria; Bartolomei, Giody; Hottiger, Michael O.; Schreiber, Valérie; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic information encoded in the genomic DNA methylation pattern is translated by methylcytosine binding proteins like MeCP2 into chromatin topology and structure and gene activity states. We have shown previously that the MeCP2 level increases during differentiation and that it causes large-scale chromatin reorganization, which is disturbed by MeCP2 Rett syndrome mutations. Phosphorylation and other posttranslational modifications of MeCP2 have been described recently to modulate its function. Here we show poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of endogenous MeCP2 in mouse brain tissue. Consequently, we found that MeCP2 induced aggregation of pericentric heterochromatin and that its chromatin accumulation was enhanced in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1−/− compared with wild-type cells. We mapped the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation domains and engineered MeCP2 mutation constructs to further analyze potential effects on DNA binding affinity and large-scale chromatin remodeling. Single or double deletion of the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated regions and PARP inhibition increased the heterochromatin clustering ability of MeCP2. Increased chromatin clustering may reflect increased binding affinity. In agreement with this hypothesis, we found that PARP-1 deficiency significantly increased the chromatin binding affinity of MeCP2 in vivo. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into the regulation of MeCP2-mediated, higher-order chromatin architecture and suggest therapeutic opportunities to manipulate MeCP2 function. PMID:26772194

  17. Structures of the inducer-binding domain of pentachlorophenol-degrading gene regulator PcpR from Sphingobium chlorophenolicum.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Robert P; Moural, Timothy W; Lewis, Kevin M; Onofrei, David; Xun, Luying; Kang, ChulHee

    2014-01-01

    PcpR is a LysR-type transcription factor from Sphingobium chlorophenolicum L-1 that is responsible for the activation of several genes involved in polychlorophenol degradation. PcpR responds to several polychlorophenols in vivo. Here, we report the crystal structures of the inducer-binding domain of PcpR in the apo-form and binary complexes with pentachlorophenol (PCP) and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP). Both X-ray crystal structures and isothermal titration calorimetry data indicated the association of two PCP molecules per PcpR, but only one 2,4,6-TCP molecule. The hydrophobic nature and hydrogen bonds of one binding cavity allowed the tight association of both PCP (Kd = 110 nM) and 2,4,6-TCP (Kd = 22.8 nM). However, the other cavity was unique to PCP with much weaker affinity (Kd = 70 μM) and thus its significance was not clear. Neither phenol nor benzoic acid displayed any significant affinity to PcpR, indicating a role of chlorine substitution in ligand specificity. When PcpR is compared with TcpR, a LysR-type regulator controlling the expression of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol degradation in Cupriavidus necator JMP134, most of the residues constituting the two inducer-binding cavities of PcpR are different, except for their general hydrophobic nature. The finding concurs that PcpR uses various polychlorophenols as long as it includes 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, as inducers; whereas TcpR is only responsive to 2,4,6-trichlorophenol. PMID:25397598

  18. Ape1 regulates WNT/β-catenin signaling through its redox functional domain in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shaojie; Zhu, Lina; Tang, Haimei; Zhang, Miaofeng; Chen, Zhihua; Fei, Jian; Han, Baosan; Zou, Gang-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (Ape1/Ref-1, Ape1) is a multifunctional protein that is upregulated in human pancreatic cancer. Ape1 redox domain plays an essential role in regulating the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during physiological metabolism and pathological stress. In the present study, we explored whether Ape1 and ROS affect WNT/β-catenin signaling. We used E3330, a small molecule inhibitor of the redox activity of Ape1, and a siRNA approach to knock down Ape1, in two human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Inhibition of Ape1 resulted in growth suppression of pancreatic cancer cells, increased ROS levels, upregulation of β-catenin and c-myc and downregulation of cyclin D1. Consistent with these data, overexpression of Ape1 in pancreatic cancer cells reduced ROS and c-myc levels and increased cyclin D1 levels. Moreover, treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with H2O2 to induce oxidative stress resulted in upregulated ROS levels, decreased Ape1 at both the mRNA and protein level, and alterations in WNT/β-catenin pathway components. Finally, treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with the WNT/β-catenin inhibitor IWR-1 resulted in growth inhibition, which was greatly enhanced when combined with E3330 treatment. In summary, our results demonstrate that ROS is an important intracellular messenger that can modulate WNT/β‑catenin signaling. The present study provides interesting new insight into crosstalk between the redox function of Ape1 and WNT/β-catenin signaling in cancer cells. Furthermore, our data show that the combination of Ape1 and WNT inhibitors enhanced the inhibition of pancreatic cell proliferation. These results provide a promising novel therapeutic strategy for treating pancreatic cancer in future.

  19. Regulation of myostatin in vivo by growth and differentiation factor-associated serum protein-1: a novel protein with protease inhibitor and follistatin domains.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jennifer J; Qiu, Yongchang; Hewick, Rodney M; Wolfman, Neil M

    2003-06-01

    Myostatin, a member of the TGFbeta superfamily, is a potent and specific negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. In serum, myostatin circulates as part of a latent complex containing myostatin propeptide and/or follistatin-related gene (FLRG). Here, we report the identification of an additional protein associated with endogenous myostatin in normal mouse and human serum, discovered by affinity purification and mass spectrometry. This protein, which we have named growth and differentiation factor-associated serum protein-1 (GASP-1), contains multiple domains associated with protease-inhibitory proteins, including a whey acidic protein domain, a Kazal domain, two Kunitz domains, and a netrin domain. GASP-1 also contains a domain homologous to the 10-cysteine repeat found in follistatin, a protein that binds and inhibits activin, another member of the TGFbeta superfamily. We have cloned mouse GASP-1 and shown that it inhibits the biological activity of mature myostatin, but not activin, in a luciferase reporter gene assay. Surprisingly, recombinant GASP-1 binds directly not only to mature myostatin, but also to the myostatin propeptide. Thus, GASP-1 represents a novel class of inhibitory TGFbeta binding proteins.

  20. Munc13 C[subscript 2]B domain is an activity-dependent Ca[superscript 2+] regulator of synaptic exocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Ok-Ho; Lu, Jun; Rhee, Jeong-Seop; Tomchick, Diana R.; Pang, Zhiping P.; Wojcik, Sonja M.; Camacho-Perez, Marcial; Brose, Nils; Machius, Mischa; Rizo, Josep; Rosenmund, Christian; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2010-04-26

    Munc13 is a multidomain protein present in presynaptic active zones that mediates the priming and plasticity of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here we use biophysical, biochemical and electrophysiological approaches to show that the central C{sub 2}B domain of Munc13 functions as a Ca{sup 2+} regulator of short-term synaptic plasticity. The crystal structure of the C{sub 2}B domain revealed an unusual Ca{sup 2+}-binding site with an amphipathic {alpha}-helix. This configuration confers onto the C{sub 2}B domain unique Ca{sup 2+}-dependent phospholipid-binding properties that favor phosphatidylinositolphosphates. A mutation that inactivated Ca{sup 2+}-dependent phospholipid binding to the C{sub 2}B domain did not alter neurotransmitter release evoked by isolated action potentials, but it did depress release evoked by action-potential trains. In contrast, a mutation that increased Ca{sup 2+}-dependent phosphatidylinositolbisphosphate binding to the C{sub 2}B domain enhanced release evoked by isolated action potentials and by action-potential trains. Our data suggest that, during repeated action potentials, Ca{sup 2+} and phosphatidylinositolphosphate binding to the Munc13 C{sub 2}B domain potentiate synaptic vesicle exocytosis, thereby offsetting synaptic depression induced by vesicle depletion.

  1. A model for regulation by SynGAP-α1 of binding of synaptic proteins to PDZ-domain 'Slots' in the postsynaptic density

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G; Mastro, Tara L; Schenker, Leslie T; Vielmetter, Jost; Hu, Rebecca; Iancu, Ariella; Reghunathan, Meera; Bannon, Barry Dylan; Kennedy, Mary B

    2016-01-01

    SynGAP is a Ras/Rap GTPase-activating protein (GAP) that is a major constituent of postsynaptic densities (PSDs) from mammalian forebrain. Its α1 isoform binds to all three PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domains of PSD-95, the principal PSD scaffold, and can occupy as many as 15% of these PDZ domains. We present evidence that synGAP-α1 regulates the composition of the PSD by restricting binding to the PDZ domains of PSD-95. We show that phosphorylation by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and Polo-like kinase-2 (PLK2) decreases its affinity for the PDZ domains by several fold, which would free PDZ domains for occupancy by other proteins. Finally, we show that three critical postsynaptic signaling proteins that bind to the PDZ domains of PSD-95 are present in higher concentration in PSDs isolated from mice with a heterozygous deletion of synGAP. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16813.001 PMID:27623146

  2. Binding of a sequence-specific single-stranded DNA-binding factor to the simian virus 40 core origin inverted repeat domain is cell cycle regulated.

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, E P; Roome, J M; Wahl, A F

    1993-01-01

    The inverted repeat domain (IR domain) within the simian virus 40 origin of replication is the site of initial DNA melting prior to the onset of DNA synthesis. The domain had previously been shown to be bound by a cellular factor in response to DNA damage. We demonstrate that two distinct cellular components bind opposite strands of the IR domain. Replication protein A (RPA), previously identified as a single-stranded DNA binding protein required for origin-specific DNA replication in vitro, is shown to have a preference for the pyrimidine-rich strand. A newly described component, IR factor B (IRF-B), specifically recognizes the opposite strand. IRF-B binding activity in nuclear extract varies significantly with cell proliferation and the cell cycle, so that binding of IRF-B to the IR domain is negatively correlated with the onset of DNA synthesis. Loss of IRF-B binding from the nucleus also occurs in response to cellular DNA damage. UV cross-linking indicates that the core binding component of IRF-B is a protein of ca. 34 kDa. We propose that RPA and IRF-B bind opposite strands of the IR domain and together may function in the regulation of origin activation. Images PMID:8380226

  3. Hippo Component TAZ Functions as a Co-repressor and Negatively Regulates ΔNp63 Transcription through TEA Domain (TEAD) Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Sama, Ivette; Zhao, Yulei; Lai, Dulcie; Janse van Rensburg, Helena J; Hao, Yawei; Yang, Xiaolong

    2015-07-01

    Transcriptional co-activator with a PDZ binding domain (TAZ) is a WW domain-containing transcriptional co-activator and a core component of an emerging Hippo signaling pathway that regulates organ size, tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance. TAZ regulates these biological functions by up-regulating downstream cellular genes through transactivation of transcription factors such as TEAD and TTF1. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying TAZ-induced tumorigenesis, we have recently performed a gene expression profile analysis by overexpressing TAZ in mammary cells. In addition to the TAZ-up-regulated genes that were confirmed in our previous studies, we identified a large number of cellular genes that were down-regulated by TAZ. In this study, we have confirmed these down-regulated genes (including cytokines, chemokines, and p53 gene family members) as bona fide downstream transcriptional targets of TAZ. By using human breast and lung epithelial cells, we have further characterized ΔNp63, a p53 gene family member, and shown that TAZ suppresses ΔNp63 mRNA, protein expression, and promoter activity through interaction with the transcription factor TEAD. We also show that TEAD can inhibit ΔNp63 promoter activity and that TAZ can directly interact with ΔNp63 promoter-containing TEAD binding sites. Finally, we provide functional evidence that down-regulation of ΔNp63 by TAZ may play a role in regulating cell migration. Altogether, this study provides novel evidence that the Hippo component TAZ can function as a co-repressor and regulate biological functions by negatively regulating downstream cellular genes.

  4. Ligation of cancer cell surface GRP78 with antibodies directed against its COOH-terminal domain up-regulates p53 activity and promotes apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Misra, Uma Kant; Mowery, Yvonne; Kaczowka, Steven; Pizzo, Salvatore Vincent

    2009-05-01

    Binding of activated α(2)-macroglobulin to GRP78 on the surface of human prostate cancer cells promotes proliferation by activating signaling cascades. Autoantibodies directed against the activated α(2)-macroglobulin binding site in the NH(2)-terminal domain of GRP78 are receptor agonists, and their presence in the sera of cancer patients is a poor prognostic indicator. We now show that antibodies directed against the GRP78 COOH-terminal domain inhibit [(3)H]thymidine uptake and cellular proliferation while promoting apoptosis as measured by DNA fragmentation, Annexin V assay, and clonogenic assay. These antibodies are receptor antagonists blocking autophosphorylation and activation of GRP78. Using 1-LN and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines and A375 melanoma cells, which express GRP78 on their cell surface, we show that antibodies directed against the COOH-terminal domain of GRP78 up-regulate the tumor suppressor protein p53. By contrast, antibody directed against the NH(2)-terminal domain of GRP78 shows negligible effects on p53 expression. PC-3 prostate cancer cells, which do not express GRP78 on their cell surface, are refractory to the effects of anti-GRP78 antibodies directed against either the COOH- or NH(2)-terminal domains. However, overexpression of GRP78 in PC-3 cells causes translocation of GRP78 to the cell surface and promotes apoptosis when these cells are treated with antibody directed against its COOH-terminal domain. Silencing GRP78 or p53 expression by RNA interference significantly blocked the increase in p53 induced by antibodies. Antibodies directed against the COOH-terminal domain may play a therapeutic role in cancer patients whose tumors trigger the production of autoantibodies directed against the NH(2)-terminal domain of GRP78.

  5. Slc26a9 is inhibited by the R-region of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator via the STAS domain.

    PubMed

    Chang, Min-Hwang; Plata, Consuelo; Sindic, Aleksandra; Ranatunga, Wasantha K; Chen, An-Ping; Zandi-Nejad, Kambiz; Chan, Kim W; Thompson, James; Mount, David B; Romero, Michael F

    2009-10-01

    SLC26 proteins function as anion exchangers, channels, and sensors. Previous cellular studies have shown that Slc26a3 and Slc26a6 interact with the R-region of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), (R)CFTR, via the Slc26-STAS (sulfate transporter anti-sigma) domain, resulting in mutual transport activation. We recently showed that Slc26a9 has both nCl(-)-HCO(3)(-) exchanger and Cl(-) channel function. In this study, we show that the purified STAS domain of Slc26a9 (a9STAS) binds purified (R)CFTR. When Slc26a9 and (R)CFTR fragments are co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, both Slc26a9-mediated nCl(-)-HCO(3)(-) exchange and Cl(-) currents are almost fully inhibited. Deletion of the Slc26a9 STAS domain (a9-DeltaSTAS) virtually eliminated the Cl(-) currents with only a modest affect on nCl(-)-HCO(3)(-) exchange activity. Co-expression of a9-DeltaSTAS and the (R)CFTR fragment did not alter the residual a9-DeltaSTAS function. Replacing the Slc26a9 STAS domain with the Slc26a6 STAS domain (a6-a9-a6) does not change Slc26a9 function and is no longer inhibited by (R)CFTR. These data indicate that the Slc26a9-STAS domain, like other Slc26-STAS domains, binds CFTR in the R-region. However, unlike previously reported data, this binding interaction inhibits Slc26a9 ion transport activity. These results imply that Slc26-STAS domains may all interact with (R)CFTR but that the physiological outcome is specific to differing Slc26 proteins, allowing for dynamic and acute fine tuning of ion transport for various epithelia.

  6. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors with Tyrosine Kinase Domain Mutations Exhibit Reduced Cbl Association, Poor Ubiquitylation, and Down-regulation but Are Efficiently Internalized

    PubMed Central

    Padrón, David; Sato, Mitsuo; Shay, Jerry W.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Minna, John D.; Roth, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Some non–small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase domain mutations require altered signaling through the EGFR for cell survival and are exquisitely sensitive to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. EGFR down-regulation was impaired in two NSCLCs with EGFR tyrosine kinase domain mutations. The mutant receptors were poorly ubiquitylated and exhibited decreased association with the ubiquitin ligase Cbl. Over-expression of Cbl increased the degradation of EGFR. Treatment with geldanamycin, an inhibitor of the chaperone heat shock protein 90, also increased both wild-type and mutant EGFR degradation without affecting internalization. The down-regulation of the mutant EGFRs was still impaired when they were stably expressed in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Thus, the mutations that altered signaling also decreased the interaction of EGFRs with the mechanisms responsible for endosomal sorting. PMID:17699773

  7. Structure of the regulatory domain of the LysR family regulator NMB2055 (MetR-like protein) from Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Sainsbury, Sarah; Ren, Jingshan; Saunders, Nigel J.; Stuart, David I.; Owens, Raymond J.

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structure of the regulatory domain of NMB2055, a putative MetR regulator from Neisseria meningitidis, is reported at 2.5 Å resolution. The structure revealed that there is a disulfide bond inside the predicted effector-binding pocket of the regulatory domain. Mutation of the cysteines (Cys103 and Cys106) that form the disulfide bond to serines resulted in significant changes to the structure of the effector pocket. Taken together with the high degree of conservation of these cysteine residues within MetR-related transcription factors, it is suggested that the Cys103 and Cys106 residues play an important role in the function of MetR regulators. PMID:22750853

  8. The C-terminal region of the transcriptional regulator THAP11 forms a parallel coiled-coil domain involved in protein dimerization.

    PubMed

    Cukier, Cyprian D; Maveyraud, Laurent; Saurel, Olivier; Guillet, Valérie; Milon, Alain; Gervais, Virginie

    2016-06-01

    Thanatos associated protein 11 (THAP11) is a cell cycle and cell growth regulator differentially expressed in cancer cells. THAP11 belongs to a distinct family of transcription factors recognizing specific DNA sequences via an atypical zinc finger motif and regulating diverse cellular processes. Outside the extensively characterized DNA-binding domain, THAP proteins vary in size and predicted domains, for which structural data are still lacking. We report here the crystal structure of the C-terminal region of human THAP11 protein, providing the first 3D structure of a coiled-coil motif from a THAP family member. We further investigate the stability, dynamics and oligomeric properties of the determined structure combining molecular dynamics simulations and biophysical experiments. Our results show that the C-ter region of THAP11 forms a left-handed parallel homo-dimeric coiled-coil structure possessing several unusual features. PMID:26975212

  9. The N-terminal Domain of SIRT1 Is a Positive Regulator of Endogenous SIRT1-dependent Deacetylation and Transcriptional Outputs

    PubMed Central

    Ghisays, Fiorella; Brace, Cynthia S.; Yackly, Shawn M.; Kwon, Hyock Joo; Mills, Kathryn F.; Kashentseva, Elena; Dimitriev, Igor P.; Curiel, David T.; Imai, Shin-ichiro; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 regulates energy metabolism, responses to stress, and aging by deacetylating many different proteins, including histones and transcription factors. The mechanisms controlling SIRT1 enzymatic activity are complex and incompletely characterized, yet essential for understanding how to develop therapeutics that target SIRT1. Here we demonstrate that the N-terminal domain of SIRT1 (NTERM) can trans-activate deacetylation activity by physically interacting with endogenous SIRT1 and promoting its association with the deacetylation substrate NF-κB p65. Two motifs within the NTERM domain contribute to activation of SIRT1-dependent activities, and expression of one of these motifs in mice is sufficient to lower fasting glucose levels and improve glucose tolerance in a manner similar to overexpression of SIRT1. Our results provide new insights into the regulation of SIRT1 activity and a rationale for pharmacological control of SIRT1-dependent activities. PMID:25772354

  10. Abl Interactor 1 (Abi-1) Wave-Binding and SNARE Domains Regulate Its Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling, Lamellipodium Localization, and Wave-1 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Echarri, Asier; Lai, Margaret J.; Robinson, Matthew R.; Pendergast, Ann Marie

    2004-01-01

    The Abl interactor 1 (Abi-1) protein has been implicated in the regulation of actin dynamics and localizes to the tips of lamellipodia and filopodia. Here, we show that Abi-1 binds the actin nucleator protein Wave-1 through an amino-terminal Wave-binding (WAB) domain and that disruption of the Abi-1-Wave-1 interaction prevents Abi-1 from reaching the tip of the lamellipodium. Abi-1 binds to the Wave homology domain of Wave-1, a region that is required for translocation of Wave-1 to the lamellipodium. Mouse embryo fibroblasts that lack one allele of Abi-1 and are homozygous null for the related Abi-2 protein exhibit decreased Wave-1 protein levels. This phenotype is rescued by Abi-1 proteins that retain Wave-1 binding but not by Abi-1 mutants that cannot bind to Wave-1. Moreover, we uncovered an overlapping SNARE domain in the amino terminus of Abi-1 that interacts with Syntaxin-1, a SNARE family member. Further, we demonstrated that Abi-1 shuttles in and out of the nucleus in a leptomycin B (LMB)-dependent manner and that complete nuclear translocation of Abi-1 in the absence of LMB requires the combined inactivation of the SNARE, WAB, and SH3 domains of Abi-1. Thus, Abi-1 undergoes nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and functions at the leading edge to regulate Wave-1 localization and protein levels. PMID:15143189

  11. The N-terminal end of the catalytic domain of SRC kinase Hck is a conformational switch implicated in long-range allosteric regulation.

    PubMed

    Banavali, Nilesh K; Roux, Benoît

    2005-11-01

    Signal transduction in cell growth and proliferation involves regulation of kinases through long-range allostery between remote protein regions. Molecular dynamics free energy calculations are used to clarify the coupling between the catalytic domain of Src kinase Hck and its N-terminal end connecting to the regulatory SH2 and SH3 modules. The N-terminal end is stable in the orientation required for the regulatory modules to remain properly bound only in the inactive catalytic domain. In the active catalytic domain, the N-terminal end prefers a different conformation consistent with dissociation of the regulatory modules. The free energy surface shows that the N-terminal end acts as a reversible two-state conformational switch coupling the catalytic domain to the regulatory modules. Structural analogy with insulin receptor kinase and c-Src suggests that such reversible conformational switching in a critical hinge region could be a common mechanism in long-range allosteric regulation of protein kinase activity.

  12. The carbonic anhydrase domain protein nacrein is expressed in the epithelial cells of the mantle and acts as a negative regulator in calcification in the mollusc Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Fumiko; Kohno, Jun

    2005-03-01

    Signals and organic matrix proteins secreted from the mantle are critical for the development of shells in molluscs. Nacrein, which is composed of a carbonic anhydrase domain and a Gly-X-Asn repeat domain, is one of the organic matrix proteins that accumulates in shells. In situ hybridization revealed that nacrein was expressed in the outer epithelial cells of the mantle of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. The recombinant nacrein protein inhibited the precipitation of calcium carbonate from a saturated solution containing CaCl2 and NaHCO3, indicating that it can act as a negative regulator for calcification in the shells of molluscs. Because deletion of the Gly-X-Asn repeat domain of nacrein had a significant effect on the ability of nacrein to inhibit the precipitation of calcium carbonate, it is conceivable that the repeat domain has a primary role in the inhibitory function of nacrein in shell formation. Together these studies suggest that nacrein functions as a negative regulator in calcification in the extrapallial space between the shell and the mantle by inhibiting the precipitation of CaCO3.

  13. Conserved Cysteine Residue in the DNA-Binding Domain of the Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 E2 Protein Confers Redox Regulation of the DNA- Binding Activity in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Alison A.; Klausner, Richard D.; Howley, Peter M.

    1992-08-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 open reading frame encodes three proteins involved in viral DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. These polypeptides share a carboxyl-terminal domain with a specific DNA-binding activity; through this domain the E2 polypeptides form dimers. In this study, we demonstrate the inhibition of E2 DNA binding in vitro by reagents that oxidize or otherwise chemically modify the free sulfydryl groups of reactive cysteine residues. However, these reagents had no effect on DNA-binding activity when the E2 polypeptide was first bound to DNA, suggesting that the free sulfydryl group(s) may be protected by DNA binding. Sensitivity to sulfydryl modification was mapped to a cysteine residue at position 340 in the E2 DNA-binding domain, an amino acid that is highly conserved among the E2 proteins of different papillomaviruses. Replacement of this residue with other amino acids abrogated the sensitivity to oxidation-reduction changes but did not affect the DNA-binding property of the E2 protein. These results suggest that papillomavirus DNA replication and transcriptional regulation could be modulated through the E2 proteins by changes in the intracellular redox environment. Furthermore, a motif consisting of a reactive cysteine residue carboxyl-terminal to a lysine residue in a basic region of the DNA-binding domain is a feature common to a number of transcriptional regulatory proteins that, like E2, are subject to redox regulation. Thus, posttranslational regulation of the activity of these proteins by the intracellular redox environment may be a general phenomenon.

  14. Regulation of the Expression of Plant Resistance Gene SNC1 by a Protein with a Conserved BAT2 Domain1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingzhong; Tessaro, Mark J.; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuelin

    2010-01-01

    Plant Resistance (R) genes encode immune receptors that recognize pathogens and activate defense responses. Because of fitness costs associated with maintaining R protein-mediated resistance, expression levels of R genes have to be tightly regulated. However, mechanisms on how R-gene expression is regulated are poorly understood. Here we show that MODIFIER OF snc1, 1 (MOS1) regulates the expression of SUPPRESSOR OF npr1-1, CONSTITUTIVE1 (SNC1), which encodes a Toll/interleukin receptor-nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat type of R protein in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In the mos1 loss-of-function mutant plants, snc1 expression is repressed and constitutive resistance responses mediated by snc1 are lost. The repression of snc1 expression in mos1 is released by knocking out DECREASE IN DNA METHYLATION1. In mos1 mutants, DNA methylation in a region upstream of SNC1 is altered. Furthermore, expression of snc1 transgenes using the native promoter does not require MOS1, indicating that regulation of SNC1 expression by MOS1 is at the chromatin level. Map-based cloning of MOS1 revealed that it encodes a novel protein with a HLA-B ASSOCIATED TRANSCRIPT2 (BAT2) domain that is conserved in plants and animals. Our study on MOS1 suggests that BAT2 domain-containing proteins may function in regulation of gene expression at chromatin level. PMID:20439546

  15. ε-Poly-L-lysine peptide chain length regulated by the linkers connecting the transmembrane domains of ε-Poly-L-lysine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Yoshimitsu; Kito, Naoko; Kita, Akihiro; Imokawa, Yuuki; Yamanaka, Kazuya; Maruyama, Chitose; Katano, Hajime

    2014-08-01

    ε-Poly-l-lysine (ε-PL), consisting of 25 to 35 l-lysine residues with linkages between the α-carboxyl groups and ε-amino groups, is produced by Streptomyces albulus NBRC14147. ε-PL synthetase (Pls) is a membrane protein with six transmembrane domains (TM1 to TM6) as well as both an adenylation domain and a thiolation domain, characteristic of the nonribosomal peptide synthetases. Pls directly generates ε-PL chain length diversity (25- to 35-mer), but the processes that control the chain length of ε-PL during the polymerization reaction are still not fully understood. Here, we report on the identification of Pls amino acid residues involved in the regulation of the ε-PL chain length. From approximately 12,000 variants generated by random mutagenesis, we found 8 Pls variants that produced shorter chains of ε-PL. These variants have one or more mutations in two linker regions connecting the TM1 and TM2 domains and the TM3 and TM4 domains. In the Pls catalytic mechanism, the growing chain of ε-PL is not tethered to the enzyme, implying that the enzyme must hold the growing chain until the polymerization reaction is complete. Our findings reveal that the linker regions are important contributors to grasp the growing chain of ε-PL. PMID:24907331

  16. Interaction between the tRNA-binding and C-terminal domains of Yeast Gcn2 regulates kinase activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lageix, Sebastien; Zhang, Jinwei; Rothenburg, Stefan; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2015-02-01

    The stress-activated protein kinase Gcn2 regulates protein synthesis by phosphorylation of translation initiation factor eIF2α. Gcn2 is activated in amino acid-deprived cells by binding of uncharged tRNA to the regulatory domain related to histidyl-tRNA synthetase, but the molecular mechanism of activation is unclear. We used a genetic approach to identify a key regulatory surface in Gcn2 that is proximal to the predicted active site of the HisRS domain and likely remodeled by tRNA binding. Mutations leading to amino acid substitutions on this surface were identified that activate Gcn2 at low levels of tRNA binding (Gcd- phenotype), while other substitutions block kinase activation (Gcn- phenotype), in some cases without altering tRNA binding by Gcn2 in vitro. Remarkably, the Gcn- substitutions increase affinity of the HisRS domain for the C-terminal domain (CTD), previously implicated as a kinase autoinhibitory segment, in a manner dampened by HisRS domain Gcd- substitutions and by amino acid starvation in vivo. Moreover, tRNA specifically antagonizes HisRS/CTD association in vitro. These findings support a model wherein HisRS-CTD interaction facilitates the autoinhibitory function of the CTD in nonstarvation conditions, with tRNA binding eliciting kinase activation by weakening HisRS-CTD association with attendant disruption of the autoinhibitory KD-CTD interaction.

  17. Role of PRDM16 and its PR domain in the epigenetic regulation of myogenic and adipogenic genes during transdifferentiation of C2C12 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Wang, Jinquan; Jiang, Zheng; Guo, Feng; Soloway, Paul D; Zhao, Ruqian

    2015-10-10

    The positive regulatory domain containing 16 (PRDM16) is commonly regarded as a "switch" controlling the transdifferentiation of myoblasts to brown adipocytes. The N-positive regulatory (PR) domain, which is highly homologous to SET domain, is a characteristic structure for the PRDM family. Many SET domain containing proteins and several PRDM members have been found to possess histone methyltransferase activity, yet the role of PRDM16 and its PR domain in the epigenetic regulation of myogenic and adipogenic genes during myoblasts/adipocytes transdifferentiation remains unexplored. In this study, we transfected C2C12 myoblasts to stably express PRDM16 and observed the repression of myogenic genes and activation of adipogenic genes at both proliferation and differentiation stages. Ectopic PRDM16-induced reprogramming of myogenic and adipogenic genes was associated with the hypermethylation on some CpG sites in the enhancer or promoter of MyoD and myogenin, but the methylation status of PPARγ promoter was not affected. C2C12 cells expressing truncated PRDM16 lacking PR domain (ΔPR-PRDM16) demonstrated attenuation of both adipogenic and myogenic potentials, indicated by PPARγ inactivation and decreased triglyceride deposition, as well as a downregulation of MyoD, MyHC and MCK genes, as compared with C2C12 cells expressing intact PRDM16. Furthermore, C2C12 cells expressing ΔPR-PRDM16 exhibited significant differences in histone modifications on the promoters of MyoD and PPARγ genes. Taken together, PRDM16-induced C2C12 transdifferentiation is associated with alterations in CpG methylation of myogenic factors, and PR domain affects both myogenesis and adipogenesis with modified histone methylation marks on MyoD and PPARγ promoters.

  18. Identification of flgZ as a flagellar gene encoding a PilZ domain protein that regulates swimming motility and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Navazo, Ana; Barahona, Emma; Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; González de Heredia, Elena; Baena, Irene; Martín-Martín, Irene; Rivilla, Rafael; Martín, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase enzymatic activities control c-di-GMP levels modulating planktonic versus sessile lifestyle behavior in bacteria. The PilZ domain is described as a sensor of c-di-GMP intracellular levels and the proteins containing a PilZ domain represent the best studied class of c-di-GMP receptors forming part of the c-di-GMP signaling cascade. In P. fluorescens F113 we have found two diguanylate cyclases (WspR, SadC) and one phosphodiesterase (BifA) implicated in regulation of swimming motility and biofilm formation. Here we identify a flgZ gene located in a flagellar operon encoding a protein that contains a PilZ domain. Moreover, we show that FlgZ subcellular localization depends on the c-di-GMP intracellular levels. The overexpression analysis of flgZ in P. fluorescens F113 and P. putida KT2440 backgrounds reveal a participation of FlgZ in Pseudomonas swimming motility regulation. Besides, the epistasis of flgZ over wspR and bifA clearly shows that c-di-GMP intracellular levels produced by the enzymatic activity of the diguanylate cyclase WspR and the phosphodiesterase BifA regulates biofilm formation through FlgZ.

  19. A Conserved C-Terminal Domain of the Aspergillus fumigatus Developmental Regulator MedA Is Required for Nuclear Localization, Adhesion and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Al Abdallah, Qusai; Choe, Se-In; Campoli, Paolo; Baptista, Stefanie; Gravelat, Fabrice N.; Lee, Mark J.; Sheppard, Donald C.

    2012-01-01

    MedA is a developmental regulator that is conserved in the genome of most filamentous fungi. In the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus MedA regulates conidiogenesis, adherence to host cells, and pathogenicity. The mechanism by which MedA governs these phenotypes remains unknown. Although the nuclear import of MedA orthologues has been reported in other fungi, no nuclear localization signal, DNA-binding domain or other conserved motifs have been identified within MedA. In this work, we performed a deletion analysis of MedA and identified a novel domain within the C-terminal region of the protein, designated MedA346–557, that is necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization of MedA. We further demonstrate that MedA nuclear localization is required for the function of MedA. Surprisingly, expression of the minimal nuclear localization fragment MedA346–557 alone was sufficient to restore conidogenesis, biofilm formation and virulence to the medA mutant strain. Collectively these results suggest that MedA functions in the regulation of transcription, and that the MedA346–557 domain is both necessary and sufficient to mediate MedA function. PMID:23185496

  20. Virulence regulation with Venus flytrap domains: structure and function of the periplasmic moiety of the sensor-kinase BvgS.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Elian; Herrou, Julien; Lensink, Marc F; Wintjens, René; Vagin, Alexey; Lebedev, Andrey; Crosson, Sean; Villeret, Vincent; Locht, Camille; Antoine, Rudy; Jacob-Dubuisson, Françoise

    2015-03-01

    Two-component systems (TCS) represent major signal-transduction pathways for adaptation to environmental conditions, and regulate many aspects of bacterial physiology. In the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis, the TCS BvgAS controls the virulence regulon, and is therefore critical for pathogenicity. BvgS is a prototypical TCS sensor-kinase with tandem periplasmic Venus flytrap (VFT) domains. VFT are bi-lobed domains that typically close around specific ligands using clamshell motions. We report the X-ray structure of the periplasmic moiety of BvgS, an intricate homodimer with a novel architecture. By combining site-directed mutagenesis, functional analyses and molecular modeling, we show that the conformation of the periplasmic moiety determines the state of BvgS activity. The intertwined structure of the periplasmic portion and the different conformation and dynamics of its mobile, membrane-distal VFT1 domains, and closed, membrane-proximal VFT2 domains, exert a conformational strain onto the transmembrane helices, which sets the cytoplasmic moiety in a kinase-on state by default corresponding to the virulent phase of the bacterium. Signaling the presence of negative signals perceived by the periplasmic domains implies a shift of BvgS to a distinct state of conformation and activity, corresponding to the avirulent phase. The response to negative modulation depends on the integrity of the periplasmic dimer, indicating that the shift to the kinase-off state implies a concerted conformational transition. This work lays the bases to understand virulence regulation in Bordetella. As homologous sensor-kinases control virulence features of diverse bacterial pathogens, the BvgS structure and mechanism may pave the way for new modes of targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:25738876

  1. Crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima TM0439: implications for the mechanism of bacterial GntR transcription regulators with Zn2+-binding FCD domains

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Meiying; Cooper, David; Grossoehmerb, Nickolas; Yu, Minmin; Hung, Li-Wei; Cieslik, Murcin; Derewendaro, Urszula; Lesley, Scott; Wilson, Ian; Giedrocb, David; Derewenda, Zygmunt

    2009-06-06

    The GntR superfamily of dimeric transcription factors, with more than 6200 members encoded in bacterial genomes, are characterized by N-terminal winged helix (WH) DNA-binding domains and diverse C-terminal, regulatory domains, which provide a basis for the classification of the constituent families. The largest of these families, FadR, contains nearly 3000 proteins with all a-helical regulatory domains classified into two related Pfam families: FadR{_}C and FCD. Only two crystal structures of the FadR family members, i.e. the E. coli FadR protein and the LldR from C. glutamicum, have been described to date in literature. Here we describe the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain, found in the Thermotoga maritima genome. The FCD domain is similar to that of the LldR regulator, and contains a buried metal binding site. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy and Trp fluorescence, we show that the recombinant protein contains bound Ni{sup 2+} ions, but it is able to bind Zn{sup 2+} with K{sub D} < 70 nM . We conclude that Zn{sup 2+} is the likely physiological metal, where it may perform either or both structural and regulatory roles. Finally, we compare the TM0439 structure to two other FadR family structures recently deposited by Structural Genomics consortia. The results call for a revision in the classification of the FadR family of transcription factors.

  2. Virulence regulation with Venus flytrap domains: structure and function of the periplasmic moiety of the sensor-kinase BvgS.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Elian; Herrou, Julien; Lensink, Marc F; Wintjens, René; Vagin, Alexey; Lebedev, Andrey; Crosson, Sean; Villeret, Vincent; Locht, Camille; Antoine, Rudy; Jacob-Dubuisson, Françoise

    2015-03-01

    Two-component systems (TCS) represent major signal-transduction pathways for adaptation to environmental conditions, and regulate many aspects of bacterial physiology. In the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis, the TCS BvgAS controls the virulence regulon, and is therefore critical for pathogenicity. BvgS is a prototypical TCS sensor-kinase with tandem periplasmic Venus flytrap (VFT) domains. VFT are bi-lobed domains that typically close around specific ligands using clamshell motions. We report the X-ray structure of the periplasmic moiety of BvgS, an intricate homodimer with a novel architecture. By combining site-directed mutagenesis, functional analyses and molecular modeling, we show that the conformation of the periplasmic moiety determines the state of BvgS activity. The intertwined structure of the periplasmic portion and the different conformation and dynamics of its mobile, membrane-distal VFT1 domains, and closed, membrane-proximal VFT2 domains, exert a conformational strain onto the transmembrane helices, which sets the cytoplasmic moiety in a kinase-on state by default corresponding to the virulent phase of the bacterium. Signaling the presence of negative signals perceived by the periplasmic domains implies a shift of BvgS to a distinct state of conformation and activity, corresponding to the avirulent phase. The response to negative modulation depends on the integrity of the periplasmic dimer, indicating that the shift to the kinase-off state implies a concerted conformational transition. This work lays the bases to understand virulence regulation in Bordetella. As homologous sensor-kinases control virulence features of diverse bacterial pathogens, the BvgS structure and mechanism may pave the way for new modes of targeted therapeutic interventions.

  3. Vesicle uncoating regulated by SH3-SH3 domain-mediated complex formation between endophilin and intersectin at synapses

    PubMed Central

    Pechstein, Arndt; Gerth, Fabian; Milosevic, Ira; Jäpel, Maria; Eichhorn-Grünig, Marielle; Vorontsova, Olga; Bacetic, Jelena; Maritzen, Tanja; Shupliakov, Oleg; Freund, Christian; Haucke, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmission involves the exo-endocytic cycling of synaptic vesicle (SV) membranes. Endocytic membrane retrieval and clathrin-mediated SV reformation require curvature-sensing and membrane-bending BAR domain proteins such as endophilin A. While their ability to sense and stabilize curved membranes facilitates membrane recruitment of BAR domain proteins, the precise mechanisms by which they are targeted to specific sites of SV recycling has remained unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the multi-domain scaffold intersectin 1 directly associates with endophilin A to facilitate vesicle uncoating at synapses. Knockout mice deficient in intersectin 1 accumulate clathrin-coated vesicles at synapses, a phenotype akin to loss of endophilin function. Intersectin 1/endophilin A1 complex formation is mediated by direct binding of the SH3B domain of intersectin to a non-canonical site on the SH3 domain of endophilin A1. Consistent with this, intersectin-binding defective mutant endophilin A1 fails to rescue clathrin accumulation at neuronal synapses derived from endophilin A1-3 triple knockout (TKO) mice. Our data support a model in which intersectin aids endophilin A recruitment to sites of clathrin-mediated SV recycling, thereby facilitating vesicle uncoating. PMID:25520322

  4. Sequence and nitrate regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana mRNA encoding nitrate reductase, a metalloflavoprotein with three functional domains

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, N.M.; Smith, M.; Bellissimo, D.; Davis, R.W. )

    1988-07-01

    The sequence of nitrate reductase mRNA from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana has been determined. A 3.0-kilobase-long cDNA was isolated from a {lambda}gt10 cDNA library of Arabidopsis leaf poly(A){sup +} RNA. The cDNA hybridized to a 3.2-kilobase mRNA whose level increased 15-fold in response to treatment of the plant with nitrate. An open reading frame encoding a 917 amino acid protein was found in the sequence. This protein is very similar to tobacco nitrate reductase, being >80% identical within a section of 450 amino acids. By comparing the Arabidopsis protein sequence with other protein sequences, three functional domains were deduced: (i) a molybdenum-pterin-binding domain that is similar to the molybdenum-pterin-binding domain of rat liver sulfite oxidase, (ii) a heme-binding domain that is similar to proteins in the cytochrome b{sub 5} superfamily, and (iii) an FAD-binding domain that is similar to NADH-cytochrome b{sub 5} reductase.

  5. Sequence and nitrate regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana mRNA encoding nitrate reductase, a metalloflavoprotein with three functional domains.

    PubMed

    Crawford, N M; Smith, M; Bellissimo, D; Davis, R W

    1988-07-01

    The sequence of nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1) mRNA from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana has been determined. A 3.0-kilobase-long cDNA was isolated from a lambda gt10 cDNA library of Arabidopsis leaf poly(A)+ RNA. The cDNA hybridized to a 3.2-kilobase mRNA whose level increased 15-fold in response to treatment of the plant with nitrate. An open reading frame encoding a 917 amino acid protein was found in the sequence. This protein is very similar to tobacco nitrate reductase, being greater than 80% identical within a section of 450 amino acids. By comparing the Arabidopsis protein sequence with other protein sequences, three functional domains were deduced: (i) a molybdenum-pterin-binding domain that is similar to the molybdenum-pterin-binding domain of rat liver sulfite oxidase, (ii) a heme-binding domain that is similar to proteins in the cytochrome b5 superfamily, and (iii) an FAD-binding domain that is similar to NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. PMID:3393528

  6. The VTLISFG motif in the BH1 domain plays a significant role in regulating the degradation of Mcl-1.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Kang; Chen, Pengxuan; Chang, Donald Choy

    2014-01-01

    Mcl-1 is a member of the Bcl-2 family protein; its degradation is required for the initiation of apoptosis. The mechanism, however, is not yet clearly known. Previously, it was reported that Mcl-1 is degraded through the ubiquitination-mediated pathway and the PEST domain is the motif responsible for promoting this degradation. We found evidence that this may not be true. We generated several Mcl-1 deletion mutants and examined their effects on protein stability. Deletion of the PEST domain did not prevent the degradation of Mcl-1 during apoptosis. The BH1 domain, but not the PEST, BH3 or BH2 domain, exhibited a short half-life. A peptide named "F3" (VTLISFG) in the C-terminus of the BH1 domain appears to be critical for the rapid turnover of Mcl-1. Deletion of F3 from GFP-Mcl-1-ΔPEST retarded the degradation of this mutant. F3 appeared to be the minimum functional sequence of the degradation motif, since deletion of a single residue was sufficient to abrogate its short half-life. Fusion of F3 with p32 resulted in the degradation of p32 during UV-induced apoptosis, while wild type p32 was not affected. Taken together, these findings suggest that F3 (VTLISFG), instead of PEST, is the major motif responsible for the degradation of Mcl-1 during apoptosis.

  7. Self-perceived successful weight regulators are less affected by self-regulatory depletion in the domain of eating behavior.

    PubMed

    Friese, Malte; Engeler, Michèle; Florack, Arnd

    2015-01-01

    Weight loss and maintenance goals are highly prevalent in many affluent societies, but many weight regulators are not successful in the long term. Research started to reveal psychological mechanisms that help successful weight regulators in being successful. In the present study, we tested the assumption that these mechanisms facilitate successful self-regulation particularly under conditions of self-regulatory depletion. Participants exerted or did not exert self-control in a first task before engaging in a taste test of a tempting but unhealthy food. Participants who had initially exerted self-control ate more than participants in the control condition. This effect was reduced in self-perceived successful weight regulators as compared to perceived unsuccessful self-regulators. A reduced susceptibility to self-regulatory depletion may be an important contributor to long-term weight regulation success in successful weight regulators.

  8. The BEACH Domain Protein SPIRRIG Is Essential for Arabidopsis Salt Stress Tolerance and Functions as a Regulator of Transcript Stabilization and Localization

    PubMed Central

    Steffens, Alexandra; Bräutigam, Andrea; Jakoby, Marc; Hülskamp, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Members of the highly conserved class of BEACH domain containing proteins (BDCPs) have been established as broad facilitators of protein–protein interactions and membrane dynamics in the context of human diseases like albinism, bleeding diathesis, impaired cellular immunity, cancer predisposition, and neurological dysfunctions. Also, the Arabidopsis thaliana BDCP SPIRRIG (SPI) is important for membrane integrity, as spi mutants exhibit split vacuoles. In this work, we report a novel molecular function of the BDCP SPI in ribonucleoprotein particle formation. We show that SPI interacts with the P-body core component DECAPPING PROTEIN 1 (DCP1), associates to mRNA processing bodies (P-bodies), and regulates their assembly upon salt stress. The finding that spi mutants exhibit salt hypersensitivity suggests that the local function of SPI at P-bodies is of biological relevance. Transcriptome-wide analysis revealed qualitative differences in the salt stress-regulated transcriptional response of Col-0 and spi. We show that SPI regulates the salt stress-dependent post-transcriptional stabilization, cytoplasmic agglomeration, and localization to P-bodies of a subset of salt stress-regulated mRNAs. Finally, we show that the PH-BEACH domains of SPI and its human homolog FAN (Factor Associated with Neutral sphingomyelinase activation) interact with DCP1 isoforms from plants, mammals, and yeast, suggesting the evolutionary conservation of an association of BDCPs and P-bodies. PMID:26133670

  9. The BEACH Domain Protein SPIRRIG Is Essential for Arabidopsis Salt Stress Tolerance and Functions as a Regulator of Transcript Stabilization and Localization.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Alexandra; Bräutigam, Andrea; Jakoby, Marc; Hülskamp, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Members of the highly conserved class of BEACH domain containing proteins (BDCPs) have been established as broad facilitators of protein-protein interactions and membrane dynamics in the context of human diseases like albinism, bleeding diathesis, impaired cellular immunity, cancer predisposition, and neurological dysfunctions. Also, the Arabidopsis thaliana BDCP SPIRRIG (SPI) is important for membrane integrity, as spi mutants exhibit split vacuoles. In this work, we report a novel molecular function of the BDCP SPI in ribonucleoprotein particle formation. We show that SPI interacts with the P-body core component DECAPPING PROTEIN 1 (DCP1), associates to mRNA processing bodies (P-bodies), and regulates their assembly upon salt stress. The finding that spi mutants exhibit salt hypersensitivity suggests that the local function of SPI at P-bodies is of biological relevance. Transcriptome-wide analysis revealed qualitative differences in the salt stress-regulated transcriptional response of Col-0 and spi. We show that SPI regulates the salt stress-dependent post-transcriptional stabilization, cytoplasmic agglomeration, and localization to P-bodies of a subset of salt stress-regulated mRNAs. Finally, we show that the PH-BEACH domains of SPI and its human homolog FAN (Factor Associated with Neutral sphingomyelinase activation) interact with DCP1 isoforms from plants, mammals, and yeast, suggesting the evolutionary conservation of an association of BDCPs and P-bodies. PMID:26133670

  10. The Chloroplastic Protein THF1 Interacts with the Coiled-Coil Domain of the Disease Resistance Protein N′ and Regulates Light-Dependent Cell Death1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Ken-Taro; Wallon, Thérèse; Sugiwaka, Yuji; Kobayashi, Kappei

    2016-01-01

    One branch of plant immunity is mediated through nucleotide-binding/Leu-rich repeat (NB-LRR) family proteins that recognize specific effectors encoded by pathogens. Members of the I2-like family constitute a well-conserved subgroup of NB-LRRs from Solanaceae possessing a coiled-coil (CC) domain at their N termini. We show here that the CC domains of several I2-like proteins are able to induce a hypersensitive response (HR), a form of programmed cell death associated with disease resistance. Using yeast two-hybrid screens, we identified the chloroplastic protein Thylakoid Formation1 (THF1) as an interacting partner for several I2-like CC domains. Co-immunoprecipitations and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays confirmed that THF1 and I2-like CC domains interact in planta and that these interactions take place in the cytosol. Several HR-inducing I2-like CC domains have a negative effect on the accumulation of THF1, suggesting that the latter is destabilized by active CC domains. To confirm this model, we investigated N′, which recognizes the coat protein of most Tobamoviruses, as a prototypical member of the I2-like family. Transient expression and gene silencing data indicated that THF1 functions as a negative regulator of cell death and that activation of full-length N′ results in the destabilization of THF1. Consistent with the known function of THF1 in maintaining chloroplast homeostasis, we show that the HR induced by N′ is light-dependent. Together, our results define, to our knowledge, novel molecular mechanisms linking light and chloroplasts to the induction of cell death by a subgroup of NB-LRR proteins. PMID:26951433

  11. The FKBP-rapamycin binding domain of human TOR undergoes strong conformational changes in the presence of membrane mimetics with and without the regulator phosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Camargo, Diana C; Link, Nina M; Dames, Sonja A

    2012-06-19

    The Ser/Thr kinase target of rapamycin (TOR) is a central controller of cellular growth and metabolism. Misregulation of TOR signaling is involved in metabolic and neurological disorders and tumor formation. TOR can be inhibited by association of a complex of rapamycin and FKBP12 to the FKBP12-rapamycin binding (FRB) domain. This domain was further proposed to interact with phosphatidic acid (PA), a lipid second messenger present in cellular membranes. Because mammalian TOR has been localized at various cellular membranes and in the nucleus, the output of TOR signaling may depend on its localization, which is expected to be influenced by the interaction with complex partners and regulators in response to cellular signals. Here, we present a detailed characterization of the interaction of the FRB domain with PA and how it is influenced by the surrounding membrane environment. On the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance- and circular dichroism-monitored binding studies using different neutral and negatively charged lipids as well as different membrane mimetics (micelles, bicelles, and liposomes), the FRB domain may function as a conditional peripheral membrane protein. However, the data for the isolated domain just indicate an increased affinity for negatively charged lipids and membrane patches but no specific preference for PA or PA-enriched regions. The membrane-mimetic environment induces strong conformational changes that largely maintain the α-helical secondary structure content but presumably disperse the helices in the lipidic environment. Consistent with overlapping binding surfaces for different lipids and the FKBP12-rapamycin complex, binding of the inhibitor complex protects the FRB domain from interactions with membrane mimetics at lower lipid concentrations.

  12. A Pivotal Role for Pro-335 in Balancing the Dual Functions of Munc18-1 Domain-3a in Regulated Exocytosis*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gayoung Anna; Park, Seungmee; Bin, Na-Ryum; Jung, Chang Hun; Kim, Byungjin; Chandrasegaram, Prashanth; Matsuda, Maiko; Riadi, Indira; Han, Liping; Sugita, Shuzo

    2014-01-01

    Munc18-1 plays essential dual roles in exocytosis: (i) stabilizing and trafficking the central SNARE protein, syntaxin-1 (i.e. chaperoning function), by its domain-1; and (ii) priming/stimulating exocytosis by its domain-3a. Here, we examine whether or not domain-3a also plays a significant role in the chaperoning of syntaxin-1 and, if so, how these dual functions of domain-3a are regulated. We demonstrate that introduction of quintuple mutations (K332E/K333E/P335A/Q336A/Y337L) in domain-3a of Munc18-1 abolishes its ability to bind syntaxin-1 and fails to rescue the level and trafficking of syntaxin-1 as well as to restore exocytosis in Munc18-1/2 double knockdown cells. By contrast, a quadruple mutant (K332E/K333E/Q336A/Y337L) sparing the Pro-335 residue retains all of these capabilities. A single point mutant of P335A reduces the ability to bind syntaxin-1 and rescue syntaxin-1 levels. Nonetheless, it surprisingly outperforms the wild type in the rescue of exocytosis. However, when additional mutations in the neighboring residues are combined with P335A mutation (K332E/K333E/P335A, P335A/Q336A/Y337L), the ability of the Munc18-1 variants to chaperone syntaxin-1 and to rescue exocytosis is strongly impaired. Our results indicate that residues from Lys-332 to Tyr-337 of domain-3a are intimately tied to the chaperoning function of Munc18-1. We also propose that Pro-335 plays a pivotal role in regulating the balance between the dual functions of domain-3a. The hinged conformation of the α-helix containing Pro-335 promotes the syntaxin-1 chaperoning function, whereas the P335A mutation promotes its priming function by facilitating the α-helix to adopt an extended conformation. PMID:25326390

  13. Slit Binding via the Ig1 Domain Is Essential for Midline Repulsion by Drosophila Robo1 but Dispensable for Receptor Expression, Localization, and Regulation in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Brown, Haley E; Reichert, Marie C; Evans, Timothy A

    2015-09-10

    The midline repellant ligand Slit and its Roundabout (Robo) family receptors constitute the major midline repulsive pathway in bilaterians. Slit proteins produced at the midline of the central nervous system (CNS) signal through Robo receptors expressed on axons to prevent them from crossing the midline, and thus regulate connectivity between the two sides of the nervous system. Biochemical structure and interaction studies support a model in which Slit binding to the first immunoglobulin-like (Ig1) domain of Robo receptors activates a repulsive signaling pathway in axonal growth cones. Here, we examine the in vivo functional importance of the Ig1 domain of the Drosophila Robo1 receptor, which controls midline crossing of axons in response to Slit during development of the embryonic CNS. We show that deleting Ig1 from Robo1 disrupts Slit binding in cultured Drosophila cells, and that a Robo1 variant lacking Ig1 (Robo1(∆Ig1)) is unable to promote ectopic midline repulsion in gain-of-function studies in the Drosophila embryonic CNS. We show that the Ig1 domain is not required for proper expression, axonal localization, or Commissureless (Comm)-dependent regulation of Robo1 in vivo, and we use a genetic rescue assay to show that Robo1(∆Ig1) is unable to substitute for full-length Robo1 to properly regulate midline crossing of axons. These results establish a direct link between in vitro biochemical studies of Slit-Robo interactions and in vivo genetic studies of Slit-Robo signaling during midline axon guidance, and distinguish Slit-dependent from Slit-independent aspects of Robo1 expression, regulation, and activity during embryonic development.

  14. Ubiquitin-associated Domain-containing Ubiquitin Regulatory X (UBX) Protein UBXN1 Is a Negative Regulator of Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Bo; Tan, Bo; Mu, Rui; Chang, Yan; Wu, Min; Tu, Hai-Qing; Zhang, Yu-Cheng; Guo, Sai-Sai; Qin, Xuan-He; Li, Tao; Li, Wei-Hua; Li, Ai-Ling; Zhang, Xue-Min; Li, Hui-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Excessive nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation should be precisely controlled as it contributes to multiple immune and inflammatory diseases. However, the negative regulatory mechanisms of NF-κB activation still need to be elucidated. Various types of polyubiquitin chains have proved to be involved in the process of NF-κB activation. Many negative regulators linked to ubiquitination, such as A20 and CYLD, inhibit IκB kinase activation in the NF-κB signaling pathway. To find new NF-κB signaling regulators linked to ubiquitination, we used a small scale siRNA library against 51 ubiquitin-associated domain-containing proteins and screened out UBXN1, which contained both ubiquitin-associated and ubiquitin regulatory X (UBX) domains as a negative regulator of TNFα-triggered NF-κB activation. Overexpression of UBXN1 inhibited TNFα-triggered NF-κB activation, although knockdown of UBXN1 had the opposite effect. UBX domain-containing proteins usually act as valosin-containing protein (VCP)/p97 cofactors. However, knockdown of VCP/p97 barely affected UBXN1-mediated NF-κB inhibition. At the same time, we found that UBXN1 interacted with cellular inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (cIAPs), E3 ubiquitin ligases of RIP1 in the TNFα receptor complex. UBXN1 competitively bound to cIAP1, blocked cIAP1 recruitment to TNFR1, and sequentially inhibited RIP1 polyubiquitination in response to TNFα. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that UBXN1 is an important negative regulator of the TNFα-triggered NF-κB signaling pathway by mediating cIAP recruitment independent of VCP/p97. PMID:25681446

  15. Kelch Repeat and BTB Domain Containing Protein 5 (Kbtbd5) Regulates Skeletal Muscle Myogenesis through the E2F1-DP1 Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Wuming; Gohla, Rachel M.; Bowlin, Kathy M.; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Garry, Daniel J.; Shi, Xiaozhong

    2015-01-01

    We have previously isolated a muscle-specific Kelch gene, Kelch repeat and BTB domain containing protein 5 (Kbtbd5)/Kelch-like protein 40 (Klhl40). In this report, we identified DP1 as a direct interacting factor for Kbtbd5 using a yeast two-hybrid screen and in vitro binding assays. Our studies demonstrate that Kbtbd5 interacts and regulates the cytoplasmic localization of DP1. GST pulldown assays demonstrate that the dimerization domain of DP1 interacts with all three of the Kbtbd5 domains. We further show that Kbtbd5 promotes the ubiquitination and degradation of DP1, thereby inhibiting E2F1-DP1 activity. To investigate the in vivo function of Kbtbd5, we used gene disruption technology and engineered Kbtbd5 null mice. Targeted deletion of Kbtbd5 resulted in postnatal lethality. Histological studies reveal that the Kbtbd5 null mice have smaller muscle fibers, a disorganized sarcomeric structure, increased extracellular matrix, and decreased numbers of mitochondria compared with wild-type controls. RNA sequencing and quantitative PCR analyses demonstrate the up-regulation of E2F1 target apoptotic genes (Bnip3 and p53inp1) in Kbtbd5 null skeletal muscle. Consistent with these observations, the cellular apoptosis in Kbtbd5 null mice was increased. Breeding of Kbtbd5 null mouse into the E2F1 null background rescues the lethal phenotype of the Kbtbd5 null mice but not the growth defect. The expression of Bnip3 and p53inp1 in Kbtbd5 mutant skeletal muscle are also restored to control levels in the E2F1 null background. In summary, our studies demonstrate that Kbtbd5 regulates skeletal muscle myogenesis through the regulation of E2F1-DP1 activity. PMID:25940086

  16. Deletion of MP/ARF5 domains III and IV reveals a requirement for Aux/IAA regulation in Arabidopsis leaf vascular patterning.

    PubMed

    Krogan, Naden T; Ckurshumova, Wenzislava; Marcos, Danielle; Caragea, Adriana E; Berleth, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    Combinatorial interactions of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTORs (ARFs) and auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA) proteins through their common domains III and IV regulate auxin responses, but insight into the functions of individual proteins is still limited. As a new tool to explore this regulatory network, we generated a gain-of-function ARF genotype by eliminating domains III and IV from the functionally well-characterized ARF MONOPTEROS(MP)/ARF5. This truncated version of MP, termed MPΔ, conferred complementing MP activity, but also displayed a number of semi-dominant traits affecting auxin signaling and organ patterning. In MPΔ, the expression levels of many auxin-inducible genes, as well as rooting properties and vascular tissue abundance, were enhanced. Lateral organs were narrow, pointed and filled with parallel veins. This effect was epistatic over the vascular hypotrophy imposed by certain Aux/IAA mutations. Further, in MPΔ leaves, failure to turn off the procambium-selecting gene PIN1 led to the early establishment of oversized central procambial domains and very limited subsequent lateral growth of the leaf lamina. We conclude that MPΔ can selectively uncouple a single ARF from regulation by Aux/IAA proteins and can be used as a genetic tool to probe auxin pathways and explore leaf development. PMID:22320407

  17. Structure and interactions of myosin-binding protein C domain C0: cardiac-specific regulation of myosin at its neck?

    PubMed

    Ratti, Joyce; Rostkova, Elena; Gautel, Mathias; Pfuhl, Mark

    2011-04-01

    Myosin-binding protein C (MyBP-C) is a multidomain protein present in the thick filaments of striated muscles and is involved in both sarcomere formation and contraction regulation. The latter function is believed to be located at the N terminus, which is close to the motor domain of myosin. The cardiac isoform of MyBP-C is linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Here, we use NMR spectroscopy and biophysical and biochemical assays to study the three-dimensional structure and interactions of the cardiac-specific Ig-like domain C0, a part of cardiac MyBP-C of which little is known. The structure confirmed that C0 is a member of the IgI class of proteins, showing many of the characteristic features of this fold. Moreover, we identify a novel interaction between C0 and the regulatory light chain of myosin, thus placing the N terminus of the protein in proximity to the motor domain of myosin. This novel interaction is disrupted by several cardiomyopathy-linked mutations in the MYBPC3 gene. These results provide new insights into how cardiac MyBP-C incorporates in the sarcomere and how it can contribute to the regulation of muscle contraction.

  18. CONSTANS and the CCAAT Box Binding Complex Share a Functionally Important Domain and Interact to Regulate Flowering of Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wenkel, Stephan; Turck, Franziska; Singer, Kamy; Gissot, Lionel; Gourrierec, José Le; Samach, Alon; Coupland, George

    2006-01-01

    The CCT (for CONSTANS, CONSTANS-LIKE, TOC1) domain is found in 45 Arabidopsis thaliana proteins involved in processes such as photoperiodic flowering, light signaling, and regulation of circadian rhythms. We show that this domain exhibits similarities to yeast HEME ACTIVATOR PROTEIN2 (HAP2), which is a subunit of the HAP2/HAP3/HAP5 trimeric complex that binds to CCAAT boxes in eukaryotic promoters. Moreover, we demonstrate that CONSTANS (CO), which promotes Arabidopsis flowering, interacts with At HAP3 and At HAP5 in yeast, in vitro, and in planta. Mutations in CO that delay flowering affect residues highly conserved between CCT and the DNA binding domain of HAP2. Taken together, these data suggest that CO might replace At HAP2 in the HAP complex to form a trimeric CO/At HAP3/At HAP5 complex. Flowering was delayed by overexpression of At HAP2 or At HAP3 throughout the plant or in phloem companion cells, where CO is expressed. This phenotype was correlated with reduced abundance of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) mRNA and no change in CO mRNA levels. At HAP2 or At HAP3 overexpression may therefore impair formation of a CO/At HAP3/At HAP5 complex leading to reduced expression of FT. During plant evolution, the number of genes encoding HAP proteins was greatly amplified, and these proteins may have acquired novel functions, such as mediating the effect of CCT domain proteins on gene expression. PMID:17138697

  19. Cofactors of LIM Domains Associate with Estrogen Receptor α to Regulate the Expression of Noncoding RNA H19 and Corneal Epithelial Progenitor Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Klein, Rachel Herndon; Stephens, Denise N; Ho, Hsiang; Chen, Jefferson K; Salmans, Michael L; Wang, Winnie; Yu, Zhengquan; Andersen, Bogi

    2016-06-17

    Cofactors of LIM domain proteins, CLIM1 and CLIM2, are widely expressed transcriptional cofactors that are recruited to gene regulatory regions by DNA-binding proteins, including LIM domain transcription factors. In the cornea, epithelium-specific expression of a dominant negative (DN) CLIM under the keratin 14 (K14) promoter causes blistering, wounding, inflammation, epithelial hyperplasia, and neovascularization followed by epithelial thinning and subsequent epidermal-like differentiation of the corneal epithelium. The defects in corneal epithelial differentiation and cell fate determination suggest that CLIM may regulate corneal progenitor cells and the transition to differentiation. Consistent with this notion, the K14-DN-Clim corneal epithelium first exhibits increased proliferation followed by fewer progenitor cells with decreased proliferative potential. In vivo ChIP-sequencing experiments with corneal epithelium show that CLIM binds to and regulates numerous genes involved in cell adhesion and proliferation, including limbally enriched genes. Intriguingly, CLIM associates primarily with non-LIM homeodomain motifs in corneal epithelial cells, including that of estrogen receptor α. Among CLIM targets is the noncoding RNA H19 whose deregulation is associated with Silver-Russell and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndromes. We demonstrate here that H19 negatively regulates corneal epithelial proliferation. In addition to cell cycle regulators, H19 affects the expression of multiple cell adhesion genes. CLIM interacts with estrogen receptor α at the H19 locus, potentially explaining the higher expression of H19 in female than male corneas. Together, our results demonstrate an important role for CLIM in regulating the proliferative potential of corneal epithelial progenitors and identify CLIM downstream target H19 as a regulator of corneal epithelial proliferation and adhesion.

  20. Regulating the Size and Stabilization of Lipid Raft-Like Domains and Using Calcium Ions as Their Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raviv, Uri; Szekely, Or

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we apply means to probe, stabilize and control the size of lipid raft-like domains in vitro. In biomembranes the size of lipid rafts is ca. 10 - 30 nm. In vitro, mixing saturated and unsaturated lipids results in micro-domains, which are unstable and coalesce. Using solution X-ray scattering, we studied the structure of binary and ternary lipid mixtures in the presence of calcium ions. Three lipids were used: saturated, unsaturated and a hybrid (1-saturated-2-unsaturated) lipid that is predominant in the phospholipids of cellular membranes. Only membranes composed of the saturated lipid can adsorb calcium ions, become charged and therefore considerably swell. The selective calcium affinity was used to show that binary mixtures, containing the saturated lipid, phase separated into large-scale domains. Our data suggests that by introducing the hybrid lipid to a mixture of the saturated and unsaturated lipids, the size of the domains decreased with the concentration of the hybrid lipid, until the three lipids could completely mix. We attribute this behavior to the tendency of the hybrid lipid to act as a line-active co-surfactant that can easily reside at the interface between the saturated and the unsaturated lipids and reduce the line-tension between them.

  1. A role for PHANTASTICA in medio-lateral regulation of adaxial domain development on tomato and tobacco leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diverse leaf forms in nature can be categorized into two groups: simple and compound. A simple leaf has a single blade unit, whilst a compound leaf is dissected into leaflets. For both simple and compound leaves, a MYB domain transcription factor PHANTASTICA (PHAN) plays an important role in establi...

  2. Targeting of Nir2 to lipid droplets is regulated by a specific threonine residue within its PI-transfer domain.

    PubMed

    Litvak, Vladimir; Shaul, Yoav D; Shulewitz, Mark; Amarilio, Roy; Carmon, Shari; Lev, Sima

    2002-09-01

    Nir2, like its Drosophila homolog retinal degeneration B (RdgB), contains an N-terminal phosphatidylinositol-transfer protein (PI-TP)-like domain. Previous studies have suggested that RdgB plays an important role in the fly phototransduction cascade and that its PI-transfer domain is critical for this function. In this domain, a specific mutation, T59E, induces a dominant retinal degeneration phenotype. Here we show that a similar mutation, T59E in the human Nir2 protein, targets Nir2 to spherical cytosolic structures identified as lipid droplets by the lipophilic dye Nile red. A truncated Nir2T59E mutant consisting of only the PI-transfer domain was also targeted to lipid droplets, whereas neither the wild-type Nir2 nor the Nir2T59A mutant was associated with lipid droplets under regular growth conditions. However, oleic-acid treatment caused translocation of wild-type Nir2, but not translocation of the T59A mutant, to lipid droplets. This treatment also induced partial targeting of endogenous Nir2, which is mainly associated with the Golgi apparatus, to lipid droplets. Targeting of Nir2 to lipid droplets was attributed to its enhanced threonine phosphorylation. These results suggest that a specific threonine within the PI-transfer domain of Nir2 provides a regulatory site for targeting to lipid droplets. In conjunction with the role of PI-TPs in lipid transport, this targeting may affect intracellular lipid trafficking and distribution and may provide the molecular basis underlying the dominant effect of the RdgB-T59E mutant on retinal degeneration. PMID:12225667

  3. Mechanistic Implications of the Unique Structural Features and Dimerization of the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Pseudomonas Sigma Regulator, PupR

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Jaime L.; Balbo, Andrea; Neau, David B.; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Zhao, Huaying; Sinha, Sangita C.; Colbert, Christopher L.

    2015-09-29

    Gram-negative bacteria tightly regulate intracellular levels of iron, an essential nutrient. To ensure this tight regulation, some outer membrane TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs) that are responsible for iron import stimulate their own transcription in response to extracellular binding by an iron-laden siderophore. This process is mediated by an inner membrane sigma regulator protein (an anti-sigma factor) that transduces an unknown periplasmic signal from the TBDT to release an intracellular sigma factor from the inner membrane, which ultimately upregulates TBDT transcription. Here we use the Pseudomonas putida ferric-pseudobactin BN7/BN8 sigma regulator, PupR, as a model system to understand the molecular mechanism of this conserved class of sigma regulators. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the cytoplasmic anti-sigma domain (ASD) of PupR to 2.0 Å. Size exclusion chromatography, small angle X-ray scattering, and sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation, all indicate that in contrast to other ASDs, the PupR-ASD exists as a dimer in solution. Mutagenesis of residues at the dimer interface identified from the crystal structure disrupts dimerization and protein stability, as determined by sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation and thermal denaturation circular dichroism spectroscopy. Lastly, these combined results suggest that this type of inner membrane sigma regulator may utilize an unusual mechanism to sequester their cognate sigma factors and prevent transcription activation.

  4. Mechanistic Implications of the Unique Structural Features and Dimerization of the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Pseudomonas Sigma Regulator, PupR

    DOE PAGES

    Jensen, Jaime L.; Balbo, Andrea; Neau, David B.; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Zhao, Huaying; Sinha, Sangita C.; Colbert, Christopher L.

    2015-09-29

    Gram-negative bacteria tightly regulate intracellular levels of iron, an essential nutrient. To ensure this tight regulation, some outer membrane TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs) that are responsible for iron import stimulate their own transcription in response to extracellular binding by an iron-laden siderophore. This process is mediated by an inner membrane sigma regulator protein (an anti-sigma factor) that transduces an unknown periplasmic signal from the TBDT to release an intracellular sigma factor from the inner membrane, which ultimately upregulates TBDT transcription. Here we use the Pseudomonas putida ferric-pseudobactin BN7/BN8 sigma regulator, PupR, as a model system to understand the molecular mechanism ofmore » this conserved class of sigma regulators. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the cytoplasmic anti-sigma domain (ASD) of PupR to 2.0 Å. Size exclusion chromatography, small angle X-ray scattering, and sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation, all indicate that in contrast to other ASDs, the PupR-ASD exists as a dimer in solution. Mutagenesis of residues at the dimer interface identified from the crystal structure disrupts dimerization and protein stability, as determined by sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation and thermal denaturation circular dichroism spectroscopy. Lastly, these combined results suggest that this type of inner membrane sigma regulator may utilize an unusual mechanism to sequester their cognate sigma factors and prevent transcription activation.« less

  5. ADAMTS13 and 15 are not regulated by the full length and N-terminal domain forms of TIMP-1, -2, -3 and -4

    PubMed Central

    GUO, CENQI; TSIGKOU, ANASTASIA; LEE, MENG HUEE

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) 13 and 15 are secreted zinc proteinases involved in the turnover of von Willebrand factor and cancer suppression. In the present study, ADAMTS13 and 15 were subjected to inhibition studies with the full-length and N-terminal domain forms of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs)-1 to −4. TIMPs have no ability to inhibit the ADAMTS proteinases in the full-length or N-terminal domain form. While ADAMTS13 is also not sensitive to the hydroxamate inhibitors, batimastat and ilomastat, ADAMTS15 can be effectively inhibited by batimastat (Kiapp 299 nM). In conclusion, the present results indicate that TIMPs are not the regulators of these two ADAMTS proteinases. PMID:26870338

  6. Differential Regulation of Disheveled in a Novel Vegetal Cortical Domain in Sea Urchin Eggs and Embryos: Implications for the Localized Activation of Canonical Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Peng, ChiehFu Jeff; Wikramanayake, Athula H.

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation along the animal-vegetal (AV) axis in sea urchin embryos is initiated when canonical Wnt (cWnt) signaling is activated in vegetal blastomeres. The mechanisms that restrict cWnt signaling to vegetal blastomeres are not well understood, but there is increasing evidence that the egg’s vegetal cortex plays a critical role in this process by mediating localized “activation” of Disheveled (Dsh). To investigate how Dsh activity is regulated along the AV axis, sea urchin-specific Dsh antibodies were used to examine expression, subcellular localization, and post-translational modification of Dsh during development. Dsh is broadly expressed during early sea urchin development, but immunolocalization studies revealed that this protein is enriched in a punctate pattern in a novel vegetal cortical domain (VCD) in the egg. Vegetal blastomeres inherit this VCD during embryogenesis, and at the 60-cell stage Dsh puncta are seen in all cells that display nuclear β-catenin. Analysis of Dsh post-translational modification using two-dimensional Western blot analysis revealed that compared to Dsh pools in the bulk cytoplasm, this protein is differentially modified in the VCD and in the 16-cell stage micromeres that partially inherit this domain. Dsh localization to the VCD is not directly affected by disruption of microfilaments and microtubules, but unexpectedly, microfilament disruption led to degradation of all the Dsh pools in unfertilized eggs over a period of incubation suggesting that microfilament integrity is required for maintaining Dsh stability. These results demonstrate that a pool of differentially modified Dsh in the VCD is selectively inherited by the vegetal blastomeres that activate cWnt signaling in early embryos, and suggests that this domain functions as a scaffold for localized Dsh activation. Localized cWnt activation regulates AV axis patterning in many metazoan embryos. Hence, it is possible that the VCD is an evolutionarily conserved

  7. Sharpening of expression domains induced by transcription and microRNA regulation within a spatio-temporal model of mid-hindbrain boundary formation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The establishment of the mid-hindbrain region in vertebrates is mediated by the isthmic organizer, an embryonic secondary organizer characterized by a well-defined pattern of locally restricted gene expression domains with sharply delimited boundaries. While the function of the isthmic organizer at the mid-hindbrain boundary has been subject to extensive experimental studies, it remains unclear how this well-defined spatial gene expression pattern, which is essential for proper isthmic organizer function, is established during vertebrate development. Because the secreted Wnt1 protein plays a prominent role in isthmic organizer function, we focused in particular on the refinement of Wnt1 gene expression in this context. Results We analyzed the dynamics of the corresponding murine gene regulatory network and the related, diffusive signaling proteins using a macroscopic model for the biological two-scale signaling process. Despite the discontinuity arising from the sharp gene expression domain boundaries, we proved the existence of unique, positive solutions for the partial differential equation system. This enabled the numerically and analytically analysis of the formation and stability of the expression pattern. Notably, the calculated expression domain of Wnt1 has no sharp boundary in contrast to experimental evidence. We subsequently propose a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism for Wnt1 miRNAs which yields the observed sharp expression domain boundaries. We established a list of candidate miRNAs and confirmed their expression pattern by radioactive in situ hybridization. The miRNA miR-709 was identified as a potential regulator of Wnt1 mRNA, which was validated by luciferase sensor assays. Conclusion In summary, our theoretical analysis of the gene expression pattern induction at the mid-hindbrain boundary revealed the need to extend the model by an additional Wnt1 regulation. The developed macroscopic model of a two-scale process facilitate the

  8. SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE Directly Interacts with the Cytoplasmic Domain of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE and Negatively Regulates Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dong; Cui, Yanjiao; Xu, Fan; Xu, Xinxin; Gao, Guanxiao; Wang, Yaxin; Guo, Zhaoxia; Wang, Dan; Wang, Ning Ning

    2015-10-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases plays an important role in the regulation of leaf senescence. We previously reported that the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (AtSARK) positively regulates leaf senescence in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here, we report the involvement of a protein serine/threonine phosphatase 2C-type protein phosphatase, SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE (SSPP), in the negative regulation of Arabidopsis leaf senescence. SSPP transcript levels decreased greatly during both natural senescence and SARK-induced precocious senescence. Overexpression of SSPP significantly delayed leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. Protein pull-down and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays demonstrated that the cytosol-localized SSPP could interact with the cytoplasmic domain of the plasma membrane-localized AtSARK. In vitro assays showed that SSPP has protein phosphatase function and can dephosphorylate the cytosolic domain of AtSARK. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of SSPP effectively rescued AtSARK-induced precocious leaf senescence and changes in hormonal responses. All our results suggested that SSPP functions in sustaining proper leaf longevity and preventing early senescence by suppressing or perturbing SARK-mediated senescence signal transduction.

  9. SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE Directly Interacts with the Cytoplasmic Domain of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE and Negatively Regulates Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dong; Cui, Yanjiao; Xu, Fan; Xu, Xinxin; Gao, Guanxiao; Wang, Yaxin; Guo, Zhaoxia; Wang, Dan; Wang, Ning Ning

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases plays an important role in the regulation of leaf senescence. We previously reported that the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (AtSARK) positively regulates leaf senescence in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here, we report the involvement of a protein serine/threonine phosphatase 2C-type protein phosphatase, SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE (SSPP), in the negative regulation of Arabidopsis leaf senescence. SSPP transcript levels decreased greatly during both natural senescence and SARK-induced precocious senescence. Overexpression of SSPP significantly delayed leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. Protein pull-down and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays demonstrated that the cytosol-localized SSPP could interact with the cytoplasmic domain of the plasma membrane-localized AtSARK. In vitro assays showed that SSPP has protein phosphatase function and can dephosphorylate the cytosolic domain of AtSARK. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of SSPP effectively rescued AtSARK-induced precocious leaf senescence and changes in hormonal responses. All our results suggested that SSPP functions in sustaining proper leaf longevity and preventing early senescence by suppressing or perturbing SARK-mediated senescence signal transduction. PMID:26304848

  10. Distinct domains in Bub1 localize RZZ and BubR1 to kinetochores to regulate the checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gang; Lischetti, Tiziana; Hayward, Daniel G.; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures proper chromosome segregation by delaying anaphase onset in response to unattached kinetochores. Checkpoint signalling requires the kinetochore localization of the Mad1–Mad2 complex that in more complex eukaryotes depends on the Rod–Zwilch–ZW10 (RZZ) complex. The kinetochore protein Zwint has been proposed to be the kinetochore receptor for RZZ, but here we show that Bub1 and not Zwint is required for RZZ recruitment. We find that the middle region of Bub1 encompassing a domain essential for SAC signalling contributes to RZZ localization. In addition, we show that a distinct region in Bub1 mediates kinetochore localization of BubR1 through direct binding, but surprisingly removal of this region increases checkpoint strength. Our work thus uncovers how Bub1 coordinates checkpoint signalling by distinct domains for RZZ and BubR1 recruitment and suggests that Bub1 localizes antagonistic checkpoint activities. PMID:26031201

  11. The rice GERMINATION DEFECTIVE 1, encoding a B3 domain transcriptional repressor, regulates seed germination and seedling development by integrating GA and carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoli; Hou, Xiaomei; Fang, Jun; Wei, Piwei; Xu, Bo; Chen, Mingluan; Feng, Yuqi; Chu, Chengcai

    2013-08-01

    It has been shown that seed development is regulated by a network of transcription factors in Arabidopsis including LEC1 (LEAFY COTYLEDON1), L1L (LEC1-like) and the B3 domain factors LEC2, FUS3 (FUSCA3) and ABI3 (ABA-INSENSITIVE3); however, molecular and genetic regulation of seed development in cereals is poorly understood. To understand seed development and seed germination in cereals, a large-scale screen was performed using our T-DNA mutant population, and a mutant germination-defective1 (gd1) was identified. In addition to the severe germination defect, the gd1 mutant also shows a dwarf phenotype and abnormal flower development. Molecular and biochemical analyses revealed that GD1 encodes a B3 domain-containing transcription factor with repression activity. Consistent with the dwarf phenotype of gd1, expression of the gibberelic acid (GA) inactivation gene OsGA2ox3 is increased dramatically, accompanied by reduced expression of GA biosynthetic genes including OsGA20ox1, OsGA20ox2 and OsGA3ox2 in gd1, resulting in a decreased endogenous GA₄ level. Exogenous application of GA not only induced GD1 expression, but also partially rescued the dwarf phenotype of gd1. Furthermore, GD1 binds to the promoter of OsLFL1, a LEC2/FUS3-like gene of rice, via an RY element, leading to significant up-regulation of OsLFL1 and a large subset of seed maturation genes in the gd1 mutant. Plants over-expressing OsLFL1 partly mimic the gd1 mutant. In addition, expression of GD1 was induced under sugar treatment, and the contents of starch and soluble sugar are altered in the gd1 mutant. These data indicate that GD1 participates directly or indirectly in regulating GA and carbohydrate homeostasis, and further regulates rice seed germination and seedling development.

  12. Developmental regulation of collagenase-3 mRNA in normal, differentiating osteoblasts through the activator protein-1 and the runt domain binding sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winchester, S. K.; Selvamurugan, N.; D'Alonzo, R. C.; Partridge, N. C.

    2000-01-01

    Collagenase-3 mRNA is initially detectable when osteoblasts cease proliferation, increasing during differentiation and mineralization. We showed that this developmental expression is due to an increase in collagenase-3 gene transcription. Mutation of either the activator protein-1 or the runt domain binding site decreased collagenase-3 promoter activity, demonstrating that these sites are responsible for collagenase-3 gene transcription. The activator protein-1 and runt domain binding sites bind members of the activator protein-1 and core-binding factor family of transcription factors, respectively. We identified core-binding factor a1 binding to the runt domain binding site and JunD in addition to a Fos-related antigen binding to the activator protein-1 site. Overexpression of both c-Fos and c-Jun in osteoblasts or core-binding factor a1 increased collagenase-3 promoter activity. Furthermore, overexpression of c-Fos, c-Jun, and core-binding factor a1 synergistically increased collagenase-3 promoter activity. Mutation of either the activator protein-1 or the runt domain binding site resulted in the inability of c-Fos and c-Jun or core-binding factor a1 to increase collagenase-3 promoter activity, suggesting that there is cooperative interaction between the sites and the proteins. Overexpression of Fra-2 and JunD repressed core-binding factor a1-induced collagenase-3 promoter activity. Our results suggest that members of the activator protein-1 and core-binding factor families, binding to the activator protein-1 and runt domain binding sites are responsible for the developmental regulation of collagenase-3 gene expression in osteoblasts.

  13. Binding of the Fkh1 Forkhead Associated Domain to a Phosphopeptide within the Mph1 DNA Helicase Regulates Mating-Type Switching in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhangli; Cherney, Rachel; Choi, Koyi; Denu, John; Zhao, Xiaolan; Fox, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fkh1 protein has roles in cell-cycle regulated transcription as well as a transcription-independent role in recombination donor preference during mating-type switching. The conserved FHA domain of Fkh1 regulates donor preference by juxtaposing two distant regions on chromosome III to promote their recombination. A model posits that this Fkh1-mediated long-range chromosomal juxtaposition requires an interaction between the FHA domain and a partner protein(s), but to date no relevant partner has been described. In this study, we used structural modeling, 2-hybrid assays, and mutational analyses to show that the predicted phosphothreonine-binding FHA domain of Fkh1 interacted with multiple partner proteins. The Fkh1 FHA domain was important for its role in cell-cycle regulation, but no single interaction partner could account for this role. In contrast, Fkh1’s interaction with the Mph1 DNA repair helicase regulated donor preference during mating-type switching. Using 2-hybrid assays, co-immunoprecipitation, and fluorescence anisotropy, we mapped a discrete peptide within the regulatory Mph1 C-terminus required for this interaction and identified two threonines that were particularly important. In vitro binding experiments indicated that at least one of these threonines had to be phosphorylated for efficient Fkh1 binding. Substitution of these two threonines with alanines (mph1-2TA) specifically abolished the Fkh1-Mph1 interaction in vivo and altered donor preference during mating-type switching to the same degree as mph1Δ. Notably, the mph1-2TA allele maintained other functions of Mph1 in genome stability. Deletion of a second Fkh1-interacting protein encoded by YMR144W also resulted in a change in Fkh1-FHA-dependent donor preference. We have named this gene FDO1 for Forkhead one interacting protein involved in donor preference. We conclude that a phosphothreonine-mediated protein-protein interface between Fkh1-FHA and Mph1 contributes

  14. A truncated hnRNP A1 isoform, lacking the RGG-box RNA binding domain, can efficiently regulate HIV-1 splicing and replication.

    PubMed

    Jean-Philippe, Jacques; Paz, Sean; Lu, Michael L; Caputi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is one of the most abundant RNA binding proteins. hnRNP A1 is localized prevalently in the nucleus but it can relocate to the cytoplasm in response to specific stimuli shuttling between nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. The cellular localization of this protein is regulated by a short C-terminus motif (M9) and other less defined sequences. The RNA binding specificity of this protein is dependent on multiple RNA binding domains (RBDs), which regulate its role in RNA processing and expression. hnRNP A1 plays multiple roles in gene expression by regulating the biogenesis and translation of messengers RNAs, the processing of miRNAs, affecting transcription and controlling telomere maintenance. The multiple functions of this protein correlate with diverse roles in genetic disease, cancer and the replication of viral pathogens. Utilizing a tagged hnRNP A1 deletion library we have shown that the three hnRNP A1 RBDs contribute to the prevalent nuclear distribution of the protein. Our data also indicate that a truncated form of the protein, lacking one of the RBDs, the RGG-box, can regulate splicing of a splicing reporter minigene and down-regulate replication of the HIV-1 virus with efficiency comparable to the wild-type protein. This functional hnRNP A1 deletion mutant is similar to a predicted hnRNP A1 isoform, which had not been previously experimentally characterized. PMID:24530421

  15. The NHERF1 PDZ2 Domain Regulates PKA–RhoA–p38-mediated NHE1 Activation and Invasion in Breast Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cardone, Rosa A.; Bellizzi, Antonia; Busco, Giovanni; Weinman, Edward J.; Dell'Aquila, Maria E.; Casavola, Valeria; Azzariti, Amalia; Mangia, Anita; Paradiso, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the signal transduction systems governing invasion is fundamental for the design of therapeutic strategies against metastasis. Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF1) is a postsynaptic density 95/disc-large/zona occludens (PDZ) domain-containing protein that recruits membrane receptors/transporters and cytoplasmic signaling proteins into functional complexes. NHERF1 expression is altered in breast cancer, but its effective role in mammary carcinogenesis remains undefined. We report here that NHERF1 overexpression in human breast tumor biopsies is associated with metastatic progression, poor prognosis, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression. In cultured tumor cells, hypoxia and serum deprivation increase NHERF1 expression, promote the formation of leading-edge pseudopodia, and redistribute NHERF1 to these pseudopodia. This pseudopodial localization of NHERF1 was verified in breast biopsies and in three-dimensional Matrigel culture. Furthermore, serum deprivation and hypoxia stimulate the Na+/H+ exchanger, invasion, and activate a protein kinase A (PKA)-gated RhoA/p38 invasion signal module. Significantly, NHERF1 overexpression was sufficient to induce these morphological and functional changes, and it potentiated their induction by serum deprivation. Functional experiments with truncated and binding groove-mutated PDZ domain constructs demonstrated that NHERF1 regulates these processes through its PDZ2 domain. We conclude that NHERF1 overexpression enhances the invasive phenotype in breast cancer cells, both alone and in synergy with exposure to the tumor microenvironment, via the coordination of PKA-gated RhoA/p38 signaling. PMID:17332506

  16. Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN2 is a RNA chaperone that is regulated by cold and developmental signals

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Kentaro; Kim, Myung-Hee; Imai, Ryozo

    2007-12-21

    Bacterial cold shock proteins (CSPs) are RNA chaperones that unwind RNA secondary structures. Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN2 (AtCSP2) contains a domain that is shared with bacterial CSPs. Here we showed that AtCSP2 binds to RNA and unwinds nucleic acid duplex. Heterologous expression of AtCSP2 complemented cold sensitivity of an Escherichia coli csp quadruple mutant, indicating that AtCSP2 function as a RNA chaperone in E. coli. AtCSP2 mRNA and protein levels increased during cold acclimation, but the protein accumulation was most prominent after 10 days of cold treatment. AtCSP2 promoter::GUS transgenic plants revealed that AtCSP2 is expressed only in root and shoot apical regions during vegetative growth but is expressed in reproductive organs such as pollens, ovules and embryos. These data indicated that AtCSP2 is involved in developmental processes as well as cold adaptation. Localization of AtCSP2::GFP in nucleolus and cytoplasm suggested different nuclear and cytosolic RNA targets.

  17. Identification, evolution, and regulation of expression of Guinea pig trappin with an unusually long transglutaminase substrate domain.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Yutaka; Kato, Akira; Fibriani, Azzania; Hirata, Taku; Kawai, Ryoji; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Kim, In-Gyu; Kojima, Soichi; Hirose, Shigehisa

    2005-05-27

    Trappins are found in human, bovine, hippopotamus, and members of the pig family, but not in rat and mouse. To clarify the evolution of the trappin genes and the functional significance of their products, we isolated the trappin gene in guinea pig, a species belonging to a rodent family distinct from rat and mouse. Guinea pig trappin was confirmed to encode the same domain structure as trappin, consisting of a signal sequence, an extra large transglutaminase substrate domain, and a whey acidic protein motif. Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization histochemistry as well as immunohistochemistry demonstrated that guinea pig trappin is expressed solely in the secretory epithelium of the seminal vesicle and that its expression is androgen-dependent. We confirmed that guinea pig trappin is cross-linked by prostate transglutaminase and that the whey acidic protein motif derived from guinea pig trappin has an inhibitory activity against leukocyte elastase. Genome sequence analysis showed that guinea pig trappin belongs to the family of REST (rapidly evolving seminal vesicle transcribed) genes. PMID:15778505

  18. Possible regulation of caveolar endocytosis and flattening by phosphorylation of F-BAR domain protein PACSIN2/Syndapin II

    PubMed Central

    Senju, Yosuke; Suetsugu, Shiro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Caveolae are flask-shaped invaginations of the plasma membrane. The BAR domain proteins form crescent-shaped dimers, and their oligomeric filaments are considered to form spirals at the necks of invaginations, such as clathrin-coated pits and caveolae. PACSIN2/Syndapin II is one of the BAR domain-containing proteins, and is localized at the necks of caveolae. PACSIN2 is thought to function in the scission and stabilization of caveolae, through binding to dynamin-2 and EHD2, respectively. These two functions are considered to be switched by PACSIN2 phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) upon hypotonic stress and sheer stress. The phosphorylation decreases the membrane binding affinity of PACSIN2, leading to its removal from caveolae. The removal of the putative oligomeric spiral of PACSIN2 from caveolar membrane invaginations could lead to the deformation of caveolae. Indeed, PACSIN2 removal from caveolae is accompanied by the recruitment of dynamin-2, suggesting that the removal provides space for the function of dynamin-2. Otherwise, the removal of PACSIN2 decreases the stability of caveolae, which could result in the flattening of caveolae. In contrast, an increase in the amount of EHD2 restored caveolar stability. Therefore, PACSIN2 at caveolae stabilizes caveolae, but its removal by phosphorylation could induce both caveolar endocytosis and flattening. PMID:26745030

  19. The Prophage-encoded Hyaluronate Lyase Has Broad Substrate Specificity and Is Regulated by the N-terminal Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Bharati, Akhilendra Pratap; Singh, Neha; Pandey, Praveen; Joshi, Pankaj; Singh, Kavita; Mitra, Kalyan; Gayen, Jiaur R.; Sarkar, Jayanta; Akhtar, Md. Sohail

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus equi is the causative agent of the highly contagious disease “strangles” in equines and zoonotic meningitis in human. Spreading of infection in host tissues is thought to be facilitated by the bacterial gene encoded extracellular hyaluronate lyase (HL), which degrades hyaluronan (HA), chondroitin 6-sulfate, and dermatan sulfate of the extracellular matrix). The clinical strain S. equi 4047 however, lacks a functional extracellular HL. The prophages of S. equi and other streptococci encode intracellular HLs which are reported to partially degrade HA and do not cleave any other glycosaminoglycans. The phage HLs are thus thought to play a role limited to the penetration of streptococcal HA capsules, facilitating bacterial lysogenization and not in the bacterial pathogenesis. Here we systematically looked into the structure-function relationship of S. equi 4047 phage HL. Although HA is the preferred substrate, this HL has weak activity toward chondroitin 6-sulfate and dermatan sulfate and can completely degrade all of them. Even though the catalytic triple-stranded β-helix domain of phage HL is functionally independent, its catalytic efficiency and specificity is influenced by the N-terminal domain. The phage HL also interacts with human transmembrane glycoprotein CD44. The above results suggest that the streptococci can use phage HLs to degrade glycosaminoglycans of the extracellular matrix for spreading virulence factors and toxins while utilizing the disaccharides as a nutrient source for proliferation at the site of infection. PMID:25378402

  20. The prophage-encoded hyaluronate lyase has broad substrate specificity and is regulated by the N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Bharati, Akhilendra Pratap; Singh, Neha; Pandey, Praveen; Joshi, Pankaj; Singh, Kavita; Mitra, Kalyan; Gayen, Jiaur R; Sarkar, Jayanta; Akhtar, Md Sohail

    2014-12-19

    Streptococcus equi is the causative agent of the highly contagious disease "strangles" in equines and zoonotic meningitis in human. Spreading of infection in host tissues is thought to be facilitated by the bacterial gene encoded extracellular hyaluronate lyase (HL), which degrades hyaluronan (HA), chondroitin 6-sulfate, and dermatan sulfate of the extracellular matrix). The clinical strain S. equi 4047 however, lacks a functional extracellular HL. The prophages of S. equi and other streptococci encode intracellular HLs which are reported to partially degrade HA and do not cleave any other glycosaminoglycans. The phage HLs are thus thought to play a role limited to the penetration of streptococcal HA capsules, facilitating bacterial lysogenization and not in the bacterial pathogenesis. Here we systematically looked into the structure-function relationship of S. equi 4047 phage HL. Although HA is the preferred substrate, this HL has weak activity toward chondroitin 6-sulfate and dermatan sulfate and can completely degrade all of them. Even though the catalytic triple-stranded β-helix domain of phage HL is functionally independent, its catalytic efficiency and specificity is influenced by the N-terminal domain. The phage HL also interacts with human transmembrane glycoprotein CD44. The above results suggest that the streptococci can use phage HLs to degrade glycosaminoglycans of the extracellular matrix for spreading virulence factors and toxins while utilizing the disaccharides as a nutrient source for proliferation at the site of infection.

  1. Flexible lid to the p53-binding domain of human Mdm2: implications for p53 regulation.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Mark A; Gesell, Jennifer J; Senior, Mary M; Wyss, Daniel F

    2003-02-18

    The stabilization of p53 against Mdm2-mediated degradation is an important event in DNA damage response. Initial models of p53 stabilization focused on posttranslational modification of p53 that would disrupt the p53-Mdm2 interaction. The N-terminal regions of both p53 and Mdm2 are modified in vivo in response to cellular stress, suggesting that modifications to Mdm2 also may affect the p53-Mdm2 interaction. Our NMR studies of apo-Mdm2 have found that, in addition to Mdm2 residues 25-109 that form the well ordered p53-binding domain that was observed in the p52-Mdm2 complex, Mdm2 residues 16-24 form a lid that closes over the p53-binding site. The Mdm2 lid, which is strictly conserved in mammals, may help to stabilize apo-Mdm2. It also competes weakly with peptidic and nonpeptidic antagonists. Modifications to the Mdm2 lid may disrupt p53-Mdm2 binding leading to p53 stabilization. Mdm2 and Mdm4 possess nearly identical p53-binding domains but different lids suggesting that lid modifications may select for p53 binding.

  2. Photodynamics of blue-light-regulated phosphodiesterase BlrP1 protein from Klebsiella pneumoniae and its photoreceptor BLUF domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, A.; Penzkofer, A.; Griese, J.; Schlichting, I.; Kirienko, Natalia V.; Gomelsky, Mark

    2008-12-01

    The BlrP1 protein from the enteric bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae consists of a BLUF and an EAL domain and may activate c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase by blue-light. The full-length protein, BlrP1, and its BLUF domain, BlrP1_BLUF, are characterized by optical absorption and emission spectroscopy. The cofactor FAD in its oxidized redox state (FAD ox) is brought from the dark-adapted receptor state to the 10-nm red-shifted putative signalling state by violet light exposure. The recovery to the receptor state occurs with a time constant of about 1 min. The quantum yield of signalling state formation is about 0.17 for BlrP1_BLUF and about 0.08 for BlrP1. The fluorescence efficiency of the FAD ox cofactor is small due to photo-induced reductive electron transfer. Prolonged light exposure converts FAD ox in the signalling state to the fully reduced hydroquinone form FAD redH - and causes low-efficient chromophore release with subsequent photo-degradation. The photo-cycle and photo-reduction dynamics in the receptor state and in the signalling state are discussed.

  3. The PZP Domain of AF10 Senses Unmodified H3K27 to Regulate DOT1L-Mediated Methylation of H3K79.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shoudeng; Yang, Ze; Wilkinson, Alex W; Deshpande, Aniruddha J; Sidoli, Simone; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D; Garcia, Benjamin A; Armstrong, Scott A; Patel, Dinshaw J; Gozani, Or

    2015-10-15

    AF10, a DOT1L cofactor, is required for H3K79 methylation and cooperates with DOT1L in leukemogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism by which AF10 regulates DOT1L-mediated H3K79 methylation is not clear. Here we report that AF10 contains a "reader" domain that couples unmodified H3K27 recognition to H3K79 methylation. An AF10 region consisting of a PHD finger-Zn knuckle-PHD finger (PZP) folds into a single module that recognizes amino acids 22-27 of H3, and this interaction is abrogated by H3K27 modification. Structural studies reveal that H3 binding triggers rearrangement of the PZP module to form an H3(22-27)-accommodating channel and that the unmodified H3K27 side chain is encased in a compact hydrogen-bond acceptor-lined cage. In cells, PZP recognition of H3 is required for H3K79 dimethylation, expression of DOT1L-target genes, and proliferation of DOT1L-addicted leukemic cells. Together, our results uncover a pivotal role for H3K27-via readout by the AF10 PZP domain-in regulating the cancer-associated enzyme DOT1L.

  4. Multiple classes of transcription factors regulate the expression of VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN7, a master switch of xylem vessel differentiation.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Tamura, Taizo; Nakano, Yoshimi; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Yoneda, Arata; Kato, Ko; Kubo, Minoru; Kajita, Shinya; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Ohtani, Misato; Demura, Taku

    2015-02-01

    The secondary cell walls of xylem cells, including vessel elements, provide mechanical strength and contribute to the conduction of water and minerals. VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN7 (VND7) is a NAC-domain transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes required for xylem vessel element formation. Transient expression assays using 68 transcription factors that are expressed during xylem vessel differentiation showed that 14 transcription factors, including VND1-VND7, are putative positive regulators of VND7 expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that all seven VND proteins bound to the VND7 promoter region at its SMBE/TERE motif, indicating that VND7 is a direct target of all of the VND transcription factors. Overexpression of VND1-VND5, GATA12 and ANAC075, newly identified transcription factors that function upstream of VND7, resulted in ectopic xylem vessel element formation. These data suggest that VND7 transcription is a regulatory target of multiple classes of transcription factors.

  5. Two Proteases, Trypsin Domain-containing 1 (Tysnd1) and Peroxisomal Lon Protease (PsLon), Cooperatively Regulate Fatty Acid β-Oxidation in Peroxisomal Matrix*

    PubMed Central

    Okumoto, Kanji; Kametani, Yukari; Fujiki, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying protein turnover and enzyme regulation in the peroxisomal matrix remain largely unknown. Trypsin domain-containing 1 (Tysnd1) and peroxisomal Lon protease (PsLon) are newly identified peroxisomal matrix proteins that harbor both a serine protease-like domain and a peroxisome-targeting signal 1 (PTS1) sequence. Tysnd1 processes several PTS1-containing proteins and cleaves N-terminal presequences from PTS2-containing protein precursors. Here we report that knockdown of Tysnd1, but not PsLon, resulted in accumulation of endogenous β-oxidation enzymes in their premature form. The protease activity of Tysnd1 was inactivated by intermolecular self-conversion of the 60-kDa form to 15- and 45-kDa chains, which were preferentially degraded by PsLon. Peroxisomal β-oxidation of a very long fatty acid was significantly decreased by knockdown of Tysnd1 and partially lowered by PsLon knockdown. Taken together, these data suggest that Tysnd1 is a key regulator of the peroxisomal β-oxidation pathway via proteolytic processing of β-oxidation enzymes. The proteolytic activity of oligomeric Tysnd1 is in turn controlled by self-cleavage of Tysnd1 and degradation of Tysnd1 cleavage products by PsLon. PMID:22002062

  6. XND1, a member of the NAC domain family in Arabidopsis thaliana, negatively regulates lignocellulose synthesis and programmed cell death in xylem

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, C.; U. Avci; E. Grant; C.H. Haigler; E.P. Beers

    2007-10-23

    Members of the large Arabidopsis NAC domain transcription factor family are regulators of meristem development, organ elongation and separation, and deposition of patterned secondary cell walls. XYLEM NAC DOMAIN 1 (XND1) is highly expressed in xylem. Changes observed for XND1 knockout plants compared with wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana included a reduction in both plant height and tracheary element length and an increase in metaxylem relative to protoxylem in roots of plants treated with the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Overexpression of XND1 resulted in extreme dwarfism associated with the absence of xylem vessels and little or no expression of tracheary element marker genes. In contrast, phloem marker-gene expression was not altered and phloem-type cells still formed. Transmission electron microscopy showed that parenchyma-like cells in the incipient xylem zone in hypocotyls of XND1 overexpressors lacked secondary wall thickenings and retained their cytoplasmic content. Considered together, these findings suggest that XND1 affects tracheary element growth through regulation of secondary wall synthesis and programmed cell death.

  7. Histone Demethylase Jumonji AT-rich Interactive Domain 1B (JARID1B) Controls Mammary Gland Development by Regulating Key Developmental and Lineage Specification Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Mike Ran; Cao, Jian; Liu, Zongzhi; Huh, Sung Jin; Polyak, Kornelia; Yan, Qin

    2014-01-01

    The JmjC domain-containing H3K4 histone demethylase jumonji AT-rich interactive domain 1B (JARID1B) (also known as KDM5B and PLU1) is overexpressed in breast cancer and is a potential target for breast cancer treatment. To investigate the in vivo function of JARID1B, we developed Jarid1b−/− mice and characterized their phenotypes in detail. Unlike previously reported Jarid1b−/− strains, the majority of these Jarid1b−/− mice were viable beyond embryonic and neonatal stages. This allowed us to further examine phenotypes associated with the loss of JARID1B in pubertal development and pregnancy. These Jarid1b−/− mice exhibited decreased body weight, premature mortality, decreased female fertility, and delayed mammary gland development. Related to these phenotypes, JARID1B loss decreased serum estrogen level and reduced mammary epithelial cell proliferation in early puberty. In mammary epithelial cells, JARID1B loss diminished the expression of key regulators for mammary morphogenesis and luminal lineage specification, including FOXA1 and estrogen receptor α. Mechanistically, JARID1B was required for GATA3 recruitment to the Foxa1 promoter to activate Foxa1 expression. These results indicate that JARID1B positively regulates mammary ductal development through both extrinsic and cell-autonomous mechanisms. PMID:24802759

  8. An N-terminal nuclear localization sequence but not the calmodulin-binding domain mediates nuclear localization of nucleomorphin, a protein that regulates nuclear number in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2005-06-24

    Nucleomorphin is a novel nuclear calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein (CaMBP) containing an extensive DEED (glu/asp repeat) domain that regulates nuclear number. GFP-constructs of the 38 kDa NumA1 isoform localize as intranuclear patches adjacent to the inner nuclear membrane. The translocation of CaMBPs into nuclei has previously been shown by others to be mediated by both classic nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) and CaM-binding domains (CaMBDs). Here we show that NumA1 possesses a CaMBD (171EDVSRFIKGKLLQKQQKIYKDLERF195) containing both calcium-dependent-binding motifs and an IQ-like motif for calcium-independent binding. GFP-constructs containing only NumA1 residues 1-129, lacking the DEED and CaMBDs, still localized as patches at the internal periphery of nuclei thus ruling out a direct role for the CaMBD in nuclear import. These constructs contained the amino acid residues 48KKSYQDPEIIAHSRPRK64 that include both a putative bipartite and classical NLS. GFP-bipartite NLS constructs localized uniformly within nuclei but not as patches. As with previous work, removal of the DEED domain resulted in highly multinucleate cells. However as shown here, multinuclearity only occurred when the NLS was present allowing the protein to enter nuclei. Site-directed mutation analysis in which the NLS was changed to 48EF49 abolished the stability of the GFP fusion at the protein but not RNA level preventing subcellular analyses. Cells transfected with the 48EF49 construct exhibited slowed growth when compared to parental AX3 cells and other GFP-NumA1 deletion mutants. In addition to identifying an NLS that is sufficient for nuclear translocation of nucleomorphin and ruling out CaM-binding in this event, this work shows that the nuclear localization of NumA1 is crucial to its ability to regulate nuclear number in Dictyostelium. PMID:15896312

  9. The p2 domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag regulates sequential proteolytic processing and is required to produce fully infectious virions.

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, S C; Moody, M D; Wehbie, R S; Kaplan, A H; Nantermet, P V; Klein, C A; Swanstrom, R

    1994-01-01

    The proteolytic processing sites of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag precursor are cleaved in a sequential manner by the viral protease. We investigated the factors that regulate sequential processing. When full-length Gag protein was digested with recombinant HIV-1 protease in vitro, four of the five major processing sites in Gag were cleaved at rates that differ by as much as 400-fold. Three of these four processing sites were cleaved independently of the others. The CA/p2 site, however, was cleaved approximately 20-fold faster when the adjacent downstream p2/NC site was blocked from cleavage or when the p2 domain of Gag was deleted. These results suggest that the presence of a C-terminal p2 tail on processing intermediates slows cleavage at the upstream CA/p2 site. We also found that lower pH selectively accelerated cleavage of the CA/p2 processing site in the full-length precursor and as a peptide primarily by a sequence-based mechanism rather than by a change in protein conformation. Deletion of the p2 domain of Gag results in released virions that are less infectious despite the presence of the processed final products of Gag. These findings suggest that the p2 domain of HIV-1 Gag regulates the rate of cleavage at the CA/p2 processing site during sequential processing in vitro and in infected cells and that p2 may function in the proper assembly of virions. Images PMID:7966591

  10. The Ubiquitin Regulatory X (UBX) Domain-containing Protein TUG Regulates the p97 ATPase and Resides at the Endoplasmic Reticulum-Golgi Intermediate Compartment*

    PubMed Central

    Orme, Charisse M.; Bogan, Jonathan S.

    2012-01-01

    p97/VCP is a hexameric ATPase that is coupled to diverse cellular processes, such as membrane fusion and proteolysis. How p97 activity is regulated is not fully understood. Here we studied the potential role of TUG, a widely expressed protein containing a UBX domain, to control mammalian p97. In HEK293 cells, the vast majority of TUG was bound to p97. Surprisingly, the TUG UBX domain was neither necessary nor sufficient for this interaction. Rather, an extended sequence, comprising three regions of TUG, bound to the p97 N-terminal domain. The TUG C terminus resembled the Arabidopsis protein PUX1. Similar to the previously described action of PUX1 on AtCDC48, TUG caused the conversion of p97 hexamers into monomers. Hexamer disassembly was stoichiometric rather than catalytic and was not greatly affected by the p97 ATP-binding state or by TUG N-terminal regions in vitro. In HeLa cells, TUG localized to the endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi intermediate compartment and endoplasmic reticulum exit sites. Although siRNA-mediated TUG depletion had no marked effect on total ubiquitylated proteins or p97 localization, TUG overexpression caused an accumulation of ubiquitylated substrates and targeted both TUG and p97 to the nucleus. A physiologic role of TUG was revealed by siRNA-mediated depletion, which showed that TUG is required for efficient reassembly of the Golgi complex after brefeldin A removal. Together, these data support a model in which TUG controls p97 oligomeric status at a particular location in the early secretory pathway and in which this process regulates membrane trafficking in various cell types. PMID:22207755

  11. Involvement of the β3-α3 loop of the Proline Dehydrogenase Domain in Allosteric Regulation of Membrane Association of Proline Utilization A†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weidong; Haile, Ashley M.; Singh, Ranjan K.; Larson, John D.; Smithen, Danielle; Chan, Jie Y.; Tanner, John J.; Becker, Donald F.

    2013-01-01

    Proline utilization A (PutA) from Escherichia coli is a membrane-associated trifunctional flavoenzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of proline to glutamate and moonlights as a transcriptional regulator. As a regulatory protein, PutA represses transcription of the put regulon, which contains the genes encoding PutA and the proline transporter PutP. The binding of proline to the proline dehydrogenase active site and the subsequent reduction of the flavin induces high affinity membrane association of PutA and relieves repression of the put regulon, thereby causing PutA to switch from its regulatory to its enzymatic role. Here, we present evidence suggesting that residues of the β3-α3 loop of the proline dehydrogenase domain (βα)8 barrel are involved in proline-mediated allosteric regulation of PutA-membrane binding. Mutation of the conserved residues Asp370 and Glu372 in the β3-α3 loop abrogates the ability of proline to induce functional membrane association. Both in vitro lipid/membrane binding assays and in vivo cell-based assays demonstrate that mutagenesis of Asp370 (D370N/A) or Glu372 (E372A) dramatically impedes PutA functional switching. The crystal structures of the proline dehydrogenase domain mutants PutA86-630D370N and PutA86-630D370A complexed with the proline analog L-tetrahydro-2-furoic acid show that the mutations cause only minor perturbations to the active site but no major structural changes, suggesting that the lack of proline response is not due to a failure of the mutated active sites to correctly bind the substrate. Rather, these results suggest that the β3-α3 loop may be involved in transmitting the status of the proline dehydrogenase active site and flavin redox state to the distal membrane association domain. PMID:23713611

  12. Analysis of the arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase of Bacteroides fragilis provides insight into regulation of single-domain arabinose phosphate isomerases.

    PubMed

    Cech, David; Wang, Pan Fen; Holler, Tod P; Woodard, Ronald W

    2014-08-01

    Arabinose-5-phosphate isomerases (APIs) catalyze the interconversion of d-ribulose-5-phosphate and D-arabinose-5-phosphate, the first step in the biosynthesis of 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo), an essential component of the lipopolysaccharide in Gram-negative bacteria. Classical APIs, such as Escherichia coli KdsD, contain a sugar isomerase domain and a tandem cystathionine beta-synthase domain. Despite substantial effort, little is known about structure-function relationships in these APIs. We recently reported an API containing only a sugar isomerase domain. This protein, c3406 from E. coli CFT073, has no known physiological function. In this study, we investigated a putative single-domain API from the anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium Bacteroides fragilis. This putative API (UniProt ID Q5LIW1) is the only protein encoded by the B. fragilis genome with significant identity to any known API, suggesting that it is responsible for lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in B. fragilis. We tested this hypothesis by preparing recombinant Q5LIW1 protein (here referred to by the UniProt ID Q5LIW1), characterizing its API activity in vitro, and demonstrating that the gene encoding Q5LIW1 (GenBank ID YP_209877.1) was able to complement an API-deficient E. coli strain. We demonstrated that Q5LIW1 is inhibited by cytidine 5'-monophospho-3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid, the final product of the Kdo biosynthesis pathway, with a Ki of 1.91 μM. These results support the assertion that Q5LIW1 is the API that supports lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in B. fragilis and is subject to feedback regulation by CMP-Kdo. The sugar isomerase domain of E. coli KdsD, lacking the two cystathionine beta-synthase domains, demonstrated API activity and was further characterized. These results suggest that Q5LIW1 may be a suitable system to study API structure-function relationships.

  13. LLM-Domain Containing B-GATA Factors Control Different Aspects of Cytokinin-Regulated Development in Arabidopsis thaliana1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ranftl, Quirin L.; Bastakis, Emmanouil; Klermund, Carina

    2016-01-01

    Leu-Leu-Met (LLM)-domain B-GATAs are a subfamily of the 30-membered GATA transcription factor family from Arabidopsis. Only two of the six Arabidopsis LLM-domain B-GATAs, i.e. GATA, NITRATE-INDUCIBLE, CARBON METABOLISM-INVOLVED (GNC) and its paralog GNC-LIKE/CYTOKININ-RESPONSIVE GATA FACTOR1 (GNL), have already been analyzed with regard to their biological function. Together, GNC and GNL control germination, greening, flowering time, and senescence downstream from auxin, cytokinin (CK), gibberellin (GA), and light signaling. Whereas overexpression and complementation analyses suggest a redundant biochemical function between GNC and GNL, nothing is known about the biological role of the four other LLM-domain B-GATAs, GATA15, GATA16, GATA17, and GATA17L (GATA17-LIKE), based on loss-of-function mutant phenotypes. Here, we examine insertion mutants of the six Arabidopsis B-GATA genes and reveal the role of these genes in the control of greening, hypocotyl elongation, phyllotaxy, floral organ initiation, accessory meristem formation, flowering time, and senescence. Several of these phenotypes had previously not been described for the gnc and gnl mutants or were enhanced in the more complex mutants when compared to gnc gnl mutants. Some of the respective responses may be mediated by CK signaling, which activates the expression of all six GATA genes. CK-induced gene expression is partially compromised in LLM-domain B-GATA mutants, suggesting that B-GATA genes play a role in CK responses. We furthermore provide evidence for a transcriptional cross regulation between these GATAs that may, in at least some cases, be at the basis of their apparent functional redundancy. PMID:26829982

  14. The N-terminal domain of the thermo-regulated surface protein PrpA of Enterococcus faecium binds to fibrinogen, fibronectin and platelets

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán Prieto, Ana M.; Urbanus, Rolf T.; Zhang, Xinglin; Bierschenk, Damien; Koekman, C. Arnold; van Luit-Asbroek, Miranda; Ouwerkerk, Janneke P.; Pape, Marieke; Paganelli, Fernanda L.; Wobser, Dominique; Huebner, Johannes; Hendrickx, Antoni P. A.; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Willems, Rob J. L.; van Schaik, Willem

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium is a commensal of the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, but is also found in non-enteric environments where it can grow between 10 °C and 45 °C. E. faecium has recently emerged as a multi-drug resistant nosocomial pathogen. We hypothesized that genes involved in the colonization and infection of mammals exhibit temperature-regulated expression control and we therefore performed a transcriptome analysis of the clinical isolate E. faecium E1162, during mid-exponential growth at 25 °C and 37 °C. One of the genes that exhibited differential expression between 25 °C and 37 °C, was predicted to encode a peptidoglycan-anchored surface protein. The N-terminal domain of this protein is unique to E. faecium and closely related enterococci, while the C-terminal domain is homologous to the Streptococcus agalactiae surface protein BibA. This region of the protein contains proline-rich repeats, leading us to name the protein PrpA for proline-rich protein A. We found that PrpA is a surface-exposed protein which is most abundant during exponential growth at 37 °C in E. faecium E1162. The heterologously expressed and purified N-terminal domain of PrpA was able to bind to the extracellular matrix proteins fibrinogen and fibronectin. In addition, the N-terminal domain of PrpA interacted with both non-activated and activated platelets. PMID:26675410

  15. The N-terminal domain of the thermo-regulated surface protein PrpA of Enterococcus faecium binds to fibrinogen, fibronectin and platelets.

    PubMed

    Guzmán Prieto, Ana M; Urbanus, Rolf T; Zhang, Xinglin; Bierschenk, Damien; Koekman, C Arnold; van Luit-Asbroek, Miranda; Ouwerkerk, Janneke P; Pape, Marieke; Paganelli, Fernanda L; Wobser, Dominique; Huebner, Johannes; Hendrickx, Antoni P A; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L; van Schaik, Willem

    2015-12-17

    Enterococcus faecium is a commensal of the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, but is also found in non-enteric environments where it can grow between 10 °C and 45 °C. E. faecium has recently emerged as a multi-drug resistant nosocomial pathogen. We hypothesized that genes involved in the colonization and infection of mammals exhibit temperature-regulated expression control and we therefore performed a transcriptome analysis of the clinical isolate E. faecium E1162, during mid-exponential growth at 25 °C and 37 °C. One of the genes that exhibited differential expression between 25 °C and 37 °C, was predicted to encode a peptidoglycan-anchored surface protein. The N-terminal domain of this protein is unique to E. faecium and closely related enterococci, while the C-terminal domain is homologous to the Streptococcus agalactiae surface protein BibA. This region of the protein contains proline-rich repeats, leading us to name the protein PrpA for proline-rich protein A. We found that PrpA is a surface-exposed protein which is most abundant during exponential growth at 37 °C in E. faecium E1162. The heterologously expressed and purified N-terminal domain of PrpA was able to bind to the extracellular matrix proteins fibrinogen and fibronectin. In addition, the N-terminal domain of PrpA interacted with both non-activated and activated platelets.

  16. Down-regulation of kelch domain-containing F-box protein in Arabidopsis enhances the production of (poly)phenols and tolerance to ultraviolet radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xuebin; Liu, Chang -Jun; Gou, Mingyue; Guo, Chunrong; Yang, Huijun

    2014-12-01

    Phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in plants engenders myriad phenolics with diverse biological functions. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is the first committed enzyme in the pathway, directing primary metabolic flux into a phenylpropanoid branch. Previously, we demonstrated that the Arabidopsis Kelch-domain containing F-box proteins, AtKFB01, -20, and -50, function as the negative regulators controlling phenylpropanoid biosynthesis via mediating PAL’s ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. Here, we reveal that Arabidopsis KFB39, a close homolog of AtKFB50, also interacts physically with PAL isozymes and modulates PALs' stability and activity. Disturbing the expression of KFB39 reciprocally affects the accumulation/deposition of a set of phenylpropanoid end products, suggesting thatmore » KFB39 is an additional post-translational regulator responsible for the turnover of PAL and negatively controlling phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. Furthermore, we discover that exposure of Arabidopsis to UV-B radiation suppresses the expression of all four KFB genes while inducing the transcription of PAL isogenes; these data suggest that Arabidopsis consolidates both transcriptional and post-translational regulation mechanisms to maximize its responses to UV stress. Simultaneous down-regulation of all four identified KFBs significantly enhances the production of (poly)phenols and the plant’s tolerance to UV irradiation. This study offers a biotechnological approach for engineering the production of useful phenolic chemicals and for increasing a plant’s resistance to environmental stress.« less

  17. Down-regulation of kelch domain-containing F-box protein in Arabidopsis enhances the production of (poly)phenols and tolerance to ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xuebin; Liu, Chang -Jun; Gou, Mingyue; Guo, Chunrong; Yang, Huijun

    2014-12-01

    Phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in plants engenders myriad phenolics with diverse biological functions. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is the first committed enzyme in the pathway, directing primary metabolic flux into a phenylpropanoid branch. Previously, we demonstrated that the Arabidopsis Kelch-domain containing F-box proteins, AtKFB01, -20, and -50, function as the negative regulators controlling phenylpropanoid biosynthesis via mediating PAL’s ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. Here, we reveal that Arabidopsis KFB39, a close homolog of AtKFB50, also interacts physically with PAL isozymes and modulates PALs' stability and activity. Disturbing the expression of KFB39 reciprocally affects the accumulation/deposition of a set of phenylpropanoid end products, suggesting that KFB39 is an additional post-translational regulator responsible for the turnover of PAL and negatively controlling phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. Furthermore, we discover that exposure of Arabidopsis to UV-B radiation suppresses the expression of all four KFB genes while inducing the transcription of PAL isogenes; these data suggest that Arabidopsis consolidates both transcriptional and post-translational regulation mechanisms to maximize its responses to UV stress. Simultaneous down-regulation of all four identified KFBs significantly enhances the production of (poly)phenols and the plant’s tolerance to UV irradiation. This study offers a biotechnological approach for engineering the production of useful phenolic chemicals and for increasing a plant’s resistance to environmental stress.

  18. A conserved serine residue regulates the stability of Drosophila Salvador and human WW domain-containing adaptor 45 through proteasomal degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Di Wu, Shian

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Ser-17 is key for the stability of Drosophila Sav. •Ala mutation of Ser-17 promotes the proteasomal degradation of Sav. •Ser-17 residue is not the main target of Hpo-induced Sav stabilization. •Hpo-dependent and -independent mechanisms regulate Sav stability. •This mechanism is conserved in the homologue of Sav, human WW45. -- Abstract: The Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a conserved tumor suppressor pathway that controls organ size through the coordinated regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Drosophila Salvador (Sav), which limits organ size, is a core component of the Hpo pathway. In this study, Ser-17 was shown to be important for the stability of Sav. Alanine mutation of Ser-17 promoted the proteasomal degradation of Sav. Destabilization and stabilization of the Sav protein mediated by alanine mutation of Ser-17 and by Hpo, respectively, were independent of each other. This implies that the stability of Sav is controlled by two mechanisms, one that is Ser-17-dependent and Hpo-independent, and another that is Ser-17-independent and Hpo-dependent. These dual mechanisms also regulated the human counterpart of Drosophila Sav, WW domain-containing adaptor 45 (WW45). The conservation of this regulation adds to its significance in normal physiology and tumorigenesis.

  19. Interaction of bacterial fatty-acid-displaced regulators with DNA is interrupted by tyrosine phosphorylation in the helix-turn-helix domain

    PubMed Central

    Derouiche, Abderahmane; Bidnenko, Vladimir; Grenha, Rosa; Pigonneau, Nathalie; Ventroux, Magali; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Nessler, Sylvie; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Françoise; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria possess transcription regulators (of the TetR family) specifically dedicated to repressing genes for cytochrome P450, involved in oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Interaction of these repressors with operator sequences is disrupted in the presence of fatty acids, and they are therefore known as fatty-acid-displaced regulators. Here, we describe a novel mechanism of inactivating the interaction of these proteins with DNA, illustrated by the example of Bacillus subtilis regulator FatR. FatR was found to interact in a two-hybrid assay with TkmA, an activator of the protein-tyrosine kinase PtkA. We show that FatR is phosphorylated specifically at the residue tyrosine 45 in its helix-turn-helix domain by the kinase PtkA. Structural modelling reveals that the hydroxyl group of tyrosine 45 interacts with DNA, and we show that this phosphorylation reduces FatR DNA binding capacity. Point mutants mimicking phosphorylation of FatR in vivo lead to a strong derepression of the fatR operon, indicating that this regulatory mechanism works independently of derepression by polyunsaturated fatty acids. Tyrosine 45 is a highly conserved residue, and PtkA from B. subtilis can phosphorylate FatR homologues from other bacteria. This indicates that phosphorylation of tyrosine 45 may be a general mechanism of switching off bacterial fatty-acid-displaced regulators. PMID:23939619

  20. Down-Regulation of Kelch Domain-Containing F-Box Protein in Arabidopsis Enhances the Production of (Poly)phenols and Tolerance to Ultraviolet Radiation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuebin; Gou, Mingyue; Guo, Chunrong; Yang, Huijun; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in plants engenders myriad phenolics with diverse biological functions. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is the first committed enzyme in the pathway, directing primary metabolic flux into a phenylpropanoid branch. Previously, we demonstrated that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Kelch domain-containing F-box proteins, AtKFB01, AtKFB20, and AtKFB50, function as the negative regulators controlling phenylpropanoid biosynthesis via mediating PAL’s ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. Here, we reveal that Arabidopsis KFB39, a close homolog of AtKFB50, also interacts physically with PAL isozymes and modulates PAL stability and activity. Disturbing the expression of KFB39 reciprocally affects the accumulation/deposition of a set of phenylpropanoid end products, suggesting that KFB39 is an additional posttranslational regulator responsible for the turnover of PAL and negatively controlling phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. Furthermore, we discover that exposure of Arabidopsis to ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation suppresses the expression of all four KFB genes while inducing the transcription of PAL isogenes; these data suggest that Arabidopsis consolidates both transcriptional and posttranslational regulation mechanisms to maximize its responses to UV light stress. Simultaneous down-regulation of all four identified KFBs significantly enhances the production of (poly)phenols and the plant’s tolerance to UV irradiation. This study offers a biotechnological approach for engineering the production of useful phenolic chemicals and for increasing a plant’s resistance to environmental stress. PMID:25502410

  1. The Evolutionarily Conserved C-terminal Domains in the Mammalian Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor Family Serve as Dual Regulators of Protein Stability and Transcriptional Potency*

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Satyaki; Lingnurkar, Raj; Carey, Timothy S.; Pomaville, Monica; Kar, Parimal; Feig, Michael; Wilson, Catherine A.; Knott, Jason G.; Arnosti, David N.; Henry, R. William

    2015-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor and related family of proteins play critical roles in development through their regulation of genes involved in cell fate. Multiple regulatory pathways impact RB function, including the ubiquitin-proteasome system with deregulated RB destruction frequently associated with pathogenesis. With the current study we explored the mechanisms connecting proteasome-mediated turnover of the RB family to the regulation of repressor activity. We find that steady state levels of all RB family members, RB, p107, and p130, were diminished during embryonic stem cell differentiation concomitant with their target gene acquisition. Proteasome-dependent turnover of the RB family is mediated by distinct and autonomously acting instability elements (IE) located in their C-terminal regulatory domains in a process that is sensitive to cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK4) perturbation. The IE regions include motifs that contribute to E2F-DP transcription factor interaction, and consistently, p107 and p130 repressor potency was reduced by IE deletion. The juxtaposition of degron sequences and E2F interaction motifs appears to be a conserved feature across the RB family, suggesting the potential for repressor ubiquitination and specific target gene regulation. These findings establish a mechanistic link between regulation of RB family repressor potency and the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:25903125

  2. Down-regulation of Kelch domain-containing F-box protein in Arabidopsis enhances the production of (poly)phenols and tolerance to ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuebin; Gou, Mingyue; Guo, Chunrong; Yang, Huijun; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2015-02-01

    Phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in plants engenders myriad phenolics with diverse biological functions. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is the first committed enzyme in the pathway, directing primary metabolic flux into a phenylpropanoid branch. Previously, we demonstrated that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Kelch domain-containing F-box proteins, AtKFB01, AtKFB20, and AtKFB50, function as the negative regulators controlling phenylpropanoid biosynthesis via mediating PAL's ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. Here, we reveal that Arabidopsis KFB39, a close homolog of AtKFB50, also interacts physically with PAL isozymes and modulates PAL stability and activity. Disturbing the expression of KFB39 reciprocally affects the accumulation/deposition of a set of phenylpropanoid end products, suggesting that KFB39 is an additional posttranslational regulator responsible for the turnover of PAL and negatively controlling phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. Furthermore, we discover that exposure of Arabidopsis to ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation suppresses the expression of all four KFB genes while inducing the transcription of PAL isogenes; these data suggest that Arabidopsis consolidates both transcriptional and posttranslational regulation mechanisms to maximize its responses to UV light stress. Simultaneous down-regulation of all four identified KFBs significantly enhances the production of (poly)phenols and the plant's tolerance to UV irradiation. This study offers a biotechnological approach for engineering the production of useful phenolic chemicals and for increasing a plant's resistance to environmental stress.

  3. Distinct structural domains of caveolin-1 independently regulate Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ microdomain-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yi-Chun; Parekh, Anant B

    2015-04-01

    In eukaryotic cells, calcium entry across the cell surface activates nuclear gene expression, a process critically important for cell growth and differentiation, learning, and memory and immune cell functions. In immune cells, calcium entry occurs through store-operated Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels, comprised of STIM1 and Orai1 proteins. Local calcium entry through CRAC channels activates expression of c-fos- and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-dependent genes. Although c-fos and NFAT often interact to activate gene expression synergistically, they can be activated independently of one another to regulate distinct genes. This raises the question of how one transcription factor can be activated and not the other when both are stimulated by the same trigger. Here, we show that the lipid raft scaffolding protein caveolin-1 interacts with the STIM1-Orai1 complex to increase channel activity. Phosphorylation of tyrosine 14 on caveolin-1 regulates CRAC channel-evoked c-fos activation without impacting the NFAT pathway or Orai1 activity. Our results reveal that structurally distinct domains of caveolin-1 selectively regulate the ability of local calcium to activate distinct transcription factors. More generally, our findings reveal that modular regulation by a scaffolding protein provides a simple, yet effective, mechanism to tunnel a local signal down a specific pathway. PMID:25645930

  4. Knockdown of a JmjC domain-containing gene JMJ524 confers altered gibberellin responses by transcriptional regulation of GRAS protein lacking the DELLA domain genes in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinhua; Yu, Chuying; Wu, Hua; Luo, Zhidan; Ouyang, Bo; Cui, Long; Zhang, Junhong; Ye, Zhibiao

    2015-01-01

    Plants integrate responses to independent hormonal and environmental signals to survive adversity. In particular, the phytohormone gibberellin (GA) regulates a variety of developmental processes and stress responses. In this study, the Jumonji-C (JmjC) domain-containing gene JMJ524 was characterized in tomato. JMJ524 responded to circadian rhythms and was upregulated by GA treatment. Knockdown of JMJ524 by RNAi caused a GA-insensitive dwarf phenotype with shrunken leaves and shortened internodes. However, in these transgenic plants, higher levels of endogenous GAs were detected. A genome-wide gene expression analysis by RNA-seq indicated that the expression levels of two DELLA-like genes, SlGLD1 (‘GRAS protein Lacking the DELLA domain’) and SlGLD2, were increased in JMJ524-RNAi transgenic plants. Nevertheless, only the overexpression of SlGLD1 in tomato resulted in a GA-insensitive dwarf phenotype, suggesting that SlGLD1 acts as a repressor of GA signalling. This study proposes that JMJ524 is required for stem elongation by altering GA responses, at least partially by regulating SlGLD1. PMID:25680796

  5. The role of metal binding and phosphorylation domains in the regulation of cisplatin-induced trafficking of ATP7B.

    PubMed

    Safaei, Roohangiz; Adams, Preston L; Mathews, Ryan A; Manorek, Gerald; Howell, Stephen B

    2013-08-01

    The copper (Cu) exporter ATP7B mediates cellular resistance to cisplatin (cDDP) by increasing drug efflux. ATP7B binds and sequesters cDDP in into secretory vesicles. Upon cDDP exposure ATP7B traffics from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the periphery of the cell in a manner that requires the cysteine residues in its metal binding domains (MBD). To elucidate the role of the various domains of ATP7B in its cDDP-induced trafficking we expressed a series of mCherry-tagged variants of ATP7B in HEK293T cells and analyzed their subcellular localization in basal media and after a 1 h exposure to 30 μM cDDP. The wild type ATP7B and a variant in which the cysteines in the CXXC motifs of MBD 1-5 were converted to serines trafficked out of the trans-Golgi (TGN) when exposed to cDDP. Conversion of the cysteines in all 6 of the CXXC motifs to serines, or in only the sixth MBD, rendered ATP7B incapable of trafficking on exposure to cDDP. Truncation of MBD1-5 or MBD1-6 resulted in the loss of TGN localization. Addition of the first 63 amino acids of ATP7B to these variants restored TGN localization to a great extent and enabled the MBD1-5 variant to undergo cDDP-induced trafficking. A variant of ATP7B in which the aspartate 1027 residue in the phosphorylation domain was converted to glutamine localized to the TGN but was incapable of cDDP-induced trafficking. These results demonstrate that the CXXC motif in the sixth MBD and the catalytic activity of ATP7B are required for cDDP-induced trafficking as they are for Cu-induced redistribution of ATP7B; this provides further evidence that cDDP mimics Cu with respect to the molecular mechanisms by they control the subcellular distribution of ATP7B.

  6. The role of metal binding and phosphorylation domains in the regulation of cisplatin-induced trafficking of ATP7B

    PubMed Central

    Safaei, Roohangiz; Adams, Preston L.; Mathews, Ryan A.; Manorek, Gerald; Howell, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    The copper (Cu) exporter ATP7B mediates cellular resistance to cisplatin (cDDP) by increasing drug efflux. ATP7B binds and sequesters cDDP in into secretory vesicles. Upon cDDP exposure ATP7B traffics from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the periphery of the cell in a manner that requires the cysteine residues in its metal binding domains (MBD). To elucidate the role of the various domains of ATP7B in its cDDP-induced trafficking we expressed a series of mCherry-tagged variants of ATP7B in HEK293T cells and analyzed their subcellular localization in basal media and after a 1 h exposure to 30 μM cDDP. The wild type ATP7B and a variant in which the cysteines in the CXXC motifs of MBD 1-5 were converted to serines trafficked out of the trans-Golgi (TGN) when exposed to cDDP. Conversion of the cysteines in all 6 of the CXXC motifs to serines, or in only the sixth MBD, rendered ATP7B incapable of trafficking on exposure to cDDP. Truncation of MBD1-5 or MBD1-6 resulted in the loss of TGN localization. Addition of the first 63 amino acids of ATP7B to these variants restored TGN localization to a great extent and enabled the MBD1-5 variant to undergo cDDP-induced trafficking. A variant of ATP7B in which the aspartate 1027 residue in the phosphorylation domain was converted to glutamine localized to the TGN but was incapable of cDDP-induced trafficking. These results demonstrate that the CXXC motif in the sixth MBD and the catalytic activity of ATP7B are required for cDDP-induced trafficking as they are for Cu-induced redistribution of ATP7B; this provides further evidence that cDDP mimics Cu with respect to the molecular mechanisms by they control the subcellular distribution of ATP7B. PMID:23803742

  7. Controlling integrin specificity and stem cell differentiation in 2-D and 3-D environments through regulation of fibronectin domain stability

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Mikaël M.; Mochizuki, Mayumi; Rothenfluh, Dominique A.; Rempel, Sandra A.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Barker, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) exerts powerful control over many cellular phenomena, including stem cell differentiation. As such, design and modulation of ECM analogs to ligate specific integrin is a promising approach to control cellular processes in vitro and in vivo for regenerative medicine strategies. Although fibronectin (FN), a crucial ECM protein in tissue development and repair, and its RGD peptide are widely used for cell adhesion, the promiscuity with which they engage integrins leads to difficulty in control of receptor-specific interactions. Recent simulations of force-mediated unfolding of FN domains and sequences analysis of human versus mouse FN suggest that the structural stability of the FN’s central cell-binding domains (FN III9-10) affects its integrin specificity. Through production of FN III9-10 variants with variable stabilities, we obtained ligands that present different specificities for the integrin α5β1 and that can be covalently linked into fibrin matrices. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of α5β1 integrin-specific engagement to influence human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) behavior in 2D and 3D environments. Our data indicate that α5β1 has an important role in the control of MSC osteogenic differentiation. FN fragments with increased specificity for α5β1 versus αvβ3 results in significantly enhanced osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in 2D and in a clinically relevant 3D fibrin matrix system, although attachment/spreading and proliferation were comparable with that on full-length FN. This work shows how integrin-dependant cellular interactions with the ECM can be engineered to control stem cell fate, within a system appropriate for both 3D cell culture and tissue engineering. PMID:19027948

  8. Arabidopsis SAG protein containing the MDN1 domain participates in seed germination and seedling development by negatively regulating ABI3 and ABI5.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changtian; Wu, Changai; Miao, Jiaming; Lei, Yunxue; Zhao, Dongxiao; Sun, Dan; Yang, Guodong; Huang, Jinguang; Zheng, Chengchao

    2014-01-01

    Three proteins containing a midasin homologue 1 (MDN1) domain from the yeast Solanum chacoense and Arabidopsis thaliana have important functions in yeast survival, seed development, and female gametogenesis. In this study, a novel protein containing the MDN1 domain from Arabidopsis negatively regulated abscisic acid (ABA) signalling during seed germination. Seeds of a T-DNA insertion line of this gene exhibited increased sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and seedling development (named sag). By contrast, seeds with overexpressed AtSAG (OX2) were less sensitive to ABA. The seeds of the sag mutant showed similar sensitivity to high concentrations of mannitol and NaCl during these stages. AtSAG was also highly expressed in germinating seeds. However, ABA-induced AtSAG expression remained almost unchanged. ABA-responsive marker genes, including ABI3, ABI5, Em1, Em6, RD29A, and RAB18, were upregulated in sag mutants but were downregulated in OX2. Genetic analyses indicated that the function of AtSAG in ABA signalling depended on ABI3 and ABI5. The expression of some target genes of ABI3 and ABI5, such as seed storage protein and oleosin genes, was induced higher by ABA in sag mutants than in wild-type germinated seeds, even higher than in abi5 mutants. This finding indicated that other regulators similar to ABI3 or ABI5 played a role during these stages. Taken together, these results indicate that AtSAG is an important negative regulator of ABA signalling during seed germination and seedling development.

  9. Functional analysis of developmentally regulated chromatin-hypersensitive domains carrying the alpha 1-fetoprotein gene promoter and the albumin/alpha 1-fetoprotein intergenic enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, D; Thomassin, H; Allard, D; Guertin, M; Hamel, D; Blaquière, M; Beauchemin, M; LaRue, H; Estable-Puig, M; Bélanger, L

    1993-01-01

    During liver development, the tandem alpha 1-fetoprotein (AFP)/albumin locus is triggered at the AFP end and then asymmetrically enhanced; this is followed by autonomous repression of the AFP-encoding gene. To understand this regulation better, we characterized the two early developmental stage-specific DNase I-hypersensitive (DH) sites so far identified in rat liver AFP/albumin chromatin: an intergenic DH-enhancer site and the AFP DH-promoter site. Mutation-transfection analyses circumscribed the DH-enhancer domain to a 200-bp DNA segment stringently conserved among species. Targeted mutations, DNA-protein-binding assays, and coexpression experiments pinpointed C/EBP as the major activatory component of the intergenic enhancer. Structure-function relationships at the AFP DH-promoter site defined a discrete glucocorticoid-regulated domain activated cooperatively by HNF1 and a highly specific AFP transcription factor, FTF, which binds to a steroid receptor recognition motif. The HNF1/FTF/DNA complex is deactivated by glucocorticoid receptors or by the ubiquitous factor NF1, which eliminates HNF1 by competition at an overlapping, high-affinity binding site. We propose that the HNF1-NF1 site might serve as a developmental switch to direct autonomous AFP gene repression in late liver development. We also conclude that the intergenic enhancer is driven by C/EBP alpha primarily to fulfill albumin gene activation functions at early developmental stages. Factor FTF seems to be the key regulator of AFP gene-specific functions in carcinoembryonic states. Images PMID:7680097

  10. Implication for the regulation of catabolism drawn from the single insulin-like growth factor binding domain protein (SIBD) gene in the mud crab, Scylla paramamosain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoshuai; Ye, Haihui; Huang, Huiyang; Liu, An; Feng, Biyun

    2015-05-15

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling system holds a central position in regulating growth and metabolism in vertebrates. As critical components of this system, the IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) play important roles in regulating the biological activities of IGFs. Recently, the single IGF-binding domain protein (SIBD) was identified in invertebrates and its sequence was highly homologous with the N-terminal domain of IGFBP. In view of the possible role as counterparts of vertebrate IGFBPs, SIBDs have attracted the ever-increasing attention. This study reports the identification of a 1284bp SIBD gene (Sp-SIBD) from a member of commercially important family of Portunidae. The tissue distribution analysis showed that Sp-SIBD was mainly expressed in the nervous tissues and hepatopancreas. RNA in situ hybridization analysis showed that the positive signals were predominantly distributed in the secretory cells of the hepatopancreas. Subsequently, we examined the effects of various stresses, including hyperosmotic stress, hyperthermia, activated stress and fasting, on glucose levels in the hemolymph and Sp-SIBD expressions in the hepatopancreas. Interestingly, we found that Sp-SIBD expression was strongly up-regulated in response to these catabolic circumstances. Given the previous findings of insulin-like peptides (ILPs) in invertebrates, we speculate that invertebrate ILPs and SIBDs promise to serve as a pair of counterparts of IGFs and IGFBPs from vertebrate species respectively. In this context, the combined results suggested, by analogy with IGFBP 1 from vertebrates, for the first time that SIBD might play a key physiological role by sequestering ILPs to inhibit energy-expensive growth until conditions are more favorable.

  11. Jarid2 (Jumonji, AT rich interactive domain 2) regulates NOTCH1 expression via histone modification in the developing heart.

    PubMed

    Mysliwiec, Matthew R; Carlson, Clayton D; Tietjen, Josh; Hung, Holly; Ansari, Aseem Z; Lee, Youngsook

    2012-01-01

    Jarid2/Jumonji, the founding member of the Jmj factor family, critically regulates various developmental processes, including cardiovascular development. The Jmj family was identified as histone demethylases, indicating epigenetic regulation by Jmj proteins. Deletion of Jarid2 in mice resulted in cardiac malformation and increased endocardial Notch1 expression during development. Although Jarid2 has been shown to occupy the Notch1 locus in the developing heart, the precise molecular role of Jarid2 remains unknown. Here we show that deletion of Jarid2 results in reduced methylation of lysine 9 on histone H3 (H3K9) at the Notch1 genomic locus in embryonic hearts. Interestingly, SETDB1, a histone H3K9 methyltransferase, was identified as a putative cofactor of Jarid2 by yeast two-hybrid screening, and the physical interaction between Jarid2 and SETDB1 was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Concurrently, accumulation of SETDB1 at the site of Jarid2 occupancy was significantly reduced in Jarid2 knock out (KO) hearts. Employing genome-wide approaches, putative Jarid2 target genes regulated by SETDB1 via H3K9 methylation were identified in the developing heart by ChIP-chip. These targets are involved in biological processes that, when dysregulated, could manifest in the phenotypic defects observed in Jarid2 KO mice. Our data demonstrate that Jarid2 functions as a transcriptional repressor of target genes, including Notch1, through a novel process involving the modification of H3K9 methylation via specific interaction with SETDB1 during heart development. Therefore, our study provides new mechanistic insights into epigenetic regulation by Jarid2, which will enhance our understanding of the molecular basis of other organ development and biological processes.

  12. Effects of PKA Phosphorylation of Cardiac Troponin I and Strong Crossbridge on Conformational Transitions of the N-Domain of Cardiac Troponin C in Regulated Thin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wen-Ji; Jayasundar, Jayant James; An, Jianli; Xing, Jun; Cheung, Herbert C.

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of cardiac muscle function is initiated by binding of Ca2+ to troponin C (cTnC) which induces a series of structural changes in cTnC and other thin filament proteins. These structural changes are further modulated by crossbridge formation and fine tuned by phosphorylation of cTnI. The objective of the present study is to use a new Förster Resonance Energy Transfer-based structural marker to distinguish structural and kinetic effects of Ca2+ binding, crossbridge interaction and protein kinase A phosphorylation of cTnI on the conformational changes of the cTnC N-domain. The FRET-based structural marker was generated by attaching AEDANS to one cysteine of a double-cysteine mutant cTnC(13C/51C) as a FRET donor and attaching DDPM to the other cysteine as the acceptor. The doubly labeled cTnC mutant was reconstituted into the thin filament by adding cTnI, cTnT, tropomyosin and actin. Changes in the distance between Cys13 and Cys51 induced by Ca2+ binding/dissociation were determined by FRET-sensed Ca2+ titration and stopped-flow studies, and time-resolved fluorescence measurements. The results showed that the presence of both Ca2+ and strong binding of myosin head to actin was required to achieve a fully open structure of the cTnC N-domain in regulated thin filaments. Equilibrium and stopped-flow studies suggested that strongly bound myosin head significantly increased the Ca2+ sensitivity and changed the kinetics of the structural transition of the cTnC N-domain. PKA phosphorylation of cTnI impacted the Ca2+ sensitivity and kinetics of the structural transition of the cTnC N-domain but showed no global structural effect on cTnC opening. These results provide an insight into the modulation mechanism of strong crossbridge and cTnI phosphorylation in cardiac thin filament activation/relaxation processes. PMID:17676764

  13. The RNA Domain Vc1 Regulates Downstream Gene Expression in Response to Cyclic Diguanylate in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Kariisa, Ankunda T.; Weeks, Kevin; Tamayo, Rita

    2016-01-01

    In many bacterial species, including the aquatic bacterium and human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) modulates processes such as biofilm formation, motility, and virulence factor production. By interacting with various effectors, c-di-GMP regulates gene expression or protein function. One type of c-di-GMP receptor is the class I riboswitch, representatives of which have been shown to bind c-di-GMP in vitro. Herein, we examined the in vitro and in vivo function of the putative class I riboswitch in Vibrio cholerae, Vc1, which lies upstream of the gene encoding GbpA, a colonization factor that contributes to attachment of V. cholerae to environmental and host surfaces containing N-acetylglucosamine moieties. We provide evidence that Vc1 RNA interacts directly with c-di-GMP in vitro, and that nucleotides conserved among this class of riboswitch are important for binding. Yet the mutation of these conserved residues individually in the V. cholerae chromosome inconsistently affects the expression of gbpA and production of the GbpA protein. By isolating the regulatory function of Vc1, we show that the Vc1 element positively regulates downstream gene expression in response to c-di-GMP. Together these data suggest that the Vc1 element responds to c-di-GMP in vivo. Positive regulation of gbpA expression by c-di-GMP via Vc1 may influence the ability of V. cholerae to associate with chitin in the aquatic environment and the host intestinal environment. PMID:26849223

  14. The RNA Domain Vc1 Regulates Downstream Gene Expression in Response to Cyclic Diguanylate in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Kariisa, Ankunda T; Weeks, Kevin; Tamayo, Rita

    2016-01-01

    In many bacterial species, including the aquatic bacterium and human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) modulates processes such as biofilm formation, motility, and virulence factor production. By interacting with various effectors, c-di-GMP regulates gene expression or protein function. One type of c-di-GMP receptor is the class I riboswitch, representatives of which have been shown to bind c-di-GMP in vitro. Herein, we examined the in vitro and in vivo function of the putative class I riboswitch in Vibrio cholerae, Vc1, which lies upstream of the gene encoding GbpA, a colonization factor that contributes to attachment of V. cholerae to environmental and host surfaces containing N-acetylglucosamine moieties. We provide evidence that Vc1 RNA interacts directly with c-di-GMP in vitro, and that nucleotides conserved among this class of riboswitch are important for binding. Yet the mutation of these conserved residues individually in the V. cholerae chromosome inconsistently affects the expression of gbpA and production of the GbpA protein. By isolating the regulatory function of Vc1, we show that the Vc1 element positively regulates downstream gene expression in response to c-di-GMP. Together these data suggest that the Vc1 element responds to c-di-GMP in vivo. Positive regulation of gbpA expression by c-di-GMP via Vc1 may influence the ability of V. cholerae to associate with chitin in the aquatic environment and the host intestinal environment.

  15. Elongator subunit 3 positively regulates plant immunity through its histone acetyltransferase and radical S-adenosylmethionine domains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathogen infection triggers a large-scale transcriptional reprogramming in plants, and the speed of this reprogramming affects the outcome of the infection. Our understanding of this process has significantly benefited from mutants that display either delayed or accelerated defense gene induction. In our previous work we demonstrated that the Arabidopsis Elongator complex subunit 2 (AtELP2) plays an important role in both basal immunity and effector-triggered immunity (ETI), and more recently showed that AtELP2 is involved in dynamic changes in histone acetylation and DNA methylation at several defense genes. However, the function of other Elongator subunits in plant immunity has not been characterized. Results In the same genetic screen used to identify Atelp2, we found another Elongator mutant, Atelp3-10, which mimics Atelp2 in that it exhibits a delay in defense gene induction following salicylic acid treatment or pathogen infection. Similarly to AtELP2, AtELP3 is required for basal immunity and ETI, but not for systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Furthermore, we demonstrate that both the histone acetyltransferase and radical S-adenosylmethionine domains of AtELP3 are essential for its function in plant immunity. Conclusion Our results indicate that the entire Elongator complex is involved in basal immunity and ETI, but not in SAR, and support that Elongator may play a role in facilitating the transcriptional induction of defense genes through alterations to their chromatin. PMID:23856002

  16. Structural basis for substrate activation and regulation by cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) domains in cystathionine [beta]-synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Kabil, Omer; Smith, Janet L.; Banerjee, Ruma

    2011-08-17

    The catalytic potential for H{sub 2}S biogenesis and homocysteine clearance converge at the active site of cystathionine {beta}-synthase (CBS), a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme. CBS catalyzes {beta}-replacement reactions of either serine or cysteine by homocysteine to give cystathionine and water or H{sub 2}S, respectively. In this study, high-resolution structures of the full-length enzyme from Drosophila in which a carbanion (1.70 {angstrom}) and an aminoacrylate intermediate (1.55 {angstrom}) have been captured are reported. Electrostatic stabilization of the zwitterionic carbanion intermediate is afforded by the close positioning of an active site lysine residue that is initially used for Schiff base formation in the internal aldimine and later as a general base. Additional stabilizing interactions between active site residues and the catalytic intermediates are observed. Furthermore, the structure of the regulatory 'energy-sensing' CBS domains, named after this protein, suggests a mechanism for allosteric activation by S-adenosylmethionine.

  17. Regulation of Murine Ovarian Epithelial Carcinoma by Vaccination against the Cytoplasmic Domain of Anti-Müllerian Hormone Receptor II.

    PubMed

    Sakalar, Cagri; Mazumder, Suparna; Johnson, Justin M; Altuntas, Cengiz Z; Jaini, Ritika; Aguilar, Robert; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V; Connolly, Denise C; Tuohy, Vincent K

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone receptor, type II (AMHR2), is a differentiation protein expressed in 90% of primary epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOCs), the most deadly gynecologic malignancy. We propose that AMHR2 may serve as a useful target for vaccination against EOC. To this end, we generated the recombinant 399-amino acid cytoplasmic domain of mouse AMHR2 (AMHR2-CD) and tested its efficacy as a vaccine target in inhibiting growth of the ID8 transplantable EOC cell line in C57BL/6 mice and in preventing growth of autochthonous EOCs that occur spontaneously in transgenic mice. We found that AMHR2-CD immunization of C57BL/6 females induced a prominent antigen-specific proinflammatory CD4+ T cell response that resulted in a mild transient autoimmune oophoritis that resolved rapidly with no detectable lingering adverse effects on ovarian function. AMHR2-CD vaccination significantly inhibited ID8 tumor growth when administered either prophylactically or therapeutically, and protection against EOC growth was passively transferred into naive recipients with AMHR2-CD-primed CD4+ T cells but not with primed B cells. In addition, prophylactic AMHR2-CD vaccination of TgMISIIR-TAg transgenic mice significantly inhibited growth of autochthonous EOCs and provided a 41.7% increase in mean overall survival. We conclude that AMHR2-CD vaccination provides effective immunotherapy of EOC with relatively benign autoimmune complications.

  18. Porcine bocavirus NP1 negatively regulates interferon signaling pathway by targeting the DNA-binding domain of IRF9.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruoxi; Fang, Liurong; Wang, Dang; Cai, Kaimei; Zhang, Huan; Xie, Lilan; Li, Yi; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2015-11-01

    To subvert host antiviral immune responses, many viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit IFN signaling pathway. Porcine bocavirus (PBoV), a newly identified porcine parvovirus, has received attention because it shows clinically high co-infection prevalence with other pathogens in post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PWMS) and diarrheic piglets. In this study, we screened the structural and non-structural proteins encoded by PBoV and found that the non-structural protein NP1 significantly suppressed IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) activity and subsequent IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. However, NP1 affected neither the activation and translocation of STAT1/STAT2, nor the formation of the heterotrimeric transcription factor complex ISGF3 (STAT1/STAT2/IRF9). Detailed analysis demonstrated that PBoV NP1 blocked the ISGF3 DNA-binding activity by combining with the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of IRF9. In summary, these results indicate that PBoV NP1 interferes with type I IFN signaling pathway by blocking DNA binding of ISGF3 to attenuate innate immune responses.

  19. The Garz Sec7 domain guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Arf regulates salivary gland development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Szul, Tomasz; Burgess, Jason; Jeon, Mili; Zinn, Kai; Marques, Guillermo; Brill, Julie A

    2011-01-01

    Surface delivery of proteins involved in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions in cultured mammalian cells requires the GBF1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor. However, the role of GBF1 in delivery of adhesion proteins during organogenesis in intact animals has not been characterized. Here, we report the function of the fly GBF1 homolog, Gartenzwerg (Garz) in the development of the salivary gland in Drosophila melanogaster. We used the GAL4/UAS system to selectively deplete Garz from salivary gland cells. We show that depletion of Garz disrupts the secretory pathway as evidenced by the collapse of Golgi-localized Lava lamp (Lva) and the TGN-localized γ subunit of the clathrin-adaptor protein complex (AP-1). Additionally, Garz depletion inhibits trafficking of cell-cell adhesion proteins cadherin (DE-cad) and Flamingo to the cell surface. Disregulation of trafficking correlates with mistargeting of the tumor suppressor protein Discs large involved in epithelial polarity determination. Garz-depleted salivary cells are smaller and lack well-defined plasma membrane domains. Garz depletion also inhibits normal elongation and positioning of epithelial cells, resulting in a disorganized salivary gland that lacks a well defined luminal duct. Our findings suggest that Garz is essential for establishment of epithelial structures and demonstrate an absolute requirement for Garz during Drosophila development. PMID:21686256

  20. Regulation of Murine Ovarian Epithelial Carcinoma by Vaccination against the Cytoplasmic Domain of Anti-Müllerian Hormone Receptor II

    PubMed Central

    Sakalar, Cagri; Mazumder, Suparna; Johnson, Justin M.; Altuntas, Cengiz Z.; Jaini, Ritika; Aguilar, Robert; Prasad, Sathyamangla V. Naga; Connolly, Denise C.; Tuohy, Vincent K.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone receptor, type II (AMHR2), is a differentiation protein expressed in 90% of primary epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOCs), the most deadly gynecologic malignancy. We propose that AMHR2 may serve as a useful target for vaccination against EOC. To this end, we generated the recombinant 399-amino acid cytoplasmic domain of mouse AMHR2 (AMHR2-CD) and tested its efficacy as a vaccine target in inhibiting growth of the ID8 transplantable EOC cell line in C57BL/6 mice and in preventing growth of autochthonous EOCs that occur spontaneously in transgenic mice. We found that AMHR2-CD immunization of C57BL/6 females induced a prominent antigen-specific proinflammatory CD4+ T cell response that resulted in a mild transient autoimmune oophoritis that resolved rapidly with no detectable lingering adverse effects on ovarian function. AMHR2-CD vaccination significantly inhibited ID8 tumor growth when administered either prophylactically or therapeutically, and protection against EOC growth was passively transferred into naive recipients with AMHR2-CD-primed CD4+ T cells but not with primed B cells. In addition, prophylactic AMHR2-CD vaccination of TgMISIIR-TAg transgenic mice significantly inhibited growth of autochthonous EOCs and provided a 41.7% increase in mean overall survival. We conclude that AMHR2-CD vaccination provides effective immunotherapy of EOC with relatively benign autoimmune complications. PMID:26618181

  1. TLR and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor signals differentially regulate exogenous antigen-presentation

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Claudia S.; Cresswell, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The effect of dendritic cell (DC) maturation on MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation is well studied, but less is known about the effects of DC maturation on MHC class I-restricted cross-presentation. We investigated the ability of mature DCs to present antigens from cells infected with Herpes simplex virus-1. Pre-treatment with pure LPS increased cross-presentation, in a manner dependent on both MyD88 and TRIF, while a similar dose of a less pure LPS preparation inhibited cross-presentation. The difference could not be attributed to differences in uptake or phenotypic maturation. The likely contaminant responsible for shutting down cross-presentation is peptidoglycan. Addition of peptidoglycan to pure LPS abrogated its ability to enhance cross-presentation. Direct activation of DCs with peptidoglycan inhibited cross-presentation through nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (Nod)-like receptor signaling. These results demonstrate that different maturation stimuli can have opposite impacts on the ability of DCs to cross-present viral antigens. PMID:22156493

  2. Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) regulates autophagy through promoting the expression of Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) in human breast adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Liangqiang; Ren, Yongzhe; Zheng, Qianqian; Wang, Lu; Lai, Yueyang; Guan, Shengwen; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Jie; Chen, Dianhua; Yang, Yunwen; Zhuang, Hongqin; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Hua, Zi-chun

    2016-01-01

    FADD (Fas-associated protein with death domain) is a classical adaptor protein in apoptosis. Increasing evidences have shown that FADD is also implicated in cell cycle progression, proliferation and tumorigenesis. The role of FADD in cancer remains largely unexplored. In this study, In Silico Analysis using Oncomine and Kaplan Meier plotter revealed that FADD is significantly up-regulated in breast cancer tissues and closely associated with a poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer. To better understanding the FADD functions in breast cancer, we performed proteomics analysis by LC-MS/MS detection and found that Rheb–mTORC1 pathway was dysregulated in MCF-7 cells when FADD knockdown. The mTORC1 pathway is a key regulator in many processes, including cell growth, metabolism and autophagy. Here, FADD interference down-regulated Rheb expression and repressed mTORC1 activity in breast cancer cell lines. The autophagy was induced by FADD deficiency in MCF7 or MDA-231 cells but rescued by recovering Rheb expression. Similarly, growth defect in FADD-knockdown cells was also restored by Rheb overexpression. These findings implied a novel role of FADD in tumor progression via Rheb–mTORC1 pathway in breast cancer. PMID:27013580

  3. EFO1 and EFO2, encoding putative WD-domain proteins, have overlapping and distinct roles in the regulation of vegetative development and flowering of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuyi; Yang, Dennis; Feldmann, Kenneth A

    2011-01-01

    From screening a population of Arabidopsis overexpression lines, two Arabidopsis genes were identified, EFO1 (early flowering by overexpression 1) and EFO2, that confer early flowering when overexpressed. The two genes encode putative WD-domain proteins which share high sequence similarity and constitute a small subfamily. Interestingly, the efo2-1 loss-of-function mutant also flowered earlier in short days and slightly earlier in long days than the wild type, while no flowering-time or morphological differences were observed in efo1-1 relative to the wild type. In addition, the efo2-1 mutation perturbed hypocotyl elongation, leaf expansion and formation, and stem elongation. EFO1 and EFO2 are both regulated by the circadian clock. Expression and genetic analyses revealed that EFO2 suppresses flowering largely through the action of CONSTANS (CO) and flowering locus T (FT), suggesting that EFO2 is a negative regulator of photoperiodic flowering. The growth defects in efo2-1 were augmented in efo1 efo2, but the induction of FT in the double mutant was comparable to that in efo2-1. Thus, while EFO2 acts as a floral repressor, EFO1 may not be directly involved in flowering, but the two genes do have overlapping roles in regulating other developmental processes. EFO1 and EFO2 may function collectively to serve as one of the converging points where the signals of growth and flowering intersect. PMID:21242318

  4. A C-terminal protein-binding domain in the retinoblastoma protein regulates nuclear c-Abl tyrosine kinase in the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Welch, P J; Wang, J Y

    1993-11-19

    The ubiquitously expressed c-Abl tyrosine kinase is localized to the nucleus and binds to DNA. The DNA binding activity is regulated by cdc2-mediated phosphorylation, suggesting a cell cycle function for c-Abl. Here we show that the tyrosine kinase activity of nuclear c-Abl is regulated in the cell cycle through a specific interaction with the retinoblastoma protein (RB). A domain in the C-terminus of RB, outside of the A/B pocket, binds to the ATP-binding lobe of the c-Abl tyrosine kinase, resulting in kinase inhibition. The RB-c-Abl interaction is not affected by the viral oncoproteins that bind to RB. Hyperphosphorylation of RB correlates with release of c-Abl and activation of the tyrosine kinase in S phase cells. The nuclear c-Abl tyrosine kinase can enhance transcription, and this activity is inhibited by RB. Nuclear c-Abl is an S phase-activated tyrosine kinase that may participate directly in the regulation of transcription. PMID:8242749

  5. CFL1, a WW Domain Protein, Regulates Cuticle Development by Modulating the Function of HDG1, a Class IV Homeodomain Transcription Factor, in Rice and Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Renhong; Li, Shibai; He, Shan; Waßmann, Friedrich; Yu, Caihong; Qin, Genji; Schreiber, Lukas; Qu, Li-Jia; Gu, Hongya

    2011-01-01

    Plants have a chemically heterogeneous lipophilic layer, the cuticle, which protects them from biotic and abiotic stresses. The mechanisms that regulate cuticle development are poorly understood. We identified a rice (Oryza sativa) dominant curly leaf mutant, curly flag leaf1 (cfl1), and cloned CFL1, which encodes a WW domain protein. We overexpressed both rice and Arabidopsis CFL1 in Arabidopsis thaliana; these transgenic plants showed severely impaired cuticle development, similar to that in cfl1 rice. Reduced expression of At CFL1 resulted in reinforcement of cuticle structure. At CFL1 was predominantly expressed in specialized epidermal cells and in regions where dehiscence and abscission occur. Biochemical evidence showed that At CFL1 interacts with HDG1, a class IV homeodomain-leucine zipper transcription factor. Suppression of HDG1 function resulted in similar defective cuticle phenotypes in wild-type Arabidopsis but much alleviated phenotypes in At cfl1-1 mutants. The expression of two cuticle development-associated genes, BDG and FDH, was downregulated in At CFL1 overexpressor and HDG1 suppression plants. HDG1 binds to the cis-element L1 box, which exists in the regulatory regions of BDG and FDH. Our results suggest that rice and Arabidopsis CFL1 negatively regulate cuticle development by affecting the function of HDG1, which regulates the downstream genes BDG and FDH. PMID:21954461

  6. The novel SH3 domain protein Dlish/CG10933 mediates fat signaling in Drosophila by binding and regulating Dachs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifei; Wang, Xing; Matakatsu, Hitoshi; Fehon, Richard; Blair, Seth S

    2016-01-01

    Much of the Hippo and planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling mediated by the Drosophila protocadherin Fat depends on its ability to change the subcellular localization, levels and activity of the unconventional myosin Dachs. To better understand this process, we have performed a structure-function analysis of Dachs, and used this to identify a novel and important mediator of Fat and Dachs activities, a Dachs-binding SH3 protein we have named Dlish. We found that Dlish is regulated by Fat and Dachs, that Dlish also binds Fat and the Dachs regulator Approximated, and that Dlish is required for Dachs localization, levels and activity in both wild type and fat mutant tissue. Our evidence supports dual roles for Dlish. Dlish tethers Dachs to the subapical cell cortex, an effect partly mediated by the palmitoyltransferase Approximated under the control of Fat. Conversely, Dlish promotes the Fat-mediated degradation of Dachs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16624.001 PMID:27692068

  7. Alternative Use of DNA Binding Domains by the Neurospora White Collar Complex Dictates Circadian Regulation and Light Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Zhou, Xiaoying; Loros, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    In the Neurospora circadian system, the White Collar complex (WCC) of WC-1 and WC-2 drives transcription of the circadian pacemaker gene frequency (frq), whose gene product, FRQ, as a part of the FRQ-FRH complex (FFC), inhibits its own expression. The WCC is also the principal Neurospora photoreceptor; WCC-mediated light induction of frq resets the clock, and all acute light induction is triggered by WCC binding to promoters of light-induced genes. However, not all acutely light-induced genes are also clock regulated, and conversely, not all clock-regulated direct targets of WCC are light induced; the structural determinants governing the shift from WCC's dark circadian role to its light activation role are poorly described. We report that the DBD region (named for being defective in binding DNA), a basic region in WC-1 proximal to the DNA-binding zinc finger (ZnF) whose function was previously ascribed to nuclear localization, instead plays multiple essential roles assisting in DNA binding and mediating interactions with the FFC. DNA binding for light induction by the WCC requires only WC-2, whereas DNA binding for circadian functions requires WC-2 as well as the ZnF and DBD motif of WC-1. The data suggest a means by which alterations in the tertiary and quaternary structures of the WCC can lead to its distinct functions in the dark and in the light. PMID:26711258

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of protein-protein interactions involving apoptosis regulator Diva (Boo) and the BH3 domain of proapoptotic Bcl-2 members.

    PubMed

    Santiveri, Clara M; Sborgi, Lorenzo; de Alba, Eva

    2012-12-01

    According to biochemical assays, the Bcl-2 protein Diva from mouse regulates programmed cell death by heterodimerizing with other members of the family and by interacting with the apoptotic protease-activating factor Apaf-1. In typical Bcl-2 heterodimers, peptide fragments comprising the Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3 domain) of proapoptotic members are capable of forming functional complexes with prosurvival proteins. High-resolution structural studies have revealed that the BH3 peptide forms an α-helix positioned in a canonical hydrophobic cleft of the antiapoptotic protein. Because Diva shows mutations in conserved residues within this area, it has been proposed to have a different interacting surface. However, we showed previously that Diva binds through the canonical groove the BH3 peptide of the human Bcl-2 killing member Harakiri. To further test Diva's binding capabilities, here we show Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) data, indicating that Diva binds peptides derived from the BH3 domain of several other proapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, including mouse Harakiri, Bid, Bak and Bmf. We have measured the binding affinities of the heterodimers, which show significant variability. Structural models of the protein-peptide complexes based on NMR chemical shift perturbation data indicate that the binding surface is analogous. These models do not rely on NMR NOE (Nuclear Overhauser Effect) data, and thus our results can only suggest that the complexes share similar intermolecular interactions. However, the observed affinity differences correlate with the α-helical population of the BH3-peptides obtained from circular dichroism experiments, which highlights a role of conformational selection in the binding mechanism. Altogether, our results shed light on important factors governing Diva-BH3 peptide molecular recognition mode.

  9. Phosphorylation of Sae2 Mediates Forkhead-associated (FHA) Domain-specific Interaction and Regulates Its DNA Repair Function.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jason; Suhandynata, Raymond T; Zhou, Huilin

    2015-04-24

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sae2 and its ortholog CtIP in higher eukaryotes have a conserved role in the initial processing of DNA lesions and influencing their subsequent repair pathways. Sae2 is phosphorylated by the ATR/ATM family kinases Mec1 and Tel1 in response to DNA damage. Among the Mec1/Tel1 consensus phosphorylation sites of Sae2, we found that mutations of Thr-90 and Thr-279 of Sae2 into alanine caused a persistent Rad53 activation in response to a transient DNA damage, similar to the loss of Sae2. To gain insight into the function of this phosphorylation of Sae2, we performed a quantitative proteomics analysis to identify its associated proteins. We found that phosphorylation of Thr-90 of Sae2 mediates its interaction with Rad53, Dun1, Xrs2, Dma1, and Dma2, whereas Rad53 and Dun1 additionally interact with phosphorylated Thr-279 of Sae2. Mutations of the ligand-binding residues of Forkhead-associated (FHA) domains of Rad53, Dun1, Xrs2, Dma1, and Dma2 abolished their interactions with Sae2, revealing the involvement of FHA-specific interactions. Mutations of Thr-90 and Thr-279 of Sae2 caused a synergistic defect when combined with sgs1Δ and exo1Δ and elevated gross chromosomal rearrangements. Likewise, mutations of RAD53 and DUN1 caused a synthetic growth defect with sgs1Δ and elevated gross chromosomal rearrangements. These findings suggest that threonine-specific phosphorylation of Sae2 by Mec1 and Tel1 contributes to DNA repair and genome maintenance via its interactions with Rad53 and Dun1.

  10. Tight conformational coupling between the domains of the enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbrial adhesin CfaE regulates binding state transition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Esser, Lothar; Interlandi, Gianluca; Kisiela, Dagmara I; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Thomas, Wendy E; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Xia, Di; Savarino, Stephen J

    2013-04-01

    CfaE, the tip adhesin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor antigen I fimbriae, initiates binding of this enteropathogen to the small intestine. It comprises stacked β-sandwich adhesin (AD) and pilin (PD) domains, with the putative receptor-binding pocket at one pole and an equatorial interdomain interface. CfaE binding to erythrocytes is enhanced by application of moderate shear stress. A G168D replacement along the AD facing the CfaE interdomain region was previously shown to decrease the dependence on shear by increasing binding at lower shear forces. To elucidate the structural basis for this functional change, we studied the properties of CfaE G168D (with a self-complemented donor strand) and solved its crystal structure at 2.6 Å resolution. Compared with native CfaE, CfaE G168D showed a downward shift in peak erythrocyte binding under shear stress and greater binding under static conditions. The thermal melting transition of CfaE G168D occurred 10 °C below that of CfaE. Compared with CfaE, the atomic structure of CfaE G168D revealed a 36% reduction in the buried surface area at the interdomain interface. Despite the location of this single modification in the AD, CfaE G168D exhibited structural derangements only in the adjoining PD compared with CfaE. In molecular dynamics simulations, the G168D mutation was associated with weakened interdomain interactions under tensile force. Taken together, these findings indicate that the AD and PD of CfaE are conformationally tightly coupled and support the hypothesis that opening of the interface plays a critical modulatory role in the allosteric activation of CfaE. PMID:23393133

  11. Energetic modeling and single-molecule verification of dynamic regulation on receptor protein diffusion by actin corrals and lipid raft domains receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chien Yu; Huang, Jung Y.; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2015-03-01

    To faithfully estimate a signal that varies in both space and time, the optimization strategy used by a live cell is to organize a collection of distributed and mobile receptors into a mobile active clustering. However, living eukaryotic cells are highly heterogeneous and stochastically dynamic. It is therefore important to develop an energetic model based on fundamental laws to verify that the underlying processes are energetically favorable. We developed an energetic model based on the generalized Langevin equation and the Cahn-Hilliard equation to simulate the diffusive behaviors of receptor proteins in the plasma membrane with a hierarchical structure of actin corrals, lipid domains, and receptor proteins. Single-molecule tracking data of EGFR acquired on live HeLa cells agrees with the simulation results. We discovered that after ligand binding, EGFR molecules move into lipid nanodomains. The transition rates between different diffusion states of liganded EGFR molecules are regulated by the lipid domains. Our method captures both the sensitivity of single-molecule processes, statistic accuracy of data analysis, and the hierarchical structure of plasma membranes.

  12. Human antibodies targeting the C-type lectin-like domain of the tumor endothelial cell marker clec14a regulate angiogenic properties in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ki, M K; Jeoung, M H; Choi, J R; Rho, S-S; Kwon, Y-G; Shim, H; Chung, J; Hong, H J; Song, B D; Lee, S

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that clec14a may be involved in tumor angiogenesis. However, a molecular mechanism has not been clearly identified. In this study, we show for the first time that C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) of clec14a may be important for regulating cell migration and filopodia formation. Using phage display technology, recombinant human antibodies specific to the CTLDs of human and mouse clec14a (clec14a-CTLD (immunoglobulin G) IgG) were selected. Functional assays using the antibodies showed that clec14a-CTLD IgGs specifically blocked endothelial cell migration and tube formation without affecting cell viability or activation. Further, clec14a-CTLD IgGs inhibited clec14a-mediated cell–cell contact by blocking interaction between CTLDs. Finally, clec14a cross-linking by the clec14a-CTLD IgGs significantly downregulated clec14a expression on the surface of endothelial cells. These results strongly suggest that the clec14a-CTLD may be a key domain in angiogenesis, and that clec14a-CTLD IgGs specifically inhibit angiogenesis by modulating CTLD-mediated cell interactions and clec14a expression on the surface of endothelial cells. PMID:23644659

  13. Dominant gain-of-function mutations in transmembrane domain III of ERS1 and ETR1 suggest a novel role for this domain in regulating the magnitude of ethylene response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Deslauriers, Stephen D; Alvarez, Ashley A; Lacey, Randy F; Binder, Brad M; Larsen, Paul B

    2015-10-01

    Prior work resulted in identification of an Arabidopsis mutant, eer5-1, with extreme ethylene response in conjunction with failure to induce a subset of ethylene-responsive genes, including AtEBP. EER5, which is a TREX-2 homolog that is part of a nucleoporin complex, functions as part of a cryptic aspect of the ethylene signaling pathway that is required for regulating the magnitude of ethylene response. A suppressor mutagenesis screen was carried out to identify second site mutations that could restore the growth of ethylene-treated eer5-1 to wild-type levels. A dominant gain-of-function mutation in the ethylene receptor ETHYLENE RESPONSE SENSOR 1 (ERS1) was identified, with the ers1-4 mutation being located in transmembrane domain III at a point nearly equivalent to the previously described etr1-2 mutation in the other Arabidopsis subfamily I ethylene receptor, ETHYLENE RESPONSE 1 (ETR1). Although both ers1-4 and etr1-2 partially suppress the ethylene hypersensitivity of eer5-1 and are at least in part REVERSION TO ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY 1 (RTE1)-dependent, ers1-4 was additionally found to restore the expression of AtEBP in ers1-4;eer5-1 etiolated seedlings after ethylene treatment in an EIN3-dependent manner. Our work indicates that ERS1-regulated expression of a subset of ethylene-responsive genes is related to controlling the magnitude of ethylene response, with hyperinduction of these genes correlated with reduced ethylene-dependent growth inhibition.

  14. GEm-Related 5 (GER5), an ABA and stress-responsive GRAM domain protein regulating seed development and inflorescence architecture.

    PubMed

    Baron, Kevin N; Schroeder, Dana F; Stasolla, Claudio

    2014-06-01

    We have identified an abscisic acid (ABA) and stress-responsive GRAM (Glucosyltransferases, Rab-like GTPase activators and Myotubularins) domain protein GER5 (GEm-Related 5) closely related to GEM (GLABRA2 Expression Modulator), a novel regulator of cell division and cell fate determination in epidermal cells. A loss-of-function T-DNA line (ger5-2) and transgenic lines silencing (GER5(RNAi)) or overexpressing (GER5(OE)) GER5 displayed several defects in reproductive development affecting seed and embryo development. RNA in situ studies revealed GER5 and related GRAM genes (GEM and GEm-Related 1 (GER1)) have both overlapping and unique expression domains in male and female reproductive organs. Hormone immunolocalization experiments further indicate GER5 transcripts preferentially localize to reproductive tissues which accumulate ABA. Expression analysis revealed members of the GRAM family (GER5, GER1, GEM) display tissue-specific expression patterns and are responsive to phytohormones and abiotic stress, in addition to genetic lesions (aba1, aba2, ctr1) affecting ABA biosynthesis or ethylene signalling. Mature seeds of ger5-2 mutants also exhibit reduced sensitivity to ABA during seed germination assays. Microarray analysis of aborting and developing seeds isolated from ger5-2 mutants revealed underlying transcriptional changes in carbohydrate metabolism, hormone signalling and catabolic processes (e.g. protein degradation, autophagy). Taken together, our results indicate ABA-responsive GRAM genes play a novel role in regulating the reproductive development of plants, and raise intriguing questions regarding the functional relationship between members of the GRAM gene family.

  15. Nucleocytoplasmic Distribution of Budding Yeast Protein Kinase A Regulatory Subunit Bcy1 Requires Zds1 and Is Regulated by Yak1-Dependent Phosphorylation of Its Targeting Domain

    PubMed Central

    Griffioen, Gerard; Branduardi, Paola; Ballarini, Annalisa; Anghileri, Paola; Norbeck, Joakim; Baroni, Maurizio D.; Ruis, Helmut

    2001-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the subcellular distribution of Bcy1 is carbon source dependent. In glucose-grown cells, Bcy1 is almost exclusively nuclear, while it appears more evenly distributed between nucleus and cytoplasm in carbon source-derepressed cells. Here we show that phosphorylation of its N-terminal domain directs Bcy1 to the cytoplasm. Biochemical fractionation revealed that the cytoplasmic fraction contains mostly phosphorylated Bcy1, whereas unmodified Bcy1 is predominantly present in the nuclear fraction. Site-directed mutagenesis of two clusters (I and II) of serines near the N terminus to alanine resulted in an enhanced nuclear accumulation of Bcy1 in ethanol-grown cells. In contrast, substitutions to Asp led to a dramatic increase of cytoplasmic localization in glucose-grown cells. Bcy1 modification was found to be dependent on Yak1 kinase and, consequently, in ethanol-grown yak1 cells the Bcy1 remained nuclear. A two-hybrid screen aimed to isolate genes encoding proteins that interact with the Bcy1 N-terminal domain identified Zds1. In ethanol-grown zds1 cells, cytoplasmic localization of Bcy1 was largely absent, while overexpression of ZDS1 led to increased cytoplasmic Bcy1 localization. Zds1 does not regulate Bcy1 modification since this was found to be unaffected in zds1 cells. However, in zds1 cells cluster II-mediated, but not cluster I-mediated, cytoplasmic localization of Bcy1 was found to be absent. Altogether, these results suggest that Zds1-mediated cytoplasmic localization of Bcy1 is regulated by carbon source-dependent phosphorylation of cluster II serines, while cluster I acts in a Zds1-independent manner. PMID:11134339

  16. The four and a half LIM domains 2 (FHL2) regulates ovarian granulosa cell tumor progression via controlling AKT1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Hua, G; He, C; Lv, X; Fan, L; Wang, C; Remmenga, S W; Rodabaugh, K J; Yang, L; Lele, S M; Yang, P; Karpf, A R; Davis, J S; Wang, C

    2016-01-01

    The four and a half LIM domains 2 (FHL2) has been shown to play important roles in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival, adhesion, motility and signal transduction in a cell type and tissue-dependent manner. However, the function of FHL2 in ovarian physiology and pathology is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the role and functional mechanism of FHL2 in the progression of ovarian granulosa cell tumors (GCTs). Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that FHL2 was overexpressed in GCT tissues. Cellular localization of FHL2 in GCT cells was cell cycle dependent. Knockdown of FHL2 suppressed GCT cell growth, reduced cell viability and inhibited cell migration. Consistently, ectopic expression of FHL2 in GCT cells with very low endogenous FHL2 promoted cell growth, improved cell viability and enhance cell migration. Importantly, overexpression of FHL2 promoted GCT progression in vivo. Mechanistic studies indicated that FHL2 regulates AKT1 gene expression in vitro and in vivo. Knockdown of FHL2 or AKT1 in GCT cell lines induced very similar phenotypes. Ectopic expression of constitutively active AKT1 rescued FHL2 knockdown-induced arrest of GCT cell growth and reduction of GCT cell viability, suggesting that FHL2 regulates GCT cell growth and viability through controlling AKT1 expression. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses indicated that FHL2 functions as a co-activator of NFκB and AP-1 to regulate AKT1 gene transcription. In conclusion, results from the present study indicate that FHL2 exerts its oncogenic action in GCT cells via controlling AKT1 gene expression. FHL2 is a promising target for the development of novel drugs against ovarian granulosa cell tumor. PMID:27415427

  17. Crystal structure of the AmpR effector binding domain provides insight into the molecular regulation of inducible ampc beta-lactamase.

    PubMed

    Balcewich, Misty D; Reeve, Thomas M; Orlikow, Evan A; Donald, Lynda J; Vocadlo, David J; Mark, Brian L

    2010-07-30

    Hyperproduction of AmpC beta-lactamase (AmpC) is a formidable mechanism of resistance to penicillins and cephalosporins in Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae. AmpC expression is regulated by the LysR-type transcriptional regulator AmpR. ampR and ampC genes form a divergent operon with overlapping promoters to which AmpR binds and regulates the transcription of both genes. AmpR induces ampC by binding to one member of the family of 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramyl peptides, which are cytosolic catabolites of peptidoglycan that accumulate during beta-lactam challenge. To gain structural insights into AmpR regulation, we determined the crystal structure of the effector binding domain (EBD) of AmpR from Citrobacter freundii up to 1.83 A resolution. The AmpR EBD is dimeric and each monomer comprises two subdomains that adopt alpha/beta Rossmann-like folds. Located between the monomer subdomains is a pocket that was found to bind the crystallization buffer molecule 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid. The pocket, together with a groove along the surface of subdomain I, forms a putative effector binding site into which a molecule of 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramyl pentapeptide could be modeled. Amino acid substitutions at the base of the interdomain pocket either were found to render AmpR incapable of inducing ampC (Thr103Val, Ser221Ala and Tyr264Phe) or resulted in constitutive ampC expression (Gly102Glu). While the substitutions that prevented ampC induction did not alter the overall AmpR EBD structure, circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the nonconservative Gly102Glu mutation affected EBD secondary structure, confirming previous work suggesting that Gly102Glu induces a conformational change to result in constitutive AmpC production. PMID:20594961

  18. Regulation of lung maturation by prolyl hydroxylase domain inhibition in the lung of the normally grown and placentally restricted fetus in late gestation.

    PubMed

    McGillick, Erin V; Orgeig, Sandra; Morrison, Janna L

    2016-06-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction induced by placental restriction (PR) in sheep leads to chronic hypoxemia and reduced surfactant maturation. The underlying molecular mechanism involves altered regulation of hypoxia signaling by increased prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) expression. Here, we evaluated the effect of intratracheal administration of the PHD inhibitor dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) on functional, molecular, and structural determinants of lung maturation in the control and PR sheep fetus. There was no effect of DMOG on fetal blood pressure or fetal breathing movements. DMOG reduced lung expression of genes regulating hypoxia signaling (HIF-3α, ACE1), antioxidant defense (CAT), lung liquid reabsorption (SCNN1-A, ATP1-A1, AQP-1, AQP-5), and surfactant maturation (SFTP-A, SFTP-B, SFTP-C, PCYT1A, LPCAT, ABCA3, LAMP3) in control fetuses. There were very few effects of DMOG on gene expression in the PR fetal lung (reduced lung expression of angiogenic factor ADM, water channel AQP-5, and increased expression of glucose transporter SLC2A1). DMOG administration in controls reduced total lung lavage phosphatidylcholine to the same degree as in PR fetuses. These changes appear to be regulated at the molecular level as there was no effect of DMOG on the percent tissue, air space, or numerical density of SFTP-B positive cells in the control and PR lung. Hence, DMOG administration mimics the effects of PR in reducing surfactant maturation in the lung of control fetuses. The limited responsiveness of the PR fetal lung suggests a potential biochemical limit or reduced plasticity to respond to changes in regulation of hypoxia signaling following exposure to chronic hypoxemia in utero. PMID:26936783

  19. The four and a half LIM domains 2 (FHL2) regulates ovarian granulosa cell tumor progression via controlling AKT1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hua, G; He, C; Lv, X; Fan, L; Wang, C; Remmenga, S W; Rodabaugh, K J; Yang, L; Lele, S M; Yang, P; Karpf, A R; Davis, J S; Wang, C

    2016-01-01

    The four and a half LIM domains 2 (FHL2) has been shown to play important roles in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival, adhesion, motility and signal transduction in a cell type and tissue-dependent manner. However, the function of FHL2 in ovarian physiology and pathology is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the role and functional mechanism of FHL2 in the progression of ovarian granulosa cell tumors (GCTs). Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that FHL2 was overexpressed in GCT tissues. Cellular localization of FHL2 in GCT cells was cell cycle dependent. Knockdown of FHL2 suppressed GCT cell growth, reduced cell viability and inhibited cell migration. Consistently, ectopic expression of FHL2 in GCT cells with very low endogenous FHL2 promoted cell growth, improved cell viability and enhance cell migration. Importantly, overexpression of FHL2 promoted GCT progression in vivo. Mechanistic studies indicated that FHL2 regulates AKT1 gene expression in vitro and in vivo. Knockdown of FHL2 or AKT1 in GCT cell lines induced very similar phenotypes. Ectopic expression of constitutively active AKT1 rescued FHL2 knockdown-induced arrest of GCT cell growth and reduction of GCT cell viability, suggesting that FHL2 regulates GCT cell growth and viability through controlling AKT1 expression. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses indicated that FHL2 functions as a co-activator of NFκB and AP-1 to regulate AKT1 gene transcription. In conclusion, results from the present study indicate that FHL2 exerts its oncogenic action in GCT cells via controlling AKT1 gene expression. FHL2 is a promising target for the development of novel drugs against ovarian granulosa cell tumor. PMID:27415427

  20. CDC-25.1 stability is regulated by distinct domains to restrict cell division during embryogenesis in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Hebeisen, Michaël; Roy, Richard

    2008-04-01

    Cdc25 phosphatases are key positive cell cycle regulators that coordinate cell divisions with growth and morphogenesis in many organisms. Intriguingly in C. elegans, two cdc-25.1(gf) mutations induce tissue-specific and temporally restricted hyperplasia in the embryonic intestinal lineage, despite stabilization of the mutant CDC-25.1 protein in every blastomere. We investigated the molecular basis underlying the CDC-25.1(gf) stabilization and its associated tissue-specific phenotype. We found that both mutations affect a canonical beta-TrCP phosphodegron motif, while the F-box protein LIN-23, the beta-TrCP orthologue, is required for the timely degradation of CDC-25.1. Accordingly, depletion of lin-23 in wild-type embryos stabilizes CDC-25.1 and triggers intestinal hyperplasia, which is, at least in part, cdc-25.1 dependent. lin-23(RNAi) causes embryonic lethality owing to cell fate transformations that convert blastomeres to an intestinal fate, sensitizing them to increased levels of CDC-25.1. Our characterization of a novel destabilizing cdc-25.1(lf) intragenic suppressor that acts independently of lin-23 indicates that additional cues impinge on different motifs of the CDC-25.1 phosphatase during early embryogenesis to control its stability and turnover, in order to ensure the timely divisions of intestinal cells and coordinate them with the formation of the developing gut.

  1. The AT-hook/PPC domain protein TEK negatively regulates floral repressors including MAF4 and MAF5

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yifeng; Gan, Eng-Seng; Ito, Toshiro

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic regulations of transposable elements (TEs) and TE-like repeat sequences help to protect genomic integrity and control various developmental processes, including flowering time. This complex action of gene silencing requires the coordination of many key players including DNA methylases, histone deacetylases and histone methyltranferases. We have recently reported that an AT-hook DNA binding protein, TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENT SILENCING VIA AT-HOOK (TEK), participates in silencing TEs and TE-like sequence containing genes, such as LerFLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and FWA. TEK knockdown in amiTEK plants causes increased histone acetylation, reduced H3K9me2 and DNA hypomethylation in the target loci, which ultimately leads to the upregulation of FLC and FWA as well as TE reactivation. In this report, we show that, besides FLC, other FLC-like genes MADS AFFECTING FLOWERING 4 (MAF4) and MAF5 are also upregulated in amiTEK. Here we discuss the role of the nuclear matrix protein TEK in the maintenance of genome integrity and in the control of flowering. PMID:23733063

  2. Phosphorylation of Oct-2 at sites located in the POU domain induces differential down-regulation of Oct-2 DNA-binding ability.

    PubMed Central

    Pevzner, V; Kraft, R; Kostka, S; Lipp, M

    2000-01-01

    We compared the effects of phosphorylation of Oct-2 protein on its binding to the consensus octamer sequence (ATGCAAAT) and two non-canonical sequences present in human (AAGCAAAT) and murine (AAACAAAT) promoters of the BLR1 (Burkitts' lymphoma receptor 1) gene encoding chemokine receptor CXCR5 (CXC-chemokine receptor 5). The latter cis-acting elements represent low-affinity recognition sequences for the octamer transcription factors. Okadaic acid was found to induce hyperphosphorylation of Oct-2 specifically in cells of lymphoid lineage. Potentially phosphorylated amino acid residues localized to the POU-specific domain of Oct-2. Whereas binding of Oct-2 to the octamer site from the human BLR1 promoter or to the consensus octamer sequence was unaffected by phosphorylation of this factor, a strong reduction of Oct-2 binding to the octamer site from the murine BLR1 promoter was observed. This finding correlates well with the down-regulation of expression of the BLR1 gene in murine splenic cells but not in lymphoid cells of human origin treated with okadaic acid. These data support the hypothesis that phosphorylation of Oct-2 may be a mechanism by which activities of the promoters containing non-canonical octamer sequences are differentially regulated in response to extracellular stimuli. PMID:10727398

  3. Structural Analysis of the Regulatory Domain of ExsA, a Key Transcriptional Regulator of the Type Three Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Manisha; Xiao, Yi; Robinson, Howard; Schubot, Florian D.

    2015-08-28

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs a type three secretion system to facilitate infections in mammalian hosts. The operons encoding genes of structural components of the secretion machinery and associated virulence factors are all under the control of the AraC-type transcriptional activator protein, ExsA. ExsA belongs to a unique subfamily of AraC-proteins that is regulated through protein-protein contacts rather than small molecule ligands. Prior to infection, ExsA is inhibited through a direct interaction with the anti-activator ExsD. To activate ExsA upon host cell contact this interaction is disrupted by the anti-antiactivator protein ExsC. Here we report the crystal structure of the regulatory domain of ExsA, which is known to mediate ExsA dimerization as well as ExsD binding. The crystal structure suggests two models for the ExsA dimer. Both models confirmed the previously shown involvement of helix α-3 in ExsA dimerization but one also suggest a role for helix α-2. These structural data are supported by the observation that a mutation in α-2 greatly diminished the ability of ExsA to activate transcription in vitro. Lastly, additional in vitro transcription studies revealed that a conserved pocket, used by AraC and the related ToxT protein for the binding of small molecule regulators, although present in ExsA is not involved in binding of ExsD.

  4. KCNK10, a Tandem Pore Domain Potassium Channel, Is a Regulator of Mitotic Clonal Expansion during the Early Stage of Adipocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Nishizuka, Makoto; Hayashi, Takahiro; Asano, Mami; Osada, Shigehiro; Imagawa, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    KCNK10, a member of tandem pore domain potassium channel family, gives rise to leak K+ currents. It plays important roles in stabilizing the negative resting membrane potential and in counterbalancing depolarization. We previously demonstrated that kcnk10 expression is quickly elevated during the early stage of adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells and that reduction of kcnk10 expression inhibits adipocyte differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism of KCNK10 in adipocyte differentiation remains unclear. Here we revealed that kcnk10 is induced by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, a cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase inhibitor and a potent inducer of adipogenesis, during the early stage of adipocyte differentiation. We also demonstrated that KCNK10 functions as a positive regulator of mitotic clonal expansion (MCE), a necessary process for terminal differentiation. The reduction of kcnk10 expression repressed the expression levels of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and C/EBPδ as well as the phosphorylation level of Akt during the early phase of adipogenesis. In addition, knockdown of kcnk10 expression suppressed insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation. These results indicate that KCNK10 contributes to the regulation of MCE through the control of C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ expression and insulin signaling. PMID:25501330

  5. Apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain is regulated by MAPK/PI3K and confers drug resistance and survival advantage to AML

    PubMed Central

    Mak, P. Y.; Mak, D. H.; Mu, H.; Shi, Y.; Ruvolo, P.; Ruvolo, V.; Jacamo, R.; Burks, J. K.; Wei, W.; Huang, X.; Kornblau, S. M.; Andreeff, M.; Carter, B. Z.

    2014-01-01

    The apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC) protein is known to suppress both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis. We previously reported that ARC expression is a strong, independent adverse prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here, we investigated the regulation and role of ARC in AML. ARC expression is upregulated in AML cells co-cultured with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and suppressed by inhibition of MAPK and PI3K signaling. AML patient samples with RAS mutations (N = 64) expressed significantly higher levels of ARC than samples without RAS mutations (N = 371) (P = 0.016). ARC overexpression protected and ARC knockdown sensitized AML cells to cytarabine and to agents that selectively induce intrinsic (ABT-737) or extrinsic (TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand) apoptosis. NOD-SCID mice harboring ARC-overexpressing KG-1 cells had significantly shorter survival than mice injected with control cells (median 84 versus 111 days) and significantly fewer leukemia cells were present when NOD/SCID IL2R null mice were injected with ARC knockdown as compared to control Molm13 cells (P = 0.005 and 0.03 at 2 and 3 weeks, respectively). Together, these findings demonstrate that MSCs regulate ARC in AML through activation of MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways. ARC confers drug resistance and survival advantage to AML in vitro and in vivo, suggesting ARC as a novel target in AML therapy. PMID:24337870

  6. Structural Analysis of the Regulatory Domain of ExsA, a Key Transcriptional Regulator of the Type Three Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Manisha; Xiao, Yi; Robinson, Howard; Schubot, Florian D.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs a type three secretion system to facilitate infections in mammalian hosts. The operons encoding genes of structural components of the secretion machinery and associated virulence factors are all under the control of the AraC-type transcriptional activator protein, ExsA. ExsA belongs to a unique subfamily of AraC-proteins that is regulated through protein-protein contacts rather than small molecule ligands. Prior to infection, ExsA is inhibited through a direct interaction with the anti-activator ExsD. To activate ExsA upon host cell contact this interaction is disrupted by the anti-antiactivator protein ExsC. Here we report the crystal structure of the regulatory domain of ExsA, which is known to mediate ExsA dimerization as well as ExsD binding. The crystal structure suggests two models for the ExsA dimer. Both models confirmed the previously shown involvement of helix α-3 in ExsA dimerization but one also suggest a role for helix α-2. These structural data are supported by the observation that a mutation in α-2 greatly diminished the ability of ExsA to activate transcription in vitro. Additional in vitro transcription studies revealed that a conserved pocket, used by AraC and the related ToxT protein for the binding of small molecule regulators, although present in ExsA is not involved in binding of ExsD. PMID:26317977

  7. Molecular interactions of ROOTLESS CONCERNING CROWN AND SEMINAL ROOTS, a LOB domain protein regulating shoot-borne root initiation in maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Majer, Christine; Xu, Changzheng; Berendzen, Kenneth W.; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Rootless concerning crown and seminal roots (Rtcs) encodes a LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES domain (LBD) protein that regulates shoot-borne root initiation in maize (Zea mays L.). GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN (GFP)-fusions revealed RTCS localization in the nucleus while its paralogue RTCS-LIKE (RTCL) was detected in the nucleus and cytoplasm probably owing to an amino acid exchange in a nuclear localization signal. Moreover, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) experiments demonstrated that RTCS primarily binds to LBD DNA motifs. RTCS binding to an LBD motif in the promoter of the auxin response factor (ARF) ZmArf34 and reciprocally, reciprocal ZmARF34 binding to an auxin responsive element motif in the promoter of Rtcs was shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assay experiments. In addition, comparative qRT-PCR of wild-type versus rtcs coleoptilar nodes suggested RTCS-dependent activation of ZmArf34 expression. Consistently, luciferase reporter assays illustrated the capacity of RTCS, RTCL and ZmARF34 to activate downstream gene expression. Finally, RTCL homo- and RTCS/RTCL hetero-interaction were demonstrated in yeast-two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments, suggesting a role of these complexes in downstream gene regulation. In summary, the data provide novel insights into the molecular interactions resulting in crown root initiation in maize. PMID:22527397

  8. The C-terminal pentapeptide of Nanog tryptophan repeat domain interacts with Nac1 and regulates stem cell proliferation but not pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tianhua; Wang, Zhe; Guo, Yunqian; Pei, Duanqing

    2009-06-12

    Overexpression of Nanog in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells has been shown to abrogate the requirement of leukemia inhibitory factor for self-renewal in culture. Little is known about the molecular mechanism of Nanog function. Here we describe the role of the tryptophan repeat (WR) domain, one of the two transactivators at its C terminus, in regulating stem cell proliferation as well as pluripotency. We first created a supertransactivator, W2W3x10, by duplicating repeats W2W3 10 times and discovered that it can functionally substitute for wild type WR at sustaining pluripotency, albeit with a significantly slower cell cycle, phenocopying Nanog(9W) with the C-terminal pentapeptide (WNAAP) of WR deleted. ES cells carrying both W2W3x10 and Nanog(9W) have a longer G1 phase, a shorter S phase in cell cycle distribution and progression analysis, and a lower level of pAkt(Ser473) compared with wild type Nanog, suggesting that both mutants impact the cell cycle machinery via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. Both mutants remain competent in dimerizing with Nanog but cannot form a complex with Nac1 efficiently, suggesting that WNAAP may be involved in Nac1 binding. By tagging Gal4DBD with WNAAP, we demonstrated that this pentapeptide is sufficient to confer Nac1 binding. Furthermore, we can rescue W2W3x10 by placing WNAAP at the corresponding locations. Finally, we found that Nanog and Nac1 synergistically up-regulate ERas expression and promote the proliferation of ES cells. These results suggest that Nanog interacts with Nac1 through WNAAP to regulate the cell cycle of ES cells via the ERas/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway, but not pluripotency, thus decoupling cell cycle control from pluripotency.

  9. Different Regulation of the p53 Core Domain Activities 3′-to-5′ Exonuclease and Sequence-Specific DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Janus, Friedemann; Albrechtsen, Nils; Knippschild, Uwe; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Grosse, Frank; Deppert, Wolfgang

    1999-01-01

    In this study we further characterized the 3′-5′ exonuclease activity intrinsic to wild-type p53. We showed that this activity, like sequence-specific DNA binding, is mediated by the p53 core domain. Truncation of the C-terminal 30 amino acids of the p53 molecule enhanced the p53 exonuclease activity by at least 10-fold, indicating that this activity, like sequence-specific DNA binding, is negatively regulated by the C-terminal basic regulatory domain of p53. However, treatments which activated sequence-specific DNA binding of p53, like binding of the monoclonal antibody PAb421, which recognizes a C-terminal epitope on p53, or a higher phosphorylation status, strongly inhibited the p53 exonuclease activity. This suggests that at least on full-length p53, sequence-specific DNA binding and exonuclease activities are subject to different and seemingly opposing regulatory mechanisms. Following up the recent discovery in our laboratory that p53 recognizes and binds with high affinity to three-stranded DNA substrates mimicking early recombination intermediates (C. Dudenhoeffer, G. Rohaly, K. Will, W. Deppert, and L. Wiesmueller, Mol. Cell. Biol. 18:5332–5342), we asked whether such substrates might be degraded by the p53 exonuclease. Addition of Mg2+ ions to the binding assay indeed started the p53 exonuclease and promoted rapid degradation of the bound, but not of the unbound, substrate, indicating that specifically recognized targets can be subjected to exonucleolytic degradation by p53 under defined conditions. PMID:10022902

  10. Nuclear Trafficking of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist P-Protein Is Regulated by an Importin-Binding Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C-Terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Caitlin L; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Oksayan, Sibil; Glover, Dominic J; Jans, David A; Moseley, Gregory W

    2016-01-01

    Rabies virus P-protein is expressed as five isoforms (P1-P5) which undergo nucleocytoplasmic trafficking important to roles in immune evasion. Although nuclear import of P3 is known to be mediated by an importin (IMP)-recognised nuclear localization sequence in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), the mechanisms underlying nuclear import of other P isoforms in which the N-NLS is inactive or has been deleted have remained unresolved. Based on the previous observation that mutation of basic residues K214/R260 of the P-protein C-terminal domain (P-CTD) can result in nuclear exclusion of P3, we used live cell imaging, protein interaction analysis and in vitro nuclear transport assays to examine in detail the nuclear trafficking properties of this domain. We find that the effect of mutation of K214/R260 on P3 is largely dependent on nuclear export, suggesting that nuclear exclusion of mutated P3 involves the P-CTD-localized nuclear export sequence (C-NES). However, assays using cells in which nuclear export is pharmacologically inhibited indicate that these mutations significantly inhibit P3 nuclear accumulation and, importantly, prevent nuclear accumulation of P1, suggestive of effects on NLS-mediated import activity in these isoforms. Consistent with this, molecular binding and transport assays indicate that the P-CTD mediates IMPα2/IMPβ1-dependent nuclear import by conferring direct binding to the IMPα2/IMPβ1 heterodimer, as well as to a truncated form of IMPα2 lacking the IMPβ-binding autoinhibitory domain (ΔIBB-IMPα2), and IMPβ1 alone. These properties are all dependent on K214 and R260. This provides the first evidence that P-CTD contains a genuine IMP-binding NLS, and establishes the mechanism by which P-protein isoforms other than P3 can be imported to the nucleus. These data underpin a refined model for P-protein trafficking that involves the concerted action of multiple NESs and IMP-binding NLSs, and highlight the intricate regulation of P

  11. Nuclear Trafficking of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist P-Protein Is Regulated by an Importin-Binding Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Caitlin L.; Wagstaff, Kylie M.; Oksayan, Sibil; Glover, Dominic J.

    2016-01-01

    Rabies virus P-protein is expressed as five isoforms (P1-P5) which undergo nucleocytoplasmic trafficking important to roles in immune evasion. Although nuclear import of P3 is known to be mediated by an importin (IMP)-recognised nuclear localization sequence in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), the mechanisms underlying nuclear import of other P isoforms in which the N-NLS is inactive or has been deleted have remained unresolved. Based on the previous observation that mutation of basic residues K214/R260 of the P-protein C-terminal domain (P-CTD) can result in nuclear exclusion of P3, we used live cell imaging, protein interaction analysis and in vitro nuclear transport assays to examine in detail the nuclear trafficking properties of this domain. We find that the effect of mutation of K214/R260 on P3 is largely dependent on nuclear export, suggesting that nuclear exclusion of mutated P3 involves the P-CTD-localized nuclear export sequence (C-NES). However, assays using cells in which nuclear export is pharmacologically inhibited indicate that these mutations significantly inhibit P3 nuclear accumulation and, importantly, prevent nuclear accumulation of P1, suggestive of effects on NLS-mediated import activity in these isoforms. Consistent with this, molecular binding and transport assays indicate that the P-CTD mediates IMPα2/IMPβ1-dependent nuclear import by conferring direct binding to the IMPα2/IMPβ1 heterodimer, as well as to a truncated form of IMPα2 lacking the IMPβ-binding autoinhibitory domain (ΔIBB-IMPα2), and IMPβ1 alone. These properties are all dependent on K214 and R260. This provides the first evidence that P-CTD contains a genuine IMP-binding NLS, and establishes the mechanism by which P-protein isoforms other than P3 can be imported to the nucleus. These data underpin a refined model for P-protein trafficking that involves the concerted action of multiple NESs and IMP-binding NLSs, and highlight the intricate regulation of P

  12. Nuclear Trafficking of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist P-Protein Is Regulated by an Importin-Binding Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C-Terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Caitlin L; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Oksayan, Sibil; Glover, Dominic J; Jans, David A; Moseley, Gregory W

    2016-01-01

    Rabies virus P-protein is expressed as five isoforms (P1-P5) which undergo nucleocytoplasmic trafficking important to roles in immune evasion. Although nuclear import of P3 is known to be mediated by an importin (IMP)-recognised nuclear localization sequence in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), the mechanisms underlying nuclear import of other P isoforms in which the N-NLS is inactive or has been deleted have remained unresolved. Based on the previous observation that mutation of basic residues K214/R260 of the P-protein C-terminal domain (P-CTD) can result in nuclear exclusion of P3, we used live cell imaging, protein interaction analysis and in vitro nuclear transport assays to examine in detail the nuclear trafficking properties of this domain. We find that the effect of mutation of K214/R260 on P3 is largely dependent on nuclear export, suggesting that nuclear exclusion of mutated P3 involves the P-CTD-localized nuclear export sequence (C-NES). However, assays using cells in which nuclear export is pharmacologically inhibited indicate that these mutations significantly inhibit P3 nuclear accumulation and, importantly, prevent nuclear accumulation of P1, suggestive of effects on NLS-mediated import activity in these isoforms. Consistent with this, molecular binding and transport assays indicate that the P-CTD mediates IMPα2/IMPβ1-dependent nuclear import by conferring direct binding to the IMPα2/IMPβ1 heterodimer, as well as to a truncated form of IMPα2 lacking the IMPβ-binding autoinhibitory domain (ΔIBB-IMPα2), and IMPβ1 alone. These properties are all dependent on K214 and R260. This provides the first evidence that P-CTD contains a genuine IMP-binding NLS, and establishes the mechanism by which P-protein isoforms other than P3 can be imported to the nucleus. These data underpin a refined model for P-protein trafficking that involves the concerted action of multiple NESs and IMP-binding NLSs, and highlight the intricate regulation of P

  13. Regulation of Neuronal Oxygen Responses in C. elegans Is Mediated through Interactions between Globin 5 and the H-NOX Domains of Soluble Guanylate Cyclases

    PubMed Central

    Abergel, Zohar; Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Zuckerman, Binyamin

    2016-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclases (sGCs) are gas-binding proteins that control diverse physiological processes such as vasodilation, platelet aggregation, and synaptic plasticity. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a complex of sGCs, GCY-35 and GCY-36, functions in oxygen (O2) sensing. Previous studies suggested that the neuroglobin GLB-5 genetically interacts with GCY-35, and that the inhibitory effect of GLB-5 on GCY-35 function is necessary for fast recovery from prolonged hypoxia. In this study, we identified mutations in gcy-35 and gcy-36 that impact fast recovery and other phenotypes associated with GLB-5, without undermining sGC activity. These mutations, heb1 and heb3, change conserved amino acid residues in the regulatory H-NOX domains of GCY-35 and GCY-36, respectively, and appear to suppress GLB-5 activity by different mechanisms. Moreover, we observed that short exposure to 35% O2 desensitized the neurons responsible for ambient O2 sensing and that this phenomenon does not occur in heb1 animals. These observations may implicate sGCs in neuronal desensitization mechanisms far beyond the specific case of O2 sensing in nematodes. The conservation of functionally important regions of sGCs is supported by examining site-directed mutants of GCY-35, which suggested that similar regions in the H-NOX domains of O2 and NO-sensing sGCs are important for heme/gas interactions. Overall, our studies provide novel insights into sGC activity and regulation, and implicate similar structural determinants in the control of both O2 and NO sensors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Soluble guanylate cyclases (sGCs) control essential and diverse physiological processes, including memory processing. We used Caenorhabditis elegans to explore how a neuroglobin inhibits a complex of oxygen-sensing sGCs, identifying sGC mutants that resist inhibition. Resistance appears to arise by two different mechanisms: increased basal sGC activity or disruption of an interaction with neuroglobin. Our

  14. p53 down-regulates SARS coronavirus replication and is targeted by the SARS-unique domain and PLpro via E3 ubiquitin ligase RCHY1.

    PubMed

    Ma-Lauer, Yue; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Hein, Marco Y; Müller, Marcel A; Deng, Wen; Lei, Jian; Meyer, Benjamin; Kusov, Yuri; von Brunn, Brigitte; Bairad, Dev Raj; Hünten, Sabine; Drosten, Christian; Hermeking, Heiko; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Mann, Matthias; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; von Brunn, Albrecht

    2016-08-30

    Highly pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has developed strategies to inhibit host immune recognition. We identify cellular E3 ubiquitin ligase ring-finger and CHY zinc-finger domain-containing 1 (RCHY1) as an interacting partner of the viral SARS-unique domain (SUD) and papain-like protease (PL(pro)), and, as a consequence, the involvement of cellular p53 as antagonist of coronaviral replication. Residues 95-144 of RCHY1 and 389-652 of SUD (SUD-NM) subdomains are crucial for interaction. Association with SUD increases the stability of RCHY1 and augments RCHY1-mediated ubiquitination as well as degradation of p53. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (CAMK2D), which normally influences RCHY1 stability by phosphorylation, also binds to SUD. In vivo phosphorylation shows that SUD does not regulate phosphorylation of RCHY1 via CAMK2D. Similarly to SUD, the PL(pro)s from SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and HCoV-NL63 physically interact with and stabilize RCHY1, and thus trigger degradation of endogenous p53. The SARS-CoV papain-like protease is encoded next to SUD within nonstructural protein 3. A SUD-PL(pro) fusion interacts with RCHY1 more intensively and causes stronger p53 degradation than SARS-CoV PL(pro) alone. We show that p53 inhibits replication of infectious SARS-CoV as well as of replicons and human coronavirus NL63. Hence, human coronaviruses antagonize the viral inhibitor p53 via stabilizing RCHY1 and promoting RCHY1-mediated p53 degradation. SUD functions as an enhancer to strengthen interaction between RCHY1 and nonstructural protein 3, leading to a further increase in in p53 degradation. The significance of these findings is that down-regulation of p53 as a major player in antiviral innate immunity provides a long-sought explanation for delayed activities of respective genes. PMID:27519799

  15. p53 down-regulates SARS coronavirus replication and is targeted by the SARS-unique domain and PLpro via E3 ubiquitin ligase RCHY1.

    PubMed

    Ma-Lauer, Yue; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Hein, Marco Y; Müller, Marcel A; Deng, Wen; Lei, Jian; Meyer, Benjamin; Kusov, Yuri; von Brunn, Brigitte; Bairad, Dev Raj; Hünten, Sabine; Drosten, Christian; Hermeking, Heiko; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Mann, Matthias; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; von Brunn, Albrecht

    2016-08-30

    Highly pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has developed strategies to inhibit host immune recognition. We identify cellular E3 ubiquitin ligase ring-finger and CHY zinc-finger domain-containing 1 (RCHY1) as an interacting partner of the viral SARS-unique domain (SUD) and papain-like protease (PL(pro)), and, as a consequence, the involvement of cellular p53 as antagonist of coronaviral replication. Residues 95-144 of RCHY1 and 389-652 of SUD (SUD-NM) subdomains are crucial for interaction. Association with SUD increases the stability of RCHY1 and augments RCHY1-mediated ubiquitination as well as degradation of p53. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (CAMK2D), which normally influences RCHY1 stability by phosphorylation, also binds to SUD. In vivo phosphorylation shows that SUD does not regulate phosphorylation of RCHY1 via CAMK2D. Similarly to SUD, the PL(pro)s from SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and HCoV-NL63 physically interact with and stabilize RCHY1, and thus trigger degradation of endogenous p53. The SARS-CoV papain-like protease is encoded next to SUD within nonstructural protein 3. A SUD-PL(pro) fusion interacts with RCHY1 more intensively and causes stronger p53 degradation than SARS-CoV PL(pro) alone. We show that p53 inhibits replication of infectious SARS-CoV as well as of replicons and human coronavirus NL63. Hence, human coronaviruses antagonize the viral inhibitor p53 via stabilizing RCHY1 and promoting RCHY1-mediated p53 degradation. SUD functions as an enhancer to strengthen interaction between RCHY1 and nonstructural protein 3, leading to a further increase in in p53 degradation. The significance of these findings is that down-regulation of p53 as a major player in antiviral innate immunity provides a long-sought explanation for delayed activities of respective genes.

  16. Regulation of Neuronal Oxygen Responses in C. elegans Is Mediated through Interactions between Globin 5 and the H-NOX Domains of Soluble Guanylate Cyclases.

    PubMed

    Abergel, Zohar; Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Zuckerman, Binyamin; Gross, Einav

    2016-01-20

    Soluble guanylate cyclases (sGCs) are gas-binding proteins that control diverse physiological processes such as vasodilation, platelet aggregation, and synaptic plasticity. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a complex of sGCs, GCY-35 and GCY-36, functions in oxygen (O2) sensing. Previous studies suggested that the neuroglobin GLB-5 genetically interacts with GCY-35, and that the inhibitory effect of GLB-5 on GCY-35 function is necessary for fast recovery from prolonged hypoxia. In this study, we identified mutations in gcy-35 and gcy-36 that impact fast recovery and other phenotypes associated with GLB-5, without undermining sGC activity. These mutations, heb1 and heb3, change conserved amino acid residues in the regulatory H-NOX domains of GCY-35 and GCY-36, respectively, and appear to suppress GLB-5 activity by different mechanisms. Moreover, we observed that short exposure to 35% O2 desensitized the neurons responsible for ambient O2 sensing and that this phenomenon does not occur in heb1 animals. These observations may implicate sGCs in neuronal desensitization mechanisms far beyond the specific case of O2 sensing in nematodes. The conservation of functionally important regions of sGCs is supported by examining site-directed mutants of GCY-35, which suggested that similar regions in the H-NOX domains of O2 and NO-sensing sGCs are important for heme/gas interactions. Overall, our studies provide novel insights into sGC activity and regulation, and implicate similar structural determinants in the control of both O2 and NO sensors. Significance statement: Soluble guanylate cyclases (sGCs) control essential and diverse physiological processes, including memory processing. We used Caenorhabditis elegans to explore how a neuroglobin inhibits a complex of oxygen-sensing sGCs, identifying sGC mutants that resist inhibition. Resistance appears to arise by two different mechanisms: increased basal sGC activity or disruption of an interaction with neuroglobin. Our

  17. Regulation of Neuronal Oxygen Responses in C. elegans Is Mediated through Interactions between Globin 5 and the H-NOX Domains of Soluble Guanylate Cyclases.

    PubMed

    Abergel, Zohar; Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Zuckerman, Binyamin; Gross, Einav

    2016-01-20

    Soluble guanylate cyclases (sGCs) are gas-binding proteins that control diverse physiological processes such as vasodilation, platelet aggregation, and synaptic plasticity. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a complex of sGCs, GCY-35 and GCY-36, functions in oxygen (O2) sensing. Previous studies suggested that the neuroglobin GLB-5 genetically interacts with GCY-35, and that the inhibitory effect of GLB-5 on GCY-35 function is necessary for fast recovery from prolonged hypoxia. In this study, we identified mutations in gcy-35 and gcy-36 that impact fast recovery and other phenotypes associated with GLB-5, without undermining sGC activity. These mutations, heb1 and heb3, change conserved amino acid residues in the regulatory H-NOX domains of GCY-35 and GCY-36, respectively, and appear to suppress GLB-5 activity by different mechanisms. Moreover, we observed that short exposure to 35% O2 desensitized the neurons responsible for ambient O2 sensing and that this phenomenon does not occur in heb1 animals. These observations may implicate sGCs in neuronal desensitization mechanisms far beyond the specific case of O2 sensing in nematodes. The conservation of functionally important regions of sGCs is supported by examining site-directed mutants of GCY-35, which suggested that similar regions in the H-NOX domains of O2 and NO-sensing sGCs are important for heme/gas interactions. Overall, our studies provide novel insights into sGC activity and regulation, and implicate similar structural determinants in the control of both O2 and NO sensors. Significance statement: Soluble guanylate cyclases (sGCs) control essential and diverse physiological processes, including memory processing. We used Caenorhabditis elegans to explore how a neuroglobin inhibits a complex of oxygen-sensing sGCs, identifying sGC mutants that resist inhibition. Resistance appears to arise by two different mechanisms: increased basal sGC activity or disruption of an interaction with neuroglobin. Our

  18. p53 down-regulates SARS coronavirus replication and is targeted by the SARS-unique domain and PLpro via E3 ubiquitin ligase RCHY1

    PubMed Central

    Ma-Lauer, Yue; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Müller, Marcel A.; Deng, Wen; Lei, Jian; Meyer, Benjamin; Kusov, Yuri; von Brunn, Brigitte; Bairad, Dev Raj; Hünten, Sabine; Drosten, Christian; Hermeking, Heiko; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Mann, Matthias; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; von Brunn, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has developed strategies to inhibit host immune recognition. We identify cellular E3 ubiquitin ligase ring-finger and CHY zinc-finger domain-containing 1 (RCHY1) as an interacting partner of the viral SARS-unique domain (SUD) and papain-like protease (PLpro), and, as a consequence, the involvement of cellular p53 as antagonist of coronaviral replication. Residues 95–144 of RCHY1 and 389–652 of SUD (SUD-NM) subdomains are crucial for interaction. Association with SUD increases the stability of RCHY1 and augments RCHY1-mediated ubiquitination as well as degradation of p53. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (CAMK2D), which normally influences RCHY1 stability by phosphorylation, also binds to SUD. In vivo phosphorylation shows that SUD does not regulate phosphorylation of RCHY1 via CAMK2D. Similarly to SUD, the PLpros from SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and HCoV-NL63 physically interact with and stabilize RCHY1, and thus trigger degradation of endogenous p53. The SARS-CoV papain-like protease is encoded next to SUD within nonstructural protein 3. A SUD–PLpro fusion interacts with RCHY1 more intensively and causes stronger p53 degradation than SARS-CoV PLpro alone. We show that p53 inhibits replication of infectious SARS-CoV as well as of replicons and human coronavirus NL63. Hence, human coronaviruses antagonize the viral inhibitor p53 via stabilizing RCHY1 and promoting RCHY1-mediated p53 degradation. SUD functions as an enhancer to strengthen interaction between RCHY1 and nonstructural protein 3, leading to a further increase in in p53 degradation. The significance of these findings is that down-regulation of p53 as a major player in antiviral innate immunity provides a long-sought explanation for delayed activities of respective genes. PMID:27519799

  19. The Arabidopsis C2H2 Zinc Finger INDETERMINATE DOMAIN1/ENHYDROUS Promotes the Transition to Germination by Regulating Light and Hormonal Signaling during Seed Maturation[W

    PubMed Central

    Feurtado, J. Allan; Huang, Daiqing; Wicki-Stordeur, Leigh; Hemstock, Laura E.; Potentier, Mireille S.; Tsang, Edward W.T.; Cutler, Adrian J.

    2011-01-01

    Seed development ends with a maturation phase that imparts desiccation tolerance, nutrient reserves, and dormancy degree. Here, we report the functional analysis of an Arabidopsis thaliana C2H2 zinc finger protein INDETERMINATE DOMAIN1 (IDD1)/ENHYDROUS (ENY). Ectopic expression of IDD1/ENY (2x35S:ENY) disrupted seed development, delaying endosperm depletion and testa senescence, resulting in an abbreviated maturation program. Consequently, mature 2x35S:ENY seeds had increased endosperm-specific fatty acids, starch retention, and defective mucilage extrusion. Using RAB18 promoter ENY lines (RAB18:ENY) to confine expression to maturation, when native ENY expression increased and peaked, resulted in mature seed with lower abscisic acid (ABA) content and decreased germination sensitivity to applied ABA. Furthermore, results of far-red and red light treatments of 2x35S:ENY and RAB18:ENY germinating seeds, and of artificial microRNA knockdown lines, suggest that ENY acts to promote germination. After using RAB18:ENY seedlings to induce ENY during ABA application, key genes in gibberellin (GA) metabolism and signaling were differentially regulated in a manner suggesting negative feedback regulation. Furthermore, GA treatment resulted in a skotomorphogenic-like phenotype in light-grown 2x35S:ENY and RAB18:ENY seedlings. The physical interaction of ENY with DELLAs and an ENY-triggered accumulation of DELLA transcripts during maturation support the conclusion that ENY mediates GA effects to balance ABA-promoted maturation during late seed development. PMID:21571950

  20. Circadian rhythm of contrast sensitivity is regulated by a dopamine-neuronal PAS-domain protein 2-adenylyl cyclase 1 signaling pathway in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Christopher K; Chaurasia, Shyam S; Jackson, Chad R; Chan, Guy C-K; Storm, Daniel R; Iuvone, P Michael

    2013-09-18

    Spatial variation in light intensity, called spatial contrast, comprises much of the visual information perceived by mammals, and the relative ability to detect contrast is referred to as contrast sensitivity (Purves et al., 2012). Recently, retinal dopamine D4 receptors (D4Rs) have been implicated in modulating contrast sensitivity (Jackson et al., 2012); however, the cellular and molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated. Our study demonstrates a circadian rhythm of contrast sensitivity that peaks during the daytime, and that its regulation involves interactions of D4Rs, the clock gene Npas2, and the clock-controlled gene adenylyl cyclase 1 (Adcy1) in a subset of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Targeted disruption of the gene encoding D4Rs reduces the amplitude of the contrast sensitivity rhythm by reducing daytime sensitivity and abolishes the rhythmic expression of Npas2 and Adcy1 mRNA in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) of the retina. Npas2(-/-) and Adcy1(-/-) mice show strikingly similar reductions in the contrast sensitivity rhythm to that in mice lacking D4Rs. Moreover, Adcy1 transcript rhythms were abolished in the GCL of Npas2(-/-) mice. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that the Adcy1 promoter is selectively activated by neuronal PAS-domain protein 2 (NPAS2)/BMAL1. Our results indicate that the contrast sensitivity rhythm is modulated by D4Rs via a signaling pathway that involves NPAS2-mediated circadian regulation of Adcy1. Hence, we have identified a circadian clock mechanism in a subset of RGCs that modulates an important aspect of retinal physiology and visual processing.

  1. A Membrane-Type-1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) – Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Axis Regulates Collagen-Induced Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Assent, Delphine; Bourgot, Isabelle; Hennuy, Benoît; Geurts, Pierre; Noël, Agnès; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Maquoi, Erik

    2015-01-01

    During tumour dissemination, invading breast carcinoma cells become confronted with a reactive stroma, a type I collagen-rich environment endowed with anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. To develop metastatic capabilities, tumour cells must acquire the capacity to cope with this novel microenvironment. How cells interact with and respond to their microenvironment during cancer dissemination remains poorly understood. To address the impact of type I collagen on the fate of tumour cells, human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells were cultured within three-dimensional type I collagen gels (3D COL1). Using this experimental model, we have previously demonstrated that membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), a proteinase overexpressed in many aggressive tumours, promotes tumour progression by circumventing the collagen-induced up-regulation of BIK, a pro-apoptotic tumour suppressor, and hence apoptosis. Here we performed a transcriptomic analysis to decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating 3D COL1-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Control and MT1-MMP expressing MCF-7 cells were cultured on two-dimensional plastic plates or within 3D COL1 and a global transcriptional time-course analysis was performed. Shifting the cells from plastic plates to 3D COL1 activated a complex reprogramming of genes implicated in various biological processes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a 3D COL1-mediated alteration of key cellular functions including apoptosis, cell proliferation, RNA processing and cytoskeleton remodelling. By using a panel of pharmacological inhibitors, we identified discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a receptor tyrosine kinase specifically activated by collagen, as the initiator of 3D COL1-induced apoptosis. Our data support the concept that MT1-MMP contributes to the inactivation of the DDR1-BIK signalling axis through the cleavage of collagen fibres and/or the alteration of DDR1 receptor signalling unit, without triggering a

  2. A unique alkaline pH-regulated and fatty acid-activated tandem pore domain potassium channel (K2P) from a marine sponge

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Gregory D.; Tang, Qiong-Yao; Heler, Robert; Tompkins-MacDonald, Gabrielle J.; Pritchard, Erica N.; Leys, Sally P.; Logothetis, Diomedes E.; Boland, Linda M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A cDNA encoding a potassium channel of the two-pore domain family (K2P, KCNK) of leak channels was cloned from the marine sponge Amphimedon queenslandica. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that AquK2P cannot be placed into any of the established functional groups of mammalian K2P channels. We used the Xenopus oocyte expression system, a two-electrode voltage clamp and inside-out patch clamp electrophysiology to determine the physiological properties of AquK2P. In whole cells, non-inactivating, voltage-independent, outwardly rectifying K+ currents were generated by external application of micromolar concentrations of arachidonic acid (AA; EC50 ∼30 μmol l–1), when applied in an alkaline solution (≥pH 8.0). Prior activation of channels facilitated the pH-regulated, AA-dependent activation of AquK2P but external pH changes alone did not activate the channels. Unlike certain mammalian fatty-acid-activated K2P channels, the sponge K2P channel was not activated by temperature and was insensitive to osmotically induced membrane distortion. In inside-out patch recordings, alkalinization of the internal pH (pKa 8.18) activated the AquK2P channels independently of AA and also facilitated activation by internally applied AA. The gating of the sponge K2P channel suggests that voltage-independent outward rectification and sensitivity to pH and AA are ancient and fundamental properties of animal K2P channels. In addition, the membrane potential of some poriferan cells may be dynamically regulated by pH and AA. PMID:22723483

  3. Cancer Cell Invasion in Three-dimensional Collagen Is Regulated Differentially by Gα13 Protein and Discoidin Domain Receptor 1-Par3 Protein Signaling.

    PubMed

    Chow, Christina R; Ebine, Kazumi; Knab, Lawrence M; Bentrem, David J; Kumar, Krishan; Munshi, Hidayatullah G

    2016-01-22

    Cancer cells can invade in three-dimensional collagen as single cells or as a cohesive group of cells that require coordination of cell-cell junctions and the actin cytoskeleton. To examine the role of Gα13, a G12 family heterotrimeric G protein, in regulating cellular invasion in three-dimensional collagen, we established a novel method to track cell invasion by membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase-expressing cancer cells. We show that knockdown of Gα13 decreased membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase-driven proteolytic invasion in three-dimensional collagen and enhanced E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. E-cadherin knockdown reversed Gα13 siRNA-induced cell-cell adhesion but failed to reverse the effect of Gα13 siRNA on proteolytic invasion. Instead, concurrent knockdown of E-cadherin and Gα13 led to an increased number of single cells rather than groups of cells. Significantly, knockdown of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a collagen-binding protein that also co-localizes to cell-cell junctions, reversed the effects of Gα13 knockdown on cell-cell adhesion and proteolytic invasion in three-dimensional collagen. Knockdown of the polarity protein Par3, which can function downstream of DDR1, also reversed the effects of Gα13 knockdown on cell-cell adhesion and proteolytic invasion in three-dimensional collagen. Overall, we show that Gα13 and DDR1-Par3 differentially regulate cell-cell junctions and the actin cytoskeleton to mediate invasion in three-dimensional collagen.

  4. Coordinated regulation by two VPS9 domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors in small GTPase Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Yuta; Kagiwada, Satoshi; Shimazu, Sayuri; Takegawa, Kaoru; Noguchi, Tetsuko; Miyamoto, Masaaki

    2015-03-20

    The small GTPase Rab5 is reported to regulate various cellular functions, such as vesicular transport and endocytosis. VPS9 domain-containing proteins are thought to activate Rab5(s) by their guanine-nucleotide exchange activities. Numerous VPS9 proteins have been identified and are structurally conserved from yeast to mammalian cells. However, the functional relationships among VPS9 proteins in cells remain unclear. Only one Rab5 and two VPS9 proteins were identified in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome. Here, we examined the cellular function of two VPS9 proteins and the relationship between these proteins in cellular functions. Vps901-GFP and Vps902-GFP exhibited dotted signals in vegetative and differentiated cells. vps901 deletion mutant (Δvps901) cells exhibited a phenotype deficient in the mating process and responses to high concentrations of ions, such as calcium and metals, and Δvps901Δvps902 double mutant cells exhibited round cell shapes similar to ypt5-909 (Rab5 mutant allele) cells. Deletion of both vps901 and vps902 genes completely abolished the mating process and responses to various stresses. A lack of vacuole formation and aberrant inner cell membrane structures were also observed in Δvps901Δvps902 cells by electron microscopy. These data strongly suggest that Vps901 and Vps902 are cooperatively involved in the regulation of cellular functions, such as cell morphology, sexual development, response to ion stresses, and vacuole formation, via Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast cells. - Highlights: • Roles of Rab5 activator VPS9 proteins in cellular functions. • Cooperation between VPS9 proteins in Rab5 signaling pathway. • Roles of each VPS9 protein in Rab5 signaling pathway are discussed.

  5. The replication foci targeting sequence (RFTS) of DNMT1 functions as a potent histone H3 binding domain regulated by autoinhibition.

    PubMed

    Misaki, Toshinori; Yamaguchi, Luna; Sun, Jia; Orii, Minami; Nishiyama, Atsuya; Nakanishi, Makoto

    2016-02-12

    DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) plays an essential role in propagation of the DNA methylation pattern to daughter cells. The replication foci targeting sequence (RFTS) of DNMT1 is required for the recruitment of DNMT1 to DNA methylation sites through direct binding to ubiquitylated histone H3 mediated by UHRF1 (Ubiquitin-like containing PHD and RING finger domains 1). Recently, it has been reported that the RFTS plugs the catalytic pocket of DNMT1 in an intermediated manner and inhibits its DNA methyltransferase activity. However, it is unclear whether this binding affects RFTS function in terms of recruitment to DNA methylation sites. Using Xenopus egg extracts, we demonstrate here that abrogation of the interaction between the RFTS and the catalytic center of DNMT1, by deletion of the C-terminal portion or disruption of the hydrogen bond, results in non-ubiquitylated histone H3 binding and abnormal accumulation of DNMT1 on the chromatin. Interestingly, DNMT1 mutants identified in patients with a neurodegenerative disease, ADCA-DN, bound to non-ubiquitylated histone H3 and accumulated on chromatin during S phase in Xenopus egg extracts. These results suggest that the interaction between the RFTS and the catalytic center of DNMT1 serves as an autoinhibitory mechanism for suppressing the histone H3 binding of DNMT1 and ensuring the accurate recruitment of DNMT1 to sites of DNA methylation. The autoinhibitory mechanism may play an important role in the regulation of gene expression in neurogenesis.

  6. Bacillus subtilis GabR, a protein with DNA-binding and aminotransferase domains, is a PLP-dependent transcriptional regulator.

    PubMed

    Belitsky, Boris R

    2004-07-16

    Bacillus subtilis GabR is a member of a poorly characterized but widespread family of chimeric bacterial proteins that have apparent DNA binding and aminotransferase domains. GabR positively regulates expression of the gabTD operon responsible for utilization of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and represses the divergently transcribed gabR gene. Purified GabR bound specifically to the DNA region overlapping the -35 region of the gabT promoter and the -10 and +1 regions of the gabR promoter. Two 6 bp direct repeats located at the ends of this region appeared to be essential for GabR binding. In transcription reactions in vitro, GabR alone repressed expression from the gabR promoter but activated expression from the gabT promoter only in the presence of GABA and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, an essential cofactor of aminotransferases. A similar requirement for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and GABA for GabR-mediated transcription activation was shown in vivo. In vitro this requirement could be partially satisfied with pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate and succinic semialdehyde, the products of a GABA-dependent aminotransferase half-reaction. We hypothesize that the GabR-catalyzed aminotransferase-like reaction between GABA and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is essential for GabR action as a transcriptional activator.

  7. A protein kinase binds the C-terminal domain of the readthrough protein of Turnip yellows virus and regulates virus accumulation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Medina, Caren; Boissinot, Sylvaine; Chapuis, Sophie; Gereige, Dalya; Rastegar, Maryam; Erdinger, Monique; Revers, Frédéric; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Brault, Véronique

    2015-12-01

    Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), a phloem-limited virus, encodes a 74kDa protein known as the readthrough protein (RT) involved in virus movement. We show here that a TuYV mutant deleted of the C-terminal part of the RT protein (TuYV-∆RTCter) was affected in long-distance trafficking in a host-specific manner. By using the C-terminal domain of the RT protein as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a phloem cDNA library from Arabidopsis thaliana we identified the calcineurin B-like protein-interacting protein kinase-7 (AtCIPK7). Transient expression of a GFP:CIPK7 fusion protein in virus-inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves led to local increase of wild-type TuYV accumulation, but not that of TuYV-∆RTCter. Surprisingly, elevated virus titer in inoculated leaves did not result in higher TuYV accumulation in systemic leaves, which indicates that virus long-distance movement was not affected. Since GFP:CIPK7 was localized in or near plasmodesmata, CIPK7 could negatively regulate TuYV export from infected cells. PMID:26402374

  8. Role of the semi-conserved histidine residue in the light-sensing domain of LitR, a MerR-type photosensory transcriptional regulator.

    PubMed

    Takano, Hideaki; Mise, Kou; Maruyama, Takafumi; Hagiwara, Kenta; Ueda, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    The LitR/CarH protein family transcriptional regulator is a new type of photoreceptor based on the function of adenosyl B12 (AdoB12) as a light-sensitive ligand. Here, we studied a semi-conserved histidine residue (His132) in the light-sensing (AdoB12-binding) domain at the C-terminus of LitR from a thermophilic Gram-negative bacterium, Thermus thermophilus HB27. The in vivo mutation of His132 within LitR caused a reduction in the rate of carotenoid production in response to illumination. BIAcore analysis revealed that the illuminated-LitRH132A possesses high DNA-binding activity compared to the wild-type protein. The subunit structure analysis showed that LitRH132A performed an incomplete subunit dissociation. The ability of LitRH132A to associate with AdoB12 was reduced compared with that of the wild-type protein in an equilibration dialysis experiment. Overall, these results suggest that His132 of LitR is involved in the association with AdoB12 as well as the light-sensitive DNA-binding activity based on oligomer dissociation. PMID:27283316

  9. A protein kinase binds the C-terminal domain of the readthrough protein of Turnip yellows virus and regulates virus accumulation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Medina, Caren; Boissinot, Sylvaine; Chapuis, Sophie; Gereige, Dalya; Rastegar, Maryam; Erdinger, Monique; Revers, Frédéric; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Brault, Véronique

    2015-12-01

    Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), a phloem-limited virus, encodes a 74kDa protein known as the readthrough protein (RT) involved in virus movement. We show here that a TuYV mutant deleted of the C-terminal part of the RT protein (TuYV-∆RTCter) was affected in long-distance trafficking in a host-specific manner. By using the C-terminal domain of the RT protein as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a phloem cDNA library from Arabidopsis thaliana we identified the calcineurin B-like protein-interacting protein kinase-7 (AtCIPK7). Transient expression of a GFP:CIPK7 fusion protein in virus-inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves led to local increase of wild-type TuYV accumulation, but not that of TuYV-∆RTCter. Surprisingly, elevated virus titer in inoculated leaves did not result in higher TuYV accumulation in systemic leaves, which indicates that virus long-distance movement was not affected. Since GFP:CIPK7 was localized in or near plasmodesmata, CIPK7 could negatively regulate TuYV export from infected cells.

  10. BC1-FMRP interaction is modulated by 2′-O-methylation: RNA-binding activity of the tudor domain and translational regulation at synapses

    PubMed Central

    Lacoux, Caroline; Di Marino, Daniele; Pilo Boyl, Pietro; Zalfa, Francesca; Yan, Bing; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Falconi, Mattia; Urlaub, Henning; Achsel, Tilmann; Mougin, Annie; Caizergues-Ferrer, Michèle; Bagni, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The brain cytoplasmic RNA, BC1, is a small non-coding RNA that is found in different RNP particles, some of which are involved in translational control. One component of BC1-containing RNP complexes is the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) that is implicated in translational repression. Peptide mapping and computational simulations show that the tudor domain of FMRP makes specific contacts to BC1 RNA. Endogenous BC1 RNA is 2′-O-methylated in nucleotides that contact the FMRP interface, and methylation can affect this interaction. In the cell body BC1 2′-O-methylations are present in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, but they are virtually absent at synapses where the FMRP–BC1–mRNA complex exerts its function. These results strongly suggest that subcellular region-specific modifications of BC1 affect the binding to FMRP and the interaction with its mRNA targets. We finally show that BC1 RNA has an important role in translation of certain mRNAs associated to FMRP. All together these findings provide further insights into the translational regulation by the FMRP–BC1 complex at synapses. PMID:22238374

  11. Basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain transcription factor MBZ1 regulates cell wall integrity, spore adherence, and virulence in Metarhizium robertsii.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Shang, Yanfang; Chen, Peilin; Cen, Kai; Wang, Chengshu

    2015-03-27

    Transcription factors (TFs) containing the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain are widely distributed in eukaryotes and display an array of distinct functions. In this study, a bZIP-type TF gene (MBZ1) was deleted and functionally characterized in the insect pathogenic fungus Metarhizium robertsii. The deletion mutant (ΔMBZ1) showed defects in cell wall integrity, adhesion to hydrophobic surfaces, and topical infection of insects. Relative to the WT, ΔMBZ1 was also impaired in growth and conidiogenesis. Examination of putative target gene expression indicated that the genes involved in chitin biosynthesis were differentially transcribed in ΔMBZ1 compared with the WT, which led to the accumulation of a higher level of chitin in mutant cell walls. MBZ1 exhibited negative regulation of subtilisin proteases, but positive control of an adhesin gene, which is consistent with the observation of effects on cell autolysis and a reduction in spore adherence to hydrophobic surfaces in ΔMBZ1. Promoter binding assays indicated that MBZ1 can bind to different target genes and suggested the possibility of heterodimer formation to increase the diversity of the MBZ1 regulatory network. The results of this study advance our understanding of the divergence of bZIP-type TFs at both intra- and interspecific levels.

  12. Basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain transcription factor MBZ1 regulates cell wall integrity, spore adherence, and virulence in Metarhizium robertsii.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Shang, Yanfang; Chen, Peilin; Cen, Kai; Wang, Chengshu

    2015-03-27

    Transcription factors (TFs) containing the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain are widely distributed in eukaryotes and display an array of distinct functions. In this study, a bZIP-type TF gene (MBZ1) was deleted and functionally characterized in the insect pathogenic fungus Metarhizium robertsii. The deletion mutant (ΔMBZ1) showed defects in cell wall integrity, adhesion to hydrophobic surfaces, and topical infection of insects. Relative to the WT, ΔMBZ1 was also impaired in growth and conidiogenesis. Examination of putative target gene expression indicated that the genes involved in chitin biosynthesis were differentially transcribed in ΔMBZ1 compared with the WT, which led to the accumulation of a higher level of chitin in mutant cell walls. MBZ1 exhibited negative regulation of subtilisin proteases, but positive control of an adhesin gene, which is consistent with the observation of effects on cell autolysis and a reduction in spore adherence to hydrophobic surfaces in ΔMBZ1. Promoter binding assays indicated that MBZ1 can bind to different target genes and suggested the possibility of heterodimer formation to increase the diversity of the MBZ1 regulatory network. The results of this study advance our understanding of the divergence of bZIP-type TFs at both intra- and interspecific levels. PMID:25673695

  13. The cytoplasmic domain close to the transmembrane region of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor contains sequence elements that regulate agonist-dependent internalisation.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Patricia; Roncero, Isabel; Blázquez, Enrique; Alvarez, Elvira

    2005-07-01

    In order to gain better insight into the molecular events involved in the signal transduction generated through glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors, we tested the effect of deletions and point mutations within the cytoplasmic tail of this receptor with a view to establishing relationships between signal transduction desensitisation and receptor internalisation. Wild-type and truncated (deletion of the last 27 amino acids (GLPR 435R) and deletion of 44 amino acids (GLPR 418R)) GLP-1 receptors bound the agonist with similar affinity. Deletion of the last 27 amino acids decreased the internalisation rate by 78%, while deletion of 44 amino acids containing all the phosphorylation sites hitherto described in this receptor decreased the internalisation rate by only 47%. Binding of the ligand to both receptors stimulated adenylyl cyclase. In contrast, deletion of the region containing amino acids 419 to 435 (GLPR 419delta435) increased the internalisation rate by 268%, and the replacement of EVQ(408-410) by alanine (GLPR A(408-410)) increased this process to 296%. In both receptors, the efficacy in stimulating adenylate cyclase was decreased. All the receptors studied were internalised by coated pits, except for the receptor with a deletion of the last 44 amino acids, which also had a faster resensitisation rate. Our findings indicate that the neighbouring trans-membrane domain of the carboxyl-terminal tail of the GLP-1 receptor contains sequence elements that regulate agonist-dependent internalisation and transmembrane signalling.

  14. Domain Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørner, Dines

    Before software can be designed we must know its requirements. Before requirements can be expressed we must understand the domain. So it follows, from our dogma, that we must first establish precise descriptions of domains; then, from such descriptions, “derive” at least domain and interface requirements; and from those and machine requirements design the software, or, more generally, the computing systems.

  15. The Best Disease-Linked Cl Channel hBest1 Regulates Cav1 (L-type) Ca2+ Channels Via SH3-binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kuai; Xiao, Qinghuan; Cui, Guiying; Lee, Amy; Hartzell, H. Criss

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the bestrophin-1 (Best1) gene are linked to several kinds of macular degeneration in both humans and dogs. Although bestrophins have been shown clearly to be Cl− ion channels, it is controversial whether Cl− channel dysfunction can explain the diseases. It has been suggested that bestrophins are multi-functional proteins: they may regulate voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in addition to functioning as Cl− channels. Here we show that hBest1 differentially modulates Cav1.3 (L-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channels through association with the Cavβ subunit. In transfected HEK-293 cells, hBest1 inhibited Cav1.3. Inhibition of Cav1.3 was not observed in the absence of the β subunit. Also, the hBest1 C-terminus binds to Cavβ subunits, suggesting that the effect of hBest1 was mediated by the Cavβ subunit. The region of hBest1 responsible for the effect was localized to a region (amino acids 330 − 370) in the cytoplasmic C-terminus that contains a predicted SH3-binding domain that is not present in other bestrophin subtypes. Mutation of Pro330 and Pro334 abolished the effects of hBest1 on Cav1.3. The effect was specific to hBest1: it was not observed with mBest1, -2, or -3. Wild type hBest1 and the disease-causing mutants R92S, G299R, and D312N inhibited Cav currents the same amount, whereas the A146K and G222E mutants were less effective. We propose that hBest1 regulates Cav channels by interacting with the Cavβ subunit and altering channel availability. Our findings reveal a novel function of bestrophin in regulation of Cav channels and suggest a possible mechanism for the role of hBest1 in macular degeneration. PMID:18509027

  16. α/β-Hydrolase domain-6 and saturated long chain monoacylglycerol regulate insulin secretion promoted by both fuel and non-fuel stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shangang; Poursharifi, Pegah; Mugabo, Yves; Levens, Emily J.; Vivot, Kevin; Attane, Camille; Iglesias, Jose; Peyot, Marie-line; Joly, Erik; Madiraju, S.R. Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Objective α/β-Hydrolase domain-6 (ABHD6) is a newly identified monoacylglycerol (MAG) lipase. We recently reported that it negatively regulates glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in the β cells by hydrolyzing lipolysis-derived MAG that acts as a metabolic coupling factor and signaling molecule via exocytotic regulator Munc13-1. Whether ABHD6 and MAG play a role in response to all classes of insulin secretagogues, in particular various fuel and non-fuel stimuli, is unknown. Methods Insulin secretion in response to various classes of secretagogues, exogenous MAG and pharmacological agents was measured in islets of mice deficient in ABHD6 specifically in the β cell (BKO). Islet perifusion experiments and determinations of glucose and fatty acid metabolism, cytosolic Ca2+ and MAG species levels were carried out. Results Deletion of ABHD6 potentiated insulin secretion in response to the fuels glutamine plus leucine and α-ketoisocaproate and to the non-fuel stimuli glucagon-like peptide 1, carbamylcholine and elevated KCl. Fatty acids amplified GSIS in control and BKO mice to the same extent. Exogenous 1-MAG amplified insulin secretion in response to fuel and non-fuel stimuli. MAG hydrolysis activity was greatly reduced in BKO islets without changes in total diacylglycerol and triacylglycerol lipase activity. ABHD6 deletion induced insulin secretion independently from KATP channels and did not alter the glucose induced rise in intracellular Ca2+. Perifusion studies showed elevated insulin secretion during second phase of GSIS in BKO islets that was not due to altered cytosolic Ca2+ signaling or because of changes in glucose and fatty acid metabolism. Glucose increased islet saturated long chain 1-MAG species and ABHD6 deletion caused accumulation of these 1-MAG species at both low and elevated glucose. Conclusion ABHD6 regulates insulin secretion in response to fuel stimuli at large and some non-fuel stimuli by controlling long chain saturated 1-MAG levels

  17. NEMO-binding Domains of Both IKKα and IKKβ Regulate IκB Kinase Complex Assembly and Classical NF-κB Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Solt, Laura A.; Madge, Lisa A.; May, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Proinflammatory NF-κB activation requires the IκB (inhibitor of NF-κB) kinase (IKK) complex that contains two catalytic subunits named IKKα and IKKβ and a regulatory subunit named NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO). NEMO and IKKβ are essential for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced NF-κB activation, and we recently demonstrated that NEMO and IKKα are sufficient for interleukin (IL)-1-induced signaling. IKKα and IKKβ both contain a functional NEMO-binding domain (NBD); however, the role of NEMO association with each kinase in NF-κB signaling and IKK complex formation remains unclear. To address this question, we stably reconstituted IKKα−/− and IKKβ−/− murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with wild-type (WT) or NBD-deficient (ΔNBD) versions of IKKα and IKKβ, respectively. TNF-induced classical NF-κB activation in IKKβ−/− MEFs was rescued by IKKβWT but not IKKβΔNBD, whereas neither IKKβWT nor IKKβΔNBD affected IL-1-induced NF-κB signaling. As previously described, classical NF-κB transcriptional activity was absent in IKKα−/− cells. Reconstitution with either IKKαWT or IKKαΔNBD rescued both IL-1 and TNF-induced transcription, demonstrating that NEMO association is not required for IKKα-dependent regulation of NF-κB-dependent transcription. Stably expressed IKKαWT or IKKβWT associated with endogenous IKKs and NEMO in IKKα−/− or IKKβ−/− MEFs, respectively, resulting in formation of the heterotrimeric IKKα-IKKβ-NEMO complex. In contrast, although the IKKαΔNBD and IKKβΔNBD mutants associated with endogenous IKKs containing an NBD, these dimeric endogenous IKK-IKKΔNBD complexes did not associate with NEMO. These findings therefore demonstrate that formation of the heterotrimeric IKKα-IKKβ-NEMO holocomplex absolutely requires two intact NEMO-binding domains. PMID:19666475

  18. WW domains of the yes-kinase-associated-protein (YAP) transcriptional regulator behave as independent units with different binding preferences for PPxY motif-containing ligands.

    PubMed

    Iglesias-Bexiga, Manuel; Castillo, Francisco; Cobos, Eva S; Oka, Tsutomu; Sudol, Marius; Luque, Irene

    2015-01-01

    YAP is a WW domain-containing effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, and the object of heightened interest as a potent oncogene and stemness factor. YAP has two major isoforms that differ in the number of WW domains they harbor. Elucidating the degree of co-operation between these WW domains is important for a full understanding of the molecular function of YAP. We present here a detailed biophysical study of the structural stability and binding properties of the two YAP WW domains aimed at investigating the relationship between both domains in terms of structural stability and partner recognition. We have carried out a calorimetric study of the structural stability of the two YAP WW domains, both isolated and in a tandem configuration, and their interaction with a set of functionally relevant ligands derived from PTCH1 and LATS kinases. We find that the two YAP WW domains behave as independent units with different binding preferences, suggesting that the presence of the second WW domain might contribute to modulate target recognition between the two YAP isoforms. Analysis of structural models and phage-display studies indicate that electrostatic interactions play a critical role in binding specificity. Together, these results are relevant to understand of YAP function and open the door to the design of highly specific ligands of interest to delineate the functional role of each WW domain in YAP signaling. PMID:25607641

  19. Nuclear localization of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) and its role in regulating LIM domain only 2 (Lmo2) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Venkitachalam, Srividya; Chueh, Fu-Yu; Yu, Chao-Lan

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lmo2 expression is elevated in Lck-transformed cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both endogenous and exogenous Lck localize in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear Lck is active in Lck-transformed cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lck binds to the promoter region of Lmo2 gene in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In contrast to JAK2, Lck does not increase histone H3 phosphorylation on Tyr 41. -- Abstract: LIM domain only protein 2 (Lmo2) is a transcription factor that plays a critical role in the development of T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). A previous report established a link between Lmo2 expression and the nuclear presence of oncogenic Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase. The oncogenic JAK2 kinase phosphorylates histone H3 on Tyr 41 that leads to the relief of Lmo2 promoter repression and subsequent gene expression. Similar to JAK2, constitutive activation of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) has been implicated in lymphoid malignancies. However, it is not known whether oncogenic Lck regulates Lmo2 expression through a similar mechanism. We show here that Lmo2 expression is significantly elevated in T cell leukemia LSTRA overexpressing active Lck kinase and in HEK 293 cells expressing oncogenic Y505FLck kinase. Nuclear localization of active Lck kinase was confirmed in both Lck-transformed cells by subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy. More importantly, in contrast to oncogenic JAK2, oncogenic Lck kinase does not result in significant increase in histone H3 phosphorylation on Tyr 41. Instead, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiment shows that oncogenic Y505FLck kinase binds to the Lmo2 promoter in vivo. This result raises the possibility that oncogenic Lck may activate Lmo2 promoter through direct interaction.

  20. A residue in the transmembrane segment 6 of domain I in insect and mammalian sodium channels regulate differential sensitivities to pyrethroid insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Eugênio E.; Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Dong, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are critical for electrical signaling in the nervous system. Pyrethroid insecticides exert their toxic action by modifying the gating of sodium channels. A valine to methionine mutation in the transmembrane segment 6 of domain I (IS6) of sodium channels from tobacco budworms (Heliothis virescens) has been shown to alter channel gating and reduce insect sodium channel sensitivity to pyrethroids. A valine to leucine substitution was subsequently reported in pyrethroid-resistant bedbug populations. Intriguingly, pyrethroid-resistant mammalian sodium channels possess an isoleucine at the corresponding position. To determine whether different substitutions at this position alter channel gating and confer pyrethroid resistance, we made valine to methionine, isoleucine or leucine substitutions at the corresponding position, V409, in a cockroach sodium channel and examined the gating properties and pyrethroid sensitivity of the three mutants in Xenopus oocytes. All three mutations reduced the channel sensitivity to three pyrethroids (permethrin, cismethrin and deltamethrin). V409M, but not V409I or V409L, caused 6-7 mV depolarizing shifts in the voltage dependences of both activation and inactivation. V409M and V409L slowed channel activation kinetics and accelerated open-state deactivation kinetics, but V409I did not. Furthermore, the substitution of isoleucine with valine, but not with methionine nor leucine, at the corresponding position in a rat skeletal muscle sodium channel, rNav1.4, enhanced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin. Collectively, our study highlights an important role of residues at 409 in regulating not only sodium channel gating, but also the differential sensitivities of insect and mammalian sodium channels to pyrethroids. PMID:23764339

  1. A cupin domain-containing protein with a quercetinase activity (VdQase) regulates Verticillium dahliae's pathogenicity and contributes to counteracting host defenses

    PubMed Central

    El Hadrami, Abdelbasset; Islam, Md. Rashidul; Adam, Lorne R.; Daayf, Fouad

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified rutin as part of potato root responses to its pathogen Verticillium dahliae. Rutin was directly toxic to the pathogen at doses greater than 160 μM, a threshold below which many V. dahliae pathogenicity-related genes were up-regulated. We identified and characterized a cupin domain-containing protein (VdQase) with a dioxygenase activity and a potential role in V. dahliae-potato interactions. The pathogenicity of VdQase knock-out mutants generated through Agrobacterium tumefasciens-mediated transformation was significantly reduced on susceptible potato cultivar Kennebec compared to wild type isolates. Fluorescence microscopy revealed a higher accumulation of flavonols in the stems of infected potatoes and a higher concentration of rutin in the leaves in response to the VdQase mutants as compared to wild type isolates. This, along with the HPLC characterization of high residual and non-utilized quercetin in presence of the knockout mutants, indicates the involvement of VdQase in the catabolism of quercetin and possibly other flavonols in planta. Quantification of Salicylic and Jasmonic Acids (SA, JA) in response to the mutants vs. wild type isolates revealed involvement of VdQase in the interference with signaling, suggesting a role in pathogenicity. It is hypothesized that the by-product of dioxygenation 2-protocatechuoylphloroglucinolcarboxylic acid, after dissociating into phloroglucinol and protocatechuoyl moieties, becomes a starting point for benzoic acid and SA, thereby interfering with the JA pathway and affecting the interaction outcome. These events may be key factors for V. dahliae in countering potato defenses and becoming notorious in the rhizosphere. PMID:26113857

  2. Conserved allosteric hot spots in the transmembrane domains of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) pumps.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2014-07-18

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs.

  3. Eps15 Homology Domain-containing Protein 3 Regulates Cardiac T-type Ca2+ Channel Targeting and Function in the Atria*

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Jerry; Musa, Hassan; Kline, Crystal F.; Makara, Michael A.; Little, Sean C.; Higgins, John D.; Hund, Thomas J.; Band, Hamid; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Proper trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters is requisite for normal cardiac function. Endosome-based protein trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters in the heart is poorly understood, particularly in vivo. In fact, for select cardiac cell types such as atrial myocytes, virtually nothing is known regarding endosomal transport. We previously linked the C-terminal Eps15 homology domain-containing protein 3 (EHD3) with endosome-based protein trafficking in ventricular cardiomyocytes. Here we sought to define the roles and membrane protein targets for EHD3 in atria. We identify the voltage-gated T-type Ca2+ channels (CaV3.1, CaV3.2) as substrates for EHD3-dependent trafficking in atria. Mice selectively lacking EHD3 in heart display reduced expression and targeting of both Cav3.1 and CaV3.2 in the atria. Furthermore, functional experiments identify a significant loss of T-type-mediated Ca2+ current in EHD3-deficient atrial myocytes. Moreover, EHD3 associates with both CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. T-type Ca2+ channel function is critical for proper electrical conduction through the atria. Consistent with these roles, EHD3-deficient mice demonstrate heart rate variability, sinus pause, and atrioventricular conduction block. In summary, our findings identify CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 as substrates for EHD3-dependent protein trafficking in heart, provide in vivo data on endosome-based trafficking pathways in atria, and implicate EHD3 as a key player in the regulation of atrial myocyte excitability and cardiac conduction. PMID:25825486

  4. A single immunoglobulin-domain IgSF protein from Sciaenops ocellatus regulates pathogen-induced immune response in a negative manner.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shun-feng; Hu, Yong-hua; Sun, Bo-guang; Zhang, Min; Chi, Heng; Sun, Li

    2012-09-01

    The immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) is a large group of cell surface proteins that include various immunoregulatory receptors such as novel immune type receptors (NITRs), which are a family of diversified proteins found exclusively in bony fish. In this study, we identified and analyzed an IgSF protein, SoIgSF1, from red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus). SoIgSF1 is composed of 225 amino acid residues and moderately related to teleost NITRs. In silico analysis indicated that SoIgSF1 is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein and contains an N-terminal signal peptide sequence, a single extracellular immunoglobulin V domain, a transmembrane region, and a cytoplasmic region. However, unlike most NITRs, the cytoplasmic region of SoIgSF1 exhibits no consensus inhibitory or stimulatory signaling sequences but has two tyrosine-containing motifs that conform to the right-half sequence of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM). Quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis showed that SoIgSF1 expression occurred mainly in immune organs and was drastically induced by viral and bacterial infection. Immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that viral infection of head kidney (HK) leukocytes induced surface expression of SoIgSF1, which was able to interact with antibodies against recombinant SoIgSF1. Antibody cross-linking of SoIgSF1 on HK leukocytes inhibited the expression of immune relevant genes and promoted viral and bacterial infection. Taken together, these results indicate that SoIgSF1, though lacking canonical intracellular signaling motifs, is involved in regulation of host immune response during pathogen infection possibly by functioning as a negative signaling receptor through a novel mechanism. PMID:22564857

  5. The pilG gene product, required for Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilus production and twitching motility, is homologous to the enteric, single-domain response regulator CheY.

    PubMed Central

    Darzins, A

    1993-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilG gene, encoding a protein which is involved in pilus production, was cloned by phenotypic complementation of a unique, pilus-defective mutant of strain PAO1. This mutant, designated FA2, although resistant to the pilus-specific phage D3112 was sensitive to the pilus-specific phages B3 and F116L. In spite of the unusual phage sensitivity pattern, FA2 lacked the ability to produce functional polar pili (pil) and was incapable of twitching motility (twt). Genetic analysis revealed that the FA2 pil mutation, designated pilG1, mapped near the met-28 marker located at 20 min and was distinct from the previously described pilT mutation. This map location was confirmed by localization of a 6.2-kb EcoRI fragment that complemented FA2 on the SpeI and DpnI physical map of the P. aeruginosa PAO1 chromosome. A 700-bp region encompassing the pilG gene was sequenced, and a 405-bp open reading frame, with characteristic P. aeruginosa codon bias, was identified. The molecular weight of the protein predicted from the amino acid sequence of PilG, which was determined to be 14,717, corresponded very closely to that of a polypeptide with the apparent molecular weight of 15,000 detected after expression of pilG from the T7 promoter in Escherichia coli. Moreover, the predicted amino acid sequence of PilG showed significant homology to that of the enteric CheY protein, a single-domain response regulator. A chromosomal pilG insertion mutant, constructed by allele replacement of the wild-type gene, was not capable of pilus production or twitching motility but displayed normal flagellum-mediated motility. These results, therefore, suggest that PilG may be an important part of the signal transduction system involved in the elaboration of P. aeruginosa pili. Images PMID:8104179

  6. A Domain-Specific Account of Self-Regulated Learning: The Cognitive and Metacognitive Activities Involved in Learning through Historical Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poitras, Eric G.; Lajoie, Susanne P.

    2013-01-01

    Educational researchers have recently begun to conceptualize theoretical constructs and mechanisms of metacognitive activities in terms of the features that are specific to particular academic domains and subject matter. In this paper, we propose a framework of domain-specific metacognition in relation to learning through historical inquiry. The…

  7. The Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway Is Regulated by an Interaction between Ubiquitin and the E2-like Fold Domain of FANCL.

    PubMed

    Miles, Jennifer A; Frost, Mark G; Carroll, Eilis; Rowe, Michelle L; Howard, Mark J; Sidhu, Ateesh; Chaugule, Viduth K; Alpi, Arno F; Walden, Helen

    2015-08-21

    The Fanconi Anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is essential for the recognition and repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICL). Inefficient repair of these ICL can lead to leukemia and bone marrow failure. A critical step in the pathway is the monoubiquitination of FANCD2 by the RING E3 ligase FANCL. FANCL comprises 3 domains, a RING domain that interacts with E2 conjugating enzymes, a central domain required for substrate interaction, and an N-terminal E2-like fold (ELF) domain. The ELF domain is found in all FANCL homologues, yet the function of the domain remains unknown. We report here that the ELF domain of FANCL is required to mediate a non-covalent interaction between FANCL and ubiquitin. The interaction involves the canonical Ile44 patch on ubiquitin, and a functionally conserved patch on FANCL. We show that the interaction is not necessary for the recognition of the core complex, it does not enhance the interaction between FANCL and Ube2T, and is not required for FANCD2 monoubiquitination in vitro. However, we demonstrate that the ELF domain is required to promote efficient DNA damage-induced FANCD2 monoubiquitination in vertebrate cells, suggesting an important function of ubiquitin binding by FANCL in vivo. PMID:26149689

  8. Modulation of Promoter Occupancy by Cooperative DNA Binding and Activation-Domain Function is a Major Determinant of Transcriptional Regulation by Activators in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masafumi

    1996-04-01

    Binding of transcriptional activators to a promoter is a prerequisite process in transcriptional activation. It is well established that the efficiency of activator binding to a promoter is determined by the affinity of direct interactions between the DNA-binding domain of an activator and its specific target sequences. However, I describe here that activator binding to a promoter is augmented in vivo by the effects of two other determinants that have not been generally appreciated: (i) the number of activator binding sites present in a promoter and (ii) the potency of activation domains of activators. Multiple sites within a promoter can cooperatively recruit cognate factors regardless of whether they contain an effective activation domain. This cooperativity can result in the synergistic activation of transcription. The second effect is the enhancement of activator binding to a promoter by the presence of activation domains. In this case, activation domains are not simply tethered to the promoter by the DNA-binding domain but instead assist the DNA-binding domain being tethered onto the promoter. This effect of activation domains on DNA binding is instrumental in determining how potent activators can induce steep transcriptional increases at low concentrations.

  9. Genome wide expression analysis of CBS domain containing proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh and Oryza sativa L. reveals their developmental and stress regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Hemant R; Singh, Anil K; Sopory, Sudhir K; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L; Pareek, Ashwani

    2009-01-01

    Background In Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh and Oryza sativa L., a large number of genes encode proteins of unknown functions, whose characterization still remains one of the major challenges. With an aim to characterize these unknown proteins having defined features (PDFs) in plants, we have chosen to work on proteins having a cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) domain. CBS domain as such has no defined function(s) but plays a regulatory role for many enzymes and thus helps in maintaining the intracellular redox balance. Its function as sensor of cellular energy has also been widely suggested. Results Our analysis has identified 34 CBS domain containing proteins (CDCPs) in Arabidopsis and 59 in Oryza. In most of these proteins, CBS domain coexists with other functional domain(s), which may indicate towards their probable functions. In order to investigate the role(s) of these CDCPs, we have carried out their detailed analysis in whole genomes of Arabidopsis and Oryza, including their classification, nomenclature, sequence analysis, domain analysis, chromosomal locations, phylogenetic relationships and their expression patterns using public databases (MPSS database and microarray data). We have found that the transcript levels of some members of this family are altered in response to various stresses such as salinity, drought, cold, high temperature, UV, wounding and genotoxic stress, in both root and shoot tissues. This data would be helpful in exploring the so far obscure functions of CBS domain and CBS domain-containing proteins in plant stress responses. Conclusion We have identified, classified and suggested the nomenclature of CDCPs in Arabidopsis and Oryza. A comprehensive analysis of expression patterns for CDCPs using the already existing transcriptome profiles and MPSS database reveals that a few CDCPs may have an important role in stress response/tolerance and development in plants, which needs to be validated further through functional genomics. PMID

  10. Cross-species sequence analysis reveals multiple charged residue-rich domains that regulate nuclear/cytoplasmic partitioning and membrane localization of a kinase anchoring protein 12 (SSeCKS/Gravin).

    PubMed

    Streb, Jeffrey W; Miano, Joseph M

    2005-07-29

    A kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) assemble and compartmentalize multiprotein signaling complexes at discrete subcellular locales and thus confer specificity to transduction cascades using ubiquitous signaling enzymes, such as protein kinase A. Intrinsic targeting domains in each AKAP determine the subcellular localization of these complexes and, along with protein-protein interaction domains, form the core of AKAP function. As a foundational step toward elucidating the relationship between location and function, we have used cross-species sequence analysis and deletion mapping to facilitate the identification of the targeting determinants of AKAP12 (also known as SSeCKS or Gravin). Three charged residue-rich regions were identified that regulate two aspects of AKAP12 localization, nuclear/cytoplasmic partitioning and perinuclear/cell periphery targeting. Using deletion mapping and green fluorescent protein chimeras, we uncovered a heretofore unrecognized nuclear localization potential. Five nuclear localization signals, including a novel class of this type of signal termed X2-NLS, are found in the central region of AKAP12 and are important for nuclear targeting. However, this nuclear localization is suppressed by the negatively charged C terminus that mediates nuclear exclusion. In this condition, the distribution of AKAP12 is regulated by an N-terminal targeting domain that simultaneously directs perinuclear and peripheral AKAP12 localization. Three basic residue-rich regions in the N-terminal targeting region have similarity to the MARCKS proteins and were found to control AKAP12 localization to ganglioside-rich regions at the cell periphery. Our data suggest that AKAP12 localization is regulated by a hierarchy of targeting domains and that the localization of AKAP12-assembled signaling complexes may be dynamically regulated. PMID:15923193

  11. Cytoplasmic domain of the beta-amyloid protein precursor of Alzheimer's disease: function, regulation of proteolysis, and implications for drug development.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Megan L; Small, David H

    2005-04-15

    The beta-amyloid protein precursor (APP) has been extensively studied for its role in amyloid production and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, little is known about the normal function of APP and its biological interactions. In this Mini-Review, the role of the cytoplasmic domain of APP in APP trafficking and proteolysis is described. These studies suggest that proteins that bind to the cytoplasmic domain may be important targets for drug development in AD. PMID:15672415

  12. Focal Adhesion Kinase Directly Interacts with TSC2 Through Its FAT Domain and Regulates Cell Proliferation in Cashmere Goat Fetal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xu; Bao, Wenlei; Yang, Jiaofu; Zhang, Tao; Sun, Dongsheng; Liang, Yan; Li, Shuyu; Wang, Yanfeng; Feng, Xue; Hao, Huifang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that senses a variety of extracellular signals, such as growth factors and integrins, to control the process of cell proliferation and metabolism. We cloned three goat FAK transcript variants (KM655805, KM658268, and KM658269) that encode 1052, 1006, and 962 amino-acid residue proteins. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the putative FAK protein contains an FERM domain, a PTK domain, two Proline-rich regions, and a focal adhesion-targeting (FAT) domain. All the three transcript variants of FAK were detected in seven different goat tissues, and variant 1 had the most accumulation whereas variant 2 and variant 3 had lower accumulation. Treatment of goat fetal fibroblasts (GFbs) with a specific FAK inhibitor, TAE226, inhibited cell proliferation (p < 0.05) and induced damage to the cell morphology in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further research demonstrated that FAK directly interacted with TSC2 (Tuberous sclerosis 2) tuberin domain through its C-terminus, which contains the complete FAT domain. In conclusion, our results indicated that FAK may be widely expressed in Cashmere goat tissues and its products participate in the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway and cell proliferation through a direct interaction with TSC2 in GFBs. PMID:27380318

  13. beta 1-Integrin-mediated glioma cell adhesion and free radical-induced apoptosis are regulated by binding to a C-terminal domain of PG-M/versican.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaojiong; Chen, Liwen; Zheng, Peng-Sheng; Yang, Burton B

    2002-04-01

    Integrins are cell-surface glycoproteins that mediate cell activities, including tissue morphogenesis, development, immune response, and cancer, through interaction with extracellular proteins. Here we report a novel means by which integrin signaling and functions are regulated. In pull-down assays and immunoprecipitation, beta(1)-integrin bound to the C-terminal domain of PG-M/versican, an extracellular chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. This was confirmed by cell-surface binding assays. Binding was calcium- and manganese-dependent. Upon native gel electrophoresis, beta(1)-integrin comigrated with the C-terminal domain of PG-M/versican. The interaction of beta(1)-integrin with the C-terminal domain of PG-M/versican activated focal adhesion kinase, enhanced integrin expression, and promoted cell adhesion. As a result, cells expressing the C-terminal domain of PG-M/versican were resistant to free radical-induced apoptosis. As the PG-M/versican peptide used in this study does not contain the RGD consensus-binding motif for integrins, the mechanism of the observed binding represents an entirely new function. PMID:11805102

  14. Alternatively spliced forms in the cytoplasmic domain of the human growth hormone (GH) receptor regulate its ability to generate a soluble GH-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Dastot, F; Sobrier, M L; Duquesnoy, P; Duriez, B; Goossens, M; Amselem, S

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the generation of soluble growth hormone binding protein (GHBP) probably differs among species. In rats and mice, it involves an alternatively spliced mRNA, whereas in rabbits, it involves limited proteolysis of the membrane-bound growth hormone receptor (GHR). In humans, this latter mechanism is favored, as no transcript coding for a soluble GHR has been detected so far. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed COS-7 cells transiently expressing the full-length human (h) GHR and observed specific GH-binding activity in the cell supernatants. Concomitantly, an alternatively spliced form in the cytoplasmic domain of GHR, hGHR-tr, was isolated from several human tissues. hGHR-tr is identical in sequence to hGHR, except for a 26-bp deletion leading to a stop codon at position 280, thereby truncating 97.5% of the intracellular domain of the receptor protein. When compared with hGHR, hGHR-tr showed a significantly increased capacity to generate a soluble GHBP. Interestingly, this alternative transcript is also expressed in liver from rabbits, mice, and rats, suggesting that, in these four species, proteolysis of the corresponding truncated transmembrane GHR is a common mechanism leading to GHBP generation. These findings support the hypothesis that GHBP may at least partly result from alternative splicing of the region encoding the intracellular domain and that the absence of a cytoplasmic domain may be involved in increased release of GHBP. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8855247

  15. Biphasic regulation of InsP3 receptor gating by dual Ca2+ release channel BH3-like domains mediates Bcl-xL control of cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Vais, Horia; Gu, Wenen; Foskett, J. Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members interact with inositol trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R) Ca2+ release channels in the endoplasmic reticulum to modulate Ca2+ signals that affect cell viability. However, the molecular details and consequences of their interactions are unclear. Here, we found that Bcl-xL activates single InsP3R channels with a biphasic concentration dependence. The Bcl-xL Bcl-2 homology 3 (BH3) domain-binding pocket mediates both high-affinity channel activation and low-affinity inhibition. Bcl-xL activates channel gating by binding to two BH3 domain-like helices in the channel carboxyl terminus, whereas inhibition requires binding to one of them and to a previously identified Bcl-2 interaction site in the channel-coupling domain. Disruption of these interactions diminishes cell viability and sensitizes cells to apoptotic stimuli. Our results identify BH3-like domains in an ion channel and they provide a unifying model of the effects of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins on the InsP3R that play critical roles in Ca2+ signaling and cell viability. PMID:26976600

  16. Self-Esteem Is Relatively Stable Late in Life: The Role of Resources in the Health, Self-Regulation, and Social Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Jenny; Hoppmann, Christiane; Ram, Nilam; Gerstorf, Denis

    2015-01-01

    A large body of research has documented changes in self-esteem across adulthood and individual-difference correlates thereof. However, little is known about whether people maintain their self-esteem until the end of life and what role key risk factors in the health, cognitive, self-regulatory, and social domains play. To examine these questions,…

  17. The relative role of the T-domain and flanking sequences for developmental control and transcriptional regulation in protein chimeras of Drosophila OMB and ORG-1.

    PubMed

    Porsch, Matthias; Sauer, Markus; Schulze, Sabine; Bahlo, Angela; Roth, Martin; Pflugfelder, Gert O

    2005-01-01

    optomotor-blind (omb) and optomotor-blind related-1 (org-1) encode T-domain DNA binding proteins in Drosophila. Members of this family of transcription factors play widely varying roles during early development and organogenesis in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Functional specificity differs in spite of similar DNA binding preferences of all family members. Using a series of domain swap chimeras, in which different parts of OMB and ORG-1 were mutually exchanged, we investigated the relevance of individual domains in vitro and in vivo. In cell culture transfection assays, ORG-1 was a strong transcriptional activator, whereas OMB appeared neutral. The main transcriptional activation function was identified in the C-terminal part of ORG-1. Also in vivo, OMB and ORG-1 showed qualitative differences when the proteins were ectopically expressed during development. Gain-of-function expression of OMB is known to counteract eye formation and resulted in the loss of the arista, whereas ORG-1 had little effect on eye development but caused antenna-to-leg transformations and shortened legs in the corresponding gain-of-function situations. The functional properties of OMB/ORG-1 chimeras in several developmental contexts was dominated by the origin of the C-terminal region, suggesting that the transcriptional activation potential can be one major determinant of developmental specificity. In late eye development, we observed, however, a strong influence of the T-domain on ommatidial differentiation. The specificity of chimeric omb/org-1transgenes, thus, depended on the cellular context in which they were expressed. This suggests that both transcriptional activation/repression properties as well as intrinsic DNA binding specificity can contribute to the functional characteristics of T-domain factors.

  18. The E3 ubiquitin ligase protein associated with Myc (Pam) regulates mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling in vivo through N- and C-terminal domains.

    PubMed

    Han, Sangyeul; Kim, Sun; Bahl, Samira; Li, Lin; Burande, Clara F; Smith, Nicole; James, Marianne; Beauchamp, Roberta L; Bhide, Pradeep; DiAntonio, Aaron; Ramesh, Vijaya

    2012-08-31

    Pam and its homologs (the PHR protein family) are large E3 ubiquitin ligases that function to regulate synapse formation and growth in mammals, zebrafish, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans. Phr1-deficient mouse models (Phr1(Δ8,9) and Phr1(Magellan), with deletions in the N-terminal putative guanine exchange factor region and the C-terminal ubiquitin ligase region, respectively) exhibit axon guidance/outgrowth defects and striking defects of major axon tracts in the CNS. Our earlier studies identified Pam to be associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) proteins, ubiquitinating TSC2 and regulating mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Here, we examine the potential involvement of the TSC/mTOR complex 1(mTORC1) signaling pathway in Phr1-deficient mouse models. We observed attenuation of mTORC1 signaling in the brains of both Phr1(Δ8,9) and Phr1(Magellan) mouse models. Our results establish that Pam regulates TSC/mTOR signaling in vitro and in vivo through two distinct domains. To further address whether Pam regulates mTORC1 through two functionally independent domains, we undertook heterozygous mutant crossing between Phr1(Δ8,9) and Phr1(Magellan) mice to generate a compound heterozygous model to determine whether these two domains can complement each other. mTORC1 signaling was not attenuated in the brains of double mutants (Phr1(Δ8,9/Mag)), confirming that Pam displays dual regulation of the mTORC1 pathway through two functional domains. Our results also suggest that although dysregulation of mTORC1 signaling may be responsible for the corpus callosum defects, other neurodevelopmental defects observed with Phr1 deficiency are independent of mTORC1 signaling. The ubiquitin ligase complex containing Pam-Fbxo45 likely targets additional synaptic and axonal proteins, which may explain the overlapping neurodevelopmental defects observed in Phr1 and Fbxo45 deficiency.

  19. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Protein Associated with Myc (Pam) Regulates Mammalian/Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Signaling in Vivo through N- and C-terminal Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sangyeul; Kim, Sun; Bahl, Samira; Li, Lin; Burande, Clara F.; Smith, Nicole; James, Marianne; Beauchamp, Roberta L.; Bhide, Pradeep; DiAntonio, Aaron; Ramesh, Vijaya

    2012-01-01

    Pam and its homologs (the PHR protein family) are large E3 ubiquitin ligases that function to regulate synapse formation and growth in mammals, zebrafish, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans. Phr1-deficient mouse models (Phr1Δ8,9 and Phr1Magellan, with deletions in the N-terminal putative guanine exchange factor region and the C-terminal ubiquitin ligase region, respectively) exhibit axon guidance/outgrowth defects and striking defects of major axon tracts in the CNS. Our earlier studies identified Pam to be associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) proteins, ubiquitinating TSC2 and regulating mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Here, we examine the potential involvement of the TSC/mTOR complex 1(mTORC1) signaling pathway in Phr1-deficient mouse models. We observed attenuation of mTORC1 signaling in the brains of both Phr1Δ8,9 and Phr1Magellan mouse models. Our results establish that Pam regulates TSC/mTOR signaling in vitro and in vivo through two distinct domains. To further address whether Pam regulates mTORC1 through two functionally independent domains, we undertook heterozygous mutant crossing between Phr1Δ8,9 and Phr1Magellan mice to generate a compound heterozygous model to determine whether these two domains can complement each other. mTORC1 signaling was not attenuated in the brains of double mutants (Phr1Δ8,9/Mag), confirming that Pam displays dual regulation of the mTORC1 pathway through two functional domains. Our results also suggest that although dysregulation of mTORC1 signaling may be responsible for the corpus callosum defects, other neurodevelopmental defects observed with Phr1 deficiency are independent of mTORC1 signaling. The ubiquitin ligase complex containing Pam-Fbxo45 likely targets additional synaptic and axonal proteins, which may explain the overlapping neurodevelopmental defects observed in Phr1 and Fbxo45 deficiency. PMID:22798074

  20. Protein phosphatase 2a (PP2A) binds within the oligomerization domain of striatin and regulates the phosphorylation and activation of the mammalian Ste20-Like kinase Mst3

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Striatin, a putative protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) B-type regulatory subunit, is a multi-domain scaffolding protein that has recently been linked to several diseases including cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), which causes symptoms ranging from headaches to stroke. Striatin association with the PP2A A/C (structural subunit/catalytic subunit) heterodimer alters PP2A substrate specificity, but targets and roles of striatin-associated PP2A are not known. In addition to binding the PP2A A/C heterodimer to form a PP2A holoenzyme, striatin associates with cerebral cavernous malformation 3 (CCM3) protein, the mammalian Mps one binder (MOB) homolog, Mob3/phocein, the mammalian sterile 20-like (Mst) kinases, Mst3, Mst4 and STK25, and several other proteins to form a large signaling complex. Little is known about the molecular architecture of the striatin complex and the regulation of these sterile 20-like kinases. Results To help define the molecular organization of striatin complexes and to determine whether Mst3 might be negatively regulated by striatin-associated PP2A, a structure-function analysis of striatin was performed. Two distinct regions of striatin are capable of stably binding directly or indirectly to Mob3--one N-terminal, including the coiled-coil domain, and another more C-terminal, including the WD-repeat domain. In addition, striatin residues 191-344 contain determinants necessary for efficient association of Mst3, Mst4, and CCM3. PP2A associates with the coiled-coil domain of striatin, but unlike Mob3 and Mst3, its binding appears to require striatin oligomerization. Deletion of the caveolin-binding domain on striatin abolishes striatin family oligomerization and PP2A binding. Point mutations in striatin that disrupt PP2A association cause hyperphosphorylation and activation of striatin-associated Mst3. Conclusions Striatin orchestrates the regulation of Mst3 by PP2A. It binds Mst3 likely as a dimer with CCM3 via residues lying between

  1. Tumor-associated NH2-terminal fragments are the most stable part of the adenomatous polyposis coli protein and can be regulated by interactions with COOH-terminal domains.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuoyu; Näthke, Inke S

    2005-06-15

    Truncation mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene are responsible for familial and sporadic colorectal cancer. APC is a large, multifunctional protein involved in cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Dominant effects that have been attributed to the NH2-terminal fragments of APC expressed in tumors may result from loss of functions due to lack of COOH-terminal regions or gain of functions due to fewer regulatory interactions. Resolving this issue and determining how structural changes contribute to the multiple functions of the APC protein requires knowledge about the structural organization of the APC molecule. To this end, we used limited proteolysis to distinguish regions of the molecule with limited structure from those that form well-folded domains. We discovered that the NH2-terminal region of APC was most resistant to proteolytic degradation, whereas middle and COOH-terminal regions were significantly more sensitive. Binding of APC to microtubules protected COOH-terminal regions of APC against proteolysis, consistent with the idea that this region of the molecule becomes ordered when bound to microtubules. Furthermore, interactions between the NH2- and COOH-terminal domains of APC were identified in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that NH2-terminal fragments of APC may be regulated by interactions with COOH-terminal domains. Indeed, expressing COOH-terminal APC fragments in tumor cells resulted in changes in the protein interactions of endogenous NH2-terminal fragments in these cells. Thus, the dominant function of NH2-terminal APC fragments found in tumor cells could be explained by loss of this regulation in tumors where COOH-terminal domains are missing.

  2. EphB1 and EphB2 intracellular domains regulate the formation of the corpus callosum and anterior commissure.

    PubMed

    Robichaux, Michael A; Chenaux, George; Ho, Hsin-Yi Henry; Soskis, Michael J; Greenberg, Michael E; Henkemeyer, Mark; Cowan, Christopher W

    2016-04-01

    The two cortical hemispheres of the mammalian forebrain are interconnected by major white matter tracts, including the corpus callosum (CC) and the posterior branch of the anterior commissure (ACp), that bridge the telencephalic midline. We show here that the intracellular signaling domains of the EphB1 and EphB2 receptors are critical for formation of both the ACp and CC. We observe partial and complete agenesis of the corpus callosum, as well as highly penetrant ACp misprojection phenotypes in truncated EphB1/2 mice that lack intracellular signaling domains. Consistent with the roles for these receptors in formation of the CC and ACp, we detect expression of these receptors in multiple brain regions associated with the formation of these forebrain structures. Taken together, our findings suggest that a combination of forward and reverse EphB1/2 receptor-mediated signaling contribute to ACp and CC axon guidance.

  3. Activity of ADAM17 (a Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 17) Is Regulated by Its Noncatalytic Domains and Secondary Structure of its Substrates*

    PubMed Central

    Stawikowska, Roma; Cudic, Mare; Giulianotti, Marc; Houghten, Richard A.; Fields, Gregg B.; Minond, Dmitriy

    2013-01-01

    ADAM proteases are implicated in multiple diseases, but no drugs based on ADAM inhibition exist. Most of the ADAM inhibitors developed to date feature zinc-binding moieties that target the active site zinc, which leads to a lack of selectivity and off target toxicity. Targeting secondary substrate binding sites (exosites) can potentially work as an alternative strategy for drug discovery; however, there are only a few reports of potential exosites in ADAM protease structures. In the study presented here, we utilized a series of TNFα-based substrates to probe ADAM10 and 17 interactions with its canonical substrate to identify the structural features that determine ADAM protease substrate specificity. We found that noncatalytic domains of ADAM17 did not directly bind the substrates used in the study but affected the binding nevertheless, most likely because of steric hindrance. Additionally, noncatalytic domains of ADAM17 affected the size/shape of the carbohydrate-binding pocket contained within the catalytic domain of ADAM17. This suggests that noncatalytic domains of ADAM17 play a role in substrate specificity and might help explain differences in substrate repertoires of ADAM17 and its closest homologue, ADAM10. We also addressed the question of which substrate features can affect ADAM protease specificity. We found that all ADAM proteases tested (i.e., ADAM10, 12, and 17) significantly decreased activity when the TNFα-derived sequence was induced into α-helical conformation, suggesting that conformation plays a role in determining ADAM protease substrate specificity. These findings can help in the discovery of ADAM isoform- and substrate-specific inhibitors. PMID:23779109

  4. The cellular distribution of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 is determined by the PDZ-I domain and regulates the malignant progression of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Guifang; Gu, Yanan; Hao, Chengcheng; Yuan, Zhu; He, Junqi; Jiang, Wen G.; Cheng, Shan

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic role of ectopic expression of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) was recently suggested. Here, we show that NHERF1 was upregulated in high grades compared with low grades. Increased NHERF1 expression was correlated with poor prognosis and poor survival. NHERF1 expression was higher in the nucleus of cancer cells than in contiguous non- mammary epithelial cells. A novel mutation, namely NHERF1 Y24S, was identified in human breast cancer tissues and shown to correspond to a conserved residue in the PDZ-I domain of NHERF1. Truncation and mutation of the PDZ-I domain of NHERF1 increased the nuclear distribution of the NHERF1 protein, and this redistribution was associated with the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells, including growth, migration, and adhesion. The present results suggest a role for NHERF1 in the progression of breast cancer mediated by the nuclear distribution of the NHERF1 protein, as determined by the truncation or key site mutation of the PDZ-I domain. PMID:27097111

  5. Transcriptional up-regulation of inhibitory PAS domain protein gene expression by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1): a negative feedback regulatory circuit in HIF-1-mediated signaling in hypoxic cells.

    PubMed

    Makino, Yuichi; Uenishi, Rie; Okamoto, Kensaku; Isoe, Tsubasa; Hosono, Osamu; Tanaka, Hirotoshi; Kanopka, Arvydas; Poellinger, Lorenz; Haneda, Masakazu; Morimoto, Chikao

    2007-05-11

    The inhibitory PAS (Per/Arnt/Sim) domain protein (IPAS), a dominant negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs), is potentially implicated in negative regulation of angiogenesis in such tissues as the avascular cornea of the eye. We have previously shown IPAS mRNA expression is up-regulated in hypoxic tissues, which at least in part involves hypoxia-dependent alternative splicing of the transcripts from the IPAS/HIF-3alpha locus. In the present study, we demonstrate that a hypoxia-driven transcriptional mechanism also plays a role in augmentation of IPAS gene expression. Isolation and analyses of the promoter region flanking to the first exon of IPAS gene revealed a functional hypoxia response element at position -834 to -799, whereas the sequence upstream of the HIF-3alpha first exon scarcely responded to hypoxic stimuli. A transient transfection experiment demonstrated that HIF-1alpha mediates IPAS promoter activation via the functional hypoxia response element under hypoxic conditions and that a constitutively active form of HIF-1alpha is sufficient for induction of the promoter in normoxic cells. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed binding of the HIF-1 complex to the element in a hypoxia-dependent manner. Taken together, HIF-1 directly up-regulates IPAS gene expression through a mechanism distinct from RNA splicing, providing a further level of negative feedback gene regulation in adaptive responses to hypoxic/ischemic conditions. PMID:17355974

  6. The basic leucine zipper domain transcription factor Atf1 directly controls Cdc13 expression and regulates mitotic entry independently of Wee1 and Cdc25 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Sushobhana; Dey, Isha; Suresh, Megalakshmi; Sundaram, Geetanjali

    2014-06-01

    Progression into mitosis is a major point of regulation in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell cycle, and its proper control is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. Investigation of the G(2)/M progression event in S. pombe has revealed the existence of a complex regulatory process that is responsible for making the decision to enter mitosis. Newer aspects of this regulation are still being revealed. In this paper, we report the discovery of a novel mode of regulation of G(2)/M progression in S. pombe. We show that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-regulated transcription factor Atf1 is a regulator of Cdc13 (mitotic cyclin) transcription and is therefore a prominent player in the regulation of mitosis in S. pombe. We have used genetic approaches to study the effect of overexpression or deletion of Atf1 on the cell length and G(2)/M progression of S. pombe cells. Our results clearly show that Atf1 overexpression accelerates mitosis, leading to an accumulation of cells with shorter lengths. The previously known major regulators of entry into mitosis are the Cdc25 phosphatase and the Wee1 kinase, which modulate cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity. The significantly striking aspect of our discovery is that Atf1-mediated G(2)/M progression is independent of both Cdc25 and Wee1. We have shown that Atf1 binds to the Cdc13 promoter, leading to activation of Cdc13 expression. This leads to enhanced nuclear localization of CDK Cdc2, thereby promoting the G(2)/M transition.

  7. Novel regulation of Skp1 by the Dictyostelium AgtA α-galactosyltransferase involves the Skp1-binding activity of its WD40 repeat domain.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Christopher M; Sheikh, M Osman; Zhang, Dongmei; West, Christopher M

    2014-03-28

    The role of Skp1 as an adaptor protein that links Cullin-1 to F-box proteins in E3 Skp1/Cullin-1/F-box protein (SCF) ubiquitin ligases is well characterized. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium and probably many other unicellular eukaryotes, Skp1 is modified by a pentasaccharide attached to a hydroxyproline near its C terminus. This modification is important for oxygen-sensing during Dictyostelium development and is mediated by a HIF-α type prolyl 4-hydroxylase and five sequentially acting cytoplasmic glycosyltransferase activities. Gene disruption studies show that AgtA, the enzyme responsible for addition of the final two galactose residues, in α-linkages to the Skp1 core trisaccharide, is unexpectedly critical for oxygen-dependent terminal development. AgtA possesses a WD40 repeat domain C-terminal to its single catalytic domain and, by use of domain deletions, binding studies, and enzyme assays, we find that the WD40 repeats confer a salt-sensitive second-site binding interaction with Skp1 that mediates novel catalytic activation in addition to simple substrate recognition. In addition, AgtA binds similarly well to precursor isoforms of Skp1 by a salt-sensitive mechanism that competes with binding to an F-box protein and recognition by early modification enzymes, and the effect of binding is diminished when AgtA modifies Skp1. Genetic studies show that loss of AgtA is more severe when an earlier glycosylation step is blocked, and overexpressed AgtA is deleterious if catalytically inactivated. Together, the findings suggest that AgtA mediates non-enzymatic control of unmodified and substrate precursor forms of Skp1 by a binding mechanism that is normally relieved by switch-like activation of its glycosylation function. PMID:24550398

  8. Solution NMR structure of the Ca2+-bound N-terminal domain of CaBP7: a regulator of golgi trafficking.

    PubMed

    McCue, Hannah V; Patel, Pryank; Herbert, Andrew P; Lian, Lu-Yun; Burgoyne, Robert D; Haynes, Lee P

    2012-11-01

    Calcium-binding protein 7 (CaBP7) is a member of the calmodulin (CaM) superfamily that harbors two high affinity EF-hand motifs and a C-terminal transmembrane domain. CaBP7 has been previously shown to interact with and modulate phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III-β (PI4KIIIβ) activity in in vitro assays and affects vesicle transport in neurons when overexpressed. Here we show that the N-terminal domain (NTD) of CaBP7 is sufficient to mediate the interaction of CaBP7 with PI4KIIIβ. CaBP7 NTD encompasses the two high affinity Ca(2+) binding sites, and structural characterization through multiangle light scattering, circular dichroism, and NMR reveals unique properties for this domain. CaBP7 NTD binds specifically to Ca(2+) but not Mg(2+) and undergoes significant conformational changes in both secondary and tertiary structure upon Ca(2+) binding. The Ca(2+)-bound form of CaBP7 NTD is monomeric and exhibits an open conformation similar to that of CaM. Ca(2+)-bound CaBP7 NTD has a solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface that is more expansive than observed in CaM or CaBP1. Within this hydrophobic pocket, there is a significant reduction in the number of methionine residues that are conserved in CaM and CaBP1 and shown to be important for target recognition. In CaBP7 NTD, these residues are replaced with isoleucine and leucine residues with branched side chains that are intrinsically more rigid than the flexible methionine side chain. We propose that these differences in surface hydrophobicity, charge, and methionine content may be important in determining highly specific interactions of CaBP7 with target proteins, such as PI4KIIIβ. PMID:22989873

  9. Regulation of a nuclear export signal by an adjacent inhibitory sequence: the effector domain of the influenza virus NS1 protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Yamakita, Y; Krug, R M

    1998-04-28

    In the cell nucleus the NS1 protein of influenza A virus inhibits both pre-mRNA splicing and the nuclear export of mRNAs. Both the RNA-binding and effector domains of the protein are required for these nuclear functions. Here we demonstrate that the NS1 protein has a latent nuclear export signal (NES) that is located at the amino end of the effector domain. In uninfected, transfected cells the NS1 protein is localized in the nucleus because the NES is specifically inhibited by the adjacent amino acid sequence in the effector domain. Substitution of alanine residues for specific amino acids in the adjacent sequence abrogates its inhibitory activity, thereby unmasking the NES and causing the full-length NS1 protein to be localized to the cytoplasm. In contrast to uninfected cells, a substantial amount of the NS1 protein in influenza virus-infected cells is located in the cytoplasm. Consequently, the NES of these NS1 protein molecules is unmasked in infected cells, indicating that the NS1 protein most likely carries out functions in the cytoplasm as well as the nucleus. A dramatically different localization of the NS1 protein occurs in cells that are infected by a virus encoding an NS1 protein lacking the NES: the shortened NS1 protein molecules are almost totally in the nucleus. Because the NES of the full-length NS1 protein is unmasked in infected but not uninfected cells, it is likely that this unmasking results from a specific interaction of another virus-specific protein with the NS1 protein.

  10. Structural Basis of Selective Aromatic Pollutant Sensing by the Effector Binding Domain of MopR, an NtrC Family Transcriptional Regulator.

    PubMed

    Ray, Shamayeeta; Gunzburg, Menachem J; Wilce, Matthew; Panjikar, Santosh; Anand, Ruchi

    2016-08-19

    Phenol and its derivatives are common pollutants that are present in industrial discharge and are major xenobiotics that lead to water pollution. To monitor as well as improve water quality, attempts have been made in the past to engineer bacterial in vivo biosensors. However, due to the paucity of structural information, there is insufficiency in gauging the factors that lead to high sensitivity and selectivity, thereby impeding development. Here, we present the crystal structure of the sensor domain of MopR (MopR(AB)) from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus in complex with phenol and its derivatives to a maximum resolution of 2.5 Å. The structure reveals that the N-terminal residues 21-47 possess a unique fold, which are involved in stabilization of the biological dimer, and the central ligand binding domain belongs to t